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Sample records for italy cathedral marble

  1. Synthetic Consolidants Attacked by Melanin-Producing Fungi: Case Study of the Biodeterioration of Milan (Italy) Cathedral Marble Treated with Acrylics▿

    PubMed Central

    Cappitelli, Francesca; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Casadevall, Arturo; Toniolo, Lucia; Brusetti, Lorenzo; Florio, Sofia; Principi, Pamela; Borin, Sara; Sorlini, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    Monuments and artistic stone surfaces are often consolidated and protected with synthetic polymers, in particular, acrylics. Although it is generally thought that acrylic polymers are resistant to biodeterioration, we report for the first time the systematic occurrence of dematiaceous meristematic fungi on many marble samples of the cathedral in Milan (Italy) previously treated with this material. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy applied to the Milan cathedral stone samples revealed characteristic features of biodeteriorated synthetic resins that differentiated them from the aged but nonbiodeteriorated samples. Samples showing biological colonization were analyzed for the presence of fungi. Cultivation and morphological characterization and methods independent from cultivation, such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis coupled with partial 18S rRNA gene sequencing and immunofluorescence staining with melanin-binding antibodies, showed that melanin-producing species are heavily present on stone surfaces protected with acrylic resins. This observation raises the question of the effectiveness of acrylics in protecting stone artworks. PMID:17071788

  2. The romanesque marble portals of Schloss Tirol/Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recheis, A.; Bidner, Th.; Hauser, W.; Mirwald, P. W.

    2003-04-01

    Marble artifacts are confronted with two kinds of problems: i) weathering, which is a task for material conservation research, ii) unclear provenance which creates problems with respect to historical interpretations. An art historically very prominent example are the two romanesque marble portals of Schloß Tyrol/ South Tyrol/Italy, the Palas portal at the entrance sheltered by a canopy and the Chapel portal leading directly from the palas hall into the chapel. Stilistic criteria and historical sources date them into the 12th century (1). The performed study concerned a detailed macroscopic mapping and ultrasonic work (2) as well as petrographical and chemical investigations on some very small drill core samples. The map-ping and ultrasonic work revealed that the Palas portal is significantly more weathered and damaged than the chapel portal. At first glance this finding seems consistent with the location of the objects. However, even if a reported period of some 120 years of unsheltered free exposure of the Palas portal after its construction is taken into account, the weathering impacts are too severe (5). A fire catastrophy documented around 1300 might be considered the relevant damage event. This again sheds some light on the specific history of the well preserved Chapel portal: stylistically both portals are contemporaneous, so one may assume that it had been taken from another locality and was built in later. A potential candidate for this is a karolingian church (7-8th century) outside the castle-complex of which the relics have been excavated recently. This picture is substantiated by the results of the material investigations (grain size, chemistry and C, O isotopes (3)) suggesting different provenance of the marbles of the two portals. Comparative studies on the regional marbles speak in favour for Laas Marble for the Palas portal and Sterzing Marble for the Chapel portal (4). The study is continued with a detailed investigation on the supposed fire

  3. Comparison of the occupational safety applications in marble quarries of Carrara (Italy) and Iscehisar (Turkey) by using Elmeri method.

    PubMed

    Ersoy, Metin; Yesilkaya, Liyaddin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a brief summary is given about marble quarries in Carrara (Italy) and Iscehisar (Turkey), the Elmeri method is introduced, work accidents that can happen in marble quarries and their causes besides work safety behaviours in fields are explained, and the Elmeri monitoring method is applied and analysed. For this reason, marble quarries are divided into seven in terms of working conditions and active six quarries both in Carrara and Iscehisar areas, and work safety behaviours are analysed. Analysis process is based on True-False method; there are 18 items in total under six main topics; three items on each topic. The safety index for each section and the main topics are also calculated. According to the calculated safety indexes, Carrara area marble quarries (65.08%) are safer than Iscehisar area marble quarries (46.01%).

  4. Geological hazard zonation in a marble exploitation area (Apuan Alps, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francioni, M.; Salvini, R.; Riccucci, S.

    2011-12-01

    The present paper describes the hazard mapping of an exploitation area sited in the Apuan Alps marble district (Italy) carried out by the integration of various survey and analysis methodologies. The research, supported by the Massa and Carrara Local Sanitary Agency responsible for workplace health and safety activities, aimed to reduce the high degree hazard of rock fall caused by the presence of potentially unstable blocks located on slopes overhanging the marble quarries. The study of rocky fronts bases on the knowledge of both the structural setting and the physical-mechanical properties of intact material and its discontinuities. In this work the main difficulty in obtaining this information was the inaccessibility of the slope overhanging the area (up to 500 meters high). For this reason, the structural and geological-engineering surveys were integrated by outcomes from digital photogrammetry carried out through terrestrial stereoscopic photos acquired from an aerostatic balloon and a helicopter. In this way, it was possible to derive the geometrical characteristics of joints (such as discontinuities dip, dip direction, spacing and persistence), blocks volumes and slopes morphology also in inaccessible areas. This information, combined with data coming from the geological-engineering survey, was used to perform the stability analysis of the slope. Subsequently, using the topographic map at the scale of 1:2,000, the Digital Terrain Model (DTM) of the slopes and several topographic profiles along it were produced. Assuming that there is a good correspondence between travelling paths and maximum down slope angle, probable trajectories of rock fall along the slope were calculated on the DTM by means of a GIS procedure which utilizes the ArcHydro module of EsriTM ArcMap software. When performing such a 2D numerical modelling of rock falls, lateral dispersion of trajectories has often been hampered by the "a priori" choice of the travelling path. Such a choice can

  5. The influence of indoor microclimate on thermal comfort and conservation of artworks: the case study of the cathedral of Matera (South Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardinale, Tiziana; Rospi, Gianluca; Cardinale, Nicola; Paterino, Lucia; Persia, Ivan

    2014-05-01

    The Matera Cathedral was built in Apulian-Romanesque style in the thirteenth century on the highest spur of the "Civita" that divides "Sassi" district in two parts. The constructive material is the calcareous stone of the Vaglia, extracted from quarries in the area of Matera. The interior is Baroque and presents several artworks, including: mortars covered with a golden patina, a wooden ceiling, painted canvas and painting frescoes, three minor altars and a major altar of precious white marble, a nativity scene made of local painted limestone. The research had to evaluate the indoor microclimate during and after the restoration works, that also concern the installation of floor heating system to heat the indoor environments. Specifically, we have analyzed the thermal comfort and the effect that the artwork and construction materials inside the Cathedral of Matera have undergone. This evaluation was carried out in two different phases: in the first one we have investigated the state of the art (history of the site, constructive typology and artworks); in the second one we have done a systematic diagnosis and an instrumental one. The analysis were carried out in a qualitative and quantitative way and have allowed us to test indoor microclimatic parameters (air temperature, relative humidity and indoor air velocity), surface temperatures of the envelope and also Fanger's comfort indices (PMV and PPD) according to the UNI EN ISO 7730. The thermal mapping of the wall surface and of the artworks, carried out through thermal imaging camera, and the instrumental measurement campaigns were made both before restoration and after installation of the heating system; in addition measurements were taken with system on and off. The analysis thus made possible to verify that the thermo-hygrometric parameters found, as a result of the recovery operations, meet the limits indicated by the regulations and international studies. In this way, we can affirm that the indoor environment

  6. Application of an integrated geotechnical and topographic monitoring system in the Lorano marble quarry (Apuan Alps, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvini, Riccardo; Vanneschi, Claudio; Riccucci, Silvia; Francioni, Mirko; Gullì, Domenico

    2015-07-01

    Accurate slope stability analysis is essential for human activity in high-risk geological contexts. This may, however, not be enough in the case of quarrying where the dynamic and evolving environment also requires effective monitoring. A well-designed monitoring system requires the acquisition of a huge dataset over time, improving knowledge of the study area and helping to refine prediction from stability analysis. This paper reports the implementation of an integrated monitoring system in a marble quarry in the Apuan Alps (Italy) and some of the results obtained. The equipment consists of a traditional geotechnical monitoring system (extensometers, crackmeters and clinometers) and two modern topographic monitoring systems (a terrestrial interferometer and a robotic total station). This work aims to provide in-depth knowledge of the large scale rock mass behaviour as a result of marble exploitation, thereby allowing continuous excavation. The results highlight the importance of integrating different monitoring systems.

  7. The Cathedral of St. Giorgio in Ragusa Ibla (Italy): a case study of the use of protective products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, Germana; Campani, Elisa; Casoli, Antonella; La Russa, Mauro Francesco; Lo Giudice, Antonino; Mazzoleni, Paolo; Pezzino, Antonino

    2008-06-01

    The Cathedral of St. Giorgio in Ragusa Ibla like the majority of historic buildings in the Ragusa area is constructed mainly from locally outcropping calcarenite belonging to the Ragusa Formation. Through the years, the cathedral has undergone diverse restoration procedures using different protective products , the nature of which was determined by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC MS). Regardless of these interventions, the materials used today are still subject to diverse forms of alterations and degradation (alveolitation, differential degradation, decohesions, chromatic alterations and the formation of biological patinas correlated to lichen activity), which cause considerable damage to the façade. In this paper, three protective products were tested on the calcarenite of the Ragusa Formation taken from a quarry: a fluorurated elastomer , a fluorurated anionic polyurethane and linseed oil. The protective efficiency was determined, after undergoing UV radiation aging by means of capillary water absorption, porosimetric and colorimetric procedures. The results highlighted a good and persistent protective capability of both the elastomer and the fluorurated polyurethane, whereas, the linseed oil not only provoked strong chromatic variations but also quickly lost its hydro-repellant capacity with aging.

  8. The Cathedral of S. Giorgio in Ragusa Ibla (Italy): characterization of construction materials and their chromatic alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, Germana; La Russa, Mauro Francesco; Lo Giudice, Antonino; Mazzoleni, Paolo; Pezzino, Antonino

    2008-08-01

    The Cathedral of St. Giorgio in Ragusa Ibla (Sicily) is one of the most important Baroque monuments of eastern Sicily. The restoration of the monument underway has put forward notable questions regarding the stone materials used and their state of degradation. The façade appears to be made mainly of a creamy white calcarenite, and of mortars and plasters. However, detailed analysis has highlighted a more complex use of the raw material. The mortar and plaster have a different composition in regards to their architectural use while the natural stone material is distinguished not only by a creamy-white calcarenite but also by a dark coloured bituminous calcarenite (pitch rock), which now appears whiter because of superficial chromatic alterations. This process was reproduced in the laboratory using an accelerated aging technique on samples of bituminous calcarenite, which allowed the cause of the alternation to be identified as photo-oxidation of the asphaltenes. Following this process of photo-oxidation, other forms of chromatic alterations affected the façade (brown orange-coloured patinas). FTIR, Scanning Electron Microscope and thin section microscopic observation allowed the characterization of also the products of this process to be carried out, highlighting the complex mechanism which the processes underwent.

  9. Sugaring marble in the Monumental Cemetery in Bologna (Italy): characterization of naturally and artificially weathered samples and first results of consolidation by hydroxyapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassoni, Enrico; Franzoni, Elisa

    2014-12-01

    The so-called sugaring of marble is a very common degradation phenomenon, affecting both historical monuments and modern buildings, which is originated by environmental temperature fluctuations. Thermal cycles are indeed responsible for micro-cracks formation at the boundaries between calcite grains, so that marble is subjected to granular disintegration and can be reduced to a sugar-like powder of isolated calcite grains by just the pressure of a finger. Since no effective, compatible and durable treatment for sugaring marble consolidation is currently available, in this paper a novel consolidating treatment recently proposed for limestone, based on the formation of hydroxyapatite inside the stone, was investigated for weathered marble. To test the new treatment on suitably decayed marble samples, some naturally sugaring marbles from the Monumental Cemetery in Bologna (Italy, nineteenth century) were firstly characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) measurement. Then, artificially weathered samples were produced by heating fresh Carrara marble samples at 400 °C for 1 h. The effects of artificial weathering were characterized using the same techniques as above, and a very good agreement was found between microstructure and mechanical features of naturally and artificially weathered samples. Then, the hydroxyapatite-based treatment was tested on the so-obtained artificially weathered samples, and the treatment effects were characterized by UPV, MIP and SEM equipped with energy dispersive spectrometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The hydroxyapatite-based treatment exhibited a remarkable ability of restoring marble cohesion and a good compatibility in terms of modifications in pore size distribution, which leads to regard this treatment as a very promising consolidant for weathered marble.

  10. The Cathedral as Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calkins, Robert G.

    1995-01-01

    Characterizes the medieval cathedral as an architectural encyclopedia, expressing the humanistic concerns, beliefs, and aspirations of the period in which it was built. Explains the theological, political, and social significance of the cathedral's architectural characteristics from the floor plan to the spires. Discusses the process and problems…

  11. Carbonate measurements in PM10 near the marble quarries of Carrara (Italy) by infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and source apportionment by positive matrix factorization (PMF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuccia, E.; Piazzalunga, A.; Bernardoni, V.; Brambilla, L.; Fermo, P.; Massabò, D.; Molteni, U.; Prati, P.; Valli, G.; Vecchi, R.

    2011-11-01

    The concentration of carbonates in atmospheric Particulate Matter (PM) is usually quite low. The surroundings of marble quarries are peculiar sites where the impact of carbonates in PM levels can be significant. We present here the results of a PM10 sampling campaign performed in Carrara (Italy). The town lies between the famous marble quarries and the harbour: about 1000 trucks per day transport marble blocks and debris from the quarries to the harbour passing through the town centre. PM10 was collected on daily basis on PTFE filters analyzed by Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (ED-XRF) and Ion-Chromatography (IC). Carbonate concentration was measured by a non-destructive Infrared Spectroscopy analysis (FT-IR). Time series of elemental (Na-Pb by ED-XRF), ionic (SO 42-, NH 4+ by ion-chromatography) and carbonate (by FT-IR) concentration values were merged in a unique data set and a PMF analysis singled out the major PM10 sources in the area. Marble transportation turned out to be the major pollution source in the town accounting to PM10 for about 36%; this corresponded to a CaCO 3 average level of about 8 μg m -3 during working days. The FT-IR analysis was a crucial part of the work and an ad-hoc analytical procedure was specifically set up, calibrated, and tested as described in the text.

  12. Petrographic characterization and provenance determination of the white marbles used in the Roman sculptures of Forum Sempronii (Fossombrone, Marche, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonelli, Fabrizio; Columbu, Stefano; Lezzerini, Marco; Miriello, Domenico

    2014-06-01

    The Roman municipium of Forum Sempronii (Fossombrone, Marche) was located along the `Via Consolare Flaminia', in the stretch of road where it ran along the final sector of the valley of the River Metauro ( Mataurus). The ancient colony of Forum Sempronii, which is cited by Strabo, Pliny, and Ptolemy, was found in the second century BC, probably on the site of an earlier community and its activity continued until the end of the fifth century AD. During ancient and more recent archaeological excavations, many fragments of coloured stones and marbles, and some white marble sculptures have been unearthed. In this paper, we report the results of the provenance identification of the white marbles used for the sculptures found in the archaeological site of Forum Sempronii and now displayed at the local archaeological museum. The determination of the source origin of the white marbles used for the sculptures has been established by mineralogical-petrographic and geochemical analyses. Microscopic study of thin sections together with carbon and oxygen stable isotope ratios indicate that more than one type of white marbles was used: Pentelikon, Lunense, and Thasian.

  13. Raman and XRD characterization of Moroccan Marbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrissi, S.; Haddad, M.; Bejjit, L.; Ait Lyazidi, S.; El Amraoui, M.; Falguères, C.

    2017-03-01

    Various marbles collected from Moroccan careers, and two white reference marbles originating from Carrare-Italy and Drama-Greece, have been studied by different analytical techniques. Chemical composition of rocks has been determined by X-Ray fluorescence. X-Ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy allowed the identification of both major (calcite and dolomite) and minor (quartz) mineralogical components. Moreover, Raman spectroscopy has been used to identify the calcium carbonate phases and to examine the graphitic ones in the marbles.

  14. Megalithic plan underlying canterbury cathedral.

    PubMed

    Borst, L B

    1969-02-07

    Woodhenge and the Trinity chapel, Canterbury, are strikingly similar in outline. One is megalithic, the other Norman Christian over Saxon Christian. An analysis of the geometry shows that both are based on Pythagorean triangles: Woodhenge with sides, 6, 17.5, and 18.5, and Canterbury with sides 12, 72, and 73 in megalithic yards. The structurally more recent eastern end of Canterbury Cathedral may have been built over and around an older megalithic site. The longitudinal axes of the composite cathedral differ by 2 degrees , and these, if aligned on Betelgeuse, would indicate buried megalithic structures dating from 2300, 1900, and 1500 B.C.

  15. Marbles in Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Helen; Meyers, Bernice; Schmidt, William

    1999-01-01

    Marbles were successfully used to help primary students develop concepts of motion. Marble-unit activities began with shaking and rattling inference bags and predicting by listening just how many marbles were in each bag. Students made qualitative and quantitative observations of the marbles, manipulated marbles with a partner, and observed…

  16. Carrara Marble: a nomination for Global Heritage Stone Resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    primavori, piero

    2014-05-01

    In the collective memory, in ordinary people, or in any technical office not devoted expressly to stone, marble is automatically associated with the word Carrara (Italy). Indisputably, for decades and decades, there has been this word association: marble means Carrara and Carrara means marble. In few other commodity sectors is a word so automatically associated with a name, engendering an identification process that, despite the inexorable onslaught of globalization, continues to exist. Carrara Marble, probably one of the most famous dimension stone in the world, has been recently designated as a suitable "Global Heritage Stone Resource". The additional designation of "Global Ornamental Stone" has also been proposed. Quarried since pre-Roman times, this marble is the testimonial of an area/industry that was able - for a variety of reasons not easily repeatable in future stone history - from the dawn of the stone sector to trigger a flywheel-effect on a global scale. The term Carrara Marble, geographically referable to the marbles extracted in the sorroundings of Carrara town, is in reality a general one, erroneously used since long time to define a multitude of different marbles (more than two hundred commercial varieties) extracted in the whole Apuane Alps region, Nortwestern Tuscany, Italy. The district of Carrara Marble is part of a wider territory where five important extractive areas can be recognized: Lunigiana, Garfagnana, Versilia, Massa and the Carrara area sensu stricto. This region is approximately 30 km long and 12 km wide, with marble outcrops, useful for commercial purposes, covering over 75 km2. The Carrara Marble is currently excavated in more than 100 quarries, at a rate of about 1.500.000 tons per year, is processed almost everywhere, and sold all over the world. The most important commercial designations are the following: 1) "Marmo Bianco"/"Marmo Ordinario" (Carrara White marble/Ordinary marble); 2) "Marmo Venato" (Veined marble); 3) "Marmo

  17. Subcritical crack growth in marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nara, Yoshitaka; Nishida, Yuki; Toshinori, Ii; Harui, Tomoki; Tanaka, Mayu; Kashiwaya, Koki

    2016-04-01

    It is essential to study time-dependent deformation and fracturing in various rock materials to prevent natural hazards related to the failure of a rock mass. In addition, information of time-dependent fracturing is essential to ensure the long-term stability of a rock mass surrounding various structures. Subcritical crack growth is one of the main causes of time-dependent fracturing in rock. It is known that subcritical crack growth is influenced by not only stress but also surrounding environment. Studies of subcritical crack growth have been widely conducted for silicate rocks such as igneous rocks and sandstones. By contrast, information of subcritical crack growth in carbonate rocks is not enough. Specifically, influence of surrounding environment on subcritical crack growth in carbonate rock should be clarified to ensure the long-term stability of a rock mass. In this study, subcritical crack growth in marble was investigated. Especially, the influence of the temperature, relative humidity and water on subcritical crack growth in marble is investigated. As rock samples, marbles obtained in Skopje-City in Macedonia and Carrara-City in Italy were used. To measure subcritical crack growth, we used the load relaxation method of the double-torsion (DT) test. All measurements by DT test were conducted under controlled temperature and relative humidity. For both marbles, it was shown that the crack velocity in marble in air increased with increasing relative humidity at a constant temperature. Additionally, the crack velocity in water was much higher than that in air. It was also found that the crack velocity increased with increasing temperature. It is considered that temperature and water have significant influences on subcritical crack growth in marble. For Carrara marble in air, it was recognized that the value of subcritical crack growth index became low when the crack velocity was higher than 10-4 m/s. This is similar to Region II of subcritical crack growth

  18. Italy

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    article title:  Rice Cultivation in Northwest Italy     ... cover at least 160,000 acres in this part of Italy, where rice is the most important crop. These views of the region were acquired on May ... May 8, 2005 - Natural color and composite images of rice cultivation in Northwest Italy. project:  MISR ...

  19. Carbonation of Subduction Interface Ultramafic Rocks and Implications for Deep Carbon Cycling: Evidence from Hybrid Serpentinite-Marble in the Voltri Massif, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scambelluri, M.; Bebout, G. E.; Gilio, M.; Belmonte, D.; Campomenosi, N.; Crispini, L.

    2015-12-01

    Release of COH fluids from hydrous minerals and carbonates influences element recycling and magmatism at subduction zones. Contradictory interpretations exist regarding the retention/storage of C in subducting plates and in the forearc to subarc mantle. Multiple lines of evidence indicate mobility of C in forearcs; however, the magnitude of this loss is highly uncertain[1-5]. A poorly constrained fraction of the 40-115 Mt/y of C initially subducted is released into fluids (e.g., by decarbonation, carbonate dissolution), and 18-43 Mt/y is returned at arc volcanoes[2-5, refs. therein]. The imbalance could reflect subduction into the deeper mantle or forearc/subarc storage[4-7]. We examine the fate of C in slab/interface ultramafic rocks, and by analogy serpentinized mantle wedge, via study of fluid-rock evolution of marble and variably carbonated serpentinite (Ligurian Alps). Based on petrography, and major/trace element and C and O isotope compositions, we demonstrate that serpentinite dehydration at 2-2.5 GPa, 550°C released aqueous fluids triggering breakdown of dolomite in nearby marbles, thus releasing C into fluids. Carbonate + olivine veins document flow of COH fluids; interaction of these COH fluids with serpentinite led to formation of high-pressure carbonated ultramafic-rock domains, thus resulting in retention of C in some rocks at an ancient subduction interface. We stress that lithologically complex interfaces could contain sites of both C release and C addition, further confounding estimates of net C loss at forearc and subarc depths [cf 4,5]. Sites of C retention, also including carbonate veins and graphite as reduced carbonate[7], could influence the transfer of slab C to at least the depths beneath volcanic fronts. 1. Poli S et al. 2009 EPSL; 2. Ague and Nicolescu 2014 Nat Geosci; 3. Cook-Collars et al. 2014 Chem Geol; 4. Collins et al. 2015 Chem Geol; 5. Kelemen and Manning 2015 PNAS; 6. Sapienza et al. 2009 CMP; 7 Galvez et al. 2013 Nat Geosci

  20. Cathedral house & crocker fence, Taylor Street east and north ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cathedral house & crocker fence, Taylor Street east and north elevations, perspective view from the northeast - Grace Cathedral, George William Gibbs Memorial Hall, 1051 Taylor Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  1. Solid Mathematical Marbling.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shufang; Jin, Xiaogang; Jaffer, Aubrey; Gao, Fei; Mao, Xiaoyang

    2016-05-25

    Years of research have been devoted to computer-generated two-dimensional marbling. However, three-dimensional marbling has yet to be explored. In this paper, we present mathematical marbling of three-dimensional solids which supports a compact random-access vector representation. Our solid marbling textures are created by composing closed-form 3D pattern tool functions. These tool functions are an injection function and five deformation functions. The injection function is used to generate basic patterns, and the deformation functions are responsible for transforming the basic pattern into complex marbling effects. The resulting representation is feature preserving and resolution-independent. Our approach can render high-quality images preserving both the sharp features and the smooth color variations of a solid texture. When implemented on the GPU, our representation enables efficient color evaluation during the real-time solid marbling texture mapping. The color of a point in the volume space is computed by the 3D pattern tool functions from its coordinates. Our method consumes very little memory because only the mathematical functions and their corresponding parameters are stored. In addition, we develop an intuitive user interface and a genetic algorithm to facilitate the solid marbling texture authoring process. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach through various solid marbling textures and 3D objects carved from them.

  2. Marvelous Marbled Underwater Scenes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walkup, Nancy

    2005-01-01

    In an effort to intrigue her fifth graders with a novel and spontaneous approach to line and movement, Nancy Walkup introduced paper marbling as a means to create remarkable decorative surface designs. To marble paper, some kind of pigment, usually oil or acrylic paint, is floated upon the surface of a liquid such as water or liquid starch. In the…

  3. A diagnosis of the yellowing of the marble high reliefs and the black decorations in the chapel of the tomb of Saint Anthony (Padua, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreotti, Alessia; Bonaduce, Ilaria; Colombini, Maria Perla; Modugno, Francesca; Ribechini, Erika

    2009-07-01

    This paper focuses on the chemical characterization of samples of black decorations and inscriptions, and of yellow-brown patinas collected from various panels of the ark from the chapel of Saint Anthony (Padua, Italy), using three analytical procedures based on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Analytical pyrolysis in the presence of hexamethyldisilazane followed by gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis (Py-GC/MS) and two procedures based on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry after wet-chemical treatment of the samples (GC/MS) were chosen for the recognition of the organic substances (used originally or in the course of restoration) and of their degradation products. In terms of the two GC/MS procedures, one was used to characterize proteins, lipids, resins, waxes, bituminous materials and their degradation products, and the other to characterize saccharide materials. The three analytical procedures used enabled us to obtain information on the presence of egg proteins, lipid materials (beeswax, siccative oil and animal fatty material), saccharide materials and Pinaceae resin. Beeswax, animal fat, egg and saccharide materials have been used in the past as restoration materials, and pine resin and siccative oil were the main ingredients in the black decorations and inscriptions.

  4. Multi-analytical approach applied to the provenance study of marbles used as covering slabs in the archaeological submerged site of Baia (Naples, Italy): The case of the "Villa con ingresso a protiro"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricca, Michela; Belfiore, Cristina Maria; Ruffolo, Silvestro Antonio; Barca, Donatella; De Buergo, Monica Alvarez; Crisci, Gino Mirocle; La Russa, Mauro Francesco

    2015-12-01

    This paper is focused on archaeometric investigations of white marbles taken from the submerged archaeological site of Baia (Naples). The marine area includes the ruins of this ancient Roman city, whose structures range from luxurious maritime villas and imperial buildings with private thermae and tabernae, to more simple and modest houses. Analyses were carried out on fifty marble fragments of covering slabs, belonging to several pavements of the monumental villa, called the Villa con ingresso a protiro, in order to ascertain their provenance. The most distinctive properties of marbles are their variety of textural property especially regarding grain size (MGS), associated with the Mn content and the variation of stable isotopes. These features, supported by the contribution of other variables and studies, establish the basis for the correct identification of the marbles. For this purpose, minero-petrographic and geochemical techniques were used. Results were compared with literature data of white marbles commonly used in antiquity, especially in the Mediterranean basin and showed that a variety of precious marbles from Carrara, Docimium (Afyon), Thasos-D, Aphrodisias, Proconnesos (Marmara), Paros and Pentelicon were used in the ancient roman city of Baia, confirming the importance of the submerged archaeological site and also allowing researchers to broaden the existing database.

  5. Deterioration of marble structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, R.J.; Hwu, H.R.; Kim, J.T.; Leu, S.M.

    1987-01-15

    The accelerated destruction of marble objects has focused attention on how the damage occurs and on the role of acid rain. Roger Cheng of the State University of New York and colleagues at the Johns Hopkins University describe their efforts to elucidate the process.

  6. Study of sulphation of Candoglia marble by means of micro X-ray diffraction experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrazzani, R.; Alessandri, I.; Bontempi, E.; Cappitelli, F.; Cianci, M.; Pantos, E.; Toniolo, L.; Depero, L. E.

    2006-06-01

    This research is aimed at assessing the particular kind of damage caused by the interaction between atmospheric pollution and the marble surface of a magnificent late gothic church, Milan Cathedral, restored in the early 1970s. On the basis of visual inspections and diagnostic investigations the facade appears to be seriously damaged by surface erosion and thick black crusts; biological crusts, micro-fractures and detachments are widely present. This paper reports on SR-μXRD data collected at the Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS), Daresbury Laboratory, and at the European Synchrotron Radiation Source (ESRF) from selected samples, covered with black crusts, originating from the Milan Cathedral facade. Mineralogical maps of the deterioration layers have been recorded by two spatial resolutions (5-100 μm), from the bulk of the stone material to the outer layer of the black surface. These maps help in elucidating the mechanism of formation of the black crusts.

  7. The Blue Marble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This spectacular Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) 'blue marble' image is based on the most detailed collection of true-color imagery of the entire Earth to date. Using a collection of satellite-based observations, scientists and visualizers stitched together months of observations of the land surface, oceans, sea ice, and clouds into a seamless, true-color mosaic of every square kilometer (.386 square mile) of our planet. Most of the information contained in this image came from MODIS, illustrating MODIS' outstanding capacity to act as an integrated tool for observing a variety of terrestrial, oceanic, and atmospheric features of the Earth. The land and coastal ocean portions of this image is based on surface observations collected from June through September 2001 and combined, or composited, every eight days to compensate for clouds that might block the satellite's view on any single day. Global ocean color (or chlorophyll) data was used to simulate the ocean surface. MODIS doesn't measure 3-D features of the Earth, so the surface observations were draped over topographic data provided by the U.S. Geological Survey EROS Data Center. MODIS observations of polar sea ice were combined with observations of Antarctica made by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's AVHRR sensor-the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer. The cloud image is a composite of two days of MODIS imagery collected in visible light wavelengths and a third day of thermal infra-red imagery over the poles. A large collection of imagery based on the blue marble in a variety of sizes and formats, including animations and the full (1 km) resolution imagery, is available at the Blue Marble page. Image by Reto Stockli, Render by Robert Simmon. Based on data from the MODIS Science Team

  8. DISTANT VIEW OF ST. FRANCIS DE SALES CATHEDRAL, LOOKING NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DISTANT VIEW OF ST. FRANCIS DE SALES CATHEDRAL, LOOKING NORTH ALONG MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. WAY FROM 14TH STREET - St. Francis de Sales Church, 2100 Martin Luther King, Jr. Way, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  9. 3-DIMENSIONAL Geometric Survey and Structural Modelling of the Dome of Pisa Cathedral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aita, D.; Barsotti, R.; Bennati, S.; Caroti, G.; Piemonte, A.

    2017-02-01

    This paper aims to illustrate the preliminary results of a research project on the dome of Pisa Cathedral (Italy). The final objective of the present research is to achieve a deep understanding of the structural behaviour of the dome, through a detailed knowledge of its geometry and constituent materials, and by taking into account historical and architectural aspects as well. A reliable survey of the dome is the essential starting point for any further investigation and adequate structural modelling. Examination of the status quo on the surveys of the Cathedral dome shows that a detailed survey suitable for structural analysis is in fact lacking. For this reason, high-density and high-precision surveys have been planned, by considering that a different survey output is needed, according both to the type of structural model chosen and purposes to be achieved. Thus, both range-based (laser scanning) and image-based (3D Photogrammetry) survey methodologies have been used. This contribution introduces the first results concerning the shape of the dome derived from surveys. Furthermore, a comparison is made between such survey outputs and those available in the literature.

  10. Portugues Marbles as Stone Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Luis; Martins, Ruben

    2013-04-01

    The main objective of this paper is to present and justify the reasons for the worldwide recognition of Portuguese Marbles as Stone Heritage. These marbles are also known as "Estremoz Marble" since was the first county were exploited. In the Estremoz Anticline marbles occupy an intermediate stratigraphic position being part of a volcano-sedimentary sequence of Cambrian age. The anticlinal structure has a Precambrian core and the younger rocks aged Devonian Period. This sequence has deformed by the Variscan Orogeny, which performed twice with different intensities both in ductile and brittle tension fields. The early Alpine Cycle also acts in the region and cause more fracturing of the marble. Practically in all the quarries is possible to perceive the spatial-temporal continuity of the deformation where one can describe a complete Wilson Cycle. Together all these geological features imprint the marbles beautiful aesthetic patterns that can be highlighted when used as dimension stone. Nowadays most of the quarries are placed in the counties of Borba and mainly in Vila Viçosa. This last city claims for itself the "Capital of the Marble" title and named the marble as "White Gold". In fact, according to the historical record, the marbles were quarried in Portuguese Alentejo's Province since the fourth century BC. Locally these geological materials are available easily accessible. Exhibit physical properties that allow the fabrication of structural and decorative elements and so were used since humans settled in the region and developed a structured Society. In the Roman period, the pieces of art made with Estremoz Marbles were exported abroad and today are represented in Museums and Archaeological Sites throughout Europe and North Africa countries. The Portuguese Marbles and Limestones, transformed into altars, stairways, columns, statues and pieces of wall cladding, were carried as ballast in the holds of ships. At the destination the Portuguese People had built

  11. Similar Fracture Patterns in Human Nose and Gothic Cathedral.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shu Jin; Tse, Kwong Ming; Lee, Heow Pueh

    2015-10-01

    This study proposes that the bony anatomy of the human nose and masonry structure of the Gothic cathedral are geometrically similar, and have common fracture patterns. We also aim to correlate the fracture patterns observed in patients' midface structures with those seen in the Gothic cathedral using computational approach. CT scans of 33 patients with facial fractures were examined and compared with computer simulations of both the Gothic cathedral and human nose. Three similar patterns were found: (1) Cracks of the nasal arch with crumpling of the vertical buttresses akin to the damage seen during minor earthquakes; (2) lateral deviation of the central nasal arch and collapse of the vertical buttresses akin to those due to lateral forces from wind and in major earthquakes; and (3) Central arch collapse seen as a result of collapse under excessive dead weight. Interestingly, the finding of occult nasal and septal fractures in the mandible fractures with absence of direct nasal trauma highlights the possibility of transmission of forces from the foundation to the arch leading to structural failure. It was also found that the structural buttresses of the Gothic cathedral delineate the vertical buttresses in the human midface structure. These morphologic similarities between the human nose and Gothic cathedral will serve as a basis to study the biomechanics of nasal fractures. Identification of structural buttresses in a skeletal structure has important implications for reconstruction as reestablishment of structural continuity restores normal anatomy and architectural stability of the human midface structure.

  12. Study of marble deterioration at City Hall, Schenectady, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, R.J.; Castillo, R.

    1984-01-01

    Constructed in 1930 at a cost of over one million dollars, the City Hall in Schenectady, New York, is listed in the U.S. Register of Historical Buildings. The masonry materials were the finest available at the time of construction; granite, fire hardened exterior brick and Vermont marble - Imperical Danby, an equivalent to Carrara marble from Italy. It is known today that the lack of impurities in the Imperial Danby leads to weak crystalline properties. Cleaned with water, sponges and stiff brushes upon completion of construction, the exterior was not cleaned over a fifty-year period. The research indicated that the marble grains are being structurally weakened by a chemical conversion process of marble to gypsum crystals. The surface zone of chemical activity (2-5 mm) shows the presence of fly ash and iron particles and points to the possibility of a catalytic mechanism for the conversion of sulfur dioxide to sulfate. This research has established symptoms which are consistent with prior reported research into building material deterioration. However, the results presented are not supportive of one mechanism over another.

  13. Marble Cake Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langmuir, C. H.

    2007-12-01

    Since the original suggestions by Hanson (Geol. Soc. London, 1977) and Allegre and Turcotte (Nature, 1986), the concept of a "veined" or "marble cake" mantle has gained wide acceptance as a paradigm for mantle composition and components. The "veined mantle" was conceived thinking of the mantle as an ultramafic migmatite with many types of veins, but emphasized metasomatic components contained in hydrous phases as an explanation for alkali basalts. The "marble cake" mantle emphasized recycled oceanic lithosphere. Both types of veins are inevitable consequences of mantle convection. Oceanic lithosphere is recycled and stretched; low melting components of the mantle are inevitably melted in ascending mantle flow, even beneath thick lithsosphere. Both vein types have been widely invoked to explain incompatible element enriched basalts from the mantle. Most recently, disequilibrium melting of veined mantle sources by various mechanisms have become a popular suggestion to explain diverse aspects of mantle geochemistry (e.g. Sobolev et al., Nature, 2005; Phipps Morgan et al., EPSL, 1999). The physical mechanisms that would allow disequilibrium melting of fine scale veins, however, remain to be demonstrated. Average upper mantle composition is residual to continents and requires removal of low F melts to generate the depleted MORB source, and enrichment by low F melts to create the enriched source. Such a process is also necessary in the Sobolev et al model for Hawaii, which generates the equivalent of a low F melt by two stages of larger degree melting. Enriched sources are not restricted to ocean islands, and the name "OIB source" is a misnomer. Enriched basalts occur on normal ridges, in back-arc basins, behind subduction zones, in continental rifts and in isolated volcanic cones. Most of these are not mantle plumes. Enriched components have been ascribed to recycled ocean lithosphere, but recycled ocean crust is depleted, not enriched. Therefore the isotopic signature

  14. Cathedrals: Stone Upon Stone. Young Discovery Library Series: 24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandiol-Coppin, Brigitte

    Part of an international series of amply illustrated, colorful, small size books for children ages 5 to 10, this volume outlines the step-by-step process of building a cathedral in the Middle Ages. Terms are defined and artisan techniques explained for each step on the way to building the edifice. The text also relates the story of how families…

  15. Marble decay due to microcracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shushakova, V.; Fuller, E. R., Jr.; Heidelbach, F.; Siegesmund, S.

    2012-04-01

    An actual degradation phenomenon of marble structures, i.e., microcracking, is examined via computer simulations with a microstructure-based finite element modelling. Crack initiation and crack propagation were characterized, as well their dependence on grain- shape preferred orientation (SPO), lattice preferred orientation (LPO), grain size and grain-boundary fracture toughness. Calcite is used as an illustrative example. Results are expected to be general for myriad marble microstructures, as the thermophysical properties of various marbles do not differ that much. Three SPOs were analyzed: equiaxed grains; elongated grains and a mixture of equiaxed and elongated grains. Six LPOs were considered: a random orientation distribution function (ODF); an ODF with strong directional crystal texture generated via March Dollase fiber-texture; and four types of actual marble texture as measured on marble samples with electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD). Two different grain sizes were analyzed: fine grains range up to 200μm and medium size grains of approximate 1mm. The fracture surface energy for the grain boundaries was chosen to be 20 % and 40 % of the fracture surface energy of a grain, so that both intergranular and transgranular fractures were possible. Simulations were performed for both heating and cooling by 50 °C in steps of 1 °C. Microcracking results were correlated with the thermoelastic responses (indicators) related to degradation. Certain combinations of SPO, LPO, grain size, and grain-boundary fracture toughness have a significant influence on the thermal-elastic response of marble. For instance, thermal stresses and elastic strain energy are a strong function of the LPO. With increasing LPO the strain energy density and the maximum principal stress decreases. With decreasing grain size and increasing LPO and SPO, the area of microcracking is smaller and microcracking commences at a higher temperature differential.

  16. Candoglia Marble and the "Veneranda Fabbrica del Duomo di Milano": a resource for Global Heritage Stone Designation in the Italian Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, Alessandro; Castelli, Daniele; Corbetta, Elio; Antonella Dino, Giovanna

    2015-04-01

    Alpine marbles have been widely used in the past for celebrated, both indoor and outdoor, applications. Among them, the Candoglia Marble, a worldwide known and appreciated georesource, and its "bastard brother" from the nearby Ornavasso area were and are exploited in the Verbano-Cusio-Ossola quarry basin of Northwestern Italian Alps. They crop out as lenses (up to 30 m in thickness) interlayered within high-grade paragneisses of the Ivrea Zone, a section of deep continental crust that experienced amphibolite- to granulite-facies metamorphism of Palaeozoic age. The Candoglia and Ornavasso Marbles are pinkish to greyish, coarse-grained (> 3 mm), calcitic marbles with frequent, cm-thick, dark-greenish silicate layers containing diopside and tremolite; minor minerals include quartz, epidote, sulphides, Ba-feldspar, barite and, occasionally, phlogopite. First record of quarrying activities in the area arises to the Roman age (Ornavasso quarrying area). Both the Ornavasso and Candoglia Marbles were widely employed in local construction (San Nicola Church and Torre della Guardia at Ornavasso, Madonna di Campagna Church at Verbania, San Giovanni in Montorfano Church), but they became famous thanks to their application for the "Duomo di Milano" since the fourteenth century. At the beginning, the building stones employed for the construction of the Gothic style, Duomo di Milano were quarried in the Ornavasso area, but in a short time, the Candoglia quarry (property of the so-called "Veneranda Fabbrica del Duomo" that incessantly takes care of the Cathedral Church from 1387 A.D.) became the main quarry for the construction and maintenance of the Cathedral. The Candoglia quarry developed during the centuries, from open pit small quarries to a unique underground quarry, characterised by a very peculiar quarrying activities (subvertical bench characterized by strong lateral forces, which have to be contrasted and monitored). The Candoglia Marble was preferred to Carrara marbles

  17. The Tower and Glass Marbles Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denman, Richard T.; Hailey, David; Rothenberg, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The Catseye Marble company tests the strength of its marbles by dropping them from various levels of their office tower, to find the highest floor from which a marble will not break. We find the smallest number of drops required and from which floor each drop should be made. We also find out how these answers change if a restriction is placed on…

  18. Impact dynamics of liquid marbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, Jeremy; Supakar, Tinku

    2016-11-01

    The impact of particle coated droplets (a.k.a. liquid marbles or armored droplets) onto solid substrates is assessed experimentally with high-speed video. The impact is characterized by the maximum spread diameter, which conforms to scaling laws in terms of the impact Weber number, meaning that the marbles behave similar to water droplets during this stage. However, the motion of the particles across the surface allows us to observe both clustering and divergence of the particle shell and, in particular, we observe the formation of arrested shapes (i.e. jammed interfaces) after impact onto hydrophobic surfaces, from an initially spherical shape. In this case, we postulate that the speed of retraction and rate of change of surface coverage is a key ingredient leading to arrested shapes.

  19. Floating mechanism of a small liquid marble

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Chin Hong; Plackowski, Chris; Nguyen, Anh V.; Vadivelu, Raja K.; John, James A. St.; Dao, Dzung Viet; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-01-01

    Flotation of small solid objects and liquid droplets on water is critical to natural and industrial activities. This paper reports the floating mechanism of liquid marbles, or liquid droplets coated with hydrophobic microparticles. We used X-ray computed tomography (XCT) to acquire cross-sectional images of the floating liquid marble and interface between the different phases. We then analysed the shape of the liquid marble and the angles at the three-phase contact line (TPCL). We found that the small floating liquid marbles follow the mechanism governing the flotation of solid objects in terms of surface tension forces. However, the contact angles formed and deformation of the liquid marble resemble that of a sessile liquid droplet on a thin, elastic solid. For small liquid marbles, the contact angle varies with volume due to the deformability of the interface. PMID:26902930

  20. Biofouling of marbles by oxygenic photosynthetic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Zeki; Öztürk, Ayten; Çolak, Emel

    2015-08-01

    Phototrophic microorganisms disfigure the surfaces of different types of stone. Stone structure is damaged by the activity of photoautotrophic and other microorganisms. However, to date few, investigations have been undertaken into the relationship between microorganisms and the properties of different types of marble. In this study, biological activity of photoautotrophic microorganisms on three types of marble (Yatagan White, Giallo Anticato and Afyon White) was investigated under laboratory conditions over a short period of time. The three types of marble supported the growth of phototrophic microbial communities on their outer and inner layers, turning their original colour from white to a yellowish green colour. The porosity of the marble types facilitated filamentous microbial growth in the presence of water. Scanning electron microscope analysis revealed the accumulation of aggregates such as small spherical, fibrillar, calcified globular bodies on the inner surfaces of the marbles. This suggests that the microscopic characteristics of particular marble types may stimulate the growth of certain types of microorganisms.

  1. The Sagrada Familia Cathedral where Gaudi envisaged his bell music

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Shigeru; Narita, Takafumi

    2004-05-01

    The Sagrada Familia Cathedral in Barcelona, Spain was constructed in 1882. According to Antoni Gaudi, who worked over its grand plan, the Cathedral was supposed to be a huge musical instrument as a whole in the event of completion. As as result, the music of bells was expected to echo through the air of Barcelona from the belfries. However, Gaudi's true intention cannot be exactly known because the materials prepared by him were destroyed by war fire. If his idea of the Sagrada Familia as an architechtural music instrument is true, an acoustical balance should be considered between the roles of the Cathedral: bell music from the belfries and quiet service in the chapel. Basic structure of the Sagrada Familia seems to be an ensemble of twin towers. Following such speculation, we made a simplified acrylic 1/25-scale model of the lower structure of a twin tower located at the left side of the Birth Gate. The higher structure of this twin tower corresponds to the pinnacle where the bells should be arranged. The lower structure (about 43 m in actual height) has five passages connecting two towers. One of two towers includes five or six tandem columns whose ends are both squeezed to about 1.5 m in diameter. These columns seem to function as a kind of muffler. The location and shape of the roof over the nave is indefinite and tentatively supposed at the top of the lower structure. Based on our scale model, acoustical characteristics of the lower twin-tower structure as a muffler and acoustical differences between the exterior field and nave field will be reported and discussed.

  2. "Friends" of Anglican Cathedrals: Norms and Values. Befriending, Friending or Misnomer?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muskett, Judith A.

    2013-01-01

    Loyal supporters of Anglican cathedrals first subscribed to "Friends" associations in the late 1920s. Yet, in 1937, a journalist in "The Times" portrayed cathedrals as a "queer thing to be a friend of." Drawing on theories of friendship from a range of disciplines, and surveys of what has been proclaimed in the public…

  3. Liquid marble as microbioreactor for bioengineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvi, Fatemeh; Jain, Kanika; Alhasan, Layla; Arbatan, Tina; Shen, Wei; Chan, Peggy P. Y.

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports the use of liquid marbles (LMs) as miniature bioreactors to produce three-dimensional (3D) spheroids including tumor-like spheriods from cancer cells and embryoid bodies (EBs) from stem cells. A liquid marble microbioreactor is prepared by placing a drop of cell suspension onto a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) particle bed. Without the addition of growth factors, suspended EBs from liquid marbles exhibit spontaneous contraction. These results indicate that the liquid marble provides a suitable microenvironment to induce EB formation and spontaneous cardiac differentiation. The EBs were further plated onto gelatin-coated tissue culture dishes. Plated EBs express mature cardiomyocyte marker cardiac troponinT (cTnT), indicating that these EBs have differentiated into functional cardiomyocytes. The cardiomyocytes generated using this liquid marble approach could be useful for transplantation.

  4. From polymer latexes to multifunctional liquid marbles.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Ana M; Mantione, Daniele; Gracia, Raquel; Leiza, Jose R; Paulis, Maria; Mecerreyes, David

    2015-02-25

    A simple method to prepare multifunctional liquid marbles and dry water with magnetic, color, and fluorescent properties is presented. Multifunctional liquid marbles were prepared by encapsulation of water droplets using flocculated polymer latexes. First, the emulsion polymerization reaction of polystyrene and poly(benzyl methacrylate) was carried out using cheap and commercially available cationic surfactants. Subsequently, flocculation of the latex was provoked by an anion-exchange reaction of the cationic surfactant by the addition of lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide salt. The flocculated polymer latex was filtered and dried, leading to very hydrophobic micronanoparticulated powders. These powders showed a great ability to stabilize the air/water interface. Stable liquid marbles were obtained by rolling water droplets onto the hydrophobic powders previously prepared. The use of very small polystyrene nanoparticles led us to the preparation of very stable and the biggest known liquid marbles up to 2.5 mL of water. Furthermore, the introduction of fluorescent comonomer dyes into the polymer powders allowed us to obtain new morphological images and new knowledge about the structure of liquid marbles by confocal microscopy. Furthermore, the introduction of magnetic nanoparticles into the polymer latex led to magnetic responsive liquid marbles, where the iron oxide nanoparticles are protected within a polymer. Altogether this method represents an accessible and general platform for the preparation of multifunctional liquid marbles and dry water, which may contribute to extending of their actual range of applications.

  5. Marble Ageing Characterization by Acoustic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudani, Mohamed El; Wilkie-Chancellier, Nicolas; Martinez, Loïc; Hébert, Ronan; Rolland, Olivier; Forst, Sébastien; Vergès-Belmin, Véronique; Serfaty, Stéphane

    In cultural heritage, statue marble characterization by acoustic waves is a well-known non-destructive method. Such investigations through the statues by time of flight method (TOF) point out sound speeds decrease with ageing. However for outdoor stored statues as the ones in the gardens of Chateau de Versailles, ageing affects mainly the surface of the Carrara marble. The present paper proposes an experimental study of the marble acoustic properties variations during accelerated laboratory ageing. The surface degradation of the marble is reproduced in laboratory for 29 mm thick marble samples by using heating/cooling thermal cycles on one face of a marble plate. Acoustic waves are generated by 1 MHz central frequency contact transducers excited by a voltage pulse placed on both sides of the plate. During the ageing and by using ad hoc transducers, the marble samples are characterized in transmission, along their volume by shear, compressional TOF measurements and along their surface by Rayleigh waves measurements. For Rayleigh waves, both TOF by transducers and laser vibrometry methods are used to detect the Rayleigh wave. The transmission measurements point out a deep decrease of the waves speeds in conjunction with a dramatic decrease of the maximum frequency transmitted. The marble acts as a low pass filter whose characteristic frequency cut decreases with ageing. This pattern occurs also for the Rayleigh wave surface measurements. The speed change in conjunction with the bandwidth translation is shown to be correlated to the material de-structuration during ageing. With a similar behavior but reversed in time, the same king of phenomena have been observed trough sol-gel materials during their structuration from liquid to solid state (Martinez, L. et all (2004). "Chirp-Z analysis for sol-gel transition monitoring". Ultrasonics, 42(1), 507-510.). A model is proposed to interpret the acoustical measurements

  6. Photoresponsive liquid marbles and dry water.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tristan Tsai Yuan; Ahsan, Aniq; Reithofer, Michael R; Tay, Siok Wei; Tan, Sze Yu; Hor, Tzi Sum Andy; Chin, Jia Min; Chew, Benny Kia Jia; Wang, Xiaobai

    2014-04-01

    Stimuli-responsive liquid marbles for controlled release typically rely on organic moieties that require lengthy syntheses. We report herein a facile, one-step synthesis of hydrophobic and oleophobic TiO2 nanoparticles that display photoresponsive wettability. Water liquid marbles stabilized by these photoresponsive TiO2 particles were found to be stable when shielded from ultraviolet (UV) radiation; however, they quickly collapsed after being irradiated with 302 nm UV light. Oil- and organic-solvent-based liquid marbles could also be fabricated using oleophobic TiO2 nanoparticles and show similar UV-induced collapse. Finally, we demonstrated the formation of the micronized form of water liquid marbles, also known as dry water, by homogenization of the TiO2 nanoparticles with water. The TiO2 dry water displayed a similar photoresponse, whereby the micronized liquid marbles collapsed after irradiation and the dry water turned from a free-flowing powder to a paste. Hence, by exploiting the photoresponsive wettability of TiO2, we fabricated liquid marbles and dry water that display photoresponse and studied the conditions required for their collapse.

