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Sample records for isotype aberrant triggering

  1. Aberrant T cell immunity triggered by human Respiratory Syncytial Virus and human Metapneumovirus infection.

    PubMed

    González, Andrea E; Lay, Margarita K; Jara, Evelyn L; Espinoza, Janyra A; Gómez, Roberto S; Soto, Jorge; Rivera, Claudia A; Abarca, Katia; Bueno, Susan M; Riedel, Claudia A; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2016-12-02

    Human Respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) are the two major etiological viral agents of lower respiratory tract diseases, affecting mainly infants, young children and the elderly. Although the infection of both viruses trigger an antiviral immune response that mediate viral clearance and disease resolution in immunocompetent individuals, the promotion of long-term immunity appears to be deficient and reinfection are common throughout life. A possible explanation for this phenomenon is that hRSV and hMPV, can induce aberrant T cell responses, which leads to exacerbated lung inflammation and poor T and B cell memory immunity. The modulation of immune response exerted by both viruses include different strategies such as, impairment of immunological synapse mediated by viral proteins or soluble factors, and the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines by epithelial cells, among others. All these viral strategies contribute to the alteration of the adaptive immunity in order to increase the susceptibility to reinfections. In this review, we discuss current research related to the mechanisms underlying the impairment of T and B cell immune responses induced by hRSV and hMPV infection. In addition, we described the role each virulence factor involved in immune modulation caused by these viruses.

  2. Aberrant substrate engagement of the ER translocon triggers degradation by the Hrd1 ubiquitin ligase

    PubMed Central

    Rubenstein, Eric M.; Kreft, Stefan G.; Greenblatt, Wesley; Swanson, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about quality control of proteins that aberrantly or persistently engage the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized translocon en route to membrane localization or the secretory pathway. Hrd1 and Doa10, the primary ubiquitin ligases that function in ER-associated degradation (ERAD) in yeast, target distinct subsets of misfolded or otherwise abnormal proteins based primarily on degradation signal (degron) location. We report the surprising observation that fusing Deg1, a cytoplasmic degron normally recognized by Doa10, to the Sec62 membrane protein rendered the protein a Hrd1 substrate. Hrd1-dependent degradation occurred when Deg1-Sec62 aberrantly engaged the Sec61 translocon channel and underwent topological rearrangement. Mutations that prevent translocon engagement caused a reversion to Doa10-dependent degradation. Similarly, a variant of apolipoprotein B, a protein known to be cotranslocationally targeted for proteasomal degradation, was also a Hrd1 substrate. Hrd1 therefore likely plays a general role in targeting proteins that persistently associate with and potentially obstruct the translocon. PMID:22689655

  3. ANRIL lncRNA triggers efficient therapeutic efficacy by reprogramming the aberrant INK4-hub in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shiqiong; Wang, Huixue; Pan, Hui; Shi, Yingyun; Li, Tianyuan; Ge, Shengfang; Jia, Renbing; Zhang, He; Fan, Xianqun

    2016-10-10

    Melanoma is an extremely aggressive disease with rapid progression, high metastatic potential and recurrence. Simultaneous correction of multiple tumor-specific gene abnormalities has become an attractive approach for developing therapeutics to treat melanoma. To potentiate anti-melanoma activity, we tested a "domino effect-like" therapeutic approach by uniquely targeting one defect and automatically triggering the endogenous corrections of other defects. Using this strategy, in a suspicious INK4b-ARF-INK4a gene cluster at chromosome 9p21, aberrant INK4a and INK4b defects were simultaneously endogenously auto-corrected after targeting the suppression of abnormal ANRIL lncRNA. In cell culture, this treatment significantly reduced the tumor metastatic capacity and tumor formation compared with absence of treatment. In animals harboring tumor xenografts, this therapeutic approach significantly inhibited tumor growth and reduced the tumor weight. Our results reveal a novel therapeutic strategy that significantly potentiates anti-melanoma efficiency by reprogramming the aberrant INK4-hub. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Domain-specific phosphomimetic mutation allows dissection of different protein kinase C (PKC) isotype-triggered activities of the RNA binding protein HuR.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Sebastian; Doller, Anke; Pendini, Nicole R; Wilce, Jacqueline A; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Eberhardt, Wolfgang

    2013-12-01

    The ubiquitous mRNA binding protein human antigen R (HuR) participates in the post-transcriptional regulation of many AU-rich element (ARE)-bearing mRNAs. Previously, by using in vitro kinase assay, we have identified serines (Ser) 158, 221 and 318 as targets of protein kinase C (PKC)-triggered phosphorylation. In this study, we tested whether GFP- or GST-tagged HuR constructs bearing a phosphomimetic Ser (S)-to-Asp (D) substitution at the different PKC target sites, would affect different HuR functions including HuR nucleo-cytoplasmic redistribution and binding to different types of ARE-containing mRNAs. The phosphomimetic GFP-tagged HuR protein bearing a phosphomimetic substitution in the hinge region of HuR (HuR-S221D) showed an increased cytoplasmic abundance when compared to wild-type HuR. Conversely, data from in vitro kinase assay and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), implicates that phosphorylation at Ser 221 is not relevant for mRNA binding of HuR. Quantification of in vitro binding affinities of GST-tagged wild-type HuR and corresponding HuR proteins bearing a phosphomimetic substitution in either RRM2 (HuR-S158D) or in RRM3 (HuR-S318D) by microscale thermophoresis (MST) indicates a specific binding of wild-type HuR to type I, II or type III-ARE-oligonucleotides in the high nanomolar range. Interestingly, phosphomimetic mutation at position 158 or 318 had a negative influence on HuR binding to type I- and type II-ARE-mRNAs whereas it significantly enhanced HuR affinity to a type III-ARE substrate. Our data suggest that differential phosphorylation of HuR by PKCs at different HuR domains coordinates subcellular HuR distribution and leads to a preferential binding to U-rich bearing target mRNA.

  5. Antibody Isotype Switching in Vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Senger, Kate; Hackney, Jason; Payandeh, Jian; Zarrin, Ali A

    2015-01-01

    The humoral or antibody-mediated immune response in vertebrates has evolved to respond to diverse antigenic challenges in various anatomical locations. Diversification of the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) constant region via isotype switching allows for remarkable plasticity in the immune response, including versatile tissue distribution, Fc receptor binding, and complement fixation. This enables antibody molecules to exert various biological functions while maintaining antigen-binding specificity. Different immunoglobulin (Ig) classes include IgM, IgD, IgG, IgE, and IgA, which exist as surface-bound and secreted forms. High-affinity autoantibodies are associated with various autoimmune diseases such as lupus and arthritis, while defects in components of isotype switching are associated with infections. A major route of infection used by a large number of pathogens is invasion of mucosal surfaces within the respiratory, digestive, or urinary tract. Most infections of this nature are initially limited by effector mechanisms such as secretory IgA antibodies. Mucosal surfaces have been proposed as a major site for the genesis of adaptive immune responses, not just in fighting infections but also in tolerating commensals and constant dietary antigens. We will discuss the evolution of isotype switching in various species and provide an overview of the function of various isotypes with a focus on IgA, which is universally important in gut homeostasis as well as pathogen clearance. Finally, we will discuss the utility of antibodies as therapeutic modalities.

  6. Immunoglobulin isotypes in childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Najam, F I; Giasuddin, A S; Shembesh, A H

    1999-01-01

    Immunoglobulin isotypes (IgG, IgA, IgM, IgD, IgE) in serum were investigated in 64 Libyan children with mild to moderately severe asthma (age: 1-12 years; sex: 39 males, 25 females) (Group A) and in 57 healthy Libyan children (age: 1-12 years; sex: 30 males, 27 females (Group B). The patients were classified according to age into three groups (A1: 1-3 years; A2: > 3-5 years; A3: > 5-12 years); according to disease activity into two groups (AA: active disease; NA: inactive disease); and according to age plus disease activity into six groups (AA1, NA1; AA2, NA2; AA3, NA3). The healthy children were also divided according to age into three groups (B1: 1-3 years; B2: > 3-5 years; B3: > 5-12 years). IgG, IgA, IgM and IgD were measured by radial immunodiffusion method and IgE was estimated by enzyme immunoassay technique utilizing immunokits from bioMerieux, France. Serum levels of IgG, IgD and IgE were elevated significantly in patients compared to controls (A vs B: p < 0.05) while IgA and IgM levels were normal (p > 0.05). IgG and IgD levels were raised in A3 (p < 0.05), while IgD levels were raised in both A2 and A3 (p < 0.05) and IgE was elevated in all age groups (p < 0.05). However, IgG was elevated significantly in AA only, while IgD and IgE levels were high in both AA and NA (p < 0.05) and IgE was even considerably higher in AA compared to NA (p < 0.02). Further elevated levels were observed for IgG in AA3 only (p < 0.05), for IgD in NA2 (p < 0.01), AA3 (p < 0.01) and NA3 (p < 0.05) and IgE was much higher in patients with active disease than with inactive disease in all age groups (p < 0.05). The fact that asthmatic attack in majority of our patients can be explained as mediated through IgE and the possibilities that IgG and IgD may play roles as aetiopathogenetic or protective regulatory factors in childhood asthma are discussed.

  7. Rheumatoid factor isotypes in localized scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Mimura, Y; Ihn, H; Jinnin, M; Asano, Y; Yamane, K; Tamaki, K

    2005-07-01

    Localized scleroderma is a connective tissue disorder that is sometimes accompanied by various immunological abnormalities. In this study, we analysed serum levels of rheumatoid factor (RF) isotypes in patients with localized scleroderma and in normal controls to determine if any of these isotypes reflect the severity of the disease. IgM RF, IgG RF and IgA RF were positive in 30%, 21%, and 7% of the patients, respectively. The levels of IgM RF were significantly higher in the patients with generalized morphea (GM), the most severe form of localized scleroderma, than those with linear scleroderma (LS) (P < 0.005) or normal controls (P < 0.0005). The levels of IgG RF were significantly higher in patients with GM than normal controls (P < 0.05). The levels of IgA RF were significantly higher in patients with GM or LS than normal controls (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01, respectively). The count of sclerotic lesions was significantly higher in patients with IgM RF than those without (P < 0.05). These results suggest that the presence of RF isotypes is one of the immunological abnormalities of localized scleroderma. IgM RF seemed to be most useful of these three factors to determine the severity of disease.

  8. A phosphatase-independent gain-of-function mutation in PTEN triggers aberrant cell growth in astrocytes through an autocrine IGF-1 loop.

    PubMed

    Fernández, S; Genis, L; Torres-Alemán, I

    2014-08-07

    Loss-of-function mutations in the phosphatase PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome10) contribute to aberrant cell growth in part through upregulation of the mitogenic IGF-1/PI3K/Akt pathway. In turn, this pathway exerts a homeostatic feedback over PTEN. Using mutagenesis analysis to explore a possible impact of this mutual control on astrocyte growth, we found that truncation of the C-terminal region of PTEN (Δ51) associates with a marked increase in NFκB activity, a transcription factor overactivated in astrocyte tumors. Whereas mutations of PTEN are considered to lead to a loss-of-function, PTENΔ51, a truncation that comprises a region frequently mutated in human gliomas, displayed a neomorphic (gain-of-function) activity that was independent of its phosphatase activity. This gain-of-function of PTENΔ51 includes stimulation of IGF-1 synthesis through protein kinase A activation of the IGF-1 promoter. Increased IGF-1 originates an autocrine loop that activates Akt and NFκB. Constitutive activation of NFκB in PTENΔ51-expressing astrocytes leads to aberrant cell growth; astrocytes expressing this mutant PTEN generate colonies in vitro and tumors in vivo. Mutations converting a tumor suppressor such as PTEN into a tumor promoter through a gain-of-function involving IGF-1 production may further our understanding of the role played by this growth factor in glioma growth and help us define druggable targets for personalized therapy.

  9. The Endocrine Dyscrasia that Accompanies Menopause and Andropause Induces Aberrant Cell Cycle Signaling that Triggers Cell Cycle Reentry of Post-mitotic Neurons, Neurodysfunction, Neurodegeneration and Cognitive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Atwood, Craig S.; Bowen, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    Sex hormones are the physiological factors that regulate neurogenesis during embryogenesis and continuing through adulthood. These hormones support the formation of brain structures such as dendritic spines, axons and synapses required for the capture of information (memories). Intriguingly, a recent animal study has demonstrated that induction of neurogenesis results in the loss of previously encoded memories in animals (e.g. infantile amnesia). In this connection, much evidence now indicates that Alzheimer’s disease (AD) also involves aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into the cell cycle. Cell cycle abnormalities appear very early in the disease, prior to the appearance of plaques and tangles, and explain the biochemical, neuropathological and cognitive changes observed with disease progression. Since sex hormones control when and how neurons proliferate and differentiate, the endocrine dyscrasia that accompanies menopause and andropause is a key signaling event that impacts neurogenesis and the acquisition, processing, storage and recall of memories. Here we review the biochemical, epidemiological and clinical evidence that alterations in endocrine signaling with menopause and andropause drive the aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into an abortive cell cycle with neurite retraction that leads to neuron dysfunction and death. When the reproductive axis is in balance, luteinizing hormone (LH), and its fetal homolog, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), promote pluripotent human and totipotent murine embryonic stem cell and neuron proliferation. However, strong evidence supports menopausal/andropausal elevations in the ratio of LH:sex steroids as driving aberrant mitotic events mediated by the upregulation of tumor necrosis factor, amyloid-β precursor protein processing towards the production of mitogenic Aβ, and the activation of Cdk5, a key regulator of cell cycle progression and tau phosphorylation (a cardinal feature of both neurogenesis and

  10. Immunoglobulin isotypes in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar.

    PubMed

    Hordvik, Ivar

    2015-02-27

    There are three major immunoglobulin (Ig) isotypes in salmonid fish: IgM, IgD and IgT, defined by the heavy chains μ, δ and τ, respectively. As a result of whole genome duplication in the ancestor of the salmonid fish family, Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) possess two highly similar Ig heavy chain gene complexes (A and B), comprising two μ genes, two δ genes, three intact τ genes and five τ pseudogenes. The μA and μB genes correspond to two distinct sub-populations of serum IgM. The IgM-B sub-variant has a characteristic extra cysteine near the C-terminal part of the heavy chain and exhibits a higher degree of polymer disulfide cross-linking compared to IgM-A. The IgM-B:IgM-A ratio in serum is typically 60:40, but skewed ratios are also observed. The IgT isotype appears to be specialized to mucosal immune responses in salmonid fish. The concentration of IgT in serum is 100 to 1000 times lower than IgM. Secreted forms of IgD have been detected in rainbow trout, but not yet in Atlantic salmon.

  11. PKC isotype functions in T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Baier, G

    2007-01-01

    The main function of mature T cells is to recognize and respond to foreign antigens by a complex activation process involving differentiation of the resting cell to a proliferating lymphoblast actively secreting immunoregulatory lymphokines or displaying targeted cytotoxicity, ultimately leading to recruitment of other cell types and initiation of an effective immune response. In order to understand the physiology and pathophysiology of T lymphocytes, it is necessary to decode the biochemical processes that integrate signals from antigen, cytokine, integrin and death receptors. The principal upon which our work is based is to explore and identify gene products of distinct members of the AGC family of protein serine/threonine kinases as key players mediating cell growth regulation. Given the established important role of PKC theta as regulator of T cell fate and knowing that several other PKC isotypes are also expressed in T cells at a high level, we now summarize the physiological and non-redundant functions of PKC alpha, beta, delta, epsilon, zeta and theta isotypes in T cells. This review describes the current knowledge of the physiological and non-redundant functions of the PKC gene products in T cells.

  12. Ozone-Induced Rice Grain Yield Loss Is Triggered via a Change in Panicle Morphology That Is Controlled by ABERRANT PANICLE ORGANIZATION 1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Tsukahara, Keita; Sawada, Hiroko; Kohno, Yoshihisa; Matsuura, Takakazu; Mori, Izumi C; Terao, Tomio; Ioki, Motohide; Tamaoki, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Rice grain yield is predicted to decrease in the future because of an increase in tropospheric ozone concentration. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here, we investigated the responses to ozone of two rice (Oryza Sativa L.) cultivars, Sasanishiki and Habataki. Sasanishiki showed ozone-induced leaf injury, but no grain yield loss. By contrast, Habataki showed grain yield loss with minimal leaf injury. A QTL associated with grain yield loss caused by ozone was identified in Sasanishiki/Habataki chromosome segment substitution lines and included the ABERRANT PANICLE ORGANIZATION 1 (APO1) gene. The Habataki allele of the APO1 locus in a near-isogenic line also resulted in grain yield loss upon ozone exposure, suggesting APO1 involvement in ozone-induced yield loss. Only a few differences in the APO1 amino acid sequences were detected between the cultivars, but the APO1 transcript level was oppositely regulated by ozone exposure: i.e., it increased in Sasanishiki and decreased in Habataki. Interestingly, the levels of some phytohormones (jasmonic acid, jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine, and abscisic acid) known to be involved in attenuation of ozone-induced leaf injury tended to decrease in Sasanishiki but to increase in Habataki upon ozone exposure. These data indicate that ozone-induced grain yield loss in Habataki is caused by a reduction in the APO1 transcript level through an increase in the levels of phytohormones that reduce leaf damage.

  13. Ozone-Induced Rice Grain Yield Loss Is Triggered via a Change in Panicle Morphology That Is Controlled by ABERRANT PANICLE ORGANIZATION 1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Tsukahara, Keita; Sawada, Hiroko; Kohno, Yoshihisa; Matsuura, Takakazu; Mori, Izumi C.; Terao, Tomio; Ioki, Motohide; Tamaoki, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Rice grain yield is predicted to decrease in the future because of an increase in tropospheric ozone concentration. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here, we investigated the responses to ozone of two rice (Oryza Sativa L.) cultivars, Sasanishiki and Habataki. Sasanishiki showed ozone-induced leaf injury, but no grain yield loss. By contrast, Habataki showed grain yield loss with minimal leaf injury. A QTL associated with grain yield loss caused by ozone was identified in Sasanishiki/Habataki chromosome segment substitution lines and included the ABERRANT PANICLE ORGANIZATION 1 (APO1) gene. The Habataki allele of the APO1 locus in a near-isogenic line also resulted in grain yield loss upon ozone exposure, suggesting APO1 involvement in ozone-induced yield loss. Only a few differences in the APO1 amino acid sequences were detected between the cultivars, but the APO1 transcript level was oppositely regulated by ozone exposure: i.e., it increased in Sasanishiki and decreased in Habataki. Interestingly, the levels of some phytohormones (jasmonic acid, jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine, and abscisic acid) known to be involved in attenuation of ozone-induced leaf injury tended to decrease in Sasanishiki but to increase in Habataki upon ozone exposure. These data indicate that ozone-induced grain yield loss in Habataki is caused by a reduction in the APO1 transcript level through an increase in the levels of phytohormones that reduce leaf damage. PMID:25923431

  14. Polarization Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, James P., Jr.; Chipman, Russell A.

    1990-01-01

    The analysis of the polarization characteristics displayed by optical systems can be divided into two categories: geometrical and physical. Geometrical analysis calculates the change in polarization of a wavefront between pupils in an optical instrument. Physical analysis propagates the polarized fields wherever the geometrical analysis is not valid, i.e., near the edges of stops, near images, in anisotropic media, etc. Polarization aberration theory provides a starting point for geometrical design and facilitates subsequent optimization. The polarization aberrations described arise from differences in the transmitted (or reflected) amplitudes and phases at interfaces. The polarization aberration matrix (PAM) is calculated for isotropic rotationally symmetric systems through fourth order and includes the interface phase, amplitude, linear diattenuation, and linear retardance aberrations. The exponential form of Jones matrices used are discussed. The PAM in Jones matrix is introduced. The exact calculation of polarization aberrations through polarization ray tracing is described. The report is divided into three sections: I. Rotationally Symmetric Optical Systems; II. Tilted and Decentered Optical Systems; and Polarization Analysis of LIDARs.

  15. Immunoglobulin light chain isotypes in the teleost Trematomus bernacchii.

    PubMed

    Coscia, Maria Rosaria; Giacomelli, Stefano; De Santi, Concetta; Varriale, Sonia; Oreste, Umberto

    2008-06-01

    Three immunoglobulin light chain (IgL) isotypes TrbeL1, TrbeL2, and TrbeL3 were identified in the Antarctic teleost Trematomus bernacchii by immunoscreening a cDNA expression library, and using RT-PCR, and 5' RACE. One of them was distinguished in two subisotypes TrbeL1A and TrbeL1B. Real-time PCR experiments showed that the different isotypes were expressed in similar ratios in the various tissues analyzed. Interestingly, the expression level of TrbeL1A isotype was very high in all tissues. Molecular models of the CH1-CL domain pairings were built and minimized for the different isotypes. Several differences were identified in the superimposable structures mainly in the loops. In addition, the isotype-specific residues determined a different distribution of the charges on the external CL domain surface. Phylogenetic trees of 43 isotype representative sequences of CL domain from teleost species, built by different methods, indicated that all teleost light chain isotypes are distributed into three groups. Furthermore, the split of the group IgL1 into two subgroups, one of them carrying a micro-satellite DNA insertion, may have occurred in the Acanthopterygean ancestor.

  16. Variant B cell receptor isotype functions differ in hairy cell leukemia with mutated BRAF and IGHV genes.

    PubMed

    Weston-Bell, Nicola J; Forconi, Francesco; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C; Sahota, Surinder S

    2014-01-01

    A functional B-cell receptor (BCR) is critical for survival of normal B-cells, but whether it plays a comparable role in B-cell malignancy is as yet not fully delineated. Typical Hairy Cell Leukemia (HCL) is a rare B-cell tumor, and unique in expressing multiple surface immunoglobulin (sIg) isotypes on individual tumor cells (mult-HCL), to raise questions as to their functional relevance. Typical mult-HCL also displays a mutated BRAF V(600)E lesion. Since wild type BRAF is a primary conduit for transducing normal BCR signals, as revealed by deletion modelling studies, it is as yet not apparent if mutated BRAF alters BCR signal transduction in mult-HCL. To address these questions, we examined BCR signalling in mult-HCL cases uniformly displaying mutated BRAF and IGHV genes. Two apparent functional sets were delineated by IgD co-expression. In sIgD(+ve) mult-HCL, IgD mediated persistent Ca(2+) flux, also evident via >1 sIgH isotype, linked to increased ERK activation and BCR endocytosis. In sIgD(-ve) mult-HCL however, BCR-mediated signals and downstream effects were restricted to a single sIgH isotype, with sIgM notably dysfunctional and remaining immobilised on the cell surface. These observations reveal discordance between expression and function of individual isotypes in mult-HCL. In dual sIgL expressing cases, only a single sIgL was fully functional. We examined effects of anti-BCR stimuli on mult-HCL survival ex-vivo. Significantly, all functional non-IgD isotypes increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation but triggered apoptosis of tumor cells, in both subsets. IgD stimuli, in marked contrast retained tumor viability. Despite mutant BRAF, BCR signals augment ERK1/2 phosphorylation, but isotype dictates functional downstream outcomes. In mult-HCL, sIgD retains a potential to transduce BCR signals for tumor survival in-vivo. The BCR in mult-HCL emerges as subject to complex regulation, with apparent conflicting signalling by individual isotypes when co-expressed with s

  17. Variant B Cell Receptor Isotype Functions Differ in Hairy Cell Leukemia with Mutated BRAF and IGHV Genes

    PubMed Central

    Weston-Bell, Nicola J.; Forconi, Francesco; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Sahota, Surinder S.

    2014-01-01

    A functional B-cell receptor (BCR) is critical for survival of normal B-cells, but whether it plays a comparable role in B-cell malignancy is as yet not fully delineated. Typical Hairy Cell Leukemia (HCL) is a rare B-cell tumor, and unique in expressing multiple surface immunoglobulin (sIg) isotypes on individual tumor cells (mult-HCL), to raise questions as to their functional relevance. Typical mult-HCL also displays a mutated BRAF V(600)E lesion. Since wild type BRAF is a primary conduit for transducing normal BCR signals, as revealed by deletion modelling studies, it is as yet not apparent if mutated BRAF alters BCR signal transduction in mult-HCL. To address these questions, we examined BCR signalling in mult-HCL cases uniformly displaying mutated BRAF and IGHV genes. Two apparent functional sets were delineated by IgD co-expression. In sIgD+ve mult-HCL, IgD mediated persistent Ca2+ flux, also evident via >1 sIgH isotype, linked to increased ERK activation and BCR endocytosis. In sIgD−ve mult-HCL however, BCR-mediated signals and downstream effects were restricted to a single sIgH isotype, with sIgM notably dysfunctional and remaining immobilised on the cell surface. These observations reveal discordance between expression and function of individual isotypes in mult-HCL. In dual sIgL expressing cases, only a single sIgL was fully functional. We examined effects of anti-BCR stimuli on mult-HCL survival ex-vivo. Significantly, all functional non-IgD isotypes increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation but triggered apoptosis of tumor cells, in both subsets. IgD stimuli, in marked contrast retained tumor viability. Despite mutant BRAF, BCR signals augment ERK1/2 phosphorylation, but isotype dictates functional downstream outcomes. In mult-HCL, sIgD retains a potential to transduce BCR signals for tumor survival in-vivo. The BCR in mult-HCL emerges as subject to complex regulation, with apparent conflicting signalling by individual isotypes when co-expressed with s

  18. Anti-DNA antibody mediated catalysis is isotype dependent.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yumin; Eryilmaz, Ertan; Zhang, Qiuting; Cowburn, David; Putterman, Chaim

    2016-01-01

    Anti-DNA antibodies are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus, and participate in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis by cross-reacting with multiple renal antigens. Previously, using a panel of murine anti-DNA IgGs that share identical variable regions but that differ in the constant regions, we demonstrated that the cross-reaction and renal pathogenicity of anti-DNA antibodies are isotype dependent. In this study, we investigated the catalytic potential of this anti-DNA antibody panel, and determined its isotype dependency. The three isotype switch variants (IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b) and the parent IgG3 PL9-11 anti-DNA antibodies were compared in their catalysis of 500 base pair linear double stranded DNA and a 12-mer peptide (ALWPPNLHAWVP), by gel analysis, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The binding affinity of anti-DNA antibodies to double stranded DNA and peptide antigens were assessed by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance. We found that the PL9-11 antibody isotypes vary significantly in their potential to catalyze the cleavage of both linear and double stranded DNA and the proteolysis of peptides. The degree of the cleavage and proteolysis increases with the incubation temperature and time. While different PL9-11 isotypes have the same initial attack sites within the ALWPPNLHAWVP peptide, there was no correlation between binding affinity to the peptide and proteolysis rates. In conclusion, the catalytic properties of anti-DNA antibodies are isotype dependent. This finding provides further evidence that antibodies that share the same variable region, but which have different constant regions, are functionally distinct. The catalytic effects modulated by antibody constant regions need to be considered in the design of therapeutic antibodies (abzymes) and peptides designed to block pathogenic autoantibodies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Anti-DNA antibody mediated catalysis is isotype dependent

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yumin; Eryilmaz, Ertan; Zhang, Qiuting; Cowburn, David; Putterman, Chaim

    2015-01-01

    Anti-DNA antibodies are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus, and participate in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis by cross-reacting with multiple renal antigens. Previously, using a panel of murine anti-DNA IgGs that share identical variable regions but that differ in the constant regions, we demonstrated that the cross-reaction and renal pathogenicity of anti-DNA antibodies are isotype dependent. In this study, we investigated the catalytic potential of this anti-DNA antibody panel, and determined its isotype dependency. The three isotype switch variants (IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b) and the parent IgG3 PL9-11 anti-DNA antibodies were compared in their catalysis of 500 base pair linear double stranded DNA and a 12-mer peptide (ALWPPNLHAWVP), by gel analysis, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The binding affinity of anti-DNA antibodies to double stranded DNA and peptide antigens were assessed by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance. We found that the PL9-11 antibody isotypes vary significantly in their potential to catalyze the cleavage of both linear and double stranded DNA and the proteolysis of peptides. The degree of the cleavage and proteolysis increases with the incubation temperature and time. While different PL9-11 isotypes have the same initial attack sites within the ALWPPNLHAWVP peptide, there was no correlation between binding affinity to the peptide and proteolysis rates. In conclusion, the catalytic properties of anti-DNA antibodies are isotype dependent. This finding provides further evidence that antibodies that share the same variable region, but which have different constant regions, are functionally distinct. The catalytic effects modulated by antibody constant regions need to be considered in the design of therapeutic antibodies (abzymes) and peptides designed to block pathogenic autoantibodies. PMID:26655427

  20. Distinct but complementary contributions of PPAR isotypes to energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Vanessa; Eeckhoute, Jérôme; Lefebvre, Philippe; Staels, Bart

    2017-04-03

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) regulate energy metabolism and hence are therapeutic targets in metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. While they share anti-inflammatory activities, the PPAR isotypes distinguish themselves by differential actions on lipid and glucose homeostasis. In this Review we discuss the complementary and distinct metabolic effects of the PPAR isotypes together with the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms, as well as the synthetic PPAR ligands that are used in the clinic or under development. We highlight the potential of new PPAR ligands with improved efficacy and safety profiles in the treatment of complex metabolic disorders.

  1. Skew aberration: a form of polarization aberration.

    PubMed

    Yun, Garam; Crabtree, Karlton; Chipman, Russell A

    2011-10-15

    We define a new class of aberration, skew aberration, which is a component of polarization aberration. Skew aberration is an intrinsic rotation of polarization states due to the geometric transformation of local coordinates, independent of coatings and interface polarization. Skew aberration in a radially symmetric system has the form of a circular retardance tilt plus coma aberration. Skew aberration causes undesired polarization distribution in the exit pupil. We demonstrate statistics on skew aberration of 2383 optical systems described in Code V's U.S. patent library [Code V Version 10.3 (Synopsys, 2011), pp. 22-24]; the mean skew aberration is 0.89° and the standard deviation is 1.37°. The maximum skew aberration found is 17.45° and the minimum is -11.33°. U.S. patent 2,896,506, which has ±7.01° of skew aberration, is analyzed in detail. Skew aberration should be of concern in microlithography optics and other high NA and large field of view optical systems.

  2. Effect of isotype on the biodistribution of radioiodinated immunoglobulins

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, H.W.; Nedelman, M.; Callahan, R.; Barlai-Kovach, M.; Wilkinson, M.; Elmaleh, D.R.; Khaw, B.A.; Nellis, M.; Rubin, R.

    1985-05-01

    A series of monoclonal antibodies of different isotypes developed against the same arsenate hapten were labeled by the iodogen bead method and employed to define the importance of isotype on biodistribution. Studies were performed with IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, IgG3, and IgM (pentamer). An ELISA assay performed before and after labeling demonstrated retained antigen combining activity. Groups of 6 rats each were injected with 12-18 ..mu..g/kg antibody and killed 1.5, 24, 48, 72 and 144 hours later. The concentration of radio-iodine in blood, heart, lung, liver, spleen, kidney, stomach, GI tract, and skeletal muscle were determined and expressed as a percent injected dose/organ. The mean half-time of blood clearance was less than 24 hours for all isotypes. Retention in the blood at 24 hours averaged 28% of the injected dose/organ for the IgG but only 9.4% with IgM. No focal localization was observed in any organ. Whole body counts indicated a 2 component clearance with an initial half-time between 48 and 72 hours for IgG, while IgM had a half-time of less than 24 hours. These data suggest that IgG isotypes have similar biodistributions, while IgM has a shorter biological half-time.

  3. Chicago aberration correction work.

    PubMed

    Beck, V D

    2012-12-01

    The author describes from his personal involvement the many improvements to electron microscopy Albert Crewe and his group brought by minimizing the effects of aberrations. The Butler gun was developed to minimize aperture aberrations in a field emission electron gun. In the 1960s, Crewe anticipated using a spherical aberration corrector based on Scherzer's design. Since the tolerances could not be met mechanically, a method of moving the center of the octopoles electrically was developed by adding lower order multipole fields. Because the corrector was located about 15 cm ahead of the objective lens, combination aberrations would arise with the objective lens. This fifth order aberration would then limit the aperture of the microscope. The transformation of the off axis aberration coefficients of a round lens was developed and a means to cancel anisotropic coma was developed. A new method of generating negative spherical aberration was invented using the combination aberrations of hexapoles. Extensions of this technique to higher order aberrations were developed. An electrostatic electron mirror was invented, which allows the cancellation of primary spherical aberration and first order chromatic aberration. A reduction of chromatic aberration by two orders of magnitude was demonstrated using such a system.

  4. Low reduction potential cytochrome b5 isotypes of Giardia intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Pazdzior, Robert; Yang, Zhen Alice; Mesbahuddin, Mirfath Sultana; Yee, Janet; van der Est, Art; Rafferty, Steven

    2015-10-01

    Despite lacking mitochondria and a known pathway for heme biosynthesis the micro-aerotolerant anaerobic protozoan parasite Giardia intestinalis encodes four members of the cytochrome b5 family of electron transfer proteins, three of which are small, single-domain proteins. While these are similar in size and fold to their better-known mammalian counterparts the Giardia proteins have distinctly lower reduction potentials, ranging from -140 to -171 mV compared to +6 mV for the bovine microsomal protein. This difference is accounted for by a more polar heme environment in the Giardia proteins, as mutation of a conserved heme pocket tyrosine residue to phenylalanine in the Giardia cytochrome b5 isotype-I (gCYTb5-I Y61F) raises its reduction potential by nearly 100 mV. All three isotypes have UV-visible spectra consistent with axial coordination of the heme by a pair of histidine residues, but electron paramagnetic spectroscopy indicates that the planes of their imidazole rings are nearly perpendicular rather than coplanar as observed in mammalian cytochrome b5, which may be due to geometrical constraints imposed by a one-residue shorter spacing between the ligand pair in the Giardia proteins. Although no function has yet to be ascribed to any Giardia cytochrome b5, the presence of similar sequences in many other eukaryotes indicates that these represent an under-characterized class of low reduction potential family members.

  5. TACI, isotype switching, CVID and IgAD.

    PubMed

    Castigli, Emanuela; Geha, Raif S

    2007-01-01

    Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most prevalent human primary immunodeficiency requiring medical attention. Until recently the only known genetic defect specific to CVID was ICOS deficiency that accounts for about 1% of the patients analyzed. Mutations in the TNFR family member TACI (transmembrane activator and calcium-modulator and cyclophilin ligand interactor), which mediates isotype switching in B cells, were found to be present in 5% of patients with CVID. Mutations in TACI were also found in relatives of patients with CVID who suffered from IgA deficiency (IgAD) as well as in a patient with isolated IgAD. In the majority of patients described to date only one TACI allele is mutated, showing an autosomal dominant transmission of the disease. B cells from individuals with TACI mutations did not produce IgG and IgA in response to the TACI ligand, APRIL (a proliferation-inducing ligand), probably reflecting impaired isotype switching. These results suggest that TACI mutations can lead to CVID.

  6. Interpreting Chromosome Aberration Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Dan; Reeder, Christopher; Loucas, Bradford; Hlatky, Lynn; Chen, Allen; Cornforth, Michael; Sachs, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can damage cells by breaking both strands of DNA in multiple locations, essentially cutting chromosomes into pieces. The cell has enzymatic mechanisms to repair such breaks; however, these mechanisms are imperfect and, in an exchange process, may produce a large-scale rearrangement of the genome, called a chromosome aberration. Chromosome aberrations are important in killing cells, during carcinogenesis, in characterizing repair/misrepair pathways, in retrospective radiation biodosimetry, and in a number of other ways. DNA staining techniques such as mFISH ( multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization) provide a means for analyzing aberration spectra by examining observed final patterns. Unfortunately, an mFISH observed final pattern often does not uniquely determine the underlying exchange process. Further, resolution limitations in the painting protocol sometimes lead to apparently incomplete final patterns. We here describe an algorithm for systematically finding exchange processes consistent with any observed final pattern. This algorithm uses aberration multigraphs, a mathematical formalism that links the various aspects of aberration formation. By applying a measure to the space of consistent multigraphs, we will show how to generate model-specific distributions of aberration processes from mFISH experimental data. The approach is implemented by software freely available over the internet. As a sample application, we apply these algorithms to an aberration data set, obtaining a distribution of exchange cycle sizes, which serves to measure aberration complexity. Estimating complexity, in turn, helps indicate how damaging the aberrations are and may facilitate identification of radiation type in retrospective biodosimetry.

  7. Interpreting Chromosome Aberration Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Dan; Reeder, Christopher; Loucas, Bradford; Hlatky, Lynn; Chen, Allen; Cornforth, Michael; Sachs, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can damage cells by breaking both strands of DNA in multiple locations, essentially cutting chromosomes into pieces. The cell has enzymatic mechanisms to repair such breaks; however, these mechanisms are imperfect and, in an exchange process, may produce a large-scale rearrangement of the genome, called a chromosome aberration. Chromosome aberrations are important in killing cells, during carcinogenesis, in characterizing repair/misrepair pathways, in retrospective radiation biodosimetry, and in a number of other ways. DNA staining techniques such as mFISH ( multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization) provide a means for analyzing aberration spectra by examining observed final patterns. Unfortunately, an mFISH observed final pattern often does not uniquely determine the underlying exchange process. Further, resolution limitations in the painting protocol sometimes lead to apparently incomplete final patterns. We here describe an algorithm for systematically finding exchange processes consistent with any observed final pattern. This algorithm uses aberration multigraphs, a mathematical formalism that links the various aspects of aberration formation. By applying a measure to the space of consistent multigraphs, we will show how to generate model-specific distributions of aberration processes from mFISH experimental data. The approach is implemented by software freely available over the internet. As a sample application, we apply these algorithms to an aberration data set, obtaining a distribution of exchange cycle sizes, which serves to measure aberration complexity. Estimating complexity, in turn, helps indicate how damaging the aberrations are and may facilitate identification of radiation type in retrospective biodosimetry.

  8. The endocrine dyscrasia that accompanies menopause and andropause induces aberrant cell cycle signaling that triggers re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into the cell cycle, neurodysfunction, neurodegeneration and cognitive disease.

    PubMed

    Atwood, Craig S; Bowen, Richard L

    2015-11-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "SBN 2014". Sex hormones are physiological factors that promote neurogenesis during embryonic and fetal development. During childhood and adulthood these hormones support the maintenance of brain structure and function via neurogenesis and the formation of dendritic spines, axons and synapses required for the capture, processing and retrieval of information (memories). Not surprisingly, changes in these reproductive hormones that occur with menopause and during andropause are strongly correlated with neurodegeneration and cognitive decline. In this connection, much evidence now indicates that Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into the cell cycle. Cell cycle abnormalities appear very early in the disease, prior to the appearance of plaques and tangles, and explain the biochemical, neuropathological and cognitive changes observed with disease progression. Intriguingly, a recent animal study has demonstrated that induction of adult neurogenesis results in the loss of previously encoded memories while decreasing neurogenesis after memory formation during infancy mitigated forgetting. Here we review the biochemical, epidemiological and clinical evidence that alterations in sex hormone signaling associated with menopause and andropause drive the aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into an abortive cell cycle that leads to neurite retraction, neuron dysfunction and neuron death. When the reproductive axis is in balance, gonadotropins such as luteinizing hormone (LH), and its fetal homolog, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), promote pluripotent human and totipotent murine embryonic stem cell and neuron proliferation. However, strong evidence supports menopausal/andropausal elevations in the LH:sex steroid ratio as driving aberrant mitotic events. These include the upregulation of tumor necrosis factor; amyloid-β precursor protein processing towards the production of mitogenic Aβ; and

  9. Tumor cells of hairy cell leukemia express multiple clonally related immunoglobulin isotypes via RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Forconi, F; Sahota, S S; Raspadori, D; Mockridge, C I; Lauria, F; Stevenson, F K

    2001-08-15

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) derives from a mature B cell and expresses markers associated with activation. Analysis of immunoglobulin variable region genes has revealed somatic mutation in most cases, consistent with an origin from a cell that has encountered the germinal center. One unusual feature of hairy cells (HCs) is the frequent expression of multiple immunoglobulin heavy chain isotypes, with dominance of immunoglobulin (Ig)--G3, but only a single light chain type. The origin and clonal relationship of these isotype variants have been unclear. In order to probe the isotype switching status of HCL, RNA transcripts of V(H)DJ(H)--constant region sequences from 5 cases of typical HCL, all expressing multiple surface immunoglobulin isotypes, were analyzed. Tumor V(H)DJ(H)--C(mu) sequences were identified and found to be somatically mutated (range, 1.4% to 6.5%), with a low level of intraclonal heterogeneity. Additional immunoglobulin isotypes of identical V(H)DJ(H) sequence were also identified, including IgD (5 of 5), IgG3 (5 of 5), IgG1 (3 of 5), IgG2 (2 of 5), IgA1 (4 of 5), and IgA2 (1 of 5). Derivation of multiple isotypes from individual cells was demonstrated by analyzing transcripts in single sorted cells from one patient, with evidence for coexistence of isotype variants in 10 of 10 cells. These findings indicate that clonally related multiple isotypes coexist in single HCs, with individual isotypes presumably generated via RNA splicing. Production of IgG3 appears common, but IgG1, IgG2, IgA1, and IgA2 also arise, indicating a continuing influence of a directed process on the tumor clone. These HCs appear to be arrested at the point of isotype switch, where RNA processing may precede deletional recombination. (Blood. 2001;98:1174-1181)

  10. Optical and electrical properties of isotype crystalline molecular organic heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, S. R.; Leu, L. Y.; So, F. F.; Yoon, W. Y.

    1989-12-01

    Optical and electronic properties of a p-P isotype heterojunctions (HJs) consisting of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) and 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) were investigated. It was found that the charge-transport properties of the HJ are limited by thermionic emission of holes over the energy barrier at the CuPc/PTCDA HJ at low forward and reverse bias, and by series resistance at high voltage. The HJ energy barrier at the CuPc/PTCDA valence-band edge, measured using current-volage and capacitance-voltage analyses, was found to be equal to 0.48 + or - 0.05 eV.

  11. Patterns of structural and sequence variation within isotype lineages of the Neisseria meningitidis transferrin receptor system

    PubMed Central

    Adamiak, Paul; Calmettes, Charles; Moraes, Trevor F; Schryvers, Anthony B

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis inhabits the human upper respiratory tract and is an important cause of sepsis and meningitis. A surface receptor comprised of transferrin-binding proteins A and B (TbpA and TbpB), is responsible for acquiring iron from host transferrin. Sequence and immunological diversity divides TbpBs into two distinct lineages; isotype I and isotype II. Two representative isotype I and II strains, B16B6 and M982, differ in their dependence on TbpB for in vitro growth on exogenous transferrin. The crystal structure of TbpB and a structural model for TbpA from the representative isotype I N. meningitidis strain B16B6 were obtained. The structures were integrated with a comprehensive analysis of the sequence diversity of these proteins to probe for potential functional differences. A distinct isotype I TbpA was identified that co-varied with TbpB and lacked sequence in the region for the loop 3 α-helix that is proposed to be involved in iron removal from transferrin. The tightly associated isotype I TbpBs had a distinct anchor peptide region, a distinct, smaller linker region between the lobes and lacked the large loops in the isotype II C-lobe. Sequences of the intact TbpB, the TbpB N-lobe, the TbpB C-lobe, and TbpA were subjected to phylogenetic analyses. The phylogenetic clustering of TbpA and the TbpB C-lobe were similar with two main branches comprising the isotype 1 and isotype 2 TbpBs, possibly suggesting an association between TbpA and the TbpB C-lobe. The intact TbpB and TbpB N-lobe had 4 main branches, one consisting of the isotype 1 TbpBs. One isotype 2 TbpB cluster appeared to consist of isotype 1 N-lobe sequences and isotype 2 C-lobe sequences, indicating the swapping of N-lobes and C-lobes. Our findings should inform future studies on the interaction between TbpB and TbpA and the process of iron acquisition. PMID:25800619

  12. Antibody-Mediated Internalization of Infectious HIV-1 Virions Differs among Antibody Isotypes and Subclasses

    PubMed Central

    McRaven, Michael D; Sawant, Sheetal; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Xu, Thomas T.; Dennison, S. Moses; Liao, Hua-Xin; Chenine, Agnès-Laurence; Alam, S. Munir; Haynes, Barton F.; Tomaras, Georgia D.

    2016-01-01

    Emerging data support a role for antibody Fc-mediated antiviral activity in vaccine efficacy and in the control of HIV-1 replication by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Antibody-mediated virus internalization is an Fc-mediated function that may act at the portal of entry whereby effector cells may be triggered by pre-existing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 acquisition. Understanding the capacity of HIV-1 antibodies in mediating internalization of HIV-1 virions by primary monocytes is critical to understanding their full antiviral potency. Antibody isotypes/subclasses differ in functional profile, with consequences for their antiviral activity. For instance, in the RV144 vaccine trial that achieved partial efficacy, Env IgA correlated with increased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. decreased vaccine efficacy), whereas V1-V2 IgG3 correlated with decreased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. increased vaccine efficacy). Thus, understanding the different functional attributes of HIV-1 specific IgG1, IgG3 and IgA antibodies will help define the mechanisms of immune protection. Here, we utilized an in vitro flow cytometric method utilizing primary monocytes as phagocytes and infectious HIV-1 virions as targets to determine the capacity of Env IgA (IgA1, IgA2), IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies to mediate HIV-1 infectious virion internalization. Importantly, both broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. PG9, 2G12, CH31, VRC01 IgG) and non-broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. 7B2 mAb, mucosal HIV-1+ IgG) mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions. Furthermore, we found that Env IgG3 of multiple specificities (i.e. CD4bs, V1-V2 and gp41) mediated increased infectious virion internalization over Env IgG1 of the same specificity, while Env IgA mediated decreased infectious virion internalization compared to IgG1. These data demonstrate that antibody-mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions depends on antibody specificity and isotype. Evaluation of the phagocytic potency of vaccine

  13. Antibody-Mediated Internalization of Infectious HIV-1 Virions Differs among Antibody Isotypes and Subclasses.

    PubMed

    Tay, Matthew Zirui; Liu, Pinghuang; Williams, LaTonya D; McRaven, Michael D; Sawant, Sheetal; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Xu, Thomas T; Dennison, S Moses; Liao, Hua-Xin; Chenine, Agnès-Laurence; Alam, S Munir; Moody, M Anthony; Hope, Thomas J; Haynes, Barton F; Tomaras, Georgia D

    2016-08-01

    Emerging data support a role for antibody Fc-mediated antiviral activity in vaccine efficacy and in the control of HIV-1 replication by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Antibody-mediated virus internalization is an Fc-mediated function that may act at the portal of entry whereby effector cells may be triggered by pre-existing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 acquisition. Understanding the capacity of HIV-1 antibodies in mediating internalization of HIV-1 virions by primary monocytes is critical to understanding their full antiviral potency. Antibody isotypes/subclasses differ in functional profile, with consequences for their antiviral activity. For instance, in the RV144 vaccine trial that achieved partial efficacy, Env IgA correlated with increased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. decreased vaccine efficacy), whereas V1-V2 IgG3 correlated with decreased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. increased vaccine efficacy). Thus, understanding the different functional attributes of HIV-1 specific IgG1, IgG3 and IgA antibodies will help define the mechanisms of immune protection. Here, we utilized an in vitro flow cytometric method utilizing primary monocytes as phagocytes and infectious HIV-1 virions as targets to determine the capacity of Env IgA (IgA1, IgA2), IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies to mediate HIV-1 infectious virion internalization. Importantly, both broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. PG9, 2G12, CH31, VRC01 IgG) and non-broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. 7B2 mAb, mucosal HIV-1+ IgG) mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions. Furthermore, we found that Env IgG3 of multiple specificities (i.e. CD4bs, V1-V2 and gp41) mediated increased infectious virion internalization over Env IgG1 of the same specificity, while Env IgA mediated decreased infectious virion internalization compared to IgG1. These data demonstrate that antibody-mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions depends on antibody specificity and isotype. Evaluation of the phagocytic potency of vaccine

  14. The structured core of human β tubulin confers isotype-specific polymerization properties

    PubMed Central

    Pamula, Melissa C.; Ti, Shih-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    Diversity in cytoskeleton organization and function may be achieved through variations in primary sequence of tubulin isotypes. Recently, isotype functional diversity has been linked to a “tubulin code” in which the C-terminal tail, a region of substantial sequence divergence between isotypes, specifies interactions with microtubule-associated proteins. However, it is not known whether residue changes in this region alter microtubule dynamic instability. Here, we examine recombinant tubulin with human β isotype IIB and characterize polymerization dynamics. Microtubules with βIIB have catastrophe frequencies approximately threefold lower than those with isotype βIII, a suppression similar to that achieved by regulatory proteins. Further, we generate chimeric β tubulins with native tail sequences swapped between isotypes. These chimeras have catastrophe frequencies similar to that of the corresponding full-length construct with the same core sequence. Together, our data indicate that residue changes within the conserved β tubulin core are largely responsible for the observed isotype-specific changes in dynamic instability parameters and tune tubulin’s polymerization properties across a wide range. PMID:27185835

  15. Changes in the Accumulation of [alpha]- and [beta]-Tubulin Isotypes during Cotton Fiber Development.

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, D. C.; Seagull, R. W.; Triplett, B. A.

    1994-01-01

    The expression of [alpha]- and [beta]-tubulin proteins in developing fibers and several other tissues of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum, cv Texas Marker 1) have been analyzed by immunoblots of one- and two-dimensional gels utilizing anti-tubulin antibodies as probes. As a percentage of total protein, fibers had greater amounts of tubulin than did hypocotyls, roots, leaves, or cotyledons. Both [alpha]- and [beta]-tubulin, having apparent molecular masses of approximately 50 kD and isoelectric points between pH 5 and pH 6, were resolved on a single two-dimensional gel. Under the conditions used, [alpha]-tubulin was less acidic in the isoelectric focusing dimension and migrated slightly faster in the sodium dodecyl sulfate dimension than did [beta]-tubulin. Nine [alpha]-tubulin isotypes that formed two distinct groups were identified on immunoblots of two-dimensional gels. The three most abundant [alpha]-tubulin isotypes were common to all tissues examined. Seven distinct [beta]-tubulin isotypes were also identified. Although their level of accumulation differed, four of the [beta]-tubulin isotypes were common to all tissues. Preferential accumulation of isotypes was more apparent in fibers than in the other tissues examined. Two [alpha]-tubulin isotypes and two [beta]-tubulin isotypes showed preferential accumulation in 10- and 20-d postanthesis fibers, respectively. PMID:12232289

  16. The role of isotype and epitope specificity of monoclonal antibody mixtures in immunodiffusion reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, B W; Godard, A; Caron, J A; Tostowaryk, W

    1987-01-01

    Twenty monoclonal antibodies to human alpha-fetoprotein have been characterized in terms of IgG subclass, epitope specificity and immunodiffusion properties. The Ig molecules consisted of six G1, ten G2a and four G2b isotypes. The epitope analysis was conducted by a solid-phase RIA employing 125I-labelled AFP. The RIA analysis resulted in the identification of seven determinants, two of which were specific for one antibody each, while others were specific for two or more antibodies. In Ouchterlony tests with the antibodies, none formed bands of immunoprecipitate when diffused individually against the antigen. Tests with all possible mixtures of pairs of the antibodies (190) resulted in positive immunodiffusion responses with only two mixtures. These each contained antibodies of the 2b isotype and demonstrated distinct epitope specificities. The immunodiffusion of mixtures of three antibodies from a group of 12 that were selected to represent equal numbers of isotypes resulted in 84 positive responses and 136 negative responses, i.e. from a total of 220 mixtures. A striking correlation was noted between positive immunodiffusion tests and composition of antibody isotypes and of epitope specificities of the mixtures. Each mixture was found to contain antibodies of at least one 2b isotype and of different epitope specificities. None of the mixtures that lacked a 2b isotype (56) responded in immunodiffusion tests. Similarly, in instances (46) in which the epitope specificities of the antibodies in the mixture were the same, i.e. duplicated or triplicated, the results were again negative despite the presence of a 2b isotype. The comparison of these studies with similar studies of a smaller group of antibodies to pregnancy-specific beta 1-glycoprotein strongly suggests that the G3 antibody isotype may have an immune precipitation enhancing effect similar to the G2b isotype. PMID:2438204

  17. 2-(m-Azidobenzoyl)taxol binds differentially to distinct β-tubulin isotypes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chia-Ping Huang; Yap, Eng-Hui; Xiao, Hui; Fiser, Andras; Horwitz, Susan Band

    2016-01-01

    There are seven β-tubulin isotypes present in distinct quantities in mammalian cells of different origin. Altered expression of β-tubulin isotypes has been reported in cancer cell lines resistant to microtubule stabilizing agents (MSAs) and in human tumors resistant to Taxol. To study the relative binding affinities of MSAs, tubulin from different sources, with distinct β-tubulin isotype content, were specifically photolabeled with a tritium-labeled Taxol analog, 2-(m-azidobenzoyl)taxol, alone or in the presence of MSAs. The inhibitory effects elicited by these MSAs on photolabeling were distinct for β-tubulin from different sources. To determine the exact amount of drug that binds to different β-tubulin isotypes, bovine brain tubulin was photolabeled and the isotypes resolved by high-resolution isoelectrofocusing. All bands were analyzed by mass spectrometry following cyanogen bromide digestion, and the identity and relative quantity of each β-tubulin isotype determined. It was found that compared with other β-tubulin isotypes, βIII-tubulin bound the least amount of 2-(m-azidobenzoyl)taxol. Analysis of the sequences of β-tubulin near the Taxol binding site indicated that, in addition to the M-loop that is known to be involved in drug binding, the leucine cluster region of βIII-tubulin contains a unique residue, alanine, at 218, compared with other isotypes that contain threonine. Molecular dynamic simulations indicated that the frequency of Taxol-accommodating conformations decreased dramatically in the T218A variant, compared with other β-tubulins. Our results indicate that the difference in residue 218 in βIII-tubulin may be responsible for inhibition of drug binding to this isotype, which could influence downstream cellular events. PMID:27651486

  18. Dynamic triggering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, David P.; Prejean, Stephanie; Schubert, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic stresses propagating as seismic waves from large earthquakes trigger a spectrum of responses at global distances. In addition to locally triggered earthquakes in a variety of tectonic environments, dynamic stresses trigger tectonic (nonvolcanic) tremor in the brittle–plastic transition zone along major plate-boundary faults, activity changes in hydrothermal and volcanic systems, and, in hydrologic domains, changes in spring discharge, water well levels, soil liquefaction, and the eruption of mud volcanoes. Surface waves with periods of 15–200 s are the most effective triggering agents; body-wave trigger is less frequent. Triggering dynamic stresses can be < 1 kPa.

  19. Regulation of microtubule motors by tubulin isotypes and posttranslational modifications

    PubMed Central

    Sirajuddin, Minhajuddin; Rice, Luke M.; Vale, Ronald D.

    2014-01-01

    The ‘tubulin-code’ hypothesis proposes that different tubulin genes or posttranslational modifications (PTMs), which mainly confer variation in the carboxy-terminal tail (CTT), result in unique interactions with microtubule-associated proteins for specific cellular functions. However, the inability to isolate distinct and homogenous tubulin species has hindered biochemical testing of this hypothesis. Here, we have engineered 25 α/β tubulin heterodimers with distinct CTTs and PTMs and tested their interactions with four different molecular motors using single molecule assays. Our results show that tubulin isotypes and PTMs can govern motor velocity, processivity and microtubule depolymerization rates, with substantial changes conferred by even single amino acid variation. Revealing the importance and specificity of PTMs, we show that kinesin-1 motility on neuronal β-tubulin (TUBB3) is increased by polyglutamylation and that robust kinesin-2 motility requires detyrosination of α-tubulin. Our results also show that different molecular motors recognize distinctive tubulin “signatures”, which supports the premise of tubulin-code hypothesis. PMID:24633327

  20. The mammalian beta-tubulin repertoire: hematopoietic expression of a novel, heterologous beta-tubulin isotype

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    We describe the structure of a novel and unusually heterologous beta- tubulin isotype (M beta 1) isolated from a mouse bone marrow cDNA library, and a second isotype (M beta 3) isolated from a mouse testis cDNA library. Comparison of M beta 1 and M beta 3 with the completed (M beta 4, M beta 5) or extended (M beta 2) sequence of three previously described beta-tubulin isotypes shows that each includes a distinctive carboxy-terminal region, in addition to multiple amino acid substitutions throughout the polypeptide chain. In every case where a mammalian interspecies comparison can be made, both the carboxy- terminal and internal amino acid substitutions that distinguish one isotype from another are absolutely conserved. We conclude that these characteristic differences are important in determining functional distinctions between different kinds of microtubule. The amino acid homologies between M beta 2, M beta 3, M beta 4, and M beta 5 are in the range of 95-97%; however the homology between M beta 1 and all the other isotypes is very much less (78%). The dramatic divergence in M beta 1 is due to multiple changes that occur throughout the polypeptide chain. The overall level of expression of M beta 1 is low, and is restricted to those tissues (bone marrow, spleen, developing liver and lung) that are active in hematopoiesis in the mouse. We predict that the M beta 1 isotype is functionally specialized for assembly into the mammalian marginal band. PMID:3782288

  1. A mutant with aberrant extracellular LcrV-YscF interactions fails to form pores and translocate Yop effector proteins but retains the ability to trigger Yop secretion in response to host cell contact.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Dana E; Murphy, Julia L; Davis, Alison J; Mecsas, Joan

    2013-05-01

    The plasmid-encoded type three secretion system (TTSS) of Yersinia spp. is responsible for the delivery of effector proteins into cells of the innate immune system, where these effectors disrupt the target cells' activity. Successful translocation of effectors into mammalian cells requires Yersinia to both insert a translocon into the host cell membrane and sense contact with host cells. To probe the events necessary for translocation, we investigated protein-protein interactions among TTSS components of the needle-translocon complex using a chemical cross-linking-based approach. We detected extracellular protein complexes containing YscF, LcrV, and YopD that were dependent upon needle formation. The formation of these complexes was evaluated in a secretion-competent but translocation-defective mutant, the YscFD28AD46A strain (expressing YscF with the mutations D28A and D46A). We found that one of the YscF and most of the LcrV and YopD cross-linked complexes were nearly absent in this mutant. Furthermore, the YscFD28AD46A strain did not support YopB insertion into mammalian membranes, supporting the idea that the LcrV tip complex is required for YopB insertion and translocon formation. However, the YscFD28AD46A strain did secrete Yops in the presence of host cells, indicating that a translocation-competent tip complex is not required to sense contact with host cells to trigger Yop secretion. In conclusion, in the absence of cross-linkable LcrV-YscF interactions, translocon insertion is abolished, but Yersinia still retains the ability to sense cell contact.

  2. A Mutant with Aberrant Extracellular LcrV-YscF Interactions Fails To Form Pores and Translocate Yop Effector Proteins but Retains the Ability To Trigger Yop Secretion in Response to Host Cell Contact

    PubMed Central

    Harmon, Dana E.; Murphy, Julia L.; Davis, Alison J.

    2013-01-01

    The plasmid-encoded type three secretion system (TTSS) of Yersinia spp. is responsible for the delivery of effector proteins into cells of the innate immune system, where these effectors disrupt the target cells' activity. Successful translocation of effectors into mammalian cells requires Yersinia to both insert a translocon into the host cell membrane and sense contact with host cells. To probe the events necessary for translocation, we investigated protein-protein interactions among TTSS components of the needle-translocon complex using a chemical cross-linking-based approach. We detected extracellular protein complexes containing YscF, LcrV, and YopD that were dependent upon needle formation. The formation of these complexes was evaluated in a secretion-competent but translocation-defective mutant, the YscFD28AD46A strain (expressing YscF with the mutations D28A and D46A). We found that one of the YscF and most of the LcrV and YopD cross-linked complexes were nearly absent in this mutant. Furthermore, the YscFD28AD46A strain did not support YopB insertion into mammalian membranes, supporting the idea that the LcrV tip complex is required for YopB insertion and translocon formation. However, the YscFD28AD46A strain did secrete Yops in the presence of host cells, indicating that a translocation-competent tip complex is not required to sense contact with host cells to trigger Yop secretion. In conclusion, in the absence of cross-linkable LcrV-YscF interactions, translocon insertion is abolished, but Yersinia still retains the ability to sense cell contact. PMID:23475976

  3. Detection of Immunoglobulin Isotypes from Dried Blood Spots

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Nancy J; Mondal, Tapan Kumar; Preissler, Mark T.; Freed, Brian M.; Stockinger, Sabine; Bell, Erin; Druschel, Charlotte; Buck Louis, Germaine M.; Lawrence, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The study was designed to determine the sensitivity and reproducibility of recovering immunoglobulin (Ig) isotypes (IgG subclasses, IgA, IgE and IgM classes) from dried blood spots (DBS), a methodologic subcomponent of the Upstate KIDS Study. A multiplexed Luminex assay was used for IgG1/2/3/4, IgA and IgM analysis; an ELISA was used for IgE. Plasma samples from de-identified patients were used to compare the Luminex assay with nephelometry, which is routinely used to quantify IgA, IgG and IgM in clinical samples. The IgE ELISA was compared to an immunofluorescence assay. Prior to evaluation of punches from newborn dried blood spots (NDBSs), recoveries of Ig from punches of cord blood DBSs (CBDBSs) vs. plasma from the same cord bloods were compared. Although the recoveries of Ig from plasma and DBSs were not comparable, which could be due to cell lysates in the DBS samples, the analyses were reproducible. Additionally, the levels of IgA, IgG2, IgG4, and IgM recovered from CBDBSs positively correlated with those in plasma. The DBS data is a relative value since it is not equivalent to the plasma concentration. The majority of Ig concentrations recovered from 108 newborns of the Upstate KIDs Study were within the range of newborn plasma Ig levels with the exception of IgG3. The IgG4 values displayed the greatest variance with a wide range (0.01–319 mg/dl), whereas, IgG1 values had the narrowest range (85.2–960.4 mg/dl). PMID:24333851

  4. The isotype repertoire of antibodies against novel UH-RA peptides in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    De Winter, Liesbeth M; Geusens, Piet; Lenaerts, Jan; Vanhoof, Johan; Stinissen, Piet; Somers, Veerle

    2016-06-07

    Recently, autoantibodies against novel UH-RA peptides (UH-RA.1 and UH-RA.21) were identified as candidate biomarkers for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who are seronegative for the current diagnostic markers rheumatoid factor and anticitrullinated protein antibodies. Previously, screening for anti-UH-RA autoantibodies was based on measuring the immunoglobulin (Ig) G response. We aimed to investigate whether measurement of other isotypes could improve the performance of diagnostic testing. In addition, assigning the isotype profile might provide valuable information on effector functions of the antibodies. The isotype profile of antibodies against UH-RA.1 and UH-RA.21 was studied. The IgG, IgM, and IgA classes, together with the 4 different IgG subclasses, were determined in 285 patients with RA, 88 rheumatic control subjects, and 90 healthy control subjects. Anti-UH-RA.1 antibodies were primarily of the IgM isotype and twice as prevalent as IgG (IgG3-dominated) and IgA. RA sensitivity when testing for anti-UH-RA.1 IgM was shown to be higher than when testing for the IgG isotype: 18 % versus 9 % sensitivity when RA specificity was set to 90 %. Within antibodies against UH-RA.21, IgG and IgA were more common than IgM. Different anti-UH-RA.21 IgG subclasses were found, with the highest prevalence found for IgG2. Combined testing for IgG and IgA slightly increased RA sensitivity of UH-RA.21-specific antibody testing to 27 % compared with solely testing for IgG (23 %). Notably, a higher number of anti-UH-RA.21 antibody isotypes was related to increased levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Finally, for both antibody responses, the full antibody isotype use was demonstrated in early and seronegative disease. The isotype distribution of anti-UH-RA.1 and anti-UH-RA.21 antibodies was successfully outlined, and, for antibodies against UH-RA.1, we found that isotype-specific testing might have implications for diagnostic testing. The exact mechanisms by

  5. Evidence for Ig Light Chain Isotype Exclusion in Shark B Lymphocytes Suggests Ordered Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Anita; Ohta, Yuko; Flajnik, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Unlike most vertebrates, the shark IgL gene organization precludes secondary rearrangements that delete self-reactive VJ rearranged genes. Nurse sharks express four L chain isotypes, κ, λ, σ, and σ-2, encoded by 35 functional minigenes or clusters. The sequence of gene activation/expression and receptor editing of these isotypes have not been studied. We therefore investigated the extent of isotypic exclusion in separated B cell subpopulations. Surface Ig (sIg)κ–expressing cells, isolated with mAb LK14 that recognizes Cκ, carry predominantly nonproductive rearrangements of other L chain isotypes. Conversely, after depletion with LK14, sIgM+ cells contained largely nonproductive κ and enrichment for in-frame VJ of the others. Because some isotypic inclusion was observed at the mRNA level, expression in the BCR was examined. Functional λ mRNA was obtained, as expected, from the LK14-depleted population, but was also in sIgκ+ splenocytes. Whereas λ somatic mutants from the depleted sample displayed evidence of positive selection, the λ genes in sIgκ+ cells accumulated bystander mutations indicating a failure to express their products at the cell surface in association with the BCR H chain. In conclusion, a shark B cell expresses one L chain isotype at the surface and other isotypes as nonproductive VJ, sterile transcripts, or in-frame VJ whose products may not associate with the H chain. Based on the mRNA content found in the B cell subpopulations, an order of L chain gene activation is suggested as: σ-2 followed by κ, then σ and λ. PMID:28760881

  6. Intraocular lens optics and aberrations.

    PubMed

    Chang, Daniel H; Rocha, Karolinne M

    2016-07-01

    This review outlines concepts in intraocular lens (IOL) optics and aberrations important both for current IOLs and for new IOLs in development. Optical aberrations make a significant impact on the laboratory and clinical performance of IOLs, especially under mesopic and low-contrast conditions. Minimizing or correcting these aberrations can potentially improve visual function. Strategic management of aberrations can have clinical utility for extended depth of focus and presbyopia correction. All IOLs affect ocular aberrations in some manner. It is important for clinicians and researchers to understand the implications how any residual aberrations could affect visual quality, visual side-effects, and depth of focus.

  7. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against dog immunoglobulin isotypes.

    PubMed

    Arce, C; Moreno, A; Millán, Y; Martín de las Mulas, J; Llanes, D

    2002-09-06

    A panel of six monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) recognizing antigenic determinants on canine immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy or light chains was produced and characterized. All monoclonals recognized the IgG(2) subclass, although only two were subclass-specific (CA3H1 and CA4F1). The CA3B8 mAb was found to be specific for an epitope on canine immunoglobulin G heavy chain, (IgG(1) and IgG(2) subclasses). Two mAbs (CA2E9 and CA5B2) reacted with an epitope on the heavy chain of canine IgG and IgM and another, CA4E7, bound to canine IgA, IgG and IgM isotypes; CA4E7 recognized an epitope on canine immunoglobulin light chain. CA4E7, CA4F1 and CA5B2 recognized an epitope in the Fab region. Three mAbs, CA3B8, CA4E7 and CA5B2, showed much lower reactivity with canine IgG by ELISA when IgG was periodate-treated, suggesting that they recognized a carbohydrate determinant. Cross-reactivity analysis of these mAbs with sera from horse, goat, cow, sheep, pig, cat, rabbit, hamster, rat, mouse and human indicated that two mAbs, CA3B8 and CA5B2, recognized a canine IgG-specific epitope; two others, CA3H1 and CA4E7, recognized an epitope also present in rabbit and sheep immunoglobulin respectively; and the remaining two (CA2E9 and CA4F1) recognized an epitope broadly present on the Igs of the species analyzed. This panel of antibodies will be a useful tool for future canine immunodiagnosis tests. With the exception of CA2E9, all mAbs were able to recognize plasma cells on paraffin-embedded tissues, and will thus be useful for immunohistochemical assays.

  8. Multi-isotype antibody responses against the multimeric Salmonella Typhi recombinant hemolysin E antigen.

    PubMed

    Ong, Eugene Boon Beng; Ignatius, Joshua; Anthony, Amy Amilda; Aziah, Ismail; Ismail, Asma; Lim, Theam Soon

    2015-01-01

    The detection and measurement of different antibody isotypes in the serum provide valuable indicators of the different stages of typhoid infection. Here, the ability of S. Typhi recombinant hemolysin E (HlyE) to detect multi-isotype antibody responses in sera of patients with typhoid and paratyphoid A was investigated using an indirect antibody immunoassay. Nanogram amounts of HlyE were found to be sufficient for detection of IgG and IgA isotypes and, in a study of individuals' sera (n = 100), the immunoassay was able to distinguish between typhoid and non-typhoid sera. The overall sensitivity, specificity and efficiency of the ELISA were 70% (39/56), 100% (44/44) and 83% respectively.

  9. Trigger finger

    MedlinePlus

    ... Redness in your cut or hand Swelling or warmth in your cut or hand Yellow or green drainage from the cut Hand pain or discomfort Fever If your trigger finger returns, call your surgeon. You may need another surgery.

