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Sample records for isotropic stationary turbulence

  1. Decaying versus stationary turbulence in particle-laden isotropic turbulence: Heavy particle statistics modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelsamie, Abouelmagd H.; Lee, Changhoon

    2013-03-01

    The current paper examines the heavy particle statistics modification by two-way interaction in particle-laden isotropic turbulence in an attempt to interpret their statistics modification using the information of modulated turbulence. Moreover, we clarify the distinctions of this modification between decaying and stationary turbulence as an extension of our previous work [A. H. Abdelsamie and C. Lee, "Decaying versus stationary turbulence in particle-laden isotropic turbulence: Turbulence modulation mechanism," Phys. Fluids 24, 015106 (2012), 10.1063/1.3678332]. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) was carried out using 1283 grid points at a Taylor micro-scale Reynolds number of Rλ ˜ 70. The effect of O(10^6) solid particles with a different Stokes number (St) was implemented as a point-force approximation in the Navier-Stokes equation. Various statistics associated with particle dispersion are investigated, and the auto-correlations models which was provided by Jung et al. ["Behavior of heavy particles in isotropic turbulence," Phys. Rev. E 77, 016307 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevE.77.016307] are extended in the current paper. DNS results reveal that the two-way coupling interaction enhances the fluid and heavy particle auto-correlation functions and the alignment between their velocity vectors for all Stokes numbers in decaying and stationary turbulence, but for different reasons. The modification mechanisms of particle dispersion statistics in stationary turbulence are different from those in decaying turbulence depending on the Stokes number, particularly for St <1.

  2. Dynamics of Aerosol Particles in Stationary, Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Lance R.; Meng, Hui

    2004-01-01

    A detailed study of the dynamics of sub-Kolmogorov-size aerosol particles in stationary isotropic turbulence has been performed. The study combined direct numerical simulations (DNS; directed by Prof. Collins) and high-resolution experimental measurements (directed by Prof. Meng) under conditions of nearly perfect geometric and parametric overlap. The goal was to measure the accumulation of particles in low-vorticity regions of the flow that arises from the effect commonly referred to as preferential concentration. The grant technically was initiated on June 13, 2000; however, funding was not available until July 11, 2000. The grant was originally awarded to Penn State University (numerical simulations) and SUNY-Buffalo (experiments); however, Prof. Collins effort was moved to Cornell University on January 2002 when he joined that university. He completed the study there. A list of the specific tasks that were completed under this study is presented.

  3. Linearly Forced Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundgren, T. S.

    2003-01-01

    Stationary isotropic turbulence is often studied numerically by adding a forcing term to the Navier-Stokes equation. This is usually done for the purpose of achieving higher Reynolds number and longer statistics than is possible for isotropic decaying turbulence. It is generally accepted that forcing the Navier-Stokes equation at low wave number does not influence the small scale statistics of the flow provided that there is wide separation between the largest and smallest scales. It will be shown, however, that the spectral width of the forcing has a noticeable effect on inertial range statistics. A case will be made here for using a broader form of forcing in order to compare computed isotropic stationary turbulence with (decaying) grid turbulence. It is shown that using a forcing function which is directly proportional to the velocity has physical meaning and gives results which are closer to both homogeneous and non-homogeneous turbulence. Section 1 presents a four part series of motivations for linear forcing. Section 2 puts linear forcing to a numerical test with a pseudospectral computation.

  4. Particle dynamics during the transition from isotropic to anisotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chung-Min; Gylfason, Armann; Toschi, Federico

    2016-11-01

    Turbulent fluctuations play an important role on the dynamics of particles in turbulence, enhancing their dispersion and mixing. In recent years the statistical properties of particles in several statistically stationary turbulent flows have been the subject of many numerical and experimental studies. In many natural and industrial environments, however, one deals with turbulence in a transient state. As a prototype system, we investigate the transition from an isotropic to an anisotropic flow, namely looking at the influence of a developing mean flow on the dynamics of particles. We simulate, via direct numerical simulation, stationary homogeneous and isotropic turbulence and then suddenly impose a mean shear or strain. This allows us to quantify the effects of the mean flow on particle dynamics in these transient periods. Preliminary results on single particle properties, such as velocities and accelerations will be reported.

  5. On the decay of homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrbek, L.; Stalp, Steven R.

    2000-08-01

    wind tunnels and a water channel, the temporal decay of turbulence created by an oscillating grid in water and the decay of energy and vorticity created by a towed grid in a stationary sample of water. We also analyze decaying vorticity data we obtained in superfluid helium and show that decaying superfluid turbulence can be described classically. This paper offers a unified investigation of decaying isotropic, homogeneous turbulence that is based on accepted forms of the three-dimensional turbulent spectra and a variety of experimental decay data obtained in air, water, and superfluid helium.

  6. DNS of Shock / Isotropic Turbulence Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grube, Nathan; Taylor, Ellen; Martín, Pino

    2010-11-01

    We discuss DNS of Shock / Isotropic Turbulence Interactions (SITI). We vary the incoming turbulence Mach number up to 0.8 and the convective Mach number up to 5 in order to determine their effects on the interaction. These cases are challenging due to the presence of shocklets in the incoming turbulence as well as significant motion of the main shock. Shock-capturing must be used at all points while still maintaining low enough numerical dissipation to preserve the turbulent fluctuations. We use the linearly- and nonlinearly-optimized Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (WENO) method[1,2]. Particular attention is paid to the inflow boundary condition, where we find the use of snapshots of "frozen" turbulence from decaying isotropic box simulations to be unsatisfactory. We instead use time-varying inflow data generated by a separate forced isotropic turbulence simulation with a specified convection speed. This allows us to access flow conditions where the assumptions of Taylor's Hypothesis are not met. 1.) Mart'in, M.P., Taylor, E.M., Wu, M., and Weirs, V.G., JCP 220(1) 270-89, 2006. 2.) Taylor, E.M., Wu, M., and Mart'in, M.P., JCP 223(1) 384-97, 2007.

  7. A new approach to Lagrangian investigations of isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barjona, Manuel; B. da Silva, Carlos; Idmec Team

    2016-11-01

    A new numerical approach is used in conjunction with direct numerical simulations (DNS) of statistically stationary (forced) isotropic turbulence to investigate the high Reynolds number scaling properties of turbulence characteristics in a Lagrangian frame. The new method provides an alternative route to the determination of the classical Lagrangian turbulence quantities, such as the second order Lagrangian velocity structure function and two point particle separation, at a much higher Reynolds number than as obtained in previous numerical simulations, and displays excellent agreement with the classical theoretical predictions and existing numerical simulations and experimental data. The authors acknowledge the Laboratory for Advanced Computing at University of Coimbra for providing HPC, computing, consulting resources that have contributed to the research results reported within this paper. URL http://www.lca.uc.pt.

  8. Modification of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence by solid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Wontae

    2005-12-01

    Particle-laden flows are prevalent in natural and industrial environments. Dilute loadings of small, heavy particles have been observed to attenuate the turbulence levels of the carrier-phase flow, up to 80% in some cases. We attempt to increase the physical understanding of this complex phenomenon by studying the interaction of solid particles with the most fundamental type of turbulence, which is homogeneous and isotropic with no mean flow. A flow facility was developed that could create air turbulence in a nearly-spherical chamber by means of synthetic jet actuators mounted on the corners. Loudspeakers were used as the actuators. Stationary turbulence and natural decaying turbulence were investigated using two-dimensional particle image velocimetry for the base flow qualification. Results indicated that the turbulence was fairly homogeneous throughout the measurement domain and very isotropic, with small mean flow. The particle-laden flow experiments were conducted in two different environments, the lab and in micro-gravity, to examine the effects of particle wakes and flow structure distortion caused by settling particles. The laboratory experiments showed that glass particles with diameters on the order of the turbulence Kolmogorov length scale attenuated the fluid turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and dissipation rate with increasing particle mass loadings. The main source of fluid TKE production in the chamber was the speakers, but the loss of potential energy of the settling particles also resulted in a significant amount of production of extra TKE. The sink of TKE in the chamber was due to the ordinary fluid viscous dissipation and extra dissipation caused by particles. This extra dissipation could be divided into "unresolved" dissipation caused by local velocity disturbances in the vicinity of the small particles and dissipation caused by large-scale flow distortions from particle wakes and particle clusters. The micro-gravity experiments in NASA's KC-135

  9. Scaling and intermittency in compressible isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianchun; Gotoh, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2017-05-01

    Scaling and intermittency in compressible isotropic turbulence at the turbulent Mach number Mt ranging from 0.5 to 1.0 are studied by using numerical simulations with solenoidal forcing. Linear relations between the structure functions of the compressible velocity component and those of thermodynamic variables are modeled based on the shock jump conditions and are verified by numerical simulations. At a turbulent Mach number around 1.0, the relative scaling exponent of the structure functions saturates with an increase of the order. After proper normalization, the tails of the probability density functions (PDFs) of the increments of the compressible velocity component and thermodynamic variables overlap one another for different separations. Moreover, we study the conditional PDFs of the increments with respect to the shocklet. Linear relations between the tails of unconditional PDFs and conditional PDFs are established. The shocklet plays an important role in the determination of the PDF tails. The compressible velocity increment is decomposed into a negative component and a positive component. The negative component of the compressible velocity increment exhibits a scaling behavior with the saturation of the scaling exponent at high orders, which is similar to the Burgers turbulence, while the positive component of the compressible velocity increment exhibits a power-law scaling behavior, which is similar to the incompressible turbulence.

  10. Asymptotic behavior of curvature of surface elements in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girimaji, S. S.

    1991-01-01

    The asymptotic behavior of the curvature of material elements in turbulence is investigated using Lagrangian velocity-gradient time series obtained from direct numerical simulations of isotropic turbulence. Several material-element ensembles of different initial curvatures and shapes are studied. It is found that, at long times, the (first five) moments of the logarithm of characteristic curvature and shape factor asymptote to values that are independent of the initial curvature or shape. This evidence strongly suggests that the asymptotic pdf's of the curvature and shape of material elements are stationary and independent of initial conditions. Irrespective of initial curvature or shape, the asymptotic shape of a material surface is cylindrical with a high probability.

  11. Small scale dynamics of isotropic viscoelastic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, M. Quan; Delache, Alexandre; Simoëns, Serge; Bos, Wouter J. T.; El Hajem, Mamoud

    2016-12-01

    The comparison of the results of direct numerical simulations of isotropic turbulence of Newtonian and viscoelastic fluid provides evidence that viscoelasticity modifies qualitatively the behavior of the smallest scales: we observe a power law in the far dissipation range of the fluid kinetic energy spectrum and we show that it is a robust feature, roughly independent of the large scale dynamics. A detailed analysis of the energy transfer shows that at these scales energy is injected into the fluid flow through polymer relaxation. It is further shown that a part of the total energy is transferred among scales through an interaction of the velocity field with the polymer field.

  12. Spectra and statistics in compressible isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianchun; Gotoh, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Spectra and one-point statistics of velocity and thermodynamic variables in isotropic turbulence of compressible fluid are examined by using numerical simulations with solenoidal forcing at the turbulent Mach number Mt from 0.05 to 1.0 and at the Taylor Reynolds number Reλ from 40 to 350. The velocity field is decomposed into a solenoidal component and a compressible component in terms of the Helmholtz decomposition, and the compressible velocity component is further decomposed into a pseudosound component, namely, the hydrodynamic component associated with the incompressible field and an acoustic component associated with sound waves. It is found that the acoustic mode dominates over the pseudosound mode at turbulent Mach numbers Mt≥0.4 in our numerical simulations. At turbulent Mach numbers Mt≤0.4 , there exists a critical wave number kc beyond which the pseudosound mode dominates while the acoustic mode dominates at small wave numbers k

  13. Near isotropic behavior of turbulent thermal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Dinesh; Pandey, Ambrish; Kumar, Abhishek; Verma, Mahendra K.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the anisotropy in turbulent convection in a three-dimensional (3D) box using direct numerical simulation. We compute the anisotropic parameter A =u⊥2/(2 u∥2) , where u⊥ and u∥ are the components of velocity perpendicular and parallel to the buoyancy direction, the shell and ring spectra, and shell-to-shell energy transfers. We observe that the flow is nearly isotropic for the Prandtl number Pr ≈1 , but the anisotropy increases with the Prandtl number. For Pr =∞ ,A ≈0.3 , anisotropy is not very significant even in extreme cases. We also observe that u∥ feeds energy to u⊥ via pressure. The computation of shell-to-shell energy transfers reveals that the energy transfer in turbulent convection is local and forward, similar to hydrodynamic turbulence. These results are consistent with the Kolmogorov's spectrum observed by Kumar et al. [Phys. Rev. E 90, 023016 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.90.023016] for turbulent convection.

  14. The curvature of material surfaces in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, S. B.; Yeung, P. K.; Girimaji, S. S.

    1989-12-01

    Direct numerical simulation is used to study the curvature of material surfaces in isotropic turbulence. The Navier-Stokes equation is solved by a 643 pseudospectral code for constant-density homogeneous isotropic turbulence, which is made statistically stationary by low-wavenumber forcing. The Taylor-scale Reynolds number is 39. An ensemble of 8192 infinitesimal material surface elements is tracked through the turbulence. For each element, a set of exact ordinary differential equations is integrated in time to determine, primarily, the two principal curvatures k1 and k2. Statistics are then deduced of the mean-square curvature M= (1)/(2) (k21+k22), and of the mean radius of curvature R=(k21+k22)-1/2. Curvature statistics attain an essentially stationary state after about 15 Kolmogorov time scales. Then the area-weighted expectation of R is found to be 12η, where η is the Kolmogorov length scale. For moderate and small radii (less than 10η) the probability density function (pdf) of R is approximately uniform, there being about 5% probability of R being less than η. The uniformity of the pdf of R, for small R, implies that the expectation of M is infinite. It is found that the surface elements with large curvatures are nearly cylindrical in shape (i.e., ‖k1‖≫‖k2‖ or ‖k2‖≫‖k1‖), consistent with the folding of the surface along nearly straight lines. Nevertheless the variance of the Gauss curvature K=k1k2 is infinite.

  15. Shocklet statistics in compressible isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianchun; Gotoh, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2017-02-01

    Shocklet statistics in compressible isotropic turbulence are studied by using numerical simulations with solenoidal forcing, at the turbulent Mach number Mt ranging from 0.5 up to 1.0 and at the Taylor Reynolds number Reλ ranging from 110 to 250. A power-law region of the probability density function (PDF) of the shocklet strength Mn-1 (Mn is the normal shock Mach number) is observed. The magnitude of the power-law exponent is found to decrease with the increase of Mt. We show that the most probable shocklet strength is proportional to Mt3, and the shocklet thickness corresponding to the most probable shock Mach number is proportional to Mt-2 in our numerical simulations. The PDFs of the jumps of the velocity and thermodynamic variables across a shocklet exhibit a similar power-law scaling. The statistics of the jumps of the velocity and thermodynamic variables are further investigated by conditioned average. Nonlinear models for the conditional average of the jumps of the velocity and thermodynamic variables are developed and verified.

  16. Random shearing direction models for isotropic turbulent diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majda, Andrew J.

    1994-06-01

    Recently, a rigorous renormalization theory for various scalar statistics has been developed for special modes of random advection diffusion involving random shear layer velocity fields with long-range spatiotemporal correlations. New random shearing direction models for isotropic turbulent diffusion are introduced here. In these models the velocity field has the spatial second-order statistics of an arbitrary prescribed stationary incompressible isotropic random field including long-range spatial correlations with infrared divergence, but the temporal correlations have finite range. The explicit theory of renormalization for the mean and second-order statistics is developed here. With ɛ the spectral parameter, for -∞<ɛ<4 and measuring the strength of the infrared divergence of the spatial spectrum, the scalar mean statistics rigorously exhibit a phase transition from mean-field behavior for ɛ<2 to anomalous behavior for ɛ with 2<ɛ<4 as conjectured earlier by Avellaneda and the author. The universal inertial range renormalization for the second-order scalar statistics exhibits a phase transition from a covariance with a Gaussian functional form for ɛ with ɛ<2 to an explicit family with a non-Gaussian covariance for ɛ with 2<ɛ<4. These non-Gaussian distributions have tails that are broader than Gaussian as ɛ varies with 2<ɛ<4 and behave for large values like exp(- C c | x|4-ɛ), with C c an explicit constant. Also, here the attractive general principle is formulated and proved that every steady, stationary, zero-mean, isotropic, incompressible Gaussian random velocity field is well approximated by a suitable superposition of random shear layers.

  17. Helicity statistics in homogeneous and isotropic turbulence and turbulence models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Ganapati; De Pietro, Massimo; Biferale, Luca

    2017-02-01

    We study the statistical properties of helicity in direct numerical simulations of fully developed homogeneous and isotropic turbulence and in a class of turbulence shell models. We consider correlation functions based on combinations of vorticity and velocity increments that are not invariant under mirror symmetry. We also study the scaling properties of high-order structure functions based on the moments of the velocity increments projected on a subset of modes with either positive or negative helicity (chirality). We show that mirror symmetry is recovered at small scales, i.e., chiral terms are subleading and they are well captured by a dimensional argument plus anomalous corrections. These findings are also supported by a high Reynolds numbers study of helical shell models with the same chiral symmetry of Navier-Stokes equations.

  18. Fluctuations of thermodynamic variables in compressible isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donzis, Diego; Jagannathan, Shriram

    2014-11-01

    A distinguishing feature of compressible turbulence is the appearance of fluctuations of thermodynamic variables. While their importance is well-known in understanding these flows, some of their basic characteristics such as the Reynolds and Mach number dependence are not well understood. We use a large database of Direct Numerical Simulation of stationary compressible isotropic turbulence on up to 20483 grids at Taylor Reynolds numbers up to 450 and a range of Mach numbers (Mt ~ 0 . 1 - 0 . 6) to examine statistical properties of thermodynamic variables. Our focus is on the PDFs and moments of pressure, density and temperature. While results at low Mt are consistent with incompressible results, qualitative changes are observed at higher Mt with a transition around Mt ~ 0 . 3 . For example, the PDF of pressure changes from negatively to positively skewed as Mt increases. Similar changes are observed for temperature and density. We suggest that large fluctuations of thermodynamic variables will be log-normal at high Mt. We also find that, relative to incompressible turbulence, the correlation between enstrophy and low-pressure regions is weakened at high Mt which can be explained by the dominance of the so-called dilatational pressure.

  19. Measurements of Turbulence Attenuation by a Dilute Dispersion of Solid Particles in Homogeneous Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, John; Hwang, Wontae; Cabral, Patrick

    2002-11-01

    the addition of gravity as a variable parameter may help us to better understand the physics of turbulence attenuation. The experiments are conducted in a turbulence chamber capable of producing stationary or decaying isotropic turbulence with nearly zero mean flow and Taylor microscale Reynolds numbers up to nearly 500. The chamber is a 410 mm cubic box with the corners cut off to make it approximately spherical. Synthetic jet turbulence generators are mounted in each of the eight corners of the box. Each generator consists of a loudspeaker forcing a plenum and producing a pulsed jet through a 20 mm diameter orifice. These synthetic jets are directed into ejector tubes pointing towards the chamber center. The ejector tubes increase the jet mass flow and decrease the velocity. The jets then pass through a turbulence grid. Each of the eight loudspeakers is forced with a random phase and frequency. The resulting turbulence is highly Isotropic and matches typical behavior of grid turbulence. Measurements of both phases are acquired using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The gas is seeded with approximately 1 micron diameter seeding particles while the solid phase is typically 150 micron diameter spherical glass particles. A double-pulsed YAG laser and a Kodak ES-1.0 10-bit PIV camera provide the PIV images. Custom software is used to separate the images into individual images containing either gas-phase tracers or large particles. Modern high-resolution PIV algorithms are then used to calculate the velocity field. A large set of image pairs are acquired for each case, then the results are averaged both spatially and over the ensemble of acquired images. The entire apparatus is mounted in two racks which are carried aboard NASA's KC-135 Flying Microgravity Laboratory. The rack containing the turbulence chamber, the laser head, and the camera floats freely in the airplane cabin (constrained by competent NASA personnel) to minimize g-jitter.

  20. Measurements of Turbulence Attenuation by a Dilute Dispersion of Solid Particles in Homogeneous Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, John; Hwang, Wontae; Cabral, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    the addition of gravity as a variable parameter may help us to better understand the physics of turbulence attenuation. The experiments are conducted in a turbulence chamber capable of producing stationary or decaying isotropic turbulence with nearly zero mean flow and Taylor microscale Reynolds numbers up to nearly 500. The chamber is a 410 mm cubic box with the corners cut off to make it approximately spherical. Synthetic jet turbulence generators are mounted in each of the eight corners of the box. Each generator consists of a loudspeaker forcing a plenum and producing a pulsed jet through a 20 mm diameter orifice. These synthetic jets are directed into ejector tubes pointing towards the chamber center. The ejector tubes increase the jet mass flow and decrease the velocity. The jets then pass through a turbulence grid. Each of the eight loudspeakers is forced with a random phase and frequency. The resulting turbulence is highly Isotropic and matches typical behavior of grid turbulence. Measurements of both phases are acquired using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The gas is seeded with approximately 1 micron diameter seeding particles while the solid phase is typically 150 micron diameter spherical glass particles. A double-pulsed YAG laser and a Kodak ES-1.0 10-bit PIV camera provide the PIV images. Custom software is used to separate the images into individual images containing either gas-phase tracers or large particles. Modern high-resolution PIV algorithms are then used to calculate the velocity field. A large set of image pairs are acquired for each case, then the results are averaged both spatially and over the ensemble of acquired images. The entire apparatus is mounted in two racks which are carried aboard NASA's KC-135 Flying Microgravity Laboratory. The rack containing the turbulence chamber, the laser head, and the camera floats freely in the airplane cabin (constrained by competent NASA personnel) to minimize g-jitter.

  1. Measurements of Turbulence Attenuation by a Dilute Dispersion of Solid Particles in Homogeneous Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, John; Hwang, Wontae; Cabral, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    the addition of gravity as a variable parameter may help us to better understand the physics of turbulence attenuation. The experiments are conducted in a turbulence chamber capable of producing stationary or decaying isotropic turbulence with nearly zero mean flow and Taylor microscale Reynolds numbers up to nearly 500. The chamber is a 410 mm cubic box with the corners cut off to make it approximately spherical. Synthetic jet turbulence generators are mounted in each of the eight corners of the box. Each generator consists of a loudspeaker forcing a plenum and producing a pulsed jet through a 20 mm diameter orifice. These synthetic jets are directed into ejector tubes pointing towards the chamber center. The ejector tubes increase the jet mass flow and decrease the velocity. The jets then pass through a turbulence grid. Each of the eight loudspeakers is forced with a random phase and frequency. The resulting turbulence is highly Isotropic and matches typical behavior of grid turbulence. Measurements of both phases are acquired using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The gas is seeded with approximately 1 micron diameter seeding particles while the solid phase is typically 150 micron diameter spherical glass particles. A double-pulsed YAG laser and a Kodak ES-1.0 10-bit PIV camera provide the PIV images. Custom software is used to separate the images into individual images containing either gas-phase tracers or large particles. Modern high-resolution PIV algorithms are then used to calculate the velocity field. A large set of image pairs are acquired for each case, then the results are averaged both spatially and over the ensemble of acquired images. The entire apparatus is mounted in two racks which are carried aboard NASA's KC-135 Flying Microgravity Laboratory. The rack containing the turbulence chamber, the laser head, and the camera floats freely in the airplane cabin (constrained by competent NASA personnel) to minimize g-jitter.

  2. Some Basic Laws of Isotropic Turbulent Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loitsianskii, L. G.

    1945-01-01

    An Investigation is made of the diffusion of artificially produced turbulence behind screens or other turbulence producers. The method is based on the author's concept of disturbance moment as a certain theoretically well-founded measure of turbulent disturbances.

  3. The radiated noise from isotropic turbulence revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilley, Geoffrey M.

    1993-01-01

    The noise radiated from isotropic turbulence at low Mach numbers and high Reynolds numbers, as derived by Proudman (1952), was the first application of Lighthill's Theory of Aerodynamic Noise to a complete flow field. The theory presented by Proudman involves the assumption of the neglect of retarded time differences and so replaces the second-order retarded-time and space covariance of Lighthill's stress tensor, Tij, and in particular its second time derivative, by the equivalent simultaneous covariance. This assumption is a valid approximation in the derivation of the second partial derivative of Tij/derivative of t exp 2 covariance at low Mach numbers, but is not justified when that covariance is reduced to the sum of products of the time derivatives of equivalent second-order velocity covariances as required when Gaussian statistics are assumed. The present paper removes these assumptions and finds that although the changes in the analysis are substantial, the change in the numerical result for the total acoustic power is small. The present paper also considers an alternative analysis which does not neglect retarded times. It makes use of the Lighthill relationship, whereby the fourth-order Tij retarded-time covariance is evaluated from the square of similar second order covariance, which is assumed known. In this derivation, no statistical assumptions are involved. This result, using distributions for the second-order space-time velocity squared covariance based on the Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) results of both Sarkar and Hussaini(1993) and Dubois(1993), is compared with the re-evaluation of Proudman's original model. These results are then compared with the sound power derived from a phenomenological model based on simple approximations to the retarded-time/space covariance of Txx. Finally, the recent numerical solutions of Sarkar and Hussaini(1993) for the acoustic power are compared with the results obtained from the analytic solutions.

  4. Sudden relaminarisation and lifetimes in forced isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkmann, Moritz; Morozov, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate an unexpected connection between isotropic turbulence and wall-bounded shear flows. We perform direct numerical simulations of isotropic turbulence forced at large scales at moderate Reynolds numbers and observe sudden transitions from chaotic dynamics to a spatially simple flow, analogous to the laminar state in wall bounded shear flows. We find that the survival probabilities of turbulence are exponential and the typical lifetimes increase super-exponentially with the Reynolds number, similar to results on relaminarisation of localised turbulence in pipe and plane Couette flow. Results from simulations subjecting the observed large-scale flow to random perturbations of variable amplitude demonstrate that it is a linearly stable simple exact solution that can be destabilised by a finite-amplitude perturbation, like the Hagen-Poiseuille profile in pipe flow. Our results suggest that both isotropic turbulence and wall-bounded shear flows qualitatively share the same phase-space dynamics.

  5. The energy decay in self-preserving isotropic turbulence revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.; Bernard, Peter S.

    1991-01-01

    The assumption of self-preservation allows for an analytical determination of the energy decay in isotropic turbulence. Here, the self-preserving isotropic decay problem is analyzed, yielding a more complete picture of self-serving isotropic turbulence. It is proven rigorously that complete self-serving isotropic turbulence admits two general types of asymptotic solutions: one where the turbulent kinetic energy K approximately t (exp -1) and one where K approximately t (sup alpha) with an exponent alpha greater than 1 that is determined explicitly by the initial conditions. By a fixed point analysis and numerical integration of the exact one-point equations, it is demonstrated that the K approximately t (exp -1) and where K approximately t (sup -alpha) with an exponent alpha greater than 1 that is determined explicitly by the initial conditions. By a fixed point analysis and numerical integration of the exact one point equations, it is demonstrated that the K approximately t (exp -1) power law decay is the asymptotically consistent high Reynolds number solution; the K approximately 1 (sup - alpha) decay law is only achieved in the limit as t yields infinity and the turbulence Reynolds number vanishes. Arguments are provided which indicate that a K approximately t (exp -1) power law decay is the asymptotic state towards which a complete self-preseving isotropic turbulence is driven at high Reynolds numbers in order to resolve the imbalance between vortex stretching and viscous diffusion.

  6. The energy decay in self-preserving isotropic turbulence revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.; Bernard, Peter S.

    1992-01-01

    The assumption of self-preservation allows for an analytical determination of the energy decay in isotropic turbulence. Here, the self-preserving isotropic decay problem is analyzed, yielding a more complete picture of self-serving isotropic turbulence. It is proven rigorously that complete self-serving isotropic turbulence admits two general types of asymptotic solutions: one where the turbulent kinetic energy K approximately t (exp -1) and one where K approximately t (sup alpha) with an exponent alpha greater than 1 that is determined explicitly by the initial conditions. By a fixed point analysis and numerical integration of the exact one-point equations, it is demonstrated that the K approximately t (exp -1) and where K approximately t (sup -alpha) with an exponent alpha greater than 1 that is determined explicitly by the initial conditions. By a fixed point analysis and numerical integration of the exact one-point equations, it is demonstrated that the K approximately t (exp -1) power law decay is the asymptotically consistent high Reynolds number solution; the K approximately 1 (sup -alpha) decay law is only achieved in the limit as t yields infinity and the turbulence Reynolds number vanishes. Arguments are provided which indicate that a K approximately t (exp -1) power law decay is the asymptotic state toward which a complete self-preserving isotropic turbulence is driven at high Reynolds numbers in order to resolve the imbalance between vortex stretching and viscous diffusion.

  7. The energy decay in self-preserving isotropic turbulence revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.; Bernard, Peter S.

    1992-01-01

    The assumption of self-preservation allows for an analytical determination of the energy decay in isotropic turbulence. Here, the self-preserving isotropic decay problem is analyzed, yielding a more complete picture of self-serving isotropic turbulence. It is proven rigorously that complete self-serving isotropic turbulence admits two general types of asymptotic solutions: one where the turbulent kinetic energy K approximately t (exp -1) and one where K approximately t (sup alpha) with an exponent alpha greater than 1 that is determined explicitly by the initial conditions. By a fixed point analysis and numerical integration of the exact one-point equations, it is demonstrated that the K approximately t (exp -1) and where K approximately t (sup -alpha) with an exponent alpha greater than 1 that is determined explicitly by the initial conditions. By a fixed point analysis and numerical integration of the exact one-point equations, it is demonstrated that the K approximately t (exp -1) power law decay is the asymptotically consistent high Reynolds number solution; the K approximately 1 (sup -alpha) decay law is only achieved in the limit as t yields infinity and the turbulence Reynolds number vanishes. Arguments are provided which indicate that a K approximately t (exp -1) power law decay is the asymptotic state toward which a complete self-preserving isotropic turbulence is driven at high Reynolds numbers in order to resolve the imbalance between vortex stretching and viscous diffusion.

  8. ISOTROPIC TURBULENCE AND INERTIAL-RANGE STRUCTURE IN THE ABRIDGED LHDI APPROXIMATION

    DTIC Science & Technology

    effective eddy viscosities, and Lagrangian spacetime statistics in stationary and decaying isotropic turbulence. The results are then specialized to the...of energy transfer, for Lagrangian spacetime structure functions, and for Lagrangian spacetime acceleration covariances. Inertial-range Eulerian... spacetime structure functions also are computed. The predicted absolute Kolmogorov spectrum in the inertial and dissipation ranges is compared with data of Grant, Stewart, and Moilliet, and of M. M. Gibson.

  9. Laboratory Study of Homogeneous and Isotropic Turbulence at High Reynolds Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecenak, Zachary; Dou, Zhongwang; Yang, Fan; Cao, Lujie; Liang, Zach; Meng, Hui

    2013-11-01

    To study particle dynamics modified by isotropic turbulence at high Reynolds numbers and provide experimental data for DNS validation, we have developed a soccer-ball-shaped truncated icosahedron turbulence chamber with 20 adjoining hexagon surfaces, 12 pentagon surfaces and twenty symettrically displaced fans, which form an enclosed chamber of 1m diameter. We use Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique to characterize the base turbulent flow, using different PIV set ups to capture various characteristic scales of turbulence. Results show that the stationary isotropic turbulence field is a spherical domain with diameter of 40 mm with quasi-zero mean velocities. The maximum rms velocity is ~1.5 m/s, corresponding to a Taylor microscale Re of 450. We extract from the PIV velocity field the whole set of turbulent flow parameters including: turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent intensity, kinetic energy dissipation rate, large eddy length and time scales, the Kolmogorov length, time and velocity scales, Taylor microscale and Re, which are critical to the study of inter-particle statistics modified by turbulence. This research is funded by an NSF grant CBET-0967407.

  10. Large-deviation statistics of vorticity stretching in isotropic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Perry L; Meneveau, Charles

    2016-03-01

    A key feature of three-dimensional fluid turbulence is the stretching and realignment of vorticity by the action of the strain rate. It is shown in this paper, using the cumulant-generating function, that the cumulative vorticity stretching along a Lagrangian path in isotropic turbulence obeys a large deviation principle. As a result, the relevant statistics can be described by the vorticity stretching Cramér function. This function is computed from a direct numerical simulation data set at a Taylor-scale Reynolds number of Re(λ)=433 and compared to those of the finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLE) for material deformation. As expected, the mean cumulative vorticity stretching is slightly less than that of the most-stretched material line (largest FTLE), due to the vorticity's preferential alignment with the second-largest eigenvalue of strain rate and the material line's preferential alignment with the largest eigenvalue. However, the vorticity stretching tends to be significantly larger than the second-largest FTLE, and the Cramér functions reveal that the statistics of vorticity stretching fluctuations are more similar to those of the largest FTLE. In an attempt to relate the vorticity stretching statistics to the vorticity magnitude probability density function in statistically stationary conditions, a model Kramers-Moyal equation is constructed using the statistics encoded in the Cramér function. The model predicts a stretched-exponential tail for the vorticity magnitude probability density function, with good agreement for the exponent but significant difference (35%) in the prefactor.

  11. Large-deviation statistics of vorticity stretching in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Perry L.; Meneveau, Charles

    2016-03-01

    A key feature of three-dimensional fluid turbulence is the stretching and realignment of vorticity by the action of the strain rate. It is shown in this paper, using the cumulant-generating function, that the cumulative vorticity stretching along a Lagrangian path in isotropic turbulence obeys a large deviation principle. As a result, the relevant statistics can be described by the vorticity stretching Cramér function. This function is computed from a direct numerical simulation data set at a Taylor-scale Reynolds number of Reλ=433 and compared to those of the finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLE) for material deformation. As expected, the mean cumulative vorticity stretching is slightly less than that of the most-stretched material line (largest FTLE), due to the vorticity's preferential alignment with the second-largest eigenvalue of strain rate and the material line's preferential alignment with the largest eigenvalue. However, the vorticity stretching tends to be significantly larger than the second-largest FTLE, and the Cramér functions reveal that the statistics of vorticity stretching fluctuations are more similar to those of the largest FTLE. In an attempt to relate the vorticity stretching statistics to the vorticity magnitude probability density function in statistically stationary conditions, a model Kramers-Moyal equation is constructed using the statistics encoded in the Cramér function. The model predicts a stretched-exponential tail for the vorticity magnitude probability density function, with good agreement for the exponent but significant difference (35%) in the prefactor.

  12. Diffusion of Heat from a Line Source in Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uberoi, Mahinder S; Corrsin, Stanley

    1953-01-01

    An experimental and analytical study has been made of some features of the turbulent heat diffusion behind a line heated wire stretched perpendicular to a flowing isotropic turbulence. The mean temperature distributions have been measured with systematic variations in wind speed, size of turbulence-producing grid, and downstream location of heat source. The nature of the temperature fluctuation field has been studied. A comparison of Lagrangian and Eulerian analyses for diffusion in a nondecaying turbulence yields an expression for turbulent-heat-transfer coefficient in terms of turbulence velocity and a Lagrangian "scale." the ratio of Eulerian to Lagrangian microscale has been determined theoretically by generalization of a result of Heisenberg and with arbitrary constants taken from independent sources, shows rough agreement with experimental results. A convenient form has been deduced for the criterion of interchangeability of instantaneous space and time derivatives in a flowing turbulence.

  13. Studies of Shock Wave Interactions with Homogeneous and Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briassulis, G.; Agui, J.; Watkins, C. B.; Andreopoulos, Y.

    1998-01-01

    A nearly homogeneous nearly isotropic compressible turbulent flow interacting with a normal shock wave has been studied experimentally in a large shock tube facility. Spatial resolution of the order of 8 Kolmogorov viscous length scales was achieved in the measurements of turbulence. A variety of turbulence generating grids provide a wide range of turbulence scales. Integral length scales were found to substantially decrease through the interaction with the shock wave in all investigated cases with flow Mach numbers ranging from 0.3 to 0.7 and shock Mach numbers from 1.2 to 1.6. The outcome of the interaction depends strongly on the state of compressibility of the incoming turbulence. The length scales in the lateral direction are amplified at small Mach numbers and attenuated at large Mach numbers. Even at large Mach numbers amplification of lateral length scales has been observed in the case of fine grids. In addition to the interaction with the shock the present work has documented substantial compressibility effects in the incoming homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flow. The decay of Mach number fluctuations was found to follow a power law similar to that describing the decay of incompressible isotropic turbulence. It was found that the decay coefficient and the decay exponent decrease with increasing Mach number while the virtual origin increases with increasing Mach number. A mechanism possibly responsible for these effects appears to be the inherently low growth rate of compressible shear layers emanating from the cylindrical rods of the grid.

  14. Cosmic-ray pitch-angle scattering in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bieber, John W.; Smith, Charles W.; Matthaeus, William H.

    1988-01-01

    A dissipation range is incorporated in the turbulence model to reconcile the divergent conclusions from studies of cosmic-ray pitch-angle scattering in isotropic magnetic turbulence. The Fokker-Planck coefficient for pitch-angle scattering is calculated. It is shown that the slab form of the Fokker-Plank coefficient (Jokipii, 1966) is valid at very low energies, while the nonslab form (Fisk, 1974) is valid at intermediate energies.

  15. Assessing the Structure of Isotropic and Anisotropic Turbulent Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatuzzo, Marco; Holden, Lisa; Grayson, Lindsay; Wallace, Kirk

    2016-10-01

    Turbulent magnetic fields permeate our universe, impacting a wide range of astronomical phenomena across all cosmic scales. A clear example is the magnetic field that threads the interstellar medium (ISM), which impacts the motion of cosmic rays through that medium. Understanding the structure of magnetic turbulence within the ISM and how it relates to the physical quantities that characterize it can thus inform our analysis of particle transport within these regions. Toward that end, we probe the structure of magentic turbulence through the use of Lyapunov exponents for a suite of isotropic and nonisotropic Alfvénic turbulence profiles. Our results provide a means of calculating a “turbulence lengthscale” that can then be connected to how cosmic rays propagate through magentically turbulent environments, and we perform such an analysis for molecular cloud environments.

  16. The decay of isotropic turbulence in a rapidly rotating frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, C. G.; Mansour, N. N.; Rogallo, R. S.

    1987-01-01

    A direct numerical simulation of the decay of initially isotropic turbulence in a rapidly rotating frame was conducted. This 128 x 128 x 128 simulation was completed for a Reynolds number Re sub lambda = 15.3 and a Rossby number Ro sub lambda = 0.07 based on the initial turbulent kinetic energy and Taylor microscale. The numerical results indicate that the turbulence remains essentially isotropic during the major part of the decay (i.e., beyond the point where the turbulent kinetic energy has decayed to less than 10 percent of its initial value). The rapid rotation has the primary effect of shutting off the energy transfer so that the turbulence dissipation (and hence the rate of decay of the turbulent kinetic energy) is substantially reduced. Consequently, the anisotropy tensor remains essentially unchanged while the energy spectrum undergoes a nearly linear viscous decay (the same results that are predicted by Rapid Distortion Theory which is only formally valid for much shorter elapsed times. Surprisingly, no Taylor-Proudman reorganization of the flow to a two-dimensional state is observed. The implications that these results have on turbulence modeling are discussed briefly along with prospective future research.

  17. Charge pariticle transport in the non-isotropic turbulences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, P.; Jokipii, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    The scattering and diffusion of energetic charged particles is not only important for understanding phenomena such as diffusive shock acceleration but it also is a natural probe of the statistical characteristics of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. Although Parker's transport equation (Parker 1965) allows us to describe the propagation of charged particles, the transport coefficients needed in the equation must be determined. Using Quasi-Linear Theory (QLT, e.g. Jokipii (1966)), one finds that coefficients can be related to the correlation function or power spectrum of homogeneous magnetic turbulence. However, different turbulence models will generally have a different influence on particle's scattering and diffusion. Among those models developed in MHD Turbulence, such as isotropic, Slab plus 2D (Tu & Marsch 1993; Gray et al 1996; Bieber et al 1996), etc. Here, using test-particle orbit simulations to calculate the transport coefficients, we study particle transport in synthesized asymmetric turbulence using the form first proposed by Goldreich & Sridhar (1995). We developed and introduce a systematic method to synthesize scale-dependent non-isotropic magnetic turbulences. We also developed and introduce a method to synthesize the 3d turbulent magnetic field from the observed solar wind time series dataset. We present the comparison of their effects on charge particle transport with previous theories and models.

  18. Reynolds number scaling of velocity increments in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Kartik P.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.; Yeung, P. K.

    2017-02-01

    Using the largest database of isotropic turbulence available to date, generated by the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the Navier-Stokes equations on an 81923 periodic box, we show that the longitudinal and transverse velocity increments scale identically in the inertial range. By examining the DNS data at several Reynolds numbers, we infer that the contradictory results of the past on the inertial-range universality are artifacts of low Reynolds number and residual anisotropy. We further show that both longitudinal and transverse velocity increments scale on locally averaged dissipation rate, just as postulated by Kolmogorov's refined similarity hypothesis, and that, in isotropic turbulence, a single independent scaling adequately describes fluid turbulence in the inertial range.

  19. Experimental study of premixed flames in intense isotropic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Bedat, B.; Cheng, R.K.

    1994-04-01

    A methodology for investigating premixed turbulent flames propagating in intense isotropic turbulence has been developed. The burner uses a turbulence generator developed by Videto and Santavicca and the flame is stabilized by weak-swirl generated by air injectors. This set-up produces stable premixed turbulent flames under a wide range of mixture conditions and turbulence intensities. The experiments are designed to investigate systematically the changes in flame structures for conditions which can be classified as wrinkled laminar flames, corrugated flames and flames with distributed reaction zones. Laser Doppler anemometry and Rayleigh scattering techniques are used to determine the turbulence and scalar statistics. In the intense turbulence, the flames are found to produce very little changes in the mean and rams velocities. Their flame speed increase linearly with turbulence intensity as for wrinkled laminar flames. The Rayleigh scattering pdfs for flames within the distributed reaction zone regime are distinctly bimodal. The probabilities of the reacting states (i.e. contributions from within the reaction zone) is not higher than those of wrinkled laminar flame. These results show that there is no drastic changes in flame structures at Karlovitz number close to unity. This suggest that the Klimov-Williams criterion under-predicts the resilience of wrinkled flamelets to intense turbulence.

  20. Computation of the sound generated by isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkar, S.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1993-01-01

    The acoustic radiation from isotropic turbulence is computed numerically. A hybrid direct numerical simulation approach which combines direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the turbulent flow with the Lighthill acoustic analogy is utilized. It is demonstrated that the hybrid DNS method is a feasible approach to the computation of sound generated by turbulent flows. The acoustic efficiency in the simulation of isotropic turbulence appears to be substantially less than that in subsonic jet experiments. The dominant frequency of the computed acoustic pressure is found to be somewhat larger than the dominant frequency of the energy-containing scales of motion. The acoustic power in the simulations is proportional to epsilon (M(sub t))(exp 5) where epsilon is the turbulent dissipation rate and M(sub t) is the turbulent Mach number. This is in agreement with the analytical result of Proudman (1952), but the constant of proportionality is smaller than the analytical result. Two different methods of computing the acoustic power from the DNS data bases yielded consistent results.

  1. A non-isotropic multiple-scale turbulence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.

    1990-01-01

    A newly developed non-isotropic multiple scale turbulence model (MS/ASM) is described for complex flow calculations. This model focuses on the direct modeling of Reynolds stresses and utilizes split-spectrum concepts for modeling multiple scale effects in turbulence. Validation studies on free shear flows, rotating flows and recirculating flows show that the current model perform significantly better than the single scale k-epsilon model. The present model is relatively inexpensive in terms of CPU time which makes it suitable for broad engineering flow applications.

  2. Computation of large-scale statistics in decaying isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chasnov, Jeffrey R.

    1993-01-01

    We have performed large-eddy simulations of decaying isotropic turbulence to test the prediction of self-similar decay of the energy spectrum and to compute the decay exponents of the kinetic energy. In general, good agreement between the simulation results and the assumption of self-similarity were obtained. However, the statistics of the simulations were insufficient to compute the value of gamma which corrects the decay exponent when the spectrum follows a k(exp 4) wave number behavior near k = 0. To obtain good statistics, it was found necessary to average over a large ensemble of turbulent flows.

  3. Model of non-stationary, inhomogeneous turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Bragg, Andrew D.; Kurien, Susan; Clark, Timothy T.

    2016-07-08

    Here, we compare results from a spectral model for non-stationary, inhomogeneous turbulence (Besnard et al. in Theor Comp Fluid Dyn 8:1–35, 1996) with direct numerical simulation (DNS) data of a shear-free mixing layer (SFML) (Tordella et al. in Phys Rev E 77:016309, 2008). The SFML is used as a test case in which the efficacy of the model closure for the physical-space transport of the fluid velocity field can be tested in a flow with inhomogeneity, without the additional complexity of mean-flow coupling. The model is able to capture certain features of the SFML quite well for intermediate to long times, including the evolution of the mixing-layer width and turbulent kinetic energy. At short-times, and for more sensitive statistics such as the generation of the velocity field anisotropy, the model is less accurate. We propose two possible causes for the discrepancies. The first is the local approximation to the pressure-transport and the second is the a priori spherical averaging used to reduce the dimensionality of the solution space of the model, from wavevector to wavenumber space. DNS data are then used to gauge the relative importance of both possible deficiencies in the model.

  4. Model of non-stationary, inhomogeneous turbulence

    DOE PAGES

    Bragg, Andrew D.; Kurien, Susan; Clark, Timothy T.

    2016-07-08

    Here, we compare results from a spectral model for non-stationary, inhomogeneous turbulence (Besnard et al. in Theor Comp Fluid Dyn 8:1–35, 1996) with direct numerical simulation (DNS) data of a shear-free mixing layer (SFML) (Tordella et al. in Phys Rev E 77:016309, 2008). The SFML is used as a test case in which the efficacy of the model closure for the physical-space transport of the fluid velocity field can be tested in a flow with inhomogeneity, without the additional complexity of mean-flow coupling. The model is able to capture certain features of the SFML quite well for intermediate to longmore » times, including the evolution of the mixing-layer width and turbulent kinetic energy. At short-times, and for more sensitive statistics such as the generation of the velocity field anisotropy, the model is less accurate. We propose two possible causes for the discrepancies. The first is the local approximation to the pressure-transport and the second is the a priori spherical averaging used to reduce the dimensionality of the solution space of the model, from wavevector to wavenumber space. DNS data are then used to gauge the relative importance of both possible deficiencies in the model.« less

  5. Model of non-stationary, inhomogeneous turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragg, Andrew D.; Kurien, Susan; Clark, Timothy T.

    2017-02-01

    We compare results from a spectral model for non-stationary, inhomogeneous turbulence (Besnard et al. in Theor Comp Fluid Dyn 8:1-35, 1996) with direct numerical simulation (DNS) data of a shear-free mixing layer (SFML) (Tordella et al. in Phys Rev E 77:016309, 2008). The SFML is used as a test case in which the efficacy of the model closure for the physical-space transport of the fluid velocity field can be tested in a flow with inhomogeneity, without the additional complexity of mean-flow coupling. The model is able to capture certain features of the SFML quite well for intermediate to long times, including the evolution of the mixing-layer width and turbulent kinetic energy. At short-times, and for more sensitive statistics such as the generation of the velocity field anisotropy, the model is less accurate. We propose two possible causes for the discrepancies. The first is the local approximation to the pressure-transport and the second is the a priori spherical averaging used to reduce the dimensionality of the solution space of the model, from wavevector to wavenumber space. DNS data are then used to gauge the relative importance of both possible deficiencies in the model.

  6. Model of non-stationary, inhomogeneous turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Bragg, Andrew D.; Kurien, Susan; Clark, Timothy T.

    2016-07-08

    Here, we compare results from a spectral model for non-stationary, inhomogeneous turbulence (Besnard et al. in Theor Comp Fluid Dyn 8:1–35, 1996) with direct numerical simulation (DNS) data of a shear-free mixing layer (SFML) (Tordella et al. in Phys Rev E 77:016309, 2008). The SFML is used as a test case in which the efficacy of the model closure for the physical-space transport of the fluid velocity field can be tested in a flow with inhomogeneity, without the additional complexity of mean-flow coupling. The model is able to capture certain features of the SFML quite well for intermediate to long times, including the evolution of the mixing-layer width and turbulent kinetic energy. At short-times, and for more sensitive statistics such as the generation of the velocity field anisotropy, the model is less accurate. We propose two possible causes for the discrepancies. The first is the local approximation to the pressure-transport and the second is the a priori spherical averaging used to reduce the dimensionality of the solution space of the model, from wavevector to wavenumber space. DNS data are then used to gauge the relative importance of both possible deficiencies in the model.

  7. On the Lighthill relationship and sound generation from isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, YE; Praskovsky, Alexander; Oncley, Steven

    1994-01-01

    In 1952, Lighthill developed a theory for determining the sound generated by a turbulent motion of a fluid. With some statistical assumptions, Proudman applied this theory to estimate the acoustic power of isotropic turbulence. Recently, Lighthill established a simple relationship that relates the fourth-order retarded time and space covariance of his stress tensor to the corresponding second-order covariance and the turbulent flatness factor, without making statistical assumptions for a homogeneous turbulence. Lilley revisited Proudman's work and applied the Lighthill relationship to evaluate directly the radiated acoustic power from isotropic turbulence. After choosing the time separation dependence in the two-point velocity time and space covariance based on the insights gained from direct numerical simulations, Lilley concluded that the Proudman constant is determined by the turbulent flatness factor and the second-order spatial velocity covariance. In order to estimate the Proudman constant at high Reynolds numbers, we analyzed a unique data set of measurements in a large wind tunnel and atmospheric surface layer that covers a range of the Taylor microscale based on Reynolds numbers 2.0 x 10(exp 3) less than or equal to R(sub lambda) less than or equal to 12.7 x 10(exp 3). Our measurements demonstrate that the Lighthill relationship is a good approximation, providing additional support to Lilley's approach. The flatness factor is found between 2.7 - 3.3 and the second order spatial velocity covariance is obtained. Based on these experimental data, the Proudman constant is estimated to be 0.68 - 3.68.

  8. Hindered Energy Cascade in Highly Helical Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, Rodion; Golbraikh, Ephim; Frick, Peter; Shestakov, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    The conventional approach to the turbulent energy cascade, based on Richardson-Kolmogorov phenomenology, ignores the topology of emerging vortices, which is related to the helicity of the turbulent flow. It is generally believed that helicity can play a significant role in turbulent systems, e.g., supporting the generation of large-scale magnetic fields, but its impact on the energy cascade to small scales has never been observed. We suggest, for the first time, a generalized phenomenology for isotropic turbulence with an arbitrary spectral distribution of the helicity. We discuss various scenarios of direct turbulent cascades with new helicity effect, which can be interpreted as a hindering of the spectral energy transfer. Therefore, the energy is accumulated and redistributed so that the efficiency of nonlinear interactions will be sufficient to provide a constant energy flux. We confirm our phenomenology by high Reynolds number numerical simulations based on a shell model of helical turbulence. The energy in our model is injected at a certain large scale only, whereas the source of helicity is distributed over all scales. In particular, we found that the helical bottleneck effect can appear in the inertial interval of the energy spectrum.

  9. Spark ignition of aviation fuel in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krisman, Alex; Lu, Tianfeng; Borghesi, Giulio; Chen, Jacqueline

    2016-11-01

    Turbulent spark ignition occurs in combustion engines where the spark must establish a viable flame kernel that leads to stable combustion. A competition exists between kernel growth, due to flame propagation, and kernel attenuation, due to flame stretch and turbulence. This competition can be measured by the Karlovitz number, Ka, and kernel viability decreases rapidly for Ka >> 1 . In this study, the evolution of an initially spherical flame kernel in a turbulent field is investigated at two cases: Ka- (Ka = 25) and Ka+ (Ka = 125) using direct numerical simulation (DNS). A detailed chemical mechanism for jet fuel (Jet-A) is used, which is relevant for many practical conditions, and the mechanism includes a pyrolysis sub-model which is important for the ignition of large hydrocarbon fuels. An auxiliary non-reacting DNS generates the initial field of isotropic turbulence with a turbulent Reynolds number of 500 (Ka-) and 1,500 (Ka+). The kernel is then imposed at the center of the domain and the reacting DNS is performed. The Ka- case survives and the Ka+ case is extinguished. An analysis of the turbulence chemistry interactions is performed and the process of extinction is described. Department of Energy - Office of Basic Energy Science under Award No. DE-SC0001198.

  10. Direct simulation of particle dispersion in a decaying isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elghobashi, S.; Truesdell, G. C.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a numerical investigation of the dispersion of solid particles in decaying isotropic turbulence are presented. The 3D time-dependent velocity field of a homogeneous nonstationary turbulence is computed using the method of direct numerical simulation (DNS). The dispersion characteristics of three different solid particles (corn, copper, and glass) injected in the flow are obtained by integrating the complete equation of particle motion along the instantaneous trajectories of 22-cubed particles for each particle type, and then by performing ensemble averaging. Good agreement was achieved between the present DNS results and the measured time development of the mean-square displacement of the particles. Questions of how and why the dispersion statistics of a solid particle differ from those of its corresponding fluid point and surrounding fluid and what influences inertia and gravity have on these statistics are also discussed.

  11. A spiral vortex model of homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Keith; Ooi, Andrew; Chong, Min

    2002-11-01

    The Lundgren-Townsend model of turbulent fine scales has been successful in predicting some of the properties of homogeneous isotropic turbulence. Lundgren obtained these results by averaging over an ensemble of nearly axisymmetric, unsteady, stretched spiral vortices. These vortical structures are represented in the model by a large-time asymptotic solution of the Navier-Stokes equations. Extending on the work of Pullin & Saffman [Phys. Fluids 8, 3072 (1996)], we calculate the energy spectrum and longitudinal velocity structure functions for a specific realisation of the Lundgren-Townsend model. Here the members of our ensemble are time-evolving spiral vortex structures resulting from the merging of stretched Burgers vortex tubes. The merging is computed numerically following the method of Buntine & Pullin [JFM 205, 263 (1989)]. We present results for a range of vortex Reynolds numbers.

  12. The signature of initial production mechanisms in isotropic turbulence decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meldi, M.

    2016-03-01

    In the present work the quantification of the time-lasting effects of production mechanisms in homogeneous isotropic turbulence decay is addressed. The analysis is developed through the use of theoretical tools as well as numerical calculations based on the eddy damped quasinormal Markovian (EDQNM) model. In both cases a modified Lin equation is used, which accounts for production mechanisms as proposed by Meldi, Lejemble, and Sagaut ["On the emergence of non-classical decay regimes in multiscale/fractal generated isotropic turbulence," J. Fluid Mech. 756, 816-843 (2014)]. The approaches used show that an exponential decay law can be observed if the intensity of the forcing is strong enough to drive the turbulence dynamics, before a power-law decay is eventually attained. The EDQNM numerical results indicate that the exponential regime can persist for long evolution times, longer than the observation time in grid turbulence experiments. A rigorous investigation of the self-similar behavior of the pressure spectrum has been performed by a comprehensive comparison of EDQNM data with direct numerical simulation (DNS)/experiments in the literature. While DNS and free decay EDQNM simulations suggest the need of a very high Reλ threshold in order to observe a clear -7/3 slope of the pressure inertial range, experimental data and forced EDQNM calculations indicate a significantly lower value. This observation suggests that the time-lasting effects of production mechanisms, which cannot be excluded in experiments, play a role in the lack of general agreement with classical numerical approaches. These results reinforce the urge to evolve the numerical simulation state of the art towards the prediction of realistic physical states.

  13. Non-isotropic turbulence effects on spray combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Y. M.; Shang, H. M.; Chen, C. P.

    1991-01-01

    A numerical model for the prediction of local properties of statistically stationary spray-combusting flows is evaluated by comparison with experimental data. To appraise the relative performance of turbulence models, computations were carried out by the k-epsilon model and the algebraic stress model. The present numerical results show the qualitative agreement with experimental data. In terms of overall local flow properties, the algebraic stress model improves a degree of conformity to the experimental data due to its ability to introduce the nonisotropic turbulence effects. Two swirl numbers are considered to investigate the influence of swirl on the droplet evaporation and trajectories, and the effects of droplet/turbulence interactions in flow properties. It is found that the large swirl produces a higher evaporationn rate, and more intensive turbulent mixing and burning. The discrepancies observed in the results are attributed mainly to uncertainties in the initial spray size and velocity distributions, the droplet/wall impingement interaction, the combustion model with the fast chemistry and the turbulence models dealing with the strong streamline curvature and complex interactions between the dispersed droplets and the continuous gas-phase flows.

  14. Non-isotropic turbulence effects on spray combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Y. M.; Shang, H. M.; Chen, C. P.

    1991-01-01

    A numerical model for the prediction of local properties of statistically stationary spray-combusting flows is evaluated by comparison with experimental data. To appraise the relative performance of turbulence models, computations were carried out by the k-epsilon model and the algebraic stress model. The present numerical results show the qualitative agreement with experimental data. In terms of overall local flow properties, the algebraic stress model improves a degree of conformity to the experimental data due to its ability to introduce the nonisotropic turbulence effects. Two swirl numbers are considered to investigate the influence of swirl on the droplet evaporation and trajectories, and the effects of droplet/turbulence interactions in flow properties. It is found that the large swirl produces a higher evaporationn rate, and more intensive turbulent mixing and burning. The discrepancies observed in the results are attributed mainly to uncertainties in the initial spray size and velocity distributions, the droplet/wall impingement interaction, the combustion model with the fast chemistry and the turbulence models dealing with the strong streamline curvature and complex interactions between the dispersed droplets and the continuous gas-phase flows.

  15. Clustering of particles in homogeneous and isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hainaux, Franck; Cartellier, Alain; Lasheras, Juan C.

    1999-11-01

    We have experimentally studied the clustering effect which occurs in a turbulent flow laden with particles of given size distribution. For this purpose we have analyzed using PDPA and image processing techniques the variations of the spatial density distribution of particles in a decaying isotropic turbulent flow. In the case of particles smaller than the Kolmogorov length scale and dilute systems (void fraction 10-5) we have found that the dynamic interaction of the particles with the various turbulent flow structures leads to the accumulation of particles forming clusters of variable fractal dimensions. These clusters were found to result in an enhancement of the particle settling velocity by an amount about 1.2 times the velocity rms. These results are in good qualitative agreement with DNS of particules settling in a homogeneous turbulent flow performed by Wang and Maxey (JFM vol.256, 1993) and also confirmed in recent LES performed by Yang and Lei (JFM vol.371, 1998). The somewhat higher enhancements observed in experiments compared to those predicted by computations seem to result from the convection velocity of dense compact regions.

  16. Long-time behavior of material-surface curvature in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girimaji, S. S.

    1992-01-01

    The behavior at large times of the curvature of material elements in turbulence is investigated using Lagrangian velocity-gradient time series obtained from direct numerical simulations of isotropic turbulence. The main objectives are: to study the asymptotic behavior of the pdf curvature as a function of initial curvature and shape; and to establish whether the curvature of an initially plane material element goes to a stationary probability distribution. The evidence available in the literature about the asymptotic curvature-pdf of initially flat surfaces is ambiguous, and the conjecture is that it is quasi-stationary. In this work several material-element ensembles of different initial curvatures and shapes are studied. It is found that, at long times the moments of the logarithm of curvature are independent of the initial pdf of curvature. This, it is argued, supports the view that the curvature attains a stationary distribution at long times. It is also shown that, irrespective of initial shape or curvature, the shape of any material element at long times is cylindrical with a high probability.

  17. PDF Modeling of Evaporating Droplets in Isotropic Turbulence.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashayek, F.; Pandya, R. V. R.

    2000-11-01

    We use a statistical closure scheme of Van Kampen [1] to obtain an approximate equation for probability density function p(τ_d, t) to predict the time (t) evolution of statistical properties related to particle time constant τd of collisionless evaporating droplets suspended in isothermal isotropic turbulent flows. The resulting Fokker-Planck equation for p(τ_d, t) has non-linear, time-dependent drift and diffusion coefficients that depend on the statistical properties of droplet's slip velocity. Approximate analytical expressions for these properties are derived and the equation is solved numerically after implementing a numerical method based on path-integral formalism. Time evolution of various droplet diameter related statistical properties are then calculated and are compared with the data available from the stochastic and direct numerical simulations (DNS) studies performed by Mashayek[2]. A good agreement for temporal evolution of mean and standard deviation of particle diameter is observed with DNS results. Reference [1] Van Kampen, N.G., Stochastic Processes in Physics and Chemistry, Elsevier Science Publishers, North Holland, Amsterdam, 1992. [2] Mashayek, F., Stochastic Simulations of Particle-Laden Isotropic Turbulent Flow, Int. J. Multiphase Flow, 25(8):1575-1599 (1999).

  18. High-resolution simulations of forced compressible isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagannathan, Shriram; Donzis, Diego

    2011-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of compressible turbulent flows are several times more expensive than their incompressible counterparts. Therefore, using large computing resources efficiently is even more pressing when studying compressible turbulence. A highly scalable code is presented which is used to perform simulations aimed at understanding fundamental turbulent processes. The code, which is based on a 2D domain decomposition, is shown to scale well up to 128k cores. To attain a statistically stationary state a new scheme is developed which involves large-scale stochastic forcing (solenoidal or dilatational) and a procedure to keep mean internal energy constant. The resulting flows show characteristics consistent with results in the literature. The attainable Reynolds and turbulent Mach numbers for given computational resources depend on the number of grid points and the degree to which the smallest scales are resolved that are given by Kolmogorov scales. A systematic comparison of simulations at different resolutions suggests that the resolution needed depends on the particular statistic being considered. The resulting database is used to investigate small-scale universality, the scaling of spectra of velocity, density and temperature fields, structure functions and the trends towards high-Reynolds number asymptotes. Differences with incompressible results are highlighted.

  19. Observation of quantum decay of homogeneous, isotropic (grid) turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihas, Gary; Munday, Lydia; Yang, Jihee; Thompson, Kyle; Guo, Wei; Chapurin, Roman; Fisher, Shaun; McClintock, Peter; Vinen, W. F.

    2014-03-01

    In classical grid turbulence fluid is forced through a stationary grid. In the quantum case a grid moves through an initially stationary superfluid driven by a linear motor. We have developed a motor using superconducting drive coils and bearings, moving a grid at constant speed (0 and 15 cm/s). Stalp et al[2] report the decay of vortex-line density L in the grid's wake measured by 2nd sound attenuation. L decayed at large times as t - 3 / 2, interpreted as a quasi-classical Richardson cascade of energy-containing eddies size limited by channel width, associated with a Kolmogorov energy spectrum. It is assumed eddies produced on a scale of the grid mesh grow through the classical fluids mechanism.[3] We can now test a semi-quantitative theory with different mesh grids or channel sizes, relating to the possible existence of inverse turbulent cascades. Our 2nd sound system is conventional, but with a novel phase and amplitude feedback loop making stringent constant temperature unnecessary. Both t - 3 / 2 and non-t - 3 / 2 decays have been observed with 2 mesh sizes. US NSF DMR#0602778 and #1007937 and EPSRC EP/H04762X/1.