  7. Evaporation rate of PTFE liquid marbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosun, A.; Erbil, H. Y.

    2009-12-01

    Liquid marbles are hydrophilic liquid drops encapsulated with a hydrophobic powder. They behave as micro-reservoirs of liquids able to move rapidly without any leakage and are promising candidates to be applied in genetic analysis where 2D microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip methods are used. The manipulation of liquid marbles using gravitational, electrostatic and magnetic fields were recently investigated. In this work, we determined the evaporation rates of PTFE marbles formed by encapsulating PTFE micropowder on a water droplet in a closed chamber where relative humidity and temperature was kept constant. Evaporation rates of PTFE marbles were compared with the rates of pure water droplets in terms of evaporation resistance, ϕ parameter and it was found that PTFE marbles have longer life-time than water droplets so that ϕ values were found to increase regularly from 0.365 to 0.627 with the increase of RH of the evaporating medium. The barrier effect of PTFE microparticles at the water-air interface was more effective when water was evaporating slowly. PTFE water marbles have life-time of 26-60 min to retain their spherical shape under normal atmospheric conditions which is suitable for many promising applications in microfluidics, genetic analysis, electromagnetic actuators and valves.

  8. Water rolling and floating upon water: marbles supported by a water/marble interface.

    PubMed

    Bormashenko, Edward; Bormashenko, Yelena; Musin, Albina

    2009-05-01

    Floating of liquid marbles on a water/air interface was studied. The critical density allowing floating marbles containing NaCl solution was established experimentally and compared with its calculated value. A satisfactory agreement between experimental and theoretical values of the critical density is reported.

  9. The atmospheric degradation of a durable lithotype used in Northern Italy: the Oira stone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toniolo, Lucia; Bugini, Roberto; Gulotta, Davide

    2016-04-01

    The cathedral of Monza is a masterpiece of the northern Italian architectural heritage dated at the beginning of the XIV century. Its façade was modified over time as a result of the variation of the general plan and its current appearance is defined by six main pillars which identify five sectors, the central one hosting the main portal and a huge rose window. All the architectural elements and sculptures were realized in stone using several and different local lithotypes, including marbles, limestones, sandstones and volcanic stones. One of the most distinctive hallmarks of the façade is the alternated presence of rows of white and dark stones for the flat blocks which cover the masonry. Originally, the white rows were realized with different types of whitish marbles, whereas the dark ones were made by Varenna stone, a local black sedimentary rock. Unfortunately, this stone type extensively deteriorated as a result of the outdoor exposition and it was therefore completely substituted with blocks of dark green-coloured Oira stone during the restoration of the façade carried out at the end of XIX century by the famous architect Luca Beltrami [1]. Pietra d'Oira is a dark green peridotite, with olivine crystals partly altered to serpentine and pertains to Metabasites embedded in gneiss and micaschist of Strona - Ceneri zone (late Palaeozoic) and outcrops on the western shore of lake Orta (North-western Piedmont) near the Oira village. In the early XX century, Pietra d'Oira replaced some stone by then badly decayed as Triassic black limestone from several quarry sites of Prealps or dark grey limestone from Saltrio quarries. Several buildings were involved in these restoration works: the façade of the Church of Certosa (Pavia, XV century), Cappella Colleoni (Bergamo, last quarter of XV century) and, as reported, the façade of the Monza cathedral. The present paper reports the study of the degradation of the Oira stone exposed to outdoor atmospheric conditions

  10. Evaporation of Ethanol-Water Binary Mixture Sessile Liquid Marbles.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Chin Hong; Bormashenko, Edward; Nguyen, Anh V; Evans, Geoffrey M; Dao, Dzung V; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-06-21

    Liquid marble is a liquid droplet coated with particles. Recently, the evaporation process of a sessile liquid marble using geometric measurements has attracted great attention from the research community. However, the lack of gravimetric measurement limits further insights into the physical changes of a liquid marble during the evaporation process. Moreover, the evaporation process of a marble containing a liquid binary mixture has not been reported before. The present paper investigates the effective density and the effective surface tension of an evaporating liquid marble that contains aqueous ethanol at relatively low concentrations. The effective density of an evaporating liquid marble is determined from the concurrent measurement of instantaneous mass and volume. Density measurements combined with surface profile fitting provide the effective surface tension of the marble. We found that the density and surface tension of an evaporating marble are significantly affected by the particle coating.

  11. Mineralogical characterization of the Shelburne marble and the Salem limestone

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, E.S.

    1989-01-01

    Samples of Shelburne marble and Salem limestone were selected to represent marbles and limestones used in buildings and monuments. The Royal variety of Shelburne marble is a white marble predominantly composed of calcite but has heterogeneously distributed gray inclusions. The select buff Salem limestone is a beige, homogeneous, fossiliferous limestone, predominantly composed of fragments of echinoderms and bryozoans. The author reports that both samples are appropriate test stones for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program stone exposure studies.

  12. Marble Bone Disease: A Rare Bone Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Harinathbabu, Maheswari; Thillaigovindan, Ranjani; Prabhu, Geetha

    2015-01-01

    Osteopetrosis, or marble bone disease, is a rare skeletal disorder due to a defective function of the osteoclasts. This defect renders bones more susceptible to osteomyelitis due to decreased vascularity. This disorder is inherited as autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive. Healthcare professionals should urge these patients to maintain their oral health as well as general health, as this condition makes these patients more susceptible to frequent infections and fractures. This case report emphasizes the signs and symptoms of marble bone disease and presents clinical and radiographic findings.  PMID:26594603

  13. Colorado Yule Marble; building stone of the Lincoln Memorial

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, Elaine S.

    1999-01-01

    The Colorado Yule marble, quarried in Marble, Colo., is a very pure white marble, and it has been widely acclaimed for its quality and purity. This marble has been used for many prominent buildings; one of the most notable is the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., built nearly 80 years ago. Although most of the marble in the memorial appears to be in very good condition, some of the stones have developed pronounced surficial roughness and show a significant loss of carved details and rounded edges compared with adjacent stones. Because adjacent blocks of marble receive nearly identical exposure to weathering agents that cause deterioration of the marble, it seems very likely that this pronounced difference in durability of adjacent stones arises from some inherent characteristic of the marble. The Colorado Yule marble is a nearly pure calcite marble with minor inclusions of mica, quartz, and feldspar. Compositions of the calcite and the inclusion phases in the marble are typical for those phases. The calcite grains that compose the marble are irregularly shaped and range from 100 to 600 micrometers in diameter. The texture of the marble is even, with a slight preferred directional elongation that is visible when the marble is cut in certain directions. Physical tests of the marble show that its strength is comparable to that of other marbles typically used in buildings. Variations in the durability of the marble, like those seen at the Lincoln Memorial, are not related to variations in calcite composition or to the presence of inclusions in the marble. Most likely, the variations arise from differences in the calcite grain boundaries and the degree to which the grains interlock with one another. Weak grain boundaries that permit water or solutions to penetrate into the marble and dissolve the calcite grains at their edges cause the marble to disaggregate or ?sugar.? Subtle differences in texture that occur in the marble from various parts of the quarry probably

  14. White Macael marble: a key element in the architectonic heritage of Andalusia for over 25 centuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, Rafael; Sol Cruz, Ana; Arriaga, Lourdes; Baltuille, José Manuel

    2013-04-01

    Marble from Macael (Andalusia) is one of the most important natural stones in the architectonic heritage of Andalusia; in particular the variety commercially known as "White Macael". This natural stone has been used outdoors as well as indoors for decorative, ornamental or structural purposes. During the 7th century (B.C.) the Phoenicians began to systematically extract these quarries to be used in their more social important elements such as sarcophagus. During the Roman period this rock had a greater importance in construction; we find columns, pavements, tombstones… in many historical buildings such as the Roman amphitheatre in Mérida (1st century B.C.) and the city of Itálica in Seville (3rd century B.C.). But it is during the Muslim period when marble from Macael is more widely used: the Mosque of Córdoba (8th century), the Lions Court in the Alhambra palace, the Alcazaba in Almería, the Medina-Azahara palace in Córdoba (10th century). Other important buildings using the white marble are: Carlos V palace or the Royal Chapel in Granada (15th century), the Almería cathedral or El Escorial monastery in Madrid (16th century), San Telmo palace in Seville (17th century) or The Royal Palace in Madrid (18th century). Uncountable number of buildings, both historical and contemporary, show different elements made of this marble. From a geological point of view, the quarries are located in the upper part of the Nevado-Filábride Complex, the lowest nappe of the Internal Zones of the Betic Chains. Under the "White Macael" name is also possible to include another commercial denominations such "White Macael Río" or "White Macael Río Veteado". It is a clear white coloured, calcitic marble (up than 97% calcite), with average grain size between 0,16 y 3,2 mm in a mosaic texture with a very homogenous aspect. Regarding the main physical and mechanical properties, this rock has an open porosity value between 0,1-0,6%, bulk density 2,50-2,75 g/cm3, water absorption at

  15. Lead poisoning of a marbled godwit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Locke, L.N.; Smith, M.R.; Windingstad, R.M.; Martin, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    A thin adult female marbled godwit (Limosa fedoa) found dead at Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Montana, was found to have 17 ingested lead shot in its gizzard. Its liver contained 51.7 ppm lead (wet weight). Based on these necropsy findings a diagnosis of lead poisoning was made.

  16. An Environmental Handbook of the Marble Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Dan

    The Elk Range located in the very center of the Colorado Rocky Mountains is described in this guide to the Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness Area. Near the ghost town of Marble, Colorado, this wilderness area is described as 66,000 acres 150 miles outside Denver encompassing 25% of all established wilderness in Colorado, 130 miles of marked trails,…

  17. Marbles, Anyone? Traditional Games in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casbergue, Renee M.; Kieff, Judith

    1998-01-01

    Children now play more solitary games, perhaps missing benefits of traditional games such as jacks, marbles, and dominoes. Such games offer children of all backgrounds the opportunity to consolidate knowledge and skills, develop a more orderly way of thinking, and establish themselves with peers. By making these games available in classrooms,…

  18. Data Collection and the Marble Company.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Nancy L.

    A study investigated how managers in various kinds of organizations make decisions and also examined ways that using the Marble Company simulation (developed by L. C. Lederman and L. P. Stewart in 1985) could enhance, clarify, and extend its findings. Managers were asked to write down what they would say to their subordinates in order to elicit…

  19. Ground-penetrating radar investigation of St. Leonard's Crypt under the Wawel Cathedral (Cracow, Poland) - COST Action TU1208

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetto, Andrea; Pajewski, Lara; Dimitriadis, Klisthenis; Avlonitou, Pepi; Konstantakis, Yannis; Musiela, Małgorzata; Mitka, Bartosz; Lambot, Sébastien; Żakowska, Lidia

    2016-04-01

    The Wawel ensemble, including the Royal Castle, the Wawel Cathedral and other monuments, is perched on top of the Wawel hill immediately south of the Cracow Old Town, and is by far the most important collection of buildings in Poland. St. Leonard's Crypt is located under the Wawel Cathedral of St Stanislaus BM and St Wenceslaus M. It was built in the years 1090-1117 and was the western crypt of the pre-existing Romanesque Wawel Cathedral, so-called Hermanowska. Pope John Paul II said his first Mass on the altar of St. Leonard's Crypt on November 2, 1946, one day after his priestly ordination. The interior of the crypt is divided by eight columns into three naves with vaulted ceiling and ended with one apse. The tomb of Bishop Maurus, who died in 1118, is in the middle of the crypt under the floor; an inscription "+ MAVRVS EPC MCXVIII +" indicates the burial place and was made in 1938 after the completion of archaeological works which resulted in the discovery of this tomb. Moreover, the crypt hosts the tombs of six Polish kings and heroes: Michał Korybut Wiśniowiecki (King of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth), Jan III Sobieski (King of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth and Commander at the Battle of Vienna), Maria Kazimiera (Queen of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth and consort to Jan III Sobieski), Józef Poniatowski (Prince of Poland and Marshal of France), Tadeusz Kościuszko (Polish general, revolutionary and a Brigadier General in the American Revolutionary War) and Władysław Sikorski (Prime Minister of the Polish Government in Exile and Commander-in-Chief of the Polish Armed Forces). The adjacent six crypts and corridors host the tombs of the other Polish kings, from Sigismund the Old to Augustus II the Strong, their families and several Polish heroes. In May 2015, the COST (European COoperation in Science and Technology) Action TU1208 "Civil engineering applications of Ground Penetrating Radar" organised and offered a Training School (TS) on the

  20. Liquid Marble Coalescence and Triggered Microreaction Driven by Acoustic Levitation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Zang, Duyang; Zhao, Liang; Qu, Mengfei; Li, Xu; Li, Xiaoguang; Li, Lixin; Geng, Xingguo

    2017-03-31

    Liquid marbles show promising potential for application in the microreactor field. Control of the coalescence between two or among multiple liquid marbles is critical; however, the successful merging of two isolated marbles is difficult because of their mechanically robust particle shells. In this work, the coalescence of multiple liquid marbles was achieved via acoustic levitation. The dynamic behaviors of the liquid marbles were monitored by a high-speed camera. Driven by the sound field, the liquid marbles moved toward each other, collided, and eventually coalesced into a larger single marble. The underlying mechanisms of this process were probed via sound field simulation and acoustic radiation pressure calculation. The results indicated that the pressure gradient on the liquid marble surface favors the formation of a liquid bridge between the liquid marbles, resulting in their coalescence. A preliminary indicator reaction was induced by the coalescence of dual liquid marbles, which suggests that expected chemical reactions can be successfully triggered with multiple reagents contained in isolated liquid marbles via acoustic levitation.

  1. The white marble used in Brasília, a World Heritage and the capital of Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heloisa Barros de Oliveira Frascá, Maria

    2015-04-01

    Created as the Brazilian capital, in the central western part of Brazil, Brasilia is a definitive example of 20th century modernist urbanism. It was built in only four years, from 1956 to 1960, following the project of urban planner Lucio Costa and architect Oscar Niemeyer that intended that every element - from the layout of the residential and administrative districts (often compared to the shape of a bird in flight) to the symmetry of the buildings themselves - should be in harmony with the city's overall design. This description is from the World Heritage Centre, of Unesco, that nominated Brasilia as a Cultural Heritage Property in 1987. Most of the remarkable buildings designed Oscar Niemeyer, cited by Unesco, are around the Plaza of Three Powers, as the Planalto ("Plateau") Palace, the National Congress, the Supreme Court, the Cathedral, the National Theatre among others. Aside from the worldwide recognition of the architectonic value of these buildings, it is barely mentioned the expressive use of white marble as cladding. Very few are found in the literature about specification criteria, provenance, fixation method and conservation. According to Oscar Niemeyer Foundation, at this moment they know that the stone come from a supplier in the State of Rio de Janeiro. A preliminary research indicated that the marble used in most of Brasilia buildings are from the municipality of Italva, in the northwest of the State of Rio de Janeiro (DRM-RJ, 2012). In a study carried out by DRM-RJ, in 2003, it is mentioned two white marble commercialized as dimension stone in Italva: "Sparkling Marble" (SM) and "Italva White Marble" (IWM), respectively dolomite-calcite marble and dolomite marble. Their main characteristics are: bulk specific gravity: 2,792 kg/m3 (SM) and 2,852kg/m3 (IWM); water absorption: 0.08 % (SM) and 0.10 % (IWM); uniaxial compression strength: 84.3 MPa (SM) and 88.2 MPa (IWM); modulus of rupture: 9.92 MPa (SM) and 8.75 MPa (IWM); coefficient of linear

  2. Anciet marble quarries in Lesvos island Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mataragkas, M.; Mataragkas, D.

    2009-04-01

    ANCIENT MARBLE QUARRIES IN LESBOS ISLAND, GREECE Varti- Matarangas M.1 & Matarangas D. 1 Institute of Geological and Mining Exploration (IGME), Olympic Village, Entrance C, ACHARNAE 13677, GREECE myrsini@igme.gr , myrsini@otenet.g r A B S T R A C T Ten ancient marble quarries of Lesbos Island, most of them previously unknown, have been studied, in the frame of the research study on the ancient marble quarries in the Aegean Sea. In the present paper the geological, petrological and morphological features of the aforementioned quarries are examined. Concerning the six ancient quarries located in the areas of Tarti, Agia Paraskevi (Tsaf), Mageiras, Loutra, Latomi (Plomari) and Thermi, the authochthonous neopaleozoic unit constitutes their geological formation, while their hosting lithological formations are the included crystalline limestone lens like beds. In two ancient quarries in the areas Moria and Alyfanta, the geological formation is the authochthonous upper Triassic series and the hosting lithological formation the upper Triassic carbonate sequence, while in the areas of Akrasi-Abeliko and Karyni, the geological formation is the thrust Triassic unit and the lithological hosting formations are the included strongly deformed or not crystalline limestone lenticular beds. Furthermore, the petrographic features were also determined permitting the identification of the building stones that have been used.

  3. Epiphanic Awakenings in Raymond Carver's "Cathedral" and Alice Walker's "Everyday Use"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadeq, Ala Eddin; Al-Badawi, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores how two short stories from very different backgrounds conclude in a significant epiphany for the characters. Raymond Carver's short story "Cathedral" and Alice Walker's "Everyday Use" are studied to see how the husband in Carver's work is blinder than his visually-impaired overnight guest, and the…

  4. Unusual Rebuilding Method of Historic St Mary's Cathedral in the Capital of Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysokowski, Adam

    2016-06-01

    St Mary's Cathedral is the Archbishop church of the Archdiocese in Perth in Western Australia. The presented sacral building was built in neo-Gothic style during the years 1863-1865. Cathedral was officially dedicated and opened for the service on 29th January, 1865. In 1973 was proclaimed the Marian Sanctuary and now represents one of the largest religious facilities in Perth. In 2005, the city authorities, together with the Archdiocese took a collective decision on the necessity of a comprehensive renovation of this sacred object. The renovation was due to the technical condition and the lack of usability of the object. The author of the paper had the opportunity to experience these problems by visiting this place several times, first time in 1989 and next years. Thus, the renovation of the present Cathedral was in its assumption not only to perform maintenance of the building and its specific architectural elements but also to increase its functional features - usable for the faithful and tourists. Reconstruction of St Mary's Cathedral in Perth can be a good example increasing the wider functionality of such facilities while keeping their antique and historical qualities. In this paper the above-mentioned issues will be more widely developed by the author.

  5. An App for the Cathedral in Freiberg--An Interdisciplinary Project Seminar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kröber, Cindy; Münster, Sander

    2014-01-01

    This project seminar aims at creating and evaluating a manual for interdisciplinary projects as part of a learning process. Working together, pedagogies and students from different disciplines assess tools and recommendations for successful collaborations while developing an app for the cathedral in Freiberg. As part of the project the students…

  6. The Grammar School at the Cathedral of the Canary Islands (1563-1851)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vera-Cazorla, Maria Jesus

    2013-01-01

    From 1563 until the death of the last teacher in 1851, there was a prebendary in the Cathedral of the Canary Islands in charge of the education of children. In fact, it could be said that this prebendary was the only continuous secondary school teacher there was in the Canary Islands until the beginning of the nineteenth century when the High…

  7. Study of marble deterioration at City Hall, Schenectady, NY

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, R.J.; Castillo, R.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of air pollution and acid precipitation were investigated as causing the erosion of marble. The research indicated that the marble grains are being structurally weakened by a chemical conversion process of marble to gypsum crystals. The surface zone of chemical activity (2-5 mm) shows the presence of fly ash and iron particles, and points to the possibility of a catalytic mechanism for the conversion of sulfur dioxide to sulfate.

  8. Blue Marble Space Institute essay contest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, JoAnna

    2014-04-01

    The Blue Marble Space Institute of Science, based in Seattle, Wash., is inviting college students to participate in its essay contest. Essays need to address the question, "In the next 100 years, how can human civilization prepare for the long-term changes to the Earth system that will occur over the coming millennium?" According to the institute, the purpose of the contest is "to stimulate creative thinking relating to space exploration and global issues by exploring how changes in the Earth system will affect humanity's future."

  9. The effect of air pollution on the stone decay of the Cologne Cathedral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graue, B.; Siegesmund, S.; Licha, T.; Simon, K.; Oyhantcabal, P.; Middendorf, B.

    2012-04-01

    Different building stones of the Cologne Cathedral show a large variation of weathering phenomena. The Drachenfels trachyte, which was the construction material for the medieval part of the cathedral, shows significant surface deterioration, back-weathering coexisting with flaking, crumbling or the massive formation of gypsum crusts. Wolff (1992) first mentioned the negative interferences between the Schlaitdorfer sandstone and the Londorfer basalt lava or the Drachenfels trachyte and the Krensheimer muschelkalk. Crust formation on limestone, sandstone, and volcanic rock from the Cologne Cathedral as well as from the Xanten and Altenberg Cathedral are investigated. These three buildings are located in different areas and exposed to varying industrial, urban, and rural environmental situations. The material investigated range from dark grey to black framboidal crusts. This 3 to 10 mm thick cauliflower-like form of gypsum crust incorporates particles from the pollution fluxes. It covers the stone surface and mainly occurs at sites protected from wind and direct rain. Secondly, thin laminar black crusts trace the stone surface and may cover complete sections of the building's structure not necessarily preferring protected sites. This kind of crust seems to have very strong bonds between the thin black crust and the stone surface. Major and trace element distribution show an enrichment of sulfur, indicating the presence of gypsum, lead and other typical pollutants (arsenic, antimony, bismuth, tin etc.), which generally can be linked to traffic and industry. This indicates that even though the SO2 emission has decreased due to i.e. stronger regulations of waste incineration plants and the ban of leaded petrol, the pollutants are still present in the crusts on the building stones. From systematic SEM observations it becomes evident that the total amount of pollution is less pronounced in the Altenberg and Xanten Cathedrals as compared with the Cologne Cathedral. The

  10. On the mechanism of floating and sliding of liquid marbles.

    PubMed

    Bormashenko, Edward; Bormashenko, Yelena; Musin, Albina; Barkay, Zahava

    2009-03-09

    The mechanisms of floating and sliding of liquid marbles are studied. Liquid marbles containing CaCl(2) and marbles containing NaOH water solutions float on water containing Na(2)CO(3) and an alcoholic solution of phenolphthalein with no chemical reaction. Sliding of liquid marbles, consisting of NaOH water solutions, on polymer substrates coated with phenolphthalein is studied as well. No chemical reaction is observed. These observations supply direct experimental evidence for the suggestion that interfaces are separated by an air layer when marbles roll on solid substrates. It is concluded that a liquid marble rests on hydrophobic particles coating the liquid. In contrast, drops containing an NaOH water solution sliding on superhydrophobic surfaces coated with phenolphthalein leave a colored trace. The mechanism of low-friction sliding of drops deposited on superhydrophobic surfaces and liquid marbles turns out to be quite different: there is no direct contact between liquid and solid in the case of marbles' motion.

  11. [Sexual dimorphism of marbled polecat Vormela peregusna (Carnivora: Mustelidae)].

    PubMed

    Rozhnov, V V; Abramov, A V

    2006-01-01

    Analysis of morphometric variation in 26 cranial characters were studied in 85 individuals of marbled polecat Vormela peregusna from Turkmenistan demonstrated a low level of sexual dimorphism in the species. The properties of sexual dimorphism in marbled polecat are discussed in terms of available hypotheses of sexual dimorphism in carnivores.

  12. Consolidated waste forms: glass marbles and ceramic pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Treat, R.L.; Rusin, J.M.

    1982-05-01

    Glass marbles and ceramic pellets have been developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory as part of the multibarrier concept for immobilizing high-level radioactive waste. These consolidated waste forms served as substrates for the application of various inert coatings and as ideal-sized particles for encapsulation in protective matrices. Marble and pellet formulations were based on existing defense wastes at Savannah River Plant and proposed commercial wastes. To produce marbles, glass is poured from a melter in a continuous stream into a marble-making device. Marbles were produced at PNL on a vibratory marble machine at rates as high as 60 kg/h. Other marble-making concepts were also investigated. The marble process, including a lead-encapsulation step, was judged as one of the more feasible processes for immobilizing high-level wastes. To produce ceramic pellets, a series of processing steps are required, which include: spray calcining - to dry liquid wastes to a powder; disc pelletizing - to convert waste powders to spherical pellets; sintering - to densify pellets and cause desired crystal formation. These processing steps are quite complex, and thereby render the ceramic pellet process as one of the least feasible processes for immobilizing high-level wastes.

  13. Performance Evaluation of Concrete using Marble Mining Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kore, Sudarshan Dattatraya; Vyas, A. K.

    2016-12-01

    A huge amount waste (approximately 60%) is generated during mining and processing in marble industries. Such waste can be best utilized in infrastructure development works. Coarse aggregate 75% by weight was replaced by aggregate obtained from marble mining waste. The impact of marble waste as a partial replacement for conventional coarse aggregate on the properties of concrete mixes such as workability, compressive strength, permeability, abrasion, etc. was evaluated. The test results revealed that the compressive strength was comparable to that of control concrete. Other properties such as workability of concrete increased, water absorption reduced by 17%, and resistance to abrasion was marginally increased by 2% as compared to that of control concrete. Ultrasonic pulse velocity and FTIR results show improvement in quality of concrete with crushed marble waste. From the TGA analysis it was confirmed that, aggregate produced from marble waste shows better performance under elevated temperature than that of conventional aggregates.

  14. The Marble Experiment: Overview and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, M. R.; Murphy, T. J.; Cobble, J. A.; Fincke, J. R.; Haines, B. M.; Hamilton, C. E.; Lee, M. N.; Oertel, J. A.; Olson, R. E.; Randolph, R. B.; Schmidt, D. W.; Shah, R. C.; Smidt, J. M.; Tregillis, I. L.

    2015-11-01

    The Marble ICF platform has recently been launched on both OMEGA and NIF with the goal to investigate the influence of heterogeneous mix on fusion burn. The unique separated reactant capsule design consists of an ``engineered'' CH capsule filled with deuterated plastic foam that contains pores or voids that are filled with tritium gas. Initially the deuterium and tritium are separated, but as the implosion proceeds, the D and T mix, producing a DT signature. The results of these experiments will be used to inform a probability density function (PDF) burn modelling approach for un-resolved cell morphology. Initial targets for platform development have consisted of either fine-pore foams or gas mixtures, with the goal to field the engineered foams in 2016. An overview of the Marble experimental campaign will be presented and simulations will be discussed. This work is supported by US DOE/NNSA, performed at LANL, operated by LANS LLC under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  15. Crystalline marble beats limestone for fluegas desulfurization

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    NovaCon Energy Systems, Inc. (Bedford, NY) has developed an alternative to conventional limestone sorbents. The new process uses a class of marble, selected with a proprietary model. Recent pilot- and full-scale demonstrations in pulverized-coal (PC) and circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boilers suggest that these patented sorbents outperform conventional limestone for the simultaneous control of SOx, NOx, and particulates during the combustion of coal and sulfur-rich fuels, such as oil, mixed municipal waste and used tires. Dubbed thermally active marbles (TAMs), these sorbents are chemically identical to grainy limestone (whose main constituent is calcium carbonate or calcite). However, thanks to the increased pressures and temperatures experienced during their geologic history, these metamorphic minerals have a regular crystalline structure that offers some advantages in the combustion zone. TAMs, on the other hand, enjoy better calcium-utilization rates because upon heating, they cleave along inter- and intra-crystalline faces, continuously exposing fresh surfaces. By minimizing the self-extinguishment suffered by limestone sorbents, TAMs are effective over operating temperatures from 1,200 F to 2,800 F, which is 400 F higher than other calcium-based sorbents. This allows them to be injected closer to the burner or combustion grate to maximize residence time in the unit.

  16. Listener perception of and acoustic differences between girl and boy choristers in an English cathedral choir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, David; Welch, Graham

    2005-09-01

    For centuries, boy choristers have been singing the top (treble) line in English cathedrals. Girl choristers were first admitted in 1991, and there is a long-running debate as to whether they can carry out this role appropriately. This paper will detail the results from two listening experiments designed to establish whether or not listeners can tell the difference between girl and boy choristers singing the top line in cathedral music. In the first experiment, 189 listeners took part and on average they were able to tell the difference 60% of the time; this was statistically significant over chance. The results suggested that repertoire played a significant part in this ability, and the second experiment was carried out in which the boys and girls sang the same repertoire. Nearly 170 listeners have completed this experiment and, on average, they are making guesses (correct 52% of the time). The paper will discuss the acoustic differences between the stimuli with respect to the singing of boy and girl choristers, while placing the discussion in the context of the English cathedral tradition.

  17. Innovative 3D information system for the restoration and preventive maintenance plan of the Milan Cathedral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giunta, Giuseppe G.; Di Paola, Eleonora; Morlin Visconti Castiglione, Benigno

    2004-02-01

    The restoration and maintenance of architecturally complex monuments need advanced tools for helping the definition of the working plan and for storing analysing and updating all the data produced. In the case of the Gothic Milan Cathedral a three-dimensional metric support has been developed. It comprises several oriented and connected stereoscopic models which makes it possible, through the stereoscopic vision, to navigate through several photograms, to accurately measure the dimension of architectural details, to draw structures with a millimeter precision. In this way a 3D-CAD model of the facade and of the internal walls of the Milan Cathedral have been created. On those vectorial models, it is possible to insert photos, documents, characterisation data and even to draw thematic maps. For instance, the load bearing structures maps have been realised after a GPR (Ground Penetrating Radar) structural survey. These maps provide structural information (e.g. fractures, block thickness and status, lessons, etc.) extremely useful for planning the restoration and maintenance work. The photogrammetric survey has been proceeded by a 3D laser scanning survey, necessary for providing a preliminary model for planning the work until the complete elaboration of the stereoscopic model. All the data have been updated in the georeferenced and integrated 3D data base of the Cathedral, which now constitutes the necessary support for defining the specific operations.

  18. Fabric anisotropy and its influence on physical weathering of different types of Carrara marbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiss, Bernd; Weiss, Thomas

    2000-11-01

    To evaluate the texture-controlled part on the thermally induced degradation of marbles, the anisotropic thermal dilatation was calculated from texture analyses of four exemplary samples from the Carrara area in Italy and compared to experimentally measured dilatation coefficients. The thermal dilatation as determined in the experiment is controlled by an intrinsic part (anisotropic single crystal properties and texture) and an extrinsic part (e.g. thermally induced microcracks). As expected from theoretical calculations, there is a correlation between the strongest dilatation and the c-axis maxima and the weakest dilatation and the a-axis maxima according to the single crystal data of calcite. However, a quantitative correlation could not be established. Obviously, other fabric parameters like the grain size, grain shape anisotropies, grain boundary geometries and microcrack formation during heating modify the texture-controlled part significantly. After thermal treatment up to 130°C, all samples show a residual strain. However, the magnitude and directional dependence is remarkably different and is unequivocally correlated to both the microstructure and the texture. Since the number of parameters controlling the physical weathering is very large, a comprehensive quantification of fabrics is indispensible for the understanding of thermally controlled degradation processes of physical weathering in marbles.

  19. The Puzzle of a Marble in a Spinning Pipe

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    MAY 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Puzzle of a Marble in a Spinning Pipe 5a. CONTRACT...Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT What trajectory does a marble follow if it is held...298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Physics Education 50 (3) 279 1. Problem statement A marble is placed one-third of the length along a

  20. Blue Marble: Remote Characterization of Habitable Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolf, Neville; Lewis, Brian; Chartres, James; Genova, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    The study of the nature and distribution of habitable environments beyond the Solar System is a key area for Astrobiology research. At the present time, our Earth is the only habitable planet that can be characterized in the same way that we might characterize planets beyond the Solar System. Due to limitations in our current and near-future technology, it is likely that extra-solar planets will be observed as single-pixel objects. To understand this data, we must develop skills in analyzing and interpreting the radiation obtained from a single pixel. These skills must include the study of the time variation of the radiation, and the range of its photometric, spectroscopic and polarimetric properties. In addition, to understand whether we are properly analyzing the single pixel data, we need to compare it with a ground truth of modest resolution images in key spectral bands. This paper discusses the concept for a mission called Blue Marble that would obtain data of the Earth using a combination of spectropolarimetry, spectrophotometry, and selected band imaging. To obtain imagery of the proper resolution, it is desirable to place the Blue Marble spacecraft no closer than the outer region of cis-lunar space. This paper explores a conceptual mission design that takes advantage of low-cost launchers, bus designs and mission elements to provide a cost effective observing platform located at one of the stable Earth-moon Lagrangian points (L4, L5). The mission design allows for the development and use of novel technologies, such as a spinning moon sensor for attitude control, and leverages lessons-learned from previous low-cost spacecraft such as Lunar Prospector to yield a low-risk mission concept.

  1. The transmission of masticatory forces and nasal septum: structural comparison of the human skull and Gothic cathedral.

    PubMed

    Hilloowala, Rumy; Kanth, Hrishi

    2007-07-01

    This study extrapolates the transmission of masticatory forces to the cranium based on the architectural principles of Gothic cathedrals. The most significant finding of the study, obtained by analysis of coronal CT scans, is the role of the hard palate, and especially the vomer and the perpendicular plate of the ethmoid in masticatory force transmission. The study also confirms, experimentally, the paths of masticatory forces, cited in literature but based purely on morphological observations. Human skulls and Gothic cathedrals have similar morphological and functional characteristics. The load exerted by the roof of the cathedral is transmitted to the ground by piers and buttresses. These structures also resist the shearing forces exerted by high winds. Similarly, the mid-facial bones of the skull transmit the vertical as well as the lateral masticatory forces from the maxillary dentition to the skull base. The nonload bearing walls and stained glass windows of the cathedral correspond to the translucent wall of the maxilla. The passageway between the aisle and the nave of the cathedral is equivalent to the meatal openings in the lateral wall of the nasal cavity.

  2. FLAT MARBLE MARKER WITH CONCRETE COLLAR – JOHN C. DURBIN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FLAT MARBLE MARKER WITH CONCRETE COLLAR – JOHN C. DURBIN (ONLY CONFEDERATE BURIAL IN CEMETERY) IN SECTION 1. VIEW TO EAST. - Danville National Cemetery, 1900 East Main Street, Danville, Vermilion County, IL

  3. Women's toilet with marble stalls and wooden doors, east end ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Women's toilet with marble stalls and wooden doors, east end of first floor. View to southwest. - San Bernardino Valley College, Life Science Building, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  4. Interior view of shower room 216 with original marble surround ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of shower room 2-16 with original marble surround and double sash windows, facing east. - Marine Barracks, Panama Canal, Barracks Building, 100' North of Thatcher Highway, Balboa, Former Panama Canal Zone, CZ

  5. 35. SECOND FLOOR, SOUTHEAST ROOM, NORTH WALL: BLACK MARBLE MANTLE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. SECOND FLOOR, SOUTHEAST ROOM, NORTH WALL: BLACK MARBLE MANTLE. Grape clusters above columns repeat in upper part of cornice and probably in destroyed ceiling centerpiece - Governor Thomas Bennett House, 1 Lucas Street, Charleston, Charleston County, SC

  6. Switching deformation mode during natural faulting in Carrara marbles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molli, Giancarlo

    2010-05-01

    A study on meso- and microstructural features of a high angle normal fault observed in the Alpi Apuane NW Tuscany (Italy) is presented to document switching in the deformation mode during different evolutionary stages of a fault zone growth in naturally deformed Carrara marble. The studied fault was formed at c.3 Km of depth and belongs to structures related to the most recent deformation history of the Alpi Apuane metamorphic core (from c.4 Ma until now, Fellin et al. 2007; Molli, 2008). On the basis of deformation mechanisms and their chronology interpreted from cross-cutting relationships, different stages of the fault zone evolution have been recognized. An early stage of deformation (stage 1) was associated with extensional and shear veins now observable in both hangingwall and footwall blocks as part of the deformation zone developed at decameter-scale. Geochemical data indicate vein-development in a locally closed system where a "stationary" fluid phase migrates over meter scale distances (Molli et al., in press). During stage 2, a localization of the deformation, possibly in precursory coarse grained calcite/quartz shear veins of stage 1, took place. During this second stage crystal-plastic deformation affected areas at the head and along the hanging wall rim of fractures accommodating fault tip distorsions in a way recalling the mode-II geometry of stable crack propagation (Atkinson, 1987; Vermilye and Scholtz, 1993; Kim et al., 2004). Following pervasive cataclasis (stage 3) characterizes a plurimeter-wide dilational jog between two non-parallel main slip surfaces with brecciation and far-derived fluids channelling leading to significant geochemical alteration of the fault rocks with respect to the protolith (Molli et al., in press). Cataclastic deformation produced a grain size refinement and a decimetric thick fault core asymmetrically bounded by the upper main slip surface. Deformation was then localized within ultracataclasite of the fault core where

  7. Central Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Clouds and haze cover most of the Italian peninsula in this view of central Italy (41.5N, 14.0E) but the Bay of Naples region with Mt. Vesuvius and the island of Capri are clear. The Adriatic Sea in the background separates Italy from the cloud covered Balkans of eastern Europe and the Tyrrhenian Sea in the foreground lies between the Italian mainland and the off scene islands of Corsica and Sardinia. Several aircraft contrails can also be seen.

  8. The Marble Types of Thassos Island through the Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskaridis, Kostas; Patronis, Michael; Papatrechas, Christos; Schouenborg, Björn

    2013-04-01

    The first references to the "white whole-grain" marble of Thassos Island, Greece, date back to the 6th century BC when stones were quarried at Alyki peninsula and at Fanari and Vathy capes. Since that time, Thassos marble was exported to Samothraki and other neighbouring islands, Asia Minor coastal cities, Southern Greece and Rome. In ancient times, there were two principal types of marble quarries in Thassos: (a) those producing material for the construction of temples and for the creation of various art pieces, i.e. ornamental stones, and (b) those for extraction of rough blocks for export. This paper aims at describing the Thassos marble, the geological setting in brief, its historic use and future supply possibilities and other reasons why it is a time-enduring ornamental stone. The aesthetical characteristics and the physical mechanical properties of its two main types (i.e. calcitic and dolomitic) are described and evaluated. The relevant results justify the wide application range and the continuous use of Thassos marble from ancient to present times and confirm the ability of this stone to survive over time. Keywords: Thassos, Marble, Ornamental Stones, Physical Mechanical Properties, Historic use

  9. Desalination of brick masonry and stone carvings in Capitullum hall of Riga Dome Cathedral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grave, J.; Krage, L.; Lusis, R.; Vitina, I.

    2011-12-01

    The construction of Riga Dome Cathedral and its Capithullum hall were initiated in 1211. Through centuries they were damaged a lot due to migration of soluble salts and moisture. During the last restoration (1888-1891) a lot of mistakes were conceded and subsequently some of probable solutions for restoration were unsuccessful. In 2009 the new restoration stage in Capithullum hall was started. Two types of desalination methods were used in hall - desalination with lime-sand plaster and poultice of lignin. Both quantitative and semiquantitative chemical analyses were performed in order to appreciate the desalination process.

  10. 3D modeling of the Strasbourg's Cathedral basements for interdisciplinary research and virtual visits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landes, T.; Kuhnle, G.; Bruna, R.

    2015-08-01

    On the occasion of the millennium celebration of Strasbourg Cathedral, a transdisciplinary research group composed of archaeologists, surveyors, architects, art historians and a stonemason revised the 1966-1972 excavations under the St. Lawrence's Chapel of the Cathedral having remains of Roman and medieval masonry. The 3D modeling of the Chapel has been realized based on the combination of conventional surveying techniques for the network creation, laser scanning for the model creation and photogrammetric techniques for the texturing of a few parts. According to the requirements and the end-user of the model, the level of detail and level of accuracy have been adapted and assessed for every floor. The basement has been acquired and modeled with more details and a higher accuracy than the other parts. Thanks to this modeling work, archaeologists can confront their assumptions to those of other disciplines by simulating constructions of other worship edifices on the massive stones composing the basement. The virtual reconstructions provided evidence in support of these assumptions and served for communication via virtual visits.

  11. Static and dynamic analyses of the stability of mining wastes (Ravaneti) in the Carrara marble area (Apuan Alps, Italy) / Analiza statyczna i dynamiczna stabilności hałd odpadów górniczych w regionie wydobycia marmurów Carrara (Alpy Apuańskie, Italia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreste, Pierpaolo; Soldano, Silvia

    2012-12-01

    The problem of the stability of "ravanetos" (debris piles of mining waste material extracted from the Apuan Alps, Italy) is very relevant, because of the consequences a landslide would have on the people and the existing civil infrastructures throughout the territory. In this work, the stability of two ravanetos that can be considered as representative of those in the Carrara area has been studied: the Polvaccio ravaneto, a recent type of debris pile and the Torrione-Tecchione, an old debris pile at present undergoing re-naturalisation. The study using the LEM (Limit Equilibrium Method) in a static and pseudo-static field, has made it possible to first carry out a back-analysis to define the most probable apparent cohesion and friction angle values of the material that makes up the ravanetos. Subsequently, it was possible to determine the intensity of the seismic wave that would be able to lead the two ravanetos to limit stability conditions and to determine the probability of such a seismic wave occurring in the next 50 years. A more accurate analysis, carried out with a numerical method in the dynamic field, of the most critical condition (the Polvaccio ravaneto) has led to more conservative results (higher safety factors) than those obtained with the LEM. This result allows us to reveal how the LEM can be considered a cautionary instrument to judge the stability of debris piles during a seismic event and that the likelihood of a landslide occurring in the two studied representative ravanetos over the next 50 years is very slim.

  12. A portable detection instrument based on DSP for beef marbling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tong; Peng, Yankun

    2014-05-01

    Beef marbling is one of the most important indices to assess beef quality. Beef marbling is graded by the measurement of the fat distribution density in the rib-eye region. However quality grades of beef in most of the beef slaughtering houses and businesses depend on trainees using their visual senses or comparing the beef slice to the Chinese standard sample cards. Manual grading demands not only great labor but it also lacks objectivity and accuracy. Aiming at the necessity of beef slaughtering houses and businesses, a beef marbling detection instrument was designed. The instrument employs Charge-coupled Device (CCD) imaging techniques, digital image processing, Digital Signal Processor (DSP) control and processing techniques and Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) screen display techniques. The TMS320DM642 digital signal processor of Texas Instruments (TI) is the core that combines high-speed data processing capabilities and real-time processing features. All processes such as image acquisition, data transmission, image processing algorithms and display were implemented on this instrument for a quick, efficient, and non-invasive detection of beef marbling. Structure of the system, working principle, hardware and software are introduced in detail. The device is compact and easy to transport. The instrument can determine the grade of beef marbling reliably and correctly.

  13. Crowning the Cathedral of Florence: Brunelleschi Builds His Dome. A Unit of Study for Grades 7-10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Symcox, Linda

    This unit focuses on a dramatic moment in the Renaissance from about 1420 when Filippo Brunelleschi single handedly created, defined, and engineered a new architecture by building the great dome of the cathedral of Santa Maria del Fiore in Florence. The dome became the symbol of Florence's grandeur during the Renaissance, and a model for great…

  14. Liquid marbles stabilized by charged polymer latexes: how does the drying of the latex particles affect the properties of liquid marbles?

    PubMed

    Sun, Guanqing; Sheng, Yifeng; Wu, Jie; Ma, Guanghui; Ngai, To

    2014-10-28

    The coating of solid particles on the surface of liquid in air makes liquid marbles a promising approach in the transportation of a small amount of liquid. The stabilization of liquid marbles by polymeric latex particles imparts extra triggers such as pH and temperature, leading to the remote manipulation of droplets for many potential applications. Because the functionalized polymeric latexes can exist either as colloidally stable latex or as flocculated latex in a dispersion, the drying of latex dispersions under different conditions may play a significant role in the stabilization of subsequent liquid marbles. This article presents the investigation of liquid marbles stabilized by poly(styrene-co-methacrylic acid) (PS-co-MAA) particles drying under varied conditions. Protonation of the particles before freeze drying makes the particles excellent liquid marble stabilizers, but it is hard to stabilize liquid marbles for particles dried in their deprotonated states. The static properties of liquid marbles with increasing concentrations of protonating reagent revealed that the liquid marbles are gradually undermined by protonating the stabilizers. Furthermore, the liquid marbles stabilized by different particles showed distinct behaviors in separation and merging manipulated by tweezers. This study shows that the initial state of the particles should be carefully taken into account in formulating liquid marbles.

  15. Effects of acid rain and sulfur dioxide on marble dissolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schuster, Paul F.; Reddy, Michael M.; Sherwood, Susan I.

    1994-01-01

    Acid precipitation and the dry deposition of sulfur dioxide (SO2) accelerate damage to carbonate-stone monuments and building materials. This study identified and quantified environmental damage to a sample of Vermont marble during storms and their preceding dry periods. Results from field experiments indicated the deposition of SO2 gas to the stone surface during dry periods and a twofold increase in marble dissolution during coincident episodes of low rain rate and decreased rainfall pH. The study is widely applicable to the analysis of carbonate-stone damage at locations affected by acid rain and air pollution.

  16. 16. CELLAR, UNDER WEST MEETING ROOM, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. Discarded marble ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. CELLAR, UNDER WEST MEETING ROOM, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. Discarded marble range top incorporated into a low brick partition. It is possible the range originally stood between the two brick walls beyond to the right. There appears to be a bricked-up fire box opening in the far wall. The fragments of the marble range top have been catalogued into the Architectural Study Collection of Independence National Historical Park. Dimensions recorded in Field Records. - Twelfth Street Meeting House, 20 South Twelfth Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  17. Effects of acid rain and sulfur dioxide on marble dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, P.F.; Reddy, M.M. ); Sherwood, S.I. )

    1994-01-01

    Acid precipitation and the dry deposition of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) accelerate damage to carbonate-stone monuments and building materials. This study identified and quantified environmental damage to a sample of Vermont marble during storms and their preceding dry periods. Results from field experiments indicated the deposition of SO[sub 2] gas to the stone surface during dry periods and a twofold increase in marble dissolution during coincident episodes of low rain rate and decreased rainfall pH. The study is widely applicable to the analysis of carbonate-stone damage at locations affected by acid rain and air pollution.

  18. 69. (Credit JTL) View beneath marble meter bench showing hydraulic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. (Credit JTL) View beneath marble meter bench showing hydraulic lines leading to water valve hydraulic control cylinders from control handles in bench; strings and pulleys activate meters. - McNeil Street Pumping Station, McNeil Street & Cross Bayou, Shreveport, Caddo Parish, LA

  19. A Unit Cell Laboratory Experiment: Marbles, Magnets, and Stacking Arrangements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, David C.

    2011-01-01

    An undergraduate first-semester general chemistry laboratory experiment introducing face-centered, body-centered, and simple cubic unit cells is presented. Emphasis is placed on the stacking arrangement of solid spheres used to produce a particular unit cell. Marbles and spherical magnets are employed to prepare each stacking arrangement. Packing…

  20. 10. MARBLE BRIDGE MIDSPAN OF EAST ARCH. THE PLATE READS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. MARBLE BRIDGE MIDSPAN OF EAST ARCH. THE PLATE READS MORRIS RUN BRIDGE, 1908, C.F. MOYER, C.Y. STRADLINGS, S.M. FITE, COMMRR'S, S.B. TWINING CO. CONTR, W. CADWALLADER CLERK. - Morris Run Bridge, Rickert Road (TR 417) spanning Morris Run in Hilltown Township, Dublin, Bucks County, PA

  1. Measuring stone weathering in cities: Surface reduction on marble monuments

    SciTech Connect

    Dragovich, D. )

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish whether measurements of stone weathering recorded by different observers could be aggregated into a simple data base for evaluating pollution effects on calcareous building stone. Apparent differences in recorded weathering rates on marble tombstones were here found to be partly a result of lettering size measured, measuring devices used, and individual observers.

  2. Measuring Marbles: Demonstrating the Basic Tenets of Measurement Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wininger, Steven R.

    2007-01-01

    A hands-on activity is described in which students attempt to measure something that they cannot see. In small groups, students estimate the number of marbles in sealed boxes. Next, students' estimates are compared with the actual numbers. Last, values from both the students' estimates and actual numbers are used to explain measurement theory and…

  3. Novel Hydroxyapatite Coatings for the Conservation of Marble and Limestone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naidu, Sonia

    Marble and limestone are calcite-based materials used in the construction of various structures, many of which have significant artistic and architectural value. Unfortunately, due to calcite's high dissolution rate, these stones are susceptible to chemically-induced weathering in nature. Limestone, due to its inherent porosity, also faces other environmental weathering processes that cause weakening from disintegration at grain boundaries. The treatments presently available are all deficient in one way or another. The aim of this work is to examine the feasibility of using hydroxyapatite (HAP) as a novel protective coating for marble and limestone, with two goals: i) to reduce acid corrosion of marble and ii) to consolidate physically weathered limestone. The motivation for using HAP is its low dissolution rate and structural compatibility with calcite. Mild, wet chemical synthesis routes, in which inorganic phosphate-based solutions were reacted with marble and limestone, alone and with other precursors, were used to produce HAP films. Film nucleation, growth and phase evolution were studied on marble to understand film formation and determine the optimal synthesis route. An acid resistance test was developed to investigate the attack mechanism on marble and quantify the efficacy of HAP-based coatings. Film nucleation and growth were dependent on substrate surface roughness and increased with calcium and carbonate salt additions during synthesis. Acid attack on marble occurred via simultaneous dissolution at grain boundaries, twin boundaries and grain surfaces. HAP provided intermediate protection against acid attack, when compared to two conventional treatments. Its ability to protect the stone from acid was not as significant as predicted from dissolution kinetics and this was attributed to incomplete coverage and residual porosity within the film, arising from its flake-like crystal growth habit, which enabled acid to access the underlying substrate. The

  4. 77 FR 70159 - Marble River, LLC v. Noble Clinton Windpark I, LLC, Noble Ellenburg Windpark, LLC, Noble...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Marble River, LLC v. Noble Clinton Windpark I, LLC, Noble Ellenburg Windpark..., Marble River, LLC (Marble River or Complainant) filed a formal complaint against Noble Clinton Windpark I... pay Marble River for headroom created by common system upgrade facilities that benefit Noble and...