  10. Molecular and Functional Properties of Three Different Peroxiredoxin Isotypes in Chinese Cabbage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Young; Jung, Young Jun; Shin, Mi Rim; Park, Jung Hoon; Nawkar, Ganesh M.; Maibam, Punyakishore; Lee, Eun Seon; Kim, Kang-San; Paeng, Seol Ki; Kim, Woe Yeon; Lee, Kyun Oh; Yun, Dae-Jin; Kang, Chang Ho; Lee, Sang Yeol

    2012-01-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prxs), which are classified into three isotypes in plants, play important roles in protection systems as peroxidases or molecular chaperones. The three Prx isotypes of Chinese cabbage, namely C1C-Prx, C2C-Prx, and C-PrxII, have recently been identified and characterized. The present study compares their molecular properties and biochemical functions to gain insights into their concerted roles in plants. The three Prx isotype genes were differentially expressed in tissue- and developmental stage-specific manners. The transcript level of the C1C-Prx gene was abundant at the seed stage, but rapidly decreased after imbibitions. In contrast, the C2C-Prx transcript was not detected in the seeds, but its expression level increased at germination and was maintained thereafter. The C-PrxII transcript level was mild at the seed stage, rapidly increased for 10 days after imbibitions, and gradually disappeared thereafter. In the localization analysis using GFP-fusion proteins, the three isotypes showed different cellular distributions. C1C-Prx was localized in the cytosol and nucleus, whereas C2C-Prx and C-Prx were found mainly in the chloroplast and cytosol, respectively. In vitro thiol-dependent antioxidant assays revealed that the relative peroxidase activities of the isotypes were C-PrxII > C2C-Prx > C1C-Prx. C1C-Prx and C2C-Prx, but not C-PrxII, prevented aggregation of malate dehydrogenase as a molecular chaperone. Taken together, these results suggest that the three isotypes of Prx play specific roles in the cells in timely and spatially different manners, but they also cooperate with each other to protect the plant. PMID:22228209

  11. Molecular and functional properties of three different peroxiredoxin isotypes in Chinese cabbage.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Young; Jung, Young Jun; Shin, Mi Rim; Park, Jung Hoon; Nawkar, Ganesh M; Maibam, Punyakishore; Lee, Eun Seon; Kim, Kang-San; Paeng, Seol Ki; Kim, Woe Yeon; Lee, Kyun Oh; Yun, Dae-Jin; Kang, Chang Ho; Lee, Sang Yeol

    2012-01-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prxs), which are classified into three isotypes in plants, play important roles in protection systems as peroxidases or molecular chaperones. The three Prx isotypes of Chinese cabbage, namely C1C-Prx, C2C-Prx, and C-PrxII, have recently been identified and characterized. The present study compares their molecular properties and biochemical functions to gain insights into their concerted roles in plants. The three Prx isotype genes were differentially expressed in tissue- and developmental stage-specific manners. The transcript level of the C1C-Prx gene was abundant at the seed stage, but rapidly decreased after imbibitions. In contrast, the C2C-Prx transcript was not detected in the seeds, but its expression level increased at germination and was maintained thereafter. The C-PrxII transcript level was mild at the seed stage, rapidly increased for 10 days after imbibitions, and gradually disappeared thereafter. In the localization analysis using GFP-fusion proteins, the three isotypes showed different cellular distributions. C1C-Prx was localized in the cytosol and nucleus, whereas C2C-Prx and C-Prx were found mainly in the chloroplast and cytosol, respectively. In vitro thiol-dependent antioxidant assays revealed that the relative peroxidase activities of the isotypes were CPrxII > C2C-Prx > C1C-Prx. C1C-Prx and C2C-Prx, but not C-PrxII, prevented aggregation of malate dehydrogenase as a molecular chaperone. Taken together, these results suggest that the three isotypes of Prx play specific roles in the cells in timely and spatially different manners, but they also cooperate with each other to protect the plant.

  12. Two distinct immunoglobulin heavy chain isotypes in a primitive, cartilaginous fish, Raja erinacea.

    PubMed

    Harding, F A; Amemiya, C T; Litman, R T; Cohen, N; Litman, G W

    1990-11-11

    Immunoglobulin heavy chain genes in Raja erinacea (little skate) are organized in clusters consisting of VH, DH, JH segments and CH exons (1). An immunoglobulin heavy chain mu-like isotype that exhibits 61-91% nucleotide sequence identity in coding segments to the Heterodontus francisci (horned shark) mu-type immunoglobulin is described. The overall length of the mu-type clusters is approximately 16 kb; transmembrane exons (TM1 and TM2) are located 3 to CH exon 4 (CH4). In three of four TM-containing genomic clones, a significant deletion is present in TM1. A second isotype of Raja immunoglobulin heavy chain genes has been detected by screening a spleen cDNA library with homologous Raja VH- and CH1-specific probes complementing the respective regions of the mu-like isotype. Weak hybridization with VH-specific probes and no discernable hybridization with C mu-specific probes were considered presumptive evidence for a second immunoglobulin isotype that nominally is designated as X-type. The Vx region of the X-type cDNA is approximately 60% identical at the nucleotide (nt) level to other Raja VH segments and thus represents a second VH family. Putative Dx and Jx sequences also have been identified. The constant region of the X-type immunoglobulin heavy chain gene consists of two characteristic immunoglobulin domains and a cysteine-rich carboxy terminal segment that are only partially homologous with the mu-like isotype. Genomic Southern blotting indicates that the V and C segments of both immunoglobulin heavy chain isotypes are encoded by complex multigene families. Vx- and different Cx-specific probes hybridize to different length transcripts in northern blot analyses of Raja spleen RNA suggesting that the regulation of expression of the X-type genes may involve differential RNA processing.

  13. Two distinct immunoglobulin heavy chain isotypes in a primitive, cartilaginous fish, Raja erinacea.

    PubMed Central

    Harding, F A; Amemiya, C T; Litman, R T; Cohen, N; Litman, G W

    1990-01-01

    Immunoglobulin heavy chain genes in Raja erinacea (little skate) are organized in clusters consisting of VH, DH, JH segments and CH exons (1). An immunoglobulin heavy chain mu-like isotype that exhibits 61-91% nucleotide sequence identity in coding segments to the Heterodontus francisci (horned shark) mu-type immunoglobulin is described. The overall length of the mu-type clusters is approximately 16 kb; transmembrane exons (TM1 and TM2) are located 3 to CH exon 4 (CH4). In three of four TM-containing genomic clones, a significant deletion is present in TM1. A second isotype of Raja immunoglobulin heavy chain genes has been detected by screening a spleen cDNA library with homologous Raja VH- and CH1-specific probes complementing the respective regions of the mu-like isotype. Weak hybridization with VH-specific probes and no discernable hybridization with C mu-specific probes were considered presumptive evidence for a second immunoglobulin isotype that nominally is designated as X-type. The Vx region of the X-type cDNA is approximately 60% identical at the nucleotide (nt) level to other Raja VH segments and thus represents a second VH family. Putative Dx and Jx sequences also have been identified. The constant region of the X-type immunoglobulin heavy chain gene consists of two characteristic immunoglobulin domains and a cysteine-rich carboxy terminal segment that are only partially homologous with the mu-like isotype. Genomic Southern blotting indicates that the V and C segments of both immunoglobulin heavy chain isotypes are encoded by complex multigene families. Vx- and different Cx-specific probes hybridize to different length transcripts in northern blot analyses of Raja spleen RNA suggesting that the regulation of expression of the X-type genes may involve differential RNA processing. Images PMID:2123029

  14. Cellular and temporal expression of NADPH oxidase (NOX) isotypes after brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Brain injury results in an increase in the activity of the reactive oxygen species generating NADPH oxidase (NOX) enzymes. Preliminary studies have shown that NOX2, NOX3, and NOX4 are the most prominently expressed NOX isotypes in the brain. However, the cellular and temporal expression profile of these isotypes in the injured and non-injured brain is currently unclear. Methods Double immunofluorescence for NOX isotypes and brain cell types was performed at acute (24 hours), sub-acute (7 days), and chronic (28 days) time points after controlled cortical impact-induced brain injury or sham-injury in rats. Results NOX2, NOX3, and NOX4 isotypes were found to be expressed in neurons, astrocytes, and microglia, and this expression was dependent on both cellular source and post-injury time. NOX4 was found in all cell types assessed, while NOX3 was positively identified in neurons only, and NOX2 was identified in microglia and neurons. NOX2 was the most responsive to injury, increasing primarily in microglia in response to injury. Quantitation of this isotype showed a significant increase in NOX2 expression at 24 hours, with reduced expression at 7 days and 28 days post-injury, although expression remained above sham levels at later time points. Cellular confirmation using purified primary or cell line culture demonstrated similar patterns in microglia, astrocytes, and neurons. Further, inhibition of NOX, and more specifically NOX2, reduced pro-inflammatory activity in microglia, demonstrating that NOX is not only up-regulated after stimulation, but may also play a significant role in post-injury neuroinflammation. Conclusions This study illustrates the expression profiles of NOX isotypes in the brain after injury, and demonstrates that NOX2, and to a lesser extent, NOX4, may be responsible for the majority of oxidative stress observed acutely after traumatic brain injury. These data may provide insight into the design of future therapeutic approaches. PMID

  15. Molecular insight of isotypes specific β-tubulin interaction of tubulin heterodimer with noscapinoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoshi, Seneha; Naik, Pradeep K.

    2014-07-01

    Noscapine and its derivatives bind stoichiometrically to tubulin, alter its dynamic instability and thus effectively inhibit the cellular proliferation of a wide variety of cancer cells including many drug-resistant variants. The tubulin molecule is composed of α- and β-tubulin, which exist as various isotypes whose distribution and drug-binding properties are significantly different. Although the noscapinoids bind to a site overlapping with colchicine, their interaction is more biased towards β-tubulin. In fact, their precise interaction and binding affinity with specific isotypes of β-tubulin in the αβ-heterodimer has never been addressed. In this study, the binding affinity of a panel of noscapinoids with each type of tubulin was investigated computationally. We found that the binding score of a specific noscapinoid with each type of tubulin isotype is different. Specifically, amino-noscapine has the highest binding score of -6.4, -7.2, -7.4 and -7.3 kcal/mol with αβI, αβII, αβIII and αβIV isotypes, respectively. Similarly 10 showed higher binding affinity of -6.8 kcal/mol with αβV, whereas 8 had the highest binding affinity of -7.2, -7.1 and -7.2 kcal/mol, respectively with αβVI, αβVII and αβVIII isotypes. More importantly, both amino-noscapine and its clinical derivative, bromo-noscapine have the highest binding affinity of -46.2 and -38.1 kcal/mol against αβIII (overexpression of αβIII has been associated with resistance to a wide range of chemotherapeutic drugs for several human malignancies) as measured using MM-PBSA. Knowledge of the isotype specificity of the noscapinoids may allow for development of novel therapeutic agents based on this class of drugs.

  16. Optical traps with geometric aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    Roichman, Yael; Waldron, Alex; Gardel, Emily; Grier, David G

    2006-05-20

    We assess the influence of geometric aberrations on the in-plane performance of optical traps by studying the dynamics of trapped colloidal spheres in deliberately distorted holographic optical tweezers. The lateral stiffness of the traps turns out to be insensitive to moderate amounts of coma, astigmatism, and spherical aberration. Moreover holographic aberration correction enables us to compensate inherent shortcomings in the optical train, thereby adaptively improving its performance. We also demonstrate the effects of geometric aberrations on the intensity profiles of optical vortices, whose readily measured deformations suggest a method for rapidly estimating and correcting geometric aberrations in holographic trapping systems.

  17. Isotype of protective anti-Salmonella antibodies in experimental mouse salmonellosis.

    PubMed

    Saxén, H; Mäkelä, O; Svenson, S B

    1984-06-01

    Mice and a rabbit were immunized with heat-killed Salmonella typhimurium bacteria or with an O-4,12 antigen-specific octasaccharide-protein conjugate. Immunoglobulin isotypes of the antisera were tested for their capacity to protect mice against experimental salmonellosis. Antibodies of immunoglobulin M + A isotypes were more protective than the immunoglobulin G antibodies in each of the two pools of mouse sera. The same protective pattern was also seen with a rabbit antiserum elicited by the artificial octasaccharide-protein conjugate, i.e., with antibodies with the exclusive specificity for the O-4,12 antigen determinants of S. typhimurium.

  18. Isotype of protective anti-Salmonella antibodies in experimental mouse salmonellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Saxén, H; Mäkelä, O; Svenson, S B

    1984-01-01

    Mice and a rabbit were immunized with heat-killed Salmonella typhimurium bacteria or with an O-4,12 antigen-specific octasaccharide-protein conjugate. Immunoglobulin isotypes of the antisera were tested for their capacity to protect mice against experimental salmonellosis. Antibodies of immunoglobulin M + A isotypes were more protective than the immunoglobulin G antibodies in each of the two pools of mouse sera. The same protective pattern was also seen with a rabbit antiserum elicited by the artificial octasaccharide-protein conjugate, i.e., with antibodies with the exclusive specificity for the O-4,12 antigen determinants of S. typhimurium. PMID:6202639

  19. Triggering Klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan, Kelton D.; /Purdue U. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    To determine if klystrons will perform to the specifications of the LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) project, a new digital trigger controller is needed for the Klystron/Microwave Department Test Laboratory. The controller needed to be programmed and Windows based user interface software needed to be written to interface with the device over a USB (Universal Serial Bus). Programming the device consisted of writing logic in VHDL (VHSIC (Very High Speed Integrated Circuits) hardware description language), and the Windows interface software was written in C++. Xilinx ISE (Integrated Software Environment) was used to compile the VHDL code and program the device, and Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 was used to compile the C++ based Windows software. The device was programmed in such a way as to easily allow read/write operations to it using a simple addressing model, and Windows software was developed to interface with the device over a USB connection. A method of setting configuration registers in the trigger device is absolutely necessary to the development of a new triggering system, and the method developed will fulfill this need adequately. More work is needed before the new trigger system is ready for use. The configuration registers in the device need to be fully integrated with the logic that will generate the RF signals, and this system will need to be tested extensively to determine if it meets the requirements for low noise trigger outputs.

  20. Patterns of tubulin isotype synthesis and usage during mitotic spindle morphogenesis in Physarum.

    PubMed

    Paul, E C; Roobol, A; Foster, K E; Gull, K

    1987-01-01

    Tubulin synthesis in the naturally synchronous plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum is a markedly periodic event restricted to the late G2 period of the cell cycle. Mitosis in the plasmodium is intranuclear, and there are no cytoplasmic microtubules at any stage of the cell cycle. We have combined a biochemical investigation of the synthesis of the plasmodial tubulin isotypes and their participation in the mitotic spindle with a microscopic study (immunofluorescence) of the development of spindle microtubules throughout the cell cycle. We have shown that all four tubulin isotypes identified in the plasmodium (alpha 1, alpha 2, beta 1 and beta 2) are present in the mitotic spindle. The stoichiometry of isotype usage in the mitotic spindle generally reflects the overall abundance of isotypes in the plasmodium as a whole: beta 2 greater than alpha 1 greater than alpha 2 greater than beta 1. We have also shown that tubulins synthesized in the G2 period of one cell cycle can be incorporated into the spindles of the immediately ensuing mitosis and have sufficient biological longevity to allow participation in the mitotic divisions of future cell cycles. Thus, the phenomenon of periodic tubulin synthesis does not reflect a restricted use of tubulin to the cell cycle in which it was synthesized. The major polymerization of tubulin in the nucleus occurred less than 30 min before metaphase. A novel tubulin-containing structure was, however, present in the nucleus approximately 60 min before metaphase. Polymerized tubulin is rapidly removed from the nucleus following nucleokinesis.

  1. Altered beta-tubulin isotype expression in paclitaxel-resistant human prostate carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ranganathan, S.; Benetatos, C. A.; Colarusso, P. J.; Dexter, D. W.; Hudes, G. R.

    1998-01-01

    To investigate the role of beta-tubulin isotype composition in resistance to paclitaxel, an anti-microtubule agent, human prostate carcinoma (DU-145) cells were intermittently exposed to increasing concentrations of paclitaxel. Cells that were selected and maintained at 10 nM paclitaxel (Pac-10) were fivefold resistant to the drug. Pac-10 cells accumulated radiolabelled paclitaxel to the same extent as DU-145 cells and were negative for MDR-1. Analysis of Pac-10 and DU-145 cells by flow cytometry showed similar cell cycle patterns. Immunofluorescent staining revealed an overall increase of alpha- and beta-tubulin levels in Pac-10 cells compared with DU-145 cells. Examination of beta-tubulin isotype composition revealed a significant increase in betaIII isotype in the resistant cells, both by immunofluorescence and by western blot analysis. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of the isotypes confirmed the increase observed for the betaIII by exhibiting ninefold higher betaIII mRNA levels and also showed fivefold increase of the betaIVa transcript. In addition, analysis of paclitaxel-resistant cells that were selected at increasing levels of the drug (Pac 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10) exhibited a positive correlation between increasing betaIII levels and increasing resistance to paclitaxel. Increased expression of specific beta-tubulin isotypes and subsequent incorporation into microtubules may alter cellular microtubule dynamics, providing a defence against the anti-microtubule effects of paclitaxel and other tubulin-binding drugs. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:9484812

  2. Aberration correction of unstable resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Construction of aspheric reflectors for unstable resonator lasers to provide an arbitrary laser mode inside the resonator to correct aberrations of an output beam by the construction of the shape of an end reflector opposite the output reflector of the resonator cavity, such as aberrations resulting from refraction of a beam exiting the solid of the resonator having an index of refraction greater than 1 or to produce an aberration in the output beam that will precisely compensate for the aberration of an optical train into which the resonator beam is coupled.

  3. The mouse B-cell antigen receptor: definition and assembly of the core receptor of the five immunoglobulin isotypes.

    PubMed

    Neuberger, M S; Patel, K J; Dariavach, P; Nelms, K; Peaker, C J; Williams, G T

    1993-04-01

    We have shown that the core antigen receptor of all five isotypes is composed of immunoglobulin in association with a common heterodimeric alpha/beta sheath. The stoichiometry of the association is unknown although preliminary evidence points to it being an IgH2L2 [alpha/beta]2 association. Studies with chimaeric molecules indicate that much of the immunoglobulin-sheath interaction must occur through the carboxyterminal end of the molecule with particular importance being given to the linker-transmembrane region. The glycosylation of the alpha chain differs according to the isotype with which it is associated. There are two sites for N-linked glycosylation on the alpha chain (Asn-30 and Asn-40); both sites are used. Mutation of Asn-30 alone decreases but does not abolish surface expression of the antigen receptor complex. Mutation of both sites prevents expression of the surface IgM[alpha/beta] complex but not of a surface IgD[alpha/beta] complex. Moreover, the pattern of alpha glycosylation is considerably affected by changes in the linker region between C mu 4 and the transmembrane, giving further support to the importance of this region in immunoglobulin-sheath interaction. Unlike IgM, IgD and IgG2b do not require alpha/beta for transport to the cell surface and can be expressed on the surface without either sheath or glycosyl phosphatidylinositol anchor. This finding may reflect that the IgD transmembrane region is significantly less hydrophobic than that of IgM; however, it should be noted that is not clear whether naked IgD exists in vivo. In fact, we have found that the alpha/beta sheath is necessary in order to facilitate efficient internalization and presentation of antigen by membrane immunoglobulin. The sheath presumably also plays a major role in potentiating transmembrane signalling. However, mutant receptors that do not associate with the alpha/beta sheath are nevertheless able to trigger phosphorylation of cellular proteins on tyrosine residues

  4. [Demonstration of immunoglobulin isotypes in the vitreous body as a contribution to the etiology of recurrent equine uveitis].

    PubMed

    Wagner, B; Brandt, K; Sheoran, A; Holmes, M A; Deegen, E; Leibold, W

    1997-11-01

    The functional properties of different immunoglobulin isotypes in equine recurrent uveitis (ERU) has not been investigated yet. Here, we describe the quantitative determination of total immunoglobulin levels and isotype differentiation in the vitreous of four horses with ERU as compared to that of seven healthy horses. In contrast to almost equal amounts of total immunoglobulin in the vitreous of both groups, remarkable differences were found: All four of the horses with ERU had significantly higher IgA contents in their vitreous as compared to the control group. However, the other isotypes monitored (IgM, IgGa, IgGb, IgGc and IgG(T)) indicated no differences between both groups. Comparing the individual ratios of immunoglobulin isotypes in the vitreous and the autologous serum of two horses with ERU and two control animals provided informative results: IgM was only detected in serum but not at all in vitreous of all horses investigated. All four IgG isotypes monitored in the diseased animals as well as these IgG isotypes and the IgA in healthy animals were present in the same ratios in serum and in vitreous of the individual horses. In general, the content of such isotypes in the vitreous was about 1000 fold lower then the respective isotypes in the autologous serum. These results are compatible with a transfer of the IgG and IgA isotypes from the serum into the vitreous in healthy individuals. All four horses with ERU, however, had a selectively increased relative IgA content in the vitreous as compared to their serum. This argues for a preferential local IgA production within the framework of a local immunological reaction to antigens located within the eyes of horses with ERU.

  5. Camera processing with chromatic aberration.

    PubMed

    Korneliussen, Jan Tore; Hirakawa, Keigo

    2014-10-01

    Since the refractive index of materials commonly used for lens depends on the wavelengths of light, practical camera optics fail to converge light to a single point on an image plane. Known as chromatic aberration, this phenomenon distorts image details by introducing magnification error, defocus blur, and color fringes. Though achromatic and apochromatic lens designs reduce chromatic aberration to a degree, they are complex and expensive and they do not offer a perfect correction. In this paper, we propose a new postcapture processing scheme designed to overcome these problems computationally. Specifically, the proposed solution is comprised of chromatic aberration-tolerant demosaicking algorithm and post-demosaicking chromatic aberration correction. Experiments with simulated and real sensor data verify that the chromatic aberration is effectively corrected.

  6. Alum Directly Modulates Murine B Lymphocytes to Produce IgG1 Isotype

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Bo-Ra; Kim, Sun-Jin; Lee, Jeong-Min; Kang, Seong-Ho; Han, Hye-Ju; Jang, Young-Saeng; Seo, Goo-young

    2013-01-01

    Aluminum hydroxide (alum) is the most widely used adjuvant in human vaccines. Nevertheless, it is virtually unknown whether alum acts on B cells. In the present study, we explored the direct effect of alum on Ig expression by murine B cells in vitro. LPS-activated mouse spleen B cells were cultured with alum, and the level of isotype-specific Ig secretion, IgG1 secreting cell numbers, and Ig germ-line transcripts (GLT) were measured using ELISA, ELISPOT, and RT-PCR, respectively. Alum consistently enhanced total IgG1 production, numbers of IgG1 secreting cells, and GLTγ1 expression. These results demonstrate that alum can directly cause IgG1 isotype switching leading to IgG1 production. PMID:23559895

  7. Comparative modelling of human β tubulin isotypes and implications for drug binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torin Huzil, J.; Ludueña, Richard F.; Tuszynski, Jack

    2006-02-01

    The protein tubulin is a target for several anti-mitotic drugs, which affect microtubule dynamics, ultimately leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Many of these drugs, including the taxanes and Vinca alkaloids, are currently used clinically in the treatment of several types of cancer. Another tubulin binding drug, colchicine, although too toxic to be used as a chemotherapeutic agent, is commonly used for the treatment of gout. The main disadvantage that all of these drugs share is that they bind tubulin indiscriminately, leading to the death of both cancerous and healthy cells. However, the broad cellular distribution of several tubulin isotypes provides a platform upon which to construct novel chemotherapeutic drugs that could differentiate between different cell types, reducing the undesirable side effects associated with current chemotherapeutic treatments. Here, we report an analysis of ten human β tubulin isotypes and discuss differences within each of the previously characterized paclitaxel, colchicine and vinblastine binding sites.

  8. Chromosome Aberrations in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Kerry A.; Durante, M.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    A review of currently available data on in vivo induced chromosome damage in the blood lymphocytes of astronauts proves that, after protracted exposure of a few months or more to space radiation, cytogenetic biodosimetry analyses of blood collected within a week or two of return from space provides a reliable estimate of equivalent radiation dose and risk. Recent studies indicate that biodosimetry estimates from single spaceflights lie within the range expected from physical dosimetry and biophysical models, but very large uncertainties are associated with single individual measurements and the total sample population remains low. Retrospective doses may be more difficult to estimate because of the fairly rapid time-dependent loss of "stable" aberrations in blood lymphocytes. Also, biodosimetry estimates from individuals who participate in multiple missions, or very long (interplanetary) missions, may be complicated by an adaptive response to space radiation and/or changes in lymphocyte survival and repopulation. A discussion of published data is presented and specific issues related to space radiation biodosimetry protocols are discussed.

  9. Dynamics of Leishmania-specific immunoglobulin isotypes in dogs with clinical leishmaniasis before and after treatment.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Alhelí; Solano-Gallego, Laia; Ojeda, Ana; Quintana, Josefina; Riera, Cristina; Gállego, Montserrat; Portús, Montserrat; Alberola, Jordi

    2006-01-01

    Concentrations of Leishmania-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG), immunoglobulin M (IgM), and immunoglobulin A (IgA) isotypes were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in 23 dogs naturally infected with Leishmania infantum before and 1 year after initiating drug therapy. Results showed a high expression and prevalence of Leishmania-specific IgG (176.4 +/- 89 ELISA units [EU]), IgM (105.3 +/- 95.5 EU), and IgA (153.6 +/- 98 EU) in dogs before treatment (median +/- interquartile range EU). One year after treatment was started, dogs were classified as responsive dogs (RDs; n = 13) or unresponsive dogs (UDs; n = 10) based on clinicopathologic findings. Both groups of dogs experienced a statistically significant decrease (P < .05) in Leishmania-specific IgG (RDs = 27%, UDs = 41%), IgM (RDs = 42%, UDs = 29%), and IgA (RDs = 56%, UDs = 46%). Concentrations of specific IgG and IgM were not different at diagnosis or after treatment between the 2 groups. However, the median value for Leishmania-specific IgA 1 year after treatment was significantly lower (P < .05) in RDs (60.8 +/- 67 EU) than in UDs (117 +/- 54 EU). Examination of our data indicates that both the IgA isotype, which is mostly produced by mucosal plasma cells, and the IgM isotype are increased in infected symptomatic dogs, as previously reported for IgG. These 3 isotypes decreased significantly 1 year after initiation of medical treatment.

  10. [T-lymphocyte subpopulations in mice: their respective role in the regulation of isotype expression].

    PubMed

    Thèze, J

    1982-01-01

    In this brief review the properties of some lymphocyte surface antigens are described. The biochemical characteristic and the cell distribution of the Lyt antigen are analysed. A peculiar consideration has also been devoted to a new family of T-cell alloantigens linked to Igh-1 and recently described by Owen et al. The respective role of T helper and T suppressor cells in the regulation of isotype expression is discussed in the light of data recently obtained in the laboratory.

  11. Arginine methylation regulates antibody responses through modulating cell division and isotype switching in B cells.

    PubMed

    Hata, Kikumi; Mizuguchi, Junichiro

    2013-03-01

    Protein arginine methylation plays crucial roles, including signal transduction, transcriptional control, cell proliferation and/or differentiation. B cells undergo clonal division, isotype switching and differentiate into antibody forming cells following stimulation with Toll-like receptor-ligand, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and T cell-derived signals, including CD40-ligand (CD40-L) and interleukin 4 (IL-4). Whether protein arginine methylation affects B cell division and/or isotype switching to IgG1 in response to LPS, IL-4, and CD40-L was examined using the arginine methyl transferase inhibitor adenosine-2',3'-dialdehyde (AdOx). Addition of AdOx substantially reduced the number of division cycles of stimulated B cells, whereas cell viability remained intact. Upon stimulation with LPS/IL-4/CD40-L, the proportion of surface IgG1 positive cells in each division cycle was slightly diminished by AdOx. However, the degree of expression of γ1 germ line transcript and activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) in response to LPS/IL-4/CD40-L were unaffected by addition of AdOx, suggesting that AdOx influences class switch recombination independent of AID expression through transcriptional control. Taken together, arginine methylation appears to be involved in B cell isotype switching, as well as in clonal expansion of B cells in response to LPS/IL-4/CD40-L.

  12. Cofactor dependence and isotype distribution of anticardiolipin antibodies in viral infections

    PubMed Central

    Guglielmone, H; Vitozzi, S; Elbarcha, O; Fernandez, E

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Antibodies to cardiolipin (aCLs) are often detected in patients with autoimmune disorders or infectious diseases.
OBJECTIVE—To investigate the distribution of aCL isotypes and requirement of protein cofactor in viral infections in order to establish the importance, if any, of these antibodies in these infectious diseases.
PATIENTS AND METHODS—The isotype distribution of aCLs in the sera from 160 patients with infection caused by HIV-1 (n=40), hepatitis A virus (n=40), hepatitis B virus (n=40), or hepatitis C virus (n=40) was studied by standardised enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in the presence and absence of protein cofactor (mainly β2-glycoprotein I). Serum samples from healthy volunteers and patients with syphilis and antiphospholipid syndrome were also included and served as negative and positive control groups respectively.
RESULTS—The prevalence of one or more aCL isotypes in serum of patients with HIV-1, hepatitis A virus, hepatitis B virus, or hepatitis C virus infection was 47%, 92%, 42%, and 17% respectively (principally IgM and/or IgA). Most of these antibodies were mainly cofactor independent.
CONCLUSIONS—The presence of aCLs in viral infections is principally cofactor independent, suggesting that cofactor dependence of the aCLs should be assessed to distinguish subjects most likely to suffer from clinical symptoms observed in the presence of these antibodies.

 PMID:11302873

  13. Differential localization of TGF-beta-precursor isotypes in normal human skin.

    PubMed

    Wataya-Kaneda, M; Hashimoto, K; Kato, M; Miyazono, K; Yoshikawa, K

    1994-08-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) can act as a multi-functional regulator of both cell growth and differentiation. Three isotypes of TGF-beta s namely TGF-beta 1, TGF-beta 2 and TGF-beta 3, have been found in human tissues. Up to now, little is known about the distribution patterns of the TGF-beta isotypes in human skin. Using the TGF-beta-precursor (latency-associated peptides) specific antibodies to confirm the specificity, we studied the immunohistochemical distribution of TGF-beta 1-3 in human skin. TGF-beta 2 was found mainly in the intercellular space of all the layers of the epidermis as well as in the cytoplasm with a weak staining. In contrast, TGF-beta 3 was present in the subepidermal area of the dermis. TGF-beta 1 was observed obviously in neither epidermis nor dermis. These results showed the differential localization of TGF-beta isotypes in human skin, suggesting that the TGF-beta 2 and TGF-beta 3 may regulate the human skin function in an epithelial autocrine or mesenchymal-epithelial interaction manner.

  14. Measurement of serum amyloid A1 (SAA1), a major isotype of acute phase SAA.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuanyuan; Yamada, Toshiyuki; Satoh, Takahiko; Okuda, Yasuaki

    2006-01-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA), a plasma precursor of reactive amyloid deposits, is a multigene product. SAA1 and SAA2, with primary structures that are 93% identical (98 of 104 amino acids), behave as acute phase proteins, as demonstrated by their increasing levels in plasma. Heretofore, it has been understood that SAA1 predominates and functions as an isotype in plasma. However, accurate measurements differentiating the two isotypes have not been reported. In this study, using monoclonal antibodies specific for SAA1, we developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for SAA1. The levels and ratios of SAA1 in total SAA (TSAA) were investigated in healthy subjects and patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The SAA1/TSAA ratio was 74 +/- 12% and 77 +/- 12% in healthy subjects and RA patients, respectively. In RA patients, the ratios were not influenced by SAA1 genotype, which has been proposed to affect plasma SAA values. The kinetics of SAA1 in inflamed patients undergoing hemodialysis was found to be parallel with total SAA and C-reactive protein. Finally, this study confirmed that SAA1 is a major isotype of acute phase SAA and may determine total SAA values. This specific assay could be used in the evaluation of SAA behavior in several clinical conditions.

  15. Cytoplasmic 5'-nucleotidase autoantibodies in inclusion body myositis: Isotypes and diagnostic utility.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Steven A

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies have identified circulating immunoglobulin (Ig) G autoantibodies against cytoplasmic 5'-nucleotidase 1A (cN1A; NT5C1A) in patients with inclusion body myositis (IBM), whose detection provides for an IBM blood diagnostic test. Whether or not anti-cN1A autoantibody isotypes other than IgG are present in IBM has not previously been reported. Plasma and serum samples from 205 patients (50 with and155 without IBM) were studied for the presence of IgM and IgA, in addition to IgG, anti-cN1A autoantibodies using immunoblots and enzyme-linked immunoassays (ELISAs). IgM, IgA, and IgG anti-cN1A autoantibodies were detected by ELISA with similar sensitivities (49-53%) and specificities (94-96%), but with differing patterns of autoantibody isotype presence. Combination assays of all 3 autoantibody levels improved diagnostic sensitivity to 76%. In addition to previously recognized IgG anti-cN1A autoantibodies, IBM patients have circulating IgM and IgA anti-cN1A autoantibodies. Differing patterns of these isotypes may be present and useful for diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Conformational Analysis of the Carboxy-Terminal Tails of Human β-Tubulin Isotypes

    PubMed Central

    Luchko, Tyler; Huzil, J. Torin; Stepanova, Maria; Tuszynski, Jack

    2008-01-01

    Several isotypes of the structural protein tubulin have been characterized. Their expression offers a plausible explanation for differences regarding microtubule function. Although sequence variation between tubulin isotypes occurs throughout the entire protein, it is the extreme carboxy-terminal tails (CTTs) that exhibit the greatest concentration of differences. In humans, the CTTs range in length from 9 to 25 residues and because of a considerable number of glutamic acid residues, contain over 1/3 of tubulin's total electrostatic charge. The CTTs are believed to be highly disordered and their precise function has yet to be determined. However, their absence has been shown to result in altered microtubule stability and a reduction in the interaction with several microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs). To characterize the role that CTTs play in microtubule function, we examined the global conformational differences within a set of nine human β-tubulin isotypes using replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations. Through the analysis of the resulting configuration ensembles, we quantified differences such as the CTTs sequence influence on overall flexibility and average secondary structure. Although only minor variations between each CTT were observed, we suggest that these differences may be significant enough to affect interactions with MAPs, thereby influencing important properties such as microtubule assembly and stability. PMID:17993481

  17. Conformational analysis of the carboxy-terminal tails of human beta-tubulin isotypes.

    PubMed

    Luchko, Tyler; Huzil, J Torin; Stepanova, Maria; Tuszynski, Jack

    2008-03-15

    Several isotypes of the structural protein tubulin have been characterized. Their expression offers a plausible explanation for differences regarding microtubule function. Although sequence variation between tubulin isotypes occurs throughout the entire protein, it is the extreme carboxy-terminal tails (CTTs) that exhibit the greatest concentration of differences. In humans, the CTTs range in length from 9 to 25 residues and because of a considerable number of glutamic acid residues, contain over 1/3 of tubulin's total electrostatic charge. The CTTs are believed to be highly disordered and their precise function has yet to be determined. However, their absence has been shown to result in altered microtubule stability and a reduction in the interaction with several microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs). To characterize the role that CTTs play in microtubule function, we examined the global conformational differences within a set of nine human beta-tubulin isotypes using replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations. Through the analysis of the resulting configuration ensembles, we quantified differences such as the CTTs sequence influence on overall flexibility and average secondary structure. Although only minor variations between each CTT were observed, we suggest that these differences may be significant enough to affect interactions with MAPs, thereby influencing important properties such as microtubule assembly and stability.

  18. Correction of Distributed Optical Aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K; Olivier, S; Carrano, C; Phillion, D

    2006-02-12

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate the use of multiple distributed deformable mirrors (DMs) to improve the performance of optical systems with distributed aberrations. This concept is expected to provide dramatic improvement in the optical performance of systems in applications where the aberrations are distributed along the optical path or within the instrument itself. Our approach used multiple actuated DMs distributed to match the aberration distribution. The project developed the algorithms necessary to determine the required corrections and simulate the performance of these multiple DM systems.

  19. Six mouse alpha-tubulin mRNAs encode five distinct isotypes: testis-specific expression of two sister genes.

    PubMed Central

    Villasante, A; Wang, D; Dobner, P; Dolph, P; Lewis, S A; Cowan, N J

    1986-01-01

    Five mouse alpha-tubulin isotypes are described, each distinguished by the presence of unique amino acid substitutions within the coding region. Most, though not all of these isotype-specific amino acids, are clustered at the carboxy terminus. One of the alpha-tubulin isotypes described is expressed exclusively in testis and is encoded by two closely related genes (M alpha 3 and M alpha 7) which have homologous 3' untranslated regions but which differ at multiple third codon positions and in their 5' untranslated regions. We show that a subfamily of alpha-tubulin genes encoding the same testis-specific isotype also exists in humans. Thus, we conclude that the duplication event leading to a pair of genes encoding a testis-specific alpha-tubulin isotype predated the mammalian radiation, and both members of the duplicated sequence have been maintained since species divergence. A second alpha-tubulin gene, M alpha 6, is expressed ubiquitously at a low level, whereas a third gene, M alpha 4, is unique in that it does not encode a carboxy-terminal tyrosine residue. This gene yields two transcripts: a 1.8-kilobase (kb) mRNA that is abundant in muscle and a 2.4-kb mRNA that is abundant in testis. Whereas the 1.8-kb mRNA encodes a distinct alpha-tubulin isotype, the 2.4-kb mRNA is defective in that the methionine residue required for translational initiation is missing. Patterns of developmental expression of the various alpha-tubulin isotypes are presented. Our data support the view that individual tubulin isotypes are capable of conferring functional specificity on different kinds of microtubules. Images PMID:3785200

  20. Pulse compressor with aberration correction

    SciTech Connect

    Mankos, Marian

    2015-11-30

    In this SBIR project, Electron Optica, Inc. (EOI) is developing an electron mirror-based pulse compressor attachment to new and retrofitted dynamic transmission electron microscopes (DTEMs) and ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) cameras for improving the temporal resolution of these instruments from the characteristic range of a few picoseconds to a few nanoseconds and beyond, into the sub-100 femtosecond range. The improvement will enable electron microscopes and diffraction cameras to better resolve the dynamics of reactions in the areas of solid state physics, chemistry, and biology. EOI’s pulse compressor technology utilizes the combination of electron mirror optics and a magnetic beam separator to compress the electron pulse. The design exploits the symmetry inherent in reversing the electron trajectory in the mirror in order to compress the temporally broadened beam. This system also simultaneously corrects the chromatic and spherical aberration of the objective lens for improved spatial resolution. This correction will be found valuable as the source size is reduced with laser-triggered point source emitters. With such emitters, it might be possible to significantly reduce the illuminated area and carry out ultrafast diffraction experiments from small regions of the sample, e.g. from individual grains or nanoparticles. During phase I, EOI drafted a set of candidate pulse compressor architectures and evaluated the trade-offs between temporal resolution and electron bunch size to achieve the optimum design for two particular applications with market potential: increasing the temporal and spatial resolution of UEDs, and increasing the temporal and spatial resolution of DTEMs. Specialized software packages that have been developed by MEBS, Ltd. were used to calculate the electron optical properties of the key pulse compressor components: namely, the magnetic prism, the electron mirror, and the electron lenses. In the final step, these results were folded

  1. Historical aspects of aberration correction.

    PubMed

    Rose, Harald H

    2009-06-01

    A brief history of the development of direct aberration correction in electron microscopy is outlined starting from the famous Scherzer theorem established in 1936. Aberration correction is the long story of many seemingly fruitless efforts to improve the resolution of electron microscopes by compensating for the unavoidable resolution-limiting aberrations of round electron lenses over a period of 50 years. The successful breakthrough, in 1997, can be considered as a quantum step in electron microscopy because it provides genuine atomic resolution approaching the size of the radius of the hydrogen atom. The additional realization of monochromators, aberration-free imaging energy filters and spectrometers has been leading to a new generation of analytical electron microscopes providing elemental and electronic information about the object on an atomic scale.

  2. Progression From IgD+ IgM+ to Isotype-Switched B Cells Is Site Specific during Coronavirus-Induced Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Phares, Timothy W.; DiSano, Krista D.; Stohlman, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Various infections in the central nervous system (CNS) trigger B cell accumulation; however, the relative dynamics between viral replication and alterations in distinct B cell subsets are largely unknown. Using a glia-tropic coronavirus infection, which is initiated in the brain but rapidly spreads to and predominantly persists in the spinal cord, this study characterizes longitudinal changes in B cell subsets at both infected anatomical sites. The phase of T cell-dependent, antibody-independent control of infectious virus was associated with a similar recruitment of naive/early-activated IgD+ IgM+ B cells into both the brain and spinal cord. This population was progressively replaced by CD138− IgD− IgM+ B cells, isotype-switched CD138− IgD− IgM− memory B cells (Bmem), and CD138+ antibody-secreting cells (ASC). A more rapid transition to Bmem and ASC in spinal cord than in brain was associated with higher levels of persisting viral RNA and transcripts encoding factors promoting B cell migration, differentiation, and survival. The results demonstrate that naive/early-activated B cells are recruited early during coronavirus CNS infection but are subsequently replaced by more differentiated B cells. Furthermore, viral persistence, even at low levels, is a driving force for accumulation of isotype-switched Bmem and ASC. IMPORTANCE Acute and chronic human CNS infections are associated with an accumulation of heterogeneous B cell subsets; however, their influence on viral load and disease is unclear. Using a glia-tropic coronavirus model, we demonstrate that the accumulation of B cells ranging from early-activated to isotype-switched differentiation stages is both temporally and spatially orchestrated. Acutely infected brains and spinal cords indiscriminately recruit a homogeneous population of early-activated B cells, which is progressively replaced by diverse, more differentiated subsets. The latter process is accelerated by elevated proinflammatory

  3. Progression from IgD+ IgM+ to isotype-switched B cells is site specific during coronavirus-induced encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Phares, Timothy W; DiSano, Krista D; Stohlman, Stephen A; Bergmann, Cornelia C

    2014-08-01

    Various infections in the central nervous system (CNS) trigger B cell accumulation; however, the relative dynamics between viral replication and alterations in distinct B cell subsets are largely unknown. Using a glia-tropic coronavirus infection, which is initiated in the brain but rapidly spreads to and predominantly persists in the spinal cord, this study characterizes longitudinal changes in B cell subsets at both infected anatomical sites. The phase of T cell-dependent, antibody-independent control of infectious virus was associated with a similar recruitment of naive/early-activated IgD(+) IgM(+) B cells into both the brain and spinal cord. This population was progressively replaced by CD138(-) IgD(-) IgM(+) B cells, isotype-switched CD138(-) IgD(-) IgM(-) memory B cells (B(mem)), and CD138(+) antibody-secreting cells (ASC). A more rapid transition to B(mem) and ASC in spinal cord than in brain was associated with higher levels of persisting viral RNA and transcripts encoding factors promoting B cell migration, differentiation, and survival. The results demonstrate that naive/early-activated B cells are recruited early during coronavirus CNS infection but are subsequently replaced by more differentiated B cells. Furthermore, viral persistence, even at low levels, is a driving force for accumulation of isotype-switched B(mem) and ASC. Acute and chronic human CNS infections are associated with an accumulation of heterogeneous B cell subsets; however, their influence on viral load and disease is unclear. Using a glia-tropic coronavirus model, we demonstrate that the accumulation of B cells ranging from early-activated to isotype-switched differentiation stages is both temporally and spatially orchestrated. Acutely infected brains and spinal cords indiscriminately recruit a homogeneous population of early-activated B cells, which is progressively replaced by diverse, more differentiated subsets. The latter process is accelerated by elevated proinflammatory

  4. Firearm trigger assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, David L.; Watson, Richard W.

    2010-02-16

    A firearm trigger assembly for use with a firearm includes a trigger mounted to a forestock of the firearm so that the trigger is movable between a rest position and a triggering position by a forwardly placed support hand of a user. An elongated trigger member operatively associated with the trigger operates a sear assembly of the firearm when the trigger is moved to the triggering position. An action release assembly operatively associated with the firearm trigger assembly and a movable assembly of the firearm prevents the trigger from being moved to the triggering position when the movable assembly is not in the locked position.

  5. Pupil aberrations in Offner spectrometers.

    PubMed

    González-Núñez, Héctor; Prieto-Blanco, Xesús; de la Fuente, Raúl

    2012-04-01

    The light path function (LPF) of an Offner spectrometer is presented. The evaluation of the LPF of this spectrometer enables its imaging properties to be studied for arbitrary object and image positions, while avoiding the more complicated analysis of intermediate images generated by the diffraction grating, which is often involved. A power series expansion of the LPF on the grating coordinates directly determines pupil aberrations of the generated spectrum and facilitates the search for configurations with small low-order aberrations. This analysis not only confirms the possibility of reducing low-order aberrations in Rowland-type mounts, namely astigmatism and coma, as predicted in previous studies, but also proves that all third-order terms in the series expansion of the aberration function can be canceled at the image of the design point and for the corresponding design wavelength, when the design point is located on a plane orthogonal to the optical axis. Furthermore, fourth-order terms are computed and shown to represent the most relevant contribution to image blurring. Third- and fourth-order aberrations are also evaluated for Rowland mounts with the design point located outside the aforementioned plane. The study described in this manuscript is not restricted to small angles of incidence, and, therefore, it goes beyond Seidel and Buchdahl aberrations.

  6. On the Definition of Aberration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Minghui; Wang, Guangli

    2014-12-01

    There was a groundbreaking step in the history of astronomy in 1728 when the effect of aberration was discovered by James Bradley (1693-1762). Recently, the solar acceleration, due to the variations in the aberrational effect of extragalactic sources caused by it, has been determined from VLBI observations with an uncertainty of about 0.5 mm{\\cdot}{s^{-1}}{\\cdot}{yr^{-1}} level. As a basic concept in astrometry with a nearly 300-year history, the definition of aberration, however, is still equivocal and discordant in the literature. It has been under continuing debate whether it depends on the relative motion between the observer and the observed source or only on the motion of the observer with respect to the frame of reference. In this paper, we will review the debate and the inconsistency in the definition of the aberration since the last century, and then discuss its definition in detail, which involves the discussions on the planetary aberration, the stellar aberration, the proper motion of an object during the travel time of light from the object to the observer, and the way of selecting the reference frame to express and distinguish the motions of the source and the observer. The aberration is essentially caused by the transformation between coordinate systems, and consequently quantified by the velocity of the observer with respect to the selected reference frame, independent of the motion of the source. Obviously, this nature is totally different from that of the definition given by the IAU WG NFA (Capitaine, 2007) in 2006, which is stated as, ``the apparent angular displacement of the observed position of a celestial object from its geometric position, caused by the finite velocity of light in combination with the motions of the observer and of the observed object.''

  7. TGFbetaR2 aberrant methylation is a potential prognostic marker and therapeutic target in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Fabrício; Colleoni, Gisele W B; Almeida, Manuella S Sampaio; Carvalho, André L; Vettore, André L

    2009-10-15

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable hematological malignancy. Different studies demonstrated the occurrence of genetic and epigenetic alterations in MM. The aberrant methylation is one of the most frequent epigenetic alterations in human genome. This study evaluated the aberrant methylation status of 20 genes in 51 MM samples by quantitative methylation-specific PCR (QMSP) and compared the methylation profile with clinicopathological characteristics of the patients. The QMSP analyses showed that PTGS2 (100.0%), SFN (100.0%), CDKN2B (90.2%), CDH1 (88.2%), ESR1 (72.5%), HIC1 (70.5%), CCND2 (62.7%), DCC (45.1%) and TGFbetaR2 (39.2%) are frequently hypermethylated in MM while aberrant methylation of RARbeta (16.6%), MGMT (12.5%), AIM1 (12.5%), CDKN2A (8.3%), SOCS1 (8.3%), CCNA1 (8.3%) and THBS1 (4.1%) are rare events. There was no methylation of GSTP1, MINT31, p14ARF and RB1 in the samples tested. Hypermethylation of ESR1 was correlated positively with isotype IgA, while aberrant methylation of THBS1 correlated negatively with isotype IgG. Furthermore, hypermethylation of DCC and TGFbetaR2 were correlated with poor survival. The multivariate analysis showed ISS and TGFbetaR2 hypermethylation strongly correlated with poor outcome. This study represents the first quantitative evaluation of promoter methylation in MM and our data provide evidence that TGFbetaR2 hypermethylation, besides ISS, may be useful as prognostic indicator in this disease.

  8. [Investigation of chromosome 1 aberrations in patients with multiple myeloma using cIg-FISH method and its significance].

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui-Fang; Li, Chun-Ming; Qiu, Hai-Rong; Lu, Hua; Wu, Han-Xin; Xu, Jia-Ren; Li, Jian-Yong; Chen, Li-Juan

    2010-12-01

    To investigate the incidence of 1q21 amplification and 1p12 deletion, and analyze the correlation between these aberrations with disease progression, prognosis and outcome in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Cytoplasm light chain immunofluorescence with simultaneous interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (cIg-FISH) was used to detecte the 1q21 amplification and 1p12 deletion in 48 patients with MM. 1q21 amplification (≥ 3 red signals) was determined in 26 of 48(54.2%) cases. The mortality of patients with 1q21 amplification was significantly higher than that of those lacking 1q21 amplification (P < 0.05). The sex, age, D-S stage, subgroup and ISS stage between patients with and without 1q21 amplification had no significant difference (P > 0.05). There was a significant difference in D-S stage and mortality between patients with 3 and with 4 copies of 1q21 (P < 0.05). No significant difference in sex, age, subgroup, ISS stage, and isotype was found between them (P > 0.05). 1p12 deletion (< 2 green signals) was found in 14 of 48 (29.2%) cases. There was no significant difference in sex, age, D-S stage, ISS stage, isotype, subgroup, and mortality between patients with and without 1p12 deletion. The frequency of chromosome 1 aberrations in multiple myeloma is high and 1q21 amplification is a poor prognosis factor.

  9. Differential effect of isotype on efficacy of anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha chimeric antibodies in experimental septic shock

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Immune complexes containing human gamma (g)1 or murine g2a antibodies generate secondary effector mechanisms via Fc receptor binding or complement activation, whereas those containing human g4 or murine g1 antibodies generally do not. Therefore, isotype selection of therapeutic antibodies may have important clinical consequences. In a rabbit model of human tumor necrosis factor (rhuTNF)-induced pyrexia, a murine/human chimeric g4 anti-human TNF-alpha monoclonal antibody (mAb) (cCB0011) showed a dose-dependent inhibition of pyrexia, whereas a g1 isotype variant of the same mAb gave a marked pyrexia that was seen at all doses indicative of an immune complex-mediated response. To investigate whether isotype difference could influence mAb efficacy in pathological disease states, hamster/murine chimeric g1 and g2a anti- murine TNF-alpha mAbs (TN3g1, TN3g2a) were studied in experimental shock in mice and rats. In lipopolysaccharide-induced shock in mice, treatment with TN3g1 mAb at 30 and 3 mg/kg resulted in 90% survival by 72 h (p < or = 0.004), and prolonged survival to 45 h (p < or = 0.05), respectively, compared with 100% mortality by 27 h in controls. In contrast, a g2a isotype variant of the same mAb (30 mg/kg) resulted in only 10% survival by 72 h (p < or = 0.05). In a neutropenic sepsis model in rats there was greater survival in animals receiving the g1 isotype of TN3 compared with g2a isotype variant (70 vs. 27%; p < or = 0.005) with 100% mortality in the controls. These differences were not due to the pharmacokinetic profiles of the mAbs. In models of experimental shock antibody isotype can affect outcome with inactive isotypes (human g4 and murine g1) being more efficacious than active isotypes (human g1 and murine g2a). PMID:8113678

  10. Rationalization of paclitaxel insensitivity of yeast β-tubulin and human βIII-tubulin isotype using principal component analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The chemotherapeutic agent paclitaxel arrests cell division by binding to the hetero-dimeric protein tubulin. Subtle differences in tubulin sequences, across eukaryotes and among β-tubulin isotypes, can have profound impact on paclitaxel-tubulin binding. To capture the experimentally observed paclitaxel-resistance of human βIII tubulin isotype and yeast β-tubulin, within a common theoretical framework, we have performed structural principal component analyses of β-tubulin sequences across eukaryotes. Results The paclitaxel-resistance of human βIII tubulin isotype and yeast β-tubulin uniquely mapped on to the lowest two principal components, defining the paclitaxel-binding site residues of β-tubulin. The molecular mechanisms behind paclitaxel-resistance, mediated through key residues, were identified from structural consequences of characteristic mutations that confer paclitaxel-resistance. Specifically, Ala277 in βIII isotype was shown to be crucial for paclitaxel-resistance. Conclusions The present analysis captures the origin of two apparently unrelated events, paclitaxel-insensitivity of yeast tubulin and human βIII tubulin isotype, through two common collective sequence vectors. PMID:22849332

  11. Differing specificities and isotypes of anti-citrullinated peptide/protein antibodies in palindromic rheumatism and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Villalba, Sonia; Gomara, María José; Cañete, Juan D; Ramírez, Julio; Salvador, Georgina; Ruiz-Esquide, Virginia; Hernández, Maria Victoria; Inciarte-Mundo, José; Haro, Isabel; Sanmartí, Raimon

    2017-06-15

    To analyze differences in the recognition of anti-citrullinated peptide/protein antibody (ACPA) citrullinated epitopes and isotypes in patients with palindromic rheumatism (PR) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). ACPA fine specificities (citrullinated peptides of enolase, fibrin, and vimentin) and isotypes (IgG, IgM, and IgA) were analyzed in 54 patients with longstanding PR and 54 patients with established RA. CCP2 tested positive in 66.7% of patients with PR and RA. The ACPA distribution of fine specificities and isotypes differed between PR and RA patients. PR patients had a lower frequency of fine ACPA specificities than RA patients, which was significant in the case of a peptide derived from vimentin (PR 24.1% vs. 59.3% RA; p < 0.001). The mean number of ACPA specificities was lower in PR than in RA patients, and only 25.9% of PR patients recognized ≥2 additional specificities compared with 46.3% of RA patients. Significantly less isotype usage, especially IgA, was observed in PR patients. The ACPA immune response differed in patients with PR and RA, with fewer fine specificities and isotype usage in patients with PR. Some patients with PR may have impaired maturation of the B-cell response against citrullinated peptides with no progression to RA.

  12. Immunoglobulin light chain (IGL) genes in torafugu: Genomic organization and identification of a third teleost IGL isotype

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xi; Zhang, Fengjun; Watabe, Shugo; Asakawa, Shuichi

    2017-01-01

    Here, we report a genome-wide survey of immunoglobulin light chain (IGL) genes of torafugu (Takifugu rubripes) revealing multi-clusters spanning three separate chromosomes (v5 assembly) and 45 scaffolds (v4 assembly). Conventional sequence similarity searches and motif scanning approaches based on recombination signal sequence (RSS) motifs were used. We found that three IGL isotypes (L1, L2, and L3) exist in torafugu and that several loci for each isotype are present. The transcriptional orientations of the variable IGL (VL) segments were found to be either the same (in the L2 isotype) or opposite (in the L1 and L3 isotypes) to the IGL joining (JL) and constant (CL) segments, suggesting they can undergo rearrangement by deletion or inversion when expressed. Alignments of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) to corresponding germline gene segments revealed expression of the three IGL isotypes in torafugu. Taken together, our findings provide a genomic framework for torafugu IGL genes and show that the IG diversity of this species could be attributed to at least three distinct chromosomal regions. PMID:28098239

  13. How To Measure Gravitational Aberration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krizek, M.; Solcova, A.

    2007-08-01

    In 1905, Henri Poincaré predicted the existence of gravitational waves and assumed that their speed c[g] would be that of the speed of light c. If the gravitational aberration would also have the same magnitude as the aberration of light, we would observe several paradoxical phenomena. For instance, the orbit of two bodies of equal mass would be unstable, since two attractive forces arise that are not in line and hence form a couple. This tends to increase the angular momentum, period, and total energy of the system. This can be modelled by a system of ordinary differential equations with delay. A big advantage of computer simulation is that we can easily perform many test for various possible values of the speed of gravity [1]. In [2], Carlip showed that gravitational aberration in general relativity is almost cancelled out by velocity-dependent interactions. This means that rays of sunlight are not parallel to the attractive gravitational force of the Sun, i.e., we do not see the Sun in the direction of its attractive force, but slightly shifted about an angle less than 20``. We show how the actual value of the gravitational aberration can be obtained by measurement of a single angle at a suitable time instant T corresponding to the perihelion of an elliptic orbit. We also derive an a priori error estimate that expresses how acurately T has to be determined to attain the gravitational aberration to a prescribed tolerance. [1] M. Křížek: Numerical experience with the finite speed of gravitational interaction, Math. Comput. Simulation 50 (1999), 237-245. [2] S. Carlip: Aberration and the speed of gravity, Phys. Lett. A 267 (2000), 81-87.

  14. Isotype analysis of gerbil-mouse heterohybridomas by RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Ukaji, Takao; Kai, Osamu

    2012-12-14

    We designed primer sets specific to the immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy-chain constant region (IGHC) genes in Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) to amplify five gerbil IGHC cDNA sequences, Cμ, Cγ1, Cγ2, Cε, and Cα. Five gerbil-mouse heterohybridomas B11D2(C2), B11E2(D5).M, B5-3, D5, and C11 respectively expressed Cγ1, Cμ, Cγ2, Cγ2, and Cγ1. In contrast, a commercial isotyping kit for mouse Igs identified Cγ1, Cμ, Cγ3, Cγ3, and Cγ1, respectively, misidentifying gerbil IgG2 as IgG3 by cross-reactivity with anti-mouse IgG3 polyclonal antibody. These primer sets will allow the accurate estimation of gerbil Ig classes and IgG subclasses. These results from three gerbil strains indicate that the primer sets can be used for isotype analysis of gerbil mAbs and for evaluation of humoral immunity.

  15. Structural model of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor isotypes bound to acetylcholine and nicotine

    PubMed Central

    Schapira, Matthieu; Abagyan, Ruben; Totrov, Maxim

    2002-01-01

    Background Nicotine is a psychoactive drug presenting a diverse array of biological activities, some positive, such as enhancement of cognitive performances, others negative, such as addiction liability. Ligands that discriminate between the different isotypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) could present improved pharmacology and toxicity profile. Results Based on the recent crystal structure of a soluble acetylcholine binding protein from snails, we have built atomic models of acetylcholine and nicotine bound to the pocket of four different human nAChR subtypes. The structures of the docked ligands correlate with available biochemical data, and reveal that the determinants for isotype selectivity are relying essentially on four residues, providing diversity of the ligand binding pocket both in terms of Van der Waals boundary, and electrostatic potential. We used our models to screen in silico a large compound database and identify a new ligand candidate that could display subtype selectivity. Conclusion The nAChR-agonist models should be useful for the design of nAChR agonists with diverse specificity profiles. PMID:11860617

  16. Isotype InGaN/GaN heterobarrier diodes by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fireman, Micha N.; Browne, David A.; Mishra, Umesh K.; Speck, James S.

    2016-02-01

    The design of isotype InGaN/GaN heterobarrier diode structures grown by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy is presented. On the (0001) Ga-polar plane, a structure consisting of a surface n+ GaN contact layer, followed by a thin InGaN layer, followed by a thick unintentionally doped (UID) GaN layer, and atop a buried n+ GaN contact layer induces a large conduction band barrier via a depleted UID GaN layer. Suppression of reverse and subthreshold current in such isotype barrier devices under applied bias depends on the quality of this composite layer polarization. Sample series were grown under fixed InGaN growth conditions that varied either the UID GaN NH3 flow rate or the UID GaN thickness, and under fixed UID GaN growth conditions that varied InGaN growth conditions. Decreases in subthreshold current and reverse bias current were measured for thicker UID GaN layers and increasing InGaN growth rates. Temperature-dependent analysis indicated that although extracted barrier heights were lower than those predicted by 1D Schrödinger Poisson simulations (0.9 eV-1.4 eV for In compositions from 10% to 15%), optimized growth conditions increased the extracted barrier height from ˜11% to nearly 85% of the simulated values. Potential subthreshold mechanisms are discussed, along with those growth factors which might affect their prevalence.

  17. Development of Immunocapture-LC/MS Assay for Simultaneous ADA Isotyping and Semiquantitation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin-Zhi; Roos, David; Philip, Elsy

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic proteins and peptides have potential to elicit immune responses resulting in anti-drug antibodies that can pose problems for both patient safety and product efficacy. During drug development immunogenicity is usually examined by risk-based approach along with specific strategies for developing "fit-for-purpose" bioanalytical approaches. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and electrochemiluminescence immunoassays are the most widely used platform for ADA detection due to their high sensitivity and throughput. During the past decade, LC/MS has emerged as a promising technology for quantitation of biotherapeutics and protein biomarkers in biological matrices, mainly owing to its high specificity, selectivity, multiplexing, and wide dynamic range. In fully taking these advantages, we describe here an immunocapture-LC/MS methodology for simultaneous isotyping and semiquantitation of ADA in human plasma. Briefly, ADA and/or drug-ADA complex is captured by biotinylated drug or anti-drug Ab, immobilized on streptavidin magnetic beads, and separated from human plasma by a magnet. ADA is then released from the beads and subjected to trypsin digestion followed by LC/MS detection of specific universal peptides for each ADA isotype. The LC/MS data are analyzed using cut-point and calibration curve. The proof-of-concept of this methodology is demonstrated by detecting preexisting ADA in human plasma.

  18. Aberrations of flat lenses and aplanatic metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Aieta, Francesco; Genevet, Patrice; Kats, Mikhail; Capasso, Federico

    2013-12-16

    A study of optical aberrations for flat lenses based on phase discontinuities is reported. The wave aberration function and the analytical expression of the aberrations up to the 4th order are derived to describe the performance of both ideal and practical flat lenses. We find that aberration-free focusing is possible under axial illumination but off-axis aberrations appear when the excitation is not normal to the interface. An alternative design for an aplanatic metasurface on a curved substrate is proposed to focus light without coma and spherical aberrations.

  19. The Art of Optical Aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wylde, Clarissa Eileen Kenney

    Art and optics are inseparable. Though seemingly opposite disciplines, the combination of art and optics has significantly impacted both culture and science as they are now known. As history has run its course, in the sciences, arts, and their fruitful combinations, optical aberrations have proved to be a problematic hindrance to progress. In an effort to eradicate aberrations the simple beauty of these aberrational forms has been labeled as undesirable and discarded. Here, rather than approach aberrations as erroneous, these beautiful forms are elevated to be the photographic subject in a new body of work, On the Bright Side. Though many recording methods could be utilized, this work was composed on classic, medium-format, photographic film using white-light, Michelson interferometry. The resulting images are both a representation of the true light rays that interacted on the distorted mirror surfaces (data) and the artist's compositional eye for what parts of the interferogram are chosen and displayed. A detailed description of the captivating interdisciplinary procedure is documented and presented alongside the final artwork, CCD digital reference images, and deformable mirror contour maps. This alluring marriage between the arts and sciences opens up a heretofore minimally explored aspect of the inextricable art-optics connection. It additionally provides a fascinating new conversation on the importance of light and optics in photographic composition.

  20. Mobility and Core-Protein Binding Patterns of Disordered C-Terminal Tails in β-Tubulin Isotypes.

    PubMed

    Laurin, Yoann; Eyer, Joel; Robert, Charles H; Prevost, Chantal; Sacquin-Mora, Sophie

    2017-03-28

    Although they play a significant part in the regulation of microtubule structure, dynamics, and function, the disordered C-terminal tails of tubulin remain invisible to experimental structural methods and do not appear in the crystallographic structures that are currently available in the Protein Data Bank. Interestingly, these tails concentrate most of the sequence variability between tubulin isotypes and are the sites of the principal post-translational modifications undergone by this protein. Using homology modeling, we developed two complete models for the human αI/βI- and αI/βIII-tubulin isotypes that include their C-terminal tails. We then investigated the conformational variability of the two β-tails using long time-scale classical molecular dynamics simulations that revealed similar features, notably the unexpected presence of common anchoring regions on the surface of the tuulin dimer, but also distinctive mobility or interaction patterns, some of which could be related to the tail lengths and charge distributions. We also observed in our simulations that the C-terminal tail from the βI isotype, but not the βIII isotype, formed contacts in the putative binding site of a recently discovered peptide that disrupts microtubule formation in glioma cells. Hindering the binding site in the βI isotype would be consistent with this peptide's preferential disruption of microtubule formation in glioma, whose cells overexpress βIII, compared to normal glial cells. While these observations need to be confirmed with more intensive sampling, our study opens new perspectives for the development of isotype-specific chemotherapy drugs.

  1. Wave aberrations of the isolated crystalline lens

    PubMed Central

    Roorda, Austin; Glasser, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    A method to measure wave aberrations in the isolated crystalline lens is demonstrated. The method employs a laser scanning technique in which the trajectories of narrow refracted laser beams are measured for an array of sample positions incident on the lens. The local slope of the emerging wavefront is calculated for each sample position, and a least squares procedure is used to fit a Zernike polynomial function to define the wave aberration. Measurements of the aberrations of an isolated porcine lens and macaque lens undergoing changes in accommodative state with mechanical stretching are shown. Many aberrations were present, but negative spherical aberration dominated. In the macaque lens, many aberrations underwent systematic changes with accommodation, most notably the 4th order spherical aberration, which became more negative, and the 6th order spherical aberration, which progressed from negative to positive. PMID:15134472

  2. Wave aberration function and its definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zverev, V. A.; Rytova, E. S.; Timoshchuk, I. N.

    2011-06-01

    A definition of a wave aberration as a phase shift upon composition of light waves in the image of a point is given using the concept of point eikonal. An expression that determines the total differential of a wave aberration function is obtained and the condition of its integrability is determined. The sequence of the wave aberration function definition at the known functions of the meridional and sagittal components of lateral aberration is presented.

  3. Effect of downregulation of germline transcripts on immunoglobulin A isotype differentiation

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    In this study we determined the role of immunoglobulin (Ig) germline transcripts in the isotype switch differentiation of the cloned lymphoma B cell line CH12.LX. In initial studies, we showed that addition of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) and interleukin 4 (IL-4), either alone or in combination, augment switching from membrane (m)IgM+ to mIgA+ cells, and that increased switching is preceded and paralleled by an increase in the steady-state level of alpha germline transcripts (alpha GLT). Interestingly, TGF-beta and IL- 4 affect switching in different ways, as shown by the fact that IL-4 increases and TGF-beta decreases the number of dual-positive (mIgM+/mIgA+) cells; in addition, TGF-beta and IL-4 have different effects on the time course of induction of alpha GLT. In subsequent studies, we established that we could downregulate alpha GLT levels in CH12.LX B cells by transfecting an expression vector that can be induced to produce transcripts antisense to the I alpha exon. Using this approach we downregulated alpha GLT in CH12.LX B cells undergoing switching in the presence of TGF-beta and IL-4 and showed that such downregulation led to decreased switching, as evidenced by decreased appearance of dual-positive B cells as well as decreased IgA synthesis relative to IgM synthesis. This result was corroborated by the fact that incubation of CH12.LX cells with phosphorothio-oligo antisense DNA to I alpha sequence also led to a decrease in the number of dual- positive cells and in the IgA/IgM secretion ratio. In summary, IgA isotype differentiation in CH12.LX B cell, particularly the steps necessary for the elaboration of mIgM+/mIgA+ switch intermediate cells, is inhibited by downregulation of alpha GLT; it is therefore apparent that alpha GLT plays a key role in the initial stage of isotype switch differentiation. PMID:8315375

  4. Regulation by interferon alpha of immunoglobulin isotype selection and lymphokine production in mice

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Antigens and infectious agents that stimulate interferon alpha(IFN- alpha) production in mice induce antibody responses that are predominantly of the immunoglobulin (Ig)G2a isotype and contain little or no IgE. This suggested the possibility that IFN-alpha might have a role in directing Ig isotype selection. Consistent with this possibility, we have found that injection of mice with recombinant mouse IFN-alpha suppresses IgE secretion, enhances IgG2a secretion, and has no independent effect on IgG1 secretion in mice stimulated with a foreign anti-IgD antibody. Injection of mice with polyinosinic acid.polycytidylic acid (poly I.C), an inducer of macrophage IFN-alpha production, also suppresses the anti-IgD antibody-induced IgE response and stimulates the IgG2a response; these effects are blocked by a sheep antibody that neutralizes mouse IFN-alpha/beta. Both recombinant IFN- alpha and poly I.C have maximum IgE suppressive and IgG2a stimulatory effects when injected early in the anti-IgD antibody-induced immune response. Addition of IFN-alpha to mouse B cells cultured with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) + interleukin 4 (IL-4) suppresses both IgG1 and IgE production, but much less potently than IFN-gamma. IFN-alpha suppresses anti-IgD antibody-induced increases in the level of splenic IL-4 mRNA, but enhances the anti-IgD antibody-induced increase in the splenic level of IFN-gamma mRNA. These results are consistent with the effect of IFN-alpha on Ig isotype expression in mice, as IL-4 stimulates IgE and suppresses IgG2a secretion while IFN-gamma exerts opposite effects. These observations suggest that antigen presenting cells, by secreting IFN-alpha early in the course of an immune response, can influence the nature of that response both through direct effects on B cells and by influencing the differentiation of T cells. PMID:1940796

  5. Using geometric algebra to study optical aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    Hanlon, J.; Ziock, H.

    1997-05-01

    This paper uses Geometric Algebra (GA) to study vector aberrations in optical systems with square and round pupils. GA is a new way to produce the classical optical aberration spot diagrams on the Gaussian image plane and surfaces near the Gaussian image plane. Spot diagrams of the third, fifth and seventh order aberrations for square and round pupils are developed to illustrate the theory.

  6. Pathophysiology of MDS: genomic aberrations.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Motoshi

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are characterized by clonal proliferation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and their apoptosis, and show a propensity to progress to acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Although MDS are recognized as neoplastic diseases caused by genomic aberrations of hematopoietic cells, the details of the genetic abnormalities underlying disease development have not as yet been fully elucidated due to difficulties in analyzing chromosomal abnormalities. Recent advances in comprehensive analyses of disease genomes including whole-genome sequencing technologies have revealed the genomic abnormalities in MDS. Surprisingly, gene mutations were found in approximately 80-90% of cases with MDS, and the novel mutations discovered with these technologies included previously unknown, MDS-specific, mutations such as those of the genes in the RNA-splicing machinery. It is anticipated that these recent studies will shed new light on the pathophysiology of MDS due to genomic aberrations.

  7. Phase Aberrations in Diffraction Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Marchesini, S; Chapman, H N; Barty, A; Howells, M R; Spence, J H; Cui, C; Weierstall, U; Minor, A M

    2005-09-29

    In coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy the diffraction pattern generated by a sample illuminated with coherent x-rays is recorded, and a computer algorithm recovers the unmeasured phases to synthesize an image. By avoiding the use of a lens the resolution is limited, in principle, only by the largest scattering angles recorded. However, the imaging task is shifted from the experiment to the computer, and the algorithm's ability to recover meaningful images in the presence of noise and limited prior knowledge may produce aberrations in the reconstructed image. We analyze the low order aberrations produced by our phase retrieval algorithms. We present two methods to improve the accuracy and stability of reconstructions.

  8. Discovery of a unique Ig heavy-chain isotype (IgT) in rainbow trout: Implications for a distinctive B cell developmental pathway in teleost fish

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, John D.; Landis, Eric D.; Phillips, Ruth B.