  20. Energy transfer and constrained simulations in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jimenez, Javier

    1993-01-01

    The defining characteristic of turbulent flows is their ability to dissipate energy, even in the limit of zero viscosity. The Euler equations, if constrained in such a way that the velocity derivatives remain bounded, conserve energy. But when they arise as the limit of the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations, when the Reynolds number goes to infinity, there is persuasive empirical evidence that the gradients become singular as just the right function of Re for the dissipation to remain non-zero and to approach a well defined limit. It is generally believed that this limiting value of the dissipation is a property of the Euler equations themselves, independent of the particular dissipative mechanism involved, and that it can be normalized with the large scale properties of the turbulent flow (e.g. the kinetic energy per unit volume u'(exp 2)/2, and the integral scale L) without reference to the Reynolds number or to other dissipative quantities. This is usually taken to imply that the low wave number end of the energy spectrum, far from the dissipative range, is also independent of the particular mechanism chosen to dispose of the energy transfer. In the following sections, we present some numerical experiments on the effect of substituting different dissipation models into the truncated Euler equations. We will see that the effect is mainly felt in the 'near dissipation' range of the energy spectrum, but that this range can be quite wide in some cases, contaminating a substantial range of wave numbers. In the process, we will develop a 'practical' approximation to the subgrid energy transfer in isotropic turbulence, and we will gain insight into the structure of the nonlinear interactions among turbulent scales of comparable size, and into the nature of energy backscatter. Some considerations on future research directions are offered at the end.

  1. The modified cumulant expansion for two-dimensional isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsumi, T.; Yanase, S.

    1981-09-01

    The two-dimensional isotropic turbulence in an incompressible fluid is investigated using the modified zero fourth-order cumulant approximation. The dynamical equation for the energy spectrum obtained under this approximation is solved numerically and the similarity laws governing the solution in the energy-containing and enstrophy-dissipation ranges are derived analytically. At large Reynolds numbers the numerical solutions yield the k to the -3rd power inertial subrange spectrum which was predicted by Kraichnan (1967), Leith (1968) and Batchelor (1969), assuming a finite enstrophy dissipation in the inviscid limit. The energy-containing range is found to satisfy an inviscid similarity while the enstrophy-dissipation range is governed by the quasi-equilibrium similarity with respect to the enstrophy dissipation as proposed by Batchelor (1969). There exists a critical time which separates the initial period and the similarity period in which the enstrophy dissipation vanishes and remains non-zero respectively in the inviscid limit.

  2. Nematic - isotropic phase transition in turbulent thermal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlers, Guenter; Weiss, Stephan

    2013-11-01

    The nematic-isotropic transition of a liquid crystal (LC) at a temperature TNI is an example of a soft phase transition, where fluid properties, although discontinuous, change only very little and where the latent heat is small. Understanding thermal convection in the presence of such a phase change is relevant to convection in Earth's mantle where discontinuous changes of the crystalline structure occur. We report on turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection of a nematic LC while it undergoes a transition from the nematic to the isotropic phase in a cylindrical convection cell with aspect ratio Γ (height over diameter) of 0.50. The difference between the top- and the bottom-plate temperature ΔT =Tb -Tt was held constant, while the average temperature Tm = (Tb +Tt) / 2 was varied. There was a significant increase of heat transport when TNI was between Tb and Tt. Measurements of the temperatures along the side wall as a function of Tm showed several ranges with qualitatively different behavior of quantities such as the time-averaged side-wall temperature, temperature gradient, or temperature fluctuations. We interpret these different ranges in terms of processes in the thermal boundary layers close to the top and bottom plates. SW acknowledges support by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft. This work was supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation through Grant No. DMR11-58514.

  3. Scale Properties of Anisotropic and Isotropic Turbulence in the Urban Surface Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao; Yuan, Renmin; Mei, Jie; Sun, Jianning; Liu, Qi; Wang, Yu

    2017-06-01

    The scale properties of anisotropic and isotropic turbulence in the urban surface layer are investigated. A dimensionless anisotropic tensor is introduced and the turbulent tensor anisotropic coefficient, defined as C, where C = 3d3 + 1 (d3 is the minimum eigenvalue of the tensor) is used to characterize the turbulence anisotropy or isotropy. Turbulence is isotropic when C ≈ 1 , and anisotropic when C ≪ 1 . Three-dimensional velocity data collected using a sonic anemometer are analyzed to obtain the anisotropic characteristics of atmospheric turbulence in the urban surface layer, and the tensor anisotropic coefficient of turbulent eddies at different spatial scales calculated. The analysis shows that C is strongly dependent on atmospheric stability ξ = (z-zd)/L_{MO} , where z is the measurement height, zd is the displacement height, and L_{MO} is the Obukhov length. The turbulence at a specific scale in unstable conditions (i.e., ξ < 0 ) is closer to isotropic than that at the same scale under stable conditions. The maximum isotropic scale of turbulence is determined based on the characteristics of the power spectrum in three directions. Turbulence does not behave isotropically when the eddy scale is greater than the maximum isotropic scale, whereas it is horizontally isotropic at relatively large scales. The maximum isotropic scale of turbulence is compared to the outer scale of temperature, which is obtained by fitting the temperature fluctuation spectrum using the von Karman turbulent model. The results show that the outer scale of temperature is greater than the maximum isotropic scale of turbulence.

  4. Preferential Rotation of Chiral Dipoles in Isotropic Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Kramel, Stefan; Voth, Greg A; Tympel, Saskia; Toschi, Federico

    2016-10-07

    We introduce a new particle shape which shows preferential rotation in three dimensional homogeneous isotropic turbulence. We call these particles chiral dipoles because they consist of a rod with two helices of opposite handedness, one at each end. 3D printing is used to fabricate these particles with a length in the inertial range and their rotations are tracked in a turbulent flow between oscillating grids. High aspect ratio chiral dipoles preferentially align with their long axis along the extensional eigenvectors of the strain rate tensor, and the helical ends respond to the extensional strain rate with a mean spinning rate that is nonzero. We use Stokesian dynamics simulations of chiral dipoles in pure strain flow to quantify the dependence of spinning on particle shape. Based on the known response to pure strain, we build a model that gives the spinning rate of small chiral dipoles using velocity gradients along Lagrangian trajectories from high resolution direct numerical simulations. The statistics of chiral dipole spinning determined with this model show surprisingly good agreement with the measured spinning of much larger chiral dipoles in the experiments.

  5. Clustering of vertically constrained passive particles in homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pietro, Massimo; van Hinsberg, Michel A. T.; Biferale, Luca; Clercx, Herman J. H.; Perlekar, Prasad; Toschi, Federico

    2015-05-01

    We analyze the dynamics of small particles vertically confined, by means of a linear restoring force, to move within a horizontal fluid slab in a three-dimensional (3D) homogeneous isotropic turbulent velocity field. The model that we introduce and study is possibly the simplest description for the dynamics of small aquatic organisms that, due to swimming, active regulation of their buoyancy, or any other mechanism, maintain themselves in a shallow horizontal layer below the free surface of oceans or lakes. By varying the strength of the restoring force, we are able to control the thickness of the fluid slab in which the particles can move. This allows us to analyze the statistical features of the system over a wide range of conditions going from a fully 3D incompressible flow (corresponding to the case of no confinement) to the extremely confined case corresponding to a two-dimensional slice. The background 3D turbulent velocity field is evolved by means of fully resolved direct numerical simulations. Whenever some level of vertical confinement is present, the particle trajectories deviate from that of fluid tracers and the particles experience an effectively compressible velocity field. Here, we have quantified the compressibility, the preferential concentration of the particles, and the correlation dimension by changing the strength of the restoring force. The main result is that there exists a particular value of the force constant, corresponding to a mean slab depth approximately equal to a few times the Kolmogorov length scale η , that maximizes the clustering of the particles.

  6. Preferential concentration of heavy particles in compressible isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qingqing; Liu, Han; Ma, Zongqiang; Xiao, Zuoli

    2016-05-01

    Numerical simulations of particle-laden compressible isotropic turbulence with Taylor Reynolds number Reλ ˜ 100 are conducted by using a high-order turbulence solver, which is based on high-order compact finite difference method in the whole flow domain and localized artificial diffusivities for discontinuities. For simplicity, only one-way coupling (i.e., the influence of fluid on particles) between the carrier flow and particles is considered. The focus is on the study of the preferential concentration of heavy particles in dissipative scale of turbulence and the underlying mechanisms. Firstly, the effect of Stokes number (St) on the particle distribution in flow of Mach 1.01 (referred to as high-Mach-number case in this study) is investigated as a necessary supplementation for the previous studies in incompressible and weakly compressible flows. It turns out that heavy particles with Stokes number close to unity exhibit the strongest preferential concentration, which is in agreement with the observation in incompressible flow. All types of heavy particles have a tendency to accumulate in high-density regions of the background flow. While all kinds of particles dominantly collect in low-vorticity regions, intermediate and large particles (St = 1 and St = 5) are also found to collect in high-vorticity regions behind the randomly formed shocklets. Secondly, the impact of turbulent Mach number (Mt) (or the compressibility) of the carrier flow on the spatial distribution of the particles with St = 1 is discussed using the simulated compressible flows with Mt being 0.22, 0.68, and 1.01, respectively. In low-Mach-number flow, particles tend to concentrate in regions of low vorticity due to the centrifuge effect of vortices and particle concentration decreases monotonically with the increasing vorticity magnitude. As Mach number increases, the degree of particle clustering is slightly weakened in low-vorticity regions but is enhanced in high-vorticity regions, which

  7. ISOTROPICALLY DRIVEN VERSUS OUTFLOW DRIVEN TURBULENCE: OBSERVATIONAL CONSEQUENCES FOR MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Jonathan J.; Frank, Adam; Blackman, Eric G.

    2010-10-10

    Feedback from protostellar outflows can influence the nature of turbulence in star-forming regions even if they are not the primary source of velocity dispersion for all scales of molecular clouds. For the rate and power expected in star-forming regions, we previously (Carroll et al.) demonstrated that outflows could drive supersonic turbulence at levels consistent with the scaling relations from Matzner although with a steeper velocity power spectrum than expected for an isotropically driven supersonic turbulent cascade. Here, we perform higher resolution simulations and combine simulations of outflow driven turbulence with those of isotropically forced turbulence. We find that the presence of outflows within an ambient isotropically driven turbulent environment produces a knee in the velocity power spectrum at the outflow scale and a steeper slope at sub-outflow scales than for a purely isotropically forced case. We also find that the presence of outflows flattens the density spectrum at large scales effectively reducing the formation of large-scale turbulent density structures. These effects are qualitatively independent of resolution. We have also carried out Principal Component Analysis (PCA) for synthetic data from our simulations. We find that PCA as a tool for identifying the driving scale of turbulence has a misleading bias toward low amplitude large-scale velocity structures even when they are not necessarily the dominant energy containing scales. This bias is absent for isotropically forced turbulence but manifests strongly for collimated outflow driven turbulence.

  8. Isotropically Driven Versus Outflow Driven Turbulence: Observational Consequences for Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Jonathan J.; Frank, Adam; Blackman, Eric G.

    2010-10-01

    Feedback from protostellar outflows can influence the nature of turbulence in star-forming regions even if they are not the primary source of velocity dispersion for all scales of molecular clouds. For the rate and power expected in star-forming regions, we previously (Carroll et al.) demonstrated that outflows could drive supersonic turbulence at levels consistent with the scaling relations from Matzner although with a steeper velocity power spectrum than expected for an isotropically driven supersonic turbulent cascade. Here, we perform higher resolution simulations and combine simulations of outflow driven turbulence with those of isotropically forced turbulence. We find that the presence of outflows within an ambient isotropically driven turbulent environment produces a knee in the velocity power spectrum at the outflow scale and a steeper slope at sub-outflow scales than for a purely isotropically forced case. We also find that the presence of outflows flattens the density spectrum at large scales effectively reducing the formation of large-scale turbulent density structures. These effects are qualitatively independent of resolution. We have also carried out Principal Component Analysis (PCA) for synthetic data from our simulations. We find that PCA as a tool for identifying the driving scale of turbulence has a misleading bias toward low amplitude large-scale velocity structures even when they are not necessarily the dominant energy containing scales. This bias is absent for isotropically forced turbulence but manifests strongly for collimated outflow driven turbulence.

  9. Joint Statistics of Finite Time Lyapunov Exponents in Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Perry; Meneveau, Charles

    2014-11-01

    Recently, the notion of Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS) has gained attention as a tool for qualitative visualization of flow features. LCS visualize repelling and attracting manifolds marked by local ridges in the field of maximal and minimal finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLE), respectively. To provide a quantitative characterization of FTLEs, the statistical theory of large deviations can be used based on the so-called Cramér function. To obtain the Cramér function from data, we use both the method based on measuring moments and measuring histograms (with finite-size correction). We generalize the formalism to characterize the joint distributions of the two independent FTLEs in 3D. The ``joint Cramér function of turbulence'' is measured from the Johns Hopkins Turbulence Databases (JHTDB) isotropic simulation at Reλ = 433 and results are compared with those computed using only the symmetric part of the velocity gradient tensor, as well as with those of instantaneous strain-rate eigenvalues. We also extend the large-deviation theory to study the statistics of the ratio of FTLEs. When using only the strain contribution of the velocity gradient, the maximal FTLE nearly doubles in magnitude and the most likely ratio of FTLEs changes from 4:1:-5 to 8:3:-11, highlighting the role of rotation in de-correlating the fluid deformations along particle paths. Supported by NSF Graduate Fellowship (DGE-1232825), a JHU graduate Fellowship, and NSF Grant CMMI-0941530. CM thanks Prof. Luca Biferale for useful discussions on the subject.

  10. Energy transfer and dissipation in forced isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkmann, Moritz; McComb, W. David; Berera, Arjun; Yoffe, Samuel

    2014-11-01

    A model for the Reynolds number dependence of the dimensionless dissipation rate Cɛ is derived from the dimensionless Kármán-Howarth equation, resulting in Cɛ =Cɛ , ∞ + C /RL , where RL is the integral scale Reynolds number. The coefficients C and Cɛ , ∞ arise from asymptotic expansions of the dimensionless second- and third-order structure functions. The model equation is fitted to data from direct numerical simulations (DNS) of forced isotropic turbulence for integral scale Reynolds numbers up to RL = 5875 (Rλ = 435), which results in an asymptote for Cɛ in the infinite Reynolds number limit Cɛ , ∞ = 0 . 47 +/- 0 . 01 . Since the coefficients in the model equation are scale-dependent while the dimensionless dissipation rate is not, we modelled the scale dependences of the coefficients by an ad hoc profile function such that they cancel out, leaving the model equation scale-independent, as it must be. The profile function was compared to DNS data to very good agreement, provided we restrict the comparison to scales small enough to be well resolved in our simulations. This work has made use of the resources provided by the UK supercomputing service HECToR, made available through the Edinburgh Compute and Data Facility (ECDF). A.B. is supported by STFC, S.R.Y. and M.F.L. are funded by EPSRC.

  11. Pressure and higher-order spectra for homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pullin, D. I.; Rogallo, R. S.

    1994-01-01

    The spectra of the pressure, and other higher-order quantities including the dissipation, the enstrophy, and the square of the longitudinal velocity derivative are computed using data obtained from direct numerical simulation of homogeneous isotropic turbulence at Taylor-Reynolds numbers R(sub lambda) in the range 38 - 170. For the pressure spectra we find reasonable collapse in the dissipation range (of the velocity spectrum) when scaled in Kolmogorov variables and some evidence, which is not conclusive, for the existence of a k(exp -7/3) inertial range where k = absolute value of K, is the modulus of the wavenumber. The power spectra of the dissipation, the enstrophy, and the square of the longitudinal velocity derivative separate in the dissipation range, but appear to converge together in the short inertial range of the simulations. A least-squares curve-fit in the dissipation range for one value of R(sub lambda) = 96 gives a form for the spectrum of the dissipation as k(exp 0)exp(-Ck eta), for k(eta) greater than 0.2, where eta is the Kolmogorov length and C is approximately equal to 2.5.

  12. Interacting scales and energy transfer in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, YE

    1993-01-01

    The dependence of the energy transfer process on the disparity of the interacting scales is investigated in the inertial and far-dissipation ranges of isotropic turbulence. The strategy for generating the simulated flow fields and the choice of a disparity parameter to characterize the scaling of the interactions is discussed. The inertial range is found to be dominated by relatively local interactions, in agreement with the Kolmogorov assumption. The far-dissipation is found to be dominated by relatively non-local interactions, supporting the classical notion that the far-dissipation range is slaved to the Kolmogorov scales. The measured energy transfer is compared with the classical models of Heisenberg, Obukhov, and the more detailed analysis of Tennekes and Lumley. The energy transfer statistics measured in the numerically simulated flows are found to be nearly self-similar for wave numbers in the inertial range. Using the self-similar form measured within the limited scale range of the simulation, an 'ideal' energy transfer function and the corresponding energy flux rate for an inertial range of infinite extent are constructed. From this flux rate, the Kolmogorov constant is calculated to be 1.5, in excellent agreement with experiments.

  13. The structure of intense vorticity in homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jimenez, J.; Wray, A. A.; Saffman, P. G.; Rogallo, R. S.

    1992-01-01

    The structure of the intense vorticity regions is studied in numerically simulated homogeneous, isotropic, equilibrium turbulent flow fields at four different Reynolds numbers in the range Re(sub lambda) = 36-171. In accordance with previous investigators, this vorticity is found to be organized in coherent, cylindrical or ribbon-like, vortices ('worms'). A statistical study suggests that they are just especially intense features of the background, O(omega'), vorticity. Their radii scale with the Kolmogorov microscale and their lengths with the integral scale of the flow. An interesting observation is that the Reynolds number based on the circulation of the intense vortices, gamma/nu, increases monotonically with Re(sub lambda), raising the question of the stability of the structures in the limit of Re(sub lambda) approaching infinity. One and two-dimensional statistics of vorticity and strain are presented; they are non-gaussian, and the behavior of their tails depends strongly on the Reynolds number. There is no evidence of convergence to a limiting distribution in our range of Re(sub lambda), even though the energy spectra and the energy dissipation rate show good asymptotic properties in the higher Reynolds number cases. Evidence is presented to show that worms are natural features of the flow and that they do not depend on the particular forcing scheme.

  14. Direct numerical simulation of two-particle relative diffusion in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeung, P. K.

    1994-10-01

    The relative diffusion of fluid particle pairs in statistically stationary isotropic turbulence is studied by direct numerical simulation, at a Taylor-scale Reynolds number of about 90. The growth of two-particle separation exhibits asymptotic stages at small and large diffusion times. Through the two-particle separation, particle-pair velocity correlations are closely related to the Eulerian spatial structure of the turbulence. At large times, the square of the separation distance has a chi-square probability distribution. At the moderate Reynolds number of the simulations, for this asymptotic distribution to be reached before the particles begin to move independently of each other, the initial separation must be small compared to the Kolmogorov scale. In an inertial frame moving with the initial particle velocities, the velocity increments of two fluid particles become uncorrelated only if their initial velocities are uncorrelated, which requires their initial separation be large compared to the integral length scale. For sufficiently large initial separations, the relative velocity increments and mean-square dispersion in this moving frame display a resemblance to inertial range scaling, but with a proportionality constant that is much smaller than classical estimates. At large times, the degree of preferential alignment between the separation and relative velocity vectors is weak, but the product of the separation distance and the velocity component projected along the separation vector is sustained on average.

  15. Modeling inertial particle acceleration statistics in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayyalasomayajula, S.; Warhaft, Z.; Collins, L. R.

    2008-09-01

    Our objective is to explain recent Lagrangian acceleration measurements of inertial particles in decaying, nearly isotropic turbulence [Ayyalasomayajula et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 144507 (2006)]. These experiments showed that as particle inertial effects increased, the variance in the particle acceleration fluctuations was reduced, and the tails of the normalized particle acceleration probability density function (PDF) became systematically attenuated. We model this phenomenon using a base flow that consists of a two-dimensional array of evenly spaced vortices with signs and intensities that vary randomly in time. We simulate a large sample of inertial particles moving through the fluid without disturbing the flow (one-way coupling). Consistent with Bec et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 550, 349 (2006)], we find that our model exhibits preferential concentration or clustering of particles in regions located away from the vortex centers. That is, inertial particles selectively sample the flow field, oversampling regions with high strains and undersampling regions with high vorticities. At low Stokes numbers, this biased "sampling" of the flow is responsible for the reduction in the acceleration variance and partially explains the attenuation of the tails of the acceleration PDF. However, contrary to previous findings, we show that the tails of the PDF are also diminished by "filtering" induced by the attenuated response of the inertial particles to temporal variations in the fluid acceleration: Inertial particles do not respond to fluctuations with frequencies much higher than the inverse of the particle stopping time. We show that larger fluid acceleration events have higher frequencies and hence experience greater filtering by particle inertia. We contrast the vortex model with previous Lagrangian acceleration models by Sawford [Phys. Fluids A 3, 1577 (1991)] and Reynolds [Phys. Fluids 15, L1 (2003)] and show that although these models capture some aspects of the inertial

  16. Direct numerical simulation study of statistically stationary propagation of a reaction wave in homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Rixin; Lipatnikov, Andrei N.

    2017-06-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) direct numerical simulation (DNS) study of the propagation of a reaction wave in forced, constant-density, statistically stationary, homogeneous, isotropic turbulence is performed by solving Navier-Stokes and reaction-diffusion equations at various (from 0.5 to 10) ratios of the rms turbulent velocity U' to the laminar wave speed, various (from 2.1 to 12.5) ratios of an integral length scale of the turbulence to the laminar wave thickness, and two Zeldovich numbers Ze=6.0 and 17.1. Accordingly, the Damköhler and Karlovitz numbers are varied from 0.2 to 25.1 and from 0.4 to 36.2, respectively. Contrary to an earlier DNS study of self-propagation of an infinitely thin front in statistically the same turbulence, the bending of dependencies of the mean wave speed on U' is simulated in the case of a nonzero thickness of the local reaction wave. The bending effect is argued to be controlled by inefficiency of the smallest scale turbulent eddies in wrinkling the reaction-zone surface, because such small-scale wrinkles are rapidly smoothed out by molecular transport within the local reaction wave.

  17. A Stochastic Model for the Relative Motion of High Stokes Number Particles in Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhariwal, Rohit; Rani, Sarma; Koch, Donald

    2014-11-01

    In the current study, a novel analytical closure for the diffusion current in the PDF equation is presented that is applicable to high-inertia particle pairs with Stokes numbers Str >> 1 . Here Str is a Stokes number based on the time-scale τr of eddies whose size scales with pair separation r. Using this closure, Langevin equations were solved to evolve particle-pair relative velocities and separations in stationary isotropic turbulence. The Langevin equation approach enables the simulation of the full PDF of pair relative motion, instead of only the first few moments of the PDF as is the case in a moments-based approach. Accordingly, PDFs Ω (U | r) and Ω (Ur | r) are computed for various separations r, where the former is the PDF of relative velocity U and the latter is the PDF of the radial component of relative velocity Ur, both conditioned upon the separation r. Consistent with the DNS study of Sundaram & Collins, the Langevin simulations capture the transition of Ω (U | r) from being Gaussian at integral-scale separations to an exponential PDF at Kolmogorov-scale separations. The radial distribution functions (RDFs) computed from these simulations also show reasonable quantitative agreement with those from the DNS of Fevrier et al.

  18. Lagrangian statistics of turbulent dispersion from 81923 direct numerical simulation of isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buaria, Dhawal; Yeung, P. K.; Sawford, B. L.

    2016-11-01

    An efficient massively parallel algorithm has allowed us to obtain the trajectories of 300 million fluid particles in an 81923 simulation of isotropic turbulence at Taylor-scale Reynolds number 1300. Conditional single-particle statistics are used to investigate the effect of extreme events in dissipation and enstrophy on turbulent dispersion. The statistics of pairs and tetrads, both forward and backward in time, are obtained via post-processing of single-particle trajectories. For tetrads, since memory of shape is known to be short, we focus, for convenience, on samples which are initially regular, with all sides of comparable length. The statistics of tetrad size show similar behavior as the two-particle relative dispersion, i.e., stronger backward dispersion at intermediate times with larger backward Richardson constant. In contrast, the statistics of tetrad shape show more robust inertial range scaling, in both forward and backward frames. However, the distortion of shape is stronger for backward dispersion. Our results suggest that the Reynolds number reached in this work is sufficient to settle some long-standing questions concerning Lagrangian scale similarity. Supported by NSF Grants CBET-1235906 and ACI-1036170.

  19. Constant-energetics physical-space forcing methods for improved convergence to homogeneous-isotropic turbulence with application to particle-laden flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassenne, Maxime; Urzay, Javier; Park, George I.; Moin, Parviz

    2016-03-01

    This study investigates control-based forcing methods for incompressible homogeneous-isotropic turbulence forced linearly in physical space which result in constant turbulent kinetic energy, constant turbulent dissipation (also constant enstrophy), or a combination of the two based on a least-squares error minimization. The methods consist of proportional controllers embedded in the forcing coefficients. During the transient, the controllers adjust the forcing coefficients such that the controlled quantity achieves very early a minimal relative error with respect to its target stationary value. Comparisons of these forcing methods are made with the non-controlled approaches of Rosales and Meneveau ["Linear forcing in numerical simulations of isotropic turbulence: Physical space implementations and convergence properties," Phys. Fluids 17, 095106 (2005)] and Carroll and Blanquart ["A proposed modification to Lundgren's physical space velocity forcing method for isotropic turbulence," Phys. Fluids 25, 105114 (2013)], using direct numerical simulations (DNS) and large-eddy simulations (LES). The results indicate that the proposed constant-energetics forcing methods shorten the transient period from a user-defined artificial flow field to Navier-Stokes turbulence while maintaining steadier statistics. Additionally, the proposed method of constant kinetic-energy forcing behaves more robustly in coarse LES when initial conditions are employed that favor the occurrence of subgrid-scale backscatter, whereas the other approaches fail to provide physical turbulent flow fields. For illustration, the proposed forcing methods are applied to dilute particle-laden homogeneous-isotropic turbulent flows; the results serve to highlight the influences of the forcing strategies on the disperse-phase statistics.

  20. Transport equation for plasmas in a stationary-homogeneous turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shaojie

    2016-02-15

    For a plasma in a stationary homogeneous turbulence, the Fokker-Planck equation is derived from the nonlinear Vlasov equation by introducing the entropy principle. The ensemble average in evaluating the kinetic diffusion tensor, whose symmetry has been proved, can be computed in a straightforward way when the fluctuating particle trajectories are provided. As an application, it has been shown that a mean parallel electric filed can drive a particle flux through the Stokes-Einstein relation, independent of the details of the fluctuations.

  1. Chaos and Predictability of Homogeneous-Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boffetta, G.; Musacchio, S.

    2017-08-01

    We study the chaoticity and the predictability of a turbulent flow on the basis of high-resolution direct numerical simulations at different Reynolds numbers. We find that the Lyapunov exponent of turbulence, which measures the exponential separation of two initially close solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations, grows with the Reynolds number of the flow, with an anomalous scaling exponent, larger than the one obtained on dimensional grounds. For large perturbations, the error is transferred to larger, slower scales, where it grows algebraically generating an "inverse cascade" of perturbations in the inertial range. In this regime, our simulations confirm the classical predictions based on closure models of turbulence. We show how to link chaoticity and predictability of a turbulent flow in terms of a finite size extension of the Lyapunov exponent.

  2. Effect of rotation on isotropic turbulence - Computation and modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardina, J.; Ferziger, J. H.; Rogallo, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    This paper uses numerical simulation to analyse the effects of uniform rotation on homogeneous turbulence. Both large-eddy and full simulations were made. The results indicate that the predominant effect of rotation is to decrease the rate of dissipation of the turbulence and increase the lengthscales, especially those along the axis of rotation. These effects are a consequence of the reduction, due to the generation of inertial waves, of the net energy transfer from large eddies to small ones. Experiments are also influenced by a more complicated interaction between the rotation and the wakes of the turbulence-generating grid which modifies the nominal initial conditions in the experiment. The latter effect is accounted for in simulations by modifying the initial conditions. Finally, a two-equation model is proposed that accounts for the effects of rotation and is able to reproduce the experimental decay of the turbulent kinetic energy.

  3. On the effects of isotropic turbulence on the evaporation rate of a liquid droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, Michael; Ferrante, Antonino

    2016-11-01

    Our objective is to explain the effects of isotropic turbulence on the vaporization rate of a liquid droplet in conditions that are relevant to spray combustion applications. To this end, we have performed direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a single droplet in homogeneous isotropic turbulence using the volume-of-fluid method for resolving fully the process of momentum, heat, and mass transfer between the liquid droplet and the gas. The simulations were performed using 10243 grid points. The effect of turbulence on the droplet vaporization rate is investigated by varying the gas-phase Reynolds number based on the Taylor microscale, Reλ. Reλ is increased from 0 to 75 by increasing the r.m.s. velocity of the gas phase while keeping all other physical properties constant. We will present the droplet evaporation rate as a function of turbulence Reynolds number and investigate the physical mechanisms.

  4. Analysis of the decay of temperature fluctuations in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, P. A.

    1982-01-01

    The Lagrangian dispersion theory of Durbin (1980) is used to analyze experiments by Warhaft and Lumley (1978) and by Sreenivasan et al. (1980) on temperature fluctuations in grid-generated turbulence. Both theory and experiment show that the decay exponent m depends on the ratio of the initial length scales of velocity and temperature, although when this ratio is greater than 2.5 such dependence is negligible. The theory shows that m is not truly constant, but within the range covered by the experiments it is nearly so. The agreement between theory and experiment lends credence to the idea that the decay of fluctuations is controlled largely by turbulent relative dispersion.

  5. Direct numerical simulation of isotropic turbulence interacting with a weak shock wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sangsan; Lele, Sanjiva K.; Moin, Parviz

    1993-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations are used to investigate the interaction of isotropic quasi-incompressible turbulence with a weak shock wave. A linear analysis of the interaction is conducted for comparison with the simulations. Both the simulations and the analysis show that turbulence is enhanced during the interaction. Turbulent kinetic energy and transverse vorticity components are amplified, and turbulent lengthscales are decreased. It is suggested that the amplification mechanism is primarily linear. Simulations also showed a rapid evolution of turbulent kinetic energy just downstream of the shock, a behavior not reproduced by the linear analysis. Analysis of the budget of the turbulent kinetic energy transport equation shows that this behavior can be attributed to the pressure transport term. Multiple compression peaks were found along the mean streamlines at locations where the local shock thickness had increased significantly.

  6. Transmission of acoustic waves through mixing layers and 2D isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juve, D.; Blanc-Benon, P.; Comte-Bellot, G.

    Ray tracing and parabolic equation methods have been used to study the properties of acoustic waves transmitted through turbulent velocity fields. A numerical simulation permits individual realizations of the turbulent field, which then allow, if desired, an ensemble averaging of the fields. Two flows have been considered, 2D isotropic turbulence and a 2D mixing layer. The following complementary aspects are developed: the occurrence of caustics, the reinforced or weakened zones of the acoustic field, the eigenrays between a source and a receiver, and the associated travel times, variances, and scintillation index.

  7. Depression of Nonlinearity in Decaying Isotropic MHD Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Servidio, S.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Dmitruk, P.

    2008-03-07

    Spectral method simulations show that undriven magnetohydrodynamic turbulence spontaneously generates coherent spatial correlations of several types, associated with local Beltrami fields, directional alignment of velocity and magnetic fields, and antialignment of magnetic and fluid acceleration components. These correlations suppress nonlinearity to levels lower than what is obtained from Gaussian fields, and occur in spatial patches. We suggest that this rapid relaxation leads to non-Gaussian statistics and spatial intermittency.

  8. Mixing of a passive scalar in isotropic and sheared homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirani, E.; Ferziger, J. H.; Reynolds, W. C.

    1981-01-01

    In order to calculate the velocity and scalar fields, the three dimensional, time-dependent equations of motion and the diffusion equation were solved numerically. The following cases were treated: isotropic, homogeneous turbulence with decay of a passive scalar; and homogeneous turbulent shear flow with a passive scalar whose mean varies linearly in the spanwise direction. The solutions were obtained at relatively low Reynolds numbers so that all of the turbulent scales could be resolved without modeling. Turbulent statistics such as integral length scales, Taylor microscales, Kolmogorov length scale, one- and two-point correlations of velocity-velocity and velocity-scalar, turbulent Prandtl/Schmidt number, r.m.s. values of velocities, the scalar quantity and pressure, skewness, decay rates, and decay exponents were calculated. The results are compared with the available expermental results, and good agreement is obtained.

  9. Dynamics of dissolved polymer chains in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shi; Collins, Lance R.

    2007-10-01

    Polymers are remarkable molecules that have relaxation times that can span 15 orders of magnitude. The very longest of the relaxation times for high molecular weight polymers are sufficiently long to overlap with fluid mechanical times scales; under those circumstances, polymers can influence the flow. A well-known example that is still not fully understood is polymer drag reduction. It has been known since Toms (1949 Proc. 1st Int. Congress on Rheology 2 135-41) that parts per million (mass basis) concentrations of polymers can reduce the drag on a solid surface by as much as 80%. Understanding the mechanism of drag reduction requires an understanding of the dynamics of the dissolved polymer chain in response to local fluctuations in the turbulent flow field. We investigate this by using Brownian dynamics simulations of bead-spring models of polymers immersed in a turbulent solvent that is separately computed using direct numerical simulations. We observe that polymer chains with parameters that are effective for drag reduction generally remain stretched for long periods of time and only occasionally relax. The relatively restricted configuration space they sample makes it reasonable to represent their behavior with simpler dumbbell models. We also study the spatial structure of the polymer stresses using a Lagrangian strategy. The results explain the need for relatively high spatial resolution for numerical simulations of polymer flows.

  10. The radiated noise from isotropic turbulence and heated jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilley, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    Our understanding of aerodynamic noise has its foundations in the work of Sir James Lighthill (1952), which was the first major advance in acoustics since the pioneering work of Lord Rayleigh in the last century. The combination of Lighthill's theory of aerodynamic noise as applied to turbulent flows and the experimental growing database from the early 1950's was quickly exploited by various jet propulsion engine designers in reducing the noise of jet engines at takeoff and landing to levels marginally acceptable to communities living in the neighborhoods of airports. The success in this noise containment led to the rapid growth of fast economical subsonic civil transport aircraft worldwide throughout the 1960's and has continued to the present day. One important factor in this success story has been the improvements in the engine cycle that have led to both reductions in specific fuel consumption and noise. The second is the introduction of Noise Certification, which specifies the maximum noise levels at takeoff and landing that all aircraft must meet before they can be entered on the Civil Aircraft Register. The growing interest in the development of a new supersonic civil transport to replace 'Concorde' in the early years of the next century has led to a resurgence of interest in the more challenging problem of predicting the noise of hot supersonic jets and developing means of aircraft noise reduction at takeoff and landing to meet the standards now accepted for subsonic Noise Certification. The prediction of aircraft noise to the accuracy required to meet Noise Certification requirements has necessitated reliance upon experimental measurements and empirically derived laws based on the available experimental data bases. These laws have their foundation in the results from Lighthill's theory, but in the case of jet noise, where the noise is generated in the turbulent mixing region with the external ambient fluid, the complexity of the turbulent motion has

  11. Numerical Investigation of a Statistically Stationary Turbulent Reacting Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overholt, Matthew R.; Pope, Stephen B.

    1997-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) has been very useful in the study of inert scalar mixing in turbulent flows, and has recently become feasible for studies of reacting scalars. We have formulated an accessible inhomogeneous nonpremixed turbulent reactive flow for investigating the effects of mixing on reaction and testing mixing models. The mixture fraction-progress variable approach is used with a model single-step reversible finite-rate thermochemistry, yielding non-trivial stationary solutions corresponding to stable reaction and allowing local extinction to occur. A mean gradient in the mixture fraction gives rise to stationarity without forcing, as well as a flame brush. A range of reaction zone thicknesses and Damkohler numbers are examined, yielding a broad spectrum of behavior, ranging from thick to thin flames, and from local extinction to near equilibrium. Based on this study results from full probability density function (PDF) simulations using the IEM and EMST mixing models are evaluated. Conditional moment closure (CMC) results are evaluated as well.

  12. Alignment of velocity and vorticity and the intermittent distribution of helicity in isotropic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yeontaek; Kim, Byung-Gu; Lee, Changhoon

    2009-07-01

    We provide an observation suggesting a strong correlation between helicity and enstrophy in fluid turbulence. Helicity statistics were obtained in a direct numerical simulation of forced isotropic turbulence. An investigation of coherent structures revealed that intermittently large local helicity was found in the core region of the coherent rotational structures, thus showing a strong correlation with local enstrophy, not dissipation. Statistics regarding the relative helicity and the correlation between velocity and vorticity conditioned on different levels of enstrophy clearly suggest that velocity and vorticity tend to be aligned in the core of the coherent structures.

  13. Attenuation of Gas Turbulence by a Nearly Stationary Dispersion of Fine Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, A. D.; Eaton, J. K.; Hwang, W.

    1999-01-01

    particles fall through the measurement volume. Measurements will be acquired using a high resolution image velocimetry (PIV) system being developed specifically for work in particle-laden flows. The measurements will include the decay of the turbulence kinetic energy under various particle loadings. The spatial spectra of the turbulence will also be measured. In a second set of experiments, the interaction of a single eddy with a collection of nearly stationary particles will be examined. The eddy will be a vortex ring emitted by a jet pulse through an orifice. The distortion of the vortex under the influence of the particles will be examined to gain a better understanding of how fine particles can cause such large reductions in turbulence levels. This experiment could not be conducted in terrestrial gravity because the high particle velocities would overwhelm the relatively low speed motion of the vortex ring. This experimental program is just getting underway. The initial challenge is to build a closed facility containing reasonably homogeneous and isotropic turbulence with zero mean velocity. Our approach is to use a set of synthetic jets mounted on the periphery of a transparent plexiglass box to create the turbulence. A synthetic jet is a plenum chamber with an orifice open to the volume of interest. The volume of the chamber fluctuates periodically so alternately a jet is ejected from the volume or flow is drawn back in as a sink. The asymmetry of this situation results in a net transport of momentum and kinetic energy into the volume of interest. The present apparatus includes eight synthetic jets each powered independently by a six inch loudspeaker. The synthetic jets discharge through ejector tubes to increase the scale of the turbulence. Construction of the apparatus is now complete and preliminary flow visualization studies have been conducted. The PIV system is also under development. A compact dual-pulse YAG laser has been acquired as the light source and

  14. The role of bulk viscosity on the decay of compressible, homogeneous, isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsen, Eric; Pan, Shaowu

    2016-11-01

    The practice of neglecting bulk viscosity in studies of compressible turbulence is widespread. While exact for monatomic gases and unlikely to strongly affect the dynamics of fluids whose bulk-to-shear viscosity ratio is small and/or of weakly compressible turbulence, this assumption is not justifiable for compressible, turbulent flows of gases whose bulk viscosity is orders of magnitude larger than their shear viscosities (e.g., CO2). To understand the mechanisms by which bulk viscosity and the associated phenomena affect compressible turbulence, we conduct DNS of freely decaying compressible, homogeneous, isotropic turbulence for ratios of bulk-to-shear viscosity ranging from 0-1000. Our simulations demonstrate that bulk viscosity increases the decay rate of turbulent kinetic energy; while enstrophy exhibits little sensitivity to bulk viscosity, dilatation is reduced by an order of magnitude within the two eddy turnover time. Via a Helmholtz decomposition of the flow, we determined that bulk viscosity damps the dilatational velocity and reduces dilatational-solenoidal exchanges, as well as pressure-dilatation coupling. In short, bulk viscosity renders compressible turbulence incompressible by reducing energy transfer between translational and internal modes.

  15. Experimental study of the structure of isotropic turbulence with intermediate range of Reynolds number. [sea-air interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, S. C.; Saad, A.

    1977-01-01

    The energetic isotropic turbulence generated by a waterfall of low head was found to be developed in part through the unstable two-phase flow of entrained air bubbles. The resulting turbulent field had a turbulent Reynolds number in excess of 20,000 and maintained a self-similar structure throughout the decay period studied. The present study may provide some insight into the structure of turbulence produced by breaking waves over the ocean.

  16. Experimental study of the structure of isotropic turbulence with intermediate range of Reynolds number. [sea-air interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, S. C.; Saad, A.

    1977-01-01

    The energetic isotropic turbulence generated by a waterfall of low head was found to be developed in part through the unstable two-phase flow of entrained air bubbles. The resulting turbulent field had a turbulent Reynolds number in excess of 20,000 and maintained a self-similar structure throughout the decay period studied. The present study may provide some insight into the structure of turbulence produced by breaking waves over the ocean.

  17. Formation of Long Tails during Breakup of Oil Droplets Mixed with Dispersants in Locally Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalan, Balaji; Katz, Joseph

    2008-11-01

    This study investigates experimentally, the effects of adding dispersants on the breakup of crude oil droplets in turbulent flows during oceanic spills. The current measurements are performed in a nearly homogeneous and isotropic turbulence facility, the central portion of which is characterized using 2-D PIV. Sample crude oil from Alaska National Slope is mixed with dispersant COREXIT 9527 and injected into the central portion of the turbulent facility. High speed, in-line digital holographic cinematography is utilized to visualize the breakup of droplets at high spatial and temporal resolution. We observe that, in some cases, after the droplet breaks up, the elongated portion of the droplet does not recoil, leaving an elongated tail, probably due to the low local surface tension. At high dispersant to oil ratios, extremely thin tails extend from the droplet, and are stretched by the flow. Breakup of these thin threads produces very small oil droplets, a desired effect during cleanup of oil spill.

  18. Fully developed isotropic turbulence: Nonperturbative renormalization group formalism and fixed-point solution.

    PubMed

    Canet, Léonie; Delamotte, Bertrand; Wschebor, Nicolás

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the regime of fully developed homogeneous and isotropic turbulence of the Navier-Stokes (NS) equation in the presence of a stochastic forcing, using the nonperturbative (functional) renormalization group (NPRG). Within a simple approximation based on symmetries, we obtain the fixed-point solution of the NPRG flow equations that corresponds to fully developed turbulence both in d=2 and 3 dimensions. Deviations to the dimensional scalings (Kolmogorov in d=3 or Kraichnan-Batchelor in d=2) are found for the two-point functions. To further analyze these deviations, we derive exact flow equations in the large wave-number limit, and show that the fixed point does not entail the usual scale invariance, thereby identifying the mechanism for the emergence of intermittency within the NPRG framework. The purpose of this work is to provide a detailed basis for NPRG studies of NS turbulence; the determination of the ensuing intermittency exponents is left for future work.

  19. Dispersion of finite size droplets and solid particles in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosso, Michele

    Turbulent disperse two-phase flows, of either fluid/fluid or fluid/solid type, are common in natural phenomena and engineering devices. Notable examples are atmospheric clouds, i.e. dispersed liquid water droplets and ice particles in a complex turbulent flow, and spray of fuel droplets in the combustion chamber of internal combustion engines. However, the physics of the interaction between a dispersed phase and turbulence is not yet fully understood. The objective of this study is to compare the dispersion of deformable finite size droplets with that of solid particles in a turbulent flow in the absence of gravity, by performing Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS). The droplets and the particles have the same diameter, of the order of the Taylor's microscale of turbulence, and the same density ratio to the carrier flow. The solid particle-laden turbulence is simulated by coupling a standard projection method with the Immersed Boundary Method (IBM). The solid particles are fully resolved in space and time without considering particle/particle collisions (two-way coupling). The liquid droplet-laden turbulence is simulated by coupling a variable-density projection method with the Accurate Conservative Level Set Method (ACLSM). The effect of the surface tension is accounted for by using the Ghost Fluid Method (GFM) in order to avoid any numerical smearing, while the discontinuities in the viscous term of the Navier-Stokes equation are smoothed out via the Continuum Surface Force approach. Droplet/droplet interactions are allowed (four-way coupling). The results presented here show that in isotropic turbulence the dispersion of liquid droplets in a given direction is larger than that of solid particles due to the reduced decay rate of turbulence kinetic energy via the four-way coupling effects of the droplets.

  20. Water Vapor Turbulence Profiles in Stationary Continental Convective Mixed Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D. D.; Wulfmeyer, Volker; Berg, Larry K.; Schween, Jan

    2014-10-08

    The U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program’s Raman lidar at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in north-central Oklahoma has collected water vapor mixing ratio (q) profile data more than 90% of the time since October 2004. Three hundred (300) cases were identified where the convective boundary layer was quasi-stationary and well-mixed for a 2-hour period, and q mean, variance, third order moment, and skewness profiles were derived from the 10-s, 75-m resolution data. These cases span the entire calendar year, and demonstrate that the q variance profiles at the mixed layer (ML) top changes seasonally, but is more related to the gradient of q across the interfacial layer. The q variance at the top of the ML shows only weak correlations (r < 0.3) with sensible heat flux, Deardorff convective velocity scale, and turbulence kinetic energy measured at the surface. The median q skewness profile is most negative at 0.85 zi, zero at approximately zi, and positive above zi, where zi is the depth of the convective ML. The spread in the q skewness profiles is smallest between 0.95 zi and zi. The q skewness at altitudes between 0.6 zi and 1.2 zi is correlated with the magnitude of the q variance at zi, with increasingly negative values of skewness observed lower down in the ML as the variance at zi increases, suggesting that in cases with larger variance at zi there is deeper penetration of the warm, dry free tropospheric air into the ML.

  1. On the dynamics of small-scale vorticity in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jimenez, Javier; Wray, A. A.

    1994-01-01

    It was previously shown that the strong vorticity in isotropic turbulence is organized into tubular vortices ('worms') whose properties were characterized through the use of full numerical simulations at several Reynolds numbers. At the time most of the observations were kinematic, and several scaling laws were discovered for which there was no theoretical explanation. In the meantime, further analysis of the same fields yielded new information on the generation of the vortices, and it was realized that even if they had to be formed by stretching, they were at any given moment actually compressed at many points of their axes. This apparent contradiction was partially explained by postulating axial inertial waves induced by the nonuniformity of the vortex cores, which helped to 'spread' the axial strain and allowed the vortices to remain compact even if not uniformly stretched. The existence of such solutions was recently proved numerically. The present report discusses a set of new numerical simulations of isotropic turbulence, and a reanalysis of the old ones, in an effort to prove or disprove the presence of these waves in actual turbulent flows and to understand the dynamics, as opposed to the kinematics, of the vortices.

  2. The Radiated Noise from Isotropic Turbulence with Applications to the Theory of Jet Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilley, G. M.

    1996-02-01

    Lighthill [1], in his Theory of Aerodynamic Noise, considered the noise from a pseudo-finite yet unbounded domain of compressible unsteady flow. The first application of this theory was given by Proudman [2] for the case of isotropic turbulence at low Mach numbers and high Reynolds numbers. More recently, Lilley [3] and Sarkar and Hussaini [4], using Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS), have reconsidered this problem, and evaluated for the first time the fourth order space-retarded time covariance which is central to Lighthill's theory for the determination of the acoustic radiated sound power. In this paper the previous work is extended to include the effects of a hot fluid in motion immersed in an external medium at rest. On the introduction of a simple hypothesis these results for the noise radiated from isotropic turbulence are used to predict the noise power radiated from a gaseous hot turbulent jet. The results are found to be qualitatively in agreement with far field experimental data on hot jets at subsonic and supersonic speeds, provided the jets are fully expanded and are devoid of shock waves. The theory has its origins in the 1950s following the publication of Lighthill's theory of aerodynamic noise, when Professor E. J. Richards, the author and their colleagues were striving to predict the noise from jet engines and establish methods for their noise reduction, without loss in performance.

  3. Field Line Random Walk in Isotropic Magnetic Turbulence up to Infinite Kubo Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonsrettee, W.; Wongpan, P.; Ruffolo, D. J.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Chuychai, P.; Rowlands, G.

    2013-12-01

    In astrophysical plasmas, the magnetic field line random walk (FLRW) plays a key role in the transport of energetic particles. In the present, we consider isotropic magnetic turbulence, which is a reasonable model for interstellar space. Theoretical conceptions of the FLRW have been strongly influenced by studies of the limit of weak fluctuations (or a strong mean field) (e.g, Isichenko 1991a, b). In this case, the behavior of FLRW can be characterized by the Kubo number R = (b/B0)(l_∥ /l_ \\bot ) , where l∥ and l_ \\bot are turbulence coherence scales parallel and perpendicular to the mean field, respectively, and b is the root mean squared fluctuation field. In the 2D limit (R ≫ 1), there has been an apparent conflict between concepts of Bohm diffusion, which is based on the Corrsin's independence hypothesis, and percolative diffusion. Here we have used three non-perturbative analytic techniques based on Corrsin's independence hypothesis for B0 = 0 (R = ∞ ): diffusive decorrelation (DD), random ballistic decorrelation (RBD) and a general ordinary differential equation (ODE), and compared them with direct computer simulations. All the analytical models and computer simulations agree that isotropic turbulence for R = ∞ has a field line diffusion coefficient that is consistent with Bohm diffusion. Partially supported by the Thailand Research Fund, NASA, and NSF.

  4. The isotropic nature of the background turbulence spectra in the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Tu, C. Y.; He, J.; Marsch, E.; Wang, L.

    2014-12-01

    At the high-frequency end of the inertial range, the solar wind turbulence power spectrum was recently found to be anisotropic with respect to the direction of local magnetic field, as an evidence for the presence of a "critical balance" style turbulence cascade. However, we find that the spectral anisotropy seems to result from intermittent structures. The following two independent studies corroborate this statement by showing that the power spectra of the background turbulence, in which there are no intermittent structures, have an isotropic nature. In Study 1, we remove the wavelet coefficients of the local intermittency with large partial variance increment (PVI), and find the spectral indices of the magnetic field are 1.63±0.02, independent of the angle θRB between the direction of the local background magnetic field and the radial direction. In Study 2, we make a statistical study on the magnetic field spectral indices obtained by using Fast Fourier Transform on 40 time series, in which no intermittent structures appear. We find that for the time series with 0o<θRB <6o, the probability distribution of the observed spectral indices peaks at -1.7, while the -2 index predicted by the "critical balance" theory rarely appears. For the time series with 84 o <θRB <90 o, the probability distribution of the indices peaks at -1.5. Considering the uncertainty of the statistics, these results show that the background-turbulence spectra are nearly isotropic with respect to θRB, which may be consistent with some explanations based on hydrodynamic turbulence theory.

  5. Calculation of velocity structure functions for vortex models of isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffman, P. G.; Pullin, D. I.

    1996-11-01

    Velocity structure functions (up'-up)m are calculated for vortex models of isotropic turbulence. An integral operator is introduced which defines an isotropic two-point field from a volume-orientation average for a specific solution of the Navier-Stokes equations. Applying this to positive integer powers of the longitudinal velocity difference then gives explicit formulas for (up'-up)m as a function of order m and of the scalar separation r. Special forms of the operator are then obtained for rectilinear stretched vortex models of the Townsend-Lundgren type. Numerical results are given for the Burgers vortex and also for a realization of the Lundgren-strained spiral vortex, and comparison with experimental measurement is made. In an Appendix, we calculate values of the velocity-derivative moments for the Townsend-Burgers model.

  6. Large-eddy simulations of viscoelastic isotropic turbulence with the FENE-P fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinho, Fernando T.; Ferreira, Pedro O.; B. da Silva, Carlos; Idmec/Feup Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    A new subgrid-scale (SGS) model developed for large-eddy simulations (LES) of dilute polymer solutions described by the Finitely Extensible Nonlinear Elastic constitutive equation closed with the Peterlin approximation (FENE-P), is presented. The filtered conformation tensor evolution equation uses the self-similarity of the polymer stretching terms, and the global equilibrium of the trace of the conformation tensor, while the SGS stresses are modelled with the classical Smagorinsky model. The new closure is assessed in direct numerical simulations (DNS) of forced isotropic turbulence using classical a-priori tests, and in a-posteriori (LES) showing excellent agreement with all the exact (filtered DNS) results.

  7. The upper atmosphere of Uranus - A critical test of isotropic turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, R. G.; Elliot, J. L.; Sicardy, B.; Nicholson, P.; Matthews, K.

    1982-01-01

    Observations of the August 15, 1980, Uranus occultation of KM 12, obtained from Cerro Tololo InterAmerican Observatory, European Southern Observatory, and Cerro Las Campanas Observatory, are used to compare the atmospheric structure at points separated by approximately 140 km along the planetary limb. The results reveal striking, but by no means perfect correlation of the light curves, ruling out isotropic turbulence as the cause of the light curve spikes. The atmosphere is strongly layered, and any acceptable turbulence model must accommodate the axial ratios of greater than about 60 which are observed. The mean temperature of the atmosphere is 150 plus or minus 15 K for the region near number density 10 to the 14th per cu cm. Derived temperature variations of vertical scale approximately 130 km and amplitude plus or minus 5 K are in agreement for all stations, and correlated spikes correspond to low-amplitude temperature variations with a vertical scale of several kilometers.

  8. Asymptotic form of the longitudinal correlation function for isotropic homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, G.

    1981-01-01

    An asymptotic form is derived for the longitudinal correlation function for isotropic homogeneous turbulence in an incompressible fluid governed by the Navier-Stokes equation. The result is obtained from an analysis of the algebraic-differential structure of the two-point correlation tensor contained in the complex-valued Fourier transform of the probability measure over the turbulence ensemble, which reveals that the Hopf characteristic functional (the complex-valued Fourier transform of the probability measure) satisfies the Fourier interference inequality. Consequences of the expression obtained, in which the correlation function is a positive definite function of the inverse cube of the spatial coordinate as it approaches infinity, are shown to include the nonexistence of the Loitsianskii invariant, and the solution is shown to be consistent with empirical formulas.

  9. On the effects of density ratio on droplet-laden isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrante, Antonino; Dodd, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Our objective is to determine the effects of varying the droplet- to carrier-fluid density ratio (ρd /ρc) on the interaction of droplets with turbulence. We performed DNS of 3130 finite-size, non-evaporating droplets of diameter approximately equal to the Taylor lengthscale and with 5% droplet volume fraction in decaying isotropic turbulence at initial Taylor-scale Reynolds number Reλ = 83 . We varied ρd /ρc from 1 to 100 while keeping the Weber number and dynamic viscosity ratio constant, Werms=1 and μd /μc =1. We derived the turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) equations for the two-fluid, carrier-fluid and droplet-fluid flow. These equations allow us to explain the pathways for TKE exchange between the carrier turbulent flow and the flow inside the droplet. We show that increasing ρd /ρc increases the decay rate of TKE in the two-fluid flow. The TKE budget shows that this increase is caused by an increase in the dissipation rate of TKE and a decrease in the power of the surface tension. The underlying physical mechanisms for these behaviors will be presented.

  10. Preferential accumulation and enhanced relative velocity of inertial droplets due to interactions with homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateson, Colin; Aliseda, Alberto

    2015-11-01

    We present results from wind tunnel experiments on the evolution of small inertial (d ~ 10 - 200 μm) water droplets in homogeneous, isotropic, slowly decaying grid turbulence. High-speed imaging and a Particle Tracking algorithm are used to calculate relative velocity distributions. We analyze the preferential concentration, via the 2D Radial Distribution Function, and enhanced relative velocity of droplets resulting from their inertial interactions with the underlying turbulence. The two-dimensional particle velocities, measured from multi-image tracks along a streamwise plane, are conditionally analyzed with respect to the distance from the nearest particle. We focus on the non-normality of the statistics for the particle-particle separation velocity component to examine the influence of the inertial interaction with the turbulence on the dynamics of the droplets. We observe a negative bias (in the mean and mode) in the separation velocity of particles for short separations, signaling a tendency of particles to collide more frequently than a random agitation by turbulence would predict. The tails of the distribution are interpreted in terms of the collision/coalescence process and the probability of collisions that do not lead to coalescence.

  11. Longitudinal and transverse structure functions in decaying nearly homogeneous and isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imtiaz, Ahmad; Lu, Zhi-Ming; Liu, Yu-Lu

    2014-01-01

    Streamwise evolution of longitudinal and transverse velocity structure functions in a decaying homogeneous and nearly isotropic turbulence is reported for Reynolds numbers Reλ up to 720. First, two theoretical relations between longitudinal and transverse structure functions are examined in the light of recently derived relations and the results show that the low-order transverse structure functions can be well approximated by longitudinal ones within the sub-inertial range. Reconstruction of fourth-order transverse structure functions with a recently proposed relation by Grauer et al. is comparatively less valid than the relation already proposed by Antonia et al. Secondly, extended self-similarity methods are used to measure the scaling exponents up to order eight and the streamwise evolution of scaling exponents is explored. The scaling exponents of longitudinal structure functions are, at first location, close to Zybin's model, and at the fourth location, close to She—Leveque model. No obvious trend is found for the streamwise evolution of longitudinal scaling exponents, whereas, on the contrary, transverse scaling exponents become slightly smaller with the development of a steamwise direction. Finally, the stremwise variation of the order-dependent isotropy ratio indicates the turbulence at the last location is closer to isotropic than the other three locations.

  12. Analysis of the behavior of bubbles and droplets in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Murray R.

    The behavior and scale-dependent dispersion of small air bubbles, and the rise of slightly buoyant oil droplets in water under isotropic turbulence conditions, are analyzed computationally. The flow field is simulated using a pseudo-spectral code, while the bubble dynamics are analyzed by integration of a Lagrangian equation of motion with buoyancy, virtual mass, pressure, drag and lift forces. Consistent with experimental data, bubble rise velocities are increasingly suppressed with increasing turbulence intensity. The role of the lift force in moving the bubbles to the down-flow side of turbulent eddies, and consequently retarding their rise, is observed. Analysis also reveals that the vertical bubble velocities are characterized by asymmetric probability density functions that are positive or negative-skewed dependent upon the non-dimensional turbulence intensity and the Taylor length scale. Lagrangian bubble trajectories are used to determine dispersion characteristics, following the theoretical development of Cushman and Moroni (2001). The dispersion of 40 mum bubbles exhibits transition to Fickian behavior, and the process is weakly affected by the turbulence level for the entire range considered. Larger, 400 mum bubbles are shown to be more sensitive to turbulence level, with transition to Fickian behavior delayed in low turbulence fields. Computations are also performed to investigate the puzzling behavior observed by Friedman and Katz (2002), that the rise velocity of slightly buoyant droplets smaller than 800 mum in diameter is enhanced by turbulence whereas the rise of larger droplets is retarded. Using the quasi-steady, empirically-determined drag and lift coefficients, the observed experimental behavior could not be reproduced. Further, analysis of the effect of lift and history forces also indicates that, within a broad range of uncertainty, these forces do not account for the experimentally observed mean droplet rise. Guided by correlations obtained

  13. Magnetic Field Line Random Walk in Isotropic Turbulence with Varying Mean Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonsrettee, W.; Subedi, P.; Ruffolo, D.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Snodin, A. P.; Wongpan, P.; Chuychai, P.; Rowlands, G.; Vyas, S.

    2016-08-01

    In astrophysical plasmas, the magnetic field line random walk (FLRW) plays an important role in guiding particle transport. The FLRW behavior is scaled by the Kubo number R=(b/{B}0)({{\\ell }}\\parallel /{{\\ell }}\\perp ) for rms magnetic fluctuation b, large-scale mean field {{\\boldsymbol{B}}}0, and coherence scales parallel ({{\\ell }}\\parallel ) and perpendicular ({{\\ell }}\\perp ) to {{\\boldsymbol{B}}}0. Here we use a nonperturbative analytic framework based on Corrsin’s hypothesis, together with direct computer simulations, to examine the R-scaling of the FLRW for varying B 0 with finite b and isotropic fluctuations with {{\\ell }}\\parallel /{{\\ell }}\\perp =1, instead of the well-studied route of varying {{\\ell }}\\parallel /{{\\ell }}\\perp for b \\ll {B}0. The FLRW for isotropic magnetic fluctuations is also of astrophysical interest regarding transport processes in the interstellar medium. With a mean field, fluctuations may have variance anisotropy, so we consider limiting cases of isotropic variance and transverse variance (with b z = 0). We obtain analytic theories, and closed-form solutions for extreme cases. Padé approximants are provided to interpolate all versions of theory and simulations to any B 0. We demonstrate that, for isotropic turbulence, Corrsin-based theories generally work well, and with increasing R there is a transition from quasilinear to Bohm diffusion. This holds even with b z = 0, when different routes to R\\to ∞ are mathematically equivalent; in contrast with previous studies, we find that a Corrsin-based theory with random ballistic decorrelation works well even up to R = 400, where the effects of trapping are barely perceptible in simulation results.

  14. Mass dependency of turbulent parameters in stationary glow discharge plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Titus, J. B.; Alexander, A. B.; Wiggins, D. L.; Johnson, J. A. III

    2013-05-15

    A direct current glow discharge tube is used to determine how mass changes the effects of certain turbulence characteristics in a weakly ionized gas. Helium, neon, argon, and krypton plasmas were created, and an axial magnetic field, varied from 0.0 to 550.0 Gauss, was used to enhance mass dependent properties of turbulence. From the power spectra of light emission variations associated with velocity fluctuations, determination of mass dependency on turbulent characteristic unstable modes, energy associated with turbulence, and the rate at which energy is transferred from scale to scale are measured. The magnetic field strength is found to be too weak to overcome particle diffusion to the walls to affect the turbulence in all four types of plasmas, though mass dependency is still detected. Though the total energy and the rate at which the energy moves between scales are mass invariant, the amplitude of the instability modes that characterize each plasma are dependent on mass.

  15. Multi-particle Lagrangian statistics of turbulent dispersion from simulations of isotropic turbulence at Rλ 1100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackl, J. F.; Yeung, P. K.; Sawford, B. L.

    2009-11-01

    Numerical simulations at up to (4096^3) grid resolution have been conducted on machines with very large processor counts to obtain the statistics of Lagrangian particle pairs and tetrads in turbulent relative dispersion. Richardson-Obukhov scaling for mean-square pair separation adjusted for initial conditions is observed for intermediate initial separations, in support of prior estimates of about 0.6 for Richardson's constant. Simulations at (Rλ 650) have also been conducted for sufficient duration to obtain fully converged exit time statistics for independently moving particles at very large scales. The fact that all particle pairs reach such large scales of separation means the inertial subrange of exit times is also captured accurately. The results show Kolmogorov scaling for positive moments of exit time, but a strong dependence on initial separations for inverse moments. Inertial-range estimates of tetrad shape factors are reinforced by simulations at Taylor-scale Reynolds numbers up to about 1100. Tetrad shape parameters conditioned on cluster size are also examined in order to understand geometric features of turbulent dispersion in more detail.

  16. Parametric Study of Decay of Homogeneous Isotropic Turbulence Using Large Eddy Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, R. C.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Rubinstein, Robert; Balakumar, Ponnampalam; Zang, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical simulations of decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence are performed with both low-order and high-order spatial discretization schemes. The turbulent Mach and Reynolds numbers for the simulations are 0.2 and 250, respectively. For the low-order schemes we use either second-order central or third-order upwind biased differencing. For higher order approximations we apply weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) schemes, both with linear and nonlinear weights. There are two objectives in this preliminary effort to investigate possible schemes for large eddy simulation (LES). One is to explore the capability of a widely used low-order computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to perform LES computations. The other is to determine the effect of higher order accuracy (fifth, seventh, and ninth order) achieved with high-order upwind biased WENO-based schemes. Turbulence statistics, such as kinetic energy, dissipation, and skewness, along with the energy spectra from simulations of the decaying turbulence problem are used to assess and compare the various numerical schemes. In addition, results from the best performing schemes are compared with those from a spectral scheme. The effects of grid density, ranging from 32 cubed to 192 cubed, on the computations are also examined. The fifth-order WENO-based scheme is found to be too dissipative, especially on the coarser grids. However, with the seventh-order and ninth-order WENO-based schemes we observe a significant improvement in accuracy relative to the lower order LES schemes, as revealed by the computed peak in the energy dissipation and by the energy spectrum.

  17. Passive scalar convective-diffusive subrange for low Prandtl numbers in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briard, A.; Gomez, T.