  5. Marble bowing: comparative studies of three different public building facades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegesmund, S.; Ruedrich, J.; Koch, A.

    2008-12-01

    The veneer cladding of the Oeconomicum (OEC, Göttingen), the State Theatre of Darmstadt (STD, Darmstadt) and of the State and University Library (SUB, Göttingen) is characterised by pronounced bowing after a short time of exposure. Direct comparison of bowing data related to measurements from 2000 to 2003 at the SUB clearly show that the amplitude in bowing had significantly increased. The bowing is different in intensity and orientation (concave, convex). The cladding material (Peccia marble, Rosa Estremoz marble and Carrara marble) are different in lattice preferred orientation, grain size distribution and grain interlocking. Depending on the bowing, panels may show cracks mostly initiated at the dowels. The percentage of visible cracks and breakouts increases with the amplitude of bowing except for the STD. Repetitive heating-cooling under dry conditions leads to considerable inelastic residual strain only after the first or second thermal cycle. The residual strain continuously increases again if water is present, whereby the moisture content after a thermal cycle has a certain impact on the decay rate. The water-enhanced thermal dilatation strongly correlates with the deterioration rate obtained from the laboratory bow test. Detailed petrophysical investigations provide evidence that with increasing bowing a decrease of mechanical properties (flexural strength or breaking load at dowel hole) occur. Marble degradation is also connected with the increase in porosity and a general shift of the maximum pore radii to larger pore sizes. On-site damage analyses were combined with laboratory tests of the bowing potential to constrain factors that may influence the risk failure. The experimental bowing data clearly demonstrate that after 40 heating cycles combined with the effect of moisture a certain impact on the decay rate is observed. In the case of demounted panels the bowing tests show that already strongly deformed panels from the building exhibit a lower

  6. Laboratory testing of sealants with a marble substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M.C.; Cechner, R.A.

    1996-12-31

    Polyurethane and silicone sealants are widely specified for installations with porous substrates such as some stones. However, when a sealant is used against such surfaces, there is a potential for a lack of adequate adhesion, or staining of the tone by misapplication or migration of the liquid components of the sealant system, such as primers or plasticizers in the formulation. Some varieties of marble in particular have been reported to be susceptible to staining and discoloration over time from sealants. Application of new sealant over existing sealants is also of great concern for remedial applications. Determining the level of substrate preparation necessary to achieve adequate bond is critical to the success of the remedial construction project. This paper discusses the development and results of a test program conducted to determine the relative performance of sealants installed on a white marble substrate. The tests performed included wet adhesion tests, accelerated weathering studies, and staining due to plasticizer migration.

  7. Radiation Shielding Properties of Some Marbles in Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Guenoglu, K.; Akkurt, I.

    2011-12-26

    Especially after development of technology, radiation started to be used in a large fields such as medicine, industry and energy. Using radiation in those fields bring hazardous effect of radiation into humancell. Thus radiation protection becomes important in physics. Although there are three ways for radiation protection, shielding of the radiation is the most commonly used method. Natural Stones such as marble is used as construction material especially in critical building and thus its radiation shielding capability should be determined.In this study, gamma ray shielding properties of some different types of marble mined in Turkey, have been measured using a NaI(Tl) scintillator detector. The measured results were also compared with the theoretical calculations XCOM.

  8. Levitation-free vibrated droplets: resonant oscillations of liquid marbles.

    PubMed

    McHale, G; Elliott, S J; Newton, M I; Herbertson, D L; Esmer, K

    2009-01-06

    A spherical conducting droplet in an alternating electric field is known to undergo shape oscillations. When the droplet is supported by a substrate, the shape is no longer a complete sphere, but shape resonances are still observed. To obtain a completely spherical droplet, some kind of levitation is needed, unless the droplet is in microgravity, and this has previously been provided by gas films or magnetic or other external forces. In this work, we report observations of shape oscillations of a hydrophobic-powder-coated droplet of water. A droplet of water rolled on a hydrophobic powder self-coats such that the water becomes encapsulated as a liquid marble. When the powder is a spherical hydrophobic grain with a contact angle greater than 90 degrees , it adheres to the solid-water interface with more than half of its diameter projecting from the liquid, thus ensuring the encapsulated water does not come into contact with any substrate. These liquid marbles are highly mobile and can be regarded as completely nonwetting droplets possessing contact angles of 180 degrees . In this work, we show that they also provide a new mechanism equivalent to levitating droplets and provide droplets with small contact areas and completely mobile contact lines for studies of shape oscillations. Liquid marbles were created using hydrophobic lycopodium and droplets of water containing potassium chloride and were excited into motion using an electrowetting-on-dielectric configuration with applied frequency swept from 1 to 250 Hz. Both an up-and-down motion and an oscillation involving multiple nodes were observed and recorded using a high-speed camera. The resonant oscillation modes of small liquid marbles were fitted to the theory for vibrations of a free spherical volume of fluid. This work demonstrates the principle that oscillation modes of completely nonwetting droplets can be studied using a simple powder coating approach without the need for an active mechanism for levitation.

  9. On trajectories of rolling marbles in cones and other funnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Gary D.

    2013-12-01

    We report on theoretical and experimental results for a ball that rolls without slipping on a surface of revolution, whose symmetry axis is aligned with a uniform gravitational field, particularly investigating both near-circular orbits and scattering-type orbits in cones. The experimental data give support for the theoretical treatment, a non-trivial application of Newton's second law that expands on our previous work and related work of others. Our findings refine those from a recent article in this journal, and largely replicate those obtained from an earlier Lagrangian approach, adding some new details and commentary. While the orbits of marbles rolling in cones do not match inverse-square-law orbits quantitatively (e.g., instead of Kepler's 3rd law, we have T2∝R), we argue that students should experience these qualitative phenomena—precession of orbits, escape velocity behavior, spin-orbit coupling, conservation laws for angular momentum, energy, and spin projection—as much for the fun and kinesthetic impressions as for the raw learning. We also report on a heretofore largely ignored variable in the exploration of rolling orbits in a gravity well: the marble's spin about its own axis as it rolls. Experimenters can, intentionally or not, vary this initial condition and produce different orbital periods for a given orbital radius—a distinctly non-celestial behavior. Careful selection of the initial spin direction and speed for a particular cone can result in marble orbits that mimic the planetary ellipses.

  10. MARBLE: A system for executing expert systems in parallel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Leonard; Johnson, Coe; Johnson, Dean

    1990-01-01

    This paper details the MARBLE 2.0 system which provides a parallel environment for cooperating expert systems. The work has been done in conjunction with the development of an intelligent computer-aided design system, ICADS, by the CAD Research Unit of the Design Institute at California Polytechnic State University. MARBLE (Multiple Accessed Rete Blackboard Linked Experts) is a system of C Language Production Systems (CLIPS) expert system tool. A copied blackboard is used for communication between the shells to establish an architecture which supports cooperating expert systems that execute in parallel. The design of MARBLE is simple, but it provides support for a rich variety of configurations, while making it relatively easy to demonstrate the correctness of its parallel execution features. In its most elementary configuration, individual CLIPS expert systems execute on their own processors and communicate with each other through a modified blackboard. Control of the system as a whole, and specifically of writing to the blackboard is provided by one of the CLIPS expert systems, an expert control system.

  11. Weathering rates of marble in laboratory and outdoor conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yerrapragada, S.S.; Chirra, S.R.; Jaynes, J.H.; Bandyopadhyay, J.K.; Gauri, K.L.; Li, S.

    1996-09-01

    In the modern urban atmosphere SO{sub 2} and NO{sub 2} attack calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) in marble exposed at rain-sheltered surfaces creating largely gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O) crusts that eventually exfoliate. In combination with CO{sub 2} these gases erode the marble at unsheltered surfaces. the authors report the development of mathematical models to predict the rate of growth of crust and the rate of surface recession. To determine the rate of growth of crust the kinetic rate constant, diffusion rate, and the order of reaction were determined by the application of the shrinking-core model applied to data generated in laboratory experiments. Based on these parameters /and average ambient levels of 10 parts per billion (ppb) SO{sub 2} and 25 ppb NO{sub 2} in Louisville, Ky., the rate of crust formation for this metro area was calculated to be 1.8 {micro}m in the first year. However, the rate of recession was modeled from data obtained by exposing marble slabs to rainfalls. A surface recession of 15 {micro}m/yr was calculated. The models predicted well the rate of growth of crust observed at several sites in Louisville and the predicted surface recession compared well with values reported in the literature.

  12. Solar-energy-system performance evaluation, Cathedral Square, Burlington, Vermont, July-December 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, K.M.

    1981-01-01

    The Cathedral Square solar site is a 10-story multiunit apartment building in Vermont. Its active solar energy system is designed to supply 51% of the hot water load, and consists of 1798 square feet of flat plate collectors, 2699-gallon water tank in an enclosed mechanical room on the roof, and two auxiliary natural gas boilers to supply hot water to immersed heat exchanger in an auxiliary storage tank. The measured solar fraction was only 28%, not 51%, which, it is concluded, is an unreasonable expectation. Other performance data include the solar savings ratio, conventional fuel savings, system performance factor, and solar system coefficient of performance. Monthly performance data are given for the solar system overall, and for the collector, storage, and hot water subsystems. Also included are insolation data, typical storage fluid temperatures, domestic hot water consumption, and solar heat exchangers inlet/outlet temperatures, and typical domestic hot water subsystem temperatures. In addition, the system operating sequence and solar energy utilization are given. Appended are a system description, performance evaluation techniques, long-term weather data. (LEW)

  13. Monitoring of the Heat and Moisture Transport through Walls of St. Martin Cathedral Tower in Bratislava

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubičár, Ľudovít; Hudec, Ján; Fidríková, Danica; Štofanik, Vladimír; Dieška, Peter; Vretenár, Viliam

    2014-05-01

    Historic monuments are subject to degradation due to exposition to surrounding meteorological conditions and groundwater. Construction of buildings consists of the plaster and material components that have porous structure. Processes like heat transport, moisture diffusion, moisturizing and drying; freezing and thawing can be found in such structures depending on environmental conditions. Monitoring of the temperature - moisture regime gives a picture on the processes running in the structure. Long term monitoring of the tower of St. Martin Cathedral in Bratislava have been performed under window sill of the belfry in exterior in south orientation. Principle of the hot-ball method is used for monitoring of the temperature and thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity of the porous system depends on the pore content. Moisture sensors are constructed from the parent material in a form of cylinder. Sensors are calibrated for dry and water saturated stage prior installation in the walls. Monitoring has been carried out in plaster and in the masonry in a distance about 10 cm from the wall surface, where sensors are installed. Information on temperature, moisture and thermal conductivity can be gained from measured signal. Use of two sensors allows estimation on heat and moisture transport through the wall. Monitoring has been performed in the period from April 2013 up to July 2013. Monitored data are correlated to the meteorological data. Details of various effects will be discussed.

  14. Light-Driven Transport of a Liquid Marble with and against Surface Flows.

    PubMed

    Kavokine, Nikita; Anyfantakis, Manos; Morel, Mathieu; Rudiuk, Sergii; Bickel, Thomas; Baigl, Damien

    2016-09-05

    Liquid marbles, that is, liquid drops coated by a hydrophobic powder, do not wet any solid or liquid substrate, making their transport and manipulation both highly desirable and challenging. Herein, we describe the light-driven transport of floating liquid marbles and emphasize a surprising motion behavior. Liquid marbles are deposited on a water solution containing photosensitive surfactants. Irradiation of the solution generates photoreversible Marangoni flows that transport the liquid marbles toward UV light and away from blue light when the thickness of the liquid substrate is large enough (Marangoni regime). Below a critical thickness, the liquid marbles move in the opposite direction to that of the surface flow at a speed increasing with decreasing liquid thickness (anti-Marangoni). We demonstrate that the anti-Marangoni motion is driven by the free surface deformation, which propels the non-wetting marble against the surface flow. We call this behavior "slide effect".

  15. Magnetic Anisotropy in Carbonate Rocks: Revisiting the Carrara Marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, V.; Hirt, A. M.; Leiss, B.; Piguet, P.; Burlini, L.

    2003-12-01

    Magnetic anisotropy has been used in numerous investigations since the 1950's as an indicator of petrofabric. In deformed rocks the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) has been shown to qualitatively, and sometimes quantitatively reflect finite strain. In low-field AMS all minerals contribute to the measured anisotropy. Over the past years several methods have been used to isolate different components to the AMS. Various high-field methods are used to separate the paramagnetic, diamagnetic and high coercivity antiferromagnetic components from the ferrimagnetic component. In spite of these advances, our understanding of the factors controlling the total AMS signal in a rock remains limited, which has hampered the quantitative use of magnetic fabrics in deformation studies. This is partly due to the limited data available on the intrinsic anisotropy of single mineral crystals. Calcite is one mineral whose AMS is well-determined. Earlier studies have shown that the magnetic fabric in deformed pure marble can be related to the crystallographic orientation of the calcite crystals (Owens and Rutter, 1978, PEPI, 16 2115; deWall et al., 2000, J. Struct. Geol., 22, 1761). De Wall et al (2000) were able to model quantitatively the AMS from the mineral fabric and AMS of calcite for coarse-grained marbles, but were less successful for fine-grained ones. In this study we have used low-field AMS and high-field torque magnetometry to isolate the diamagnetic signal of Carrara marbles. The magnetic fabric has been compared with the calcite fabric in the rocks. Preliminary results will be presented of synthetic calcite aggregates prepared from Carrara marble powder, which was initially uniaxially cold pressed at different amount of load, in order to induce a c-axis maximum type of fabric of various strength, and compare it with the magnetic anisotropy. This was later Hot Isostatic Pressed at about 150 MPa and 700° C to reduce porosity and increase/homogenize the grain

  16. Reinforcement of natural rubber hybrid composites based on marble sludge/Silica and marble sludge/rice husk derived silica

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Khalil; Nizami, Shaikh Sirajuddin; Riza, Nudrat Zahid

    2013-01-01

    A research has been carried out to develop natural rubber (NR) hybrid composites reinforced with marble sludge (MS)/Silica and MS/rice husk derived silica (RHS). The primary aim of this development is to scrutinize the cure characteristics, mechanical and swelling properties of such hybrid composite. The use of both industrial and agricultural waste such as marble sludge and rice husk derived silica has the primary advantage of being eco-friendly, low cost and easily available as compared to other expensive fillers. The results from this study showed that the performance of NR hybrid composites with MS/Silica and MS/RHS as fillers is extremely better in mechanical and swelling properties as compared with the case where MS used as single filler. The study suggests that the use of recently developed silica and marble sludge as industrial and agricultural waste is accomplished to provide a probable cost effective, industrially prospective, and attractive replacement to the in general purpose used fillers like china clay, calcium carbonate, and talc. PMID:25685484

  17. Reinforcement of natural rubber hybrid composites based on marble sludge/Silica and marble sludge/rice husk derived silica.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Khalil; Nizami, Shaikh Sirajuddin; Riza, Nudrat Zahid

    2014-03-01

    A research has been carried out to develop natural rubber (NR) hybrid composites reinforced with marble sludge (MS)/Silica and MS/rice husk derived silica (RHS). The primary aim of this development is to scrutinize the cure characteristics, mechanical and swelling properties of such hybrid composite. The use of both industrial and agricultural waste such as marble sludge and rice husk derived silica has the primary advantage of being eco-friendly, low cost and easily available as compared to other expensive fillers. The results from this study showed that the performance of NR hybrid composites with MS/Silica and MS/RHS as fillers is extremely better in mechanical and swelling properties as compared with the case where MS used as single filler. The study suggests that the use of recently developed silica and marble sludge as industrial and agricultural waste is accomplished to provide a probable cost effective, industrially prospective, and attractive replacement to the in general purpose used fillers like china clay, calcium carbonate, and talc.

  18. Venice, Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Four hundred bridges cross the labyrinth of canals that form the 120 islands of Venice, situated in a saltwater lagoon between the mouths of the Po and Piave rivers in northeast Italy. All traffic in the city moves by boat. Venice is connected to the mainland, 4 kilometers (2.5 miles) away, by ferries as well as a causeway for road and rail traffic. The Grand Canal winds through the city for about 3 kilometers (about 2 miles), dividing it into two nearly equal sections. According to tradition, Venice was founded in 452, when the inhabitants of Aquileia, Padua, and several other northern Italian cities took refuge on the islands of the lagoon from the Teutonic tribes invading Italy at that time.

    This image was acquired on December 9, 2001 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    Dr. Anne

  19. Measuring the Coefficient of Friction of a Small Floating Liquid Marble

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Chin Hong; Nguyen, Anh Van; Evans, Geoffrey M.; Dao, Dzung Viet; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the friction coefficient of a moving liquid marble, a small liquid droplet coated with hydrophobic powder and floating on another liquid surface. A floating marble can easily move across water surface due to the low friction, allowing for the transport of aqueous solutions with minimal energy input. However, the motion of a floating marble has yet to be systematically characterised due to the lack of insight into key parameters such as the coefficient of friction between the floating marble and the carrier liquid. We measured the coefficient of friction of a small floating marble using a novel experimental setup that exploits the non-wetting properties of a liquid marble. A floating liquid marble pair containing a minute amount magnetite particles were immobilised and then released in a controlled manner using permanent magnets. The capillarity-driven motion was analysed to determine the coefficient of friction of the liquid marbles. The “capillary charge” model was used to fit the experimental results. We varied the marble content and carrier liquid to establish a relationship between the friction correction factor and the meniscus angle. PMID:27910916

  20. Measuring the Coefficient of Friction of a Small Floating Liquid Marble.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Chin Hong; Nguyen, Anh Van; Evans, Geoffrey M; Dao, Dzung Viet; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-12-02

    This paper investigates the friction coefficient of a moving liquid marble, a small liquid droplet coated with hydrophobic powder and floating on another liquid surface. A floating marble can easily move across water surface due to the low friction, allowing for the transport of aqueous solutions with minimal energy input. However, the motion of a floating marble has yet to be systematically characterised due to the lack of insight into key parameters such as the coefficient of friction between the floating marble and the carrier liquid. We measured the coefficient of friction of a small floating marble using a novel experimental setup that exploits the non-wetting properties of a liquid marble. A floating liquid marble pair containing a minute amount magnetite particles were immobilised and then released in a controlled manner using permanent magnets. The capillarity-driven motion was analysed to determine the coefficient of friction of the liquid marbles. The "capillary charge" model was used to fit the experimental results. We varied the marble content and carrier liquid to establish a relationship between the friction correction factor and the meniscus angle.

  1. Measuring the Coefficient of Friction of a Small Floating Liquid Marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooi, Chin Hong; Nguyen, Anh Van; Evans, Geoffrey M.; Dao, Dzung Viet; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-12-01

    This paper investigates the friction coefficient of a moving liquid marble, a small liquid droplet coated with hydrophobic powder and floating on another liquid surface. A floating marble can easily move across water surface due to the low friction, allowing for the transport of aqueous solutions with minimal energy input. However, the motion of a floating marble has yet to be systematically characterised due to the lack of insight into key parameters such as the coefficient of friction between the floating marble and the carrier liquid. We measured the coefficient of friction of a small floating marble using a novel experimental setup that exploits the non-wetting properties of a liquid marble. A floating liquid marble pair containing a minute amount magnetite particles were immobilised and then released in a controlled manner using permanent magnets. The capillarity-driven motion was analysed to determine the coefficient of friction of the liquid marbles. The “capillary charge” model was used to fit the experimental results. We varied the marble content and carrier liquid to establish a relationship between the friction correction factor and the meniscus angle.

  2. Georgia marble at the Minnesota State Capitol The Effects of Mineralogy and Climate on Durability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitenack, Paul; Shotwell, L. Brad; Scheffler, Michael J.

    2016-11-01

    Based on visual observations and tests made of Georgia marble units that have been in service at the historic Minnesota State Capitol for 110 years, a fielddiscernible correlation exists between marble unit mineralogical composition and unit weathering performance. Field studies noted over the course of a five-year restoration project of the capitol exterior were used to categorize the original marble cladding into four perceptible types, which were evaluated by field testing that suggested a correlation between the textural and mineralogical differences within the marble and its long-term durability. To test this theory, field-issued repair assignments made during an exterior marble restoration project at the capitol were examined statistically. The nature and frequency of assigned repairs were compared to the type of marble from which they were originally fabricated to determine whether a correlation existed. The results of this comparison provided convincing statistical verification of the link between mineralogy and durability. This hypothesis was then verified through detailed petrographic analysis in a laboratory setting, which determined that marble consisting of a smaller, more interlocked grain configuration that was more dolomitic than calcitic in its basic chemistry consistently proved to be more durable in weathering performance over time. The paper describes the process followed by the authors to categorize and study the distinct varieties of Georgia marble present on the Minnesota State Capitol, and how this information was used to guide the restoration process with the intent of maximizing the anticipated service life of new marble replacements.

  3. Grain growth in synthetic marbles with added mica and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olgaard, D. L.; Evans, B.

    1988-10-01

    Evolution of grain size in synthetic marbles was traced from compaction of unconsolidated powder, through primary recrystallization and normal grain growth, to a size stabilized by second phases. To form the marbles, reagent grade CaCO3 was mixed with 0, 1 and 5 volume% mica and heat-treated under pressure with added water. Densification with negligible recrystallization occurred within one hour at 500° C and 500 MPa confining pressure. Primary recrystallization occurred at 500 550° C, causing increases of grain size of factors of 2 5. Resulting samples had uniform grain size, gently curved grain boundaries, and near-equilibrium triple junctions; they were used subsequently for normal grain growth studies. Normal grain growth occurred above 550° C; at 800° C, grain size ( D) increased from 7 μm ( D 0) to 65 μm in 24 hours. Growth rates fit the equation, D n - D {0/ n }= Kt, where K is a constant and n≃2.6. Minor amounts of pores or mica particles inhibit normal grain growth and lead to a stabilized grain size, D max, which depends on the size of the second phases and the inverse of their volume fraction raised to a power between 0.3 and 1. Once D max is reached, normal growth continues only if second phases are mobile or coarsen, or if new driving forces are introduced that cause unpinning of boundaries. Normal grain growth in Solnhofen limestone was significantly slower than in pure synthetic marble, suggesting that migration is also inhibited by second phases in the limestone.

  4. Transgranular Crack Nucleation in Carrara Marble of Brittle Failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yi; Wong, Louis Ngai Yuen; Maruvanchery, Varun

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the microcrack nucleation is of a fundamental importance in the study of rock fracturing process. Due to variations in texture and mineralogy, different rocks may show different distinctive microcrack nucleation mechanisms. In order to understand the microcrack nucleation mechanisms in Carrara marble comprehensively, localized damage zones are artificially produced by loading specimens containing an array of en-echelon flaws in this study. Then, representative samples were cut from those loaded specimens and prepared for optical observation. Four types of microcrack nucleation mechanisms leading to the formation of transgranular cracks have been identified in Carrara marble. Type I and II mechanisms are favored by the distinctive polygonal shape of the crystal grains in Carrara marble. Local tensile stress concentration in these two mechanisms is attributed to grain sliding and divergent normal contact force, respectively. Type III mechanism is associated with the gliding along twin lamellae. The resultant tensile stress concentration could nucleate microcracks within the grain containing these lamellae or in the grain boundary. No microcracks in the adjoining grains were observed in this study. Our statistical analysis suggests that type III mechanism favors the nucleation of new cracks which are nearly perpendicular to the gently inclined twin lamellae and thus have a small angle with the maximum loading direction (about 15°). Type IV mechanism operates in grains failed mainly due to compressive stress rather than tensile stress concentration. Sets of parallel microcracks of this mechanism seem to be related to the crystallographic planes of calcite. The microcracking results also suggest that most of the grain boundaries in damaged zone have been cracked at the loading about 80 % of the specimen strength, while transgranular cracks begin to occur at that time and flourish after about 90 % loading of the strength.

  5. Marble-type glass based on blast furnace slag

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkisov, P.D.; Smirnov, V.G.; Trifonova, T.E.; Sergeev, Yu.N.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses the recovery and use of blast furnace wastes as coloring agents in the manufacture of imitation marble glass. The slags consist of a series of metal oxides each of which is tested for the color it generates when reacted and annealed with the molten glass. Comparative tests were also run against non-waste coloring agents and it was found that the waste-derived colorants were equal or superior both in process behavior and in generating the appropriate optical properties in the finished glass.

  6. The marbled crayfish as a paradigm for saltational speciation by autopolyploidy and parthenogenesis in animals

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Günter; Falckenhayn, Cassandra; Schrimpf, Anne; Schmid, Katharina; Hanna, Katharina; Panteleit, Jörn; Helm, Mark; Schulz, Ralf; Lyko, Frank

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The parthenogenetic all-female marbled crayfish is a novel research model and potent invader of freshwater ecosystems. It is a triploid descendant of the sexually reproducing slough crayfish, Procambarus fallax, but its taxonomic status has remained unsettled. By cross-breeding experiments and parentage analysis we show here that marbled crayfish and P. fallax are reproductively separated. Both crayfish copulate readily, suggesting that the reproductive barrier is set at the cytogenetic rather than the behavioural level. Analysis of complete mitochondrial genomes of marbled crayfish from laboratory lineages and wild populations demonstrates genetic identity and indicates a single origin. Flow cytometric comparison of DNA contents of haemocytes and analysis of nuclear microsatellite loci confirm triploidy and suggest autopolyploidisation as its cause. Global DNA methylation is significantly reduced in marbled crayfish implying the involvement of molecular epigenetic mechanisms in its origination. Morphologically, both crayfish are very similar but growth and fecundity are considerably larger in marbled crayfish, making it a different animal with superior fitness. These data and the high probability of a divergent future evolution of the marbled crayfish and P. fallax clusters suggest that marbled crayfish should be considered as an independent asexual species. Our findings also establish the P. fallax–marbled crayfish pair as a novel paradigm for rare chromosomal speciation by autopolyploidy and parthenogenesis in animals and for saltational evolution in general. PMID:26519519

  7. Catalytic liquid marbles: Ag nanowire-based miniature reactors for highly efficient degradation of methylene blue.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yue-E; Lee, Hiang Kwee; Chew, Wee Shern; Phang, In Yee; Liu, Tianxi; Ling, Xing Yi

    2014-06-04

    Ag nanowire-based catalytic liquid marbles are fabricated as miniature reactors, which demonstrate highly efficient, support-free and rate-controllable heterogeneous degradation of methylene blue, with catalytic efficiency close to 100%. Our miniature catalytic liquid marbles are essential for reactions involving highly toxic/hazardous or costly reactants, where small volume preliminary reactions are preferred.

  8. Genetic evaluation of Angus cattle for carcass marbling using ultrasound and genomic indicators

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives were to estimate genetic parameters needed to elucidate the relationships of a molecular breeding value for marbling (MBV), intramuscular fat of yearling bulls measured with ultrasound (IMF) and marbling score of harvested steers (MRB), and to assess the utility of MBV and IMF in predicti...

  9. Genome Sequence of a Marbled Eel Polyoma-Like Virus in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping-Chung

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report here the complete genome sequence of a virus isolated from a diseased marbled eel (Anguilla marmorata) in Taiwan. The virus has been characterized as being related to Japanese eel endothelial cell-infecting virus (JEECV), with a large T-antigen-like protein. The sequence of the marbled eel virus displays low homology to the JEECV. PMID:28183770

  10. Genome Sequence of a Marbled Eel Polyoma-Like Virus in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wen, Chiu-Ming; Liu, Ping-Chung; Nan, Fan-Hua

    2017-02-09

    We report here the complete genome sequence of a virus isolated from a diseased marbled eel (Anguilla marmorata) in Taiwan. The virus has been characterized as being related to Japanese eel endothelial cell-infecting virus (JEECV), with a large T-antigen-like protein. The sequence of the marbled eel virus displays low homology to the JEECV.

  11. Don't Lose Your Marbles!: Game Project Teaches Introductory Manufacturing Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapur, Arjun; Carter, Horlin; Dillon, Dave

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a lab activity conducted in an introductory manufacturing class. In this good, simple, mass-production project, the students designed and produced a small game composed of a piece of plywood and 14 glass marbles. In appearance, the game is something like Chinese checkers, but it involves jumping over marbles, then removing…

  12. "Right-Throughs, Rings, and Taws": Marbles Pitching Terminology in Trinidad and Tobago.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winer, Lise; Boos, Hans E. A.

    Marble games, or pitch, are among the most widely played of traditional boys' games in Trinidad and Tobago and have declined in the last two decades. Nearly 200 marbles terms found in Trinidad and Tobago English Creole are documented. Although most are British in origin, there are East Indian, French Creole, and possible African influences on this…

  13. Vocational Training in Italy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training, Berlin (West Germany).

    This document on vocational training in Italy contains eight chapters. Chapter 1 describes the population of Italy. Chapter 2 describes the Italian economy through the agricultural, industrial, and service sectors. Chapter 3 describes education and vocational training in Italy, including regional agricultural and nonagricultural vocational…

  14. Evaluation of Slip Potentials on Bilecik Beige Marble with Pendulum Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem Çerçevik, Ali; Yerel Kandemir, Suheyla; Ozgur Yayli, M.

    2016-10-01

    This study deals with the determining of slip resistance and classification of slip potential for 5 different type of Bilecik Beige Marble were applied tumbling. TS EN 14231 Standard “Determination of Slip Resistance with Pendulum Friction Test Equipment” was basically utilized in determining the slip resistances of Bilecik Beige Marble with wet and dry surfaces. After tumbling process, by depending on the Bilecik Beige Marble type reduce slip potential, especially wet conditions. Slip resistance values on marble sample plates were specified to be considerably change by depending on both the applied surface processing techniques and dry/wet of surface characteristics. Finally, marbles used in this research have been classified according to safety applications by taking into account their slip resistance values.

  15. Effect of grain size and heavy metals on As immobilization by marble particles.

    PubMed

    Simón, M; García, I; González, V; Romero, A; Martín, F

    2015-05-01

    The effect of grain size and the interaction of heavy metals on As sorption by marble waste with different particle sizes was investigated. Acidic solutions containing only arsenic and a mixture of arsenic, lead, zinc, and cadmium were put in contact with the marble waste. The amount of metal(loid)s that were immobilized was calculated using the difference between the concentration in the acidic solution and in the liquid phase of the suspensions. Approximately 420 μg As m(-2) was sorbed onto the marble grains, both nonspecifically and specifically, where ≥ 80 % of the total arsenic in the acidic solution remained soluble, which suggests that this amendment is not effective to immobilize arsenic. However, in mixed contamination, relatively stable Pb-Ca arsenates were formed on the surface of the marble particles, and the soluble arsenic was reduced by 95 %, which indicates that marble particles can effectively immobilize arsenic and lead when both appear together.

  16. Changes in the chemical composition of an acidic soil treated with marble quarry and marble cutting wastes.

    PubMed

    Tozsin, Gulsen; Oztas, Taskin; Arol, Ali Ihsan; Kalkan, Ekrem

    2015-11-01

    Soil acidity greatly affects the availability of plant nutrients. The level of soil acidity can be adjusted by treating the soil with certain additives. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of marble quarry waste (MQW) and marble cutting waste (MCW) on the chemical composition and the acidity of a soil. Marble wastes at different rates were applied to an acid soil. Their effectiveness in neutralizing the soil pH was compared with that of agricultural lime. The changes in the chemical composition of the soil were also evaluated with column test at the end of a 75-day incubation period. The results indicated that the MQW and MCW applications significantly increased the soil pH (from 4.71 up to 6.54), the CaCO3 content (from 0.33% up to 0.75%), and the exchangeable Ca (from 14.79 cmol kg(-1) up to 21.18 cmol kg(-1)) and Na (from 0.57 cmol kg(-1) up to 1.07 cmol kg(-1)) contents, but decreased the exchangeable K (from 0.46 cmol kg(-1) down to 0.28 cmol kg(-1)), the plant-available P (from 25.56 mg L(-1) down to 16.62 mg L(-1)), and the extractable Fe (from 259.43 mg L(-1) down to 55.4 mg L(-1)), Cu (from 1.97 mg L(-1) down to 1.42 mg L(-1)), Mn (from 17.89 mg L(-1) down to 4.61 mg L(-1)) and Zn (from 7.88 mg L(-1) down to 1.56 mg L(-1)) contents. In addition, the Cd (from 0.060 mg L(-1) down to 0.046 mg L(-1)), Ni (from 0.337 mg L(-1) down to 0.092 mg L(-1)) and Pb (from 28.00 mg L(-1) down to 20.08 mg L(-1)) concentrations decreased upon the treatment of the soil with marble wastes.

  17. Rare earths in the Leadville Limestone and its marble derivates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarvis, J.C.; Wildeman, T.R.; Banks, N.G.

    1975-01-01

    Samples of unaltered and metamorphosed Leadville Limestone (Mississippian, Colorado) were analyzed by neutron activation for ten rare-earth elements (REE). The total abundance of the REE in the least-altered limestone is 4-12 ppm, and their distribution patterns are believed to be dominated by the carbonate minerals. The abundances of the REE in the marbles and their sedimentary precursors are comparable, but the distribution patterns are not. Eu is enriched over the other REE in the marbles, and stratigraphically upward in the formation (samples located progressively further from the heat source), the light REE become less enriched relative to the heavy REE. The Eu anomaly is attributed to its ability, unique among the REE, to change from the 3+ to 2+ oxidation state. Whether this results in preferential mobilization of the other REE or whether this reflects the composition of the pore fluid during metamorphism is unknown. Stratigraphically selective depletion of the heavy REE may be attributed to more competition for the REE between fluid and carbonate minerals in the lower strata relative to the upper strata. This competition could have been caused by changes in the temperature of the pore fluid or to the greater resistance to solution of the dolomite in the lower parts of the formation than the calcite in the upper parts. ?? 1975.

  18. Metamorphism of the Murphy belt, Marble Hill, GA

    SciTech Connect

    La Tour, T.E.; Gray, J. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-03-01

    Rocks of the Murphy belt consist of marble and metamorphosed mafic and highly aluminous pelitic rocks. The aluminous rocks contain sillimanite + kyanite + staurolite + garnet (gt) + muscovite + biotite + plagioclase + quartz [+-] tourmaline. Staurolite and kyanite are relict and closely intergrown. Garnet occurs as two generations, gt 1 and gt 2. Gt 1 and the biotite schistosity are coeval. Sillimanite needles and large porphyroblasts of muscovite (0.5--2.0 cm), formed from kyanite-staurolite aggregates coevally with gt 2, and both contain inclusions of relict kyanite and staurolite. Both are younger than the primary biotite schistosity and grew at sillimanite-muscovite grade. Muscovite porphyroblasts are partially recrystallized, leaving mica fish with thin trails of fine-grained muscovite. Kyanite [+-] staurolite are partially to completely recrystallized to spindle shaped aggregates and fine-grained muscovite. Some fine muscovite mantles the earlier phases and defined the new foliation. No sillimanite occurs in the recrystallized muscovite. This extreme grain size reduction occurred during medium-T retrograde metamorphism and converted many rocks into button schists or phyllonites. The above indicate extreme internal deformation following the metamorphic peak, during which primary sedimentary structures were destroyed. Also, competent mafic lithologies were dismembered into pods and discontinuous layers. Lithologic boundaries are no longer sedimentary, but tectonic. The association of aluminous schists and mafic rocks suggests deep-marine deposition, probably along a convergent margin. Conversely, the association is inconsistent with shallow deposition along a stable passive margin. The marble probably represents discontinuous reefs associated with the volcanic arc.

  19. Large outbreaks of ciguatera after consumption of brown marbled grouper.

    PubMed

    Chan, Thomas Y K

    2014-07-11

    Brown marbled grouper (Epinephelus fuscoguttatus) is an apex predator from coral reefs of the Indo-Pacific region. All five published case series of ciguatera after consumption of brown marbled grouper were reviewed to characterize the types, severity and chronicity of ciguatera symptoms associated with its consumption. Three of these case series were from large outbreaks affecting over 100-200 subjects who had eaten this reef fish served at banquets. Affected subjects generally developed a combination of gastrointestinal, neurological and, less commonly, cardiovascular symptoms. Gastrointestinal symptoms occurred early and generally subsided in 1-2 days. Some neurological symptoms (e.g., paresthesia of four limbs) could last for weeks or months. Sinus bradycardia and hypotension occurred early, but could be severe and prolonged, necessitating the timely use of intravenous fluids, atropine and dopamine. Other cardiovascular and neurological features included atrial ectopics, ventricular ectopics, dyspnea, chest tightness, PR interval >0.2 s, ST segment changes, polymyositis and coma. Concomitant alcohol consumption was associated with a much higher risk of developing bradycardia, hypotension and altered skin sensation. The public should realize that consumption of the high-risk fish (especially the ciguatoxin-rich parts and together with alcohol use) and repeated ciguatoxin exposures will result in more severe and chronic illness.

  20. Large Outbreaks of Ciguatera after Consumption of Brown Marbled Grouper

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Thomas Y. K.

    2014-01-01

    Brown marbled grouper (Epinephelus fuscoguttatus) is an apex predator from coral reefs of the Indo-Pacific region. All five published case series of ciguatera after consumption of brown marbled grouper were reviewed to characterize the types, severity and chronicity of ciguatera symptoms associated with its consumption. Three of these case series were from large outbreaks affecting over 100–200 subjects who had eaten this reef fish served at banquets. Affected subjects generally developed a combination of gastrointestinal, neurological and, less commonly, cardiovascular symptoms. Gastrointestinal symptoms occurred early and generally subsided in 1–2 days. Some neurological symptoms (e.g., paresthesia of four limbs) could last for weeks or months. Sinus bradycardia and hypotension occurred early, but could be severe and prolonged, necessitating the timely use of intravenous fluids, atropine and dopamine. Other cardiovascular and neurological features included atrial ectopics, ventricular ectopics, dyspnea, chest tightness, PR interval >0.2 s, ST segment changes, polymyositis and coma. Concomitant alcohol consumption was associated with a much higher risk of developing bradycardia, hypotension and altered skin sensation. The public should realize that consumption of the high-risk fish (especially the ciguatoxin-rich parts and together with alcohol use) and repeated ciguatoxin exposures will result in more severe and chronic illness. PMID:25019942

  1. Crystal Size Distribution of Periclase in Contact Metamorphic Marbles as Record of Fluid Infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, T.; Baumgartner, L.; Foster, C. T.; Bowman, J.

    2007-12-01

    Crystal size distributions (CSD) of periclase in contact metamorphic marbles are combined with geochemical and petrologic information to deduce the controls that acted on the periclase forming reaction. Data are presented for two profiles in a dolomite xenolith in mafic intrusive rocks at the Cima Uzza, southern Adamello massif (Italy). Stable isotope data and the presence of a sharp periclase reaction front on hand specimen scale shows that the formation of periclase is the consequence of high temperature fluid infiltration. Stable isotope data show depletion for 13C and 18O in a narrow region (~40cm) near the igneous contact, whereas the periclase forming reaction front extends up to 4m into the host rock. The carbon and the oxygen front are located at the same place, which would require an X(CO2) of 0.5, if the isotope fronts are interpreted using a standard infiltration model, even if modelled as the side of a front. A similar amount of reaction progress, calculated from measured volume of periclase (corrected for retrograde brucite formation), was found over the entire profiles. Surprisingly, dolomite is still present as prograde leftovers in most samples demonstrating that reaction did not go to completion. The median grain size of periclase crystals remains constant over both profiles. Nevertheless, CSD\\'{ } s flatten systematically, reflecting a larger proportion of bigger grains with increasing distance from the contact. We interpret variations in grain sizes to be the result of changing reaction affinities along an infiltration front flattened (dispersed) by diffusion/dispersion and kinetics. A numerical model is presented, based on the textural analyses and geochemistry data from the field, describing the dynamic nucleation and crystallization of periclase in this infiltration driven system.

  2. Linking groundwater pollution to the decay of 15th-century sculptures in Burgos Cathedral (northern Spain).

    PubMed

    Gázquez, Fernando; Rull, Fernando; Medina, Jesús; Sanz-Arranz, Aurelio; Sanz, Carlos

    2015-10-01

    Precipitation of salts-mainly hydrated Mg-Na sulfates-in building materials is rated as one of the most severe threats to the preservation of our architectural and cultural heritage. Nevertheless, the origin of this pathology is still unknown in many cases. Proper identification of the cause of damage is crucial for correct planning of future restoration actions. The goal of this study is to identify the source of the degradation compounds that are affecting the 15th-century limestone sculptures that decorate the retro-choir of Burgos Cathedral (northern Spain). To this end, detailed characterization of minerals by in situ (Raman spectroscopy) and laboratory techniques (XRD, Raman and FTIR) was followed by major elements (ICP and IC) and isotopic analysis (δ(34)S and δ(15)N) of both the mineral phases precipitated on the retro-choir and the dissolved salts in groundwater in the vicinity of the cathedral. The results reveal unequivocal connection between the damage observed and capillary rise of salts-bearing water from the subsoil. The multianalytical methodology used is widely applicable to identify the origin of common affections suffered by historical buildings and masterpieces.

  3. Integrated Techniques for Analysis and Monitoring of Historical Monuments: the case of S.Giovanni al Sepolcro in Brindisi (Southern Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calia, A.; Giannotta, M. T.; Masini, N.; Quarta, G.; Persico, R.

    2009-04-01

    Non destructive testing has been gaining a large interest in the field of the diagnostics applied to the cultural heritage. The exceptional and brittle nature of the investigated structures, in fact, discourages invasive investigation techniques even more than in other applications. In particular, non-destructive testing can be exploited for the detection of fractures or for the investigation of pillars and columns within churches of particular historical and/or architectural relevance. This has been recently done in the cathedral of Matera [1], and previously in the crypt of the Romanesque cathedral of Otranto [2]. In both cases, integrated prospecting has been performed, where GPR data have been considered together with acoustic sounding or resistive measurements and even microclimatic investigation. Integrated prospecting is a good help to perform not only the diagnosis of the structure but also its restoring and continuative preservation. In this contribution, we propose a case study where integrated methodologies have been adopted for the analysis of the conservation state of the architectural elements which constitute the church of S.Giovanni al Sepolcro, in Brindisi (Southern Italy). This church is a precious artifact of medieval age, which recently underwent restoration works. IBAM-CNR has been put in charge of the task to analyse the constitutive materials, the superficial finishing (paintings, patinas, plasters etc.) and the causes and the products of the decay. The information retrieved from the analysis of the materials have been fruitfully integrated with non-destructive testing of the structure. Some results will be shown at the conference. References [1] N. Masini, R. Persico, A. Guida, A. Pagliuca, "A Multifrequency and Multisensor Approach for the Study and the Restoration of Monuments: the Case of the Cathedral of Matera.", Advances in Geoscience, vol. 18, pp. 1-6, 2008. [2] G. Leucci, R. Persico, F. Soldovieri, "Detection of Fracture From GPR

  4. Petrogenesis of polygenic marbles, Baqi-Abad region, Yazd, central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayati, Farimah; Mackizadeh, Mohammad Ali

    2017-01-01

    Mineralogy, minerals paragenesis and evolution of polygenic marbles were investigated in the Baqi-Abad region (Yazd province). The area is located in the central Iran. Studied marbles are classified as calcitic marbles, brucite-bearing marbles and forsterite- serpentine bearing marbles. The following mineral assemblages have been determined: calcite + dolomite + forsterite + serpentine + talc + brucite + hydromagnesite. Based on calcite twin's geometry, marbles underwent the temperature formation between 200 and 300°C. Two mineral assemblages which have been defined in marbles are related to two stages of contact- metamorphism and metasomatism. In the first stage, de-carbonation reactions have been taken place in high fCO2 so anhydrous minerals are formed. The Second stage is characterized by invading H2O bearing fluids, leading to the formation of hydrous paragenesis. Brucite is probably formed by the de-silicification of serpentines at the first stage. On the other hand, due to the influence of hydrothermal fluids, olivines can be directly altered to brucite. It is obvious that hydromagnesite was formed at the expense of dolomite, brucite and serpentine. Its formation is associated with final carbonation reactions. As a whole, it can be concluded that based on the paragenetic relationships of minerals, there are four stages in mineral evolution system including carbonation, dehydration, de-carbonation and final dehydration processes.

  5. Deformation of ferrofluid marbles in the presence of a permanent magnet.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2013-11-12

    This paper investigates the deformation of ferrofluid marbles in the presence of a permanent magnet. Ferrofluid marbles are formed using a water-based ferrofluid and 1 μm hydrophobic polytetrafluoride particles. A marble placed on a Teflon coated glass plate deforms under gravity. In the presence of a permanent magnet, the marble is further deformed with a larger contact area. The geometric parameters are normalized by the radius of an undistorted spherical marble. The paper first discusses a scaling relationship between the dimensionless radius of the contact area as well as the dimensionless height and the magnetic Bond number. The dimensionless contact radius is proportional to the fourth root of the magnetic bond number. The dimensionless height scales with the inverse square root of the magnetic Bond number. In the case of a moving marble dragged by a permanent magnet, the deformation is evaluated as the difference between advancing and receding curvatures of the top view. The dimensionless height and the contact diameter of the marble do not significantly depend on the speed or the capillary number. The scaling analysis and experimental data show that the deformation is proportional to the capillary number.

  6. Characterization of Genes for Beef Marbling Based on Applying Gene Coexpression Network

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Dajeong; Kim, Nam-Kuk; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Park, Hye-Sun; Cho, Yong-Min; Chai, Han-Ha; Kim, Heebal

    2014-01-01

    Marbling is an important trait in characterization beef quality and a major factor for determining the price of beef in the Korean beef market. In particular, marbling is a complex trait and needs a system-level approach for identifying candidate genes related to the trait. To find the candidate gene associated with marbling, we used a weighted gene coexpression network analysis from the expression value of bovine genes. Hub genes were identified; they were topologically centered with large degree and BC values in the global network. We performed gene expression analysis to detect candidate genes in M. longissimus with divergent marbling phenotype (marbling scores 2 to 7) using qRT-PCR. The results demonstrate that transmembrane protein 60 (TMEM60) and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPYD) are associated with increasing marbling fat. We suggest that the network-based approach in livestock may be an important method for analyzing the complex effects of candidate genes associated with complex traits like marbling or tenderness. PMID:24624372

  7. Multi-approach characterization of the Rhodope marbles, Greece used in monuments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dotsika, Elissavet; Raco, Brunella; Psomiadis, David; Poutoukis, Dimitrios; Zisi, Nikoleta

    2010-05-01

    Northern Greece has many archaeological sites featuring buildings and objects entirely or partly constructed from marble whose provenance is doubtful. In Northern Greece, the most probable source of such marble is the Rhodope Mountains. For the purpose of supporting further provenance studies, these marbles are fully scientifically characterized. The sampling took place in several ancient quarries which were on trade routes of Hellenistic, Roman or Byzantine settlements. Trade of marble in N. Greece is proved to have been equally important as in S. Greece, comparing the qualitative marble of Thassos with the best marbles of the south (e.g. Paros, Naxos etc.). The techniques used are petrographic and geochemical (microscope, X-Ray diffraction patterns, Scanning Electron Microscope) methods and stable isotope ratio analysis (δ13C and δ18O). The use of a multi-technique approach with combined parameters allows the best possible discrimination. This scientific investigation both supplements the isotopic database and proves that in N. Greece people used also imported marbles.

  8. Strength Behavior, Creep Failure and Permeability Change of a Tight Marble Under Triaxial Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zaobao; Shao, Jianfu

    2017-03-01

    The coupled hydro-mechanical behaviors of a tight marble are investigated by a series of laboratory tests with continuous gas injection during the hydrostatic compression, triaxial compression and compressive creep tests. Hydrostatic compression tests are firstly carried out in three steps to identify the viscous effect of hydrostatic stress on deformation and permeability of the marble. Coupled triaxial tests are then conducted at a constant axial strain rate under five different confining pressures ( P c) with continuous gas injection. Coupled creep behaviors of the marble are also characterized by a constant deviatoric stress test under P c = 30 MPa with gas flowing at a constant injection pressure. The high-stress unloading failure behavior of the marble is finally investigated by an unloading test with a previous multi-step creep phase to realize a high-stress state as well as to investigate the time-dependent deformation of marble under different deviatoric stresses. Experimental results reveal that gas permeability of the marble shows an evident rate-dependent effect in hydrostatic compression. Mechanical behaviors of the tight marble are closely depended on the applied P c in triaxial tests, and its permeability exhibits a decrease phase at initial deviatoric loading and turns to increase at a critical stress corresponding to the initial yield stress. Marble can withstand more important plastic deformation under high P c than under lower ones. Gas flow seems to be more sensitive than the strains to characterize the creep behaviors of the marble. No time-dependent strains are observed when deviatoric creep stress is lower than 50% of its peak strength under P c = 30 MPa.

  9. Population genetic structure and conservation of marbled murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friesen, V.L.; Birt, T.P.; Piatt, J.F.; Golightly, R.T.; Newman, S.H.; Hebert, P.N.; Congdon, B.C.; Gissing, G.

    2005-01-01

    Marbled murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus) are coastal seabirds that nest from California to the Aleutian Islands. They are declining and considered threatened in several regions. We compared variation in the mitochondrial control region, four nuclear introns and three microsatellite loci among 194 murrelets from throughout their range except Washington and Oregon. Significant population genetic structure was found: nine private control region haplotypes and three private intron alleles occurred at high frequency in the Aleutians and California; global estimates of FST or ??ST and most pairwise estimates involving the Aleutians and/or California were significant; and marked isolation-by-distance was found. Given the available samples, murrelets appear to comprise five genetic management units: (1) western Aleutian Islands, (2) central Aleutian Islands, (3) mainland Alaska and British Columbia, (4) northern California, and (5) central California.

  10. Discrepant Results in a 2-D Marble Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalajian, Peter

    2013-03-01

    Video analysis of 2-D collisions is an excellent way to investigate conservation of linear momentum. The often-desired experimental design goal is to minimize the momentum loss in order to demonstrate the conservation law. An air table with colliding pucks is an ideal medium for this experiment, but such equipment is beyond the budget of many schools. Substituting marbles on a table for air pucks introduces angular momentum and sliding friction so that simple video analysis will demonstrate that linear momentum is not conserved.1,2 Nevertheless, these labs offer students insights into the real-world application of physics. During a recent classroom trial, an unexpected result forced my students to think creatively and critically about what happened in the experiment.

  11. Grain Boundary Microstructures of Wet and Dry Recrystallizing Marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bresser, H.; Urai, J.; Olgaard, D.