    2005-01-01

    During the analysis of Ig superfamily members within the available rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) EST gene index, we identified a unique Ig heavy-chain (IgH) isotype. cDNAs encoding this isotype are composed of a typical IgH leader sequence and a VDJ rearranged segment followed by four Ig superfamily C-1 domains represented as either membrane-bound or secretory versions. Because teleost fish were previously thought to encode and express only two IgH isotypes (IgM and IgD) for their humoral immune repertoire, we isolated all three cDNA isotypes from a single homozygous trout (OSU-142) to confirm that all three are indeed independent isotypes. Bioinformatic and phylogenetic analysis indicates that this previously undescribed divergent isotype is restricted to bony fish, thus we have named this isotype “IgT” (τ) for teleost fish. Genomic sequence analysis of an OSU-142 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone positive for all three IgH isotypes revealed that IgT utilizes the standard rainbow trout VH families, but surprisingly, the IgT isotype possesses its own exclusive set of DH and JH elements for the generation of diversity. The IgT D and J segments and τ constant (C) region genes are located upstream of the D and J elements for IgM, representing a genomic IgH architecture that has not been observed in any other vertebrate class. All three isotypes are primarily expressed in the spleen and pronephros (bone marrow equivalent), and ontogenically, expression of IgT is present 4 d before hatching in developing embryos. PMID:15863615

  9. Cloning, expression, purification and characterization of an isotype of clytin, a calcium-binding photoprotein from the luminous hydromedusa Clytia gregarium.

    PubMed

    Inouye, Satoshi

    2008-05-01

    The cDNA for an isotype of clytin, a calcium-binding photoprotein from the luminous jellyfish Clytia gregarium, was identified and named clytin-II. The histidine-tagged apoprotein of clytin-II expressed into the periplasmic space of Escherichia coli cells was isolated by nickel chelate affinity chromatography. Recombinant clytin-II regenerated from apoprotein by incubation with coelenterazine was purified. The yield of purified clytin-II was 13 mg from 2 l of cultured cells with purity >95%. The luminescence properties of clytin-II were characterized by comparison with clytin-I and aequorin, and semi-synthetic clytin-II was also prepared. The initial luminescence intensity of clytin-II triggered by Ca(2+) was 4.5 times higher than that of clytin-I and aequorin, but the luminescence capacity was close to clytin-I and aequorin. Thus, clytin-II is a useful protein, showing high sensitivity in the signal-to-noise ratio of luminescence intensity.

  10. Monoclonal antibodies and toxins--a perspective on function and isotype.

    PubMed

    Chow, Siu-Kei; Casadevall, Arturo

    2012-06-01

    Antibody therapy remains the only effective treatment for toxin-mediated diseases. The development of hybridoma technology has allowed the isolation of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with high specificity and defined properties, and numerous mAbs have been purified and characterized for their protective efficacy against different toxins. This review summarizes the mAb studies for 6 toxins--Shiga toxin, pertussis toxin, anthrax toxin, ricin toxin, botulinum toxin, and Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB)--and analyzes the prevalence of mAb functions and their isotypes. Here we show that most toxin-binding mAbs resulted from immunization are non-protective and that mAbs with potential therapeutic use are preferably characterized. Various common practices and caveats of protection studies are discussed, with the goal of providing insights for the design of future research on antibody-toxin interactions.

  11. Monoclonal Antibodies and Toxins—A Perspective on Function and Isotype

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Siu-Kei; Casadevall, Arturo

    2012-01-01

    Antibody therapy remains the only effective treatment for toxin-mediated diseases. The development of hybridoma technology has allowed the isolation of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with high specificity and defined properties, and numerous mAbs have been purified and characterized for their protective efficacy against different toxins. This review summarizes the mAb studies for 6 toxins—Shiga toxin, pertussis toxin, anthrax toxin, ricin toxin, botulinum toxin, and Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB)—and analyzes the prevalence of mAb functions and their isotypes. Here we show that most toxin-binding mAbs resulted from immunization are non-protective and that mAbs with potential therapeutic use are preferably characterized. Various common practices and caveats of protection studies are discussed, with the goal of providing insights for the design of future research on antibody-toxin interactions. PMID:22822456

  12. Trap modulated photoresponse of InGaN/Si isotype heterojunction at zero-bias

    SciTech Connect

    Chandan, Greeshma; Mukundan, Shruti; Mohan, Lokesh; Krupanidhi, S. B.; Roul, Basanta

    2015-07-14

    n-n isotype heterojunction of InGaN and bare Si (111) was formed by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy without nitridation steps or buffer layers. High resolution X-ray diffraction studies were carried out to confirm the formation of epilayers on Si (111). X-ray rocking curves revealed the presence of large number of edge threading dislocations at the interface. Room temperature photoluminescence studies were carried out to confirm the bandgap and the presence of defects. Temperature dependent I-V measurements of Al/InGaN/Si (111)/Al taken in dark confirm the rectifying nature of the device. I-V characteristics under UV illumination, showed modest rectification and was operated at zero bias making it a self-powered device. A band diagram of the heterojunction is proposed to understand the transport mechanism for self-powered functioning of the device.

  13. Differential Regulation of Protein- and Polysaccharide-Specific Ig Isotype Production In Vivo in Response to Intact Streptococcus pneumoniae

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    response [3]. More recently, a normal pathogen-specific IgG isotype response to Borrelia burgdorferi was observed in TLR2-/- mice, although this...was associated with a higher burden of pathogen [113]. However, MyD88-/- mice infected with B. burgdorferi demonstrated elevated B. burgdorferi

  14. Expression of mammalian protein kinase C in Schizosaccharomyces pombe: isotype-specific induction of growth arrest, vesicle formation, and endocytosis.

    PubMed Central

    Goode, N T; Hajibagheri, M A; Warren, G; Parker, P J

    1994-01-01

    Mammalian protein kinase C (PKC) isotypes elicit a number of effects on expression in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. A small decrease in growth rate results from PKC-gamma expression, and treatment of these cells with phorbol esters leads to marked growth inhibition and vesicle formation. PKC-delta and -eta expression causes growth inhibition and vesiculation, and the magnitude of both of these effects is increased by phorbol esters. In contrast, PKC-epsilon expression produces growth inhibition but no vesicle accumulation, and this effect is not responsive to phorbol ester. Finally, PKC-zeta has no observable effect. Thus, isotype-specific biological effects are observed. The accumulation of vesicles correlates with phorbol ester-dependent growth inhibition and occurs only with expression of those isotypes that down-regulate in response to phorbol esters in these cells. Antibodies against mammalian clathrin light chain 1a identified clathrin-coated vesicles and up-regulation of clathrin expression in those cells where vesicles accumulate; the increased vesicular traffic includes an element of endocytosis. Thus expression of specific mammalian PKC isotypes up-regulates endocytosis in S. pombe, providing a likely explanation for PKC-mediated receptor internalization in higher eukaryotes. Images PMID:7803858

  15. Monoclonal antibodies specific for equine IgG sub-isotypes including an antibody which recognizes B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Lunn, D P; Holmes, M A; Schram, B; Duffus, W P

    1995-08-01

    Equine immunoglobulin G is currently classified as consisting of five sub-isotypes: IgGa, b, and c, IgG(T), and IgG(B). The study of the role of these immunoglobulins in antigen-specific responses, and the examination of their functional properties would be greatly facilitated by the availability of monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) that distinguish between them. The production and characterization of two Mabs that recognize an IgG sub-isotype with the characteristics of IgG(ab) is described. The immunoglobulin identified by these Mabs had a heavy chain weight of 53 kDa, was of rapid cathodal electrophoretic mobility in immuno-electrophoretic analysis, and reacted only with anti-sera to IgG, and not with anti-sera to IgG(T), IgA, or IgM in radial-immunodiffusion analysis. In addition, one of these two Mabs (CVS1) also recognized the majority of peripheral blood B lymphocytes in indirect immunofluorescent staining analysis, suggesting either that equine IgD may share a common antigenic epitope with an IgG sub-isotype, or that a large proportion of equine B lymphocytes may express an IgG sub-isotype on their surface.

  16. Four primordial immunoglobulin light chain isotypes, including lambda and kappa, identified in the most primitive living jawed vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Criscitiello, Michael F; Flajnik, Martin F

    2007-10-01

    The discovery of a fourth immunoglobulin (Ig) light (L) chain isotype in sharks has revealed the origins and natural history of all vertebrate L chains. Phylogenetic comparisons have established orthology between this new shark L chain and the unique Xenopus L chain isotype sigma. More importantly, inclusion of this new L chain family in phylogenetic analyses showed that all vertebrate L chains can be categorized into four ancestral clans originating prior to the emergence of cartilaginous fish: one restricted to elasmobranchs (sigma-cart/type I), one found in all cold-blooded vertebrates (sigma/teleost type 2/elasmobranch type IV), one in all groups except bony fish (lambda/elasmobranch type II), and one in all groups except birds (kappa/elasmobranch type III/teleost type 1 and 3). All four of these primordial L chain isotypes (sigma, sigma-cart, lambda and kappa) have maintained separate V region identities since their emergence at least 450 million years ago, suggestive of an ancient physiological distinction of the L chains. We suggest that, based upon unique, discrete sizes of complementarity determining regions 1 and 2 and other features of the V region sequences, the different L chain isotypes arose to provide different functional conformations in the Ig binding site when they pair with heavy chains.

  17. Isotype distribution of anticardiolipin antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus: prospective analysis of a series of 100 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Cervera, R; Font, J; López-Soto, A; Casals, F; Pallarés, L; Bové, A; Ingelmo, M; Urbano-Márquez, A

    1990-01-01

    A prospective study of IgG and IgM isotypes of anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL) in a series of 100 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus was carried out. To determine the normal range of both isotype titres a group of 100 normal control serum samples was studied and a log-normal distribution of IgG and IgM isotypes was found. The IgG anticardiolipin antibody serum was regarded as positive if a binding index greater than 2.85 (SD 3.77) was detected and a binding index greater than 4.07 (3.90) was defined as positive for IgM anticardiolipin antibody. Twenty four patients were positive for IgG aCL, 20 for IgM aCL, and 36 for IgG or IgM aCL, or both. IgG aCL were found to have a significant association with thrombosis and thrombocytopenia, and IgM aCL with haemolytic anaemia and neutropenia. Specificity and predictive value for these clinical manifestations increased at moderate and high anticardiolipin antibody titres. In addition, a significant association was found between aCL and the presence of lupus anticoagulant. Identification of these differences in the anticardiolipin antibody isotype associations may improve the clinical usefulness of these tests, and this study confirms the good specificity and predictive value of the anticardiolipin antibody titre for these clinical manifestations. PMID:2107799

  18. The expression and localization of inhibin isotypes in mouse testis during postnatal development

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yujin; Kim, Joong-Sun; Song, Myoung-Sub; Seo, Heung-Sik; Kim, Jong Choon; Bae, Chun-Sik; Kim, Seungjoon; Shin, Taekyun; Kim, Sung-Ho

    2008-01-01

    Inhibin, which is important for normal gonadal function, acts on the pituitary gonadotropins to suppress follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) secretion. The level and cellular localization of the inhibin isotypes, α, βA and βB, in the testis of mice were examined during postnatal development in order to determine if inhibin expression is related to testicular maturation. Mouse testes were sampled on postnatal days (PNDs) 1, 3, 6, 18, 48 and 120, and analyzed by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. Western blot analysis showed very low levels of inhibin α, βA and βB expression in the testes at days 1 to 6 after birth. The levels then increased gradually from PND 18 to 48-120, and there were significant peaks at PND 48. Inhibin α, βA and βB were detected in testicular cells during postnatal development using immunohistochemistry. The immunoreactivity of inhibin α was rarely observed in testicular cells during PND 1 to 6, or in the cytoplasmic process of Sertoli cells surrounding the germ cells and interstitial cells during PND 18 to 120. Inhibin βA and βB immunoreactivity was rarely observed in the testis from PND 1 to 6. On the other hand, it was observed in some spermatogonial cells, as well as in the interstitial space between PND 48 and PND 120. We conclude that the expression of inhibin isotypes increases progressively in the testis of mice with increasing postnatal age, suggesting that inhibin is associated with a negative feedback signal for FSH in testicular maturation. PMID:19043308

  19. Age-related differences in human palatine tonsillar B cell subsets and immunoglobulin isotypes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jino; Chang, Dong-Yeop; Kim, Sang-Wook; Choi, Yoon Seok; Jeon, Sea-Yuong; Racanelli, Vito; Kim, Dae Woo; Shin, Eui-Cheol

    2016-02-01

    The tonsils provide defense of the upper aerodigestive tract against pathogens. Although long known to undergo functional changes with age, the precise changes occurring within tonsillar B cell populations remain undefined. In the present study, we investigated age-related changes in palatine tonsillar B cell subsets and immunoglobulin (Ig) isotypes. Palatine tonsils were obtained from forty-two tonsillectomy patients without tonsillitis who were divided into three groups: young children (4-9 years), adolescents (10-19 years), and adults (20-60 years). Tonsillar B cells were then analyzed by flow cytometry. Using expression of CD38 and IgD to define B cell subsets, we found that the frequency of germinal center (GC) B cells in the tonsils was significantly higher, and the frequency of memory B cells lower, in young children as compared to adolescents and adults. Within the GC B cell subsets, adults had a higher frequency of IgA(+) cells and a lower frequency of IgM(+) cells as compared to individuals in the younger age groups. Moreover, young children had a higher frequency of IgG(+) cells in the GC B cell subsets than did individuals in the older age groups. We also observed an abundance of IgM(+) cells among memory B cells and plasmablasts in young children and IgA(+) cells in adults. In summary, the proportion of GC B cells in palatine tonsillar B cells decreases with age, while the proportion of memory B cells increases with age. In addition, Ig isotypes in tonsils preferentially switch from IgM to IgA as individuals age.

  20. Isotype InGaN/GaN heterobarrier diodes by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Fireman, Micha N.; Browne, David A.; Speck, James S.; Mishra, Umesh K.

    2016-02-07

    The design of isotype InGaN/GaN heterobarrier diode structures grown by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy is presented. On the (0001) Ga-polar plane, a structure consisting of a surface n{sup +} GaN contact layer, followed by a thin InGaN layer, followed by a thick unintentionally doped (UID) GaN layer, and atop a buried n{sup +} GaN contact layer induces a large conduction band barrier via a depleted UID GaN layer. Suppression of reverse and subthreshold current in such isotype barrier devices under applied bias depends on the quality of this composite layer polarization. Sample series were grown under fixed InGaN growth conditions that varied either the UID GaN NH{sub 3} flow rate or the UID GaN thickness, and under fixed UID GaN growth conditions that varied InGaN growth conditions. Decreases in subthreshold current and reverse bias current were measured for thicker UID GaN layers and increasing InGaN growth rates. Temperature-dependent analysis indicated that although extracted barrier heights were lower than those predicted by 1D Schrödinger Poisson simulations (0.9 eV–1.4 eV for In compositions from 10% to 15%), optimized growth conditions increased the extracted barrier height from ∼11% to nearly 85% of the simulated values. Potential subthreshold mechanisms are discussed, along with those growth factors which might affect their prevalence.

  1. IgG Subclasses and Isotypes of VH4-34 Encoded Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Neelima M; Kshirsagar, Mihir A; Bieber, Marcia M; Teng, Nelson N H

    2015-01-01

    VH4-34 gene encoded autoantibodies are elevated in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and in other diseases associated with B-cell hyperproliferation/dysfunction. One of the autoantigens recognized by VH4-34-encoded antibodies are branched/linear poly N-acetyl lactosamine chains. Since the anti-carbohydrate response in humans is dominated by the IgG2 subclass, here we tested whether VH4-34 encoded IgG showed similar subclass segregation. Serum samples from SLE, infectious mononucleosis, nasopharyngeal carcinoma and hepatitis-C were analyzed. Levels of VH4-34-encoded IgM and IgA isotypes were also tested. VH4-34-IgM and IgA were elevated in all four clinical conditions. VH4-34-IgG was detected in the IgG1 and IgG3 subclass but not in the IgG2 and IgG4 subclass. Interestingly, VH4-34-IgG3 was also detected in serum samples of normal healthy adults. These observations are discussed in context of the VH4-34 gene regulation. VH4-34 repertoire development is of interest since it is the only human VH gene profoundly overrepresented in the naïve repertoire but counter-selected for antibody secretion. VH4-34 B-cell could thus become a unique tool to inspect germinal center independent/dependent pathways of subclass and isotype-specific antibody secretion.

  2. Seidel aberrations of the Gabor superlens.

    PubMed

    Hamilton Shepard, R

    2014-02-10

    Equations are presented for the third-order Seidel aberrations of the Gabor superlens (GSL) as a function of microtelescope channel position within the aperture array. To reveal the origin and form of increasing aberration with channel height, Seidel coefficients are derived as a function of the accumulating pitch difference between the lens arrays and the aberrations present in the centered channel. Two- and three-element Gabor lenses are investigated and their aberrations are expressed as a function of first-order design parameters. The derived theory is then compared to a real ray trace simulation to demonstrate the accuracy of third-order aberration theory to predict GSL image quality.

  3. Neural compensation for the eye's optical aberrations.

    PubMed

    Artal, Pablo; Chen, Li; Fernández, Enrique J; Singer, Ben; Manzanera, Silvestre; Williams, David R

    2004-04-16

    A fundamental problem facing sensory systems is to recover useful information about the external world from signals that are corrupted by the sensory process itself. Retinal images in the human eye are affected by optical aberrations that cannot be corrected with ordinary spectacles or contact lenses, and the specific pattern of these aberrations is different in every eye. Though these aberrations always blur the retinal image, our subjective impression is that the visual world is sharp and clear, suggesting that the brain might compensate for their subjective influence. The recent introduction of adaptive optics to control the eye's aberrations now makes it possible to directly test this idea. If the brain compensates for the eye's aberrations, vision should be clearest with the eye's own aberrations rather than with unfamiliar ones. We asked subjects to view a stimulus through an adaptive optics system that either recreated their own aberrations or a rotated version of them. For all five subjects tested, the stimulus seen with the subject's own aberrations was always sharper than when seen through the rotated version. This supports the hypothesis that the neural visual system is adapted to the eye's aberrations, thereby removing somehow the effects of blur generated by the sensory apparatus from visual experience. This result could have important implications for methods to correct higher order aberrations with customized refractive surgery because some benefits of optimizing the correction optically might be undone by the nervous system's compensation for the old aberrations.

  4. Aberration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    (1) The apparent displacement of a star from its mean position on the celestial sphere due to the velocity of the Earth in its orbit around the Sun. The phenomenon was discovered in 1729 by James Bradley (1693-1762) who was, in fact, trying to measure stellar parallax. The displacement is caused by the combination of the velocity of the Earth and the velocity of light approaching from the source. ...

  5. Specificity and isotype of Rh specific antibodies produced by human B-cell lines established from alloimmunized Rh negative women.

    PubMed

    Pasha, Roya Payam Khaja; Bahrami, Zahra Samadi; Niroomanesh, Shirin; Ramzi, Fereshteh; Razavi, Ali Reza; Shokri, Fazel

    2005-10-01

    Despite the successful outcome of anti-D prophylaxis program, alloimmunization still occurs. The aim of this study was to examine the specificity and isotype of anti-Rh antibodies in plasma samples of Rh negative alloimmunized individuals and to study the same parameters in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) generated from the same donors. Specificity of anti-Rh antibodies was determined in plasma of nine alloimmunized subjects by direct hemagglutination using a panel of known RBC genotypes and isotype of specific antibodies were identified by an antigen specific ELISA. Similar methods were employed to determine specificity and isotype of antibodies produced by Rh specific LCLs established from four donors. LCLs were generated by Epstein-Barr virus transformation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from each donor followed by their culture over a feeder of human fetal fibroblasts. Upon emergence of lymphoblastoid cells, culture supernatants were assayed for presence of Rh specific antibody by hemagglutination assay. Anti-D was the predominant antibody in both plasma samples and among the 128 established LCLs; however, antibodies to other Rh specificities namely C and E were also produced. The isotype of anti-Rh antibody in all plasma samples was found to be IgG, predominantly IgG1, combined in 7 samples with IgM. Similarly 76%, 9.2% and 14.8% of LCLs were determined to produce antibody of IgG, IgM and of both isotypes, respectively. The data supported that the D antigen is the immunodominant component of the Rh system as indicated by the in vitro and in vivo profiles of Rh specificities in our alloimmunized subjects.

  6. Accumulation of secreted antibodies in plant cell cultures varies according to the isotype, host species and culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Magy, Bertrand; Tollet, Jérémie; Laterre, Raphaëlle; Boutry, Marc; Navarre, Catherine

    2014-05-01

    Nicotiana tabacum suspension cells have been widely used to produce monoclonal antibodies, but the yield of secreted antibodies is usually low probably because of proteolytic degradation. Most IgGs that have been expressed in suspension cells have been of the human IgG1 isotype. In this study, we examined whether other isotypes displayed the same sensitivity to proteolytic degradation and whether the choice of plant host species mattered. Human serum IgG displayed different degradation profiles when incubated in spent culture medium from N. tabacum, Nicotiana benthamiana or Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cells. Zymography showed that the protease profile was host species dependent. Three human isotypes, IgG1, IgG2 and IgG4, and a mouse IgG2a were provided with the same heavy- and light-chain variable regions from an anti-human IgM antibody and expressed in N. tabacum cv. BY-2 and A. thaliana cv. Col-0 cells. Although all tested isotypes were detected in the extracellular medium using SDS-PAGE and a functional ELISA, up to 10-fold differences in the level of intact antibody were found according to the isotype expressed, to the host species and to the culture conditions. In the best combination (BY-2 cells secreting human IgG1), we reported accumulation of more than 30 mg/L of intact antibody in culture medium. The possibility of using IgG constant regions as a scaffold to allow stable accumulation of antibodies with different variable regions was demonstrated for human IgG2 and mouse IgG2a. © 2013 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Correlations between corneal and total wavefront aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrochen, Michael; Jankov, Mirko; Bueeler, Michael; Seiler, Theo

    2002-06-01

    Purpose: Corneal topography data expressed as corneal aberrations are frequently used to report corneal laser surgery results. However, the optical image quality at the retina depends on all optical elements of the eye such as the human lens. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the correlations between the corneal and total wavefront aberrations and to discuss the importance of corneal aberrations for representing corneal laser surgery results. Methods: Thirty three eyes of 22 myopic subjects were measured with a corneal topography system and a Tschernig-type wavefront analyzer after the pupils were dilated to at least 6 mm in diameter. All measurements were centered with respect to the line of sight. Corneal and total wavefront aberrations were calculated up to the 6th Zernike order in the same reference plane. Results: Statistically significant correlations (p < 0.05) between the corneal and total wavefront aberrations were found for the astigmatism (C3,C5) and all 3rd Zernike order coefficients such as coma (C7,C8). No statistically significant correlations were found for all 4th to 6th order Zernike coefficients except for the 5th order horizontal coma C18 (p equals 0.003). On average, all Zernike coefficients for the corneal aberrations were found to be larger compared to Zernike coefficients for the total wavefront aberrations. Conclusions: Corneal aberrations are only of limited use for representing the optical quality of the human eye after corneal laser surgery. This is due to the lack of correlation between corneal and total wavefront aberrations in most of the higher order aberrations. Besides this, the data present in this study yield towards an aberration balancing between corneal aberrations and the optical elements within the eye that reduces the aberration from the cornea by a certain degree. Consequently, ideal customized ablations have to take both, corneal and total wavefront aberrations, into consideration.

  8. Myofascial trigger point pain.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Bernadette

    2013-01-01

    Myofascial trigger point pain is an extremely prevalent cause of persistent pain disorders in all parts of the body, not just the head, neck, and face. Features include deep aching pain in any structure, referred from focally tender points in taut bands of skeletal muscle (the trigger points). Diagnosis depends on accurate palpation with 2-4 kg/cm2 of pressure for 10 to 20 seconds over the suspected trigger point to allow the referred pain pattern to develop. In the head and neck region, cervical muscle trigger points (key trigger points) often incite and perpetuate trigger points (satellite trigger points) and referred pain from masticatory muscles. Management requires identification and control of as many perpetuating factors as possible (posture, body mechanics, psychological stress or depression, poor sleep or nutrition). Trigger point therapies such as spray and stretch or trigger point injections are best used as adjunctive therapy.

  9. Determination of aberration center of Ronchigram for automated aberration correctors in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sannomiya, Takumi; Sawada, Hidetaka; Nakamichi, Tomohiro; Hosokawa, Fumio; Nakamura, Yoshio; Tanishiro, Yasumasa; Takayanagi, Kunio

    2013-12-01

    A generic method to determine the aberration center is established, which can be utilized for aberration calculation and axis alignment for aberration corrected electron microscopes. In this method, decentering induced secondary aberrations from inherent primary aberrations are minimized to find the appropriate axis center. The fitness function to find the optimal decentering vector for the axis was defined as a sum of decentering induced secondary aberrations with properly distributed weight values according to the aberration order. Since the appropriate decentering vector is determined from the aberration values calculated at an arbitrary center axis, only one aberration measurement is in principle required to find the center, resulting in /very fast center search. This approach was tested for the Ronchigram based aberration calculation method for aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. Both in simulation and in experiments, the center search was confirmed to work well although the convergence to find the best axis becomes slower with larger primary aberrations. Such aberration center determination is expected to fully automatize the aberration correction procedures, which used to require pre-alignment of experienced users. This approach is also applicable to automated aperture positioning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Aberrations for Grazing Incidence Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Timo T.

    2008-01-01

    Large number of grazing incidence telescope configurations have been designed and studied. Wolte1 telescopes are commonly used in astronomical applications. Wolter telescopes consist of a paraboloidal primary mirror and a hyperboloidal or an ellipsoidal secondary mirror. There are 8 possible combinations of Wolter telescopes. Out of these possible designs only type 1 and type 2 telescopes are widely used. Type 1 telescope is typically used for x-ray applications and type 2 telescopes are used for EUV applications. Wolter-Schwarzshild (WS) telescopes offer improved image quality over a small field of view. The WS designs are stigmatic and free of third order coma and, therefore, the PSF is significantly better over a small field of view. Typically the image is more symmetric about its centroid. As for the Wolter telescopes there are 8 possible combinations of WS telescopes. These designs have not been widely used because the surface equations are complex parametric equations complicating the analysis and typically the resolution requirements are too low to take full advantage of the WS designs. There are several other design options. Most notable are wide field x-ray telescope designs. Polynomial designs were originally suggested by Burrows4 and hyperboloid-hyperboloid designs for solar physics applications were designed by Harvey5. No general aberration theory exists for grazing incidence telescopes that would cover all the design options. Several authors have studied the aberrations of grazing incidence telescopes. A comprehensive theory of Wolter type 1 and 2 telescopes has been developed. Later this theory was expanded to include all possible combinations of grazing incidence and also normal incidence paraboloid-hyperboloid and paraboloid-ellipsoid telescopes. In this article the aberration theory of Wolter type telescopes is briefly reviewed.

  11. The IgG and IgM isotypes of anti-annexin A5 antibodies: relevance for primary antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bećarević, Mirjana

    2016-11-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disease that is characterized by the presence of thromboses and/or recurrent pregnancy losses (RPL). The persistent presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL Abs): IgG and/or IgM isotypes of the anticardiolipin and/or anti-β2 glycoprotein I antibodies and lupus anticoagulant is mandatory for the laboratory diagnosis of APS. Due to the heating debate on the relevance of the IgM isotype of aPL Abs as a laboratory criterion defining APS, the focus of this article was to analyze whether both the IgG and IgM isotype of anti-annexin A5 Abs have equal relevance for clinical and serological features of patients with primary APS (PAPS). The IgG isotype of anti-annexin A5 Abs is associated with RPL in PAPS patients, although it is not elucidated whether these Abs are the cause or the consequence of RPL in PAPS. No data that could substantiate the association of the IgG and/or the IgM isotypes of anti-annexin A5 Abs with the presence of arterial and/or venous thromboses and/or their main complications in PAPS is available so far. However, the presence of clinical manifestations of the PAPS is increasing with the multiple positivity for aPL Abs and the IgM isotype of anti-annexin A5 Abs. The importance of the IgM isotype of anti-annexin A5 Abs in PAPS needs further elucidation due to the facts that majority of the available articles did not differentiate between both isotypes or only investigated the IgG isotype of anti-annexin A5 Abs.

  12. Dealing with Asthma Triggers

    MedlinePlus

    ... dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Dealing With Asthma Triggers KidsHealth > For Kids > Dealing With Asthma Triggers ... or the flu weather conditions exercise continue Managing Asthma Asthma can't be cured but it can ...

  13. Asthma triggers (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... asthma triggers are mold, pets, dust, grasses, pollen, cockroaches, odors from chemicals, and smoke from cigarettes. ... asthma triggers are mold, pets, dust, grasses, pollen, cockroaches, odors from chemicals, and smoke from cigarettes.

  14. Distinct Functional Roles of β-Tubulin Isotypes in Microtubule Arrays of Tetrahymena thermophila, a Model Single-Celled Organism

    PubMed Central

    Pucciarelli, Sandra; Ballarini, Patrizia; Sparvoli, Daniela; Barchetta, Sabrina; Yu, Ting; Detrich, H. William; Miceli, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Background The multi-tubulin hypothesis proposes that each tubulin isotype performs a unique role, or subset of roles, in the universe of microtubule function(s). To test this hypothesis, we are investigating the functions of the recently discovered, noncanonical β-like tubulins (BLTs) of the ciliate, Tetrahymena thermophila. Tetrahymena forms 17 distinct microtubular structures whose assembly had been thought to be based on single α- and β-isotypes. However, completion of the macronuclear genome sequence of Tetrahymena demonstrated that this ciliate possessed a β-tubulin multigene family: two synonymous genes (BTU1 and BTU2) encode the canonical β-tubulin, BTU2, and six genes (BLT1-6) yield five divergent β-tubulin isotypes. In this report, we examine the structural features and functions of two of the BLTs (BLT1 and BLT4) and compare them to those of BTU2. Methodology/Principal Findings With respect to BTU2, BLT1 and BLT4 had multiple sequence substitutions in their GTP-binding sites, in their interaction surfaces, and in their microtubule-targeting motifs, which together suggest that they have specialized functions. To assess the roles of these tubulins in vivo, we transformed Tetrahymena with expression vectors that direct the synthesis of GFP-tagged versions of the isotypes. We show that GFP-BLT1 and GFP-BLT4 were not detectable in somatic cilia and basal bodies, whereas GFP-BTU2 strongly labeled these structures. During cell division, GFP-BLT1 and GFP-BLT4, but not GFP-BTU2, were incorporated into the microtubule arrays of the macronucleus and into the mitotic apparatus of the micronucleus. GFP-BLT1 also participated in formation of the microtubules of the meiotic apparatus of the micronucleus during conjugation. Partitioning of the isotypes between nuclear and ciliary microtubules was confirmed biochemically. Conclusion/Significance We conclude that Tetrahymena uses a family of distinct β-tubulin isotypes to construct subsets of functionally different

  15. Phase and birefringence aberration correction

    DOEpatents

    Bowers, Mark; Hankla, Allen

    1996-01-01

    A Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing phase conjugate mirror corrects phase aberrations of a coherent electromagnetic beam and birefringence induced upon that beam. The stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) phase conjugation technique is augmented to include Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing (BEFWM). A seed beam is generated by a main oscillator which arrives at the phase conjugate cell before the signal beams in order to initiate the Brillouin effect. The signal beam which is being amplified through the amplifier chain is split into two perpendicularly polarized beams. One of the two beams is chosen to be the same polarization as some component of the seed beam, the other orthogonal to the first. The polarization of the orthogonal beam is then rotated 90.degree. such that it is parallel to the other signal beam. The three beams are then focused into cell containing a medium capable of Brillouin excitation. The two signal beams are focused such that they cross the seed beam path before their respective beam waists in order to achieve BEFWM or the two signal beams are focused to a point or points contained within the focused cone angle of the seed beam to achieve seeded SBS, and thus negate the effects of all birefringent and material aberrations in the system.

  16. Phase and birefringence aberration correction

    DOEpatents

    Bowers, M.; Hankla, A.

    1996-07-09

    A Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing phase conjugate mirror corrects phase aberrations of a coherent electromagnetic beam and birefringence induced upon that beam. The stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) phase conjugation technique is augmented to include Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing (BEFWM). A seed beam is generated by a main oscillator which arrives at the phase conjugate cell before the signal beams in order to initiate the Brillouin effect. The signal beam which is being amplified through the amplifier chain is split into two perpendicularly polarized beams. One of the two beams is chosen to be the same polarization as some component of the seed beam, the other orthogonal to the first. The polarization of the orthogonal beam is then rotated 90{degree} such that it is parallel to the other signal beam. The three beams are then focused into cell containing a medium capable of Brillouin excitation. The two signal beams are focused such that they cross the seed beam path before their respective beam waists in order to achieve BEFWM or the two signal beams are focused to a point or points contained within the focused cone angle of the seed beam to achieve seeded SBS, and thus negate the effects of all birefringent and material aberrations in the system. 5 figs.

  17. The misalignment induced aberrations of TMA telescopes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kevin P; Schmid, Tobias; Rolland, Jannick P

    2008-12-08

    The next major space-borne observatory, the James Webb Space Telescope, will be a 6.6M field-biased, obscured, three-mirror anastigmat (TMA). Over the used field of view, the performance of TMA telescopes is dominated by 3(rd) order misalignment aberrations. Here it is shown that two dominant 3(rd) order misalignment aberrations arise for any TMA telescope. One aberration, field constant 3(rd) order coma is a well known misalignment aberration commonly seen in two-mirror Ritchey Chretien telescopes. The second aberration, field-asymmetric, field-linear, 3(rd) order astigmatism is a new and unique image orientation dependence with field derived here for the first time using nodal aberration theory.

  18. Aberrations of ellipsoidal reflectors for unit magnification.

    PubMed

    Mielenz, K D

    1974-12-01

    Ellipsoidal reflectors are useful for the 1:1 imaging of small objects without spherical and chromatic aberration. The magnitude of the off-axis aberrations of such reflectors is computed by application of Fermat's principle to the Hamiltonian point characteristic. The limiting form of the mirror aperture for which these aberrations do not exceed a set tolerance is an ellipse whose semiaxes depend on object size and angle of incidence.

  19. Monochromatic ocular wave aberrations in young monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Ramamirtham, Ramkumar; Kee, Chea-su; Hung, Li-Fang; Qiao-Grider, Ying; Roorda, Austin; Smith, Earl L.

    2006-01-01

    High-order monochromatic aberrations could potentially influence vision-dependent refractive development in a variety of ways. As a first step in understanding the effects of wave aberration on refractive development, we characterized the maturational changes that take place in the high-order aberrations of infant rhesus monkey eyes. Specifically, we compared the monochromatic wave aberrations of infant and adolescent animals and measured the longitudinal changes in the high-order aberrations of infant monkeys during the early period when emmetropization takes place. Our main findings were that (1) adolescent monkey eyes have excellent optical quality, exhibiting total RMS errors that were slightly better than those for adult human eyes that have the same numerical aperture and (2) shortly after birth, infant rhesus monkeys exhibited relatively larger magnitudes of high-order aberrations predominately spherical aberration, coma, and trefoil, which decreased rapidly to assume adolescent values by about 200 days of age. The results demonstrate that rhesus monkey eyes are a good model for studying the contribution of individual ocular components to the eye’s overall aberration structure, the mechanisms responsible for the improvements in optical quality that occur during early ocular development, and the effects of high-order aberrations on ocular growth and emmetropization. PMID:16750549

  20. Chromatic aberration measurement for transmission interferometric testing.

    PubMed

    Seong, Kibyung; Greivenkamp, John E

    2008-12-10

    A method of chromatic aberration measurement is described based on the transmitted wavefront of an optical element obtained from a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The chromatic aberration is derived from transmitted wavefronts measured at five different wavelengths. Reverse ray tracing is used to remove induced aberrations associated with the interferometer from the measurement. In the interferometer, the wavefront transmitted through the sample is tested against a plano reference, allowing for the absolute determination of the wavefront radius of curvature. The chromatic aberrations of a singlet and a doublet have been measured.

  1. Experimental versus expected halide-ion size differences; structural changes in three series of isotypic bismuth chalcogenide halides.

    PubMed

    Keller, Egbert; Krämer, Volker

    2006-06-01

    Experimentally determined halide-ion size differences are compared with expected size differences in the three series of isotypic bismuth chalcogenide halide compounds, KBi(6)O(9)X (X = Cl, Br and I), BiOX (X = F, Cl, Br and I) and BiSX (X = Cl, Br and I). The strong deviations observed can be assigned to steric strain caused by the heterogeneity of the bond-valence pattern and (for BiOX) to anion-anion repulsion and a change in the connectivity scheme. Some special features of the BiOF structure and the question of "isotypism" within the BiOX series are briefly discussed. Structural changes within the BiSX series are analysed.

  2. Structure cristalline de CsYb 3F 10: Composés isotypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A´onard, S.; Roux, M. Th.; Lambert, B.

    1982-03-01

    Cesium ytterbium fluoride CsYb 3F 10 crystallizes in the monoclinic system, with parameters a = 4.2893(2) A˚, b = 6.7437(4) A˚, c = 16.196(2) A˚, β = 90°, Z = 2 and space group Pc. The structure has been solved by three-dimensional Patterson and Fourier syntheses and refined by a least-squares method. For 1406 independent reflections recorded on an automatic four-circle diffractometer ( λAgKα), the final R value is 0.031 ( RW = 0.034). Three edge-sharing pentagonal bipyramids surrounding three ytterbium atoms form Yb 3F 17 groups and the structure is described by the superposition, according to the sequence AAA … of identical sheets of edge- and corner-sharing Yb 3F 17 groups. In these sheets, Yb atoms are located at the lattice points of a pseudo-hexagonal network. The nonoccupancy of some of these lattice points creates tunnels, perpendicular to the sheets, in which cesium atoms are located. Lattice parameters of isotypic compounds are given.

  3. Structure cristalline de la phase β-KEr 2F 7. Composés isotypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleonard, S.; Le Fur, Y.; Gorius, M. F.; Roux, M. Th.

    1980-08-01

    Potassium erbium fluoride β-KEr 2F 7 crystallizes in the orthorhombic system, space group Pna2 1, with the unit-cell dimensions a = 11.820, b = 13.333, c = 7.816Å ( Z = 8). The crystal structure has been solved from single-crystal diffractometer measurements (Ag Kα) by Patterson and Fourier syntheses and refined by a least-squares method. The final R value is 0.042 for 2374 independent observed reflections ( RW = 0.051). The four species of erbium atoms are surrounded by eight fluorine atoms. These fluorine atoms form, respectively, three quadratic antiprisms and one dodecahedron, derived from a distorted cube. Two antiprisms and the dodecahedron share two of their faces to form (Er 3F 17) 8- groups. These groups are bidimensionally linked and the planes they form are joined together by the third antiprism. A three-dimensional network is then produced, in the tunnels of which potassium atoms are located. Lattice parameters of compounds which are isotypic to the new structure type of β-KEr 2F 7 are given.

  4. Identification of three immunodominant motifs with atypical isotype profile scattered over the Onchocerca volvulus proteome

    PubMed Central

    Van Dorst, Bieke; Stuyver, Lieven J.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the immune response upon infection with the filarial nematode Onchocerca volvulus and the mechanisms that evolved in this parasite to evade immune mediated elimination is essential to expand the toolbox available for diagnostics, therapeutics and vaccines development. Using high-density peptide microarrays we scanned the proteome-wide linear epitope repertoire in Cameroonian onchocerciasis patients and healthy controls from Southern Africa which led to the identification of 249 immunodominant antigenic peptides. Motif analysis learned that 3 immunodominant motifs, encompassing 3 linear epitopes, are present in 70, 43, and 31 of these peptides, respectively and appear to be scattered over the entire proteome in seemingly non-related proteins. These linear epitopes are shown to have an atypical isotype profile dominated by IgG1, IgG3, IgE and IgM, in contrast to the commonly observed IgG4 response in chronic active helminth infections. The identification of these linear epitope motifs may lead to novel diagnostic development but further evaluation of cross-reactivity against common co-infecting human nematode infections will be needed. PMID:28125577

  5. Isotype, subclass and molecular size of immunoglobulins in salivas from young infants.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D J; King, W F; Taubman, M A

    1989-01-01

    Whole saliva samples from 17 infants who were between 3 and 20 weeks of age were analysed for isotype, subclass and molecular size of immunoglobulins. IgA concentrations ranged from 1.7 to over 60 micrograms/ml. IgM concentrations ranged from undetected to 59% of the IgA concentration in the respective saliva. Ratios of salivary IgM to salivary IgA were inversely correlated with the age of the infant. Gel filtration of 31 salivas on calibrated columns of Superose 6 revealed the IgA to elute in a position consistent with that of secretory IgA. IgM eluted in a position consistent with that of the pentameric molecule. IgA1 was the predominating subclass (IgA1/IgA1 + IgA2 = 0.64) in infant whole saliva. Both IgA subclass concentrations were significantly lower than concentrations measured in adult parotid salivas. Several infant salivas initially contained greater than 95% IgA1 but salivary IgA2 concentrations progressively increased as these infants grew older. These observations support the conclusions that essentially all IgA in whole saliva of predentate infants is of secretory origin, that adult salivary IgM/IgA proportions are achieved early in life, but that, at least in some infants, the salivary IgA subclass proportions are still changing during this time. PMID:2736804

  6. Anti-fasciola IgG isotypes among patients with fascioliasis before and after treatment.

    PubMed

    Hassan, M M; Mostafa, N E; Ramadan, M; Nassar, A; Hassounah, O; Omar, O

    2000-08-01

    Stool examination using modified Kato thick smear method was performed to detect Fasciola eggs and other parasites. Abdominal pain was the major presenting symptom (83.3%) followed by pallor (71.6%) and fever (16.7%). Anaemia and hepatomegaly were recorded in 70% of patients compared to 25% with splenomegaly. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed hepatomegaly and common bile duct dilatation in 70% of patients. Moreover, 6 cases showed Olympic game rings which is diagnostic. All of patients had positive IgG4 levels, 58 cases were found positive for specific total IgG and IgG1, whereas, only 36 cases had positive IgG2 levels (60%). All negative control group showed no cross reactions. On the other hand, ELISA detecting IgG4 showed the highest specificity (95%), followed by IgG2 (85%) and the least specific test was obtained with detection of IgG (70%) and IgG1 (65%). One week after treatment, 90% of patients were completely cured. One and 3 months after treatment, the cure rate was 83.3%. In completely cured patients, none of anti-Fasciola isotypes was significantly changed.

  7. Identification of three immunodominant motifs with atypical isotype profile scattered over the Onchocerca volvulus proteome.

    PubMed

    Lagatie, Ole; Van Dorst, Bieke; Stuyver, Lieven J

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the immune response upon infection with the filarial nematode Onchocerca volvulus and the mechanisms that evolved in this parasite to evade immune mediated elimination is essential to expand the toolbox available for diagnostics, therapeutics and vaccines development. Using high-density peptide microarrays we scanned the proteome-wide linear epitope repertoire in Cameroonian onchocerciasis patients and healthy controls from Southern Africa which led to the identification of 249 immunodominant antigenic peptides. Motif analysis learned that 3 immunodominant motifs, encompassing 3 linear epitopes, are present in 70, 43, and 31 of these peptides, respectively and appear to be scattered over the entire proteome in seemingly non-related proteins. These linear epitopes are shown to have an atypical isotype profile dominated by IgG1, IgG3, IgE and IgM, in contrast to the commonly observed IgG4 response in chronic active helminth infections. The identification of these linear epitope motifs may lead to novel diagnostic development but further evaluation of cross-reactivity against common co-infecting human nematode infections will be needed.

  8. Regulation of microtubule motors by tubulin isotypes and post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Sirajuddin, Minhajuddin; Rice, Luke M; Vale, Ronald D

    2014-04-01

    The 'tubulin-code' hypothesis proposes that different tubulin genes or post-translational modifications (PTMs), which mainly confer variation in the carboxy-terminal tail (CTT), result in unique interactions with microtubule-associated proteins for specific cellular functions. However, the inability to isolate distinct and homogeneous tubulin species has hindered biochemical testing of this hypothesis. Here, we have engineered 25 α/β-tubulin heterodimers with distinct CTTs and PTMs and tested their interactions with four different molecular motors using single-molecule assays. Our results show that tubulin isotypes and PTMs can govern motor velocity, processivity and microtubule depolymerization rates, with substantial changes conferred by even single amino acid variation. Revealing the importance and specificity of PTMs, we show that kinesin-1 motility on neuronal β-tubulin (TUBB3) is increased by polyglutamylation and that robust kinesin-2 motility requires detyrosination of α-tubulin. Our results also show that different molecular motors recognize distinctive tubulin 'signatures', which supports the premise of the tubulin-code hypothesis.

  9. Quantification of SAA1 and SAA2 in lung cancer plasma using the isotype-specific PRM assays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeoun Jin; Gallien, Sebastien; El-Khoury, Victoria; Goswami, Panchali; Sertamo, Katriina; Schlesser, Marc; Berchem, Guy; Domon, Bruno

    2015-09-01

    The quantification of plasma proteins using the high resolution and accurate mass (HR/AM)-based parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) method provides an immediate benefit over the conventional SRM-based method in terms of selectivity. In this study, multiplexed PRM assays were developed to analyze isotypes of serum amyloid A (SAA) proteins in human plasma with a focus on SAA1 and SAA2. Elevated plasma levels of these proteins in patients diagnosed with lung cancer have been reported in previous studies. Since SAA1 and SAA2 are highly homologous, the available immunoassays tend to overestimate their concentrations due to cross-reactivity. On the other hand, when mass spectrometry (MS)-based assays are used, the presence of the several allelic variants may result in a problem of underestimation. In the present study, eight peptides that represent the target proteins at three different levels: isotype-specific (SAA1α,  SAA 1β,  SAA1γ,  SAA2α,  SAA2β), protein-specific (SAA1 or SAA2), and pan SAA (SAA1 and SAA2) were chosen to differentiate SAAs in lung cancer plasma samples using a panel of PRM assays. The measurement of specific isotypes, leveraging the analytical performance of PRM, allowed to quantify the allelic variants of both target proteins. The isotypes detected were corroborated with the genetic information obtained from the same samples. The combination of SAA2α and SAA2β assays representing the total SAA2 concentration demonstrated a superior analytical outcome than the previously used assay on the common peptide when applied to the detection of lung cancer.

  10. Polarization Aberrations of Optical Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jota, Thiago

    This work does not limit itself to its title and touches on a number of related topics beyond it. Starting with the title, Polarization Aberrations of Optical Coatings, the immediate question that comes to mind is: what coatings? All coatings? Not all coatings, but just enough that a third person could take this information and apply it anywhere: to all coatings. The computational work-flow required to break-down the aberrations caused by polarizing events (3D vector forms of reflection and refraction) in dielectric and absorbing materials and for thick and thin films is presented. Therefore, it is completely general and of interest to the wide optics community. The example system is a Ritchey-Chretien telescope. It looks very similar to a Cassegrain, but it is not. It has hyperbolic surfaces, which allows for more optical aberration corrections. A few modern systems that use this configuration are the Hubble Space Telescope and the Keck telescopes. This particular system is a follow-up on this publication, where an example Cassegrain with aluminum coatings is characterized, and I was asked to simply evaluate it at another wavelength. To my surprise, I found a number of issues which lead me to write a completely new, one-of-its-kind 3D polarization ray-tracing code. It can do purely geometrical ray-tracing with add-on the polarization analysis capability, and more importantly: it keeps your data at your fingertips while offering all the outstanding facilities of Mathematica. The ray-tracing code and its extensive library, which can do several advanced computations, is documented in the appendix. The coatings of the Ritchey-Chretien induce a number of aberrations, primarily, but not limited to: tilt, defocus, astigmatism, and coma. I found those forms to exist in both aluminum and with a reflectance-enhancing dielectric quarter-wave multilayer coating over aluminum. The thickness of the film stack varies as function of position to present a quarter-wave of optical

  11. Novel mutations involving βI-, βIIA-, or βIVB-tubulin isotypes with functional resemblance to βIII-tubulin in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiwei; Zhang, Hangxiao; Wang, Xumin; Patterson, Jordan; Winter, Philip; Graham, Kathryn; Ghosh, Sunita; Lee, John C; Katsetos, Christos D; Mackey, John R; Tuszynski, Jack A; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Ludueña, Richard F

    2017-05-01

    Tubulin is the target for very widely used anti-tumor drugs, including Vinca alkaloids, taxanes, and epothilones, which are an important component of chemotherapy in breast cancer and other malignancies. Paclitaxel and other tubulin-targeting drugs bind to the β subunit of tubulin, which is a heterodimer of α and β subunits. β-Tubulin exists in the form of multiple isotypes, which are differentially expressed in normal and neoplastic cells and differ in their ability to bind to drugs. Among them, the βIII isotype is overexpressed in many aggressive and metastatic cancers and may serve as a prognostic marker in certain types of cancer. The underpinning mechanisms accounting for the overexpression of this isotype in cancer cells are unclear. To better understand the role of β-tubulin isotypes in cancer, we analyzed over 1000 clones from 90 breast cancer patients, sequencing their β-tubulin isotypes, in search of novel mutations. We have elucidated two putative emerging molecular subgroups of invasive breast cancer, each of which involve mutations in the βI-, βIIA-, or βIVB isotypes of tubulin that increase their structural, and possibly functional, resemblance to the βIII isotype. A unifying feature of the first of the two subgroups is the mutation of the highly reactive C239 residue of βI- or βIVB-tubulin to L239, R239, Y239, or P239, culminating in probable conversion of these isotypes from ROS-sensitive to ROS-resistant species. In the second subgroup, βI, βIIA, and βIVB have up to seven mutations to the corresponding residues in βIII-tubulin. Given that βIII-tubulin has emerged as a pro-survival factor, overexpression of this isotype may confer survival advantages to certain cancer cell types. In this mini-review, we bring attention to a novel mechanism by which cancer cells may undergo adaptive mutational changes involving alternate β-tubulin isotypes to make them acquire some of the pro-survival properties of βIII-tubulin. These "hybrid

  12. Identification of antibody isotypes in biological fluids by means of micro-Raman spectroscopy and chemometric methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo-Andrade, C.; Pichardo-Molina, J. L.; Barbosa-Sabanero, G.; Frausto-Reyes, C.

    2008-02-01

    Clinical diagnosis of infections, generally are realized by serological methods, which identifies the antibodies presents in serum or tissue fluids of the patient. Antibodies are proteins present in our bodies that aid in the elimination of pathogens or antigens. Identification of antibodies isotypes is important because can help to predict when and whether patients will recover from infections and are commonly diagnosed by means of indirect methods such as serological test. In the other hand, the majority of these methods requires specific kits for the analysis, special sample preparation, chemical reagents, expensive equipment and require long time for getting results. In this work we show the feasibility to discriminate antibody isotypes in biological fluids like human colostrum by means of Raman spectroscopy and chemometrics. Spectra were obtained using an excitation wavelength of 514 nm over dried samples of human colostrum labeled previously as positives to specific IgG and IgM antibodies against Toxoplasma Gondii by means of ELISA test. Partial least square-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was used to discriminate among antibody isotypes by use second derivative of Raman spectra of colostrum samples.

  13. Triggering trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Di Stefano, Giulia; Maarbjerg, Stine; Nurmikko, Turo; Truini, Andrea; Cruccu, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Although it is widely accepted that facial pain paroxysms triggered by innocuous stimuli constitute a hallmark sign of trigeminal neuralgia, very few studies to date have systematically investigated the role of the triggers involved. In the recently published diagnostic classification, triggered pain is an essential criterion for the diagnosis of trigeminal neuralgia but no study to date has been designed to address this issue directly. In this study, we set out to determine, in patients with trigeminal neuralgia, how frequently triggers are present, which manoeuvres activate them and where cutaneous and mucosal trigger zones are located. Methods Clinical characteristics focusing on trigger factors were collected from 140 patients with trigeminal neuralgia, in a cross-sectional study design. Results Provocation of paroxysmal pain by various trigger manoeuvres was reported by 136 of the 140 patients. The most frequent manoeuvres were gentle touching of the face (79%) and talking (54%). Trigger zones were predominantly reported in the perioral and nasal region. Conclusion This study confirms that in trigeminal neuralgia, paroxysmal pain is associated with triggers in virtually all patients and supports the use of triggers as an essential diagnostic feature of trigeminal neuralgia.

  14. Psychometric Characteristics of the Aberrant Behavior Checklist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aman, Michael G.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Information is presented on the psychometric characteristics of the Aberrant Behavior Checklist, a measure of psychotropic drug effects. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability of the checklist appeared very good. Interrater reliability was generally in the moderate range. In general, validity was established for most Aberrant Behavior…

  15. Dynamics of ocular aberrations in keratoconus.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Hema; Jinabhai, Amit; O'Donnell, Clare

    2010-05-01

    The aim was to investigate the fluctuations in monochromatic ocular aberrations with accommodation and tear-film changes in moderate keratoconic eyes. We measured the changes in ocular higher-order aberrations in 10 moderate keratoconic and 10 visually normal eyes to accommodative stimuli ranging from zero to 5.00 DS using a Hartmann-Shack aberrometer. In addition, the changes in ocular higher-order aberrations were measured for up to 15 seconds after a blink in eight keratoconic and eight visually normal eyes. These results show that ocular spherical (p = 0.68) and coma-like (p = 0.71) aberrations did not change significantly with accommodation from zero to 5.00 DS in keratoconic eyes. In contrast to normal eyes, the ocular higher-order RMS error tended to decrease in magnitude after a blink in keratoconic eyes. Vertical coma became less negative with time after a blink in the keratoconic group, therefore, reducing the manifest ocular higher order RMS error by counteracting the negative vertical coma of the cornea. Compared to the manifest monochromatic higher-order aberrations, any dynamic fluctuations in ocular aberrations with accommodation and tear film changes are relatively small in moderate keratoconic eyes. This implies that the correction of monochromatic higher-order aberrations in keratoconus using customised soft contact lenses will not be significantly hindered by such dynamic aberrational changes.

  16. Learning Disorders and Sex Chromosome Aberrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hier, D. B.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    In a prospective study of 20 adult dyslexic men, no sex chromosome aberrations were detected. A retrospective study of 89 Ss with known sex chromosome aberrations revealed 20 of them to be mentally retarded. Among the 69 Ss of normal intelligence, learning, speech, and attention disorders were frequent. (Author/DLS)

  17. Harmonic oscillator states in aberration optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Kurt Bernardo

    1993-01-01

    The states of the three-dimensional quantum harmonic oscillator classify optical aberrations of axis-symmetric systems due to the isomorphism between the two mathematical structures. Cartesian quanta and angular momentum classifications have their corresponding aberration classifications. The operation of concatenation of optical elements introduces a new operation between harmonic oscillator states.

  18. Stay away from asthma triggers

    MedlinePlus

    Asthma triggers - stay away from; Asthma triggers - avoiding; Reactive airway disease - triggers; Bronchial asthma - triggers ... to them. Have someone who does not have asthma cut the grass, or wear a facemask if ...

  19. Repeatability of peripheral aberrations in young emmetropes.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, Karthikeyan; Theagarayan, Baskar; Carius, Staffan; Gustafsson, Jörgen

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the intrasession repeatability of ocular aberration measurements in the peripheral visual field with a commercially available Shack-Hartmann aberrometer (complete ophthalmic analysis system-high definition-vision research). The higher-order off-axis aberrations data in young healthy emmetropic eyes are also reported. The aberrations of the right eye of 18 emmetropes were measured using an aberrometer with an open field of view that allows peripheral measurements. Five repeated measures of ocular aberrations were obtained and assessed in steps of 10° out to ±40° in the horizontal visual field (nasal + and temporal -) and -20° in the inferior visual field. The coefficient of repeatability, coefficient of variation, and the intraclass correlation coefficient were calculated as a measure of intrasession repeatability. In all eccentric angles, the repeatability of the third- and fourth-order aberrations was better than the fifth and sixth order aberrations. The coefficient of variation was <30% and the intraclass correlation coefficient was >0.90 for the third and fourth order but reduced gradually for higher orders. There was no statistical significant difference in variance of total higher-order root mean square between on- and off-axis measurements (p > 0.05). The aberration data in this group of young emmetropes showed that the horizontal coma (C(3)(1)) was most positive at 40° in the temporal field, decreasing linearly toward negative values with increasing off-axis angle into the nasal field, whereas all other higher-order aberrations showed little or no change. The complete ophthalmic analysis system-high definition-vision research provides fast, repeatable, and valid peripheral aberration measurements and can be used efficiently to measure off-axis aberrations in the peripheral visual field.

  20. Shark IgW C region diversification through RNA processing and isotype switching1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cecilia; Du Pasquier, Louis; Hsu, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Sharks and skates represent the earliest vertebrates with an adaptive immune system based on lymphocyte antigen receptors generated by V(D)J recombination. Shark B cells express two classical immunoglobulins (Ig), IgM and IgW, encoded by an early, alternative gene organization consisting of numerous autonomous miniloci, where the individual gene cluster carries a few rearranging gene segments and one constant region, μ or ω. We have characterized eight distinct Ig miniloci encoding the nurse shark omega heavy (H) chain. Each cluster consists of VH, D and JH segments and six to eight constant (C) domain exons. Two interspersed secretory exons, in addition to the 3’-most C exon with tailpiece, provide the gene cluster with the ability to generate at least six secreted isoforms that differ as to polypeptide length and C domain combination. All clusters appear to be functional, as judged by the capability for rearrangement and absence of defects in the deduced amino acid sequence. We previously showed that IgW VDJ can perform isotype switching to μ C regions; in this study we found that switching also occurs between ω clusters. Thus C region diversification for any IgW VDJ can take place at the DNA level, by switching to other ω or μ C regions, as well as by RNA processing to generate different C isoforms. The wide array of pathogens recognized by antibodies require different disposal pathways, and our findings demonstrate complex and unique pathways for C effector function diversity that evolved independently in cartilaginous fishes. PMID:23935192

  1. Three Hierarchies in Skeletal Muscle Fibre Classification Allotype, Isotype and Phenotype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoh, Joseph F. Y.; Hughes, Suzanne; Hugh, Gregory; Pozgaj, Irene

    1991-01-01

    and synthesizing slow myosin. It is proposed that within each muscle allotype, the various isotypes of primary and secondary fibers are myogenically determined, and are derived from different lineage of myoblasts.

  2. The evolution of multiple isotypic IgM heavy chain genes in the shark.

    PubMed

    Lee, Victor; Huang, Jing Li; Lui, Ming Fai; Malecek, Karolina; Ohta, Yuko; Mooers, Arne; Hsu, Ellen

    2008-06-01

    The IgM H chain gene organization of cartilaginous fishes consists of 15-200 miniloci, each with a few gene segments (V(H)-D1-D2-J(H)) and one C gene. This is a gene arrangement ancestral to the complex IgH locus that exists in all other vertebrate classes. To understand the molecular evolution of this system, we studied the nurse shark, which has relatively fewer loci, and characterized the IgH isotypes for organization, functionality, and the somatic diversification mechanisms that act upon them. Gene numbers differ slightly between individuals ( approximately 15), but five active IgM subclasses are always present. Each gene undergoes rearrangement that is strictly confined within the minilocus; in B cells there is no interaction between adjacent loci located > or =120 kb apart. Without combinatorial events, the shark IgM H chain repertoire is based on junctional diversity and, subsequently, somatic hypermutation. We suggest that the significant contribution by junctional diversification reflects the selected novelty introduced by RAG in the early vertebrate ancestor, whereas combinatorial diversity coevolved with the complex translocon organization. Moreover, unlike other cartilaginous fishes, there are no germline-joined VDJ at any nurse shark mu locus, and we suggest that such genes, when functional, are species-specific and may have specialized roles. With an entire complement of IgM genes available for the first time, phylogenetic analyses were performed to examine how the multiple Ig loci evolved. We found that all domains changed at comparable rates, but V(H) appears to be under strong positive selection for increased amino acid sequence diversity, and surprisingly, so does Cmicro2.

  3. West Nile virus-specific immunoglobulin isotype responses in vaccinated and infected horses.

    PubMed

    Khatibzadeh, Sarah M; Gold, Carvel B; Keggan, Alison E; Perkins, Gillian A; Glaser, Amy L; Dubovi, Edward J; Wagner, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    To compare antibody responses of horses naturally infected with West Nile virus (WNV) and those vaccinated against WNV, to identify whether vaccination interferes with the ability to diagnose WNV infection, and to determine the duration of antibody responses after vaccination. Sera from horses naturally infected with WNV (n = 10) and adult WNV-naïve horses before and after vaccination with a live canarypox virus-vectored vaccine (7) or a killed virus vaccine (8). An established WNV IgM capture ELISA was used to measure IgM responses. Newly developed capture ELISAs were used to measure responses of 8 other WNV-specific immunoglobulin isotypes. A serum neutralization assay was used to determine anti-WNV antibody titers. WNV-specific IgM responses were typically detected in the sera of WNV-infected horses but not in sera of horses vaccinated against WNV. Natural infection with and vaccination against WNV induced an immunoglobulin response that was primarily composed of IgG1. West Nile virus-specific IgG1 was detected in the sera of most horses 14 days after vaccination. Serum anti-WNV IgG1 and neutralizing antibody responses induced by the killed-virus vaccines were higher and lasted longer than did those induced by the live canarypox virus-vectored vaccine. On the basis of these findings, we recommend that horses be vaccinated against WNV annually near the beginning of mosquito season, that both IgM and IgG1 responses against WNV be measured to distinguish between natural infection and vaccination, and that a WNV IgG1 ELISA be used to monitor anti-WNV antibodies titers in vaccinated horses.

  4. Associations between vitamin D-binding protein isotypes, circulating 25(OH)D levels, and vitamin D metabolite uptake in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hibler, Elizabeth A; Jacobs, Elizabeth T; Stone, Angelika Dampf; Sardo, Christine L; Galligan, Michael A; Jurutka, Peter W

    2014-04-01

    Vitamin D metabolites have been extensively studied as cancer chemopreventive agents. Gc-globulin (GC) isotypes, based on rs7041 and rs4588 diplotypes, have varying affinities for 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), which may affect circulating metabolite concentration as well as delivery at the cellular level. We evaluated associations between GC isotype and circulating vitamin D metabolite concentrations in 403 ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) clinical trial participants. Metabolite uptake was evaluated in human colon cancer (HCT-116) cells treated with ethanol vehicle, 1,25(OH)2D, or 25(OH)D, and with plasma from individuals with known GC isotype. Mammalian-2-hybrid and vitamin D-responsive element-based luciferase assays were used to measure the vitamin D receptor pathway activation as a marker for metabolite uptake. Regression analysis demonstrated significantly lower serum 25(OH)D concentration for clinical trial participants with 1F_2, 1S_2, or 2_2 isotypes (P < 0.01) compared with 1S_1S. Consistent with these in vivo observations, cellular data revealed that 25(OH)D uptake varied less by GC isotype only at the higher concentration tested (P = 0.05), while 1,25(OH)2D uptake differed markedly by GC isotype across concentration and assay (P < 0.01). The 1F_1S and 1F_2 isotypes produced the greatest reporter gene induction with 1,25(OH)2D treatment and, while activation varied less with 25(OH)D, the 2_2 isotype demonstrated increased induction at the lower concentration. These results suggest that vitamin D metabolite concentration and delivery to colon cells may vary not only by GC isotype, but also that certain isotypes may more effectively deliver 1,25(OH)2D versus 25(OH)D. Overall, these results may help identify populations at risk for cancer and potential recipients of targeted chemoprevention.

  5. Lessons from (triggered) tremor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, Joan

    2010-01-01

    I test a “clock-advance” model that implies triggered tremor is ambient tremor that occurs at a sped-up rate as a result of loading from passing seismic waves. This proposed model predicts that triggering probability is proportional to the product of the ambient tremor rate and a function describing the efficacy of the triggering wave to initiate a tremor event. Using data mostly from Cascadia, I have compared qualitatively a suite of teleseismic waves that did and did not trigger tremor with ambient tremor rates. Many of the observations are consistent with the model if the efficacy of the triggering wave depends on wave amplitude. One triggered tremor observation clearly violates the clock-advance model. The model prediction that larger triggering waves result in larger triggered tremor signals also appears inconsistent with the measurements. I conclude that the tremor source process is a more complex system than that described by the clock-advance model predictions tested. Results of this and previous studies also demonstrate that (1) conditions suitable for tremor generation exist in many tectonic environments, but, within each, only occur at particular spots whose locations change with time; (2) any fluid flow must be restricted to less than a meter; (3) the degree to which delayed failure and secondary triggering occurs is likely insignificant; and 4) both shear and dilatational deformations may trigger tremor. Triggered and ambient tremor rates correlate more strongly with stress than stressing rate, suggesting tremor sources result from time-dependent weakening processes rather than simple Coulomb failure.

  6. Aberration correction past and present.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, P W

    2009-09-28

    Electron lenses are extremely poor: if glass lenses were as bad, we should see as well with the naked eye as with a microscope! The demonstration by Otto Scherzer in 1936 that skillful lens design could never eliminate the spherical and chromatic aberrations of rotationally symmetric electron lenses was therefore most unwelcome and the other great electron optician of those years, Walter Glaser, never ceased striving to find a loophole in Scherzer's proof. In the wartime and early post-war years, the first proposals for correcting C(s) were made and in 1947, in a second milestone paper, Scherzer listed these and other ways of correcting lenses; soon after, Dennis Gabor invented holography for the same purpose. These approaches will be briefly summarized and the work that led to the successful implementation of quadupole-octopole and sextupole correctors in the 1990 s will be analysed. In conclusion, the elegant role of image algebra in describing image formation and processing and, above all, in developing new methods will be mentioned.

  7. Iteration of ultrasound aberration correction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maasoey, Svein-Erik; Angelsen, Bjoern; Varslot, Trond

    2004-05-01

    Aberration in ultrasound medical imaging is usually modeled by time-delay and amplitude variations concentrated on the transmitting/receiving array. This filter process is here denoted a TDA filter. The TDA filter is an approximation to the physical aberration process, which occurs over an extended part of the human body wall. Estimation of the TDA filter, and performing correction on transmit and receive, has proven difficult. It has yet to be shown that this method works adequately for severe aberration. Estimation of the TDA filter can be iterated by retransmitting a corrected signal and re-estimate until a convergence criterion is fulfilled (adaptive imaging). Two methods for estimating time-delay and amplitude variations in receive signals from random scatterers have been developed. One method correlates each element signal with a reference signal. The other method use eigenvalue decomposition of the receive cross-spectrum matrix, based upon a receive energy-maximizing criterion. Simulations of iterating aberration correction with a TDA filter have been investigated to study its convergence properties. A weak and strong human-body wall model generated aberration. Both emulated the human abdominal wall. Results after iteration improve aberration correction substantially, and both estimation methods converge, even for the case of strong aberration.

  8. Schmitt trigger multivibrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zrubek, W. E.

    1969-01-01

    Schmitt trigger multivibrator circuit, capable of astable, monostable or bistable operation, incorporates an input circuit in conjunction with a Schmitt trigger circuit. The circuits form two output signal levels, are useful in switching circuit applications, initiates oscillations, and forms highly unsymmetrical wave forms.

  9. Causality and headache triggers

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Dana P.; Smitherman, Todd A.; Martin, Vincent T.; Penzien, Donald B.; Houle, Timothy T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to explore the conditions necessary to assign causal status to headache triggers. Background The term “headache trigger” is commonly used to label any stimulus that is assumed to cause headaches. However, the assumptions required for determining if a given stimulus in fact has a causal-type relationship in eliciting headaches have not been explicated. Methods A synthesis and application of Rubin’s Causal Model is applied to the context of headache causes. From this application the conditions necessary to infer that one event (trigger) causes another (headache) are outlined using basic assumptions and examples from relevant literature. Results Although many conditions must be satisfied for a causal attribution, three basic assumptions are identified for determining causality in headache triggers: 1) constancy of the sufferer; 2) constancy of the trigger effect; and 3) constancy of the trigger presentation. A valid evaluation of a potential trigger’s effect can only be undertaken once these three basic assumptions are satisfied during formal or informal studies of headache triggers. Conclusions Evaluating these assumptions is extremely difficult or infeasible in clinical practice, and satisfying them during natural experimentation is unlikely. Researchers, practitioners, and headache sufferers are encouraged to avoid natural experimentation to determine the causal effects of headache triggers. Instead, formal experimental designs or retrospective diary studies using advanced statistical modeling techniques provide the best approaches to satisfy the required assumptions and inform causal statements about headache triggers. PMID:23534872

  10. AMY trigger system

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Yoshihide

    1989-04-01

    A trigger system of the AMY detector at TRISTAN e{sup +}e{sup -} collider is described briefly. The system uses simple track segment and shower cluster counting scheme to classify events to be triggered. It has been operating successfully since 1987.

  11. Polarization aberrations of crossed folding mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crandall, David G.; Chipman, Russell A.

    1995-08-01

    Polarization aberrations due to varying polarization state across the field of view (FOV) are investigated for crossed folding mirrors. We define crossed mirrors as oriented in space such that s-polarized light incident on the first mirror is p-polarized at the second mirror. This completely compensates for polarization state changes at one point in the field of view. The resulting polarization aberrations are explored across the FOV using the example of aluminum mirrors overcoated with a 12 layer, highly reflective, dielectric stack. The polarization aberration is very low along a band across the field of view. For arbitrary points in the FOV, the retardance and diattenuation are slightly elliptical.

  12. Effects of Phase Aberration and Phase Aberration Correction on the Minimum Variance Beamformer.

    PubMed

    Chau, Gustavo; Dahl, Jeremy; Lavarello, Roberto

    2017-07-01

    The minimum variance (MV) beamformer has the potential to enhance the resolution and contrast of ultrasound images but is sensitive to steering vector errors. Robust MV beamformers have been proposed but mainly evaluated in the presence of gross sound speed mismatches, and the impact of phase aberration correction (PAC) methods in mitigating the effects of phase aberration in MV beamformed images has not been explored. In this study, an analysis of the effects of aberration on conventional MV and eigenspace MV (ESMV) beamformers is carried out. In addition, the impact of three PAC algorithms on the performance of MV beamforming is analyzed. The different beamformers were tested on simulated data and on experimental data corrupted with electronic and tissue-based aberration. It is shown that all gains in performance of the MV beamformer with respect to delay-and-sum (DAS) are lost at high aberration strengths. For instance, with an electronic aberration of 60 ns, the lateral resolution of DAS degrades by 17% while MV degrades by 73% with respect to the images with no aberration. Moreover, although ESMV shows robustness at low aberration levels, its degradation at higher aberrations is approximately the same as that of regular MV. It is also shown that basic PAC methods improve the aberrated MV beamformer. For example, in the case of electronic aberration, multi-lag reduces degradation in lateral resolution from 73% to 28% and contrast loss from 85% to 25%. These enhancements allow the combination of MV and PAC to outperform DAS and PAC and ESMV in moderate and strong aberrations. We conclude that the effect of aberration on the MV beamformer is stronger than previously reported in the literature and that PAC is needed to improve its clinical potential.