    2015-01-01

    In this Rapid Communication, we study the behavior of a strongly diffusive passive scalar field T submitted to a freely decaying, homogeneous and isotropic turbulence with eddy-damped quasinormal Markovian simulations. We present a new subrange located between the k-17 /3 inertial-diffusive subrange and the Kolmogorov wave number kη. This subrange is generated by small-scale convection linked to kη that balances diffusion effects. Thus, we build a typical length scale kCD -1 based on convection and diffusion and give an expression for the shape of the passive scalar spectrum in this subrange ET˜√{Pr}k-11 /3 using physical arguments. This result unifies two different theories coming from Batchelor [G. K. Batchelor, J. Fluid. Mech. 5, 113 (1959), 10.1017/S002211205900009X] and Chasnov [J. Chasnov et al., Phys. Fluids A 1, 1698 (1989), 10.1063/1.857535] and explains results previously obtained experimentally.

  18. Isotropic boundary adapted wavelets for coherent vorticity extraction in turbulent channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farge, Marie; Sakurai, Teluo; Yoshimatsu, Katsunori; Schneider, Kai; Morishita, Koji; Ishihara, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    We present a construction of isotropic boundary adapted wavelets, which are orthogonal and yield a multi-resolution analysis. We analyze DNS data of turbulent channel flow computed at a friction-velocity based Reynolds number of 395 and investigate the role of coherent vorticity. Thresholding of the wavelet coefficients allows to split the flow into two parts, coherent and incoherent vorticity. The statistics of the former, i.e., energy and enstrophy spectra, are close to the ones of the total flow, and moreover the nonlinear energy budgets are well preserved. The remaining incoherent part, represented by the large majority of the weak wavelet coefficients, corresponds to a structureless, i.e., noise-like, background flow and exhibits an almost equi-distribution of energy.

  19. A Lagrangian study of scalar diffusion in isotropic turbulence with chemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitarai, S.; Riley, J. J.; Kosály, G.

    2003-12-01

    Direct numerical simulations are performed of a single-step, nonpremixed, Arrhenius-type reaction developing in isotropic, incompressible, decaying turbulence, for conditions where flame extinction and re-ignition occur. The Lagrangian characteristics of scalar diffusion, information necessary for modeling approaches such as some implementations of probability density function (PDF) methods, are investigated by tracking fluid particles. Focusing on the mixture fraction and temperature as the scalar variables of interest, fluid particles are characterized as continuously burning or noncontinuously burning based upon their recent time history, and noncontinuously burning particles are further characterized based upon their initial regions relative to the flame zone. The behavior of the mixture fraction and temperature fields is contrasted for the different types of particles characterized. Significant differences among these characterized particles are found, for example, in the unclosed conditional expectations of scalar diffusion appearing in the composition PDF equations.

  20. Active Control for Statistically Stationary Turbulent PremixedFlame Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J.B.; Day, M.S.; Grcar, J.F.; Lijewski, M.J.

    2005-08-30

    The speed of propagation of a premixed turbulent flame correlates with the intensity of the turbulence encountered by the flame. One consequence of this property is that premixed flames in both laboratory experiments and practical combustors require some type of stabilization mechanism to prevent blow-off and flashback. The stabilization devices often introduce a level of geometric complexity that is prohibitive for detailed computational studies of turbulent flame dynamics. Furthermore, the stabilization introduces additional fluid mechanical complexity into the overall combustion process that can complicate the analysis of fundamental flame properties. To circumvent these difficulties we introduce a feedback control algorithm that allows us to computationally stabilize a turbulent premixed flame in a simple geometric configuration. For the simulations, we specify turbulent inflow conditions and dynamically adjust the integrated fueling rate to control the mean location of the flame in the domain. We outline the numerical procedure, and illustrate the behavior of the control algorithm on methane flames at various equivalence ratios in two dimensions. The simulation data are used to study the local variation in the speed of propagation due to flame surface curvature.

  1. The predicted influence of turbulence in stationary gas tungsten arc welds

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, K.; Weckman, D.C.; Strong, A.B.

    1996-12-31

    The effects of turbulence in stationary gas tungsten arc welds (GTAW) in AISI 304 stainless steel have been examined using a finite element thermofluids model of the process. It is capable of modelling either laminar or turbulent flow in the weld pool. The model includes buoyancy, Lorentz and Marangoni driven fluid flow, a large deformation model of the free surface, volumetric expansion and a {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model. To facilitate implementation of the wall function boundary conditions for the {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model, a dynamic numerical grid remapping technique was used to clearly separate elements in the liquid from those in the solid. The laminar and turbulent thermofluids models correctly predicted the qualitative influence of sulphur contents of AISI 304 stainless steels on Marangoni induced flow and weld pool dimensions previously observed in experiments; however, the laminar flow model consistently overpredicted the weld pool depths by more than 54%. Alternatively, all results predicted using the {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence thermofluids model were found to be within the limits of experimental uncertainty reported for experimental measurements. This strongly suggests that the flow in these stationary GTA welds in AISI 304 stainless steel was turbulent and that accurate predictions of fluid flow patterns and weld pool shapes and dimensions in AISI 304 welds will only be possible if the effects of turbulence are modelled accurately.

  2. Boundedness of the mixed velocity-temperature derivative skewness in homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, S. L.; Antonia, R. A.; Djenidi, L.; Danaila, L.; Zhou, Y.

    2016-09-01

    The transport equation for the mean scalar dissipation rate ɛ ¯ θ is derived by applying the limit at small separations to the generalized form of Yaglom's equation in two types of flows, those dominated mainly by a decay of energy in the streamwise direction and those which are forced, through a continuous injection of energy at large scales. In grid turbulence, the imbalance between the production of ɛ ¯ θ due to stretching of the temperature field and the destruction of ɛ ¯ θ by the thermal diffusivity is governed by the streamwise advection of ɛ ¯ θ by the mean velocity. This imbalance is intrinsically different from that in stationary forced periodic box turbulence (or SFPBT), which is virtually negligible. In essence, the different types of imbalance represent different constraints imposed by the large-scale motion on the relation between the so-called mixed velocity-temperature derivative skewness ST and the scalar enstrophy destruction coefficient Gθ in different flows, thus resulting in non-universal approaches of ST towards a constant value as Reλ increases. The data for ST collected in grid turbulence and in SFPBT indicate that the magnitude of ST is bounded, this limit being close to 0.5.

  3. Calculation of velocity structure functions for vortex models of isotropic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Saffman, P.G.; Pullin, D.I.

    1996-11-01

    Velocity structure functions ({ital u}{sub {ital p}}{sup {prime}}{minus}{ital u}{sub {ital p}}){sup {ital m}} are calculated for vortex models of isotropic turbulence. An integral operator is introduced which defines an isotropic two-point field from a volume-orientation average for a specific solution of the Navier{endash}Stokes equations. Applying this to positive integer powers of the longitudinal velocity difference then gives explicit formulas for ({ital u}{sub {ital p}}{sup {prime}}{minus}{ital u}{sub {ital p}}){sup {ital m}} as a function of order {ital m} and of the scalar separation {ital r}. Special forms of the operator are then obtained for rectilinear stretched vortex models of the Townsend{endash}Lundgren type. Numerical results are given for the Burgers vortex and also for a realization of the Lundgren-strained spiral vortex, and comparison with experimental measurement is made. In an Appendix, we calculate values of the velocity-derivative moments for the Townsend{endash}Burgers model. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Universality of spectrum of passive scalar variance at very high Schmidt number in isotropic steady turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotoh, Toshiyuki

    2012-11-01

    Spectrum of passive scalar variance at very high Schmidt number up to 1000 in isotropic steady turbulence has been studied by using very high resolution DNS. Gaussian random force and scalar source which are isotropic and white in time are applied at low wavenumber band. Since the Schmidt number is very large, the system was integrated for 72 large eddy turn over time for the system to forgot the initial state. It is found that the scalar spectrum attains the asymptotic k-1 spectrum in the viscous-convective range and the constant CB is found to be 5.7 which is larger than 4.9 obtained by DNS under the uniform mean scalar gradient. Reasons for the difference are inferred as the Reynolds number effect, anisotropy, difference in the scalar injection, duration of time average, and the universality of the constant is discussed. The constant CB is also compared with the prediction by the Lagrangian statistical theory for the passive scalar. The scalar spectrum in the far diffusive range is found to be exponential, which is consistent with the Kraichnan's spectrum. However, the Kraichnan spectrum was derived under the assumption that the velocity field is white in time, therefore theoretical explanation of the agreement needs to be explored. Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research No. 21360082, Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan.

  5. Modelling and prediction of non-stationary optical turbulence behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doelman, Niek; Osborn, James

    2016-07-01

    There is a strong need to model the temporal fluctuations in turbulence parameters, for instance for scheduling, simulation and prediction purposes. This paper aims at modelling the dynamic behaviour of the turbulence coherence length r0, utilising measurement data from the Stereo-SCIDAR instrument installed at the Isaac Newton Telescope at La Palma. Based on an estimate of the power spectral density function, a low order stochastic model to capture the temporal variability of r0 is proposed. The impact of this type of stochastic model on the prediction of the coherence length behaviour is shown.

  6. Experimental Study of Inertial Particle-Pair Relative Velocity in Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Zhongwang

    The investigation of turbulence-enhanced inertial particle collision in isotropic turbulence could improve our understanding and modeling of many particle-laden turbulent flows in engineering and nature. In this study, we investigate one of the most critical factors of particle collision - particle-pair relative velocity (RV) in three major steps. First, to generate a reliable homogeneous and isotropic turbulence (HIT) field, we have designed and implemented a high Reynolds number (R lambda), enclosed, fan-driven HIT chamber in the shape of 'soccer ball', conducive for studying inertial particle dynamics using whole-field imaging techniques. The characterization of turbulence in this near-zero-mean flow chamber was performed using a new two-scale particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) approach. The measurement results showed that turbulence in the apparatus achieved high homogeneity and isotropy in a large central region (48mm diameter) of the chamber with minimized gravity effect. A maximum Rlambda of 384 was achieved. Second, to measure particle-pair RV accurately, we have employed numerical experiments to systemically analyze the measurement error in the previous particle-pair RV measurement by holographic PIV. We found that accurate RV measurement requires high accuracy of both particle positioning and particle pairing. To meet these requirements, we have devised a novel planar 4-frame particle tracking velocimetry technique (4F-PTV) combining two PIV systems. It tracks particles in four consecutive frames in high speed to increase particle pairing accuracy. Furthermore, the particles are tracked only in a thin laser light sheet, thus negating the intrinsic position uncertainty in the depth direction in holographic PIV. In addition, we have studied the laser thickness effect on the RV measurement and attempted to use Monte Carlo analysis to correct this effect. Third, and most importantly, to better understand turbulence-enhanced inertial particle collision, we

  7. Digital holographic measurement of the Lagrangian evaporation rate of droplets dispersing in a homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marié, J. L.; Tronchin, T.; Grosjean, N.; Méès, L.; Öztürk, O. Can; Fournier, C.; Barbier, B.; Lance, M.

    2017-02-01

    The evaporation rate of diethyl ether droplets dispersing in a homogeneous, nearly isotropic turbulence is measured by following droplets along their trajectory. Measurements are performed at ambient temperature and pressure by using in-line digital holography. The holograms of droplets are recorded with a single high-speed camera (3 kHz), and droplets trajectories are reconstructed with an "inverse problem approach" (IPA) algorithm previously used in Chareyron et al. (New J Phys 14:043039, 2012) and Marié et al. (Exp Fluid 55(4):1708, 2014. doi: 10.1007/s00348-014-1708-6). The thermal/vapor concentration wakes developing around the droplets are visible behind each hologram. A standard reconstruction process is applied, showing that these wakes are aligned with the relative Lagrangian velocity seen by droplets at each instant. This relative velocity is that obtained from the dynamic equation of droplets motion and the positions and diameter of the droplets measured by holography and the IPA reconstruction. Sequences of time evolution of droplets 3D positions, diameter and 3D relative velocity are presented. In a number of cases, the evaporation rate of droplets changes along the trajectory and deviates from the value estimated with a standard film model of evaporation. This shows that turbulence may significantly influence the phase change process.

  8. On the mechanism for the clustering of inertial particles in the inertial range of isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Lance; Bragg, Andrew; Ireland, Peter

    2014-11-01

    In this talk, we consider the physical mechanism for the clustering of inertial particles in the inertial range of turbulence. By comparisons with DNS data we demonstrate that the mechanism in the theory of Zaichik et al. (Phys. Fluids 19, 113308, 2007) quantitatively describes the clustering of particles in the inertial range. We then analyze the theory for isotropic turbulence in the limit Reλ --> ∞ . For arbitrary St (Stokes number), there exists a separation in the inertial range beyond which Str << 1 , where Str is the Stokes number based on the eddy turnover timescale at separation r. The inertial-range clustering in this limit can be understood to be due to the preferential sampling of the coarse-grained velocity gradient tensor at that scale. At smaller separations, there may be transitions to Str ~ 1 , where a path history symmetry breaking effect dominates the clustering mechanism, and in some cases Str >> 1 , which implies ballistic behavior and a flat RDF. The scaling for each of these regimes is derived and compared to DNS, where applicable. Finally, we compare the results with the ``sweep-stick'' mechanism by Coleman and Vassilicos (Phys. Fluids 21, 113301, 2009) and discuss the similarities and differences between the two theories.

  9. Public-database enabled analysis of Lagrangian dynamics of isotropic turbulence near the Vieillefosse tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Huidan; Meneveau, Charles

    2010-11-01

    We study the Lagrangian time evolution of velocity gradient dynamics near the Vieillefosse tail. The data are obtained from fluid particle tracking through the 1024^4 space-time DNS of forced isotropic turbulence at Reλ=433, using a web-based public database (http://turbulence.pha.jhu.edu). Examination of individual time-series of velocity gradient invariants R and Q show that they are punctuated by strong peaks of negative Q and positive R. Most of these occur very close to the Viellefosse tail along Q = - (3/2^2/3) R^2/3. It is found there that the magnitude of pressure Hessian has positive Lagrangian time-derivative, meaning that it increases in order to resist the rapid growth. We also observe a "phase delay" of the pressure Hessian signals compared to those of R and Q, indicative of an "overshoot" of the controlling mechanism. We also examine the trajectories in the recently proposed 3-D extension of the R-Q plane (see Lüthi B, Holzner M, Tsinober A. 2009, J. Fluid Mech. 641, 497-507). Finally, Lagrangian models of the velocity gradient tensor are examined in the same light to identify similarities and differences with the observed dynamics. Such comparisons supply informative guidance to model improvements.

  10. The rotation and translation of non-spherical particles in homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byron, Margaret

    The motion of particles suspended in environmental turbulence is relevant to many scientific fields, from sediment transport to biological interactions to underwater robotics. At very small scales and simple shapes, we are able to completely mathematically describe the motion of inertial particles; however, the motion of large aspherical particles is significantly more complex, and current computational models are inadequate for large or highly-resolved domains. Therefore, we seek to experimentally investigate the coupling between freely suspended particles and ambient turbulence. A better understanding of this coupling will inform not only engineering and physics, but the interactions between small aquatic organisms and their environments. In the following pages, we explore the roles of shape and buoyancy on the motion of passive particles in turbulence, and allow these particles to serve as models for meso-scale aquatic organisms. We fabricate cylindrical and spheroidal particles and suspend them in homogeneous, isotropic turbulence that is generated via randomly-actuated jet arrays. The particles are fabricated with agarose hydrogel, which is refractive-index-matched to the surrounding fluid (water). Both the fluid and the particle are seeded with passive tracers, allowing us to perform Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) simultaneously on the particle and fluid phase. To investigate the effects of shape, particles are fabricated at varying aspect ratios; to investigate the effects of buoyancy, particles are fabricated at varying specific gravities. Each particle type is freely suspended at a volume fraction of F=0.1%, for which four-way coupling interactions are negligible. The suspended particles are imaged together with the surrounding fluid and analyzed using stereoscopic PIV, which yields three velocity components in a two-dimensional measurement plane. Using image thresholding, the results are separated into simultaneous fluid-phase and solid-phase velocity

  11. Marked drag reduction in non-affine viscoelastic turbulence in homogeneous isotropic and pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuti, K.; Matsumoto, K.; Adati, M.

    2011-12-01

    Effect of non-affinity of the molecular motions to the macroscopic deformation in the polymer-diluted flow on turbulent drag reduction (DR) is studied using the DNS data for homogeneous isotropic turbulence and pipe flow. The polymer stress is obtained by solving the non-affine Johnson-Segalman constitutive equation. In both flows, DR is maximal when non-affinity is either minimum or maximum, but the largest reduction is achieved when non-affinity is maximum. As an extreme case, in pipe flow, the mean velocity profile exceeds the Virk's maximum DR limit and almost complete relaminarization of turbulent state is achieved. The normal-stress difference (NSD) is obtained on the basis of new eigenvectors which span the isosurfaces of vortex tube and sheet. It is shown that the first NSD is predominantly positive, while the second NSD is negative along the sheets and tubes. Thus, an extra tension is exerted on the sheet and tube. With an increase of effective viscosity by an addition of elongation viscosity, resistance of the sheet and tube to their stretching is enhanced. The principal mechanism for DR when non-affinity is maximum is that the transformation of the sheet into the tube is restrained because the sheet tends to snap back to the original flat form. When non-affinity is minimum, the tubes are created but its stretching is suppressed by annihilation of lowering of the pressure in the tube-core region. In both cases, cascade of the energy into the small scales is diminished leading to the reduction of drag.

  12. Large-deviation joint statistics of the finite-time Lyapunov spectrum in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Perry L.; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-08-01

    One of the hallmarks of turbulent flows is the chaotic behavior of fluid particle paths with exponentially growing separation among them while their distance does not exceed the viscous range. The maximal (positive) Lyapunov exponent represents the average strength of the exponential growth rate, while fluctuations in the rate of growth are characterized by the finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLEs). In the last decade or so, the notion of Lagrangian coherent structures (which are often computed using FTLEs) has gained attention as a tool for visualizing coherent trajectory patterns in a flow and distinguishing regions of the flow with different mixing properties. A quantitative statistical characterization of FTLEs can be accomplished using the statistical theory of large deviations, based on the so-called Cramér function. To obtain the Cramér function from data, we use both the method based on measuring moments and measuring histograms and introduce a finite-size correction to the histogram-based method. We generalize the existing univariate formalism to the joint distributions of the two FTLEs needed to fully specify the Lyapunov spectrum in 3D flows. The joint Cramér function of turbulence is measured from two direct numerical simulation datasets of isotropic turbulence. Results are compared with joint statistics of FTLEs computed using only the symmetric part of the velocity gradient tensor, as well as with joint statistics of instantaneous strain-rate eigenvalues. When using only the strain contribution of the velocity gradient, the maximal FTLE nearly doubles in magnitude, highlighting the role of rotation in de-correlating the fluid deformations along particle paths. We also extend the large-deviation theory to study the statistics of the ratio of FTLEs. The most likely ratio of the FTLEs λ1 : λ2 : λ3 is shown to be about 4:1:-5, compared to about 8:3:-11 when using only the strain-rate tensor for calculating fluid volume deformations. The results

  13. Large-deviation joint statistics of the finite-time Lyapunov spectrum in isotropic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Perry L. Meneveau, Charles

    2015-08-15

    One of the hallmarks of turbulent flows is the chaotic behavior of fluid particle paths with exponentially growing separation among them while their distance does not exceed the viscous range. The maximal (positive) Lyapunov exponent represents the average strength of the exponential growth rate, while fluctuations in the rate of growth are characterized by the finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLEs). In the last decade or so, the notion of Lagrangian coherent structures (which are often computed using FTLEs) has gained attention as a tool for visualizing coherent trajectory patterns in a flow and distinguishing regions of the flow with different mixing properties. A quantitative statistical characterization of FTLEs can be accomplished using the statistical theory of large deviations, based on the so-called Cramér function. To obtain the Cramér function from data, we use both the method based on measuring moments and measuring histograms and introduce a finite-size correction to the histogram-based method. We generalize the existing univariate formalism to the joint distributions of the two FTLEs needed to fully specify the Lyapunov spectrum in 3D flows. The joint Cramér function of turbulence is measured from two direct numerical simulation datasets of isotropic turbulence. Results are compared with joint statistics of FTLEs computed using only the symmetric part of the velocity gradient tensor, as well as with joint statistics of instantaneous strain-rate eigenvalues. When using only the strain contribution of the velocity gradient, the maximal FTLE nearly doubles in magnitude, highlighting the role of rotation in de-correlating the fluid deformations along particle paths. We also extend the large-deviation theory to study the statistics of the ratio of FTLEs. The most likely ratio of the FTLEs λ{sub 1} : λ{sub 2} : λ{sub 3} is shown to be about 4:1:−5, compared to about 8:3:−11 when using only the strain-rate tensor for calculating fluid volume

  14. Non-stationary Generation of Weak Turbulence for Very Stable and Weak-Wind Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahrt, Larry; Thomas, Christoph; Richardson, Scott; Seaman, Nelson; Stauffer, David; Zeeman, Matthias

    2013-05-01

    Turbulence measurements for very stable conditions near the surface are contrasted among three sites: a high altitude basin during winter with grass or snow-covered grass, a broad valley with complex agricultural land use, and a more narrow valley that is influenced by a valley cold pool and cold air drainage. In contrast to previous studies, this investigation emphasizes the very weak turbulence with large bulk Richardson number occurring during extensive periods between brief mixing events. The relationship of the turbulence to the non-stationary wind and stratification is examined along with the impact of short-term flow accelerations, directional shear and downward diffusion of turbulence from higher levels. The failure of the turbulence for strong stratification to decrease with further increase of stratification is explored. Additional analyses are applied to weak-wind cases for the entire range of stratification, including weak stratification associated with cloudy conditions.

  15. The length distribution of streamline segments in homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, P.; Gampert, M.; Peters, N.

    2012-04-01

    by Schaefer et al. ["Fast and slow changes of the length of gradient trajectories in homogenous shear turbulence," in Advances in Turbulence XII, edited by B. Eckhardt (Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 2009), pp. 565-572] we will refer to the morphological part of the evolution of streamline segments as slow changes while the topological part of the evolution is referred to as fast changes. This separation yields a transport equation for the probability density function (pdf) P(l) of the arclength l of streamline segments in which the slow changes translate into a convection and a diffusion term when terms up to second order are included and the fast changes yield integral terms. The overall temporal evolution (morphological and topological) of the arclength l of streamline segments is analyzed and associated with the motion of the above isosurface. This motion is diffusion controlled for small segments, while large segments are mainly subject to strain and pressure fluctuations. The convection velocity corresponds to the first order jump moment, while the diffusion term includes the second order jump moment. It is concluded, both theoretically and from direct numerical simulations (DNS) data of homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence at two different Reynolds numbers, that the normalized first order jump moment is quasi-universal, while the second order one is proportional to the inverse of the square root of the Taylor based Reynolds number Re_{λ }^{-1/2}. Its inclusion thus represents a small correction in the limit of large Reynolds numbers. Numerical solutions of the pdf equation yield a good agreement with the pdf obtained from the DNS data. The interplay of viscous drift acting on small segments and linear strain acting on large segments yield, as it has already been concluded for dissipation elements, that the mean length of streamline segments should scale with Taylor microscale.

  16. MAGNETIC FIELD LINE RANDOM WALK IN ISOTROPIC TURBULENCE WITH ZERO MEAN FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Sonsrettee, W.; Ruffolo, D.; Snodin, A. P.; Wongpan, P.; Subedi, P.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Chuychai, P. E-mail: david.ruf@mahidol.ac.th E-mail: pat.wongpan@postgrad.otago.ac.nz E-mail: prasub@udel.edu

    2015-01-01

    In astrophysical plasmas, magnetic field lines often guide the motions of thermal and non-thermal particles. The field line random walk (FLRW) is typically considered to depend on the Kubo number R = (b/B {sub 0})(ℓ{sub ∥}/ℓ ) for rms magnetic fluctuation b, large-scale mean field B {sub 0}, and parallel and perpendicular coherence scales ℓ{sub ∥} and ℓ , respectively. Here we examine the FLRW when R → ∞ by taking B {sub 0} → 0 for finite b{sub z} (fluctuation component along B {sub 0}), which differs from the well-studied route with b{sub z} = 0 or b{sub z} << B {sub 0} as the turbulence becomes quasi-two-dimensional (quasi-2D). Fluctuations with B {sub 0} = 0 are typically isotropic, which serves as a reasonable model of interstellar turbulence. We use a non-perturbative analytic framework based on Corrsin's hypothesis to determine closed-form solutions for the asymptotic field line diffusion coefficient for three versions of the theory, which are directly related to the k {sup –1} or k {sup –2} moment of the power spectrum. We test these theories by performing computer simulations of the FLRW, obtaining the ratio of diffusion coefficients for two different parameterizations of a field line. Comparing this with theoretical ratios, the random ballistic decorrelation version of the theory agrees well with the simulations. All results exhibit an analog to Bohm diffusion. In the quasi-2D limit, previous works have shown that Corrsin-based theories deviate substantially from simulation results, but here we find that as B {sub 0} → 0, they remain in reasonable agreement. We conclude that their applicability is limited not by large R, but rather by quasi-two-dimensionality.

  17. The minimum energy decay rate in quasi-isotropic grid turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, P. A.

    2011-08-01

    We consider high Reynolds number, freely-decaying, isotropic turbulence in which the large scales evolve in a self-similar manner when normalized by the integral scales, u and ℓ. As it is well known, a range of possible behaviors may be observed depending on the form of the longitudinal velocity correlation at large separation, uf∞=u 2f(r →∞). We consider the cases u2f∞=cmr-m,2≤m ≤6, whose spectral counterpart is E(k →0)~cmkm -1 for m <6, with or without a lnk correction, and E(k →0)~I k4 for m =6. (I is Loitsyansky's integral.) It has long been known that the cmm=constant during the decay. This, in turn, sets the energy decay rate as u2~t-(1-p)2m /(m+2), where p is the power-law exponent for the normalized dissipation rate, εℓ/εℓu3u3~t-p, observed empirically to be a small positive number in grid turbulence. We systematically explore the properties of these different classes of turbulence and arrive at the following conclusions. (i) The invariance of cm is a direct consequence of linear momentum conservation for m ≤4, and angular momentum conservation for m =5. (ii) The classical spectra of Saffman, E(k →0)~c3k2, and Batchelor, E(k →0)~Ik4, are robust in the sense that they emerge from a broad class of initial conditions. In particular, it is necessary only that <ωi ω'j >∞ ≤O(r-8) at t =0. The non-classical spectra (m =2,4,5), on the other hand, require very specific initial conditions in order to be realized, of the form <ωiω'j>∞=O(r-(m +2)). (Note the equality rather than the inequality here.) This makes the non-classical spectra less likely to be observed in practice. (iii) The case of m =2, which is usually associated with the u2~t-1 decay law, is pathological in a number of respects. For example, its spectral tensor diverges as k →0, and the long-range correlations ∞=O(r-2) are too strong to be a consequence of the Biot-Savart law. (It is the Biot-Savart law that lies behind the long-range correlations in the

  18. Intermittency in the isotropic component of helical and nonhelical turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, L. N.; Mininni, P. D.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the isotropic component of turbulent flows spanning a broad range or Reynolds numbers. The aim is to identify scaling laws and their Reynolds number dependence in flows under different mechanical forcings. To this end, we applied an SO(3) decomposition to data stemming from direct numerical simulations with spatial resolutions ranging from 643 to 10243 grid points, and studied the scaling of high order moments of the velocity field. The study was carried out for two different flows obtained forcing the system with a Taylor-Green vortex or the Arn’old-Beltrami-Childress flow. Our results indicate that helicity has no significant impact on the scaling exponents as obtained from the generalized structure functions. Intermittency effects increase with the Reynolds number in the range of parameters studied, and in some cases are larger than what can be expected from several models of intermittency in the literature. The observed dependence of intermittency with the Reynolds number decreases if extended self-similarity is used to estimate the exponents.

  19. Time resolved measurements of rigid fiber dispersion in near homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabban, Lilach; Cohen, Asaf; van Hout, Rene; Empfl Environmental Multi-Phase Flow Laboratory Team

    2013-11-01

    Time resolved, planar particle image velocimetry (PIV, 3kHz) and two-orthogonal view, digital holographic cinematography (2kHz) was used to measure 3D fiber trajectories/orientation dynamics in near homogeneous isotropic air turbulence (HIT) with dilute suspended fibers. The PIV covered a field of view of 6 × 12 mm2 and the holography a volume of interest of 173 mm3, positioned at the center of the chamber. HIT (Reλ = 144) was generated in the center of a 403 cm3 cube by eight woofers mounted on each of its corners. Three different nylon fibers having a length of 0.5 mm and diameter of 10, 14 and 19 μm were released from the top of the chamber. Fibers had Stokes numbers of order one and are expected to accumulate in regions of low vorticity and settle along a path of local minimal drag. Fiber 3D trajectories/orientations have been obtained from the holography measurements and orientational/translational dispersion coefficients will be presented. In addition the flow field in the vicinity of tracked fibers has been resolved by the PIV, and results on fluid and fiber accelerations and position correlation with in-plane strain rate and out-of-plane vorticity will be presented.

  20. A priori study of subgrid-scale flux of a passive scalar in isotropic homogeneous turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Chumakov, Sergei

    2008-01-01

    We perform a direct numerical simulation (DNS) of forced homogeneous isotropic turbulence with a passive scalar that is forced by mean gradient. The DNS data are used to study the properties of subgrid-scale flux of a passive scalar in the framework of large eddy simulation (LES), such as alignment trends between the flux, resolved, and subgrid-scale flow structures. It is shown that the direction of the flux is strongly coupled with the subgrid-scale stress axes rather than the resolved flow quantities such as strain, vorticity, or scalar gradient. We derive an approximate transport equation for the subgrid-scale flux of a scalar and look at the relative importance of the terms in the transport equation. A particular form of LES tensor-viscosity model for the scalar flux is investigated, which includes the subgrid-scale stress. Effect of different models for the subgrid-scale stress on the model for the subgrid-scale flux is studied.

  1. Structure transitions induced by the Hall term in homogeneous and isotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, H.; Araki, K.

    2014-07-15

    Hall effects on local structures in homogeneous, isotropic, and incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence are studied numerically. The transition of vortices from sheet-like to tubular structures induced by the Hall term is found, while the kinetic energy spectrum does not distinguish the two types of structures. It is shown by the use of the sharp low-pass filter that the transition occurs not only in the scales smaller than the ion skin depth but also in a larger scale. The transition is related with the forward energy transfer in the spectral space. Analyses by the use of the sharp low-pass filter show that the nonlinear energy transfer associated with the Hall term is dominated by the forward transfer and relatively local in the wave number space. A projection of the simulation data to a Smagorinsky-type sub-grid-scale model shows that the high wave number component of the Hall term may possibly be replaced by the model effectively.

  2. On Pair Diffusion and Preferential Concentration of High Stokes Number Particles in Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, Sarma; Koch, Donald

    2012-11-01

    In this study, we derived the Fokker-Planck equation governing the PDF of pair separation and relative velocity vectors of high St particles. The PDF equation contains a particle-pair diffusion coefficient in relative velocity space. We developed an analytical theory to predict this relative velocity-space pair diffusion coefficient in the limit of high St . Using the diffusion coefficient, Langevin-equation-based stochastic simulations were performed to evolve pair separation and velocity vectors in isotropic turbulence for particle Stokes numbers, St = 1 , 2 , 4 , 10 ,and, 20 and a Taylor micro-scale Reynolds number, Reλ = 75 . The most significant finding from the Langevin simulations is that our pair diffusivity theory successfully captures the transition of relative velocity PDF from a Gaussian PDF at separations of the order of integral length scale to a non-Gaussian PDF at smaller separations. The pair radial distribution functions (RDFs) computed using our theory show that as the Stokes number increased, particles preferentially accumulate even at integral length scale separations. Another significant finding of our approach is that the slope of RDF at Kolmogorov length scale separations for higher St particles is not zero.

  3. FUNDAMENTAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY (INCLUDING APPLICATIONS): Scalar Statistics along Inertial Particle Trajectory in Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ya-Ming; Liu, Zhao-Hui; Han, Hai-Feng; Li, Jing; Wang, Han-Feng; Zheng, Chu-Guang

    2009-06-01

    The statistics of a passive scalar along inertial particle trajectory in homogeneous isotropic turbulence with a mean scalar gradient is investigated by using direct numerical simulation. We are interested in the influence of particle inertia on such statistics, which is crucial for further understanding and development of models in non-isothermal gas-particle flows. The results show that the scalar variance along particle trajectory decreases with the increasing particle inertia firstly; when the particle's Stokes number St is less than 1.0, it reaches the minimal value when St is around 1.0, then it increases if St increases further. However, the scalar dissipation rate along the particle trajectory shows completely contrasting behavior in comparison with the scalar variance. The mechanical-to-thermal time scale ratios averaged along particle, p, are approximately two times smaller than that computed in the Eulerian frame r, and stay at nearly 1.77 with a weak dependence on particle inertia. In addition, the correlations between scalar dissipation and now structure characteristics along particle trajectories, such as strain and vorticity, are also computed, and they reach their maximum and minimum, 0.31 and 0.25, respectively, when St is around 1.0.

  4. Covariance statistics of turbulence velocity components for wind-energy-conversion system design-homogeneous, isotropic case

    SciTech Connect

    Fichtl, G.H.

    1983-09-01

    When designing a wind energy converison system (WECS), it may be necessary to take into account the distribution of wind across the disc of rotation. The specific engineering applications include structural strength, fatigue, and control. This wind distribution consists of two parts, namely that associated with the mean wind profile and that associated with the turbulence velocity fluctuation field. The work reported herein is aimed at the latter, namely the distribution of turbulence velocity fluctuations across the WECS disk of rotation. A theory is developed for the two-time covariance matrix for turbulence velocity vector components for wind energy conversion system (WECS) design. The theory is developed for homogeneous and iotropic turbulance with the assumption that Taylor's hypothesis is valid. The Eulerian turbulence velocity vector field is expanded about the hub of the WECS. Formulae are developed for the turbulence velocity vector component covariance matrix following the WECS blade elements. It is shown that upon specification of the turbulence energy spectrum function and the WECS rotation rate, the two-point, two-time covariance matrix of the turbulent flow relative to the WECS bladed elements is determined. This covariance matrix is represented as the sum of nonstationary and stationary contributions. Generalized power spectral methods are used to obtain two-point, double frequency power spectral density functions for the turbulent flow following the blade elements. The Dryden turbulence model is used to demonstrate the theory. A discussion of linear system response analysis is provided to show how the double frequency turbulence spectra might be used to calculate response spectra of a WECS to turbulent flow. Finally the spectrum of the component of turbulence normal to the WECS disc of rotation, following the blade elements, is compared with experimental results.

  5. Forces on stationary particles in near-bed turbulent flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmeeckle, M.W.; Nelson, J.M.; Shreve, R.L.

    2007-01-01

    In natural flows, bed sediment particles are entrained and moved by the fluctuating forces, such as lift and drag, exerted by the overlying flow on the particles. To develop a better understanding of these forces and the relation of the forces to the local flow, the downstream and vertical components of force on near-bed fixed particles and of fluid velocity above or in front of them were measured synchronously at turbulence-resolving frequencies (200 or 500 Hz) in a laboratory flume. Measurements were made for a spherical test particle fixed at various heights above a smooth bed, above a smooth bed downstream of a downstream-facing step, and in a gravel bed of similarly sized particles as well as for a cubical test particle and 7 natural particles above a smooth bed. Horizontal force was well correlated with downstream velocity and not correlated with vertical velocity or vertical momentum flux. The standard drag formula worked well to predict the horizontal force, but the required value of the drag coefficient was significantly higher than generally used to model bed load motion. For the spheres, cubes, and natural particles, average drag coefficients were found to be 0.76, 1.36, and 0.91, respectively. For comparison, the drag coefficient for a sphere settling in still water at similar particle Reynolds numbers is only about 0.4. The variability of the horizontal force relative to its mean was strongly increased by the presence of the step and the gravel bed. Peak deviations were about 30% of the mean force for the sphere over the smooth bed, about twice the mean with the step, and 4 times it for the sphere protruding roughly half its diameter above the gravel bed. Vertical force correlated poorly with downstream velocity, vertical velocity, and vertical momentum flux whether measured over or ahead of the test particle. Typical formulas for shear-induced lift based on Bernoulli's principle poorly predict the vertical forces on near-bed particles. The

  6. Comparison between Lagrangian and mesoscopic Eulerian modelling approaches for inertial particles suspended in decaying isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, A.; Moreau, M.; Simonin, O.; Helie, J.

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the accuracy of the mesoscopic approach proposed by Février et al. [P. Février, O. Simonin, K.D. Squires, Partitioning of particle velocities in gas-solid turbulent flows into a continuous field and a spatially uncorrelated random distribution: theoretical formalism and numerical study, J. Fluid Mech. 533 (2005) 1-46] by comparison against the Lagrangian approach for the simulation of an ensemble of non-colliding particles suspended in a decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence given by DNS. The mesoscopic Eulerian approach involves to solve equations for a few particle PDF moments: number density, mesoscopic velocity, and random uncorrelated kinetic energy (RUE), derived from particle flow ensemble averaging conditioned by the turbulent fluid flow realization. In addition, viscosity and diffusivity closure assumptions are used to compute the unknown higher order moments which represent the mesoscopic velocity and RUE transport by the uncorrelated velocity component. A detailed comparison between the two approaches is carried out for two different values of the Stokes number based on the initial fluid Kolmogorov time scale, St=0.17 and 2.2. In order to perform reliable comparisons for the RUE local instantaneous distribution and for the mesoscopic kinetic energy spectrum, the error due to the computation method of mesoscopic quantities from Lagrangian simulation results is evaluated and minimized. A very good agreement is found between the mesoscopic Eulerian and Lagrangian predictions for the small particle Stokes number case corresponding to the smallest particle inertia. For larger particle inertia, a bulk viscous term is included in the mesoscopic velocity governing equation to avoid spurious spatial oscillation that may arise due to the inability of the numerical scheme to resolve sharp number density gradients. As a consequence, for St=2.2, particle number density and RUE spatial distribution predicted by the

  7. Charged-Particle Transport in the Data-Driven, Non-Isotropic Turbulent Mangetic Field in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, P.; Jokipii, J. R.; Giacalone, J.

    2016-12-01

    Anisotropies in astrophysical turbulence has been proposed and observed for a long time. And recent observations adopting the multi-scale analysis techniques provided a detailed description of the scale-dependent power spectrum of the magnetic field parallel and perpendicular to the scale-dependent magnetic field line at different scales in the solar wind. In the previous work, we proposed a multi-scale method to synthesize non-isotropic turbulent magnetic field with pre-determined power spectra of the fluctuating magnetic field as a function of scales. We present the effect of test particle transport in the resulting field with a two-scale algorithm. We find that the scale-dependent turbulence anisotropy has a significant difference in the effect on charged par- ticle transport from what the isotropy or the global anisotropy has. It is important to apply this field synthesis method to the solar wind magnetic field based on spacecraft data. However, this relies on how we extract the power spectra of the turbulent magnetic field across different scales. In this study, we propose here a power spectrum synthesis method based on Fourier analysis to extract the large and small scale power spectrum from a single spacecraft observation with a long enough period and a high sampling frequency. We apply the method to the solar wind measurement by the magnetometer onboard the ACE spacecraft and regenerate the large scale isotropic 2D spectrum and the small scale anisotropic 2D spectrum. We run test particle simulations in the magnetid field generated in this way to estimate the transport coefficients and to compare with the isotropic turbulence model.

  8. PIV measurement of high-Reynolds-number homogeneous and isotropic turbulence in an enclosed flow apparatus with fan agitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Zhongwang; Pecenak, Zachary K.; Cao, Lujie; Woodward, Scott H.; Liang, Zach; Meng, Hui

    2016-03-01

    Enclosed flow apparatuses with negligible mean flow are emerging as alternatives to wind tunnels for laboratory studies of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence (HIT) with or without aerosol particles, especially in experimental validation of Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS). It is desired that these flow apparatuses generate HIT at high Taylor-microscale Reynolds numbers ({{R}λ} ) and enable accurate measurement of turbulence parameters including kinetic energy dissipation rate and thereby {{R}λ} . We have designed an enclosed, fan-driven, highly symmetric truncated-icosahedron ‘soccer ball’ airflow apparatus that enables particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) and other whole-field flow measurement techniques. To minimize gravity effect on inertial particles and improve isotropy, we chose fans instead of synthetic jets as flow actuators. We developed explicit relations between {{R}λ} and physical as well as operational parameters of enclosed HIT chambers. To experimentally characterize turbulence in this near-zero-mean flow chamber, we devised a new two-scale PIV approach utilizing two independent PIV systems to obtain both high resolution and large field of view. Velocity measurement results show that turbulence in the apparatus achieved high homogeneity and isotropy in a large central region (48 mm diameter) of the chamber. From PIV-measured velocity fields, we obtained turbulence dissipation rates and thereby {{R}λ} by using the second-order velocity structure function. A maximum {{R}λ} of 384 was achieved. Furthermore, experiments confirmed that the root mean square (RMS) velocity increases linearly with fan speed, and {{R}λ} increases with the square root of fan speed. Characterizing turbulence in such apparatus paves the way for further investigation of particle dynamics in particle-laden homogeneous and isotropic turbulence.

  9. Root mean square fluctuation of a weak magnetic field in an infinite medium of homogeneous stationary turbulence.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, B.-C.

    1972-01-01

    The generation of a magnetic field by statistically homogeneous, stationary velocity turbulence is considered. The generation of rms magnetic fluctuation is explicitly demonstrated in the limit of short turbulence correlation time. It is shown that the fluctuation associated with a growing or stationary mean field grows with time such that the ratio of the fluctuation and the square of the mean field tends to a steady value, which is a monotonically decreasing function of the growth rate of the mean field.

  10. Self-similar spiral flow structure in low Reynolds number isotropic and decaying turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassilicos, J. C.; Brasseur, James G.

    1996-07-01

    It is rigorously proved for axisymmetric incompressible flows with bounded axial vorticity at infinity that if a spiral-helical streamline has a Kolmogorov capacity (box-counting dimension) DK>~1, then the velocity field must have a singularity at the axis of symmetry. Furthermore, certain types of singularity with DK=1 can be excluded. The Burgers and the Lundgren vortices are examples of strained vortices with different types of near-singular structure, and in both cases sections of streamlines have a well-defined DK>~1. However, the strain severely limits the region in space where DK is larger than 1. An algorithm is developed which detects streamlines with persistently strong curvature and calculates both the DK of the streamlines and the lower bound scale δmin of the range of self-similar scaling defined by DK. Error bounds on DK are also computed. The use of this algorithm partly relies on the fact that two to three turns of a spiral are enough to determine a spiral's DK. We detect well-defined self-similar scaling in the geometry of streamlines around vortex tubes in decaying isotropic direct numerical simulation turbulence with exceptionally fine small-scale resolution and Reλ around 20. The measured values of DK vary from DK=1 to DK~=1.60, and in general the self-similar range of length scales over which DK is well defined extends over one decade and ends at one of two well-defined inner scales, one just above and the other just below the Kolmogorov microscale η. We identify two different types of accumulation of length scales with DK>~1 on streamlines around the vortex tubes in the simulated turbulence: an accumulation of the streamline towards a central axis of the vortex tube in a spiral-helical fashion, and a helical and axial accumulation of the streamline towards a limit circle at the periphery of the vortex tube. In the latter case, the limit circle lies in a region along the axis of the vortex tube where there is a rapid drop in enstrophy. The

  11. Experimental Study of Homogeneous Isotropic Slowly-Decaying Turbulence in Giant Grid-Wind Tunnel Set Up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliseda, Alberto; Bourgoin, Mickael; Eswirp Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    We present preliminary results from a recent grid turbulence experiment conducted at the ONERA wind tunnel in Modane, France. The ESWIRP Collaboration was conceived to probe the smallest scales of a canonical turbulent flow with very high Reynolds numbers. To achieve this, the largest scales of the turbulence need to be extremely big so that, even with the large separation of scales, the smallest scales would be well above the spatial and temporal resolution of the instruments. The ONERA wind tunnel in Modane (8 m -diameter test section) was chosen as a limit of the biggest large scales achievable in a laboratory setting. A giant inflatable grid (M = 0.8 m) was conceived to induce slowly-decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence in a large region of the test section, with minimal structural risk. An international team or researchers collected hot wire anemometry, ultrasound anemometry, resonant cantilever anemometry, fast pitot tube anemometry, cold wire thermometry and high-speed particle tracking data of this canonical turbulent flow. While analysis of this large database, which will become publicly available over the next 2 years, has only started, the Taylor-scale Reynolds number is estimated to be between 400 and 800, with Kolmogorov scales as large as a few mm . The ESWIRP Collaboration is formed by an international team of scientists to investigate experimentally the smallest scales of turbulence. It was funded by the European Union to take advantage of the largest wind tunnel in Europe for fundamental research.

  12. Mechanisms for the clustering of inertial particles in the inertial range of isotropic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Bragg, Andrew D; Ireland, Peter J; Collins, Lance R

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we consider the physical mechanism for the clustering of inertial particles in the inertial range of isotropic turbulence. We analyze the exact, but unclosed, equation governing the radial distribution function (RDF) and compare the mechanisms it describes for clustering in the dissipation and inertial ranges. We demonstrate that in the limit Str≪1, where Str is the Stokes number based on the eddy turnover time scale at separation r, the clustering in the inertial range can be understood to be due to the preferential sampling of the coarse-grained fluid velocity gradient tensor at that scale. When Str≳O(1) this mechanism gives way to a nonlocal clustering mechanism. These findings reveal that the clustering mechanisms in the inertial range are analogous to the mechanisms that we identified for the dissipation regime [see New J. Phys. 16, 055013 (2014)]. Further, we discuss the similarities and differences between the clustering mechanisms we identify in the inertial range and the "sweep-stick" mechanism developed by Coleman and Vassilicos [Phys. Fluids 21, 113301 (2009)]. We show that the idea that initial particles are swept along with acceleration stagnation points is only approximately true because there always exists a finite difference between the velocity of the acceleration stagnation points and the local fluid velocity. This relative velocity is sufficient to allow particles to traverse the average distance between the stagnation points within the correlation time scale of the acceleration field. We also show that the stick part of the mechanism is only valid for Str≪1 in the inertial range. We emphasize that our clustering mechanism provides the more fundamental explanation since it, unlike the sweep-stick mechanism, is able to explain clustering in arbitrary spatially correlated velocity fields. We then consider the closed, model equation for the RDF given in Zaichik and Alipchenkov [Phys. Fluids 19, 113308 (2007)] and use this

  13. Mechanisms for the clustering of inertial particles in the inertial range of isotropic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Bragg, Andrew D.; Ireland, Peter J.; Collins, Lance R.

    2015-08-27

    In this study, we consider the physical mechanism for the clustering of inertial particles in the inertial range of isotropic turbulence. We analyze the exact, but unclosed, equation governing the radial distribution function (RDF) and compare the mechanisms it describes for clustering in the dissipation and inertial ranges. We demonstrate that in the limit Str <<1, where Str is the Stokes number based on the eddy turnover time scale at separation r, the clustering in the inertial range can be understood to be due to the preferential sampling of the coarse-grained fluid velocity gradient tensor at that scale. When Str≳O(1) this mechanism gives way to a nonlocal clustering mechanism. These findings reveal that the clustering mechanisms in the inertial range are analogous to the mechanisms that we identified for the dissipation regime. Further, we discuss the similarities and differences between the clustering mechanisms we identify in the inertial range and the “sweep-stick” mechanism developed by Coleman and Vassilicos. We show that the idea that initial particles are swept along with acceleration stagnation points is only approximately true because there always exists a finite difference between the velocity of the acceleration stagnation points and the local fluid velocity. This relative velocity is sufficient to allow particles to traverse the average distance between the stagnation points within the correlation time scale of the acceleration field. We also show that the stick part of the mechanism is only valid for Str<<1 in the inertial range. We emphasize that our clustering mechanism provides the more fundamental explanation since it, unlike the sweep-stick mechanism, is able to explain clustering in arbitrary spatially correlated velocity fields. We then consider the closed, model equation for the RDF given in Zaichik and Alipchenkov and use this, together with the results from our analysis, to predict the

  14. Mechanisms for the clustering of inertial particles in the inertial range of isotropic turbulence

    DOE PAGES

    Bragg, Andrew D.; Ireland, Peter J.; Collins, Lance R.

    2015-08-27

    In this study, we consider the physical mechanism for the clustering of inertial particles in the inertial range of isotropic turbulence. We analyze the exact, but unclosed, equation governing the radial distribution function (RDF) and compare the mechanisms it describes for clustering in the dissipation and inertial ranges. We demonstrate that in the limit Str <<1, where Str is the Stokes number based on the eddy turnover time scale at separation r, the clustering in the inertial range can be understood to be due to the preferential sampling of the coarse-grained fluid velocity gradient tensor at that scale. When Str≳O(1)more » this mechanism gives way to a nonlocal clustering mechanism. These findings reveal that the clustering mechanisms in the inertial range are analogous to the mechanisms that we identified for the dissipation regime. Further, we discuss the similarities and differences between the clustering mechanisms we identify in the inertial range and the “sweep-stick” mechanism developed by Coleman and Vassilicos. We show that the idea that initial particles are swept along with acceleration stagnation points is only approximately true because there always exists a finite difference between the velocity of the acceleration stagnation points and the local fluid velocity. This relative velocity is sufficient to allow particles to traverse the average distance between the stagnation points within the correlation time scale of the acceleration field. We also show that the stick part of the mechanism is only valid for Str<<1 in the inertial range. We emphasize that our clustering mechanism provides the more fundamental explanation since it, unlike the sweep-stick mechanism, is able to explain clustering in arbitrary spatially correlated velocity fields. We then consider the closed, model equation for the RDF given in Zaichik and Alipchenkov and use this, together with the results from our analysis, to predict the analytic form of the RDF in the

  15. Mechanisms for the clustering of inertial particles in the inertial range of isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragg, Andrew D.; Ireland, Peter J.; Collins, Lance R.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we consider the physical mechanism for the clustering of inertial particles in the inertial range of isotropic turbulence. We analyze the exact, but unclosed, equation governing the radial distribution function (RDF) and compare the mechanisms it describes for clustering in the dissipation and inertial ranges. We demonstrate that in the limit Str≪1 , where Str is the Stokes number based on the eddy turnover time scale at separation r , the clustering in the inertial range can be understood to be due to the preferential sampling of the coarse-grained fluid velocity gradient tensor at that scale. When Str≳O (1 ) this mechanism gives way to a nonlocal clustering mechanism. These findings reveal that the clustering mechanisms in the inertial range are analogous to the mechanisms that we identified for the dissipation regime [see New J. Phys. 16, 055013 (2014), 10.1088/1367-2630/16/5/055013]. Further, we discuss the similarities and differences between the clustering mechanisms we identify in the inertial range and the "sweep-stick" mechanism developed by Coleman and Vassilicos [Phys. Fluids 21, 113301 (2009), 10.1063/1.3257638]. We show that the idea that initial particles are swept along with acceleration stagnation points is only approximately true because there always exists a finite difference between the velocity of the acceleration stagnation points and the local fluid velocity. This relative velocity is sufficient to allow particles to traverse the average distance between the stagnation points within the correlation time scale of the acceleration field. We also show that the stick part of the mechanism is only valid for Str≪1 in the inertial range. We emphasize that our clustering mechanism provides the more fundamental explanation since it, unlike the sweep-stick mechanism, is able to explain clustering in arbitrary spatially correlated velocity fields. We then consider the closed, model equation for the RDF given in Zaichik and

  16. Effect of stationary and dynamic transverse squared bars over the turbulent behavior in a channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez Pastran, Jesus; Duque-Daza, Carlos; Lopez, Omar D.

    2016-11-01

    Turbulent flows over rough surfaces are present in different industrial scenarios. Generally, roughness is used to modify the boundary layer behavior, in order to improve heat transfer rates and mixing processes, which is usually accompanied by an increase of skin-friction drag. In the present work two different techniques for modification of the turbulent boundary layer were explored: first, the use of an arrangement of transverse squared bars (synthetic roughness); second, the use of an oscillating movement of the squared bars. In both cases the goal was to assess the increase or decrease of the skin-friction drag and the changes in the turbulent behavior of the flow. Large Eddy Simulations were carried out in order to study a fully developed turbulent channel flow with a smooth upper wall and a synthetically roughed lower wall with a friction Reynolds number around 180. Channel flow over walls with stationary bars and with one of the bars oscillating in the spanwise direction were also considered. Consistency between skin-friction coefficient modification and evolution of Q-structures was observed. Finally, a comparison of changes on some of the TKE terms between smooth surfaces and synthetically rough surfaces allowed to identify the effect of the squared bars for each case.

  17. Large-eddy simulations of forced isotropic turbulence with viscoelastic fluids described by the FENE-P model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Pedro O.; Pinho, Fernando T.; da Silva, Carlos B.

    2016-12-01

    A new subgrid-scale (SGS) model developed for large-eddy simulations (LES) of dilute polymer solutions, described by the finitely extensible nonlinear elastic constitutive equation closed with the Peterlin approximation, is presented. In this distortion similarity model (DSIM) the filtered conformation tensor evolution equation is based on the self-similarity of the polymer stretching terms, and on a global equilibrium of the trace of the conformation tensor, which is proportional to the elastic energy stored in the polymer molecules, while the SGS stresses are modelled with the classical Smagorinsky model. The DSIM closure is assessed in direct numerical simulations (DNS) of forced isotropic turbulence using classical a priori tests, and in a posteriori (LES) showing very good agreement with all the exact (filtered DNS) results. The DSIM model is simple to implement and computationally inexpensive and represents a major step forward in the numerical simulation of turbulent flows of Newtonian fluids with polymer additives.

  18. Computing Normal Shock-Isotropic Turbulence Interaction With Tetrahedral Meshes and the Space-Time CESE Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatachari, Balaji Shankar; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2016-11-01

    The focus of this study is scale-resolving simulations of the canonical normal shock- isotropic turbulence interaction using unstructured tetrahedral meshes and the space-time conservation element solution element (CESE) method. Despite decades of development in unstructured mesh methods and its potential benefits of ease of mesh generation around complex geometries and mesh adaptation, direct numerical or large-eddy simulations of turbulent flows are predominantly carried out using structured hexahedral meshes. This is due to the lack of consistent multi-dimensional numerical formulations in conventional schemes for unstructured meshes that can resolve multiple physical scales and flow discontinuities simultaneously. The CESE method - due to its Riemann-solver-free shock capturing capabilities, non-dissipative baseline schemes, and flux conservation in time as well as space - has the potential to accurately simulate turbulent flows using tetrahedral meshes. As part of the study, various regimes of the shock-turbulence interaction (wrinkled and broken shock regimes) will be investigated along with a study on how adaptive refinement of tetrahedral meshes benefits this problem. The research funding for this paper has been provided by Revolutionary Computational Aerosciences (RCA) subproject under the NASA Transformative Aeronautics Concepts Program (TACP).

  19. Direct numerical simulations of homogeneous isotropic turbulence in a dense gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giauque, A.; Corre, C.; Menghetti, M.

    2017-03-01

    A study of turbulence in BZT dense gas flows is performed using DNS. It is shown that for a large but realistic intensity, the turbulence in dense gas flows behaves in a highly compressible manner when the average thermodynamic state lies within the inversion region in which the gas fundamental derivative is negative. A close similarity is observed in the evolution of the kinetic energy when the initial turbulent Mach number and the Taylor Reynolds number are matched regardless of the Equation of State (EoS) considered. A large turbulent Mach number is yet more easily attained in dense gas flows lying in the inversion region because of the low speed of sound associated with it. In this case the turbulence shows a highly compressible evolution with periodic exchanges between the internal and kinetic energies. In order to assess the capabilities of currently available Large Eddy Simulation (LES) subgrid-scale models, a-posteriori tests are performed using the dynamic Smagorinsky model. Coherently with the hypothesis it relies on, the model perfectly captures the evolution of the kinetic energy when the turbulent Mach number is low enough. When using the perfect gas EoS at a higher turbulent Mach number the agreement is reasonable. Yet, when the average thermodynamic state lies within the inversion region and when using the thermal and caloric Martin&Hou EoS, the model is not able to capture the correct evolution of the kinetic energy. The results presented in this study call for a specific research effort directed towards the assessment and possibly the development of advanced subgrid-scale models for LES of turbulent dense gas flows.

  20. Comparison of three stationary tests for eddy covariance measurements of turbulent fluxes of different scalars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donateo, Antonio; Cava, Daniela; Contini, Daniele

    2013-04-01

    In atmospheric turbulent flows, variables describing the motion undergo random and stochastic fluctuations. In turbulence studies the hypotheses of stationarity and ergodicity of time series is required in order to obtain estimates of ensemble averages from the temporal averages obtained from single runs. In atmosphere, however, equivalence between the two averages is just approximated because of non stationarity often inherent to atmospheric time series. Typically non-stationary conditions are driven by weather or internal boundary layer changing, for example for the presence of gravity waves or simply for the slow diurnal evolution of the boundary layer. The individuation of non-stationary cases is important for measurements of turbulent fluxes using the eddy covariance method generally applied to 30 minutes averages. Moreover it is necessary to have an analytical/parametric stationarity test, which can be used in real time determination of turbulent fluxes, for example in Fluxnet network. Nowadays different stationarity tests are proposed in literature and they are substantially used by scientific community (Foken & Wichura, 1996; Mahrt, 1998; Affre et al., 2000). In this work several time series have been analysed with the three different stationarity tests and a comparison of their performances has been developed. The stationarity tests have been applied to different scalars (temperature, ultrafine particles number concentration, carbon dioxide and water vapour concentration). All the time series come from measurements in different sites and are collected over different canopies: iced surface (in Antarctica), urban or suburban surface (Italy) and vegetal canopy over forests (both in Italy and USA). In total 6 different sites have been analysed and the performances of the stationarity tests do not seem to be site dependent. The correlation of their performances as a function of local micro-meteorological conditions have been analysed. All the three tests show

  1. Analytical linear theory for the interaction of a planar shock wave with an isotropic turbulent vorticity field.

    PubMed

    Wouchuk, J G; Huete Ruiz de Lira, C; Velikovich, A L

    2009-06-01

    An exact analytical model for the interaction between an isolated shock wave and an isotropic turbulent vorticity field is presented. The interaction with a single-mode two-dimensional (2D) divergence-free vorticity field is analyzed in detail, giving the time and space evolutions of the perturbed quantities downstream. The results are generalized to study the interaction of a planar shock wave with an isotropic three-dimensional (3D) or 2D preshock vorticity field. This field is decomposed into Fourier modes, and each mode is assumed to interact independently with the shock front. Averages of the downstream quantities are made by integrating over the angles that define the orientation of the upstream velocity field. The ratio of downstream/upstream kinetic energies is in good agreement with existing numerical and experimental results for both 3D and 2D preshock vorticity fields. The generation of sound and the sonic energy flux radiated downstream from the shock front is also discussed in detail, as well as the amplification of transverse vorticity across the shock front. The anisotropy is calculated for the far downstream fields of both velocity and vorticity. All the quantities characteristic of the shock-turbulence interaction are reduced to closed-form exact analytical expressions. They are presented as explicit functions of the two parameters that govern the dynamics of the interaction: the adiabatic exponent gamma and the shock Mach number M1 . These formulas are further reduced to simpler exact asymptotic expressions in the limits of weak and strong shock waves (M_{1}-11, M_{1}1) and high shock compressibility of the gas (gamma-->1) .

  2. Analysis of non-stationary turbulent flows using Multivariate EMD and Matching Pursuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Arvind; Agostini, Lionel; Gaitonde, Datta; Visbal, Miguel

    2016-11-01

    Time-series analysis of highly transient non-stationary turbulent flow is challenging. Traditional Fourier based techniques are generally difficult to apply because of the highly aperiodic nature of the data. Another significant obstacle is assimilating multivariate data, such as multiple variables at a location or from different sources in a flow-field. Such an analysis has the potential to identify sensitive events common among these sources. In this work, we explore two techniques to address these challenges - Multivariate Empirical Mode Decomposition and Matching Pursuits, on deep dynamic stall of a plunging airfoil in a mixed laminar-transitional-turbulent regime. Although primarily used for neuroscience applications, we use them in fluid mechanics and highlight their significant potential to overcome limitations of more traditional techniques. Application of these methods highlight different stages in the development of stall. A first stage shows development of 2-D boundary layer oscillations at frequencies similar to those associated with trailing edge vortices. Subsequently, new instabilities arise due to imminent separation. The separation bubble itself is characterized by relatively higher frequency content, and further analysis indicates its 3-D collapse.

  3. Effects of Reynolds Number and Stokes Number on Particle-pair Relative Velocity in Isotropic Turbulence: An Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Zhongwang; Bragg, Andrew; Hammond, Adam; Liang, Zach; Collins, Lance; Meng, Hui

    2016-11-01

    Effects of Reynolds number (Rλ) and Stokes number (St) on particle-pair relative velocity (RV) were studied using four-frame particle tracking in an enclosed turbulence chamber. Two tests were performed: varying Rλ between 246 and 357 at six St values, and varying St between 0.02 and 4.63 at five Rλ values. By comparing experimental and DNS results of mean inward particle-pair RV, , we observed excellent agreement for all test conditions across a large range of particle separation distance (r) ; however at r <= 10 η (η: Kolmogorov length scale), experimental values were higher than simulation. At fixed St , was found to be independent of Rλ in the observable St , r, and Rλ ranges. At fixed Rλ, increased with St at small r and decreased with St at large r. We further compared and variance of RV, , between experiments, DNS and theoretical predictions by Pan and Padoan (2010). At 0 < St <= 1 , theory-predicted and matched with DNS and experiment in the range of r = 1 - 60 η . As St increased, theoretical predictions were lower than experiment and DNS results. The potential causes of these trends are explored. Additionally, we discuss the observed electrostatic charge effect on particle relative motion in isotropic turbulence and our plans of studying this effect using an integrated experimental, numerical and theoretical approach. This work was supported by NSF CBET-0967407 and CBET-0967349.

  4. A numerical study of mixing in stationary, nonpremixed, turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overholt, Matthew Ryan

    1998-10-01

    In this work a detailed numerical study is made of a statistically-stationary, non-premixed, turbulent reacting model flow known as Periodic Reaction Zones. The mixture fraction-progress variable approach is used, with a mean gradient in the mixture fraction and a model, single-step, reversible, finite-rate thermochemistry, yielding both stationary and local extinction behavior. The passive scalar is studied first, using a statistical forcing scheme to achieve stationarity of the velocity field. Multiple independent direct numerical simulations (DNS) are performed for a wide range of Reynolds numbers with a number of results including a bilinear model for scalar mixing jointly conditioned on the scalar and x2-component of velocity, Gaussian scalar probability density function tails which were anticipated to be exponential, and the quantification of the dissipation of scalar flux. A new deterministic forcing scheme for DNS is then developed which yields reduced fluctuations in many quantities and a more natural evolution of the velocity fields. This forcing method is used for the final portion of this work. DNS results for Periodic Reaction Zones are compared with the Conditional Moment Closure (CMC) model, the Quasi-Equilibrium Distributed Reaction (QEDR) model, and full probability density function (PDF) simulations using the Euclidean Minimum Spanning Tree (EMST) and the Interaction by Exchange with the Mean (IEM) mixing models. It is shown that CMC and QEDR results based on the local scalar dissipation match DNS wherever local extinction is not present. However, due to the large spatial variations of scalar dissipation, and hence local Damkohler number, local extinction is present even when the global Damkohler number is twenty-five times the critical value for extinction. Finally, in the PDF simulations the EMST mixing model closely reproduces CMC and DNS results when local extinction is not present, whereas the IEM model results in large error.

  5. The influence of search strategies and homogeneous isotropic turbulence on planktonic contact rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, C. J.; Reynolds, A. M.