    2003-12-01

    We analyzed 2D grain boundary maps of samples of marble that were deformed at high temperature with and without added water. Our aim was to relate the grain boundary geometry of wet and dry marble to the observed mechanical behavior, and to obtain criteria that can help interpretation of natural calcite rocks in terms of the influence of water on their deformation. We made use of cylindrical samples of pure white, microporous Carrara marble that were axially compressed in a gas medium deformation apparatus at temperatures (T) ranging 600-1000° C, a constant confining pressure of 300 MPa and strain rates around 10-5 s-1. Samples were jacketed in sealed Pt-capsules with or without the addition of 0.4-2.1 wt% water. Microstructural analysis was carried out using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Light Optical Microscopy. Traced grain boundary maps were made from ultra thin sections of samples, and were quantitatively analyzed using Image Analysis techniques. The strength of water-added samples was found to be slightly less than of dry samples at all temperatures investigated (weakening ~40% at T=600° C, decreasing to ˜10% at higher T), with one exception at T=800° C. Microstructurally, the samples showed grain flattening and twinning at T=600° C and development of new grains by dynamic recrystallization at higher T, dominated by grain boundary migration. Grain boundaries in wet samples showed isolated or locally continuous remnants of fluid pockets in SEM. Quantitatively, the mean grain size and grain size distribution were found to only marginally vary between dry and wet samples. Average roundness of grains in wet recrystallized samples is systematically better than in dry samples. The fractal dimension D for the relationship between grain diameter d and grain perimeter P (expressed P ˜dD) for wet samples is systematically lower than for dry samples. Thus, grain boundaries in wet-deformed samples have less irregular shapes than in dry samples. Average

  12. Large scale Hugoniot material properties for Danby Marble

    SciTech Connect

    Rinehart, E.J.

    1993-11-01

    This paper presents the results of simulation experiments of nuclear underground testing carried out using the HYDROPLUS methodology for yield verifications of non-standard tests. The objective of this test series was to demonstrate the accuracy of stress and velocity measurements in hard, low porosity rock, to obtain comparisons of large-scale material properties with those obtained from laboratory testing of the same material, and to address the problems posed by a material having a clear precursor wave preceding the main shock wave. The test series consisted of three individual experimental tests. The first established material properties of the Danby marble selected for use in the experiments. The second and third tests looked at stress and velocity gage errors obtained when gages were placed in boreholes and grouted into place.

  13. Monitoring Heritage Buildings with Open Source Hardware Sensors: A Case Study of the Mosque-Cathedral of Córdoba.

    PubMed

    Mesas-Carrascosa, Francisco Javier; Verdú Santano, Daniel; Meroño de Larriva, Jose Emilio; Ortíz Cordero, Rafael; Hidalgo Fernández, Rafael Enrique; García-Ferrer, Alfonso

    2016-09-29

    A number of physical factors can adversely affect cultural heritage. Therefore, monitoring parameters involved in the deterioration process, principally temperature and relative humidity, is useful for preventive conservation. In this study, a total of 15 microclimate stations using open source hardware were developed and stationed at the Mosque-Cathedral of Córdoba, which is registered with UNESCO for its outstanding universal value, to assess the behavior of interior temperature and relative humidity in relation to exterior weather conditions, public hours and interior design. Long-term monitoring of these parameters is of interest in terms of preservation and reducing the costs of future conservation strategies. Results from monitoring are presented to demonstrate the usefulness of this system.

  14. Monitoring Heritage Buildings with Open Source Hardware Sensors: A Case Study of the Mosque-Cathedral of Córdoba

    PubMed Central

    Mesas-Carrascosa, Francisco Javier; Verdú Santano, Daniel; Meroño de Larriva, Jose Emilio; Ortíz Cordero, Rafael; Hidalgo Fernández, Rafael Enrique; García-Ferrer, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    A number of physical factors can adversely affect cultural heritage. Therefore, monitoring parameters involved in the deterioration process, principally temperature and relative humidity, is useful for preventive conservation. In this study, a total of 15 microclimate stations using open source hardware were developed and stationed at the Mosque-Cathedral of Córdoba, which is registered with UNESCO for its outstanding universal value, to assess the behavior of interior temperature and relative humidity in relation to exterior weather conditions, public hours and interior design. Long-term monitoring of these parameters is of interest in terms of preservation and reducing the costs of future conservation strategies. Results from monitoring are presented to demonstrate the usefulness of this system. PMID:27690056

  15. The determination of resistance of marble to thermal and moisture cycles: relevance and limits of the recent European natural stone standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellopede, Rossana; Castelletto, Eleonora; Marini, Paola; Zichella, Lorena

    2015-04-01

    The recent European standard EN 16306:2013 specifies laboratory methodology on the determination of the resistance to thermal and moisture cycling of marble for cladding of building façades. In particular measurements of bowing and flexural strength should be performed before and at the end of the ageing cycles. Bowing is measured on specimens of dimension 30*100*400mm exposed to moisture from beneath and heating (gradually till 80°C) on the upper face. The flexural strength should be measured both on reference and on exposed specimens in order to assess the variation of mechanical properties. Additional non-destructive tests are foreseen but are not compulsory for the standard. Moreover, the Annex A of the EN 16306, contains a guidance of the limit values that could be useful for the building planner for façade panels dimensioning. Different varieties of marble (two from Italy, one from Greece and three from Portugal) have been tested by means of this laboratory ageing test. Non-destructive tests such as the measurements of Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity (UPV), porosity, and water absorption have been executed together with the conventional flexural strength test. Image analysis on thin sections soaked with methylene blue have been analysed to further investigate the correlation between porosity and tendency to bowing. Base on the results obtained, some consideration on the decrease of mechanical resistance and the bowing in relation to the variety of marble tested and the limit values indicated the Annex A of EN 16306 can be drawn. Besides, from the data analysed a deepened discussion has been made. It is known that bowing and rapid strength loss occur in some varieties of marble when used as exterior cladding but further considerations can be made: bowing and flexural strength are correlate and in which way? Often the bowing is related to the decrease of flexural strength but it happens that there is a decrease in the mechanical resistance of the stone also

  16. Utah Marbles and Mars Blueberries: Comparitive Terrestrial Analogs for Hematite Concretions on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, M. A.; Beitler, B.; Parry, W. T.; Ormö, J.; Komatsu, G.

    2005-03-01

    Compelling comparisons show why Utah iron oxide-cemented "marbles" are a good analog for Mars hematite "blueberries". Terrestrial examples offer valuable models for interpreting the diagenetic history and importance of water on Mars.

  17. Methods for tracing the origin of white marbles used in antiquity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochaska, Walter; Grillo, Silvana Maria

    2013-04-01

    The topic of this paper is to given an overview of the methods to pinpoint the origin of white marbles and to discuss the progress made in this field during the last years. To pinpoint the place of origin of the marble to an area or even to a special quarry may be of appreciable importance in investigating ancient trading routes and trade relations. A material-specific classification can be conducive to understand if the workshops of an area used marbles of acceptable quality from a local quarry or quarrying areas or if they used imported marbles in or without combination with local ones. Furthermore during restoration activities the knowledge of the origin of the marbles used in architecture may be of importance for supplying more or less original types of marbles. It may also be of interest for evaluating the authenticity of artifact information on the provenance of the used material. The first attempt to discriminate between different marbles used petrographic methods followed by instrumental chemical analyses, especially the analysis of trace elements. In the last decades multi-element neutron activation analysis (NAA) of various trace elements was attempted to pinpoint the origins of marbles. A few decades ago stable isotope analysis seemed to be the solution of this problem and became the standard methods for investigation the origin of white marbles. However, with the rapidly increasing number of historical marble quarrying sites and with the increasing number of analyzed samples in general, the compositional fields in the isotope diagram became larger and many classical marbles show large ranges of overlap. Therefore special attention is drawn to a new method to characterize the chemical properties of microinclusiones of the marbles additional to the conventionally used methods to ascribe their origin to a special quarry or at least to a defined geological formation of a given area. Several case studies will be presented: Different types of marbles were

  18. Using marble wastes as a soil amendment for acidic soil neutralization.

    PubMed

    Tozsin, Gulsen; Arol, Ali Ihsan; Oztas, Taskin; Kalkan, Ekrem

    2014-01-15

    One of the most important factors limiting plant growth is soil pH. The objective of this study is to determine the effectiveness of marble waste applications on neutralization of soil acidity. Marble quarry waste (MQW) and marble cutting waste (MCW) were applied to an acid soil at different rates and their effectiveness on neutralization was evaluated by a laboratory incubation test. The results showed that soil pH increased from 4.71 to 6.36 and 6.84 by applications of MCW and MQW, respectively. It was suggested that MQW and MCW could be used as soil amendments for the neutralization of acid soils and thus the negative impact of marble wastes on the environment could be reduced.

  19. Marble tombstone in national cemeteries as indicators of stone damage: general methods

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, N.S.; Berman, S.M.

    1983-01-01

    The role of acid deposition in damage to materials exposed to the environment is a matter of national concern. Marble tombstones are an example of widely distributed materials of uniform composition which have known times of exposure. A study of marble tombstones in 23 national cemeteries and soldiers lots in private cemeteries identified the marble source, the method of cutting, historical data, and physical measurements. The results show that fine-grained Vermont marble should be used as a standard in short-term exposure studies because it weathers more rapidly. A comparison of the weathering rates for rural, suburban, and urban cemeteries with comparable climates with high annual precipitation levels indicates that the urban environment causes significant damage beyond that observed in rural environments and that local sources dominate the deposition of damaging pollutants. 16 references, 6 figures, 4 tables.

  20. Weight losses of marble and limestone briquettes exposed to outdoor environments in the eastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Youngdahl, C.A.

    1987-08-01

    Weight losses of marble and limestone samples exposed to outdoor environments at field sites in the eastern United States have been monitored in studies initiated in 1984. The prodcedures are described, and the results are tabulated and discussed. A rate of marble loss approximately equivalent to 16 ..mu..m of surface recession per year was found in North Carolina, and losses of this order were also observed in New Jersey, New York, and Washington, DC. Limestone weight losses were much higher than for marble in the first year; loss of extraneous materials from the porous limestone appeared to be a likely contributor to the overall loss. The rate of limestone loss diminished in the second year, though it continued to be higher than for marble. Exposures are continuing in a planned 10-yr program of tests. 8 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Liquid marbles prepared from pH-responsive sterically stabilized latex particles.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Syuji; Suzaki, Motomichi; Armes, Steven P; Dupin, Damien; Hamasaki, Sho; Aono, Kodai; Nakamura, Yoshinobu

    2011-07-05

    Submicrometer-sized pH-responsive sterically stabilized polystyrene (PS) latex particles were synthesized by dispersion polymerization in isopropyl alcohol with a poly[2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate]- (PDEA-) based macroinitiator. These PDEA-PS latexes were extensively characterized with respect to their particle size distribution, morphology, chemical composition, and pH-responsive behavior. Millimeter- and centimeter-sized "liquid marbles" with aqueous volumes varying between 15 μL and 2.0 mL were readily prepared by rolling water droplets on the dried PDEA-PS latex powder. The larger liquid marbles adopted nonspherical shapes due to gravitational forces; analysis of this deformation enabled the surface tension to be estimated. Scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy studies indicated that flocs of the PDEA-PS particles were adsorbed at the surface of these water droplets, leading to stable liquid marbles. The relative mechanical integrity of the liquid marbles prepared from alkaline aqueous solution (pH 10) was higher than those prepared from acidic aqueous solution (pH 2) as judged by droplet roller experiments. These liquid marbles exhibited long-term stability (over 1 h) when transferred onto the surface of liquid water, provided that the solution pH of the subphase was above pH 8. In contrast, the use of acidic solutions led to immediate disintegration of these liquid marbles within 10 min, with dispersal of the PDEA-PS latex particles in the aqueous solution. Thus the critical minimum solution pH required for long-term liquid marble stability correlates closely with the known pK(a) value of 7.3 for the PDEA stabilizer chains. Stable liquid marbles were also successfully prepared from aqueous Gellan gum solution and glycerol.

  2. New cleaning strategies based on carbon nanomaterials applied to the deteriorated marble surfaces: A comparative study with enzyme based treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentini, Federica; Diamanti, Alessia; Carbone, M.; Bauer, E. M.; Palleschi, Giuseppe

    2012-06-01

    Pentelic marbles from Basilica Neptuni in Rome-Italy (27-25 B.C.) show the signs of deterioration phenomena, which can be identified as black crust as well as black and grey patina. The present study has the twofold objective of assessing the entity of the deterioration and proposing new cleaning strategies based on nanotechnologies. The former is achieved by performing optical microscopy, differential interference contrast (DIC), stereomicroscopy, scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/EDX) and infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis. The second objective of this study, involves different treatments based on a new cleaning strategy with carbon nanomaterials and bio-cleaning (used here for comparison) performed with enzymes, as glucose oxidase (GOD) and lipase. Nanomicelles assembled with functionalised carbon nano-fibres (CNF-COOH) and dispersed in Tween 20 medium show the highest cleaning performances in terms of removal of the black crust, compared with the pristine single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and the enzyme-based cleaning treatments. In particular, in these last two cases, the GOD-based biocleaning is efficient in removing the grey and dark patina, but works slow on the black crust. Finally, the lipase based cleaning approach is efficient in the black patina removal, though at the working temperature of 38 °C.

  3. Counseling in Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remley, Theodore P.; Bacchini, Eugenio; Krieg, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The counseling profession in Italy is in an early stage of development. No university preparation programs exist, and counselors are not employed in schools. Counselors maintain private practices, work in agencies, and are employed by the government. Counselors receive their preparation in Italy from professional associations in programs that…

  4. Lignin-AuNPs liquid marble for remotely-controllable detection of Pb2+

    PubMed Central

    Han, Guocheng; Wang, Xiaoying; Hamel, Jonathan; Zhu, Hongli; Sun, Runcang

    2016-01-01

    This work reported the green and facile fabrication of a versatile lignin-AuNP composite, which was readily and remotely encapsulated to form novel liquid marbles. The marbles can stay suspended in water, and show excellent photothermal conversion properties, as well as visual detection and adsorption towards Pb2+. More importantly, the marbles can simultaneously remotely detect and adsorb Pb2+ via co-precipitation by simply controlling the near infrared (NIR) irradiation. It is believed that the remotely-controllable NIR-responsive lignin-AuNPs liquid marble can be used in Pb2+-related reactions. The liquid marble can be placed in the system at the very beginning of the reaction and stably stays on the surface until the reaction has ended. After reacting, upon remote NIR irradiation, the liquid marble bursts to adsorb Pb2+, and the residual Pb2+ can be collected. This facile manipulation strategy does not use complicated nanostructures or sophisticated equipment, so it has potential applications for channel-free microfluidics, smart microreactors, microengines, and so on. PMID:27909335

  5. Laboratory Investigations for the Role of Flushing Media in Diamond Drilling of Marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, A.; Khandelwal, Manoj; Rao, K. U. M.

    2011-05-01

    Marble is used as a natural stone for decorative purposes from ages. Marble is a crystalline rock, composed predominantly of calcite, dolomite or serpentine. The presence of impurities imparts decorative pattern and colors. The diamond-based operations are extensively used in the mining and processing of marble. Marble is mined out in the form of blocks of cuboids shape and has to undergo extensive processing to make it suitable for the end users. The processing operation includes slabbing, sizing, polishing, etc. Diamond drilling is also commonly used for the exploration of different mineral deposits throughout the world. In this paper an attempt has been made to enhance the performance of diamond drilling on marble rocks by adding polyethylene-oxide (PEO) in the flushing water. The effect of PEO added with the drilling water was studied by varying different machine parameters and flushing media concentration in the laboratory. The responses were rate of penetration and torque at bit-rock interface. Different physico-mechanical properties of marble were also determined. It was found that flushing water added with PEO can substantially enhance the penetration rates and reduce the torque developed at the bit-rock interface as compared to plain flushing water.

  6. Proteome Analysis of Bovine Longissimus dorsi Muscle Associated with the Marbling Score

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Y. N.; Kim, S. H.; Yoon, D. H.; Lee, H. G.; Kang, H. S.; Seo, K. S.

    2012-01-01

    The breeding value of marbling score in skeletal muscle is an important factor for evaluating beef quality. In the present study, we investigated proteins associated with the breeding value of the marbling score for bovine sirloin to select potential biomarkers to improve meat quality through comparative proteomic analysis. Proteins isolated from muscle were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. After analyzing images of the stained gel, seven protein spots for the high marbling score group were identified corresponding to changes in expression that were at least two-fold compared to the low marbling score group. Four spots with increased intensities in the high marbling score group were identified as phosphoglycerate kinase 1, triosephophate isomerase, acidic ribosomal phosphoprotein PO, and capping protein (actin filament) Z-line alpha 2. Spots with decreased intensities in the high marbling score group compared to the low score group were identified as 14-3-3 epsilon, carbonic anhydrase II, and myosin light chain 1. Expression of myosin light chain 1 and carbonic anhydrase 2 was confirmed by Western blotting. Taken together, these data could help improve the economic performance of cattle and provide useful information about the underlying the function of bovine skeletal muscle. PMID:25049666

  7. Switchable Opening and Closing of a Liquid Marble via Ultrasonic Levitation.

    PubMed

    Zang, Duyang; Li, Jun; Chen, Zhen; Zhai, Zhicong; Geng, Xingguo; Binks, Bernard P

    2015-10-27

    Liquid marbles have promising applications in the field of microreactors, where the opening and closing of their surfaces plays a central role. We have levitated liquid water marbles using an acoustic levitator and, thereby, achieved the manipulation of the particle shell in a controlled manner. Upon increasing the sound intensity, the stable levitated liquid marble changes from a quasi-sphere to a flattened ellipsoid. Interestingly, a cavity on the particle shell can be produced on the polar areas, which can be completely healed when decreasing the sound intensity, allowing it to serve as a microreactor. The integral of the acoustic radiation pressure on the part of the particle surface protruding into air is responsible for particle migration from the center of the liquid marble to the edge. Our results demonstrate that the opening and closing of the liquid marble particle shell can be conveniently achieved via acoustic levitation, opening up a new possibility to manipulate liquid marbles coated with non-ferromagnetic particles.

  8. Development of tailored ceramic microstructures using recycled marble processing residue as pore-former

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domopoulou, A.; Spiliotis, X.; Charalampides, G.; Baklavaridis, A.; Papapolymerou, G.; Karayannis, V.

    2016-06-01

    Recycling of marble processing residue is significant since marble processing constitutes an important industrial sector. Therefore, the sustainable management and the valorisation, in an economically profitable manner, of this industrial by-product should be considered. In this work, the potential use of marble residue as pore-former into clayey mixtures for the production of lightweight, porous and thermal insulating ceramics is investigated. Four samples consisting of clayey ceramic body incorporating up to 50 wt.% fine marble residue powder were produced. The final ceramic products were produced upon firing (sintering) at 950oC. Porosity and thermal conductivity measurements were carried out in order to assess the thermal insulating behavior of the produced sintered ceramics. The porosity of the sintered ceramics increases substantially by increasing the marble residue admixture loading. This, in turn, leads to a decrease in thermal conductivity. Consequently, the marble residue can be successfully employed as pore-forming agent, in order to improve the insulating behavior of the ceramic materials.

  9. Lignin-AuNPs liquid marble for remotely-controllable detection of Pb2+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Guocheng; Wang, Xiaoying; Hamel, Jonathan; Zhu, Hongli; Sun, Runcang

    2016-12-01

    This work reported the green and facile fabrication of a versatile lignin-AuNP composite, which was readily and remotely encapsulated to form novel liquid marbles. The marbles can stay suspended in water, and show excellent photothermal conversion properties, as well as visual detection and adsorption towards Pb2+. More importantly, the marbles can simultaneously remotely detect and adsorb Pb2+ via co-precipitation by simply controlling the near infrared (NIR) irradiation. It is believed that the remotely-controllable NIR-responsive lignin-AuNPs liquid marble can be used in Pb2+-related reactions. The liquid marble can be placed in the system at the very beginning of the reaction and stably stays on the surface until the reaction has ended. After reacting, upon remote NIR irradiation, the liquid marble bursts to adsorb Pb2+, and the residual Pb2+ can be collected. This facile manipulation strategy does not use complicated nanostructures or sophisticated equipment, so it has potential applications for channel-free microfluidics, smart microreactors, microengines, and so on.

  10. Preliminary notes about Heritage Stone Resources from Apulia region South Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeone, Vincenzo; Doglioni, Angelo

    2013-04-01

    Apulia region in south Italy is characterized by a calcareous basement of cretaceous limestone outcropping in the large Murgia highland in central Apulia and by the presence of Miocenic and Pleistocenic calcareous sandstone that historically the have been used for many buildings and architectural purpose and can be considered as part of heritage stone resources that still today are used for several building purpose. Here is presented a preliminary overview of the main kind of stone that can be properly included in the global stone resources. The main limestone stones are the Bari cretaceous limestone that have been used to build up many Apulia Romanic cathedrals as Trani Cathedral, and also many mediaeval castle as the famous Castel del Monte built by Fredric II. The most famous variety is Trani stone dug in large open quarry in the area at north of Bari. A second important stone resource is the Lecce sandstone. It is a quite homogeneous and compact Miocenic sandstone, made up by fragments of limestone and fossil carbonate with calcites cement and the presence of other substances included dispersion of clay minerals. It has a light-colored or pale yellow with tiny pink veins. It is dug in large quarries throughout the Salento peninsula in southern Apulia. It is a rock relatively soft and easily workable also due to the presence of small quantities of clay. Improves its characteristics of resistance as a result of drying. Even if it was largely used for architecture and decorative purpose it is easily degradable for effect of weathering effects. It was the base of famous monuments and decoration of Lecce Baroque in the XVIII century, including the palace of Celestine and the adjacent Santa Croce Church, the Church of Santa Chiara and the Cathedral. A third relevant heritage stone is the Gravina calcareous sandstone (Upper Pleistocene) largely outcropping along the border of Murge calcareous horst. It has been used for several historical ancient building (XVII

  11. Mineralogical characterization of the Shelburne Marble and the Salem limestone: Test stones used to study the effects of acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, E.S.

    1989-01-01

    The Salem Limestone and the Shelburne Marble are representative of limestones and marbles commonly used in buildings and monuments. Both stones are composed predominantly of calcite. The Salem Limestone is homogeneous in composition and mineralogic characteristics throughout the test block. The Shelburne Marble has compositionally homogeneous mineral phases, but the distribution of those phases within the test block is random. The mineralogy and physical characteristics of the Shelburne Marble and Salem Limestone test blocks described in the study provide a baseline for future studies of the weathering behavior of these stones. Because the Shelburne Marble and the Salem Limestone are representative of typical commercial marbles and limestones, they are likely to be useful in a consortium study of the effects of acid precipitation on these two types of building stones.

  12. A Multi-analytical Approach for the Characterization of Marbles from Lesser Himalayas (Northwest Pakistan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahad, M.; Iqbal, Y.; Riaz, M.; Ubic, R.; Redfern, S. A. T.

    2015-12-01

    The KP province of Pakistan hosts widespread deposits of thermo-metamorphic marbles that were extensively used as a building and ornamental stones since the time of earliest flourishing civilization in this region known as Indus Valley Civilization (2500 BC). The macroscopic characteristics of 22 marble varieties collected from three different areas of Lesser Himalayas (Northwest Pakistan), its chemical, mineralogical, petrographic features, temperature conditions of metamorphic re-crystallization, and the main physical properties are presented in order to provide a solid basis for possible studies on the provenance and distribution of building stones from this region. The results provide a set of diagnostic parameters that allow discriminating the investigated marbles and quarries. Studied marbles overlap in major phase assemblage, but the accessory mineral content, chemistry, the maximum grain size (MGS) and other petrographic characteristics are particularly useful in the distinction between them. On the basis of macroscopic features, the studied marbles can be classifies into four groups: (i) white (ii) grey-to-brown veined, (iii) brown-reddish to yellowish and (iv) dark-grey to blackish veined marbles. The results show that the investigated marbles are highly heterogeneous in both their geochemical parameters and minero-petrographic features. Microscopically, the white, grey-to-brown and dark-grey to blackish marbles display homeoblastic/granoblastic texture, and the brown-reddish to yellowish marbles display a heteroblastic texture with traces of slightly deformed polysynthetic twining planes. Minero-petrography, XRD, SEM and EPMA revealed that the investigated marbles chiefly consist of calcite along with dolomite, quartz, muscovite, pyrite, K-feldspar, Mg, Ti and Fe-oxides as subordinates. The magnesium content of calcite coexisting with dolomite was estimated by both XRD and EPMA/EDS, indicating the metamorphic temperature of re-crystallization from 414

  13. MissMarble, a multi-user interdisciplinary data base of marble for archaeometric, art historian and restoration use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zöldföldi, J.; Székely, B.; Hegedüs, P.

    2009-04-01

    assured via co-ordinated activity of the data producers. The aim of the MissMarble project was to develop an interdisciplinary data base management system for analytical results of marble occurrences (geological samples) and marble artefacts (archaeological and architectural objects). The system is characterised by user friendly interfaces for data entry, storage, continuous dissemination, and exchange. Furthermore the system provides practical hints to understand the techniques applied on various samples and relate them to other literature data. The goal of the developed system is to provide help for data comparison, provenance analyses and to reveal missing analytical results. The various user groups have different access rights. Beside of the Editors, Contributors are a special user group who are allowed to enter their own analytical results. Conceptually we intend to manage the results of analyses of both type of material (archaeological and geological samples) together to handle the data in the same manner. It enhances the overlaps and the gaps in the analytical results defining the further analyses to be done. The data entries are organized in the following scheme: sample identification; methods applied on the sample; colour and fabric; mineralogical composition; textural properties; chemical and isotope geochemical composition; engineering physical properties. Dependencies on the sample type: (in case of geological sample) geological classification (age, facies); (in case of archaeological samples) archaeological description of the objects; probable provenance (if determined); conservational and restoration experience. The system is designed so that further amendments and extensions are possible without data loss. It is updated and tailored according to the experience gathered during its use. To this end a pinboard is used for user feedback. The system functionalities, data structure and data content are regularly revised according to the requirements of the users

  14. A Marble Embryo: Meanings of a Portrait from 1900

    PubMed Central

    Hopwood, Nick

    2012-01-01

    Portraits of scientists use attributes of discovery to construct identities; portraits that include esoteric accessories may fashion identities for these too. A striking example is a marble bust of the anatomist Wilhelm His by the Leipzig sculptor Carl Seffner. Made in 1900, it depicts the founder of modern human embryology looking down at a model embryo in his right hand. This essay reconstructs the design and viewing of this remarkable portrait in order to shed light on private and public relations between scientists, research objects and audiences. The bust came out of a collaboration to model the face of the composer Johann Sebastian Bach and embodies a shared commitment to anatomical exactitude in three dimensions. His’s research agendas and public character explain the contemplative pose and unprecedented embryo model, which he had laboriously constructed from material a midwife supplied. The early contexts of display in the His home and art exhibitions suggest interpretive resources for viewers and hence likely meanings. Seffner’s work remains exceptional, but has affinities to portraits of human embryologists and embryos produced since 1960. Embryo images have acquired such controversial prominence that the model may engage us more strongly now than it did exhibition visitors around 1900. PMID:22606754

  15. Electromagnetic and ultrasonic investigations on a roman marble slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capizzi, Patrizia; Cosentino, Pietro L.

    2010-05-01

    The archaeological Museum of Rome (Museo delle Terme di Diocleziano) asked our group about the physical consistency of a marble slab (II - III century AD) that has recently fallen down during the transportation for an exhibition. In fact, due to insurance conflict, it was necessary to control the new fractures due to the recent accident and distinguish them from the ancient ones. The sculptured slab (today's size is 1280 x 70 x 9 cm), cut at the ends for a re-use as an inscription in the rear face, was restored (assemblage of different broken parts and cleaning) in contemporary times. We used different methodologies to investigate the slab: namely a pacometer (Protovale Elcometer) to individuate internal coupling pins, GPR (2000 MHz) and Ultrasonic (55 kHz) tomographic high-density surveys to investigate the internal extension of all the visible fractures and to search for the unknown internal ones. For every methodology used the quality of the acquired data was relatively high. They have been processed and compared to give a set of information useful for the bureaucratic problems of the Museum. Later on, the data have been processed in depth, for studying how to improve the data processing and for extracting all the information contained in the whole set of experimental data. Finally, the results of such a study in depth are exposed in detail.

  16. Laboratory study of fault healing in Carrara marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacey, Helen; Evans, Brian; Mok, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    High-pressure fluids on a fault plane can trigger fault movement, but precipitation from these fluids can also lead to cementation, which may alter fault plane strength and permeability and may reduce the probability of reactivation. Chemically reactive rocks such as carbonates present us with the opportunity to study this healing in more detail. This work reports upon the influence of precipitation upon the strength and frictional response of the fault plane in Carrara marble. Hold-slide experiments were undertaken on cores with pre-cut faults in the presence of either water or argon at identical conditions; T = 450oC, Pc = 130MPa, Pp = 45MPa, hold time = 7200 s. When water was present, cementation occurred along the fault plane. When the fault plane was fully cemented, the sample was up to 16MPa stronger compared to those in experiments undertaken with argon as the pore fluid. In addition, the fully cemented faults produced a much more ductile response during slip. It is likely that in the presence of argon, the frictional strength depended on the asperities on the fault surface, i.e., fault roughness. In the presence of water, fault strengthening was accompanied by a major change in the fault topology. Apparently, slip along the cemented calcite grain contacts occurred in a much more ductile manner.

  17. Underwater Photogrammetry and 3d Reconstruction of Marble Cargos Shipwreck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balletti, C.; Beltrame, C.; Costa, E.; Guerra, F.; Vernier, P.

    2015-04-01

    Nowadays archaeological and architectural surveys are based on the acquisition and processing of point clouds, allowing a high metric precision, essential prerequisite for a good documentation. Digital image processing and laser scanner have changed the archaeological survey campaign, from manual and direct survey to a digital one and, actually, multi-image photogrammetry is a good solution for the underwater archaeology. This technical documentation cannot operate alone, but it has to be supported by a topographical survey to georeference all the finds in the same reference system. In the last years the Ca' Foscari and IUAV University of Venice are conducting a research on integrated survey techniques to support underwater metric documentation. The paper will explain all the phases regarding the survey's design, images acquisition, topographic measure and the data processing of two Roman shipwrecks in south Sicily. The cargos of the shipwrecks are composed by huge marble blocks, but they are different for morphological characteristic of the sites, for the depth and for their distribution on the seabed. Photogrammetrical and topographical surveys were organized in two distinct methods, especially for the second one, due to the depth that have allowed an experimentation of GPS RTK's measurements on one shipwreck. Moreover, this kind of three-dimensional documentation is useful for educational and dissemination aspect, for the ease of understanding by wide public.

  18. Habituation of Backward Escape Swimming in the Marbled Crayfish.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Azusa; Nagayama, Toshiki

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, we performed behavioral analyses of the habituation of backward escape swimming in the marbled crayfish, Procambarus fallax. Application of rapid mechanical stimulation to the rostrum elicited backward swimming following rapid abdominal flexion of crayfish. Response latency was very short-tens of msec-suggesting that backward swimming is mediated by MG neurons. When stimulation was repeated with 10 sec interstimulus intervals the MG-like tailflip did not occur, as the animals showed habituation. Retention of habituation was rather short, with most animals recovering from habituation within 10 min. Previous experience of habituation was remembered and animals habituated faster during a second series of experiments with similar repetitive stimuli. About half the number of stimulus trials was necessary to habituate in the second test compared to the first test. This promotion of habituation was observed in animals with delay periods of rest within 60 min following the first habituation. After 90 min of rest from the first habitation, animals showed a similar time course for the second habituation. With five stimuli at 15 min interval during 90 min of the rest, trained animals showed rapid habituation, indicating reinforcement of the memory of previous experiments. Crayfish also showed dishabituation when mechanical stimulation was applied to the tail following habituation.

  19. Ruby-sapphire-spinel mineralization in marble of the middle and southern Urals: Geology, mineralogy, and genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisin, A. Yu.; Murzin, V. V.; Tomilina, A. V.; Pritchin, M. E.

    2016-07-01

    Ruby and spinel occurrences hosted in marble on the eastern slope of the Urals are considered. Ruby- and spinel-bearing marble is a specific rock in granite-gneiss complexes of the East Ural Megazone, which formed at the Late Paleozoic collision stage of the evolution of the Urals. Organogenic marine limestone is the protolith of the marble. No relict sedimentary bedding has been retained in the marble. The observed banding is a secondary phenomenon related to crystallization and is controlled by flow cleavage. Magnesian metasomatism of limestone with the formation of fine-grained dolomite enriched in Cr, V, Ti, Mn, Cu, Zn, Ga, and REE took place at the prograde stage of metamorphism. Dedolomitization of rocks with the formation of background calcite marble also developed at the prograde stage. Mg-calcite marble with spinel and ruby of the first type formed in the metamorphic fluid circulation zone. Magnesian metasomatism with the formation of bicarbonate marble with ruby, pink sapphire, and spinel of the second type developed at the early retrograde stage. The formation of mica-bearing mineralized zones with corundum and spinel of the third type controlled by cleavage fractures is related to the pneumatolytic-hydrothermal stage. The data on ruby-bearing marble in the Urals may be used for forecasting and prospecting of ruby and sapphire deposits hosted in marble worldwide.

  20. Stable isotope (C, O, H) characteristics and genesis of the Tazheran brucite marbles and skarns, Olkhon region, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doroshkevich, Anna; Sklyarov, Eugene; Starikova, Anastasia; Vasiliev, Vladimir; Ripp, German; Izbrodin, Ivan; Posokhov, Viktor

    2016-10-01

    Stable isotope compositions are examined for brucite marble and Mg-skarn that occur in the southern part of the Tazheran massif, Olkhon region, Russia. Brucite marble exhibits a narrow range in δ18O of +23.3 to +26.2 ‰ and shows carbon isotope depletion of -1.9 to -4.4 ‰) as compared with the country dolomite isotope compositions (+2.0 to +2.4 ‰) which is explained by both decarbonation processes and participation of fluids depleted in 13C. The emplacement of brucite marble was accompanied by the formation of endo- and exoskarn at the contact between syenite and brucite marble. δ18O profiles across the contact show a typical decrease towards the syenite side interpreted as the result of fluid/rock interaction and influx of magmatic fluids. Finally, we discuss the mechanisms of brucite marble emplacement and consider three possible ways of producing these rocks: (1) injection of dolomite with subsequent transformation to periclase marble and then to brucite marble; (2) injection of periclase marble with a following replacement of periclase by brucite or injection of brucite marble; (3) crustal water-rich carbonate melt. We favor models 2 and 3 and discuss their strengths and weaknesses.

  1. Strength, Deformability and X-ray Micro-CT Observations of Deeply Buried Marble Under Different Confining Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sheng-Qi; Ju, Yang; Gao, Feng; Gui, Yi-Lin

    2016-11-01

    In this research, a series of triaxial compression experiments and X-ray observations were conducted to explore the strength, deformability and internal damage mechanism of deeply buried marble. The results show that an increase in confining pressure results in obvious brittle-ductile transition characteristics of deeply buried marble. The Young's modulus of the marble increased nonlinearly with increasing confining pressure. The peak and residual strength of the marble exhibit a clear linear relationship with the confining pressure, which can be described by the linear Mohr-Coulomb criterion. The sensitivity of the residual strength on the confining pressure was clearly higher than that of the peak strength. After uniaxial and triaxial compression failure, marble specimens were analyzed using a three-dimensional X-ray micro-CT scanning system. Based on horizontal and vertical cross-sections, the marble specimen is mainly dominated by axial splitting tensile cracks under uniaxial compression, but under confining pressure, the marble specimen is mainly dominated by a single shear crack. To quantitatively evaluate the internal damage of the marble material, the crack area and aperture extent for each horizontal cross-section were calculated by analyzing the binarized pictures. The system of crack planes under uniaxial compression is more complicated than that under triaxial compression, which is also supported by the evolution of the crack area and aperture extent. Finally, the brittle-ductile transition mechanism of the marble is discussed and interpreted according to the proposed conceptual models.

  2. Detection of fractures from GPR data: the case history of the Cathedral of Otranto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leucci, G.; Persico, R.; Soldovieri, F.

    2007-12-01

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys were carried out in the preliminary stage of a project of structural monitoring of the 42 columns inside the crypt of the 'Cattedrale di Otranto' (Lecce, Italy). Detailed knowledge of the structure of the internal columns was a key reason for their restoration since they had several points of deterioration (i.e. fractures). The aim of this work was to test the reliability of both a standard GPR processing (in a time domain) and a linear inverse scattering algorithm (in a frequency domain) in order to detect and achieve information on the damaged zones inside the columns. First, the reliability of both the techniques was preliminarily assessed by processing synthetic data resembling the measurement conditions of the experimental cases. Then the experimental data were processed by means of the two techniques. Our comparative analysis, for both the numerical and the experimental analyses, indicates that the linear inverse scattering approach is better suited for the detection of local fractures compared to the classical time-domain processing, while increasing the computational cost at a reasonable rate.

  3. THz imaging of majolica tiles and biological attached marble fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catapano, Ilaria; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Devices exploiting waves in the frequency range from 0.1 THz to 10 THz (corresponding to a free-space wavelength ranging from 30 μm to 3 mm) deserve attention as diagnostic technologies for cultural heritage. THz waves are, indeed, non-ionizing radiations capable of penetrating into non-metallic materials, which are opaque to both visible and infrared waves, without implying long term risks to the molecular stability of the exposed objects and humans. Moreover, THz surveys involve low poewr probing waves, are performed without contact with the object and, thanks to the recent developments, which have allowed the commercialization of compact, flexible and portable systems, maybe performed in loco (i.e. in the place where the artworks are usually located). On the other hand, THz devices can be considered as the youngest among the sensing and imaging electromagnetic techniques and their actual potentialities in terms of characterization of artworks is an ongoing research activity. As a contribution within this context, we have performed time of flight THz imaging [1,2] on ceramic and marble objects. In particular, we surveyed majolica tiles produced by Neapolitan ceramists in the 18th and 19th centuries with the aim to gather information on their structure, constructive technique and conservation state. Moreover, we investigated a Marmo di Candoglia fragment in order to characterize the biological attach affecting it. All the surveys were carried out by using the Fiber-Coupled Terahertz Time Domain System (FICO) developed by Z-Omega and available at the Institute of Electromagnetic Sensing of the Environment (IREA). This system is equipped with fiber optic coupled transmitting and receiving probes and with an automatic positioning system enabling to scan a 150 mm x 150 mm area under a reflection measurement configuration. Based on the obtained results we can state that the use of THz waves allows: - the reconstruction of the object topography; - the geometrical

  4. Groundwater Flow in the Arthur Marble Aquifer, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, M. K.

    2008-05-01

    Arthur Marble underlies the Takaka Valley and outcrops in Karst Uplands to east and west of the valley in the South Island of New Zealand. It is the principal groundwater aquifer in the region and host to the remarkable Waikoropupu Springs near the coast. With average flow of 13,300 L/s, the karstic springs have many interesting features including unusual size and clarity. This work uses rainfall and river level, natural tracer and chemical measurements to determine the recharge sources and nature of the flow system in the Arthur Marble Aquifer (AMA). Total recharge to the AMA of 19,750 L/s comes from three sources (Karst Uplands stream seepage, Takaka River seepage and Takaka Valley rainfall infiltration). Since 13,300 L/s is discharged at the springs, the remainder must escape via offshore springs (6,450 L/s). The oxygen-18 mass balance allows the contribution of each source to each spring to be determined; most of the flow to the Main Spring of the Waikoropupu Springs comes from the Karst Uplands. The offshore springs are mostly fed from the Takaka River. The chemical concentrations of the Main Spring show input of 0.5% of sea water on average, but varying with flow. This variation with flow shows that two water components (sea-water-bearing and non-sea-water-bearing) contribute to the spring's discharge. Tritium measurements spanning 40 years, and CFC-11 measurements, give a mean residence time of 8 years for the Main Spring water using the preferred two-component model. Our conceptual flow model, based on the flow, oxygen-18, chloride and tritium measurements, reveals that two different flow systems with different recharge sources are needed to explain the flow within the AMA. One system contains deeply penetrating old water with mean age 10.2 years and water volume 3 cubic kilometers, recharged from the Karst Uplands. The other, at shallow levels below the valley floor, has much younger water, with mean age 1.2 years and water volume 0.4 cubic kilometers

  5. Calcite-graphite thermometry of the Franklin Marble, New Jersey Highlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peck, W.H.; Volkert, R.A.; Meredith, M.T.; Rader, E.L.

    2006-01-01

    We present new stable-isotope data for the Mesoproterozoic Franklin Marble from outcrops along an 80-km traverse parallel to and across strike of the structural grain of the western New Jersey Highlands. Calcite and dolomite from marble have an average ??13C of 0.35??? ?? 0.73??? PDB (n = 46) and a more limited range than other Mesoproterozoic marbles from the Adirondacks and the Canadian Grenville Province. The small range of ??13C values from the New Jersey samples is consistent with the preservation of a primary marine isotopic signature and limited postdepositional isotopic modification, except proximal to Zn or Fe ore deposits and fault zones. Fractionations between calcite and well-formed graphite (??13C[Cal-Gr]) for analyzed Franklin Marble samples average 3.31???. ?? 0.25??? (n = 34), and dolomite-graphite fractionations average 3.07??? ?? 0.30??? (n = 6). Taken together, these indicate an average temperature of 769?? ?? 43??C during metamorphism associated with the Ottawan Orogeny in the New Jersey Highlands. Thus, carbon isotope fractionations demonstrate that the Franklin Marble was metamorphosed at granulite facies conditions. Metamorphic temperatures are relatively constant for the area sampled and overprint the metamorphosed carbonatehosted Zn-Fe-Mn ore deposits. The results of this study support recent work proposing that pressure and temperature conditions during Ottawan orogenesis did not vary greatly across faults that partition the Highlands into structural blocks. ?? 2006 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

  6. Characteristics and Health Benefit of Highly Marbled Wagyu and Hanwoo Beef.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Takafumi; Joo, Seon-Tea

    2016-01-01

    This review addresses the characteristics and health benefit of highly marbled Wagyu and Hanwoo beef. Marbling of Wagyu and Hanwoo beef has been increased in Japan and Korea to meet domestic consumer preferences. Wagyu and Hanwoo cattle have high potential of accumulating intramuscular fat (IMF) and producing highly marbled beef. The IMF content varies depending on the feeding of time, finishing diet, and breed type. IMF increases when feeding time is increased. The rate of IMF increase in grain-fed cattle is faster than that in pasture-fed cattle. Fatty acid composition are also different depending on breeds. Highly marbled Wagyu and Hanwoo beef have higher proportions of monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) due to higher concentrations of oleic acid. MUFAs have little effect on total cholesterol. They are heart-healthy dietary fat because they can lower low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol while increasing high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol. Clinical trials have indicated that highly marbled beef does not increase LDL-cholesterol. This review also emphasizes that high oleic acid beef such as Wagyu and Hanwoo beef might be able to reduce risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

  7. Characteristics and Health Benefit of Highly Marbled Wagyu and Hanwoo Beef

    PubMed Central

    Gotoh, Takafumi

    2016-01-01

    This review addresses the characteristics and health benefit of highly marbled Wagyu and Hanwoo beef. Marbling of Wagyu and Hanwoo beef has been increased in Japan and Korea to meet domestic consumer preferences. Wagyu and Hanwoo cattle have high potential of accumulating intramuscular fat (IMF) and producing highly marbled beef. The IMF content varies depending on the feeding of time, finishing diet, and breed type. IMF increases when feeding time is increased. The rate of IMF increase in grain-fed cattle is faster than that in pasture-fed cattle. Fatty acid composition are also different depending on breeds. Highly marbled Wagyu and Hanwoo beef have higher proportions of monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) due to higher concentrations of oleic acid. MUFAs have little effect on total cholesterol. They are heart-healthy dietary fat because they can lower low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol while increasing high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol. Clinical trials have indicated that highly marbled beef does not increase LDL-cholesterol. This review also emphasizes that high oleic acid beef such as Wagyu and Hanwoo beef might be able to reduce risk factors for cardiovascular disease. PMID:28115881

  8. Laboratory study on factors influencing nitrogen removal in marble chip biofilters incorporating nitritation and anammox.

    PubMed

    Tao, Wendong; Wen, Jianfeng; Norton, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    It remains challenging to integrate nitritation and anammox in ecologically engineered treatment systems such as passive biofilters that are packed with natural materials and have low energy inputs. This study explored the factors influencing nitritation-anammox through parallel operation of two laboratory-scale biofilters packed with large and small marble chips respectively. Clean marble chips (mainly CaCO3) had an alkalinity dissolution rate of 130 mg CaCO3/kg marble d when water pH approached 6.5. Marble chips effectively increased water pH and provided sufficient alkalinity to support nitritation-anammox in the biofilters. Ammonium and total nitrogen removal decreased by 47 and 26%, respectively, when nutrients were not amended to influent. An influent nitrite concentration above 8.9 mg N/L could inhibit anammox in thin biofilms of biofilters. Nitritation-anammox was enhanced with a hydraulic retention time of 2 d relative to 7 d, likely due to enhanced air entrainment. Size of marble chips rarely made a significant difference in nitrogen removal, possibly due to sufficient surface area available for bacterial attachment and alkalinity dissolution.

  9. Finite-element modelling of thermal micracking in fresh and consolidated marbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, T.; Fuller, E.; Siegesmund, S.

    2003-04-01

    The initial stage of marble weathering is supposed to be controlled by thermal microcracking. Due to the anisotropy of the thermal expansion coefficients of calcite, the main rock forming mineral in marble, stresses are caused which lead to thermally-induced microcracking, especially along the grain boundaries. The so-called "granular disintegration" is a frequent weathering phenomenon observed for marbles. The controlling parameters are the grain size, grain shape and grain orientation. We use a finite-element approach to constrain magnitude and directional dependence of thermal degradation. Therefore, different assumptions are validated including the fracture toughness of the grain boundaries, the effects of the grain-to-grain orientation and bulk lattice preferred orientation (here referred to as texture). The resulting thermal microcracking and bulk rock thermal expansion anisotropy are validated. It is evident that thermal degradation depends on the texture. Strongly textured marbles exhibit a clear directional dependence of thermal degradation and a smaller bulk thermal degradation than randomly oriented ones. The effect of different stone consolidants in the pore space of degraded marble is simulated and its influence on mechanical properties such as tensile strength are evaluated.

  10. Weight losses of marble and limestone briquettes exposed to outdoor environments in the eastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Reimann, K.J.

    1991-09-01

    Gravimetric changes in marble and limestone briquettes exposed to outdoor environment at five sites in the eastern United States have been monitored since 1984. An earlier report describes procedures and results obtained in 1984--1988. This report presents the results of the exposure period 1984--1988 and reviews and summarizes those of prior years. A linear relationship was found between cumulative gravimetric losses and exposure period or rain depth. These losses resulted in an average recession rate of 14 to 24 {mu}m/yr for marble and twice that for limestone. Variations in recession among the various exposure sites can be ascribed to differences in rain depth and hydrogen ion concentration. The annual recession rates obtained from gravimetry yielded rates that were for marble twice those obtained from runoff experiments, and more than three times those for limestone; this indicates that physical erosion plays an important role. Gravimetric monitoring of exposed briquettes is continuing in a planned 10-yr program.

  11. Liquid marbles as a micro-reactor for efficient radical alternating copolymerization of diene monomer and oxygen.

    PubMed

    Sato, E; Yuri, M; Fujii, S; Nishiyama, T; Nakamura, Y; Horibe, H

    2015-12-18

    Liquid marbles have been shown to be a novel micro-reactor to synthesize polyperoxides by the radical alternating copolymerization of the 1,3-diene monomer with oxygen in a good yield. Oxygen gas is effectively absorbed as a comonomer by the large and permeable gas-liquid interface of the liquid marbles.

  12. Rapid method to determine actinides and 89/90Sr in limestone and marble samples

    DOE PAGES

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian; Hutchison, Jay B.; ...

    2016-04-12

    A new method for the determination of actinides and radiostrontium in limestone and marble samples has been developed that utilizes a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion to digest the sample. Following rapid pre-concentration steps to remove sample matrix interferences, the actinides and 89/90Sr are separated using extraction chromatographic resins and measured radiometrically. The advantages of sodium hydroxide fusion versus other fusion techniques will be discussed. Lastly, this approach has a sample preparation time for limestone and marble samples of <4 hours.

  13. Provenance of white marbles from the nabatean sites of Qase Al Bint and colonnaded street baths at Petra, Jordan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Jaber, Nizar; al-Saad, Ziad; Shiyyab, Adnan; Degryse, Patrick

    Intercultural relations and trade are important components of understanding of historical interrelationships between regions and cultures. One of the most interesting objects of trade is stone, because of the expense and difficulty of its transport. Thus, the source of marble used in the Nabatean city of Petra was investigated using established petrological, geochemical and isotopic analyses. Specifically, marble from Qasr al Bint and the Colonnaded Street baths were sampled and investigated. The results of these analyses show that the marbles came from sources in Asia Minora and Greece. The most likely sources of the marble are the quarries of Thasos, Penteli, Prokennesos and Dokimeion. The choice of marble followed the desired utilitarian and aesthetic function of the stone. These results show that active trade in stone was part of the cultural interaction of the period.

  14. 78 FR 52984 - Stone Age Interiors, Inc.; d/b/a Colorado Springs Marble and Granite Including On-Site Leased...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ... Employment and Training Administration Stone Age Interiors, Inc.; d/b/a Colorado Springs Marble and Granite... former workers of Stone Age Interiors, Inc., d/b/a Colorado Springs Marble and Granite, Colorado Springs... investigation, I determine that workers of Stone Age Interiors, Inc., d/b/a Colorado Springs Marble and...