  13. IgA anticardiolipin and anti-beta2-glycoprotein I are the most prevalent isotypes in African American patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Cucurull, E; Gharavi, A E; Diri, E; Mendez, E; Kapoor, D; Espinoza, L R

    1999-07-01

    Ethnicity plays a role in the prevalence, isotype distribution, and clinical significance of anticardiolipin (aCL) and anti-beta2-glycoprotein I (anti-beta2-GPI) antibodies in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Few studies have been done in the African American population. Serum samples from 100 African American patients with SLE were tested for IgG, IgM, and IgA aCL and anti-beta2-GPI antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Computerized clinical data on these patients were reviewed with a specific focus on clinical manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Positivity for at least one isotype of aCL antibodies was found in 33% of the patients, whereas 28% were positive for at least one isotype of anti-beta2-GPI antibodies. IgA was the most prevalent isotype for both antibodies; 24% of the patients in the aCL ELISA and 19% in the anti-beta2-GPI ELISA were positive for IgA. Positivity for both aCL and anti-beta2-GPI in the same patient was seen more frequently with the IgA isotype. Fewer than half of the patients positive for aCL antibodies had medium-to-high levels of antibodies. A few patients had presented thrombotic manifestations, and these patients were positive for aCL (P = 0.01) and anti-beta2-GPI antibodies (P = 0.02). No other manifestations of APS could be significantly correlated with the presence of these antibodies. Our results show that IgA is the most prevalent isotype among the African American patients with SLE studied. The predominance of the IgA isotype and the low prevalence of medium-to-high levels of aCL antibodies may account for the low frequency of clinical manifestations of APS in these patients.

  14. Image Ellipticity from Atmospheric Aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    de Vries, W H; Olivier, S S; Asztalos, S J; Rosenberg, L J; Baker, K L

    2007-03-06

    We investigate the ellipticity of the point-spread function (PSF) produced by imaging an unresolved source with a telescope, subject to the effects of atmospheric turbulence. It is important to quantify these effects in order to understand the errors in shape measurements of astronomical objects, such as those used to study weak gravitational lensing of field galaxies. The PSF modeling involves either a Fourier transform of the phase information in the pupil plane or a ray-tracing approach, which has the advantage of requiring fewer computations than the Fourier transform. Using a standard method, involving the Gaussian weighted second moments of intensity, we then calculate the ellipticity of the PSF patterns. We find significant ellipticity for the instantaneous patterns (up to more than 10%). Longer exposures, which we approximate by combining multiple (N) images from uncorrelated atmospheric realizations, yield progressively lower ellipticity (as 1/{radical}N). We also verify that the measured ellipticity does not depend on the sampling interval in the pupil plane using the Fourier method. However, we find that the results using the ray-tracing technique do depend on the pupil sampling interval, representing a gradual breakdown of the geometric approximation at high spatial frequencies. Therefore, ray tracing is generally not an accurate method of modeling PSF ellipticity induced by atmospheric turbulence unless some additional procedure is implemented to correctly account for the effects of high spatial frequency aberrations. The Fourier method, however, can be used directly to accurately model PSF ellipticity, which can give insights into errors in the statistics of field galaxy shapes used in studies of weak gravitational lensing.

  15. TGF-{beta}-stimulated aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin via the ERK signaling pathway in cultured retinal pigment epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eun Jee; Chun, Ji Na; Jung, Sun-Ah; Cho, Jin Won; Lee, Joon H.

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta} induces aberrant expression of {beta}III in RPE cells via the ERK pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta} increases O-GlcNAc modification of {beta}III in RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene by TGF-{beta}. -- Abstract: The class III {beta}-tubulin isotype ({beta}{sub III}) is expressed exclusively by neurons within the normal human retina and is not present in normal retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in situ or in the early phase of primary cultures. However, aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin has been observed in passaged RPE cells and RPE cells with dedifferentiated morphology in pathologic epiretinal membranes from idiopathic macular pucker, proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) has been implicated in dedifferentiation of RPE cells and has a critical role in the development of proliferative vitreoretinal diseases. Here, we investigated the potential effects of TGF-{beta} on the aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin and the intracellular signaling pathway mediating these changes. TGF-{beta}-induced aberrant expression and O-linked-{beta}-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNac) modification of class III {beta}-tubulin in cultured RPE cells as determined using Western blotting, RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. TGF-{beta} also stimulated phosphorylation of ERK. TGF-{beta}-induced aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin was significantly reduced by pretreatment with U0126, an inhibitor of ERK phosphorylation. Our findings indicate that TGF-{beta} stimulated aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin via activation of the ERK signaling pathway. These data demonstrate that mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene in response to TGF-{beta} stimulation and provide useful information

  16. Transverse chromatic aberration after corneal refractive surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anera, R. G.; Jiménez, J. R.; Jiménez del Barco, L.; Hita, E.

    2005-05-01

    An expression has been deduced theoretically from a schematic-eye model, for the transverse or lateral chromatic aberration (TCA) after refractive surgery. The aim was to investigate analytically how chromatic aberration varies after the emmetropization process. These changes in the TCA have been characterized from changes in corneal asphericity. The results indicate that TCA after refractive surgery diminishes as the degree of myopia increases, a trend contrary to that occurring with monochromatic aberrations, such as spherical or coma. These results can explain the fact that the real deterioration of the visual function under photopic conditions detected in those operated on for myopia is less than expected when only monochromatic aberrations are taken into account.

  17. Aberrations of a horizontal-vertical depolarizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclain, Stephen C.; Chipman, Russell A.; Hillman, Lloyd W.

    1992-01-01

    Ray-trace equations for uniaxial birefringent materials are used here to derive third-order estimates for aberrations that are produced in imaging through uniaxial plates and horizontal-vertical (HV) depolarizers. An HV depolarizer is a spatial pseudodepolarizer; it converts a uniform input polarization state into a continuum of spatially varying polarization states in an output beam. An HV depolarizer consists of two birefringent wedges whose crystal axes are crossed at 90 deg. The interface between the wedges is included, which leads to a spatially varying retardance that provides the spatial pseudodepolarization. In HV depolarizers, spherical aberration, astigmatism, and image doubling are the principal aberrations for on-axis objects. Only spherical aberration occurs in isotropic plates, while the presence of birefringent wedges introduces astigmatism and image doubling. It is shown that image separation is proportional to the magnitude of the retardance variation.

  18. Spherical aberration in electrically thin flat lenses.

    PubMed

    Ruphuy, Miguel; Ramahi, Omar M

    2016-08-01

    We analyze the spherical aberration of a new generation of lenses made of flat electrically thin inhomogeneous media. For such lenses, spherical aberration is analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively, and comparison is made to the classical gradient index rod. Both flat thin and thick lenses are made of gradient index materials, but the physical mechanisms and design equations are different. Using full-wave three-dimensional numerical simulation, we evaluate the spherical aberrations using the Maréchal criterion and show that the thin lens gives significantly better performance than the thick lens (rod). Additionally, based on ray tracing formulation, third-order analysis for longitudinal aberration and optical path difference are presented, showing strong overall performance of thin lenses in comparison to classical rod lenses.

  19. Antineutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA) of IgA isotype in adult Henoch-Schönlein purpura.

    PubMed Central

    Ronda, N; Esnault, V L; Layward, L; Sepe, V; Allen, A; Feehally, J; Lockwood, C M

    1994-01-01

    ANCA are associated with certain forms of systemic vasculitis, and have been reported previously to be of the IgG and IgM isotype. We examined the possible association between IgA ANCA and the IgA-related diseases Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) and IgA nephropathy (IgAN). IgA and IgG ANCA were detected by isotype-specific solid-phase assays with a crude neutrophil extract, and their presence was confirmed by antigen-specific fluid-phase competitive inhibition tests and by indirect immunofluorescence. The possible interference by IgA rheumatoid factor was excluded. IgA ANCA were detected in sera from 11/14 HSP patients (79%), from 1/30 IgAN patients (3%), from 1/40 patients with vasculitides classically associated with IgG ANCA (2.5%), and in none of 60 sera from healthy blood donors. IgG ANCA were present with IgA ANCA in three patients with HSP. Only one HSP serum had anti-myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity by both IgA and IgG isotype-specific ELISA, and none was positive for proteinase 3 (PR3). Western blot analysis performed with neutrophil extract showed that the four strongest IgA ANCA-positive HSP sera reacted with a 51-kD protein; Western blot performed on cellular fractions showed that this protein is primarily membrane-associated, and different from fibronectin. Our study suggests that adult HSP is closely associated with circulating IgA ANCA, which may be directed against a different autoantigen than that recognized by IgG ANCA. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8287608

  20. The prevalence of rheumatoid factor isotypes and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptides in Malaysian rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Edmund Luke; Gun, Suk Chyn; Somnath, Sushela Devi; D'Souza, Beryl; Lim, Ai Lee; Chinna, Karuthan; Radhakrishnan, Ammu K

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the prevalence of rheumatoid factor (RF) isotypes and second generation anti-cyclic citrullinated peptides (anti-CCP) in Malaysian rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. In this cross-sectional study, 147 established RA patients from three ethnic groups were recruited from a major rheumatology clinic in Malaysia. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) for serum RF isotypes IgA, IgG and IgM as well as second-generation anti-CCP were performed and the prevalence of each auto-antibody was compared in the three ethnic groups. The anti-CCP was the most prevalent auto-antibody in each of the ethnic groups, followed closely by RF IgM and RF IgG. Rheumatoid factor IgA was the least prevalent across all three ethnic groups. The anti-CCP-RF IgM combination provided the best test sensitivity. Seroprevalence of anti-CCP was strongly associated with the presence of each of the RF isotypes. The seroprevalence of RF and anti-CCP did not increase or decrease with advancing age, age at onset and disease duration. When used alone, anti-CCP provides a diagnostic advantage over RF IgM on the basis of test sensitivity. Considering the high cost of the anti-CCP assay, step-wise serum testing with IgM RF followed by anti-CCP may provide a more economically sensible option to optimize test sensitivity for RA. © 2010 The Authors. International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases © 2010 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. Membrane isoforms of human immunoglobulins of the A1 and A2 isotypes: structural and functional study.

    PubMed Central

    Leduc, I; Drouet, M; Bodinier, M C; Helal, A; Cogné, M

    1997-01-01

    As for IgM, human IgA occurs either as soluble molecules in plasma and various other body fluids, or as membrane-bound molecules on differentiated B cells, where they are part of the B-cell receptor for antigen (BCR). We studied the structure of transcripts encoding the membrane-anchored alpha-chain of the human BCR alpha, which may be present in two different forms resulting from alternate splicing of the alpha-chain mRNA (type I or type II). The ratio of type I versus type II did not vary upon stimulation of a B-cell line with various cytokines. Rather, it differed strikingly in cells expressing either the IgA1 or IgA2 isotype of the BCR alpha, with virtually no type II alpha-chain in the latter. Co-modulation experiments also yielded different results for both isotypes, since they demonstrated a physical association of both membrane (m)IgA1 and mIgA2 with CD79b, the beta component of the BCR Ig alpha/Ig beta heterodimer, but only of mIgA1 with CD19. Whatever the isotype, the BCR of the IgA class was able to carry out signal transduction upon cross-linking by specific monoclonal antibodies but, in contrast to mIgM, it relied mainly on the entry of extracellular Ca2+ rather than on the release of intracellular stocks. Images Figure 2 PMID:9155637

  2. LHCb Topological Trigger Reoptimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Ilten, Philip; Khairullin, Egor; Rogozhnikov, Alex; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Williams, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The main b-physics trigger algorithm used by the LHCb experiment is the so- called topological trigger. The topological trigger selects vertices which are a) detached from the primary proton-proton collision and b) compatible with coming from the decay of a b-hadron. In the LHC Run 1, this trigger, which utilized a custom boosted decision tree algorithm, selected a nearly 100% pure sample of b-hadrons with a typical efficiency of 60-70%; its output was used in about 60% of LHCb papers. This talk presents studies carried out to optimize the topological trigger for LHC Run 2. In particular, we have carried out a detailed comparison of various machine learning classifier algorithms, e.g., AdaBoost, MatrixNet and neural networks. The topological trigger algorithm is designed to select all ’interesting” decays of b-hadrons, but cannot be trained on every such decay. Studies have therefore been performed to determine how to optimize the performance of the classification algorithm on decays not used in the training. Methods studied include cascading, ensembling and blending techniques. Furthermore, novel boosting techniques have been implemented that will help reduce systematic uncertainties in Run 2 measurements. We demonstrate that the reoptimized topological trigger is expected to significantly improve on the Run 1 performance for a wide range of b-hadron decays.

  3. Chromosome aberrations in decondensed sperm DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    Factors that could influence the chromosomal aberration frequency observed at first cleavage following in vivo exposure of germ cells to chemical mutagens are discussed. The techniques of chromosome aberration analysis following sperm DNA condensation by in vitro fertilization or fusion seem to be viable research areas for providing information of human germ cell exposures. However, the potential sensitivity of the assay needs to be better understood, and factors that can influence this sensitivity require a great deal of further study using animal models.

  4. Sensing Phase Aberrations behind Lyot Coronagraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Soummer, Rémi; Pueyo, Laurent; Wallace, J. Kent; Shao, Michael

    2008-11-01

    Direct detection of young extrasolar planets orbiting nearby stars can be accomplished from the ground with extreme adaptive optics and coronagraphy in the near-infrared, as long as this combination can provide an image with a dynamic range of 107 after the data are processed. Slowly varying speckles due to residual phase aberrations that are not measured by the primary wave-front sensor are the primary obstacle to achieving such a dynamic range. In particular, non-common optical path aberrations occurring between the wave-front sensor and the coronagraphic occulting spot degrade performance the most. We analyze the passage of both low and high spatial frequency phase ripples, as well as low-order Zernike aberrations, through an apodized pupil Lyot coronagraph in order to demonstrate the way coronagraphic filtering affects various aberrations. We derive the coronagraphically induced cutoff frequency of the filtering and estimate coronagraphic contrast losses due to low-order Zernike aberrations: tilt, astigmatism, defocus, coma, and spherical aberration. Such slowly varying path errors can be measured behind a coronagraph and corrected by a slowly updated optical path delay precompensation or offset asserted on the wave front by the adaptive optics (AO) system. We suggest ways of measuring and correcting all but the lowest spatial frequency aberrations using Lyot plane wave-front data, in spite of the complex interaction between the coronagraph and those mid-spatial frequency aberrations that cause image plane speckles near the coronagraphic focal plane mask occulter's edge. This investigation provides guidance for next-generation coronagraphic instruments currently under construction.

  5. Prediction of Visual Acuity from Wavefront Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B. (Inventor); Ahumada, Albert J. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for generating a visual acuity metric, based on wavefront aberrations (WFAs), associated with a test subject and representing classes of imperfections, such as defocus, astigmatism, coma and spherical aberrations, of the subject's visual system. The metric allows choices of different image template, can predict acuity for different target probabilities, can incorporate different and possibly subject-specific neural transfer functions, can predict acuity for different subject templates, and incorporates a model of the optotype identification task.

  6. Measles Virus-Specific Immunoglobulin G Isotype Immune Response in Early and Late Infections

    PubMed Central

    Isa, María Beatríz; Martínez, Laura; Giordano, Miguel; Zapata, Marta; Passeggi, Carlos; De Wolff, María Cristina; Nates, Silvia

    2001-01-01

    A total of 154 human serum samples (32 acute-phase and 22 convalescent-phase serum samples obtained within a week and between days 8 and 26 after the onset of rash, respectively, and 100 samples drawn from healthy immune adults) were processed by an immunofluorescence assay for the detection of immunoglobulin M (IgM), total immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4 measles virus-specific antibodies. In the acute phase, IgG1 was seen first, followed by IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4 responses, the mean seropositivity of which gradually increased during convalescence, reaching 100% (standard deviation [SD], 84 to 100%), 57% (SD, 34 to 80%), 86% (SD, 66 to 100%), and 86% (SD, 66 to 100%), respectively. IgG2 rose and fell in connection with IgG3 subclass antibodies, showing a rate of detection of IgG2 and/or IgG3 subclass antibodies of 95.5% (range, 100 to 86.5%) in the convalescent phase of infection. The mean percentage of measles IgG2 and IgG3 seropositivity dropped significantly during the memory phase, to 2% (range, 2 to 6%) and 3% (range, 3 to 7%), respectively (P < 0.05); meanwhile IgG1 and IgG4 subclass responses remained relatively unmodified in samples obtained years after infection (mean 100% [SD, 96 to 100%] and 86% [SD, 79 to 93%], respectively). Results obtained defined two highly different immune isotypic response patterns. One pattern is restrictive to IgG2 and/or IgG3 in the convalescent phase and is kinetically similar to the IgM antibody response, so its detection could be referred to as a recent viral activity. On the other hand, IgG1 and IgG4 were detected in both the convalescent and memory phases of the immune response, but their isolated occurrence without IgG2 and IgG3 could be related to the long-lasting immunity. PMID:11136766

  7. Rheumatoid factors in 129XB recombinant inbred strains. Igh-1-linked control of allotypic and isotypic specificities.

    PubMed

    Van Snick, J; Coutelier, J P; Van Roost, E; Guénet, J L

    1984-02-01

    To examine the role of autologous IgG in the induction of murine rheumatoid factors (RF) we have analyzed the allotypic specificity of anti-IgG2a RF in recombinant inbred strains derived from 129/Sv (Igh-1a) and C57BL/6 (Igh-1b) mice. In five of six Igh-1a strains, anti-IgG2a RF reacted with IgG2aa but failed to react with IgG2ab. In contrast, isotype-specific RF, which reacted equally well with a and b allotypes of IgG2a, represented the major RF species in one Igh-1a and all five Igh-1b strains tested. An additional form of RF specific for IgG2ab and not reactive with IgG2aa was detected in one Igh-1b strain. RF specific for a give allotype was thus only found in the presence of that allotype, which strongly suggests the involvement of autologous IgG in the induction of mouse RF synthesis. The specificity of RF was apparently further controlled by genes linked to but different from the Igh-C locus, as indicated by the absence of IgG2aa-specific RF in one of the 6 Igh-1a strains tested. Because this strain, 129XBG, has been shown to express idiotypic markers characteristic of Igh-1b mice, it is likely that the genes, which in the presence of a given allotype induce the production of isotype rather than allotype-specific RF, are identical to those that control the expression of idiotypes. Evidence was also obtained to indicate that Igh-1-linked genes influence the isotypic specificity and the isotype of RF itself: IgA anti-IgG2a predominated in Igh-1a strains and IgM anti-IgG1 in Igh-1b strains. Interestingly enough, total IgA and IgG2a levels also were higher in Igh-1a than in Igh-1b strains.

  8. Rheumatoid factors in 129XB recombinant inbred strains. Igh-1-linked control of allotypic and isotypic specificities

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    To examine the role of autologous IgG in the induction of murine rheumatoid factors (RF) we have analyzed the allotypic specificity of anti-IgG2a RF in recombinant inbred strains derived from 129/Sv (Igh- 1a) and C57BL/6 (Igh-1b) mice. In five of six Igh-1a strains, anti- IgG2a RF reacted with IgG2aa but failed to react with IgG2ab. In contrast, isotype-specific RF, which reacted equally well with a and b allotypes of IgG2a, represented the major RF species in one Igh-1a and all five Igh-1b strains tested. An additional form of RF specific for IgG2ab and not reactive with IgG2aa was detected in one Igh-1b strain. RF specific for a give allotype was thus only found in the presence of that allotype, which strongly suggests the involvement of autologous IgG in the induction of mouse RF synthesis. The specificity of RF was apparently further controlled by genes linked to but different from the Igh-C locus, as indicated by the absence of IgG2aa-specific RF in one of the 6 Igh-1a strains tested. Because this strain, 129XBG, has been shown to express idiotypic markers characteristic of Igh-1b mice, it is likely that the genes, which in the presence of a given allotype induce the production of isotype rather than allotype-specific RF, are identical to those that control the expression of idiotypes. Evidence was also obtained to indicate that Igh-1-linked genes influence the isotypic specificity and the isotype of RF itself: IgA anti-IgG2a predominated in Igh-1a strains and IgM anti-IgG1 in Igh-1b strains. Interestingly enough, total IgA and IgG2a levels also were higher in Igh-1a than in Igh-1b strains. PMID:6420498

  9. Accommodation to Wavefront Vergence and Chromatic Aberration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yinan; Kruger, Philip B.; Li, James S.; Lin, Peter L.; Stark, Lawrence R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Longitudinal chromatic aberration (LCA) provides a cue to accommodation with small pupils. However, large pupils increase monochromatic aberrations, which may obscure chromatic blur. In the present study, we examined the effect of pupil size and LCA on accommodation. Methods Accommodation was recorded by infrared optometer while observers (nine normal trichromats) viewed a sinusoidally moving Maltese cross target in a Badal stimulus system. There were two illumination conditions: white (3000 K; 20 cd/m2) and monochromatic (550 nm with 10 nm bandwidth; 20 cd/m2) and two artificial pupil conditions (3 mm and 5.7 mm). Separately, static measurements of wavefront aberration were made with the eye accommodating to targets between 0 and 4 D (COAS, Wavefront Sciences). Results Large individual differences in accommodation to wavefront vergence and to LCA are a hallmark of accommodation. LCA continues to provide a signal at large pupil sizes despite higher levels of monochromatic aberrations. Conclusions Monochromatic aberrations may defend against chromatic blur at high spatial frequencies, but accommodation responds best to optical vergence and to LCA at 3 c/deg where blur from higher order aberrations is less. PMID:21317666

  10. Individual eye model based on wavefront aberration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Huanqing; Wang, Zhaoqi; Zhao, Qiuling; Quan, Wei; Wang, Yan

    2005-03-01

    Based on the widely used Gullstrand-Le Grand eye model, the individual human eye model has been established here, which has individual corneal data, anterior chamber depth and the eyeball depth. Furthermore, the foremost thing is that the wavefront aberration calculated from the individual eye model is equal to the eye's wavefront aberration measured with the Hartmann-shack wavefront sensor. There are four main steps to build the model. Firstly, the corneal topography instrument was used to measure the corneal surfaces and depth. And in order to input cornea into the optical model, high-order aspheric surface-Zernike Fringe Sag surface was chosen to fit the corneal surfaces. Secondly, the Hartmann-shack wavefront sensor, which can offer the Zernike polynomials to describe the wavefront aberration, was built to measure the wavefront aberration of the eye. Thirdly, the eye's axial lengths among every part were measured with A-ultrasonic technology. Then the data were input into the optical design software-ZEMAX and the crystalline lens's shapes were optimized with the aberration as the merit function. The individual eye model, which has the same wavefront aberrations with the real eye, is established.

  11. The isotype of the BCR as a surrogate for the GCB and ABC molecular subtypes in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ruminy, P; Etancelin, P; Couronné, L; Parmentier, F; Rainville, V; Mareschal, S; Bohers, E; Burgot, C; Cornic, M; Bertrand, P; Lenormand, B; Picquenot, J-M; Jardin, F; Tilly, H; Bastard, C

    2011-04-01

    Gene expression profiling has identified two major molecular subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) that are histologically indistinguishable but differ in cure rates. Here, we investigated whether the isotype of the B-cell receptor (BCR) expressed by the tumoral cells correlated with the molecular subtype and survival. Gene expression analysis clustered the 53 patients included in this study into three subgroups, 17 germinal center B-cell-like (GCB) cases, 26 activated B-cell-like (ABC) cases and 10 intermediate cases. The molecular subtype was correlated with the isotype, as 15/17 GCB cases expressed a secondary isotype (immunoglobulin (Ig)G or IgA), whereas 24/26 ABC cases expressed a primary isotype (IgM or IgD) (P<0.0001). There was a trend toward a worse outcome for patients with an ABC DLBCL and a shorter overall survival for patients with IgM+ tumor (P=0.21 and 0.014, respectively). Finally, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis revealed a striking asymmetric pattern, as the IGHM gene is conserved only on the productive IGH allele in most IgM+ tumors. Taken together, these data indicate that the isotype of the BCR is a reliable indicator for the GCB and ABC subtypes in DLBCL, and suggest that the conservation of an IgM is required for ABC DLBCL lymphomagenesis to occur.

  12. Isotype commitment in the in vivo immune responses. I. Antigen- dependent specific and polyclonal plaque-forming cell responses by B lymphocytes induced to extensive proliferation

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The random recombination and deletion hypothesis for the control of isotype commitment in antibody responses was directly tested in a serial transfer system in vivo. Normal or hyperimmune spleen cells were used in weekly serial transfers with antigen into irradiated recipients until clonal senescence was observed. Antigen-specific and -nonspecific plaque-forming cells of all isotypes were determined at each transfer time. No major changes in the isotypes of specific antibodies were observed for the whole life-span of the transferred cells (9-10 wk), and no indication was obtained for the accumulation of cells transcribing the most 3' members of the C-gene cluster with sustained proliferation. Rather, the dominant isotypes were found throughout the response to be IgG1, IgG2b, and IgG2a. The results imply isotype- specific regulatory mechanisms in the control of Ig class production. These appear to operate as well in the antigen-nonspecific component of the immune response. PMID:6809880

  13. Cloning and structural analysis of two highly divergent IgA isotypes, IgA1 and IgA2 from the duck billed platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus.

    PubMed

    Vernersson, M; Belov, K; Aveskogh, M; Hellman, L

    2010-01-01

    To trace the emergence of modern IgA isotypes during vertebrate evolution we have studied the immunoglobulin repertoire of a model monotreme, the platypus. Two highly divergent IgA-like isotypes (IgA1 and IgA2) were identified and their primary structures were determined from full-length cDNAs. A comparative analysis of the amino acid sequences for IgA from various animal species showed that the two platypus IgA isotypes form a branch clearly separated from their eutherian (placental) counterparts. However, they still conform to the general structure of eutherian IgA, with a hinge region and three constant domains. This indicates that the deletion of the second domain and the formation of a hinge region in IgA did occur very early during mammalian evolution, more than 166 million years ago. The two IgA isotypes in platypus differ in primary structure and appear to have arisen from a very early gene duplication, possibly preceding the metatherian eutherian split. Interestingly, one of these isotypes, IgA1, appears to be expressed in only the platypus, but is present in the echidna based on Southern blot analysis. The platypus may require a more effective mucosal immunity, with two highly divergent IgA forms, than the terrestrial echidna, due to its lifestyle, where it is exposed to pathogens both on land and in the water.

  14. Calorimetry Triggering in ATLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Igonkina, O.; Achenbach, R.; Adragna, P.; Aharrouche, M.; Alexandre, G.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X.; Aracena, I.; Backlund, S.; Baines, J.; Barnett, B.M.; Bauss, B.; Bee, C.; Behera, P.; Bell, P.; Bendel, M.; Benslama, K.; Berry, T.; Bogaerts, A.; Bohm, C.; Bold, T.; /UC, Irvine /AGH-UST, Cracow /Birmingham U. /Barcelona, IFAE /CERN /Birmingham U. /Rutherford /Montreal U. /Santa Maria U., Valparaiso /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Geneva U. /City Coll., N.Y. /Barcelona, IFAE /CERN /Birmingham U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Birmingham U. /Lisbon, LIFEP /Rio de Janeiro Federal U. /City Coll., N.Y. /Birmingham U. /Copenhagen U. /Copenhagen U. /Brookhaven /Rutherford /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Pennsylvania U. /Montreal U. /SLAC /CERN /Michigan State U. /Chile U., Catolica /City Coll., N.Y. /Oxford U. /La Plata U. /McGill U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Hamburg U. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Geneva U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /CERN /Rutherford /Rio de Janeiro Federal U. /Birmingham U. /Montreal U. /CERN /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Liverpool U. /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Pennsylvania U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Geneva U. /Birmingham U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Rutherford /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Rutherford /Royal Holloway, U. of London /AGH-UST, Cracow /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Birmingham U. /Hamburg U. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Geneva U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Michigan State U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U. /Birmingham U. /CERN /Montreal U. /Stockholm U. /Arizona U. /Regina U. /Regina U. /Rutherford /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /City Coll., N.Y. /University Coll. London /Humboldt U., Berlin /Queen Mary, U. of London /Argonne /LPSC, Grenoble /Arizona U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Birmingham U. /Antonio Narino U. /Hamburg U. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Birmingham U. /Chile U., Catolica /Indiana U. /Manchester U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Rutherford /City Coll., N.Y. /Stockholm U. /La Plata U. /Antonio Narino U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Antonio Narino U. /Pavia U. /City Coll., N.Y. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Pennsylvania U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IFAE /Chile U., Catolica /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Rutherford /Barcelona, IFAE /Nevis Labs, Columbia U. /CERN /Antonio Narino U. /McGill U. /Rutherford /Santa Maria U., Valparaiso /Rutherford /Chile U., Catolica /Brookhaven /Oregon U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Barcelona, IFAE /McGill U. /Antonio Narino U. /Antonio Narino U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Sydney U. /Rutherford /McGill U. /McGill U. /Pavia U. /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Barcelona, IFAE /SLAC /Stockholm U. /Moscow State U. /Stockholm U. /Birmingham U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Birmingham U. /Geneva U. /Oregon U. /Barcelona, IFAE /University Coll. London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Birmingham U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Birmingham U. /Birmingham U. /Oregon U. /La Plata U. /Geneva U. /Chile U., Catolica /McGill U. /Pavia U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Regina U. /Birmingham U. /Birmingham U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Oxford U. /CERN /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /UC, Irvine /UC, Irvine /Wisconsin U., Madison /Rutherford /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /CERN /Geneva U. /Copenhagen U. /City Coll., N.Y. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Rio de Janeiro Federal U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Stockholm U. /University Coll. London

    2011-12-08

    The ATLAS experiment is preparing for data taking at 14 TeV collision energy. A rich discovery physics program is being prepared in addition to the detailed study of Standard Model processes which will be produced in abundance. The ATLAS multi-level trigger system is designed to accept one event in 2/10{sup 5} to enable the selection of rare and unusual physics events. The ATLAS calorimeter system is a precise instrument, which includes liquid Argon electro-magnetic and hadronic components as well as a scintillator-tile hadronic calorimeter. All these components are used in the various levels of the trigger system. A wide physics coverage is ensured by inclusively selecting events with candidate electrons, photons, taus, jets or those with large missing transverse energy. The commissioning of the trigger system is being performed with cosmic ray events and by replaying simulated Monte Carlo events through the trigger and data acquisition system.

  15. ELECTRONIC TRIGGER CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Russell, J.A.G.

    1958-01-01

    An electronic trigger circuit is described of the type where an output pulse is obtained only after an input voltage has cqualed or exceeded a selected reference voltage. In general, the invention comprises a source of direct current reference voltage in series with an impedance and a diode rectifying element. An input pulse of preselected amplitude causes the diode to conduct and develop a signal across the impedance. The signal is delivered to an amplifier where an output pulse is produced and part of the output is fed back in a positive manner to the diode so that the amplifier produces a steep wave front trigger pulsc at the output. The trigger point of the described circuit is not subject to variation due to the aging, etc., of multi-electrode tabes, since the diode circuit essentially determines the trigger point.

  16. Dealing with Asthma Triggers

    MedlinePlus

    ... smell given off by paint or gas, and air pollution. If you notice that an irritant triggers your ... or other tobacco products around you. If outdoor air pollution is a problem, running the air conditioner or ...

  17. Study of ocular aberrations with age.

    PubMed

    Athaide, Helaine Vinche Zampar; Campos, Mauro; Costa, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Aging has various effects on visual system. Vision deteriorate, contrast sensitivity decreases and ocular aberrations apparently make the optical quality worse across the years. To prospective evaluate ocular aberrations along the ages. Three hundred and fifteen patients were examined, 155 were male (39.36%) and 160 were female (60.63%). Ages ranged from 5 to 64 year-old, the study was performed from February to November, 2004. Patients were divided into 4 age-groups according to IBGE (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística) classification: 68 patients from 5 to 14 year-old, 55 patients from 15 to 24 year-old, 116 from 25 to 44 year-old and 76 from 45 to 67 year-old. All patients had the following characteristics: best corrected visual acuity > 20/25, emmetropia or spherical equivalent < 3.50 SD, refractive astigmatism < 1.75 CD on cycloplegic refraction, normal ophthalmologic exam and no previous ocular surgeries. This protocol was approved by Federal University of São Paulo Institutional Review Board. Total optical aberrations were measured by H-S sensor LadarWave Custom Cornea Wavefront System (Alcon Laboratories Inc, Orlando, FLA, USA) and were statistically analysed. Corneal aberrations were calculated using CT-View software Version 6.89 (Sarver and Associates, Celebration, FL, USA). Lens aberrations were calculated by subtraction. High-order (0.32 e 0.48 microm) and ocular spherical aberrations (0.02 e 0.26 microm) increased respectively in child and middle age groups. High order (0.27 microm) and corneal spherical aberrations (0.05 microm) did not show changes with age. Lens showed a statistically significant spherical aberration increase (from -0.02 to 0.22 microm). Vertical (from 0.10 to -0.07 microm) and horizontal coma (from 0.01 to -0.12 microm) presented progressively negative values with aging. High-order and spherical aberrations increased with age due to lens contribution. The cornea did not affect significantly changes observed on ocular

  18. Deletional switch recombination occurs in interleukin-4-induced isotype switching to IgE expression by human B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Shapira, S K; Jabara, H H; Thienes, C P; Ahern, D J; Vercelli, D; Gould, H J; Geha, R S

    1991-01-01

    There is controversy as to whether deletional rearrangement occurs between the IgM and IgE switch regions (S mu and S epsilon, respectively) during switching to the IgE isotype. We have addressed the issue by stimulating normal human B cells, sorted for lack of expression of surface IgE, to produce IgE by infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the presence of interleukin 4 (IL-4). Genomic DNA was amplified for S mu/S epsilon switch junction fragments by utilizing the nested-primer polymerase chain reaction. Switch junction fragments were amplified from B cells infected with EBV in the presence of IL-4 but not from B cells infected with EBV alone. The DNA sequence of these "switch fragments" revealed direct joining of S mu to S epsilon in each case. The recombination sites within S mu were clustered within 900 base pairs at the 5' end of the switch region, suggesting that there are "hot spots" for recombination within S mu. The S epsilon recombination sites were scattered throughout the S epsilon region. These findings indicate that IL-4-induced isotype switching to IgE production in human B cells is accompanied by DNA rearrangements with joining of S mu to S epsilon. Images PMID:1881893

  19. Immunogenicity and antigenicity of immunoglobulins. XII. Intact light chain and heavy chain isotype-restricted Vk-associated epitopes.

    PubMed

    Walker, M; Hardie, D; Lowe, J; Ling, N R; De Lange, G; Jefferis, R

    1985-06-01

    Immunization with intact IgG has allowed the isolation of four hybridomas producing antibodies recognizing epitopes expressed within subpopulations of human kappa light chains unrelated to known polymorphisms (Km) and previously defined V-region subgroups. The V-region-associated epitopes recognized are conformation-dependent, being expressed on intact light chain but not on isolated VK or CK fragments. The frequency of expression within paraprotein panels of different heavy chain isotypes varied between individual antibodies. An epitope recognized by B2A6, expressed by greater than 85% IgGK paraproteins, was not represented in 16 IgM paraproteins tested, suggesting that association of VK with mu chains does not result in display of the epitope recognized, or alternatively, that selective association between VK and CH gene products occurs. These data contrast with the reactivity of other McAb for CK epitopes which were reactive with isolated CK fragments, and for all kappa-bearing paraproteins, regardless of heavy chain isotypes.

  20. Detection of Bovine IgG Isotypes in a PPA-ELISA for Johne's Disease Diagnosis in Infected Herds.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Bárbara; Gilardoni, Liliana Rosa; Jolly, Ana; Colavecchia, Silvia Beatriz; Paolicchi, Fernando Alberto; Mundo, Silvia Leonor

    2012-01-01

    Johne's Disease or Paratuberculosis is a chronic granulomatous enteritis disease affecting ruminants. Detection of subclinically infected animals is difficult, hampering the control of this disease. The aim of this work was to evaluate the performance of detection of IgG isotypes in a PPA-ELISA to improve the recognition of cattle naturally infected with Map in different stages. A total of 108 animals from Tuberculosis-free herds were grouped as follows: exposed (n = 30), subclinically infected (n = 26), clinically infected (n = 14), and healthy controls (n = 38). Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves of isotypes/PPA-ELISAs were constructed and areas under the curves were compared to evaluate the performance of each test. Our study demonstrated that the conventional PPA-ELISA (detecting IgG) is the best to identify clinically infected animals with high sensitivity (92.9%) and specificity (100%). Meanwhile, IgG2/PPA-ELISA improved the number of subclinically infected cattle detected as compared with conventional IgG/PPA-ELISA (53.8 versus 23.1%). In addition, it had the maximum sensitivity (65.0%, taking into account all Map-infected cattle). In conclusion, the combination of IgG and IgG2/PPA-ELISAs may improve the identification of Map-infected cattle in different stages of disease. The usefulness of IgG2 detection in serological tests for Johne's Disease diagnosis should be further evaluated.

  1. Characterization of the interactions of rabbit neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) with rabbit and human IgG isotypes.

    PubMed

    Szikora, Bence; Hiripi, László; Bender, Balázs; Kacskovics, Imre; Iliás, Attila

    2017-01-01

    Despite the increasing importance of rabbit as an animal model in pharmacological studies like investigating placental transfer of therapeutic IgGs, little is known about the molecular interaction of the rabbit neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) with rabbit and human IgG molecules. We analyzed the interactions of the rabbit and human FcRn with rabbit and human IgG isotypes using surface plasmon resonance assay. Similar to FcRn of other species, rabbit FcRn functions in pH-dependent manner, as it binds IgGs at pH 6.0, but no binding occurs at pH 7.4. We also showed that rabbit FcRn binds rabbit IgG and human IgG1 with nearly identical affinity, whereas it has stronger interactions with the other human IgG isotypes. The similar affinity of rabbit IgG and human IgG1 for rabbit FcRn was confirmed by in vitro FcRn-mediated recycling assay. These data verify that rabbit is an appropriate animal model for analyzing the pharmacokinetics of human therapeutic monoclonal antibodies.

  2. The mouse Igh-1a and Igh-1b H chain constant regions are derived from two distinct isotypic genes.

    PubMed

    Jouvin-Marche, E; Morgado, M G; Leguern, C; Voegtle, D; Bonhomme, F; Cazenave, P A

    1989-01-01

    Genetic and structural analyses of the mouse genes encoding constant region of immunoglobulin subclass (Igh-C) have shown that recombination is rare within this cluster which is inherited as a set designated the Igh haplotype. Recent molecular analyses have demonstrated that either DNA exchanges or gene duplications have probably occurred during the evolution of this set of genes. In order to assess the generality of the duplication processes, the presence and expression of two allelic forms of the Igh-1 (gamma 2a) gene (Igh-1a and Igh-1b) were examined in a large panel of wild mice belonging to Mus musculus domesticus and Mus musculus musculus species. Our data indicate that certain M. m. domesticus animals and most animals in the M. m. musculus group coexpress the two allelic forms of Igh-1. Moreover, genetic studies show that these two immunoglobulin types are encoded by tandemly arranged genes. We propose that wild mice, from which laboratory mice are derived, carry three isotypic gamma 2 genes (Igh-1a, Igh-1b, Igh-3), and these have given rise to the two isotypes seen in laboratory strains by a deletion/insertion mechanism.

  3. Role of diacylglycerol-regulated protein kinase C isotypes in growth factor activation of the Raf-1 protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Cai, H; Smola, U; Wixler, V; Eisenmann-Tappe, I; Diaz-Meco, M T; Moscat, J; Rapp, U; Cooper, G M

    1997-01-01

    The Raf protein kinases function downstream of Ras guanine nucleotide-binding proteins to transduce intracellular signals from growth factor receptors. Interaction with Ras recruits Raf to the plasma membrane, but the subsequent mechanism of Raf activation has not been established. Previous studies implicated hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine (PC) in Raf activation; therefore, we investigated the role of the epsilon isotype of protein kinase C (PKC), which is stimulated by PC-derived diacylglycerol, as a Raf activator. A dominant negative mutant of PKC epsilon inhibited both proliferation of NIH 3T3 cells and activation of Raf in COS cells. Conversely, overexpression of active PKC epsilon stimulated Raf kinase activity in COS cells and overcame the inhibitory effects of dominant negative Ras in NIH 3T3 cells. PKC epsilon also stimulated Raf kinase in baculovirus-infected Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 cells and was able to directly activate Raf in vitro. Consistent with its previously reported activity as a Raf activator in vitro, PKC alpha functioned similarly to PKC epsilon in both NIH 3T3 and COS cell assays. In addition, constitutively active mutants of both PKC alpha and PKC epsilon overcame the inhibitory effects of dominant negative mutants of the other PKC isotype, indicating that these diacylglycerol-regulated PKCs function as redundant activators of Raf-1 in vivo. PMID:9001227

  4. Detection of Bovine IgG Isotypes in a PPA-ELISA for Johne's Disease Diagnosis in Infected Herds

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Bárbara; Gilardoni, Liliana Rosa; Jolly, Ana; Colavecchia, Silvia Beatriz; Paolicchi, Fernando Alberto; Mundo, Silvia Leonor

    2012-01-01

    Johne's Disease or Paratuberculosis is a chronic granulomatous enteritis disease affecting ruminants. Detection of subclinically infected animals is difficult, hampering the control of this disease. The aim of this work was to evaluate the performance of detection of IgG isotypes in a PPA-ELISA to improve the recognition of cattle naturally infected with Map in different stages. A total of 108 animals from Tuberculosis-free herds were grouped as follows: exposed (n = 30), subclinically infected (n = 26), clinically infected (n = 14), and healthy controls (n = 38). Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves of isotypes/PPA-ELISAs were constructed and areas under the curves were compared to evaluate the performance of each test. Our study demonstrated that the conventional PPA-ELISA (detecting IgG) is the best to identify clinically infected animals with high sensitivity (92.9%) and specificity (100%). Meanwhile, IgG2/PPA-ELISA improved the number of subclinically infected cattle detected as compared with conventional IgG/PPA-ELISA (53.8 versus 23.1%). In addition, it had the maximum sensitivity (65.0%, taking into account all Map-infected cattle). In conclusion, the combination of IgG and IgG2/PPA-ELISAs may improve the identification of Map-infected cattle in different stages of disease. The usefulness of IgG2 detection in serological tests for Johne's Disease diagnosis should be further evaluated. PMID:22792511

  5. Epitope and isotype specificities of antibodies to -amyloid peptide for protection against Alzheimer's disease-like neuropathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bard, Frédérique; Barbour, Robin; Cannon, Catherine; Carretto, Robert; Fox, Michael; Games, Dora; Guido, Teresa; Hoenow, Kathleen; Hu, Kang; Johnson-Wood, Kelly; Khan, Karen; Kholodenko, Dora; Lee, Celeste; Lee, Mike; Motter, Ruth; Nguyen, Minh; Reed, Amanda; Schenk, Dale; Tang, Pearl; Vasquez, Nicki; Seubert, Peter; Yednock, Ted

    2003-02-01

    Transgenic PDAPP mice, which express a disease-linked isoform of the human amyloid precursor protein, exhibit CNS pathology that is similar to Alzheimer's disease. In an age-dependent fashion, the mice develop plaques containing -amyloid peptide (A) and exhibit neuronal dystrophy and synaptic loss. It has been shown in previous studies that pathology can be prevented and even reversed by immunization of the mice with the A peptide. Similar protection could be achieved by passive administration of some but not all monoclonal antibodies against A. In the current studies we sought to define the optimal antibody response for reducing neuropathology. Immune sera with reactivity against different A epitopes and monoclonal antibodies with different isotypes were examined for efficacy both ex vivo and in vivo. The studies showed that: (i) of the purified or elicited antibodies tested, only antibodies against the N-terminal regions of A were able to invoke plaque clearance; (ii) plaque binding correlated with a clearance response and neuronal protection, whereas the ability of antibodies to capture soluble A was not necessarily correlated with efficacy; (iii) the isotype of the antibody dramatically influenced the degree of plaque clearance and neuronal protection; (iv) high affinity of the antibody for Fc receptors on microglial cells seemed more important than high affinity for Aβ itself; and (v) complement activation was not required for plaque clearance. These results indicate that antibody Fc-mediated plaque clearance is a highly efficient and effective process for protection against neuropathology in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Aberrant adenosine A2A receptor signaling contributes to neurodegeneration and cognitive impairments in a mouse model of synucleinopathy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qidi; Ren, Xiangpeng; Liu, Ya; Li, Zhihui; Zhang, Liping; Chen, Xingjun; He, Chaoxiang; Chen, Jiang-Fan

    2016-09-01

    Synucleinopathy is characterized by abnormal accumulation of misfolded α-synuclein (α-Syn)-positive cytoplasmic inclusions and by neurodegeneration and cognitive impairments, but the pathogenesis mechanism of synucleinopathy remains to be defined. Using a transmission model of synucleinopathy by intracerebral injection of preformed A53T α-Syn fibrils, we investigated whether aberrant adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) signaling contributed to pathogenesis of synucleinopathy. We demonstrated that intra-hippocampal injection of preformed mutant α-Syn fibrils triggered a striking and selective induction of A2AR expression which was closely co-localized with pSer129 α-Syn-rich inclusions in neurons and glial cells of hippocampus. Importantly, by abolishing aberrant A2AR signaling triggered by mutant α-Syn, genetic deletion of A2ARs blunted a cascade of pathological events leading to synucleinopathy, including pSer129 α-Syn-rich and p62-positive aggregates, NF-κB activation and astrogliosis, apoptotic neuronal cell death and working memory deficits without affecting motor activity. These findings define α-Syn-triggered aberrant A2AR signaling as a critical pathogenesis mechanism of synucleinopathy with dual controls of cognition and neurodegeneration by modulating α-Syn aggregates. Thus, aberrant A2AR signaling represents a useful biomarker as well as a therapeutic target of synucleinopathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Inducible costimulator is required for type 2 antibody isotype switching but not T helper cell type 2 responses in chronic nematode infection

    PubMed Central

    Loke, P'ng; Zang, Xingxing; Hsuan, Lisa; Waitz, Rebecca; Locksley, Richard M.; Allen, Judith E.; Allison, James P.

    2005-01-01

    Inducible costimulator (ICOS) has been suggested to perform an important role in T helper cell type 2 (Th2) responses, germinal center formation, and isotype switching. The role of ICOS in chronic Th2 responses was studied in a nematode model with the filarial parasite, Brugia malayi. Contrary to expectations, we did not observe a significant defect in IL-4-producing Th2 cells in ICOS–/– mice or in eosinophil recruitment. We also found that ICOS was not required for the differentiation of alternatively activated macrophages (AAMΦ) that express Ym1 and Fizz1. Although the production of IgE was slightly reduced in ICOS–/– mice, this was not as significant as in CD28–/– mice. In contrast to live infection, the primary response of ICOS–/– mice immunized with soluble B. malayi antigen and complete Freund's adjuvant resulted in significantly fewer IL-4-producing cells in the lymph nodes. As previously reported, we observed a defect in antibody isotype switching toward the IgG1 isotype in ICOS–/– mice during live infection. Interestingly, there was a significant enhancement of parasite-specific IgG3 isotype antibodies. CD28–/– and MHC class II–/– mice also had enhanced parasite-specific IgG3 isotype antibodies. Our results suggest that ICOS is not required to maintain a chronic cellular Th2 response. The primary role of ICOS in a chronic helminth infection could be to drive antibodies toward type 2 isotypes. T-independent antibody response to the parasite could be enhanced in the absence of costimulation and T cell help. PMID:15994233

  8. Triggered Earthquakes Following Parkfield?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hough, S. E.

    2004-12-01

    When the M5.0 Arvin earthquake struck approximately 30 hours after the 28 September 2004 M6.0 Parkfield earthquake, it seemed likely if not obvious that the latter had triggered the former. The odds of a M5.0 or greater event occurring by random chance in a given 2-day window is low, on the order of 2%. However, previously published results suggest that remotely triggered earthquakes are observed only following much larger mainshocks, typically M7 or above. Moreover, using a standard beta-statistic approach, one finds no pervasive regional increase of seismicity in the weeks following the Parkfield mainshock. (Neither were any moderate events observed at regional distances following the 1934 and 1966 Parkfield earthquakes.) Was Arvin a remotely triggered earthquake? To address this issue further I compare the seismicity rate changes following the Parkfield mainshock with those following 14 previous M5.3-7.1 earthquakes in central and southern California. I show that, on average, seismicity increased to a distance of at least 120 km following these events. For all but the M7.1 Hector Mine mainshock, this is well beyond the radius of what would be considered a traditional aftershock zone. Average seismicity rates also increase, albeit more weakly, to a distance of about 220 km. These results suggest that even moderate mainshocks in central and southern California do trigger seismicity at distances up to 220 km, supporting the inference that Arvin was indeed a remotely triggered earthquake. In general, only weak triggering is expected following moderate (M5.5-6.5) mainshocks. However, as illustrated by Arvin and, in retrospect, the 1986 M5.5 Oceanside earthquake, which struck just 5 days after the M5.9 North Palm Springs earthquake, triggered events can sometimes be large enough to generate public interest, and anxiety.

  9. Calculation of aberration coefficients by ray tracing.

    PubMed

    Oral, M; Lencová, B

    2009-10-01

    In this paper we present an approach for the calculation of aberration coefficients using accurate ray tracing. For a given optical system, intersections of a large number of trajectories with a given plane are computed. In the Gaussian image plane the imaging with the selected optical system can be described by paraxial and aberration coefficients (geometric and chromatic) that can be calculated by least-squares fitting of the analytical model on the computed trajectory positions. An advantage of such a way of computing the aberration coefficients is that, in comparison with the aberration integrals and the differential algebra method, it is relatively easy to use and its complexity stays almost constant with the growing complexity of the optical system. This paper shows a tested procedure for choosing proper initial conditions and computing the coefficients of the fifth-order geometrical and third-order, first-degree chromatic aberrations by ray tracing on an example of a weak electrostatic lens. The results are compared with the values for the same lens from a paper Liu [Ultramicroscopy 106 (2006) 220-232].

  10. Describing ocular aberrations with wavefront vergence maps.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jayoung; Thibos, Larry N; Iskander, D Robert

    2009-05-01

    A common optometric problem is to specify the eye's ocular aberrations in terms of Zernike coefficients and to reduce that specification to a prescription for the optimum sphero-cylindrical correcting lens. The typical approach is first to reconstruct wavefront phase errors from measurements of wavefront slopes obtained by a wavefront aberrometer. This paper applies a new method to this clinical problem that does not require wavefront reconstruction. Instead, we base our analysis of axial wavefront vergence as inferred directly from wavefront slopes. The result is a wavefront vergence map that is similar to the axial power maps in corneal topography and hence has a potential to be favoured by clinicians. We use our new set of orthogonal Zernike slope polynomials to systematically analyse details of the vergence map analogous to Zernike analysis of wavefront maps. The result is a vector of slope coefficients that describe fundamental aberration components. Three different methods for reducing slope coefficients to a spherocylindrical prescription in power vector forms are compared and contrasted. When the original wavefront contains only second order aberrations, the vergence map is a function of meridian only and the power vectors from all three methods are identical. The differences in the methods begin to appear as we include higher order aberrations, in which case the wavefront vergence map is more complicated. Finally, we discuss the advantages and limitations of vergence map representation of ocular aberrations.

  11. The CMS trigger system

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2017-01-24

    This paper describes the CMS trigger system and its performance during Run 1 of the LHC. The trigger system consists of two levels designed to select events of potential physics interest from a GHz (MHz) interaction rate of proton-proton (heavy ion) collisions. The first level of the trigger is implemented in hardware, and selects events containing detector signals consistent with an electron, photon, muon, tau lepton, jet, or missing transverse energy. A programmable menu of up to 128 object-based algorithms is used to select events for subsequent processing. The trigger thresholds are adjusted to the LHC instantaneous luminosity during datamore » taking in order to restrict the output rate to 100 kHz, the upper limit imposed by the CMS readout electronics. The second level, implemented in software, further refines the purity of the output stream, selecting an average rate of 400 Hz for offline event storage. The objectives, strategy and performance of the trigger system during the LHC Run 1 are described.« less

  12. Cygnus Trigger System

    SciTech Connect

    G. Corrow, M. Hansen, D. Henderson, C. Mitton

    2008-02-01

    The Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two radiographic sources (Cygnus 1, Cygnus 2) each with a dose rating of 4 rads at 1 m, and a 1-mm diameter spot size. The electrical specifications are: 2.25 MV, 60 kA, 60 ns. This facility is located in an underground environment at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These sources were developed as a primary diagnostic for subcritical tests, which are single-shot, high-value events. In such an application there is an emphasis on reliability and reproducibility. A robust, low-jitter trigger system is a key element for meeting these goals. The trigger system was developed with both commercial and project-specific equipment. In addition to the traditional functions of a trigger system there are novel features added to protect the investment of a high-value shot. Details of the trigger system, including elements designed specifically for a subcritical test application, will be presented. The individual electronic components have their nominal throughput, and when assembled have a system throughput with a measured range of jitter. The shot-to-shot jitter will be assessed both individually and in combination. Trigger reliability and reproducibility results will be presented for a substantial number of shots executed at the NTS.

  13. The CMS trigger system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; Damiao, D. De Jesus; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; De Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Assran, Y.; El Sawy, M.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Verlage, T.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Trippkewitz, K. D.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Gonzalez, D.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Scharf, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schwandt, J.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Akbiyik, M.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Frensch, F.; Friese, R.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Haitz, D.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hazi, A.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Sahoo, D. K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mehta, A.; Mittal, M.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nishu, N.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, V.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dey, S.; Dutta, S.; Jain, Sa.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Chowdhury, S. Roy; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Mahakud, B.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sarkar, T.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Kothekar, K.; Sharma, S.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Najafabadi, M. Mohammadi; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Viliani, L.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Calvelli, V.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Brianza, L.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Di Guida, S.; Esposito, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Bacchetta, N.; Bellato, M.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Montecassiano, F.; Passaseo, M.; Pazzini, J.; Pegoraro, M.; Pozzobon, N.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Ventura, S.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D'imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Gelli, S.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Preiato, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Kiani, B.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Monteil, E.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Ravera, F.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Schizzi, A.; Zanetti, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. J.; Lee, S.; Oh, Y. D.; Sakharov, A.; Son, D. C.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Go, Y.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Yoo, H. D.; Choi, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Ryu, M. S.; Choi, Y.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Dudenas, V.; Juodagalvis, A.; Vaitkus, J.; Ahmed, I.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Ali, M. A. B. Md; Mohamad Idris, F.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Yusli, M. N.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Byszuk, A.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Kierzkowski, K.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Oklinski, W.; Olszewski, M.; Pozniak, K.; Walczak, M.; Zabolotny, W.; Bargassa, P.; Silva, C. Beirão Da Cruz E.; Di Francesco, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Leonardo, N.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nguyen, F.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Toldaiev, O.; Vadruccio, D.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Afanasiev, S.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Konoplyanikov, V.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Shulha, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Zarubin, A.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Kuznetsova, E.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Karneyeu, A.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, I.; Safronov, G.; Spiridonov, A.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Bylinkin, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Kaminskiy, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Myagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Santaolalla, J.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Castiñeiras De Saa, J. R.; De Castro Manzano, P.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Fernandez, M.; Garcia-Ferrero, J.; Gomez, G.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Trevisani, N.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benaglia, A.; Bendavid, J.; Benhabib, L.; Benitez, J. F.; Berruti, G. M.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Castello, R.; Cerminara, G.; D'Alfonso, M.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; Daponte, V.; David, A.; De Gruttola, M.; De Guio, F.; De Roeck, A.; De Visscher, S.; Di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dorney, B.; du Pree, T.; Dünser, M.; Dupont, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Franzoni, G.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kirschenmann, H.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Lucchini, M. T.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Martelli, A.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Nemallapudi, M. V.; Neugebauer, H.; Orfanelli, S.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Piparo, D.; Racz, A.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Ruan, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Seidel, M.; Sharma, A.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Triossi, A.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Zagozdzinska, A.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Casal, B.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Heidegger, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Micheli, F.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pata, J.; Pauss, F.; Perrozzi, L.; Quittnat, M.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Tavolaro, V. R.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Aarrestad, T. K.; Amsler, C.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Galloni, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Salerno, D.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Doan, T. H.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Konyushikhin, M.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Yu, S. S.; Kumar, Arun; Bartek, R.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Fiori, F.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Miñano Moya, M.; Petrakou, E.; Tsai, J. f.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Demiroglu, Z. S.; Dozen, C.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Polatoz, A.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Zorbilmez, C.; Akin, I. V.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, E. A.; Yetkin, T.; Cakir, A.; Cankocak, K.; Sen, S.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Grynyov, B.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Beck, L.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. 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P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Osherson, M.; Roskes, J.; Sady, A.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Kenny, R. P., III; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; Mcginn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the CMS trigger system and its performance during Run 1 of the LHC. The trigger system consists of two levels designed to select events of potential physics interest from a GHz (MHz) interaction rate of proton-proton (heavy ion) collisions. The first level of the trigger is implemented in hardware, and selects events containing detector signals consistent with an electron, photon, muon, τ lepton, jet, or missing transverse energy. A programmable menu of up to 128 object-based algorithms is used to select events for subsequent processing. The trigger thresholds are adjusted to the LHC instantaneous luminosity during data taking in order to restrict the output rate to 100 kHz, the upper limit imposed by the CMS readout electronics. The second level, implemented in software, further refines the purity of the output stream, selecting an average rate of 400 Hz for offline event storage. The objectives, strategy and performance of the trigger system during the LHC Run 1 are described.

  14. Trigger mechanism for engines

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, L.R.

    1989-02-28

    A trigger mechanism is described for a blower-vacuum apparatus having a trigger mounted within a handle and a small engine comprising: a throttle; a ''L'' shaped lever having first and second legs mounted for rotation about an intermediate pivot within the handle when the trigger is depressed, interconnecting the trigger and the throttle, the second leg having first teeth defined therein, the lever further having idle, full throttle and stop positions; a normally raised latch means adapted to be rotated and axially depressed, the latch means having second teeth situated on a cam to engage the first teeth for holding the lever in an intermediate position between the idle and full throttle positions when the latch means is rotated. The latch means further are cam teeth into potential engagement with the lever teeth when the trigger is depressed, lever is biased to the stop position; and idle adjusting means means for intercepting the second leg for preventing the second leg from reaching the stop position when the latch means is raised.

  15. CDF - Secondary vertex trigger

    SciTech Connect

    D. Lucchesi

    2002-10-25

    At the beginning of 2002 a new data taking with an upgraded trigger system started for the CDF collaboration. One of the major improvements is the track trigger. A fast processor reconstructs tracks in the central drift chamber and the Silicon Vertex Tracker combines these tracks with the silicon vertex detector information to have track parameters with a precision as good as the offine reconstruction. This system allows CDF to trigger on tracks significantly displaced from the primary vertex with high efficiency for signal events like charm and beauty and to keep low background rates. The performances, in terms of resolution and efficiency, of both the processors are illustrated and the firsts physics results are discussed.

  16. Microfabricated triggered vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Roesler, Alexander W.; Schare, Joshua M.; Bunch, Kyle

    2010-05-11

    A microfabricated vacuum switch is disclosed which includes a substrate upon which an anode, cathode and trigger electrode are located. A cover is sealed over the substrate under vacuum to complete the vacuum switch. In some embodiments of the present invention, a metal cover can be used in place of the trigger electrode on the substrate. Materials used for the vacuum switch are compatible with high vacuum, relatively high temperature processing. These materials include molybdenum, niobium, copper, tungsten, aluminum and alloys thereof for the anode and cathode. Carbon in the form of graphitic carbon, a diamond-like material, or carbon nanotubes can be used in the trigger electrode. Channels can be optionally formed in the substrate to mitigate against surface breakdown.

  17. Optical aberrations in professional baseball players.

    PubMed

    Kirschen, David G; Laby, Daniel M; Kirschen, Matthew P; Applegate, Raymond; Thibos, Larry N

    2010-03-01

    To determine the presence, type, and size of optical higher-order aberrations (HOAs) in professional athletes with superior visual acuity and to compare them with those in an age-matched population of nonathletes. Vero Beach and Fort Myers, Florida, USA. Players from 2 professional baseball teams were studied. Each player's optical aberrations were measured with a naturally dilated 4.0 mm pupil using a Z-Wave aberrometer and a LADARWave aberrometer. One hundred sixty-two players (316 eyes) were evaluated. The HOAs were less than 0.026 mum in all cases. Spherical aberration C(4,0) was the largest aberration with both aberrometers. There were small but statistically significant differences between the aberrometers in mean values for trefoil C(3,3) and C(3,-3) and secondary astigmatism C(4,2). Although statistically significant, the differences were clinically insignificant, being similar at approximately 0.031 diopter (D) of spherical power. A statistically significant difference was found between the professional baseball players and the control population in trefoil C(3,-3). These differences were clinically insignificant, similar to 0.071 D of spherical power. Professional baseball players have small higher-order optical aberrations when tested with naturally dilated pupils. No clinically significant differences were found between the 2 aberrometers. Statistically significant differences in trefoil were found between the players and the control population; however, the difference was clinically insignificant. It seems as though the visual system of professional baseball players is limited by lower-order aberrations and that the smaller HOAs do not enhance visual function over that in a control population. Copyright 2010 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Aberration Compensation Using Nematic Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somalingam, S.; Hain, M.; Tschudi, T.; Knittel, J.; Richter, H.

    We have developed a novel transmissive nematic liquid crystal device which is capable of compensating spherical wavefront aberration that occurs during the operation of optical pickup systems. In order to increase the storage capacity, next generation optical data storage systems beyond CD and DVD will use according to the Blu-Ray specification (BD) blue laser light and an objective lens with high numerical aperture (N.A.) of 0.85. However, such high N.A. systems have an inherent higher sensitivity on aberrations. For example spherical aberration is inversely proportional to the wavelength and grows with the fourth power of N.A. of the objective lens. In an optical pickup system there are two sources for spherical aberration: The first one is the variation of the substrate thickness due to manufacturing tolerances under mass production conditions. The second one concerns disks with multiple data-layers, which cause spherical aberration when layers are switched, as the objective lens can only be optimized for a single layer thickness. We report a method for effective compensation of spherical aberration by utilizing a novel liquid crystal device, which generates a parabolic wavefront profile. This particular shape makes the device highly tolerant against lateral movement. A sophisticated electrode design allows us to reduce the number of driving electrodes down to two by using the method of conductive ladder mashing. Further evaluation in a blue-DVD test drive has been carried out with good results. By placing the device into an optical pick-up we were able to readout a dual-layer ROM disk with a total capacity of 50 gigabytes (GB). A data-to-clock jitter of 6.9% for the 80 μm and of 8.0% for the 100 μm cover layer could be realized.

  19. Spherical aberrations of human astigmatic corneas.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huawei; Dai, Guang-Ming; Chen, Li; Weeber, Henk A; Piers, Patricia A

    2011-11-01

    To evaluate whether the average spherical aberration of human astigmatic corneas is statistically equivalent to human nonastigmatic corneas. Spherical aberrations of 445 astigmatic corneas prior to laser vision correction were retrospectively investigated to determine Zernike coefficients for central corneal areas 6 mm in diameter using CTView (Sarver and Associates). Data were divided into groups according to cylinder power (0.01 to 0.25 diopters [D], 0.26 to 0.75 D, 0.76 to 1.06 D, 1.07 to 1.53 D, 1.54 to 2.00 D, and >2.00 D) and according to age by decade. Spherical aberrations were correlated with age and astigmatic power among groups and the entire population. Statistical analyses were conducted, and P<.05 was considered statistically significant. Mean patient age was 42.6±11 years. Astigmatic corneas had an average astigmatic power of 0.78±0.58 D and mean spherical aberration was 0.25±0.13 μm for the entire population and approximately the same (0.27 μm) for individual groups, ranging from 0.23 to 0.29 μm (P>.05 for all tested groups). Mean spherical aberration of astigmatic corneas was not correlated significantly with cylinder power or age (P>.05). Spherical aberrations are similar to those of nonastigmatic corneas, permitting the use of these additional data in the design of aspheric toric intra-ocular lenses. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Chromosome aberration test for hydroxyapatite in sheep.

    PubMed

    Kannan, T P; Nik Ahmad Shah, N L; Azlina, A; Samsudin, A R; Narazah, M Y; Salleh, Ma'arof

    2004-05-01

    The present study is aimed at finding the mutagenicity and cytotoxicity of dense form of synthetic hydroxyapatite (Source: School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia) in the blood of sheep. The biomaterial was implanted in the tibia of Malin, an indigenous sheep breed of Malaysia. Blood was collected from the sheep before implantation of the biomaterial, cultured and a karyological study was made. Six weeks after implantation, blood was collected from the same animal, cultured and screened for chromosome aberrations. The mitotic indices and karyological analysis indicated that the implantation of synthetic hydroxyapatite (dense form) did not produce any cytotoxicity or chromosome aberrations in the blood of sheep.

  1. Aberration corrected Lorentz scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    McVitie, S; McGrouther, D; McFadzean, S; MacLaren, D A; O'Shea, K J; Benitez, M J

    2015-05-01

    We present results from an aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscope which has been customised for high resolution quantitative Lorentz microscopy with the sample located in a magnetic field free or low field environment. We discuss the innovations in microscope instrumentation and additional hardware that underpin the imaging improvements in resolution and detection with a focus on developments in differential phase contrast microscopy. Examples from materials possessing nanometre scale variations in magnetisation illustrate the potential for aberration corrected Lorentz imaging as a tool to further our understanding of magnetism on this lengthscale.

  2. Video Event Trigger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Glenn L.; Lichter, Michael J.

    1994-01-01

    Video event trigger (VET) processes video image data to generate trigger signal when image shows significant change like motion or appearance, disappearance, change in color, change in brightness, or dilation of object. System aids in efficient utilization of image-data-storage and image-data-processing equipment in applications in which many video frames show no changes and are wasteful to record and analyze all frames when only relatively few frames show changes of interest. Applications include video recording of automobile crash tests, automated video monitoring of entrances, exits, parking lots, and secure areas.

  3. Triggered Nanoparticles as Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang Soo; Duncan, Bradley; Creran, Brian; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Drug delivery systems (DDSs) face several challenges including site-specific delivery, stability, and the programmed release of drugs. Engineered nanoparticle (NP) surfaces with responsive moieties can enhance the efficacy of DDSs for in vitro and in vivo systems. This triggering process can be achieved through both endogenous (biologically controlled release) and exogenous (external stimuli controlled release) activation. In this review, we will highlight recent examples of the use of triggered release strategies of engineered nanomaterials for in vitro and in vivo applications. PMID:24159362

  4. Trigger Circuit for Marx Generators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-02-08

    A trigger circuit is provided for a trigger system for a Marx generator column. The column includes a plurality of metal electrode pairs wherein the...electrode (trigatron) spark gap switch forming the first spark gap of the Marx generator column. The triggering circuit includes a trigger

  5. Misalignment induced aberration off-axis optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Zhihai; Fan, Xuewu; Ma, Zhen; Zou, Gangyi

    2016-10-01

    Through introducing transformed pupil vector and shifted center of aberration fields vector into the nodal aberration expansions of an axially symmetric optical system, the aberration expression in third order of an off-axis optical system and misaligned off-axis optical system are detailed. Nodal aberration characteristics of misaligned off-axis optical system are revealed only by analyzing the pupil decentration vector, aberration fields shifted vector and the aberration coefficients of the axially symmetric optical system. Actually, it is well demonstrated that the 3rd spherical aberration, 3rd coma, 3rd astigmatism in a misalignment off-axis system are comparable to the aberrations in a misalignment axially symmetric system. Otherwise it will not only induced constant 3rd spherical aberration but also constant 3rd coma and 3rd astigmatism over the field of view, when aligned an off-axis optical system elements with error axial spacing.

  6. The isotype and IgG subclass distribution of anti-carbamylated protein antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    van Delft, Myrthe A M; Verheul, Marije K; Burgers, Leonie E; Derksen, Veerle F A M; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H M; van der Woude, Diane; Huizinga, Tom W J; Toes, René E M; Trouw, Leendert A

    2017-08-15

    Anti-carbamylated protein (anti-CarP) antibodies have recently been reported to occur in around 45% of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and to have prognostic and diagnostic properties. At present, the breadth and molecular make-up of the anti-CarP antibody response is ill defined. To understand the anti-CarP antibody immune response and potential immune effector mechanisms it can recruit, we determined the anti-CarP antibody isotype and IgG-subclass usage in RA patients. Anti-CarP antibody IgM, IgA, and IgG or IgG subclasses were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in sera from 373 unselected RA patients and 196 healthy controls. An additional 114 anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) and anti-CarP IgG double-positive patients were selected to study the concomitant presence of both antibody systems. Anti-CarP IgG was present in around 45% of the patients and comprised all anti-CarP IgG subclasses. The presence of anti-CarP IgG1 particularly associates with radiological damage. Anti-CarP IgM was detected in 16% of RA patients, even in anti-CarP IgG-positive individuals, and is indicative of an actively ongoing immune response. Around 45% of the patients were positive for IgA which included ACPA-positive cases but also 24% of the ACPA-negative cases. In ACPA and anti-CarP double-positive patients, the distribution and number of isotypes and IgG subclasses was similar for both autoantibodies at the group level, but substantial variation was observed within individual patient samples. In RA, the anti-CarP antibody response uses a broad spectrum of isotypes and seems to be an actively ongoing immune reaction. Furthermore, the anti-CarP and ACPA autoantibody responses seems to be differentially regulated.

  7. Disambiguating Syntactic Triggers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakas, William Gregory; Fodor, Janet Dean

    2012-01-01

    We present data from an artificial language domain that suggest new contributions to the theory of syntactic triggers. Whether a learning algorithm is capable of matching the achievements of child learners depends in part on how much parametric ambiguity there is in the input. For practical reasons this cannot be established for the domain of all…

  8. Common Asthma Triggers

    MedlinePlus

    ... your bedroom. Wash your bedding on the hottest water setting. Outdoor Air Pollution Outdoor air pollution can trigger an asthma attack. ... newspaper to plan your activities for when air pollution levels will be ... home by removing as many water and food sources as you can. Cockroaches are ...

  9. AIDS radio triggers.

    PubMed

    Elias, A M

    1991-07-01

    In April 1991, the Ethnic Communities' Council of NSW was granted funding under the Community AIDS Prevention and Education Program through the Department of Community Services and Health, to produce a series of 6x50 second AIDS radio triggers with a 10-second tag line for further information. The triggers are designed to disseminate culturally-sensitive information about HIV/AIDS in English, Italian, Greek, Spanish, Khmer, Turkish, Macedonian, Serbo-Croatian, Arabic, Cantonese, and Vietnamese, with the goal of increasing awareness and decreasing the degree of misinformation about HIV/AIDS among people of non-English-speaking backgrounds through radio and sound. The 6 triggers cover the denial that AIDS exists in the community, beliefs that words and feelings do not protect one from catching HIV, encouraging friends to be compassionate, compassion within the family, AIDS information for a young audience, and the provision of accurate and honest information on HIV/AIDS. The triggers are slated to be completed by the end of July 1991 and will be broadcast on all possible community, ethnic, and commercial radio networks across Australia. They will be available upon request in composite form with an information kit for use by health care professionals and community workers.