    2007-12-01

    Many species have been shown to adopt a Lévy-flight pattern of movement which are consistent with the most efficient way to locate sparsely distributed targets. Here, we consider a predator that conducts its search for prey in a turbulent environment. Such a situation is relevant to zooplankton-phytoplankton ecosystems. Kinematic simulation is used to represent the turbulent velocity field in the surface layers of the open ocean and contact with the prey is maximised for a predator swimming a Lévy flight with an exponent μsime1.2. The contact rate exceeds that recorded during straight-line swimming and passive advection. The observation that the contact rate is maximised for μsime1.2 appears to be not strongly dependent on predator swimming speed. The results are discussed in the context of recent work on planktonic search in laboratory conditions where Lévy-flight exponents of μsime2 were noted.

  6. On the modification of particle dispersion in isotropic turbulence by free rotation of particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yongnam; Lee, Changhoon

    2008-11-01

    Effect of a particle's spin is investigated numerically by considering the effect of lift occurring due to difference of rotations of a particle and of fluid such as the Saffman lift and Magnus force. These lift forces have been neglected in many previous works on particle-laden turbulence. The trajectory of particles can be changed by the lift forces, resulting in significant modification of the stochastic characteristics of heavy particles. Probability density functions and autocorrelations are examined of velocity, acceleration of solid particle and acceleration of fluid at the position of solid particle. Changes in velocity statistics are negligible but statistics related with acceleration are a little bit changed by particle's rotation. When a laden particle encounters with coherent structures during the motion, the particle's rotation might significantly affects the motion due to intermittently large fluid acceleration near coherent structures. The result can be used for development of stochastic model for particle dispersion. Detailed physical interpretation will be presented in the meeting.

  7. Turbulent burning velocities of premixed CH{sub 4}/diluent/air flames in intense isotropic turbulence with consideration of radiation losses

    SciTech Connect

    Shy, S.S.; Yang, S.I.; Lin, W.J.; Su, R.C.

    2005-10-01

    This paper presents turbulent burning velocities, S{sub T}, of several premixed CH{sub 4}/diluent/air flames at the same laminar burning velocity S{sub L}=0.1 m/s for two equivalence ratios f=0.7 and 1.4 near flammability limits with consideration of radiation heat losses from small (N{sub 2} diluted) to large (CO{sub 2} diluted). Experiments are carried out in a cruciform burner, in which the long vertical vessel is used to provide a downward propagating premixed flame and the large horizontal vessel equipped with a pair of counterrotating fans and perforated plates can be used to generate an intense isotropic turbulence in the central region between the two perforated plates. Turbulent flame speeds are measured by four different arrangements of pairs of ion-probe sensors at different positions from the top to the bottom of the central region in the burner. It is found that the effect of gas velocity on S{sub T} measured in the central region can be neglected. Simultaneous measurements using the pressure transducer and ion-probe sensors show that the pressure rise due to turbulent burning has little influence on S{sub T}. These measurements prove the accuracy of the S{sub T} data. At f=0.7, the percentage of [(S{sub T}/S{sub L}){sub CO{sub 2}}-(S{sub T}/S{sub L}){sub N{sub 2}}]/(S{sub T}/S{sub L}){sub N{sub 2}} decreases gradually from -4 to -17% when values of u{sup '}/S{sub L} increase from 4 to 46, while at f=1.4 such decrease is much more abrupt from -19 to -53% when values of u{sup '}/S{sub L} only increase from 4 to 18. The larger the radiation losses, the smaller the values of S{sub T}. This decreasing effect is augmented by increasing u{sup '}/S{sub L} and is particularly pronounced for rich CH{sub 4} flames. When u{sup '}/S{sub L}=18, lean CO{sub 2} and/or N{sub 2}-diluted CH{sub 4} flames have much higher, 3.6 and/or 1.8 times higher, values of S{sub T}/S{sub L} than rich CO{sub 2} and/or N{sub 2}-diluted CH{sub 4} flames, respectively. It is found that

  8. Experimental heat transfer investigation of stationary and orthogonally rotating asymmetric and symmetric heated smooth and turbulated channels

    SciTech Connect

    El-Husayni, H.A.; Taslim, M.E.; Kercher, D.M. GE Aircraft Engines, Lynn, MA )

    1992-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation to determine the effects of variations in wall thermal boundary conditions on local heat transfer coefficients in stationary and orthogonally rotating smooth walls and two opposite-wall turbulated square channels are presented. Findings are obtained for three distributions of uniform wall heat flux: asymmetric, applied to the primary wall only; symmetric, applied to two opposite walls only; and fully symmetric, applied to all four channel walls. Trailing side heat transfer generally increased with rotation number, whereas the leading wall results showed a decreasing trend at low rotation numbers to a minimum and then an increasing trend with a further increase in the rotation number. The stationary turbulated wall heat transfer coefficients did not vary markedly with the variations in wall heat flux distributions. While the asymmetric case exhibited a slight deficit in trailing wall heat transfer coefficients due to rotation, the symmetric case indicated little change, whereas the fully symmetric case showed an enhancement. 32 refs.

  9. An Analytical Model for the Three-Point Third-Order Velocity Correlation in Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Henry; Moser, Robert

    2006-11-01

    In turbulent flows, the three-point third-order velocity correlation Tijk(r,r') = is an important quantity. In particular, when considering large eddy simulation, the contribution of the nonlinear terms to evolution of the two-point second-order correlation of filtered velocities can be written in terms of integrals of the three-point correlation. In contrast, the two-point third order correlation appears in the equation for the unfiltered two-point correlation, and under the Kolmogorov scaling assumptions, this is sufficient to determine it. An analytic model for the three-point third-order correlation, under the same assumptions, would be very useful in the analysis of LES. There are constraints imposed by continuity and symmetry, and in 1954, Proudman and Reid determined a general form for the Fourier transform of this correlation that satisfies the constraints. Inverse transforming to physical-space yields a form for Tijk(r,r') in terms of derivatives of a scalar function of the magnitudes of the separation vectors. Considering the simplest possible forms of the scalar function that are consistent with the known two-point third-order correlation in the Kolmogorov inertial range yields a six-dimensional space of representations. The coefficients of the representation for Tijk are then determined from DNS data to yield the proposed model.

  10. Experimental heat transfer investigation of stationary and orthogonally rotating asymmetric and symmetric heated smooth and turbulated channels

    SciTech Connect

    El-Husayni, H.A.; Taslim, M.E. . Mechanical Engineering Dept.); Kercher, D.M. )

    1994-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the effects of variations in wall thermal boundary conditions on local heat transfer coefficients in stationary and orthogonally rotating smooth wall and two opposite-wall turbulated square channels. Results were obtained for three distributions of uniform wall heat flux: asymmetric, applied to the primary wall only; symmetric, applied to two opposite walls only; and fully symmetric, applied to all four channel walls. Measured stationary and rotating smooth channel average heat transfer coefficients at channel location L/D[sub h] = 9.53 were not significantly sensitive to wall heat flux distributions. Trailing side heat transfer generally increased with Rotation number, whereas the leading wall results showed a decreasing trend at low Rotation numbers to a minimum and then an increasing trend with further increase in Rotation number. The stationary turbulated wall heat transfer coefficients did not vary markedly with the variations in wall heat flux distributions. Rotating leading wall heat transfer decreased with Rotation number and showed little sensitivity to heat flux distributions except for the fully symmetric heated wall case at the highest Reynolds number tested. Trailing wall heat transfer coefficients were sensitive to the thermal wall distributions generally at all Reynolds numbers tested and particularly with increasing Rotation number. While the asymmetric case showed a slight deficit in trailing wall heat transfer coefficients due to rotation, the symmetric case indicated little change, whereas the fully symmetric case exhibited an enhancement.

  11. One- and two-point velocity distribution functions and velocity autocorrelation functions for various Reynolds numbers in decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, Iwao

    2007-01-01

    A decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence is treated on the combined bases of the Kolmogorov hypothesis and the cross-independence hypothesis (for a closure of the Monin-Lundgren (ML) hierarchy of many-point velocity distributions) in turbulence. Similarity solutions for one- and two-point velocity distributions are obtained in the viscous, inertial and large-scale ranges of separation distance, from which we can give a reasonable picture of longitudinal and transverse velocity autocorrelation functions for any Reynolds number, even though they are distant from exact solutions of the infinite ML hierarchy. Possibility of non-similarity solutions with other reasonable and more realistic features is unveiled within the same theoretical framework. The cross-independence hypothesis is proved to be inconsistent with the Kolmogorov [1941b. Dissipation of energy in locally isotropic turbulence. Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 32, 16-18.] theory in the inertial range. This is the main factor by which our special strategy (described in Introduction) is taken for solving this problem.

  12. Enhanced settling of nonheavy inertial particles in homogeneous isotropic turbulence: The role of the pressure gradient and the Basset history force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hinsberg, M. A. T.; Clercx, H. J. H.; Toschi, F.

    2017-02-01

    The Stokes drag force and the gravity force are usually sufficient to describe the behavior of sub-Kolmogorov-size (or pointlike) heavy particles in turbulence, in particular when the particle-to-fluid density ratio ρp/ρf≳103 (with ρp and ρf the particle and fluid density, respectively). This is, in general, not the case for smaller particle-to-fluid density ratios, in particular not for ρp/ρf≲102 . In that case the pressure gradient force, added mass effects, and the Basset history force also play important roles. In this study we focus on the understanding of the role of these additional forces, all of hydrodynamic origin, in the settling of particles in turbulence. In order to qualitatively elucidate the complex dynamics of such particles in homogeneous isotropic turbulence, we first focus on the case of settling of such particles in the flow field of a single vortex. After having explored this simplified case we extend our analysis to homogeneous isotropic turbulence. In general, we found that the pressure gradient force leads to a decrease in the settling velocity. This can be qualitatively understood by the fact that this force prevents the particles from sweeping out of vortices, a mechanism known as preferential sweeping which causes enhanced settling. Additionally, we found that the Basset history force can both increase and decrease the enhanced settling, depending on the particle Stokes number. Finally, the role of the nonlinear Stokes drag has been explored, confirming that it affects settling of inertial particles in turbulence, but only in a limited way for the parameter settings used in this investigation.

  13. A Stationary One-Equation Turbulent Model with Applications in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, H. B.; Paiva, A.

    2017-05-01

    A one-equation turbulent model is studied in this work in the steady-state and with homogeneous Dirichlet boundary conditions. The considered problem generalizes two distinct approaches that are being used with success in the applications to model different flows through porous media. The novelty of the problem relies on the consideration of the classical Navier-Stokes equations with a feedback forces field, whose presence in the momentum equation will affect the equation for the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) with a new term that is known as the production and represents the rate at which TKE is transferred from the mean flow to the turbulence. By assuming suitable growth conditions on the feedback forces field and on the function that describes the rate of dissipation of the TKE, as well as on the production term, we will prove the existence of the velocity field and of the TKE. The proof of their uniqueness is made by assuming monotonicity conditions on the feedback forces field and on the turbulent dissipation function, together with a condition of Lipschitz continuity on the production term. The existence of a unique pressure, will follow by the application of a standard version of de Rham's lemma.

  14. Experiments on turbulence beneath a free surface in a stationary field generated by a Crump weir: turbulence structure and correlation with the free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Sandro

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a companion paper to a study devoted to the analysis of experimental instantaneous fluid levels and three-component fluid velocity measurements in a stationary flow field generated by a Crump weir in a laboratory flume, using an ultrasonic distance sensor and a three-probe arrangement of an ultrasonic Doppler velocity profiler (UVP) (Longo in Exp Fluids, doi: 10.1007/s00348-010-0881-5, 2010). Whereas Longo (Exp Fluids, doi: 10.1007/s00348-010-0881-5, 2010) deals with a general overview of the problem, the description of the experiments and the analysis of the free surface statistics and relevant scales, the present manuscript is devoted to a detailed analysis of the turbulence and the correlation with the free surface. The data are elaborated by obtaining the macroturbulence Reynolds tensor, using conditional averages based on free surface-fluctuation statistics. We also compute the two-point correlations of fluid velocity, the micro-scale and the integral scale, the correlation between free surface and the turbulence beneath. A free surface-boundary layer was detected having a thickness proportional to the root mean square of the free surface-height series and with a velocity scale that correlates well with the free surface-elevation time gradient. Most of the relevant state variables, such as the mean velocity and Reynolds stress components, collapse to a single curve if scaled appropriately. There are many indicators that a specific regime occurs that has an optimal tuning between the free surface and turbulence. In this regime, the length scales are considered as an indicator.

  15. Rotor noise due to atmospheric turbulence ingestion. I - Fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.; Greitzer, E. M.

    1986-01-01

    In the present analytical procedure for the prediction of helicopter rotor noise generation due to the ingestion of atmospheric turbulence, different models for turbulence fluid mechanics and the ingestion process are combined. The mean flow and turbulence statistics associated with the atmospheric boundary layer are modeled with attention to the effects of atmospheric stability length, windspeed, and altitude. The turbulence field can be modeled as isotropic, locally stationary, and homogeneous. For large mean flow contraction ratios, accurate predictions of turbulence vorticity components at the rotor face requires the incorporation of the differential drift of fluid particles on adjacent streamlines.

  16. Assessment of large-eddy simulation in capturing preferential concentration of heavy particles in isotropic turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Guodong; Zhang, Jian; He, Guo-Wei; Wang, Lian-Ping

    2010-12-01

    Particle-laden turbulent flow is a typical non-equilibrium process characterized by particle relaxation time τp and the characteristic timescale of the flows τf, in which the turbulent mixing of heavy particles is related to different scales of fluid motions. The preferential concentration (PC) of heavy particles could be strongly affected by fluid motion at dissipation-range scales, which presents a major challenge to the large-eddy simulation (LES) approach. The errors in simulated PC by LES are due to both filtering and the subgrid scale (SGS) eddy viscosity model. The former leads to the removal of the SGS motion and the latter usually results in a more spatiotemporally correlated vorticity field. The dependence of these two factors on the flow Reynolds number is assessed using a priori and a posteriori tests, respectively. The results suggest that filtering is the dominant factor for the under-prediction of the PC for Stokes numbers less than 1, while the SGS eddy viscosity model is the dominant factor for the over-prediction of the PC for Stokes numbers between 1 and 10. The effects of the SGS eddy viscosity model on the PC decrease as the Reynolds number and Stokes number increase. LES can well predict the PC for particle Stokes numbers larger than 10. An SGS model for particles with small and intermediate Stokes numbers is needed to account for the effects of the removed SGS turbulent motion on the PC.

  17. Testing an in-line digital holography ‘inverse method’ for the Lagrangian tracking of evaporating droplets in homogeneous nearly isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chareyron, D.; Marié, J. L.; Fournier, C.; Gire, J.; Grosjean, N.; Denis, L.; Lance, M.; Méès, L.

    2012-04-01

    An in-line digital holography technique is tested, the objective being to measure Lagrangian three-dimensional (3D) trajectories and the size evolution of droplets evaporating in high-Reλ strong turbulence. The experiment is performed in homogeneous, nearly isotropic turbulence (50 × 50 × 50 mm3) created by the meeting of six synthetic jets. The holograms of droplets are recorded with a single high-speed camera at frame rates of 1-3 kHz. While hologram time series are generally processed using a classical approach based on the Fresnel transform, we follow an ‘inverse problem’ approach leading to improved size and 3D position accuracy and both in-field and out-of-field detection. The reconstruction method is validated with 60 μm diameter water droplets released from a piezoelectric injector ‘on-demand’ and which do not appreciably evaporate in the sample volume. Lagrangian statistics on 1000 reconstructed tracks are presented. Although improved, uncertainty on the depth positions remains higher, as expected in in-line digital holography. An additional filter is used to reduce the effect of this uncertainty when calculating the droplet velocities and accelerations along this direction. The diameters measured along the trajectories remain constant within ±1.6%, thus indicating that accuracy on size is high enough for evaporation studies. The method is then tested with R114 freon droplets at an early stage of evaporation. The striking feature is the presence on each hologram of a thermal wake image, aligned with the relative velocity fluctuations ‘seen’ by the droplets (visualization of the Lagrangian fluid motion about the droplet). Its orientation compares rather well with that calculated by using a dynamical equation for describing the droplet motion. A decrease of size due to evaporation is measured for the droplet that remains longest in the turbulence domain.

  18. Planktonic encounter rates in homogeneous isotropic turbulence: the case of predators with limited fields of sensory perception.

    PubMed

    Lewis, D M

    2003-05-07

    It is a well-established fact that encounter rates between different species of planktonic microorganism, either swimming, or passively advected by the flow, are enhanced in the presence of turbulence. However, due to the complexity of the various calculations involved, current encounter rate theories are based on a number of simplifying approximations, which do not reflect reality. In particular, a typical planktonic predator is usually assumed to have perfect 'all round vision', i.e. it can perceive a prey particle at any relative orientation, provided it lies within some given contact radius R. Unfortunately, there is a wide body of experimental evidence that this is not the case. In this study the encounter problem for a predator with a limited field of sensory perception, swimming in a turbulent flow, is examined from first principles and a number of new modelling ideas proposed. A wide range of kinematic simulations are also undertaken to test these predictions. Particular attention is paid to the swimming strategy such a predator might undertake to enhance its encounter rate. It turns out that the predicted optimum swimming strategies differ radically from the results of previous work. Empirical evidence is also presented which appears to support these new findings.

  19. Higher-order derivative correlations and the alignment of small-scale structures in isotropic numerical turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    The classical approach to the investigation of small-scale intermittency in turbulence is based on the higher-order derivative correlations such as skewness and flatness factors. In the study of the small scales, numerial simulations can provide more detail than experiments. In the present paper, a variety of velocity- and scalar-derivative correlations are calculated over a range of Reynolds numbers. Particular attention is given to third- and fourth-order correlations, taking into account also some fifth- and sixth-order correlations to allow comparisons with the phenomenological models. The governing equations are the incompresssible Navier-Stokes equation for the velocity and transport equation for a passive scalar. Two numerical codes are used for the simulations presented. Attention is given to details regarding the numerical method used, forcing, simulation parameters, spectra and skewnesses, and graphics.

  20. Higher-order derivative correlations and the alignment of small-scale structures in isotropic numerical turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    In a three dimensional simulation higher order derivative correlations, including skewness and flatness factors, are calculated for velocity and passive scalar fields and are compared with structures in the flow. The equations are forced to maintain steady state turbulence and collect statistics. It is found that the scalar derivative flatness increases much faster with Reynolds number than the velocity derivative flatness, and the velocity and mixed derivative skewness do not increase with Reynolds number. Separate exponents are found for the various fourth order velocity derivative correlations, with the vorticity flatness exponent the largest. Three dimensional graphics show strong alignment between the vorticity, rate of strain, and scalar-gradient fields. The vorticity is concentrated in tubes with the scalar gradient and the largest principal rate of strain aligned perpendicular to the tubes. Velocity spectra, in Kolmogorov variables, collapse to a single curve and a short minus 5/3 spectral regime is observed.

  1. Comparison of Stochastic Theory and DNS for the Relative Motion of High-Inertia Particle Pairs in Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, Sarma; Dhariwal, Rohit; Koch, Donald

    2016-11-01

    In an earlier work, we derived closures in the limit of high Stokes number for the diffusivity tensor in the PDF equation for particle pairs. The diffusivity contained the time integral of the Eulerian two-time correlation of fluid relative velocities seen by pairs that are nearly stationary.The two-time correlation was analytically resolved through the approximation that the temporal change in the fluid relative velocities seen by a pair occurs principally due to the advection of smaller eddies past the pair by large scale eddies. Two diffusivity expressions were obtained based on whether the pair center of mass remained fixed during flow time scales, or moved in response to integral-scale eddies. A quantitative analysis of the stochastic theory is performed through a comparison of the pair statistics obtained using Langevin simulations with those from DNS. Langevin simulations of particle pair dispersion were performed using the diffusivity closures for four particle Stokes numbers based on the Kolmogorov time-scale, Stη = 10 , 20 , 40 , 80 and at two Taylor micro-scale Reynolds numbers Reλ = 76 , 131 . Statistics such as RDF, PDF, variance and kurtosis of particle-pair relative velocities were computed using both Langevin and DNS runs, and compared.

  2. Power fluctuations, large deviations and turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Bandi, Mahesh M; Chumakov, Sergei; Connaughton, Colm P

    2008-01-01

    We study local power fluctuations in numerical simulations of stationary, homogenous, isotropic turbulence in two and three dimensions with Gaussian forcing. Due to the near-Gaussianity of the one-point velocity distribution, the probability distribution function (pdf) of the local power is well modeled by the pdf of the product of two joint normally distributed variables. In appropriate units, this distribution is calculated exactly and shown to satisfy a Fluctuation Relation (FR) with a coefficient which depends on {epsilon}.

  3. Observation of profiles of turbulence in stationary and well mixed convective boundary layers over the ARM Southern Great Plains and the Tropical Western Pacific sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, M.; Turner, D. D.; Heus, T.; Newsom, R. K.

    2016-12-01

    The high temporal and vertical resolution and the ability to operate continuously under most atmospheric conditions make Raman lidars outstanding tools for studying turbulence in the convective boundary layer (CBL). Raman lidars have been used to study the turbulent structure of the CBL and the entrainment zone; however, previous studies have been in general based on a limited number of cases, which restricts the representativeness of the results for different atmospheric conditions. This study uses data from the autonomous Raman lidars that measure water vapor over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site located at Lamont, Oklahoma (USA) and the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site located at Darwin (Australia) as part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. The data from SGP used here spans 4 years from January 2012 to December 2015 and the TWP data span 6 years from January 2010 to December 2015. The vertical profiles of turbulent fluctuations have been derived using an auto covariance technique to separate out the instrument random error from the atmospheric variability over a set of 2-h period time series during which the CBL is quasi-stationary and well mixed. The temporal and vertical resolutions of water vapor are 10 s and 37.5 m, respectively. The error analysis of the Raman lidars observations demonstrates that the lidars are capable of resolving the vertical structure of turbulence in the CBL, and the small noise errors allow us to thoroughly examine different moments up to the fourth-order. The monthly, seasonal and yearly variations of the vertical profiles of variance, skewness, kurtosis and integral scale have been carefully analyzed. We particularly highlight noticeable differences between the structure of turbulence in the CBL and the entrainment zone at the SGP and TWP sites.

  4. The effect of the polymer relaxation time on the nonlinear energy cas- cade and dissipation of statistically steady and decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, Pedro C.; da Silva, Carlos B.; Pinho, Fernando T.

    2013-11-01

    We report a numerical study of statistically steady and decaying turbulence of FENE-P fluids for varying polymer relaxation times ranging from the Kolmogorov dissipation time-scale to the eddy turnover time. The total turbulent kinetic energy dissipation is shown to increase with the polymer relaxation time in both steady and decaying turbulence, implying a ``drag increase.'' If the total power input in the statistically steady case is kept equal in the Newtonian and the viscoelastic simulations the increase in the turbulence-polymer energy transfer naturally lead to the previously reported depletion of the Newtonian, but not the overall, kinetic energy dissipation. The modifications to the nonlinear energy cascade with varying Deborah/Weissenberg numbers are quantified and their origins investigated. The authors acknowledge the financial support from Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia under grant PTDC/EME-MFE/113589/2009.

  5. Isotropic wave turbulence with simplified kernels: Existence, uniqueness, and mean-field limit for a class of instantaneous coagulation-fragmentation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merino-Aceituno, Sara

    2016-12-01

    The isotropic 4-wave kinetic equation is considered in its weak formulation using model (simplified) homogeneous kernels. Existence and uniqueness of solutions is proven in a particular setting where the kernels have a rate of growth at most linear. We also consider finite stochastic particle systems undergoing instantaneous coagulation-fragmentation phenomena and give conditions in which this system approximates the solution of the equation (mean-field limit).

  6. Time-resolved Tomo-PIV measurements of the interaction between a stationary held sphere and a turbulent boundary layer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hout, Rene; Eisma, Jerke; Overmars, Edwin; Elsinga, Gerrit; Westerweel, Jerry

    2015-11-01

    Time resolved tomographic PIV measurements (acquisition rate 250Hz) were performed in a turbulent boundary layer (TBL) on the side wall of an open channel, water flow facility (cross section 60x60cm, Wx H) , 3.5m downstream of the inlet at a bulk flow velocity of Ub = 0.17m/s (Reb =Ub H / ν = 102x103, δ0 . 99 = 5 . 0 cm, Reθ = 891). The measurement volume was a horizontal slab (6x1.5x6cm3, lx wx h) extending from the side wall, 30cm above the bottom. The Tomo-PIV setup comprised four high-speed ImagerPro HS cameras (2016x2016pixels), a high-speed laser (Nd:YLF, Darwin Duo 80M, Quantronix), optics/prisms and data acquisition/processing software (LaVision, DaVis8.2). A sphere with diameter, D = 6mm (D+ = 51, ``+'' denotes inner wall scaling), was positioned at y = 37.5 and 5.4mm (y+ = 319 and 46) from the wall (measured from the sphere's center). The latter position covers most of the buffer layer while the former is well in the outer layer. Sphere Reynolds numbers based on D and the average streamwise velocity at the sphere's center were 984 (y+ = 319) and 684 (y+ = 46). Results show the interaction between the coherent turbulence structures in the TBL and those generated in the sphere's wake. Total and partial destruction of the log-law layer is observed when the sphere is positioned in the buffer and outer layer, respectively.

  7. Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, Uriel

    1996-01-01

    Written five centuries after the first studies of Leonardo da Vinci and half a century after A.N. Kolmogorov's first attempt to predict the properties of flow, this textbook presents a modern account of turbulence, one of the greatest challenges in physics. "Fully developed turbulence" is ubiquitous in both cosmic and natural environments, in engineering applications and in everyday life. Elementary presentations of dynamical systems ideas, probabilistic methods (including the theory of large deviations) and fractal geometry make this a self-contained textbook. This is the first book on turbulence to use modern ideas from chaos and symmetry breaking. The book will appeal to first-year graduate students in mathematics, physics, astrophysics, geosciences and engineering, as well as professional scientists and engineers.

  8. Chaotic Lagrangian models for turbulent relative dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacorata, Guglielmo; Vulpiani, Angelo

    2017-04-01

    A deterministic multiscale dynamical system is introduced and discussed as a prototype model for relative dispersion in stationary, homogeneous, and isotropic turbulence. Unlike stochastic diffusion models, here trajectory transport and mixing properties are entirely controlled by Lagrangian chaos. The anomalous "sweeping effect," a known drawback common to kinematic simulations, is removed through the use of quasi-Lagrangian coordinates. Lagrangian dispersion statistics of the model are accurately analyzed by computing the finite-scale Lyapunov exponent (FSLE), which is the optimal measure of the scaling properties of dispersion. FSLE scaling exponents provide a severe test to decide whether model simulations are in agreement with theoretical expectations and/or observation. The results of our numerical experiments cover a wide range of "Reynolds numbers" and show that chaotic deterministic flows can be very efficient, and numerically low-cost, models of turbulent trajectories in stationary, homogeneous, and isotropic conditions. The mathematics of the model is relatively simple, and, in a geophysical context, potential applications may regard small-scale parametrization issues in general circulation models, mixed layer, and/or boundary layer turbulence models as well as Lagrangian predictability studies.

  9. Chaotic Lagrangian models for turbulent relative dispersion.

    PubMed

    Lacorata, Guglielmo; Vulpiani, Angelo

    2017-04-01

    A deterministic multiscale dynamical system is introduced and discussed as a prototype model for relative dispersion in stationary, homogeneous, and isotropic turbulence. Unlike stochastic diffusion models, here trajectory transport and mixing properties are entirely controlled by Lagrangian chaos. The anomalous "sweeping effect," a known drawback common to kinematic simulations, is removed through the use of quasi-Lagrangian coordinates. Lagrangian dispersion statistics of the model are accurately analyzed by computing the finite-scale Lyapunov exponent (FSLE), which is the optimal measure of the scaling properties of dispersion. FSLE scaling exponents provide a severe test to decide whether model simulations are in agreement with theoretical expectations and/or observation. The results of our numerical experiments cover a wide range of "Reynolds numbers" and show that chaotic deterministic flows can be very efficient, and numerically low-cost, models of turbulent trajectories in stationary, homogeneous, and isotropic conditions. The mathematics of the model is relatively simple, and, in a geophysical context, potential applications may regard small-scale parametrization issues in general circulation models, mixed layer, and/or boundary layer turbulence models as well as Lagrangian predictability studies.

  10. Numerical study of small-scale intermittency in three-dimensional turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siggia, E. D.

    1981-06-01

    A study is presented of the intermittency effects (comparable to the 1949 Batchelor and Townsend experiments) which are studied for stationary, homogeneous, isotropic turbulence by means of a direct spectral simulation on a 64 x 64 x 64 lattice. The turbulence is kept stationary, and the rate of energy input and viscosity are free parameters. The interrelations of intermittency and parameterizations of the large scales are discussed. The equations for energy and vorticity balance are checked as a function of wavenumber, and the locality of the energy cascade in wavenumber is also examined. First- and second-derivative flatness factors of order 4.5, 5.0 and 9.0 respectively are found under stationary conditions with bursts to higher values. Three-dimensional plots of the vorticity reveal persistent and extended tubes, sheets, and blobs.

  11. The convergence of DNS results to the LIA solution in canonical shock-turbulence interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Jaiyoung; Livescu, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    The interaction between isotropic turbulence and a normal shock wave is studied using Direct Numerical Simulations, with all flow scales (including the shock width) accurately solved. The simulation domain is open-ended, in a reference frame where the shock is stationary and turbulence is fed through the inlet. Realistic turbulence is generated in separate stationary isotropic simulations, with background velocity matching the shock speed, to avoid the use of the Taylor hypothesis. The shock Mach numbers range from 1.1 to 2.2 and the microscale Reynolds numbers range from 10 to 50. The vortical mode dominates upstream of the shock and the simulations cover the parameter space from linear inviscid, close to the Linear Interaction Analysis (LIA) limit, to regimes dominated by nonlinear and/or viscous effects. This comprehensive coverage of the parameter space shows, for the first time, that turbulence quantities from DNS converge to the LIA solutions as the shock width becomes thinner than the turbulence scales. In this regime, the shock Mach number becomes the dominant parameter, consistent to the LIA prediction.

  12. Diffusion of Sound Waves in a Turbulent Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard H.

    1960-01-01

    The directional and frequency diffusion of a plane monochromatic 2 sound wave in statistically homogeneous, isotropic, and stationary turbulence is analyzed theoretically. The treatment is based on the diffusion equation for the energy density of sound waves, using the scattering cross section derived by Kraichnan for the type of turbulence assumed here. A form for the frequency-wave number spectrum of the turbulence is adopted which contains the pertinent parameters of the flow and is adapted to ease of calculation. A new approach to the evaluation of the characteristic period of the flow is suggested. This spectrum is then related to the scattering cross section. Finally, a diffusion equation is derived as a small-angle scattering approximation to the rigorous transport equation. The rate of spread of the incident wave in frequency and direction is calculated, as well as the power spectrum and autocorrelation for the wave.

  13. Spectral multigrid methods for the solution of homogeneous turbulence problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erlebacher, G.; Zang, T. A.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1987-01-01

    New three-dimensional spectral multigrid algorithms are analyzed and implemented to solve the variable coefficient Helmholtz equation. Periodicity is assumed in all three directions which leads to a Fourier collocation representation. Convergence rates are theoretically predicted and confirmed through numerical tests. Residual averaging results in a spectral radius of 0.2 for the variable coefficient Poisson equation. In general, non-stationary Richardson must be used for the Helmholtz equation. The algorithms developed are applied to the large-eddy simulation of incompressible isotropic turbulence.

  14. Scaling of Lyapunov Exponents in Homogeneous, Isotropic DNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzsimmons, Nicholas; Malaya, Nicholas; Moser, Robert

    2013-11-01

    Lyapunov exponents measure the rate of separation of initially infinitesimally close trajectories in a chaotic system. Using the exponents, we are able to probe the chaotic nature of homogeneous isotropic turbulence and study the instabilities of the chaotic field. The exponents are measured by calculating the instantaneous growth rate of a linear disturbance, evolved with the linearized Navier-Stokes equation, at each time step. In this talk, we examine these exponents in the context of homogeneous isotropic turbulence with two goals: 1) to investigate the scaling of the exponents with respect to the parameters of forced homogeneous isotropic turbulence, and 2) to characterize the instabilities that lead to chaos in turbulence. Specifically, we explore the scaling of the Lyapunov exponents with respect to the Reynolds number and with respect to the ratio of the integral length scale and the computational domain size.

  15. Safety of isotropic flywheels

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, M.W.

    1981-04-30

    A probabilistic safety criterion for isotropic flywheel rotors is established based on the tolerated noncontainment failure rates of commercial aircraft turbojet engine rotors. A technique is developed combining reliability with fracture mechanics, and a sample calculation provided, to show the energy-storage levels that isotropic flywheel rotors could achieve within the constraints of this safety criterion.

  16. Infinite Products of Random Isotropically Distributed Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'yn, A. S.; Sirota, V. A.; Zybin, K. P.

    2017-01-01

    Statistical properties of infinite products of random isotropically distributed matrices are investigated. Both for continuous processes with finite correlation time and discrete sequences of independent matrices, a formalism that allows to calculate easily the Lyapunov spectrum and generalized Lyapunov exponents is developed. This problem is of interest to probability theory, statistical characteristics of matrix T-exponentials are also needed for turbulent transport problems, dynamical chaos and other parts of statistical physics.

  17. Preferential concentration of particles by turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squires, Kyle D.; Eaton, John K.

    1991-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation of isotropic turbulence was used to investigate the effect of turbulence on the concentration fields of heavy particles. The hydrodynamic field was computed using 64-cubed points, and a statistically stationary flow was obtained by forcing the low-wave-number components of the velocity field. The particles used in the simulations were time advanced according to Stokes drag law and were also assumed to be much more dense than the fluid. Properties of the particle cloud were obtained by following the trajectories of 1,000,000 particles through the simulated flow fields. Three values of the ratio of the particle time constant to large-scale turbulence time scale were used in the simulations: 0.075, 0.15, and 0.52. The simulations show that the particles collect preferentially in regions of low vorticity and high strain rate. This preferential collection was most pronounced for particles with the instantaneous number density as much as 25 times the mean value. The fact that dense particles collect in regions of low vorticity and high strain in turn implies that turbulence may actually inhibit rather than enhance mixing of particles.

  18. Universality and scaling in compressible turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donzis, Diego; Jagannathan, Shriram

    2016-11-01

    A large database of Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of stationary compressible isotropic turbulence at a range of Taylor Reynolds numbers (Rλ 38 - 450) and turbulent Mach numbers (Mt 0 . 1 - 0 . 6) is used to explore universality. While in incompressible turbulence self-similarity analysis leads to a single scaling parameter (Rλ), compressible turbulence expands the parameter space due to the coupling between hydrodynamics and thermodynamics, and the dependence on the mode of external forcing. While for the former it is common to use Mt as a scaling parameter, the effects of the latter are harder to quantify, and their consequences may have been attributed to a certain lack of universality. For instance, when the dilatational mode is forced, the variance and skewness of pressure shows significant scatter when plotted against Mt. Using a Helmholtz decomposition, we split the velocity field into solenoidal and dilatational modes, and propose scaling parameters that include the contribution from both modes. When expressed against these parameters, we observe a universal scaling regime regardless of the mode of excitation of forcing. Other quantities that follow this behavior are also discussed. Support from NSF and AFOSR is gratefully acknowledged.

  19. Structure of wind-shear turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, G.; Laituri, T. R.

    1989-01-01

    The statistical characteristics of wind shear turbulence are modelled. Isotropic turbulence serves as the basis of comparison for the anisotropic turbulence which exists in wind shear. The question of turbulence scales in wind shear is addressed from the perspective of power spectral density.

  20. Structure of wind-shear turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, G.; Laituri, T. R.

    1988-01-01

    The statistical characteristics of wind-shear turbulence are modelled. Isotropic turbulence serves as the basis of comparison for the anisotropic turbulence which exists in wind shear. The question of how turbulence scales in a wind shear is addressed from the perspective of power spectral density.

  1. The effects of anisotropic free-stream turbulence on turbulent boundary layer behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang-Wei, F.; Hoffman, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of near-isotropic and highly anisotropic free-stream turbulence on mean flow properties of the turbulence structure of turbulent boundary layers in a near zero pressure gradient flow has been experimentally evaluated. Turbulence levels vary from 0.5% to 8.0% and the momentum thickness Reynolds number varies from 800 to 1100. The results indicate that the effects of free-stream turbulence on the classical boundary layer properties for near-isotropic turbulence which have been published by other investigators are similar to the case of highly anisotropic turbulence fields, while the effects of free-stream turbulence on the properties of the turbulent structure within the boundary layer for the case of near-isotropic turbulence are quite different compared to the highly anisotropic case.

  2. Modeling the turbulent kinetic energy equation for compressible, homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aupoix, B.; Blaisdell, G. A.; Reynolds, William C.; Zeman, Otto

    1990-01-01

    The turbulent kinetic energy transport equation, which is the basis of turbulence models, is investigated for homogeneous, compressible turbulence using direct numerical simulations performed at CTR. It is shown that the partition between dilatational and solenoidal modes is very sensitive to initial conditions for isotropic decaying turbulence but not for sheared flows. The importance of the dilatational dissipation and of the pressure-dilatation term is evidenced from simulations and a transport equation is proposed to evaluate the pressure-dilatation term evolution. This transport equation seems to work well for sheared flows but does not account for initial condition sensitivity in isotropic decay. An improved model is proposed.

  3. Structure of the isotropic transport operators in three independent space variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abu-Shumays, I. K.; Bareiss, E. H.

    1969-01-01

    Based on the idea of separation of variables, a spectral theory for the three-dimensional, stationary, isotropic transport operator in a vector space of complex-valued Borel functions results in continuous sets of regular and generalized eigenfunctions.

  4. Electron magnetohydrodynamics: Dynamics and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2013-11-01

    We consider dynamics and turbulent interaction of whistler modes within the framework of inertialess electron magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD). We argue that there is no energy principle in EMHD: any stationary closed configuration is neutrally stable. On the other hand, the relaxation principle, the long term evolution of a weakly dissipative system towards Taylor-Beltrami state, remains valid in EMHD. We consider the turbulent cascade of whistler modes. We show that (i) harmonic whistlers are exact nonlinear solutions; (ii) collinear whistlers do not interact (including counterpropagating); (iii) waves with the same value of the wave vector k1=k2 do not interact; (iv) whistler modes have a dispersion that allows a three-wave decay, including into a zero frequency mode; (v) the three-wave interaction effectively couples modes with highly different wave numbers and propagation angles. In addition, linear interaction of a whistler with a single zero mode can lead to spatially divergent structures via parametric instability. All these properties are drastically different from MHD, so that the qualitative properties of the Alfvén turbulence can not be transferred to the EMHD turbulence. We derive the Hamiltonian formulation of EMHD, and using Bogoliubov transformation reduce it to the canonical form; we calculate the matrix elements for the three-wave interaction of whistlers. We solve numerically the kinetic equation and show that, generally, the EMHD cascade develops within a broad range of angles, while transiently it may show anisotropic, nearly two-dimensional structures. Development of a cascade depends on the forcing (nonuniversal) and often fails to reach a steady state. Analytical estimates predict the spectrum of magnetic fluctuations for the quasi-isotropic cascade ∝k-2. The cascade remains weak (not critically balanced). The cascade is UV local, while the infrared locality is weakly (logarithmically) violated.

  5. Critical issues encountered in experiments and measurements involving optical turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, Frank D.

    2007-02-01

    The successful design and operation of high energy laser (HEL) and laser communication systems require a comprehensive and thorough knowledge of the real turbulent atmosphere coupled with high-fidelity realistic laser beam propagation models. To date, modeling and simulation of laser beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence have relied upon a traditional theoretical basis that assumes the existence of homogeneous, isotropic, stationary, and Kolmogorov turbulence. The real impact of the refractive index structure parameter ( C2 n ) on laser beam propagation including effects of non-classical turbulence as well as inner (l °) and outer scale (L °) effects will be examined. Observations clearly show turbulence is often layered and is produced by wave activity and episodic events such as Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. Other critical turbulence issues involve the relationship between mechanical and optical turbulence and the effect of path variability of turbulence and inner scale on optical turbulence parameters over long paths. These issues will be examined from data obtained from five systems: a) a new measurement platform using a free-flying balloon that lifts a ring with a boom upon which are mounted several fine wire (1-μm diameter) sensors to measure high-speed temperature and velocity fluctuations, b) a new system using a kite/tethered blimp platform that obtains both profile and measurements at a fixed altitude over time, c) a 50 MHz radar at Vandenberg Air Force Base that senses at high temporal and spatial resolution to 20 km ASL, d) an instrumented aircraft system, and e) a suite of optical systems. The first four systems all provide estimates of C2 n , the eddy dissipation rate (\\Vegr), l ° and L °. Methods of calibration and problems of interpreting results from the measurement systems are discussed.

  6. Three-dimensional direct numerical simulation study of conditioned moments associated with front propagation in turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, R.; Lipatnikov, A. N.; Bai, X. S.

    2014-08-01

    In order to gain further insight into (i) the use of conditioned quantities for characterizing turbulence within a premixed flame brush and (ii) the influence of front propagation on turbulent scalar transport, a 3D Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) study of an infinitely thin front that self-propagates in statistically stationary, homogeneous, isotropic, forced turbulence was performed by numerically integrating Navier-Stokes and level set equations. While this study was motivated by issues relevant to premixed combustion, the density was assumed to be constant in order (i) to avoid the influence of the front on the flow and, therefore, to know the true turbulence characteristics as reference quantities for assessment of conditioned moments and (ii) to separate the influence of front propagation on turbulent transport from the influence of pressure gradient induced by heat release. Numerical simulations were performed for two turbulence Reynolds numbers (50 and 100) and four ratios (1, 2, 5, and 10) of the rms turbulent velocity to the front speed. Obtained results show that, first, the mean front thickness is decreased when a ratio of the rms turbulent velocity to the front speed is decreased. Second, although the gradient diffusion closure yields the right direction of turbulent scalar flux obtained in the DNS, the diffusion coefficient Dt determined using the DNS data depends on the mean progress variable. Moreover, Dt is decreased when the front speed is increased, thus, indicating that the front propagation affects turbulent scalar transport even in a constant-density case. Third, conditioned moments of the velocity field differ from counterpart mean moments, thus, disputing the use of conditioned velocity moments for characterizing turbulence when modeling premixed turbulent combustion. Fourth, computed conditioned enstrophies are close to the mean enstrophy in all studied cases, thus, suggesting the use of conditioned enstrophy for characterizing turbulence

  7. The isotropic Hamiltonian formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Vaisman, Izu

    2011-02-10

    A Hamiltonian formalism is a procedure that allows to associate a dynamical system to a function and that includes classical Hamiltonian mechanics as a particular case. The present, expository paper gives a survey of the Hamiltonian formalism defined by an isotropic subbundle of TM+T*M, in particular, by a Dirac structure. We discuss reduction and geometric quantization of the Hamiltonian dynamical systems provided by this formalism.

  8. Turbulent scales of dilute particle-laden flows in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groszmann, Daniel E.; Rogers, Chris B.

    2004-12-01

    The work described in this paper attempts to characterize the effects of inertia, isolated from gravity, on the dispersion of solid particles in a turbulent air flow. The experiment consisted of releasing particles of various sizes in an enclosed box of fan-generated, near-homogeneous, isotropic, and stationary turbulent airflow and examining the particle behavior in a microgravity environment. The turbulence box was characterized in ground-based experiments using laser Doppler velocimetry techniques. Microgravity was established by free floating the experiment apparatus during the parabolic trajectory of NASA's KC-135 reduced-gravity aircraft. The microgravity generally lasted about 20 s, with about 50 parabolas per flight and one flight per day over a testing period of four days. To cover a broad range of flow regimes of interest, particles with Stokes numbers St of about 1-100 were released in the turbulence box. The three-dimensional measurements of particle motion were made with a particle-tracking algorithm using a three-camera stereo imaging system. Digital photogrammetric techniques were used to determine the particle locations from the calibrated camera images. The epipolar geometry constraint identified matching particles from the three different camera views and a direct spatial intersection scheme determined the coordinates of particles in three-dimensional space. Since particle loadings were light, velocity and acceleration constraints allowed particles in a sequence of frames to be matched, resulting in particle tracks and dispersion measurements. The goal was to compare the dispersion of different Stokes number particles in zero gravity and thereby decouple the effects of gravity from inertia on the dispersion. Results show that higher inertia particles disperse less in isotropic, nondecaying turbulent flows under zero gravity, in agreement with current models. Measurements show that particles with St≈1 dispersed about ten times more than the St

  9. Stationary and non-stationary nonlinear optical spectroscopy on surface polaritons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponath, H. E.

    1984-01-01

    A phenomenological theory is given for non-stationary electromagnetic surface waves propagating along the boundary plane between two homogeneous isotropic media. The description of nonlinear optical effects using shortened wave equations is demonstrated for spontaneous and simulated Raman scattering processes on surface polaritons.

  10. Isotropically polarized speckle patterns.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Mikolaj K; Aizpurua, Javier; Zambrana-Puyalto, Xavier; Vidal, Xavier; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel; Sáenz, Juan José

    2015-03-20

    The polarization of the light scattered by an optically dense and random solution of dielectric nanoparticles shows peculiar properties when the scatterers exhibit strong electric and magnetic polarizabilities. While the distribution of the scattering intensity in these systems shows the typical irregular speckle patterns, the helicity of the incident light can be fully conserved when the electric and magnetic polarizabilities of the scatterers are equal. We show that the multiple scattering of helical beams by a random dispersion of "dual" dipolar nanospheres leads to a speckle pattern exhibiting a perfect isotropic constant polarization, a situation that could be useful in coherent control of light as well as in lasing in random media.

  11. Dynamic multiscaling in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Ray, Samriddhi Sankar; Sahoo, Ganapati; Pandit, Rahul

    2016-11-01

    We present a study of the multiscaling of time-dependent velocity and magnetic-field structure functions in homogeneous, isotropic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in three dimensions. We generalize the formalism that has been developed for analogous studies of time-dependent structure functions in fluid turbulence to MHD. By carrying out detailed numerical studies of such time-dependent structure functions in a shell model for three-dimensional MHD turbulence, we obtain both equal-time and dynamic scaling exponents.

  12. Turbulence program for propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing

    1995-01-01

    Program goals at the Center for Modeling of Turbulence and Transition (CMOTT), NASA Lewis Research Center, are (1) to develop reliable turbulence (including bypass transition) and combustion models for complex flows in propulsion systems and (2) to integrate developed models into deliverable CFD tools for propulsion systems in collaboration with industry. This viewgraph presentation covers the following topics: development of turbulence and combustion models; collaboration with industry and technology transfer; isotropic eddy viscosity models; algebraic Reynolds stress models; scalar turbulence models; second order closure models; multiple scale k-epsilon models; and PDF modeling of turbulent reacting flows.

  13. On the preferential sampling of helicity by isotropic helicoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biferale, Luca; Gustavsson, Kristian; Scatamacchia, Riccardo

    2016-11-01

    We present a theoretical and numerical study on the motion of isotropic helicoids in complex flows. These are particles whose motion is invariant under rotations but not under mirror reflections of the particle. This is the simplest, yet unexplored, extension of the much studied case of small spherical particles. We show that heavy isotropic helicoids, due to the coupling between translational and rotational degrees of freedom, preferentially sample different helical regions in laminar or chaotic advecting flows. This opens the way to control and engineer particles able to track complex flow structures with potential applications to microfluidics and turbulence. ERC AdG Grant NewTURB no. 339032.

  14. Rodlike localized structure in isotropic pattern-forming systems.

    PubMed

    Bordeu, Ignacio; Clerc, Marcel G

    2015-10-01

    Stationary two-dimensional localized structures have been observed in a wide variety of dissipative systems. The existence, stability properties, dynamical evolution, and bifurcation diagram of an azimuthal symmetry breaking, rodlike localized structure in the isotropic prototype model of pattern formation, the Swift-Hohenberg model, is studied. These rodlike structures persist under the presence of nongradient perturbations. Interaction properties of the rodlike structures are studied. This allows us to envisage the possibility of different crystal-like configurations.

  15. Suppression of turbulent resistivity in turbulent Couette flow

    SciTech Connect

    Si, Jiahe Sonnenfeld, Richard G.; Colgate, Arthur S.; Westpfahl, David J.; Romero, Van D.; Martinic, Joe; Colgate, Stirling A.; Li, Hui; Nornberg, Mark D.

    2015-07-15

    Turbulent transport in rapidly rotating shear flow very efficiently transports angular momentum, a critical feature of instabilities responsible both for the dynamics of accretion disks and the turbulent power dissipation in a centrifuge. Turbulent mixing can efficiently transport other quantities like heat and even magnetic flux by enhanced diffusion. This enhancement is particularly evident in homogeneous, isotropic turbulent flows of liquid metals. In the New Mexico dynamo experiment, the effective resistivity is measured using both differential rotation and pulsed magnetic field decay to demonstrate that at very high Reynolds number rotating shear flow can be described entirely by mean flow induction with very little contribution from correlated velocity fluctuations.

  16. Sedimentation of finite-size particles in quiescent and turbulent environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Luca; Fornari, Walter; Picano, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    Sedimentation of a dispersed solid phase is widely encountered in applications and environmental flows. We present Direct Numerical Simulations of sedimentation in quiescent and turbulent environments using an Immersed Boundary Method to study the behavior of finite-size particles in homogeneous isotropic turbulence. The particle radius is approximately 6 Komlogorov lengthscales, the volume fraction 0.5% and 1% and the density ratio 1.02. The results show that the mean settling velocity is lower in an already turbulent flow than in a quiescent fluid. The reduction with respect to a single particle in quiescent fluid is about 12% in dilute conditions. The probability density function of the particle velocity is almost Gaussian in a turbulent flow, whereas it displays large positive tails in quiescent fluid. These tails are associated to the intermittent fast sedimentation of particle pairs in drafting-kissing-tumbling motions. Using the concept of mean relative velocity we estimate the mean drag coefficient from empirical formulas and show that non stationary effects, related to vortex shedding, explain the increased reduction in mean settling velocity in a turbulent environment. This work was supported by the European Research Council Grant No. ERC-2013- CoG-616186, TRITOS.

  17. Controlling turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnen, Jakob; Hof, Björn

    2015-11-01

    We show that a simple modification of the velocity profile in a pipe can lead to a complete collapse of turbulence and the flow fully relaminarises. The annihilation of turbulence is achieved by a steady manipulation of the streamwise velocity component alone, greatly reducing control efforts. Several different control techniques are presented: one with a local modification of the flow profile by means of a stationary obstacle, one employing a nozzle injecting fluid through a small gap at the pipe wall and one with a moving wall, where a part of the pipe is shifted in the streamwise direction. All control techniques act on the flow such that the streamwise velocity profile becomes more flat and turbulence gradually grows faint and disappears. In a smooth straight pipe the flow remains laminar downstream of the control. Hence a reduction in skin friction by a factor of 8 and more can be accomplished. Stereoscopic PIV-measurements and movies of the development of the flow during relaminarisation are presented.

  18. Isotropic Monte Carlo Grain Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J.

    2013-04-25

    IMCGG performs Monte Carlo simulations of normal grain growth in metals on a hexagonal grid in two dimensions with periodic boundary conditions. This may be performed with either an isotropic or a misorientation - and incliantion-dependent grain boundary energy.

  19. Inflow Turbulence Generation Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaohua

    2017-01-01

    Research activities on inflow turbulence generation methods have been vigorous over the past quarter century, accompanying advances in eddy-resolving computations of spatially developing turbulent flows with direct numerical simulation, large-eddy simulation (LES), and hybrid Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes-LES. The weak recycling method, rooted in scaling arguments on the canonical incompressible boundary layer, has been applied to supersonic boundary layer, rough surface boundary layer, and microscale urban canopy LES coupled with mesoscale numerical weather forecasting. Synthetic methods, originating from analytical approximation to homogeneous isotropic turbulence, have branched out into several robust methods, including the synthetic random Fourier method, synthetic digital filtering method, synthetic coherent eddy method, and synthetic volume forcing method. This article reviews major progress in inflow turbulence generation methods with an emphasis on fundamental ideas, key milestones, representative applications, and critical issues. Directions for future research in the field are also highlighted.

  20. Indentation of Transversely Isotropic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Talapady Srivatsa

    Instrumented indentation, as a tool for characterization of mechanical properties, has well been established in the past decades. Studies have been conducted to understand the behavior of isotropic materials under indentation and techniques to accurately predict isotropic material properties have also been reported. Further, within the isotropic regime, work has been done to predict the indentation hardness without having to investigate the area of contact during indentation. Studies have also reported the prospect of utilizing indentation to predict the fatigue behavior of isotropic materials. This dissertation is made with the intent of extending the use of indentation, as a characterization tool, to the anisotropic regime. The effect of transverse isotropy on the indentation response of materials is systematically studied here. Extensive computational analysis is performed to elucidate the underlying deformation mechanics of indentation of transversely isotropic materials. Owing to the anisotropy, indentation may be performed parallel or perpendicular to the plane of isotropy of the specimen. It is observed that the indentation response varies significantly for each of these cases. The two cases are treated as unique and an identical systematic analysis is carried for both. The indentation orientations shall henceforth be referred to as transverse and longitudinal indentation for indentation parallel and perpendicular to the plane of isotropy respectively. A technique is developed capable of extracting the elastic-plastic properties of transversely isotropic materials from interpretation of indentation response in either direction. The technique is rigorously tested for its robustness, accuracy and uniqueness of results. A sensitivity analysis is performed to determine how sensitive the technique is to errors in experimental results. Rigorous studies are performed to understand the variation in pile-up or sink-in during indentation with varying anisotropy in the

  1. Charged Particle Diffusion in Isotropic Random Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, P.; Sonsrettee, W.; Blasi, P.; Ruffolo, D.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Montgomery, D.; Chuychai, P.; Dmitruk, P.; Wan, M.; Parashar, T. N.; Chhiber, R.

    2017-03-01

    The investigation of the diffusive transport of charged particles in a turbulent magnetic field remains a subject of considerable interest. Research has most frequently concentrated on determining the diffusion coefficient in the presence of a mean magnetic field. Here we consider the diffusion of charged particles in fully three-dimensional isotropic turbulent magnetic fields with no mean field, which may be pertinent to many astrophysical situations. We identify different ranges of particle energy depending upon the ratio of Larmor radius to the characteristic outer length scale of turbulence. Two different theoretical models are proposed to calculate the diffusion coefficient, each applicable to a distinct range of particle energies. The theoretical results are compared to those from computer simulations, showing good agreement.

  2. Charged Particle Diffusion in Isotropic Random Static Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, P.; Sonsrettee, W.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Ruffolo, D. J.; Wan, M.; Montgomery, D.

    2013-12-01

    Study of the transport and diffusion of charged particles in a turbulent magnetic field remains a subject of considerable interest. Research has most frequently concentrated on determining the diffusion coefficient in the presence of a mean magnetic field. Here we consider Diffusion of charged particles in fully three dimensional statistically isotropic magnetic field turbulence with no mean field which is pertinent to many astrophysical situations. We classify different regions of particle energy depending upon the ratio of Larmor radius of the charged particle to the characteristic outer length scale of turbulence. We propose three different theoretical models to calculate the diffusion coefficient each applicable to a distinct range of particle energies. The theoretical results are compared with those from computer simulations, showing very good agreement.

  3. Transversely isotropic poroelasticity arising from thin isotropic layers

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J.G.

    1996-11-01

    Percolation phenomena play central roles in the field of poroelasticity, where two distinct sets of percolating continua intertwine. A connected solid frame forms the basis of the elastic behavior of a poroelastic medium in the presence of confining forces, while connected pores permit a percolating fluid (if present) to influence the mechanical response of the system from within. The present paper discusses isotropic and anisotropic poroelastic media and establishes general formulas for the behavior of transversely isotropic poroelasticity arising from laminations of isotropic components. The Backus averaging method is shown to provide elementary means of constructing general formulas. The results for confined fluids are then compared with the more general Gassmann formulas that must be satisfied by any anisotropic poroelastic medium and found to be in complete agreement.

  4. Turbulent solutions of equations of fluid motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deissler, R. G.

    1985-01-01

    Some turbulent solutions of the unaveraged Navier-Stokes equations (equations of fluid motion) are reviewed. Those equations are solved numerically in order to study the nonlinear physics of incompressible turbulent flow. The three components of the mean-square velocity fluctuations are initially equal for the conditions chosen. The resulting solutions show characteristics of turbulence, such as the linear and nonlinear excitation of small-scale fluctuations. For the stronger fluctuations the initially nonrandom flow develops into an apparently random turbulence. The cases considered include turbulence that is statistically homogeneous or inhomogeneous and isotropic or anisotropic. A statistically steady-state turbulence is obtained by using a spatially periodic body force. Various turbulence processes, including the transfer of energy between eddy sizes and between directional components and the production, dissipation, and spatial diffusion of turbulence, are considered. It is concluded that the physical processes occurring in turbulence can be profitably studied numerically.

  5. Transversely isotropic elasticity and poroelasticity arising from thin isotropic layers

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J.G.

    1997-07-01

    Since the classic work of Postma [1955] and Backus [1962], much has been learned about elastic constants in vertical transversely isotropic (VTI) media when the anisotropy is due to fine layering of isotropic elastic materials. However, new results are still being discovered. For example, the P-wave anisotropy parameter c{sub 11}/c{sub 33} lies in the range 1/4 {<=} c{sub 11}/c{sub 33} {<=} <{lambda}+2{mu}><1/({lambda}+2{mu})>, when the layers are themselves composed of isotropic elastic materials with Lame constants {lambda} and {mu} and the vertical average of the layers is symbolized by <{center_dot}>. The lower bound corrects a result of Postma. For porous layers, a connected solid frame forms the basis of the elastic behavior of a poroelastic medium in the presence of confining forces, while connected pores permit a percolating fluid (if present) to influence the mechanical response of the system from within. For isotropic and anisotropic poroelastic media, we establish general formulas for the behavior of transversely isotropic poroelasticity arising from laminations of isotropic components. The Backus averaging method is shown to provide elementary means of constructing general formulas. The results for confined fluids are then compared with the more general Gassmann [1951] formulas that must be satisfied by any anisotropic poroelastic medium and found to be in complete agreement. Such results are important for applications to oil exploration using AVO (amplitude versus offset) since the presence or absence of a fluid component, as well as the nature of the fluid, is the critical issue and the ways in which the fluid influences seismic reflection data still need to be better understood.

  6. Liquid crystal alignment at macroscopically isotropic polymer surfaces: Effect of an isotropic-nematic phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryasova, Natalie; Reznikov, Yuri

    2016-09-01

    We study the effect of an isotropic-nematic (I -N ) phase transition on the liquid crystal alignment at untreated polymer surfaces. We demonstrate that the pattern at the untreated substrate in the planar cell where the other substrate is uniformly rubbed strongly depends on the temperature gradient across the cell during the I -N phase transition, being macroscopically isotropic if the untreated substrate is cooled faster, but becoming almost homogeneous along the rubbing direction in the opposite temperature gradient. We interpret the observed effect using complementary models of heat transfer and nematic elasticity. Based on the heat transfer model we show that the asymmetric temperature conditions in our experiments provide unidirectional propagation of the I -N interface during the phase transition and determine the initial director orientation pattern at the test's untreated surface. Using the Frank-Oseen model of nematic elasticity, we represent the three-dimensional director field in the nematic cell as a two-dimensional (2D) pattern at the untreated surface and perform 2D numeric simulations. The simulations explain the experimental results: Different initial director orientations at the untreated surface evolve into different stationary patterns.

  7. Bumblebee Flight in Heavy Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, T.; Kolomenskiy, D.; Schneider, K.; Lehmann, F.-O.; Sesterhenn, J.

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution numerical simulations of a tethered model bumblebee in forward flight are performed superimposing homogeneous isotropic turbulent fluctuations to the uniform inflow. Despite tremendous variation in turbulence intensity, between 17% and 99% with respect to the mean flow, we do not find significant changes in cycle-averaged aerodynamic forces, moments, or flight power when averaged over realizations, compared to laminar inflow conditions. The variance of aerodynamic measures, however, significantly increases with increasing turbulence intensity, which may explain flight instabilities observed in freely flying bees.

  8. Phase Contrast Imaging Measurements of Short Wavelength Turbulence Generated by Shear in the QH-mode Edge on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rost, J. C.; Porkolab, M.; Dorris, J. R.; Marinoni, A.; Burrell, K. H.

    2012-10-01

    The Phase Contrast Imaging (PCI) diagnostic on DIII-D provides a line-integrated measurement of density fluctuations covering wavenumbers 2 to 30 cm-1. An outer gap scan during QH-mode with stationary plasma parameters allowed the PCI to sample a large range in kr/kθ. A narrow peak in turbulence amplitude is seen near the LCFS. The ExB Doppler shift allows the location to be determined precisely, showing two distinct regions of turbulence at 0.5 and 0.2 cm inside the LCFS with kr>0 and kr<0 respectively, consistent with the expected effects of shear in the Er well. PCI measurements at 200 kHz show that kθ=0.8 cm-1 with poloidal correlation length Lθ=6 cm. Using a simple non-isotropic turbulence model, we find that kr=3 cm-1 and Lr=0.5 cm, with n/n˜25% in the pedestal for this high-kr turbulence. These fluctuations, which are outside the parameter range accessible to most turbulence diagnostics, are large enough in amplitude to play a role in setting the pedestal structure. These PCI observations are qualitatively similar to those made in ELM-free H-mode and between ELMs suggesting that similar large kr turbulence may be important.

  9. Bi-isotropic constitutive relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sihvola, A. H.; Lindell, I. V.

    1991-03-01

    The constitutive relations of general bi-isotropic media, requiring four material parameters, can be written in different ways to describe their electromagnetic behavior. This communication contains a two-way 'dictionary' between a proposed formulation of the constitutive relations with three other sets of relations, generalized from relations used for chiral materials.

  10. Cascade modeling of single and two-phase turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotnov, Igor A.

    The analysis of turbulent two-phase flows requires closure models in order to perform reliable computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CFMD) analyses. A turbulence cascade model, which tracks the evolution of the turbulent kinetic energy between the various eddy sizes, has been developed for the analysis of the single and bubbly two-phase turbulence. Various flows are considered including the decay of isotropic grid-induced turbulence, uniform shear flow and turbulent channel flow. The model has been developed using a "building block" approach by moving from modeling of simpler turbulent flows (i.e., homogeneous, isotropic decay) to more involved turbulent flows (i.e., non-homogeneous channel flow). The spectral cascade-transport model's performance has been assessed against a number of experimental and direct numerical simulation (DNS) results.

  11. Anisotropic Particles in Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voth, Greg A.; Soldati, Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    Anisotropic particles are common in many industrial and natural turbulent flows. When these particles are small and neutrally buoyant, they follow Lagrangian trajectories while exhibiting rich orientational dynamics from the coupling of their rotation to the velocity gradients of the turbulence field. This system has proven to be a fascinating application of the fundamental properties of velocity gradients in turbulence. When particles are not neutrally buoyant, they experience preferential concentration and very different preferential alignment than neutrally buoyant tracer particles. A vast proportion of the parameter range of anisotropic particles in turbulence is still unexplored, with most existing research focusing on the simple foundational cases of axisymmetric ellipsoids at low concentrations in homogeneous isotropic turbulence and in turbulent channel flow. Numerical simulations and experiments have recently developed a fairly comprehensive picture of alignment and rotation in these cases, and they provide an essential foundation for addressing more complex problems of practical importance. Macroscopic effects of nonspherical particle dynamics include preferential concentration in coherent structures and drag reduction by fiber suspensions. We review the models used to describe nonspherical particle motion, along with numerical and experimental methods for measuring particle dynamics.