  15. Analysing deterioration of marble stones exposed to underwater conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cámara, Beatriz; Álvarez de Buergo, Mónica; Bethencourt, Manuel; Freire-Lista, David; Fort, Rafael

    2016-04-01

    The peculiar conditions of the marine environment make the conservation of underwater archaeological sites an extremely complex procedure. This is due to the fact that the prevailing conditions in this environment promote the development of deterioration phenomena in submerged artefacts through the synergistic action of physical, chemical and biological factors. The objective of the present investigation was to determine how petrophysical properties of cultural heritage materials can be affected by being exposed to the specific underwater conditions of the sea bottom, and so, to evaluate how this can affect, in a long term, in their durability and evolution when they part of an archaeological site. For this purpose, two types of marble (the Italian Carrara and the Spanish Macael) were subjected to an experiment consisting of exposing stone materials for one and a half year to underwater conditions. The experimental test was located in an archaeological site in the Bay of Cadiz (southern Spain), Bajo del Chapitel (recognized as Cultural Interest), which includes remains of shipwrecks from different periods. In this site, samples were submerged to 12 m depth and placed in the sea bottom simulating the different positions in which underwater archaeological objects can be found (fully exposed, half buried and covered). Petrophysical characterisation involved determination of the apparent and bulk densities, water saturation (maximum water content a material may contain), open porosity (porosity accessible to water), chromatic parameters and ultrasonic velocity. Before measuring, samples were subjected to mechanical cleaning (in those samples with biological colonization) and to removal of salt deposits. Results showed significant differences in these petrophysical properties after underwater submersion, which were directly related to the type of underwater exposure condition. Comparative analysis of petrophysical properties, like the one conducted in this study

  16. Capillary origami: superhydrophobic ribbon surfaces and liquid marbles

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Michael I; Shirtcliffe, Neil J; Geraldi, Nicasio R

    2011-01-01

    apply to superhydrophobic surfaces. The results are given for both droplets being wrapped by thin ribbons and for solid grains encapsulating droplets to form liquid marbles. PMID:21977426

  17. Geological 3D modeling for excavation activity in an underground marble quarry in the Apuan Alps (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanneschi, Claudio; Salvini, Riccardo; Massa, Giovanni; Riccucci, Silvia; Borsani, Angelo

    2014-08-01

    The three-dimensional laser scanning technique has recently become common in diverse working environments. Even in geology, where further development is needed, this technique is increasingly useful in tackling various problems such as stability investigations or geological and geotechnical monitoring. Three-dimensional laser scanning supplies detailed and complete geometrical information in short working times, as a result of the acquisition of a large number of data-points that accurately model the detected surfaces. Moreover, it is possible to combine these data with high quality photographic images so as to provide important information for geological applications, as follows. A working approach, that combines terrestrial laser scanning and traditional geological surveys, is presented. A three-dimensional model, that includes information about the geological structure in an underground quarry in the Apuan Alps, is realized. This procedure is adaptable to other geological contexts, and because of its operating speed and accuracy it is invaluable for optimal excavation, in which a proper planning of quarrying activity is vital for safety and commercial reasons.

  18. Religious slaughter in Italy.

    PubMed

    Cenci-Goga, B T; Mattiacci, C; De Angelis, G; Marini, P; Cuccurese, A; Rossi, R; Catanese, B

    2010-06-01

    This research aims to understand the prevalence of religious slaughter practices in Italy. Two different ways of slaughtering animals are identified. Conventional slaughter is performed with prior stunning; kosher slaughter is practiced without stunning. Halal slaughter is performed for most animals without stunning. Halal slaughter with prior stunning is acceptable for 5.90% of small ruminants. For Halal slaughter in Italy, the terms "religious slaughter with stunning" and "religious slaughter without stunning" should be used to differentiate religious slaughter practices, keeping animal welfare in perspective.

  19. The central tower of the cathedral of Schleswig - New investigations to understand the alcali-silica reaction of historical mortars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedekind, Wanja; Protz, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The damaging alcali-silica reaction leads to crack-formation and structural destruction at noumerous, constructed with cement mortar, buildings worldwide. The ASR-reaction causes the expansion of altered aggregates by the formation of a swelling gel. This gel consists of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) that increases in volume with water, which exerts an expansive pressure inside the material. The cathedral of Schleswig is one of the oldest in northern Germany. The first church was built in 985-965. The Romanesque building part was erected around 1180 and the Gothic nave at the end of the 13th century. The central tower was constructed between 1888 and 1894 with brick and cement mortar. With 112 meters, the tower is the second-largest church spire of the country of Schleswig-Holstein in northern Germany. Due to the formation of cracks and damages from 1953 to 1956 first restoration works took place. Further developments of cracks are making restoration necessary again today. For developing a suitable conservation strategy, different investigations were done. The investigation included the determination of the pore space properties, the hygric and thermal dilatation and mercury porosimetry measurements. Furthermore, the application of cathodoluminescence microscopy may give information about the alteration process and microstructures present and reveal the differences between unaltered and altered mortars. An obvious relation between the porosity and the swelling intensity could be detected. Furthermore it becomes apparent, that a clear zonation of the mortar took place. The mortar near the surface is denser with a lower porosity and has a significantly lower swelling or dilatation.

  20. Monitoring of the temperature - moisture regime of critical parts in the tower of the St. Martin Cathedral in Bratislava.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubicar, L.; Fidríková, D.; Štofanik, V.; Vretenár, V.

    2012-04-01

    Historic monuments are subject to degradation due to exposition to surrounding meteorological conditions and groundwater. Degradation is most often manifested by deterioration of plaster, walls structure and building elements like stones. A significant attention measures are undertaken to prevent degradation of the cultural heritage throughout the world. Our contribution is to monitor the objects for recognition of the critical state when it is necessary to make adjustments to avoid destruction. Buildings consisting from the listed elements belong to porous materials. Moisture diffusion, condensation, etc. attack structure stability of the buildings. Then the moisture diffusion and effects like drying, freezing / thawing belong to the control mechanisms of the degradation. In addition to laboratory experiments concerning the mentioned effects, we simultaneously studied processes by monitoring of the cultural monuments. During monitoring we have identified diffusion of moisture associated with cycle day / night and cycle moisture /drying caused by meteorological precipitation. Long term monitoring is performed in the tower of St. Martin Cathedral in Bratislava under the window sill of the belfry in exterior at three orientations, the north, south and the west. Monitoring is carried out in plaster and in masonry about 10 cm from the wall surface. The thermal conductivity sensors are used for monitoring that operate on the principle of the hot ball method. Then thermal conductivity of porous material is a function of pore content. The sensor has shape of a ball in diameter up to 2 mm in which a heat source as well as a thermometer is integrated into one component. A small heat output is delivered into the surrounding material. The temperature response of the sensor gives information on the thermal conductivity. For use in the preservation of cultural heritage a number of measuring devices have been developed for automatic registration of temperature and moisture in

  1. 76 FR 61599 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revised Critical Habitat for the Marbled Murrelet

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 17 RIN 1018-AW84 Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revised Critical Habitat for the Marbled Murrelet AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), are revising designated...

  2. Low dose effects of a Withania somnifera extract on altered marble burying behavior in stressed mice

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Amitabha; Chatterjee, Shyam Sunder; Kumar, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Withania somnifera root (WSR) extracts are often used in traditionally known Indian systems of medicine for prevention and cure of psychosomatic disorders. The reported experiment was designed to test whether low daily oral doses of such extracts are also effective in suppressing marble burying behavior in stressed mice or not. Materials and Methods: Groups of mice treated with 10, 20, or 40 mg/kg daily oral doses of WSR were subjected to a foot shock stress-induced hyperthermia test on the 1st, 5th, 7th, and 10th day of the experiment. On the 11th and 12th treatment days, they were subjected to marble burying tests. Stress response suppressing effects of low dose WSR were estimated by its effects on body weight and basal core temperature of animals during the course of the experiment. Results: Alterations in bodyweight and basal core temperature triggered by repeated exposures to foot shock stress were absent even in the 10 mg/kg/day WSR treated group, whereas the effectiveness of the extract in foot shock stress-induced hyperthermia and marble burying tests increased with its increasing daily dose. Conclusion: Marble burying test in stressed mice is well suited for identifying bioactive constituents of W. somnifera like medicinal plants with adaptogenic, anxiolytic and antidepressant activities, or for quantifying pharmacological interactions between them. PMID:27366354

  3. Laser processing of natural stones: Study of laser cutting assisted by water saturation of marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamata, Hirofumi; Kaneoka, Masaru; Tanaka, Kazuya; Sugimoto, Kenji

    2000-01-01

    Some possibilities of laser processing of natural stones were evaluated and the laser irradiation parameters suited for the following materials removal and melting processes were examined. 1) Surface roughening of granite, 2) Cutting of marble after water immersion, 3) Drilling of holes in natural stones for locating metal fittings, and 4) Surface melting and glazing of soft stones.

  4. Generation of three-dimensional multiple spheroid model of olfactory ensheathing cells using floating liquid marbles

    PubMed Central

    Vadivelu, Raja K.; Ooi, Chin H.; Yao, Rebecca-Qing; Tello Velasquez, Johana; Pastrana, Erika; Diaz-Nido, Javier; Lim, Filip; Ekberg, Jenny A. K.; Nguyen, Nam-Trung; St John, James A.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a novel protocol for three-dimensional culturing of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), which can be used to understand how OECs interact with other cells in three dimensions. Transplantation of OECs is being trialled for repair of the paralysed spinal cord, with promising but variable results and thus the therapy needs improving. To date, studies of OEC behaviour in a multicellular environment have been hampered by the lack of suitable three-dimensional cell culture models. Here, we exploit the floating liquid marble, a liquid droplet coated with hydrophobic powder and placed on a liquid bath. The presence of the liquid bath increases the humidity and minimises the effect of evaporation. Floating liquid marbles allow the OECs to freely associate and interact to produce OEC spheroids with uniform shapes and sizes. In contrast, a sessile liquid marble on a solid surface suffers from evaporation and the cells aggregate with irregular shapes. We used floating liquid marbles to co-culture OECs with Schwann cells and astrocytes which formed natural structures without the confines of gels or bounding layers. This protocol can be used to determine how OECs and other cell types associate and interact while forming complex cell structures. PMID:26462469

  5. Simple spot method of image analysis for evaluation of highly marbled beef.

    PubMed

    Irie, M; Kohira, K

    2012-04-01

    The simple method of evaluating highly marbled beef was examined by image analysis. The images of the cross section at the 6 to 7th rib were obtained from 82 carcasses of Wagyu cattle. By using an overall trace method, the surrounding edges of the longissimus thoracis and three muscles were traced automatically and manually with image analysis. In a spot method, 3 to 5 locations (2.5 or 3.0 cm in diameter) for each muscle were rapidly selected with no manual trace. The images were flattened, binarized, and the ratio of fat area to muscle area was determined. The correlation coefficients for marbling between different muscles, and between the overall trace and the spot methods were 0.55 to 0.81 between different muscles and 0.89 to 0.97, respectively. These results suggested that the simple spot method is speedy and almost as useful as the overall trace method as a measuring technique for beef marbling in loin muscles, especially for highly marbled beef.

  6. A micromechanical constitutive model for the dynamic response of brittle materials "Dynamic response of marble"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberman, Keith

    2001-07-01

    A micromechanically based constitutive model for the dynamic inelastic behavior of brittle materials, specifically "Dionysus-Pentelicon marble" with distributed microcracking is presented. Dionysus-Pentelicon marble was used in the construction of the Parthenon, in Athens, Greece. The constitutive model is a key component in the ability to simulate this historic explosion and the preceding bombardment form cannon fire that occurred at the Parthenon in 1678. Experiments were performed by Rosakis (1999) that characterized the static and dynamic response of this unique material. A micromechanical constitutive model that was previously successfully used to model the dynamic response of granular brittle materials is presented. The constitutive model was fitted to the experimental data for marble and reproduced the experimentally observed basic uniaxial dynamic behavior quite well. This micromechanical constitutive model was then implemented into the three dimensional nonlinear lagrangain finite element code Dyna3d(1998). Implementing this methodology into the three dimensional nonlinear dynamic finite element code allowed the model to be exercised on several preliminary impact experiments. During future simulations, the model is to be used in conjunction with other numerical techniques to simulate projectile impact and blast loading on the Dionysus-Pentelicon marble and on the structure of the Parthenon.

  7. GPR data processing for 3D fracture mapping in a marble quarry (Thassos, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandjean, G.; Gourry, J. C.

    1996-11-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) has been successfully applied to detect and map fractures in marble quarries. The aim was to distinguish quickly intact marketable marble areas from fractured ones in order to improve quarry management. The GPR profiling method was chosen because it is non destructive and quickly provides a detailed image of the subsurface. It was performed in domains corresponding to future working areas in real quarry-exploitation conditions. Field surveying and data processing were adapted to the local characteristics of the fractures: E-W orientation, sub-vertical dip, and karst features. After the GPR profiles had been processed, using methods adapted from seismics (amplitude compensation, filtering and Fourier migration), the interpreted fractures from a 12 × 24 × 15 m zone were incorporated into a 3D model. Due to the low electrical conductivity of the marble, GPR provides penetration depths of about 8 and 15 m, and resolutions of about 1 and 5 cm for frequencies of 900 and 300 MHz respectively. The detection power thus seems to be sufficient to recommend use of this method. As requested by the quarriers, the 3D representation can be used directly by themselves to locate high- or low-quality marble areas. Comparison between the observed surface fractures and the fractures detected using GPR showed reasonable correlation.

  8. Map showing structural control of breccia pipes on the southern Marble Plateau, north-central Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Sutphin, H.B.; Wenrich, K.J.

    1988-01-01

    Solution collapse breccia pipes, concentrated throughout the southwestern corner of the Colorado Plateau in Arizona, have been mapped in detail on the southern Marble Plateau. Within the study area, 77 of the 90 (86%) collapse structures fall within northwest-trending and northeast-trending zones that cover only 23% of the total surface area.

  9. Generation of three-dimensional multiple spheroid model of olfactory ensheathing cells using floating liquid marbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadivelu, Raja K.; Ooi, Chin H.; Yao, Rebecca-Qing; Tello Velasquez, Johana; Pastrana, Erika; Diaz-Nido, Javier; Lim, Filip; Ekberg, Jenny A. K.; Nguyen, Nam-Trung; St John, James A.

    2015-10-01

    We describe a novel protocol for three-dimensional culturing of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), which can be used to understand how OECs interact with other cells in three dimensions. Transplantation of OECs is being trialled for repair of the paralysed spinal cord, with promising but variable results and thus the therapy needs improving. To date, studies of OEC behaviour in a multicellular environment have been hampered by the lack of suitable three-dimensional cell culture models. Here, we exploit the floating liquid marble, a liquid droplet coated with hydrophobic powder and placed on a liquid bath. The presence of the liquid bath increases the humidity and minimises the effect of evaporation. Floating liquid marbles allow the OECs to freely associate and interact to produce OEC spheroids with uniform shapes and sizes. In contrast, a sessile liquid marble on a solid surface suffers from evaporation and the cells aggregate with irregular shapes. We used floating liquid marbles to co-culture OECs with Schwann cells and astrocytes which formed natural structures without the confines of gels or bounding layers. This protocol can be used to determine how OECs and other cell types associate and interact while forming complex cell structures.

  10. Why Do Marbles Become Paler on Grinding? Reflectance, Spectroscopy, Color, and Particle Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagorio, Maria Gabriela

    2004-01-01

    A qualitative description of the color-change problem, which will assist in rationalizing the change in color of marbles after grinding them using a simple physical picture and the qualitative dependence of diffuse reflectance on particle size is presented. Different approaches are discussed but it is seen that the interpretation of nanoparticles…

  11. More about the Puzzle of a Marble in a Spinning Pipe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2015-01-01

    What trajectory in the laboratory frame does a marble follow if it is held inside a freely rotating pipe and then suddenly released so that it can slide frictionlessly outward along the pipe? A previously published solution is only valid for a pipe of small moment of inertia (so that it is either low in mass or short in length).

  12. Residual strain change resulting from stress corrosion in Carrara marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigtlaender, Anne; Leith, Kerry; Krautblatter, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Residual stresses and strains have been shown to play a fundamental role in determining the elastic behavior of engineering materials, yet the effect of these strains on brittle and elastic behavior of rocks remains unclear. In order to evaluate the impact of stored elastic strains on fracture propagation in rock, we undertook a four-month-long three-point bending test on three large 1100 x 100 x 100 mm Carrara Marble samples. This test induced stable low stress conditions in which strains were concentrated at the tip of a saw cut and pre-cracked notch. A corrosive environment was created at the tip of the notch on two samples (M2 and M4) by dripping calcite saturated water (pH ~ 7.5-8). Sample M5 was loaded in the same way, but kept dry. Samples were unloaded prior to failure, and along with an additional non-loaded reference sample (M0), cored into cylindrical subsamples (ø = 50 mm, h = 100 mm) before being tested for changes in residual elastic strains at the SALSA neutron diffractometer at the Institute Laue-Langevin (ILL), Grenoble, France. Three diffraction peaks corresponding to crystallographic planes hkl (110), (104) and (006) were measured in all three spatial directions relative to the notch. Shifts in the diffraction peak position (d) with respect to a strain free state are indicative of intergranular strain, while changes in the width of the peak (FWHM) reflect changes in intragranular strain. We observe distinctly different patterns in residual and volumetric strains in hkℓ (104) and (006) for the dry M5 and wet tested samples (M2 and M4) indicating the presence of water changes the deformation mechanism, while (110) is strained in compression around 200 μstrain in all samples. A broadening of the diffraction peaks (006) and (110) in front of the crack tip is observed in M2 and M4, while M5 shows no changes in the peak width throughout the depth of the sample. We suggest water present at the crack tip increased the rate of corrosion, allowing a

  13. Italy: Mt. Etna

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... coast of Sicily, to the southwest of mainland Italy. Major eruptions have been issuing from both summit and flank vents. Fine ash falling ... repeated caldera collapse, and partially buried by younger volcanic structures. Eruptions are related to a complex tectonic situation, ...

  14. Beginning Reading in Italy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tutolo, Daniel

    Teaching practices in Italy, where teachers combine three different methods for teaching reading, may provide insight into ways to improve methodologies in the United States. The first method is the natural method, which, unlike American methods, teaches reading and writing simultaneously with the emphasis on writing. The teacher writes as…

  15. Occupational cancer in Italy.

    PubMed Central

    Merler, E; Vineis, P; Alhaique, D; Miligi, L

    1999-01-01

    This article is a discussion of occupational cancer in Italy. The introduction provides the necessary context of Italian industrialization and occupational health regulation. This is followed by a review of Italian epidemiologic studies of occupational cancer risks considered in terms of relative measures of risk and attributable risk of carcinogenic agents or exposure circumstances. We attempt to establish the number of workers exposed to carcinogens in Italy and the intensity of their exposures. Finally, the Italian system of compensation for occupational cancer is discussed. Several cohort and case-control studies have addressed the issue of occupational risks, mostly among male workers. The results of these studies suggest that the growing incidence of and mortality by mesothelioma is explained by the widespread and intense exposure to asbestos in some Italian industrial settings. A high attributable risk of lung tumors among male populations in industrial areas of northern Italy is explained by occupational exposures. However, insufficient data are available for clear definition of the extent and intensity of occupational exposure to carcinogenic substances. In Italy, we must prioritize and maximize resources in occupational cancer epidemiology and revitalize the role of national institutions. Recent legislation has established new regulations on the handling of carcinogenic substances in industrial settings, a new list of occupational diseases, and a national registry of mesothelioma linked to asbestos exposure. These legislative changes are expected to have positive effects. PMID:10350509

  16. Usutu Virus, Italy, 1996

    PubMed Central

    Bakonyi, Tamás; Rossi, Giacomo; Mani, Paolo; Nowotny, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Retrospective analysis of archived tissue samples from bird deaths in the Tuscany region of Italy in 1996 identified Usutu virus. Partial sequencing confirmed identity with the 2001 Vienna strain and provided evidence for a much earlier introduction of this virus into Europe than previously assumed. PMID:23347844

  17. Personal Identity in Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crocetti, Elisabetta; Rabaglietti, Emanuela; Sica, Luigia Simona

    2012-01-01

    This chapter discusses specifics of identity formation in Italian adolescents and emerging adults. We review consistent evidence illustrating that, in Italy, a progressive deferral of transition to adulthood strongly impacts youth identity development by stimulating identity exploration and postponement of identity commitments. We also consider…

  18. Impact of marble industry effluents on water and sediment quality of Barandu River in Buner District, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Mulk, Shahi; Azizullah, Azizullah; Korai, Abdul Latif; Khattak, Muhammad Nasir Khan

    2015-02-01

    Industries play an important role in improving the living standard but at the same time cause several environmental problems. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the impact of industries on the quality of environment. In the present study, the impact of marble industry effluents on water and sediment quality of Barandu River in Buner District, Pakistan was evaluated. Water and sediment samples were collected at three different sampling sites (upstream, industrial, and downstream sites) from Barandu River and their physicochemical properties were inter-compared. In addition, different marble stones and mix water (wastewater) from marble industry were analyzed. The measured physicochemical parameters of river water including pH, electrical conductivity (EC), alkalinity, total hardness, Ca and Mg hardness, total dissolved solid (TDS), total suspended solids (TSS), sulfates (SO4 (2-)), sodium (Na(+)), potassium (K(+)), nitrites (NO2 (-)), nitrate (NO3 (-)), chloride (Cl(-)), calcium (Ca(2+)), and magnesium (Mg(2+)) were found to be significantly altered by effluent discharges of marble industries. Similarly, heavy metal concentrations in both water and sediments of the river were significantly increased by marble industry wastewater. It is concluded that large quantities of different pollutants are added to Barandu River due to direct disposal of marble industry effluents which degrades its quality. Therefore, it is recommended that direct disposal of marble industry wastewater should be banned and all effluents must be properly treated before discharging in the river water.

  19. Marble Burying and Nestlet Shredding as Tests of Repetitive, Compulsive-like Behaviors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Kane, Michael J.; Briggs, Denise I.; Francescutti, Dina M.; Kuhn, Donald M.

    2013-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are serious and debilitating psychiatric conditions and each constitutes a significant public health concern, particularly in children. Both of these conditions are highlighted by the repeated expression of meaningless behaviors. Individuals with OCD often show checking, frequent hand washing, and counting. Children with ASDs also engage in repetitive tapping, arm or hand flapping, and rocking. These behaviors can vary widely in intensity and frequency of expression. More intense forms of repetitive behaviors can even result in injury (e.g. excessive grooming, hand washing, and self-stimulation). These behaviors are therefore very disruptive and make normal social discourse difficult. Treatment options for repetitive behaviors in OCD and ASDs are somewhat limited and there is great interest in developing more effective therapies for each condition. Numerous animal models for evaluating compulsive-like behaviors have been developed over the past three decades. Perhaps the animal models with the greatest validity and ease of use are the marble burying test and the nestlet shredding test. Both tests take advantage of the fact that the target behaviors occur spontaneously in mice. In the marble burying test, 20 marbles are arrayed on the surface of clean bedding. The number of marbles buried in a 30 min session is scored by investigators blind to the treatment or status of the subjects. In the nestlet shredding test, a nestlet comprised of pulped cotton fiber is preweighed and placed on top of cage bedding and the amount of the nestlet remaining intact after a 30 min test session is determined. Presently, we describe protocols for and show movie documentation of marble burying and nestlet shredding. Both tests are easily and accurately scored and each is sensitive to small changes in the expression of compulsive-like behaviors that result from genetic manipulations, disease, or head injury. PMID

  20. Relationships between monounsaturated fatty acids of marbling flecks and image analysis traits in longissimus muscle for Japanese Black steers.

    PubMed

    Nakahashi, Y; Maruyama, S; Seki, S; Hidaka, S; Kuchida, K

    2008-12-01

    The percentage of MUFA to total fatty acids of beef differs among intermuscular, intramuscular, and subcutaneous fat even within an individual cow. Our objective was to investigate the variation of the percentage of MUFA by geometric and sectional change of marbling flecks in rib eye. Longissimus muscles of 8 Japanese Black steers from a common sire and a common maternal grand sire were used. Three slices (1 from rib roast and 2 from sirloin) from each animal were selected for analysis. Five marbling flecks from each slice were randomly taken to obtain the percentage of MUFA using gas chromatography. High-quality digital images of all slices were taken with a mirror-type camera. The area and location of each marbling fleck were calculated by image analysis. The marbling flecks were categorized by area [small <0.4 cm(2), medium 0.4 to 2.0 cm(2), large >2.0 cm(2)], by location (dorsal and ventral), and by slice section through the LM (front, middle, and back). The effects of classification according to the area, location, and slice section were statistically significant (P < 0.05) for the percentage of MUFA. Least squares means of the percentage of MUFA for marbling flecks of sizes small, medium, and large were 56.8, 58.4, and 60.2%, respectively, indicating that larger marbling flecks had greater MUFA (P < 0.05). Those of dorsal, ventral, front, middle, and back were 59.1, 57.8, 55.4, 59.9, and 60.1%, respectively. The percentages of MUFA of the marbling flecks located in the dorsal part were greater than those in the ventral part (P < 0.05). The percentages of MUFA from middle and back were greater than those from front (P < 0.01). We suggest that the area, location, and slice section of marbling would be the determining factors for the percentage of MUFA of marbling.

  1. Brittle Asperities and Stick-Slip Motion: Insight from Friction Experiments along A Gabbro/Marble Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S.; Takizawa, S.; Fukuyama, E.; Yamashita, F.; Mizoguchi, K.; Kawakata, H.

    2015-12-01

    We conduct a series of meter-scale direct shear experiments along a gabbro/marble fault interface at NIED in Japan. Unlike the transitional behavior from stick-slip to stable sliding along a marble/marble interface under 1.3 MPa normal stress and 0.01 mm/s loading rate, the gabbro/marble case shows persistent stick-slip behavior under the same loading conditions as well as under 2.6 MPa normal stress in subsequent tests. Visual observations of the damage pattern reveal quite different features between the marble/marble case and the gabbro/marble case. For the former, the generated damage typically shows a low aspect ratio between loading-parallel and loading-perpendicular directions, suggesting that some diffusional deformation is effective during slip. For the latter, intruded gabbro pieces with preferred growing direction parallel to loading are distributed on top of the marble side, showing that hard rocks like gabbro can be partially fractured off when sheared against soft rocks like marble. Strain array data show that the apparent friction before failure is high or even above 1 near locations where fractured-off gabbro pieces are later observed, confirming that intact rock strength of gabbro has to be overcome upon the onset of fracture. Although at this moment we do not fully understand the behind mechanism, we believe that the brittleness of gabbro dominates in making the difference. If true, this result will highlight the role of brittle asperities in generating stick-slip fault behavior in a surrounding ductile-like environment. An analogous natural example may be found by the role of seamount in generating earthquakes through or underneath sediments in subduction zones (Cloos, 1992). However, instead of shearing off long-wavelength feature as illustrated by Cloos (1992), our study suggests that the collective behavior of tiny pieces along a nominally flat surface may also generate unstable ruptures macroscopically.

  2. Effectiveness of USDA instrument-based marbling measurements for categorizing beef carcasses according to differences in longissimus muscle sensory attributes.

    PubMed

    Emerson, M R; Woerner, D R; Belk, K E; Tatum, J D

    2013-02-01

    This study quantified relationships between USDA instrument marbling measurements and LM sensory attributes (tenderness, flavor, juiciness), and shear force. Heifer (n = 390) and steer (n = 328) carcasses (all A-maturity) were selected at 4 beef processing plants in Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, and Texas to represent 7 marbling degrees: traces (TR), slight (SL), small (SM), modest (MT), moderate (MD), slightly abundant (SA), and moderately abundant (MA). Classification into marbling groups was based on marbling scores determined using USDA-approved VBG 2000 grading systems. Strip loin steaks were obtained from both sides of each carcass and aged for 14 d. One steak was used to obtain Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF) and slice shear force (SSF) measurements. The other steak was evaluated by a trained sensory panel for juiciness, tenderness, intensity of flavors characterized as meaty/brothy, buttery/beef fat, bloody/serumy, livery/organy, and grassy; and overall sensory experience (negative or positive). Instrument marbling score explained 45%, 40%, 32%, 71%, and 61% of the observed variation in panel ratings for juiciness, tenderness, meaty/brothy flavor intensity, buttery/beef fat flavor intensity, and overall sensory experience, respectively. Increased degree of marbling resulted in steaks having greater (P < 0.001) juiciness (MA > SA > MD > MT > SM > SL = TR), meaty/brothy flavor (MA = SA > MD = MT > SM > SL > TR), and buttery/beef fat flavor (MA > SA > MD > MT > SM > SL > TR). Steak tenderness also increased (P < 0.001) as marbling degree increased; however, tenderness differences among marbling degrees differed for steers (MA = SA > MD = MT > SM > SL = TR) and heifers (MA = SA > MD > MT > SM > SL > TR). Steaks produced by steers had lower (P < 0.05) WBSF and SSF values, and were rated as more tender by sensory panelists than steaks produced by heifers, but the effect of sex on panel tenderness was significant only among steaks with TR marbling. Results of

  3. Mineral resources of the Marble Canyon Wilderness Study Area, White Pine County, Nevada, and Millard County, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Diggles, M.F.; Nowlan, G.A.; Blank, H.R. Jr.; Marcus, S.M. ); Kness, R.F. )

    1990-01-01

    This book reports on the Marble Canyon Wilderness Study Area that has large inferred subeconomic resources of ordinary limestone and marble. This area of faulted and metamorphosed Paleozoic to Quaternary rocks has zones within it of high and moderate mineral resource potential for limestone and marble, moderate and low potential for barite, and low potential for gold, silver, copper, lead, zinc, tungsten, molybdenum, beryllium, and fluorite. The entire study area has moderate potential for oil and gas and low potential for geothermal energy resources.

  4. Depiction of facial nerve paresis in the gallery of portraits carved in stone by George Matthew the Dalmatian on the Sibenik Cathedral dating from the 15th century.

    PubMed

    Skrobonja, Ante; Culina, Tatjana

    2011-06-01

    The introductory segment of this paper briefly describes George Matthew the Dalmatian, the architect who, between 1441 and 1473, oversaw the construction of the Cathedral of St. James in Sibenik, a city on the Croatian side of the Adriatic coast. Of the most impressive details included in this monumental construction and sculptural flamboyant gothic production infused with distinctive Dalmatian spirit is a frieze of 71 stone and three lion portraits encircling the outer apse wall. From the intriguing amalgamation of portraits of anonymous people this master came across in his surrounding, the fiftieth head in the row has been selected for this occasion. On the face of a younger man the authors have recognized and described pathognomonic right-sided facial nerve paresis. The question posed here is whether this is coincidental or it represents the master's courage, given that instead of famous people in the cathedral he situated not only ordinary people but also those "labelled" and traditionally marginalized, thus, in the most beautiful manner, foreshadowing the forthcoming spirit of Humanism and Renaissance in Croatian and European art.

  5. Mount Vesuvius, Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) image of Mt. Vesuvius, Italy was acquired September 26, 2000. The full-size false-color image covers an area of 36 by 45 km. Vesuvius overlooks the city of Naples and the Bay of Naples in central Italy. (Popocatepetl and Mount Fuji are other volcanos surrounded by dense urban areas.) In 79 AD, Vesuvius erupted cataclysmically, burying all of the surrounding cites with up to 30 m of ash. The towns of Pompeii and Herculanaeum were rediscovered in the 18th century, and excavated in the 20th century. They provide a snapshot of Roman life from 2000 years ago: perfectly preserved are wooden objects, food items, and the casts of hundreds of victims. Vesuvius is intensively monitored for potential signs of unrest that could signal the beginning of another eruption. Image courtesy NASA/GSFC/MITI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team

  6. Mt. Vesuvius, Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This ASTER image of Mt. Vesuvius Italy was acquired September 26, 2000, and covers an area of 36 by 45 km. Vesuvius overlooks the city of Naples and the Bay of Naples in central Italy. In 79 AD, Vesuvius erupted cataclysmically, burying all of the surrounding cites with up to 30 m of ash. The towns of Pompeii and Herculanaeum were rediscovered in the 18th century, and excavated in the 20th century. They provide a snapshot of Roman life from 2000 years ago: perfectly preserved are wooden objects, food items, and the casts of hundreds of victims. Vesuvius is intensively monitored for potential signs of unrest that could signal the beginning of another eruption. The image is centered at 40.8 degrees north latitude, 14.4 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  7. Conscientious objection in Italy.

    PubMed

    Minerva, Francesca

    2015-02-01

    The law regulating abortion in Italy gives healthcare practitioners the option to make a conscientious objection to activities that are specific and necessary to an abortive intervention. Conscientious objectors among Italian gynaecologists amount to about 70%. This means that only a few doctors are available to perform abortions, and therefore access to abortion is subject to constraints. In 2012 the International Planned Parenthood Federation European Network (IPPF EN) lodged a complaint against Italy to the European Committee of Social Rights, claiming that the inadequate protection of the right to access abortion implies a violation of the right to health. In this paper I will discuss the Italian situation with respect to conscientious objection to abortion and I will suggest possible solutions to the problem.

  8. "Belgian black and red marbles" as potential candidates for Global Heritage Stone Resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourneur, Francis; Pereira, Dolores

    2016-04-01

    The Paleozoic substrate of South Belgium is rich in compact limestones, able to take a good polished finishing and to be used as "marbles". Among them, the black and red varieties were and still are of special importance, intensively exploited and largely exported, almost worldwide. The pure black marbles were extracted mostly from Frasnian (Upper Devonian) and Viséan (Lower Carboniferous) strata, in many localities like Namur, Dinant, Theux and Basècles. Today only the Frasnian variety is still exploited in a spectacular underground quarry in Golzinne, close to the town of Gembloux. These black marbles, already known in Antiquity, were exported since the Middle Age, first in Western Europe, then, from the 19th c., at a larger scale, almost worldwide. Among their most frequent uses figured of course funeral objects, like the epitaph of the Pope Adrian the 1st, offered by Charlemagne and preserved in the St-Pieter basilica in Rom. Another famous reference is the tombs of the Dukes of Burgundy in Dijon, with white crystalline marble and alabaster. The red marbles are limestones from reefal origin, forming mudmounds more or less rich in fossils of Late Frasnian (Late Devonian) age. They show a strong variability in colors, from dark red to light pinkish grey, and in texture, with many sedimentary structures and/or tectonic veins. The outcrops are non-stratified, which allows extraction of large blocks, for example for high columns. Known in the Roman time, they were intensively exploited since at least the 16th c. During the 19th and beginning of 20th c., more than hundred quarries were active in South Belgium, from Rance at West to Chaudfontaine at East, around Philippeville and Rochefort. They were largely used both in civil and religious buildings, mostly for inside decoration, for examples as altars or fireplaces. Among the most symbolic places, the Belgian red marbles were massively employed in Versailles, like in the famous "Galerie des Glaces". But many

  9. Paragonite in marbles from the Tauern Window, Austria: Compositional and thermobaric controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droop, G. T. R.

    2013-03-01

    Paragonite coexists with phengite, chlorite, zoisite, tremolite and quartz in dolomitic marbles from near Döllach in the Sonnblick area of the SE Tauern Window, Austria, prompting an investigation into the petrogenetic significance of paragonite in carbonate rocks. Thermodynamic calculations on pure-end-member reactions indicate that the assemblages paragonite + CaCO3 + quartz and paragonite + dolomite + quartz are stable over wide ranges of X(CO2) and have P-T stability fields almost as wide as that of paragonite + quartz. P-T pseudosection calculations spanning 0.35-1.4 GPa and 400-590 °C in the model system Na2O-CaO-K2O-FeO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-TiO2-H2O-CO2 yield wide fields for paragonite-bearing assemblages in the Döllach paragonite-marbles at low X(CO2). The bulk compositions of these rocks are characterised by high values of molar Na/(Na + K) and Al/(Na + K) and these parameters are influential in stabilising paragonite-bearing assemblages in marbles. A large proportion of published limestone and dolostone whole-rock compositions would be capable of supporting paragonite at P-T conditions within the greenschist, blueschist or epidote-amphibolite facies. Paragonite is probably much more common in low- and medium-grade marbles than the rarity of reports of its occurrence suggest. Apart from zoisite, the hydrous silicates in the Döllach marbles are characterised by modest fluorine contents, with XF values of coexisting minerals decreasing in the order Tr > Phe > Pa ≈ Chl. Calcite-dolomite thermometry and pseudosection calculations indicate peak-metamorphic conditions for the Döllach marbles of T = 510 ± 20 °C, P > 0.77 GPa and X(CO2) < 0.065. The P-T data agree with previous estimates for the area.

  10. Group Psychotherapy in Italy.

    PubMed

    Giannone, Francesca; Giordano, Cecilia; Di Blasi, Maria

    2015-10-01

    This article describes the history and the prevailing orientations of group psychotherapy in Italy (psychoanalytically oriented, psychodrama, CBT groups) and particularly group analysis. Provided free of charge by the Italian health system, group psychotherapy is growing, but its expansion is patchy. The main pathways of Italian training in the different group psychotherapy orientations are also presented. Clinical-theoretical elaboration on self development, psychopathology related to group experiences, and the methodological attention paid to objectives and methods in different clinical groups are issues related to group therapy in Italy. Difficulties in the relationship between research and clinical practice are discussed, as well as the empirical research network that tries to bridge the gap between research and clinical work in group psychotherapy. The economic crisis in Italy has led to massive cuts in health care and to an increasing demand for some forms of psychological treatment. For these reasons, and because of its positive cost-benefit ratio, group psychotherapy is now considered an important tool in the national health care system to expand the clinical response to different forms of psychological distress.

  11. Use of a bovine genome array to identify new biological pathways for beef marbling in Hanwoo (Korean Cattle)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Marbling (intramuscular fat) is a valuable trait that impacts on meat quality and an important factor determining price of beef in the Korean beef market. Animals that are destined for this high marbling market are fed a high concentrate ration for approximately 30 months in the Korean finishing farms. However, this feeding strategy leads to inefficiencies and excessive fat production. This study aimed to identify candidate genes and pathways associated with intramuscular fat deposition on highly divergent marbling phenotypes in adult Hanwoo cattle. Results Bovine genome array analysis was conducted to detect differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in m. longissimus with divergent marbling phenotype (marbling score 2 to 7). Three data-processing methods (MAS5.0, GCRMA and RMA) were used to test for differential expression (DE). Statistical analysis identified 21 significant transcripts from at least two data-processing methods (P < 0.01). All 21 differentially expressed genes were validated by real-time PCR. Results showed a high concordance in the gene expression fold change between the microarrays and the real time PCR data. Gene Ontology (GO) and pathway analysis demonstrated that some genes (ADAMTS4, CYP51A and SQLE) over expressed in high marbled animals are involved in a protein catabolic process and a cholesterol biosynthesis process. In addition, pathway analysis also revealed that ADAMTS4 is activated by three regulators (IL-17A, TNFα and TGFβ1). QRT-PCR was used to investigate gene expression of these regulators in muscle with divergent intramuscular fat contents. The results demonstrate that ADAMTS4 and TGFβ1 are associated with increasing marbling fat. An ADAMTS4/TGFβ1 pathway seems to be associated with the phenotypic differences between high and low marbled groups. Conclusions Marbling differences are possibly a function of complex signaling pathway interactions between muscle and fat. These results suggest that ADAMTS4, which is involved

  12. Innocent until proven guilty? Stable coexistence of alien rainbow trout and native marble trout in a Slovenian stream.

    PubMed

    Vincenzi, Simone; Crivelli, Alain J; Jesensek, Dusan; Rossi, Gianluigi; De Leo, Giulio A

    2011-01-01

    To understand the consequences of the invasion of the nonnative rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss on the native marble trout Salmo marmoratus, we compared two distinct headwater sectors where marble trout occur in allopatry (MTa) or sympatry (MTs) with rainbow trout (RTs) in the Idrijca River (Slovenia). Using data from field surveys from 2002 to 2009, with biannual (June and September) sampling and tagging from June 2004 onwards, we analyzed body growth and survival probabilities of marble trout in each stream sector. Density of age-0 in September over the study period was greater for MTs than MTa and very similar between MTs and RTs, while density of trout ≥age-1 was similar for MTa and MTs and greater than density of RTs. Monthly apparent survival probabilities were slightly higher in MTa than in MTs, while RTs showed a lower survival than MTs. Mean weight of marble and rainbow trout aged 0+ in September was negatively related to cohort density for both marble and rainbow trout, but the relationship was not significantly different between MTs and MTa. No clear depression of body growth of sympatric marble trout between sampling intervals was observed. Despite a later emergence, mean weight of RTs cohorts at age 0+ in September was significantly higher than weight of both MTs and MTa. The establishment of a self-sustaining population of rainbow trout does not have a significant impact on body growth and survival probabilities of sympatric marble trout. The numerical dominance of rainbow trout in streams at lower altitudes seem to suggest that while the low summer flow pattern of Slovenian streams is favorable for rainbow trout invasion, the adaptation of marble trout to headwater environments may limit the invasion success of rainbow trout in headwaters.

  13. Comments on the Yule Marble Haines block: potential replacement, Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, Arlington National Cemetery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mossotti, Victor G.

    2014-01-01

    Marble for the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery was cut from the Colorado Yule Marble Quarry in 1931. Although anecdotal reports suggest that cracks were noticed in the main section of the monument shortly after its installation at the Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia, detailed documentation of the extent of cracking did not appear until 1963. Although debate continues as to whether the main section of the Tomb of the Unknowns monument should be repaired or replaced, Mr. John S. Haines of Glenwood Springs, Colorado, in anticipation of the permanent closing of the Yule Quarry, donated a 58-ton block of Yule Marble, the so-called Haines block, as a potential backup. The brief study reported here was conducted during mid-summer 2009 at the behest of the superintendent of Arlington National Cemetery. The field team entered the subterranean Yule Marble Quarry with the Chief Extraction Engineer in order to contrast the method used for extraction of the Haines block with the method that was probably used to extract the marble block that is now cracked. Based on surficial inspection and shallow coring of the Haines block, and on the nature of crack propagation in Yule Marble as judged by close inspection of a large collection of surrogate Yule Marble blocks, the team found the block to be structurally sound and cosmetically equivalent to the marble used for the current monument. If the Haines block were needed, it would be an appropriate replacement for the existing cracked section of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Monument.

  14. Innocent until proven guilty? Stable coexistence of alien rainbow trout and native marble trout in a Slovenian stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincenzi, Simone; Crivelli, Alain J.; Jesensek, Dusan; Rossi, Gianluigi; de Leo, Giulio A.

    2011-01-01

    To understand the consequences of the invasion of the nonnative rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss on the native marble trout Salmo marmoratus, we compared two distinct headwater sectors where marble trout occur in allopatry (MTa) or sympatry (MTs) with rainbow trout (RTs) in the Idrijca River (Slovenia). Using data from field surveys from 2002 to 2009, with biannual (June and September) sampling and tagging from June 2004 onwards, we analyzed body growth and survival probabilities of marble trout in each stream sector. Density of age-0 in September over the study period was greater for MTs than MTa and very similar between MTs and RTs, while density of trout ≥age-1 was similar for MTa and MTs and greater than density of RTs. Monthly apparent survival probabilities were slightly higher in MTa than in MTs, while RTs showed a lower survival than MTs. Mean weight of marble and rainbow trout aged 0+ in September was negatively related to cohort density for both marble and rainbow trout, but the relationship was not significantly different between MTs and MTa. No clear depression of body growth of sympatric marble trout between sampling intervals was observed. Despite a later emergence, mean weight of RTs cohorts at age 0+ in September was significantly higher than weight of both MTs and MTa. The establishment of a self-sustaining population of rainbow trout does not have a significant impact on body growth and survival probabilities of sympatric marble trout. The numerical dominance of rainbow trout in streams at lower altitudes seem to suggest that while the low summer flow pattern of Slovenian streams is favorable for rainbow trout invasion, the adaptation of marble trout to headwater environments may limit the invasion success of rainbow trout in headwaters.

  15. Inhibition of acid mine drainage and immobilization of heavy metals from copper flotation tailings using a marble cutting waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozsin, Gulsen

    2016-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) with high concentrations of sulfates and metals is generated by the oxidation of sulfide bearing wastes. CaCO3-rich marble cutting waste is a residual material produced by the cutting and polishing of marble stone. In this study, the feasibility of using the marble cutting waste as an acid-neutralizing agent to inhibit AMD and immobilize heavy metals from copper flotation tailings (sulfide- bearing wastes) was investigated. Continuous-stirring shake-flask tests were conducted for 40 d, and the pH value, sulfate content, and dissolved metal content of the leachate were analyzed every 10 d to determine the effectiveness of the marble cutting waste as an acid neutralizer. For comparison, CaCO3 was also used as a neutralizing agent. The average pH value of the leachate was 2.1 at the beginning of the experiment ( t = 0). In the experiment employing the marble cutting waste, the pH value of the leachate changed from 6.5 to 7.8, and the sulfate and iron concentrations decreased from 4558 to 838 mg/L and from 536 to 0.01 mg/L, respectively, after 40 d. The marble cutting waste also removed more than 80wt% of heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) from AMD generated by copper flotation tailings.

  16. Near-infrared spectral image analysis of pork marbling based on Gabor filter and wide line detector techniques.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui; Liu, Li; Ngadi, Michael O; Gariépy, Claude; Prasher, Shiv O

    2014-01-01

    Marbling is an important quality attribute of pork. Detection of pork marbling usually involves subjective scoring, which raises the efficiency costs to the processor. In this study, the ability to predict pork marbling using near-infrared (NIR) hyperspectral imaging (900-1700 nm) and the proper image processing techniques were studied. Near-infrared images were collected from pork after marbling evaluation according to current standard chart from the National Pork Producers Council. Image analysis techniques-Gabor filter, wide line detector, and spectral averaging-were applied to extract texture, line, and spectral features, respectively, from NIR images of pork. Samples were grouped into calibration and validation sets. Wavelength selection was performed on calibration set by stepwise regression procedure. Prediction models of pork marbling scores were built using multiple linear regressions based on derivatives of mean spectra and line features at key wavelengths. The results showed that the derivatives of both texture and spectral features produced good results, with correlation coefficients of validation of 0.90 and 0.86, respectively, using wavelengths of 961, 1186, and 1220 nm. The results revealed the great potential of the Gabor filter for analyzing NIR images of pork for the effective and efficient objective evaluation of pork marbling.

  17. 3D Visualization of Sheath Folds in Roman Marble from Ephesus, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wex, Sebastian; Passchier, Cornelis W.; de Kemp, Eric A.; Ilhan, Sinan

    2013-04-01

    Excavation of a palatial 2nd century AD house (Terrace House Two) in the ancient city of Ephesus, Turkey in the 1970s produced 10.313 pieces of colored, folded marble which belonged to 54 marble plates of 1.6 cm thickness that originally covered the walls of the banquet hall of the house. The marble plates were completely reassembled and restored by a team of workers over the last 6 years. The plates were recognized as having been sawn from two separate large blocks of "Cipollino verde", a green mylonitized marble from Karystos on the Island of Euboea, Greece. After restoration, it became clear that all slabs had been placed on the wall in approximately the sequence in which they had been cut off by a Roman stone saw. As a result, the marble plates give a full 3D insight in the folded internal structure of 1m3 block of mylonite. The restoration of the slabs was recognized as a first, unique opportunity for detailed reconstruction of the 3D geometry of m-scale folds in mylonitized marble. Photographs were taken of each slab and used to reconstruct their exact arrangement within the originally quarried blocks. Outlines of layers were digitized and a full 3D reconstruction of the internal structure of the block was created using ArcMap and GOCAD. Fold structures in the block include curtain folds and multilayered sheath folds. Several different layers showing these structures were digitized on the photographs of the slab surfaces and virtually mounted back together within the model of the marble block. Due to the serial sectioning into slabs, with cm-scale spacing, the visualization of the 3D geometry of sheath folds was accomplished with a resolution better than 4 cm. Final assembled 3D images reveal how sheath folds emerge from continuous layers and show their overall consistency as well as a constant hinge line orientation of the fold structures. Observations suggest that a single deformation phase was responsible for the evolution of "Cipollino verde" structures

  18. Insertion and confinement of hydrophobic metallic powder in water: The bubble-marble effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meir, Yehuda; Jerby, Eli

    2014-09-01

    Metallic powders such as thermite are known as efficient fuels also applicable in oxygen-free environments. However, due to their hydrophobicity, they hardly penetrate into water. This paper presents an effect that enables the insertion and confinement of hydrophobic metallic powders in water, based on encapsulating an air bubble surrounded by a hydrophobic metallic shell. This effect, regarded as an inverse of the known liquid-marble effect, is named here "bubble marble" (BM). The sole BM is demonstrated experimentally as a stable, maneuverable, and controllable soft-solid-like structure, in a slightly deformed hollow spherical shape of ˜1-cm diameter. In addition to experimental and theoretical BM aspects, this paper also demonstrates its potential for underwater applications, such as transportation of solid objects within BM and underwater combustion of thermite BM by localized microwaves. Hence, the BM phenomena may open new possibilities for heat and thrust generation, as well as material processing and mass transfer underwater.

  19. Strength and deformation behaviors of veined marble specimens after vacuum heat treatment under conventional triaxial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Haijian; Jing, Hongwen; Yin, Qian; Yu, Liyuan; Wang, Yingchao; Wu, Xingjie

    2017-03-01

    The mechanical behaviors of rocks affected by high temperature and stress are generally believed to be significant for the stability of certain projects involving rocks, such as nuclear waste storage and geothermal resource exploitation. In this paper, veined marble specimens were treated to high temperature treatment and then used in conventional triaxial compression tests to investigate the effect of temperature, confining pressure, and vein angle on strength and deformation behaviors. The results show that the strength and deformation parameters of the veined marble specimens changed with the temperature, presenting a critical temperature of 600°C. The triaxial compression strength of a horizontal vein (β = 90°) is obviously larger than that of a vertical vein (β = 0°). The triaxial compression strength, elasticity modulus, and secant modulus have an approximately linear relation to the confining pressure. Finally, Mohr-Coulomb and Hoek-Brown criteria were respectively used to analyze the effect of confining pressure on triaxial compression strength.

  20. The complete mitochondrial genome of the marbled rockfish Sebastiscus marmoratus (Scorpaeniformes, Scorpaenidae) from Japan.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dianrong; Zhang, Hui; Yanagimoto, Takashi; Yin, Lina; Gao, Tianxiang

    2015-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of marbled rockfish Sebastiscus marmoratus collected from Japan was determined by next-generation sequencing. The mitogenome is a circular molecule 17,301 bp in length, including the typical structure of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and a control region. The ETAS, central CSB and CSB were detected in the control region. The gene contents of the mitogenome are identical to those observed in most bony fishes.

  1. Bowing of marble panels: On-site damage analysis from the oeconomicum building at Goettingen (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, A.; Siegesmund, S.