  10. Triggered plasma opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Mendel, Clifford W.

    1988-01-01

    A triggerable opening switch for a very high voltage and current pulse includes a transmission line extending from a source to a load and having an intermediate switch section including a plasma for conducting electrons between transmission line conductors and a magnetic field for breaking the plasma conduction path and magnetically insulating the electrons when it is desired to open the switch.

  11. Aberrations of diffracted wave fields. II. Diffraction gratings.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, V N

    2000-12-01

    The Rayleigh-Sommerfeld theory is applied to diffraction of a spherical wave by a grating. The grating equation is obtained from the aberration-free diffraction pattern, and its aberrations are shown to be the same as the conventional aberrations obtained by using Fermat's principle. These aberrations are shown to be not associated with the diffraction process. Moreover, it is shown that the irradiance distribution of a certain diffraction order is the Fraunhofer diffraction pattern of the grating aperture as a whole aberrated by the aberration of that order.

  12. Assessing the construct validity of aberrant salience.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Kristin; Roiser, Jonathan P

    2009-01-01

    We sought to validate the psychometric properties of a recently developed paradigm that aims to measure salience attribution processes proposed to contribute to positive psychotic symptoms, the Salience Attribution Test (SAT). The "aberrant salience" measure from the SAT showed good face validity in previous results, with elevated scores both in high-schizotypy individuals, and in patients with schizophrenia suffering from delusions. Exploring the construct validity of salience attribution variables derived from the SAT is important, since other factors, including latent inhibition/learned irrelevance (LIrr), attention, probabilistic reward learning, sensitivity to probability, general cognitive ability and working memory could influence these measures. Fifty healthy participants completed schizotypy scales, the SAT, a LIrr task, and a number of other cognitive tasks tapping into potentially confounding processes. Behavioural measures of interest from each task were entered into a principal components analysis, which yielded a five-factor structure accounting for approximately 75% of the variance in behaviour. Implicit aberrant salience was found to load onto its own factor, which was associated with elevated "Introvertive Anhedonia" schizotypy, replicating our previous finding. LIrr loaded onto a separate factor, which also included implicit adaptive salience, but was not associated with schizotypy. Explicit adaptive and aberrant salience, along with a measure of probabilistic learning, loaded onto a further factor, though this also did not correlate with schizotypy. These results suggest that the measures of LIrr and implicit adaptive salience might be based on similar underlying processes, which are dissociable both from implicit aberrant salience and explicit measures of salience.

  13. Cosmological parameter estimation: impact of CMB aberration

    SciTech Connect

    Catena, Riccardo; Notari, Alessio E-mail: notari@ffn.ub.es

    2013-04-01

    The peculiar motion of an observer with respect to the CMB rest frame induces an apparent deflection of the observed CMB photons, i.e. aberration, and a shift in their frequency, i.e. Doppler effect. Both effects distort the temperature multipoles a{sub lm}'s via a mixing matrix at any l. The common lore when performing a CMB based cosmological parameter estimation is to consider that Doppler affects only the l = 1 multipole, and neglect any other corrections. In this paper we reconsider the validity of this assumption, showing that it is actually not robust when sky cuts are included to model CMB foreground contaminations. Assuming a simple fiducial cosmological model with five parameters, we simulated CMB temperature maps of the sky in a WMAP-like and in a Planck-like experiment and added aberration and Doppler effects to the maps. We then analyzed with a MCMC in a Bayesian framework the maps with and without aberration and Doppler effects in order to assess the ability of reconstructing the parameters of the fiducial model. We find that, depending on the specific realization of the simulated data, the parameters can be biased up to one standard deviation for WMAP and almost two standard deviations for Planck. Therefore we conclude that in general it is not a solid assumption to neglect aberration in a CMB based cosmological parameter estimation.

  14. Functional Analysis and Treatment of Aberrant Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mace, F. Charles; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This article reviews general classes of variables which help to maintain aberrant behavior including attention seeking, sensory and perceptual consequences, and access to materials or activities. Suggestions for a methodology providing a comprehensive functional analysis are offered which include descriptive analysis, hypothesis forming,…

  15. Anti-forensics of chromatic aberration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Owen; Stamm, Matthew C.

    2015-03-01

    Over the past decade, a number of information forensic techniques have been developed to identify digital image manipulation and falsification. Recent research has shown, however, that an intelligent forger can use anti-forensic countermeasures to disguise their forgeries. In this paper, an anti-forensic technique is proposed to falsify the lateral chromatic aberration present in a digital image. Lateral chromatic aberration corresponds to the relative contraction or expansion between an image's color channels that occurs due to a lens's inability to focus all wavelengths of light on the same point. Previous work has used localized inconsistencies in an image's chromatic aberration to expose cut-and-paste image forgeries. The anti-forensic technique presented in this paper operates by estimating the expected lateral chromatic aberration at an image location, then removing deviations from this estimate caused by tampering or falsification. Experimental results are presented that demonstrate that our anti-forensic technique can be used to effectively disguise evidence of an image forgery.

  16. Aberration features in directional dark matter detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bozorgnia, Nassim; Gelmini, Graciela B.; Gondolo, Paolo E-mail: gelmini@physics.ucla.edu

    2012-08-01

    The motion of the Earth around the Sun causes an annual change in the magnitude and direction of the arrival velocity of dark matter particles on Earth, in a way analogous to aberration of stellar light. In directional detectors, aberration of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) modulates the pattern of nuclear recoil directions in a way that depends on the orbital velocity of the Earth and the local galactic distribution of WIMP velocities. Knowing the former, WIMP aberration can give information on the latter, besides being a curious way of confirming the revolution of the Earth and the extraterrestrial provenance of WIMPs. While observing the full aberration pattern requires extremely large exposures, we claim that the annual variation of the mean recoil direction or of the event counts over specific solid angles may be detectable with moderately large exposures. For example, integrated counts over Galactic hemispheres separated by planes perpendicular to Earth's orbit would modulate annually, resulting in Galactic Hemisphere Annual Modulations (GHAM) with amplitudes larger than the usual non-directional annual modulation.

  17. The Extent of Mismeasurement for Aberrant Examinees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petridou, Alexandra; Williams, Julian

    2010-01-01

    The person-fit literature assumes that aberrant response patterns could be a sign of person mismeasurement, but this assumption has rarely, if ever, been empirically investigated before. We explore the validity of test responses and measures of 10-year-old examinees whose response patterns on a commercial standardized paper-and-pencil mathematics…

  18. Optical advantages of astigmatic aberration corrected heliostats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rooyen, De Wet; Schöttl, Peter; Bern, Gregor; Heimsath, Anna; Nitz, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Astigmatic aberration corrected heliostats adapt their shape in dependence of the incidence angle of the sun on the heliostat. Simulations show that this optical correction leads to a higher concentration ratio at the target and thus in a decrease in required receiver aperture in particular for smaller heliostat fields.

  19. Corneal Aberrations Before and After Photorefractive Keratectomy

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Nicola; De Bernardo, Maddalena; Lanza, Michele; Borrelli, Maria; Fusco, Fabrizia; Flagiello, Antimo

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether - and which - higher-order corneal aberrations, up to the sixth order, are induced by photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). Methods 197 eyes of 197 patients have been examined with a corneal aberrometer for a 3.5 and a 6.0 mm pupil simulation, both before and 1, 3, 6 months after myopic PRK treatment ranging from −15.25 D to -0.5 D (mean −5.31±2.95 D). The statistical evaluation was performed using a paired Student's T-test. Results After PRK there is a clear-cut increase in almost all the higher-order corneal aberrations for both a 3.5 and a 6.0 mm pupil simulation. These aberrations tend to normalize after 3 and 6 months mainly for a 3.5 mm simulation, whereas such normalization is not present for a 6.0 mm simulation. Conclusions PRK induces significant aberrations both for 3.5 and 6 mm pupils, 1 month after PRK, but a trend towards normalization is evident at the 6 month follow-up for the smaller pupil size.

  20. Monoclonal Antibodies of a Diverse Isotype Induced by an O-Antigen Glycoconjugate Vaccine Mediate In Vitro and In Vivo Killing of African Invasive Nontyphoidal Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Yun Shan; Clare, Simon; Micoli, Francesca; Saul, Allan; Mastroeni, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS), particularly Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis, is responsible for a major global burden of invasive disease with high associated case-fatality rates. We recently reported the development of a candidate O-antigen–CRM197 glycoconjugate vaccine against S. Typhimurium. Here, using a panel of mouse monoclonal antibodies generated by the vaccine, we examined the relative efficiency of different antibody isotypes specific for the O:4 antigen of S. Typhimurium to effect in vitro and in vivo killing of the invasive African S. Typhimurium strain D23580. All O:4-specific antibody isotypes could mediate cell-free killing and phagocytosis of S. Typhimurium by mouse blood cells. Opsonization of Salmonella with O:4-specific IgA, IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b, but not IgM, resulted in cell-dependent bacterial killing. At high concentrations, O:4-specific antibodies inhibited both cell-free complement-mediated and cell-dependent opsonophagocytic killing of S. Typhimurium in vitro. Using passive immunization in mice, the O:4-specific antibodies provided in vivo functional activity by decreasing the bacterial load in the blood and tissues, with IgG2a and IgG2b being the most effective isotypes. In conclusion, an O-antigen–CRM197 glycoconjugate vaccine can induce O-antigen-specific antibodies of different isotypes that exert in vitro and in vivo killing of S. Typhimurium. PMID:26169269

  1. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor N-terminal domain controls isotype-selective gene expression and adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hummasti, Sarah; Tontonoz, Peter

    2006-06-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARgamma, PPARalpha, and PPARdelta) are important regulators of lipid metabolism. Although they share significant structural similarity, the biological effects associated with each PPAR isotype are distinct. For example, PPARalpha and PPARdelta regulate fatty acid catabolism, whereas PPARgamma controls lipid storage and adipogenesis. The different functions of PPARs in vivo can be explained at least in part by the different tissue distributions of the three receptors. The question of whether the receptors have different intrinsic activities and regulate distinct target genes, however, has not been adequately explored. We have engineered cell lines that express comparable amounts of each receptor. Transcriptional profiling of these cells in the presence of selective agonists reveals partially overlapping but distinct patterns of gene regulation by the three PPARs. Moreover, analysis of chimeric receptors points to the N terminus of each receptor as the key determinant of isotype-selective gene expression. For example, the N terminus of PPARgamma confers the ability to promote adipocyte differentiation when fused to the PPARdelta DNA binding domain and ligand binding domain, whereas the N terminus of PPARdelta leads to the inappropriate expression of fatty acid oxidation genes in differentiated adipocytes when fused to PPARgamma. Finally, we demonstrate that the N terminus of each receptor functions in part to limit receptor activity because deletion of the N terminus leads to nonselective activation of target genes. A more detailed understanding of the mechanisms by which the individual PPARs differentially regulate gene expression should aid in the design of more effective drugs, including tissue- and target gene-selective PPAR modulators.

  2. Further evidence that BALB/c and C57BL/6 gamma 2a genes originate from two distinct isotypes.

    PubMed

    Morgado, M G; Cam, P; Gris-Liebe, C; Cazenave, P A; Jouvin-Marche, E

    1989-11-01

    Gene conversion by the corresponding gamma 2b gene has been proposed to explain the multiple differences between the nucleic acid sequences of BALB/c (Igh-1a) and C57BL/6 (Igh-1b) gamma 2a immunoglobulin allelic genes. However, genetic analysis indicates that duplicated forms of gamma 2a genes are not only present in Eastern Asia, but also in European wild mouse populations which suggests a widespread phenomenon. In order to verify whether the gamma 2a-related isotypic genes, namely gamma 2c and gamma 2a, could correspond to those present as alleles in domestic mice (Igh-1b and Igh-1a), a genomic library from Mus m.musculus strain (MAI) was constructed. Extensive mapping of the recombinant phages and Southern blot analysis with several restriction enzymes gave the complete organization of these loci: gamma 2b (18 kb) gamma 2c (17 kb) gamma 2a (14 kb) epsilon. The homology in flanking, coding and intervening region sequences indicates that MAI gamma 2c and gamma 2a related genes correspond to C57BL/6 and BALB/c Igh-1 alleles respectively. Also, Southern blot analysis using several probes derived from exonic and intronic regions between gamma 2b and gamma 2a genes shows a 2.0- to 3.0-kb difference in the distance between gamma 2b and gamma 2a genes of BALB/c strain as compared to C57BL/6. Taken together, these results indicate that BALB/c and C57BL/6 gamma 2a genes could originate from different isotypes.

  3. Further evidence that BALB/c and C57BL/6 gamma 2a genes originate from two distinct isotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Morgado, M G; Cam, P; Gris-Liebe, C; Cazenave, P A; Jouvin-Marche, E

    1989-01-01

    Gene conversion by the corresponding gamma 2b gene has been proposed to explain the multiple differences between the nucleic acid sequences of BALB/c (Igh-1a) and C57BL/6 (Igh-1b) gamma 2a immunoglobulin allelic genes. However, genetic analysis indicates that duplicated forms of gamma 2a genes are not only present in Eastern Asia, but also in European wild mouse populations which suggests a widespread phenomenon. In order to verify whether the gamma 2a-related isotypic genes, namely gamma 2c and gamma 2a, could correspond to those present as alleles in domestic mice (Igh-1b and Igh-1a), a genomic library from Mus m.musculus strain (MAI) was constructed. Extensive mapping of the recombinant phages and Southern blot analysis with several restriction enzymes gave the complete organization of these loci: gamma 2b (18 kb) gamma 2c (17 kb) gamma 2a (14 kb) epsilon. The homology in flanking, coding and intervening region sequences indicates that MAI gamma 2c and gamma 2a related genes correspond to C57BL/6 and BALB/c Igh-1 alleles respectively. Also, Southern blot analysis using several probes derived from exonic and intronic regions between gamma 2b and gamma 2a genes shows a 2.0- to 3.0-kb difference in the distance between gamma 2b and gamma 2a genes of BALB/c strain as compared to C57BL/6. Taken together, these results indicate that BALB/c and C57BL/6 gamma 2a genes could originate from different isotypes. Images PMID:2510996

  4. The binding spectra of carp C3 isotypes against natural targets independent of the binding specificity of their thioester.

    PubMed

    Ichiki, Satoko; Kato-Unoki, Yoko; Somamoto, Tomonori; Nakao, Miki

    2012-09-01

    The central component of complement, C3, plays a versatile role in innate immune defense of vertebrates and some invertebrates. A notable molecular characteristic of this component is an intra-chain thioester site that enables C3 to bind covalently to its target. It has been reported that the binding preference of the thioester to hydroxyl or amino groups is primarily defined by presence or absence of the catalytic histidine residue at position 1126 in human C3. In teleosts, a unique C3 (non-His type) has been found, in addition to the common His type C3. These distinct C3 isoforms may provide diversity in the target-binding attributable to the different binding specificities of their thioesters. In the present study, we examine the hypothesized correlation of the catalytic histidine with the binding spectra of two major C3 isotypes of carp towards various model and natural targets. The results reveal that non-His type C3, rather than His type C3, has a wider range of binding spectrum, despite the binding specificity of its thioester being limited to amino groups. It is therefore hypothesized that the binding spectra of C3 isotypes are not defined by the binding specificity of the thioester but is more affected by differences in microbe-associated molecular patterns that activate complement. Overall, the present data imply that non-His type C3 plays a significant role against bacterial infections in the fish defense system. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Prevalence of anti- beta2GPI antibodies and their isotypes in patients with renal diseases and clinical suspicion of antiphospholipid syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Anis, Sabiha; Ahmed, Ejaz; Muzaffar, Rana

    2013-01-01

    Background: Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) are autoantibodies that are associated with a clinical state of hypercoagulability and diverse clinical manifestations collectively known as antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Objectives: To investigate the prevalence of anti-beta2glycoproteinI-antibodies (anti-β2GPI) and their isotypes in patients with renal diseases and clinical suspicion of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Patients and Methods: This is a retrospective study in which we have analyzed the prevalence of anti-β2GPI and its isotypes in 170 patients on initial testing and in 29 patients repeated after 12 weeks for confirmation of APS.  The clinical information was provided by the treating physicians or retrieved from the clinical records. The tests for anti-β2GPI screening and its isotypes (IgG, IgM and IgA) detection were assessed. Results: On initial samples, anti-β2GPI was positive in 118patients.  IgA-β2GPI positivity (93; 79%) was significantly higher than IgM and IgG isotypes.  Out of anti-β2GPI positive patients, clinical features in 95 patients were suggestive of APS or had SLE.  Of these, IgA isotypes was found in 66% (P = 0.010), IgM in 31% (P = 0.033), and IgG in 11% (P = 0.033). On repeat testing, anti-β2GPI was persistently found In 22 patients with a continual predominance of IgA-anti-β2GPI over IgM and IgG isotypes (91% vs. 45.5% and 18% respectively). Conclusions:   Our results show that IgA-anti-β2GPI antibodies are the most prevalent isotypes in patients with renal disease or on renal replacement therapy in our population.  Thus inclusion of IgA-anti-β2GPI in the testing repertoire may increase the diagnostic sensitivity for APS in patients with renal diseases. PMID:24475447

  6. The Aberrant Coronary Artery - The Management Approach.

    PubMed

    King, Nina-Marie; Tian, David D; Munkholm-Larsen, Stine; Buttar, Sana N; Chow, Vincent; Yan, Tristan

    2017-07-03

    An aberrant coronary artery is a rare clinical occurrence with an incidence of 0.05-1.2%. Often it is an incidental finding detected on coronary angiography or at autopsy. However, symptomatic patients can experience angina, arrhythmia, sudden death or non-specific symptoms such as dyspnoea and syncope. At present, there are no guidelines or dedicated studies assessing the treatment of an aberrant coronary artery leaving management options for these patients controversial. Selected international cardiothoracic surgeons were surveyed electronically in November 2016 to determine whether consensus exists on different management aspects for patients with an aberrant coronary artery arising from the contralateral sinus with an interarterial course. For asymptomatic patients with either an aberrant left main coronary artery (ALMCA) arising from the contralateral sinus or an aberrant right main coronary artery (ARMCA) arising from the contralateral sinus, there was no consensus on surgical correction of the anomaly. If myocardial ischaemia was demonstrated on either coronary angiography with fractional flow reserve measurements and/or stress myocardial perfusion scan, surgical correction was the consensus between the surveyed surgeons. If surgery was deemed appropriate, coronary artery bypass surgery utilising the internal mammary artery was marginally preferred by the respondents in patients with an ALMCA whilst unroofing of the coronary ostium was preferred in patients with an ARMCA. Although no consensus was reached, a large proportion of respondents would not treat a patient over the age of 30 years differently compared to those under 30 years old. For symptomatic patients or if myocardial ischaemia is demonstrated on either coronary angiography with fractional flow reserve measurements and/or stress myocardial perfusion scan, surgical correction is indicated. Copyright © 2017 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the

  7. Quantitative analysis of the effect of tubulin isotype expression on sensitivity of cancer cell lines to a set of novel colchicine derivatives

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A maximum entropy approach is proposed to predict the cytotoxic effects of a panel of colchicine derivatives in several human cancer cell lines. Data was obtained from cytotoxicity assays performed with 21 drug molecules from the same family of colchicine compounds and correlate these results with independent tubulin isoform expression measurements for several cancer cell lines. The maximum entropy method is then used in conjunction with computed relative binding energy values for each of the drug molecules against tubulin isotypes to which these compounds bind with different affinities. Results We have found by using our analysis that αβI and αβIII tubulin isoforms are the most important isoforms in establishing predictive response of cancer cell sensitivity to colchicine derivatives. However, since αβI tubulin is widely distributed in the human body, targeting it would lead to severe adverse side effects. Consequently, we have identified tubulin isotype αβIII as the most important molecular target for inhibition of microtubule polymerization and hence cancer cell cytotoxicity. Tubulin isotypes αβI and αβII are concluded to be secondary targets. Conclusions The benefit of being able to correlate expression levels of specific tubulin isotypes and the resultant cell death effect is that it will enable us to better understand the origin of drug resistance and hence design optimal structures for the elimination of cancer cells. The conclusion of the study described herein identifies tubulin isotype αβIII as a target for optimized chemotherapy drug design. PMID:20509970

  8. Optically triggered infrared photodetector.

    PubMed

    Ramiro, Íñigo; Martí, Antonio; Antolín, Elisa; López, Esther; Datas, Alejandro; Luque, Antonio; Ripalda, José M; González, Yolanda

    2015-01-14

    We demonstrate a new class of semiconductor device: the optically triggered infrared photodetector (OTIP). This photodetector is based on a new physical principle that allows the detection of infrared light to be switched ON and OFF by means of an external light. Our experimental device, fabricated using InAs/AlGaAs quantum-dot technology, demonstrates normal incidence infrared detection in the 2-6 μm range. The detection is optically triggered by a 590 nm light-emitting diode. Furthermore, the detection gain is achieved in our device without an increase of the noise level. The novel characteristics of OTIPs open up new possibilities for third generation infrared imaging systems ( Rogalski, A.; Antoszewski, J.; Faraone, L. J. Appl. Phys. 2009, 105 (9), 091101).

  9. Trigger developments for ARA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ming-Yuan

    2013-04-01

    The Askaryan Radio Array (ARA) is a planned large-scale neutrino detector at the South Pole aiming at observing ultra-high-energy cosmogenic neutrinos via detecting radio Cherenkov radiation from neutrinos' interaction with Antarctic ice. By the end of the austral summer of 2012/13 three detector stations have been deployed at depths of up to 200 m. A prototype detector station has been taking data for two years. The final array is planned to consist of 37 stations with a 200 km^2 coverage, and provide high sensitivity in the range of 10 PeV to 10 EeV. In order to increase the discover potential of the stations, advanced triggering schemes are in development which take into account the topology of signal events. Here a brief status and the triggering schemes in development will be presented, and based on simulations their improvements to ARA neutrino sensitivity will be discussed.

  10. GLAST's GBM Burst Trigger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, D.; Briggs, M.; Connaughton, V.; Kippen, M.; Preece, R.

    2003-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will detect and localize bursts for the GLAST mission, and provide the spectral and temporal context in the traditional 10 keV to 25 MeV band for the high energy observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT). The GBM will use traditional rate triggers in up to three energy bands, and on a variety of timescales between 16 ms and 16 s.

  11. GLAST's GBM Burst Trigger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, D.; Briggs, M.; Connaughton, V.; Kippen, M.; Preece, R.

    2003-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will detect and localize bursts for the GLAST mission, and provide the spectral and temporal context in the traditional 10 keV to 25 MeV band for the high energy observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT). The GBM will use traditional rate triggers in up to three energy bands, and on a variety of timescales between 16 ms and 16 s.

  12. Neural networks for triggering

    SciTech Connect

    Denby, B. ); Campbell, M. ); Bedeschi, F. ); Chriss, N.; Bowers, C. ); Nesti, F. )

    1990-01-01

    Two types of neural network beauty trigger architectures, based on identification of electrons in jets and recognition of secondary vertices, have been simulated in the environment of the Fermilab CDF experiment. The efficiencies for B's and rejection of background obtained are encouraging. If hardware tests are successful, the electron identification architecture will be tested in the 1991 run of CDF. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. GLAST's GBM Burst Trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Band, D.; Kippen, M.

    2004-09-28

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will detect and localize bursts for the GLAST mission, and provide the spectral and temporal context in the traditional 10 keV to 25 MeV band for the high energy observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT). The GBM will use traditional rate triggers in up to three energy bands, and on a variety of timescales between 16 ms and 16 s.

  14. Dopamine triggers Heterosynaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Masago; Otaka, Mami; Huang, Yanhua; Neumann, Peter A.; Winters, Bradley D.; Grace, Anthony A.; Schlüter, Oliver M.; Dong, Yan

    2013-01-01

    As a classic neuromodulator, dopamine has long been thought to modulate, rather than trigger, synaptic plasticity. In contrast, our present results demonstrate that within the parallel projections of dopaminergic and GABAergic terminals from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) to nucleus accumbens core (NAcCo), action potential-activated release of dopamine heterosynaptically triggers LTD at GABAergic synapses, which is likely mediated by activating presynaptically-located dopamine D1 class receptors and expressed by inhibiting presynaptic release of GABA. Moreover, this dopamine-mediated heterosynaptic LTD is abolished after withdrawal from cocaine exposure. These results suggest that action potential-dependent dopamine release triggers very different cellular consequences from those induced by volume release or pharmacological manipulation. Activation of the VTA-to-NAcCo projections is essential for emotional and motivational responses. This dopamine-mediated LTD allows a flexible output of NAcCo neurons, whereas disruption of this LTD may contribute to the rigid emotional and motivational state observed in addicts during cocaine withdrawal. PMID:23595734

  15. Effects of interactions among wave aberrations on optical image quality.

    PubMed

    McLellan, J S; Prieto, P M; Marcos, S; Burns, S A

    2006-09-01

    Wave aberrations degrade the optical quality of the eye relative to the diffraction limit, but there are situations in which having slightly aberrated optics can provide some relative visual benefits. This fact led us to consider whether interactions among aberrations in the eye's wavefront produce an advantage for image quality relative to wavefronts with randomized combinations of aberrations with the same total RMS error. Total ocular wave aberrations from two experimental groups and corneal wave aberrations from one group were measured and expressed as Zernike polynomial expansions through the seventh-order. In a series of Monte Carlo simulations, modulation transfer functions (MTFs) for the measured wave aberrations were compared to distributions of artificial MTFs for wavefronts created by randomizing the sign or orientation of the aberrations, while maintaining the RMS error within each Zernike order. In a control condition, "synthetic" model eyes were produced by choosing each individual aberration term at random from individuals in the experimental group, and again MTFs were compared for original and randomized signs. Results were summarized by the MTF ratio: real MTF/mean simulated MTF, as a function of spatial frequency. For a 6mm pupil, the mean MTF ratio for total ocular aberrations was greater than 1.0 up to 60 cycles per degree, suggesting that the eye's aberrations are not independent and that there may be a positive functional consequences to their interrelations. This positive relation did not hold for corneal aberrations alone, or for the synthetic eyes.

  16. Accommodative lag and fluctuations when optical aberrations are manipulated.

    PubMed

    Gambra, Enrique; Sawides, Lucie; Dorronsoro, Carlos; Marcos, Susana

    2009-06-09

    We evaluated the accommodative response to a stimulus moving from 0 to 6 D following a staircase function under natural, corrected, and induced optical aberrations, using an adaptive-optics (AO) electromagnetic deformable mirror. The accommodative response of the eye (through the mirror) and the change of aberrations were measured on 5 subjects using a Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor operating at 12.8 Hz. Five conditions were tested: (1) natural aberrations, (2) AO correction of the unaccommodated state and induction (over 6-mm pupils) of (3) +1 microm and (4) -1 microm of spherical aberration and (5) -2 microm of vertical coma. Four subjects showed a better accommodative response with AO correction than with their natural aberrations. The induction of negative spherical aberration also produced a better accommodative response in the same subjects. Accommodative lag increased in all subjects when positive spherical aberration and coma were induced. Fluctuations of the accommodative response (computed during each 1-D period of steady accommodation) increased with accommodative response when high-order aberrations were induced. The largest fluctuations occurred for induced negative spherical aberration and the smallest for natural and corrected aberrations. The study demonstrates that aberrations influence accommodative lag and fluctuations of accommodation and that correcting aberrations improves rather than compromises the accommodative response.

  17. Aberrations of diffracted wave fields: distortion.

    PubMed

    Harvey, James E; Bogunovic, Dijana; Krywonos, Andrey

    2003-03-01

    Near-field diffraction patterns are merely aberrated Fraunhofer diffraction patterns. These aberrations, inherent to the diffraction process, provide insight and understanding into wide-angle diffraction phenomena. Nonparaxial patterns of diffracted orders produced by a laser beam passing through a grating and projected upon a plane screen exhibit severe distortion (W311). This distortion is an artifact of the configuration chosen to observe diffraction patterns. Grating behavior expressed in terms of the direction cosines of the propagation vectors of the incident and diffracted orders exhibits no distortion. Use of a simple direction cosine diagram provides an elegant way to deal with nonparaxial diffraction patterns, particularly when large obliquely incident beams produce conical diffraction.

  18. Learning disorders and sex chromosome aberrations.

    PubMed

    Hier, D B; Atkins, L; Perlo, V P

    1980-03-01

    No sex chromosome aberrations were detected in a prospective study of twenty adult dyslexic men. A retrospective study of eighty-nine subjects with known sex chromosome aberrations revealed twenty of them to be mentally-retarded. Among the sixty-nine subjects of normal intelligence, learning, speech and attention disorders were frequent. Children with 47,XYY, 47,XXY, and 47,XXX karyotypes appeared particularly prone to experience delays in speech development as well as later academic underachievement in language-related subjects. In contrast, speech development was normal in all of the girls with Turner's syndrome and later academic difficulties were usually confined to mathematics or science. Hyperactivity was noted with considerable frequency among 47,XYY and Turner's syndrome subjects, but not among subjects with a 47,XXX or 47,XXY karyotype.

  19. Finite Hamiltonian Systems: Linear Transformations and Aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Kurt Bernardo

    2008-11-01

    In finite Hamiltonian systems, the operators of position, momentum, and energy have a finite number N of eigenvalues. These operators can be naturally realized as generators of the Lie algebra su(2), in a representation of spin j, of dimension N = 2j+1. Time evolution is rotation of a phase space sphere, whose projections perform the harmonic motion of an oscillator. The (centrally extended) group of rigid—linear—motions of this phase space is then U(2). On the other hand, N-point wavefunctions—signals—can be subject to a U(N) group of unitary matrices, containing the linear U(2); aberrations are transformations outside that subgroup. As in geometric optics, we classify the aberration multiplets by order and weight. Their action on phase space is displayed by means of a Wigner function on the sphere, to be compared with the corresponding geometric canonical transformations.

  20. Chromosome aberrations among the Yanomamma Indians.

    PubMed

    Bloom, A D; Neel, J V; Choi, K W; Iida, S; Chagnon, N

    1970-07-01

    The chromosomes of leucocytes cultured from the peripheral blood of 49 primitive Yanomama Indians of Venezuela were studied to determine the types and frequencies of aberrations in a human population not exposed to the same exogenous agents as civilized man. In all but one instance, 100 cells per individual were scored. In 13 cases, we found one or more cells with multiple complex breaks and rearrangements, represented by tetracentric, tricentric, and numerous dicentric chromosomes. From the standpoint of chromosomal damage, these cells are among the most abnormal cells yet described in vivo in man, and were not seen in the controls. There was also a higher than expected frequency of cells with an isolated structural aberration in both Indians and controls. This may be the result of a 24- to 48-hour delay in the initiation of culture. The cause of the more extensive damage to some cells remains to be determined.

  1. The aberrant retroesophageal right subclavian artery.

    PubMed

    Seres-Sturm, M; Maros, T N; Seres-Sturm, L

    1985-01-01

    Two cases with arteria lusoria were found at 278 routine dissections. These arteria arise as the last branches of the aortic arch and have a retroesophageal position. At the crossing point, the esophagus narrows due to the groove caused by the artery. The appearance of this malposition is the consequence of the perturbation in the organo-genesis of the right dorsal aorta and fourth branchial artery. The aberration can lead to disphagia lusoria.

  2. Persistent Tachypnea of Infancy. Usual and Aberrant.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Daniela; Wetzke, Martin; Reu, Simone; Wesselak, Waltraud; Schams, Andrea; Hengst, Meike; Kammer, Birgit; Ley-Zaporozhan, Julia; Kappler, Matthias; Proesmans, Marijke; Lange, Joanna; Escribano, Amparo; Kerem, Eitan; Ahrens, Frank; Brasch, Frank; Schwerk, Nicolaus; Griese, Matthias

    2016-02-15

    Persistent tachypnea of infancy (PTI) is a specific clinical entity of undefined etiology comprising the two diseases neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia of infancy (NEHI) and pulmonary interstitial glycogenosis. The outcome of typical NEHI is favorable. The outcome may be different for patients without a typical NEHI presentation, and thus a lung biopsy to differentiate the diseases is indicated. To determine whether infants with the characteristic clinical presentation and computed tomographic (CT) imaging of NEHI (referred to as "usual PTI") have long-term outcome and biopsy findings similar to those of infants with an aberrant presentation and/or with additional localized minor CT findings (referred to as "aberrant PTI"). In a retrospective cohort study, 89 infants with PTI were diagnosed on the basis of clinical symptoms and, if available, CT scans and lung biopsies. Long-term outcome in childhood was measured on the basis of current status. Infants with usual PTI had the same respiratory and overall outcomes during follow-up of up to 12 years (mean, 3.8 yr) as infants who had some additional localized minor findings (aberrant PTI) visualized on CT images. Both usual and aberrant PTI had a relatively favorable prognosis, with 50% of the subjects fully recovered by age 2.6 years. None of the infants died during the study period. This was independent of the presence or absence of histological examination. PTI can be diagnosed on the basis of typical history taking, clinical findings, and a high-quality CT scan. Further diagnostic measures, including lung biopsies, may be limited to rare, complicated cases, reducing the need for an invasive and potentially harmful procedure.

  3. The harmonic oscillator behind all aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Kurt Bernardo

    2010-12-23

    The group-theoretical structure of the harmonic oscillator appears in many guises. Originally developed by Marcos Moshinsky among several others for applications in nuclear physics, we point out here that the harmonic oscillator structure appears in aberrations of geometric optics, particularly in their classification by rank, symplectic spin and weight. And further, the finite harmonic oscillator appears again in the nonlinear transformations of finite Hamiltonian systems, when applied to the parallel processing of signals.

  4. [A rare observation of intralaryngeal aberrant goiter].

    PubMed

    Gadzhimirzaev, G A; Shakhnazarov, A M; Gadzhimirzaeva, R G

    This paper was designed to report a rare observation of intralaryngeal aberrant goiter associated with goiter of the main thyroid tissue and chronic suppurative otitis media complicated by the polyp that causes occlusion of the auditory passage. The histomorphological investigation of the material harvested intraoperatively following rehabilitation of the purulent focus in the middle ear and the removal of the tumour from the inside of the right vestibular fold confirmed the diagnosis of colloid goiter.

  5. [Familial, structural aberration of the Y chromosome with fertility disorders].

    PubMed

    Gall, H; Schmid, M; Schmidtke, J; Schempp, W; Weber, L

    1985-11-01

    Cytogenetic studies on a patient with Klinefelter's syndrome revealed an inherited, structural aberration of the Y-chromosome which has not been described before. The aberrant Y-chromosome was characterized by eight different banding methods. The value of individual staining techniques in studies on Y-heterochromatin aberrations is emphasized. Analysis of the cytogenetic studies (banding methods, restriction endonuclease of DNA, and measurement of the length of the Y-chromosome) permits an interpretation to be made on how the aberrant Y-chromosome originated. The functions of the Y-chromosome are discussed. The decrease in fertility (cryptozoospermia) in the two brothers with the same aberrant Y-chromosome was striking.

  6. Modulation of endogenous β-tubulin isotype expression as a result of human βIII cDNA transfection into prostate carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Ranganathan, S; McCauley, R A; Dexter, D W; Hudes, G R

    2001-01-01

    Increases of individual β tubulin isotypes in antimicrotubule drug resistant cell lines have been reported by several laboratories. We have previously described elevations in βIII and βIVa isotypes in estramustine and paclitaxel resistant human prostate carcinoma cells. To investigate further the function of β tubulin isotypes in antimicrotubule drug response, human prostate carcinoma cells that normally have very low to undetectable levels of βIII were stably transfected with βIII cDNA in pZeoSV system. An 18 bp haemagglutinin (HA) epitope tag was added at the 3′ end prior to cloning into the vector. Cells were transfected with pZeoSV or pZeoSV-βIII plasmids and selected in the presence of Zeocin. Immunofluorescent staining of the transfectant cells have shown significant expression and incorporation of HA-tagged βIII tubulin into cellular microtubules. Quantitation of Western blots revealed the HA-tagged βIII levels to be approximately 7-fold higher than the vector control cells. RT-PCR analysis confirmed the increase at the transcript level and also revealed a collateral increase of βII and βIVb transcripts. Cell viability assays indicated that sensitivity of βIII transfected cells to various antimicrotubule agents was similar to vector transfected cells: IC50 values for estramustine, paclitaxel, colchicine and vinblastine were 4 μM, 4 nM, 22 nM and 2 nM, respectively for both cell lines. Thus, overexpression of βIII isotype in human prostate carcinoma cells by stable transfection failed to confer antimicrotubule drug resistance to these cells. Counterregulatory increases of endogenous βII and βIVb tubulin isotypes in these βIII transfected cells may be a compensatory mechanism used by the cells to overcome the effects of elevated βIII levels on the cellular microtubules. These results highlight the difficulty in isolating the contribution of single tubulin isotypes in drug response studies. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http

  7. DNA Repair Defects and Chromosomal Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; George, K. A.; Huff, J. L.; Pluth, J. M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    Yields of chromosome aberrations were assessed in cells deficient in DNA doublestrand break (DSB) repair, after exposure to acute or to low-dose-rate (0.018 Gy/hr) gamma rays or acute high LET iron nuclei. We studied several cell lines including fibroblasts deficient in ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated; product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (nibrin; product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity. Chromosomes were analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting method in cells at the first division post irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). Gamma irradiation induced greater yields of both simple and complex exchanges in the DSB repair-defective cells than in the normal cells. The quadratic dose-response terms for both simple and complex chromosome exchanges were significantly higher for the ATM- and NBS-deficient lines than for normal fibroblasts. However, in the NBS cells the linear dose-response term was significantly higher only for simple exchanges. The large increases in the quadratic dose-response terms in these repair-defective cell lines points the importance of the functions of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications to facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize the formation of aberrations. The differences found between ATM- and NBS-deficient cells at low doses suggest that important questions should with regard to applying observations of radiation sensitivity at high dose to low-dose exposures. For aberrations induced by iron nuclei, regression models preferred purely linear dose responses for simple exchanges and quadratic dose responses for complex exchanges. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) factors of all of

  8. DNA Repair Defects and Chromosomal Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; George, K. A.; Huff, J. L.; Pluth, J. M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    Yields of chromosome aberrations were assessed in cells deficient in DNA doublestrand break (DSB) repair, after exposure to acute or to low-dose-rate (0.018 Gy/hr) gamma rays or acute high LET iron nuclei. We studied several cell lines including fibroblasts deficient in ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated; product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (nibrin; product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity. Chromosomes were analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting method in cells at the first division post irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). Gamma irradiation induced greater yields of both simple and complex exchanges in the DSB repair-defective cells than in the normal cells. The quadratic dose-response terms for both simple and complex chromosome exchanges were significantly higher for the ATM- and NBS-deficient lines than for normal fibroblasts. However, in the NBS cells the linear dose-response term was significantly higher only for simple exchanges. The large increases in the quadratic dose-response terms in these repair-defective cell lines points the importance of the functions of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications to facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize the formation of aberrations. The differences found between ATM- and NBS-deficient cells at low doses suggest that important questions should with regard to applying observations of radiation sensitivity at high dose to low-dose exposures. For aberrations induced by iron nuclei, regression models preferred purely linear dose responses for simple exchanges and quadratic dose responses for complex exchanges. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) factors of all of

  9. Chromatic variation of aberration: the role of induced aberrations and raytrace direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berner, A.; Nobis, T.; Shafer, D.; Gross, H.

    2015-09-01

    The design and optimization process of an optical system contains several first order steps. The definition of the appropriate lens type and the fixation of the raytrace direction are some of them. The latter can be understood as a hidden assumption rather than an aware design step. This is usually followed by the determination of the paraxial lens layout calculated for the primary wavelength. It is obvious, that for this primary wavelength the paraxial calculations are independent of raytrace direction. Today, most of the lens designs are specified not to work only for one wavelength, but in a certain wavelength range. Considering such rays of other wavelengths, one can observe that depending on the direction there will already occur differences in the first order chromatic aberrations and additionally in the chromatic variation of the third-order aberrations. The reason for this effect are induced aberrations emerging from one surface to the following surfaces by perturbed ray heights and ray angles. It can be shown, that the total amount of surface-resolved first order chromatic aberrations and the chromatic variation of the five primary aberrations can be split into an intrinsic part and an induced part. The intrinsic part is independent of the raytrace direction whereas the induced part is not.

  10. SIVsm Tat, Rev, and Nef1: functional characteristics of r-GV internalization on isotypes, cytokines, and intracellular degradation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Recombinant gas vesicles (r-GV) from Halobacterium sp. strain SD109 expressing cassettes with different SIVsm inserts, have potential utility as an effective antigen display system for immunogen testing in vivo and for initial epitope assessments in vitro. Previous mouse model studies demonstrated immunization with r-GV expressing selected exogenous sequences elicited a prolonged immune response. Here we tested segments from three SIVsm genes (tat, rev, and nef) each surface displayed by r-GV. As with HIV, for SIVsm the proteins encoded by tat, rev and nef respectively serve critical and diverse functions: effects on efficient viral RNA polymerase II transcription, regulation of viral gene expression and effects on specific signaling functions through the assembly of multiprotein complexes. Humoral responses to r-GVTat, Rev or Nef1 elicited in vivo, associated changes in selected cell cytokine production following r-GV internalization, and the capacity of J774A.1 macrophage cells to degrade these internalized display/delivery particles in vitro were examined. Results The in vivo studies involving r-GV immunizations and in vitro studies of r-GV uptake by J774A.1 macrophages demonstrated: (i) tests for antibody isotypes in immunized mice sera showed activation and re-stimulation of memory B cells, (ii) during long term immune response to the epitopes, primarily the IgG1 isotype was produced, (iii) in vitro, macrophage degradation of r-GV containing different SIVsm inserts occurred over a period of days resulting in an inherent slow breakdown and degradation of the SIVsm peptide inserts, (iv) vesicle specific GvpC, a larger protein, degraded more slowly than the recombinant peptide inserts and (v) in vitro uptake and degradation of the r-GV populations tested was associated with SIVsm insert specific patterns for cytokines IL-10, IL-12 and IL-18. Conclusions Together these findings provide new information underscoring r-GV potential. They can clearly

  11. Subnanosecond trigger system for ETA

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, E.G.; Lauer, E.J.; Reginato, L.L.; Rogers D.; Schmidt, J.A.

    1980-05-30

    A high-voltage trigger system capable of triggering 30, 250 kV spark gaps; each with less than +- 1 ns jitter has been constructed. In addition to low jitter rates, the trigger system must be capable of delivering the high voltage pulses to the spark gaps either simultaneously or sequentially as determined by other system requirements. The trigger system consists of several stages of pulse amplification culminating in 160 kV pulses having 30 ns risetime. The trigger system is described and test data provided.

  12. 3D resolved mapping of optical aberrations in thick tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jun; Mahou, Pierre; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel; Débarre, Delphine

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple method for mapping optical aberrations with 3D resolution within thick samples. The method relies on the local measurement of the variation in image quality with externally applied aberrations. We discuss the accuracy of the method as a function of the signal strength and of the aberration amplitude and we derive the achievable resolution for the resulting measurements. We then report on measured 3D aberration maps in human skin biopsies and mouse brain slices. From these data, we analyse the consequences of tissue structure and refractive index distribution on aberrations and imaging depth in normal and cleared tissue samples. The aberration maps allow the estimation of the typical aplanetism region size over which aberrations can be uniformly corrected. This method and data pave the way towards efficient correction strategies for tissue imaging applications. PMID:22876353

  13. Nodal aberration theory for wild-filed asymmetric optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang; Cheng, Xuemin; Hao, Qun

    2016-10-01

    Nodal Aberration Theory (NAT) was used to calculate the zero field position in Full Field Display (FFD) for the given aberration term. Aiming at wide-filed non-rotational symmetric decentered optical systems, we have presented the nodal geography behavior of the family of third-order and fifth-order aberrations. Meanwhile, we have calculated the wavefront aberration expressions when one optical element in the system is tilted, which was not at the entrance pupil. By using a three-piece-cellphone lens example in optical design software CodeV, the nodal geography is testified under several situations; and the wavefront aberrations are calculated when the optical element is tilted. The properties of the nodal aberrations are analyzed by using Fringe Zernike coefficients, which are directly related with the wavefront aberration terms and usually obtained by real ray trace and wavefront surface fitting.

  14. Pediatric Trigger Digits.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Andrea S; Bae, Donald S

    2015-11-01

    Pediatric trigger thumb presents not at birth but early in childhood. Most evidence suggests that it is caused by a developmental size mismatch between the flexor pollicis longus tendon and its sheath. Patients generally present with the thumb interphalangeal joint locked in flexion. Surgical reviews report near universally excellent outcomes after open release of the A1 pulley. However, recent reports indicate that there may be a role for nonsurgical treatment for families that are willing to wait several years for possible spontaneous resolution of the deformity. Triggering in digits other than the thumb in children is generally associated with an underlying diagnosis including anatomic abnormalities of the tendons, and metabolic, inflammatory, and infectious etiologies. Although some have advocated nonsurgical treatment, surgery is often necessary to address the underlying anatomic etiology. More extensive surgery beyond simple A1 pulley release is often required, including release of the A3 pulley and resection of a slip of the flexor digitorum superficialis tendon. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Protons Trigger Mitochondrial Flashes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianhua; Zhang, Xing; Huang, Zhanglong; Wu, Di; Liu, Beibei; Zhang, Rufeng; Yin, Rongkang; Hou, Tingting; Jian, Chongshu; Xu, Jiejia; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Yanru; Gao, Feng; Cheng, Heping

    2016-07-26

    Emerging evidence indicates that mitochondrial flashes (mitoflashes) are highly conserved elemental mitochondrial signaling events. However, which signal controls their ignition and how they are integrated with other mitochondrial signals and functions remain elusive. In this study, we aimed to further delineate the signal components of the mitoflash and determine the mitoflash trigger mechanism. Using multiple biosensors and chemical probes as well as label-free autofluorescence, we found that the mitoflash reflects chemical and electrical excitation at the single-organelle level, comprising bursting superoxide production, oxidative redox shift, and matrix alkalinization as well as transient membrane depolarization. Both electroneutral H(+)/K(+) or H(+)/Na(+) antiport and matrix proton uncaging elicited immediate and robust mitoflash responses over a broad dynamic range in cardiomyocytes and HeLa cells. However, charge-uncompensated proton transport, which depolarizes mitochondria, caused the opposite effect, and steady matrix acidification mildly inhibited mitoflashes. Based on a numerical simulation, we estimated a mean proton lifetime of 1.42 ns and diffusion distance of 2.06 nm in the matrix. We conclude that nanodomain protons act as a novel, to our knowledge, trigger of mitoflashes in energized mitochondria. This finding suggests that mitoflash genesis is functionally and mechanistically integrated with mitochondrial energy metabolism.

  16. Human eyes do not need monochromatic aberrations for dynamic accommodation.

    PubMed

    Bernal-Molina, Paula; Marín-Franch, Iván; Del Águila-Carrasco, Antonio J; Esteve-Taboada, Jose J; López-Gil, Norberto; Kruger, Philip B; Montés-Micó, Robert

    2017-09-01

    To determine if human accommodation uses the eye's own monochromatic aberrations to track dynamic accommodative stimuli. Wavefront aberrations were measured while subjects monocularly viewed a monochromatic Maltese cross moving sinusoidally around 2D of accommodative demand with 1D amplitude at 0.2 Hz. The amplitude and phase (delay) of the accommodation response were compared to the actual vergence of the stimulus to obtain gain and temporal phase, calculated from wavefront aberrations recorded over time during experimental trials. The tested conditions were as follows: Correction of all the subject's aberrations except defocus (C); Correction of all the subject's aberrations except defocus and habitual second-order astigmatism (AS); Correction of all the subject's aberrations except defocus and odd higher-order aberrations (HOAs); Correction of all the subject's aberrations except defocus and even HOAs (E); Natural aberrations of the subject's eye, i.e., the adaptive-optics system only corrected the optical system's aberrations (N); Correction of all the subject's aberrations except defocus and fourth-order spherical aberration (SA). The correction was performed at 20 Hz and each condition was repeated six times in randomised order. Average gain (±2 standard errors of the mean) varied little across conditions; between 0.55 ± 0.06 (SA), and 0.62 ± 0.06 (AS). Average phase (±2 standard errors of the mean) also varied little; between 0.41 ± 0.02 s (E), and 0.47 ± 0.02 s (O). After Bonferroni correction, no statistically significant differences in gain or phase were found in the presence of specific monochromatic aberrations or in their absence. These results show that the eye's monochromatic aberrations are not necessary for accommodation to track dynamic accommodative stimuli. © 2017 The Authors. Ophthalmic and Physiological Optics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of College of Optometrists.

  17. Structure of a shark IgNAR antibody variable domain and modeling of an early-developmental isotype.

    PubMed

    Streltsov, Victor A; Carmichael, Jennifer A; Nuttall, Stewart D

    2005-11-01

    The new antigen receptor (IgNAR) antibodies from sharks are disulphide bonded dimers of two protein chains, each containing one variable and five constant domains. Three types of IgNAR variable domains have been discovered, with Type 3 appearing early in shark development and being overtaken by the antigen-driven affinity-matured Type 1 and 2 response. Here, we have determined the first structure of a naturally occurring Type 2 IgNAR variable domain, and identified the disulphide bond that links and stabilizes the CDR1 and CDR3 loops. This disulphide bridge locks the CDR3 loop in an "upright" conformation in contrast to other shark antibody structures, where a more lateral configuration is observed. Further, we sought to model the Type 3 isotype based on the crystallographic structure reported here. This modeling indicates (1) that internal Type 3-specific residues combine to pack into a compact immunoglobulin core that supports the CDR loop regions, and (2) that despite apparent low-sequence variability, there is sufficient plasticity in the CDR3 loop to form a conformationally diverse antigen-binding surface.

  18. Reformatting Rituximab into Human IgG2 and IgG4 Isotypes Dramatically Improves Apoptosis Induction In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Könitzer, Jennifer D.; Sieron, Annette; Wacker, Angelika; Enenkel, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The direct induction of cell death, or apoptosis, in target cells is one of the effector mechanisms for the anti CD20 antibody Rituximab. Here we provide evidence that Rituximab’s apoptotic ability is linked to the antibody IgG isotype. Reformatting Rituximab from the standard human IgG1 heavy chain into IgG2 or IgG4 boosted in vitro apoptosis induction in the Burkitt’s lymphoma B cell line Ramos five and four-fold respectively. The determinants for this behavior are located in the hinge region and CH1 domain of the heavy chain. By transplanting individual IgG2 or IgG4 specific amino acid residues onto otherwise IgG1 like backbones, thereby creating hybrid antibodies, the same enhancement of apoptosis induction could be achieved. The cysteines at position 131 of the CH1 domain and 219 in the hinge region, involved in IgG2 and IgG4 disulfide formation, were found to be of particular structural importance. Our data indicates that the hybrid antibodies possess a different CD20 binding mode than standard Rituximab, which appears to be key in enhancing apoptotic ability. The presented work opens up an interesting engineering route for enhancing the direct cytotoxic ability of therapeutic antibodies. PMID:26713448

  19. Improving the solubility of anti-LINGO-1 monoclonal antibody Li33 by isotype switching and targeted mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Pepinsky, R Blake; Silvian, Laura; Berkowitz, Steven A; Farrington, Graham; Lugovskoy, Alexey; Walus, Lee; Eldredge, John; Capili, Allan; Mi, Sha; Graff, Christilyn; Garber, Ellen

    2010-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) are a favorite drug platform of the biopharmaceutical industry. Currently, over 20 Mabs have been approved and several hundred others are in clinical trials. The anti-LINGO-1 Mab Li33 was selected from a large panel of antibodies by Fab phage display technology based on its extraordinary biological activity in promoting oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination in vitro and in animal models of remyelination. However, the Li33 Fab had poor solubility when converted into a full antibody in an immunoglobulin G1 framework. A detailed analysis of the biochemical and structural features of the antibody revealed several possible reasons for its propensity to aggregate. Here, we successfully applied three molecular approaches (isotype switching, targeted mutagenesis of complementarity determining region residues, and glycosylation site insertion mutagenesis) to address the solubility problem. Through these efforts we were able to improve the solubility of the Li33 Mab from 0.3 mg/mL to >50 mg/mL and reduce aggregation to an acceptable level. These strategies can be readily applied to other proteins with solubility issues.

  20. Demonstration of isotype GaN/AlN/GaN heterobarrier diodes by NH{sub 3}-molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Fireman, Micha N.; Browne, David A.; Mazumder, Baishakhi; Speck, James S.; Mishra, Umesh K.

    2015-05-18

    The results of vertical transport through nitride heterobarrier structures grown by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy are presented. Structures are designed with binary layers to avoid the effects of random alloy fluctuations in ternary nitride barriers. The unintentional incorporation of Ga in the AlN growth is investigated by atom probe tomography and is shown to be strongly dependent on both the NH{sub 3} flowrate and substrate temperature growth parameters. Once nominally pure AlN layer growth conditions are achieved, structures consisting of unintentionally doped (UID) GaN spacer layers adjacent to a nominally pure AlN are grown between two layers of n+ GaN, from which isotype diodes are fabricated. Varying the design parameters of AlN layer thickness, UID spacer layer thickness, and threading dislocation density show marked effects on the vertical transport characteristics of these structures. The lack of significant temperature dependence, coupled with Fowler-Nordheim and/or Milliken-Lauritsen analysis, point to a prevalently tunneling field emission mechanism through the AlN barrier. Once flatband conditions in the UID layer are achieved, electrons leave the barrier with significant energy. This transport mechanism is of great interest for applications in hot electron structures.

  1. FGFR4 GLY388 isotype suppresses motility of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells by EDG-2 gene repression.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Christiane Regina; Knyazev, Pjotr; Bange, Johannes; Ullrich, Axel

    2006-06-01

    Clinical investigations of an FGFR4 germline polymorphism, resulting in substitution of glycine by arginine at codon 388 (G388 to R388), have shown a correlation between FGFR4 R388 and aggressive disease progression in cancer patients. Here, we studied the differential effects of the two FGFR4 isotypes on cellular signalling and motility in the MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell model. cDNA array analysis showed the ability of FGFR4 G388 to suppress expression of specific genes involved in invasiveness and motility. Further investigations concentrating on cell signalling and motility revealed an abrogation of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-dependent LPA-induced Akt activation and cell migration due to downregulation of the LPA receptor Edg-2 in FGFR4 G388-expressing MDA-MB-231 cells. Moreover, FGFR4 G388 expression attenuated the invasivity of the breast cancer cell line and decreased small Rho GTPase activity. We conclude that FGFR4 G388 suppresses cell motility of invasive breast cancer cells by altering signalling pathways and the expression of genes that are required for metastasis. Therefore, the positive effect of FGFR4 R388 on disease progression appears to result from a loss of the tumour suppressor activity displayed by FGFR4 G388 rather than the acquisition or enhancement of oncogenic potential.

  2. Improving the solubility of anti-LINGO-1 monoclonal antibody Li33 by isotype switching and targeted mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pepinsky, R. Blake; Silvian, Laura; Berkowitz, Steven A.; Farrington, Graham; Lugovskoy, Alexey; Walus, Lee; Eldredge, John; Capili, Allan; Mi, Sha; Graff, Christilyn; Garber, Ellen

    2010-11-15

    Monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) are a favorite drug platform of the biopharmaceutical industry. Currently, over 20 Mabs have been approved and several hundred others are in clinical trials. The anti-LINGO-1 Mab Li33 was selected from a large panel of antibodies by Fab phage display technology based on its extraordinary biological activity in promoting oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination in vitro and in animal models of remyelination. However, the Li33 Fab had poor solubility when converted into a full antibody in an immunoglobulin G1 framework. A detailed analysis of the biochemical and structural features of the antibody revealed several possible reasons for its propensity to aggregate. Here, we successfully applied three molecular approaches (isotype switching, targeted mutagenesis of complementarity determining region residues, and glycosylation site insertion mutagenesis) to address the solubility problem. Through these efforts we were able to improve the solubility of the Li33 Mab from 0.3 mg/mL to >50 mg/mL and reduce aggregation to an acceptable level. These strategies can be readily applied to other proteins with solubility issues.

  3. Structure of a shark IgNAR antibody variable domain and modeling of an early-developmental isotype

    PubMed Central

    Streltsov, Victor A.; Carmichael, Jennifer A.; Nuttall, Stewart D.

    2005-01-01

    The new antigen receptor (IgNAR) antibodies from sharks are disulphide bonded dimers of two protein chains, each containing one variable and five constant domains. Three types of IgNAR variable domains have been discovered, with Type 3 appearing early in shark development and being overtaken by the antigen-driven affinity-matured Type 1 and 2 response. Here, we have determined the first structure of a naturally occurring Type 2 IgNAR variable domain, and identified the disulphide bond that links and stabilizes the CDR1 and CDR3 loops. This disulphide bridge locks the CDR3 loop in an “upright” conformation in contrast to other shark antibody structures, where a more lateral configuration is observed. Further, we sought to model the Type 3 isotype based on the crystallographic structure reported here. This modeling indicates (1) that internal Type 3-specific residues combine to pack into a compact immunoglobulin core that supports the CDR loop regions, and (2) that despite apparent low-sequence variability, there is sufficient plasticity in the CDR3 loop to form a conformationally diverse antigen-binding surface. PMID:16199666

  4. Prospective study of early rheumatoid arthritis. II. Association of rheumatoid factor isotypes with fluctuations in disease activity.

    PubMed Central

    Withrington, R H; Teitsson, I; Valdimarsson, H; Seifert, M H

    1984-01-01

    Thirty-three patients with early peripheral synovitis were followed up for two to four years in order to study the relationship between fluctuations in rheumatoid factor (RF) levels and indices of clinical activity. Twenty-eight of these patients developed classical/definite rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Seventeen patients developed erosive disease of their hands and wrists and thirteen had a positive RF agglutination test. Nineteen patients had raised levels of IgM, RF, IgA, RF, or IgG RF as measured by isotype-specific ELISA techniques. The within-patient fluctuations in IgA RF levels correlated significantly with the corresponding fluctuations in grip strength (p less than 0.05), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (p less than 0.01), and a composite index of disease activity (p less than 0.02). IgG RF levels were also associated with changes in ESR and grip strength, but IgM RF showed only a weak association with fluctuations in ESR and not with any other clinical parameters. It is suggested that serum IgA RF may be a useful marker of disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:6497460

  5. Isolation of cDNA clones specifying the fourth component of mouse complement and its isotype, sex-limited protein.

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, M; Takahashi, M; Natsuume-Sakai, S; Nonaka, M; Tanaka, S; Shimizu, A; Honjo, T

    1984-01-01

    cDNA clones specific for the fourth component of mouse complement (C4) and its hormonally regulated isotype, sex-linked protein (Slp), were isolated using as a probe a 20-mer synthetic oligonucleotide corresponding to a known sequence of human C4 cDNA. Two types of clones, one specific for C4 (pFC4/10, with a 3.7 kilobase insert) and one specific for Slp (pFSlp/1, with a 4.7 kilobase insert), were isolated from liver cDNA libraries constructed from the Slp-producing FM mouse strain. The cDNA inserts of these clones shared 70% of the restriction sites determined. Only one type of clone was isolated from the Slp-negative DBA/1 strain; this type showed restriction maps indistinguishable from that of pFC4/10. pFC4/10 and pFSlp/1 displayed extensive homology: 94% nucleotide homology and 89% derived amino acid homology in the C4a region and 92% nucleotide homology and 89% derived amino acid homology in the thiol-ester region. An Arg-Gln-Lys-Arg sequence in the beta-alpha junction and a Cys-Ala-Glu-Gln sequence in the thiol-ester site were identified for both proteins. A remarkable divergency between C4 and Slp sequences was recognized in the region immediately following the C4a sequence. PMID:6208559

  6. DNP-KLH Yields Changes in Leukocyte Populations and Immunoglobulin Isotype Use with Different Immunization Routes in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Weir, Heather; Chen, Patricia L.; Deiss, Thaddeus C.; Jacobs, Natalie; Nabity, Mary B.; Young, Matt; Criscitiello, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Distinct methods are required for inducing mucosal versus systemic immunity in mammals for vaccine protection at the tissues most commonly breached by pathogens. Understanding of mucosal immunization in teleost fish is needed to combat aquaculture disease, understand emerging ecological threats, and know how vertebrate adaptive immunity evolved. Here, we quantitatively measured expression levels of IgM as well as the teleost mucosal immunoglobulin, IgZ/IgT, in zebrafish given an antigen systemically via intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection or mucosally via bath immersion. Both immunoglobulin isotypes and the B cell activating factor gene transcription was induced in fish injected with antigen as compared to saline injected or antigen immersed fish, though these failed to reach statistical significance. Here we provide additional reference hematology for this model species. Differential blood counts revealed a greater lymphocyte percentage in both i.p. and immersed fish, with increase in large lymphocyte counts and decrease in neutrophils. These humoral adaptive gene transcription and cytological data should provide a foundation for more studies connecting immunology in this dominant developmental and genetic fish model to other species where mucosal immunization is of greater commercial importance. PMID:26648935

  7. Demonstration of isotype GaN/AlN/GaN heterobarrier diodes by NH3-molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fireman, Micha N.; Browne, David A.; Mazumder, Baishakhi; Speck, James S.; Mishra, Umesh K.

    2015-05-01

    The results of vertical transport through nitride heterobarrier structures grown by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy are presented. Structures are designed with binary layers to avoid the effects of random alloy fluctuations in ternary nitride barriers. The unintentional incorporation of Ga in the AlN growth is investigated by atom probe tomography and is shown to be strongly dependent on both the NH3 flowrate and substrate temperature growth parameters. Once nominally pure AlN layer growth conditions are achieved, structures consisting of unintentionally doped (UID) GaN spacer layers adjacent to a nominally pure AlN are grown between two layers of n+ GaN, from which isotype diodes are fabricated. Varying the design parameters of AlN layer thickness, UID spacer layer thickness, and threading dislocation density show marked effects on the vertical transport characteristics of these structures. The lack of significant temperature dependence, coupled with Fowler-Nordheim and/or Milliken-Lauritsen analysis, point to a prevalently tunneling field emission mechanism through the AlN barrier. Once flatband conditions in the UID layer are achieved, electrons leave the barrier with significant energy. This transport mechanism is of great interest for applications in hot electron structures.

  8. Non-UV Photoelectric Properties of the Ni/n-Si/N+-SiC Isotype Heterostructure Schottky Barrier Photodiode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lian-Bi; Chen, Zhi-Ming; Ren, Zhan-Qiang; Gao, Zhan-Jun

    2013-09-01

    The energy-band structure and non-ultraviolet photoelectric properties of a Ni/n-Si/N+-SiC isotype heterostructure Schottky photodiode are simulated by using Silvaco-Atlas. There are energy offsets in the conduction and valance band of the heterojunction, which are about 0.09 eV and 1.79 eV, respectively. The non-UV photodiode with this structure is fabricated on a 6H-SiC(0001) substrate. J—V measurements indicate that the device has good rectifying behavior with a rectification ratio up to 200 at 5 V, and the turn-on voltage is about 0.7 V. Under non-ultraviolet illumination of 0.6 W/cm2, the device demonstrates a significant photoelectric response with a photocurrent density of 2.9 mA/cm2 and an open-circuit voltage of 63.0 mV. Non-ultraviolet operation of the SiC-based photoelectric device is initially realized.

  9. Crystal and molecular structure and spectroscopic behavior of isotypic synthetic analogs of the oxalate minerals stepanovite and zhemchuzhnikovite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piro, Oscar E.; Echeverría, Gustavo A.; González-Baró, Ana C.; Baran, Enrique J.

    2016-04-01

    The crystal structure of synthetic stepanovite, Na[Mg(H2O)6][Fe(C2O4)3]·3H2O, and zhemchuzhnikovite, Na[Mg(H2O)6][Al0.55Fe0.45(C2O4)3]·3H2O, has been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction methods. The compounds are isotypic to each other and to the previously reported Na[Mg(H2O)6][M(C2O4)3]·3H2O (M: Cr, Al). They crystallize in the trigonal P3 c1 space group with Z = 6 molecules per unit cell and (hexagonal axes) a = 17.0483(4), c = 12.4218(4) Å for the iron compound, and a = 16.8852(5), c = 12.5368(5) Å for the Al/Fe solid solution. Comparison of our crystallographic results with previous X-ray diffraction and chemical data of type stepanovite and zhemchuzhnikovite minerals provides compelling evidence that these natural materials possess the same crystal and molecular structure as their synthetic counterparts. It is shown that the originally reported unit cell for stepanovite represents a pronounced sub-cell and that the correct unit cell and space group are based on weak superstructure reflections. The infrared and Raman spectra of both synthetic analogs were also recorded and are briefly discussed.

  10. A Composite Polymeric Carbon Nitride with In Situ Formed Isotype Heterojunctions for Highly Improved Photocatalysis under Visible Light.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qinghua; Li, Zhi; Bai, Yu; Huang, Zheng-Hong; Kang, Feiyu; Yang, Quan-Hong

    2017-03-01

    Introducing heterojunction is an effective way for improving the intrinsic photocatalytic activity of a graphitic carbon nitride (GCN) semiconductor. These heterostructures are mostly introduced by interfacing GCN with foreign materials that normally have entirely different physicochemical properties and show unfavorable compatibility, thus resulting in a limited improvement of the photocatalytic performance of the resultant materials. Herein, a composite polymeric carbon nitride (CPCN) that contains both melon-based GCN and triazine-based crystalline carbon nitride (CCN) is prepared by a simple thermal reaction between lithium chloride and GCN. Thanks to the intimate contact and good compatibility between GCN and CCN, an in situ formed heterojunction acts as a driving force for separating the photogenerated charge carriers in CPCN. As a result, CPCN exhibits a significantly improved photocatalytic performance under visible light irradiation, which is, respectively, 10.6 and 5.3 times as high as those of the GCN and CCN alone. This well designed isotype heterojunction by a coupling of CCN presents an effective avenue for developing efficient GCN photocatalysts.

  11. Cell type- and isotype-specific expression and regulation of β-tubulins in primary olfactory ensheathing cells and Schwann cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Omar, Mohamed; Hansmann, Florian; Kreutzer, Robert; Kreutzer, Mihaela; Brandes, Gudrun; Wewetzer, Konstantin

    2013-05-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) and Schwann cells (SCs) are closely-related cell types with regeneration-promoting properties. Comparative gene expression analysis is particularly relevant since it may explain cell type-specific effects and guide the use of each cell type into special clinical applications. In the present study, we focused on β-tubulin isotype expression in primary adult canine glia as a translational large animal model. β-tubulins so far have been studied mainly in non-neuronal tumors and implied in tumorigenic growth. We show here that primary OECs and SCs expressed βII-V isotype mRNA. Interestingly, βIII-tubulin mRNA and protein expression was high in OECs and low in SCs, while fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) induced its down-regulation in both cell types to the same extent. This was in contrast to βV-tubulin mRNA which was similarly expressed in both cell types and unaltered by FGF-2. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed that OEC cultures contained a higher percentage of βIII-tubulin-positive cells compared to SC cultures. Addition of FGF-2 reduced the number of βIII-tubulin-positive cells in both cultures and significantly increased the percentage of cells with a multipolar morphology. Taken together, we demonstrate cell type-specific expression (βIII) and isotype-specific regulation (βIII, βV) of β-tubulin isotypes in OECs and SCs. While differential expression of βIII-tubulin in primary glial cell types with identical proliferative behaviour argues for novel functions unrelated to tumorigenic growth, strong βIII-tubulin expression in OECs may help to explain the specific properties of this glial cell type.

  12. Chromosomal aberrations in ISS crew members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannes, Christian; Goedecke, Wolfgang; Antonopoulos, Alexandra

    2012-07-01

    High energy radiation is a major risk factor in manned space missions. Astronauts and cosmonauts are exposed to ionising radiations of cosmic and solar origin, while on the Earth's surface people are well protected by the atmosphere and a deflecting magnetic field. There are now data available describing the dose and the quality of ionising radiation on-board of the International Space Station (ISS). Nonetheless, the effect of increased radiation dose on mutation rates of ISS crew members are hard to predict. Therefore, direct measurements of mutation rates are required in order to better estimate the radiation risk for longer duration missions. The analysis of chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes is a well established method to measure radiation-induced mutations. We present data of chromosome aberration analyses from lymphocyte metaphase spreads of ISS crew members participating in short term (10-14 days) or long term (around 6 months) missions. From each subject we received two blood samples. The first sample was drawn about 10 days before launch and a second one within 3 days after return from flight. From lymphocyte cultures metaphase plates were prepared on glass slides. Giemsa stained and in situ hybridised metaphases were scored for chromosome changes in pre-flight and post-flight blood samples and the mutation rates were compared. Results obtained in chromosomal studies on long-term flight crew members showed pronounced inter-individual differences in the response to elevated radiation levels. Overall slight but significant elevations of typical radiation induced aberrations, i.e., dicentric chromosomes and reciprocal translocations have been observed. Our data indicate no elevation of mutation rates due to short term stays on-board the ISS.

  13. Nostalgia: content, triggers, functions.

    PubMed

    Wildschut, Tim; Sedikides, Constantine; Arndt, Jamie; Routledge, Clay

    2006-11-01

    Seven methodologically diverse studies addressed 3 fundamental questions about nostalgia. Studies 1 and 2 examined the content of nostalgic experiences. Descriptions of nostalgic experiences typically featured the self as a protagonist in interactions with close others (e.g., friends) or in momentous events (e.g., weddings). Also, the descriptions contained more expressions of positive than negative affect and often depicted the redemption of negative life scenes by subsequent triumphs. Studies 3 and 4 examined triggers of nostalgia and revealed that nostalgia occurs in response to negative mood and the discrete affective state of loneliness. Studies 5, 6, and 7 investigated the functional utility of nostalgia and established that nostalgia bolsters social bonds, increases positive self-regard, and generates positive affect. These findings demarcate key landmarks in the hitherto uncharted research domain of nostalgia.