  12. Statistics and geometry of passive scalars in turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Jörg; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2005-12-01

    We present direct numerical simulations of the mixing of the passive scalar at modest Taylor microscale (10<=Rλ<=42) and Schmidt numbers larger than unity (2<=Sc<=32). The simulations resolve below the Batchelor scale up to a factor of 4. The advecting turbulence is homogeneous and isotropic, and is maintained stationary by stochastic forcing at low wave numbers. The passive scalar is rendered stationary by a mean scalar gradient in one direction. The relation between geometrical and statistical properties of scalar field and its gradients is examined. The Reynolds numbers and Schmidt numbers are not large enough for either the Kolmogorov scaling or the Batchelor scaling to develop and, not surprisingly, we find no fractal scaling of scalar level sets, or isosurfaces, in the intermediate viscous range. The area-to-volume ratio of isosurfaces reflects the nearly Gaussian statistics of the scalar fluctuations. The scalar flux across the isosurfaces, which is determined by the conditional probability density function (PDF) of the scalar gradient magnitude, has a stretched exponential distribution towards the tails. The PDF of the scalar dissipation departs distinctly, for both small and large amplitudes, from the log-normal distribution for all cases considered. The joint statistics of the scalar and its dissipation rate, and the mean conditional moment of the scalar dissipation, are studied as well. We examine the effects of coarse-graining on the probability density to simulate the effects of poor probe-resolution in measurements.

  13. New Exact Relations for Helicities in Hall Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Supratik; Galtier, Sebastien

    2016-04-01

    Hall magnetohydrodynamics is a mono-fluid plasma model appropriate for probing Final{some of the} physical processes (other than pure kinetic effects) at length scales smaller than the scales of standard MHD. In sub-ionic space plasma turbulence (e.g. the solar wind) this fluid model has been proved to be useful. Three-dimensional incompressible Hall magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) possesses three inviscid invariants which are the total energy, the magnetic helicity and the generalized helicity. In this presentation, we would like to discuss new exact relations for helicities (magnetic helicities and generalized helicities) which are derived for homogeneous stationary (not necessarily isotropic) Hall MHD turbulence (and also for its inertialess electron MHD limit) in the asymptotic limit of large Reynolds numbers. The universal laws are written only in terms of mixed second-order structure functions, i.e. the scalar product of two different increments and are written simply as ηM = di < δ ( {b} × {j}) \\cdot δ {b} >, with ηM the average magnetic helicity flux rate, {b} the magnetic field, {j} the current and ± ηG = < δ ( {v} × {Ω} ) \\cdot δ {Ω} > , with ηM the average generalized helicity flux rate, {v} the fluid velocity and {Ω} = {b} + dI {ω} being the generalized helicity where ω is simply the fluid vorticity ( = nabla × {v}). It provides, therefore, a direct measurement of the dissipation rates for the corresponding helicities even in case of an anisotropic plasma turbulence. This study shows that the generalized helicity cascade is strongly linked to the left polarized fluctuations while the magnetic helicity cascade is linked to the right polarized fluctuations. The newly derived relations also show that like energy, a non-zero helicity flux can only be associated to a departure of Beltrami flow state. {Reference} S. Banerjee & S. Galtier, {Chiral Exact Relations for Helicities in Hall Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence} (submitted).

  14. Estimating three-demensional energy transfer in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, K. S.; Helland, K. N.; Rosenblatt, M.

    1980-01-01

    To obtain an estimate of the spectral transfer function that indicates the rate of decay of energy, an x-wire probe was set at a fixed position, and two single wire probes were set at a number of locations in the same plane perpendicular to the mean flow in the wind tunnel. The locations of the single wire probes are determined by pseudo-random numbers (Monte Carlo). Second order spectra and cross spectra are estimated. The assumption of isotropy relative to second order spectra is examined. Third order spectra are also estimated corresponding to the positions specified. A Monte Carlo Fourier transformation of the downstream bispectra corresponding to integration across the plane perpendicular to the flow is carried out assuming isotropy. Further integration is carried out over spherical energy shells.

  15. Interaction of Isotropic Turbulence with a Shock Wave

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    5 1.3 Objectives and Overview....................................... 6 2. Linear Analysis...Length Scales .................................. 74 4.1.5 Thermodynamic Properties ................................ 75 5 4.1.6 M odeling Issues...78 4.2 Modification of a Shock Wave ...................................... 82 5 4.2.1 Statistics of a Shock Wave

  16. Constitutive modeling for isotropic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaswamy, V. G.; Vanstone, R. H.; Dame, L. T.; Laflen, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    The unified constitutive theories for application to typical isotropic cast nickel base supperalloys used for air-cooled turbine blades were evaluated. The specific modeling aspects evaluated were: uniaxial, monotonic, cyclic, creep, relaxation, multiaxial, notch, and thermomechanical behavior. Further development of the constitutive theories to model thermal history effects, refinement of the material test procedures, evaluation of coating effects, and verification of the models in an alternate material will be accomplished in a follow-on for this base program.

  17. Spherical 3D isotropic wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanusse, F.; Rassat, A.; Starck, J.-L.

    2012-04-01

    Context. Future cosmological surveys will provide 3D large scale structure maps with large sky coverage, for which a 3D spherical Fourier-Bessel (SFB) analysis in spherical coordinates is natural. Wavelets are particularly well-suited to the analysis and denoising of cosmological data, but a spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform does not currently exist to analyse spherical 3D data. Aims: The aim of this paper is to present a new formalism for a spherical 3D isotropic wavelet, i.e. one based on the SFB decomposition of a 3D field and accompany the formalism with a public code to perform wavelet transforms. Methods: We describe a new 3D isotropic spherical wavelet decomposition based on the undecimated wavelet transform (UWT) described in Starck et al. (2006). We also present a new fast discrete spherical Fourier-Bessel transform (DSFBT) based on both a discrete Bessel transform and the HEALPIX angular pixelisation scheme. We test the 3D wavelet transform and as a toy-application, apply a denoising algorithm in wavelet space to the Virgo large box cosmological simulations and find we can successfully remove noise without much loss to the large scale structure. Results: We have described a new spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform, ideally suited to analyse and denoise future 3D spherical cosmological surveys, which uses a novel DSFBT. We illustrate its potential use for denoising using a toy model. All the algorithms presented in this paper are available for download as a public code called MRS3D at http://jstarck.free.fr/mrs3d.html

  18. Generation of quasistationary magnetic fields in a turbulent laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychenkov, V. Iu.; Gradov, O. M.; Chokparova, G. A.

    1984-07-01

    A theory is derived for the generation of quasi-stationary magnetic fields in a laser plasma with well developed ion-acoustic turbulence. Qualitative changes are caused in the nature of the magnetic-field generation by an anomalous anisotropic transport in the turbulent plasma. The role played by turbulent diffusion and thermodiffusive transport in the magnetic-field saturation is discussed.

  19. Calculation of Turbulent Expansion Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tollmien, Walter

    1945-01-01

    On the basis of certain formulas recently established by L. Prandtl for the turbulent interchange of momentum in stationary flows, various cases of "free turbulence" - that is, of flows without boundary walls - are treated in the present report. Prandtl puts the apparent shearing stress introduced by the turbulent momentum interchange. This present report deals first with the mixing of an air stream of uniform velocity with the adjacent still air, than with the expansion or diffusion of an air jet in the surrounding air space.

  20. Phenomenology of turbulent convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Mahendra; Chatterjee, Anando; Kumar, Abhishek; Samtaney, Ravi

    2016-11-01

    We simulate Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC) in which a fluid is confined between two thermally conducting plates. We report results from direct numerical simulation (DNS) of RBC turbulence on 40963 grid, the highest resolution hitherto reported, on 65536 cores of Cray XC40, Shaheen II, at KAUST. The non-dimensional parameters of our simulation are: the Rayleigh number Ra = 1 . 1 ×1011 (the highest ever for a pseudo-spectral simulation) and Prandtl number of unity. We present energy flux diagnostics of shell-to-shell (in wave number space) transfer. Furthermore, noting that convective flows are anisotropic due to buoyancy, we quantify anisotropy by subdividing each wavenumber shell into rings and quantify ring energy spectrum. An outstanding question in convective turbulence is the wavenumber scaling of the energy spectrum. Our pseudo-spectral simulations of turbulent thermal convection coupled with novel energy transfer diagnostics have provided a definitive answer to this question. We conclude that convective turbulence exhibits behavior similar to fluid turbulence, that is, Kolmogorov's k - 5 / 3 spectrum with forward and local energy transfers, along with a nearly isotropic energy distribution. The supercomputer Shaheen at KAUST was utilized for the simulations.

  1. Anisotropic form of third-order moments and relationship to the cascade rate in axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Podesta, J. J.; Forman, M. A.; Smith, C. W.

    2007-09-15

    Laws governing the behavior of statistical third-order moments in the inertial range are among the few rigorous results in the theory of statistically homogeneous incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. These fundamental laws apply to both isotropic and anisotropic turbulence. Assuming that the turbulence is stationary in time and statistically axisymmetric under proper rotations about the direction of the mean magnetic field, it is shown that the general mathematical form of the tensor quantities appearing in these laws is constrained by symmetry to have a particular form. Using these forms, the general solutions of the law for the vector and pseudovector third-order moments F and F{sub C} are obtained in the limit of large kinetic Reynolds number and large magnetic Reynolds number. The physical meaning of the different terms in F and F{sub C} are investigated and a method for obtaining the cascade rates of energy {epsilon} and cross-helicity {epsilon}{sub C} from experimental data is described. The results show that the measurement of the cascade rates goes hand-in-hand with the measurement of the spatial anisotropy of the third-order moments F and F{sub C}. The theory developed here can be applied to measure the turbulent cascade rates of energy and cross-helicity in laboratory plasma experiments, numerical simulations, and the solar wind.

  2. Stirring turbulence with turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cekli, Hakki Ergun; Joosten, René; van de Water, Willem

    2015-12-01

    We stir wind-tunnel turbulence with an active grid that consists of rods with attached vanes. The time-varying angle of these rods is controlled by random numbers. We study the response of turbulence on the statistical properties of these random numbers. The random numbers are generated by the Gledzer-Ohkitani-Yamada shell model, which is a simple dynamical model of turbulence that produces a velocity field displaying inertial-range scaling behavior. The range of scales can be adjusted by selection of shells. We find that the largest energy input and the smallest anisotropy are reached when the time scale of the random numbers matches that of the largest eddies of the wind-tunnel turbulence. A large mismatch of these times creates a highly intermittent random flow with interesting but quite anomalous statistics.

  3. A Transversely Isotropic Thermoelastic Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, S. M.

    1989-01-01

    A continuum theory is presented for representing the thermoelastic behavior of composites that can be idealized as transversely isotropic. This theory is consistent with anisotropic viscoplastic theories being developed presently at NASA Lewis Research Center. A multiaxial statement of the theory is presented, as well as plane stress and plane strain reductions. Experimental determination of the required material parameters and their theoretical constraints are discussed. Simple homogeneously stressed elements are examined to illustrate the effect of fiber orientation on the resulting strain distribution. Finally, the multiaxial stress-strain relations are expressed in matrix form to simplify and accelerate implementation of the theory into structural analysis codes.

  4. Are random fractal clusters isotropic\\?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Family, Fereydoon; Vicsek, Tamás; Meakin, Paul

    1985-08-01

    We have studied the shape of large clusters in the lattice-animal, percolation, and growing-percolation models. By calculating the radius of gyration tensor we find that in these models the clusters have an anisotropic shape. The results suggest that the critical droplets in related isotropic equilibrium models, such as the Ising model, may also be anisotropic. We have also determined the leading nonanalytic correction-to-scaling exponent by analyzing the anisotropy data and find that for percolation in two dimensions e~=0.47. .AE

  5. Particle dispersion models and drag coefficients for particles in turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowe, C. T.; Chung, J. N.; Troutt, T. R.

    1988-01-01

    Some of the concepts underlying particle dispersion due to turbulence are reviewed. The traditional approaches to particle dispersion in homogeneous, stationary turbulent fields are addressed, and recent work on particle dispersion in large scale turbulent structures is reviewed. The state of knowledge of particle drag coefficients in turbulent gas-particle flows is also reviewed.

  6. Large Eddy Simulation of Homogeneous Rotating Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squires, Kyle D.; Mansour, Nagi N.; Cambon, Claude; Chasnov, Jeffrey R.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Study of turbulent flows in rotating reference frames has proven to be one of the more challenging areas of turbulence research. The large number of theoretical, experimental, and computational studies performed over the years have demonstrated that the effect of solid-body rotation on turbulent flows is subtle and remains exceedingly difficult to predict. Because of the complexities associated with non-homogeneous turbulence, it is worthwhile to examine the effect of steady system rotation on the evolution of an initially isotropic turbulent flow. The assumption of statistical homogeneity considerably simplifies analysis and computation; calculation of homogeneous turbulence is further motivated since it possesses the essential physics found in more complex rotating flows. The principal objectives of the present study have therefore been to increase our fundamental understanding of turbulent flows in rotating reference frames through an examination of the asymptotic state of homogeneous rotating turbulence; particularly as to the existence of an asymptotic state which is self similar. Knowledge of an asymptotic similarity state permits prediction of the ultimate statistical evolution of the flow without requiring detailed knowledge of the complex, and not well understood, non-linear transfer processes. Aside from examination of possible similarity states in rotating turbulence, of further interest in this study has been an examination of the degree to which solid-body rotation induces a two-dimensional state in an initially isotropic flow.

  7. Turbulence in the Intracluster Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brüggen, M.; Vazza, F.

    We review our knowledge about turbulence in the intracluster medium, a very hot, dilute plasma that permeates clusters of galaxies. A thorough understanding of turbulence in the intracluster medium is crucial for the use of clusters to determine cosmological parameters. Moreover, clusters provide a unique laboratory to study a very unique and extreme plasma. Both, the observational evidence as well as results from (magneto-)hydrodynamical simulations are reviewed. In particular, we assess the roles of various drivers of turbulence: accretion and merging, active galactic nuclei, the motion of galaxies and conductive instabilities. It has been shown that the turbulence driven by accretion in galaxy clusters is mostly tangential in the inner regions and isotropic in regions close to the virial radius, while AGN drive mostly radial turbulent motions at close to sonic speeds. On the cluster scale, the energetically dominant mechanism for driving turbulence are major cluster mergers. In this chapter, we will focus on turbulent motions on the large scales—the properties of microphysical turbulence are reviewed elsewhere in this book (see the chapter by Brunetti and Jones).

  8. Isotropic Negative Thermal Expansion Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lingling; Li, Bo; Zhou, Ji

    2016-07-13

    Negative thermal expansion materials are important and desirable in science and engineering applications. However, natural materials with isotropic negative thermal expansion are rare and usually unsatisfied in performance. Here, we propose a novel method to achieve two- and three-dimensional negative thermal expansion metamaterials via antichiral structures. The two-dimensional metamaterial is constructed with unit cells that combine bimaterial strips and antichiral structures, while the three-dimensional metamaterial is fabricated by a multimaterial 3D printing process. Both experimental and simulation results display isotropic negative thermal expansion property of the samples. The effective coefficient of negative thermal expansion of the proposed models is demonstrated to be dependent on the difference between the thermal expansion coefficient of the component materials, as well as on the circular node radius and the ligament length in the antichiral structures. The measured value of the linear negative thermal expansion coefficient of the three-dimensional sample is among the largest achieved in experiments to date. Our findings provide an easy and practical approach to obtaining materials with tunable negative thermal expansion on any scale.

  9. Premixed autoignition in compressible turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konduri, Aditya; Kolla, Hemanth; Krisman, Alexander; Chen, Jacqueline

    2016-11-01

    Prediction of chemical ignition delay in an autoignition process is critical in combustion systems like compression ignition engines and gas turbines. Often, ignition delay times measured in simple homogeneous experiments or homogeneous calculations are not representative of actual autoignition processes in complex turbulent flows. This is due the presence of turbulent mixing which results in fluctuations in thermodynamic properties as well as chemical composition. In the present study the effect of fluctuations of thermodynamic variables on the ignition delay is quantified with direct numerical simulations of compressible isotropic turbulence. A premixed syngas-air mixture is used to remove the effects of inhomogeneity in the chemical composition. Preliminary results show a significant spatial variation in the ignition delay time. We analyze the topology of autoignition kernels and identify the influence of extreme events resulting from compressibility and intermittency. The dependence of ignition delay time on Reynolds and turbulent Mach numbers is also quantified. Supported by Basic Energy Sciences, Dept of Energy, United States.

  10. Anisotropic Turbulence and Protostellar Feedback in Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Charles Edward

    I investigate the decay and regeneration of turbulence in molecular clouds and the resulting star formation in those clouds in the presence of protostellar feedback. Studies of turbulence generally only consider isotropic turbulence, while the turbulence in molecular clouds may be anisotropic. I perform a series of simulations of anisotropic turbulence and measure its decay rate. I find that anisotropic turbulence decays slower than isotropic turbulence. When I break the velocity dispersion into isotropic and anisotropic components, I find the decay time is the crossing time of the isotropic component, which can be much slower than the total velocity dispersion. As part of this study, I present a measure of anisotropy that can be calculated in observations of molecular clouds. I also investigate the effects of compression on turbulence. This is motivated by the need to replenish turbulent energy. Using a series of simulations of contracting turbulence, I find that turbulence behaves as a monatomic ideal gas under isotropic compression. I also find that compression in a single direction imparts energy to that direction, but does not transfer that energy to the other two directions. Finally, I perform a series of high resolution star formation simulations with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) including hydrodynamics, gravity, radiation, protostellar outflows and protostellar luminosity. The simulations provide a self-consistent story of star formation, all while matching observations. The matched observations include the masses of both stars and prestellar cores, the clustering of cores and the luminosity function of protostars. In this story of star formation, cores form on the Jeans length of the host cloud. Each core forms a central star or binary, but also fragments repeatedly down 0.05 M⊙ stars. The stellar radiation prevents fragmentation below this mass scale, but is not important on larger scales. The protostellar outflows eject 2/3 of the incoming mass

  11. Nucleation and transients at the onset of vortex turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Greg; Alstrom, Preben; Bohr, Tomas

    1992-01-01

    We present analytical and numerical results that explain the transient turbulent dynamics observed in the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation. Just below the transition to turbulence, we observe that metastable turbulent states break down by the nucleation and growth of single-vortex droplets, leading to a 'frozen' state with a low (but finite) density of stationary vortices. We derive the relation between nucleation time and radius, and determine their dependence on the distance to the turbulence transition line.

  12. Helicopter rotor noise due to ingestion of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.; Greitzer, E. M.

    1986-01-01

    A theoretical study was conducted to develop an analytical prediction method for helicopter main rotor noise due to the ingestion of atmospheric turbulence. This study incorporates an atmospheric turbulence model, a rotor mean flow contraction model and a rapid distortion turbulence model which together determine the statistics of the non-isotropic turbulence at the rotor plane. Inputs to the combined mean inflow and turbulence models are controlled by atmospheric wind characteristics and helicopter operating conditions. A generalized acoustic source model was used to predict the far field noise generated by the non-isotropic flow incident on the rotor. Absolute levels for acoustic spectra and directivity patterns were calculated for full scale helicopters, without the use of empirical or adjustable constants. Comparisons between isotropic and non-isotropic turbulence at the rotor face demonstrated pronounced differences in acoustic spectra. Turning and contraction of the flow for hover and low speed vertical ascent cases result in a 3 dB increase in the acoustic spectrum energy and a 10 dB increase in tone levels. Compared to trailing edge noise, turbulence ingestion noise is the dominant noise mechanism below approximately 30 rotor harmonics, while above 100 harmonics, trailing edge noise levels exceed turbulence ingestion noise by 25 dB.

  13. On the Lundgren-Townsend model of turbulent fine scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullin, D. I.; Saffman, P. G.

    1993-01-01

    Vorticity and velocity-derivative moments for homogeneous isotropic turbulence are calculated using the strained-spiral vortex model of turbulent fine scales given by Lundgren (1982). A specific form of the relaxing spiral vortex is proposed, modeled by a rolling-up vortex layer embedded in a background containing opposite signed vorticity and with zero total circulation at infinity.

  14. ANISOTROPY LENGTHENS THE DECAY TIME OF TURBULENCE IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Charles E.; McKee, Christopher F.; Klein, Richard I.

    2011-09-01

    The decay of isothermal turbulence with velocity anisotropy is investigated using computational simulations and synthetic observations. We decompose the turbulence into isotropic and anisotropic components with total velocity dispersions {sigma}{sub iso} and {sigma}{sub ani}, respectively. We find that the decay rate of the turbulence depends on the crossing time of the isotropic component only. A cloud of size L with significant anisotropy in its turbulence has a dissipation time, t{sub diss} = L/(2{sigma}{sub iso}). This translates into turbulent energy decay rates on the cloud scale that can be much lower for anisotropic turbulence than for isotropic turbulence. To help future observations determine whether observed molecular clouds have the level of anisotropy required to maintain the observed level of turbulence over their lifetimes, we performed a principal component analysis on our simulated clouds. Even with projection effects washing out the anisotropic signal, there is a measurable difference in the axis-constrained principal component analysis performed in directions parallel and perpendicular to the direction of maximum velocity dispersion. When this relative difference, {psi}, is 0.1, there is enough anisotropy for the dissipation time to triple the expected isotropic value. We provide a fit for converting {psi} into an estimate for the dissipation time, t{sub diss}.

  15. Controlling elastic waves with isotropic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zheng; Hu, Jin; Hu, Gengkai; Tao, Ran; Wang, Yue

    2011-03-01

    Design of functional devices with isotropic materials has significant advantages, as regards easy fabrication and broadband application. In this letter, we present a method to derive isotropic transformation material parameters for elastodynamics under local conformal transformation. The transformed material parameters are then applied to design a beam bender, a four-beam antenna and an approximate carpet cloak for elastic wave with isotropic materials, validated by the numerical simulations.

  16. Measuring isotropic subsurface light transport.

    PubMed

    Happel, Kathrin; Dörsam, Edgar; Urban, Philipp

    2014-04-21

    Subsurface light transport can affect the visual appearance of materials significantly. Measuring and modeling this phenomenon is crucial for accurately reproducing colors in printing or for rendering translucent objects on displays. In this paper, we propose an apparatus to measure subsurface light transport employing a reference material to cancel out adverse signals that may bias the results. In contrast to other approaches, the setup enables improved focusing on rough surfaces (e.g. uncoated paper). We derive a measurement equation that may be used to deduce the point spread function (PSF) of subsurface light transport. Main contributions are the usage of spectrally-narrowband exchangeable LEDs allowing spectrally-resolved measurements and an approach based on quadratic programming for reconstructing PSFs in the case of isotropic light transport.

  17. Macroscopic simulation of isotropic permanent magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruckner, Florian; Abert, Claas; Vogler, Christoph; Heinrichs, Frank; Satz, Armin; Ausserlechner, Udo; Binder, Gernot; Koeck, Helmut; Suess, Dieter

    2016-03-01

    Accurate simulations of isotropic permanent magnets require to take the magnetization process into account and consider the anisotropic, nonlinear, and hysteretic material behaviour near the saturation configuration. An efficient method for the solution of the magnetostatic Maxwell equations including the description of isotropic permanent magnets is presented. The algorithm can easily be implemented on top of existing finite element methods and does not require a full characterization of the hysteresis of the magnetic material. Strayfield measurements of an isotropic permanent magnet and simulation results are in good agreement and highlight the importance of a proper description of the isotropic material.

  18. Dielectrophoretic manipulation of nematic and isotropic droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Bomi; Song, Jang-Kun

    2016-03-01

    Dielectrophoresis can provide a delicate tool to control electrically neutral particles in colloid. The dielectrophoresis is usually applied to solid particles or heterogeneous liquid droplet in continuous liquid, but we devised and investigated the dielectrophoresis of isotropic droplets within nematic phase or vice versa. Using multi-components liquid crystal mixtures that exhibit relatively wide temperature range of nematic-isotropic coexistence, we achieved a field-induced phase separation between isotropic and nematic. We also fabricated the isotropic-nematic filaments that was achieved using a biased surface preference for either isotropic or nematic phase of the alignment layer [1]. The dielectrophoresis manipulations of isotropic and nematic droplets required much lower voltage compared to that for the electro wetting type devices. In addition, we observed the bi-directional actuation of isotropic droplets using anisotropic dielectric property of liquid crystal, which is not possible in usual dielectrophoresis. The bidirectional actuation was achieved by controlling the LC director within the cell so as to change the sign of the difference between the effective dielectric constant of nematic and isotropic liquid crystals. We simulated the bi-directional dielectrophoresis by performing the LC director calculation and the corresponding dielectrophoresis. The simulation results matched well with the experimental data. Thus, the bi-directional dielectrophoresis using isotropic and nematic droplets may open new possibility of electro- optical applications using liquid crystals.

  19. The relationship between strength of turbulence and backscattering radar power at HF and VHF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hocking, W. K.

    1983-01-01

    The formulae relating turbulence and other atmospheric parameters to backscattered power for radar observations are reviewed. Emphasis is on the case of scatter from turbulent irregularities which have scales corresponding to the range of isotropic, inertial range turbulence. The applicability of this assumption is discussed. A formula is introduced for the mesosphere which relates ionospheric electron densities to backscattered power.

  20. Unsteady turbulence cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Susumu; Vassilicos, J. C.

    2016-11-01

    We have run a total of 311 direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of decaying three-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence in a periodic box with values of the Taylor length-based Reynolds number up to about 300 and an energy spectrum with a wide wave-number range of close to -5 /3 power-law dependence at the higher Reynolds numbers. On the basis of these runs, we have found a critical time when (i) the rate of change of the square of the integral length scale turns from increasing to decreasing, (ii) the ratio of interscale energy flux to high-pass filtered turbulence dissipation changes from decreasing to very slowly increasing in the inertial range, (iii) the signature of large-scale coherent structures disappears in the energy spectrum, and (iv) the scaling of the turbulence dissipation changes from the one recently discovered in DNSs of forced unsteady turbulence and in wind tunnel experiments of turbulent wakes and grid-generated turbulence to the classical scaling proposed by G. I. Taylor [Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 151, 421 (1935), 10.1098/rspa.1935.0158] and A. N. Kolmogorov [Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 31, 538 (1941)]. Even though the customary theoretical basis for this Taylor-Kolmogorov scaling is a statistically stationary cascade where large-scale energy flux balances dissipation, this is not the case throughout the entire time range of integration in all our DNS runs. The recently discovered dissipation scaling can be reformulated physically as a situation in which the dissipation rates of the small and large scales evolve together. We advance two hypotheses that may form the basis of a theoretical approach to unsteady turbulence cascades in the presence of large-scale coherent structures.

  1. Unsteady turbulence cascades.

    PubMed

    Goto, Susumu; Vassilicos, J C

    2016-11-01

    We have run a total of 311 direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of decaying three-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence in a periodic box with values of the Taylor length-based Reynolds number up to about 300 and an energy spectrum with a wide wave-number range of close to -5/3 power-law dependence at the higher Reynolds numbers. On the basis of these runs, we have found a critical time when (i) the rate of change of the square of the integral length scale turns from increasing to decreasing, (ii) the ratio of interscale energy flux to high-pass filtered turbulence dissipation changes from decreasing to very slowly increasing in the inertial range, (iii) the signature of large-scale coherent structures disappears in the energy spectrum, and (iv) the scaling of the turbulence dissipation changes from the one recently discovered in DNSs of forced unsteady turbulence and in wind tunnel experiments of turbulent wakes and grid-generated turbulence to the classical scaling proposed by G. I. Taylor [Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 151, 421 (1935)1364-502110.1098/rspa.1935.0158] and A. N. Kolmogorov [Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 31, 538 (1941)]. Even though the customary theoretical basis for this Taylor-Kolmogorov scaling is a statistically stationary cascade where large-scale energy flux balances dissipation, this is not the case throughout the entire time range of integration in all our DNS runs. The recently discovered dissipation scaling can be reformulated physically as a situation in which the dissipation rates of the small and large scales evolve together. We advance two hypotheses that may form the basis of a theoretical approach to unsteady turbulence cascades in the presence of large-scale coherent structures.

  2. Kinematics of velocity and vorticity correlations in turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, P. S.

    1983-01-01

    The kinematic problem of calculating second-order velocity moments from given values of the vorticity covariance is examined. Integral representation formulas for second-order velocity moments in terms of the two-point vorticity correlation tensor are derived. The special relationships existing between velocity moments in isotropic turbulence are expressed in terms of the integral formulas yielding several kinematic constraints on the two-point vorticity correlation tensor in isotropic turbulence. Numerical evaluation of these constraints suggests that a Gaussian curve may be the only form of the longitudinal velocity correlation coefficient which is consistent with the requirement of isotropy. It is shown that if this is the case, then a family of exact solutions to the decay of isotropic turbulence may be obtained which contains Batchelor's final period solution as a special case. In addition, the computed results suggest a method of approximating the integral representation formulas in general turbulent shear flows.

  3. Kinematics of velocity and vorticity correlations in turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, P. S.

    1983-08-01

    The kinematic problem of calculating second-order velocity moments from given values of the vorticity covariance is examined. Integral representation formulas for second-order velocity moments in terms of the two-point vorticity correlation tensor are derived. The special relationships existing between velocity moments in isotropic turbulence are expressed in terms of the integral formulas yielding several kinematic constraints on the two-point vorticity correlation tensor in isotropic turbulence. Numerical evaluation of these constraints suggests that a Gaussian curve may be the only form of the longitudinal velocity correlation coefficient which is consistent with the requirement of isotropy. It is shown that if this is the case, then a family of exact solutions to the decay of isotropic turbulence may be obtained which contains Batchelor's final period solution as a special case. In addition, the computed results suggest a method of approximating the integral representation formulas in general turbulent shear flows.

  4. Light-Steered Isotropic Semiconductor Micromotors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuanrui; Mou, Fangzhi; Xu, Leilei; Wang, Shaofei; Guan, Jianguo; Feng, Zunpeng; Wang, Quanwei; Kong, Lei; Li, Wei; Wang, Joseph; Zhang, Qingjie

    2017-01-01

    Intelligent photoresponsive isotropic semiconductor micromotors are developed by taking advantage of the limited penetration depth of light to induce asymmetrical surface chemical reactions. Independent of the Brownian motion of themselves, the as-proposed isotropic micromotors are able to continuously move with both motion direction and speed just controlled by light, as well as precisely manipulate particles for nanoengineering.

  5. Decay of capillary wave turbulence.

    PubMed

    Deike, Luc; Berhanu, Michael; Falcon, Eric

    2012-06-01

    We report on the observation of freely decaying capillary wave turbulence on the surface of a fluid. The capillary wave turbulence spectrum decay is found to be self-similar in time with the same power law exponent as the one found in the stationary regime, in agreement with weak turbulence predictions. The amplitude of all Fourier modes are found to decrease exponentially with time at the same damping rate. The longest wavelengths involved in the system are shown to be damped by a viscous surface boundary layer. These long waves play the role of an energy source during the decay that sustains nonlinear interactions to keep capillary waves in a wave turbulent state.

  6. Characterizing inertial and convective optical turbulence by detrended fluctuation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funes, Gustavo; Figueroa, Eduardo; Gulich, Damián.; Zunino, Luciano; Pérez, Darío. G.

    2013-10-01

    Atmospheric turbulence is usually simulated at the laboratory by generating convective free flows with hot surfaces, or heaters. It is tacitly assumed that propagation experiments in this environment are comparable to those usually found outdoors. Nevertheless, it is unclear under which conditions the analogy between convective and isotropic turbulence is valid; that is, obeying Kolmogorov isotropic models. For instance, near-ground-level turbulence often is driven by shear ratchets deviating from established inertial models. In this case, a value for the structure constant can be obtained but it would be unable to distinguish between both classes of turbulence. We have performed a conceptually simple experiment of laser beam propagation through two types of artificial turbulence: isotropic turbulence generated by a turbulator [Proc. SPIE 8535, 853508 (2012)], and convective turbulence by controlling the temperature of electric heaters. In both cases, a thin laser beam propagates across the turbulent path, and its wandering is registered by a position sensor detector. The strength of the optical turbulence, in terms of the structure constant, is obtained from the wandering variance. It is expressed as a function of the temperature difference between cold and hot sources in each setup. We compare the time series behaviour for each turbulence with increasing turbulence strength by estimating the Hurst exponent, H, through detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). Refractive index fluctuations are inherently fractal; this characteristic is reflected in their spectra power-law dependence—in the inertial range. This fractal behaviour is inherited by time series of optical quantities, such as the wandering, by the occurrence of long-range correlations. By analyzing the wandering time series with this technique, we are able to correlate the turbulence strength to the value of the Hurt exponent. Ultimately, we characterize both types of turbulence.

  7. Large eddy simulations of compressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grete, Philipp

    2017-02-01

    Supersonic, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is thought to play an important role in many processes - especially in astrophysics, where detailed three-dimensional observations are scarce. Simulations can partially fill this gap and help to understand these processes. However, direct simulations with realistic parameters are often not feasible. Consequently, large eddy simulations (LES) have emerged as a viable alternative. In LES the overall complexity is reduced by simulating only large and intermediate scales directly. The smallest scales, usually referred to as subgrid-scales (SGS), are introduced to the simulation by means of an SGS model. Thus, the overall quality of an LES with respect to properly accounting for small-scale physics crucially depends on the quality of the SGS model. While there has been a lot of successful research on SGS models in the hydrodynamic regime for decades, SGS modeling in MHD is a rather recent topic, in particular, in the compressible regime. In this thesis, we derive and validate a new nonlinear MHD SGS model that explicitly takes compressibility effects into account. A filter is used to separate the large and intermediate scales, and it is thought to mimic finite resolution effects. In the derivation, we use a deconvolution approach on the filter kernel. With this approach, we are able to derive nonlinear closures for all SGS terms in MHD: the turbulent Reynolds and Maxwell stresses, and the turbulent electromotive force (EMF). We validate the new closures both a priori and a posteriori. In the a priori tests, we use high-resolution reference data of stationary, homogeneous, isotropic MHD turbulence to compare exact SGS quantities against predictions by the closures. The comparison includes, for example, correlations of turbulent fluxes, the average dissipative behavior, and alignment of SGS vectors such as the EMF. In order to quantify the performance of the new nonlinear closure, this comparison is conducted from the

  8. Broken symmetry in ideal magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical study of the long-time evolution of a number of cases of inviscid, isotropic, incompressible, three-dimensional fluid, and magneto-fluid turbulence has been completed. The results confirm that ideal magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is non-ergodic if there is no external magnetic field present. This is due essentially to a canonical symmetry being broken in an arbitrary dynamical representation. The broken symmetry manifests itself as a coherent structure, i.e., a non-zero time-averaged part of the turbulent magnetic field. The coherent structure is observed, in one case, to contain about eighteen percent of the total energy.

  9. Constitutive modeling for isotropic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, K. S.; Lindholm, U. S.; Bodner, S. R.

    1988-01-01

    The third and fourth years of a 4-year research program, part of the NASA HOST Program, are described. The program goals were: (1) to develop and validate unified constitutive models for isotropic materials, and (2) to demonstrate their usefulness for structural analysis of hot section components of gas turbine engines. The unified models selected for development and evaluation were those of Bodner-Partom and of Walker. The unified approach for elastic-viscoplastic constitutive equations is a viable method for representing and predicting material response characteristics in the range where strain rate and temperature dependent inelastic deformations are experienced. This conclusion is reached by extensive comparison of model calculations against the experimental results of a test program of two high temperature Ni-base alloys, B1900+Hf and Mar-M247, over a wide temperature range for a variety of deformation and thermal histories including uniaxial, multiaxial, and thermomechanical loading paths. The applicability of the Bodner-Partom and the Walker models for structural applications has been demonstrated by implementing these models into the MARC finite element code and by performing a number of analyses including thermomechanical histories on components of hot sections of gas turbine engines and benchmark notch tensile specimens. The results of the 4-year program have been published in four annual reports. The results of the base program are summarized in this report. The tasks covered include: (1) development of material test procedures, (2) thermal history effects, and (3) verification of the constitutive model for an alternative material.

  10. How Isotropic is the Universe?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadeh, Daniela; Feeney, Stephen M.; Pontzen, Andrew; Peiris, Hiranya V.; McEwen, Jason D.

    2016-09-01

    A fundamental assumption in the standard model of cosmology is that the Universe is isotropic on large scales. Breaking this assumption leads to a set of solutions to Einstein's field equations, known as Bianchi cosmologies, only a subset of which have ever been tested against data. For the first time, we consider all degrees of freedom in these solutions to conduct a general test of isotropy using cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization data from Planck. For the vector mode (associated with vorticity), we obtain a limit on the anisotropic expansion of (σV/H )0 <4.7 ×10-11 (95% C.L.), which is an order of magnitude tighter than previous Planck results that used cosmic microwave background temperature only. We also place upper limits on other modes of anisotropic expansion, with the weakest limit arising from the regular tensor mode, (σT ,reg/H )0 <1.0 ×10-6 (95% C.L.). Including all degrees of freedom simultaneously for the first time, anisotropic expansion of the Universe is strongly disfavored, with odds of 121 000:1 against.

  11. Constitutive modeling for isotropic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, Ulric S.; Chan, Kwai S.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of the program is to evaluate and develop existing constitutive models for use in finite-element structural analysis of turbine engine hot section components. The class of constitutive equation studied is considered unified in that all inelastic deformation including plasticity, creep, and stress relaxation are treated in a single term rather than a classical separation of plasticity (time independent) and creep (time dependent) behavior. The unified theories employed also do not utilize the classical yield surface or plastic potential concept. The models are constructed from an appropriate flow law, a scalar kinetic relation between strain rate, temperature and stress, and evolutionary equations for internal variables describing strain or work hardening, both isotropic and directional (kinematic). This and other studies have shown that the unified approach is particularly suited for determining the cyclic behavior of superalloy type blade and vane materials and is entirely compatible with three-dimensional inelastic finite-element formulations. The behavior was examined of a second nickel-base alloy, MAR-M247, and compared it with the Bodner-Partom model, further examined procedures for determining the material-specific constants in the models, and exercised the MARC code for a turbine blade under simulated flight spectrum loading. Results are summarized.

  12. How Isotropic is the Universe?

    PubMed

    Saadeh, Daniela; Feeney, Stephen M; Pontzen, Andrew; Peiris, Hiranya V; McEwen, Jason D

    2016-09-23

    A fundamental assumption in the standard model of cosmology is that the Universe is isotropic on large scales. Breaking this assumption leads to a set of solutions to Einstein's field equations, known as Bianchi cosmologies, only a subset of which have ever been tested against data. For the first time, we consider all degrees of freedom in these solutions to conduct a general test of isotropy using cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization data from Planck. For the vector mode (associated with vorticity), we obtain a limit on the anisotropic expansion of (σ_{V}/H)_{0}<4.7×10^{-11} (95% C.L.), which is an order of magnitude tighter than previous Planck results that used cosmic microwave background temperature only. We also place upper limits on other modes of anisotropic expansion, with the weakest limit arising from the regular tensor mode, (σ_{T,reg}/H)_{0}<1.0×10^{-6} (95% C.L.). Including all degrees of freedom simultaneously for the first time, anisotropic expansion of the Universe is strongly disfavored, with odds of 121 000:1 against.

  13. Non-linear dielectric effect in the isotropic phase above the isotropic-cholesteric phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Prabir K.; Chakraborty, Sumanta; Rzoska, Sylwester J.

    2011-11-01

    Using the Landau-de Gennes theory, the temperature, pressure and frequency dependence of the non-linear effect in the isotropic phase above the isotropic-cholesteric phase transition is calculated. The influence of pressure on the isotropic-cholesteric phase transition is discussed by varying the coupling between the orientational order parameter and the macroscopic polarization of polar cholesterics. Comparing the results of the calculations with existing data, we finally conclude that the model provides a description of the isotropic-cholesteric transition that takes all experimentally known features of the unusual negative and positive pretransitional effect in the isotropic phase of the system into account in a qualitatively correct way.

  14. Partitioning of particle velocities in gas-solid turbulent flows into a continuous field and a spatially uncorrelated random distribution: theoretical formalism and numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Février, Pierre; Simonin, Olivier; Squires, Kyle D.

    2005-06-01

    The velocity distribution of dilute suspensions of heavy particles in gas-solid turbulent flows is investigated. A statistical approach - the mesoscopic Eulerian formalism (MEF) - is developed in which an average conditioned on a realization of the turbulent carrier flow is introduced and enables a decomposition of the instantaneous particle velocity into two contributions. The first is a contribution from an underlying continuous turbulent velocity field shared by all the particles - the mesoscopic Eulerian particle velocity field (MEPVF) - that accounts for all particle-particle and fluid-particle two-point correlations. The second contribution corresponds to a distribution - the quasi-Brownian velocity distribution (QBVD) - that represents a random velocity component satisfying the molecular chaos assumption that is not spatially correlated and identified with each particle of the system. The MEF is used to investigate properties of statistically stationary particle-laden isotropic turbulence. The carrier flow is computed using direct numerical simulation (DNS) or large-eddy simulation (LES) with discrete particle tracking employed for the dispersed phase. Particle material densities are much larger than that of the fluid and the force of the fluid on the particle is assumed to reduce to the drag contribution. Computations are performed in the dilute regime for which the influences of inter-particle collisions and fluid-turbulence modulation are neglected. The simulations show that increases in particle inertia increase the contribution of the quasi-Brownian component to the particle velocity. The particle velocity field is correlated at larger length scales than the fluid, with the integral length scales of the MEPVF also increasing with particle inertia. Consistent with the previous work of Abrahamson (1975), the MEF shows that in the limiting case of large inertia, particle motion becomes stochastically equivalent to a Brownian motion with a random spatial

  15. Applicability of the isotropic vorticity theory to an adverse pressure gradient flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, S. C.; Azad, R. S.

    1980-03-01

    The isotropic vorticity theory is examined for an adverse pressure gradient flow on the basis of experimental data obtained in a conical diffuser. This conical diffuser is the same as that used by Okwuobi and Azad (1973), having an 8-deg included angle and an area ratio of 4:1 with fully developed pipe flow at the entry. The experiments are conducted in a low-speed open-circuit wind tunnel. It is shown that the rates and ratio of production and dissipation of the turbulent vorticity are constant in the core region of the diffuser but increase significantly in the wall layer. The validity of the analysis of Batchelor and Townsend (1947) for isotropic vorticity is discussed. The results suggest that even in a shear flow subjected to adverse pressure gradient, the isotropic theory of vorticity can be applied to a region far removed from the wall.

  16. Controlled-Turbulence Bioreactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, David A.; Schwartz, Ray; Trinh, Tinh

    1989-01-01

    Two versions of bioreactor vessel provide steady supplies of oxygen and nutrients with little turbulence. Suspends cells in environment needed for sustenance and growth, while inflicting less damage from agitation and bubbling than do propeller-stirred reactors. Gentle environments in new reactors well suited to delicate mammalian cells. One reactor kept human kidney cells alive for as long as 11 days. Cells grow on carrier beads suspended in liquid culture medium that fills cylindrical housing. Rotating vanes - inside vessel but outside filter - gently circulates nutrient medium. Vessel stationary; magnetic clutch drives filter cylinder and vanes. Another reactor creates even less turbulence. Oxygen-permeable tubing wrapped around rod extending along central axis. Small external pump feeds oxygen to tubing through rotary coupling, and oxygen diffuses into liquid medium.

  17. Two-dimensional convective turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Gruzinov, A.V.; Kukharkin, N.; Sudan, R.N.

    1996-02-01

    We show that 2D {bold E{times}B} ionospheric turbulence of the electron density in the equatorial electrojet is isomorphic to the viscous convection of an ordinary fluid in a porous medium due to temperature gradients. Numerical simulations reveal the strong anisotropy in the turbulence, which consists of rising hot bubbles and falling cool bubbles. These bubbles break up into fingers leading to the formation of stable shear flows. After reaching a quasisteady state, the omnidirectional energy spectrum approaches a {ital k}{sup {minus}2} behavior, rather than {ital k}{sup {minus}5/3} as expected from isotropic turbulence. Physical mechanisms that lead to anisotropy are analyzed. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  18. Turbulence forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, C. L.

    1987-01-01

    In order to forecast turbulence, one needs to have an understanding of the cause of turbulence. Therefore, an attempt is made to show the atmospheric structure that often results when aircraft encounter moderate or greater turbulence. The analysis is based on thousands of hours of observations of flights over the past 39 years of aviation meteorology.

  19. Inertial currents in isotropic plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, M.; Erickson, G. M.; Pontius, D. H., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The magnetospheric convection electric field contributes to Birkeland currents. The effects of the field are to polarize the plasma by displacing the bounce paths of the ions from those of electrons, to redistribute the pressure so that it is not constant along magnetic field lines, and to enhance the pressure gradient by the gradient of the bulk speed. Changes in the polarization charge during the convection of the plasma are neutralized by electrons in the form of field-aligned currents that close through the ionosphere. The pressure drives field-aligned currents through its gradient in the same manner as in quasi-static plasmas, but with modifications that are important if the bulk speed is of the order of the ion thermal speed; the variations in the pressure along field lines are maintained by a weak parallel potential drop. These effects are described in terms of the field-aligned currents in steady state, isotropic, MHD plasma. Solutions are developed by taking the MHD limit ot two-fluid solutions and illustrated in the special case of Maxwellian plasma for which the temperature is constant along magnetic field lines. The expression for the Birkeland current density is a generalization of Vasyliunas' expression for the field-aligned current density in quasi-static plasma and provides a unifying expression when both pressure gradients and ion inertia operate simultaneously as sources of field-aligned currents. It contains a full account of different aspects of the ion flow (parallel and perpendicular velocity and vorticity) that contribute to the currents. Contributions of ion inertia to field-aligned currents will occur in regions of strong velocity shear, electric field reversal, or large gradients in the parallel velocity or number density, and may be important in the low-latitude boundary layer, plasma sheet boundary layer, and the inner edge region of the plasma sheet.

  20. The influence of free-stream turbulence on turbulent boundary layers with mild adverse pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, J. A.; Kassir, S. M.; Larwood, S. M.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of near isotropic free-stream turbulence on the shape factors and skin friction coefficients of turbulent boundary layers is presented for the cases of zero and mild adverse pressure gradients. With free-stream turbulence, improved fluid mixing occurs in boundary layers with adverse pressure gradients relative to the zero pressure gradient condition, with the same free-stream turbulence intensity and length scale. Stronger boundary layers with lower shape factors occur as a result of a lower ratio of the integral scale of turbulence to the boundary layer thickness, and to vortex stretching of the turbulent eddies in the free-stream, both of which act to improve the transmission of momentum from the free-stream to the boundary layers.

  1. The influence of free-stream turbulence on turbulent boundary layers with mild adverse pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, Jon A.

    1988-01-01

    The influence of near isotropic free-stream turbulence on the shape factors and skin friction coefficients of turbulent bounday layers is presented for the cases of zero and mild adverse pressure gradients. With free-stream turbulence, improved fluid mixing occurs in boundary layers with adverse pressure gradients relative to the zero pressure gradient condition, with the same free-stream turbulence intensity and length scale. Stronger boundary layers with lower shape factors occur as a result of a lower ratio of the integral scale of turbulence to the boundary layer thickness, and to vortex stretching of the turbulent eddies in the free stream, both of which act to improve the transmission of momentum from the free stream to the boundary layers.

  2. Three velocity component, nonhomogeneous atmospheric boundary layer turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlmutter, M.; Frost, W.; Fichtl, G. H.

    1976-01-01

    The vertical nonhomogeneous character of turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer results in a non-stationary turbulence process relative to an aircraft during takeoff and landing despite the fact that the turbulence statistics can be horizontally homogeneous. The simulation of the three components of the turbulent winds which include the nonstationary aspect of atmospheric turbulence is the subject of this paper. A procedure is developed and demonstrated to generate the three components of a turbulence ramdom process field, u sub i(x,z) where x and z denote horizontal and vertical coordinates and u sub i, i = 1,2,3 are the three orthogonal components of the turbulent random field. This field satisfies any desired one point auto spectra as well as two point statistics (interlevel correlations). By use of Taylors frozen eddy hypothesis we can transform the turbulent random field into the time domain and obtain the random turbulence along an aircraft trajectory.

  3. Dynamics of quantum turbulence of different spectra

    PubMed Central

    Walmsley, Paul; Zmeev, Dmitry; Pakpour, Fatemeh; Golov, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    Turbulence in a superfluid in the zero-temperature limit consists of a dynamic tangle of quantized vortex filaments. Different types of turbulence are possible depending on the level of correlations in the orientation of vortex lines. We provide an overview of turbulence in superfluid 4He with a particular focus on recent experiments probing the decay of turbulence in the zero-temperature regime below 0.5 K. We describe extensive measurements of the vortex line density during the free decay of different types of turbulence: ultraquantum and quasiclassical turbulence in both stationary and rotating containers. The observed decays and the effective dissipation as a function of temperature are compared with theoretical models and numerical simulations. PMID:24704876

  4. Shell models of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plunian, Franck; Stepanov, Rodion; Frick, Peter

    2013-02-01

    Shell models of hydrodynamic turbulence originated in the seventies. Their main aim was to describe the statistics of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence in spectral space, using a simple set of ordinary differential equations. In the eighties, shell models of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence emerged based on the same principles as their hydrodynamic counter-part but also incorporating interactions between magnetic and velocity fields. In recent years, significant improvements have been made such as the inclusion of non-local interactions and appropriate definitions for helicities. Though shell models cannot account for the spatial complexity of MHD turbulence, their dynamics are not over simplified and do reflect those of real MHD turbulence including intermittency or chaotic reversals of large-scale modes. Furthermore, these models use realistic values for dimensionless parameters (high kinetic and magnetic Reynolds numbers, low or high magnetic Prandtl number) allowing extended inertial range and accurate dissipation rate. Using modern computers it is difficult to attain an inertial range of three decades with direct numerical simulations, whereas eight are possible using shell models. In this review we set up a general mathematical framework allowing the description of any MHD shell model. The variety of the latter, with their advantages and weaknesses, is introduced. Finally we consider a number of applications, dealing with free-decaying MHD turbulence, dynamo action, Alfvén waves and the Hall effect.

  5. Spatial and velocity statistics of inertial particles in turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bec, J.; Biferale, L.; Cencini, M.; Lanotte, A. S.; Toschi, F.

    2011-12-01

    Spatial and velocity statistics of heavy point-like particles in incompressible, homogeneous, and isotropic three-dimensional turbulence is studied by means of direct numerical simulations at two values of the Taylor-scale Reynolds number Reλ ~ 200 and Reλ ~ 400, corresponding to resolutions of 5123 and 20483 grid points, respectively. Particles Stokes number values range from St ≈ 0.2 to 70. Stationary small-scale particle distribution is shown to display a singular -multifractal- measure, characterized by a set of generalized fractal dimensions with a strong sensitivity on the Stokes number and a possible, small Reynolds number dependency. Velocity increments between two inertial particles depend on the relative weight between smooth events - where particle velocity is approximately the same of the fluid velocity-, and caustic contributions - when two close particles have very different velocities. The latter events lead to a non-differentiable small-scale behaviour for the relative velocity. The relative weight of these two contributions changes at varying the importance of inertia. We show that moments of the velocity difference display a quasi bi-fractal-behavior and that the scaling properties of velocity increments for not too small Stokes number are in good agreement with a recent theoretical prediction made by K. Gustavsson and B. Mehlig arXiv: 1012.1789v1 [physics.flu-dyn], connecting the saturation of velocity scaling exponents with the fractal dimension of particle clustering.

  6. Delayed correlation between turbulent energy injection and dissipation.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Bruce R; Yousef, Tarek A; Haugen, Nils Erland L; Brandenburg, Axel; Krogstad, Per-Age

    2004-11-01

    The dimensionless kinetic energy dissipation rate C(epsilon) is estimated from numerical simulations of statistically stationary isotropic box turbulence that is slightly compressible. The Taylor microscale Reynolds number (Re(lambda)) range is 20< or approximately equal to Re(lambda) < or approximately equal to 220 and the statistical stationarity is achieved with a random phase forcing method. The strong Re(lambda) dependence of C(epsilon) abates when Re(lambda) approximately 100 after which C(epsilon) slowly approaches approximately 0.5, a value slightly different from previously reported simulations but in good agreement with experimental results. If C(epsilon) is estimated at a specific time step from the time series of the quantities involved it is necessary to account for the time lag between energy injection and energy dissipation. Also, the resulting value can differ from the ensemble averaged value by up to +/-30%. This may explain the spread in results from previously published estimates of C(epsilon).

  7. Characterizing Wake Turbulence with Staring Lidar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastine, D.; Wächter, M.; Peinke, J.; Trabucchi, D.; Kühn, M.

    2015-06-01

    Lidar measurements in the German offshore wind farm Alpha Ventus were performed to investigate the turbulence characteristics of wind turbine wakes. In particular, we compare measurements of the free flow in the surroundings of the wind turbines with measurements in the inner region of a wake flow behind one turbine. Our results indicate that wind turbines modulate the turbulent structures of the flow on a wide range of scales. For the data of the wake flow, the power spectrum as well as the multifractal intermittency coefficient reveal features of homogeneous isotropic turbulence. Thus, we conjecture that on scales of the rotor a new turbulent cascade is initiated, which determines the features of the turbulent wake flow quite independently from the more complex wind flow in the surroundings of the turbine.

  8. Scintillation from Turbulence in the Stratosphere for Middle-Infrared Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, C.; Conan, J.; Michau, V.

    Atmospheric turbulence in the sense of disturbances of the speed field masses of air is much weaker in the stratosphere than in the troposphere. However, strong gradients of density mainly due to temperature fluctuations cause optical turbulence. Recent experiments highlight the composite feature of turbulence in the stratosphere. We present a model of scintillation based on a 3D model of anisotropic and isotropic turbulence.

  9. Emission of sound from axisymmetric turbulence convected by a mean flow with application to jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.; Rosenbaum, B. M.

    1972-01-01

    A model, based on Lighthill's theory, for predicting aerodynamic noise from a turbulent shear flow is developed. This model is a generalization of the one developed by Ribner. Unlike Ribner's model, it does not require that the turbulent correlations factor into space and time-dependent parts. It replaces his assumption of isotropic. turbulence by the more realistic one of axisymmetric turbulence. The implications of the model for jet noise are discussed.

  10. Stationary Density Profiles in Alcator C-mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesner, J.; Ernst, D.; Hughes, J. W.; Mumgaard, R.; Shiraiwa, S.; Whyte, D. G.

    2012-10-01

    In the absence of an internal particle source, plasma turbulence will impose an intrinsic relationship between an inwards pinch and an outwards diffusion resulting in a stationary density profile as determined by the turbulent equipartition (TEP) theory. The Alcator C-mod tokamak utilizes RF heating and current drive so that fueling only occurs in the vicinity of the separatrix. Density is determined from Thomson scattering. Discharges that transition from L-mode to I-mode are seen to maintain a stationary profile. For reversed shear discharges maintained by non-inductive current drive (Vloop 0) a drop of density in the vicinity of the axis is consistent with an observed rise in q, although error in the measurement precludes making this observation definitive.

  11. Isotropic versus anisotropic modeling of photorefractive solitons.

    PubMed

    Belić, M R; Vujić, D; Stepken, A; Kaiser, F; Calvo, G F; Agulló-López, F; Carrascosa, M

    2002-06-01

    The question of the isotropic versus anisotropic modeling of incoherent spatial screening solitons in photorefractive crystals is addressed by a careful theoretical and numerical analysis. Isotropic, or local, models allow for an extended spiraling of two interacting scalar solitons, and for a prolonged propagation of vortex vector solitons, whereas anisotropic, nonlocal, models prevent such phenomena. In the context of Kukhtarev's material equations, the difference in behavior is traced to the continuity equation for the current density. We further show that neither an indefinite spiraling of two solitons nor stable propagation of vortex vector solitons is generally possible in both isotropic and anisotropic models. Such systems do not conserve angular momentum, even in the case of an isotropic change in the index of refraction.

  12. Experimental assessment of helicopter rotor turbulence ingestion noise in hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Schlinker, R. H.; Amiet, R. K.

    1989-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to assess the accuracy of a theory for non-isotropic turbulence ingestion. In order to generate non-isotropic turbulence in a controlled environment, a scale model rotor in a closed chamber was used so that the turbulence generated by the rotor was reingested by the recirculating flow. Simultaneous measurements of turbulence inflow properties and far field acoustics were acquired. Measurements confirmed that the inflow turbulence was highly non-isotropic. The measured aerodynamic properties were used as inputs for the noise prediction procedure. The general agreement between the non-isotropic noise prediction procedure and the experiment was good, although the procedure generally overpredicts the quasi-tonal low to mid range frequencies and underpredicts the higher broadband signals. The predicted sound power level as a function of polar angle was in close agreement with measurements, except near the rotor plane, which is not modeled by the present analysis. It is determined that the most sensitive parameter influencing the predicted noise was the turbulence intensity.

  13. Stationary black diholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manko, V. S.; Rabadán, R. I.; Sanabria-Gómez, J. D.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we present and analyze the simplest physically meaningful model for stationary black diholes—a binary configuration of counterrotating Kerr-Newman black holes endowed with opposite electric charges—elaborated in a physical parametrization on the basis of one of the Ernst-Manko-Ruiz equatorially antisymmetric solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations. The model saturates the Gabach-Clement inequality for interacting black holes with struts, and in the absence of rotation, it reduces to the Emparan-Teo electric dihole solution. The physical characteristics of each dihole constituent satisfy identically the well-known Smarr's mass formula.

  14. Ceramic stationary gas turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Roode, M. van

    1995-10-01

    The performance of current industrial gas turbines is limited by the temperature and strength capabilities of the metallic structural materials in the engine hot section. Because of their superior high-temperature strength and durability, ceramics can be used as structural materials for hot section components (blades, nozzles, combustor liners) in innovative designs at increased turbine firing temperatures. The benefits include the ability to increase the turbine inlet temperature (TIT) to about 1200{degrees}C ({approx}2200{degrees}F) or more with uncooled ceramics. It has been projected that fully optimized stationary gas turbines would have a {approx}20 percent gain in thermal efficiency and {approx}40 percent gain in output power in simple cycle compared to all metal-engines with air-cooled components. Annual fuel savings in cogeneration in the U.S. would be on the order of 0.2 Quad by 2010. Emissions reductions to under 10 ppmv NO{sub x} are also forecast. This paper describes the progress on a three-phase, 6-year program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, to achieve significant performance improvements and emissions reductions in stationary gas turbines by replacing metallic hot section components with ceramic parts. Progress is being reported for the period September 1, 1994, through September 30, 1995.

  15. Ceramic stationary gas turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Roode, M. van

    1995-12-31

    The performance of current industrial gas turbines is limited by the temperature and strength capabilities of the metallic structural materials in the engine hot section. Because of their superior high-temperature strength and durability, ceramics can be used as structural materials for hot section components (blades, nozzles, combustor liners) in innovative designs at increased turbine firing temperatures. The benefits include the ability to increase the turbine inlet temperature (TIT) to about 1200{degrees}C ({approx}2200{degrees}F) or more with uncooled ceramics. It has been projected that fully optimized stationary gas turbines would have a {approx}20 percent gain in thermal efficiency and {approx}40 percent gain in output power in simple cycle compared to all metal-engines with air-cooled components. Annual fuel savings in cogeneration in the U.S. would be on the order of 0.2 Quad by 2010. Emissions reductions to under 10 ppmv NO{sub x} are also forecast. This paper describes the progress on a three-phase, 6-year program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, to achieve significant performance improvements and emissions reductions in stationary gas turbines by replacing metallic hot section components with ceramic parts. Progress is being reported for the period September 1, 1994, through September 30, 1995.

  16. Gyrokinetic modelling of stationary electron and impurity profiles in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Skyman, A. Tegnered, D. Nordman, H. Strand, P.

    2014-09-15

    Particle transport due to Ion Temperature Gradient (ITG)/Trapped Electron Mode (TEM) turbulence is investigated using the gyrokinetic code GENE. Both a reduced quasilinear treatment and nonlinear simulations are performed for typical tokamak parameters corresponding to ITG dominated turbulence. The gyrokinetic results are compared and contrasted with results from a computationally efficient fluid model. A selfconsistent treatment is used, where the stationary local profiles are calculated corresponding to zero particle flux simultaneously for electrons and trace impurities. The scaling of the stationary profiles with magnetic shear, safety factor, electron-to-ion temperature ratio, collisionality, toroidal sheared rotation, plasma β, triangularity, and elongation is investigated. In addition, the effect of different main ion mass on the zero flux condition is discussed. The electron density gradient can significantly affect the stationary impurity profile scaling. It is therefore expected that a selfconsistent treatment will yield results more comparable to experimental results for parameter scans where the stationary background density profile is sensitive. This is shown to be the case in scans over magnetic shear, collisionality, elongation, and temperature ratio, for which the simultaneous zero flux electron and impurity profiles are calculated. A slight asymmetry between hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium with respect to profile peaking is obtained, in particular, for scans in collisionality and temperature ratio.

  17. Consistent Initial Conditions for the DNS of Compressible Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ristorcelli, J. R.; Blaisdell, G. A.

    1996-01-01

    Relationships between diverse thermodynamic quantities appropriate to weakly compressible turbulence are derived. It is shown that for turbulence of a finite turbulent Mach number there is a finite element of compressibility. A methodology for generating initial conditions for the fluctuating pressure, density and dilatational velocity is given which is consistent with finite Mach number effects. Use of these initial conditions gives rise to a smooth development of the flow, in contrast to cases in which these fields are specified arbitrarily or set to zero. Comparisons of the effect of different types of initial conditions are made using direct numerical simulation of decaying isotropic turbulence.

  18. Studying Turbulence Using Numerical Simulation Databases, 2. Proceedings of the 1988 Summer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The focus of the program was on the use of direct numerical simulations of turbulent flow for study of turbulence physics and modeling. A special interest was placed on turbulent mixing layers. The required data for these investigations were generated from four newly developed codes for simulation of time and spatially developing incompressible and compressible mixing layers. Also of interest were the structure of wall bounded turbulent and transitional flows, evaluation of diagnostic techniques for detection of organized motions, energy transfer in isotropic turbulence, optical propagation through turbulent media, and detailed analysis of the interaction of vortical structures.

  19. Premixed Turbulent Flame Propagation in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Suresh

    1999-01-01

    A combined numerical-experimental study has been carried out to investigate the structure and propagation characteristics of turbulent premixed flames with and without the influence of buoyancy. Experimentally, the premixed flame characteristics are studied in the wrinkled regime using a Couette flow facility and an isotropic flow facility in order to resolve the scale of flame wrinkling. Both facilities were chosen for their ability to achieve sustained turbulence at low Reynolds number. This implies that conventional diagnostics can be employed to resolve the smallest scales of wrinkling. The Couette facility was also built keeping in mind the constraints imposed by the drop tower requirements. Results showed that the flow in this Couette flow facility achieves full-developed turbulence at low Re and all turbulence statistics are in good agreement with past measurements on large-scale facilities. Premixed flame propagation studies were then carried out both using the isotropic box and the Couette facility. Flame imaging showed that fine scales of wrinkling occurs during flame propagation. Both cases in Ig showed significant buoyancy effect. To demonstrate that micro-g can remove this buoyancy effect, a small drop tower was built and drop experiments were conducted using the isotropic box. Results using the Couette facility confirmed the ability to carry out these unique reacting flow experiments at least in 1g. Drop experiments at NASA GRC were planned but were not completed due to termination of this project.

  20. Propagation of multi-Gaussian Schell-model vortex beams in isotropic random media.

    PubMed

    Tang, Miaomiao; Zhao, Daomu

    2015-12-14

    The effect of isotropic and homogeneous random media on propagation characteristics of recently introduced multi-Gaussian Schell-model (MGSM) vortex beams is investigated. The analytical formula for the cross-spectral density function of such a beam propagating in random turbulent media is derived and used to explore the evolution of the spectral density, the degree of coherence and the turbulence-induced spreading. An example illustrates the fact that, at sufficiently large distance from the source, the source correlations modulation of the spectral distribution in free space is shown to be suppressed by the uniformly correlated turbulence. The impacts, arising from the index M, the correlation width of the source and the properties of the medium on such characteristics are analyzed in depth.