    2003-04-01

    The use of natural stone panels or cladding material for building facades has led to some durability problems, especially with marble slabs. To examine the effects of intrinsic and extrinsic parameters on bowing a very detailed study was performed on the Oeconomicum Building at the University of Goettingen. In total 1556 panels from the whole building were measured with respect to the bowing using a bow-meter. The variation of bowing ranges from concave (up to 23 mm/m) to convex (up to -11 mm/m). The variation is not controlled by the position with respect to the geographical coordinates, height above ground, shadows, temperature etc.. On the north facade the different rock structures visible on the panel surfaces are a result of the marble slabs being cut in different directions. The different degree in bowing is associated with the structure of the marble since all other influencing factors are relatively constant (position, temperature, moisture content, building physics). Experimental data on the expansion behaviour under dry and/or wet conditions reveal a different degree in bowing with respect to the rock fabric and may help to explain the observed differences in bowing. The effect of the rock fabric especially of the lattice preferred orientation in this case clearly controls the deterioration of the marble and the degree of bowing. The bowing is also characterized by an increase in the porosity, decreasing values of ultrasonic wave velocities and flexural strength. The loss of cohesion in the strongly deteriorated panels is clearly visible in the microstructure by the open grain boundaries which are interconnected to intergranular microcracks.

  2. The impact of recreational boat traffic on Marbled Murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus).

    PubMed

    Bellefleur, Danielle; Lee, Philip; Ronconi, Robert A

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the impact of small boat traffic on reaction distances of Marbled Murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus), in the marine waters of Pacific Rim National Park Reserve, British Columbia, Canada. Observers on moving boats recorded the minimum distance the boat came to murrelets on the water, and any disturbance reaction (fly, dive, no reaction). Out of the 7500 interactions 11.7% flew, 30.8% dove and 58.1% exhibited no flushing reaction. Using a product-limit analysis, we developed curves for the proportion of Marbled Murrelets flushing (dive or flight) as a function of reaction distance. Overall, the majority of Marbled Murrelets waited until boats were within 40 m before reacting, with 25% of the population reacting at 29.2m. A stepwise Cox regression indicated that age, boat speed, and boat density (loaded in that order), significantly affected flushing response. More juveniles flushed than adults (70.1 versus 51.7%), but at closer distances. Faster boats caused a greater proportion of birds to flush, and at further distances (25% of birds flushed at 40 m at speeds > 29 kph versus 28m at speeds <12kph). A stepwise logistic regression on diving and flight responses indicated that birds tended to fly completely out of feeding areas at the approach of boats travelling >28.8 kph and later in the season (July and August). Other secondary variables included; boat density and time of day. Discussion focused on possible management actions such as the application of speed limits, set back distances, and exclusion of boat traffic to protect Marbled Murrelets.

  3. 3D visualization of sheath folds in Ancient Roman marble wall coverings from Ephesos, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wex, Sebastian; Passchier, Cees W.; de Kemp, Eric A.; İlhan, Sinan

    2014-10-01

    Archaeological excavations and restoration of a palatial Roman housing complex in Ephesos, Turkey yielded 40 wall-decorating plates of folded mylonitic marble (Cipollino verde), derived from the internal Hellenides near Karystos, Greece. Cipollino verde was commonly used for decoration purposes in Roman buildings. The plates were serial-sectioned from a single quarried block of 1,25 m3 and provided a research opportunity for detailed reconstruction of the 3D geometry of meterscale folds in mylonitized marble. A GOCAD model is used to visualize the internal fold structures of the marble, comprising curtain folds and multilayered sheath folds. The sheath folds are unusual in that they have their intermediate axis normal to the parent layering. This agrees with regional tectonic studies, which suggest that Cipollino verde structures formed by local constrictional non-coaxial flow. Sheath fold cross-section geometry, exposed on the surface of a plate or outcrop, is found to be independent of the intersection angle of the fold structure with the studied plane. Consequently, a single surface cannot be used as an indicator of the three-dimensional geometry of transected sheath folds.

  4. Effects of salinity change on two superoxide dismutases (SODs) in juvenile marbled eel Anguilla marmorata

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Salinity is one of the most important factors that affect the fish growth and survival. Superoxide dismutases (SODs), as the primary antioxidant enzymes, play a first role in the process of preventing oxidative stress caused by excessive superoxide anion (O\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}${}_{2}^{-}$\\end{document}2−) in living organisms. In the present study, we investigated the effects of salinity on the gene expressions as well as enzymatic activities of MnSOD and Cu/ZnSOD in gill, intestine, kidney, liver and muscle tissues of the marbled eel Anguilla marmorata. We found that the liver might possess stronger redox capacity compared with other tissues. Furthermore, the gene expressions and enzymatic activities of SODs in juvenile marbled eels could be effectively enhanced by low salinity but inhibited when the salinity was higher than the body tolerance. Our findings indicated that MnSOD and Cu/ZnSOD played vital roles in the adaptation of marbled eels to salinity variation, which contributed to the elucidation of physiological adaptation and regulatory mechanism of SODs in eels. PMID:27547518

  5. Sedimentology of the Castner Marble, Franklin Mountains, El Paso County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Pittenger, M.A.; Marsaglia, K.M. )

    1992-04-01

    The Castner Marble occurs within roof pendants in the Red Bluff Granite complex, and is the oldest Proterozoic unit exposed in the Franklin Mountains. This contact-metamorphosed metasedimentary unit consists of six lithologies: (1) stromatolitic limestone, (2) cryptalgalaminite, (3) massive limestone, (4) hornfels, (5) rhythmite, and (6) flat-pebble conglomerate. Based on the distribution of these lithologies, the Castner Marble can be divided into three distinct intervals: (1) lower section, consisting of stromatolitic, cryptalgalaminite and massive limestone, (2) middle section, characterized by thick hornfels and massive limestone beds, and (3) upper section, consisting of interbedded rhythmite and flat-pebble conglomerates. The lower section represents a shallow-water, intertidal to subtidal deposit, whereas the upper section was deposited in deeper water (below wave base) by turbidite or storm-related processes. The middle section may be a transition between the two, in that it contains lithologies found in the upper and lower sections. These three sections appear to record a transgression on a low-energy, carbonate ramp/platform. The contact between the Castner Marble and the overlying basaltic Mundy Breccia marks a catastrophic event or series of events in which megabreccias of deep-water, subtidal carbonate facies were deposited onto underlying rhythmite intervals.

  6. [Social cooperatives in Italy].

    PubMed

    Villotti, P; Zaniboni, S; Fraccaroli, F

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the role of social cooperatives in Italy as a type of economic, non-profit organization and their role in contributing to the economic and social growth of the country. The purpose of this paper is to learn more about the experience of the Italian social cooperatives in promoting the work integration process of disadvantaged workers, especially those suffering from mental disorders, from a theoretical and an empirical point of view. Social enterprise is the most popular and consolidated legal and organizational model for social enterprises in Italy, introduced by Law 381/91. Developed during the early 1980s, and formally recognized by law in the early 1990s, social cooperatives aim at pursuing the general interest of the community to promote the human needs and social inclusion of citizens. They are orientated towards aims that go beyond the interest of the business owners, the primary beneficiary of their activities is the community, or groups of disadvantaged people. In Italy, Law 381/91 distinguishes between two categories of social cooperatives, those producing goods of social utility, such as culture, welfare and educational services (A-type), and those providing economic activities for the integration of disadvantaged people into employment (B-type). The main purpose of B-type social cooperatives is to integrate disadvantaged people into the open labour market. This goal is reached after a period of training and working experience inside the firm, during which the staff works to improve both the social and professional abilities of disadvantaged people. During the years, B-type social co-ops acquired a particular relevance in the care of people with mental disorders by offering them with job opportunities. Having a job is central in the recovery process of people suffering from mental diseases, meaning that B-type social co-ops in Italy play an important rehabilitative and integrative role for this vulnerable population of workers. The

  7. The Language Situation in Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tosi, Arturo

    2004-01-01

    This monograph provides an overview of the language situation in Italy, within the framework of language policy and language planning. It presents an account of multilingualism, linguistic diversity, social variation, educational issues and phenomena of language contact both within and outside Italy. The four main threads are (1) the current…

  8. The Bologna Process in Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballarino, Gabriele; Perotti, Loris

    2012-01-01

    Italy was among the promoters of the Bologna Process and the early adopters of the reform. If one looks at its impact on the formal structure of curricula and study programmes, the reform undertaken under the Bologna banner seems to have been one of the major educational reforms ever achieved in Italy. This article describes how the Bologna…

  9. Synthetic Polymers at Interfaces: Monodisperse Emulsions Multiple Emulsions and Liquid Marbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guanqing

    The adsorption of polymeric materials at interfaces is an energetically favorable process which is investigated in much diversified fields, such as emulsions, bubbles, foams, liquid marbles. Pickering emulsion, which is emulsion stabilized by solid particles has been investigated for over one century and preparation of Pickering emulsion with narrow size distribution is crucial for both the theoretical study of the stabilization mechanism and practical application, such as templated fabrication of colloidosomes. The precise control over the size and functionality of polymer latices allows the preparation of monodisperse Pickering emulsions with desired sizes through SPG membrane emulsification at rather rapid rate compared to microfludic production. Double or multiple emulsions have long been investigated but its rapid destabilization has always been a major obstacle in applying them into practical applications. The modern living polymerization techniques allow us to prepare polymers with designed structure of block copolymers which makes it possible to prepare ultra-stable multiple emulsions. The precise tuning of the ratio of hydrophobic part over the hydrophilic can unveil the stabilization mechanism. Liquid marble is a new type of materials of which liquid droplets are coated by dry particles. The coating of an outer layer of dry particles renders the liquid droplets non-sticky at solid surface which is useful in transportation of small amount of liquid without leakage at extreme low friction force. The property of liquid marbles relies largely on the stabilizers and the drying condition of polymeric latices is shown to have great influence on the property of liquid marbles. Firstly, an introduction to the interfacial and colloidal science with special attention to topics on emulsions, multiple emulsion and liquid marbles is given in Chapter 1. The unique features of an interface and a discussion on the definition of colloids are introduced prior to the

  10. The Underwater Recovery of Monumental Marble Column Drums from an Ancient Shipwreck at Kızılburun, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Deborah N.

    2016-08-01

    In the first century B.C., a stone carrier sank off the Aegean coast of Turkey at Kızılburun transporting all the elements of a monumental marble column, including a single Doric capital and eight drums. The 60-tonne cargo lay at a depth of 45-48 m and was excavated in its entirety by the Institute of Nautical Archaeology at Texas A&M University between 2005 and 2011. Ongoing research has shown that the Doric column pieces in the Kızılburun cargo originated in the marble quarries on Proconnesus Island in the Sea of Marmara and were very likely heading for the Temple of Apollo at Claros when the ship sank just 50 km short of its destination. The complete recovery of the ship's cargo posed a unique set of methodological challenges involving lifting the multi-tonne marble drums without disturbing the delicate waterlogged wooden hull remains preserved beneath. This report summarizes the solutions developed over five seasons in order to rig, hoist, move, and ultimately raise to the surface eight large ancient marble column drums (as well as all the other marble artifacts in the cargo) from a depth of almost 50 m under water.

  11. Evolution of a calcite marble shear zone complex on Thassos Island, Greece: microstructural and textural fabrics and their kinematic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bestmann, Michel; Kunze, Karsten; Matthews, Alan

    2000-11-01

    The deformation history of a monophase calcite marble shear zone complex on Thassos Island, Northern Greece, is reconstructed by detailed geometric studies of the textural and microstructural patterns relative to a fixed reference system (shear zone boundary, SZB). Strain localization within the massive marble complex is linked to decreasing P- T conditions during the exhumation process of the metamorphic core complex. Solvus thermometry indicates that temperatures of 300-350°C prevailed during part of the shear zone deformation history. The coarse-grained marble protolith outside the shear zone is characterized by symmetrically oriented twin sets due to early coaxial deformation. A component of heterogeneous non-coaxial deformation is first recorded within the adjacent protomylonite. Enhanced strain weakening by dynamic recrystallization promoted strong localization of plastic deformation in the ultramylonite of the calcite shear zone, where high strain was accommodated by non-coaxial flow. This study demonstrates that both a pure shear and a simple shear strain path can result in similar crystallographic preferred orientations (single c-axis maximum perpendicular to the SZB) by different dominant deformation mechanisms. Separated a-axis pole figures (+ a- and - a-axis) show different density distributions with orthorhombic texture symmetry in the protolith marble and monoclinic symmetry in the ultramylonite marble consistently with the observed grain fabric symmetry.

  12. Gestalt psychology in Italy.

    PubMed

    Verstegen, I

    2000-01-01

    Graz gestalt psychology was introduced into Italy after World War I with Vittorio Benussi's emigration to Padua. His earliest adherent, Cesare Musatti, defended Graz theory, but after Benussi's premature death became an adherent of the Berlin gestalt psychology of Wertheimer-Köhler-Koffka. He trained his two most important students, Fabio Metelli and Gaetano Kanizsa, in orthodox Berlin theory. They established rigid "schools" in Padua and Trieste. The structure of Italian academics allowed for such strict orthodoxy, quite unlike the situation in America, where scientific objectivity mitigated against schools. In the 1960s, some of the students of Metelli and Kanizsa (above all Bozzi) initiated a realist movement-felt in Kanizsa's late work-that was quite independent of that of J. J. Gibson. Finally, more recently, Benussi and Graz theorizing have been embraced again, sentimentally, as a predecedent to Kanizsa-Bozzi.

  13. Gastric cancer in Italy.

    PubMed

    Cipriani, F; Buiatti, E; Palli, D

    1991-01-01

    Although Gastric Cancer (GC) death rates are decreasing worldwide, in high risk areas GC is still a major public health problem. Italy is one of the European countries with the highest mortality rates for GC (males: 17.3; females: 8.2 x 100,000 inhabitants in 1987) which represents the third cause of death due to cancer in 1987, accounting for over 14,000 deaths per year (10% of cancer deaths). Reasons for the geographic variability in GC occurrence within the country are reviewed, discussing the results of two recent analytical epidemiological studies carried out in Italy. These large case-control studies focused on dietary factors, involving high and low-risk areas for GC (Florence, Siena, Forlì, Imola, Cremona, Genoa, Cagliari, and Milan). Low socio-economic status, family history of GC, residence in rural areas were associated to GC risk, while migration from southern areas and body mass index were inversely related to GC. Consumption of traditional soups, meat, salted and dried fish, cold cuts and seasoned cheeses, as well as the intake of animal proteins and nitrites were related to an increased GC risk. On the contrary consumption of fresh fruit, citrus fruit, raw vegetables, spices, garlic and olive oil, and vitamin C, E and beta-carotene intake were found to be protective factors. Among diet-related factors, preference for salty foods and frequent broiling were positively related to GC, while the longstanding availbility of a refrigerator or freezer and the habits of consuming frozen foods were associated with decreased GC risk. These results are discussed in detail, considering the main hypotheses on GC carcinogenesis.

  14. Subcutaneous anchor attachment increases retention of radio transmitters on Xantus' and marbled murrelets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newman, Scott H.; Takekawa, John Y.; Whitworth, Darrell L.; Burkett, Esther E.

    1999-01-01

    We modified a subcutaneous anchor attachment and achieved transmitter reten- tion times that exceeded those reported previously for other attachments used on alcids. Traditional suture and epoxy attachment methods were used on Xantus' Murrelets in 1995 and 1996, while the modified attachment was used for Xantus' Murrelets in 1996 and 1997 and Marbled Murrelets in 1997. Modifications included use of an inhalant anesthetic, placing the anchor in a more cranial position on the back, application of marine epoxy, and place- ment of a single subcutaneous non-absorbable suture at the caudal end of the radio to hold the radio in place initially. We located 22 of 56 (39%) Xantus' Murrelets radio-marked using suture and epoxy during aerial surveys in 1995 and 1996. Of birds radio-marked using the subcutaneous anchor attachment, we located 92 of 113 (81%) Xantus' Murrelets marked in 1996 and 1997 and all 28 (100%) Marbled Murrelets marked in 1997 during aerial surveys. The maximum confirmed duration for the subcutaneous anchor transmitter attachment was 51 d for Xantus' Murrelets and 78 d for Marbled Murrelets versus 41 d for the suture and epoxy attachment used on Xantus' Murrelets. Recapture rates of radio-marked Xantus' Mur- relets were similar to recapture rates of unmarked Xantus' Murrelets. Our post-release ob- servations indicated negligible short-term physical effects from the attachment procedure, while telemetry data and examination of recaptured murrelets indicated no evidence of infection or other long-term physical effects. Breeding behavior of some murrelets was not disrupted; however, further evaluation of potential effects of this attachment technique on breeding and behavior is needed.

  15. 13C 12C exchange between calcite and graphite: A possible thermometer in Grenville marbles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Valley, J.W.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    The fractionation of 13C between calcite and graphite, ??(Cc-Gr). is consistently small (2.6-4.8 permil) in 34 assemblages from upper amphibolite- and granulite-facies marbles of the Grenville Province. In 25 samples from the Adirondack Mountains, New York, it decreases regularly with increasing metamorphic temperature. The fractionations are independent of absolute ??13C values of calcite (-2.9 to +5.0). For T = 600-800??C, the Adirondack data are described by ??(Cc-Gr) = -0.00748T (??C) + 8.68. This good correlation between ?? and T suggests that carbon isotope equilibrium was attained in these high-grade marbles and that the theoretical calculations of this fractionation by Bottinga are approximately 2 permil too large in this temperature range. Because of the relatively high temperature sensitivity suggested by these results and by Bottinga's calculations, and the pressure independence of isotope fractionation, ??(Cc-Gr) may provide a very good thermometer for high-grade marbles. Comparison of this field calibration for ??(Cc-Gr) vs temperature with results from other terranes supports the utility of ??(Cc-Gr) for geothermometry and suggests that graphite is much more sluggish to exchange than calcite, that exchange between calcite and graphite occurs at temperatures as low as 300??C, and that equilibrium may normally be attained only when peak metamorphic temperatures are greater than 500-600??C. Because 13C exchange is an unavoidable metamorphic process at temperatures above 300??C, high values of ??13C(Gr) in moderate- to high-grade carbonate-bearing rocks do not provide a sufficient criterion to infer an abiogenic origin for the graphite. ?? 1981.

  16. The calcite → aragonite transformation in low-Mg marble: Equilibrium relations, transformations mechanisms, and rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hacker, Bradley R.; Rubie, David C.; Kirby, Stephen H.; Bohlen, Steven R.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental transformation of a rather pure natural calcite marble to aragonite marble did not proceed via the expected straightforward polymorphic replacement. Instead, the small amount of Mg in the starting material (0.36 wt %) was excluded from the growing aragonite and diffused preferentially into the remaining calcite grains, producing Mg-rich calcite rods that persisted as relicts. Nucleation of aragonite occurred exclusively on grain boundaries, with aragonite [001] oriented subparallel to calcite [0001]. The aragonite crystals preferentially consumed the calcite crystal on which they nucleated, and the reaction fronts developed preferentially along the {010} and {110} planes of aragonite. Each aragonite neoblast that grew was nearly free of Mg (typically <0.1 wt %). The excess Mg was taken up by the calcite grains in between, stabilizing them and causing a few volume percent rodlike relicts of Mg-enriched calcite (up to 10 wt % MgO) to be left behind by the advancing reaction front. The aragonite growth rates are approximately linear and range from ∼3 × 10−11 m s−1 at 600°C to ∼9 × 10−9 m s−1 at 850°C, with an apparent activation enthalpy of 166 ± 91 kJ mol−1. This reaction mechanism and the resultant texture are akin to cellular precipitation reactions in metals. Similar transformation textures have been reported from high-Mg marbles in Japan and China that disproportionated to low-Mg calcite and dolomite.

  17. Geology of the Marble exploration hole 4, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKeown, Francis Alexander; Wilmarth, Verl Richard

    1959-01-01

    This report summarizes the information obtained during preparation of the lithologic log of the core and presents results of chemical analyses of marble samples collected from surface near the drill hole. The report was prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey on behalf of the Albuquerque Operations Office, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The writers acknowledge the assistance of Mr. John Foster, drilling foreman for Minerals Engineering Company and Mr. Walter A. Johnson, field engineer for Holmes and Narver, Inc., the engineering-contracting firm.

  18. Pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in marbled water frog Telmatobius marmoratus: first record from Lake Titicaca, Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Cossel, John; Lindquist, Erik; Craig, Heather; Luthman, Kyle

    2014-11-13

    The pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) has been associated with amphibian declines worldwide but has not been well-studied among Critically Endangered amphibian species in Bolivia. We sampled free-living marbled water frogs Telmatobius marmoratus (Anura: Leptodactylidae) from Isla del Sol, Bolivia, for Bd using skin swabs and quantitative polymerase chain reactions. We detected Bd on 44% of T. marmoratus sampled. This is the first record of Bd in amphibians from waters associated with Lake Titicaca, Bolivia. These results further confirm the presence of Bd in Bolivia and substantiate the potential threat of this pathogen to the Critically Endangered, sympatric Titicaca water frog T. culeus and other Andean amphibians.

  19. Status Review of the Marbled Murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus) in Alaska and British Columbia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    Burger, University of Victoria, S.A. Hatch, U.S. Geological Survey, V.L. Friesen , Queen’s University, T.P. Birt, Queens University, M.L. Arimitsu, U.S...Kuletz, K.J., Burger, A.E., Hatch, S.A., Friesen , V.L., Birt, T.P. , Arimitsu, M.L., Drew, G.S., Harding, A.M.A., and K.S. Bixler, 2007, Status...British Columbia ........................................................189 Appendix E . Population Trends of the Marbled Murrelet Evident from At-Sea

  20. Investigating the effect of using granite and marble as a building material on the radiation exposure of humans.

    PubMed

    Ebaid, Y Y; Bakr, W F

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to comprehensively study the radiological hazards of granite and marble used as a building material in Egypt. The activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K were determined using high-resolution hyper-pure germanium detectors in 25 samples of different types of commercially available granite and marble. The measured activity concentrations for these natural radionuclides were compared with the reported data for Egypt and other countries. In order to assess the radiological impact, the radiation hazard parameters such as radium equivalent activity (Ra(eq)) and hazard level index (I(γ)) were calculated. The internal and external dose rates due to natural radionuclides in granite and marble were also calculated. The data obtained were considered as helpful  in regulating the use of building materials in Egypt.

  1. Thin-section microscopy of decayed crystalline marble from the garden sculptures of Schoenbrunn Palace in Vienna

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, J.

    2007-11-15

    Sterzing marble, a crystalline white marble used in the late-Baroque garden sculptures of Schoenbrunn Palace in Vienna, was studied by means of thin-section and scanning electron microscopy in order to obtain a better understanding of its surface decay caused by atmospheric weathering. Following the classification of distinct phenomena of deterioration by visual on-site inspection, the microstructural features including surface erosion, micro-cracking, soiling, black crust formation, and microbiological infestation are exemplified by microscopical images and are briefly discussed. The results proved useful for evaluating and understanding the various types of marble decay for creating a safer basis for establishing the procedural principles aimed at conservation and maintenance of the sculptures.

  2. Italy INAF Data Center Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negusini, M.; Sarti, P.

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Italian INAF VLBI Data Center. Our Data Center is located in Bologna, Italy and belongs to the Institute of Radioastronomy, which is part of the National Institute of Astrophysics.

  3. 78 FR 37586 - Stone Age Interiors, Inc., D/B/A Colorado Springs Marble and Granite, Including On-Site Leased...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Stone Age Interiors, Inc., D/B/A Colorado Springs Marble and Granite... former workers of Stone Age Interiors, Inc., d/b/a Colorado Springs Marble and Granite, Colorado...

  4. The First Estimates of Marbled Cat Pardofelis marmorata Population Density from Bornean Primary and Selectively Logged Forest.

    PubMed

    Hearn, Andrew J; Ross, Joanna; Bernard, Henry; Bakar, Soffian Abu; Hunter, Luke T B; Macdonald, David W

    2016-01-01

    The marbled cat Pardofelis marmorata is a poorly known wild cat that has a broad distribution across much of the Indomalayan ecorealm. This felid is thought to exist at low population densities throughout its range, yet no estimates of its abundance exist, hampering assessment of its conservation status. To investigate the distribution and abundance of marbled cats we conducted intensive, felid-focused camera trap surveys of eight forest areas and two oil palm plantations in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. Study sites were broadly representative of the range of habitat types and the gradient of anthropogenic disturbance and fragmentation present in contemporary Sabah. We recorded marbled cats from all forest study areas apart from a small, relatively isolated forest patch, although photographic detection frequency varied greatly between areas. No marbled cats were recorded within the plantations, but a single individual was recorded walking along the forest/plantation boundary. We collected sufficient numbers of marbled cat photographic captures at three study areas to permit density estimation based on spatially explicit capture-recapture analyses. Estimates of population density from the primary, lowland Danum Valley Conservation Area and primary upland, Tawau Hills Park, were 19.57 (SD: 8.36) and 7.10 (SD: 1.90) individuals per 100 km2, respectively, and the selectively logged, lowland Tabin Wildlife Reserve yielded an estimated density of 10.45 (SD: 3.38) individuals per 100 km2. The low detection frequencies recorded in our other survey sites and from published studies elsewhere in its range, and the absence of previous density estimates for this felid suggest that our density estimates may be from the higher end of their abundance spectrum. We provide recommendations for future marbled cat survey approaches.

  5. The First Estimates of Marbled Cat Pardofelis marmorata Population Density from Bornean Primary and Selectively Logged Forest

    PubMed Central

    Hearn, Andrew J.; Ross, Joanna; Bernard, Henry; Bakar, Soffian Abu; Hunter, Luke T. B.; Macdonald, David W.

    2016-01-01

    The marbled cat Pardofelis marmorata is a poorly known wild cat that has a broad distribution across much of the Indomalayan ecorealm. This felid is thought to exist at low population densities throughout its range, yet no estimates of its abundance exist, hampering assessment of its conservation status. To investigate the distribution and abundance of marbled cats we conducted intensive, felid-focused camera trap surveys of eight forest areas and two oil palm plantations in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. Study sites were broadly representative of the range of habitat types and the gradient of anthropogenic disturbance and fragmentation present in contemporary Sabah. We recorded marbled cats from all forest study areas apart from a small, relatively isolated forest patch, although photographic detection frequency varied greatly between areas. No marbled cats were recorded within the plantations, but a single individual was recorded walking along the forest/plantation boundary. We collected sufficient numbers of marbled cat photographic captures at three study areas to permit density estimation based on spatially explicit capture-recapture analyses. Estimates of population density from the primary, lowland Danum Valley Conservation Area and primary upland, Tawau Hills Park, were 19.57 (SD: 8.36) and 7.10 (SD: 1.90) individuals per 100 km2, respectively, and the selectively logged, lowland Tabin Wildlife Reserve yielded an estimated density of 10.45 (SD: 3.38) individuals per 100 km2. The low detection frequencies recorded in our other survey sites and from published studies elsewhere in its range, and the absence of previous density estimates for this felid suggest that our density estimates may be from the higher end of their abundance spectrum. We provide recommendations for future marbled cat survey approaches. PMID:27007219

  6. Rapid method to determine actinides and 89/90Sr in limestone and marble samples

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian; Hutchison, Jay B.; Utsey, Robin C.; Sudowe, Ralf; McAlister, Daniel R.

    2016-04-12

    A new method for the determination of actinides and radiostrontium in limestone and marble samples has been developed that utilizes a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion to digest the sample. Following rapid pre-concentration steps to remove sample matrix interferences, the actinides and 89/90Sr are separated using extraction chromatographic resins and measured radiometrically. The advantages of sodium hydroxide fusion versus other fusion techniques will be discussed. Lastly, this approach has a sample preparation time for limestone and marble samples of <4 hours.

  7. Roughening, recession, and chemical alteration of marble and limestone sample surfaces during atmospheric exposure in the eastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Youngdahl, C.A.; Doe, B.R.

    1986-02-01

    Marble and limestone surfaces were exposed to atmospheric conditions at four eastern US sites and were monitored for changes in surface chemistry, surface roughness/recession, and weight. The effect of acid deposition, to which calcareous materials are especially sensitive, was of particular interest. Results are described for the first year of testing, and aspects of a preliminary equation to relate damage to environmental factors are discussed. Thus far, findings support that acid deposition substantially damages marble and limestone surfaces. Improvements in methods to reduce uncertainties in the quantitative contributions of important chemical species are outlined for the ongoing effort.

  8. A sand budget for Marble Canyon, Arizona: implications for long-term monitoring of sand storage change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grams, Paul E.

    2013-01-01

    Recent U.S. Geological Survey research is providing important insights into how best to monitor changes in the amount of tributary-derived sand stored on the bed of the Colorado River and in eddies in Marble Canyon, Arizona. Before the construction of Glen Canyon Dam and other dams upstream, sandbars in Glen, Marble, and Grand Canyons were replenished each year by sediment-rich floods. Sand input into the Colorado River is crucial to protecting endangered native fish, animals, and plants and cultural and recreational resources along the river in Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and Grand Canyon National Park.

  9. Lake Garda, Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This ASTER image was acquired on July 29, 2000 and covers an area of 30 by 57 km in northern Italy. Lake Garda was formed by glaciers during the last Ice Age, and is Italy's largest lake. Lago di Garda lies in the provinces of Verona, Brescia, and Trento, and is 51 kilometers (32 miles) long and from 3 to 18 kilometers (2 to 11 miles) wide. The Sarca is its chief affluent, and the lake is drained southward by the Mincio, which discharges into the Po River. Many villas are situated on its shores. On the peninsula of Sirmione, at the southern end of the lake, are the ruins of a Roman villa and a castle of the Scaligers, an Italian family of the 16th century. The RIGHT image has the land area masked out, and a harsh stretch was applied to the lake values to display variations in sediment load. Also visible are hundreds of boats and their wakes, criss-crossing the lake.

    The image is centered at 45.6 degrees north latitude, 10.6 degrees east longitude.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for

  10. Laser paint removal on the outside walls of the Church Abbey Saint Adoeno in Bisceglie (BAT), Italy: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daurelio, G.; Catalano, I. M.; Bassi, P.

    2010-09-01

    It is the oldest church in the city after the cathedral. It is among the purest examples of Romanesque. It was founded in 1074 and expenses for its construction helped the inhabitants of the agricultural hamlets of the Cirignano, Pacciano and Zappino. The church was dedicated to St. Adoeno Dado, bishop of Rouen, protector of Norman, because , according to tradition, the building also participated Norman soldiers. San Adoeno church has a façade at cusp with a truncated tympanum , crowned by an eagle. In the centre of the façade there is a rose ornament surrounded by four lions and a statue of St. Adoeno ( Figs. A to I ). On the outside walls of this Abbey many graffiti, produced by different coloured spray paints were found. After the usual photographical tests some Laser Paint Removal trials were executed to verify the damage threshold of the calcareous stony substrate as well as the possibility to ablate these paints by a Nd - YAG laser in Q-Switch mode. Even if all the classical four laser paint ablation techniques were employed some paints showed a great difficulty to be removed from the substrate. For these ones it was necessary to increase at maximum both the energy per pulse and the fluence value for obtaining some acceptable result but the substrate looked turned pale. It was decided to remove a small amount of these paints and subject to chemical analysis for determining whether they were acrylic based. At the same time it was investigated on the type of limestone substrate that appeared more porous and less hard on the surface than the common local limestone marble basin, that is, Trani or Bisceglie. So, on the light of these investigations, the possible solution for this hard laser ablation problem was carried out with an acceptable final result.

  11. In situ Raman spectroscopic study of marble capitals in the Alhambra monumental ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjonilla, Paz; Domínguez-Vidal, Ana; de la Torre López, María José; Rubio-Domene, Ramón; Ayora-Cañada, María José

    2016-12-01

    The marble capitals of five different sites in the Alhambra complex (Granada, Spain), namely the Mexuar, the Hall of the Abencerrages, the Hall of the Kings, the Court of the Myrtles and the Court of the Main Canal, have been investigated. The decoration of the capitals exhibits mainly blue, red, black and gilding motifs with different states of conservation. The work has been carried out in situ by means of a portable Raman micro-spectrometer with an excitation laser of 785 nm. In addition to preserving the artwork with a non-invasive study, the on-site investigation gives a more representative knowledge of the art objects because the measurements are not limited to the samples that can be taken (few and small). The obtained Raman spectra were of good quality despite challenging adverse conditions out of the laboratory. Cinnabar, minium, carbon black, natural lapis lazuli and azurite were the main pigments found. Synthetic ultramarine blue was also detected in a capital as a result of a modern restoration. Degradation products as tin oxide in the gildings and weddellite in the preparation layers were also identified. All the results together with a careful visual inspection can be combined to elucidate the different execution techniques employed to apply the pigments on the marble substrate of the capitals in the Nasrid and Christian periods.

  12. Structural analysis of sheath folds in the Sylacauga Marble Group, Talladega slate belt, southern Appalachians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mies, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    Remnant blocks of marble from the Moretti-Harrah dimension-stone quarry provide excellent exposure of meter-scale sheath folds. Tubular structures with elliptical cross-sections (4 ???Ryz ??? 5) are the most common expression of the folds. The tubes are elongate subparallel to stretching lineation and are defined by centimeter-scale layers of schist. Eccentrically nested elliptical patterns and opposing asymmetry of folds ('S' and 'Z') are consistent with the sheath-fold interpretation. Sheath folds are locally numerous in the Moretti-Harrah quarry but are not widely distributed in the Sylacauga Marble Group; reconnaissance in neighboring quarries provided no additional observations. The presence of sheath folds in part of the Talladega slate belt indicates a local history of plastic, non-coaxial deformation. Such a history of deformation is substantiated by petrographic study of an extracted hinge from the Moretti-Harrah quarry. The sheath folds are modeled as due to passive amplification of initial structures during simple shear, using both analytic geometry and graphic simulation. As indicated by these models, relatively large shear strains (y ??? 9) and longitudinal initial structures are required. The shear strain presumably relates to NW-directed displacement of overlying crystalline rocks during late Paleozoic orogeny. ?? 1993.

  13. Hydroxyapatite coatings for marble protection: Optimization of calcite covering and acid resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziani, Gabriela; Sassoni, Enrico; Franzoni, Elisa; Scherer, George W.

    2016-04-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) has a much lower dissolution rate and solubility than calcite, especially in an acidic environment, so it has been proposed for the protection of marble against acidic rain corrosion. Promising results were obtained, but further optimization is necessary as the treated layer is often incomplete, cracked and/or porous. In this paper, several parameters were investigated to obtain a coherent, uncracked layer, and to avoid the formation of metastable, soluble phases instead of HAP: the role of the pH of the starting solution; the effect of organic and inorganic additions, and in particular that of ethanol, as it is reported to adsorb on calcite, hence possibly favoring the growth of the HAP layer. Finally, a double application of the treatment was tested. Results were compared to those obtained with ammonium oxalate treatment, widely investigated for marble protection. Results indicate that adding small amounts of ethanol to the formulation remarkably increases the acid resistance of treated samples, and yields better coverage of the surface without crack formation. The effectiveness of the treatment is further enhanced when a second treatment is applied. The efficacy of ethanol-doped DAP mixtures was found to be remarkably higher than that of ammonium oxalate based treatments.

  14. Diving and foraging patterns of Marbled Murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus): Testing predictions from optimal-breathing models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jodice, Patrick G.; Collopy, M.W.

    1999-01-01

    The diving behavior of Marbled Murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus) was studied using telemetry along the Oregon coast during the 1995 and 1996 breeding seasons and examined in relation to predictions from optimal-breathing models. Duration of dives, pauses, dive bouts, time spent under water during dive bouts, and nondiving intervals between successive dive bouts were recorded. Most diving metrics differed between years but not with oceanographic conditions or shore type. There was no effect of water depth on mean dive time or percent time spent under water even though dive bouts occurred in depths from 3 to 36 m. There was a significant, positive relationship between mean dive time and mean pause time at the dive-bout scale each year. At the dive-cycle scale, there was a significant positive relationship between dive time and preceding pause time in each year and a significant positive relationship between dive time and ensuing pause time in 1996. Although it appears that aerobic diving was the norm, there appeared to be an increase in anaerobic diving in 1996. The diving performance of Marbled Murrelets in this study appeared to be affected by annual changes in environmental conditions and prey resources but did not consistently fit predictions from optimal-breathing models.

  15. Experimental and numerical study of a fractured marble epistyle restored with layers of titanium bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourkoulis, S.-K.; Mentzini, M.; Ganniari-Papageorgiou, E.

    2010-06-01

    The mechanical behaviour of fractured prismatic marble architraves (epistyles) is evaluated in the present study both experimentally and numerically. The study is based on a recently introduced method for the calculation of the reinforcement required for joining together fractured structural elements of ancient monuments. The experimental assessment includes the construction of an accurate model of the most seriously damaged architrave of the north colonnade of the Parthenon Temple in a scale 1:3. The epistyle is considered symmetrically fractured at its mid-plane and it is restored with three horizontal layers of titanium bars. A multi-point bending arrangement was designed including a system of double T-beams and steel rollers in order to approach in an optimum manner the action of the uniformly distributed load exerted on the epistyle in its original position. A numerical analysis followed in an effort to study the parameters influencing the behaviour of the epistyle. The numerical model simulated accurately all the geometrical details of the experimental model, the load application mode and the mechanical characteristics of the three materials used for the restoration (marble, titanium and interposed cementitious material). The analysis enlightened interesting points concerning the location of the regions of the structure more susceptible to failure.

  16. Comparative study of pulsed laser cleaning applied to weathered marble surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, P.; Antúnez, V.; Ortiz, R.; Martín, J. M.; Gómez, M. A.; Hortal, A. R.; Martínez-Haya, B.

    2013-10-01

    The removal of unwanted matter from surface stones is a demanding task in the conservation of cultural heritage. This paper investigates the effectiveness of near-infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) laser pulses for the cleaning of surface deposits, iron oxide stains and different types of graffiti (black, red and green sprays and markers, and black cutting-edge ink) on dolomitic white marble. The performance of the laser techniques is compared to common cleaning methods on the same samples, namely pressurized water and chemical treatments. The degree of cleaning achieved with each technique is assessed by means of colorimetric measurements and X-ray microfluorescence. Eventual morphological changes induced on the marble substrate are monitored with optical and electronic microscopy. It is found that UV pulsed laser ablation at 266 nm manages to clean all the stains except the cutting-edge ink, although some degree of surface erosion is produced. The IR laser pulses at 1064 nm can remove surface deposits and black spray acceptably, but a yellowing is observed on the stone surface after treatment. An economic evaluation shows that pulsed laser cleaning techniques are advantageous for the rapid cleaning of small or inaccessible surface areas, although their extensive application becomes expensive due to the long operating times required.

  17. Cannabidiol reverses the mCPP-induced increase in marble-burying behavior.

    PubMed

    Nardo, Mirella; Casarotto, Plinio C; Gomes, Felipe V; Guimarães, Francisco S

    2014-10-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD), one of the main components of Cannabis sp., presents clinical and preclinical anxiolytic properties. Recent results using the marble-burying test (MBT) suggest that CBD can also induce anticompulsive-like effects. Meta-chloro-phenyl-piperazine (mCPP) is a nonspecific serotonergic agonist (acting mainly at 5HT1A, 5HT2C and 5HT1D receptors) reported to increase symptoms in OCD patients and block the anticompulsive-like effect of serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) in animal models. The aim of this study was to investigate the interference of CBD on mCPP effects in repetitive burying. Administration of mCPP showed dual effects in the MBT, increasing the number of buried marbles at lower (0.1 mg/kg) while decreasing it at higher doses (1 mg/kg), an effect not related to a general increase in anxiety-like behavior. As found previously, CBD (30 mg/kg) and the positive control fluoxetine (FLX; 10 mg/kg) decreased burying behavior without changing general exploratory activity. A similar effect was found when subeffective doses of CBD (15 mg/kg) and FLX (3 mg/kg) were administered together. These subeffective doses alone were also able to block mCPP-induced repetitive burying. The results, in addition to reinforcing a possible anticompulsive effect of CBD, also suggest that mCPP-induced repetitive burying could be a useful test for the screening of compounds with presumed anticompulsive properties.

  18. Status Review of the Marbled Murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus) in Alaska and British Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piatt, J.F.; Kuletz, K.J.; Burger, A.E.; Hatch, Shyla A.; Friesen, V.L.; Birt, T.P.; Arimitsu, M.L.; Drew, G.S.; Harding, A.M.A.; Bixler, K.S.

    2007-01-01

    The Marbled Murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus) is a small, diving seabird inhabiting inshore waters of the Northeastern Pacific Ocean. This species feeds on small, schooling fishes and zooplankton, and nests primarily on the moss-covered branches of large, old-growth conifers, and also, in some parts of its range, on the ground. We reviewed existing information on this species to evaluate its current status in the northern part of its range-Alaska (U.S.) and British Columbia (Canada). Within the southern part of its range (Washington, Oregon, and California, U.S.), the Marbled Murrelet was listed as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in 1993, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) needed information on the species throughout its range for ESA deliberations. We compiled published information on the conservation status, population biology, foraging ecology, population genetics, population status and trends, demography, marine and nesting habitat characteristics, threats, and ongoing conservation efforts for Marbled Murrelets in Alaska and British Columbia. We conducted a new genetic study using samples from a segment of the range that had not been included in previous studies (Washington, Oregon) and additional nuclear intron and microsatellite markers. We also analyzed available at-sea survey data from several locations for trend. To understand the reasonableness of the empirical trend data, we developed demographic models incorporating stochasticity to discern what population trends were possible by chance. The genetic studies substantially confirmed previous findings on population structure in the Marbled Murrelet. Our present work finds three populations: (1) one comprising birds in the central and western Aleutian Islands; (2) one comprising birds in central California; and (3) one comprising birds within the center of the range from the eastern Aleutians to northern California. Our knowledge of genetic structure within this

  19. Fracturing and Failure Behavior of Carrara Marble in Quasistatic and Dynamic Brazilian Disc Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Louis Ngai Yuen; Zou, Chunjiang; Cheng, Yi

    2014-07-01

    The tensile strength and fracturing behavior of Carrara marble subjected to the dynamic Brazilian disc test using the split Hopkinson pressure bar technique are determined and compared with those obtained by the conventional quasistatic Brazilian disc test. Detailed observation of the cracking processes is aided by high-speed video footage captured at a frame rate of 100,000 frames per second. The dynamic increase factor is computed, revealing a strong strain rate dependence of the Carrara marble when subjected to strain rates above 1 s-1. Similar to the quasistatic loading tests, conspicuous white zones/patches commonly appear prior to the initiation of visible cracks in the dynamic loading tests. Identification of the white patch initiation and evolution is aided by image comparison software. Comparing the cracking and failure processes under quasistatic and dynamic loading, some distinct differences in the white patch geometry and initiation load are observed. In addition, the extent of the compressive failure zones around the contact points between the loading platens and specimens is found to increase with the strain rate.

  20. Application of preliminary risk analysis at marble finishing plants in Recife's metropolitan area.

    PubMed

    de Melo Neto, Rútilo P; Kohlman Rabbani, Emilia R

    2012-01-01

    The finishing of marble occurs in quarries all over Brazil, being the most significant dimension of the ornamental stone sector, with 7,000 businesses. Recife's Metropolitan Area (RMR) contains approximately 106 marble quarries, 25 of them unionized. The study focused on the application of Preliminary Risk Analysis, conducted at two unionized quarries: M1, a small business; and the second, M2, considered a micro enterprise. In this analysis both the administrative and the productive sectors were evaluated. The fieldwork was done in the month of December 2010. The study revealed that the two quarries carried moderate risks in the administrative sector, mainly due to ergonomic factors, and that in the productive sectors the risks were high, specifically because of excess noise, dust material, and precarious electrical installations. Using the results of the qualitative analysis as a base, the need for quantitative study presents itself in order to determine the most adequate modes of protection to be of assistance in the management of these risks, guaranteeing the safety and health of the worker and consequently the improvement in productivity in this sector.

  1. Deterioration of marble. A retrospective analysis of tombstone measurements in the New York City area

    SciTech Connect

    Husar, R.B.; Patterson, D.E.; Baer, N.S.

    1985-03-01

    A data base of tombstone thickness and depth of emblem inscription at Veterans Administration cemeteries has been compiled by New York University. A subset of measurements for two cemeteries in the vicinity of New York City was selected for analysis in this study. For comparable meteorological conditions, different weathering rates of fine grain marble tombstones were observed for the two cemeteries. Tombstones in the Cypress Hills cemetery, which is located within an industrial area, were observed to have higher rates than similar stones in the semi-rural area of the Long Island cemetery. By using a retrospective air-quality model, which is described in another publication, to predict SO/sub 2/ concentrations in New York City from 1880 to 1980, concentration trends of SO/sub 2/ were estimated for both cemeteries. A linear relationship was found to exist between the weathering rates and estimated SO/sub 2/ concentrations. A value of 10 mm per century per ppm of SO/sub 2/ was derived as the best estimate for the weathering coefficient of fine grain marble for the New York City area.

  2. Thenature of marbled Terra Sigillata slips: a combined mu XRF and mu XRD investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Leon, Yoanna; Sciau, Philippe; Goudeau, Philippe; Tamura, Nobumichi; Webb, Sam; Mehta, Apurva

    2009-01-31

    In addition to the red terra sigillata production, the largest Gallic workshop (La Graufesenque) made a special type of terra sigillata, called 'marbled' by the archaeologists. Produced exclusively on this site, this pottery is characterized by a surface finish made of a mixture of yellow and red slips. Because the two slips are intimately mixed, it is difficult to obtain the precise composition of one of the two constituents without contamination by the other. In order to obtain very precise correlation at the appropriate scale between the color aspect and the element and mineralogical phase distributions in the slip, combined electron microprobe, x-ray micro spectroscopies and micro diffraction on cross sectional samples were performed. The aim is to discover how potters were able to produce this unique type of terra sigillata and especially this slip showing an intense yellow color. Results show that the yellow component of marbled sigillata was made from a titanium-rich clay preparation. The color is related to the formation of a pseudobrookite (TiFe2O5) phase in the yellow part of the slip, the main characteristics of that structure being considered nowadays as essential for the fabrication of stable yellow ceramic pigments. Its physical properties such as high refractive indices and a melting point higher than that of most silicates widely used as ceramic colorants are indeed determinant for this kind of applications. Finally, the red parts have a similar composition (elementary and mineralogical) to the one of standard red slip.

  3. Influence of humidity and water on subcritical crack growth in marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nara, Yoshitaka; Nishida, Yuki

    2014-05-01

    For the prevention of natural hazards related to the failure of rock, it is essential to investigate time-dependent deformation and fracturing in various rock materials. In addition, to ensure the long-term stability of a rock mass surrounding various structures, information of subcritical crack growth is essential. Subcritical crack growth is one of the main causes of time-dependent fracturing in rock. It is known that subcritical crack growth is influenced by not only stress but also surrounding environment. Studies of subcritical crack growth have been widely conducted for silicate rocks such as igneous rocks and sandstones. On the other hand, information of subcritical crack growth in carbonate rocks is not enough. Especially, influence of surrounding environment on subcritical crack growth in carbonate rock should be clarified to ensure the long-term integrity of a rock mass. However, influence of surrounding environmental conditions on subcritical crack growth in carbonate rock has not been clarified yet. In this study, we investigated subcritical crack growth in carbonate rocks. Specifically, we investigated the influence of relative humidity and water on subcritical crack growth in air at a constant temperature (50 °C). A marble obtained in Skopje-City in Macedonia was used as a rock sample, because this is a homogeneous, fine-grained and brittle carbonate rock. To measure subcritical crack growth, we used the load relaxation method of the double-torsion (DT) test. In order to investigate the influence of environmental condition, all measurements by DT test were conducted under controlled temperature and relative humidity. It was shown that the crack velocity in marble in air increased with increasing relative humidity at a constant temperature. Additionally, the crack velocity in water was much higher than that in air. It was also found that the crack velocity in air was higher than that predicted from a calculation theoretically at 100 % relative

  4. Graviquakes in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petricca, P.; Barba, S.; Carminati, E.; Doglioni, C.; Riguzzi, F.

    2015-08-01

    We discuss the mechanics of crustal normal fault-related earthquakes, and show that they represent dissipation of gravitational potential energy (graviquakes) and their magnitude increases with the involved volume (delimited by the seismogenic fault and an antithetic dilated wedge in its hangingwall), and the fault dip. The magnitude increases with the deepening of the brittle-ductile transition (BDT), which in turn enlarges the involved volume. The fault dip seems rather controlled by the static friction of the involved crustal layers. We apply the model to the extensional area of the Italian peninsula, whose geodynamics is controlled by the Alpine and Apennines subduction zones. The latter has a well-developed backarc basin and a large part of the accretionary prism is affected by on-going extensional tectonics, which is responsible for most of peninsular Italy seismicity. Analyzing the seismic record of the Apennines, the length of seismogenic normal faults tends to be at most about 3 times the hypocenter depth. We compile a map of the brittle-ductile transition depth and, assuming a fixed 45° or 60° fault dip and a dilated wedge developed during the interseismic period almost perpendicular to the fault plane, we compute the maximum volume of the hangingwall collapsing at the coseismic stage, and estimate the maximum expected magnitude. Lower magnitude values are obtained in areas with thinner brittle layer and higher heat flow. Moreover, lower magnitude relative to those theoretically expected may occur in areas of higher strain rate where faults may creep faster due to lower frictional values.

  5. 76 FR 26280 - Vermont Marble Power Division of Omya Inc.; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ...: Otter Creek Hydroelectric Project. f. Location: The existing project is located on Otter Creek in... accepted for filing and is now ready for environmental analysis. l. The Otter Creek Project consists of... license for the Otter Creek Hydroelectric Project from Vermont Marble Power to Central Vermont...

  6. Comics and the Structure of Childhood Feeling: Sublimation and the Play of Pretending in Gilbert Hernandez's "Marble Season"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewkowich, David

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, I study the narrative structure of comics as a means to describe the ways that indeterminate modes of representation can allow the reader to imagine that which in childhood can never be fully expressed. Analyzing a number of panels from Gilbert Hernandez's graphic novel, "Marble Season," I describe a conceptual link…

  7. Genome Sequence of Carbon Dioxide-Sequestering Serratia sp. Strain ISTD04 Isolated from Marble Mining Rocks.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manish; Gazara, Rajesh Kumar; Verma, Sandhya; Kumar, Madan; Verma, Praveen Kumar; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2016-10-20

    The Serratia sp. strain ISTD04 has been identified as a carbon dioxide (CO2)-sequestering bacterium isolated from marble mining rocks in the Umra area, Rajasthan, India. This strain grows chemolithotrophically on media that contain sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) as the sole carbon source. Here, we report the genome sequence of 5.07 Mb Serratia sp. ISTD04.

  8. Digital processing of SEM images for the assessment of evaluation indexes of cleaning interventions on Pentelic marble surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Moropoulou, A. Delegou, E.T.; Vlahakis, V.; Karaviti, E.