  14. Gravity triggered neutrino condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Barenboim, Gabriela

    2010-11-01

    In this work we use the Schwinger-Dyson equations to study the possibility that an enhanced gravitational attraction triggers the formation of a right-handed neutrino condensate, inducing dynamical symmetry breaking and generating a Majorana mass for the right-handed neutrino at a scale appropriate for the seesaw mechanism. The composite field formed by the condensate phase could drive an early epoch of inflation. We find that to the lowest order, the theory does not allow dynamical symmetry breaking. Nevertheless, thanks to the large number of matter fields in the model, the suppression by additional powers in G of higher order terms can be compensated, boosting them up to their lowest order counterparts. This way chiral symmetry can be broken dynamically and the infrared mass generated turns out to be in the expected range for a successful seesaw scenario.

  15. [Higher order aberrations in physiological optical system--own experience].

    PubMed

    Zelichowska, Beata; Rekas, Marek; Krix-Jachym, Karolina; Rubajczyk, Marcin

    2007-01-01

    To assess higher order aberrations in the physiological optical system in relation to pupil diameter and age of people studied. The study comprised 235 eyes of 122 subjects (67 women and 55 men) (mean age 43.8 +/- 15.5 years). Aberrations of the optical system were assessed using a LADARWave aberrometer (Alcon Laboratories). Aberration finding analysis included age, the pupil diameter, and their interrelations. ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallistest, multiple comparison and Ch2 tests were used to establish the statistical significance, and the correlation coefficient was calculated according to Spearman test. Basing on the studies performed, we found that the older subjects were the more statistically significant was the increase in the prevalence of higher order aberrations, including coma and spherical aberrations, at the same pupil diameter of 5-6.5 mm. When the relationship between aberrations and the pupil diameter was analyzed in a group of subjects aged 20-40 yrs, it turned out that the bigger the pupil diameter was the more statistically significant was the increase of higher order aberrations, including coma. While assessing the whole group studied we found a statistically significant reverse correlation between the pupil diameter and the subjects' age. Aberrations parameters between age groups 20-40, 40-60 and over 60 y. did not differ significantly. In the optical system an age-related increase of higher order aberrations is compensated by miosis, which reduces disadvantages of these aberrations and maintains the best optical quality of retinal image.

  16. Wavefront aberrations of x-ray dynamical diffraction beams.

    PubMed

    Liao, Keliang; Hong, Youli; Sheng, Weifan

    2014-10-01

    The effects of dynamical diffraction in x-ray diffractive optics with large numerical aperture render the wavefront aberrations difficult to describe using the aberration polynomials, yet knowledge of them plays an important role in a vast variety of scientific problems ranging from optical testing to adaptive optics. Although the diffraction theory of optical aberrations was established decades ago, its application in the area of x-ray dynamical diffraction theory (DDT) is still lacking. Here, we conduct a theoretical study on the aberration properties of x-ray dynamical diffraction beams. By treating the modulus of the complex envelope as the amplitude weight function in the orthogonalization procedure, we generalize the nonrecursive matrix method for the determination of orthonormal aberration polynomials, wherein Zernike DDT and Legendre DDT polynomials are proposed. As an example, we investigate the aberration evolution inside a tilted multilayer Laue lens. The corresponding Legendre DDT polynomials are obtained numerically, which represent balanced aberrations yielding minimum variance of the classical aberrations of an anamorphic optical system. The balancing of classical aberrations and their standard deviations are discussed. We also present the Strehl ratio of the primary and secondary balanced aberrations.

  17. Exploring the Origin of Differential Binding Affinities of Human Tubulin Isotypes αβII, αβIII and αβIV for DAMA-Colchicine Using Homology Modelling, Molecular Docking and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Dulal; Kunwar, Ambarish

    2016-01-01

    Tubulin isotypes are found to play an important role in regulating microtubule dynamics. The isotype composition is also thought to contribute in the development of drug resistance as tubulin isotypes show differential binding affinities for various anti-cancer agents. Tubulin isotypes αβII, αβIII and αβIV show differential binding affinity for colchicine. However, the origin of differential binding affinity is not well understood at the molecular level. Here, we investigate the origin of differential binding affinity of a colchicine analogue N-deacetyl-N-(2-mercaptoacetyl)-colchicine (DAMA-colchicine) for human αβII, αβIII and αβIV isotypes, employing sequence analysis, homology modeling, molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation and MM-GBSA binding free energy calculations. The sequence analysis study shows that the residue compositions are different in the colchicine binding pocket of αβII and αβIII, whereas no such difference is present in αβIV tubulin isotypes. Further, the molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations results show that residue differences present at the colchicine binding pocket weaken the bonding interactions and the correct binding of DAMA-colchicine at the interface of αβII and αβIII tubulin isotypes. Post molecular dynamics simulation analysis suggests that these residue variations affect the structure and dynamics of αβII and αβIII tubulin isotypes, which in turn affect the binding of DAMA-colchicine. Further, the binding free-energy calculation shows that αβIV tubulin isotype has the highest binding free-energy and αβIII has the lowest binding free-energy for DAMA-colchicine. The order of binding free-energy for DAMA-colchicine is αβIV ≃ αβII >> αβIII. Thus, our computational approaches provide an insight into the effect of residue variations on differential binding of αβII, αβIII and αβIV tubulin isotypes with DAMA-colchicine and may help to design new analogues with higher

  18. Exploring the Origin of Differential Binding Affinities of Human Tubulin Isotypes αβII, αβIII and αβIV for DAMA-Colchicine Using Homology Modelling, Molecular Docking and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Kumbhar, Bajarang Vasant; Borogaon, Anubhaw; Panda, Dulal; Kunwar, Ambarish

    2016-01-01

    Tubulin isotypes are found to play an important role in regulating microtubule dynamics. The isotype composition is also thought to contribute in the development of drug resistance as tubulin isotypes show differential binding affinities for various anti-cancer agents. Tubulin isotypes αβII, αβIII and αβIV show differential binding affinity for colchicine. However, the origin of differential binding affinity is not well understood at the molecular level. Here, we investigate the origin of differential binding affinity of a colchicine analogue N-deacetyl-N-(2-mercaptoacetyl)-colchicine (DAMA-colchicine) for human αβII, αβIII and αβIV isotypes, employing sequence analysis, homology modeling, molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation and MM-GBSA binding free energy calculations. The sequence analysis study shows that the residue compositions are different in the colchicine binding pocket of αβII and αβIII, whereas no such difference is present in αβIV tubulin isotypes. Further, the molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations results show that residue differences present at the colchicine binding pocket weaken the bonding interactions and the correct binding of DAMA-colchicine at the interface of αβII and αβIII tubulin isotypes. Post molecular dynamics simulation analysis suggests that these residue variations affect the structure and dynamics of αβII and αβIII tubulin isotypes, which in turn affect the binding of DAMA-colchicine. Further, the binding free-energy calculation shows that αβIV tubulin isotype has the highest binding free-energy and αβIII has the lowest binding free-energy for DAMA-colchicine. The order of binding free-energy for DAMA-colchicine is αβIV ≃ αβII > αβIII. Thus, our computational approaches provide an insight into the effect of residue variations on differential binding of αβII, αβIII and αβIV tubulin isotypes with DAMA-colchicine and may help to design new analogues with higher

  19. Retinol binding protein and vitamin D associations with serum antibody isotypes, serum influenza virus-specific neutralizing activities and airway cytokine profiles.

    PubMed

    Jones, B G; Oshansky, C M; Bajracharya, R; Tang, L; Sun, Y; Wong, S S; Webby, R; Thomas, P G; Hurwitz, J L

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin A supports the induction of immunoglobulin (Ig)A responses at mucosal surfaces in mice, but much less is known about the influence of vitamins on antibody isotype expression in humans. To address this knowledge gap, we examined 46 residual blood samples from adults and children, some of whom were experiencing influenza virus infections of the respiratory tract. Assays were performed for retinol binding protein (RBP, a surrogate for vitamin A), vitamin D (a related vitamin) and antibody isotypes. Results showed that all but two tested samples exhibited RBP and/or vitamin D insufficiencies or deficiencies. Vitamin D correlated with blood IgM and IgG3, while RBP correlated with IgG4 and IgA. RBP also correlated positively with age and with influenza virus-specific antibody neutralization titres. Individuals with low blood RBP levels exhibited the highest frequencies of over-expressed cytokines and growth factors in nasal wash samples, an indication of inflamed mucosal tissues. While cause-effect relationships were not discerned, results support a hypothesis that vitamins directly influence B cell isotype expression in humans, and by so doing may help protect mucosal surfaces from respiratory viral disease.

  20. Peripheral Aberrations and Image Quality for Contact Lens Correction

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jie; Thibos, Larry N.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Contact lenses reduced the degree of hyperopic field curvature present in myopic eyes and rigid contact lenses reduced sphero-cylindrical image blur on the peripheral retina, but their effect on higher order aberrations and overall optical quality of the eye in the peripheral visual field is still unknown. The purpose of our study was to evaluate peripheral wavefront aberrations and image quality across the visual field before and after contact lens correction. Methods A commercial Hartmann-Shack aberrometer was used to measure ocular wavefront errors in 5° steps out to 30° of eccentricity along the horizontal meridian in uncorrected eyes and when the same eyes are corrected with soft or rigid contact lenses. Wavefront aberrations and image quality were determined for the full elliptical pupil encountered in off-axis measurements. Results Ocular higher-order aberrations increase away from fovea in the uncorrected eye. Third-order aberrations are larger and increase faster with eccentricity compared to the other higher-order aberrations. Contact lenses increase all higher-order aberrations except 3rd-order Zernike terms. Nevertheless, a net increase in image quality across the horizontal visual field for objects located at the foveal far point is achieved with rigid lenses, whereas soft contact lenses reduce image quality. Conclusions Second order aberrations limit image quality more than higher-order aberrations in the periphery. Although second-order aberrations are reduced by contact lenses, the resulting gain in image quality is partially offset by increased amounts of higher-order aberrations. To fully realize the benefits of correcting higher-order aberrations in the peripheral field requires improved correction of second-order aberrations as well. PMID:21873925

  1. Aberrations in Fresnel Lenses and Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Don

    1999-01-01

    The NASA/MSFC Shooting Star program revealed a number of technical problems that must be solved before solar thermal propulsion can become a reality. The fundamental problem of interest here is the collection of solar energy. This is the first step in the propulsion process and indeed the most important. Everything else depends on the efficiency and focusing ability of the collection lens or mirror. An initial model of Fresnel lens behavior using a wave optics approach has been completed and the results were encouraging enough to warrant an experimental investigation. This experimental investigation confirmed some of the effects predicted and produced invaluable photographic evidence of coherence based diffraction and aberration.

  2. Microcollimated laser diode with low wavefront aberration

    SciTech Connect

    Ogata, S.; Sekii, H.; Maeda, T.; Goto, H.; Yamashita, T.; Imanaka, K. )

    1989-11-01

    The authors developed microcollimated laser diode( MCLD) utilizing a 1 mm short focal length, phi, lc 0.5 mm small diameter micro Fresnel lens (MFL) for the first time as the collimating lens. The MCLD is assembled with a 780 nm quantum-well laser diode dice and an MFL in the smallest commercial available laser package. The radiated laser beam form the MCLD has higher than 2mW power at 50 mA driving current, narrow enough as a phi 2 mm beam diameter with nearly Gaussian intensity profile, and low wavefront aberration less than {lambda}14 (rms value) measured at 1 m distance.

  3. The CMS High Level Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trocino, Daniele

    2014-06-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a two-level trigger system: the Level-1 Trigger, implemented in custom-designed electronics, and the High-Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. A software trigger system requires a tradeoff between the complexity of the algorithms running with the available computing power, the sustainable output rate, and the selection efficiency. We present the performance of the main triggers used during the 2012 data taking, ranging from simple single-object selections to more complex algorithms combining different objects, and applying analysis-level reconstruction and selection. We discuss the optimisation of the trigger and the specific techniques to cope with the increasing LHC pile-up, reducing its impact on the physics performance.

  4. Aberrant DNA Methylation and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Sunipa; Buckles, Eric; Estrada, John; Koochekpour, Shahriar

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most prevalent cancer, a significant contributor to morbidity and a leading cause of cancer-related death in men in Western industrialized countries. In contrast to genetic changes that vary among individual cases, somatic epigenetic alterations are early and highly consistent events. Epigenetics encompasses several different phenomena, such as DNA methylation, histone modifications, RNA interference, and genomic imprinting. Epigenetic processes regulate gene expression and can change malignancy-associated phenotypes such as growth, migration, invasion, or angiogenesis. Methylations of certain genes are associated with PCa progression. Compared to normal prostate tissues, several hypermethylated genes have also been identified in benign prostate hyperplasia, which suggests a role for aberrant methylation in this growth dysfunction. Global and gene-specific DNA methylation could be affected by environmental and dietary factors. Among other epigenetic changes, aberrant DNA methylation might have a great potential as diagnostic or prognostic marker for PCa and could be tested in tumor tissues and various body fluids (e.g., serum, urine). The DNA methylation markers are simple in nature, have high sensitivity, and could be detected either quantitatively or qualitatively. Availability of genome-wide screening methodologies also allows the identification of epigenetic signatures in high throughput population studies. Unlike irreversible genetic changes, epigenetic alterations are reversible and could be used for PCa targeted therapies. PMID:22547956

  5. Relationships between chromosome structure and chromosomal aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eidelman, Yuri; Andreev, Sergey

    An interphase nucleus of human lymphocyte was simulated by the novel Monte Carlo tech-nique. The main features of interphase chromosome structure and packaging were taken into account: different levels of chromatin organisation; nonrandom localisation of chromosomes within a nucleus; chromosome loci dynamics. All chromosomes in a nucleus were modelled as polymer globules. A dynamic pattern of intra/interchromosomal contacts was simulated. The detailed information about chromosomal contacts, such as distribution of intrachromoso-mal contacts over the length of each chromosome and dependence of contact probability on genomic separation between chromosome loci, were calculated and compared to the new exper-imental data obtained by the Hi-C technique. Types and frequencies of simple and complex radiation-induced chromosomal exchange aberrations (CA) induced by X-rays were predicted with taking formation and decay of chromosomal contacts into account. Distance dependence of exchange formation probability was calculated directly. mFISH data for human lymphocytes were analysed. The calculated frequencies of simple CA agreed with the experimental data. Complex CA were underestimated despite the dense packaging of chromosome territories within a nucleus. Possible influence of chromosome-nucleus structural organisation on the frequency and spectrum of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations is discussed.

  6. Lymphocyte chromosomal aberration assay in radiation biodosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Agrawala, Paban K.; Adhikari, J. S.; Chaudhury, N. K.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiations, whether medical, occupational or accidental, leads to deleterious biological consequences like mortality or carcinogenesis. It is considered that no dose of ionizing radiation exposure is safe. However, once the accurate absorbed dose is estimated, one can be given appropriate medical care and the severe consequences can be minimized. Though several accurate physical dose estimation modalities exist, it is essential to estimate the absorbed dose in biological system taking into account the individual variation in radiation response, so as to plan suitable medical care. Over the last several decades, lots of efforts have been taken to design a rapid and easy biological dosimeter requiring minimum invasive procedures. The metaphase chromosomal aberration assay in human lymphocytes, though is labor intensive and requires skilled individuals, still remains the gold standard for radiation biodosimetry. The current review aims at discussing the human lymphocyte metaphase chromosomal aberration assay and recent developments involving the application of molecular cytogenetic approaches and other technological advancements to make the assay more authentic and simple to use even in the events of mass radiation casualties. PMID:21829315

  7. Correction of aberrant growth preserves tissue homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Samara; Pineda, Cristiana M; Xin, Tianchi; Boucher, Jonathan; Suozzi, Kathleen C; Park, Sangbum; Matte-Martone, Catherine; Gonzalez, David G; Rytlewski, Julie; Beronja, Slobodan; Greco, Valentina

    2017-08-17

    Cells in healthy tissues acquire mutations with surprising frequency. Many of these mutations are associated with abnormal cellular behaviours such as differentiation defects and hyperproliferation, yet fail to produce macroscopically detectable phenotypes. It is currently unclear how the tissue remains phenotypically normal, despite the presence of these mutant cells. Here we use intravital imaging to track the fate of mouse skin epithelium burdened with varying numbers of activated Wnt/β-catenin stem cells. We show that all resulting growths that deform the skin tissue architecture regress, irrespective of their size. Wild-type cells are required for the active elimination of mutant cells from the tissue, while utilizing both endogenous and ectopic cellular behaviours to dismantle the aberrant structures. After regression, the remaining structures are either completely eliminated or converted into functional skin appendages in a niche-dependent manner. Furthermore, tissue aberrancies generated from oncogenic Hras, and even mutation-independent deformations to the tissue, can also be corrected, indicating that this tolerance phenomenon reflects a conserved principle in the skin. This study reveals an unanticipated plasticity of the adult skin epithelium when faced with mutational and non-mutational insult, and elucidates the dynamic cellular behaviours used for its return to a homeostatic state.

  8. Myofascial Trigger Point Pain Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Gerwin, Robert D

    2016-10-01

    Myofascial pain syndromes caused by trigger points (TrPs) in muscle are a common cause of local and generalized pain. Trigger points are hyperirritable zones in contracted bands of muscle, thought to be caused by muscle overload or stress. Stress TrPs have characteristic electromyographic features, and can be visualized with ultrasound and magnetic resonance elastography. Trigger point needling or injection can be effective in inactivating TrP, but correcting triggers is also critical. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  9. Genomic aberrations in spitzoid tumours and their implications for diagnosis, prognosis and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wiesner, Thomas; Kutzner, Heinz; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Mihm, Martin J.; Busam, Klaus J.; Murali, Rajmohan

    2016-01-01

    Summary Histopathological evaluation of melanocytic tumours usually allows reliable distinction of benign melanocytic naevi from melanoma. More difficult is the histopathological classification of Spitz tumours, a heterogeneous group of tumours composed of large epithelioid or spindle-shaped melanocytes. Spitz tumours are biologically distinct from conventional melanocytic naevi and melanoma, as exemplified by their distinct patterns of genetic aberrations. Whereas conventional naevi and melanoma often harbour BRAF mutations, NRAS mutations, or inactivation of NF1, Spitz tumours show HRAS mutations, inactivation of BAP1 (often combined with BRAF mutations), or genomic rearrangements involving the kinases ALK, ROS1, NTRK1, BRAF, RET, and MET. In Spitz naevi, which lack significant histological atypia, all of these mitogenic driver aberrations trigger rapid cell proliferation, but after an initial growth phase, various tumour suppressive mechanisms stably block further growth. In some tumours, additional genomic aberrations may abrogate various tumour suppressive mechanisms, such as cell-cycle arrest, telomere shortening, or DNA damage response. The melanocytes then start to grow in a less organised fashion, may spread to regional lymph nodes, and are termed atypical Spitz tumours. Upon acquisition of even more aberrations, which often activate additional oncogenic pathways or reduce and alter cell differentiation, the neoplastic cells become entirely malignant and may colonise and take over distant organs (spitzoid melanoma). The sequential acquisition of genomic aberrations suggests that Spitz tumours represent a continuous biological spectrum, rather than a dichotomy of benign versus malignant, and that tumours with ambiguous histological features (atypical Spitz tumours) might be best classified as low-grade melanocytic tumours. The number of genetic aberrations usually correlates with the degree of histological atypia and explains why existing ancillary genetic

  10. EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED CHROMOSOME ABERRATIONS IN PLANTS

    PubMed Central

    Kihlman, B. A.

    1957-01-01

    The finding of Lilly and Thoday that potassium cyanide produces structural chromosome changes in root tips of Vicia faba was confirmed. Like mustards, diepoxides, and maleic hydrazide, potassium cyanide seems to act on cells at early interphase. A tendency of cyanide breaks to be concentrated in heterochromatic segments of the chromosomes was evident. The production of chromosome aberrations by cyanide proved to be practically unaffected by the temperature during treatment. In agreement with Lilly and Thoday, the effect of potassium cyanide was found to be dependent on oxygen tension during treatment. The effect of potassium cyanide increases with increasing oxygen concentration up to 100 per cent oxygen. In the absence of oxygen, potassium cyanide was not completely inactive, but produced a low, though significant frequency of aberrations. Pretreatments with 2.4-dinitrophenol did not influence the effect of potassium cyanide. When bean roots were treated with potassium cyanide before a treatment with 8-ethoxycaffeine, or at the same time as they were treated with 8-ethoxycaffeine, the effect of 8-ethoxycaffeine was almost completely suppressed. The effects of a number of other heavy metal complexing agents were also tested. Sodium fluoride, potassium thiocyanate, carbon monoxide, o-phenanthroline, 2.2-bipyridine, and sodium azide were without radiomimetic effect under the conditions employed, and so was a mixture of sodium azide and sodium fluoride. A low, but quite significant, radiomimetic effect was obtained after treatments with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate, cupferron, and 8-hydroxyquinoline. Under anaerobic conditions, the effects of cyanide and cupferron were both quantitatively and qualitatively indistinguishable. Unlike the effect of cyanide, the effect of cupferron was not enhanced by the presence of oxygen. The effects of the same heavy metal complexing agents were tested on the activities of the enzymes catalase and peroxidase. The activities of both

  11. The PHENIX Muon Trigger Upgrade Level-1 Trigger System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajoie, John; Kempel, Todd

    2010-02-01

    The PHENIX Muon Trigger Upgrade adds a set of Level-1 trigger detectors to the existing muon spectrometers and will enhance the ability of the experiment to pursue a rich program of spin physics in polarized proton collisions. The upgrade will allow the experiment to select high momentum muons from the decay of W bosons and reject both beam-associated and low-momentum collision background, enabling the study of quark and antiquark polarization in the proton. The Muon Trigger Upgrade will add momentum and timing information to the present muon Level-1 trigger, which only makes use of tracking in the PHENIX muon identifier (MuID) panels. Signals from new Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) and re-instrumented planes in the existing muon tracking (MuTr) chambers will provide momentum and timing information for the new Level-1 trigger. An RPC timing resolution of ˜2 ns will permit rejection of beam related backgrounds while tracking information from the RPCs and MuTr station will be used by the trigger to select events with high momentum muon candidates. The RPC and MuTr hit information will be sent by optical fibers to a set of Level-1 trigger processors that will make use of cutting edge FPGA technology to provide very high data densities in a compact form factor. The layout of the upgrade, details of the Level-1 electronics and trigger algorithm development will be presented. )

  12. Strongly Phase-Aberrated Nondiffraction Limited Laser Beams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-01-01

    AFWL-TR-75-153 AFWL-TR 75-153 A CO o o v v v STRONGLY PHASE-ABERRATED NOND1FFRACTION LIMITED LASER BEAMS Charles B. Hogge January 1976...8217./’< ^^U/.v:4;->) <ju5^ Nondiffraction limited ; /; ^’ Aberrations ’ ^»^ ^ Random phase 20 ABSTRACT (Continue on...Results for Strongly Phase Aberrated Nondiffraction Limited Beams 36 IV SYSTEM JITTER AND CASCADED RANDOM PHASE DISTORTIONS 53 System

  13. Imaging System Using Shared Optics and Aberration Exploitation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-11

    the past it has generally been accepted that the resolution of lenses with geometric aberrations cannot be increased beyond a certain threshold. In...this work we aim to overcome this limitation and demonstrate very high resolution imagery for aberrated lenses through the use of hybrid optical and...of any camera is fundamentally limited by geometric aberrations. In the past it has generally been accepted that the resolution of lenses with

  14. Correcting Aberrations in Complex Magnet Systems for Muon Cooling Channels

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Maloney, B. Erdelyi, A. Afanaciev, R.P. Johnson, Y.S. Derbenev, V.S. Morozov

    2011-03-01

    Designing and simulating complex magnet systems needed for cooling channels in both neutrino factories and muon colliders requires innovative techniques to correct for both chromatic and spherical aberrations. Optimizing complex systems, such as helical magnets for example, is also difficult but essential. By using COSY INFINITY, a differential algebra based code, the transfer and aberration maps can be examined to discover what critical terms have the greatest influence on these aberrations.

  15. Chromatic aberration matching of the polychromatic optical transfer function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, M.

    1981-02-01

    To point out the danger of evaluating lenses on the basis of color-blind polychromatic OTFs, it has been shown that lenses with completely different chromatic aberrations can have the same polychromatic OTF. An analytical technique - chromatic aberration matching - is proposed that will ascertain the chromatic aberrations that are different and yet give the same polychromatic OTF for a specified spectral combination of the light source and the detector. A typical numerical example is given which supports the theory and the discussion.

  16. Aberration influenced generation of rotating two-lobe light fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotova, S. P.; Losevsky, N. N.; Prokopova, D. V.; Samagin, S. A.; Volostnikov, V. G.; Vorontsov, E. N.

    2016-08-01

    The influence of aberrations on light fields with a rotating intensity distribution is considered. Light fields were generated with the phase masks developed using the theory of spiral beam optics. The effects of basic aberrations, such as spherical aberration, astigmatism and coma are studied. The experimental implementation of the fields was achieved with the assistance of a liquid crystal spatial light modulator HOLOEYE HEO-1080P, operating in reflection mode. The results of mathematical modelling and experiments have been qualitatively compared.

  17. Line of Sight of an Aberrated Optical System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-24

    8217 4. TITLE (and &"do) TYEO’lEOTAeEID)OEE LIME OF SIGHT OF AN ABERRATED _____________ OPTICAL SYTE S. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(&) I...aberration across its interior regardless of Q shape. Next, an optical system with aberrated but uniformly illuminated annular pupil is considered. The...and R a 21! [sn Mwh, Q ; C) +cosO _9W(h,6; C) 1 id ~ 2b111J J (h) sin h h d8, (2b where E -R2W! I(h) hdh de (30) Ca -15- We now expand the aberration

  18. Comparison of Aberrations After Standard and Customized Refractive Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, L.; He, X.; Wang, Y.

    2013-09-01

    To detect possible differences in residual wavefront aberrations between standard and customized laser refractive surgery based onmathematical modeling, the residual optical aberrations after conventional and customized laser refractive surgery were compared accordingto the ablation profile with transition zone. The results indicated that ablation profile has a significant impact on the residual aberrations.The amount of residual aberrations for conventional correction is higher than that for customized correction. Additionally, the residualaberrations for high myopia eyes are markedly larger than those for moderate myopia eyes. For a 5 mm pupil, the main residual aberrationterm is coma and yet it is spherical aberration for a 7 mm pupil. When the pupil diameter is the same as optical zone or greater, themagnitudes of residual aberrations is obviously larger than that for a smaller pupil. In addition, the magnitudes of the residual fifth orsixth order aberrations are relatively large, especially secondary coma in a 6 mm pupil and secondary spherical aberration in a 7 mm pupil.Therefore, the customized ablation profile may be superior to the conventional correction even though the transition zone and treatmentdecentration are taken into account. However, the customized ablation profile will still induce significant amount of residual aberrations.

  19. Adaptive optics simulation of intraocular lenses with modified spherical aberration.

    PubMed

    Piers, Patricia A; Fernandez, Enrique J; Manzanera, Silvestre; Norrby, Sverker; Artal, Pablo

    2004-12-01

    Adaptive optics systems can be used to investigate the potential visual benefit associated with correcting ocular wave-front aberration. In this study, adaptive optics techniques were used to evaluate the potential advantages and disadvantages associated with intraocular lenses (IOLs) with modified spherical aberration profiles. An adaptive optics vision simulator was constructed that allows psychophysical tests to be performed while viewing targets through any desired ocular wave-front profile. With this simulator, the subjective visual performance of four subjects was assessed by letter acuity and contrast sensitivity (at 3, 6, and 15 cyc/deg) for two different values of induced spherical aberration. The values of spherical aberration were chosen to reproduce two conditions: the average amount measured in pseudophakic patients with implanted IOLs having spherical surfaces and the complete correction of the individual's spherical aberration. Visual performance was assessed in both white and green light, at best focus and for defocus of +/-0.5 and +/-1.0 D. There was an average improvement in visual acuity associated with the correction of spherical aberration of 10% and 38% measured in white and green light, respectively. Similarly, average contrast sensitivity measurements improved 32% and 57% in white and green light. When spherical aberration was corrected, visual performance was as good as or better than for the normal spherical aberration case for defocus as large as +/-1 D. Correcting ocular spherical aberration improves spatial vision in the best-focus position without compromising the subjective tolerance to defocus.

  20. Spherical aberration and diffraction derived via Fourier optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geary, J.; Peterson, P.

    1984-02-01

    Noting that third-order spherical aberration is usually derived by way of classical geometric wavefront aberration theory, an alternative derivation is demonstrated with Fourier optics. The quadratic phase factor introduced by a lens (Goodman, 1968) is taken as the point of departure. It is shown that by extending this technique, it is possible to pick up the effect of spherical aberration, as manifested in a Fourier-optics-defined structural aberration coefficient. This coefficient is compared with the classical structural coefficient for a planoconvex lens. This difference is also demonstrated through Fresnel propagation. The effects of these differences on diffraction are investigated in the maximum Strehl planes.

  1. Aberration design of zoom lens systems using thick lens modules.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinkai; Chen, Xiaobo; Xi, Juntong; Wu, Zhuoqi

    2014-12-20

    A systematic approach for the aberration design of a zoom lens system using a thick lens module is presented. Each component is treated as a thick lens module at the beginning of the design. A thick lens module refers to a thick lens component with a real lens structure, like lens materials, lens curvatures, lens thicknesses, and lens interval distances. All nine third-order aberrations of a thick lens component are considered during the design. The relationship of component aberrations in different zoom positions can be approximated from the aberration shift. After minimizing the aberrations of the zoom lens system, the nine third-order aberrations of every lens component can be determined. Then the thick lens structure of every lens component can be determined after optimization according to their first-order properties and third-order aberration targets. After a third optimization for minimum practical third-order aberrations of a zoom lens system, the aberration design using the thick lens module is complete, which provides a practical zoom lens system with thick lens structures. A double-sided telecentric zoom lens system is designed using the thick lens module in this paper, which shows that this method is practical for zoom lens design.

  2. The NA62 trigger system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivda, M.; NA62 Collaboration

    2013-08-01

    The main aim of the NA62 experiment (NA62 Technical Design Report, [1]) is to study ultra-rare Kaon decays. In order to select rare events over the overwhelming background, central systems with high-performance, high bandwidth, flexibility and configurability are necessary, that minimize dead time while maximizing data collection reliability. The NA62 experiment consists of 12 sub-detector systems and several trigger and control systems, for a total channel count of less than 100,000. The GigaTracKer (GTK) has the largest number of channels (54,000), and the Liquid Krypton (LKr) calorimeter shares with it the largest raw data rate (19 GB/s). The NA62 trigger system works with 3 trigger levels. The first trigger level is based on a hardware central trigger unit, so-called L0 Trigger Processor (L0TP), and Local Trigger Units (LTU), which are all located in the experimental cavern. Other two trigger levels are based on software, and done with a computer farm located on surface. The L0TP receives information from triggering sub-detectors asynchronously via Ethernet; it processes the information, and then transmits a final trigger decision synchronously to each sub-detector through the Trigger and Timing Control (TTC) system. The interface between L0TP and the TTC system, which is used for trigger and clock distribution, is provided by the Local Trigger Unit board (LTU). The LTU can work in two modes: global and stand-alone. In the global mode, the LTU provides an interface between L0TP and TTC system. In the stand-alone mode, the LTU can fully emulate L0TP and so provides an independent way for each sub-detector for testing or calibration purposes. In addition to the emulation functionality, a further functionality is implemented that allows to synchronize the clock of the LTU with the L0TP and the TTC system. For testing and debugging purposes, a Snap Shot Memory (SSM) interface is implemented, that can work

  3. Lactogenic immunity and milk antibody isotypes to transmissible gastroenteritis virus in sows exposed to porcine respiratory coronavirus during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lanza, I; Shoup, D I; Saif, L J

    1995-06-01

    Passive protection provided by sows inoculated with the virulent Miller strain of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), or the ISU-1 strain of porcine respiratory coronavirus (PRCV), or both was evaluated in nursing pigs challenge exposed with virulent TGEV. Four sows (group B) were inoculated with PRCV oronasally twice at 4 and 2 weeks before parturition; 1 sow (group C) was inoculated similarly, but in 2 subsequent pregnancies; and 2 sows (group D) were oronasally primed with PRCV at 4 weeks before parturition, and 2 weeks later were administered a booster inoculation of virulent TGEV. Two additional sows (group E) remained uninoculated and served as seronegative controls, and 1 sow (group A) that had been naturally infected with TGEV served as a seropositive control. The degree of passive immunity transferred by these sows to their litters was assessed by challenge exposing the pigs of sows in groups B-E (only the second litter of group C) with virulent TGEV at 3 to 5 days of age. After challenge exposure, clinical signs of infection and mortality were noted and fecal and nasal shedding of virus was assessed by ELISA. The IgA, IgG, and IgM antibody titers to TGEV were quantified in colostrum and milk of the sows by use of an isotype-specific monoclonal antibody-capture ELISA, using biotinylated monoclonal antibodies against each porcine isotype as detecting reagents. A plaque-reduction assay was used to quantify neutralizing antibody titers in serum, colostrum, milk, and fractionated whey (IgG and IgA/IgM). In the sow naturally infected with TGEV (group A), there was a pronounced decrease in IgG antibody titers to TGEV in the transition from colostrum to milk, and IgA TGEV antibodies became predominant, with high titers maintained throughout lactation. The 4 group-B sows partially protected their pigs after TGEV challenge exposure; mean mortality was 67%, compared with 100% in pigs suckling the 2 TGEV seronegative control sows (group-E litters). Although

  4. Clearance of antibodies from rat sarcoma cell surfaces. Rate of clearance of alloantibodies depends on antibody isotype.

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, S M; Styles, J M; Dean, C J; Shepherd, P S

    1983-01-01

    The influence of antibody isotype on the lifetime of complexes involving cell surface antigens of the rat fibrosarcoma HSN.TC has been investigated using direct binding and competitive RIAs to monitor the antibodies. Alloantibodies of the IgG class that had bound to the cells during a 1-hr exposure to antiserum were cleared subsequently from the cell surface by an active process involving two distinct phases. Between 30 and 70% of these antibodies were lost in the first 10 hr but the antibodies remaining were cleared more slowly with half-lives ranging from 20 to 40 hr. Antibodies of the IgM class, however, and those that could bind Clq and initiate the complement cascade were cleared rapidly with half-lives of less than 3 hr. Analysis of total cell-associated immunoglobulin showed that the disappearance from the cell surface was not a consequence of intracellular accumulation of antibody but was caused by the release of the antibody in a degraded form. The surface expression of the majority of the alloantigens involved was not affected by continuous exposure to antibody although modulation of a subpopulation of antigens could not be excluded. These results suggest that the clearance of alloantibodies involved their internalization and degradation and that antibodies capable of forming multimeric complexes were cleared rapidly. Some of the IgG-containing complexes, however, exhibited extended lifetimes at the cell surface, suggesting that either they were not internalized or they were recycled between the cell interior and the plasma membrane. PMID:6654388

  5. Synthesis, structure and optical properties of two isotypic crystals, Na3MO4Cl (M=W, Mo)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Shujuan; Bai, Chunyan; Zhang, Bingbing; Yang, Zhihua; Pan, Shilie

    2016-05-01

    Two isotypic compounds, Na3MO4Cl (M = W, Mo) have been obtained from the high temperature solution, and their structures were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Both of them crystallize in the space group P4/nmm of tetragonal system with the unit cells: a=7.5181(15), c=5.360(2) for Na3WO4Cl and a=7.4942(12), c=5.3409(18) for Na3MoO4Cl. The structure exhibits a 3D network built up by the ClNa6 groups, and the MO4 groups reside in the tunnels of the 3D network. The structural similarities and differences between Na3MO4Cl (M=W, Mo) and Sr3MO4F (M=Al, Ga) have been discussed. Meanwhile, detailed structure comparison analyses between Na3MO4Cl (M=W, Mo) and Na3MO4F (M=W, Mo) indicate that the different connection modes of ClNa6 and FNa6 make Na3MO4Cl and Na3MO4F crystallize in different structures. The IR spectra were used to verify the validity of the structure. The diffuse reflectance spectra show that the UV absorption edges are about 249 nm (4.99 eV) and 265 nm (4.69 eV) for Na3WO4Cl and Na3MoO4Cl, respectively. In addition, the first-principles theoretical studies are also carried out to aid the understanding of electronic structures and linear optical properties.

  6. Efficient production of bispecific IgG of different isotypes and species of origin in single mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Michael; Zhou, Jianhui; McCarty, Luke; Ellerman, Diego; Slaga, Dionysos; Junttila, Teemu T.; Sandoval, Wendy; Ovacik, Meric A.; Lin, Kedan; Hu, Zhilan; Spiess, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bispecific IgG production in single host cells has been a much sought-after goal to support the clinical development of these complex molecules. Current routes to single cell production of bispecific IgG include engineering heavy chains for heterodimerization and redesign of Fab arms for selective pairing of cognate heavy and light chains. Here, we describe novel designs to facilitate selective Fab arm assembly in conjunction with previously described knobs-into-holes mutations for preferential heavy chain heterodimerization. The top Fab designs for selective pairing, namely variants v10 and v11, support near quantitative assembly of bispecific IgG in single cells for multiple different antibody pairs as judged by high-resolution mass spectrometry. Single-cell and in vitro-assembled bispecific IgG have comparable physical, in vitro biological and in vivo pharmacokinetics properties. Efficient single-cell production of bispecific IgG was demonstrated for human IgG1, IgG2 and IgG4 thereby allowing the heavy chain isotype to be tailored for specific therapeutic applications. Additionally, a reverse chimeric bispecific IgG2a with humanized variable domains and mouse constant domains was generated for preclinical proof-of-concept studies in mice. Efficient production of a bispecific IgG in stably transfected mammalian (CHO) cells was shown. Individual clones with stable titer and bispecific IgG composition for >120 days were readily identified. Such long-term cell line stability is needed for commercial manufacture of bispecific IgG. The single-cell bispecific IgG designs developed here may be broadly applicable to biotechnology research, including screening bispecific IgG panels, and to support clinical development. PMID:27929752

  7. A novel syndrome caused by the E410K amino acid substitution in the neuronal β-tubulin isotype 3

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Sheena; Balasubramanian, Ravikumar; Chan, Wai-Man; Kang, Peter B.; Andrews, Caroline; Webb, Bryn D.; MacKinnon, Sarah E.; Oystreck, Darren T.; Rankin, Jessica; Crawford, Thomas O.; Geraghty, Michael; Pomeroy, Scott L.; Crowley, William F.; Jabs, Ethylin Wang; Hunter, David G.; Grant, Patricia E.

    2013-01-01

    Missense mutations in TUBB3, the gene that encodes the neuronal-specific protein β-tubulin isotype 3, can cause isolated or syndromic congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles, a form of complex congenital strabismus characterized by cranial nerve misguidance. One of the eight TUBB3 mutations reported to cause congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles, c.1228G>A results in a TUBB3 E410K amino acid substitution that directly alters a kinesin motor protein binding site. We report the detailed phenotypes of eight unrelated individuals who harbour this de novo mutation, and thus define the ‘TUBB3 E410K syndrome’. Individuals harbouring this mutation were previously reported to have congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles, facial weakness, developmental delay and possible peripheral neuropathy. We now confirm by electrophysiology that a progressive sensorimotor polyneuropathy does indeed segregate with the mutation, and expand the TUBB3 E410K phenotype to include Kallmann syndrome (hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and anosmia), stereotyped midface hypoplasia, intellectual disabilities and, in some cases, vocal cord paralysis, tracheomalacia and cyclic vomiting. Neuroimaging reveals a thin corpus callosum and anterior commissure, and hypoplastic to absent olfactory sulci, olfactory bulbs and oculomotor and facial nerves, which support underlying abnormalities in axon guidance and maintenance. Thus, the E410K substitution defines a new genetic aetiology for Moebius syndrome, Kallmann syndrome and cyclic vomiting. Moreover, the c.1228G>A mutation was absent in DNA from ∼600 individuals who had either Kallmann syndrome or isolated or syndromic ocular and/or facial dysmotility disorders, but who did not have the combined features of the TUBB3 E410K syndrome, highlighting the specificity of this phenotype–genotype correlation. The definition of the TUBB3 E410K syndrome will allow clinicians to identify affected individuals and predict the mutation based

  8. Myocarditis in different experimental models infected by Trypanosoma cruzi is correlated with the production of IgG1 isotype.

    PubMed

    Caldas, Ivo Santana; Diniz, Livia de Figueiredo; Guedes, Paulo Marcos da Matta; Nascimento, Álvaro Fernando da Silva do; Galvão, Lúcia Maria da Cunha; Lima, Wanderson Geraldo de; Caldas, Sérgio; Bahia, Maria Terezinha

    2017-03-01

    This study was designed to verify the relationship between IgG antibodies isotypes and myocarditis in Trypanosoma cruzi infection using mice and dogs infected with different T. cruzi strains. The animals were infected with benznidazole-susceptible Berenice-78 and benznidazole-resistant AAS and VL-10 strains. The IgG subtypes were measured in serum samples from dogs (IgG, IgG1, and IgG2) and mice (IgG, IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b). The infection of dogs with VL-10 strain induced the highest levels of heart inflammation while intermediate and lower levels were detected with Berenice-78 and AAS strains, respectively. Similar results were found in mice infected with VL-10, but not in those infected with AAS or Berenice-78 strains. The AAS strain induced higher levels of heart inflammation in mice, while Berenice-78 strain was not able to induce it. Correlation analysis between myocarditis and antibody reactivity index revealed very interesting results, mainly for IgG and IgG1, the latter being the most exciting. High IgG1 showed a significant correlation with myocarditis in both experimental models, being more significant in dogs (r=0.94, p<0.0001) than in mice (r=0.58, p=0.047). Overall, our data suggest that IgG1 could be a good marker to demonstrate myocarditis intensity in Chagas disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The role of aberrant mitochondrial bioenergetics in diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Subir K Roy; Smith, Darrell R; Fernyhough, Paul

    2013-03-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a neurological complication of diabetes that causes significant morbidity and, because of the obesity-driven rise in incidence of type 2 diabetes, is becoming a major international health problem. Mitochondrial phenotype is abnormal in sensory neurons in diabetes and may contribute to the etiology of diabetic neuropathy where a distal dying-back neurodegenerative process is a key component contributing to fiber loss. This review summarizes the major features of mitochondrial dysfunction in neurons and Schwann cells in human diabetic patients and in experimental animal models (primarily exhibiting type 1 diabetes). This article attempts to relate these findings to the development of critical neuropathological hallmarks of the disease. Recent work reveals that hyperglycemia in diabetes triggers nutrient excess in neurons that, in turn, mediates a phenotypic change in mitochondrial biology through alteration of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) signaling axis. This vital energy sensing metabolic pathway modulates mitochondrial function, biogenesis and regeneration. The bioenergetic phenotype of mitochondria in diabetic neurons is aberrant due to deleterious alterations in expression and activity of respiratory chain components as a direct consequence of abnormal AMPK/PGC-1α signaling. Utilization of innovative respirometry equipment to analyze mitochondrial function of cultured adult sensory neurons from diabetic rodents shows that the outcome for cellular bioenergetics is a reduced adaptability to fluctuations in ATP demand. The diabetes-induced maladaptive process is hypothesized to result in exhaustion of the ATP supply in the distal nerve compartment and induction of nerve fiber dissolution. The role of mitochondrial dysfunction in the etiology of diabetic neuropathy is compared with other types of neuropathy with a distal dying-back pathology such as Friedreich

  10. Photon-triggered nanowire transistors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungkil; Lee, Hoo-Cheol; Kim, Kyoung-Ho; Hwang, Min-Soo; Park, Jin-Sung; Lee, Jung Min; So, Jae-Pil; Choi, Jae-Hyuck; Kwon, Soon-Hong; Barrelet, Carl J; Park, Hong-Gyu

    2017-10-01

    Photon-triggered electronic circuits have been a long-standing goal of photonics. Recent demonstrations include either all-optical transistors in which photons control other photons or phototransistors with the gate response tuned or enhanced by photons. However, only a few studies report on devices in which electronic currents are optically switched and amplified without an electrical gate. Here we show photon-triggered nanowire (NW) transistors, photon-triggered NW logic gates and a single NW photodetection system. NWs are synthesized with long crystalline silicon (CSi) segments connected by short porous silicon (PSi) segments. In a fabricated device, the electrical contacts on both ends of the NW are connected to a single PSi segment in the middle. Exposing the PSi segment to light triggers a current in the NW with a high on/off ratio of >8 × 10(6). A device that contains two PSi segments along the NW can be triggered using two independent optical input signals. Using localized pump lasers, we demonstrate photon-triggered logic gates including AND, OR and NAND gates. A photon-triggered NW transistor of diameter 25 nm with a single 100 nm PSi segment requires less than 300 pW of power. Furthermore, we take advantage of the high photosensitivity and fabricate a submicrometre-resolution photodetection system. Photon-triggered transistors offer a new venue towards multifunctional device applications such as programmable logic elements and ultrasensitive photodetectors.

  11. The TOTEM modular trigger system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagliesi, M. G.; Berretti, M.; Cecchi, R.; Greco, V.; Lami, S.; Latino, G.; Oliveri, E.; Pedreschi, E.; Scribano, A.; Spinella, F.; Turini, N.

    2010-05-01

    The TOTEM experiment will measure the total cross-section with the luminosity independent method and study elastic and diffractive scattering at the LHC. We are developing a modular trigger system, based on programmable logic, that will select meaningful events within 2.5 μs. The trigger algorithm is based on a tree structure in order to obtain information compression. The trigger primitive is generated directly on the readout chip, VFAT, that has a specific fast output that gives low resolution hits information. In two of the TOTEM detectors, Roman Pots and T2, a coincidence chip will perform track recognition directly on the detector readout boards, while for T1 the hits are transferred from the VFATs to the trigger hardware. Starting from more than 2000 bits delivered by the detector electronics, we extract, in a first step, six trigger patterns of 32 LVDS signals each; we build, then, on a dedicated board, a 1-bit (L1) trigger signal for the TOTEM experiment and 16 trigger bits to the CMS experiment global trigger system for future common data taking.

  12. Fermi GBM Early Trigger Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael; Paciesas, Bill; Meegan, Charles

    2009-05-25

    Since the launch of the Fermi observatory on June 11 2008, the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has seen approximately 250 triggers of which about 150 were cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). GBM operates dozens of trigger algorithms covering various energy bands and timescales and is therefore sensitive to a wide variety of phenomena, both astrophysical and not.

  13. Triggering requirements for SSC physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gilchriese, M.G.D.

    1989-04-01

    Some aspects of triggering requirements for high P{sub T} physics processes at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) are described. A very wide range of trigger types will be required to enable detection of the large number of potential physics signatures possible at the SSC. Although in many cases trigger rates are not now well understood, it is possible to conclude that the ability to trigger on transverse energy, number and energy of jets, number and energy of leptons (electrons and muons), missing energy and combinations of these will be required. An SSC trigger system must be both highly flexible and redundant to ensure reliable detection of many new physics processes at the SSC.

  14. Structural aberrations in group A Staphylococcus bacteriophages.

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, H W; Berthiaume, L; Sonea, S; Kasatiya, S S

    1976-01-01

    Six related Staphylococcus phages spontaneously produced various abnormal head and tail structures: (i) giant capsids which were tailed and apparently contained nucleic acid; (ii) regular and irregular smooth polyheads; (iii) heads and polyheads with wavy outlines; (iv) mottled heads and polyheads; (v) abnormally long and short tails; and (vi) "double capsids" connected by a small bridge. Some of these structures are rare, or have not yet been reported. The frequency os specific aberrant particles varied from one phage to another. Length distribution of smooth irregular polyheads and of abnormal tails indicated that these structures assemble at random from protein synthesized in excess. These phages represent an interesting model for genetic and morphogentic studies. Images PMID:131865

  15. Aberrant angiogenesis: The gateway to diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Kota, Sunil K; Meher, Lalit K; Jammula, Sruti; Kota, Siva K; Krishna, S V S; Modi, Kirtikumar D

    2012-11-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is a metabolic cum vascular syndrome with resultant abnormalities in both micro- and macrovasculature. The adverse long-term effects of diabetes mellitus have been described to involve many organ systems. Apart from hyperglycemia, abnormalities of angiogenesis may cause or contribute toward many of the clinical manifestations of diabetes. These are implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular abnormalities of the retina, kidneys, and fetus, impaired wound healing, increased risk of rejection of transplanted organs, and impaired formation of coronary collaterals. A perplexing feature of the aberrant angiogenesis is that excessive and insufficient angiogenesis can occur in different organs in the same individual. The current article hereby reviews the molecular mechanisms including abnormalities in growth factors, cytokines, and metabolic derangements, clinical implications, and therapeutic options of dealing with abnormal angiogenesis in diabetes.

  16. Aberrant angiogenesis: The gateway to diabetic complications

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Sunil K.; Meher, Lalit K.; Jammula, Sruti; Kota, Siva K.; Krishna, S. V. S.; Modi, Kirtikumar D.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is a metabolic cum vascular syndrome with resultant abnormalities in both micro- and macrovasculature. The adverse long-term effects of diabetes mellitus have been described to involve many organ systems. Apart from hyperglycemia, abnormalities of angiogenesis may cause or contribute toward many of the clinical manifestations of diabetes. These are implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular abnormalities of the retina, kidneys, and fetus, impaired wound healing, increased risk of rejection of transplanted organs, and impaired formation of coronary collaterals. A perplexing feature of the aberrant angiogenesis is that excessive and insufficient angiogenesis can occur in different organs in the same individual. The current article hereby reviews the molecular mechanisms including abnormalities in growth factors, cytokines, and metabolic derangements, clinical implications, and therapeutic options of dealing with abnormal angiogenesis in diabetes. PMID:23226636

  17. Specific chromosome aberrations in ataxia telangiectasia.

    PubMed Central

    Oxford, J M; Harnden, D G; Parrington, J M; Delhanty, J D

    1975-01-01

    Cytogenetic observations on seven cases of ataxia telangiectasia are presented. The aberration frequency was found to be increased in all of them with a specificity for the involvement of the D-group chromosomes in rearrangements. Clones of cytogenetically abnormal cells were observed in the lymphocytes of three cases and in the cultured skin fibroblasts of two cases, again with a specificity for D-group involvement. G-banding shows that chromosome 14 is frequently involved in rearrangements in clone cells and that the band 14q12 may be a highly specific exchange point. The significance of lymphocyte clones with a proliferative advantage in vivo is discussed. Cytogenetic studies of the parents and sibs of these cases are also reported. Images PMID:1177276

  18. Patterns of Chromosomal Aberrations in Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Grade, Marian; Difilippantonio, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are a defining feature of solid tumors. Such cytogenetic alterations are mainly classified into structural chromosomal aberrations and copy number alterations, giving rise to aneuploid karyotypes. The increasing detection of these genetic changes allowed the description of specific tumor entities and the associated patterns of gene expression. In fact, tumor-specific landscapes of gross genomic copy number changes, including aneuploidies of entire chromosome arms and chromosomes result in a global deregulation of the transcriptome of cancer cells. Furthermore, the molecular characterization of cytogenetic abnormalities has provided insights into the mechanisms of tumorigenesis and has, in a few instances, led to the clinical implementation of effective diagnostic and prognostic tools, as well as treatment strategies that target a specific genetic abnormality. PMID:26376875

  19. Overlapped Fourier coding for optical aberration removal

    PubMed Central

    Horstmeyer, Roarke; Ou, Xiaoze; Chung, Jaebum; Zheng, Guoan; Yang, Changhuei

    2014-01-01

    We present an imaging procedure that simultaneously optimizes a camera’s resolution and retrieves a sample’s phase over a sequence of snapshots. The technique, termed overlapped Fourier coding (OFC), first digitally pans a small aperture across a camera’s pupil plane with a spatial light modulator. At each aperture location, a unique image is acquired. The OFC algorithm then fuses these low-resolution images into a full-resolution estimate of the complex optical field incident upon the detector. Simultaneously, the algorithm utilizes redundancies within the acquired dataset to computationally estimate and remove unknown optical aberrations and system misalignments via simulated annealing. The result is an imaging system that can computationally overcome its optical imperfections to offer enhanced resolution, at the expense of taking multiple snapshots over time. PMID:25321982

  20. Congenital Aberrant Tearing: A Re-Look

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Marilyn T.; Strömland, Kerstin; Ventura, Liana

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Congenital aberrant tearing is characterized by tearing when eating (“crocodile tears”), lack of emotional tearing, or both. Most reported cases are associated with Duane syndrome. In our previous studies we observed aberrant tearing in individuals with thalidomide embryopathy and Möbius sequence. This report summarizes the literature on the subject and adds 3 new studies that give information on this unusual condition. Methods Twenty-eight individuals with Möbius sequence were interviewed about tearing symptoms at a support group meeting in Italy. In Sweden 30 adults primarily from the original thalidomide series were reexamined. In this latter study, a Schirmer test was done at baseline and repeated 5 minutes after eating. Twenty families in Brazil who have children with Möbius sequence were questioned about tearing symptoms and exposure to misoprostol during pregnancy. Results In the 28 Italian individuals, either “crocodile tears” or lack of emotional tearing was noted in 7 cases. In the thalidomide study, 10 of 30 patients had tearing when eating and 7 had no emotional tearing. Low Schirmer scores or increased tearing after eating was noted in a few asymptomatic individuals. Among the 20 Brazilian children with Möbius sequence, 10 had some tearing abnormality. Conclusion Congenital anomalous lacrimation is rare but usually associated with Duane syndrome or abduction deficits, as in Möbius sequence and, less frequently, facial nerve palsy. Studies implicate an early insult in development at 4 to 6 weeks. At that time the facial nerve, sixth nerve, and lacrimal nucleus are in close proximity in the embryo. PMID:19277226

  1. Effect of chromatic aberration on atomic-resolved spherical aberration corrected STEM images.

    PubMed

    Kuramochi, Koji; Yamazaki, Takashi; Kotaka, Yasutoshi; Ohtsuka, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Iwao; Watanabe, Kazuto

    2009-12-01

    The effect of the chromatic aberration (C(c)) coefficient in a spherical aberration (C(s))- corrected electromagnetic lens on high-resolution high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images is explored in detail. A new method for precise determination of the C(c) coefficient is demonstrated, requiring measurement of an atomic-resolution one-frame through-focal HAADF STEM image. This method is robust with respect to instrumental drift, sample thickness, all lens parameters except C(c), and experimental noise. It is also demonstrated that semi-quantitative structural analysis on the nanometer scale can be achieved by comparing experimental C(s)- corrected HAADF STEM images with their corresponding simulated images when the effects of the C(c) coefficient and spatial incoherence are included.

  2. Pattern of chromosomal aberrations in patients from north East iran.

    PubMed

    Ghazaey, Saeedeh; Mirzaei, Farzaneh; Ahadian, Mitra; Keifi, Fatemeh; Semiramis, Tootian; Abbaszadegan, Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations are common causes of multiple anomaly syndromes. Recurrent chromosomal aberrations have been identified by conventional cytogenetic methods used widely as one of the most important clinical diagnostic techniques. In this retrospective study, the incidences of chromosomal aberrations were evaluated in a six year period from 2005 to 2011 in Pardis Clinical and Genetics Laboratory on patients referred to from Mashhad and other cities in Khorasan province. Karyotyping was performed on 3728 patients suspected of having chromosomal abnormalities. The frequencies of the different types of chromosomal abnormalities were determined, and the relative frequencies were calculated in each group. Among these patients, 83.3% had normal karyotypes with no aberrations. The overall incidences of chromosomal abnormalities were 16.7% including sex and autosomal chromosomal anomalies. Of those, 75.1 % showed autosomal chromosomal aberrations. Down syndrome (DS) was the most prevalent autosomal aberration in the patients (77.1%). Pericentric inversion of chromosome 9 was seen in 5% of patients. This inversion was prevalent in patients with recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA). Sex chromosomal aberrations were observed in 24.9% of abnormal patients of which 61% had Turner's syndrome and 33.5% had Klinefelter's syndrome. According to the current study, the pattern of chromosomal aberrations in North East of Iran demonstrates the importance of cytogenetic evaluation in patients who show clinical abnormalities. These findings provide a reason for preparing a local cytogenetic data bank to enhance genetic counseling of families who require this service.

  3. Sextupole system for the correction of spherical aberration

    DOEpatents

    Crewe, A.V.; Kopf, D.A.

    In an electron beam device in which an electron beam is developed and then focused by a lens to a particular spot, there is provided a means for eliminating spherical aberration. A sextupole electromagnetic lens is positioned between two focusing lenses. The interaction of the sextupole with the beam compensates for spherical aberration. (GHT)

  4. Adaptive aberration correction using a triode hyperbolic electron mirror.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, J P S; Word, R C; Könenkamp, R

    2011-01-01

    A converging electron mirror can be used to compensate spherical and chromatic aberrations in an electron microscope. This paper presents an analytical solution to a novel triode (three electrode) hyperbolic mirror as an improvement to the well-known diode (two electrode) hyperbolic mirror for aberration correction. A weakness of the diode mirror is a lack of flexibility in changing the chromatic and spherical aberration coefficients independently without changes in the mirror geometry. In order to remove this limitation, a third electrode can be added. We calculate the optical properties of the resulting triode mirror analytically on the basis of a simple model field distribution. We present the optical properties-the object/image distance, z(0), and the coefficients of spherical and chromatic aberration, C(s) and C(c), of both mirror types from an analysis of electron trajectories in the mirror field. From this analysis, we demonstrate that while the properties of both designs are similar, the additional parameters in the triode mirror improve the range of aberration that can be corrected. The triode mirror is also able to provide a dynamic adjustment range of chromatic aberration for fixed spherical aberration and focal length, or any permutation of these three parameters. While the dynamic range depends on the values of aberration correction needed, a nominal 10% tuning range is possible for most configurations accompanied by less than 1% change in the other two properties.

  5. Modified Matching Ronchi Test to Visualize Lens Aberrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassani, Kh; Ziafi, H. Hooshmand

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a modification to the matching Ronchi test to visualize lens aberrations with simple and inexpensive equipment available in educational optics labs. This method can help instructors and students to observe and estimate lens aberrations in real time. It is also a semi-quantitative tool for primary tests in research labs. In this work…

  6. Aberration analysis calculations for synchrotron radiation beamline design

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, W.R.; Howells, M.; Padmore, H.A.

    1997-09-01

    The application of ray deviation calculations based on aberration coefficients for a single optical surface for the design of beamline optical systems is reviewed. A systematic development is presented which allows insight into which aberration may be causing the rays to deviate from perfect focus. A new development allowing analytical calculation of line shape is presented.

  7. Modified Matching Ronchi Test to Visualize Lens Aberrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassani, Kh; Ziafi, H. Hooshmand

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a modification to the matching Ronchi test to visualize lens aberrations with simple and inexpensive equipment available in educational optics labs. This method can help instructors and students to observe and estimate lens aberrations in real time. It is also a semi-quantitative tool for primary tests in research labs. In this work…

  8. Optical aberrations measurement with a low cost optometric instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlan, Walter D.; Muñoz-Escrivá, L.; Pons, A.; Martínez-Corral, M.

    2002-08-01

    A simple experimental method for measuring optical aberrations of a single lens is proposed. The technique is based on the use of an optometric instrument employed for the assessment of the refractive state of the eye: the retinoscope. Experimental results for spherical aberration and astigmatism are obtained.

  9. Topography effects and wave aberrations in advanced PSM technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdmann, Andreas

    2001-09-01

    Both mask design and quality of the projection optics have a large impact on the performance of a phase shift mask (PSM). Topographic features on the reticle such as etched trenches in alternating PSM produce a spectrum of the diffracted light which differs from that one of an infinitely thin amplitude/phase object, as it is assumed in standard imaging algorithms. Many authors have investigated the consequences of this phenomenon with respect to aberration free imaging. However, the diffraction of light from topographic features implies also a modified interaction between the mask and wave aberrations of the projector. Rigorous simulation of the light diffraction from the mask is combined with standard lithography imaging algorithms to explore the interaction of topography effects and wave aberrations. For example, the nominal shift of a phase edge in the final resist profile can result both from topography effects and/or from odd-order wave aberrations such as tilt and coma. The sensitivity of typical lithographic parameters with respect to topography parameters and typical wave aberrations is investigated. PSM are also used for the monitoring of aberrations. Neglecting the topography of these phase objects may result in a misinterpretation of aberration phenomena. Consequences of rigorous diffraction defects for the design and interpretation of phase objects in aberration monitors will be discussed.

  10. Extending nodal aberration theory to include mount-induced aberrations with application to freeform surfaces.

    PubMed

    Fuerschbach, Kyle; Rolland, Jannick P; Thompson, Kevin P

    2012-08-27

    This paper introduces the path forward for the integration of freeform optical surfaces, particularly those related to φ-polynomial surfaces, including Zernike polynomial surfaces, with nodal aberration theory. With this formalism, the performance of an optical system throughout the field of view can be anticipated analytically accounting for figure error, mount-induced errors, and misalignment. Previously, only misalignments had been described by nodal aberration theory, with the exception of one special case for figure error. As an example of these new results, three point mounting error that results in a Zernike trefoil deformation is studied for the secondary mirror of a two mirror and three mirror telescope. It is demonstrated that for the case of trefoil deformation applied to a surface not at the stop, there is the anticipated field constant contribution to elliptical coma (also called trefoil) as well as a newly identified field dependent contribution to astigmatism: field linear, field conjugate astigmatism. The magnitude of this astigmatic contribution varies linearly with the field of view; however, it has a unique variation in orientation with field that is described mathematically by a concept that is unique to nodal aberration theory known as the field conjugate vector.

  11. Chaos in ocular aberration dynamics of the human eye

    PubMed Central

    Hampson, Karen M.; Mallen, Edward A. H.

    2012-01-01

    Since the characterization of the eye’s monochromatic aberration fluctuations in 2001, the power spectrum has remained the most widely used method for analyzing their dynamics. However, the power spectrum does not capture the complexities of the fluctuations. We measured the monochromatic aberration dynamics of six subjects using a Shack-Hartmann sensor sampling at 21 Hz. We characterized the dynamics using techniques from chaos theory. We found that the attractor embedding dimension for all aberrations, for all subjects, was equal to three. The embedding lag averaged across aberrations and subjects was 0.31 ± 0.07 s. The Lyapunov exponent of the rms wavefront error was positive for each subject, with an average value of 0.44 ± 0.15 µm/s. This indicates that the aberration dynamics are chaotic. Implications for future modeling are discussed. PMID:22567581

  12. The application of information fusion in human eye aberration measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peiming; Chen, Jiabi; Cao, Liang; Zhuang, Songlin

    2008-12-01

    A novel human eye aberration measurement method based on information fusion is presented here. We built a combined subjective and objective human eye aberration measurement system which is composed by an objective measurement part which measure human eye aberration by using Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor and a subjective view test part through which can test the subject's vision. The deformable mirror can compensate the high order aberrations of human eye, and thus, can improve the visual acuity of human eye. We had weighting process on Zernike coefficients of both psychology stimulated results and objective results by the method of information fusion, and got combined Zernike coefficients, and finally the combined wavefront aberrations. The result shows that information fusion can combine advantages of both subjective and objective measurement, can have more comprehensive to characterized human eye visual performance, thus providing a more detailed advice for ideal individual human eye.

  13. A new momenclature for structural aberrations detected by chromosome painting

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, J.D.; Morgan, W.F.; Awa, A.A.; Bauchinger, M.; Blakey, D.; Cornforth, N.N.; Littlefield, L.G.; Natarajan, A.T.; Shasserre, C.

    1994-12-31

    The advent of chromosome painting has brought the realization that structural aberrations can be far more complex than previously imagined. Different laboratories have devised their own nomenclature systems to deal with this complexity, with the result that the terminology has become inconsistent and confusing. Recently, an international group of cytogeneticists experienced with chromosome painting convened to address this issue. The result is a systematic nomenclature capable of describing chromosome aberrations occurring between painted and unpainted chromosomes, as well as aberrations involving only painted chromosomes. The nomenclature is flexible enough to describe accurately even the most extensively rearranged chromosomes. As a consequence of this flexibility, the scheme upon which the nomenclature is based differs substantially from other systems of aberration classification. We call this system the Protocol for Aberration Identification and Nomenclature Terminology (PAINT).

  14. Correction of spherochromatic aberration by system of thin layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miks, A.; Novak, J.

    2005-08-01

    It is well-known from the theory of optical imaging that optical systems generally show a presence of a chromatic aberration, which originates from a variation of the refraction index of glass on the wavelength of light. The chromatic aberration must be well corrected in order to obtain a good quality of optical image. In practice, it is used a proper combination of optical elements manufactured from different types of optical glass with a different dispersion in order to suppress the chromatic aberration. Our work shows a way how to correct spherochromatic aberration using a system of thin aspherical layers. The equations are derived for determination of parameters of thin layers with respect to a required spherochromatic aberration.

  15. Multifractal nature of ocular aberration dynamics of the human eye

    PubMed Central

    Hampson, Karen M.; Mallen, Edward A. H.

    2011-01-01

    Ocular monochromatic aberrations display dynamic behavior even when the eye is fixating on a stationary stimulus. The fluctuations are commonly characterized in the frequency domain using the power spectrum obtained via the Fourier transform. In this paper we used a wavelet-based multifractal analytical approach to provide a more in depth analysis of the nature of the aberration fluctuations. The aberrations of five subjects were measured at 21 Hz using an open-view Shack-Hartmann sensor. We show that the aberration dynamics are multifractal. The most frequently occurring Hölder exponent for the rms wavefront error, averaged across the five subjects, was 0.31 ± 0.10. This suggests that the time course of the aberration fluctuations is antipersistant. Future applications of multifractal analysis are discussed. PMID:21412452

  16. Effects of aberrations in spatiotemporal focusing of ultrashort laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bangshan; Salter, Patrick S; Booth, Martin J

    2014-04-01

    Spatiotemporal focusing, or simultaneous spatial and temporal focusing (SSTF), has already been adopted for various applications in microscopy, photoactivation for biological studies, and laser fabrication. We investigate the effects of aberrations on focus formation in SSTF, in particular, the effects of phase aberrations related to low-order Zernike modes and a refractive index mismatch between the immersion medium and sample. By considering a line focus, we are able to draw direct comparison between the performance of SSTF and conventional spatial focusing (SF). Wide-field SSTF is also investigated and is found to be much more robust to aberrations than either line SSTF or SF. These results show the sensitivity of certain focusing methods to specific aberrations, and can inform on the necessity and benefit of aberration correction.

  17. Seismology: dynamic triggering of earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Gomberg, Joan; Johnson, Paul

    2005-10-06

    After an earthquake, numerous smaller shocks are triggered over distances comparable to the dimensions of the mainshock fault rupture, although they are rare at larger distances. Here we analyse the scaling of dynamic deformations (the stresses and strains associated with seismic waves) with distance from, and magnitude of, their triggering earthquake, and show that they can cause further earthquakes at any distance if their amplitude exceeds several microstrain, regardless of their frequency content. These triggering requirements are remarkably similar to those measured in the laboratory for inducing dynamic elastic nonlinear behaviour, which suggests that the underlying physics is similar.

  18. Pulsed thyristor trigger control circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A trigger control circuit is provided for producing firing pulses for the thyristor of a thyristor control system such as a power factor controller. The control circuit overcomes thyristor triggering problems involved with the current lag associated with controlling inductive loads and utilizes a phase difference signal, already present in the power factor controller, in deriving a signal for inhibiting generation of a firing pulse until no load current is flowing from the preceding half cycle and thereby ensuring that the thyristor is triggered on during each half cycle.

  19. Triggered Release from Polymer Capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Esser-Kahn, Aaron P.; Odom, Susan A.; Sottos, Nancy R.; White, Scott R.; Moore, Jeffrey S.

    2011-07-06

    Stimuli-responsive capsules are of interest in drug delivery, fragrance release, food preservation, and self-healing materials. Many methods are used to trigger the release of encapsulated contents. Here we highlight mechanisms for the controlled release of encapsulated cargo that utilize chemical reactions occurring in solid polymeric shell walls. Triggering mechanisms responsible for covalent bond cleavage that result in the release of capsule contents include chemical, biological, light, thermal, magnetic, and electrical stimuli. We present methods for encapsulation and release, triggering methods, and mechanisms and conclude with our opinions on interesting obstacles for chemically induced activation with relevance for controlled release.

  20. Wave aberrations in rhesus monkeys with vision-induced ametropias.

    PubMed

    Ramamirtham, Ramkumar; Kee, Chea-Su; Hung, Li-Fang; Qiao-Grider, Ying; Huang, Juan; Roorda, Austin; Smith, Earl L

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between refractive errors and high-order aberrations in infant rhesus monkeys. Specifically, we compared the monochromatic wave aberrations measured with a Shack-Hartman wavefront sensor between normal monkeys and monkeys with vision-induced refractive errors. Shortly after birth, both normal monkeys and treated monkeys reared with optically induced defocus or form deprivation showed a decrease in the magnitude of high-order aberrations with age. However, the decrease in aberrations was typically smaller in the treated animals. Thus, at the end of the lens-rearing period, higher than normal amounts of aberrations were observed in treated eyes, both hyperopic and myopic eyes and treated eyes that developed astigmatism, but not spherical ametropias. The total RMS wavefront error increased with the degree of spherical refractive error, but was not correlated with the degree of astigmatism. Both myopic and hyperopic treated eyes showed elevated amounts of coma and trefoil and the degree of trefoil increased with the degree of spherical ametropia. Myopic eyes also exhibited a much higher prevalence of positive spherical aberration than normal or treated hyperopic eyes. Following the onset of unrestricted vision, the amount of high-order aberrations decreased in the treated monkeys that also recovered from the experimentally induced refractive errors. Our results demonstrate that high-order aberrations are influenced by visual experience in young primates and that the increase in high-order aberrations in our treated monkeys appears to be an optical byproduct of the vision-induced alterations in ocular growth that underlie changes in refractive error. The results from our study suggest that the higher amounts of wave aberrations observed in ametropic humans are likely to be a consequence, rather than a cause, of abnormal refractive development.