  1. Turbulence Effects.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    SONAR SIGNALS, *UNDERWATER SOUND SIGNALS, SHOCK WAVES, TURBULENCE, WAVE PROPAGATION, SOUND TRANSMISSION, ACOUSTIC ATTENUATION, AMPLITUDE, UNDERWATER EXPLOSIONS, ACOUSTIC REFLECTION, SOUND RANGING, BOTTOM LOSS, BOTTOM BOUNCE .

  2. Onset of meso-scale turbulence in active nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doostmohammadi, Amin; Shendruk, Tyler N.; Thijssen, Kristian; Yeomans, Julia M.

    2017-05-01

    Meso-scale turbulence is an innate phenomenon, distinct from inertial turbulence, that spontaneously occurs at low Reynolds number in fluidized biological systems. This spatiotemporal disordered flow radically changes nutrient and molecular transport in living fluids and can strongly affect the collective behaviour in prominent biological processes, including biofilm formation, morphogenesis and cancer invasion. Despite its crucial role in such physiological processes, understanding meso-scale turbulence and any relation to classical inertial turbulence remains obscure. Here we show how the motion of active matter along a micro-channel transitions to meso-scale turbulence through the evolution of locally disordered patches (active puffs) from an ordered vortex-lattice flow state. We demonstrate that the stationary critical exponents of this transition to meso-scale turbulence in a channel coincide with the directed percolation universality class. This finding bridges our understanding of the onset of low-Reynolds-number meso-scale turbulence and traditional scale-invariant turbulence in confinement.

  3. Compressibility Effects on the Growth and Structure of Homogeneous Turbulent Shear Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaisdell, G. A.; Mansour, N. N.; Reynolds, W. C.

    1993-01-01

    Compressibility effects within decaying isotropic turbulence and homogeneous turbulent shear flow have been studied using direct numerical simulation. The objective of this work is to increase our understanding of compressible turbulence and to aid the development of turbulence models for compressible flows. The numerical simulations of compressible isotropic turbulence show that compressibility effects are highly dependent on the initial conditions. The shear flow simulations, on the other hand, show that measures of compressibility evolve to become independent of their initial values and are parameterized by the root mean square Mach number. The growth rate of the turbulence in compressible homogeneous shear flow is reduced compared to that in the incompressible case. The reduced growth rate is the result of an increase in the dissipation rate and energy transfer to internal energy by the pressure-dilatation correlation. Examination of the structure of compressible homogeneous shear flow reveals the presence of eddy shocklets, which are important for the increased dissipation rate of compressible turbulence.

  4. Measurement of the Turbulence Kinetic Energy Budget of a Turbulent Planar Wake Flow in Pressure Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xiao-Feng; Thomas, Flint O.; Nelson, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) is a very important quantity for turbulence modeling and the budget of this quantity in its transport equation can provide insight into the flow physics. Turbulence kinetic energy budget measurements were conducted for a symmetric turbulent wake flow subjected to constant zero, favorable and adverse pressure gradients in year-three of research effort. The purpose of this study is to clarify the flow physics issues underlying the demonstrated influence of pressure gradient on wake development and provide experimental support for turbulence modeling. To ensure the reliability of these notoriously difficult measurements, the experimental procedure was carefully designed on the basis of an uncertainty analysis. Four different approaches, based on an isotropic turbulence assumption, a locally axisymmetric homogeneous turbulence assumption, a semi-isotropy assumption and a forced balance of the TKE equation, were applied for the estimate of the dissipation term. The pressure transport term is obtained from a forced balance of the turbulence kinetic energy equation. This report will present the results of the turbulence kinetic energy budget measurement and discuss their implication on the development of strained turbulent wakes.

  5. PDF turbulence modeling and DNS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, A. T.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of time discontinuity (or jump condition) in the coalescence/dispersion (C/D) mixing model is addressed in probability density function (pdf). A C/D mixing model continuous in time is introduced. With the continuous mixing model, the process of chemical reaction can be fully coupled with mixing. In the case of homogeneous turbulence decay, the new model predicts a pdf very close to a Gaussian distribution, with finite higher moments also close to that of a Gaussian distribution. Results from the continuous mixing model are compared with both experimental data and numerical results from conventional C/D models. The effect of Coriolis forces on compressible homogeneous turbulence is studied using direct numerical simulation (DNS). The numerical method used in this study is an eight order compact difference scheme. Contrary to the conclusions reached by previous DNS studies on incompressible isotropic turbulence, the present results show that the Coriolis force increases the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy, and that anisotropy develops as the Coriolis force increases. The Taylor-Proudman theory does apply since the derivatives in the direction of the rotation axis vanishes rapidly. A closer analysis reveals that the dissipation rate of the incompressible component of the turbulent kinetic energy indeed decreases with a higher rotation rate, consistent with incompressible flow simulations (Bardina), while the dissipation rate of the compressible part increases; the net gain is positive. Inertial waves are observed in the simulation results.

  6. Bacteria foraging in turbulent waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, John; Tang, Wenbo; Stocker, Roman

    2009-11-01

    Marine bacteria are the Ocean's recyclers, contributing to as much as 50% of the productivity of the marine food web. Bacteria forage on patches of dissolved nutrients using chemotaxis, the ability to swim up chemical gradients. As turbulence is ubiquitous in the Ocean, it is important to understand how turbulent flow conditions affect bacterial foraging. We used three-dimensional, isotropic direct numerical simulations coupled with a bacterial transport equation to address this problem. After the flow is continuously forced until it reaches a steady state, microscale nutrient patches are injected into the turbulent flow, and stirring produces thin nutrient filaments. Two populations of bacteria compete against each other: one population is motile and chemotactic (`active'), the other is non-motile (`passive'). The distribution of both populations is initially uniform. Chemotaxis allows active bacteria to cluster near the center of the nutrient filaments, increasing their nutrient uptake relative to passive bacteria. Increasing the turbulence intensity increases the short-term chemotactic advantage by quickly producing large gradients in the nutrient concentration, but also leads to rapid mixing of the nutrient field, which makes the chemotactic advantage short-lived. The results suggest that the evolutionary advantage of chemotaxis, based on the increase in nutrient uptake relative to the energetic cost of swimming, strongly depends on the turbulence level.

  7. On the application of Rice's exceedance statistics to atmospheric turbulence.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, W. Y.

    1972-01-01

    Discrepancies produced by the application of Rice's exceedance statistics to atmospheric turbulence are examined. First- and second-order densities from several data sources have been measured for this purpose. Particular care was paid to each selection of turbulence that provides stationary mean and variance over the entire segment. Results show that even for a stationary segment of turbulence, the process is still highly non-Gaussian, in spite of a Gaussian appearance for its first-order distribution. Data also indicate strongly non-Gaussian second-order distributions. It is therefore concluded that even stationary atmospheric turbulence with a normal first-order distribution cannot be considered a Gaussian process, and consequently the application of Rice's exceedance statistics should be approached with caution.

  8. Correlations of velocity and temperature fluctuations in the stagnation-point flow of circular cylinder in turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    The present analyses of boundary layer flow and turbulence transport attempt to characterize the influence of freestream turbulence on the surface heat-transfer rate and stagnation point region skin friction of a circular cross-section cylinder in turbulent flow. The Reynolds stress-transport equations and k-epsilon two-equation turbulence modeling are used, yielding time-averaged turbulence double-correlations, mean-flow properties, surface heat-transfer rate, and skin-friction with freestream isotropic turbulence. A comparison of analytical results with experimental data indicates that large Reynolds normal stresses are induced at the boundary layer edge by the kinetic energy of the turbulence.

  9. Stationary engineering handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Petrocelly, K.L.

    1989-01-01

    Years ago, the only qualifications you needed to become to become an operating engineer were the ability to shovel large chunks of coal through small furnace doors and the fortitude to sweat profusely for hours without fainting. As a consequence of technological evolution, the engineer's coal shovels have been replaced with computers and now perspiration is more the result of job stress than exposure to high temperatures. The domain of the operator has been extended far beyond the smoke-filled caverns that once encased him, out into the physical plant, and his responsibilities have been expanded accordingly. Unlike his less sophisticated predecessor, today's technician must be well versed in all aspects of the operation. The field of power plant operations has become a full-fledged profession and its principals are called Stationary Engineers. This book addresses the areas of responsibility and the education and skills needed for successful operation of building services equipment.

  10. Effect of anisotropic turbulence on aerodynamic noise. [Lighthill theory mathematical model for axisymmetric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M.; Rosenbaum, B.

    1973-01-01

    A model based on Lighthill's theory for predicting aerodynamic noise from a turbulent shear flow is developed. This model is a generalization of the one developed by Ribner. It does not require that the turbulent correlations factor into space and time-dependent parts. It replaces his assumption of isotropic turbulence by the more realistic one of axisymmetric turbulence. In the course of the analysis, a hierarchy of equations is developed wherein each succeeding equation involves more assumptions than the preceding equation but requires less experimental information for its use. The implications of the model for jet noise are discussed. It is shown that for the particular turbulence data considered anisotropy causes the high-frequency self-noise to be beamed downstream.

  11. Quantifying and scaling airplane performance in turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Johnhenri R.

    This dissertation studies the effects of turbulent wind on airplane airspeed and normal load factor, determining how these effects scale with airplane size and developing envelopes to account for them. The results have applications in design and control of aircraft, especially small scale aircraft, for robustness with respect to turbulence. Using linearized airplane dynamics and the Dryden gust model, this dissertation presents analytical and numerical scaling laws for airplane performance in gusts, safety margins that guarantee, with specified probability, that steady flight can be maintained when stochastic wind gusts act upon an airplane, and envelopes to visualize these safety margins. Presented here for the first time are scaling laws for the phugoid natural frequency, phugoid damping ratio, airspeed variance in turbulence, and flight path angle variance in turbulence. The results show that small aircraft are more susceptible to high frequency gusts, that the phugoid damping ratio does not depend directly on airplane size, that the airspeed and flight path angle variances can be parameterized by the ratio of the phugoid natural frequency to a characteristic turbulence frequency, and that the coefficient of variation of the airspeed decreases with increasing airplane size. Accompanying numerical examples validate the results using eleven different airplanes models, focusing on NASA's hypothetical Boeing 757 analog the Generic Transport Model and its operational 5.5% scale model, the NASA T2. Also presented here for the first time are stationary flight, where the flight state is a stationary random process, and the stationary flight envelope, an adjusted steady flight envelope to visualize safety margins for stationary flight. The dissertation shows that driving the linearized airplane equations of motion with stationary, stochastic gusts results in stationary flight. It also shows how feedback control can enlarge the stationary flight envelope by alleviating

  12. Static spherically symmetric wormholes with isotropic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cataldo, Mauricio; Liempi, Luis; Rodríguez, Pablo

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we study static spherically symmetric wormhole solutions sustained by matter sources with isotropic pressure. We show that such spherical wormholes do not exist in the framework of zero-tidal-force wormholes. On the other hand, it is shown that for the often used power-law shape function there are no spherically symmetric traversable wormholes sustained by sources with a linear equation of state p = ωρ for the isotropic pressure, independently of the form of the redshift function ϕ (r). We consider a solution obtained by Tolman at 1939 for describing static spheres of isotropic fluids, and show that it also may describe wormhole spacetimes with a power-law redshift function, which leads to a polynomial shape function, generalizing a power-law shape function, and inducing a solid angle deficit.

  13. Efficient modeling in transversely isotropic inhomogeneous media

    SciTech Connect

    Alkhalifah, T.

    1993-11-01

    An efficient modeling technique for transversely isotropic, inhomogeneous media, is developed using a mix of analytical equations and numerical calculations. The analytic equation for the raypath in a factorized transversely isotropic (FTI) media with linear velocity variation, derived by Shearer and Chapman, is used to trace between two points. In addition, I derive an analytical equation for geometrical spreading in FTI media that aids in preserving program efficiency; however, the traveltime is calculated numerically. I then generalize the method to treat general transversely isotropic (TI) media that are not factorized anisotropic inhomogeneous by perturbing the FTI traveltimes, following the perturbation ideas of Cerveny and Filho. A Kirchhoff-summation-based program relying on Trorey`s (1970) diffraction method is used to generate synthetic seismograms for such a medium. For the type of velocity models treated, the program is much more efficient than finite-difference and general ray-trace modeling techniques.

  14. Small-scale universality in fluid turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Jörg; Scheel, Janet D.; Krasnov, Dmitry; Donzis, Diego A.; Yakhot, Victor; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2014-01-01

    Turbulent flows in nature and technology possess a range of scales. The largest scales carry the memory of the physical system in which a flow is embedded. One challenge is to unravel the universal statistical properties that all turbulent flows share despite their different large-scale driving mechanisms or their particular flow geometries. In the present work, we study three turbulent flows of systematically increasing complexity. These are homogeneous and isotropic turbulence in a periodic box, turbulent shear flow between two parallel walls, and thermal convection in a closed cylindrical container. They are computed by highly resolved direct numerical simulations of the governing dynamical equations. We use these simulation data to establish two fundamental results: (i) at Reynolds numbers Re ∼ 102 the fluctuations of the velocity derivatives pass through a transition from nearly Gaussian (or slightly sub-Gaussian) to intermittent behavior that is characteristic of fully developed high Reynolds number turbulence, and (ii) beyond the transition point, the statistics of the rate of energy dissipation in all three flows obey the same Reynolds number power laws derived for homogeneous turbulence. These results allow us to claim universality of small scales even at low Reynolds numbers. Our results shed new light on the notion of when the turbulence is fully developed at the small scales without relying on the existence of an extended inertial range. PMID:25024175

  15. A Quadratic Closure for Compressible Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Futterman, J A

    2008-09-16

    We have investigated a one-point closure model for compressible turbulence based on third- and higher order cumulant discard for systems undergoing rapid deformation, such as might occur downstream of a shock or other discontinuity. In so doing, we find the lowest order contributions of turbulence to the mean flow, which lead to criteria for Adaptive Mesh Refinement. Rapid distortion theory (RDT) as originally applied by Herring closes the turbulence hierarchy of moment equations by discarding third order and higher cumulants. This is similar to the fourth-order cumulant discard hypothesis of Millionshchikov, except that the Millionshchikov hypothesis was taken to apply to incompressible homogeneous isotropic turbulence generally, whereas RDT is applied only to fluids undergoing a distortion that is 'rapid' in the sense that the interaction of the mean flow with the turbulence overwhelms the interaction of the turbulence with itself. It is also similar to Gaussian closure, in which both second and fourth-order cumulants are retained. Motivated by RDT, we develop a quadratic one-point closure for rapidly distorting compressible turbulence, without regard to homogeneity or isotropy, and make contact with two equation turbulence models, especially the K-{var_epsilon} and K-L models, and with linear instability growth. In the end, we arrive at criteria for Adaptive Mesh Refinement in Finite Volume simulations.

  16. Negative Poisson's ratio materials via isotropic interactions.

    PubMed

    Rechtsman, Mikael C; Stillinger, Frank H; Torquato, Salvatore

    2008-08-22

    We show that under tension a classical many-body system with only isotropic pair interactions in a crystalline state can, counterintuitively, have a negative Poisson's ratio, or auxetic behavior. We derive the conditions under which the triangular lattice in two dimensions and lattices with cubic symmetry in three dimensions exhibit a negative Poisson's ratio. In the former case, the simple Lennard-Jones potential can give rise to auxetic behavior. In the latter case, a negative Poisson's ratio can be exhibited even when the material is constrained to be elastically isotropic.

  17. The Two Isotropic Asymptotes of Fiber Composites,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-01

    Voigt and Reuss models of summed stiffness and compliance. The compliance quasi-isotropic asymptote, which >’-:’ has evidently not been discussed in the...i,j,e)de o0 The resulting pseudo -isotropic compliance (series-model) Hooke’s law matrix is similar but not identical to Eq. (3): W(1) W(4) 0 a aIE...given by 1 W( ) 14) E : - Vc Wc 4W(5) 2[W(1) - W()] (8) c W() W(14 12 Direct formulas for the pseudo -isctrcpic moduli, in terms of the ply 1s natural

  18. The analysis and simulation of compressible turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erlebacher, Gordon; Hussaini, M. Y.; Kreiss, H. O.; Sarkar, S.

    1990-01-01

    Compressible turbulent flows at low turbulent Mach numbers are considered. Contrary to the general belief that such flows are almost incompressible, (i.e., the divergence of the velocity field remains small for all times), it is shown that even if the divergence of the initial velocity field is negligibly small, it can grow rapidly on a non-dimensional time scale which is the inverse of the fluctuating Mach number. An asymptotic theory which enables one to obtain a description of the flow in terms of its divergence-free and vorticity-free components has been developed to solve the initial-value problem. As a result, the various types of low Mach number turbulent regimes have been classified with respect to the initial conditions. Formulae are derived that accurately predict the level of compressibility after the initial transients have disappeared. These results are verified by extensive direct numerical simulations of isotropic turbulence.

  19. Helicity fluctuations in incompressible turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Michael M.; Moin, Parviz

    1987-01-01

    Results from direct numerical simulations of several homogeneous flows and fully developed turbulent channel flow indicate that the probability distribution function (pdf) of relative helicity density exhibits at most a 20 percent deviation from a flat distribution. Isotropic flows exhibit a slight helical nature but the presence of mean strain in homogeneous turbulence suppresses helical behavior. All the homogeneous turbulent flows studied show no correlation between relative helicity density and the dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy. The channel flow simulations indicate that, except for low-dissipation regions near the outer edge of the buffer layer, there is no tendency for the flow to be helical. The strong peaks in the relative helicity density pdf and the association of these peaks with regions of low dissipation found in previous simulations by Pelz et al.(1985) are not observed.

  20. Stationary Engineering Laboratory Manual--2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steingress, Frederick M.; Frost, Harold J.

    The Stationary Engineering Laboratory Manual 2 was designed for vocational/technical high school students who have received instruction in the basics of stationary engineering. It was developed for students who will be operating a live plant and who will be responsible for supplying steam for heating, cooking, and baking. Each lesson in the manual…

  1. Stationary Engineering. Science Manual--2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Harold J.; Steingress, Frederick M.

    This second-year student manual contains 140 brief related science lessons applying science and math to trade activities in the field of stationary engineering. The lessons are organized into 16 units: (1) Introduction to Stationary Engineering, (2) Engineering Fundamentals, (3) Steam Boilers, (4) Boiler Fittings, (5) Boilerroom System, (6)…

  2. Stochastic representations of seismic anisotropy: transversely isotropic effective media models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xin; Jordan, Thomas H.

    2017-06-01

    We apply Jordan's self-consistent, second-order Born theory to compute the effective stiffness tensor for spatially stationary, stochastic models of 3-D elastic heterogeneity. The effects of local anisotropy can be separated from spatially extended geometric anisotropy by factoring the covariance of the moduli into a one-point variance tensor and a two-point correlation function. The latter is incorporated into the rescaled Kneer tensor, which is contracted against the one-point variance tensor to yield a second-order perturbation to the Voigt average. The theory can handle heterogeneity with orthotropic stochastic symmetry, but the calculations presented here are restricted to media with transversely isotropic (TI) statistics. We thoroughly investigate TI stochastic media that are locally isotropic. If the heterogeneity aspect ratio η is unity, the effective medium is isotropic, and the main effect of the scattering is to reduce the moduli. The two limiting regimes are a 2-D vertical stochastic bundle (η → 0), where the P and S anisotropy ratios are negative, and a 1-D horizontal stochastic laminate (η → ∞), where they are positive. The effective-medium equations for the latter yield the second-order approximation to Backus's exact solution, demonstrating the connection between Backus theory and self-consistent effective-media theory. Comparisons of the exact and second-order results for non-Gaussian laminates indicate that the approximation should be adequate for moduli heterogeneities less than about 30 per cent and thus valid for most seismological purposes. We apply the locally isotropic theory to data from the Los Angeles Basin to illustrate how it can be used to explain shallow seismic anisotropy. To assess the relative contributions of geometric and local anisotropy to the effective anisotropy, we consider a rotational model for stochastic anisotropic variability proposed by Jordan. In this model, the axis of a hexagonally symmetric stiffness

  3. Extreme events in computational turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, P. K.; Zhai, X. M.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2015-01-01

    We have performed direct numerical simulations of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence in a periodic box with 8,1923 grid points. These are the largest simulations performed, to date, aimed at improving our understanding of turbulence small-scale structure. We present some basic statistical results and focus on “extreme” events (whose magnitudes are several tens of thousands the mean value). The structure of these extreme events is quite different from that of moderately large events (of the order of 10 times the mean value). In particular, intense vorticity occurs primarily in the form of tubes for moderately large events whereas it is much more “chunky” for extreme events (though probably overlaid on the traditional vortex tubes). We track the temporal evolution of extreme events and find that they are generally short-lived. Extreme magnitudes of energy dissipation rate and enstrophy occur simultaneously in space and remain nearly colocated during their evolution. PMID:26424452

  4. Numerical experiments in homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogallo, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    The direct simulation methods developed by Orszag and Patternson (1972) for isotropic turbulence were extended to homogeneous turbulence in an incompressible fluid subjected to uniform deformation or rotation. The results of simulations for irrotational strain (plane and axisymmetric), shear, rotation, and relaxation toward isotropy following axisymmetric strain are compared with linear theory and experimental data. Emphasis is placed on the shear flow because of its importance and because of the availability of accurate and detailed experimental data. The computed results are used to assess the accuracy of two popular models used in the closure of the Reynolds-stress equations. Data from a variety of the computed fields and the details of the numerical methods used in the simulation are also presented.

  5. Exact solution of the isotropic majority-vote model on complete graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fronczak, Agata; Fronczak, Piotr

    2017-07-01

    The isotropic majority-vote (MV) model, which, apart from the one-dimensional case, is thought to be nonequilibrium and violating the detailed balance condition. We show that this is not true when the model is defined on a complete graph. In the stationary regime, the MV model on a fully connected graph fulfills the detailed balance and is equivalent to the modified Ehrenfest urn model. Using the master equation approach, we derive the exact expression for the probability distribution of finding the system in a given spin configuration. We show that it only depends on the absolute value of magnetization. Our theoretical predictions are validated by numerical simulations.

  6. A filament model of MHD turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Petviashvili, V.

    1996-11-01

    Turbulence of ordinary fluid is recognized as chaotic motion with almost no linear features. It is well described in wavenumber space by Kolmogorov`s phenomenological theory in wave number k-space: The source of energy should exist in the region of small wavenumbers. Then isotropic energy flux is generated in k-space directed toward a larger k-region where the energy is absorbed by viscosity. The main characteristics of energy spectrum of Kolmogorov turbulence is universal and in good agreement with observations.

  7. DNS study of dependence of bulk consumption velocity in a constant-density reacting flow on turbulence and mixture characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Rixin; Lipatnikov, Andrei N.

    2017-06-01

    3D Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) study of propagation of a single-reaction wave in forced, statistically stationary, homogeneous, isotropic, and constant-density turbulence was performed in order to evaluate both developing UTt and fully developed UTs bulk turbulent consumption velocities by independently varying a ratio of 0.5 ≤u'/SL≤ 90 of the r.m.s. turbulent velocity to the laminar wave speed and a ratio of 0.39 ≤L11/δF≤ 12.5 of the longitudinal integral length scale of the turbulence to the laminar wave thickness. Accordingly, the Damköhler D a =(L11SL ) /(u'δF ) and Karlovitz K a =δF/(SLτη ) numbers were varied from 0.01 to 24.7 and from 0.36 to 587, respectively. Here, τη is the Kolmogorov time scale. The obtained DNS data show that, at sufficiently low Da, the fully developed ratio of UTs/u' is mainly controlled by Da and scales as √{D a }. However, such a scaling should not be extrapolated to high Da. The higher Da (or the lower Ka), the less pronounced dependence of UTs/u' on a ratio of L11/δF. Moreover, scaling laws UT∝u'αSL1 -α(L11/δF ) β are substantially different for developing UTt and fully developed UTs, i.e., the scaling exponents α and, especially, β depend on the wave-development time. Furthermore, α and, especially, β depend on a method used to evaluate the developing UTt. Such effects can contribute to significant scatter of expressions for UT or ST as a function of {u', SL, L11, δF}, obtained by parameterizing various experimental databases.

  8. Quantum Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubota, Makoto

    2008-11-01

    The present article reviews the recent developments in the physics of quantum turbulence. Quantum turbulence (QT) was discovered in superfluid 4He in the 1950s, and the research has tended toward a new direction since the mid 90s. The similarities and differences between quantum and classical turbulence have become an important area of research. QT is comprised of quantized vortices that are definite topological defects, being expected to yield a model of turbulence that is much simpler than the classical model. The general introduction of the issue and a brief review on classical turbulence are followed by a description of the dynamics of quantized vortices. Then, we discuss the energy spectrum of QT at very low temperatures. At low wavenumbers, the energy is transferred through the Richardson cascade of quantized vortices, and the spectrum obeys the Kolmogorov law, which is the most important statistical law in turbulence; this classical region shows the similarity to conventional turbulence. At higher wavenumbers, the energy is transferred by the Kelvin-wave cascade on each vortex. This quantum regime depends strongly on the nature of each quantized vortex. The possible dissipation mechanism is discussed. Finally, important new experimental studies, which include investigations into temperature-dependent transition to QT, dissipation at very low temperatures, QT created by vibrating structures, and visualization of QT, are reviewed. The present article concludes with a brief look at QT in atomic Bose-Einstein condensates.

  9. Leith diffusion model for homogeneous anisotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, Robert; Clark, Timothy; Kurien, Susan

    2016-11-01

    A new spectral closure model for homogeneous anisotropic turbulence is proposed. The systematic development begins by closing the third-order correlation describing nonlinear interactions by an anisotropic generalization of the Leith diffusion model for isotropic turbulence. The correlation tensor is then decomposed into a tensorially isotropic part, or directional anisotropy, and a trace-free remainder, or polarization anisotropy. The directional and polarization components are then decomposed using irreducible representations of the SO(3) symmetry group. Under the ansatz that the decomposition is truncated at quadratic order, evolution equations are derived for the directional and polarization pieces of the correlation tensor. Numerical simulation of the model equations for a freely decaying anisotropic flow illustrate the non-trivial effects of spectral dependencies on the different return-to-isotropy rates of the directional and polarization contributions.

  10. Leith diffusion model for homogeneous anisotropic turbulence

    DOE PAGES

    Rubinstein, Robert; Clark, Timothy T.; Kurien, Susan

    2017-06-01

    Here, a proposal for a spectral closure model for homogeneous anisotropic turbulence. The systematic development begins by closing the third-order correlation describing nonlinear interactions by an anisotropic generalization of the Leith diffusion model for isotropic turbulence. The correlation tensor is then decomposed into a tensorially isotropic part, or directional anisotropy, and a trace-free remainder, or polarization anisotropy. The directional and polarization components are then decomposed using irreducible representations of the SO(3) symmetry group. Under the ansatz that the decomposition is truncated at quadratic order, evolution equations are derived for the directional and polarization pieces of the correlation tensor. Here, numericalmore » simulation of the model equations for a freely decaying anisotropic flow illustrate the non-trivial effects of spectral dependencies on the different return-to-isotropy rates of the directional and polarization contributions.« less

  11. Leith diffusion model for homogeneous anisotropic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, Robert; Clark, Timothy T.; Kurien, Susan

    2016-07-19

    Here, a proposal for a spectral closure model for homogeneous anisotropic turbulence. The systematic development begins by closing the third-order correlation describing nonlinear interactions by an anisotropic generalization of the Leith diffusion model for isotropic turbulence. The correlation tensor is then decomposed into a tensorially isotropic part, or directional anisotropy, and a trace-free remainder, or polarization anisotropy. The directional and polarization components are then decomposed using irreducible representations of the SO(3) symmetry group. Under the ansatz that the decomposition is truncated at quadratic order, evolution equations are derived for the directional and polarization pieces of the correlation tensor. Here, numerical simulation of the model equations for a freely decaying anisotropic flow illustrate the non-trivial effects of spectral dependencies on the different return-to-isotropy rates of the directional and polarization contributions.

  12. Generation of Turbulent Inflow Conditions for Pipe Flow via an Annular Ribbed Turbulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moallemi, Nima; Brinkerhoff, Joshua

    2016-11-01

    The generation of turbulent inflow conditions adds significant computational expense to direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent pipe flows. Typical approaches involve introducing boxes of isotropic turbulence to the velocity field at the inlet of the pipe. In the present study, an alternative method is proposed that incurs a lower computational cost and allows the anisotropy observed in pipe turbulence to be physically captured. The method is based on a periodic DNS of a ribbed turbulator upstream of the inlet boundary of the pipe. The Reynolds number based on the bulk velocity and pipe diameter is 5300 and the blockage ratio (BR) is 0.06 based on the rib height and pipe diameter. The pitch ratio is defined as the ratio of rib streamwise spacing to rib height and is varied between 1.7 and 5.0. The generation of turbulent flow structures downstream of the ribbed turbulator are identified and discussed. Suitability of this method for accurate representation of turbulent inflow conditions is assessed through comparison of the turbulent mean properties, fluctuations, Reynolds stress profiles, and spectra with published pipe flow DNS studies. The DNS results achieve excellent agreement with the numerical and experimental data available in the literature.

  13. Biomimetic Isotropic Nanostructures for Structural Coloration

    SciTech Connect

    Forster, Jason D.; Noh, Heeso; Liew, Seng Fatt; Saranathan, Vinodkumar; Schreck, Carl F.; Yang, Lin; Park, Jin-Gyu; Prum, Richard O.; Mochrie, Simon G.J.; O'Hern, Corey S.; Cao, Hui; Dufresne, Eric R.

    2010-08-09

    The self-assembly of films that mimic color-producing nanostructures in bird feathers is described. These structures are isotropic and have a characteristic length-scale comparable to the wavelength of visible light. Structural colors are produced when wavelength-independent scattering is suppressed by limiting the optical path length through geometry or absorption.

  14. Quenching and anisotropy of hydromagnetic turbulent transport

    SciTech Connect

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Brandenburg, Axel; Rheinhardt, Matthias; Käpylä, Petri J.; Käpylä, Maarit J.

    2014-11-01

    Hydromagnetic turbulence affects the evolution of large-scale magnetic fields through mean-field effects like turbulent diffusion and the α effect. For stronger fields, these effects are usually suppressed or quenched, and additional anisotropies are introduced. Using different variants of the test-field method, we determine the quenching of the turbulent transport coefficients for the forced Roberts flow, isotropically forced non-helical turbulence, and rotating thermal convection. We see significant quenching only when the mean magnetic field is larger than the equipartition value of the turbulence. Expressing the magnetic field in terms of the equipartition value of the quenched flows, we obtain for the quenching exponents of the turbulent magnetic diffusivity about 1.3, 1.1, and 1.3 for Roberts flow, forced turbulence, and convection, respectively. However, when the magnetic field is expressed in terms of the equipartition value of the unquenched flows, these quenching exponents become about 4, 1.5, and 2.3, respectively. For the α effect, the exponent is about 1.3 for the Roberts flow and 2 for convection in the first case, but 4 and 3, respectively, in the second. In convection, the quenching of turbulent pumping follows the same power law as turbulent diffusion, while for the coefficient describing the Ω×J effect nearly the same quenching exponent is obtained as for α. For forced turbulence, turbulent diffusion proportional to the second derivative along the mean magnetic field is quenched much less, especially for larger values of the magnetic Reynolds number. However, we find that in corresponding axisymmetric mean-field dynamos with dominant toroidal field the quenched diffusion coefficients are the same for the poloidal and toroidal field constituents.

  15. Transversely Isotropic Elasticity Imaging of Cancellous Bone

    PubMed Central

    Shore, Spencer W.; Barbone, Paul E.; Oberai, Assad A.; Morgan, Elise F.

    2012-01-01

    To measure spatial variations in mechanical properties of biological materials, prior studies have typically performed mechanical tests on excised specimens of tissue. Less invasive measurements, however, are preferable in many applications, such as patient-specific modeling, disease diagnosis, and tracking of age- or damage-related degradation of mechanical properties. Elasticity imaging (elastography) is a nondestructive imaging method in which the distribution of elastic properties throughout a specimen can be reconstructed from measured strain or displacement fields. To date, most work in elasticity imaging has concerned incompressible, isotropic materials. This study presents an extension of elasticity imaging to three-dimensional, compressible, transversely isotropic materials. The formulation and solution of an inverse problem for an anisotropic tissue subjected to a combination of quasi-static loads is described, and an optimization and regularization strategy that indirectly obtains the solution to the inverse problem is presented. Several applications of transversely isotropic elasticity imaging to cancellous bone from the human vertebra are then considered. The feasibility of using isotropic elasticity imaging to obtain meaningful reconstructions of the distribution of material properties for vertebral cancellous bone from experiment is established. However, using simulation, it is shown that an isotropic reconstruction is not appropriate for anisotropic materials. It is further shown that the transversely isotropic method identifies a solution that predicts the measured displacements, reveals regions of low stiffness, and recovers all five elastic parameters with approximately 10% error. The recovery of a given elastic parameter is found to require the presence of its corresponding strain (e.g., a deformation that generates ε12 is necessary to reconstruct C1212), and the application of regularization is shown to improve accuracy. Finally, the effects

  16. Transversely isotropic elasticity imaging of cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Shore, Spencer W; Barbone, Paul E; Oberai, Assad A; Morgan, Elise F

    2011-06-01

    To measure spatial variations in mechanical properties of biological materials, prior studies have typically performed mechanical tests on excised specimens of tissue. Less invasive measurements, however, are preferable in many applications, such as patient-specific modeling, disease diagnosis, and tracking of age- or damage-related degradation of mechanical properties. Elasticity imaging (elastography) is a nondestructive imaging method in which the distribution of elastic properties throughout a specimen can be reconstructed from measured strain or displacement fields. To date, most work in elasticity imaging has concerned incompressible, isotropic materials. This study presents an extension of elasticity imaging to three-dimensional, compressible, transversely isotropic materials. The formulation and solution of an inverse problem for an anisotropic tissue subjected to a combination of quasi-static loads is described, and an optimization and regularization strategy that indirectly obtains the solution to the inverse problem is presented. Several applications of transversely isotropic elasticity imaging to cancellous bone from the human vertebra are then considered. The feasibility of using isotropic elasticity imaging to obtain meaningful reconstructions of the distribution of material properties for vertebral cancellous bone from experiment is established. However, using simulation, it is shown that an isotropic reconstruction is not appropriate for anisotropic materials. It is further shown that the transversely isotropic method identifies a solution that predicts the measured displacements, reveals regions of low stiffness, and recovers all five elastic parameters with approximately 10% error. The recovery of a given elastic parameter is found to require the presence of its corresponding strain (e.g., a deformation that generates ɛ₁₂ is necessary to reconstruct C₁₂₁₂), and the application of regularization is shown to improve accuracy. Finally

  17. Turbulence modeling and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shabbir, Aamir

    1992-01-01

    The best way of verifying turbulence is to do a direct comparison between the various terms and their models. The success of this approach depends upon the availability of the data for the exact correlations (both experimental and DNS). The other approach involves numerically solving the differential equations and then comparing the results with the data. The results of such a computation will depend upon the accuracy of all the modeled terms and constants. Because of this it is sometimes difficult to find the cause of a poor performance by a model. However, such a calculation is still meaningful in other ways as it shows how a complete Reynolds stress model performs. Thirteen homogeneous flows are numerically computed using the second order closure models. We concentrate only on those models which use a linear (or quasi-linear) model for the rapid term. This, therefore, includes the Launder, Reece and Rodi (LRR) model; the isotropization of production (IP) model; and the Speziale, Sarkar, and Gatski (SSG) model. Which of the three models performs better is examined along with what are their weaknesses, if any. The other work reported deal with the experimental balances of the second moment equations for a buoyant plume. Despite the tremendous amount of activity toward the second order closure modeling of turbulence, very little experimental information is available about the budgets of the second moment equations. Part of the problem stems from our inability to measure the pressure correlations. However, if everything else appearing in these equations is known from the experiment, pressure correlations can be obtained as the closing terms. This is the closest we can come to in obtaining these terms from experiment, and despite the measurement errors which might be present in such balances, the resulting information will be extremely useful for the turbulence modelers. The purpose of this part of the work was to provide such balances of the Reynolds stress and heat

  18. Interaction of turbulence with a detonation wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, T. L.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Ribner, H. S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper addresses a specific reactive-flow configuration, namely, the interaction of a detonation wave with convected homogeneous isotropic weak turbulence (which can be constructed by a Fourier synthesis of small-amplitude vorticity waves). The effect of chemical heat release on the rms fluctuations downstream of the detonation is presented as a function of Mach number. In addition, for the particular case of the von Karman spectrum, the one-dimensional power spectra of these flow quantities are given.

  19. Interaction of turbulence with a detonation wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, T. L.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Ribner, H. S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper addresses a specific reactive-flow configuration, namely, the interaction of a detonation wave with convected homogeneous isotropic weak turbulence (which can be constructed by a Fourier synthesis of small-amplitude vorticity waves). The effect of chemical heat release on the rms fluctuations downstream of the detonation is presented as a function of Mach number. In addition, for the particular case of the von Karman spectrum, the one-dimensional power spectra of these flow quantities are given.

  20. Interactively variable isotropic resolution in computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lapp, Robert M; Kyriakou, Yiannis; Kachelriess, Marc; Wilharm, Sylvia; Kalender, Willi A

    2008-05-21

    An individual balancing between spatial resolution and image noise is necessary to fulfil the diagnostic requirements in medical CT imaging. In order to change influencing parameters, such as reconstruction kernel or effective slice thickness, additional raw-data-dependent image reconstructions have to be performed. Therefore, the noise versus resolution trade-off is time consuming and not interactively applicable. Furthermore, isotropic resolution, expressed by an equivalent point spread function (PSF) in every spatial direction, is important for the undistorted visualization and quantitative evaluation of small structures independent of the viewing plane. Theoretically, isotropic resolution can be obtained by matching the in-plane and through-plane resolution with the aforementioned parameters. Practically, however, the user is not assisted in doing so by current reconstruction systems and therefore isotropic resolution is not commonly achieved, in particular not at the desired resolution level. In this paper, an integrated approach is presented for equalizing the in-plane and through-plane spatial resolution by image filtering. The required filter kernels are calculated from previously measured PSFs in x/y- and z-direction. The concepts derived are combined with a variable resolution filtering technique. Both approaches are independent of CT raw data and operate only on reconstructed images which allows for their application in real time. Thereby, the aim of interactively variable, isotropic resolution is achieved. Results were evaluated quantitatively by measuring PSFs and image noise, and qualitatively by comparing the images to direct reconstructions regarded as the gold standard. Filtered images matched direct reconstructions with arbitrary reconstruction kernels with standard deviations in difference images of typically between 1 and 17 HU. Isotropic resolution was achieved within 5% of the selected resolution level. Processing times of 20-100 ms per frame

  1. Poissonian steady states: from stationary densities to stationary intensities.

    PubMed

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2012-10-01

    Markov dynamics are the most elemental and omnipresent form of stochastic dynamics in the sciences, with applications ranging from physics to chemistry, from biology to evolution, and from economics to finance. Markov dynamics can be either stationary or nonstationary. Stationary Markov dynamics represent statistical steady states and are quantified by stationary densities. In this paper, we generalize the notion of steady state to the case of general Markov dynamics. Considering an ensemble of independent motions governed by common Markov dynamics, we establish that the entire ensemble attains Poissonian steady states which are quantified by stationary Poissonian intensities and which hold valid also in the case of nonstationary Markov dynamics. The methodology is applied to a host of Markov dynamics, including Brownian motion, birth-death processes, random walks, geometric random walks, renewal processes, growth-collapse dynamics, decay-surge dynamics, Ito diffusions, and Langevin dynamics.

  2. Wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarenko, Sergey

    2015-07-01

    Wave turbulence is the statistical mechanics of random waves with a broadband spectrum interacting via non-linearity. To understand its difference from non-random well-tuned coherent waves, one could compare the sound of thunder to a piece of classical music. Wave turbulence is surprisingly common and important in a great variety of physical settings, starting with the most familiar ocean waves to waves at quantum scales or to much longer waves in astrophysics. We will provide a basic overview of the wave turbulence ideas, approaches and main results emphasising the physics of the phenomena and using qualitative descriptions avoiding, whenever possible, involved mathematical derivations. In particular, dimensional analysis will be used for obtaining the key scaling solutions in wave turbulence - Kolmogorov-Zakharov (KZ) spectra.

  3. Wall Turbulence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanratty, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives an account of research on the structure of turbulence close to a solid boundary. Included is a method to study the flow close to the wall of a pipe without interferring with it. (Author/JN)

  4. A dynamic subgrid-scale model for compressible turbulence and scalar transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moin, P.; Squires, K.; Cabot, W.; Lee, S.

    1991-01-01

    The dynamic subgrid-scale (SGS) model of Germano et al. (1991) is generalized for the large eddy simulation (LES) of compressible flows and transport of a scalar. The model was applied to the LES of decaying isotropic turbulence, and the results are in excellent agreement with experimental data and direct numerical simulations. The expression for the SGS turbulent Prandtl number was evaluated using direct numerical simulation (DNS) data in isotropic turbulence, homogeneous shear flow, and turbulent channel flow. The qualitative behavior of the model for turbulent Prandtl number and its dependence on molecular Prandtl number, direction of scalar gradient, and distance from the wall are in accordance with the total turbulent Prandtl number from the DNS data.

  5. Effect of Contraction on Turbulence and Temperature Fluctuations Generated by a Warm Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, Robert R., Jr.; Corrsin, Stanley

    1959-01-01

    Hot-wire anemometer measurements were made of several statistical properties of approximately homogeneous and isotropic fields of turbulence and temperature fluctuations generated by a warm grid in a uniform airstream sent through a 4-to-1 contraction. These measurements were made both in the contraction and in the axisymmetric domain farther downstream. In addition to confirming the well-known turbulence anisotropy induced by strain, the data show effects on the skewnesses of both longitudinal velocity fluctuation (which has zero skewness in isotropic turbulence) and its derivative. The concomitant anisotropy in the temperature field accelerates the decay of temperature fluctuations.

  6. Simulation and modeling of homogeneous, compressed turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C.T.; Ferziger, J.H.; Chapman, D.R.

    1985-05-01

    Low Reynolds number homogeneous turbulence undergoing low Mach number isotropic and one-dimensional compression was simulated by numerically solving the Navier-Stokes equations. The numerical simulations were performed on a CYBER 205 computer using a 64 x 64 x 64 mesh. A spectral method was used for spatial differencing and the second-order Runge-Kutta method for time advancement. A variety of statistical information was extracted from the computed flow fields. These include three-dimensional energy and dissipation spectra, two-point velocity correlations, one-dimensional energy spectra, turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate, integral length scales, Taylor microscales, and Kolmogorov length scale. Results from the simulated flow fields were used to test one-point closure, two-equation models. A new one-point-closure, three-equation turbulence model which accounts for the effect of compression is proposed. The new model accurately calculates four types of flows (isotropic decay, isotropic compression, one-dimensional compression, and axisymmetric expansion flows) for a wide range of strain rates.

  7. Simulation and modeling of homogeneous, compressed turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. T.; Ferziger, J. H.; Chapman, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    Low Reynolds number homogeneous turbulence undergoing low Mach number isotropic and one-dimensional compression was simulated by numerically solving the Navier-Stokes equations. The numerical simulations were performed on a CYBER 205 computer using a 64 x 64 x 64 mesh. A spectral method was used for spatial differencing and the second-order Runge-Kutta method for time advancement. A variety of statistical information was extracted from the computed flow fields. These include three-dimensional energy and dissipation spectra, two-point velocity correlations, one-dimensional energy spectra, turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate, integral length scales, Taylor microscales, and Kolmogorov length scale. Results from the simulated flow fields were used to test one-point closure, two-equation models. A new one-point-closure, three-equation turbulence model which accounts for the effect of compression is proposed. The new model accurately calculates four types of flows (isotropic decay, isotropic compression, one-dimensional compression, and axisymmetric expansion flows) for a wide range of strain rates.

  8. Spatiotemporal intermittency in the torsional Couette flow between a rotating and a stationary disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cros, A.; Le Gal, P.

    2002-11-01

    This work is devoted to the experimental study of the transition to turbulence of a flow confined in a narrow gap between a rotating and a stationary disk. When the fluid layer thickness is of the same order of magnitude as the boundary layer depths, the azimuthal velocity axial gradient is nearly constant and this rotating disk flow tends to be a torsional Couette flow. As in the plane Couette flow or the Taylor-Couette flow, transition to turbulence occurs via the appearance of turbulent domains inside a laminar background. In the rotating disk case, the nucleation of turbulent spirals, previously called "solitary waves" in the rotating disk flow literature, is connected to the birth of structural defects in a periodic underlying roll pattern. As the rotation rate is increased, the lifetime of these turbulent structures increases until a threshold is reached where they then form permanent turbulent spirals arranged nearly periodically all around a circumference. However, since the number of these turbulent spirals decreases with the rotational frequency, the transition to a fully turbulent regime is not achieved. Thus the turbulent fraction of the pattern saturates to a value lower than 0.5. After a geometrical description of the structures, we present a statistical analysis of sizes and lifetimes of the turbulent and laminar domains in order to compare this transition to already observed spatiotemporal intermittent behavior.

  9. Regimes of turbulence without an energy cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barenghi, C. F.; Sergeev, Y. A.; Baggaley, A. W.

    2016-10-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations of turbulent 4He and 3He-B have established that, at hydrodynamic length scales larger than the average distance between quantum vortices, the energy spectrum obeys the same 5/3 Kolmogorov law which is observed in the homogeneous isotropic turbulence of ordinary fluids. The importance of the 5/3 law is that it points to the existence of a Richardson energy cascade from large eddies to small eddies. However, there is also evidence of quantum turbulent regimes without Kolmogorov scaling. This raises the important questions of why, in such regimes, the Kolmogorov spectrum fails to form, what is the physical nature of turbulence without energy cascade, and whether hydrodynamical models can account for the unusual behaviour of turbulent superfluid helium. In this work we describe simple physical mechanisms which prevent the formation of Kolmogorov scaling in the thermal counterflow, and analyze the conditions necessary for emergence of quasiclassical regime in quantum turbulence generated by injection of vortex rings at low temperatures. Our models justify the hydrodynamical description of quantum turbulence and shed light into an unexpected regime of vortex dynamics.

  10. Regimes of turbulence without an energy cascade

    PubMed Central

    Barenghi, C. F.; Sergeev, Y. A.; Baggaley, A. W.

    2016-01-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations of turbulent 4He and 3He-B have established that, at hydrodynamic length scales larger than the average distance between quantum vortices, the energy spectrum obeys the same 5/3 Kolmogorov law which is observed in the homogeneous isotropic turbulence of ordinary fluids. The importance of the 5/3 law is that it points to the existence of a Richardson energy cascade from large eddies to small eddies. However, there is also evidence of quantum turbulent regimes without Kolmogorov scaling. This raises the important questions of why, in such regimes, the Kolmogorov spectrum fails to form, what is the physical nature of turbulence without energy cascade, and whether hydrodynamical models can account for the unusual behaviour of turbulent superfluid helium. In this work we describe simple physical mechanisms which prevent the formation of Kolmogorov scaling in the thermal counterflow, and analyze the conditions necessary for emergence of quasiclassical regime in quantum turbulence generated by injection of vortex rings at low temperatures. Our models justify the hydrodynamical description of quantum turbulence and shed light into an unexpected regime of vortex dynamics. PMID:27761005

  11. Apparent anisotropy in inhomogeneous isotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Fan-Chi; Ritzwoller, Michael H.

    2011-09-01

    Surface waves propagating through a laterally inhomogeneous medium undergo wavefield complications such as multiple scattering, wave front healing, and backward scattering. Unless accounted for accurately, these effects will introduce a systematic isotropic bias in estimates of azimuthal anisotropy. We demonstrate with synthetic experiments that backward scattering near an observing station will introduce an apparent 360° periodicity into the azimuthal distribution of anisotropy near strong lateral variations in seismic wave speeds that increases with period. Because it violates reciprocity, this apparent 1ψ anisotropy, where ψ is the azimuthal angle, is non-physical for surface waves and is, therefore, a useful indicator of isotropic bias. Isotropic bias of the 2ψ (180° periodicity) component of azimuthal anisotropy, in contrast, is caused mainly by wave front healing, which results from the broad forward scattering part of the surface wave sensitivity kernel. To test these predictions, we apply geometrical ray theoretic (eikonal) tomography to teleseismic Rayleigh wave measurements across the Transportable Array component of USArray to measure the directional dependence of phase velocities between 30 and 80 s period. Eikonal tomography accounts for multiple scattering (ray bending) but not finite frequency effects such as wave front healing or backward scattering. At long periods (>50 s), consistent with the predictions from the synthetic experiments, a significant 1ψ component of azimuthal anisotropy is observed near strong isotropic structural contrasts with fast directions that point in the direction of increasing phase speeds. The observed 2ψ component of azimuthal anisotropy is more weakly correlated with synthetic predictions of isotropic bias, probably because of the imprint of intrinsic structural anisotropy. The observation of a 1ψ component of azimuthal anisotropy is a clear indicator of isotropic bias in the inversion caused by unmodelled

  12. Atmospheric turbulence not simply two-dimensional or three-dimensional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2012-08-01

    A complete mathematical description of turbulence is one of the most sought-after prizes in physics, and although the research of Pinel et al. does not provide a full account, it does aim to pin down the answer to one subset of that effort: Are two-dimensional (2-D) or 3-D the main options for atmospheric turbulence? In the earliest statistical descriptions, scientists assumed that turbulence was direction independent (isotropic) but in two separate regimes: at large scales being horizontally isotropic, while at small scales being isotropic in 3-D space. In this view, only large-scale turbulence behaves differently in the vertical and horizontal directions, that is, with horizontally stratified vortices.

  13. Binary Quantum Turbulence Arising from Countersuperflow Instability in Two-Component Bose-Einstein Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Hiromitsu; Ishino, Shungo; Tsubota, Makoto

    2010-11-12

    We theoretically study the development of quantum turbulence from two counter-propagating superfluids of miscible Bose-Einstein condensates by numerically solving the coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations. When the relative velocity exceeds a critical value, the countersuperflow becomes unstable and quantized vortices are nucleated, which leads to isotropic quantum turbulence consisting of two superflows. It is shown that the binary turbulence can be realized experimentally in a trapped system.

  14. Binary quantum turbulence arising from countersuperflow instability in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hiromitsu; Ishino, Shungo; Tsubota, Makoto

    2010-11-12

    We theoretically study the development of quantum turbulence from two counter-propagating superfluids of miscible Bose-Einstein condensates by numerically solving the coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations. When the relative velocity exceeds a critical value, the countersuperflow becomes unstable and quantized vortices are nucleated, which leads to isotropic quantum turbulence consisting of two superflows. It is shown that the binary turbulence can be realized experimentally in a trapped system.

  15. Particle Dispersion Within Zonal Jets in Two-Layer Beta-Plane Turbulence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-21

    shows that the rate of diffusion due to turbulent motions is several orders of magnitude larger than the molecular diffusion rate. Given an isotropic...may be written as KT ( ’j) /(I VO1) and dimensional analysis yields KT , ’ (U0)/(0/L) = UL. The ratio of the eddy diffusivity to the molecular ...Reynolds number of the flow. Thus, the Reynolds number of a turbulent flow can be thought of as the ratio of molecular diffusion to turbulent diffusion

  16. Pattern-fluid interpretation of chemical turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Christian; Schröder-Turk, Gerd E.; Mecke, Klaus

    2015-04-01

    The spontaneous formation of heterogeneous patterns is a hallmark of many nonlinear systems, from biological tissue to evolutionary population dynamics. The standard model for pattern formation in general, and for Turing patterns in chemical reaction-diffusion systems in particular, are deterministic nonlinear partial differential equations where an unstable homogeneous solution gives way to a stable heterogeneous pattern. However, these models fail to fully explain the experimental observation of turbulent patterns with spatio-temporal disorder in chemical systems. Here we introduce a pattern-fluid model as a general concept where turbulence is interpreted as a weakly interacting ensemble obtained by random superposition of stationary solutions to the underlying reaction-diffusion system. The transition from turbulent to stationary patterns is then interpreted as a condensation phenomenon, where the nonlinearity forces one single mode to dominate the ensemble. This model leads to better reproduction of the experimental concentration profiles for the "stationary phases" and reproduces the turbulent chemical patterns observed by Q. Ouyang and H. L. Swinney [Chaos 1, 411 (1991), 10.1063/1.165851].

  17. Large-Eddy Simulations of Baroclinic Instability and Turbulent Mixing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    lateral mixing of fluid properties across the unstable front, and the transition from strongly horizontal, geostrophic motion on the mesoscale to...three-dimensional, quasi -isotropic, non-hydrostatic motion on turbulent scales. Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting...dispersion. RESULTS Baroclinic Wave Experiments Novel numerical simulations of baroclinic instability of a shallow, geostrophically balanced

  18. On curve and surface stretching in turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etemadi, Nassrollah

    1989-01-01

    Cocke (1969) proved that in incompressible, isotropic turbulence the average material line (material surface) elements increase in comparison with their initial values. Good estimates of how much they increase in terms of the eigenvalues of the Green deformation tensor were rigorously obtained.

  19. Anisotropy in MHD turbulence due to a mean magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, J. V.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Montgomery, D.

    1982-01-01

    The development of anisotropy in an initially isotropic spectrum is studied numerically for two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. The anisotropy develops due to the combined effects of an externally imposed dc magnetic field and viscous and resistive dissipation at high wave numbers. The effect is most pronounced at high mechanical and magnetic Reynolds numbers. The anisotropy is greater at the higher wave numbers.

  20. Simulation of Unsteady Flows Using an Unstructured Navier-Stokes Solver on Moving and Stationary Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Vatsa, Veer N.; Atkins, Harold L.

    2005-01-01

    We apply an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) solver for unstructured grids to unsteady flows on moving and stationary grids. Example problems considered are relevant to active flow control and stability and control. Computational results are presented using the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model and are compared to experimental data. The effect of grid and time-step refinement are examined.

  1. Measurement of Non-Stationary Characteristics of a Landfall Typhoon at the Jiangyin Bridge Site.

    PubMed

    He, Xuhui; Qin, Hongxi; Tao, Tianyou; Liu, Wenshuo; Wang, Hao

    2017-09-22

    The wind-sensitive long-span suspension bridge is a vital element in land transportation. Understanding the wind characteristics at the bridge site is thus of great significance to the wind- resistant analysis of such a flexible structure. In this study, a strong wind event from a landfall typhoon called Soudelor recorded at the Jiangyin Bridge site with the anemometer is taken as the research object. As inherent time-varying trends are frequently captured in typhoon events, the wind characteristics of Soudelor are analyzed in a non-stationary perspective. The time-varying mean is first extracted with the wavelet-based self-adaptive method. Then, the non-stationary turbulent wind characteristics, e.g.; turbulence intensity, gust factor, turbulence integral scale, and power spectral density, are investigated and compared with the results from the stationary analysis. The comparison highlights the importance of non-stationary considerations of typhoon events, and a transition from stationarity to non-stationarity for the analysis of wind effects. The analytical results could help enrich the database of non-stationary wind characteristics, and are expected to provide references for the wind-resistant analysis of engineering structures in similar areas.

  2. WYPIWYG hyperelasticity for isotropic, compressible materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo, José; Latorre, Marcos; Montáns, Francisco Javier

    2016-10-01

    Nowadays the most common approach to model elastic behavior at large strains is through hyperelasticity. Hyperelastic models usually specify the shape of the stored energy function. This shape is modulated by some material parameters that are computed so the predicted stresses best fit the experimental data. Many stored energy functions have been proposed in the literature for isotropic and anisotropic materials, either compressible or incompressible. What-You-Prescribe-Is-What-You-Get (WYPIWYG) formulations present a different approach which may be considered an extension of the infinitesimal framework. The shape of the stored energy is not given beforehand but computed numerically from experimental data solving the equilibrium equations. The models exactly fit the experimental data without any material parameter. WYPIWYG procedures have comparable efficiency in finite element procedures as classical hyperelasticity. In this work we present a WYPIWYG numerical procedure for compressible isotropic materials and we motivate the formulation through an equivalent infinitesimal model.

  3. Vorticity spectra in high Reynolds number anisotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Scott C.; Foss, John F.

    2005-08-01

    Assuming a turbulent flow to be homogeneous and isotropic allows for significant theoretical simplification in the description of its motions. The validity of these assumptions, first put forth by Kolmogorov [A. N. Kolmogorov, "The local structure of turbulence in incompressible viscous fluids for very large Reynolds numbers," C. R. Acad. Sci. URSS 30, 301 (1941)], has been the subject of considerable analytical development and extensive research as they are applied to actual flows. The present investigation describes the one-dimensional vorticity spectra of two flow fields: a single stream shear layer and the near surface region of an atmospheric boundary layer. Both flow fields exhibit a power-law region with a slope of -1 in the one-dimensional spectra of the spanwise component of vorticity in the same wave-number range for which the velocity spectra indicated the isotropic behavior. This is in strong disagreement with the isotropic prediction, which does not exhibit a power-law behavior.

  4. ODTLES : a model for 3D turbulent flow based on one-dimensional turbulence modeling concepts.

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, Randy; Kerstein, Alan R.; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon

    2005-01-01

    This report describes an approach for extending the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model of Kerstein [6] to treat turbulent flow in three-dimensional (3D) domains. This model, here called ODTLES, can also be viewed as a new LES model. In ODTLES, 3D aspects of the flow are captured by embedding three, mutually orthogonal, one-dimensional ODT domain arrays within a coarser 3D mesh. The ODTLES model is obtained by developing a consistent approach for dynamically coupling the different ODT line sets to each other and to the large scale processes that are resolved on the 3D mesh. The model is implemented computationally and its performance is tested and evaluated by performing simulations of decaying isotropic turbulence, a standard turbulent flow benchmarking problem.

  5. A model for fully developed turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Goldman, I.; Chasnov, J.

    1987-11-01

    A model for stationary, fully developed turbulence is presented in which the turbulent spectral energy function is completely determined once the time scale for the energy fed into the eddy interaction is known. The form of the eddy correlation time scale determining the turbulent viscosity is suggested by the basic equation of the model itself, up to a dimensionless constant that is fixed by demanding that the coefficient of the spectrum in the Heisenberg-Kolmogoroff inertial range of wavenunmbers be the experimental value. The model makes quantitative predictions that are compared with data on turbulent convection; the k-epsilon and Smagorinsky relations; the spectral function, transfer term, and dissipation term; the skewness factor; the Kolmogoroff and Batchelor constants; and the inertial-conductive and inertial-convective ranges.

  6. Isotropic Contraction Of Mercury Due To Despinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, Isamu; Bills, B. G.

    2009-09-01

    Mercury's slow rotation period of 59 days is presumably the result of solar tides driving its initial rotational state to the present 3:2 spin-orbit resonance. The observed large gravity coefficients can be explained as due to a remnant rotational bulge recording an initial rotation period of a few days (Matsuyama and Nimmo 2009). Despinning changes the shape of the rotational bulge, generating both compressional and extensional stresses (Melosh 1977). However, Mercury's surface is dominated by compressional tectonic features (Watters et al. 1998), and the inferred global contraction has been explained as due to thermal cooling (Solomon 1976). In addition to non-isotropic changes associated with the rotational flattening, despinning causes isotropic contraction of the entire planet. We consider the effect of the compressional stresses generated by this isotropic contraction on the predicted tectonic pattern. References Matsuyama and Nimmo. Gravity and tectonic patterns of Mercury: Effect of tidal deformation, spin-orbit resonance, nonzero eccentricity, despinning, and reorientation. J. Geophys. Res. (2009) vol. 114 pp. E01010 Melosh. Global tectonics of a despun planet. Icarus (1977) vol. 31 pp. 221-243 Solomon. Some aspects of core formation in Mercury. Icarus (1976) vol. 28 pp. 509-521 Watters et al. Topography of lobate scarps on Mercury: New constraints on the planet's contraction. Geology (1998) vol. 26 pp. 991-994

  7. On the subgrid-scale modeling of compressible turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, C. G.; Erlebacher, G.; Zang, T. A.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1987-01-01

    A subgrid-scale model recently derived for use in the large-eddy simulation of compressible turbulent flows is examined from a fundamental theoretical and computational standpoint. It is demonstrated that this model, which is applicable only to compressible turbulent flows in the limit of small density fluctuations, correlates somewhat poorly with the results of direct numerical simulations of compressible isotropic turbulence at low Mach numbers. An alternative model, based on Favre-filtered fields, is suggested which appears to reduce these limitations.

  8. Large-eddy simulation of a turbulent mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansour, N. N.; Ferziger, J. H.; Reynolds, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    The three dimensional, time dependent (incompressible) vorticity equations were used to simulate numerically the decay of isotropic box turbulence and time developing mixing layers. The vorticity equations were spatially filtered to define the large scale turbulence field, and the subgrid scale turbulence was modeled. A general method was developed to show numerical conservation of momentum, vorticity, and energy. The terms that arise from filtering the equations were treated (for both periodic boundary conditions and no stress boundary conditions) in a fast and accurate way by using fast Fourier transforms. Use of vorticity as the principal variable is shown to produce results equivalent to those obtained by use of the primitive variable equations.

  9. PDF methods for combustion in high-speed turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, Stephen B.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the research performed during the second year of this three-year project. The ultimate objective of the project is extend the applicability of probability density function (pdf) methods from incompressible to compressible turbulent reactive flows. As described in subsequent sections, progress has been made on: (1) formulation and modelling of pdf equations for compressible turbulence, in both homogeneous and inhomogeneous inert flows; and (2) implementation of the compressible model in various flow configurations, namely decaying isotropic turbulence, homogeneous shear flow and plane mixing layer.

  10. Soliton turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tchen, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical works in atmospheric turbulence have used the Navier-Stokes fluid equations exclusively for describing large-scale motions. Controversy over the existence of an average temperature gradient for the very large eddies in the atmosphere suggested that a new theoretical basis for describing large-scale turbulence was necessary. A new soliton formalism as a fluid analogue that generalizes the Schrodinger equation and the Zakharov equations has been developed. This formalism, processing all the nonlinearities including those from modulation provided by the density fluctuations and from convection due to the emission of finite sound waves by velocity fluctuations, treats large-scale turbulence as coalescing and colliding solitons. The new soliton system describes large-scale instabilities more explicitly than the Navier-Stokes system because it has a nonlinearity of the gradient type, while the Navier-Stokes has a nonlinearity of the non-gradient type. The forced Schrodinger equation for strong fluctuations describes the micro-hydrodynamical state of soliton turbulence and is valid for large-scale turbulence in fluids and plasmas where internal waves can interact with velocity fluctuations.

  11. Stationary density profiles in the Alcator C-mod tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesner, J.; Ernst, D.; Hughes, J.; Mumgaard, R.; Scott, S.; Shiraiwa, S.; Whyte, D.

    2012-12-01

    In the absence of an internal particle source, plasma turbulence will impose an intrinsic relationship between an inwards pinch and an outwards diffusion resulting in a stationary density profile. The Alcator C-mod tokamak utilizes RF heating and current drive so that fueling only occurs in the vicinity of the separatrix. Discharges that transition from L-mode to I-mode are seen to maintain a self-similar stationary density profile as measured by Thomson scattering. For discharges with negative magnetic shear, an observed rise of the safety factor in the vicinity of the magnetic axis appears to be accompanied by a decrease of electron density, qualitatively consistent with the theoretical expectations.