    2007-11-15

    In this work, digital processing of scanning-electron-microscopy images utilized to assess cleaning interventions applied on the Pentelic marble surfaces of the National Archaeological Museum and National Library in Athens, Greece. Beside mineralogical and chemical characterization that took place by scanning-electron-microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy, the image-analysis program EDGE was applied for estimating three evaluation indexes of the marble micro-structure. The EDGE program was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey for the evaluation of cleaning interventions applied on Philadelphia City Hall. This computer program analyzes scanning-electron-microscopy images of stone specimens cut in cross-section for measuring the fractal dimension of the exposed surfaces, the stone near-surface fracture density, the shape factor (a surface roughness factor) and the friability index which represents the physico-chemical and physico-mechanical stability of the stone surface. The results indicated that the evaluation of the marble surface micro-structure before and after cleaning is achieved by the suggested indexes, while the performance of cleaning interventions on the marble surfaces can be assessed.

  9. The effect of supplementing rumen undegradable unsaturated fatty acids on marbling in early-weaned steers.

    PubMed

    Mangrum, K S; Tuttle, G; Duckett, S K; Sell, G S; Krehbiel, C R; Long, N M

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if supplementation with a rumen undegradable unsaturated fatty acids (FA) source improved marbling deposition in early-weaned steers. All steers (Angus, = 23; Angus × Hereford, = 24) were weaned at 150 ± 5 d of age. Steers were blocked by BW and breed and then randomly assigned to either control (CON; average 1.5 kg of corn gluten feed [CGF], = 23) or isocaloric supplementation containing a rumen undegradable fat source (RUF; 200 g of Megalac-R added to an average of 1.06 kg of CGF, = 24) offered 5 d/wk for 110 d. All steers had ad libitum access to pastures throughout treatment and received supplements individually. Steer BW and blood samples were collected at 0, 55, and 110 d of supplementation, and real-time ultrasound measurements were collected at d 110. Following treatment, steers were transported to Oklahoma State University for finishing and subsequent harvesting at a commercial plant. All data were analyzed using the PROC MIXED procedure of SAS either as repeated measures or ANOVA depending on parameters. There were no significant changes in BW from the beginning of treatment to harvest due to treatment. Ultrasound data showed that RUF steers tended ( = 0.08) to have more i.m. fat than CON at d 110. Serum concentrations of FA showed a treatment × day interaction ( < 0.02) for 16:0, 18:0, 18:1-9, 18:2, 20:4, and total FA. These specific FA concentrations slightly increased in CON steers, but there was a more pronounced increase in the concentration of these FA across the supplementation period in RUF steers. Serum triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations were increased ( < 0.01) on d 55 and 110 in RUF steers compared with those in CON steers. Serum leptin concentration in RUF steers was greater ( < 0.01) than CON steers at d 110. After harvest, RUF carcasses had greater ( = 0.01) marbling scores than those of CON carcasses. All other carcass measures were similar between treatments. The percentage of total

  10. Diagnostic analysis of stone materials from underwater excavations: the case study of the Roman archaeological site of Baia (Naples, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloise, P.; Ricca, M.; La Russa, M. F.; Ruffolo, S. A.; Belfiore, C. M.; Padeletti, G.; Crisci, G. M.

    2014-03-01

    This work belongs to the framework of the national research project "COMAS" (Planned COnservation, " in situ", of underwater archaeological artifacts), funded by the Italian Ministry of Education, Universities and Research (MIUR), concerning the submarine archaeological area of Baia (Naples, Italy). The site includes remains of the ancient cities of Baiae and Portus Iulius, which, since the 4th century AD, started to be submerged because of the bradyseism phenomenon. The work aims to the characterization of four different types of stone materials collected from the site, specifically marbles, limestones, ignimbrites, and bricks, in order to investigate their state of conservation. In particular, specimens were sampled from some masonry structures and pavement slabs ( opus sectile) in a specific area of the submerged site, called " Villa a Protiro". In order to characterize archaeological samples from a mineralogical-petrographic point of view, polarized optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses were carried out, while to assess their conservation state, the surface colonization by biodeteriogen agents and their interaction with the substrate were studied through observations under a stereomicroscope, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Marble and limestone samples revealed an intense bioerosion phenomena, attributable to epilithic and endolithic forms, particularly boring sponges. On the contrary, ignimbrites suffer a lower degree of biological colonization related to the activity of other species, such as serpulids and bryozoans. In bricks, biocolonisation is correlated to the type of temper used in the artifact, the quartz pastes having a greater susceptibility to biological attack than the volcanic ones.

  11. Indoor damage of aged porous natural stone due to thermohygric stress: a case study of opuka stone altar from the St. Vitus Cathedral, Prague (Czech Republic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prikryl, Richard; Prikrylova, Jirina; Racek, Martin; Kreislova, Kateřina; Weishauptova, Zuzana

    2016-04-01

    Opuka stone (extremely fine-grained clayey-calcareous silicite) used for a carved stone altar located in the interior of the St. Vitus Cathedral (Prague, Czech Republic) was affected by decay phenomena (formation of the case-hardened surface, its later blistering, flaking and/or powdering of stone substrate) which are similar to those observed in outdoor environments. Through the detailed analytical study (optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectrometry and x-ray elemental mapping of cross-sections of surface layers, x-ray diffraction of surface layers, ion-exchange chromatography for water-soluble salts, mercury porosimetry) and analysis of long-term indoor environmental monitoring (temperature, relative humidity, sulphur and nitrogen oxides deposition), it has been found that observed decay phenomena, which are manifested on microscale by brittle damage and formation of mode I (tensile) cracks along the exposed surface of the stone, can be interpreted as a result from thermohygric stress occurring on the interface between case hardened surface layer and stone substrate.

  12. Long-term monitoring of fresco paintings in the cathedral of Valencia (Spain) through humidity and temperature sensors in various locations for preventive conservation.

    PubMed

    Zarzo, Manuel; Fernández-Navajas, Angel; García-Diego, Fernando-Juan

    2011-01-01

    We describe the performance of a microclimate monitoring system that was implemented for the preventive conservation of the Renaissance frescoes in the apse vault of the Cathedral of Valencia, that were restored in 2006. This system comprises 29 relative humidity (RH) and temperature sensors: 10 of them inserted into the plaster layer supporting the fresco paintings, 10 sensors in the walls close to the frescoes and nine sensors measuring the indoor microclimate at different points of the vault. Principal component analysis was applied to RH data recorded in 2007. The analysis was repeated with data collected in 2008 and 2010. The resulting loading plots revealed that the similarities and dissimilarities among sensors were approximately maintained along the three years. A physical interpretation was provided for the first and second principal components. Interestingly, sensors recording the highest RH values correspond to zones where humidity problems are causing formation of efflorescence. Recorded data of RH and temperature are discussed according to Italian Standard UNI 10829 (1999).

  13. Long-Term Monitoring of Fresco Paintings in the Cathedral of Valencia (Spain) Through Humidity and Temperature Sensors in Various Locations for Preventive Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Zarzo, Manuel; Fernández-Navajas, Angel; García-Diego, Fernando-Juan

    2011-01-01

    We describe the performance of a microclimate monitoring system that was implemented for the preventive conservation of the Renaissance frescoes in the apse vault of the Cathedral of Valencia, that were restored in 2006. This system comprises 29 relative humidity (RH) and temperature sensors: 10 of them inserted into the plaster layer supporting the fresco paintings, 10 sensors in the walls close to the frescoes and nine sensors measuring the indoor microclimate at different points of the vault. Principal component analysis was applied to RH data recorded in 2007. The analysis was repeated with data collected in 2008 and 2010. The resulting loading plots revealed that the similarities and dissimilarities among sensors were approximately maintained along the three years. A physical interpretation was provided for the first and second principal components. Interestingly, sensors recording the highest RH values correspond to zones where humidity problems are causing formation of efflorescence. Recorded data of RH and temperature are discussed according to Italian Standard UNI 10829 (1999). PMID:22164100

  14. Sound production in marbled rockfish (Sebastiscus marmoratus) and implications for fisheries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuguang; Guo, Hongyi; Zhang, Shouyu; Song, Jiakun

    2015-01-01

    Recently, several rockfish species (genus Sebastes) have been reported to be soniferous. To determine whether an additional rockfish species produces sounds, passive acoustic recordings were analyzed from captive marbled rockfish (Sebastiscus marmoratus) during the non-spawning season. Three distinct sounds were identified based on frequency features. The common characteristics among all sounds were low frequency (below 300 Hz) and rapidly dampened pulses consisting of 3-5 acoustic energy cycles. During free-swimming conditions in the canvas tank, the fish produced voluntary sounds with lower frequencies than the disturbance sounds produced by individuals during prodding. Two types of sounds were identified in the disturbance context: one type consists of single or double pulses with two peak frequencies, and another type consists of a series of pulses with a single peak frequency. These results suggest that specific-species and behavior-associated sounds are potentially useful in passive acoustical surveys to monitor rockfish populations and distributions remotely.

  15. Ciguatoxic Potential of Brown-Marbled Grouper in Relation to Fish Size and Geographical Origin

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Thomas Y. K.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the ciguatoxic potential of brown-marbled grouper (Epinephelus fuscoguttatus) in relation to fish size and geographical origin, this review systematically analyzed: 1) reports of large ciguatera outbreaks and outbreaks with description of the fish size; 2) Pacific ciguatoxin (P-CTX) profiles and levels and mouse bioassay results in fish samples from ciguatera incidents; 3) P-CTX profiles and levels and risk of toxicity in relation to fish size and origin; 4) regulatory measures restricting fish trade and fish size preference of the consumers. P-CTX levels in flesh and size dependency of toxicity indicate that the risk of ciguatera after eating E. fuscoguttatus varies with its geographical origin. For a large-sized grouper, it is necessary to establish legal size limits and control measures to protect public health and prevent overfishing. More risk assessment studies are required for E. fuscoguttatus to determine the size threshold above which the risk of ciguatera significantly increases. PMID:26324735

  16. Ciguatoxic Potential of Brown-Marbled Grouper in Relation to Fish Size and Geographical Origin.

    PubMed

    Chan, Thomas Y K

    2015-11-01

    To determine the ciguatoxic potential of brown-marbled grouper (Epinephelus fuscoguttatus) in relation to fish size and geographical origin, this review systematically analyzed: 1) reports of large ciguatera outbreaks and outbreaks with description of the fish size; 2) Pacific ciguatoxin (P-CTX) profiles and levels and mouse bioassay results in fish samples from ciguatera incidents; 3) P-CTX profiles and levels and risk of toxicity in relation to fish size and origin; 4) regulatory measures restricting fish trade and fish size preference of the consumers. P-CTX levels in flesh and size dependency of toxicity indicate that the risk of ciguatera after eating E. fuscoguttatus varies with its geographical origin. For a large-sized grouper, it is necessary to establish legal size limits and control measures to protect public health and prevent overfishing. More risk assessment studies are required for E. fuscoguttatus to determine the size threshold above which the risk of ciguatera significantly increases.

  17. Preliminary study on analysis and removal of wax from a Carrara marble statue.

    PubMed

    Barreca, Salvatore; Bruno, Maurizio; Oddo, Lorena; Orecchio, Santino

    2015-11-27

    This preliminary study has mainly focused on the wax identification by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and removal. Wax is used for many purposes in the field of art as protective coatings on wooden, stone or metal objects. From the comparison of the spectra H NMR and in particular with the correspondence of the resonance peaks of the samples taken from the statue and beeswax and paraffin, we can conclude that the wax applied on the statue surface is beeswax. From our data, it can be concluded that, to remove the beeswax, from any stone support, the more effective solvent is the mixture of cyclohexane/ethyl acetate. The removal percentages ranged from 19 to 99%. Lower percentages of removal have been observed in the case of yellow marble, probably because of its high porosity. We can affirm that, this solvent mixture can be employed in real art objects using cotton swabs to remove protective wax.

  18. PSI decides to write off most of its $2. 7B Marble Hill investment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-03-01

    After the Indiana Supreme Court ruled last November that the utility may not recover its investment from the cancelled plant, Public Service Indiana (PSI) decided to write off a substantial portion of the $2.7 million already invested in the cancelled Marble Hill nuclear plant. The board will omit common stock dividends for three years and the preferred stock dividend for the first quarter. It will also accept a negotiated rate settlement of 8.2% increase. A 5% emergency surcharge will become permanent. The settlement calls for the utility to restrict capital expenditures over the next three years to the $285.1 million already budgeted for construction. Opposition from a consumers group argues that ratepayers should not be the risk bearers for PSI, but the utility argues that its long-term financial health depends on attracting and keeping investors.

  19. Size and Geometry Effects on the Mechanical Properties of Carrara Marble Under Dynamic Loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Chunjiang; Wong, Louis Ngai Yuen

    2016-05-01

    The effects of specimen size and geometry on the dynamic mechanical properties of Carrara marble including compressive strength, failure strain and elastic modulus are investigated in this research. Four different groups of specimens of different sizes and cross-sectional geometries are loaded under a wide range of strain rates by the split Hopkinson pressure bar setup. The experimental results indicate that all these mechanical properties are significantly influenced by the specimen size and geometry to different extent, hence highlighting the importance of taking into account of the specimen size and geometry in dynamic tests on rock materials. In addition, the transmission coefficient and the determination of strain rate under dynamic tests are discussed in detail.

  20. The weathering of natural and artificial stones in the baroque church of S. Pietro in Valle (Fano-Italy).

    PubMed

    Maione, Michela; Mangani, Filippo; Amadori, Maria Letizia; Campagna, Michele

    2003-04-01

    The church of San Pietro in Valle in Fano is with good reason considered one of the outstanding examples of baroque art in Central Italy. Currently the church is in a serious degradation status. For this reason, and in order to devise a correct conservative restoration project, a scientific study has been carried out, aimed at characterizing mortars used for the application of marble decorations and the different degradation products occurring in the church (i.e. pulverizations, encrustations, salt efflorescences, and condensation water). In the following, results obtained analyzing the different sample typologies by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, electron scanning microscopy with energy-dispersion micro-analytical system, ion chromatography, and head-space solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry will be reported.

  1. Mechanisms of population differentiation in marbled murrelets: historical versus contemporary processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Congdon, B.C.; Piatt, J.F.; Martin, K.; Friesen, V.L.

    2000-01-01

    Mechanisms of population differentiation in highly vagile species such as seabirds are poorly understood. Previous studies of marbled murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus; Charadriiformes: Alcidae) found significant population genetic structure, but could not determine whether this structure is due to historical vicariance (e.g., due to Pleistocene glaciers), isolation by distance, drift or selection in peripheral populations, or nesting habitat selection. To discriminate among these possibilities, we analyzed sequence variation in nine nuclear introns from 120 marbled murrelets sampled from British Columbia to the western Aleutian Islands. Mismatch distributions indicated that murrelets underwent at least one population expansion during the Pleistocene and probably are not in genetic equilibrium. Maximum-likelihood analysis of allele frequencies suggested that murrelets from 'mainland' sites (from the Alaskan Peninsula east) are genetically different from those in the Aleutians and that these two lineages diverged prior to the last glaciation. Analyses of molecular variance, as well as estimates of gene flow derived using coalescent theory, indicate that population genetic structure is best explained by peripheral isolation of murrelets in the Aleutian Islands, rather than by selection associated with different nesting habitats. No isolation-by-distance effects could be detected. Our results are consistent with a rapid expansion of murrelets from a single refugium during the early-mid Pleistocene, subsequent isolation and divergence in two or more refugia during the final Pleistocene glacial advance, and secondary contact following retreat of the ice sheets. Population genetic structure now appears to be maintained by distance effects combined with small populations and a highly fragmented habitat in the Aleutian Islands.

  2. Effects of Thermal Damage and Confining Pressure on the Mechanical Properties of Coarse Marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Mengdi; Rong, Guan; Zhou, Chuangbing; Peng, Jun

    2016-06-01

    Heating treatment generally causes thermal damage inside rocks, and the influence of thermal damage on mechanical properties of rocks is an important topic in rock mechanics. The coarse marble specimens drilled out from a rock block were first heated to a specific temperature level of 200, 400 and 600 °C except the control group left at 20 °C. A series of triaxial compression tests subjected to the confining pressure of 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 MPa were conducted. Coupling effects of thermal damage and confining pressure on the mechanical properties of marbles including post-peak behaviors and failure modes, strength and deformation parameters, characteristic stresses in the progressive failure process had been investigated. Meanwhile, accompanied tests of physical properties were carried out to study the effect of thermal damage on microstructure, porosity and P-wave velocity. Finally, the degradation parameter was defined and a strength-degradation model to describe the peak strength was proposed. Physical investigations show that porosity increases slowly and P-wave velocity reduces dramatically, which could be re-demonstrated by the microscopy results. As for the post-peak behaviors and the failure modes, there is a brittle to ductile transition trend with increasing confining pressure and thermal effect reinforces the ductility to some degree. The comparative study on strength and deformation parameters concludes that heating causes damage and confining pressure inhibits the damage to develop. Furthermore, crack damage stress and crack initiation stress increase, while the ratios of crack damage stress to peak strength and crack initiation stress to peak strength show a decreasing trend with the increase of confining pressure; the magnitude of crack damage stress or crack initiation stress shows a tendency of decrease with the increasing heating temperature and the tendency vanishes subjected to high confinement.

  3. The Radio Phenomenon in Italy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faenza, Roberto

    One in a series of studies of experiments in new audiovisual techniques in Europe and the situations in some member countries, this paper traces the development of radio in Italy. Opposing views about radio broadcasting (public monopoly vs. freedom of broadcasting) are examined, and the various political and legal aspects of communications in…

  4. Laboratory study of SO2 dry deposition on limestone and marble: Effects of humidity and surface variables

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spiker, E. C.; Hosker, R.P.; Weintraub, V.C.; Sherwood, S.I.

    1995-01-01

    The dry deposition of gaseous air pollutants on stone and other materials is influenced by atmospheric processes and the chemical characteristics of the deposited gas species and of the specific receptor material. Previous studies have shown that relative humidity, surface moisture, and acid buffering capability of the receptor surface are very important factors. To better quantify this behavior, a special recirculating wind tunnel/environmental chamber was constructed, in which wind speed, turbulence, air temperature, relative humidity, and concentrations of several pollutants (SO2, O3, nitrogen oxides) can be held constant. An airfoil sample holder holds up to eight stone samples (3.8 cm in diameter and 1 cm thick) in nearly identical exposure conditions. SO2 deposition on limestone was found to increase exponentially with increasing relative humidity (RH). Marble behaves similarly, but with a much lower deposition rate. Trends indicate there is little deposition below 20% RH on clean limestone and below 60% RH on clean marble. This large difference is due to the limestone's greater porosity, surface roughness, and effective surface area. These results indicate surface variables generally limit SO2 deposition below about 70% RH on limestone and below at least 95% RH on marble. Aerodynamic variables generally limit deposition at higher relative humidity or when the surface is wet.The dry deposition of gaseous air pollutants on stone and other materials is influenced by atmospheric processes and the chemical characteristics of the deposited gas species and of the specific receptor material. Previous studies have shown that relative humidity, surface moisture, and acid buffering capability of the receptor surface are very important factors. To better quantify this behavior, a special recirculating wind tunnel/environmental chamber was constructed, in which wind speed, turbulence, air temperature, relative humidity, and concentrations of several pollutants (SO2, O3

  5. Prediction of fat percentage within marbling score on beef longissimus muscle using 3 different fat determination methods.

    PubMed

    Dow, D L; Wiegand, B R; Ellersieck, M R; Lorenzen, C L

    2011-04-01

    Consumers are concerned with fat consumption from meat products, and the ability to determine fat has changed with recent technological advances. The objective of this study was to predict fat percentage within marbling scores and compare 3 fat analysis procedures. Steaks (n = 119) were selected by USDA grading system using an E + V Vision Grading camera at a commercial beef plant during 1 d. Two samples per carcass were cut from the 13th rib, both sides, and transported to the University of Missouri meat laboratory. The sample from the right side of the carcass was allotted to Warner-Bratzler shear force, and the sample from the left side, which was graded by the camera, was allotted to fat extraction. Warner-Bratzler shear force samples were cut into 2.54-cm steaks and aged for 14 d. Steaks allotted to fat extraction were trimmed of all external fat and twice ground using 8- and 4-mm grinding plates. The finely ground beef was then split into its allotted fat-extraction methods. The 3 methods used in fat extraction were 2:1 chloroform/methanol (Folch), ether-extractable fat (ether), and microwave drying and nuclear magnetic resonance (CEM). Warner-Bratzler shear force values were not different between marbling scores (P > 0.05). Regardless of fat extraction method, fat percentage increased as marbling score increased (P < 0.05). All regression equations for fat percentage, regardless of extraction method, were linear. Prediction equation for fat percentage using CEM was -3.46 + 0.016 (marbling score), R(2) of 0.824 (P < 0.0001). Prediction equation for fat percentage using ether was -3.08 + 0.017 (marbling score), R(2) of 0.859 (P < 0.0001). Prediction equation for fat percentage using Folch was -3.42 + 0.019 (marbling score), R(2) of 0.816 (P < 0.0001). When the CEM, Folch, and ether methods were compared, CEM and Folch regression lines had different slopes (P < 0.05). The slope of the regression line for ether was not different (P > 0.05) from CEM or Folch

  6. An analysis of the black crusts from the Seville Cathedral: a challenge to deepen the understanding of the relationships among microstructure, microchemical features and pollution sources.

    PubMed

    Ruffolo, Silvestro A; Comite, Valeria; La Russa, Mauro F; Belfiore, Cristina M; Barca, Donatella; Bonazza, Alessandra; Crisci, Gino M; Pezzino, Antonino; Sabbioni, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The Cathedral of Seville is one of the most important buildings in the whole of southern Spain. It suffers, like most of the historical buildings located in urban environments, from several degradation phenomena related to the high pollution level. Undoubtedly, the formation of black crusts plays a crucial role in the decay of the stone materials belonging to the church. Their formation occurs mainly on carbonate building materials, whose interaction with a sulfur oxide-enriched atmosphere leads to the transformation of calcium carbonate (calcite) into calcium sulfate dihydrate (gypsum) which, together with embedded carbonaceous particles, forms the black crusts on the stone surface. To better understand the composition and the formation dynamics of this degradation product and to identify the pollutant sources and evaluate their impact on the stone material, an analytical study was carried out on the black crust samples collected from different areas of the building. For a complete characterization of the black crusts, several techniques were used, including laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, micro infrared spectroscopy, optical and scanning electron microscopy. This battery of tests provided information about the nature and distribution of the mineralogical phases and the elements within the crusts and the crust-substrate interface, contributing to the identification of the major pollution sources responsible for the deterioration of the monument over time. In addition, the results revealed a relation among the height of sampling, the surface exposure and the concentration of heavy metals. Finally, information has been provided about the origin of the concentration gradients of some metals.

  7. Toward a holistic environmental impact assessment of marble quarrying and processing: proposal of a novel easy-to-use IPAT-based method.

    PubMed

    Capitano, Cinzia; Peri, Giorgia; Rizzo, Gianfranco; Ferrante, Patrizia

    2017-03-01

    Marble is a natural dimension stone that is widely used in building due to its resistance and esthetic qualities. Unfortunately, some concerns have arisen regarding its production process because quarrying and processing activities demand significant amounts of energy and greatly affect the environment. Further, performing an environmental analysis of a production process such as that of marble requires the consideration of many environmental aspects (e.g., noise, vibrations, dust and waste production, energy consumption). Unfortunately, the current impact accounting tools do not seem to be capable of considering all of the major aspects of the (marble) production process that may affect the environment and thus cannot provide a comprehensive and concise assessment of all environmental aspects associated with the marble production process. Therefore, innovative, easy, and reliable methods for evaluating its environmental impact are necessary, and they must be accessible for the non-technician. The present study intends to provide a contribution in this sense by proposing a reliable and easy-to-use evaluation method to assess the significance of the environmental impacts associated with the marble production process. In addition, an application of the method to an actual marble-producing company is presented to demonstrate its practicability. Because of its relative ease of use, the method presented here can also be used as a "self-assessment" tool for pursuing a virtuous environmental policy because it enables company owners to easily identify the segments of their production chain that most require environmental enhancement.

  8. Occurrence, distribution and prey items of juvenile marbled sole Pseudopleuronectes yokohamae around a submarine groundwater seepage on a tidal flat in southwestern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, Masaki; Sugimoto, Ryo; Hori, Masakazu; Tomiyama, Takeshi; Shoji, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Occurrence, distribution and prey items of juvenile marbled sole Pseudopleuronectes yokohamae were investigated around a submarine groundwater seepage on a tidal flat in southwestern Japan. Spatial distribution of radon-222 (222Rn) concentration in water showed more submarine groundwater seepage in the offshore area. The lower salinities at offshore sampling stations corresponded with the highest 222Rn concentrations. Juvenile marbled sole were collected from March through June with seasonal peak in April in 2013 and 2014. Mean abundance of juvenile marbled sole was highest at the second most offshore station where high submarine groundwater seepage was indicated. Major prey items in the stomachs of the marbled sole at the post-settlement stage (10-40 mm) were small crustaceans such as cumaceans and gammarids, which were partially replaced with polychaetes in larger juveniles (40-50 mm). Abundance of these major prey items was also higher at offshore stations. A negative correlation between gammarid abundance and salinity indicated a higher concentration of gammarids around the area of high submarine groundwater seepage, a pattern not observed for the other major prey organisms. Stable isotope analysis showed greater dependence of post-settlement stage marbled sole on the small crustaceans with low δ13C indicating that nutrients of terrestrial origin contribute to production of the juvenile marbled sole on the tidal flat.

  9. Preparation of low-surface-energy poly[2-(perfluorooctyl)ethyl acrylate] microparticles and its application to liquid marble formation.

    PubMed

    Matsukuma, Daisuke; Watanabe, Hirohmi; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Takahara, Atsushi

    2011-02-15

    We demonstrate the successful preparation of stable liquid marbles from various liquids. This is accomplished by using low-surface-energy poly[2-(perfluorooctyl)ethyl acrylate] (PFA-C(8)) as microparticles. The PFA-C(8) microparticles were prepared by the spontaneous self-organized microparticulation of PFA-C(8). The physical properties remained intact in the polymer morphology as confirmed by wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements. The extremely low surface energy of PFA-C(8) provides a high solid-liquid spreading coefficient (S(S/L)) value for various combinations of liquids. As a result, liquid marbles were obtained from various liquids, unlike the case with other fluorine polymer particles such as poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) and poly(vinilydene fluoride) (PVDF). These results suggest that the technique is widely applicable for preparing novel functional materials.

  10. Ruschita Romanian marble - 130 years of official exploitation and 130 m depth of architectural beauty around the word

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetean, Valentina

    2013-04-01

    Developed in a large metamorphic area, the marble deposit from Ruschita perimeter is the most important Romanian source for ornamental stone, the old quarry being operative since 1883. The closest locality offer the commercial name also, identical with the geological one as is defined in the technical referentials and in the denomination European standard. Ruschita is also an active quarry, developed by step-by-step expansion in depth (the initial extraction reached 130 m depth), but also in the adjacent areas. The important height of the open deposit offered the possibility to the owner, MARMOSIM SA, to apply an experimental extraction method, by underground mining. It is the only Romanian place, and few in the world, where this spectacular mining element can be found for dimension stone. The extraction gallery was built starting from the lower level of the old quarry and allowed obtaining nicer and bigger blocks. The Ruschita marble is a metamorphic stone with high crystallinity and medium size of crystals (until 0.2-0.5 mm). Has the basic colour from white and grey to pink, with many intermediary nuances generally given by grey veins and less by impurities from internal structure. The stone present irregular break, sometimes following the very narrow internal discontinuities, invisible at macroscopic analyse. The main physical - mechanical characteristics are presented below: Characteristic M.U. Value Apparent density Kg/m3 2680 - 2720 Water absorption % 0.12 - 0.21 Capillarity g/m2.s0,5 0.130-0.218 Porosity % 0.30 - 0.74 Compression strength N/mm2 85 - 120 Flexural strength MPa 15-18 Rupture energy J 5 Coefficient of frost cleftness % 10 -14 Abrasion resistance - Bohme cm3/50cm2 17-18 Salt crystallization % 0.1 Nowadays, the extraction in the Ruschita area is achieved by equipments from Dazzini, Fantini, Pellegrini, Korfamann, Caterpillar, Volvo and Komatsu. The average volume of blocks is bigger than 10-12 m2. The Ruschita marble can be easily cut at size and

  11. Sliding behavior of calcite and dolomite marbles at seismic deformation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnuolo, E.; Smith, S. A.; Niemeijer, A. R.; di Toro, G.; Nielsen, S.

    2010-12-01

    Our understanding of earthquake physics is hampered by the poor knowledge of the evolution of the friction coefficient in rocks (µ or the ratio of shear stress over normal stress) at deformation conditions typical of the seismic source (normal stress > 40 MPa, slip rates > 1 m/s, abrupt accelerations, etc.). Insights can be gained by experiments using a novel rotary shear deformation apparatus, SHIVA (Slow to HIgh Velocity Apparatus) which, by exploiting the large available power (300 kW), is capable of extending the performance of previous experimental apparatus to more realistic (i.e., approaching natural) conditions. Here we present results from experiments performed on samples of Carrara (98% calcite) and dolomite (98% dolomite) marbles. The two rocks were selected because many earthquakes worldwide nucleate within and rupture through carbonates sequences (e.g., L’Aquila 2009 Mw 6.3). Tests were conducted on hollow cylinders (50/30 mm ext/int diameter) at velocities of 0.001-6.5 m/s and normal stresses up to 40 MPa. Each experiment consists of three steps: (1) loading of the sample to the target normal stress; (2) acceleration to the imposed slip rate; (3) deceleration until the target slip or duration is reached. The two marbles show a similar evolution of friction: µ rapidly increases to reach an initial peak value (~ 0.6) followed by a dramatic reduction towards an extremely low steady-state value (< 0.1), comparable to previous experiments performed at lower normal stresses (< 13 MPa). For both rock-types experiments with multiple slip pulses separated by short periods of no sliding (i.e. slide-hold-slide tests) show that the initial peak friction upon re-sliding increases significantly with hold time, while the steady state friction remains roughly the same. Steady-state friction of calcite is slightly lower than that of dolomite. The dramatic reduction in friction occurs over a slip weakening distance in the range 0.4-2.5 m for calcite and 0.1-0.4 m

  12. Influence of Glen Canyon Dam on Fine-Sediment Storage in the Colorado River in Marble Canyon, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazel, J. E.; Topping, D. J.; Schmidt, J. C.; Kaplinski, M.

    2005-12-01

    Glen Canyon Dam has caused a fundamental change in the distribution of fine-sediment storage in the 99-km reach of the Colorado River in Marble Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. The two major storage sites for fine sediment (i.e., sand and finer material) in this canyon river are lateral recirculation eddies and the main-channel bed. We use a combination of methods, including direct measurement of sediment storage change, measurements of sediment flux, and comparison of the grain size of sediment found in different storage sites relative to the supply and that in transport, in order to evaluate the change in both volume and location of sediment storage. The analysis shows that the bed of the main channel was an important storage environment for fine sediment in the pre-dam era. In years of large seasonal accumulation, ~50% of the fine sediment supplied to the reach from upstream sources was stored on the main-channel bed. In contrast, sediment budgets constructed for two short-duration, experimental releases from Glen Canyon Dam indicate that ~90% of the sediment discharge from the reach during each release was derived from eddy storage, rather than from sandy deposits on the main-channel bed. These results indicate that the majority of the fine sediment in Marble Canyon is now stored in eddies, even though they occupy a small percentage (~17%) of the total river area. Because of a 95% reduction in the supply of fine sediment to Marble Canyon, future high releases not timed with substantial tributary inputs will potentially erode sediment from long-term eddy storage, resulting in continued degradation in Marble Canyon.

  13. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 4): Mathis Brothers Landfill (South Marble Top Road), Walker County, GA, March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    This decision document (Record of Decision) presents the selected remedial action for the Mathis Brothers - South Marble Top Road Landfill site, Walker County, Georgia. At this time the remedial action is proposed as both the first, and the final remedial action for the site. The function of this remedy is to treat contamination and reduce it to health based levels. Source material and contaminated soils are the principal threat at the site.

  14. Republic of Italy (country profile).

    PubMed

    Hakkert, R

    1986-02-01

    This discussion of Italy focuses on the following: cities and regions; population growth; households and families; housing and construction; ethnicity and religion; education; economy and labor force; consumption; and transport and communications. Italy, with its total area of 116,374 square miles, is about the size of Florida and Georgia combined. Its 56.6 million people form the 2nd largest population in Western Europe, after West Germany, but slightly larger than Great Britain and France. The main administrative divisions are 20 regions, subdivided into 95 provinces. The provinces in turn are divided into 8090 "comuni" or municipalities. The 6 cities with more than 500,000 people are Roma, Milano, Napoli, Torino, Genova, and Palermo. They account for 14% of the population. The 43 cities with between 100,000-500,000 account for another 13%. There are 373 middle-sized communities with between 20,000 and 100,000 people, accounting for 26% of population. Italy has a regional problem. The line separating the regions of Emilia Romagna, Toscana, Umbria, and Lazio from the regions to the south and east is important. The regions north of it hold 62% of the population but are responsible for 73% of the gross national product (GNP) and 78% of the industrial product. The regions to the south are economically much weaker. At the time of the last Italian census on October 25, 1981, the country counted 56.6 million inhabitants. Compared to 33.5 million at the turn of the century, this implies an average annual growth rate of .61%. Between 1900-70, nearly 20 million Italians left their country. Most settled in the US, Argentina, and Brazil. Beginning in the 1960s, a new sort of migration was added as young Italians temporarily left to work in the more prosperous countries of northern Europe. The birthrate, which had declined slowly to 18/1000 during the 1960s, fell more rapidly during the 1970s, to 10.9/1000 in 1981 and 10.3 in 1984. The death rate in Italy has changed little

  15. Renaissance Neurosurgery: Italy's Iconic Contributions.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Anil; Khan, Imad Saeed; Apuzzo, Michael L

    2016-03-01

    Various changes in the sociopolitical milieu of Italy led to the increasing tolerance of the study of cadavers in the late Middle Ages. The efforts of Mondino de Liuzzi (1276-1326) and Guido da Vigevano (1280-1349) led to an explosion of cadaver-centric studies in centers such as Bologna, Florence, and Padua during the Renaissance period. Legendary scientists from this era, including Leonardo Da Vinci, Andreas Vesalius, Bartolomeo Eustachio, and Costanzo Varolio, furthered the study of neuroanatomy. The various texts produced during this period not only helped increase the understanding of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology but also led to the formalization of medical education. With increased understanding came new techniques to address various neurosurgical problems from skull fractures to severed peripheral nerves. The present study aims to review the major developments in Italy during the vibrant Renaissance period that led to major progress in the field of neurosurgery.

  16. Changes on aggregation in mine waste amended with biochar and marble mud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ángeles Muñoz, María; Guzmán, Jose; Zornoza, Raúl; Moreno-Barriga, Fabián; Faz, Ángel; Lal, Rattan

    2016-04-01

    Mining activities have produced large amounts of wastes over centuries accumulated in tailing ponds in Southeast Spain. Applications of biochar may have a high potential for reclamation of degraded soils. Distribution, size and stability of aggregates are important indices of soil physical quality. However, research data on aggregation processes at amended mining tailings with biochar are scanty. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the effects of seven different treatments involving biochar and marble mud (MM) on the aggregation in mine waste (MW). Seven different treatments were tested after 90 days of incubation in the laboratory. These treatments were the mix of MW and: biochar from solid pig manure (PM), biochar from cotton crop residues (CR), biochar from municipal solid waste (MSW), marble mud (MM), PM+MM, CR+MM, MSW+MM and control without amendment. High sand percentages were identified in the MW. The biochars made from wastes (PM, CR, MSW) were obtained through pyrolysis of feedstocks. The water stability of soil aggregates was studied. The data on total aggregation were corrected for the primary particles considering the sandy texture of the MW. Moreover, partial aggregation was determined for each fraction and the mean weight diameter (MWD) of aggregates was computed. Soil bulk density and total porosity were also determined. No significant differences were observed in total aggregation and MWD among treatments including the control. For the size range of >4.75 mm, there were significant differences in aggregates > 4.75 mm between CR+MM in comparison with that for CT. There were also significant differences between MSW and PM+MM for the 1-0.425 mm fraction, and between CT and MM and CR for 0.425-0.162 mm aggregate size fractions. Therefore, CR-derived biochar applied with MM enhanced stability of macro-aggregates. Furthermore, soil bulk density was also the lowest bulk density and total porosity the highest for the CR-derived biochar

  17. Acoustic and Electrical Signal Emission recordings when marble specimens are subjected to compressional mechanical stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triantis, Dimos; Stavrakas, Ilias; Hloupis, George; Ninos, Konstantinos; Vallianatos, Filippos

    2013-04-01

    The detection of Acoustic Emissions (AE) and Electrical Signals (ES) has been proved as a valuable experimental method to characterize the mechanical status of marble specimens when subjected to mechanical stress. In this work, marble specimens with dimensions 10cm x 4cm x 4cm where subjected to sequential loading cycles. The maximum stress of each loading was near the vicinity of fracture and was maintained for a relatively long time (th=200s). Concurrently to the mechanical tests, AE and ES were recorded. Specifically, two AE sensors and five ES sensors were installed on the surface of the specimens and the detected emissions were stored on a PC. The recordings show that AE and ES provide information regarding the damage spreading and location in the bulk of the specimen. Specifically, when the mechanical stress was maintained constant at the high stress value during each loading cycle the cumulative number of the AE hits become gradually less reaching a minimum after the first three loading cycles, indicating the existence of the Kaiser effect. During the eighth loading cycle the AE hits show a significant increase that became maximum at the ninth cycle before where failure occured. A similar behavior was observed for the cumulative energy. A b-value analysis was conducted following both Aki's and Gutenberg-Richter relations on the amplitudes of the AE hits. The b-values were found to increase during the three first loading cycles while consequently they were practically constant until reaching the two final loading cycles where they became gradually lower. The ES significantly increases during the stress increase of each cycle and gradually restores at a background level when the applied stress is maintained constant near the vicinity of fracture. It was observed that the background restoration level becomes gradually higher during the first four loading cycles. Consequently, during the next three loading cycles the background level is maintained practically

  18. A kinetic study of the replacement of calcite marble by fluorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trindade Pedrosa, Elisabete; Boeck, Lena; Putnis, Christine V.; Putnis, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Replacement reactions are relevant in any situation that involves the reequilibration between a solid and an aqueous fluid phase and are commonly controlled by an interface-coupled dissolution-precipitation mechanism (Putnis and Putnis, 2007). These reactions control many large-scale Earth processes whenever aqueous fluids are available, such as during metamorphism, metasomatism, and weathering. An important consequence of coupled dissolution-precipitation is the generation of porosity in the product phase that then allows the infiltration of the fluid within the mineral being replaced. Understanding the mechanism and kinetics of the replacement of carbonates by fluorite has application in earth sciences and engineering. Fluorite (CaF2) occurs in all kinds of rocks (igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic) and its origin is commonly associated with hydrothermal fluids. Moreover, calcium carbonate has been suggested as a successful seed material for the sequestration of fluoride from contaminated waters (Waghmare and Arfin, 2015). The aim of the present work is to investigate aspects of the replacement of calcium carbonate by fluorite to better understand the mechanism and kinetics of this reaction. Small cubes (˜ 3 × 3 × 3 mm) of Carrara marble (CaCO3 > 99 %) were cut and reacted with a 4 M ammonium fluoride (NH4F) solution for different times (1 to 48 hours) and temperatures (60, 80, 100, and 140 ° C). The microstructure of the product phases was analysed using SEM. The kinetics of replacement was monitored from the Rietveld analysis of X-ray powder diffraction patterns of the products as a function of temperature and reaction time. After reaction, all samples preserved their size and external morphology (a pseudomorphic replacement) and the product phase (fluorite) was highly porous. The activation energy Ea (kJ/mol) of the replacement reaction was empirically determined by both model-fitting and model-free methods. The isoconversional method yielded an

  19. Strain localization in ultramylonitic calcite marbles by dislocation creep-accommodated grain boundary sliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogowitz, Anna; Grasemann, Bernhard; Clancy White, Joseph

    2015-04-01

    Strain localization in monomineralic rocks is often associated with brittle precursors, resulting in stress and strain concentration, followed by grain size reduction and activation of grain-size-sensitive deformation mechanisms such as diffusion creep, grain boundary sliding and cataclastic flow. The aforementioned mechanisms typically tend to produce a random crystallographic orientation or a decrease in intensity of a pre-existing texture. However, reports of fine grained polycrystalline materials showing a preferred crystallographic orientation indicate a need for subsequent grain re-organization by either static annealing or the activation of additional deformation mechanisms in conjunction with grain boundary sliding. We present observations from an almost pure calcite marble layer from Syros Island (Cyclades, Greece) deformed in lower greenschist facies conditions. The presence of a crack (i.e. cross-cutting element) that rotated during shear resulted in the formation of a flanking structure. At the location of maximum displacement (120 cm) along the cross-cutting element, the marble is extremely fine grained (3 µm) leading to anticipation of deformation by grain-size-sensitive mechanisms. Detailed microstructural analysis of the highly strained (80 < gamma < 1000) calcite ultramylonite by optical microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction and scanning transmission electron microscopy show that recrystallization by bulging results in small, strain-free grains. The change in grain size appears to be concomitant with increased activity of independent grain boundary sliding as indicated by a random misorientation angle distribution. At the same time, dislocation multiplication through Frank-Read sources produces high mean dislocation density (~ 5x10^13 m^-2) as well as a weak primary CPO; the latter all argue that grain boundary sliding was accommodated by dislocation activity. Theoretical and experimental determined relationships (paleowattmeter

  20. Mixing the mantle marble-cake: timescale constraints from Os isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parman, S.; Pearson, G.; Nowell, G.; van Hunen, J.

    2007-12-01

    In their seminal paper, Allegre and Turcotte (1986) presented a model in which the upper mantle is a mixture of depleted, harzburgitic mantle and subducted basalt that has been mechanically mixed together, the mantle marble-cake. Since their publication, most studies of mantle heterogeneity have focused on the enriched components, which are equated with subducted basalt and/or sediments, and successfully explain OIB Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic systematics. In this talk, we will focus on a different part of the marble-cake, depleted (harzburgitic) heterogeneities. Though abundant in abyssal peridotites and ophiolites, these have been difficult to study geochemically because they have very low concentrations of typical trace elements and radiogenic isotopes, and are overprinted by any mixing with enriched mantle or melts. However, Os is compatible during mantle melting, is enriched in depleted mantle and thus is robust with respect to mixing with enriched components or metasomatism. Somewhat surprisingly, Os isotope studies of the convecting mantle show clear evidence for depleted heterogeities up to 2 billion years old, but the relative paucity of data (less than 100 analyses), makes it difficult to extract meaningful mixing information. Rapid analysis of osmiridium grains by laser-ablation inductively coupled multi-collector plasma mass spectrometry now allows large Os datasets to be acquired (100s of datapoints), which are suitable for statistical analyses (Meibom, 2002). Here we present new and published laser-ablation analyses of osmiridiums from a global collection. The data generally show an exponential decrease in heterogeneities with age, such that over 90% of heterogeneities are destroyed within 2 billion years, though rare heterogeneities as old as 2.7 Ga survive. The exponential decrease in survivorship is generally consistent with the mechanical mixing model of Allegre & Turcotte (1986). Subsequent 2-dimensional mixing models suggest that high-viscosity blobs can

  1. Salinity and temperature tolerance of brown-marbled grouper Epinephelus fuscoguttatus.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Sha-Yen; Chen, Chih-Sung; Chen, Jiann-Chu

    2013-04-01

    Grouper have to face varied environmental stressors as a result of drastic changes to water conditions during the storm season. We aimed to test the response of brown-marbled grouper to drastic and gradual changes in temperature and salinity to understand the grouper's basic stress response. The results can improve the culture of grouper. Brown-marbled grouper, Epinephelus fuscoguttatus (6.2 ± 0.8 g) were examined for temperature and salinity tolerances at nine different environmental regimes (10, 20, and 33 ‰ combined with 20, 26 and 32 °C), in which the fish were subjected to both gradual and sudden changes in temperature and salinity. The critical thermal maximum (50 % CTMAX) and the upper incipient lethal temperature (UILT) were in the ranges of 35.9-38.3 and 32.7-36.5 °C, respectively. The critical thermal minimum (50 % CTMIN) and the lower incipient lethal temperature (LILT) were in the ranges of 9.8-12.2 and 14.9-22.3 °C, respectively. The critical salinity maximum (50 % CSMAX) and the upper incipient lethal salinity (UILS) were in the ranges of 67.0-75.5 and 54.2-64.8 ‰, respectively. Fish at temperature of 20 °C and a salinity of 33 ‰ tolerated temperatures as low as 10 °C when the temperature was gradually decreased. Fish acclimated at salinities of 10-33 ‰ and a temperature of 32 °C tolerated salinities of as high as 75-79 ‰. All fish survived from accumulating salinity after acute transfer to 20, 10, 5, and 3 ‰. But all fish died while transferred to 0 ‰. Relationships among the UILT, LILT, 50 % CTMAX, 50 % CTMIN, UILS, 50 % CSMAX, salinity, and temperature were examined. The grouper's temperature and salinity tolerance elevated by increasing acclimation temperature and salinity. On the contrary, the grouper's temperature and salinity tolerance degraded by decreasing acclimation temperature and salinity. The tolerance of temperature and salinity on grouper in gradual changes were higher than in drastic changes.

  2. Italy INAF Analysis Center Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negusini, M.; Sarti, P.

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activity of the Italian INAF VLBI Analysis Center. Our Analysis Center is located in Bologna, Italy and belongs to the Institute of Radioastronomy, which is part of the National Institute of Astrophysics. IRA runs the observatories of Medicina and Noto, where two 32-m VLBI AZ-EL telescopes are situated. This report contains the AC's VLBI data analysis activities and shortly outlines the investigations into the co-locations of space geodetic instruments.

  3. Southern Italy, Instrument Pointing Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    This view of the 'heel' of the 'boot' of Southern Italy (40.5N, 18.0E) shows the rich an varied detail of the Salentina peninsula. This southern promontory, projecting into the Mediterranean Sea, is known for its year round mild climate and agricultural produce. The typical European cluster city and town plan wherein the farming population lives in communities and commutes to the fields can be observed throughout the peninsula.

  4. New approach to the differentiation of marble samples using thermal analysis and chemometrics in order to identify provenance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The possibility of applying a novel chemometric approach which could allow the differentiation of marble samples, all from different quarries located in the Mediterranean basin and frequently used in ancient times for artistic purposes, was investigated. By suggesting tentative or allowing to rule out unlikely attributions, this kind of differentiation could, indeed, be of valuable support to restorers and other professionals in the field of cultural heritage. Experimental data were obtained only using thermal analytical techniques: Thermogravimetry (TG), Derivative Thermogravimetry (DTG) and Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA). Results The extraction of kinetic parameters from the curves obtained using these thermal analytical techniques allowed Activation Energy values to be evaluated together with the logarithm of the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor of the main TG-DTG process. The main data thus obtained after subsequent chemometric evaluation (using Principal Components Analysis) have already proved useful in the identification the original quarry of a small number of archaeological marble finds. Conclusion One of the most evident advantages of the thermoanalytical – chemometric approach adopted seems to be that it allows the certain identification of an unknown find composed of a marble known to be present among the reference samples considered, that is, contained in the reference file. On the other hand with equal certainty it prevents the occurrence of erroneous or highly uncertain identification if the find being tested does not belong to the reference file considered. PMID:24982691

  5. The Kolmården serpentine marble in Sweden, a building stone found at many levels in the society.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wikström, Anders; Pereira, Dolores

    2013-04-01

    The Kolmården marble is a green serpentine marble of Svekofennian age (c. 1900 Ma). Serpentine is mainly secondary after diopside. The rock has been used as far back as in the 13th century. But it was mainly due to the start of the building of the Royal castles in Stockholm in the 17th century when the stone became more extensively used. The quarries were in operation until the 1970s and during the last years the production was so rationalized that one finds the stone in stairs, pavement and non structural ornaments within "common" houses all over the country. One can also find this stone in many exclusive places all over the world (e.g. the Paris Opera house, League of Nations building in Geneva, Leeds University Library, Uppsala University, Rockefeller Center, etc). The importance of this stone in international architecture, the good physical and mechanical behaviour observed in its emplacements and the possibilities for preservation of some of the quarries makes the Kolmården marble a good candidate as Global Stone Heritage Stone. The nomination will also trigger international publications on this natural stone to spread its knowledge among scientists and architects to be able to select this rock in case that some restoration on the mentioned important buildings is needed at some point.

  6. Seismic risk perception in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crescimbene, Massimo; La Longa, Federica; Camassi, Romano; Pino, Nicola Alessandro; Peruzza, Laura

    2014-05-01

    Risk perception is a fundamental element in the definition and the adoption of preventive counter-measures. In order to develop effective information and risk communication strategies, the perception of risks and the influencing factors should be known. This paper presents results of a survey on seismic risk perception in Italy conducted from January 2013 to present . The research design combines a psychometric and a cultural theoretic approach. More than 7,000 on-line tests have been compiled. The data collected show that in Italy seismic risk perception is strongly underestimated; 86 on 100 Italian citizens, living in the most dangerous zone (namely Zone 1), do not have a correct perception of seismic hazard. From these observations we deem that extremely urgent measures are required in Italy to reach an effective way to communicate seismic risk. Finally, the research presents a comparison between groups on seismic risk perception: a group involved in campaigns of information and education on seismic risk and a control group.

  7. Controlled silanization of silica nanoparticles to stabilize foams, climbing films, and liquid marbles.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Paul D I; Holt, Ben L

    2011-11-01

    We describe a method for the synthesis of multigram amounts of silica nanoparticles which are controllably hydrophobized to different extents using a room temperature vapor phase silanization process. The extent of hydrophobization of the particles can be adjusted by changing the amount of dichlorodimethylsilane reagent used in the reaction. The method produces particles with good uniformity of surface coating; the silane coating varies from monolayer coverage at low extents of hydrophobization to approximately trilayer at high extents of hydrophobization. Acid-base titration using conductivity detection was used to characterize the extent of hydrophobization which is expressed as the percent of surface silanol groups remaining after silanization. Particles with %SiOH ranging from 100% (most hydrophilic) to 20% (most hydrophobic) were hand shaken with water/methanol mixtures and produced either a particle dispersion, foam, climbing films, or liquid marbles. The type of colloidal structure produced is discussed in terms of the liquid-air-particle contact angle and the energy of adsorption of the particles to the liquid-air surface.