  1. Tubular g-C3 N4 Isotype Heterojunction: Enhanced Visible-Light Photocatalytic Activity through Cooperative Manipulation of Oriented Electron and Hole Transfer.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhenwei; Yang, Dong; Sun, Yuanyuan; Nan, Yanhu; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2016-08-01

    A tubular g-C3 N4 isotype heterojunction (TCNH) photocatalyst was designed for cooperative manipulation of the oriented transfer of photogenerated electrons and holes to pursue high catalytic performance. The adduct of cyanuric acid and melamine (CA·M) is first hydrothermally treated to assemble into hexagonal prism crystals; then the hybrid precursors of urea and CA·M crystals are calcined to form tubular g-C3 N4 isotype heterojunctions. Upon visible-light irradiation, the photogenerated electrons transfer from g-C3 N4 (CA·M) to g-C3 N4 (urea) driven by the conduction band offset of 0.05 eV, while the photogenerated holes transfer from g-C3 N4 (urea) to g-C3 N4 (CA·M) driven by the valence band offset of 0.18 eV, which renders oriented transfer of the charge carriers across the heterojunction interface. Meanwhile, the tubular structure of TCNH is favorable for oriented electron transfer along the longitudinal dimension, which greatly decreases the chance of charge carrier recombination. Consequently, TCNH exhibits a high hydrogen evolution rate of 63 μmol h(-1) (0.04 g, λ > 420 nm), which is nearly five times of the pristine g-C3 N4 and higher than most of the existing g-C3 N4 photocatalysts. This study demonstrates that isotype heterojunction structure and tubular structure can jointly manipulate the oriented transfer of electrons and holes, thus facilitating the visible-light photocatalysis.

  2. Changes in anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies and rheumatoid factor isotypes serum levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis following treatment with different biological drugs.

    PubMed

    Iannone, Florenzo; Tampoia, Marilina; Giannini, Margherita; Lopalco, Giuseppe; Cantarini, Luca; Villalta, C Danilo; Galeazzi, Mauro; Lapadula, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP) are a serological marker of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and also have a prognostic value for more aggressive disease. Whether anti-CCP levels may change during treatment according to clinical response is matter of debate. Likewise, it is unknown whether different biological drugs have peculiar effects on anti-CCP levels. This study aimed to investigate changes in anti-CCP serum levels in RA patients on biological drugs with different mechanism of action. We studied 71 patients with active RA tested positive for anti-CCP who started a first biological drug (54 anti-TNF-α drug, 9 rituximab, 8 tocilizumab). In 14 patients stopping anti-TNF-α treatment for ineffectiveness, rituximab was started. Anti-CCP and rheumatoid factor (RF) isotypes (IgM, IgA, IgG) levels were measured at entry, 12 months and again at 12 months after swapping to rituximab. After 1 year of therapy of the first biological drug, patients taking anti-TNF-α drugs showed a significant reduction of the anti-CCP levels (p=0.002), and all RF isotypes (p=0.003). Also patients treated with rituximab or tolicizumab had a significant decrease in anti-CCP (p=0.01) and RF isotype levels (p=0.01). Anti-CCP levels did not correlated with DAS28 over time. In patients switching to rituximab after failure of TNF-α blockers, anti-CCP levels did not change at 12 months (p=0.06), despite of the reduction of DAS28 (p=0.02) and RFs levels (p=0.02). Our study showed that anti-CCP levels may change during RA course, regardless of the biological drug used and the clinical response.

  3. Neutralization Takes Precedence Over IgG or IgA Isotype-related Functions in Mucosal HIV-1 Antibody-mediated Protection.

    PubMed

    Astronomo, Rena D; Santra, Sampa; Ballweber-Fleming, Lamar; Westerberg, Katharine G; Mach, Linh; Hensley-McBain, Tiffany; Sutherland, Laura; Mildenberg, Benjamin; Morton, Georgeanna; Yates, Nicole L; Mize, Gregory J; Pollara, Justin; Hladik, Florian; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Denny, Thomas N; Warrier, Ranjit; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Nitayapan, Sorachai; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Ferrari, Guido; Shaw, George M; Xia, Shi-Mao; Liao, Hua-Xin; Montefiori, David C; Tomaras, Georgia D; Haynes, Barton F; McElrath, Juliana M

    2016-12-01

    HIV-1 infection occurs primarily through mucosal transmission. Application of biologically relevant mucosal models can advance understanding of the functional properties of antibodies that mediate HIV protection, thereby guiding antibody-based vaccine development. Here, we employed a human ex vivo vaginal HIV-1 infection model and a rhesus macaque in vivo intrarectal SHIV challenge model to probe the protective capacity of monoclonal broadly-neutralizing (bnAb) and non-neutralizing Abs (nnAbs) that were functionally modified by isotype switching. For human vaginal explants, we developed a replication-competent, secreted NanoLuc reporter virus system and showed that CD4 binding site bnAbs b12 IgG1 and CH31 IgG1 and IgA2 isoforms potently blocked HIV-1JR-CSF and HIV-1Bal26 infection. However, IgG1 and IgA nnAbs, either alone or together, did not inhibit infection despite the presence of FcR-expressing effector cells in the tissue. In macaques, the CH31 IgG1 and IgA2 isoforms infused before high-dose SHIV challenge were completely to partially protective, respectively, while nnAbs (CH54 IgG1 and CH38 mIgA2) were non-protective. Importantly, in both mucosal models IgG1 isotype bnAbs were more protective than the IgA2 isotypes, attributable in part to greater neutralization activity of the IgG1 variants. These findings underscore the importance of potent bnAb induction as a primary goal of HIV-1 vaccine development.

  4. Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody and rheumatoid factor isotypes in Iranian patients with rheumatoid arthritis: evaluation of clinical value and association with disease activity.

    PubMed

    Shakiba, Yadollah; Koopah, Susan; Jamshidi, Ahmad Reza; Amirzargar, Ali Akbar; Massoud, Ahmad; Kiani, Amir; Nicknam, Mohammad Hossein; Nazari, Bahareh; Nikbin, Behrouz

    2014-06-01

    In this study we determined the frequency, sensitivity and specificity of anti cyclic citrullinated peptides (anti-CCP) IgG antibody, total rheumatoid factor (RF-T), and RF isotypes in Iranian patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and their association with age, clinical and serological parameters. Anti-CCP and RF-T and RF isotypes level were measured in 418 patients and 399 healthy controls by enzyme-linked immunosurbant assay (ELISA). Additionally, serum C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), visual analog scale (VAS) and disease activity score (DAS28) were evaluated in RA patients. The anti-CCP was positive in 53.1% of RA patients and 4.7% of controls. The frequency of RF-T was 61.87% and 17.66% in RA patients and controls respectively. The prevalence of RF isotypes in RA patients was 46.52% for RF-IgM, 23.47% for RF-IgA and 21.74% for RF-IgG. 31.39% of RA patients were RF-IgM positive without RF-IgA and RF-IgG and 21.9% were positive for all three RF classes. The anti-CCP positive patients showed increased number of swollen joints. On the other hand, RF-T positive patients exhibited a longer disease duration, lower age of onset and also higher ESR, CRP level and increased swollen joints. RF-T titer was significantly higher in RA patients with active disease compared to remission, low and moderate active groups. The sensitivity and specificity were 53.1, 95.3 for anti-CCP antibody and 61.8, 82.3 for RF-T. Our results support that anti-CCP and RF titer maybe valuable in estimation of disease activity and other inflammatory parameters in RA patients.

  5. Amino acid residues 1101-1105 of the isotypic region of human C4B is important to the covalent binding activity of complement component C4.

    PubMed

    Reilly, B D; Levine, R P; Skanes, V M

    1991-11-01

    The C4A and C4B isotypes of human C4 show certain functional differences that stem from their relative preference for transacylation to amino (-NH2) vs hydroxyl (-OH) nucleophiles, respectively, on complement-activating surfaces. Comparison of amino acid sequences of the alpha-chain fragment of C4, C4d, has shown C4A- and C4B-specific sequences at residues 1101-1106 are the only consistent structural difference between isotype, i.e., Pro, Cys, Pro, Val, Leu, Asp in C4A and Leu, Ser, Pro, Val Ile, His in C4B. These residues may be responsible either in part or entirely for properties associated with isotype. To examine the functional role of residues 1101-1106 in C4B-mediated hemolysis, whole serum or immunopurified human C4 with allotypes, A3B1, A3, B2B1, or B1 were preincubated in the presence or absence of an antipeptide mAb (BII-1) specific for amino acid residues 1101-1105 of C4B. Sensitized sheep E and C4-deficient guinea pig serum was then added and lysis measured by absorbance at 415 nm. Our results show lysis of antibody-sensitized sheep E is inhibited by antibody and C4B2B1, C4B1, or C4A3B1 but not antibody and C4A3. The interference of hemolysis by BII-1 could not be explained by inhibition of activation of C4B or inhibition of C3 or C5 convertase activity. Furthermore, results from uptake experiments show that BII-1 interferes with the covalent binding activity of C4B, indicating residues 1101-1105 play a role in the covalent binding reaction of C4B to the target E-antibody complex.

  6. Electronic, magnetic, and transport properties of the isotypic aluminides SmT2Al10 (T = Fe, Ru)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peratheepan, P.; Strydom, A. M.

    2015-03-01

    We report the results of a comprehensive physical and magnetic property study of the new isotypic aluminides SmT2Al10 (T = Fe, Ru). These two compounds are members of a rare-earth based system which has become an exemplary case study of the interplay of magnetism and correlated electron phenomena. SmFe2Al10 and SmRu2Al10 are found to order in a putative antiferromagnetic spin arrangement at TN = 14.5 K and 12.5 K, respectively. Moreover, SmRu2Al10 shows a further phase transition at TSR = 5 K which is likely due to spin reorientation. The susceptibility of SmFe2Al10 points to a valence instability of the Sm ionic state at intermediate temperatures well above TN. Electronic and thermal transport confirm that SmFe2Al10 undergoes an antiferromagnetic superzone gap formation below TN, whereas SmRu2Al10 suffers a lattice anomaly driven magnetoelastic coupling at TN. Below TN, the physical properties of SmT2Al10 (T = Fe, Ru) are governed by magnons with an antiferromagnetic spin-wave spectrum that reveals spin-gap opening. Our findings in this work have exposed a new anomalous correlated compound in the RT2Al10 series. SmFe2Al10 has a magnetic ordered ground state in spite of an unstable valence at higher temperature. This is comparable with CeRu2Al10, which is a unique and controversial Kondo insulator that orders antiferromagnetic at TN = 27 K. Among the series of rare-earth RT2Al10 compounds, the presented Sm compounds are two new members with anomalously high magnetic ordering temperatures, and it is envisaged that together with the two very well studied compounds CeRu2Al10 and CeOs2Al10 our presented studies will enable a broader approach towards understanding the fascinating properties of this materials class.

  7. Cluster M Mycobacteriophages Bongo, PegLeg, and Rey with Unusually Large Repertoires of tRNA Isotypes

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Welkin H.; Anders, Kirk R.; Baird, Madison; Bowman, Charles A.; Boyle, Michelle M.; Broussard, Gregory W.; Chow, Tiffany; Clase, Kari L.; Cooper, Shannon; Cornely, Kathleen A.; DeJong, Randall J.; Delesalle, Veronique A.; Deng, Lisa; Dunbar, David; Edgington, Nicholas P.; Ferreira, Christina M.; Weston Hafer, Kathleen; Hartzog, Grant A.; Hatherill, J. Robert; Hughes, Lee E.; Ipapo, Khristina; Krukonis, Greg P.; Meier, Christopher G.; Monti, Denise L.; Olm, Matthew R.; Page, Shallee T.; Peebles, Craig L.; Rinehart, Claire A.; Rubin, Michael R.; Russell, Daniel A.; Sanders, Erin R.; Schoer, Morgan; Shaffer, Christopher D.; Wherley, James; Vazquez, Edwin; Yuan, Han; Zhang, Daiyuan; Cresawn, Steven G.; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Hendrix, Roger W.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genomic analysis of a large set of phages infecting the common host Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2155 shows that they span considerable genetic diversity. There are more than 20 distinct types that lack nucleotide similarity with each other, and there is considerable diversity within most of the groups. Three newly isolated temperate mycobacteriophages, Bongo, PegLeg, and Rey, constitute a new group (cluster M), with the closely related phages Bongo and PegLeg forming subcluster M1 and the more distantly related Rey forming subcluster M2. The cluster M mycobacteriophages have siphoviral morphologies with unusually long tails, are homoimmune, and have larger than average genomes (80.2 to 83.7 kbp). They exhibit a variety of features not previously described in other mycobacteriophages, including noncanonical genome architectures and several unusual sets of conserved repeated sequences suggesting novel regulatory systems for both transcription and translation. In addition to containing transfer-messenger RNA and RtcB-like RNA ligase genes, their genomes encode 21 to 24 tRNA genes encompassing complete or nearly complete sets of isotypes. We predict that these tRNAs are used in late lytic growth, likely compensating for the degradation or inadequacy of host tRNAs. They may represent a complete set of tRNAs necessary for late lytic growth, especially when taken together with the apparent lack of codons in the same late genes that correspond to tRNAs that the genomes of the phages do not obviously encode. IMPORTANCE The bacteriophage population is vast, dynamic, and old and plays a central role in bacterial pathogenicity. We know surprisingly little about the genetic diversity of the phage population, although metagenomic and phage genome sequencing indicates that it is great. Probing the depth of genetic diversity of phages of a common host, Mycobacterium smegmatis, provides a higher resolution of the phage population and how it has evolved. Three new phages

  8. Cluster M mycobacteriophages Bongo, PegLeg, and Rey with unusually large repertoires of tRNA isotypes.

    PubMed

    Pope, Welkin H; Anders, Kirk R; Baird, Madison; Bowman, Charles A; Boyle, Michelle M; Broussard, Gregory W; Chow, Tiffany; Clase, Kari L; Cooper, Shannon; Cornely, Kathleen A; DeJong, Randall J; Delesalle, Veronique A; Deng, Lisa; Dunbar, David; Edgington, Nicholas P; Ferreira, Christina M; Weston Hafer, Kathleen; Hartzog, Grant A; Hatherill, J Robert; Hughes, Lee E; Ipapo, Khristina; Krukonis, Greg P; Meier, Christopher G; Monti, Denise L; Olm, Matthew R; Page, Shallee T; Peebles, Craig L; Rinehart, Claire A; Rubin, Michael R; Russell, Daniel A; Sanders, Erin R; Schoer, Morgan; Shaffer, Christopher D; Wherley, James; Vazquez, Edwin; Yuan, Han; Zhang, Daiyuan; Cresawn, Steven G; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Hendrix, Roger W; Hatfull, Graham F

    2014-03-01

    Genomic analysis of a large set of phages infecting the common host Mycobacterium smegmatis mc(2)155 shows that they span considerable genetic diversity. There are more than 20 distinct types that lack nucleotide similarity with each other, and there is considerable diversity within most of the groups. Three newly isolated temperate mycobacteriophages, Bongo, PegLeg, and Rey, constitute a new group (cluster M), with the closely related phages Bongo and PegLeg forming subcluster M1 and the more distantly related Rey forming subcluster M2. The cluster M mycobacteriophages have siphoviral morphologies with unusually long tails, are homoimmune, and have larger than average genomes (80.2 to 83.7 kbp). They exhibit a variety of features not previously described in other mycobacteriophages, including noncanonical genome architectures and several unusual sets of conserved repeated sequences suggesting novel regulatory systems for both transcription and translation. In addition to containing transfer-messenger RNA and RtcB-like RNA ligase genes, their genomes encode 21 to 24 tRNA genes encompassing complete or nearly complete sets of isotypes. We predict that these tRNAs are used in late lytic growth, likely compensating for the degradation or inadequacy of host tRNAs. They may represent a complete set of tRNAs necessary for late lytic growth, especially when taken together with the apparent lack of codons in the same late genes that correspond to tRNAs that the genomes of the phages do not obviously encode. The bacteriophage population is vast, dynamic, and old and plays a central role in bacterial pathogenicity. We know surprisingly little about the genetic diversity of the phage population, although metagenomic and phage genome sequencing indicates that it is great. Probing the depth of genetic diversity of phages of a common host, Mycobacterium smegmatis, provides a higher resolution of the phage population and how it has evolved. Three new phages constituting a new

  9. Involvement of aberrant cyclin-dependent kinase 5/p25 activity in experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Yousuf, Mohammad A; Tan, Chunfeng; Torres-Altoro, Melissa I; Lu, Fang-Min; Plautz, Erik; Zhang, Shanrong; Takahashi, Masaya; Hernandez, Adan; Kernie, Steven G; Plattner, Florian; Bibb, James A

    2016-07-01

    . Moreover, TBI deregulates Ca(2+) -homeostasis triggering p25 production. The protein kinase Cdk5 is aberrantly activated by p25 leading to phosphorylation of substrates including tau and Rb protein. Loss of Cdk5 attenuates TBI lesion size, indicating that Cdk5 is a critical player in TBI pathogenesis and thus may be a suitable therapeutic target for TBI. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  10. Isolation of cardiac myosin light-chain isotypes by chromatofocusing. Comparison of human cardiac atrial light-chain 1 and foetal ventricular light-chain 1.

    PubMed

    Vincent, N D; Cummins, P

    1985-04-01

    Cardiac myosin light chain isotypes have been resolved using chromatofocusing, a new preparative column chromatographic technique. The method relies on production of narrow-range, shallow and stable pH gradients using ion-exchange resins and buffers with even buffering capacity over the required pH range. Light chains were resolved in order of decreasing isoelectric point in the pH range 5.2-4.5. Gradients of delta pH = 0.004-0.006/ml elution volume were achieved which were capable of resolving light chains with isoelectric point differences of only 0.03. Analytical isoelectric focusing of light chains in polyacrylamide gels could be used to predict the results of preparative chromatofocusing for method development. Chromatofocusing was capable of resolving human and bovine cardiac light chain 1 and 2 subunits, atrial (ALC) and ventricular (VLC) light chain isotypes and homologous VLC-2 and VLC-2* light chains. The technique was used to purify and resolve the human foetal ventricular light chain 1 (FLC-1) from adult ventricular light chain 1 (VLC-1) present in foetal ventricles and the atrial light chain 1 (ALC-1) in adult atria. Comparative peptide mapping studies and amino acid analyses were carried out on FLC-1 and ALC-1. No differences were detected between FLC-1 and ALC-1 using three different proteases and amino acid compositions were similar with the exception of glycine content. The studies indicate that FLC-1 and ALC-1 are homologous, and possibly identical, light chains. Comparison of human FLC-1/ALC-1 with VLC-1 suggested marked structural and chemical differences in these light chain isotypes, in particular in the contents of methionine, proline, lysine and alanine residues. Differences in the contents of these residues were also apparent in the corresponding bovine atrial and ventricular light chains [Wikman-Coffelt, J. & Srivastava, S. (1979) FEBS Lett. 106, 207-212]. The latter three residues are known to be rich in the N-termini of cardiac and

  11. Can Weather Changes Trigger Migraines?

    MedlinePlus

    ... uptodate.com/home. Accessed Jan. 27, 2015. Triggers: Environmental and physical factors. National Headache Foundation. http://www.headaches.org/education/Tools_for_Sufferers/Headache_-_Frequently_Asked_Questions/Environmental_ ...

  12. Spherical aberration and the sign of defocus.

    PubMed

    Thibos, Larry N; Bradley, Arthur; Liu, Tao; López-Gil, Norberto

    2013-11-01

    Visual sensing of the sign of defocus is important not only for the rapid control of accommodation but also for regulating the slower long-term growth of the eye. We examined the possibility that ocular spherical aberration (SA) elicits a sign of defocus by optical modeling of image formation using the principles of physical optics. Retinal image contrast, as measured by the area under the visually weighted modulation-transfer function, depends on both the magnitude and the sign of defocus relative to the sign of the SA. Image contrast is greater for hyperopic blur than for myopic blur when SA is positive and vice versa when SA is negative. When coupled with Wallman's hypothesis that retinal activity caused by image contrast inhibits eye growth, these results provide a testable hypothesis to account for myopia progression. For example, we suggest that hyperopic blur is a risk factor for myopia progression only when the eye has a negative SA because that is the combination leading to relatively low contrast in the defocused retinal image. Because the likelihood of a negative SA increases with accommodation, avoiding long hours of near work in the presence of accommodative lag may help prevent the onset and progression of myopia.

  13. The Mechanisms of Aberrant Protein Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Samuel; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Chris; Knowles, Tuomas

    2012-02-01

    We discuss the development of a kinetic theory for understanding the aberrant loss of solubility of proteins. The failure to maintain protein solubility results often in the assembly of organized linear structures, commonly known as amyloid fibrils, the formation of which is associated with over 50 clinical disorders including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. A true microscopic understanding of the mechanisms that drive these aggregation processes has proved difficult to achieve. To address this challenge, we apply the methodologies of chemical kinetics to the biomolecular self-assembly pathways related to protein aggregation. We discuss the relevant master equation and analytical approaches to studying it. In particular, we derive the underlying rate laws in closed-form using a self-consistent solution scheme; the solutions that we obtain reveal scaling behaviors that are very generally present in systems of growing linear aggregates, and, moreover, provide a general route through which to relate experimental measurements to mechanistic information. We conclude by outlining a study of the aggregation of the Alzheimer's amyloid-beta peptide. The study identifies the dominant microscopic mechanism of aggregation and reveals previously unidentified therapeutic strategies.

  14. Optical aberrations of the cornea and the crystalline lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Zhao-Qi; Wang, Yan; Zuo, Tong

    2006-09-01

    The wave-front aberrations of the anterior corneal surface, the posterior corneal surface and the complete eye have been measured by a corneal topographic system (Orbscan II) and a Hartmann-Shack wave-front sensor. We have calculated the aberrations for both the corneal surfaces with the discrete set of corneal elevation data, and with which to acquire the aberrations of the whole cornea. The aberrations of the crystalline lens are calculated by subtracting the aberrations of the cornea from that of the complete eye. The aberration combination between the anterior and the posterior corneal surface, between the cornea and the crystalline lens is complicated, either compensation or addition. For individual Zernike terms, astigmatism and quatrefoil in the anterior corneal surface are added by the posterior corneal surface, while some other terms show compensation between the two surfacesE And for complete eye, astigmatism and spherical aberrations in the cornea are partially compensated by the crystalline lens, and other terms show addition between the two parts. Individual eye shows different combinations of compensation and addition across different Zernike terms.

  15. Aberration correction of zoom lenses using evolutionary programming.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sourav

    2013-08-10

    A systematic approach for the aberration correction of zoom systems is presented. It is assumed that the powers and movements of the components of the zoom systems are known. Each component is considered as a system of thin lenses in contact. An evolutionary algorithm is developed to explore the multivariate hyperspace of design variables formed by spherical aberration, central coma, and longitudinal chromatic aberration of each component for infinite conjugate. The primary aberrations for each component at any zoom position are deduced from three central aberration coefficients of the component for infinite conjugate using conjugate shift formulas. Overall system aberrations of the zoom systems are determined by using stop shift formulas. In most of the zoom lens systems it is important to achieve stability in the primary aberrations of the system over the zoom range. This is facilitated by proper formulation of the merit function for the optimization process. Investigations have been carried out on four-component zoom lenses, and an ab initio structure of a four-component zoom lens is presented.

  16. The H1 Trigger with Emphasis on Tracking Triggers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedlberger, J.

    1995-11-01

    Since the commissioning of the electron proton collider HERA in 1992 at DESY the H1 experiment collected data with stable performance. The collision frequency of 10.4 MHz necessitates a pipelined design of the data acquisition and the trigger. A multilevel trigger is used to provide the required selectivity on physics processes and to allow for fast rejection of background events. Subdetector-based, deadtime-free triggers are combined to produce a first level trigger. The dcr φ trigger described herein, extracts its data from the central driftchamber. The drifttime of the signals is measured online and logical functions are applied on the digitized time measurements. To account for different performance parameters of the driftchamber the hardware demands a high flexibility, thus leading to a design with Programmable Gate Arrays (XILINX). Track-finding is achieved by means of ten thousand look-up tables, each with typically 20 inputs. Although the signals for one event will arrive within 1.1 μs, it is possible to determine the timing of the event online within one bunchcrossing (0.096 μs).

  17. Does Twitter Trigger Bursts in Signature Collections?

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Imoto, Seiya; Kami, Masahiro; Watanabe, Kenji; Miyano, Satoru; Yuji, Koichiro

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The quantification of social media impacts on societal and political events is a difficult undertaking. The Japanese Society of Oriental Medicine started a signature-collecting campaign to oppose a medical policy of the Government Revitalization Unit to exclude a traditional Japanese medicine, “Kampo,” from the public insurance system. The signature count showed a series of aberrant bursts from November 26 to 29, 2009. In the same interval, the number of messages on Twitter including the keywords “Signature” and “Kampo,” increased abruptly. Moreover, the number of messages on an Internet forum that discussed the policy and called for signatures showed a train of spikes. Methods and Findings In order to estimate the contributions of social media, we developed a statistical model with state-space modeling framework that distinguishes the contributions of multiple social media in time-series of collected public opinions. We applied the model to the time-series of signature counts of the campaign and quantified contributions of two social media, i.e., Twitter and an Internet forum, by the estimation. We found that a considerable portion (78%) of the signatures was affected from either of the social media throughout the campaign and the Twitter effect (26%) was smaller than the Forum effect (52%) in total, although Twitter probably triggered the initial two bursts of signatures. Comparisons of the estimated profiles of the both effects suggested distinctions between the social media in terms of sustainable impact of messages or tweets. Twitter shows messages on various topics on a time-line; newer messages push out older ones. Twitter may diminish the impact of messages that are tweeted intermittently. Conclusions The quantification of social media impacts is beneficial to better understand people’s tendency and may promote developing strategies to engage public opinions effectively. Our proposed method is a promising tool to explore

  18. Tartrazine-induced chromosomal aberrations in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Patterson, R M; Butler, J S

    1982-08-01

    Tartrazine (FD & C Yellow No.5) has been shown to induce chromosomal aberrations in fibroblast cells of Muntiacus muntjac in vitro. M. muntjac cells were exposed to various concentrations of tartrazine (in the 5-20 micrograms/ml range) and were evaluated for induced chromosomal aberrations after two different periods of culture. Total percentages of chromosomal aberrations were significantly increased above control levels in all experimental groups. The results suggest that further studies are needed to determine the potential mutagenic effects of tartrazine.

  19. Off-axis variable focus and aberration control mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himmer, Phillip A.; Dickensheets, David L.

    2003-01-01

    Elliptical-boundary deformable mirrors have been developed for focus control of an optical beam incident at forty-five degrees with respect to the surface normal. The mirrors are silicon nitride membranes 1.4×1 mm in size, designed to accommodate a 1 mm diameter beam. Two electrostatic actuation zones provide control over spherical aberration. Focal lengths ranging from infinity to 36 mm have been achieved, and the mirror surface figure has been characterized to quantify aberration. Residual aberrations have been observed to be less than λ/5 (peak to peak) measured at λ = 660 nm.

  20. The activation of IgM- or isotype-switched IgG- and IgE-BCR exhibits distinct mechanical force sensitivity and threshold

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Zhengpeng; Chen, Xiangjun; Chen, Haodong; Ji, Qinghua; Chen, Yingjia; Wang, Jing; Cao, Yiyun; Wang, Fei; Lou, Jizhong; Tang, Zhuo; Liu, Wanli

    2015-01-01

    B lymphocytes use B cell receptors (BCRs) to sense the physical features of the antigens. However, the sensitivity and threshold for the activation of BCRs resulting from the stimulation by mechanical forces are unknown. Here, we addressed this question using a double-stranded DNA-based tension gauge tether system serving as a predefined mechanical force gauge ranging from 12 to 56 pN. We observed that IgM-BCR activation is dependent on mechanical forces and exhibits a multi-threshold effect. In contrast, the activation of isotype-switched IgG- or IgE-BCR only requires a low threshold of less than 12 pN, providing an explanation for their rapid activation in response to antigen stimulation. Mechanistically, we found that the cytoplasmic tail of the IgG-BCR heavy chain is both required and sufficient to account for the low mechanical force threshold. These results defined the mechanical force sensitivity and threshold that are required to activate different isotyped BCRs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06925.001 PMID:26258882

  1. Presentation of high antigen-dose by splenic B220(lo) B cells fosters a feedback loop between T helper type 2 memory and antibody isotype switching.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Jason S; Guloglu, F Betul; Zaghouani, Habib

    2016-04-01

    Effective humoral immunity ensues when antigen presentation by B cells culminates in productive cooperation with T lymphocytes. This collaboration, however, remains ill-defined because naive antigen-specific B cells are rare and difficult to track in vivo. Herein, we used a defined transfer model to examine how B lymphocytes, as antigen-presenting cells, shape the development of T-cell memory suitable for generation of relevant antibody responses. Specifically, we examined how B cells presenting different doses of antigen during the initial priming phase shape the development of CD4 T-cell memory and its influence on humoral immunity. The findings indicate that B cells presenting low dose of antigen favour the development of T helper type 1 (Th1) type memory, while those presenting a high antigen dose yielded better Th2 memory cells. The memory Th2 cells supported the production of antibodies by effector B cells and promoted isotype switching to IgG1. Moreover, among the B-cell subsets tested for induction of Th2 memory, the splenic but not peritoneal B220(lo) cells were most effective in sustaining Th2 memory development as well as immunoglobulin isotype switching, and this function involved a tight control by programmed death 1-programmed death ligand 2 interactions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. F200Y polymorphism of the β-tubulin isotype 1 gene in Haemonchus contortus and sheep flock management practices related to anthelmintic resistance in eastern Amazon.

    PubMed

    Chagas, Alexandre Moura; Sampaio Junior, Francisco Dantas; Pacheco, Adlilton; da Cunha, Amanda Batista; Cruz, Juliana Dos Santos; Scofield, Alessandra; Góes-Cavalcante, Gustavo

    2016-08-15

    The objective of the present study was to determine the frequency of the F200Y polymorphism in the β-tubulin isotype 1 gene of Haemonchus contortus from various sheep flocks in eastern Amazon, and to identify management practices that may favor the emergence of resistance to anthelmintic drugs in the same area. In total, 305 specimens of H. contortus were collected from sheep at 12 farms located in the state of Pará. An allele-specific PCR was performed to detect the F200Y polymorphism, and questionnaires were used to obtain information about the farms and flocks. All genotypes were detected as follows: 31% of the parasites were RR, 37% of the parasites were SR, and 32% were SS. The completed questionnaires revealed that all farms employed semi-intensive farming systems, performed suppressive anthelmintic treatment, and based their choice of drug on cost and availability rather than on any knowledge regarding drugs that remained effective on their property. It can thus be concluded that the SNP in codon 200 of the β-tubulin isotype 1 gene is present in the H. contortus populations from eastern Amazon, and that a series of management practices that favor the emergence of anthelmintic resistance are employed on these farms.

  3. Tumor Treating Fields Perturb the Localization of Septins and Cause Aberrant Mitotic Exit

    PubMed Central

    Holtzman, Talia S.; Lee, Sze Xian; Wong, Eric T.; Swanson, Kenneth D.

    2015-01-01

    The anti-tumor effects of chemotherapy and radiation are thought to be mediated by triggering G1/S or G2/M cell cycle checkpoints, while spindle poisons, such as paclitaxel, block metaphase exit by initiating the spindle assembly checkpoint. In contrast, we have found that 150 kilohertz (kHz) alternating electric fields, also known as Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields), perturbed cells at the transition from metaphase to anaphase. Cells exposed to the TTFields during mitosis showed normal progression to this point, but exhibited uncontrolled membrane blebbing that coincided with metaphase exit. The ability of such alternating electric fields to affect cellular physiology is likely to be dependent on their interactions with proteins possessing high dipole moments. The mitotic Septin complex consisting of Septin 2, 6 and 7, possesses a high calculated dipole moment of 2711 Debyes (D) and plays a central role in positioning the cytokinetic cleavage furrow, and governing its contraction during ingression. We showed that during anaphase, TTFields inhibited Septin localization to the anaphase spindle midline and cytokinetic furrow, as well as its association with microtubules during cell attachment and spreading on fibronectin. After aberrant metaphase exit as a consequence of TTFields exposure, cells exhibited aberrant nuclear architecture and signs of cellular stress including an overall decrease in cellular proliferation, followed by apoptosis that was strongly influenced by the p53 mutational status. Thus, TTFields are able to diminish cell proliferation by specifically perturbing key proteins involved in cell division, leading to mitotic catastrophe and subsequent cell death. PMID:26010837

  4. Tumor treating fields perturb the localization of septins and cause aberrant mitotic exit.

    PubMed

    Gera, Nidhi; Yang, Aaron; Holtzman, Talia S; Lee, Sze Xian; Wong, Eric T; Swanson, Kenneth D

    2015-01-01

    The anti-tumor effects of chemotherapy and radiation are thought to be mediated by triggering G1/S or G2/M cell cycle checkpoints, while spindle poisons, such as paclitaxel, block metaphase exit by initiating the spindle assembly checkpoint. In contrast, we have found that 150 kilohertz (kHz) alternating electric fields, also known as Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields), perturbed cells at the transition from metaphase to anaphase. Cells exposed to the TTFields during mitosis showed normal progression to this point, but exhibited uncontrolled membrane blebbing that coincided with metaphase exit. The ability of such alternating electric fields to affect cellular physiology is likely to be dependent on their interactions with proteins possessing high dipole moments. The mitotic Septin complex consisting of Septin 2, 6 and 7, possesses a high calculated dipole moment of 2711 Debyes (D) and plays a central role in positioning the cytokinetic cleavage furrow, and governing its contraction during ingression. We showed that during anaphase, TTFields inhibited Septin localization to the anaphase spindle midline and cytokinetic furrow, as well as its association with microtubules during cell attachment and spreading on fibronectin. After aberrant metaphase exit as a consequence of TTFields exposure, cells exhibited aberrant nuclear architecture and signs of cellular stress including an overall decrease in cellular proliferation, followed by apoptosis that was strongly influenced by the p53 mutational status. Thus, TTFields are able to diminish cell proliferation by specifically perturbing key proteins involved in cell division, leading to mitotic catastrophe and subsequent cell death.

  5. High order aberration and straylight evaluation after cataract surgery with implantation of an aspheric, aberration correcting monofocal intraocular lens

    PubMed Central

    Kretz, Florian T A; Tandogan, Tamer; Khoramnia, Ramin; Auffarth, Gerd U

    2015-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the quality of vision in respect to high order aberrations and straylight perception after implantation of an aspheric, aberration correcting, monofocal intraocular lens (IOL). METHODS Twenty-one patients (34 eyes) aged 50 to 83y underwent cataract surgery with implantation of an aspheric, aberration correcting IOL (Tecnis ZCB00, Abbott Medical Optics). Three months after surgery they were examined for uncorrected (UDVA) and corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), contrast sensitivity (CS) under photopic and mesopic conditions with and without glare source, ocular high order aberrations (HOA, Zywave II) and retinal straylight (C-Quant). RESULTS Postoperatively, patients achieved a postoperative CDVA of 0.0 logMAR or better in 97.1% of eyes. Mean values of high order abberations were +0.02±0.27 (primary coma components) and -0.04±0.16 (spherical aberration term). Straylight values of the C-Quant were 1.35±0.44 log which is within normal range of age matched phakic patients. The CS measurements under mesopic and photopic conditions in combination with and without glare did not show any statistical significance in the patient group observed (P≥0.28). CONCLUSION The implantation of an aspherical aberration correcting monofocal IOL after cataract surgery resulted in very low residual higher order aberration (HOA) and normal straylight. PMID:26309872

  6. External triggering and triggered targeting strategies for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanfei; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2017-06-01

    Drug delivery systems that are externally triggered to release drugs and/or target tissues hold considerable promise for improving the treatment of many diseases by minimizing nonspecific toxicity and enhancing the efficacy of therapy. These drug delivery systems are constructed from materials that are sensitive to a wide range of external stimuli, including light, ultrasound, electrical and magnetic fields, and specific molecules. The responsiveness conferred by these materials allows the release of therapeutics to be triggered on demand and remotely by a physician or patient. In this Review, we describe the rationales for such systems and the types of stimuli that can be deployed, and provide an outlook for the field.

  7. Anthropogenic Triggering of Large Earthquakes

    PubMed Central

    Mulargia, Francesco; Bizzarri, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The physical mechanism of the anthropogenic triggering of large earthquakes on active faults is studied on the basis of experimental phenomenology, i.e., that earthquakes occur on active tectonic faults, that crustal stress values are those measured in situ and, on active faults, comply to the values of the stress drop measured for real earthquakes, that the static friction coefficients are those inferred on faults, and that the effective triggering stresses are those inferred for real earthquakes. Deriving the conditions for earthquake nucleation as a time-dependent solution of the Tresca-Von Mises criterion applied in the framework of poroelasticity yields that active faults can be triggered by fluid overpressures < 0.1 MPa. Comparing this with the deviatoric stresses at the depth of crustal hypocenters, which are of the order of 1–10 MPa, we find that injecting in the subsoil fluids at the pressures typical of oil and gas production and storage may trigger destructive earthquakes on active faults at a few tens of kilometers. Fluid pressure propagates as slow stress waves along geometric paths operating in a drained condition and can advance the natural occurrence of earthquakes by a substantial amount of time. Furthermore, it is illusory to control earthquake triggering by close monitoring of minor “foreshocks”, since the induction may occur with a delay up to several years. PMID:25156190

  8. Anthropogenic triggering of large earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Mulargia, Francesco; Bizzarri, Andrea

    2014-08-26

    The physical mechanism of the anthropogenic triggering of large earthquakes on active faults is studied on the basis of experimental phenomenology, i.e., that earthquakes occur on active tectonic faults, that crustal stress values are those measured in situ and, on active faults, comply to the values of the stress drop measured for real earthquakes, that the static friction coefficients are those inferred on faults, and that the effective triggering stresses are those inferred for real earthquakes. Deriving the conditions for earthquake nucleation as a time-dependent solution of the Tresca-Von Mises criterion applied in the framework of poroelasticity yields that active faults can be triggered by fluid overpressures < 0.1 MPa. Comparing this with the deviatoric stresses at the depth of crustal hypocenters, which are of the order of 1-10 MPa, we find that injecting in the subsoil fluids at the pressures typical of oil and gas production and storage may trigger destructive earthquakes on active faults at a few tens of kilometers. Fluid pressure propagates as slow stress waves along geometric paths operating in a drained condition and can advance the natural occurrence of earthquakes by a substantial amount of time. Furthermore, it is illusory to control earthquake triggering by close monitoring of minor "foreshocks", since the induction may occur with a delay up to several years.

  9. VLBI measurement of the secular aberration drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, O.; Lambert, S. B.; Gontier, A.-M.

    2011-05-01

    Aims: While analyzing decades of very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) data, we detected the secular aberration drift of the extragalatic radio source proper motions caused by the rotation of the Solar System barycenter around the Galactic center. Our results agree with the predicted estimate to be 4-6 micro arcseconds per year (μas/yr) towards α = 266° and δ = -29°. In addition, we tried to detect the quadrupole systematics of the velocity field. Methods: The analysis method consisted of three steps. First, we analyzed geodetic and astrometric VLBI data to produce radio source coordinate time series. Second, we fitted proper motions of 555 sources with long observational histories over the period 1990-2010 to their respective coordinate time series. Finally, we fitted vector spherical harmonic components of degrees 1 and 2 to the proper motion field. Results: Within the error bars, the magnitude and the direction of the dipole component agree with predictions. The dipole vector has an amplitude of 6.4 ± 1.5 μas/yr and is directed towards equatorial coordinates α = 263° and δ = -20°. The quadrupole component has not been detected. The primordial gravitational wave density, integrated over a range of frequencies less than 10-9 Hz, has a limit of 0.0042h-2 where h is the normalized Hubble constant is H0/(100 km s-1). We dedicate this work to the memory of Anne-Marie Gontier, our colleague and personal friend, and a widely recognized specialist of VLBI. She passed away shortly after this paper was submitted.Proper motion data is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/529/A91

  10. Focusing Diffraction Grating Element with Aberration Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iazikov, Dmitri; Mossberg, Thomas W.; Greiner, Christoph M.

    2010-01-01

    Diffraction gratings are optical components with regular patterns of grooves, which angularly disperse incoming light by wavelength in a single plane, called dispersion plane. Traditional gratings on flat substrates do not perform wavefront transformation in the plane perpendicular to the dispersion plane. The device proposed here exhibits regular diffraction grating behavior, dispersing light. In addition, it performs wavelength transformation (focusing or defocusing) of diffracted light in a direction perpendicular to the dispersion plane (called sagittal plane). The device is composed of a diffraction grating with the grooves in the form of equidistant arcs. It may be formed by defining a single arc or an arc approximation, then translating it along a certain direction by a distance equal to a multiple of a fixed distance ("grating period") to obtain other groove positions. Such groove layout is nearly impossible to obtain using traditional ruling methods, such as mechanical ruling or holographic scribing, but is trivial for lithographically scribed gratings. Lithographic scribing is the newly developed method first commercially introduced by LightSmyth Technologies, which produces gratings with the highest performance and arbitrary groove shape/spacing for advanced aberration control. Unlike other types of focusing gratings, the grating is formed on a flat substrate. In a plane perpendicular to the substrate and parallel to the translation direction, the period of the grating and, therefore, the projection of its k-vector onto the plane is the same for any location on the grating surface. In that plane, no waveform transformation by the grating k-vector occurs, except of simple redirection.

  11. Task difficulty and aberrant behavior in severely handicapped students.

    PubMed

    Weeks, M; Gaylord-Ross, R

    1981-01-01

    The influence of task difficulty on aberrant behavior was investigated with three severely handicapped students. Noticeably higher rates of problem behavior occurred in demand compared to no-demand conditions. In addition, there were higher rates of problem behaviors on difficult versus easy tasks. Both these findings were validated with visual discrimination and perceptual motor tasks. An errorless learning procedure effectively minimized errors and aberrant behavior in visual discrimination tasks but not in perceptual motor tasks. It was conceptualized that aberrant behavior was maintained by negative reinforcement contingencies. Difficult tasks were aversive to the children, who emitted aberrant responses to escape or avoid such tasks. By contrast, conditions in which no demands were made, easy tasks, and, in visual discrimination learning, errorless tasks, were less aversive and resulted in little or no problem behavior. Implications for reducing maladaptive behaviors through curricular modifications are discussed and contrasted to more traditional consequence manipulation approaches.

  12. Higher order monochromatic aberrations of the human infant eye

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingyun; Candy, T. Rowan

    2009-01-01

    The monochromatic optical aberrations of the eye degrade retinal image quality. Any significant aberrations during postnatal development could contribute to infants’ immature visual performance and provide signals for the control of eye growth. Aberrations of human infant eyes from 5 to 7 weeks old were compared with those of adult subjects using a model of an adultlike infant eye that accounted for differences in both eye and pupil size. Data were collected using the COAS Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. The results demonstrate that the higher order aberrations of the 5-to-7-week-old eye are less than a factor of 2 greater than predicted for an adultlike infant eye of this age. The data are discussed in the context of infants’ visual performance and the signals available for controlling growth of the eye. PMID:16097867

  13. Task difficulty and aberrant behavior in severely handicapped students.

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, M; Gaylord-Ross, R

    1981-01-01

    The influence of task difficulty on aberrant behavior was investigated with three severely handicapped students. Noticeably higher rates of problem behavior occurred in demand compared to no-demand conditions. In addition, there were higher rates of problem behaviors on difficult versus easy tasks. Both these findings were validated with visual discrimination and perceptual motor tasks. An errorless learning procedure effectively minimized errors and aberrant behavior in visual discrimination tasks but not in perceptual motor tasks. It was conceptualized that aberrant behavior was maintained by negative reinforcement contingencies. Difficult tasks were aversive to the children, who emitted aberrant responses to escape or avoid such tasks. By contrast, conditions in which no demands were made, easy tasks, and, in visual discrimination learning, errorless tasks, were less aversive and resulted in little or no problem behavior. Implications for reducing maladaptive behaviors through curricular modifications are discussed and contrasted to more traditional consequence manipulation approaches. PMID:7328069

  14. Multiple imaging with an aberration optimized hololens array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthil Kumar, A.; Vasu, R. M.

    1989-08-01

    The imaging performance of hololenses formed with four different geometries were studied through an analysis of their third-order aberration coefficients. It is found that the geometry proposed by Brandt (1969) gives the least residual aberration with minimum variation of this aberration with the reconstruction angle. When the ideal position of one of the construction beams is changed in order to generate a hololens array, the residual aberration is found to increase sharply, which in turn affects the image resolution among the multiplied images in the output. A hololens array was generated using Brandt's geometry with the help of a one-dimensional sinusoidal grating. The results of multiple imaging with the hololens array are presented. The image resolution is reasonably high and can be further improved by reducing the f-number of the hololenses.

  15. Multiple Imaging With An Aberration Optimized Hololens Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A. Senthil; Vasu, R. M.

    1989-08-01

    We study the imaging performance of hololenses formed with four different geometries through an analysis of their third-order aberration coefficients. It is found that the geometry proposed by Brandt [Appl. Opt. 8(7), 1421-1429 (1969)] gives the least residual aberration with minimum variation of this aberration with the reconstruction angle. When the ideal position of one of the construction beams is changed in order to generate a hololens array, the residual aberration is found to increase sharply, which in turn affects the image resolution among the multiplied images in the output. We have generated a hololens array using Brandt's geometry with the help of a 1-D sinusoidal grating. The results of multiple imaging with the hololens array are presented. The image resolution is reasonably high and can be further improved by reducing the f-number of the hololenses.

  16. Electron Optics for Biologists: Physical Origins of Spherical Aberrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geissler, Peter; Zadunaisky, Jose

    1974-01-01

    Reports on the physical origins of spherical aberrations in axially symmetric electrostatic lenses to convey the essentials of electon optics to those who must think critically about the resolution of the electron microscope. (GS)

  17. Early Development of Children with Sex Chromosome Aberrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haka-Ilse, Katerina; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Arthur Retlaw and Associates, Inc., Suite 2080, 1603 Orrington Avenue, Evanston, Illinois 60201. A prospective study was made of the early development of 42 children with sex chromosome aberrations. (Author)

  18. MORPHOLOGICAL ABERRATION OF ARTHROBACTER GLOBIFORMIS CELLS DUE TO BIOTIN DEFICIENCY.

    PubMed

    CHAN, E C

    1964-03-01

    Chan, E. C. S. (University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada). Morphological aberration of Arthrobacter globiformis cells due to biotin deficiency. J. Bacteriol. 87:641-651. 1964.-Morphological aberration of Arthrobacter globiformis strain 425 was shown to occur during growth in a chemically defined medium without added biotin. Such aberrant cells could revert back to normal coccoid forms upon inoculation into fresh medium supplemented with the vitamin. This abnormal cellular development occurred even when there was good growth (turbidity) or increase in total cell mass. Light photomicrographs of negative and cell-wall stains of the organism at different times of the morphological growth cycle are presented in support of these observations. The relationship between cellular aberration and the biochemical role of biotin is briefly discussed.

  19. Anisoplanatism in adaptive optics systems due to pupil aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, B

    2005-08-01

    Adaptive optics systems typically include an optical relay that simultaneously images the science field to be corrected and also a set of pupil planes conjugate to the deformable mirror of the system. Often, in the optical spaces where DM's are placed, the pupils are aberrated, leading to a displacement and/or distortion of the pupil that varies according to field position--producing a type of anisoplanatism, i.e., a degradation of the AO correction with field angle. The pupil aberration phenomenon is described and expressed in terms of Seidel aberrations. An expression for anisoplanatism as a function of pupil distortion is derived, an example of an off-axis parabola is given, and a convenient method for controlling pupil-aberration-generated anisoplanatism is proposed.

  20. Industrial accidents triggered by lightning.

    PubMed

    Renni, Elisabetta; Krausmann, Elisabeth; Cozzani, Valerio

    2010-12-15

    Natural disasters can cause major accidents in chemical facilities where they can lead to the release of hazardous materials which in turn can result in fires, explosions or toxic dispersion. Lightning strikes are the most frequent cause of major accidents triggered by natural events. In order to contribute towards the development of a quantitative approach for assessing lightning risk at industrial facilities, lightning-triggered accident case histories were retrieved from the major industrial accident databases and analysed to extract information on types of vulnerable equipment, failure dynamics and damage states, as well as on the final consequences of the event. The most vulnerable category of equipment is storage tanks. Lightning damage is incurred by immediate ignition, electrical and electronic systems failure or structural damage with subsequent release. Toxic releases and tank fires tend to be the most common scenarios associated with lightning strikes. Oil, diesel and gasoline are the substances most frequently released during lightning-triggered Natech accidents.

  1. Aberration correction results in the IBM STEM instrument.

    PubMed

    Batson, P E

    2003-09-01

    Results from the installation of aberration correction in the IBM 120 kV STEM argue that a sub-angstrom probe size has been achieved. Results and the experimental methods used to obtain them are described here. Some post-experiment processing is necessary to demonstrate the probe size of about 0.078 nm. While the promise of aberration correction is demonstrated, we remain at the very threshold of practicality, given the very stringent stability requirements.

  2. Multiplexed aberration measurement for deep tissue imaging in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Liu, Rui; Milkie, Daniel E.; Sun, Wenzhi; Tan, Zhongchao; Kerlin, Aaron; Chen, Tsai-Wen; Kim, Douglas S.; Ji, Na

    2014-01-01

    We describe a multiplexed aberration measurement method that modulates the intensity or phase of light rays at multiple pupil segments in parallel to determine their phase gradients. Applicable to fluorescent-protein-labeled structures of arbitrary complexity, it allows us to obtain diffraction-limited resolution in various samples in vivo. For the strongly scattering mouse brain, a single aberration correction improves structural and functional imaging of fine neuronal processes over a large imaging volume. PMID:25128976

  3. Optical aberration compensation in a multiplexed optical trapping system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čižmár, T.; Dalgarno, H. I. C.; Ashok, P. C.; Gunn-Moore, F. J.; Dholakia, K.

    2011-04-01

    In this paper we discuss optical aberrations within a multiplexed optical trapping system. We analyze two of the most powerful methods for optical trap multiplexing: time-shared beam steering and holographic beam shaping in a tandem system with an acousto-optic deflector and spatial light modulator. We show how to isolate and correct for the aberrations introduced by these individual optical components using the spatial light modulator and demonstrate the enhancement this provides to optical trapping.

  4. Aberration vignetting phenomena and its visualization in wide angular objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livshits, Irina; Letunovskaya, Marina; Potemin, Igor; Okishev, Sergey; Zhdanov, Dmitry

    2016-11-01

    Aberration vignetting phenomena changes light distribution in the image plane. A method of physically accurate simulation of this effect in optical devices is presented. We modified a stochastic ray tracing technique to use it for the analysis and visualization of the aberration vignetting. Some useful illustrations with a number of visual examples of these phenomena for different optical systems are given: bi-concentric lens, wide-angle lens, fish-eye lenses, etc.

  5. Adaptive optics enables 3D STED microscopy in aberrating specimens

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Travis J.; Burke, Daniel; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Booth, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    Stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy allows fluorescence far-field imaging with diffraction-unlimited resolution. Unfortunately, extending this technique to three-dimensional (3D) imaging of thick specimens has been inhibited by sample-induced aberrations. Here we present the first implementation of adaptive optics in STED microscopy to allow 3D super-resolution imaging in strongly aberrated imaging conditions, such as those introduced by thick biological tissue. PMID:23037223

  6. Modified matching Ronchi test to visualize lens aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassani, Kh; Hooshmand Ziafi, H.

    2011-09-01

    We introduce a modification to the matching Ronchi test to visualize lens aberrations with simple and inexpensive equipment available in educational optics labs. This method can help instructors and students to observe and estimate lens aberrations in real time. It is also a semi-quantitative tool for primary tests in research labs. In this work by comparing a single lens with a doublet, we can clearly demonstrate the superior quality of the doublet over the single lens, and estimate their conic constants.

  7. Wide-angle chromatic aberration corrector for the human eye.

    PubMed

    Benny, Yael; Manzanera, Silvestre; Prieto, Pedro M; Ribak, Erez N; Artal, Pablo

    2007-06-01

    The human eye is affected by large chromatic aberration. This may limit vision and makes it difficult to see fine retinal details in ophthalmoscopy. We designed and built a two-triplet system for correcting the average longitudinal chromatic aberration of the eye while keeping a reasonably wide field of view. Measurements in real eyes were conducted to examine the level and optical quality of the correction. We also performed some tests to evaluate the effect of the corrector on visual performance.

  8. Aberrant Alternative Splicing Is Another Hallmark of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ladomery, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The vast majority of human genes are alternatively spliced. Not surprisingly, aberrant alternative splicing is increasingly linked to cancer. Splice isoforms often encode proteins that have distinct and even antagonistic properties. The abnormal expression of splice factors and splice factor kinases in cancer changes the alternative splicing of critically important pre-mRNAs. Aberrant alternative splicing should be added to the growing list of cancer hallmarks. PMID:24101931

  9. On the theory of temporal aberrations for cathode lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Liwei; Li, Yuan; Zhang, Zhiquan; Monastyrski, M. A.; Ya Schelev, M.

    2005-05-01

    A new approach to the theory of temporal aberration for cathode lenses is given in the present paper. A definition of temporal aberration is given in which a certain initial energy of electron emission along the axial direction [epsilon]z1 (0[less-than-or-equals, slant][epsilon]z1[less-than-or-equals, slant][epsilon]0max) is considered. A new method to calculate the temporal aberration coefficients of cathode lenses named "direct integral method" is also presented. The "direct integral method" gives new expressions of the temporal aberration coefficients which are expressed in integral forms. The difference between "direct integral method" and "[tau]-variation method" is that the "[tau]-variation method" needs to solve the differential equations for the three of temporal geometrical aberration coefficients of second order, while the "direct integral method" only needs to carry out the integral calculation for all of these temporal aberration coefficients of second order. All of the formulae of the temporal aberration coefficients deduced from "direct integral method" and "[tau]-variation method" have been verified by an electrostatic concentric spherical system model, and contrasted with the analytical solutions. Results show that these two methods have got identical solutions and the solutions of temporal aberration coefficients of the first and second order are the same as with the analytical solutions. Although some forms of the results seem different, but they can be transformed into the same form. Thus, it can be concluded these two methods given by us are equivalent and correct, but the "direct integral method" is related to solve integral equations, which is more convenient for computation and could be suggested for use in practical design.

  10. Detector array control and triggering

    SciTech Connect

    Aiello, S.; Anzalone, A.; Bartolucci, M. |

    1998-08-01

    A commercial DSP-based board installed in a host-PC was employed for the fast, on-line and real-time computation of special algorithms, in order to perform event selection and operate as a 2nd level trigger. Moreover an ad hoc build interface, realized using PLDs with a view to connecting the DSP-board to the ADCs and to the data acquisition system, has been tested in order to evaluate the performances of these programmable devices used as a look-up-table and as a decisional part of a 1st level trigger.

  11. Aberrant Glycosylation as Biomarker for Cancer: Focus on CD43

    PubMed Central

    de Laurentiis, Annamaria; Fiume, Giuseppe; Borrelli, Antonella; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Scala, Iris; Buonaguro, Franco Maria; Quinto, Ileana; Scala, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Glycosylation is a posttranslational modification of proteins playing a major role in cell signalling, immune recognition, and cell-cell interaction because of their glycan branches conferring structure variability and binding specificity to lectin ligands. Aberrant expression of glycan structures as well as occurrence of truncated structures, precursors, or novel structures of glycan may affect ligand-receptor interactions and thus interfere with regulation of cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation. Indeed, aberrant glycosylation represents a hallmark of cancer, reflecting cancer-specific changes in glycan biosynthesis pathways such as the altered expression of glycosyltransferases and glycosidases. Most studies have been carried out to identify changes in serum glycan structures. In most cancers, fucosylation and sialylation are significantly modified. Thus, aberrations in glycan structures can be used as targets to improve existing serum cancer biomarkers. The ability to distinguish differences in the glycosylation of proteins between cancer and control patients emphasizes glycobiology as a promising field for potential biomarker identification. In this review, we discuss the aberrant protein glycosylation associated with human cancer and the identification of protein glycoforms as cancer biomarkers. In particular, we will focus on the aberrant CD43 glycosylation as cancer biomarker and the potential to exploit the UN1 monoclonal antibody (UN1 mAb) to identify aberrant CD43 glycoforms. PMID:24689054

  12. Achromatic doublet intraocular lens for full aberration correction

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Enrique J.; Artal, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    A doublet intraocular lens optimized for both chromatic and monochromatic aberration correction in pseudophakic eyes is presented. Ray-tracing techniques were applied to design the lens in white light within a chromatic eye model. Combinations of two materials, already commonly used in intraocular lenses, as acrylic and silicone, were used. Iterative optimization algorithms were employed to correct for longitudinal chromatic aberration, spherical aberration and off-axis aberrations within 10 degrees of visual field. The performance of this lens was compared with a standard single-material aspheric intraocular lens. Near full aberration correction was achieved with the doublet intraocular lens. The modulation transfer function and Strehl ratio were superior for the doublet lens. Through-focus calculations were also conducted showing better optical quality for the doublet. Real higher-order aberrations from normal eyes were incorporated in the model to evaluate the effect on the doublet intraocular lens performance. Results showed that the doublet lens preserved its benefits under realistic conditions. This doublet intraocular lens should provide patients with a better quality of vision after it is further developed in terms of manufacturing and surgical limitations. PMID:28663881

  13. Induction of chromosome aberrations in human cells by charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H.; Durante, M.; George, K.; Yang, T. C.

    1997-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations induced by high-energy charged particles in normal human lymphocytes and human fibroblasts have been investigated. The charged particles included 250 MeV/nucleon protons, 290 MeV/nucleon carbon ions and 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions. The energies of the charged particles were higher than in most of the studies reported in the literature. Lymphocytes were stimulated to grow immediately after irradiation, while fibroblasts were incubated at 37 degrees C for 24 h for repair. Chromosomes were collected at the first mitosis after irradiation and chromosome aberrations were scored using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with a whole-chromosome 4 probe. Chromosome aberrations were classified as reciprocal exchanges, incomplete exchanges, deletions and complex exchanges. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for each type of aberration was calculated by dividing a dose of 4 Gy by the dose of the charged particles producing the same effect as 4 Gy of gamma rays. Results of this study showed that complex aberrations have the highest RBE for radiation of high linear energy transfer (LET) for human lymphocytes, but for fibroblasts, the greatest effect was for incomplete exchanges. For both lymphocytes and fibroblasts, iron ions induced a similar fraction of aberrant cells.

  14. Photolithography for the static compensation of human eye aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bara, Salvador; Jaroszewicz, Zbigniew

    2004-08-01

    Recent developments in human eye aberration measurements allow to design and fabricate compensating elements aiming to achieve aberration-limited imaging. This is important not merely from a subject's viewpoint (improving the sharpness of the outer world images formed at the retina) but mainly for clinical instrumentation purposes, especially those dealing with high-resolution retinal imaging (eye fundus cameras, scanning laser ophtlalmosopes, etc.). Here we report recent developments in the correction of the static component of the eye aberrations. Aberration data of several subjects were used for manufacturing personally customized phase plates designed to compensate for the wave aberration in the human eye. These plates were made by gray-level single-mask photosculpture in photoresist and then placed in front of the eye. The effects of misalignments as well as the strategy to design wide-field correcting elements are briefly revised. Applications include improving images in scanning laser ophtalmoscopes. The future plans of research including application of axicons for compensation of the lack of accommodation and kinoforms cancelling high amounts of eye's aberrations in monochromatic illumination are also sketched.

  15. Lesion Generation Through Ribs Using Histotripsy Therapy Without Aberration Correction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yohan; Wang, Tzu-Yin; Xu, Zhen; Cain, Charles A.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of using high-intensity pulsed therapeutic ultrasound, or histotripsy, to non-invasively generate lesions through the ribs. Histotripsy therapy mechanically ablates tissue through the generation of a cavitation bubble cloud, which occurs when the focal pressure exceeds a certain threshold. We hypothesize that histotripsy can generate precise lesions through the ribs without aberration correction if the main lobe retains its shape and exceeds the cavitation initiation threshold and the secondary lobes remain below the threshold. To test this hypothesis, a 750-kHz focused transducer was used to generate lesions in tissue-mimicking phantoms with and without the presence of rib aberrators. In all cases, 8000 pulses with 16 to 18 MPa peak rarefactional pressure at a repetition frequency of 100 Hz were applied without aberration correction. Despite the high secondary lobes introduced by the aberrators, high-speed imaging showed that bubble clouds were generated exclusively at the focus, resulting in well-confined lesions with comparable dimensions. Collateral damage from secondary lobes was negligible, caused by single bubbles that failed to form a cloud. These results support our hypothesis, suggesting that histotripsy has a high tolerance for aberrated fields and can generate confined focal lesions through rib obstacles without aberration correction. PMID:22083767

  16. Induction of chromosome aberrations in human cells by charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H.; Durante, M.; George, K.; Yang, T. C.

    1997-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations induced by high-energy charged particles in normal human lymphocytes and human fibroblasts have been investigated. The charged particles included 250 MeV/nucleon protons, 290 MeV/nucleon carbon ions and 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions. The energies of the charged particles were higher than in most of the studies reported in the literature. Lymphocytes were stimulated to grow immediately after irradiation, while fibroblasts were incubated at 37 degrees C for 24 h for repair. Chromosomes were collected at the first mitosis after irradiation and chromosome aberrations were scored using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with a whole-chromosome 4 probe. Chromosome aberrations were classified as reciprocal exchanges, incomplete exchanges, deletions and complex exchanges. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for each type of aberration was calculated by dividing a dose of 4 Gy by the dose of the charged particles producing the same effect as 4 Gy of gamma rays. Results of this study showed that complex aberrations have the highest RBE for radiation of high linear energy transfer (LET) for human lymphocytes, but for fibroblasts, the greatest effect was for incomplete exchanges. For both lymphocytes and fibroblasts, iron ions induced a similar fraction of aberrant cells.

  17. Generalized Alvarez lens for correction of laser aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    LaFortune, K N

    2004-12-02

    The Alvarez lens (US Patent No. 3,305,294 [1]) is a compact aberration corrector. The original design emphasized in the patent consists of a pair of adjacent optical elements that provide a variable focus. A lens system with a variable effective focal length is nothing new. Such systems are widely used in cameras, for example. It is the compactness and simplicity of operation that is the key advantage of the Alvarez lens. All of the complexity is folded into the design and fabrication of the optical elements. As mentioned in the Alvarez patent [1] and elaborated upon in Palusinski et al. [2], if one is willing to fold even more complexity into the optical elements, it is possible to correct higher-order aberrations as well. There is no theoretical limit to the number or degree of wavefront distortions that can be corrected. The only limitation is that there must be a fixed relative magnitude of the aberrations. Independent correction of each component of the higher-order aberrations can not be performed without additional elements and degrees of freedom [3]. Under some circumstances, coupling may be observed between different aberrations. This can be mitigated with the appropriate choice of design parameters. New methods are available today that increase the practicality of making higher-order aberration correctors [4,5,6].

  18. Lesion generation through ribs using histotripsy therapy without aberration correction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yohan; Wang, Tzu-Yin; Xu, Zhen; Cain, Charles A

    2011-11-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of using high-intensity pulsed therapeutic ultrasound, or histotripsy, to non-invasively generate lesions through the ribs. Histotripsy therapy mechanically ablates tissue through the generation of a cavitation bubble cloud, which occurs when the focal pressure exceeds a certain threshold. We hypothesize that histotripsy can generate precise lesions through the ribs without aberration correction if the main lobe retains its shape and exceeds the cavitation initiation threshold and the secondary lobes remain below the threshold. To test this hypothesis, a 750-kHz focused transducer was used to generate lesions in tissue-mimicking phantoms with and without the presence of rib aberrators. In all cases, 8000 pulses with 16 to 18 MPa peak rarefactional pressure at a repetition frequency of 100 Hz were applied without aberration correction. Despite the high secondary lobes introduced by the aberrators, high-speed imaging showed that bubble clouds were generated exclusively at the focus, resulting in well-confined lesions with comparable dimensions. Collateral damage from secondary lobes was negligible, caused by single bubbles that failed to form a cloud. These results support our hypothesis, suggesting that histotripsy has a high tolerance for aberrated fields and can generate confined focal lesions through rib obstacles without aberration correction.

  19. Wave-front aberration measurements on GRIN-rod lenses.

    PubMed

    Cline, T W; Jander, R B

    1982-03-15

    A survey of the optical quality of commercial and experimental Selfoc GRIN-rod lenses was made using a digital Twyman-Green wave-front interferometer. The technique provides an accurate and reproducible method for predicting lens performance in microoptic devices. Wave-front aberrations are reported for (1/4) pitch lenses measured in a double-pass configuration. It was found that spherical aberration is dominant in commercial lenses. SLW (1/4) pitch lenses have lower aberrations than SLS lenses and are quite suitable for microoptic devices based on fiber-to-fiber coupling. Measured multimode coupling efficiency under steady-state modal propagation is compared to measured spherical aberration for a number of lenses. The slope of the coupling dependence on spherical aberration was found to be -0.1 dB/wave. Effects due to mechanical alignment and the modal distribution in the fibers had a greater influence on the measured coupling efficiency than the contribution due the intrinsic lens aberrations, especially for the SLW lenses. Comparison of this empirical dependence with theoretical predictions for a uniform distribution, which suggests a stronger dependence, is discussed. This work suggests that commercially available GRIN-rod lenses are suitable for use in microoptic components.

  20. Know Your Smoking Triggers | Smokefree.gov

    Cancer.gov

    Triggers are the things that make you want to smoke. Different people have different triggers, like a stressful situation, sipping coffee, going to a party, or smelling cigarette smoke. Most triggers fall into one of these four categories: Emotional Pattern Social Withdrawal Knowing your triggers and understanding the best way to deal with them is your first line of defense.

  1. A new look at trigger point injections.

    PubMed

    Wong, Clara S M; Wong, Steven H S

    2012-01-01

    Trigger point injections are commonly practised pain interventional techniques. However, there is still lack of objective diagnostic criteria for trigger points. The mechanisms of action of trigger point injection remain obscure and its efficacy remains heterogeneous. The advent of ultrasound technology in the noninvasive real-time imaging of soft tissues sheds new light on visualization of trigger points, explaining the effect of trigger point injection by blockade of peripheral nerves, and minimizing the complications of blind injection.

  2. A New Look at Trigger Point Injections

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Clara S. M.; Wong, Steven H. S.

    2012-01-01

    Trigger point injections are commonly practised pain interventional techniques. However, there is still lack of objective diagnostic criteria for trigger points. The mechanisms of action of trigger point injection remain obscure and its efficacy remains heterogeneous. The advent of ultrasound technology in the noninvasive real-time imaging of soft tissues sheds new light on visualization of trigger points, explaining the effect of trigger point injection by blockade of peripheral nerves, and minimizing the complications of blind injection. PMID:21969825

  3. Suppression of the noninvolved pair of the myeloma isotype correlates with poor survival in newly diagnosed and relapsed/refractory patients with myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Milosavljevic, Dejan; Berlanga, Oscar; Zojer, Niklas; Hübl, Wolfgang; Fritz, Veronique; Harding, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Heavy light chain (HLC) assays allow precise measurement of the monoclonal and of the noninvolved polyclonal immunoglobulins of the same isotype as the M‐protein (e.g., monoclonal IgAκ and polyclonal IgAλ in case of an IgAκ myeloma), which was not possible before. The noninvolved polyclonal immunoglobulin is termed ‘HLC‐matched pair’. We investigated the impact of the suppression of the HLC‐matched pair on outcome in 203 patients with multiple myeloma, a phenomenon that likely reflects the host's attempt to control the myeloma clone. Severe (>50%) HLC‐matched pair suppression was identified in 54.5% of the 156 newly diagnosed patients and was associated with significantly shorter survival (45.4 vs. 71.9 months, P = 0.019). This correlation was statistically significant in IgG patients (46.4 vs. 105.1 months, P = 0.017), but not in patients with IgA myelomas (32.9 vs. 54.1 months, P = 0.498). At best response, HLC‐matched pair suppression improved only in patients with ≥VGPR, indicating partial or complete humoral immune reconstitution during remission in those with excellent response. Severe HLC‐matched pair suppression retained its prognostic impact also during follow‐up after first response. In the 47 pretreated patients with relapsed/refractory disease, a similar correlation between severe HLC suppression and survival was noted (22.8 vs. not reached, P = 0.028). Suppression of the polyclonal immunoglobulins of the other isotypes than the myeloma protein correlated neither with HLC‐matched pair suppression, nor with outcome. Multivariate analysis identified severe HLC‐matched pair suppression as independent risk factor for shorter survival, highlighting the impact of isotype specific immune dysregulation on outcome in multiple myeloma. Am. J. Hematol. 91:295–301, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. American Journal of Hematology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26662888

  4. Zebrafish immunoglobulin IgD: unusual exon usage and quantitative expression profiles with IgM and IgZ/T heavy chain isotypes.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Anastasia M; Moustafa, Farah M; Romanowski, Kryzstof E; Steiner, Lisa A

    2011-09-01

    The zebrafish is an emerging model for comparative immunology and biomedical research. In contrast to the five heavy chain isotype system of mice and human (IgD, IgM, IgA, IgG, IgE), zebrafish harbor gene segments for IgD, IgM, and novel heavy chain isotype called IgZ/T which appears restricted to bony fishes. The purpose of this study was to design and validate a suite of quantitative real time RT-PCR protocols to measure IgH expression in a vertebrate model which has considerable promise for modeling both pathogenic infection and chronic conditions leading to immune dysfunction. Specific primers were designed and following verification of their specificty, relative expression levels of IgD, IgM, and IgZ/T were measured in triplicate for zebrafish raised under standard laboratory conditions. During embryonic stages, low levels of each heavy chain isotype (IgH) were detected with each increasing steadily between 2 and 17 weeks post fertilization. Overall IgM>IgZ>IgD throughout zebrafish development with the copy number of IgM being several fold higher than that of IgD or IgZ/T. IgD exon usage was also characterized, as its extremely long size and presence of a stop codon in the second IgD exon in zebrafish, raised questions as to how this antibody might be expressed. Zebrafish IgD was found to be a chimeric immunoglobulin, with the third IgD exon spliced to the first IgM constant exon thereby circumventing the first and second IgD exons. Collectively, the qRT-PCR results represent the first comparative profile of IgD, IgM, IgZ/T expression over the lifespan of any fish species and the primers and assay parameters reported should prove useful in enabling researchers to rapidly quantify changes in IgH expression in zebrafish models of disease where altered IgH expression is manifested.

  5. Zebrafish immunoglobulin IgD: unusual exon usage and quantitative expression profiles with IgM and IgZ/T heavy chain isotypes

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Anastasia M.; Moustafa, Farah M.; Romanowski, Kryzstof E.; Steiner, Lisa A.