  12. Lyapunov spectrum in turbulent combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanaly, Malik; Raman, Venkat

    2016-11-01

    Transient flame evolution is an important flow problem for many practical applications (for example high-altitude relight, ignition in internal combustion engines, unstart in scramjets). Current approaches to combustion modeling utilize assumptions that are valid mainly for statistically stationary processes. In order to understand the transient problem, a dynamic systems approach is followed here. The propagation of a flame in a turbulent channel flow is used as a canonical turbulent combustion system and is analyzed with the Lyapunov theory. In particular, the Lyapunov spectrum for this flow is computed using multiple coordinated simulations. For a range of flow conditions, dimensionality of the state-space is determined. It is shown that the internal structure of the flame plays a critical role in determining the response of the system to perturbations in the flow.

  13. Quantum turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrbek, L.

    2011-12-01

    We review physical properties of quantum fluids He II and 3He-B, where quantum turbulence (QT) has been studied experimentally. Basic properties of QT in these working fluids are discussed within the phenomenological two-fluid model introduced by Landau. We consider counterflows in which the normal and superfluid components flow against each other, as well as co-flows in which the direction of the two fluids is the same. We pay special attention to the important case of zero temperature limit, where QT represents an interesting and probably the simplest prototype of three-dimensional turbulence in fluids. Experimental techniques to explore QT such as second sound attenuation, Andreev reflection, NMR, ion propagation are briefly introduced and results of various experiments on so-called Vinen QT and Kolmogorov QT both in He II and 3He are discussed, emphasizing similarities and differences between classical and quantum turbulence.

  14. Turbulence in Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Lecture notes for the AGARD Fluid Dynamics Panel (FDP) Special Course on 'Turbulence in Compressible Flows' have been assembled in this report. The following topics were covered: Compressible Turbulent Boundary Layers, Compressible Turbulent Free Shear Layers, Turbulent Combustion, DNS/LES and RANS Simulations of Compressible Turbulent Flows, and Case Studies of Applications of Turbulence Models in Aerospace.

  15. Turbulence in Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Lecture notes for the AGARD Fluid Dynamics Panel (FDP) Special Course on 'Turbulence in Compressible Flows' have been assembled in this report. The following topics were covered: Compressible Turbulent Boundary Layers, Compressible Turbulent Free Shear Layers, Turbulent Combustion, DNS/LES and RANS Simulations of Compressible Turbulent Flows, and Case Studies of Applications of Turbulence Models in Aerospace.

  16. Some Results Relevant to Statistical Closures for Compressible Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ristorcelli, J. R.

    1998-01-01

    For weakly compressible turbulent fluctuations there exists a small parameter, the square of the fluctuating Mach number, that allows an investigation using a perturbative treatment. The consequences of such a perturbative analysis in three different subject areas are described: 1) initial conditions in direct numerical simulations, 2) an explanation for the oscillations seen in the compressible pressure in the direct numerical simulations of homogeneous shear, and 3) for turbulence closures accounting for the compressibility of velocity fluctuations. Initial conditions consistent with small turbulent Mach number asymptotics are constructed. The importance of consistent initial conditions in the direct numerical simulation of compressible turbulence is dramatically illustrated: spurious oscillations associated with inconsistent initial conditions are avoided, and the fluctuating dilatational field is some two orders of magnitude smaller for a compressible isotropic turbulence. For the isotropic decay it is shown that the choice of initial conditions can change the scaling law for the compressible dissipation. A two-time expansion of the Navier-Stokes equations is used to distinguish compressible acoustic and compressible advective modes. A simple conceptual model for weakly compressible turbulence - a forced linear oscillator is described. It is shown that the evolution equations for the compressible portions of turbulence can be understood as a forced wave equation with refraction. Acoustic modes of the flow can be amplified by refraction and are able to manifest themselves in large fluctuations of the compressible pressure.

  17. Turbulent Flow Between Rotating Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih-I, Pai

    1943-01-01

    The turbulent air flow between rotating cylinders was investigated. The distributions of mean speed and of turbulence were measured in the gap between a rotating inner and a stationary outer cylinder. The measurements led to the conclusion that the turbulent flow in the gap cannot be considered two dimensional, but that a particular type of secondary motion takes place. It is shown that the experimentally found velocity distribution can be fully understood under the assumption that this secondary motion consists of three-dimensional ring-shape vortices. The vortices occur only in pairs, and their number and size depend on the speed of the rotating cylinder; the number was found to decrease with increasing speed. The secondary motion has an essential part in the transmission of the moment of momentum. In regions where the secondary motion is negligible, the momentum transfer follows the laws known for homologous turbulence. Ring-shape vortices are known to occur in the laminar flow between rotating cylinders, but it was hitherto unknown that they exist even at speeds that are several hundred times the critical limit.

  18. Inverse energy cascade in rotational turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Huidan (Whitney); Chen, Rou; Wang, Hengjie

    2012-11-01

    Rotation influences large-scale motions in the Earth's atmosphere and oceans and it is also important in many industrial applications such as turbo machinery, rotor-craft, and rotating channel etc. We study rotation effects on decaying isotropic turbulence through direct numerical simulation using lattice Boltzmann method. A Coriolis force characterized by the angular velocity of the frame of reference Ω is included in the lattice Boltzmann equations. The effects of rotation on fundamental turbulence features such as kinetic energy and enstrophy decay, energy spectrum, etc. are studied. The decay laws are quantitatively captured. Inverse energy cascade are observed in the 3D turbulence with and without rotation. The scaling of the inverse energy cascade and its relation to initial energy spectrum are explored. Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI).

  19. Coherent structures in ion temperature gradient turbulence-zonal flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rameswar; Singh, R.; Kaw, P.; Gürcan, Ã.-. D.; Diamond, P. H.

    2014-10-01

    Nonlinear stationary structure formation in the coupled ion temperature gradient (ITG)-zonal flow system is investigated. The ITG turbulence is described by a wave-kinetic equation for the action density of the ITG mode, and the longer scale zonal mode is described by a dynamic equation for the m = n = 0 component of the potential. Two populations of trapped and untrapped drift wave trajectories are shown to exist in a moving frame of reference. This novel effect leads to the formation of nonlinear stationary structures. It is shown that the ITG turbulence can self-consistently sustain coherent, radially propagating modulation envelope structures such as solitons, shocks, and nonlinear wave trains.

  20. A variational principle for turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, M. E.

    1980-11-01

    A general control theory is proposed to select the realized stationary state whenever the equations of motion are densely nonunique (degenerate). For the turbulent flow in a pipe with given pressure gradient, the theory implies that the discharge is an extremum. Quantitative results, such as von Karman's constant, emerge when this variational principle is combined with inequalities pertaining to the mean field. The control theory is also applied to fully turbulent thermal convection, and a variational principle for this problem is obtained which is also consistent with measurements.

  1. Scaling laws in magnetized plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Boldyrev, Stanislav

    2015-06-28

    Interactions of plasma motion with magnetic fields occur in nature and in the laboratory in an impressively broad range of scales, from megaparsecs in astrophysical systems to centimeters in fusion devices. The fact that such an enormous array of phenomena can be effectively studied lies in the existence of fundamental scaling laws in plasma turbulence, which allow one to scale the results of analytic and numerical modeling to the sized of galaxies, velocities of supernovae explosions, or magnetic fields in fusion devices. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) provides the simplest framework for describing magnetic plasma turbulence. Recently, a number of new features of MHD turbulence have been discovered and an impressive array of thought-provoking phenomenological theories have been put forward. However, these theories have conflicting predictions, and the currently available numerical simulations are not able to resolve the contradictions. MHD turbulence exhibits a variety of regimes unusual in regular hydrodynamic turbulence. Depending on the strength of the guide magnetic field it can be dominated by weakly interacting Alfv\\'en waves or strongly interacting wave packets. At small scales such turbulence is locally anisotropic and imbalanced (cross-helical). In a stark contrast with hydrodynamic turbulence, which tends to ``forget'' global constrains and become uniform and isotropic at small scales, MHD turbulence becomes progressively more anisotropic and unbalanced at small scales. Magnetic field plays a fundamental role in turbulent dynamics. Even when such a field is not imposed by external sources, it is self-consistently generated by the magnetic dynamo action. This project aims at a comprehensive study of universal regimes of magnetic plasma turbulence, combining the modern analytic approaches with the state of the art numerical simulations. The proposed study focuses on the three topics: weak MHD turbulence, which is relevant for laboratory devices, the solar

  2. Mixing and chemical reaction in sheared and nonsheared homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, Andy D.; Hill, James C.

    1992-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations were made to examine the local structure of the reaction zone for a moderately fast reaction between unmixed species in decaying, homogeneous turbulence and in a homogeneous turbulent shear flow. Pseudospectral techniques were used in domains of 64 exp 3 and higher wavenumbers. A finite-rate, single step reaction between non-premixed reactants was considered, and in one case temperature-dependent Arrhenius kinetics was assumed. Locally intense reaction rates that tend to persist throughout the simulations occur in locations where the reactant concentration gradients are large and are amplified by the local rate of strain. The reaction zones are more organized in the case of a uniform mean shear than in isotropic turbulence, and regions of intense reaction rate appear to be associated with vortex structures such as horseshoe vortices and fingers seen in mixing layers. Concentration gradients tend to align with the direction of the most compressive principal strain rate, more so in the isotropic case.

  3. Mixing and chemical reaction in sheared and nonsheared homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, Andy D.; Hill, James C.

    1992-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations were made to examine the local structure of the reaction zone for a moderately fast reaction between unmixed species in decaying, homogeneous turbulence and in a homogeneous turbulent shear flow. Pseudospectral techniques were used in domains of 64 exp 3 and higher wavenumbers. A finite-rate, single step reaction between non-premixed reactants was considered, and in one case temperature-dependent Arrhenius kinetics was assumed. Locally intense reaction rates that tend to persist throughout the simulations occur in locations where the reactant concentration gradients are large and are amplified by the local rate of strain. The reaction zones are more organized in the case of a uniform mean shear than in isotropic turbulence, and regions of intense reaction rate appear to be associated with vortex structures such as horseshoe vortices and fingers seen in mixing layers. Concentration gradients tend to align with the direction of the most compressive principal strain rate, more so in the isotropic case.

  4. Turbulent solutions of the equations of fluid motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deissler, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    Some turbulent solutions of the unaveraged Navier-Stokes equations (equations of fluid motion) are reviewed. Those equations are solved numerically in order to study the nonlinear physics of incompressible turbulent flow. Initial three-dimensional cosine velocity fluctuations and periodic boundary conditions are used in most of the work considered. The three components of the mean-square velocity fluctuations are initially equal for the conditions chosen. The resulting solutions show characteristics of turbulence such as the linear and nonlinear excitation of small-scale fluctuations. For the stronger fluctuations, the initially nonrandom flow develops into an apparently random turbulence. Thus randomness or turbulence can arise as a consequence of the structure of the Navier-Stokes equations. The cases considered include turbulence which is statistically homogeneous or inhomogeneous and isotropic or anisotropic. A mean shear is present in some cases. A statistically steady-state turbulence is obtained by using a spatially periodic body force. Various turbulence processes, including the transfer of energy between eddy sizes and between directional components, and the production, dissipation, and spatial diffusion of turbulence, are considered. It is concluded that the physical processes occurring in turbulence can be profitably studied numerically.

  5. Effects of axisymmetric contractions on turbulence of various scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan-Atichat, J.; Nagib, H. M.; Drubka, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    Digitally acquired and processed results from an experimental investigation of grid generated turbulence of various scales through and downstream of nine matched cubic contour contractions ranging in area ratio from 2 to 36, and in length to inlet diameter ratio from 0.25 to 1.50 are reported. An additional contraction with a fifth order contour was also utilized for studying the shape effect. Thirteen homogeneous and nearly isotropic test flow conditions with a range of turbulence intensities, length scales and Reynolds numbers were generated and used to examine the sensitivity of the contractions to upstream turbulence. The extent to which the turbulence is altered by the contraction depends on the incoming turbulence scales, the total strain experienced by the fluid, as well as the contraction ratio and the strain rate. Varying the turbulence integral scale influences the transverse turbulence components more than the streamwise component. In general, the larger the turbulence scale, the lesser the reduction in the turbulence intensity of the transverse components. Best agreement with rapid distortion theory was obtained for large scale turbulence, where viscous decay over the contraction length was negligible, or when a first order correction for viscous decay was applied to the results.

  6. Ignition transition in turbulent premixed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Shy, S.S.; Liu, C.C.; Shih, W.T.

    2010-02-15

    Recently, Shy and his co-workers reported a turbulent ignition transition based on measurements of minimum ignition energies (MIE) of lean premixed turbulent methane combustion in a centrally-ignited, fan-stirred cruciform burner capable of generating intense isotropic turbulence. Using the same methodology, this paper presents new complete MIE data sets for stoichiometric and rich cases at three different equivalence ratios {phi} = 1.0, 1.2 and 1.3, each covering a wide range of a turbulent Karlovitz number (Ka) indicating a time ratio between chemical reaction and turbulence. Thus, ignition transition in premixed turbulent combustion depending on both Ka and {phi} can be identified for the first time. It is found that there are two distinct modes on ignition in randomly stirred methane-air mixtures (ignition transition) separated by a critical Ka where values of Ka{sub c} {approx} 8-26 depending on {phi} with the minimum Ka{sub c} occurring near {phi} = 1. For Ka < Ka{sub c}, MIE increases gradually with Ka, flame kernel formation is similar to laminar ignition remaining a torus, and 2D laser tomography images of subsequent outwardly-propagating turbulent flames show sharp fronts. For Ka > Ka{sub c}, MIE increases abruptly with Ka, flame kernel is disrupted, and subsequent randomly-propagating turbulent flames reveal distributed-like fronts. Moreover, we introduce a reaction zone Peclet number (P{sub RZ}) indicating the diffusivity ratio between turbulence and chemical reaction, such that the aforementioned very scattering MIE data depending on Ka and {phi} can be collapsed into a single curve having two drastically different increasing slopes with P{sub RZ} which are separated by a critical P{sub RZ} {approx} 4.5 showing ignition transition. Finally, a physical model is proposed to explain these results. (author)

  7. Physical Mechanisms of Two-Dimensional Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecke, Robert

    2004-03-01

    Turbulence has slowly yielded its mysteries through over 100 years of persistent effort. Recently experimental techniques and computation power have reached the stage where significant progress has been made on this very challenging problem. Two dimensional turbulence offers some real advantages in terms of reduced degrees of freedom such that the problem can now be thoroughly explored from many perspectives. Further, two-dimensional turbulence exhibits the basic phenomena of direct-enstrophy and inverse-energy cascades thought to apply to oceanic and atmospheric systems. We have investigated the properties of turbulence in two spatial dimensions using experimental measurements of the grid turbulence in a flowing soap film^1 and of the electromagnetically-forced turbulence in a thin salt layer floating on a dense immiscible fluid underlayer. We have also explored 2D turbulence using several different direct numerical simulations of homogeneous, isotropic turbulence in a periodic box^2. The data for both consist of high resolution fields of velocity; some are statistically independent sets and others are temporally resolved for dynamics. From this data we construct conventional Eulerian statistics, directly measure energy and enstrophy transfer^1, identify coherent structures in the flow, determine Lagrangian quantities, and calculate stretching fields. This comprehensive experimental and numerical characterization elucidates the physical mechanisms of two-dimensional turbulence. ^1 M.K. Rivera, W.B. Daniel and R.E. Ecke, Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 104502 (2003). ^2 S. Chen, R.E. Ecke, G. Eyink, X. Wang, and Z. Xiao, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 214501 (2003).

  8. Turbulent transport modelling of separating and reattaching shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Launder, B. E.

    1982-01-01

    The improvement of capabilities for computer simulation of turbulent recirculating flows was investigated. Attention has been limited to two dimensional flows and principally to statistically stationary motion. Improvement of turbulence modeling explored the treatment of the near wall sublayer and of the exterior fully turbulent region, working within the framework of turbulence closures requiring the solution of transport equations for the turbulence energy and its dissipation rate. The work on the numerical procedure, based on the Gosman-Pun program TEACH, addressed the problems of incorporating the turbulence model as well as the extension to time dependent flows, the incorporation of a third order approximation of convective transport, and the treatment of non-orthogonal boundaries.

  9. Active Control of Stationary Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nino, Giovanni; Breidenthal, Robert; Bhide, Aditi; Sridhar, Aditya

    2016-11-01

    A system for active stationary vortex control is presented. The system uses a combination of plasma actuators, pressure sensors and electrical circuits deposited on aerodynamic surfaces using printing electronics methods. Once the pressure sensors sense a change on the intensity or on the position of the stationary vortices, its associated controller activates a set of plasma actuator to return the vortices to their original or intended positions. The forces produced by the actuators act on the secondary flow in the transverse plane, where velocities are much less than in the streamwise direction. As a demonstration case, the active vortex control system is mounted on a flat plate under low speed wind tunnel testing. Here, a set of vortex generators are used to generate the stationary vortices and the plasma actuators are used to move them. Preliminary results from the experiments are presented and compared with theoretical values. Thanks to the USAF AFOSR STTR support under contract # FA9550-15-C-0007.

  10. Lagrangian statistics of light particles in turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercado, Julián Martínez; Prakash, Vivek N.; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef; (International CollaborationTurbulence Research)

    2012-05-01

    We study the Lagrangian velocity and acceleration statistics of light particles (micro-bubbles in water) in homogeneous isotropic turbulence. Micro-bubbles with a diameter db = 340 μm and Stokes number from 0.02 to 0.09 are dispersed in a turbulent water tunnel operated at Taylor-Reynolds numbers (Reλ) ranging from 160 to 265. We reconstruct the bubble trajectories by employing three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry. It is found that the probability density functions (PDFs) of the micro-bubble acceleration show a highly non-Gaussian behavior with flatness values in the range 23 to 30. The acceleration flatness values show an increasing trend with Reλ, consistent with previous experiments [G. Voth, A. La Porta, A. M. Crawford, J. Alexander, and E. Bodenschatz, "Measurement of particle accelerations in fully developed turbulence," J. Fluid Mech. 469, 121 (2002)], 10.1017/S0022112002001842 and numerics [T. Ishihara, Y. Kaneda, M. Yokokawa, K. Itakura, and A. Uno, "Small-scale statistics in highresolution direct numerical simulation of turbulence: Reynolds number dependence of one-point velocity gradient statistics," J. Fluid Mech. 592, 335 (2007)], 10.1017/S0022112007008531. These acceleration PDFs show a higher intermittency compared to tracers [S. Ayyalasomayajula, Z. Warhaft, and L. R. Collins, "Modeling inertial particle acceleration statistics in isotropic turbulence," Phys. Fluids. 20, 095104 (2008)], 10.1063/1.2976174 and heavy particles [S. Ayyalasomayajula, A. Gylfason, L. R. Collins, E. Bodenschatz, and Z. Warhaft, "Lagrangian measurements of inertial particle accelerations in grid generated wind tunnel turbulence," Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 144507 (2006)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.97.144507 in wind tunnel experiments. In addition, the micro-bubble acceleration autocorrelation function decorrelates slower with increasing Reλ. We also compare our results with experiments in von Kármán flows and point-particle direct numerical simulations with periodic

  11. The dynamics of variable-density turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, D.L.

    1995-11-01

    The dynamics of variable-density turbulent fluids are studied by direct numerical simulation. The flow is incompressible so that acoustic waves are decoupled from the problem, and implying that density is not a thermodynamic variable. Changes in density occur due to molecular mixing. The velocity field, is in general, divergent. A pseudo-spectral numerical technique is used to solve the equations of motion. Three-dimensional simulations are performed using a grid size of 128{sup 3} grid points. Two types of problems are studied: (1) the decay of isotropic, variable-density turbulence, and (2) buoyancy-generated turbulence in a fluid with large density fluctuations. In the case of isotropic, variable-density turbulence, the overall statistical decay behavior, for the cases studied, is relatively unaffected by the presence of density variations when the initial density and velocity fields are statistically independent. The results for this case are in quantitative agreement with previous numerical and laboratory results. In this case, the initial density field has a bimodal probability density function (pdf) which evolves in time towards a Gaussian distribution. The pdf of the density field is symmetric about its mean value throughout its evolution. If the initial velocity and density fields are statistically dependent, however, the decay process is significantly affected by the density fluctuations. For the case of buoyancy-generated turbulence, variable-density departures from the Boussinesq approximation are studied. The results of the buoyancy-generated turbulence are compared with variable-density model predictions. Both a one-point (engineering) model and a two-point (spectral) model are tested against the numerical data. Some deficiencies in these variable-density models are discussed and modifications are suggested.

  12. Regularization of turbulence - a comprehensive modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geurts, B. J.

    2011-12-01

    Turbulence readily arises in numerous flows in nature and technology. The large number of degrees of freedom of turbulence poses serious challenges to numerical approaches aimed at simulating and controlling such flows. While the Navier-Stokes equations are commonly accepted to precisely describe fluid turbulence, alternative coarsened descriptions need to be developed to cope with the wide range of length and time scales. These coarsened descriptions are known as large-eddy simulations in which one aims to capture only the primary features of a flow, at considerably reduced computational effort. Such coarsening introduces a closure problem that requires additional phenomenological modeling. A systematic approach to the closure problem, know as regularization modeling, will be reviewed. Its application to multiphase turbulent will be illustrated in which a basic regularization principle is enforced to physically consistently approximate momentum and scalar transport. Examples of Leray and LANS-alpha regularization are discussed in some detail, as are compatible numerical strategies. We illustrate regularization modeling to turbulence under the influence of rotation and buoyancy and investigate the accuracy with which particle-laden flow can be represented. A discussion of the numerical and modeling errors incurred will be given on the basis of homogeneous isotropic turbulence.

  13. Turbulent combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Talbot, L.; Cheng, R.K.

    1993-12-01

    Turbulent combustion is the dominant process in heat and power generating systems. Its most significant aspect is to enhance the burning rate and volumetric power density. Turbulent mixing, however, also influences the chemical rates and has a direct effect on the formation of pollutants, flame ignition and extinction. Therefore, research and development of modern combustion systems for power generation, waste incineration and material synthesis must rely on a fundamental understanding of the physical effect of turbulence on combustion to develop theoretical models that can be used as design tools. The overall objective of this program is to investigate, primarily experimentally, the interaction and coupling between turbulence and combustion. These processes are complex and are characterized by scalar and velocity fluctuations with time and length scales spanning several orders of magnitude. They are also influenced by the so-called {open_quotes}field{close_quotes} effects associated with the characteristics of the flow and burner geometries. The authors` approach is to gain a fundamental understanding by investigating idealized laboratory flames. Laboratory flames are amenable to detailed interrogation by laser diagnostics and their flow geometries are chosen to simplify numerical modeling and simulations and to facilitate comparison between experiments and theory.

  14. Turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardina, Jorge E.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop, verify, and incorporate the baseline two-equation turbulence models which account for the effects of compressibility into the three-dimensional Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) code and to provide documented descriptions of the models and their numerical procedures so that they can be implemented into 3-D CFD codes for engineering applications.

  15. Evaporation of polydispersed droplets in a highly turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochet, M.; Bazile, Rudy; Ferret, B.; Cazin, S.

    2009-09-01

    A model experiment for the study of evaporating turbulent two-phase flows is presented here. The study focuses on a situation where pre-atomized and dispersed droplets vaporize and mix in a heated turbulent flow. The test bench consists in a channel flow with characteristics of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence where fluctuations levels reach very high values (25% in the established zone). An ultrasonic atomizer allows the injection of a mist of small droplets of acetone in the carrier flow. The large range diameters ensure that every kind of droplet behavior with regards to turbulence is possible. Instantaneous concentration fields of the vaporized phase are extracted from fluorescent images (PLIF) of the two phase flow. The evolution of the mixing of the acetone vapor is analyzed for two different liquid mass loadings. Despite the high turbulence levels, concentration fluctuations remain significant, indicating that air and acetone vapor are not fully mixed far from the injector.

  16. Analysis of two-equation turbulence models for recirculating flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thangam, S.

    1991-01-01

    The two-equation kappa-epsilon model is used to analyze turbulent separated flow past a backward-facing step. It is shown that if the model constraints are modified to be consistent with the accepted energy decay rate for isotropic turbulence, the dominant features of the flow field, namely the size of the separation bubble and the streamwise component of the mean velocity, can be accurately predicted. In addition, except in the vicinity of the step, very good predictions for the turbulent shear stress, the wall pressure, and the wall shear stress are obtained. The model is also shown to provide good predictions for the turbulence intensity in the region downstream of the reattachment point. Estimated long time growth rates for the turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate of homogeneous shear flow are utilized to develop an optimal set of constants for the two equation kappa-epsilon model. The physical implications of the model performance are also discussed.

  17. Role of Zonal Flow in Turbulent Transport Scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Z. Lin; T.S. Hahm; J.A. Krommes; W.W. Lee; J. Lewandowski; H. Mynick; H. Qin; G. Rewoldt; W.M. Tang; R. White

    2000-11-15

    Transport scalings with respect to collisionality (n*) and device size (r*) are obtained from massively parallel gyrokinetic particle simulations of toroidal ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) turbulence in the presence of zonal flows. Simulation results show that ion thermal transport from electrostatic ITG turbulence depends on ion-ion collisions due to the neo-classical damping of self-generated EXB zonal flows that regulate the turbulence. Fluctuations and heat transport levels exhibit bursting behavior with a period corresponding to the collisional damping time of poloidal flows. Results from large-scale full torus simulations with device-size scans for realistic parameters show that Bohm-like transport can be driven by microscopic scale fluctuations in the ITG turbulence with isotropic spectra. These simulation results resolve some apparent physics contradictions between experimental observations and turbulent transport theories.

  18. Nonequilibrium stationary states and entropy.

    PubMed

    Gallavotti, G; Cohen, E G D

    2004-03-01

    In transformations between nonequilibrium stationary states, entropy might not be a well defined concept. It might be analogous to the "heat content" in transformations in equilibrium which is not well defined either, if they are not isochoric (i.e., do involve mechanical work). Hence we conjecture that in a nonequilibrium stationary state the entropy is just a quantity that can be transferred or created, such as heat in equilibrium, but has no physical meaning as "entropy content" as a property of the system.

  19. Chaotic Dynamos Generated by a Turbulent Flow of Liquid Sodium

    SciTech Connect

    Ravelet, F.; Monchaux, R.; Aumaitre, S.; Chiffaudel, A.; Daviaud, F.; Dubrulle, B.; Berhanu, M.; Fauve, S.; Mordant, N.; Petrelis, F.; Bourgoin, M.; Odier, Ph.; Plihon, N.; Pinton, J.-F.; Volk, R.

    2008-08-15

    We report the observation of several dynamical regimes of the magnetic field generated by a turbulent flow of liquid sodium (VKS experiment). Stationary dynamos, transitions to relaxation cycles or to intermittent bursts, and random field reversals occur in a fairly small range of parameters. Large scale dynamics of the magnetic field result from the interactions of a few modes. The low dimensional nature of these dynamics is not smeared out by the very strong turbulent fluctuations of the flow.

  20. Linearized holographic isotropization at finite coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atashi, Mahdi; Fadafan, Kazem Bitaghsir; Jafari, Ghadir

    2017-06-01

    We study holographic isotropization of an anisotropic homogeneous non-Abelian strongly coupled plasma in the presence of Gauss-Bonnet corrections. It was verified before that one can linearize Einstein's equations around the final black hole background and simplify the complicated setup. Using this approach, we study the expectation value of the boundary stress tensor. Although we consider small values of the Gauss-Bonnet coupling constant, it is found that finite coupling leads to significant increasing of the thermalization time. By including higher order corrections in linearization, we extend the results to study the effect of the Gauss-Bonnet coupling on the entropy production on the event horizon.

  1. Shear elasticity of isotropic magnetic gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Lopez, M. T.; Borin, D. Yu.; Zubarev, A. Yu.

    2017-08-01

    The paper deals with a theoretical study of the effective shear modulus of a magnetic gel, consisting of magnetizable particles randomly and isotropically distributed in an elastic matrix. The effect of an external magnetic field on the composite modulus is the focus of our consideration. We take into account that magnetic interaction between the particles can induce their spatial rearrangement and lead to internal anisotropy of the system. Our results show that, if this magnetically induced anisotropy is insignificant, the applied field reduces the total shear modulus of the composite. Strong anisotropy can qualitatively change the magnetomechanic effect and induce an increase of this modulus with the field.

  2. Isotropic homogeneous universe with viscous fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, N.O.; Dias, R.S.; Banerjee, A.

    1985-04-01

    Exact solutions are obtained for the isotropic homogeneous cosmological model with viscous fluid. The fluid has only bulk viscosity and the viscosity coefficient is taken to be a power function of the mass density. The equation of state assumed obeys a linear relation between mass density and pressure. The models satisfying Hawking's energy conditions are discussed. Murphy's model is only a special case of this general set of solutions and it is shown that Murphy's conclusion that the introduciton of bulk viscosity can avoid the occurrence of space-time singularity at finite past is not, in general, valid.

  3. The influence of upstream turbulence on the stability of tube bundles subjected to cross-flow

    SciTech Connect

    Romberg, O.; Popp, K.

    1996-12-01

    Tube failures in heat exchangers are often caused by inadmissible vibrations. Especially the fluidelastic instability is a dangerous excitation mechanism. The investigations refer to the influence of isotropic upstream turbulence on the stability behavior of parallel and rotated triangular tube arrays of different pitch-to-diameter ratios. The excitation is due to air cross-flow in a wind tunnel. The experimental apparatus allows to measure the stability boundaries (Connors diagram) of fully flexible bundles as well as single flexibly mounted tubes with variable equilibrium position in otherwise fixed arrays. By using a turbulence grid with variable geometric properties it is possible to produce isotropic turbulence with variable turbulence intensity Tu and scale length L{sub x} at the inlet of the bundle. These values were determined using hot wire anemometers. The investigations show in most of the cases a stabilization of the tubes with increasing turbulence.

  4. Analysis of temporal power spectra for optical waves propagating through weak anisotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cui, Linyan

    2015-06-01

    Analytic expressions for the temporal power spectra of irradiance fluctuations and angle of arrival (AOA) fluctuations are derived for optical waves propagating through weak anisotropic non-Kolmogorov atmospheric turbulence. In the derivation, the anisotropic non-Kolmogorov spectrum is adopted, which adopts the assumption of circular symmetry in the orthogonal plane throughout the path and the same degree of anisotropy along the propagation direction for all the turbulence cells. The final expressions consider simultaneously the anisotropic factor and general spectral power law values. When the anisotropic factor equals one (corresponding to the isotropic turbulence), the derived temporal power spectral models have good consistency with the known results for the isotropic turbulence. Numerical calculations show that the increased anisotropic factor alleviates the atmospheric turbulence's influence on the final expressions.

  5. Structure in turbulent thermal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandar, S.

    1992-12-01

    Small-scale features of vorticity, strain rate, and temperature gradients are considered in a Rayleigh-Bénard convection. The results reported are from a direct numerical simulation of turbulent convection performed in a rectangular box of aspect ratio 2√2 at a Rayleigh number of 6.5×106 and a Prandtl number of 0.72. In agreement with earlier results [Ashurst et al., Phys. Fluids 30, 2343 (1987) and Ruetsch and Maxey, Phys. Fluids A 3, 1587 (1991)], the intermediate strain rate is on an average positive, but the ratio of alpha, beta, and gamma strain rates are measured to be 5.3:1.0:-6.3. This result differs from the earlier result of 3:1:-4 obtained in homogeneous isotropic and shear turbulences. Buoyancy-induced vorticity production makes significant contribution to the overall enstrophy balance, especially close to the boundaries. Vorticity production by buoyancy is exclusively in the horizontal direction and is balanced by preferred production by stretching and tilting in the vertical direction, due to the preferred alignment of extensional alpha strain rate with the vertical direction. Such directional alignment of vorticity, strain rate, and scalar gradient is explained on the basis of preferred spatial orientation of coherent structures in thermal turbulence.

  6. Group-theoretical model of developed turbulence and renormalization of the Navier-Stokes equation.

    PubMed

    Saveliev, V L; Gorokhovski, M A

    2005-07-01

    On the basis of the Euler equation and its symmetry properties, this paper proposes a model of stationary homogeneous developed turbulence. A regularized averaging formula for the product of two fields is obtained. An equation for the averaged turbulent velocity field is derived from the Navier-Stokes equation by renormalization-group transformation.

  7. Isotropization of nematic liquid crystals by TMDSC

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei; Dadmun, M.; Zhang, Ge; Boller, A.; Wunderlich, B. |

    1997-12-01

    Temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry (TMDSC) and traditional DSC are used to study the transition between the nematic liquid crystalline state and the isotropic liquid for two small molecules [4,4{prime}-azoxyanisole and N,N`-bis(4-n-octyloxybenzal)-1,4-phenylenediamine] and one macromolecule (4,4{prime}-dihydroxy-{alpha}-methylstilbene copolymerized with a 1:1 molar mixture of 1,7-dibromoheptane and 1,9-dibromononane). The DSC measurements with 4,4{prime}-azoxyanisole were used for temperature calibration with varying heating and cooling rates. Quasi-isothermal TMDSC with small temperature amplitude and standard TMDSC with underlying heating and cooling rates were utilized to analyze the breadth of the transitions. It could be verified that the isotropization transition of a nematic liquid crystal is, indeed, reversible for all three molecules. The nature of the transition changes, however, from relatively sharp, for small, rigid molecules, to about three kelvins wide for the small molecule with flexible ends, to as broad as 20 K for the macromolecule. It was also demonstrated that quantitative heats of fusion of sharp transitions can be extracted from TMDSC, but only from the time-domain heat-flow signal.

  8. Stationary measure in the multiverse

    SciTech Connect

    Linde, Andrei; Vanchurin, Vitaly; Winitzki, Sergei E-mail: vitaly@cosmos2.phy.tufts.edu

    2009-01-15

    We study the recently proposed ''stationary measure'' in the context of the string landscape scenario. We show that it suffers neither from the ''Boltzmann brain'' problem nor from the ''youngness'' paradox that makes some other measures predict a high CMB temperature at present. We also demonstrate a good performance of this measure in predicting the results of local experiments, such as proton decay.

  9. Wave Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, Alan C.; Rumpf, Benno

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we state and review the premises on which a successful asymptotic closure of the moment equations of wave turbulence is based, describe how and why this closure obtains, and examine the nature of solutions of the kinetic equation. We discuss obstacles that limit the theory's validity and suggest how the theory might then be modified. We also compare the experimental evidence with the theory's predictions in a range of applications. Finally, and most importantly, we suggest open challenges and encourage the reader to apply and explore wave turbulence with confidence. The narrative is terse but, we hope, delivered at a speed more akin to the crisp pace of a Hemingway story than the wordjumblingtumbling rate of a Joycean novel.

  10. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent reacting flows

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.H.

    1993-12-01

    The development of turbulent combustion models that reflect some of the most important characteristics of turbulent reacting flows requires knowledge about the behavior of key quantities in well defined combustion regimes. In turbulent flames, the coupling between the turbulence and the chemistry is so strong in certain regimes that is is very difficult to isolate the role played by one individual phenomenon. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is an extremely useful tool to study in detail the turbulence-chemistry interactions in certain well defined regimes. Globally, non-premixed flames are controlled by two limiting cases: the fast chemistry limit, where the turbulent fluctuations. In between these two limits, finite-rate chemical effects are important and the turbulence interacts strongly with the chemical processes. This regime is important because industrial burners operate in regimes in which, locally the flame undergoes extinction, or is at least in some nonequilibrium condition. Furthermore, these nonequilibrium conditions strongly influence the production of pollutants. To quantify the finite-rate chemistry effect, direct numerical simulations are performed to study the interaction between an initially laminar non-premixed flame and a three-dimensional field of homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence. Emphasis is placed on the dynamics of extinction and on transient effects on the fine scale mixing process. Differential molecular diffusion among species is also examined with this approach, both for nonreacting and reacting situations. To address the problem of large-scale mixing and to examine the effects of mean shear, efforts are underway to perform large eddy simulations of round three-dimensional jets.

  11. Filament turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidsen, Joern

    2010-03-01

    How much information do you need to distinguish between different mechanisms for spatiotemporal chaos in three-dimensions? In this talk, I will show that the observation of the dynamics on the surface of a medium can be sufficient. Studying mechanisms for filament turbulence in the context of reaction-diffusion media, we found numerically that two major classes of instabilities leave a very different signature on what can be observed on the surface of a three-dimensional medium. These results are of direct relevance in the context of ventricular fibrillation - a turbulent electrical wave activity that destroys the coherent contraction of the ventricular muscle and its main pumping function leading to sudden cardiac death. While it has been proposed that the three-dimensional structure of the heart plays an important role in this type of filament turbulence, only the surface of the heart is currently accessible to experimental observation preventing the study of the full dynamics. Our results suggest that such observations might be sufficient.

  12. Evolution of the shock front and turbulence structures in the shock/turbulence interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kevlahan, N.; Mahesh, K.; Lee, S.

    1992-01-01

    The interaction of a weak shock front with isotropic turbulence has been investigated using Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS). Two problems were considered: the ability of the field equation (the equation for a propagating surface) to model the shock; and a quantitative study of the evolution of turbulence structure using the database generated by Lee et al. Field equation model predictions for front shape have been compared with DNS results; good agreement is found for shock wave interaction with 2D turbulence and for a single steady vorticity wave. In the interaction of 3D isotropic turbulence with a normal shock, strong alignment of vorticity with the intermediate eigenvector of the rate of strain tensor (S(sup *)(sub ij) = S(sub ij) - (1/3)(delta(sub ij))(S(sub kk))) is seen to develop upstream of the shock and to be further amplified on passage through the shock. Vorticity tends to align at 90 deg to the largest eigenvector, but there is no preferred alignment with the smallest eigenvector. Upstream of the shock, the alignments continue to develop even after the velocity derivative skewness saturates. There is a significant tendency, which increases with time throughout the computational domain, for velocity to align with vorticity. The alignment between velocity and vorticity is strongest in eddy regions and weakest in convergence regions.

  13. Direct simulation of compressible turbulence in a shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkar, S.; Erlebacher, G.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1991-01-01

    Compressibility effects on the turbulence in homogeneous shear flow are investigated. The growth of the turbulent kinetic energy was found to decrease with increasing Mach number: a phenomenon which is similar to the reduction of turbulent velocity intensities observed in experiments on supersonic free shear layers. An examination of the turbulent energy budget shows that both the compressible dissipation and the pressure-dilatation contribute to the decrease in the growth of kinetic energy. The pressure-dilatation is predominantly negative in homogeneous shear flow, in contrast to its predominantly positive behavior in isotropic turbulence. The different signs of the pressure-dilatation are explained by theoretical consideration of the equations for the pressure variance and density variance. Previously, the following results were obtained for isotropic turbulence: (1) the normalized compressible dissipation is of O(M(sub t)(exp 2)); and (2) there is approximate equipartition between the kinetic and potential energies associated with the fluctuating compressible mode. Both of these results were substantiated in the case of homogeneous shear. The dilatation field is significantly more skewed and intermittent than the vorticity field. Strong compressions seem to be more likely than strong expansions.

  14. On the dynamics of homogeneous turbulence near a surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Oscar; Riley, James J.

    2011-11-01

    It is becoming increasing clear that stably-stratified flows can support a stratified turbulence k - 5 / 3 inertial range, different from Kolmogorov's. Stratification inhibits vertical motions, but the large-scale quasi-horizontal motions produce strong vertical shearing and small-scale instabilities. The result is a k - 5 / 3 horizontal spectrum for the horizontal velocities at scales larger than the Ozmidov scale, the largest scale that can overturn. For smaller scales, the classical Kolmogorov k - 5 / 3 applies. Inspired by data taken near the water surface in a tidal river, we here explore to what extent the dynamics of the nonlinear spectral energy transfer of near-surface turbulence with no mean shear (i.e., horizontally isotropic turbulence bounded by free-slip and no-slip surfaces) is analogous to stably stratified turbulence. To that end, we perform DNS of decaying isotropic turbulence with Reλ ~ 100 , but bounded by a non-slip surface and a free slip surface. The behavior of the flow near the free-slip surface is similar to stratified turbulence, with a tentative k - 5 / 3 range, but the same is not true for the no-slip surface at the present Reynolds numbers. This research was supported by ARO and NSF. Chickadel et al. (2011) to appear in IEEE Geosci. Remote Sens. Lett.

  15. FUNDAMENTAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY (INCLUDING APPLICATIONS): Vortex Turbulence due to the Interplay of Filament Tension and Rotational Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Mi; Ma, Ping

    2009-07-01

    The mechanism of scroll wave turbulence is investigated in excitable media with rotational anisotropy. We adopt the Barkley model with heterogeneity in the diffusion constants. Through comparative numerical studies, we demonstrate the vortex turbulence results from the rotational anisotropy's cooperation with negative filament tension or competition with positive filament tension. The presence of rotational anisotropy can enlarge the parameter region leading to negative-tension induced wave turbulence in isotropic media.

  16. Subgrid or Reynolds stress-modeling for three-dimensional turbulence computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubesin, M. W.

    1975-01-01

    A review is given of recent advances in two distinct computational methods for evaluating turbulence fields, namely, statistical Reynolds stress modeling and turbulence simulation, where large eddies are followed in time. It is shown that evaluation of the mean Reynolds stresses, rather than use of a scalar eddy viscosity, permits an explanation of streamline curvature effects found in several experiments. Turbulence simulation, with a new volume averaging technique and third-order accurate finite-difference computing is shown to predict the decay of isotropic turbulence in incompressible flow with rather modest computer storage requirements, even at Reynolds numbers of aerodynamic interest.

  17. Real wave propagation in the isotropic-relaxed micromorphic model.

    PubMed

    Neff, Patrizio; Madeo, Angela; Barbagallo, Gabriele; d'Agostino, Marco Valerio; Abreu, Rafael; Ghiba, Ionel-Dumitrel

    2017-01-01

    For the recently introduced isotropic-relaxed micromorphic generalized continuum model, we show that, under the assumption of positive-definite energy, planar harmonic waves have real velocity. We also obtain a necessary and sufficient condition for real wave velocity which is weaker than the positive definiteness of the energy. Connections to isotropic linear elasticity and micropolar elasticity are established. Notably, we show that strong ellipticity does not imply real wave velocity in micropolar elasticity, whereas it does in isotropic linear elasticity.

  18. Isotropic quantum scattering and unconventional superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Park, T; Sidorov, V A; Ronning, F; Zhu, J-X; Tokiwa, Y; Lee, H; Bauer, E D; Movshovich, R; Sarrao, J L; Thompson, J D

    2008-11-20

    Superconductivity without phonons has been proposed for strongly correlated electron materials that are tuned close to a zero-temperature magnetic instability of itinerant charge carriers. Near this boundary, quantum fluctuations of magnetic degrees of freedom assume the role of phonons in conventional superconductors, creating an attractive interaction that 'glues' electrons into superconducting pairs. Here we show that superconductivity can arise from a very different spectrum of fluctuations associated with a local (or Kondo-breakdown) quantum critical point that is revealed in isotropic scattering of charge carriers and a sublinear, temperature-dependent electrical resistivity. At this critical point, accessed by applying pressure to the strongly correlated, local-moment antiferromagnet CeRhIn(5), magnetic and charge fluctuations coexist and produce electronic scattering that is maximal at the optimal pressure for superconductivity. This previously unanticipated source of pairing glue opens possibilities for understanding and discovering new unconventional forms of superconductivity.

  19. Kinematical uniqueness of homogeneous isotropic LQC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Jonathan; Hanusch, Maximilian

    2017-01-01

    In a paper by Ashtekar and Campiglia, invariance under volume preserving residual diffeomorphisms has been used to single out the standard representation of the reduced holonomy-flux algebra in homogeneous loop quantum cosmology (LQC). In this paper, we use invariance under all residual diffeomorphisms to single out the standard kinematical Hilbert space of homogeneous isotropic LQC for both the standard configuration space {{{R}}\\text{Bohr}} , as well as for the Fleischhack one {R}\\sqcup {{{R}}\\text{Bohr}} . We first determine the scale invariant Radon measures on these spaces, and then show that the Haar measure on {{{R}}\\text{Bohr}} is the only such measure for which the momentum operator is hermitian w.r.t. the corresponding inner product. In particular, the measure is forced to be identically zero on {R} in the Fleischhack case, so that for both approaches, the standard kinematical LQC-Hilbert space is singled out.

  20. Scattering from isotropic plasma coated nihility sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussan, M. M.; Ghaffar, A.; Alkanhal, Majeed A. S.; Naz, M. Y.; Ur Rehman, Sajjad; Khan, Y.

    2017-06-01

    In this study, it is observed that when an isotropic collisional plasma coating layer is produced on a nihility sphere, its back scattering efficiency becomes non-zero. Field equations, at each interface, are expanded in terms of spherical wave vector functions (SWVFs) by enforcing the extended classical wave scattering theory. Electromagnetic boundary conditions are applied at both interfaces, i.e., free space-plasma and plasma layer-nihility sphere core to obtain the scattering coefficients. The obtained scattering coefficients are used to calculate the forward scattering, back scattering, and extinction efficiencies. The obtained computational results show that an increase in collisional frequency causes a decrease in both forward and backscattered efficiencies and an increase in extinction efficiency. Furthermore, the numerical results indicate that an increase in plasma density causes an increase in both forward and backscattered efficiencies and a decrease in extinction efficiency.

  1. Constitutive model development for isotropic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.

    1982-01-01

    The objective is to develop a unified constitutive model for finite-element structural analysis of turbine engine hot section components. This effort constitutes a different approach for nonlinear finite-element computer codes which were heretofore based on classical inelastic methods. A unified constitutive theory will avoid the simplifying assumptions of classical theory and should more accurately represent the behavior of superalloy materials under cyclic loading conditions and high temperature environments. Model development will be directed toward isotropic, cast nickel-base alloys used for aircooled turbine blades and vanes. The contractor will select a base material for model development and an alternate material for verification purposes from a list of three alloys specified by NASA. The candidate alloys represent a cross-section of turbine blade and vane materials of interest to both large and small size engine manufacturers. Material stock for the base and alternate materials will be supplied to the Contractor by the government.

  2. Isotropic MD simulations of dynamic brittle fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Espanol, P.; Rubio, M.A.; Zuniga, I.

    1996-12-01

    The authors present results obtained by molecular dynamics simulations on the propagation of fast cracks in triangular 2D lattices. Their aim is to simulate Mode 1 fracture of brittle isotropic materials. They propose a force law that respects the isotropy of the material. The code yields the correct imposed sound c{sub {parallel}}, shear c{sub {perpendicular}} and surface V{sub R} wave speeds. Different notch lengths are systematically studied. They observed that initially the cracks are linear and always branch at a particular critical velocity c* {approx} 0.8V{sub R} and that this occurs when the crack tip reaches the position of a front emitted from the initial crack tip and propagating at a speed c = 0.68V{sub R}.

  3. Isotropic cosmological singularities: other matter models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tod, K. P.

    2003-02-01

    Isotropic cosmological singularities are singularities which can be removed by rescaling the metric. In some cases already studied, the existence and uniqueness of cosmological models with data at the singularity has been established (Anguige K and Tod K P 1999 Ann. Phys., NY 276 257-93, 294-320, Anguige K 2000 Ann. Phys., NY 285 395-419). These were cosmologies with, as source, either perfect fluids with linear equations of state or massless, collisionless particles. In this paper, we consider how to extend these results to a variety of other matter models. These are scalar fields, massive collisionless matter, the Yang-Mills plasma given by Choquet-Bruhat (Choquet-Bruhat Y 1996 Yang-Mills plasmas Global Structure and Evolution in General Relativity (Springer Lecture Notes in Physics vol 460) ed S Cotsakis and G W Gibbons (Berlin: Springer)) and matter satisfying the Einstein-Boltzmann equation.

  4. A revisit of the equilibrium assumption for prediction of near-wall turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimpour, Farid; Venayagamoorthy, Subhas

    2014-11-01

    Assuming equilibrium between the rates of production (P) and dissipation (ɛ) of the turbulent kinetic energy (k) is widely employed for prediction and modeling of turbulent flows. In this study, we revisit the consequence of using equilibrium assumption for prediction of near-wall turbulence. To this end, the relevant scales inherent in the turbulent viscosity (νt) formulation of the standard k- ɛ model is derived. We show that such turbulent viscosity formulations are not suitable for modeling near-wall turbulence. Furthermore, by using the turbulent viscosity (νt) formulation suggested by Durbin, we also show that the anisotropic Reynolds stress is correlated with the wall-normal, isotropic Reynolds stress. `A priori' tests are performed to assess the validity of the propositions using the direct numerical simulation (DNS) data of unstratified channel flow. The comparisons with the data are excellent and confirm our findings. Funded by the National Science Foundation.

  5. Measurements of Turbulence at Two Tidal Energy Sites in Puget Sound, WA

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Jim; Polagye, Brian; Durgesh, Vibhav; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2012-06-05

    Field measurements of turbulence are pre- sented from two sites in Puget Sound, WA (USA) that are proposed for electrical power generation using tidal current turbines. Rapidly sampled data from multiple acoustic Doppler instruments are analyzed to obtain statistical mea- sures of fluctuations in both the magnitude and direction of the tidal currents. The resulting turbulence intensities (i.e., the turbulent velocity fluctuations normalized by the harmonic tidal currents) are typically 10% at the hub- heights (i.e., the relevant depth bin) of the proposed turbines. Length and time scales of the turbulence are also analyzed. Large-scale, anisotropic eddies dominate the energy spectra, which may be the result of proximity to headlands at each site. At small scales, an isotropic turbulent cascade is observed and used to estimate the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy. Data quality and sampling parameters are discussed, with an emphasis on the removal of Doppler noise from turbulence statistics.

  6. Impact of plasma parameter on self-organization of electron temperature gradient driven turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, C.; Idomura, Y.; Maeyama, S.; Ogawa, Y.

    2017-04-01

    Self-organization in the slab electron temperature gradient driven (ETG) turbulence is investigated based on gyrokinetic simulations and the Hasegawa-Mima (HM) equation. The scale and the anisotropy of self-organized turbulent structures vary depending on the Rhines scale and the characteristic scale given by the adiabatic response term in the HM equation. The former is determined by competition between the linear wave dispersion and the nonlinear turbulent cascade, while the latter is given as the scale, at which the turbulent cascade is impeded. These scales are controlled by plasma parameters such as the density and temperature gradient, and the temperature ratio of ion to electron. It is found that depending on the plasma parameters, the ETG turbulence shows either isotropic turbulence or zonal flows, which give significantly different transport levels. Although the modulational instability excites zonal modes regardless of the plasma parameters, the final turbulent structure is determined by the self-organization process.

  7. Noise of a model helicopter rotor due to ingestion of turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paterson, R. W.; Amiet, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation of the noise of a model helicoper rotor due to ingestion of turbulence was conducted. Experiments were performed with a 0.76 m dia, articulated model rotor for a range of inflow turbulence and rotor operating conditions. Inflow turbulence levels varied from approximately 2 to 19 percent and tip Mach number was varied from 0.3 to 0.52. Test conditions included ingestion of a atmospheric turbulence in outdoor hover as well as ingestion of grid generated isotropic turbulence in the wind tunnel airstream. In wind tunnel testing, both forward flight and vertical ascent (climb) were simulated. Far field noise spectra and directivity were measured in addition to incident turbulence intensities, length scales, and spectra. Results indicate that ingestion of atmospheric turbulence is the dominant helicopter rotor hover noise mechanism at the moderate to high frequencies which determine perceived noise level.

  8. Spectral Analysis of Cluster Induced Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Ravi; Ireland, Peter; Capecelatro, Jesse; Fox, Rodney; Desjardins, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    Particle laden turbulent flows are an important feature of many industrial processes such as fluidized bed reactors. The study of cluster-induced turbulence (CIT), wherein particles falling under gravity generate turbulence in the carrier gas via fluctuations in particle concentration, may lead to better models for these processes. We present a spectral analysis of a database of statistically stationary CIT simulations. These simulations were previously performed using a two way coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian approach for various mass loadings and particle-scale Reynolds numbers. The Lagrangian particle data is carefully filtered to obtain Eulerian fields for particle phase volume fraction, velocity, and granular temperature. We perform a spectral decomposition of the particle and fluid turbulent kinetic energy budget. We investigate the contributions to the particle and fluid turbulent kinetic energy by pressure strain, viscous dissipation, drag exchange, viscous exchange, and pressure exchange over the range of wavenumbers. Results from this study may help develop closure models for large eddy simulation of particle laden turbulent flows.

  9. Can we remove the systematic error due to isotropic inhomogeneities?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negishi, Hiroyuki; Nakao, Ken-ichi

    2017-01-01

    Usually, we assume that there is no inhomogeneity isotropic in terms of our location in our Universe. This assumption has not been observationally confirmed yet in sufficient accuracy, and we need to consider the possibility that there are non-negligible large-scale isotropic inhomogeneities in our Universe. The existence of large-scale isotropic inhomogeneities affects the determination of cosmological parameters. In particular, from only the distance-redshift relation, we cannot distinguish the inhomogeneous isotropic universe model from the homogeneous isotropic one, because of the ambiguity in the cosmological parameters. In this paper, in order to avoid such ambiguity, we consider three observables—the distance-redshift relation, the fluctuation spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation, and the scale of the baryon acoustic oscillation—and compare these observables in two universe models. One is the inhomogeneous isotropic universe model with the cosmological constant, and the other is the homogeneous isotropic universe model with dark energy other than the cosmological constant. We show that these two universe models cannot predict the same observational data of all three observables but the same ones of only two of three, as long as the perturbations are adiabatic. In principle, we can distinguish the inhomogeneous isotropic universe from the homogeneous isotropic one through the appropriate three observables, if the perturbations are adiabatic.

  10. Viscous propulsion in active transversely isotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cupples, G.; Dyson, R. J.; Smith, D. J.

    2017-02-01

    Taylor's swimming sheet is a classical model of microscale propulsion and pumping. Many biological fluids and substances are fibrous, having a preferred direction in their microstructure; for example cervical mucus is formed of polymer molecules which create an oriented fibrous network. Moreover, suspensions of elongated motile cells produce a form of active oriented matter. To understand how these effects modify viscous propulsion, we extend Taylor's classical model of small-amplitude zero-Reynolds-number propulsion of a 'swimming sheet' via the transversely-isotropic fluid model of Ericksen, which is linear in strain rate and possesses a distinguished direction. The energetic costs of swimming are significantly altered by all rheological parameters and the initial fibre angle. Propulsion in a passive transversely-isotropic fluid produces an enhanced mean rate of working, independent of the initial fibre orientation, with an approximately linear dependence of energetic cost on the extensional and shear enhancements to the viscosity caused by fibres. In this regime the mean swimming velocity is unchanged from the Newtonian case. The effect of the constant term in Ericksen's model for the stress, which can be identified as a fibre tension or alternatively a stresslet characterising an active fluid, is also considered. This stress introduces an angular dependence and dramatically changes the streamlines and flow field; fibres aligned with the swimming direction increase the energetic demands of the sheet. The constant fibre stress may result in a reversal of the mean swimming velocity and a negative mean rate of working if sufficiently large relative to the other rheological parameters.

  11. Velocity analysis for transversely isotropic media

    SciTech Connect

    Alkhalifah, T.; Tsvankin, I.

    1994-08-01

    The main difficulty in extending seismic processing to anisotropic media is the recovery of anisotropic velocity fields from surface reflection data. Velocity analysis for transversely isotropic (TI) media can be done by inverting the dependence of P-wave moveout velocities on the ray parameter. P-wave NMO velocity in homogeneous TI media with a vertical symmetry axis depends just on the zero-dip value V{sub nmo} and a new effective parameter {eta} that reduces to the difference between Thomsen parameters {epsilon} and {delta} in the limit of weak anisotropy. It is possible to obtain {eta} and reconstruct the NMO velocity as a function of ray parameter using moveout velocities for two different dips. Moreover, V{sub nmo}(0) and {eta} determine not only the NMO velocity, but also also long-spread (nonhyperbollic) P-wave moveout for horizontal reflectors and time-migration impulse response. Inversion of dip-moveout information allows performance of all time-processing steps in TI media using only surface P-wave data. Isotropic time-processing methods remain entirely valid for elliptical anisotropy ({epsilon} = {delta}). Accurate time-to-depth conversion, however, requires the vertical velocity V{sub P0} be resolved independently. If I-P0 is known, then allisotropies {epsilon} and {delta} can be found by inverting two P-wave NMO velocities corresponding to a horizontal and a dipping reflector. If no information is available, all three parameters (V {sub P0}, {epsilon}, and {delta}) can be obtained by combining inversion results with shear-wave information. such as the P-SV or SV-SV wave NMO velocities for a horizontal reflector. Generalization of Tsvankin`s single-layer NMO equation for layered anisotropic media with a dipping reflector provides a basis for extending anisotropic velocity analysis to vertically inhomogeneous media. The influence of a stratified overburden on moveout velocity can be stripped through a Dix-type differentiation procedure.

  12. Statistical Mechanics of Turbulent Dynamos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2014-01-01

    Incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and magnetic dynamos, which occur in magnetofluids with large fluid and magnetic Reynolds numbers, will be discussed. When Reynolds numbers are large and energy decays slowly, the distribution of energy with respect to length scale becomes quasi-stationary and MHD turbulence can be described statistically. In the limit of infinite Reynolds numbers, viscosity and resistivity become zero and if these values are used in the MHD equations ab initio, a model system called ideal MHD turbulence results. This model system is typically confined in simple geometries with some form of homogeneous boundary conditions, allowing for velocity and magnetic field to be represented by orthogonal function expansions. One advantage to this is that the coefficients of the expansions form a set of nonlinearly interacting variables whose behavior can be described by equilibrium statistical mechanics, i.e., by a canonical ensemble theory based on the global invariants (energy, cross helicity and magnetic helicity) of ideal MHD turbulence. Another advantage is that truncated expansions provide a finite dynamical system whose time evolution can be numerically simulated to test the predictions of the associated statistical mechanics. If ensemble predictions are the same as time averages, then the system is said to be ergodic; if not, the system is nonergodic. Although it had been implicitly assumed in the early days of ideal MHD statistical theory development that these finite dynamical systems were ergodic, numerical simulations provided sufficient evidence that they were, in fact, nonergodic. Specifically, while canonical ensemble theory predicted that expansion coefficients would be (i) zero-mean random variables with (ii) energy that decreased with length scale, it was found that although (ii) was correct, (i) was not and the expected ergodicity was broken. The exact cause of this broken ergodicity was explained, after much

  13. MHD Turbulence and Magnetic Dynamos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V

    2014-01-01

    Incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and magnetic dynamos, which occur in magnetofluids with large fluid and magnetic Reynolds numbers, will be discussed. When Reynolds numbers are large and energy decays slowly, the distribution of energy with respect to length scale becomes quasi-stationary and MHD turbulence can be described statistically. In the limit of infinite Reynolds numbers, viscosity and resistivity become zero and if these values are used in the MHD equations ab initio, a model system called ideal MHD turbulence results. This model system is typically confined in simple geometries with some form of homogeneous boundary conditions, allowing for velocity and magnetic field to be represented by orthogonal function expansions. One advantage to this is that the coefficients of the expansions form a set of nonlinearly interacting variables whose behavior can be described by equilibrium statistical mechanics, i.e., by a canonical ensemble theory based on the global invariants (energy, cross helicity and magnetic helicity) of ideal MHD turbulence. Another advantage is that truncated expansions provide a finite dynamical system whose time evolution can be numerically simulated to test the predictions of the associated statistical mechanics. If ensemble predictions are the same as time averages, then the system is said to be ergodic; if not, the system is nonergodic. Although it had been implicitly assumed in the early days of ideal MHD statistical theory development that these finite dynamical systems were ergodic, numerical simulations provided sufficient evidence that they were, in fact, nonergodic. Specifically, while canonical ensemble theory predicted that expansion coefficients would be (i) zero-mean random variables with (ii) energy that decreased with length scale, it was found that although (ii) was correct, (i) was not and the expected ergodicity was broken. The exact cause of this broken ergodicity was explained, after much

  14. Turbulence topologies predicted using large eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bing-Chen; Bergstrom, Donald J.; Yin, Jing; Yee, Eugene

    In this paper, turbulence topologies related to the invariants of the resolved velocity gradient and strain rate tensors are studied based on large eddy simulation. The numerical results presented in the paper were obtained using two dynamic models, namely, the conventional dynamic model of Lilly and a recently developed dynamic nonlinear subgrid scale (SGS) model. In contrast to most of the previous research investigations which have mainly focused on isotropic turbulence, the present study examines the influence of near-wall anisotropy on the flow topologies. The SGS effect on the so-called SGS dissipation of the discriminant is examined and it is shown that the SGS stress contributes to the deviation of the flow topology of real turbulence from that of the ideal restricted Euler flow. The turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) transfer between the resolved and subgrid scales of motion is studied, and the forward and backward scatters of TKE are quantified in the invariant phase plane. Some interesting phenomenological results have also been obtained, including a wing-shaped contour pattern for the density of the resolved enstrophy generation and the near-wall dissipation shift of the peak location (mode) in the joint probability density function of the invariants of the resolved strain rate tensor. The newly observed turbulence phenomenologies are believed to be important and an effort has been made to explain them on an analytical basis.

  15. Turbulent swirling layer with free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardet, Philippe; Peterson, Per; Savas, Omer

    2007-11-01

    A turbulent annular liquid wall jet, or vortex tube, generated by helical injection inside a tube was characterized experimentally. The resulting hollow confined swirling layer is proposed for use in a thick liquid first-wall chamber concept for inertial fusion power plants. The velocity fields were measured with a single camera split-screen stereoscopic particle image velocimetry scheme. The flow was studied at 5 stations between 1.5 and 4.5 ``vortex tube'' diameters downstream of the injection nozzle in a horizontal plane that coincides with the tube axis. Up to 1024 independent realizations were recorded and analyzed for Reynolds numbers ranging from 3,200 to 14,000 at each station. The turbulent structures are non-isotropic and non-homogeneous. Gradients in average velocity and Reynolds stress result in turbulent kinetic energy production. Between 1.5 and 3.5 diameters, the average azimuthal velocity profile alone is non uniform away from the wall. Persistent large vortical structures are observed. The turbulent kinetic energy decreases slowly with distance while the dissipation decreases rapidly. At 4.5 diameters, the wall effect influences strongly the average velocity profiles. The vortical structures disappear and the turbulent kinetic energy increases.

  16. Application of turbulence modeling to predict surface heat transfer in stagnation flow region of circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Chi R.; Yeh, Frederick C.

    1987-01-01

    A theoretical analysis and numerical calculations for the turbulent flow field and for the effect of free-stream turbulence on the surface heat transfer rate of a stagnation flow are presented. The emphasis is on the modeling of turbulence and its augmentation of surface heat transfer rate. The flow field considered is the region near the forward stagnation point of a circular cylinder in a uniform turbulent mean flow. The free stream is steady and incompressible with a Reynolds number of the order of 10 to the 5th power and turbulence intensity of less than 5 percent. For this analysis, the flow field is divided into three regions: (1) a uniform free-stream region where the turbulence is homogeneous and isotropic; (2) an external viscid flow region where the turbulence is distorted by the variation of the mean flow velocity; and, (3) an anisotropic turbulent boundary layer region over the cylinder surface. The turbulence modeling techniques used are the kappa-epsilon two-equation model in the external flow region and the time-averaged turbulence transport equation in the boundary layer region. The turbulence double correlations, the mean velocity, and the mean temperature within the boundary layer are solved numerically from the transport equations. The surface heat transfer rate is calculated as functions of the free-stream turbulence longitudinal microlength scale, the turbulence intensity, and the Reynolds number.

  17. A stationary q-metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toktarbay, S.; Quevedo, H.

    2014-10-01

    We present a stationary generalization of the static $q-$metric, the simplest generalization of the Schwarzschild solution that contains a quadrupole parameter. It possesses three independent parameters that are related to the mass, quadrupole moment and angular momentum. We investigate the geometric and physical properties of this exact solution of Einstein's vacuum equations, and show that it can be used to describe the exterior gravitational field of rotating, axially symmetric, compact objects.