    2011-01-01

    The zebrafish is an emerging model for comparative immunology and biomedical research. In contrast to the five heavy chain isotype system of mice and human (IgD, IgM, IgA, IgG, IgE), zebrafish harbor gene segments for IgD, IgM, and novel heavy chain isotype called IgZ/T which appears restricted to bony fishes. The purpose of this study was to design and validate a suite of quantitative real time RT-PCR protocols to measure IgH expression in a vertebrate model which has considerable promise for modelling both pathogenic infection and chronic conditions leading to immune dysfunction. Specific primers were designed and following verification of their specificty, relative expression levels of IgD, IgM, and IgZ/T were measured in triplicate for zebrafish raised under standard laboratory conditions. During embryonic stages, low levels of each heavy chain isotype (IgH) were detected with each increasing steadily between 2 and 17 weeks post fertilization. Overall IgM>IgZ>IgD throughout zebrafish development with the copy number of IgM being several fold higher than that of IgD or IgZ/T. IgD exon usage was also characterized, as its extremely long size and presence of a stop codon in the second IgD exon in zebrafish, raised questions as to how this antibody might be expressed. Zebrafish IgD was found to be a chimeric immunoglobulin, with the third IgD exon spliced to the first IgM constant exon thereby circumventing the first and second IgD exons. Collectively, the qRT-PCR results represent the first comparative profile of IgD, IgM, IgZ/T expression over the lifespan of any fish species and the primers and assay parameters reported should prove useful in enabling researchers to rapidly quantify changes in IgH expression in zebrafish models of disease where altered IgH expression is manifested. PMID:21820179

  6. Suicide Triggers Described by Herodotus

    PubMed Central

    Auchincloss, Stephane; Ahmadi, Jamshid

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to better understand the triggers of suicide, particularly among the ancient Greek and Persian soldiers and commanders. Method: ‘Herodotus:TheHistories’ is a history of the rulers and soldiery who participated in the Greco-Persian wars (492-449 BCE). A new translation (2013) of this manuscript was studied. Accounts of suicide were collected and collated, with descriptions of circumstances, methods, and probable triggers. Results: Nine accounts of suicide were identified. Eight of these were named individuals (4 Greeks and 4 Persians); of whom, seven were male. Only one (not the female) appeared to act in response to a mental disorder. Other triggers of suicide included guilt, avoidance of dishonour/punishment and altruism. Cutting/ stabbing was the most common method; others included hanging, jumping, poison, and burning (the single female). Conclusion: While soldiers at a time of war do not reflect the general community, they are nevertheless members of their society. Thus, this evidence demonstrates that suicide triggered by burdensome circumstances (in addition to mental disorder) was known to the Greek and Persian people more than two millennia ago. PMID:27437010

  7. Triggering Reform at Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    An intriguing experiment is afoot in some of the nation's struggling public schools. New "Parent Trigger" laws passed in California and on the agenda in New York, Ohio, Colorado, and Chicago, allow parents of chronically failing schools to unseat the schools' leadership and staff. But the initiative has pitfalls. It's easy to mobilize…

  8. Transcranial phase aberration correction using beam simulations and MR-ARFI

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, Urvi Kaye, Elena; Pauly, Kim Butts

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Transcranial magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery is a noninvasive technique for causing selective tissue necrosis. Variations in density, thickness, and shape of the skull cause aberrations in the location and shape of the focal zone. In this paper, the authors propose a hybrid simulation-MR-ARFI technique to achieve aberration correction for transcranial MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery. The technique uses ultrasound beam propagation simulations with MR Acoustic Radiation Force Imaging (MR-ARFI) to correct skull-caused phase aberrations. Methods: Skull-based numerical aberrations were obtained from a MR-guided focused ultrasound patient treatment and were added to all elements of the InSightec conformal bone focused ultrasound surgery transducer during transmission. In the first experiment, the 1024 aberrations derived from a human skull were condensed into 16 aberrations by averaging over the transducer area of 64 elements. In the second experiment, all 1024 aberrations were applied to the transducer. The aberrated MR-ARFI images were used in the hybrid simulation-MR-ARFI technique to find 16 estimated aberrations. These estimated aberrations were subtracted from the original aberrations to result in the corrected images. Each aberration experiment (16-aberration and 1024-aberration) was repeated three times. Results: The corrected MR-ARFI image was compared to the aberrated image and the ideal image (image with zero aberrations) for each experiment. The hybrid simulation-MR-ARFI technique resulted in an average increase in focal MR-ARFI phase of 44% for the 16-aberration case and 52% for the 1024-aberration case, and recovered 83% and 39% of the ideal MR-ARFI phase for the 16-aberrations and 1024-aberration case, respectively. Conclusions: Using one MR-ARFI image and noa priori information about the applied phase aberrations, the hybrid simulation-MR-ARFI technique improved the maximum MR-ARFI phase of the beam's focus.

  9. Optical aberrations of intraocular lenses measured in vivo and in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero, Sergio; Marcos, Susana; Jiménez-Alfaro, Ignacio

    2003-10-01

    Corneal and ocular aberrations were measured in a group of eyes before and after cataract surgery with spherical intraocular lens (IOL) implantation by use of well-tested techniques developed in our laboratory. By subtraction of corneal from total aberration maps, we also estimated the optical quality of the intraocular lens in vivo. We found that aberrations in pseudophakic eyes are not significantly different from aberrations in eyes before cataract surgery or from previously reported aberrations in healthy eyes of the same age. However, aberrations in pseudophakic eyes are significantly higher than in young eyes. We found a slight increase of corneal aberrations after surgery. The aberrations of the IOL and the lack of balance of the corneal spherical aberrations by the spherical aberrations of the intraocular lens also degraded the optical quality in pseudophakic eyes. We also measured the aberrations of the IOL in vitro, using an eye cell model, and simulated the aberrations of the IOL on the basis of the IOL's physical parameters. We found a good agreement among in vivo, in vitro, and simulated measures of spherical aberration: Unlike the spherical aberration of the young crystalline lens, which tends to be negative, the spherical aberration of the IOL is positive and increases with lens power. Computer simulations and in vitro measurements show that tilts and decentrations might be contributors to the increased third-order aberrations in vivo in comparison with in vitro measurements.

  10. Tuning fifth-order aberrations in a Quadrupole-Octupole Corrector

    SciTech Connect

    Lupini, Andrew R; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2012-01-01

    The resolution of conventional electron microscopes is usually limited by spherical aberration. Microscopes equipped with aberration-correctors are then primarily limited by higher-order, chromatic, and misalignment aberrations. In particular the Nion third-order aberration correctors installed on machines with a low energy spread and possessing sophisticated alignment software were limited by the uncorrected fifth-order aberrations. Here we show how the Nion fifth-order aberration corrector can be used to adjust and reduce some of the fourth and fifth-order aberrations in a probe-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope.

  11. Analytical approach to the impact of polarization aberration on lithographic imaging.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yuanying; Wang, Xiangzhao; Li, Sikun; Cao, Yuting

    2012-06-01

    An analytical approach to the impact of polarization aberration on lithographic imaging is proposed. The linear relationship between image placement error (IPE) of alternating phase-shifting mask (Alt-PSM) and odd aberration items of polarization aberrations, as well as that between best focus shift (BFS) of Alt-PSM and even aberration items of polarization aberrations are established by analytical equations, respectively. The validity of the linear relationships is demonstrated by numerical results. The differences and connections between scalar aberration and polarization aberration are briefly discussed based on these linear relationships.

  12. Chromosomal aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes of train engine drivers.

    PubMed

    Nordenson, I; Mild, K H; Järventaus, H; Hirvonen, A; Sandström, M; Wilén, J; Blix, N; Norppa, H

    2001-07-01

    Studies of Swedish railway employees have indicated that railroad engine drivers have an increased cancer morbidity and incidence of chronic lymphatic leukemia. The drivers are exposed to relatively high magnetic fields (MF), ranging from a few to over a hundred microT. Although the possible genotoxic potential of MF is unclear, some earlier studies have indicated that occupational exposure to MF may increase chromosome aberrations in blood lymphocytes. Since an increased level of chromosomal aberrations has been suggested to predict elevated cancer risk, we performed a cytogenetic analysis on cultured (48 h) peripheral lymphocytes of Swedish train engine drivers. A pilot study of 18 engine drivers indicated a significant difference in the frequency of cells with chromosomal aberrations (gaps included or excluded) in comparison with seven concurrent referents (train dispatchers) and a control group of 16 office workers. The engine drivers had about four times higher frequency of cells with chromosome-type aberrations (excluding gaps) than the office workers (P < 0.01) and the dispatchers (P < 0.05). Seventy-eight percent of the engine drivers showed at least one cell per 100 with chromosome-type aberrations compared with 29% among the dispatchers and 31% among the office workers. In a follow-up study, another 30 engine drivers showed an increase (P < 0.05) in the frequency of cells with chromosome-type aberrations (gaps excluded) as compared with 30 referent policemen. Sixty percent of the engine drivers had one or more cells (per 100 cells) with chromosome-type aberrations compared with 30% among the policemen. In conclusion, the results of the two studies support the hypothesis that exposure to MF at mean intensities of 2-15 microT can induce chromosomal damage. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Volumetric optical coherence microscopy enabled by aberrated optics (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Jeffrey A.; Liu, Siyang; Adie, Steven G.

    2017-02-01

    Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) is an interferometric imaging technique that enables high resolution, non-invasive imaging of 3D cell cultures and biological tissues. Volumetric imaging with OCM suffers a trade-off between high transverse resolution and poor depth-of-field resulting from defocus, optical aberrations, and reduced signal collection away from the focal plane. While defocus and aberrations can be compensated with computational methods such as interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) or computational adaptive optics (CAO), reduced signal collection must be physically addressed through optical hardware. Axial scanning of the focus is one approach, but comes at the cost of longer acquisition times, larger datasets, and greater image reconstruction times. Given the capabilities of CAO to compensate for general phase aberrations, we present an alternative method to address the signal collection problem without axial scanning by using intentionally aberrated optical hardware. We demonstrate the use of an astigmatic spectral domain (SD-)OCM imaging system to enable single-acquisition volumetric OCM in 3D cell culture over an extended depth range, compared to a non-aberrated SD-OCM system. The transverse resolution of the non-aberrated and astigmatic imaging systems after application of CAO were 2 um and 2.2 um, respectively. The depth-range of effective signal collection about the nominal focal plane was increased from 100 um in the non-aberrated system to over 300 um in the astigmatic system, extending the range over which useful data may be acquired in a single OCM dataset. We anticipate that this method will enable high-throughput cellular-resolution imaging of dynamic biological systems over extended volumes.

  14. Construction of special eye models for investigation of chromatic and higher-order aberrations of eyes.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yi; Wang, Yan; Wang, Zhaoqi; Liu, Yongji; Zhang, Lin; He, Yuanqing; Chang, Shengjiang

    2014-01-01

    An achromatic element eliminating only longitudinal chromatic aberration (LCA) while maintaining transverse chromatic aberration (TCA) is established for the eye model, which involves the angle formed by the visual and optical axis. To investigate the impacts of higher-order aberrations on vision, the actual data of higher-order aberrations of human eyes with three typical levels are introduced into the eye model along visual axis. Moreover, three kinds of individual eye models are established to investigate the impacts of higher-order aberrations, chromatic aberration (LCA+TCA), LCA and TCA on vision under the photopic condition, respectively. Results show that for most human eyes, the impact of chromatic aberration on vision is much stronger than that of higher-order aberrations, and the impact of LCA in chromatic aberration dominates. The impact of TCA is approximately equal to that of normal level higher-order aberrations and it can be ignored when LCA exists.

  15. Serum anti-phenolic glycolipid-1 IgA correlates to IgM isotype in leprosy patients: a possible candidate for seroepidemiological surveys?

    PubMed

    de Macedo, Alexandre C; Guimarães, Juliana A; Rodrigues, Raphael O; Araújo, Thiago D V; Tavares, Clodis M; Cabral, Paula B; de Moraes-Pinto, Maria Isabel; Nagao-Dias, Aparecida T

    2017-06-08

    The aim of this study was to compare serum anti-phenolic glycolipid-1 IgA, IgG, and IgM levels in leprosy patients and controls. Analysis of anti-PGL-1 IgA, IgG, or IgM in serum samples from multibacillary (MB, n=32) and paucibacillary (PB, n=22) leprosy patients, and in non-endemic controls (n=17), using an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A strong correlation between serum IgM and IgA isotypes was found (r=.745, P<.0001) in MB patients. A moderate correlation was found in all analyses in PB patients. A moderate agreement was found between anti-PGL1 IgA and IgM tests. Based on the ROC curves, the cut-off values were selected and the parameters of validation were calculated. Considering the clinical forms altogether, the diagnostic sensitivities were 50.0% for IgA, 22.2% for IgG, and 74.1% for IgM. The positive (VPP) and negative (VPN) predictive values were estimated for each isotype. For IgA, the VPP and VPN were, respectively, 100.0% (87.0%-100.0%; 95% confidence interval) and 38.7% (24.4%-54.5%); for IgG, 100% (87.0%-100.0%) and 28.8% (17.8%-42.1%), respectively; and for IgM, 95.2% (83.8%-99.4%) and 51.7% (32.5%-70.6%), respectively. Despite the limiting factors, anti-PGL1 IgA correlates to IgM levels and it could be considered as a possible laboratorial tool to be also used, for instance, in serological follow-up studies. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. A monoclonal antibody distinguishes between two IgM heavy chain isotypes in Atlantic salmon and brown trout: protein characterization, 3D modeling and epitope mapping.

    PubMed

    Kamil, Atif; Falk, Knut; Sharma, Animesh; Raae, Arnt; Berven, Frode; Koppang, Erling Olaf; Hordvik, Ivar

    2011-09-01

    Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and brown trout (Salmo trutta) possess two distinct subpopulations of IgM which can be separated by anion exchange chromatography. Accordingly, there are two isotypic μ genes in these species, related to ancestral tetraploidy. In the present work it was verified by mass spectrometry that IgM of peak 1 (subpopulation 1) have heavy chains previously designated as μB type whereas IgM of peak 2 (subpopulation 2) have heavy chains of μA type. Two adjacent cysteine residues are present near the C-terminal part of μB, in contrast to one cysteine residue in μA. Salmon IgM of both peak 1 and peak 2 contain light chains of the two most common isotypes: IgL1 and IgL3. In contrast to salmon and brown trout, IgM of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) is eluted in a single peak when subjected to anion exchange chromatography. Surprisingly, a monoclonal antibody MAb4C10 against rainbow trout IgM, reacted with μA in salmon, whereas in brown trout it reacted with μB. It is plausible to assume that DNA has been exchanged between the paralogous A and B loci during evolution while maintaining the two sub-variants, with and without the extra cysteine. MAb4C10 was conjugated to magnetic beads and used to separate cells, demonstrating that μ transcripts residing from captured cells were primarily of A type in salmon and B type in brown trout. An analysis of amino acid substitutions in μA and μB of salmon and brown trout indicated that the third constant domain is essential for MAb4C10 binding. This was supported by 3D modeling and was finally verified by studies of MAb4C10 reactivity with a series of recombinant μ3 constructs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Specific β-Tubulin Isotypes Can Functionally Enhance or Diminish Epothilone B Sensitivity in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Pei Pei; McCarroll, Joshua A.; Byrne, Frances L.; Garner, James; Kavallaris, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Epothilones are a new class of microtubule stabilizing agents with promising preclinical and clinical activity. Their cellular target is β-tubulin and factors influencing intrinsic sensitivity to epothilones are not well understood. In this study, the functional significance of specific β-tubulin isotypes in intrinsic sensitivity to epothilone B was investigated using siRNA gene knockdown against βII-, βIII- or βIVb-tubulins in two independent non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines, NCI-H460 and Calu-6. Drug-treated clonogenic assays showed that sensitivity to epothilone B was not altered following knockdown of βII-tubulin in both NSCLC cell lines. In contrast, knockdown of βIII-tubulin significantly increased sensitivity to epothilone B. Interestingly, βIVb-tubulin knockdowns were significantly less sensitive to epothilone B, compared to mock- and control siRNA cells. Cell cycle analysis of βIII-tubulin knockdown cells showed a higher percentage of cell death with epothilone B concentrations as low as 0.5 nM. In contrast, βIVb-tubulin knockdown cells displayed a decrease in epothilone B-induced G2-M cell cycle accumulation compared to control siRNA cells. Importantly, βIII-tubulin knockdowns displayed a significant dose-dependent increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells upon treatment with epothilone B, as detected using caspase 3/7 activity and Annexin-V staining. Higher concentrations of epothilone B were required to induce apoptosis in the βIVb-tubulin knockdowns compared to control siRNA, highlighting a potential mechanism underlying decreased sensitivity to this agent. This study demonstrates that specific β-tubulin isotypes can influence sensitivity to epothilone B and may influence differential sensitivity to this promising new agent. PMID:21738778

  18. Persistence of the protective immunity and kinetics of the isotype specific antibody response against the viral nucleocapsid protein after experimental Schmallenberg virus infection of sheep.

    PubMed

    Poskin, Antoine; Verite, Stephanie; Comtet, Loic; Van der Stede, Yves; Cay, Brigitte; De Regge, Nick

    2015-10-15

    Schmallenberg virus (SBV) is an Orthobunyavirus that induces abortion, stillbirths and congenital malformations in ruminants. SBV infection induces a long lasting seroconversion under natural conditions. The persistence of the protective immunity and the isotype specific antibody response upon SBV infection of sheep has however not been studied in detail. Five sheep were kept in BSL3 facilities for more than 16 months and subjected to repeated SBV infections. Blood was regularly sampled and organs were collected at euthanasia. The presence of SBV RNA in serum and organs was measured with quantitative real-time PCR. The appearance and persistence of neutralizing and SBV nucleoprotein (N) isotype specific antibodies was determined with virus neutralization tests (VNT) and ELISAs. The primo SBV infection protected ewes against clinical signs, viraemia and virus replication in organs upon challenge infections more than 15 months later. Production of neutralizing SBV specific antibodies was first detected around 6 days post primo-inoculation with VNT and correlated with the appearance of SBV-N specific IgM antibodies. These IgM antibodies remained present for 2 weeks. SBV-N specific IgG antibodies were first detected between 10 and 21 dpi and reached a plateau at 28 dpi. This plateau remained consistently high and no significant decrease in titre was found over a period of more than 1 year. Similar results were found for the neutralising antibody response. In conclusion, the SBV specific IgM response probably eliminates SBV from the blood and the protective immunity induced by SBV infection protects sheep against reinfection for at least 16 months.

  19. Isotype switching and titer variation of anti-Ro/SSA antibodies over time in 100 patients with undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD).

    PubMed

    Ceribelli, A; Cavazzana, I; Franceschini, F; Quinzanini, M; Rizzini, F Lodi; Cattaneo, R

    2008-01-01

    To correlate the clinical course of the disease with the titer, the isotype profile and the switch of the anti-Ro/SSA antibodies in a cohort of patients affected by UCTD. One hundred selected patients with anti-Ro/SSA antibodies detected by counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE), and affected by UCTD with a mean follow-up of 7.6 years (SD 4.8 yrs.), were studied. The titer of IgA, IgG and IgM anti-Ro/SSA antibodies was determined in two different sera, obtained at the time of diagnosis and at the last visit, by ELISA with Ro/SSA recombinant proteins as substrate. Thirty-five patients evolved from UCTD to a different connective tissue disease, while 65 showed a stable disease. Anti-Ro/SSA antibodies were detected in 91% and 97% of the patients, at baseline and during follow-up, respectively. IgG dominates the anti-Ro response. The titer of IgA, IgM and IgG anti-Ro/SSA did not differ significantly between the two groups of patients with UCTD. An increasing trend of IgG and IgA anti-Ro/SSA titer could be detected in patients evolving in primary Sjögren's Syndrome (pSS), but only the increase of IgG anti-Ro/SSA was significant (p=0.0235). IgG dominates the anti-Ro/SSA response in patients with UCTD. No substantial change of the antibody isotype against Ro/SSA peptides could be observed during follow-up. The titer of IgG anti-Ro/SSA significantly raised in the group of patients evolving in pSS.

  20. Reprogramming IgH isotype-switched B cells to functional-grade induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wesemann, Duane R.; Portuguese, Andrew J.; Magee, Jennifer M.; Gallagher, Michael P.; Zhou, Xiaolong; Panchakshari, Rohit A.; Alt, Frederick W.

    2012-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be formed from somatic cells by a defined set of genetic factors; however, aberrant epigenetic silencing of the imprinted Dlk1-Dio3 gene cluster often hinders their developmental potency and ability to contribute to high-grade chimerism in mice. Here, we describe an approach that allows splenic B cells activated to undergo Ig heavy-chain (IgH) class-switch recombination (CSR) to be reprogrammed into iPSCs that contribute to high-grade chimerism in mice. Treatment of naïve splenic B cells in culture with anti-CD40 plus IL-4 induces IgH CSR from IgM to IgG1 and IgE. CSR leads to irreversible IgH locus deletions wherein the IgM-producing Cμ exons are permanently excised from the B-cell genome. We find that anti-CD40 plus IL-4–activated B cells produce iPSCs that are uniformly hypermethylated in the imprinted Dlk1-Dio3 gene cluster and fail to produce chimerism in mice. However, treatment of activated B cells with the methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine before and at early stages of reprogramming attenuates hypermethylation of the Dlk1-Dio3 locus in resultant iPSCs and enables them to form high-grade chimerism in mice. These conditions allowed us to produce chimeric mice in which all mature B cells were derived entirely from IgG1-expressing B-cell–derived iPSCs. We conclude that culture conditions of activated B cells before and at early stages of reprogramming influence the developmental potency of resultant iPSCs. PMID:22869756

  1. Time sequence of events leading to chromosomal aberration formation

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, R.C.; Bender, M.A.

    1993-05-01

    Investigations have been carried out on the influence of the repair polymerases on the yield of different types of chromosomal aberrations. The studies were mainly concerned with the effect of inhibiting the polymerases on the yield of aberrations. The polymerases fill in single-strand regions, and the fact that their inhibition affects the yield of aberrations suggests that single-strand lesions are influential in aberration formation. The results indicate that there are two actions of polymerases in clastogenesis. One is in their involvement in a G{sub 2} repair system, in which either of the two chromatids is concerned, and which does not yield aberrations unless the inhibition is still operating when the cells enter mitosis. The second is such that when repair is inhibited, further damage accrues. The second action is affected by inhibiting polymerase repair, but also operates even when the repair enzymes are active. The production of chromosomal exchanges involves a series of reactions, some of which are reversible. The time span over which the reactions occur is much longer than has been envisaged previously.

  2. Time sequence of events leading to chromosomal aberration formation

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, R.C. ); Bender, M.A. )

    1993-01-01

    Investigations have been carried out on the influence of the repair polymerases on the yield of different types of chromosomal aberrations. The studies were mainly concerned with the effect of inhibiting the polymerases on the yield of aberrations. The polymerases fill in single-strand regions, and the fact that their inhibition affects the yield of aberrations suggests that single-strand lesions are influential in aberration formation. The results indicate that there are two actions of polymerases in clastogenesis. One is in their involvement in a G[sub 2] repair system, in which either of the two chromatids is concerned, and which does not yield aberrations unless the inhibition is still operating when the cells enter mitosis. The second is such that when repair is inhibited, further damage accrues. The second action is affected by inhibiting polymerase repair, but also operates even when the repair enzymes are active. The production of chromosomal exchanges involves a series of reactions, some of which are reversible. The time span over which the reactions occur is much longer than has been envisaged previously.

  3. Risk estimation based on chromosomal aberrations induced by radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; Bonassi, S.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2001-01-01

    The presence of a causal association between the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes and the risk of cancer has been substantiated recently by epidemiological studies. Cytogenetic analyses of crew members of the Mir Space Station have shown that a significant increase in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations can be detected after flight, and that such an increase is likely to be attributed to the radiation exposure. The risk of cancer can be estimated directly from the yields of chromosomal aberrations, taking into account some aspects of individual susceptibility and other factors unrelated to radiation. However, the use of an appropriate technique for the collection and analysis of chromosomes and the choice of the structural aberrations to be measured are crucial in providing sound results. Based on the fraction of aberrant lymphocytes detected before and after flight, the relative risk after a long-term Mir mission is estimated to be about 1.2-1.3. The new technique of mFISH can provide useful insights into the quantification of risk on an individual basis.

  4. Chromosome aberrations as biomarkers of radiation quality: modelling basic mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottolenghi, A.; Ballarini, F.

    Since space radiation consists of a mixed field of different particles having different energies, including HZE ions, conventional measurements of absorbed doses are not sufficient to completely characterise the radiation field and perform reliable estimates of health risks. Biological dosimetry, based on the observation of specific radiation-induced endpoints (typically chromosome aberrations) after exposure, can be a helpful approach in case of monitored exposure to space radiation or other mixed fields, as well as in case of accidental exposure. Although various ratios of aberrations (e.g. dicentrics to centric rings and complex exchanges to simple exchanges) have been suggested as possible biomarkers both in theoretical and in experimental studies, all of them have been subjected to some criticisms. In this context a mechanistic model and a Monte Carlo code for the simulation of chromosome aberrations was developed. The model, able to provide dose-responses for different aberrations (e.g. dicentrics, rings, translocations, insertions and other complex exchanges), was further developed to assess the dependence of various ratios of aberrations on radiation quality. The predictions of the model were compared with available data, whose experimental conditions were faithfully reproduced. Particular attention was devoted to the scoring criteria adopted in different laboratories and to possible biases introduced by interphase death and mitotic delay; this latter aspect was investigated by taking into account both metaphase data and data obtained with PCC (Premature Chromosome Condensation).

  5. Effects of contrast medium on radiation-induced chromosome aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    Matsubara, S.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, H.; Kuwabara, Y.; Okano, T.

    1982-07-01

    The effects of contrast material (meglumine iothalamate) on radiation-induced chromosome aberrations were investigated in studies on the lymphocytes of patients who had undergone diagnostic radiography and in in vitro experiments with diagnostic x rays and /sup 60/Co gamma rays. Chromosome and chromatid aberrations were found to increase significantly with increasing concentrations of contrast material that were added at irradiation. However, the aberrations were not associated with elevation of the ratio of dicentric and ring chromosomes to the number of cells with unstable chromosome aberrations at the first mitosis. Lymphocytes irradiated in the absence of contrast material did not show an increase in chromosome-type aberrations when the agent was given in increasing concentrations during subsequent incubation, but there were greater numbers of chromatid gaps and breaks. When lymphocytes were exposed to 400 R (103.2 mC/kg) of /sup 60/Co gamma rays, the presence of contrast agent did not increase the yield of dicentric and ring chromosomes, but induced a marked delay in cell proliferation, especially in lymphocytes with more heavily damaged chromosomes. In additional examination, the contrast agent itself induced sister chromatid exchanges in lymphocytes.

  6. Sub-ångstrom resolution using aberration corrected electron optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batson, P. E.; Dellby, N.; Krivanek, O. L.

    2002-08-01

    Following the invention of electron optics during the 1930s, lens aberrations have limited the achievable spatial resolution to about 50 times the wavelength of the imaging electrons. This situation is similar to that faced by Leeuwenhoek in the seventeenth century, whose work to improve the quality of glass lenses led directly to his discovery of the ubiquitous ``animalcules'' in canal water, the first hints of the cellular basis of life. The electron optical aberration problem was well understood from the start, but more than 60 years elapsed before a practical correction scheme for electron microscopy was demonstrated, and even then the remaining chromatic aberrations still limited the resolution. We report here the implementation of a computer-controlled aberration correction system in a scanning transmission electron microscope, which is less sensitive to chromatic aberration. Using this approach, we achieve an electron probe smaller than 1Å. This performance, about 20 times the electron wavelength at 120keV energy, allows dynamic imaging of single atoms, clusters of a few atoms, and single atomic layer `rafts' of atoms coexisting with Au islands on a carbon substrate. This technique should also allow atomic column imaging of semiconductors, for detection of single dopant atoms, using an electron beam with energy below the damage threshold for silicon.

  7. Metaphase chromosome aberrations as markers of radiation exposure and dose

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, A.L.; Khan, M.A.; Jostes, R.F.; Cross, F.T.

    1992-10-01

    Chromosome aberration frequency provides the most reliable biological marker of dose for detecting acute accidental radiation exposure. Significant radiation-induced changes in the frequency of chromosome aberrations can be detected at very low doses. Our paper provides information on using molecular chromosome probes paints'' to score chromosome damage and illustrates how technical advances make it possible to understand mechanisms involved during formation of chromosome aberrations. In animal studies chromosome aberrations provide a method to relate cellular damage to cellular dose. Using an In vivo/In vitro approach aberrations provided a biological marker of dose from radon progeny exposure which was used to convert WLM to dose in rat tracheal epithelial cells. Injection of Chinese hamsters with [sup 144]Ce which produced a low dose rate exposure of bone marrow to either low-LET radiation increased the sensitivity of the cells to subsequent external exposure to [sup 60]Co. These studies demonstrated the usefulness of chromosome damage as a biological marker of dose and cellular responsiveness.

  8. Metaphase chromosome aberrations as markers of radiation exposure and dose

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, A.L.; Khan, M.A.; Jostes, R.F.; Cross, F.T.

    1992-10-01

    Chromosome aberration frequency provides the most reliable biological marker of dose for detecting acute accidental radiation exposure. Significant radiation-induced changes in the frequency of chromosome aberrations can be detected at very low doses. Our paper provides information on using molecular chromosome probes ``paints`` to score chromosome damage and illustrates how technical advances make it possible to understand mechanisms involved during formation of chromosome aberrations. In animal studies chromosome aberrations provide a method to relate cellular damage to cellular dose. Using an In vivo/In vitro approach aberrations provided a biological marker of dose from radon progeny exposure which was used to convert WLM to dose in rat tracheal epithelial cells. Injection of Chinese hamsters with {sup 144}Ce which produced a low dose rate exposure of bone marrow to either low-LET radiation increased the sensitivity of the cells to subsequent external exposure to {sup 60}Co. These studies demonstrated the usefulness of chromosome damage as a biological marker of dose and cellular responsiveness.

  9. Primary chromatic aberration elimination via optimization work with genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bo-Wen; Liu, Tung-Kuan; Fang, Yi-Chin; Chou, Jyh-Horng; Tsai, Hsien-Lin; Chang, En-Hao

    2008-09-01

    Chromatic Aberration plays a part in modern optical systems, especially in digitalized and smart optical systems. Much effort has been devoted to eliminating specific chromatic aberration in order to match the demand for advanced digitalized optical products. Basically, the elimination of axial chromatic and lateral color aberration of an optical lens and system depends on the selection of optical glass. According to reports from glass companies all over the world, the number of various newly developed optical glasses in the market exceeds three hundred. However, due to the complexity of a practical optical system, optical designers have so far had difficulty in finding the right solution to eliminate small axial and lateral chromatic aberration except by the Damped Least Squares (DLS) method, which is limited in so far as the DLS method has not yet managed to find a better optical system configuration. In the present research, genetic algorithms are used to replace traditional DLS so as to eliminate axial and lateral chromatic, by combining the theories of geometric optics in Tessar type lenses and a technique involving Binary/Real Encoding, Multiple Dynamic Crossover and Random Gene Mutation to find a much better configuration for optical glasses. By implementing the algorithms outlined in this paper, satisfactory results can be achieved in eliminating axial and lateral color aberration.

  10. Risk estimation based on chromosomal aberrations induced by radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; Bonassi, S.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2001-01-01

    The presence of a causal association between the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes and the risk of cancer has been substantiated recently by epidemiological studies. Cytogenetic analyses of crew members of the Mir Space Station have shown that a significant increase in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations can be detected after flight, and that such an increase is likely to be attributed to the radiation exposure. The risk of cancer can be estimated directly from the yields of chromosomal aberrations, taking into account some aspects of individual susceptibility and other factors unrelated to radiation. However, the use of an appropriate technique for the collection and analysis of chromosomes and the choice of the structural aberrations to be measured are crucial in providing sound results. Based on the fraction of aberrant lymphocytes detected before and after flight, the relative risk after a long-term Mir mission is estimated to be about 1.2-1.3. The new technique of mFISH can provide useful insights into the quantification of risk on an individual basis.

  11. Chromosome aberrations as biomarkers of radiation exposure: Modelling basic mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarini, F.; Ottolenghi, A.

    The space radiation environment is a mixed field consisting of different particles having different energies, including high charge and energy (HZE) ions. Conventional measurements of absorbed doses may not be sufficient to completely characterise the radiation field and perform reliable estimates of health risks. Biological dosimetry, based on the observation of specific radiation-induced endpoints (typically chromosome aberrations), can be a helpful approach in case of monitored exposure to space radiation or other mixed fields, as well as in case of accidental exposure. Furthermore, various ratios of aberrations (e.g. dicentric chromosomes to centric rings and complex exchanges to simple exchanges) have been suggested as possible fingerprints of radiation quality, although all of them have been subjected to some criticisms. In this context a mechanistic model and a Monte Carlo code for the simulation of chromosome aberration induction were developed. The model, able to provide dose-responses for different aberrations (e.g. dicentrics, rings, fragments, translocations, insertions and other complex exchanges), was further developed to assess the dependence of various ratios of aberrations on radiation quality. The predictions of the model were compared with available data, whose experimental conditions were faithfully reproduced. Particular attention was devoted to the scoring criteria adopted in different laboratories and to possible biases introduced by interphase death and mitotic delay. This latter aspect was investigated by taking into account both metaphase data and data obtained with Premature Chromosome Condensation (PCC).

  12. Focusing of an elliptical mirror based system with aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Ai, Min; Zhang, He; Wang, Chao; Tan, Jiubin

    2013-10-01

    The effect of primary aberrations on the focusing of an elliptical mirror based system is studied by using the Debye integral. Specifically, the apodization function for elliptical mirror is derived and expressed by the eccentricity of the elliptical mirror. For the elliptical mirror with low aperture, intensity distributions in the presence of aberrations near focus are presented based on the derived scalar theory, while for the high-aperture condition, vectorial theory is used to describe the electric field in the focal region. In particular, the effect of aberrations is studied under radially polarized illumination. Moreover, tolerance conditions are given based on the knowledge of focusing with aberrations. It is found that the elliptical mirror based system shares a similar level of tolerance conditions with that of the single lens, while both of them are more sensitive to the presence of astigmatism than other aberrations. It is believed that the results will theoretically support the application of the high-aperture elliptical mirror in scanning microscopy.

  13. Minimum change in spherical aberration that can be perceived

    PubMed Central

    Manzanera, Silvestre; Artal, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    It is important to know the visual sensitivity to optical blur from both a basic science perspective and a practical point of view. Of particular interest is the sensitivity to blur induced by spherical aberration because it is being used to increase depth of focus as a component of a presbyopic solution. Using a flicker detection-based procedure implemented on an adaptive optics visual simulator, we measured the spherical aberration thresholds that produce just-noticeable differences in perceived image quality. The thresholds were measured for positive and negative values of spherical aberration, for best focus and + 0.5 D and + 1.0 D of defocus. At best focus, the SA thresholds were 0.20 ± 0.01 µm and −0.17 ± 0.03 µm for positive and negative spherical aberration respectively (referred to a 6-mm pupil). These experimental values may be useful in setting spherical aberration permissible levels in different ophthalmic techniques. PMID:27699113

  14. Antimutagenic potential of curcumin on chromosomal aberrations in Allium cepa *

    PubMed Central

    Ragunathan, Irulappan; Panneerselvam, Natarajan

    2007-01-01

    Turmeric has long been used as a spice and food colouring agent in Asia. In the present investigation, the antimutagenic potential of curcumin was evaluated in Allium cepa root meristem cells. So far there is no report on the biological properties of curcumin in plant test systems. The root tip cells were treated with sodium azide at 200 and 300 µg/ml for 3 h and curcumin was given at 5, 10 and 20 µg/ml for 16 h, prior to sodium azide treatment. The tips were squashed after colchicine treatment and the cells were analyzed for chromosome aberration and mitotic index. Curcumin induces chromosomal aberration in Allium cepa root tip cells in an insignificant manner, when compared with untreated control. Sodium azide alone induces chromosomal aberrations significantly with increasing concentrations. The total number of aberrations was significantly reduced in root tip cells pretreated with curcumin. The study reveals that curcumin has antimutagenic potential against sodium azide induced chromosomal aberrations in Allium cepa root meristem cells. In addition, it showed mild cytotoxicity by reducing the percentage of mitotic index in all curcumin treated groups, but the mechanism of action remains unknown. The antimutagenic potential of curcumin is effective at 5 µg/ml in Allium cepa root meristem cells. PMID:17610326

  15. Method for triggering an action

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Bartholomew, David B.; Johnson, Monte L.; Moon, Justin; Koehler, Roger O.

    2006-10-17

    A method for triggering an action of at least one downhole device on a downhole network integrated into a downhole tool string synchronized to an event comprises determining latency, sending a latency adjusted signal, and performing the action. The latency is determined between a control device and the at least one downhole device. The latency adjusted signal for triggering an action is sent to the downhole device. The action is performed downhole synchronized to the event. A preferred method for determining latency comprises the steps: a control device sends a first signal to the downhole device; after receiving the signal, the downhole device sends a response signal to the control device; and the control device analyzes the time from sending the signal to receiving the response signal.

  16. The CDF silicon vertex trigger

    SciTech Connect

    B. Ashmanskas; A. Barchiesi; A. Bardi

    2003-06-23

    The CDF experiment's Silicon Vertex Trigger is a system of 150 custom 9U VME boards that reconstructs axial tracks in the CDF silicon strip detector in a 15 {mu}sec pipeline. SVT's 35 {mu}m impact parameter resolution enables CDF's Level 2 trigger to distinguish primary and secondary particles, and hence to collect large samples of hadronic bottom and charm decays. We review some of SVT's key design features. Speed is achieved with custom VLSI pattern recognition, linearized track fitting, pipelining, and parallel processing. Testing and reliability are aided by built-in logic state analysis and test-data sourcing at each board's input and output, a common inter-board data link, and a universal ''Merger'' board for data fan-in/fan-out. Speed and adaptability are enhanced by use of modern FPGAs.

  17. The ALICE high level trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alt, T.; Grastveit, G.; Helstrup, H.; Lindenstruth, V.; Loizides, C.; Röhrich, D.; Skaali, B.; Steinbeck, T.; Stock, R.; Tilsner, H.; Ullaland, K.; Vestbø, A.; Vik, T.; Wiebalck, A.; the ALICE Collaboration

    2004-08-01

    The ALICE experiment at LHC will implement a high-level trigger system for online event selection and/or data compression. The largest computing challenge is posed by the TPC detector, which requires real-time pattern recognition. The system entails a very large processing farm that is designed for an anticipated input data stream of 25 GB s-1. In this paper, we present the architecture of the system and the current state of the tracking methods and data compression applications.

  18. The Shootdown of Trigger 4

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-04-01

    this interview to be highly credible. Although young , Cadillac 2A had flown 100 combat missions prior to 29 July, 50 of which were in search of MiGs...north of Phuc Yen. Between Phuc Yen and Thud Ridge. 13:13:15 Trigger 1 White (I) Whoa! What the fuck is that? I hope that was a Thud! 29 13:13:31

  19. Development of autonomous triggering instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Steve E.; Swift, Theresa M.; Fonda, James W.

    2008-03-01

    Triggering instrumentation for autonomous monitoring of load-induced strain is described for economical, fast bridge inspection. The development addresses one aspect for the management of transportation infrastructure - bridge monitoring and inspection. The objectives are to provide quantitative performance information from a load test, to minimize the setup time at the bridge, and to minimize the closure time to traffic. Multiple or networked measurements can be made for a prescribed loading sequence. The proposed smart system consists of in-situ strain sensors, an embedded data acquisition module, and a measurement triggering system. A companion control unit is mounted on the truck serving as the load. As the truck moves to the proper position, the desired measurement is automatically relayed back to the control unit. In this work, the testing protocol is developed and the performance parameters for the triggering and data acquisition are measured. The test system uses a dedicated wireless sensor mote and an infrared positioning system. The electronic procedure offers improvements in available information and economics.

  20. Stimulus conflict triggers behavioral avoidance.

    PubMed

    Dignath, David; Eder, Andreas B

    2015-12-01

    According to a recent extension of the conflict-monitoring theory, conflict between two competing response tendencies is registered as an aversive event and triggers a motivation to avoid the source of conflict. In the present study, we tested this assumption. Over five experiments, we examined whether conflict is associated with an avoidance motivation and whether stimulus conflict or response conflict triggers an avoidance tendency. Participants first performed a color Stroop task. In a subsequent motivation test, participants responded to Stroop stimuli with approach- and avoidance-related lever movements. These results showed that Stroop-conflict stimuli increased the frequency of avoidance responses in a free-choice motivation test, and also increased the speed of avoidance relative to approach responses in a forced-choice test. High and low proportions of response conflict in the Stroop task had no effect on avoidance in the motivation test. Avoidance of conflict was, however, obtained even with new conflict stimuli that had not been presented before in a Stroop task, and when the Stroop task was replaced with an unrelated filler task. Taken together, these results suggest that stimulus conflict is sufficient to trigger avoidance.

  1. Optical Spectra of Triggered Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, T. D.; Biagi, C. J.; Hill, J. D.; Jordan, D. M.; Uman, M. A.; Christian, H. J., Jr.

    2009-12-01

    In August 2009, the first optical spectra of triggered lightning flashes were acquired. Data from two triggered lightning flashes were obtained at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing in north-central Florida. The spectrometer that was used has an average dispersion of 260 Å/mm resulting in an average resolution of 5 Å when mated to a Photron (SA1.1) high-speed camera. The spectra captured with this system had a free spectral range of 3800-8000 Å. The spectra were captured at 300,000 frames per second. The spectrometer's vertical field of view was 3 m at an altitude 50 m above the launch tower, intended to view the middle of the triggering wire. Preliminary results show that the copper spectrum dominated the earliest part of the flash and copper lines persisted during the total lifetime of the detectable spectrum. Animations over the lifetime of the stroke from the initial wire illumination to multiple return strokes show the evolution of the spectrum. In addition, coordinated high speed channel base current, electric field and imagery measurements of the exploding wire, downward leaders, and return strokes were recorded. Quantitative analysis of the spectral evolution will be discussed in the context of the overall flash development.

  2. In vivo chromosome aberration test for hydroxyapetite in mice.

    PubMed

    Kannan, T P; Nik Ahmad Shah, N L; Azlina, A; Samsudin, A R; Narazah, M Y; Salleh, Ma'arof

    2004-05-01

    This study evaluates the cytotoxic and mutagenic effect of synthetic hydroxyapatite granules (source: School of Material and Mineral Resources Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia) in the bone marrow cells of mice. Mice are exposed to synthetic hydroxyapatite granules, the bone marrow cells are collected and observed for chromosome aberrations. No chromosome aberrations were noticed in the animals exposed to distilled water (negative control) and to the test substance, synthetic hydroxyapatite granules (treatment) groups. Chromosome aberrations were observed in the animals exposed to Mitomycin C (positive control group). There was no indication of cytotoxicity due to synthetic hydroxyapatite granules in the animals as revealed by the mitotic index. Hence, synthetic hydroxyapatite granules are considered non-mutagenic under the prevailing test conditions.

  3. Aberrant Protein S-Nitrosylation in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Tomohiro; Tu, Shichun; Akhtar, Mohd Waseem; Sunico, Carmen R.; Okamoto, Shu-ichi; Lipton, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    S-Nitrosylation is a redox-mediated posttranslational modification that regulates protein function via covalent reaction of nitric oxide (NO)-related species with a cysteine thiol group on the target protein. Under physiological conditions, S-nitrosylation can be an important modulator of signal transduction pathways, akin to phosphorylation. However, with aging or environmental toxins that generate excessive NO, aberrant S-nitrosylation reactions can occur and affect protein misfolding, mitochondrial fragmentation, synaptic function, apoptosis or autophagy. Here, we discuss how aberrantly S-nitrosylated proteins (SNO-proteins) play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Insight into the pathophysiological role of aberrant S-nitrosylation pathways will enhance our understanding of molecular mechanisms leading to neurodegenerative diseases and point to potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:23719160

  4. An electron microscope for the aberration-corrected era.

    PubMed

    Krivanek, O L; Corbin, G J; Dellby, N; Elston, B F; Keyse, R J; Murfitt, M F; Own, C S; Szilagyi, Z S; Woodruff, J W

    2008-02-01

    Improved resolution made possible by aberration correction has greatly increased the demands on the performance of all parts of high-end electron microscopes. In order to meet these demands, we have designed and built an entirely new scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The microscope includes a flexible illumination system that allows the properties of its probe to be changed on-the-fly, a third-generation aberration corrector which corrects all geometric aberrations up to fifth order, an ultra-responsive yet stable five-axis sample stage, and a flexible configuration of optimized detectors. The microscope features many innovations, such as a modular column assembled from building blocks that can be stacked in almost any order, in situ storage and cleaning facilities for up to five samples, computer-controlled loading of samples into the column, and self-diagnosing electronics. The microscope construction is described, and examples of its capabilities are shown.

  5. Conformal dome aberration correction by designing the inner surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wang; Chen, Shouqian; Fan, Zhigang

    2016-12-01

    The ray transmission models of optical domes were established, and the characteristics of the rays while passing through a hemispherical dome and a conformal dome were comparatively analysed. Acquiring the minimum deviated angles from the inner surface of the conformal dome was then determined to be the designing goal for reducing the dynamic aberrations. Based on this, the inner surface of the conformal dome was optimized and thus, the dynamic aberrations were reduced. Finally, a completely cooled conformal optical system was designed. The results show that the optical system have produced good imaging quality within all the fields of regard, which further illustrates that designing the inner surface of a conformal dome is an effective method for aberration correction.

  6. Ischemic Stroke Injury Is Mediated by Aberrant Cdk5

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Douglas A.; Torres-Altoro, Melissa I.; Tan, Zhenjun; Tozzi, Alessandro; Di Filippo, Massimiliano; DiNapoli, Vincent; Plattner, Florian; Kansy, Janice W.; Benkovic, Stanley A.; Huber, Jason D.; Miller, Diane B.; Greengard, Paul; Calabresi, Paolo; Rosen, Charles L.

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Treatment options are limited and only a minority of patients receive acute interventions. Understanding the mechanisms that mediate neuronal injury and death may identify targets for neuroprotective treatments. Here we show that the aberrant activity of the protein kinase Cdk5 is a principal cause of neuronal death in rodents during stroke. Ischemia induced either by embolic middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in vivo or by oxygen and glucose deprivation in brain slices caused calpain-dependent conversion of the Cdk5-activating cofactor p35 to p25. Inhibition of aberrant Cdk5 during ischemia protected dopamine neurotransmission, maintained field potentials, and blocked excitotoxicity. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition or conditional knock-out (CKO) of Cdk5 prevented neuronal death in response to ischemia. Moreover, Cdk5 CKO dramatically reduced infarctions following MCAO. Thus, targeting aberrant Cdk5 activity may serve as an effective treatment for stroke. PMID:24920629

  7. Screening for aberrant behavior in the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Borofsky, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    This paper attempts to promote a fuller understanding of how psychological assessment procedures can be used to reduce the threat from aberrant behavior in the nuclear industry. It begins with a discussion of the scientifically based methods that are used by psychologists in constructing, scoring, and interpreting these procedures. This discussion includes an emphasis on the concepts of validity and reliability and their central importance when one is choosing specific psychological screening tools. Criteria for selecting and using psychological assessment procedures when screening for aberrant behavior are also provided. Some commonly used assessment procedures that satisfy these criteria are discussed. A number a psychological assessment procedures specifically recommended for use in screening for aberrant behavior in the nuclear industry are described.

  8. Differential aberration correction (DAC) microscopy: a new molecular ruler.

    PubMed

    Vallotton, P

    2008-11-01

    Considerable efforts have been deployed towards measuring molecular range distances in fluorescence microscopy. In the 1-10 nm range, Förster energy transfer microscopy is difficult to beat. Above 300 nm, conventional diffraction limited microscopy is suitable. We introduce a simple experimental technique that allows bridging the gap between those two resolution scales in both 2D and 3D with a resolution of about 20 nm. The method relies on a computational approach to accurately correct optical aberrations over the whole field of view. The method is differential because the probes of interest are affected in exactly the same manner by aberrations as are the reference probes used to construct the aberration deformation field. We expect that this technique will have significant implications for investigating structural and functional questions in bio-molecular sciences.

  9. Low chromatic aberration hexapole for molecular state selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Yi; Deng, Xiao-Bing; Hu, Zhong-Kun

    2016-01-01

    In molecular beam state-selection experiments, the electrostatic hexapole acts as an optical lens, imaging molecules from the source to the focus. The molecular longitudinal velocity spread induces the phenomenon of chromatic aberration, which will reduce the state-selection purity. We propose a scheme which can effectively reduce the chromatic aberration by changing the hexapole voltage operating manner. The hexapole is already charged before molecules arrive at the entrance of the hexapole. When molecules are completely inside the hexapole, the voltage is switched off rapidly at an appropriate time. In this manner, faster molecules travel a longer hexapole focusing region than slower molecules. Therefore the focusing positions of molecules with different velocities become close. Numerical trajectory simulations of molecular state selection are carried out, and the results show that this low chromatic aberration hexapole can significantly improve the state purity from 46.2% to 87.0%.

  10. Dynamic compensation of chromatic aberration in a programmable diffractive lens.

    PubMed

    Millán, María S; Otón, Joaquín; Pérez-Cabré, Elisabet

    2006-10-02

    A proposal to dynamically compensate chromatic aberration of a programmable phase Fresnel lens displayed on a liquid crystal device and working under broadband illumination is presented. It is based on time multiplexing a set of lenses, designed with a common focal length for different wavelengths, and a tunable spectral filter that makes each sublens work almost monochromatically. Both the tunable filter and the sublens displayed by the spatial light modulator are synchronized. The whole set of sublenses are displayed within the integration time of the sensor. As a result the central order focalization has a unique location at the focal plane and it is common for all selected wavelengths. Transversal chromatic aberration of the polychromatic point spread function is reduced by properly adjusting the pupil size of each sublens. Longitudinal chromatic aberration is compensated by making depth of focus curves coincident for the selected wavelengths. Experimental results are in very good agreement with theory.

  11. Measuring chromatic aberrations in imaging systems using plasmonic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gennaro, Sylvain D.; Roschuk, Tyler R.; Maier, Stefan A.; Oulton, Rupert F.

    2016-04-01

    Chromatic aberration in optical systems arises from the wavelength dependence of a glass's refractive index. Polychromatic rays incident upon an optical surface are refracted at slightly different angles and in traversing an optical system follow distinct paths creating images displaced according to color. Although arising from dispersion, it manifests as a spatial distortion correctable only with compound lenses with multiple glasses and accumulates in complicated imaging systems. While chromatic aberration is measured with interferometry, simple methods are attractive for their ease of use and low cost. In this letter we retrieve the longitudinal chromatic focal shift of high numerical aperture (NA) microscope objectives from the extinction spectra of metallic nanoparticles within the focal plane. The method is accurate for high NA objectives with apochromatic correction, and enables rapid assessment of the chromatic aberration of any complete microscopy systems, since it is straightforward to implement

  12. [Chromosome aberrations in workers in a printing press].

    PubMed

    Pelclová, D; Rössner, P; Pícková, J; Hykes, P

    1990-08-10

    Using cytogenetic analysis of peripheral lymphocytes the authors examined three groups of subjects: 42 rotogravure printers exposed to toluene in concentrations of 400-4400 mg.m-3 for a mean period of 13 years, 28 administrative employees of the printing plant exposed to low concentrations of toluene (8-16 mg.m-3) in their offices, whereby more than half of them spent on average two hours in the photogravure workshop, and 32 control subjects. In the printers 3.64% subjects, in the office staff 3.32% aberrant cells were found. The difference between the control group and the two groups from the printing plant was highly significant as regards the number of aberrant cells (P less than 0.005) and chromatid breaks and number of breaks per cell. The higher frequency of aberrant cells in probably associated with exposure to toluene, gravure printing dyes and in all three groups also with the highly contaminated communal atmosphere.

  13. Adaptive phase aberration correction based on imperialist competitive algorithm.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, R; Hajimahmoodzadeh, M; Fallah, H R

    2014-01-01

    We investigate numerically the feasibility of phase aberration correction in a wavefront sensorless adaptive optical system, based on the imperialist competitive algorithm (ICA). Considering a 61-element deformable mirror (DM) and the Strehl ratio as the cost function of ICA, this algorithm is employed to search the optimum surface profile of DM for correcting the phase aberrations in a solid-state laser system. The correction results show that ICA is a powerful correction algorithm for static or slowly changing phase aberrations in optical systems, such as solid-state lasers. The correction capability and the convergence speed of this algorithm are compared with those of the genetic algorithm (GA) and stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm. The results indicate that these algorithms have almost the same correction capability. Also, ICA and GA are almost the same in convergence speed and SPGD is the fastest of these algorithms.

  14. Prospects for electron beam aberration correction using sculpted phase masks.

    PubMed

    Shiloh, Roy; Remez, Roei; Arie, Ady

    2016-04-01

    Technological advances in fabrication methods allowed the microscopy community to take incremental steps towards perfecting the electron microscope, and magnetic lens design in particular. Still, state of the art aberration-corrected microscopes are yet 20-30 times shy of the theoretical electron diffraction limit. Moreover, these microscopes consume significant physical space and are very expensive. Here, we show how a thin, sculpted membrane is used as a phase-mask to induce specific aberrations into an electron beam probe in a standard high resolution TEM. In particular, we experimentally demonstrate beam splitting, two-fold astigmatism, three-fold astigmatism, and spherical aberration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Hyperphosphorylation of RyRs Underlies Triggered Activity in Transgenic Rabbit Model of LQT2 Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Terentyev, Dmitry; Rees, Colin M.; Li, Weiyan; Cooper, Leroy L.; Jindal, Hitesh K.; Peng, Xuwen; Lu, Yichun; Terentyeva, Radmila; Odening, Katja E.; Daley, Jean; Bist, Kamana; Choi, Bum-Rak; Karma, Alain; Koren, Gideon

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Loss-of function mutations in HERG potassium channels underlie long QT syndrome (LQTS) type 2 (LQT2), and are associated with fatal ventricular tachyarrhythmia. Previously, most studies focused on plasmamembrane-related pathways involved in arrhythmogenesis in LQTS, while pro-arrhythmic changes in intracellular Ca2+ handling remained unexplored. Objective We investigated the remodeling of Ca2+ homeostasis in ventricular cardiomyocytes derived from transgenic rabbit model of LQT2 in order to determine whether these changes contribute to triggered activity in the form of early afterdepolarizations (EADs). Methods and Results Confocal Ca2+ imaging revealed decrease in amplitude of Ca2+ transients and SR Ca2+ content in LQT2 myocytes. Experiments using SR-entrapped Ca2+ indicator demonstrated enhanced RyR-mediated SR Ca2+ leak in LQT2 cells. Western blot analyses showed increased phosphorylation of RyR in LQT2 myocytes vs. controls. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated loss of protein phosphatases type 1 and type 2 from the RyR complex. Stimulation of LQT2 cells with β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol resulted in prolongation of the plateau of action potentials accompanied by aberrant Ca2+ releases and EADs, which were abolished by inhibition of CaMKII. Computer simulations showed that late aberrant Ca2+ releases caused by RyR hyperactivity promote EADs and underlie the enhanced triggered activity through increased forward mode of NCX1. Conclusions Hyperactive, hyperphosphorylated RyRs due to reduced local phosphatase activity enhance triggered activity in LQT2 syndrome. EADs are promoted by aberrant RyR-mediated Ca2+ releases that are present despite a reduction of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) content. Those releases increase forward mode NCX1, thereby slowing repolarization and enabling L-type Ca2+ current reactivation. PMID:25249569

  16. Aberrant hepatic arteries running through pancreatic parenchyma encountered during pancreatoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Xu, Jianwei; Sun, Dong; Zhang, Zongli

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Aberrant hepatic arteries (HAs) encountered during pancreatoduodenectomy are difficult to manage. Mehtods: Two cases with rare types of aberrant HA running through the pancreatic parenchyma were reviewed. Results: The first case, a 68-year-old man, was admitted with obstructive jaundice. A tumor of the pancreatic head and aberrant HAs were suspected on computed tomography (CT) scan. At laparotomy, a new variation was identified; namely, 2 aberrant arteries—a right replaced HA and middle HA (RMHA) that both originated from the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and ran via intrapancreatic paths posterior and anterior to the pancreatic head, respectively. Branches of the RMHA to the pancreas were ligated and severed and the trunk preserved. The RMHA was mistakenly identified as an aberrant left HA (RLHA), whereas the RLHA was overlooked and not dissected intraoperatively. CT angiography performed 11 days postoperatively identified that the RLHA originated from the left gastric artery (LGA). The second case had a variation of Michels IX. A 58-year-old woman presented with obstructive jaundice and a distal cholangiocarcinoma was suspected on the basis of enhanced CT scan. At laparotomy, the common hepatic artery (CHA) was found to originate entirely from the SMA and run posterior to the pancreatic head via an intrapancreatic path. The segment of CHA in the pancreatic parenchyma was removed and reconstructed with the LGA. Conclusions: Preoperative identification of aberrant HAs helps in planning appropriate operative procedures and minimizing unnecessary complications. Both preservation and reconstruction of these arteries are technically safe and feasible; however, preservation is preferable. PMID:27930504

  17. The BHVI-EyeMapper: peripheral refraction and aberration profiles.

    PubMed

    Fedtke, Cathleen; Ehrmann, Klaus; Falk, Darrin; Bakaraju, Ravi C; Holden, Brien A

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this article was to present the optical design of a new instrument (BHVI-EyeMapper, EM), which is dedicated to rapid peripheral wavefront measurements across the visual field for distance and near, and to compare the peripheral refraction and higher-order aberration profiles obtained in myopic eyes with and without accommodation. Central and peripheral refractive errors (M, J180, and J45) and higher-order aberrations (C[3, 1], C[3, 3], and C[4, 0]) were measured in 26 myopic participants (mean [±SD] age, 20.9 [±2.0] years; mean [±SD] spherical equivalent, -3.00 [±0.90] diopters [D]) corrected for distance. Measurements were performed along the horizontal visual field with (-2.00 to -5.00 D) and without (+1.00 D fogging) accommodation. Changes as a function of accommodation were compared using tilt and curvature coefficients of peripheral refraction and aberration profiles. As accommodation increased, the relative peripheral refraction profiles of M and J180 became significantly (p < 0.05) more negative and the profile of M became significantly (p < 0.05) more asymmetric. No significant differences were found for the J45 profiles (p > 0.05). The peripheral aberration profiles of C[3, 1], C[3, 3], and C[4, 0] became significantly (p < 0.05) less asymmetric as accommodation increased, but no differences were found in the curvature. The current study showed that significant changes in peripheral refraction and higher-order aberration profiles occurred during accommodation in myopic eyes. With its extended measurement capabilities, that is, permitting rapid peripheral refraction and higher-order aberration measurements up to visual field angles of ±50 degrees for distance and near (up to -5.00 D), the EM is a new advanced instrument that may provide additional insights in the ongoing quest to understand and monitor myopia development.

  18. Adaptive and aberrant reward prediction signals in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Roiser, Jonathan P.; Stephan, Klaas E.; den Ouden, Hanneke E.M.; Friston, Karl J.; Joyce, Eileen M.

    2010-01-01

    Theories of the positive symptoms of schizophrenia hypothesize a role for aberrant reinforcement signaling driven by dysregulated dopamine transmission. Recently, we provided evidence of aberrant reward learning in symptomatic, but not asymptomatic patients with schizophrenia, using a novel paradigm, the Salience Attribution Test (SAT). The SAT is a probabilistic reward learning game that employs cues that vary across task-relevant and task-irrelevant dimensions; it provides behavioral indices of adaptive and aberrant reward learning. As an initial step prior to future clinical studies, here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine the neural basis of adaptive and aberrant reward learning during the SAT in healthy volunteers. As expected, cues associated with high relative to low reward probabilities elicited robust hemodynamic responses in a network of structures previously implicated in motivational salience; the midbrain, in the vicinity of the ventral tegmental area, and regions targeted by its dopaminergic projections, i.e. medial dorsal thalamus, ventral striatum and prefrontal cortex (PFC). Responses in the medial dorsal thalamus and polar PFC were strongly correlated with the degree of adaptive reward learning across participants. Finally, and most importantly, differential dorsolateral PFC and middle temporal gyrus (MTG) responses to cues with identical reward probabilities were very strongly correlated with the degree of aberrant reward learning. Participants who showed greater aberrant learning exhibited greater dorsolateral PFC responses, and reduced MTG responses, to cues erroneously inferred to be less strongly associated with reward. The results are discussed in terms of their implications for different theories of associative learning. PMID:19969090

  19. Chromosome aberration assays in genetic toxicology testing in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ishidate, M; Miura, K F; Sofuni, T

    1998-08-03

    The chromosome aberration test using cultured mammalian cells is one of the sensitive methods to predict environmental mutagens and/or carcinogens, and is a complementary test to the Salmonella/microsome assay (Ames test). From our recent survey of 951 chemicals which have been tested for their clastogenicity in cultured mammalian cells such as Chinese hamster fibroblasts or human lymphocytes, it was noted that 47% of them are consistently positive either with or without metabolic activation. When the test was performed using the cell line CHL/IU, 39.2% (292/745) were found to be positive. However, 8% (36/447) of such clastogens were positive only at an extremely high concentration of more than 10 mM. About 11% (48/447) of clastogens such as diethylstilbestrol (DES) and methyl AalphaC (Glob-P-1) induced mainly polyploid cells. Most chemicals induced chromatid-type aberrations, some induce only break-type aberrations at relatively high dose levels, but others induce more exchange-type aberrations at relatively low dose levels. Clastogenic activities were compared among different clastogens, using the D20 value, which is the minimum dose (mg/ml) at which aberrations were found in 20% of metaphases. In addition, the translocation (TR) value was calculated from the incidence of cells with exchange-type aberrations. It was suggested that possible carcinogens are included in the group of compounds with relatively low D20 values, but with high TR values. Karyological analysis was performed, using a FISH painting probe prepared from No. 1 chromosome of CHO cells, on the clonal subline isolated after treatment with benzo(a)pyrene. However, no specific changes common to the agent were detected. Laser scanning cytometry (LSC) was also applied to screen for abnormal karyotypes. A translocation between particular chromosomes was reflected by the deletion of a DNA peak.

  20. Aberrant actin depolymerization triggers the pyrin inflammasome and autoinflammatory disease that is dependent on IL-18, not IL-1β

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Man Lyang; Chae, Jae Jin; Park, Yong Hwan; De Nardo, Dominic; Stirzaker, Roslynn A.; Ko, Hyun-Ja; Tye, Hazel; Cengia, Louise; DiRago, Ladina; Metcalf, Donald; Roberts, Andrew W.; Kastner, Daniel L.; Lew, Andrew M.; Lyras, Dena; Kile, Benjamin T.; Croker, Ben A.

    2015-01-01

    Gain-of-function mutations that activate the innate immune system can cause systemic autoinflammatory diseases associated with increased IL-1β production. This cytokine is activated identically to IL-18 by an intracellular protein complex known as the inflammasome; however, IL-18 has not yet been specifically implicated in the pathogenesis of hereditary autoinflammatory disorders. We have now identified an autoinflammatory disease in mice driven by IL-18, but not IL-1β, resulting from an inactivating mutation of the actin-depolymerizing cofactor Wdr1. This perturbation of actin polymerization leads to systemic autoinflammation that is reduced when IL-18 is deleted but not when IL-1 signaling is removed. Remarkably, inflammasome activation in mature macrophages is unaltered, but IL-18 production from monocytes is greatly exaggerated, and depletion of monocytes in vivo prevents the disease. Small-molecule inhibition of actin polymerization can remove potential danger signals from the system and prevents monocyte IL-18 production. Finally, we show that the inflammasome sensor of actin dynamics in this system requires caspase-1, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain, and the innate immune receptor pyrin. Previously, perturbation of actin polymerization by pathogens was shown to activate the pyrin inflammasome, so our data now extend this guard hypothesis to host-regulated actin-dependent processes and autoinflammatory disease. PMID:26008898

  1. Aberrant actin depolymerization triggers the pyrin inflammasome and autoinflammatory disease that is dependent on IL-18, not IL-1β.

    PubMed

    Kim, Man Lyang; Chae, Jae Jin; Park, Yong Hwan; De Nardo, Dominic; Stirzaker, Roslynn A; Ko, Hyun-Ja; Tye, Hazel; Cengia, Louise; DiRago, Ladina; Metcalf, Donald; Roberts, Andrew W; Kastner, Daniel L; Lew, Andrew M; Lyras, Dena; Kile, Benjamin T; Croker, Ben A; Masters, Seth L

    2015-06-01

    Gain-of-function mutations that activate the innate immune system can cause systemic autoinflammatory diseases associated with increased IL-1β production. This cytokine is activated identically to IL-18 by an intracellular protein complex known as the inflammasome; however, IL-18 has not yet been specifically implicated in the pathogenesis of hereditary autoinflammatory disorders. We have now identified an autoinflammatory disease in mice driven by IL-18, but not IL-1β, resulting from an inactivating mutation of the actin-depolymerizing cofactor Wdr1. This perturbation of actin polymerization leads to systemic autoinflammation that is reduced when IL-18 is deleted but not when IL-1 signaling is removed. Remarkably, inflammasome activation in mature macrophages is unaltered, but IL-18 production from monocytes is greatly exaggerated, and depletion of monocytes in vivo prevents the disease. Small-molecule inhibition of actin polymerization can remove potential danger signals from the system and prevents monocyte IL-18 production. Finally, we show that the inflammasome sensor of actin dynamics in this system requires caspase-1, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain, and the innate immune receptor pyrin. Previously, perturbation of actin polymerization by pathogens was shown to activate the pyrin inflammasome, so our data now extend this guard hypothesis to host-regulated actin-dependent processes and autoinflammatory disease.

  2. Aberration Theory - A Spectrum Of Design Techniques For The Perplexed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, David

    1986-10-01

    The early medieval scholar Maimonides wrote a famous book called "Guide for the Perplexed", which explained various thorny philosophical and religious questions for the benefit of the puzzled novice. I wish I had had such a person to guide me when I first started a career in lens design. There the novice is often struck by how much of an "art" this endeavor is. The best bet, for a beginner with no experience, should be to turn to optical aberration theory - which, in principle, should explain much of what goes into designing an optical system. Unfortunately, this subject is usually presented in the form of proofs and derivations, with little time spent on the practical implications of aberration theory. Furthermore, a new generation of lens designers, who grew up with the computer, often consider aberration theory as an unnecessary relic from the past. My career, by contrast, is based on the conviction that using the results of aberration theory is the only intelligent way to design optical systems. Computers are an invaluable aide, but we must, ultimately, bite the bullet and think. Along these lines, I have given several papers over the last few years which deal directly with the philosophy of lens design; the kind of guides for the perplexed that I wished I had had from the start. These papers include: "Lens design on a desert island - A simple method of optical design", "A modular method of optical design", "Optical design with air lenses", "Optical design with 'phantom' aspherics", "Optical design methods: your head as a personal computer", "Aberration theory and the meaning of life", and a paper at Innsbruck - "Some interesting correspondences in aberration theory". In all cases, the emphasis is on using your head to think, and the computer to help you out with the numerical work and the "fine-tuning" of a design. To hope that the computer will do the thinking for you is folly. Solutions gained by this route rarely equal the results of an experienced and

  3. Adaptive aberration correction of GRIN lenses for confocal endomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, W. M.; Yun, S. H.

    2012-01-01

    Graded-index (GRIN) lenses serve as a key component for miniature endoscopes because of their small diameters and ease of assembly. However, the nonaplanatic nature of GRIN lenses causes inherent spatial aberrations that lower image resolution and sharpness. Here we present the diagnosis of the aberrations in GRIN probes and the use of adaptive optics to compensate for the wavefront errors in the endoscope. Two different operation schemes based on preset and in situ measurements are demonstrated, both resulting in a substantial reduction of the wavefront error from 0.42 to <0.1 μm. PMID:22139258

  4. An integrative characterization of recurrent molecular aberrations in glioblastoma genomes.

    PubMed

    Sintupisut, Nardnisa; Liu, Pei-Ling; Yeang, Chen-Hsiang

    2013-10-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant primary brain tumor in adults. Decades of investigations and the recent effort of the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project have mapped many molecular alterations in GBM cells. Alterations on DNAs may dysregulate gene expressions and drive malignancy of tumors. It is thus important to uncover causal and statistical dependency between 'effector' molecular aberrations and 'target' gene expressions in GBMs. A rich collection of prior studies attempted to combine copy number variation (CNV) and mRNA expression data. However, systematic methods to integrate multiple types of cancer genomic data-gene mutations, single nucleotide polymorphisms, CNVs, DNA methylations, mRNA and microRNA expressions and clinical information-are relatively scarce. We proposed an algorithm to build 'association modules' linking effector molecular aberrations and target gene expressions and applied the module-finding algorithm to the integrated TCGA GBM data sets. The inferred association modules were validated by six tests using external information and datasets of central nervous system tumors: (i) indication of prognostic effects among patients; (ii) coherence of target gene expressions; (iii) retention of effector-target associations in external data sets; (iv) recurrence of effector molecular aberrations in GBM; (v) functional enrichment of target genes; and (vi) co-citations between effectors and targets. Modules associated with well-known molecular aberrations of GBM-such as chromosome 7 amplifications, chromosome 10 deletions, EGFR and NF1 mutations-passed the majority of the validation tests. Furthermore, several modules associated with less well-reported molecular aberrations-such as chromosome 11 CNVs, CD40, PLXNB1 and GSTM1 methylations, and mir-21 expressions-were also validated by external information. In particular, modules constituting trans-acting effects with chromosome 11 CNVs and cis-acting effects with chromosome

  5. Increased frequency of chromosomal aberrations in railroad car painters.

    PubMed

    Piña-Calva, A; Madrigal-Bujaidar, E; Fuentes, M V; Neria, P; Pérez-Lucio, C; Vélez-Zamora, N M

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if exposure to paints and solvents contributes to chromosomal alterations in occupationally exposed individuals. A total of 25 male railroad and underground railroad car painters were studied. This group had a mean age of 32.7 y and a mean exposure time of 5.2 y. The results were compared with those obtained for 25 healthy (unexposed) males. The scoring of structural chromosome aberrations clearly revealed an increase in the number of all types of aberrations considered in the population of painters. This suggests that exposure to a combination of chemicals may increase genotoxicity in industrial workers.

  6. Aberration compensation and resolution improvement of focus modulation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Juanjuan; Gao, Peng; Shao, Xiaopeng

    2017-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) has wide applications in biological research and medical diagnosis. However, the spatial resolution and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of CLSM is reduced in the presence of an aberration. Here we improve the p