  18. Time scale of stationary decoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polonyi, Janos

    2017-07-01

    The decoherence of a test particle interacting with an ideal gas is studied by the help of the effective Lagrangian, derived in the leading order of the perturbation expansion and in order O (∂t2) . The stationary decoherence time is found to be comparable to or longer than the diffusion time. The decoherence time reaches its minimal value for classical, completely decohered environment, suggesting that physical decoherence is slowed down as compared with diffusion by the quantum coherence of the environment.

  19. Coherence in Turbulence: New Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levich, Eugene

    2009-07-01

    It is claimed that turbulence in fluids is inherently coherent phenomenon. The coherence shows up clearly as strongly correlated helicity fluctuations of opposite sign. The helicity fluctuations have cellular structure forming clusters that are actually observed as vorticity bands and coherent structures in laboratory turbulence, direct numerical simulations and most obviously in atmospheric turbulence. The clusters are named BCC - Beltrami Cellular Clusters - because of the observed nearly total alignment of the velocity and vorticity fields in each particular cell, and hence nearly maximal possible helicity in each cell; although when averaged over all the cells the residual mean helicity in general is small and does not play active dynamical role. The Beltrami like fluctuations are short-lived and stabilize only in small and generally contiguous sub-domains that are tending to a (multi)fractal in the asymptotic limit of large Reynolds numbers, Re → ∞. For the model of homogeneous isotropic turbulence the theory predicts the leading fractal dimension of BCC to be: DF = 2.5. This particular BCC is responsible for generating the Kolmogorov -5/3 power law energy spectrum. The most obvious role that BCC play dynamically is that the nonlinear interactions in them are relatively reduced, due to strong spatial alignment between the velocity field v(r, t) and the vorticity field ω(r, t) = curlv(r, t), while the physical quantities typically best characterizing turbulence intermittency, such as entrophy, vorticity stretching and generation, and energy dissipation are maximized in and near them. The theory quantitatively relates the reduction of nonlinear inter-actions to the BCC fractal dimension DF and subsequent turbulence intermittency. It is further asserted that BCC is a fundamental feature of all turbulent flows, e.g., wall bounded turbulent flows, atmospheric and oceanic flows, and their leading fractal dimension remains invariant and universal in these flows

  20. The effects of concave curvature on turbulent boundary layer structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeans, A. H.; Johnston, J. P.

    This paper reports the results of flow visualization studies on the structure of turbulent boundary layers over concave walls. A flat plate turbulent boundary layer was grown on one wall of a straight, large water channel and then passed over a concave wall. The flow was visualized in two ways, (1) by injecting dyes into the sublayers and (2) by generating hydrogen bubbles on fine wires placed in the flow. Mean velocity and turbulence intensity profiles were measured using a hot film anemometer. The boundary layer on the concave wall was found to be dominated by randomly occurring, large-scale sweeps and ejections. The stationary roll-cells, or Taylor-Goertler structures are not a feature of this flow. The sweeps appear to inhibit the usual bursting mechanism for producing turbulence near the wall, while the ejections appear to create additional turbulence in the outer flow.

  1. An investigation of turbulent transport in the extreme lower atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koper, C. A., Jr.; Sadeh, W. Z.

    1975-01-01

    A model in which the Lagrangian autocorrelation is expressed by a domain integral over a set of usual Eulerian autocorrelations acquired concurrently at all points within a turbulence box is proposed along with a method for ascertaining the statistical stationarity of turbulent velocity by creating an equivalent ensemble to investigate the flow in the extreme lower atmosphere. Simultaneous measurements of turbulent velocity on a turbulence line along the wake axis were carried out utilizing a longitudinal array of five hot-wire anemometers remotely operated. The stationarity test revealed that the turbulent velocity is approximated as a realization of a weakly self-stationary random process. Based on the Lagrangian autocorrelation it is found that: (1) large diffusion time predominated; (2) ratios of Lagrangian to Eulerian time and spatial scales were smaller than unity; and, (3) short and long diffusion time scales and diffusion spatial scales were constrained within their Eulerian counterparts.

  2. Turbulence Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-01

    system of codes for missile detection, the SPIRITS system of codes for aircraft/helicopter detection, the HSCT system of codes (MICOM) NSWC, etc) for...Academic Press, N.Y. 1974. Cebeci, T. and Smith, A.M.O., "Analysis of Turbulent Boundary Layers", Series in A01jed Mathematics and MW1WiG Vol. XV ...647-6, (Naval Ordnance Lab Research Rpt. 280), Jan. 1964. Dash, S.M., et. al., "Computer Code for HSCT Exhaust Flowfield Simulation and Observations

  3. Explosive turbulent magnetic reconnection.

    PubMed

    Higashimori, K; Yokoi, N; Hoshino, M

    2013-06-21

    We report simulation results for turbulent magnetic reconnection obtained using a newly developed Reynolds-averaged magnetohydrodynamics model. We find that the initial Harris current sheet develops in three ways, depending on the strength of turbulence: laminar reconnection, turbulent reconnection, and turbulent diffusion. The turbulent reconnection explosively converts the magnetic field energy into both kinetic and thermal energy of plasmas, and generates open fast reconnection jets. This fast turbulent reconnection is achieved by the localization of turbulent diffusion. Additionally, localized structure forms through the interaction of the mean field and turbulence.

  4. High efficiency stationary hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Hynek, S.; Fuller, W.; Truslow, S.

    1995-09-01

    Stationary storage of hydrogen permits one to make hydrogen now and use it later. With stationary hydrogen storage, one can use excess electrical generation capacity to power an electrolyzer, and store the resultant hydrogen for later use or transshipment. One can also use stationary hydrogen as a buffer at fueling stations to accommodate non-steady fueling demand, thus permitting the hydrogen supply system (e.g., methane reformer or electrolyzer) to be sized to meet the average, rather than the peak, demand. We at ADL designed, built, and tested a stationary hydrogen storage device that thermally couples a high-temperature metal hydride to a phase change material (PCM). The PCM captures and stores the heat of the hydriding reaction as its own heat of fusion (that is, it melts), and subsequently returns that heat of fusion (by freezing) to facilitate the dehydriding reaction. A key component of this stationary hydrogen storage device is the metal hydride itself. We used nickel-coated magnesium powder (NCMP) - magnesium particles coated with a thin layer of nickel by means of chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Magnesium hydride can store a higher weight fraction of hydrogen than any other practical metal hydride, and it is less expensive than any other metal hydride. We designed and constructed an experimental NCM/PCM reactor out of 310 stainless steel in the form of a shell-and-tube heat exchanger, with the tube side packed with NCMP and the shell side filled with a eutectic mixture of NaCL, KCl, and MgCl{sub 2}. Our experimental results indicate that with proper attention to limiting thermal losses, our overall efficiency will exceed 90% (DOE goal: >75%) and our overall system cost will be only 33% (DOE goal: <50%) of the value of the delivered hydrogen. It appears that NCMP can be used to purify hydrogen streams and store hydrogen at the same time. These prospects make the NCMP/PCM reactor an attractive component in a reformer-based hydrogen fueling station.

  5. Anisotropy, inhomogeneity and inertial-range scalings in turbulent convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincon, François

    2006-09-01

    This paper provides a detailed study of turbulent statistics and scale-by-scale budgets in turbulent Rayleigh Bénard convection. It aims at testing the applicability of Kolmogorov and Bolgiano theories in the case of turbulent convection and at improving the understanding of the underlying inertial-range scalings, for which a general agreement is still lacking. Particular emphasis is laid on anisotropic and inhomogeneous effects, which are often observed in turbulent convection between two differentially heated plates. For this purpose, the SO(3) decomposition of structure functions and a method of description of inhomogeneities are used to derive inhomogeneous and anisotropic generalizations of Kolmogorov and Yaglom equations applying to Rayleigh Bénard convection, which can be extended easily to other types of anisotropic and/or inhomogeneous flows. The various contributions to these equations are computed in and off the central plane of a convection cell using data produced by a direct numerical simulation of turbulent Boussinesq convection at Ra {=} 10(6) and Pr {=} 1 with aspect ratio A {=} 5. The analysis of the isotropic part of the Kolmogorov equation demonstrates that the shape of the third-order velocity structure function is significantly influenced by buoyancy forcing and large-scale inhomogeneities, while the isotropic part of the mixed third-order structure function <(Deltatheta)(2Deltavec{u}>) appearing in the Yaglom equation exhibits a clear scaling exponent 1 in a small range of scales. The magnitudes of the various low ℓ degree anisotropic components of the equations are also estimated and are shown to be comparable to their isotropic counterparts at moderate to large scales. The analysis of anisotropies notably reveals that computing reduced structure functions (structure functions computed at fixed depth for correlation vectors boldsymbol{r} lying in specific planes only) in order to reveal scaling exponents predicted by isotropic theories

  6. Ambient and Wake Turbulence Measurements at Marine Energy Sites from a Five Beam AD2CP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, M. A.; Thomson, J. M.

    2016-02-01

    Ambient turbulence at hydrokinetic energy sites is a key input for turbine design and for their performance determination. Added turbulence from rotating blades to the flow affects the environment surrounding the turbine and has an impact in turbine array distribution. We present two approaches of turbulence measurements: stationary and drifting. Stationary measurements allow for time and frequency analysis of turbulent velocities, while drifting measurements give a spatial characterization of turbulence. For both approaches we used the new five beam Nortek Signature AD2CP. This instrument captures turbulent flow along the water column at high sampling rates (8 Hz) with low Doppler noise level; the use of five beams also makes it possible to fully calculate the Reynolds Stresses. Both sets of measurements require Doppler noise removal for consistent results. Stationary measurements of ambient turbulence were carried out in Admiralty Inlet, WA, in May 2015. The Signature was deployed up looking on a sea spider tripod in a 50 m depth tidal channel during two tidal cycles. This data set allowed us to characterize the turbulence in terms of spectra and Reynolds Stresses in order to evaluate the turbulent kinetic energy balance along the water column and to compare results to other tidal energy sites with similar characteristics where turbulence measurements were taken as well. Drifting measurements of ambient and wake turbulence were conducted in the vicinity of the ORPC RivGen® turbine deployed on the Kvichak River in Alaska in July 2015. The Signature was mounted down looking onboard an anchor buoy equipped with two GPS data receivers for georefference. The cross-sectional river span was covered by releasing the drifter at different positions across the river. More than 300 drifts were performed to spatially characterize turbulence before and after turbine's deployment and grid connection. Results indicate an increased turbulent wake extending up to 75 m downstream

  7. Hierarchical structures in fully developed turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Li

    Analysis of the probability density functions (PDFs) of the velocity increment dvl and of their deformation is used to reveal the statistical structure of the intermittent energy cascade dynamics of turbulence. By analyzing a series of turbulent data sets including that of an experiment of fully developed low temperature helium turbulent gas flow (Belin, Tabeling, & Willaime, Physica D 93, 52, 1996), of a three-dimensional isotropic Navier-Stokes simulation with a resolution of 2563 (Cao, Chen, & She, Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 3711, 1996) and of a GOY shell model simulation (Leveque & She, Phys. Rev. E 55, 1997) of a very big sample size (up to 5 billions), the validity of the Hierarchical Structure model (She & Leveque, Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 366, 1994) for the inertial-range is firmly demonstrated. Furthermore, it is shown that parameters in the Hierarchical Structure model can be reliably measured and used to characterize the cascade process. The physical interpretations of the parameters then allow to describe differential changes in different turbulent systems so as to address non-universal features of turbulent systems. It is proposed that the above study provides a framework for the study of non-homogeneous turbulence. A convergence study of moments and scaling exponents is also carried out with detailed analysis of effects of finite statistical sample size. A quantity Pmin is introduced to characterize the resolution of a PDF, and hence the sample size. The fact that any reported scaling exponent depends on the PDF resolution suggests that the validation (or rejection) of a model of turbulence needs to carry out a resolution dependence analysis on its scaling prediction.

  8. Active Colloids in Isotropic and Anisotropic Electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Chenhui

    Electrically driven flows of fluids with respect to solid surfaces (electro-osmosis) and transport of particles in fluids (electrophoresis), collectively called electrokinetics, is a technologically important area of modern science. In this thesis, we study the electrokinetic phenomena in both isotropic and anisotropic fluids. A necessary condition of electrokinetics is separation of electric charges in space. In classic linear electrokinetics, with an isotropic electrolyte such as water, the charges are separated through dissociation of ionic groups at the solid-fluid interface; presence of the electric field is not required. In the nonlinear electrokinetics, the charges are separated with the assistance of the electric field. In the so-called induced-charge electro-osmosis (ICEO) the electric field separates charges near strongly polarizable surfaces such as metals. We establish the patterns of electro-osmotic velocities caused by nonlinear ICEO around an immobilized metallic and Janus (metallic-dielectric) spheres placed in water. In the case of the Janus particles, the flows are asymmetric, which results in pumping of water around the particle if it is immobilized, or in electrophoresis is the particle is free. When the isotropic electrolyte such as water is replaced with a LC electrolyte, the mechanism of the field-assisted charge separation becomes very different. Namely, the charges are separated at the director gradients, thanks to the anisotropy of electric conductivity and dielectric permittivity of the LC. These distortions can be created by the colloidal particles placed in the LC. We demonstrate the occurrence of nonlinear LC-enabled electro-osmosis (LCEO) by studying the flow patterns around colloidal spheres with different surface anchoring. LCEO velocities grow with the square of the electric field, which allows one to use an AC field to drive steady flows and to avoid electrode damage. Director distortions needed to trigger the LCEO can also be

  9. A formal derivation of the local energy transfer (LET) theory of homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McComb, W. D.; Yoffe, S. R.

    2017-09-01

    A statistical closure of the Navier-Stokes hierarchy which leads to equations for the two-point, two-time covariance of the velocity field for stationary, homogeneous isotropic turbulence is presented. It is a generalisation of the self-consistent field method due to Edwards (1964) for the stationary, single-time velocity covariance. The probability distribution functional P≤ft[\\mathbf{u},t\\right] is obtained, in the form of a series, from the Liouville equation by means of a perturbation expansion about a Gaussian distribution, which is chosen to give the exact two-point, two-time covariance. The triple moment is calculated in terms of an ensemble-averaged infinitesimal velocity-field propagator, and shown to yield the Edwards result as a special case. The use of a Gaussian zero-order distribution has been found to justify the introduction of a fluctuation-response relation, which is in accord with modern dynamical theories. In a sense this work completes the analogy drawn by Edwards between turbulence and Brownian motion. Originally Edwards had shown that the noise input was determined by the correlation of the velocity field with the externally applied stirring forces but was unable to determine the system response. Now we find that the system response is determined by the correlation of the velocity field with internal quasi-entropic forces. This analysis is valid to all orders of perturbation theory, and allows the recovery of the local energy transfer (LET) theory, which had previously been derived by more heuristical methods. The LET theory is known to be in good agreement with experimental results. It is also unique among two-point statistical closures in displaying an acceptable (i.e. non-Markovian) relationship between the transfer spectrum and the system response, in accordance with experimental results. As a result of the latter property, it is compatible with the Kolmogorov (K41) spectral phenomenology. In memory of Professor Sir Sam Edwards F

  10. Theoretical and experimental plastic strain ratios in planar isotropic textures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Insoo

    1996-06-01

    The plastic strain ratios of planar isotropic sheet specimens were studied by using unidirectionally solidified commercial Al. Sn and Al-Cu alloy sheets and Cu sheets electrodeposited under the various electrolysis conditions. The measured plastic strain ratios of [100] planar isotropic sheets by using unidirectionally solidified Al and Al-Cu alloy are about 0.17-0.52, that of [110] planar isotropic sheets using unidirectionally solidified Sn(BCT) are about 2.5, that of [110] planar isotropic sheets using electrodeposited Cu are 1.38-2.05 and that of [111] planar isotropic sheets using electrodeposited Cu are 2.61-2.85. There is a substantial discrepancy between the experimental plastic strain ratios which are measured from planar isotropic sheets and theoretical plastic strain ratios which are calculated by Backofen method and Bunge method, but the measured plastic strain ratio of [100] planar isotropic sheet using unidirectionally solidified Al and Al-Cu alloy is in good agreement with Bunge method and the measured plastic strain ratio of [110] and [111] planar isotropic sheets using electrodeposited Cu are in good agreement with Backofen method.

  11. The effects of particle loading on turbulence structure and modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squires, Kyle D.; Eaton, J. K.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the present research was to extend the Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) approach to particle-laden turbulent flows using a simple model of particle/flow interaction. The program addressed the simplest type of flow, homogeneous, isotropic turbulence, and examined interactions between the particles and gas phase turbulence. The specific range of problems examined include those in which the particle is much smaller than the smallest length scales of the turbulence yet heavy enough to slip relative to the flow. The particle mass loading is large enough to have a significant impact on the turbulence, while the volume loading was small enough such that particle-particle interactions could be neglected. Therefore, these simulations are relevant to practical problems involving small, dense particles conveyed by turbulent gas flows at moderate loadings. A sample of the results illustrating modifications of the particle concentration field caused by the turbulence structure is presented and attenuation of turbulence by the particle cloud is also illustrated.

  12. Clustering of settling charged particles in turbulence: theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jiang; Nordsiek, Hansen; Shaw, Raymond A.

    2010-12-01

    Atmospheric clouds, electrosprays and protoplanetary nebula (dusty plasma) contain electrically charged particles embedded in turbulent flows, often under the influence of an externally imposed, approximately uniform gravitational or electric force. We have developed a theoretical description of the dynamics of such systems of charged, sedimenting particles in turbulence, allowing radial distribution functions (RDFs) to be predicted for both monodisperse and bidisperse particle size distributions. The governing parameters are the particle Stokes number (particle inertial time scale relative to turbulence dissipation time scale), the Coulomb-turbulence parameter (ratio of Coulomb 'terminal' speed to the turbulence dissipation velocity scale) and the settling parameter (the ratio of the gravitational terminal speed to the turbulence dissipation velocity scale). The theory is compared to measured RDFs for water particles in homogeneous, isotropic air turbulence. The RDFs are obtained from particle positions measured in three dimensions using digital holography. The measurements verify the general theoretical expression, consisting of a power law increase in particle clustering due to particle response to dissipative turbulent eddies, modulated by an exponential electrostatic interaction term. Both terms are modified as a result of the gravitational diffusion-like term, and the role of 'gravity' is explored by imposing a macroscopic uniform electric field to create an enhanced, effective gravity.

  13. Anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in a strong external magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D.; Turner, L.

    1981-01-01

    A strong external dc magnetic field introduces a basic anisotropy in incompressible MHD turbulence. The modifications that this is likely to produce in the properties of the turbulence are investigated for high Reynolds numbers. It is found that the turbulent spectrum splits into two parts: (1) an essentially two-dimensional spectrum with both the velocity field and the magnetic fluctuations perpendicular to the dc magnetic field, and (2) a generally weaker and more nearly isotropic spectrum of Alfven waves. These results are discussed in relation to measurements from the Culham-Harwell Zeta pinch device and the UCLA Macrorotor tokamak, as well as in relation to measurements of MHD turbulence in the solar wind.

  14. Anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in a strong external magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D.; Turner, L.

    1981-01-01

    A strong external dc magnetic field introduces a basic anisotropy into incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. The modifications that this is likely to produce in the properties of the turbulence are explored for the high Reynolds number case. The conclusion is reached that the turbulent spectrum splits into two parts: an essentially two dimensional spectrum with both the velocity field and magnetic fluctuations perpendicular to the dc magnetic field, and a generally weaker and more nearly isotropic spectrum of Alfven waves. A minimal characterization of the spectral density tensors is given. Similarities to measurements from the Culham-Harwell Zeta pinch device and the UCLA Macrotor Tokamak are remarked upon, as are certain implications for the Belcher and Davis measurements of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the solar wind.

  15. Methods of separation of variables in turbulence theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuge, S.

    1978-01-01

    Two schemes of closing turbulent moment equations are proposed both of which make double correlation equations separated into single-point equations. The first is based on neglected triple correlation, leading to an equation differing from small perturbed gasdynamic equations where the separation constant appears as the frequency. Grid-produced turbulence is described in this light as time-independent, cylindrically-isotropic turbulence. Application to wall turbulence guided by a new asymptotic method for the Orr-Sommerfeld equation reveals a neutrally stable mode of essentially three dimensional nature. The second closure scheme is based on an assumption of identity of the separated variables through which triple and quadruple correlations are formed. The resulting equation adds, to its equivalent of the first scheme, an integral of nonlinear convolution in the frequency describing a role due to triple correlation of direct energy-cascading.

  16. Influence of initial mean helicity on homogeneous turbulent shear flow.

    PubMed

    Jacobitz, Frank G; Schneider, Kai; Bos, Wouter J T; Farge, Marie

    2011-11-01

    Helicity statistics are studied in homogeneous turbulent shear flow. Initial mean helicity is imposed on an isotropic turbulence field using a decomposition of the flow into complex-valued helical waves. The initial decay of the turbulent kinetic energy is weakened in the presence of strong mean helicity, consistent with an analytic analysis of the spectral tensor of velocity correlations. While exponential growth of the mean turbulent kinetic energy is obtained, the mean helicity decays. Probability distribution functions (PDFs) of helicity are skewed and show that the imposed mean helicity prevails throughout the simulations. A wavelet-based scale-dependent analysis shows a trend to two dimensionalization for large scales of motion and a preference for helical motion at small scales. The magnitude of the skewness of the PDFs decreases for smaller scales. Joint PDFs indicate a strong correlation of the signs of both, helicity and superhelicity, for all cases. This correlation supports the conjecture that superhelicity dissipates helicity.

  17. Accelerative propagation and explosion triggering by expanding turbulent premixed flames.

    PubMed

    Akkerman, V'yacheslav; Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Law, Chung K

    2013-02-01

    The dynamics and morphology of outwardly propagating, accelerating turbulent premixed flames and the effect of flame acceleration on explosion triggering are analyzed. Guided by recent theoretical results and substantiated by experiments, we find that an expanding flame front in an externally forced, near-isotropic turbulent environment exhibits accelerative propagation given by a well-defined power law based on the average global flame radius. In this context the limits of the power-law exponent and the effective turbulence intensity experienced by the flame are derived. The power-law exponent is found to be substantially larger than that for the hydrodynamically unstable cellular laminar flames, hence facilitating the possibility of detonation triggering in turbulent environments. For large length scales, hydrodynamic instability is expected to provide additional acceleration, thus further favoring the attainment of detonation triggering.

  18. Spatiotemporal velocity-velocity correlation function in fully developed turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canet, Léonie; Rossetto, Vincent; Wschebor, Nicolás; Balarac, Guillaume

    2017-02-01

    Turbulence is a ubiquitous phenomenon in natural and industrial flows. Since the celebrated work of Kolmogorov in 1941, understanding the statistical properties of fully developed turbulence has remained a major quest. In particular, deriving the properties of turbulent flows from a mesoscopic description, that is, from the Navier-Stokes equation, has eluded most theoretical attempts. Here, we provide a theoretical prediction for the functional space and time dependence of the velocity-velocity correlation function of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence from the field theory associated to the Navier-Stokes equation with stochastic forcing. This prediction, which goes beyond Kolmogorov theory, is the analytical fixed point solution of nonperturbative renormalization group flow equations, which are exact in the limit of large wave numbers. This solution is compared to two-point two-times correlation functions computed in direct numerical simulations. We obtain a remarkable agreement both in the inertial and in the dissipative ranges.

  19. Numerical simulation of turbulence in the presence of shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaanan, S.; Ferziger, J. H.; Reynolds, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    The numerical calculations are presented of the large eddy structure of turbulent flows, by use of the averaged Navier-Stokes equations, where averages are taken over spatial regions small compared to the size of the computational grid. The subgrid components of motion are modeled by a local eddy-viscosity model. A new finite-difference scheme is proposed to represent the nonlinear average advective term which has fourth-order accuracy. This scheme exhibits several advantages over existing schemes with regard to the following: (1) the scheme is compact as it extends only one point away in each direction from the point to which it is applied; (2) it gives better resolution for high wave-number waves in the solution of Poisson equation, and (3) it reduces programming complexity and computation time. Examples worked out in detail are the decay of isotropic turbulence, homogeneous turbulent shear flow, and homogeneous turbulent shear flow with system rotation.

  20. The use of direct numerical simulation data in turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansour, N. N.

    1991-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent flows provide a complete data base to develop and to test turbulence models. In this article, the progress made in developing models for the dissipation rate equation is reviewed. New scaling arguments for the various terms in the dissipation rate equation were tested using data from DNS of homogeneous shear flows. Modifications to the epsilon-equation model that take into account near-wall effects were developed using DNS of turbulent channel flows. Testing of new models for flows under mean compression was carried out using data from DNS of isotropically compressed turbulence. In all of these studies the data from the simulations was essential in guiding the model development. The next generation of DNS will be at higher Reynolds numbers, and will undoubtedly lead to improved models for computations of flows of practical interest.

  1. Spectral characteristics of interchange turbulence in the ionosphere. Memorandum report

    SciTech Connect

    Hassam, A.B.; Hall, W.; Huba, J.D.; Keskinen, M.J.

    1986-10-22

    The spectral characteristics of turbulence associated with the magnetized-plasma Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the presence of a background neutral gas are studied. Particular attention is paid to comparing the spectra obtained in the ion-neutral collision-dominated case with the spectra from the ion inertia-dominated case. A saturated level of turbulence is obtained for a model system confined between conducting boundaries with an imposed density gradient between the boundaries. The potential spectrum in the collisional case shows a marked anisotropy in contrast to that in the inertial case which is isotropic and exhibits Kolmogorov scaling. The anisotropy in the collisional case is attributed to the viscous nature of the turbulence and the consequent suppression of inertial overshoots. Application of these results to ionospheric turbulence is discussed.

  2. Aspects of Turbulent / Non-Turbulent Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bisset, D. K.; Hunt, J. C. R.; Rogers, M. M.; Koen, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    A distinct boundary between turbulent and non-turbulent regions in a fluid of otherwise constant properties is found in many laboratory and engineering turbulent flows, including jets, mixing layers, boundary layers and wakes. Generally, the flow has mean shear in at least one direction within t he turbulent zone, but the non-turbulent zones have no shear (adjacent laminar shear is a different case, e.g. transition in a boundary layer). There may be purely passive differences between the turbulent and non-turbulent zones, e.g. small variations in temperature or scalar concentration, for which turbulent mixing is an important issue. The boundary has several major characteristics of interest for the present study. Firstly, the boundary advances into the non-turbulent fluid, or in other words, nonturbulent fluid is entrained. Secondly, the change in turbulence properties across the boundary is remarkably abrupt; strong turbulent motions come close to the nonturbulent fluid, promoting entrainment. Thirdly, the boundary is irregular with a continually changing convoluted shape, which produces statistical intermittency. Its shape is contorted at all scales of the turbulent motion.

  3. Turbulence and turbulent mixing in natural fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl H.

    2010-12-01

    Turbulence and turbulent mixing in natural fluids begin with big bang turbulence powered by spinning combustible combinations of Planck particles and Planck antiparticles. Particle prograde accretions on a spinning pair release 42% of the particle rest mass energy to produce more fuel for turbulent combustion. Negative viscous stresses and negative turbulence stresses work against gravity, extracting mass-energy and space-time from the vacuum. Turbulence mixes cooling temperatures until strong-force viscous stresses freeze out turbulent mixing patterns as the first fossil turbulence. Cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies show big bang turbulence fossils along with fossils of weak plasma turbulence triggered as plasma photon-viscous forces permitting gravitational fragmentation on supercluster to galaxy mass scales. Turbulent morphologies and viscous-turbulent lengths appear as linear gas-protogalaxy-clusters in the Hubble ultra-deep field at z~7. Protogalaxies fragment into Jeans mass clumps of primordial-gas planets at decoupling: the dark matter of galaxies. Shortly after the plasma-to-gas transition, planet mergers produce stars that explode on overfeeding to fertilize and distribute the first life.

  4. Compressibility effects on turbulent mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panickacheril John, John; Donzis, Diego

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the effect of compressibility on passive scalar mixing in isotropic turbulence with a focus on the fundamental mechanisms that are responsible for such effects using a large Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) database. The database includes simulations with Taylor Reynolds number (Rλ) up to 100, turbulent Mach number (Mt) between 0.1 and 0.6 and Schmidt number (Sc) from 0.5 to 1.0. We present several measures of mixing efficiency on different canonical flows to robustly identify compressibility effects. We found that, like shear layers, mixing is reduced as Mach number increases. However, data also reveal a non-monotonic trend with Mt. To assess directly the effect of dilatational motions we also present results with both dilatational and soleniodal forcing. Analysis suggests that a small fraction of dilatational forcing decreases mixing time at higher Mt. Scalar spectra collapse when normalized by Batchelor variables which suggests that a compressive mechanism similar to Batchelor mixing in incompressible flows might be responsible for better mixing at high Mt and with dilatational forcing compared to pure solenoidal mixing. We also present results on scalar budgets, in particular on production and dissipation. Support from NSF is gratefully acknowledged.

  5. Nonlinear elastic inclusions in isotropic solids

    PubMed Central

    Yavari, Arash; Goriely, Alain

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a geometric framework to calculate the residual stress fields and deformations of nonlinear solids with inclusions and eigenstrains. Inclusions are regions in a body with different reference configurations from the body itself and can be described by distributed eigenstrains. Geometrically, the eigenstrains define a Riemannian 3-manifold in which the body is stress-free by construction. The problem of residual stress calculation is then reduced to finding a mapping from the Riemannian material manifold to the ambient Euclidean space. Using this construction, we find the residual stress fields of three model systems with spherical and cylindrical symmetries in both incompressible and compressible isotropic elastic solids. In particular, we consider a finite spherical ball with a spherical inclusion with uniform pure dilatational eigenstrain and we show that the stress in the inclusion is uniform and hydrostatic. We also show how singularities in the stress distribution emerge as a consequence of a mismatch between radial and circumferential eigenstrains at the centre of a sphere or the axis of a cylinder. PMID:24353470

  6. Crossover from isotropic to directed percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zongzheng; Yang, Ji; Ziff, Robert M.; Deng, Youjin

    2012-08-01

    We generalize the directed percolation (DP) model by relaxing the strict directionality of DP such that propagation can occur in either direction but with anisotropic probabilities. We denote the probabilities as p↓=ppd and p↑=p(1-pd), with p representing the average occupation probability and pd controlling the anisotropy. The Leath-Alexandrowicz method is used to grow a cluster from an active seed site. We call this model with two main growth directions biased directed percolation (BDP). Standard isotropic percolation (IP) and DP are the two limiting cases of the BDP model, corresponding to pd=1/2 and pd=0,1 respectively. In this work, besides IP and DP, we also consider the 1/2

  7. Constitutive modeling for isotropic materials (HOST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, Ulric S.; Chan, Kwai S.; Bodner, S. R.; Weber, R. M.; Walker, K. P.; Cassenti, B. N.

    1984-01-01

    The results of the first year of work on a program to validate unified constitutive models for isotropic materials utilized in high temperature regions of gas turbine engines and to demonstrate their usefulness in computing stress-strain-time-temperature histories in complex three-dimensional structural components. The unified theories combine all inelastic strain-rate components in a single term avoiding, for example, treating plasticity and creep as separate response phenomena. An extensive review of existing unified theories is given and numerical methods for integrating these stiff time-temperature-dependent constitutive equations are discussed. Two particular models, those developed by Bodner and Partom and by Walker, were selected for more detailed development and evaluation against experimental tensile, creep and cyclic strain tests on specimens of a cast nickel base alloy, B19000+Hf. Initial results comparing computed and test results for tensile and cyclic straining for temperature from ambient to 982 C and strain rates from 10(exp-7) 10(exp-3) s(exp-1) are given. Some preliminary date correlations are presented also for highly non-proportional biaxial loading which demonstrate an increase in biaxial cyclic hardening rate over uniaxial or proportional loading conditions. Initial work has begun on the implementation of both constitutive models in the MARC finite element computer code.

  8. Microplane constitutive model for porous isotropic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baant, Zdenk P.; Zi, Goangseup

    2003-01-01

    The paper deals with constitutive modelling of contiguous rock located between rock joints. A fully explicit kinematically constrained microplane-type constitutive model for hardening and softening non-linear triaxial behaviour of isotropic porous rock is developed. The microplane framework, in which the constitutive relation is expressed in terms of stress and strain vectors rather than tensors, makes it possible to model various microstructural physical mechanisms associated with oriented internal surfaces, such as cracking, slip, friction and splitting of a particular orientation. Formulation of the constitutive relation is facilitated by the fact that it is decoupled from the tensorial invariance restrictions, which are satisfied automatically. In its basic features, the present model is similar to the recently developed microplane model M4 for concrete, but there are significant improvements and modifications. They include a realistic simulation of (1) the effects of pore collapse on the volume changes during triaxial loading and on the reduction of frictional strength, (2) recovery of frictional strength during shearing, and (3) the shear-enhanced compaction in triaxial tests, manifested by a deviation from the hydrostatic stress-strain curve. The model is calibrated by optimal fitting of extensive triaxial test data for Salem limestone, and good fits are demonstrated. Although these data do not cover the entire range of behaviour, credence in broad capabilities of the model is lend by its similarity to model M4 for concrete - an artificial rock. The model is intended for large explicit finite-element programs.

  9. Constitutive modeling for isotropic materials (HOST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, U. S.; Chan, K. S.; Bodner, S. R.; Weber, R. M.; Walker, K. P.; Cassenti, B. N.

    1985-01-01

    This report presents the results of the second year of work on a problem which is part of the NASA HOST Program. Its goals are: (1) to develop and validate unified constitutive models for isotropic materials, and (2) to demonstrate their usefulness for structural analyses of hot section components of gas turbine engines. The unified models selected for development and evaluation are that of Bodner-Partom and Walker. For model evaluation purposes, a large constitutive data base is generated for a B1900 + Hf alloy by performing uniaxial tensile, creep, cyclic, stress relation, and thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) tests as well as biaxial (tension/torsion) tests under proportional and nonproportional loading over a wide range of strain rates and temperatures. Systematic approaches for evaluating material constants from a small subset of the data base are developed. Correlations of the uniaxial and biaxial tests data with the theories of Bodner-Partom and Walker are performed to establish the accuracy, range of applicability, and integability of the models. Both models are implemented in the MARC finite element computer code and used for TMF analyses. Benchmark notch round experiments are conducted and the results compared with finite-element analyses using the MARC code and the Walker model.

  10. Isotropical conductive adhesives filled with silver nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Y.; Xia, Y. P.; Zhang, G. Q.; Wu, H. P.; Tao, G. L.

    2009-07-01

    In this study, a solution-phase method was demonstrated to generate silver (Ag) nanowires with diameters in the range of 30~50nm and lengths of up to ~50μm, which was proceed by reducing silver nitrate with ethylene glycol in the presence of poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP). Fundamental material characterizations including X-ray diffraction transmission electro microscopy (TEM) and scanning electro microscopy (SEM) were conducted on these Ag nanowires. A novel kind of isotropical conductive adhesives (ICA) was prepared by using these Ag nanowires as conductive filler. Electrical property including bulk resistivity and mechanical property including shear strength were investigated and compared with that of conventional ICA filled with micrometer-sized Ag particles or nanometer-sized Ag particles. The average diameter of these Ag particles is about 1μm and 100 nm respectively. The results shown that ICA filled Ag nanowires exhibited higher conductivity, higher shear strength and low percolation threshold value than traditional ICA. Possible conductive mechanism was discussed based on theory calculation.

  11. Centrifugal acceleration in the isotropic photon field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhtadze, G. G.; Berezhiani, V. I.; Osmanov, Z.

    In this paper, we study centrifugal acceleration of particles moving along a prescribed rotating curved trajectories. We consider the physical system embedded in an isotropic photon field and study the influence of the photon drag force on the acceleration process. For this purpose, we study three major configurations of the field lines: the straight line, the Archimede spiral and the dipolar field line configuration. By analyzing dynamics of particles sliding along the field lines in the equatorial plane, we have found several interesting features of motion. In particular, it has been shown that for rectilinear field lines, the particles reach the light cylinder (area where the linear velocity of rotation exactly equals the speed of light) zone relatively slowly for bigger drag forces. Considering the Archimedes’ spiral, we have found that in cases when the field lines lag behind the rotation, the particles achieve the force-free regime of dynamics regardless of the drag force. Unlike this scenario, when the spiral is oriented in an opposite direction, the particles do not reach the force free regime, but tend to stable equilibrium locations.

  12. Isotropic microscale mechanical properties of coral skeletons

    PubMed Central

    Pasquini, Luca; Molinari, Alan; Fantazzini, Paola; Dauphen, Yannicke; Cuif, Jean-Pierre; Levy, Oren; Dubinsky, Zvy; Caroselli, Erik; Prada, Fiorella; Goffredo, Stefano; Di Giosia, Matteo; Reggi, Michela; Falini, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Scleractinian corals are a major source of biogenic calcium carbonate, yet the relationship between their skeletal microstructure and mechanical properties has been scarcely studied. In this work, the skeletons of two coral species: solitary Balanophyllia europaea and colonial Stylophora pistillata, were investigated by nanoindentation. The hardness HIT and Young's modulus EIT were determined from the analysis of several load–depth data on two perpendicular sections of the skeletons: longitudinal (parallel to the main growth axis) and transverse. Within the experimental and statistical uncertainty, the average values of the mechanical parameters are independent on the section's orientation. The hydration state of the skeletons did not affect the mechanical properties. The measured values, EIT in the 76–77 GPa range, and HIT in the 4.9–5.1 GPa range, are close to the ones expected for polycrystalline pure aragonite. Notably, a small difference in HIT is observed between the species. Different from corals, single-crystal aragonite and the nacreous layer of the seashell Atrina rigida exhibit clearly orientation-dependent mechanical properties. The homogeneous and isotropic mechanical behaviour of the coral skeletons at the microscale is correlated with the microstructure, observed by electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, and with the X-ray diffraction patterns of the longitudinal and transverse sections. PMID:25977958

  13. Analytical investigation of stratified isotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vytovtov, Konstantin A.

    2005-04-01

    A rigorous analytical approach for investigating a stratified medium with an arbitrary finite number of homogeneous isotropic layers in a period is developed. The approach is based on the translation matrix method. It is well known that the translation matrix for a period must be found as the product of the layer matrices. It is proved that this matrix can be represented as a finite sum of trigonometric matrices, and thus the dispersion relation of a stratified medium is written in an analytical form. All final expressions are obtained in terms of the constitutive parameters. To this author's knowledge, this is the first time that the new sign function that allows us to develop the presented analytical results has been described. The condition of the existence of a wave with an arbitrary period divisible by a structure period is found in analytical form. It is proved that changing the layer arrangement within the period does not affect the structure of the transmission and absorption bands.

  14. Development of renormalization group analysis of turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. M.

    1990-01-01

    The renormalization group (RG) procedure for nonlinear, dissipative systems is now quite standard, and its applications to the problem of hydrodynamic turbulence are becoming well known. In summary, the RG method isolates self similar behavior and provides a systematic procedure to describe scale invariant dynamics in terms of large scale variables only. The parameterization of the small scales in a self consistent manner has important implications for sub-grid modeling. This paper develops the homogeneous, isotropic turbulence and addresses the meaning and consequence of epsilon-expansion. The theory is then extended to include a weak mean flow and application of the RG method to a sequence of models is shown to converge to the Navier-Stokes equations.

  15. Multiscale equations for strongly stratified turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chini, Greg; Rocha, Cesar; Julien, Keith; Caulfield, Colm-Cille

    2016-11-01

    Strongly stratified turbulent shear flows are of fundamental importance owing to their widespread occurrence and their impact on diabatic mixing, yet direct numerical simulations of such flows remain challenging. Here, a reduced, multiscale description of turbulent shear flows in the presence of strong stable density stratification is derived via asymptotic analysis of the governing Boussinesq equations. The analysis explicitly recognizes the occurrence of dynamics on disparate spatiotemoporal scales, and yields simplified partial differential equations governing the coupled evolution of slowly-evolving small aspect-ratio ('pancake') modes and isotropic, strongly non-hydrostatic stratified-shear (e.g. Kelvin-Helmholtz) instability modes. The reduced model is formally valid in the physically-relevant regime in which the aspect-ratio of the pancake structures tends to zero in direct proportion to the horizontal Froude number. Relative to the full Boussinesq equations, the model offers both computational and conceptual advantages.

  16. Energy spectra in elasto-inertial turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, P. C.; da Silva, C. B.; Pinho, F. T.

    2016-07-01

    Direct numerical simulations of statistically steady homogeneous isotropic turbulence in viscoelastic fluids described by the FENE-P model are presented. Emphasis is given to large polymer relaxation times compared to the eddy turnover time, which is a regime recently termed elasto-inertial turbulence. In this regime the polymers are ineffective in dissipating kinetic energy but they play a lead role in transferring kinetic energy to the small solvent scales which turns out to be concomitant with the depletion of the usual non-linear energy cascade. However, we show that the non-linear interactions are still highly active, but they lead to no net downscale energy transfer because the forward and reversed energy cascades are nearly balanced. Finally, we show that the tendency for a steeper elasto-inertial power-law spectra is reversed for large polymer relaxation times and the spectra tend towards the usual k-5/3 functional form.

  17. Vortex statistics in turbulent channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsas, José Hugo; Augusto Moriconi, Luca Roberto

    2016-11-01

    In order to address the role of coherent structures in wall bounded turbulence, we study the statistics of morphological and kinematic properties of vortices, such as circulation, radius and height distributions. To accomplish that, we introduce a novel vortex identification method named as "vorticity curvature criterion" which is based on the local properties of the vorticity field. We furthermore employ a background subtraction procedure to remove shearing background effects expected to be present in the topology of the streamwise/wall-normal plane flow configurations. We discuss, through a comparative study of performance with the usual swirling strength criterion, and extending the previous analyses to the detection of coherent structures in the spanwise/wall normal planes, isotropization issues for the paradigmatic case of numerical turbulent channel flows. We acknowledge the funding from CNPq, CAPES and Faperj.

  18. Development of renormalization group analysis of turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. M.

    1990-01-01

    The renormalization group (RG) procedure for nonlinear, dissipative systems is now quite standard, and its applications to the problem of hydrodynamic turbulence are becoming well known. In summary, the RG method isolates self similar behavior and provides a systematic procedure to describe scale invariant dynamics in terms of large scale variables only. The parameterization of the small scales in a self consistent manner has important implications for sub-grid modeling. This paper develops the homogeneous, isotropic turbulence and addresses the meaning and consequence of epsilon-expansion. The theory is then extended to include a weak mean flow and application of the RG method to a sequence of models is shown to converge to the Navier-Stokes equations.

  19. The analysis and modeling of dilatational terms in compressible turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkar, S.; Erlebacher, G.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Kreiss, H. O.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that the dilatational terms that need to be modeled in compressible turbulence include not only the pressure-dilatation term but also another term - the compressible dissipation. The nature of these dilatational terms in homogeneous turbulence is explored by asymptotic analysis of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. A non-dimensional parameter which characterizes some compressible effects in moderate Mach number, homogeneous turbulence is identified. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of isotropic, compressible turbulence are performed, and their results are found to be in agreement with the theoretical analysis. A model for the compressible dissipation is proposed; the model is based on the asymptotic analysis and the direct numerical simulations. This model is calibrated with reference to the DNS results regarding the influence of compressibility on the decay rate of isotropic turbulence. An application of the proposed model to the compressible mixing layer has shown that the model is able to predict the dramatically reduced growth rate of the compressible mixing layer.

  20. Modeling Rotating Turbulent Flows with the Body Force Potential Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Amitabh; Perot, Blair

    2000-11-01

    Like a Reynolds Stress Transport equation model, the turbulent potential model has an explicit Coriolis acceleration term that appears in the model that accounts for rotation effects. In this work the additional secondary effects that system rotation has on the dissipation rate, return-to-isotropy, and fast pressure strain terms are also included in the model. The resulting model is tested in the context of rotating isotropic turbulence, rotating homogeneous shear flow, rotating channel flow, and swirling pipe flow. Many of the model changes are applicable to Reynolds stress transport equation models. All model modifications are frame indifferent.

  1. MEASUREMENTS AND COMPUTATIONS OF FUEL DROPLET TRANSPORT IN TURBULENT FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Katz and Omar Knio

    2007-01-10

    The objective of this project is to study the dynamics of fuel droplets in turbulent water flows. The results are essential for development of models capable of predicting the dispersion of slightly light/heavy droplets in isotropic turbulence. Since we presently do not have any experimental data on turbulent diffusion of droplets, existing mixing models have no physical foundations. Such fundamental knowledge is essential for understanding/modeling the environmental problems associated with water-fuel mixing, and/or industrial processes involving mixing of immiscible fluids. The project has had experimental and numerical components: 1. The experimental part of the project has had two components. The first involves measurements of the lift and drag forces acting on a droplet being entrained by a vortex. The experiments and data analysis associated with this phase are still in progress, and the facility, constructed specifically for this project is described in Section 3. In the second and main part, measurements of fuel droplet dispersion rates have been performed in a special facility with controlled isotropic turbulence. As discussed in detail in Section 2, quantifying and modeling the of droplet dispersion rate requires measurements of their three dimensional trajectories in turbulent flows. To obtain the required data, we have introduced a new technique - high-speed, digital Holographic Particle Image Velocimetry (HPIV). The technique, experimental setup and results are presented in Section 2. Further information is available in Gopalan et al. (2005, 2006). 2. The objectives of the numerical part are: (1) to develop a computational code that combines DNS of isotropic turbulence with Lagrangian tracking of particles based on integration of a dynamical equation of motion that accounts for pressure, added mass, lift and drag forces, (2) to perform extensive computations of both buoyant (bubbles) and slightly buoyant (droplets) particles in turbulence conditions

  2. Determining the alpha dynamo parameter in incompressible homogeneous magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Goldstein, M. L.; Lantz, S. R.

    1983-01-01

    Alpha, an important parameter in dynamo theory, is proportional to either the kinetic, current, magnetic, or velocity helicity of the fluctuating magnetic field and fluctuating velocity field. The particular helicity to which alpha is proportional depends on the assumptions used in deriving the first order smoothed equations that describe the alpha effect. In two cases, when alpha is proportional to either the magnetic helicity or velocity helicity, alpha is determined experimentally from two point measurements of the fluctuating fields in incompressible, homogeneous turbulence having arbitrary symmetry. For the other two possibilities, alpha is determined if the turbulence is isotropic.

  3. Three-dimensional time dependent computation of turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, D.; Reynolds, W. C.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    The three-dimensional, primitive equations of motion are solved numerically for the case of isotropic box turbulence and the distortion of homogeneous turbulence by irrotational plane strain at large Reynolds numbers. A Gaussian filter is applied to governing equations to define the large scale field. This gives rise to additional second order computed scale stresses (Leonard stresses). The residual stresses are simulated through an eddy viscosity. Uniform grids are used, with a fourth order differencing scheme in space and a second order Adams-Bashforth predictor for explicit time stepping. The results are compared to the experiments and statistical information extracted from the computer generated data.

  4. Implicit Large-Eddy Simulation of Transition and Turbulence Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinstein, Fernando

    2014-11-01

    In ILES, energy-containing large scales are resolved, and physics capturing numerics are used to spatially filter-out unresolved scales and implicitly model subgrid scale effects. Analysis of transition and decay in the ILES context are the focus of the present work. Euler based ILES is based on using the LANL RAGE code with triple-periodic boundary conditions on evenly spaced grids involving 64, 128, 256, and 512 cells in each direction; Navier-Stokes based isotropic turbulence data generated with the CFDNS code provided initial conditions for ILES. Effects of grid resolution on the ILES unsteady turbulence measures are examined in detail.

  5. Statistical turbulence theory and turbulence phenomenology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The application of deductive turbulence theory for validity determination of turbulence phenomenology at the level of second-order, single-point moments is considered. Particular emphasis is placed on the phenomenological formula relating the dissipation to the turbulence energy and the Rotta-type formula for the return to isotropy. Methods which deal directly with most or all the scales of motion explicitly are reviewed briefly. The statistical theory of turbulence is presented as an expansion about randomness. Two concepts are involved: (1) a modeling of the turbulence as nearly multipoint Gaussian, and (2) a simultaneous introduction of a generalized eddy viscosity operator.

  6. Study of Lagrangian characteristic times using direct numerical simulation of turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C. H.; Bertoglio, J.-P.; Squires, K.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1987-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations and large eddy simulations of homogeneous isotropic turbulence are used to compute Lagrangian statistics of turbulence and, in particular, its time scales. The computed time scales are compared with the spectral times scales that are frequently used in Eddy Damped Quasi-Normal Markovian calculations of the spectrum. The time scale models are rather good at high wavenumber and the results point to directions for improvement of the time scales at low wavenumber.

  7. Application of a new K-tau model to near wall turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thangam, S.; Abid, R.; Speziale, Charles G.

    1991-01-01

    A recently developed K-tau model for near wall turbulent flows is applied to two severe test cases. The turbulent flows considered include the incompressible flat plate boundary layer with the adverse pressure gradients and incompressible flow past a backward facing step. Calculations are performed for this two-equation model using an anisotropic as well as isotropic eddy-viscosity. The model predictions are shown to compare quite favorably with experimental data.

  8. Ribbon turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venaille, Antoine; Nadeau, Louis-Philippe; Vallis, Geoffrey

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the non-linear equilibration of a two-layer quasi-geostrophic flow in a channel with an initial eastward baroclinically unstable jet in the upper layer, paying particular attention to the role of bottom friction. In the limit of low bottom friction, classical theory of geostrophic turbulence predicts an inverse cascade of kinetic energy in the horizontal with condensation at the domain scale and barotropization in the vertical. By contrast, in the limit of large bottom friction, the flow is dominated by ribbons of high kinetic energy in the upper layer. These ribbons correspond to meandering jets separating regions of homogenized potential vorticity. We interpret these results by taking advantage of the peculiar conservation laws satisfied by this system: the dynamics can be recast in such a way that the initial eastward jet in the upper layer appears as an initial source of potential vorticity levels in the upper layer. The initial baroclinic instability leads to a turbulent flow that stirs this potential vorticity field while conserving the global distribution of potential vorticity levels. Statistical mechanical theory of the 1 1/2 layer quasi-geostrophic model predicts the formation of two regions of homogenized potential vorticity separated by a minimal interface. We explain that cascade phenomenology leads to the same result. We then show that the dynamics of the ribbons results from a competition between a tendency to reach the equilibrium state and baroclinic instability that induces meanders of the interface. These meanders intermittently break and induce potential vorticity mixing, but the interface remains sharp throughout the flow evolution. We show that for some parameter regimes, the ribbons act as a mixing barrier which prevents relaxation toward equilibrium, favouring the emergence of multiple zonal (eastward) jets.

  9. Efficient generation of propagation-invariant spatially stationary partially coherent fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarav, Shaurya; Bhattacharjee, Abhinandan; Wanare, Harshawardhan; Jha, Anand K.

    2017-09-01

    We propose and demonstrate a method for generating propagation-invariant spatially stationary fields in a controllable manner. Our method relies on producing incoherent mixtures of plane waves using planar primary sources that are spatially completely uncorrelated. The strengths of the individual plane waves in the mixture determine the exact functional form of the generated coherence function. We use light-emitting diodes as the primary incoherent sources and experimentally demonstrate the effectiveness of our method by generating several spatially stationary fields, including a type that we refer to as the regionwise spatially stationary field. We also experimentally demonstrate the propagation invariance of these fields, which is an extremely interesting and useful property of such fields. Our work should have important implications for applications that exploit the spatial coherence properties either in a transverse plane or in a propagation-invariant manner, such as correlation holography, wide-field optical coherence tomography, and imaging through turbulence.

  10. Large-Eddy Simulations of Baroclinic Instability and Turbulent Mixing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    lateral mixing of fluid properties across the unstable front, and the transition from strongly horizontal, geostrophic motion on the mesoscale to three...dimensional, quasi -isotropic, non-hydrostatic motion on turbulent scales. Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting...which can be removed from the system by either a gradual cascade of energy through progressively smaller scale, quasi -two-dimensional eddies or through

  11. Shock-turbulence interactions in a reacting flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, T. L.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Ribner, H. S.

    1992-01-01

    A specific reactive flow configuration, the interaction of a detonation wave with convected homogeneous isotropic weak turbulence (which can be constructed by a Fourier synthesis of small amplitude shear waves) is addressed. The effect of chemical heat release on the rms fluctuations downstream of the detonation is presented as a function of Mach number. In addition, for the particular case of the von Karman spectrum, the one dimensional power spectra of these flow quantities is given.

  12. Coupling Turbulence in Hybrid LES-RANS Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, Stephen L.

    2011-01-01

    A formulation is proposed for hybrid LES-RANS computations that permits accurate computations during resolution changes, so that resolution may be changed at will in order to employ only as much resolution in each subdomain as is required by the physics. The two components of this formulation, establishing the accuracy of a hybrid model at constant resolutions throughout the RANS-to-LES range and maintaining that accuracy when resolution is varied, are demonstrated for decaying, homogeneous, isotropic turbulence.

  13. Energy Transfer in Rotating Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambon, Claude; Mansour, Nagi N.; Godeferd, Fabien S.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The influence or rotation on the spectral energy transfer of homogeneous turbulence is investigated in this paper. Given the fact that linear dynamics, e.g. the inertial waves regime tackled in an RDT (Rapid Distortion Theory) fashion, cannot Affect st homogeneous isotropic turbulent flow, the study of nonlinear dynamics is of prime importance in the case of rotating flows. Previous theoretical (including both weakly nonlinear and EDQNM theories), experimental and DNS (Direct Numerical Simulation) results are gathered here and compared in order to give a self-consistent picture of the nonlinear effects of rotation on tile turbulence. The inhibition of the energy cascade, which is linked to a reduction of the dissipation rate, is shown to be related to a damping due to rotation of the energy transfer. A model for this effect is quantified by a model equation for the derivative-skewness factor, which only involves a micro-Rossby number Ro(sup omega) = omega'/(2(OMEGA))-ratio of rms vorticity and background vorticity as the relevant rotation parameter, in accordance with DNS and EDQNM results fit addition, anisotropy is shown also to develop through nonlinear interactions modified by rotation, in an intermediate range of Rossby numbers (Ro(omega) = (omega)' and Ro(omega)w greater than 1), which is characterized by a marco-Rossby number Ro(sup L) less than 1 and Ro(omega) greater than 1 which is characterized by a macro-Rossby number based on an integral lengthscale L and the micro-Rossby number previously defined. This anisotropy is mainly an angular drain of spectral energy which tends to concentrate energy in tile wave-plane normal to the rotation axis, which is exactly both the slow and the two-dimensional manifold. In Addition, a polarization of the energy distribution in this slow 2D manifold enhances horizontal (normal to the rotation axis) velocity components, and underlies the anisotropic structure of the integral lengthscales. Finally is demonstrated the

  14. Energy Transfer in Rotating Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambon, Claude; Mansour, Nagi N.; Godeferd, Fabien S.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The influence or rotation on the spectral energy transfer of homogeneous turbulence is investigated in this paper. Given the fact that linear dynamics, e.g. the inertial waves regime tackled in an RDT (Rapid Distortion Theory) fashion, cannot Affect st homogeneous isotropic turbulent flow, the study of nonlinear dynamics is of prime importance in the case of rotating flows. Previous theoretical (including both weakly nonlinear and EDQNM theories), experimental and DNS (Direct Numerical Simulation) results are gathered here and compared in order to give a self-consistent picture of the nonlinear effects of rotation on tile turbulence. The inhibition of the energy cascade, which is linked to a reduction of the dissipation rate, is shown to be related to a damping due to rotation of the energy transfer. A model for this effect is quantified by a model equation for the derivative-skewness factor, which only involves a micro-Rossby number Ro(sup omega) = omega'/(2(OMEGA))-ratio of rms vorticity and background vorticity as the relevant rotation parameter, in accordance with DNS and EDQNM results fit addition, anisotropy is shown also to develop through nonlinear interactions modified by rotation, in an intermediate range of Rossby numbers (Ro(omega) = (omega)' and Ro(omega)w greater than 1), which is characterized by a marco-Rossby number Ro(sup L) less than 1 and Ro(omega) greater than 1 which is characterized by a macro-Rossby number based on an integral lengthscale L and the micro-Rossby number previously defined. This anisotropy is mainly an angular drain of spectral energy which tends to concentrate energy in tile wave-plane normal to the rotation axis, which is exactly both the slow and the two-dimensional manifold. In Addition, a polarization of the energy distribution in this slow 2D manifold enhances horizontal (normal to the rotation axis) velocity components, and underlies the anisotropic structure of the integral lengthscales. Finally is demonstrated the

  15. A Monte Carlo simulation technique for low-altitude, wind-shear turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Roland L.; Laituri, Tony R.; Trevino, George

    1990-01-01

    A case is made for including anisotropy in a Monte Carlo flight simulation scheme of low-altitude wind-shear turbulence by means of power spectral density. This study attempts to eliminate all flight simulation-induced deficiencies in the basic turbulence model. A full-scale low-altitude wind-shear turbulence simulation scheme is proposed with particular emphasis on low cost and practicality for near-ground flight. The power spectral density statistic is used to highlight the need for realistic estimates of energy transfer associated with low-altitude wind-shear turbulence. The simulation of a particular anisotropic turbulence model is shown to be a relatively simple extension from that of traditional isotropic (Dryden) turbulence.

  16. CHARGED-PARTICLE TRANSPORT IN MAGNETIC TURBULENCE. I. A GLOBALLY ANISOTROPIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, P.; Jokipii, J. R.

    2015-12-10

    Collisionless magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence is common in large scale astrophysical environments. The determination of the transport of charged particles both parallel and perpendicular in such a system is of considerable interest. Quasi-linear analysis or direct numerical simulation can be used to find the effects of the turbulent magnetic field on the transport of charged particles. A number of different magnetic turbulence models have been proposed in the last several decades. We present here the results of studying particle transport in synthesized, anisotropic turbulence and compare the results with those obtained using the standard isotropic turbulence model in a series of papers. In this paper we consider the magnetic field turbulence model with global anisotropy.

  17. Reverse Energy Cascade in Turbulent Weakly Ionized Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Kyron; Appartaim, R.; Belay, K.; Johnson, J. A., III

    1998-01-01

    For systems far from equilibrium, the neglect of a role for viscous effects in turbulence may be generally inappropriate when the relaxation time for the molecular process approaches the local flow time (Orou et al. (1996)). Furthermore, for stationary collisional plasmas, the conventional Reynolds number is irrelevant under circumstances where the standard features of turbulence in ordinary gases are observed in the plasma (Johnson et al. (1987)). The current theoretical understanding of these turbulent phenomenon is particularly inadequate for turbulence associated with ionizing shock waves; generally speaking, thermodynamic, acoustic and pressure fluctuations are all seen as amplified across the shock wave followed by a dramatic decay (relaminarization) usually attributed to a lack of importance of viscosity in the turbulent regions. This decay would be accelerated when the flow speed is also reduced due to the importance usually given to the conventional Reynolds number (which is directly proportional to velocity) as a quality of turbulence index. However, evidence supporting this consensus is lacking. By contrast, recent evidence of vanishing triple correlations form De Silva et al. (1996) provides strong support for early theoretical speculation of inherently molecular effects in macroscopic turbulence in Tsuge (1974). This specifically suggests that the role of compressive effects ordinarily associated with the shock wave could be significantly muted by the existence of a strongly turbulent local environment. There is also more recent theoretical speculation (Frisch et al. (1984)) of an inherently and previously unsuspected non-dissipative nature to turbulence, with energy conservation being nurtured by reverse energy cascades in the turbulent fluctuation spectra. Furthermore, the role which might be played by fluctuations on quantum mechanical phenomena and variations in molecular parameters is completely unknown, especially of the sort which might be found

  18. Reverse Energy Cascade in Turbulent Weakly Ionized Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Kyron; Appartaim, R.; Belay, K.; Johnson, J. A., III

    1998-01-01

    For systems far from equilibrium, the neglect of a role for viscous effects in turbulence may be generally inappropriate when the relaxation time for the molecular process approaches the local flow time (Orou et al. (1996)). Furthermore, for stationary collisional plasmas, the conventional Reynolds number is irrelevant under circumstances where the standard features of turbulence in ordinary gases are observed in the plasma (Johnson et al. (1987)). The current theoretical understanding of these turbulent phenomenon is particularly inadequate for turbulence associated with ionizing shock waves; generally speaking, thermodynamic, acoustic and pressure fluctuations are all seen as amplified across the shock wave followed by a dramatic decay (relaminarization) usually attributed to a lack of importance of viscosity in the turbulent regions. This decay would be accelerated when the flow speed is also reduced due to the importance usually given to the conventional Reynolds number (which is directly proportional to velocity) as a quality of turbulence index. However, evidence supporting this consensus is lacking. By contrast, recent evidence of vanishing triple correlations form De Silva et al. (1996) provides strong support for early theoretical speculation of inherently molecular effects in macroscopic turbulence in Tsuge (1974). This specifically suggests that the role of compressive effects ordinarily associated with the shock wave could be significantly muted by the existence of a strongly turbulent local environment. There is also more recent theoretical speculation (Frisch et al. (1984)) of an inherently and previously unsuspected non-dissipative nature to turbulence, with energy conservation being nurtured by reverse energy cascades in the turbulent fluctuation spectra. Furthermore, the role which might be played by fluctuations on quantum mechanical phenomena and variations in molecular parameters is completely unknown, especially of the sort which might be found

  19. Investigating source processes of isotropic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Andrea

    explosion. In contrast, recovering the announced explosive yield using seismic moment estimates from moment tensor inversion remains challenging but we can begin to put error bounds on our moment estimates using the NSS technique. The estimation of seismic source parameters is dependent upon having a well-calibrated velocity model to compute the Green's functions for the inverse problem. Ideally, seismic velocity models are calibrated through broadband waveform modeling, however in regions of low seismicity velocity models derived from body or surface wave tomography may be employed. Whether a velocity model is 1D or 3D, or based on broadband seismic waveform modeling or the various tomographic techniques, the uncertainty in the velocity model can be the greatest source of error in moment tensor inversion. These errors have not been fully investigated for the nuclear discrimination problem. To study the effects of unmodeled structures on the moment tensor inversion, we set up a synthetic experiment where we produce synthetic seismograms for a 3D model (Moschetti et al., 2010) and invert these data using Green's functions computed with a 1D velocity mode (Song et al., 1996) to evaluate the recoverability of input solutions, paying particular attention to biases in the isotropic component. The synthetic experiment results indicate that the 1D model assumption is valid for moment tensor inversions at periods as short as 10 seconds for the 1D western U.S. model (Song et al., 1996). The correct earthquake mechanisms and source depth are recovered with statistically insignificant isotropic components as determined by the F-test. Shallow explosions are biased by the theoretical ISO-CLVD tradeoff but the tectonic release component remains low, and the tradeoff can be eliminated with constraints from P wave first motion. Path-calibration to the 1D model can reduce non-double-couple components in earthquakes, non-isotropic components in explosions and composite sources and improve

  20. Extraction of shear viscosity in stationary states of relativistic particle systems.

    PubMed

    Reining, F; Bouras, I; El, A; Wesp, C; Xu, Z; Greiner, C

    2012-02-01

    Starting from a classical picture of shear viscosity we construct a stationary velocity gradient in a microscopic parton cascade. Employing the Navier-Stokes ansatz we extract the shear viscosity coefficient η. For elastic isotropic scatterings we find an excellent agreement with the analytic values. This confirms the applicability of this method. Furthermore, for both elastic and inelastic scatterings with pQCD based cross sections we extract the shear viscosity coefficient η for a pure gluonic system and find a good agreement with already published calculations.