  8. Toward a virtual reconstruction of an antique three-dimensional marble puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benamar, Fatima Zahra; Fauvet, Eric; Hostein, Antony; Laligant, Olivier; Truchetet, Frederic

    2017-01-01

    The reconstruction of broken objects is an important field of research for many applications, such as art restoration, surgery, forensics, and solving puzzles. In archaeology, the reconstruction of broken artifacts is a very time-consuming task due to the handling of fractured objects, which are generally fragile. However, it can now be supported by three-dimensional (3-D) data acquisition devices and computer processing. Those techniques are very useful in this domain because they allow the remote handling of very accurate models of fragile parts, they permit the extensive testing of reconstruction solutions, and they provide access to the parts for the entire research community. An interesting problem has recently been proposed by archaeologists in the form of a huge puzzle composed of a thousand fragments of Pentelic marble of different sizes found in Autun (France), and all attempts to reconstruct the puzzle during the last two centuries have failed. Archaeologists are sure that some fragments are missing and that some of the ones we have come from different slabs. We propose an inexpensive transportable system for 3-D acquisition setup and a 3-D reconstruction method that is applied to this Roman inscription but is also relevant to other applications.

  9. Underwater microwave ignition of hydrophobic thermite powder enabled by the bubble-marble effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meir, Yehuda; Jerby, Eli

    2015-08-01

    Highly energetic thermite reactions could be useful for a variety of combustion and material-processing applications, but their usability is yet limited by their hard ignition conditions. Furthermore, in virtue of their zero-oxygen balance, exothermic thermite reactions may also occur underwater. However, this feature is also hard to utilize because of the hydrophobic properties of the thermite powder, and its tendency to agglomerate on the water surface rather than to sink into the water. The recently discovered bubble-marble (BM) effect enables the insertion and confinement of a thermite-powder batch into water by a magnetic field. Here, we present a phenomenon of underwater ignition of a thermite-BM by localized microwaves. The thermite combustion underwater is observed in-situ, and its microwave absorption and optical spectral emission are detected. The vapour pressure generated by the thermite reaction is measured and compared to theory. The combustion products are examined ex-situ by X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy which verifies the thermite reaction. Potential applications of this underwater combustion effect are considered, e.g., for detonation, wet welding, thermal drilling, material processing, thrust generation, and composite-material production, also for other oxygen-free environments.

  10. Underwater microwave ignition of hydrophobic thermite powder enabled by the bubble-marble effect

    SciTech Connect

    Meir, Yehuda; Jerby, Eli

    2015-08-03

    Highly energetic thermite reactions could be useful for a variety of combustion and material-processing applications, but their usability is yet limited by their hard ignition conditions. Furthermore, in virtue of their zero-oxygen balance, exothermic thermite reactions may also occur underwater. However, this feature is also hard to utilize because of the hydrophobic properties of the thermite powder, and its tendency to agglomerate on the water surface rather than to sink into the water. The recently discovered bubble-marble (BM) effect enables the insertion and confinement of a thermite-powder batch into water by a magnetic field. Here, we present a phenomenon of underwater ignition of a thermite-BM by localized microwaves. The thermite combustion underwater is observed in-situ, and its microwave absorption and optical spectral emission are detected. The vapour pressure generated by the thermite reaction is measured and compared to theory. The combustion products are examined ex-situ by X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy which verifies the thermite reaction. Potential applications of this underwater combustion effect are considered, e.g., for detonation, wet welding, thermal drilling, material processing, thrust generation, and composite-material production, also for other oxygen-free environments.

  11. Embryonic development of the histaminergic system in the ventral nerve cord of the Marbled Crayfish (Marmorkrebs).

    PubMed

    Rieger, V; Harzsch, S

    2008-04-01

    The embryonic development of neurotransmitter systems in crustaceans so far is poorly understood. Therefore, in the current study we monitored the ontogeny of histamine-immunoreactive neurons in the ventral nerve cord of the Marbled Crayfish, an emerging crustacean model system for developmental studies. The first histaminergic neurons arise around 60% of embryonic development, well after the primordial axonal scaffold of the ventral nerve cord has been established. This suggests that histaminergic neurons do not serve as pioneer neurons but that their axons follow well established axonal tracts. The developmental sequence of the different types of histaminergic neurons is charted in this study. The analysis of the histaminergic structures is also extended into adult specimens, showing a persistence of embryonic histaminergic neurons into adulthood. Our data are compared to the pattern of histaminergic neurons in other crustaceans and discussed with regard to our knowledge on other aspects of neurogenesis in Crustacea. Furthermore, the possible role of histaminergic neurons as characters in evolutionary considerations is evaluated.

  12. The effect of recurrent floods on genetic composition of marble trout populations.

    PubMed

    Pujolar, José Martin; Vincenzi, Simone; Zane, Lorenzo; Jesensek, Dusan; De Leo, Giulio A; Crivelli, Alain J

    2011-01-01

    A changing global climate can threaten the diversity of species and ecosystems. We explore the consequences of catastrophic disturbances in determining the evolutionary and demographic histories of secluded marble trout populations in Slovenian streams subjected to weather extremes, in particular recurrent flash floods and debris flows causing massive mortalities. Using microsatellite data, a pattern of extreme genetic differentiation was found among populations (global F(ST) of 0.716), which exceeds the highest values reported in freshwater fish. All locations showed low levels of genetic diversity as evidenced by low heterozygosities and a mean of only 2 alleles per locus, with few or no rare alleles. Many loci showed a discontinuous allele distribution, with missing alleles across the allele size range, suggestive of a population contraction. Accordingly, bottleneck episodes were inferred for all samples with a reduction in population size of 3-4 orders of magnitude. The reduced level of genetic diversity observed in all populations implies a strong impact of genetic drift, and suggests that along with limited gene flow, genetic differentiation might have been exacerbated by recurrent mortalities likely caused by flash flood and debris flows. Due to its low evolutionary potential the species might fail to cope with an intensification and altered frequency of flash flood events predicted to occur with climate change.

  13. Temporal variability in abundance of Marbled Murrelets at sea in southeast Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Speckman, Suzann G.; Springer, Alan M.; Piatt, John F.; Thomas, Dana

    2000-01-01

    We examined effects of season, time of day, tide stage, tidal oscillation, and sea surface temperature on Marbled Murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus) abundance and distribution at sea. We also evaluated whether constraining surveys to specific time periods or tide stages would reduce temporal variability in counts. Murrelets were surveyed daily from small boats and from shore in Auke Bay and Fritz Cove, Alaska, from May through August in 1992 and 1993. Murrelet numbers were high before egg-laying, declined by more than half during egg-laying and incubation and were highly variable during chick-rearing and fledging. Murrelet numbers were highest in early and late morning and declined throughout the day, sometimes increasing slightly in the evening. Peak murrelet numbers occurred on high or falling morning tides, especially in shallow areas where Pacific sand lance (Ammodytes hexapterus) were abundant. Differences between years in murrelet abundance and breeding phenology probably resulted from interannual differences in the pattern of seasonal warming and subsequent effects on production at lower trophic levels. We recommend that surveys for trends in abundance in Southeast Alaska be conducted in early morning, in June, at high or falling tides. Power analyses indicated that surveys conducted in this manner would minimize the number of years required to detect a significant change in abundance.

  14. Anisotropy of diamagnetic susceptibility in Thassos marble: A comparison between measured and modeled data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wall, Helga; Bestmann, Michel; Ullemeyer, Klaus

    2000-11-01

    A study of shear zones within the calcite marble complex of the island of Thassos (Greece) shows that the low field anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS)-technique can be successfully applied to diamagnetic rocks for characterizing rock fabrics. The strain path involves both an early pure shear stage and a simple shear overprint that is documented by a transition from triaxial (neutral) to uniaxial (prolate) shapes of AMS ellipsoids. The maximum susceptibility is oriented perpendicular to the rock foliation, reflecting the preferred orientation of calcite c-axes in the protolith as well as in the mylonites. For three samples that represent different types of calcite fabrics, the AMS was recalculated from neutron and electron backscatter diffraction textural data. A comparison of the measured and modeled data shows a good coincidence for the orientation of the principal AMS axes and for the recalculated anisotropy data. Both measured and modeled data sets reflect the change from neutral to distinct prolate ellipsoids during progressive deformation.

  15. Temporally adaptive sampling: a case study in rare species survey design with marbled salamanders (Ambystoma opacum).

    PubMed

    Charney, Noah D; Kubel, Jacob E; Eiseman, Charles S

    2015-01-01

    Improving detection rates for elusive species with clumped distributions is often accomplished through adaptive sampling designs. This approach can be extended to include species with temporally variable detection probabilities. By concentrating survey effort in years when the focal species are most abundant or visible, overall detection rates can be improved. This requires either long-term monitoring at a few locations where the species are known to occur or models capable of predicting population trends using climatic and demographic data. For marbled salamanders (Ambystoma opacum) in Massachusetts, we demonstrate that annual variation in detection probability of larvae is regionally correlated. In our data, the difference in survey success between years was far more important than the difference among the three survey methods we employed: diurnal surveys, nocturnal surveys, and dipnet surveys. Based on these data, we simulate future surveys to locate unknown populations under a temporally adaptive sampling framework. In the simulations, when pond dynamics are correlated over the focal region, the temporally adaptive design improved mean survey success by as much as 26% over a non-adaptive sampling design. Employing a temporally adaptive strategy costs very little, is simple, and has the potential to substantially improve the efficient use of scarce conservation funds.

  16. 2002 Blue Marble and Developments in HDTV Technology for Public Outreach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, Fritz; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Fritz Hasler (NASA/Goddard) will demonstrate the latest Blue Marble Digital Earth technology. We will fly in from space through Terra, Landsat 7, to 1 m Ikonos "Spy Satellite" data of Disney World and the Orlando Convention Center. You will see the complete global cloud free and cloudy 500 m datasets from the EOS Terra satellite. Spectacular new animations from Terra, Landsat 7, and SeaWiFS will be presented. See also animations of the hurricanes & tropical storms of the 2001 season, as well as Floyd, Georges, and Mitch, etc. from GOES & TRMM supported by MM5 3-D nested numerical model results. See movies assembled using new low cost HDTV nonlinear editing equipment that is revolutionizing the way we communicate scientific results. See climate change in action with Global Land & Ocean productivity changes over the last 20 years. Remote sensing observations of ocean SST, height, winds, color, and El Nino from GOES, AVHRR, SSMI & SeaWiFS are put in context with atmospheric and ocean simulations. Compare symmetrical equatorial eddies observed by GOES with the simulations.

  17. The Effect of Recurrent Floods on Genetic Composition of Marble Trout Populations

    PubMed Central

    Pujolar, José Martin; Vincenzi, Simone; Zane, Lorenzo; Jesensek, Dusan; De Leo, Giulio A.; Crivelli, Alain J.

    2011-01-01

    A changing global climate can threaten the diversity of species and ecosystems. We explore the consequences of catastrophic disturbances in determining the evolutionary and demographic histories of secluded marble trout populations in Slovenian streams subjected to weather extremes, in particular recurrent flash floods and debris flows causing massive mortalities. Using microsatellite data, a pattern of extreme genetic differentiation was found among populations (global FST of 0.716), which exceeds the highest values reported in freshwater fish. All locations showed low levels of genetic diversity as evidenced by low heterozygosities and a mean of only 2 alleles per locus, with few or no rare alleles. Many loci showed a discontinuous allele distribution, with missing alleles across the allele size range, suggestive of a population contraction. Accordingly, bottleneck episodes were inferred for all samples with a reduction in population size of 3–4 orders of magnitude. The reduced level of genetic diversity observed in all populations implies a strong impact of genetic drift, and suggests that along with limited gene flow, genetic differentiation might have been exacerbated by recurrent mortalities likely caused by flash flood and debris flows. Due to its low evolutionary potential the species might fail to cope with an intensification and altered frequency of flash flood events predicted to occur with climate change. PMID:21931617

  18. Micro-scale observations of semi-brittle failure in Carrara marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tal, Y.; Evans, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    We studied the generation and extension of micro cracks during semi-brittle failure of rectangular prisms (12 mm x 6 mm x 6 mm) of Carrara marble under uniaxial compression (i.e., with no confining pressure) at temperatures ranging from 25 to 184 °C and compared these observations to existing damage models. Using a long distance microscope, we generated a series of sequential images of micro-scale grid made of square markers with sides about 7.5 mm long and spacing of 12.6 mm. The grid covered a region of 1 mm x 0.8 mm near the center of one free surface. By measuring the relative displacements of the grid markers, we generated 2 - D finite strain distribution maps at each stage of the experiment. Deformation was concentrated along cracks. To study and quantify their evolution additional filtering stage was applied. At 105 °C and 184 °C, the number and length of micro cracks increased with increasing load, and near the peak stress, they intersected and coalesced. By measuring the number and vertical dimension of the cracks intersecting the surface, we calculated a damage parameter as defined by Ashby and Sammis [1990]. In the two experiments mentioned above, the damage sustained by the samples near the peak stress was much larger than that calculated from the model. In a third experiment at room temperature, failure was very abrupt and no micro cracks were observed within the region analyzed.

  19. Temporally Adaptive Sampling: A Case Study in Rare Species Survey Design with Marbled Salamanders (Ambystoma opacum)

    PubMed Central

    Charney, Noah D.; Kubel, Jacob E.; Eiseman, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    Improving detection rates for elusive species with clumped distributions is often accomplished through adaptive sampling designs. This approach can be extended to include species with temporally variable detection probabilities. By concentrating survey effort in years when the focal species are most abundant or visible, overall detection rates can be improved. This requires either long-term monitoring at a few locations where the species are known to occur or models capable of predicting population trends using climatic and demographic data. For marbled salamanders (Ambystoma opacum) in Massachusetts, we demonstrate that annual variation in detection probability of larvae is regionally correlated. In our data, the difference in survey success between years was far more important than the difference among the three survey methods we employed: diurnal surveys, nocturnal surveys, and dipnet surveys. Based on these data, we simulate future surveys to locate unknown populations under a temporally adaptive sampling framework. In the simulations, when pond dynamics are correlated over the focal region, the temporally adaptive design improved mean survey success by as much as 26% over a non-adaptive sampling design. Employing a temporally adaptive strategy costs very little, is simple, and has the potential to substantially improve the efficient use of scarce conservation funds. PMID:25799224

  20. Origin and growth of weathering crusts on ancient marbles in industrial atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moropoulou, A.; Bisbikou, K.; Torfs, K.; Van Grieken, R.; Zezza, F.; Macri, F.

    The origin and growth of weathering crusts on the ancient marbles of ruins of the Sanctuary of Demeter in the industrial atmosphere of Eleusis in Greece have been investigated. A systematic mineralogical, petrographical and chemical examination of weathered stones and crusts was performed, both in situ and in the lab, on samples taken from different parts of the monument in relation to the surface characteristics as well as to the exposure to rain, sea-salt spray and wet and dry deposition of airborne pollutants and dust. In particular, the various material-environment interactions take place, are characterized by (a) disintegrated "washed-out" surfaces, where products are taken away through dissolution, (b) rusty yellow patinas rich in Fe and Cu, (c) firmly attached black crusts in contact with percolating water, where recrystallized calcite shields amorphous deposits rich in S, Si, Fe and carbonaceous particles, (d) black loose deposits in the water sheltered areas, consisting mainly of gypsum and fly ash particles and (e) cementitious crusts, coating and pitting the horizontal surfaces. Moreover, an interconnected evolution of various physicochemical processes is shown, characteristic of the origin and growth of various crusts, which are formed and classified accordingly.

  1. Simulation of a Spherical Wave Experiment in Marble using a Multidirectional Damage Model

    SciTech Connect

    Antoun, T H; Lomov, I N

    2003-07-18

    This paper presents experimental results and computational simulations of spherical wave propagation in Danby marble. The experiment consisted of a 2-cm-diameter explosive charge detonated in the center of a cylindrical rock sample. Radial particle velocity histories were recorded at several concentric locations in the sample. An extensively damaged region near the charge cavity and two networks of cracks were evident in the specimen after the test. The first network consists of radial cracks emanating form the cavity and extending about halfway through the specimen. The second network consists of circumferential cracks occurring in a relatively narrow band that extends from the outer boundary of the radially cracked region toward the free surface. The experiment was simulated using the GEODYN code and a multi-directional damage model. The model is developed within the framework of a properly invariant nonlinear thermomechanical theory with damage represented by a second order tensor that admits load-induced anisotropy such as was observed in the experiment.

  2. Direct observations of damage during unconfined brittle failure of Carrara marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tal, Yuval; Evans, Brian; Mok, Ulrich

    2016-03-01

    To observe and quantify the production of microfracturing from initial yield to failure, we deformed Carrara marble samples in uniaxial compression at 20, 105, and 180°C and continuously observed a region of about 1 mm2 on an exposed face with a long-working distance microscope. Using image processing and microscale strain-mapping techniques, we measured local strains over a length scale of tens of micrometers. By treating the images with various filters, we identified linear damage features, as well as the magnitude of localized strain and the mode of deformation, i.e., shear versus normal deformation. In general, shear deformation is more prevalent after initial yielding, while tensile deformation dominates closer to peak stress. Independent measurements of both stress and microcrack density at different stages of each experiment provide a unique opportunity to explicitly compare the data with damage models. The model of Ashby and Sammis (1990) significantly underestimated the damage that the rock could sustain before peak stress, perhaps owing to the influence of weak grain boundaries on the damage production. In these samples, microcracks tended to form near boundaries before yield stress. During strain hardening, the damage parameters increased rapidly as longer microcracks grew along the boundaries and finally transected grains as loading neared peak stress. The microcrack density can be empirically related to the reduction of Young's modulus; stiffness ratios decay exponentially with increasing microcrack density for T ≤ 105°C.

  3. Origin of gem corundum in calcite marble: The Revelstoke occurrence in the Canadian Cordillera of British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzikowski, Tashia J.; Cempírek, Jan; Groat, Lee A.; Dipple, Gregory M.; Giuliani, Gaston

    2014-06-01

    The calcite marble-hosted gem corundum (ruby, sapphire) occurrence near Revelstoke, British Columbia, Canada, occurs in the Monashee Complex of the Omineca Belt of the Canadian Cordillera. Corundum occurs in thin, folded and stretched layers with green muscovite + Ba-bearing K-feldspar + anorthite (An0.85-1) ± phlogopite ± Na-poor scapolite. Other silicate layers within the marble are composed of: (1) diopside + tremolite ± quartz and (2) garnet (Alm0.7-0.5Grs0.2-0.4) + Na-rich scapolite + diopside + tremolite + Na,K-amphiboles. Non-silicate layers in the marble are either magnetite- or graphite-bearing. Predominantly pink (locally red or purple) opaque to transparent corundum crystals have elevated Cr2O3 (≤ 0.21 wt.%) and variable amounts of TiO2; rare blue rims on the corundum crystals contain higher amounts of TiO2 (≤ 0.53 wt.%) and Fe2O3 (≤ 0.07 wt.%). The associated micas have elevated Cr, V, Ti, and Ba contents. Petrography of the silicate layers show that corundum formed from muscovite at the peak of metamorphism (~ 650-700 °C at 8.5-9 kbar). Because the marble is almost pure calcite (dolomite is very rare), the corundum was preserved because it did not react with dolomite to spinel + calcite during decompression. The scapolite-bearing assemblages formed during or after decompression of the rock at ~ 650 °C and 4-6 kbar. Gem-quality corundum crystals formed especially on borders of the mica-feldspar layers in an assemblage with calcite. Whole rock geochemistry data show that the corundum-bearing silicate (mica-feldspar) layers formed by mechanical mixing of carbonate with the host gneiss protolith; the bulk composition of the silicate layers was modified by Si and Fe depletion during prograde metamorphism. High element mobility is supported by the homogenization of δ18O and δ13C values in carbonates and silicates for the marble and silicate layers. The silicate layers and the gneiss contain elevated contents of Cr and V due to the volcanoclastic

  4. Biogenic nitrogen and carbon in Fe-Mn-oxyhydroxides from an Archean chert, Marble Bar, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinti, Daniele L.; Hashizume, Ko; Orberger, Beate; Gallien, Jean-Paul; Cloquet, Christophe; Massault, Marc

    2007-02-01

    To quantify and localize nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) in Archean rocks from the Marble Bar formation, Western Australia, and to gain insights on their origin and potential biogenicity, we conducted nuclear reaction analyses (NRA) and carbon and nitrogen isotope ratio measurements on various samples from the 3460-Myr-old Fe-rich Marble Bar chert. The Marble Bar chert formed during the alteration of basaltic volcanoclastic rocks with Fe- and Si-rich hydrothermal fluids, and the subsequent precipitation of magnetite, carbonates, massive silica, and, locally, sulfides. At a later stage, the magnetite, sulfides, and carbonates were replaced by Fe-Mn-oxyhydroxides. Nuclear reaction analyses indicate that most of the N and C resides within these Fe-Mn-oxyhydroxides, but a minor fraction is found in K-feldspars and Ba-mica dispersed in the silica matrix. The N and C isotopic composition of Fe-oxides suggests the presence of a unique biogenic source with δ 15NAIR values from +6.0 +/- 0.5‰ to 7.3 +/- 1.1‰ and a δ 13CPDB value of -19.9 +/- 0.1‰. The C and N isotope ratios are similar to those observed in Proterozoic and Phanerozoic organic matter. Diffusion-controlled fractionation of N and C released during high combustion temperatures indicates that these two elements are firmly embedded within the iron oxides, with activation energies of 18.7 +/- 3.7 kJ/mol for N and 13.0 +/- 3.8 kJ/mol for C. We propose that N and C were chemisorbed on iron and were subsequently embedded in the crystals during iron oxidation and crystal growth. The Fe-isotopic composition of the Marble Bar chert (δ 56Fe = -0.38 +/- 0.02‰) is similar to that measured in iron oxides formed by direct precipitation of iron from hydrothermal plumes in contact with oxygenated waters. To explain the N and C isotopic composition of Marble Bar chert, we propose either (1) a later addition of N and C at the end of Archean when oxygen started to rise or (2) an earlier development of localized oxygenated

  5. a Geometrical Similarity Pattern as AN Experimental Model for Shapes in Architectural Heritage: a Case Study of the Base of the Pillars in the Cathedral of Seville and the Church of Santiago in Jerez, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyano, J. J.; Barrera, J. A.; Nieto, J. E.; Marín, D.; Antón, D.

    2017-02-01

    This paper proposes a procedure for the search of a geometrical similarity pattern in architectural heritage by means of calculating probability indexes to support hypotheses initially endorsed by documentary sources. The buildings analysed are the Cathedral of Seville and the Church of Santiago, in Jerez, Spain. The 3D models of their selected pillars are obtained by means of Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS), Optical Scanning (OS) and photogrammetry through image-based modelling software (SFM-IBM). To this end, a procedure for the comparison of shapes is established. It is based on similarity statistics, the determination of homologous points and the agreement of characteristic sections. Here, two key aspects are considered: on the one hand, the metric standpoint; on the other hand, historical-graphical features of the 3D models: composition, techniques, styles, and historical-graphical documentary sources. Thus, putting aside the mere dimensional analysis, the sections are compared with graphical patterns and models of which the same authorship - stonemasons working in that age - is accurately known. As a result, the outcomes of this research reveal the geometrical similarity between the elements of the pillars of the Cathedral of Seville and the Church of Santiago.

  6. Marble-burying is enhanced in 3xTg-AD mice, can be reversed by risperidone and it is modulable by handling.

    PubMed

    Torres-Lista, Virginia; López-Pousa, Secundino; Giménez-Llort, Lydia

    2015-07-01

    Translational research on behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) is relevant to the study the neuropsychiatric symptoms that strongly affect the quality of life of the human Alzheimer's disease (AD) patient and caregivers, frequently leading to early institutionalization. Among the ethological behavioural tests for rodents, marble burying is considered to model the spectrum of anxiety, psychotic and obsessive-compulsive like symptoms. The present work was aimed to study the behavioural interactions of 12 month-old male 3xTg-AD mice with small objects using the marble-burying test, as compared to the response elicited in age-matched non-transgenic (NTg) mice. The distinction of the classical 'number of buried marbles' but also those left 'intact' and those 'changed' of position of marbles or partially buried (the transitional level of interaction) provided new insights into the modelling of BPSD-like alterations in this AD model. The analysis revealed genotype differences in the behavioural patterns and predominant behaviors. In the NTg mice, predominance was shown in the 'changed or partially buried', while interactions with marble were enhanced in 3xTg-AD mice resulting in an increase of marble burying. Besides, genotype-dependent meaningful correlations were found, with the marble test pattern of 3xTg-AD mice being directly related to neophobia in the corner tests. In both genotypes, the increase of burying was reversed by chronic treatment with risperidone (1mg/kg, s.c.). In 3xTg-AD mice, the repetitive handling of animals during the treatment also exerted modulatory effects. These distinct patterns further characterize the modelling of BPSD-like symptoms in the 3xTg-AD mice, and provide another behavioural tool to assess the benefits of preventive and/or therapeutic strategies, as well as the potential action of risk factors for AD, in this animal model.

  7. Italy: An Open Air Museum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzorusso, Ann

    2016-04-01

    Imagine if you could see the River Styx, bathe in the Fountain of Youth, collect water which enhances fertility, wear a gem that heals bodily ailments, understand how our health is affected by geomagnetic fields, venture close to the flames of Hell on Earth and much, much, more. Know something? These things exist - on Earth - today - in Italy and you can visit them because Italy is an open air museum. Ann C. Pizzorusso, in her recent book, reveals how Italy's geology has affected its art, literature, architecture, religion, medicine and just about everything else. She explores the geologic birth of the land, describing the formation of the Alps and Apennines, romantic bays of Tuscany and Lazio, volcanoes of the south and Caribbean-like beaches of Puglia. But that's not all, from the first pages of this visually stunning book, the reader has the impression of being in an art museum, where one can wander from page to page to satisfy one's curiosity-- guided from time to time by the Etruscan priests, Virgil, Dante, Goethe or Leonardo da Vinci himself. Pizzorusso stitches together widely diverse topics - such as gemology, folk remedies, grottoes, painting, literature, physics and religion - using geology as a thread. Quoting everyone from Pliny the Elder to NASA physicist Friedemann Freund, the work is solidly backed scholarship that reads as easily as a summer novel. Wonderfully illustrated with many photos licensed from Italian museums, HRH Elizabeth II and the Ministero Beni Culturali the book highlights the best works in Italian museums and those outside in the "open air museums." This approach can be used in any other country in the world and can be used for cultural tourism (a tour following the book has been organized for cultural and university groups), an ideal way of linking museums to the surrounding landscape.

  8. Integration in Italy: A Dynamic Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berrigan, Carol

    The result of trips by American special educators to Italy in 1984 and 1986, this paper reviews laws, public policy, and events in Italy's recent history leading to widespread desegregation of the disabled special schools and other institutions. The review of legislation focuses on National Law 517 (1977) with such specified strategies for pupil…

  9. Dramatic Decomposition Weakening of Simulated Faults in Carrara Marble at Seismic Slip-rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, R.; Shimamoto, T.; Hirose, T.; Ree, J.

    2005-12-01

    Evolution of fault-zone strength and its weakening mechanisms during an earthquake are critical for understanding of earthquake rupture process. We report dramatic weakening of dry simulated faults in Carrara marble at seismic slip-rates, with frictional coefficient as low as 0.04 (probably the lowest record as rock friction). Calcite decomposition was confirmed by in-situ CO2 detection and other methods and the weakening may require new weakening mechanisms other than currently suggested ones such as frictional melting, thermal pressurization and silica gel formation. We conducted rotary-shear friction experiments on Carrara marble at slip-rates (V) of 0.09-1.24 m/s and normal stresses (σn) of 2.5-13.4 MPa. For preventing a thermal fracturing and applying a high normal load, we used solid cylindrical specimens jacketed with aluminum tubes. Narrow gap was left between the two aluminum tubes to avoid metal-to-metal contact. Our main results can be summarized as follows: (1) Slip weakening occurs in all experiments except for the runs at the lowest V (0.09 m/s); (2) Steady-state friction coefficient (μss) decreases as slip-rate and normal load increase; (3) At the highest V (1.13-1.24 m/s) and σn = 7.3 MPa, the average friction coefficient of initial peak friction (μp) is 0.61 (± 0.02), but the average μss is 0.04! (± 0.01) which is much lower than μp; (4) Decrease in average temperature of sliding surfaces corresponds to increase in friction, and strength recovery occurs very rapidly and completely upon cooling of specimens; (5) XRD and EPMA data show that the gouge for the specimens at V > 0.09 m/s is composed of calcite, lime (CaO) and/or hydrated lime (Ca(OH)2); (6) CO2 gas was detected with sensors during the weakening; (7) Decomposed calcite forms a fault zone consisting of ultrafine-grained gouge, but no melt or amorphous material was identified by optical microscopy or XRD analysis. Calcite decomposition clearly indicates that temperature in the fault

  10. Geodermatophilus poikilotrophi sp. nov.: A Multitolerant Actinomycete Isolated from Dolomitic Marble

    PubMed Central

    Montero-Calasanz, Maria del Carmen; Hofner, Benjamin; Göker, Markus; Rohde, Manfred; Spröer, Cathrin; Hezbri, Karima; Gtari, Maher; Schumann, Peter; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    A novel Gram-reaction-positive, aerobic actinobacterium, tolerant to mitomycin C, heavy metals, metalloids, hydrogen peroxide, desiccation, and ionizing- and UV-radiation, designated G18T, was isolated from dolomitic marble collected from outcrops in Samara (Namibia). The growth range was 15–35°C, at pH 5.5–9.5 and in presence of 1% NaCl, forming greenish-black coloured colonies on GYM Streptomyces agar. Chemotaxonomic and molecular characteristics of the isolate matched those described for other representatives of the genus Geodermatophilus. The peptidoglycan contained meso-diaminopimelic acid as diagnostic diaminoacid. The main phospholipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, and small amount of diphosphatidylglycerol. MK-9(H4) was the dominant menaquinone and galactose was detected as diagnostic sugar. The major cellular fatty acids were branched-chain saturated acids iso-C16:0 and iso-C15:0 and the unsaturated C17:1ω8c and C16:1ω7c. The 16S rRNA gene showed 97.4–99.1% sequence identity with the other representatives of genus Geodermatophilus. Based on phenotypic results and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain G18T is proposed to represent a novel species, Geodermatophilus poikilotrophi. Type strain is G18T (= DSM 44209T = CCUG 63018T). The INSDC accession number is HF970583. The novel R software package lethal was used to compute the lethal doses with confidence intervals resulting from tolerance experiments. PMID:25114928

  11. Marine Habitat Selection by Marbled Murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus) during the Breeding Season

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Teresa J.; Raphael, Martin G.; Bloxton, Thomas D.

    2016-01-01

    The marbled murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus) is a declining seabird that is well-known for nesting in coastal old-growth forests in the Pacific Northwest. Most studies of habitat selection have focused on modeling terrestrial nesting habitat even though marine habitat is believed to be a major contributor to population declines in some regions. To address this information gap, we conducted a 5-year study of marine resource selection by murrelets in Washington, which contains a population experiencing the steepest documented declines and where marine habitat is believed to be compromised. Across five years we tracked 157 radio-tagged murrelets during the breeding season (May to August), and used discrete choice models to examine habitat selection. Using an information theoretic approach, our global model had the most support, suggesting that murrelet resource selection at-sea is affected by many factors, both terrestrial and marine. Locations with higher amounts of nesting habitat (β = 21.49, P < 0.001) that were closer to shore (β = -0.0007, P < 0.001) and in cool waters (β = -0.2026, P < 0.001) with low footprint (β = -0.0087, P < 0.001) had higher probabilities of use. While past conservation efforts have focused on protecting terrestrial nesting habitat, we echo many past studies calling for future efforts to protect marine habitat for murrelets, as the current emphasis on terrestrial habitat alone may be insufficient for conserving populations. In particular, marine areas in close proximity to old-growth nesting habitat appear important for murrelets during the breeding season and should be priorities for protection. PMID:27681655

  12. Marine Habitat Selection by Marbled Murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus) during the Breeding Season.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Teresa J; Raphael, Martin G; Bloxton, Thomas D

    The marbled murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus) is a declining seabird that is well-known for nesting in coastal old-growth forests in the Pacific Northwest. Most studies of habitat selection have focused on modeling terrestrial nesting habitat even though marine habitat is believed to be a major contributor to population declines in some regions. To address this information gap, we conducted a 5-year study of marine resource selection by murrelets in Washington, which contains a population experiencing the steepest documented declines and where marine habitat is believed to be compromised. Across five years we tracked 157 radio-tagged murrelets during the breeding season (May to August), and used discrete choice models to examine habitat selection. Using an information theoretic approach, our global model had the most support, suggesting that murrelet resource selection at-sea is affected by many factors, both terrestrial and marine. Locations with higher amounts of nesting habitat (β = 21.49, P < 0.001) that were closer to shore (β = -0.0007, P < 0.001) and in cool waters (β = -0.2026, P < 0.001) with low footprint (β = -0.0087, P < 0.001) had higher probabilities of use. While past conservation efforts have focused on protecting terrestrial nesting habitat, we echo many past studies calling for future efforts to protect marine habitat for murrelets, as the current emphasis on terrestrial habitat alone may be insufficient for conserving populations. In particular, marine areas in close proximity to old-growth nesting habitat appear important for murrelets during the breeding season and should be priorities for protection.

  13. Modeling marbled murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus) habitat using LiDAR-derived canopy data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagar, Joan C.; Eskelson, Bianca N.I.; Haggerty, Patricia K.; Nelson, S. Kim; Vesely, David G.

    2014-01-01

    LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) is an emerging remote-sensing tool that can provide fine-scale data describing vertical complexity of vegetation relevant to species that are responsive to forest structure. We used LiDAR data to estimate occupancy probability for the federally threatened marbled murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus) in the Oregon Coast Range of the United States. Our goal was to address the need identified in the Recovery Plan for a more accurate estimate of the availability of nesting habitat by developing occupancy maps based on refined measures of nest-strand structure. We used murrelet occupancy data collected by the Bureau of Land Management Coos Bay District, and canopy metrics calculated from discrete return airborne LiDAR data, to fit a logistic regression model predicting the probability of occupancy. Our final model for stand-level occupancy included distance to coast, and 5 LiDAR-derived variables describing canopy structure. With an area under the curve value (AUC) of 0.74, this model had acceptable discrimination and fair agreement (Cohen's κ = 0.24), especially considering that all sites in our sample were regarded by managers as potential habitat. The LiDAR model provided better discrimination between occupied and unoccupied sites than did a model using variables derived from Gradient Nearest Neighbor maps that were previously reported as important predictors of murrelet occupancy (AUC = 0.64, κ = 0.12). We also evaluated LiDAR metrics at 11 known murrelet nest sites. Two LiDAR-derived variables accurately discriminated nest sites from random sites (average AUC = 0.91). LiDAR provided a means of quantifying 3-dimensional canopy structure with variables that are ecologically relevant to murrelet nesting habitat, and have not been as accurately quantified by other mensuration methods.

  14. Marble Canyon 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ NTMS area Arizona: data report

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, J.D.

    1980-07-01

    Results of ground water and stream/surface sediment reconnaissance (HSSR) in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Marble Canyon 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ quadrangle are presented. The target sampling density for all media collected was one site per 12 square kilometers. This resulted in 884 sediment samples being collected; however, dry conditions and sparse population resulted in the collection of only 2 ground water samples. Grand Canyon National Park, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, and much Indian tribal land in the southern half of the quadrangle were not sampled. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 9 other elements in ground water. Mass spectrometry results are given for helium in ground water. Field measurements for sediment samples are presented in tables and maps. Statistical summaries of data and a brief description of results are given. A generalized geologic map and a summary of the geology of the area are included. Data from ground water include: water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity); physical measurements (water temperature, and scintillometer readings); and elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, He, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). Data from sediment sites include: water chemistry measurements (where available) for pH, conductivity, and alkalinity; and elemental analyses(U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation, etc.) are also tabulated. Histograms, cumulative frequency, and areal distribution plots for most elements; Log U/Th, Log U/Hf, and Log U/(Th + Hf) ratios; and scintillometer readings are included.

  15. Heterogeneity of inelastic strain during creep of Carrara marble: Microscale strain measurement technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintanilla-Terminel, Alejandra; Evans, Brian

    2016-08-01

    We combined the split cylinder technique with microfabrication technology to observe strain heterogeneities that were produced during high-pressure transient creep of Carrara marble. Samples were patterned with a custom-designed grid of markers spaced 10 µm apart and containing an embedded coordinate system. The microscale strain measurement (MSSM) technique described here allowed us to analyze the local strain distribution with unprecedented detail over large regions. The description of the strain field is a function of the area over which strain is being computed. The scale at which the strain field can be considered homogeneous can provide insight into the deformation processes taking place. At 400-500°C, when twinning production is prolific, we observe highly strained bands that span several grains. One possible cause for the multigrain bands is the need to relieve strain incompatibilities that result when twins impinge on neighboring grains. At 600-700°C, the strain fields are still quite heterogeneous, and local strain varies substantially within grains and near grain boundaries, but the multigrain slip bands are not present. Deformation is concentrated in much smaller areas within grains and along some grain boundaries. The disappearance of the multigrain slip bands occurs when the deformation conditions allow additional slip systems to be activated. At 600°C, when the total strain is varied from 0.11 to 0.36, the spatial scale of the heterogeneity does not vary, but there are increases in the standard deviation of the distribution of local strains normalized by the total strain; thus, we conclude that the microstructure does not achieve a steady state in this strain interval.

  16. Genetic association of marbling score with intragenic nucleotide variants at selection signals of the bovine genome.

    PubMed

    Ryu, J; Lee, C

    2016-04-01

    Selection signals of Korean cattle might be attributed largely to artificial selection for meat quality. Rapidly increased intragenic markers of newly annotated genes in the bovine genome would help overcome limited findings of genetic markers associated with meat quality at the selection signals in a previous study. The present study examined genetic associations of marbling score (MS) with intragenic nucleotide variants at selection signals of Korean cattle. A total of 39 092 nucleotide variants of 407 Korean cattle were utilized in the association analysis. A total of 129 variants were selected within newly annotated genes in the bovine genome. Their genetic associations were analyzed using the mixed model with random polygenic effects based on identical-by-state genetic relationships among animals in order to control for spurious associations produced by population structure. Genetic associations of MS were found (P<3.88×10-4) with six intragenic nucleotide variants on bovine autosomes 3 (cache domain containing 1, CACHD1), 5 (like-glycosyltransferase, LARGE), 16 (cell division cycle 42 binding protein kinase alpha, CDC42BPA) and 21 (snurportin 1, SNUPN; protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 9, PTPN9; chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4, CSPG4). In particular, the genetic associations with CDC42BPA and LARGE were confirmed using an independent data set of Korean cattle. The results implied that allele frequencies of functional variants and their proximity variants have been augmented by directional selection for greater MS and remain selection signals in the bovine genome. Further studies of fine mapping would be useful to incorporate favorable alleles in marker-assisted selection for MS of Korean cattle.

  17. Intractions of mantle and crustal magmas in the southern part of the Ivrea Zone (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinigoi, S.; Antonini, P.; Demarchi, G.; Longinelli, A.; Mazzucchelli, M.; Negrini, L.; Rivalenti, G.

    1991-10-01

    In the southern part of the Ivrea Zone (Italy), the majority of the Mafic Formation is composed of: 1. amphibole-bearing gabbro; 2. a series of rocks ranging from norites to charnockites; 3. leucocratic charnockites. In the proximity of metasedimentary septa within the Mafic Formation, the igneous lithologies are in many places intimately and chaotically intermingled, giving rise to a marble-cake structure. Whole-rock chemistry, and oxygen and strontium isotopic compositions indicate that the mafic and felsic rocks are dominated by mantle and crustal sources respectively. The norite-charnockite suite may be modelled as the mixing product of basic and acid melts. Abundant plastic deformation structures suggest that mafic and hybrid rocks experienced an important tectonic event during or soon after their crystallization. Melting of crustal country rocks continued after the deformation event and produced the undeformed leucocratic charnockites. The study area exemplifies some of the possible effects of the intrusion of a large volume of basic magma into hot crust.

  18. Marble waste and pig manure amendments decrease metal availability, increase soil quality and facilitate vegetation development in bare mine soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zornoza, Raúl; Faz, Ángel; Martínez-Martínez, Silvia; Acosta, José A.; Gómez, M. Dolores; Ángeles Muñoz, M.

    2013-04-01

    In order to bring out a functional and sustainable land use in a highly contaminated mine tailing, firstly environmental risks have to be reduced or eliminated by suitable reclamation activities. Tailing ponds pose environmental hazards, such as acidity and toxic metals reaching to waters through wind and water erosions and leaching. As a consequence, soils have no vegetation and low soil organic matter and nutrients. Various physicochemical and biochemical properties, together with exchangeable metals were measured before, 6 months and 12 months after the application of marble waste and pigs manure as reclamation strategy in a tailing pond from SE Spain to reduce hazards for environment and human health. Three months after the last addition of amendments, eight different native shrub species where planted for phytostabilization. Results showed the pH increased up to neutrality. Aggregates stability, organic carbon, total nitrogen, cation exchange capacity, bioavailable phosphorus and potassium, microbial biomass and microbial activity increased with the application of the amendments, while exchangeable metals drastically decreased (~90%). After one year of plantation, only 20% planted species died, with a high growth of survivals reaching flowering and fructification. This study confirms the high effectiveness of initial applications of marble wastes together with pig manure and plantation of shrub species to initialize the recovery of the ecosystem in bare mine soils under Mediterranean semiarid conditions. Key Words: pig manure, marble waste, heavy metals, mine soil. Acknowledgements This work has been funded by the European Union LIFE+ project MIPOLARE (LIFE09 ENV/ES/000439). J.A. Acosta acknowledges a "Saavedra Fajardo" contract from Comunidad Autónoma de Murcia (Spain)

  19. Estimation of Coast-Wide Population Trends of Marbled Murrelets in Canada Using a Bayesian Hierarchical Model.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Douglas F; Drever, Mark C; McAllister, Murdoch K; Schroeder, Bernard K; Lindsay, David J; Faust, Deborah A

    2015-01-01

    Species at risk with secretive breeding behaviours, low densities, and wide geographic range pose a significant challenge to conservation actions because population trends are difficult to detect. Such is the case with the Marbled Murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus), a seabird listed as 'Threatened' by the Species at Risk Act in Canada largely due to the loss of its old growth forest nesting habitat. We report the first estimates of population trend of Marbled Murrelets in Canada derived from a monitoring program that uses marine radar to detect birds as they enter forest watersheds during 923 dawn surveys at 58 radar monitoring stations within the six Marbled Murrelet Conservation Regions on coastal British Columbia, Canada, 1996-2013. Temporal trends in radar counts were analyzed with a hierarchical Bayesian multivariate modeling approach that controlled for variation in tilt of the radar unit and day of year, included year-specific deviations from the overall trend ('year effects'), and allowed for trends to be estimated at three spatial scales. A negative overall trend of -1.6%/yr (95% credibility interval: -3.2%, 0.01%) indicated moderate evidence for a coast-wide decline, although trends varied strongly among the six conservation regions. Negative annual trends were detected in East Vancouver Island (-9%/yr) and South Mainland Coast (-3%/yr) Conservation Regions. Over a quarter of the year effects were significantly different from zero, and the estimated standard deviation in common-shared year effects between sites within each region was about 50% per year. This large common-shared interannual variation in counts may have been caused by regional movements of birds related to changes in marine conditions that affect the availability of prey.

  20. Estimation of Coast-Wide Population Trends of Marbled Murrelets in Canada Using a Bayesian Hierarchical Model

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Bernard K.; Lindsay, David J.; Faust, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    Species at risk with secretive breeding behaviours, low densities, and wide geographic range pose a significant challenge to conservation actions because population trends are difficult to detect. Such is the case with the Marbled Murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus), a seabird listed as ‘Threatened’ by the Species at Risk Act in Canada largely due to the loss of its old growth forest nesting habitat. We report the first estimates of population trend of Marbled Murrelets in Canada derived from a monitoring program that uses marine radar to detect birds as they enter forest watersheds during 923 dawn surveys at 58 radar monitoring stations within the six Marbled Murrelet Conservation Regions on coastal British Columbia, Canada, 1996–2013. Temporal trends in radar counts were analyzed with a hierarchical Bayesian multivariate modeling approach that controlled for variation in tilt of the radar unit and day of year, included year-specific deviations from the overall trend (‘year effects’), and allowed for trends to be estimated at three spatial scales. A negative overall trend of -1.6%/yr (95% credibility interval: -3.2%, 0.01%) indicated moderate evidence for a coast-wide decline, although trends varied strongly among the six conservation regions. Negative annual trends were detected in East Vancouver Island (-9%/yr) and South Mainland Coast (-3%/yr) Conservation Regions. Over a quarter of the year effects were significantly different from zero, and the estimated standard deviation in common-shared year effects between sites within each region was about 50% per year. This large common-shared interannual variation in counts may have been caused by regional movements of birds related to changes in marine conditions that affect the availability of prey. PMID:26258803

  1. Patch occupancy, number of individuals and population density of the Marbled White in a changing agricultural landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenda, Magdalena; Skórka, Piotr

    2010-09-01

    Metapopulation theory predicts the occurrence of animals in habitat patches. In this paper, we tested predictions based on this theory, including effects of spatial autocorrelation, to describe factors affecting the presence, local number of individuals and density of the Marbled White butterfly Melanargia galathea in habitat patches spread across the agricultural landscape of southern Poland. This agricultural landscape has undergone significant changes in recent decades due to the country's political transformation and is currently characterized by a large proportion of fallow (abandoned) land. We compared 48 occupied habitat patches with 60 unoccupied ones. Positive spatial autocorrelation was found in the number and density of individuals in habitat patches. The probability of patch occupancy was higher for patches that were larger, had a higher proportion of edges, were located closer to the nearest neighbouring local population and to the nearest piece of fallow, contained a smaller area of cut grass, and also had more nectar resources. The number of Marbled Whites in habitat patches was positively related to the patch area, the distance to the nearest fallow and the abundance of nectar resources, but was negatively related to the density of shrubs. The density of individuals was positively related to abundance of flowers, proportion of edge in a patch and distance to the nearest fallow, but it was negatively related to patch area, vegetation height and grass cover. These results indicate that recent land-use changes in agricultural landscapes have had both positive and negative effects on the presence and local number of individuals and density of the Marbled White. These changes affect the metapopulation of the species through changes in habitat quality and landscape connectivity in the area surrounding habitat patches.

  2. iTRAQ proteomic analysis of salinity acclimation proteins in the gill of tropical marbled eel (Anguilla marmorata).

    PubMed

    Jia, Yihe; Yin, Shaowu; Li, Li; Li, Peng; Liang, Fenfei; Wang, Xiaolu; Wang, Xiaojun; Wang, Li; Su, Xinhua

    2016-06-01

    Osmoregulation plays an important role in the migration process of catadromous fish. The osmoregulatory mechanisms of tropical marbled eel (Anguilla marmorata), a typical catadromous fish, did not gain sufficient attention, especially at the molecular level. In order to enrich the protein database of A. marmorata, a proteomic analysis has been carried out by iTRAQ technique. Among 1937 identified proteins in gill of marbled eel, the expression of 1560 proteins (80 %) was quantified. Compared with the protein expression level in the gill of marbled eel in freshwater (salinity of 0 ‰), 336 proteins were up-regulated and 67 proteins were down-regulated in seawater (salinity of 25 ‰); 33 proteins were up-regulated and 32 proteins were down-regulated in brackish water (salinity of 10 ‰). These up-regulated proteins including Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, V-type proton ATPase, sodium-potassium-chloride co-transporter and heat shock protein 90 were enriched in many KEGG-annotated pathways, which are related to different functions of the gill. The up-regulated oxidative phosphorylation and seleno-compound metabolism pathways involve the synthesis and consumption of ATP, which represents extra energy consumption. Another identified pathway is the ribosome pathway in which a large number of up-regulated proteins are involved. It is also more notable that tight junction and cardiac muscle contraction pathways may have correlation with ion transport in gill cells. This is the first report describing the proteome of A. marmorata for acclimating to the change of salinity. These results provide a functional database for migratory fish and point out some possible new interactions on osmoregulation in A. marmorata.

  3. Integrated Geophysycal Prospecting in Late Antiquity and Early Medieval Sites in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannotta, Maria Teresa; Leucci, Giovanni; De Giorgi, Lara; Matera, Loredana; Persico, Raffaele; Muci, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    geophysical prospecting to the reconstruction of the landscape from the late antiquity to the middle age, Proc. of 6th International Congress "Science and Technology for the Safeguard of Cultural Heritage in the Mediterranean Basin", Athens, Greece, 22nd-25th October 2013. [2] L. De Giorgi, G. Leucci, Detection of hazardous cavities below a road using combined geophysical methods. Surveys in Geophysics, online DOI 10.1007/s10712-013-9277-4, 2014. [3] R. Persico, Introduction to Ground Penetrating Radar: Inverse Scattering and data processing. Wiley, 2014 [4] S. Piscitelli, E.Rizzo, F. Cristallo,V. Lapenna, L. Crocco, R. Persico, F. Soldovieri, GPR and Microwave Tomography for Detecting shallow Cavities in the Historical Area of Sassi of Matera (Southern Italy), Near Surface Geophysics, vol. 5, pp. 275-285, 2007. [5] G. Leucci, N. Masini, R. Persico, F. Soldovieri." GPR and sonic tomography for structural restoration: the case of the Cathedral of Tricarico", Journal of Geophysics and Engineering, vol. 8, pp. S76-S92, Aug. 2011. [6] L. Matera, M. Noviello, M. Ciminale, R. Persico, Integration of multisensor data: an experiment in the archaeological park of Egnazia (Apulia, Southern Italy), Near Surface Geophysics, vol. 13, n. 6, pp. 613-621, 2015

  4. Relationships of consumer sensory ratings, marbling score, and shear force value to consumer acceptance of beef strip loin steaks.

    PubMed

    Platter, W J; Tatum, J D; Belk, K E; Chapman, P L; Scanga, J A; Smith, G C

    2003-11-01

    Logistic regression was used to quantify and characterize the effects of changes in marbling score, Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF), and consumer panel sensory ratings for tenderness, juiciness, or flavor on the probability of overall consumer acceptance of strip loin steaks from beef carcasses (n = 550). Consumers (n = 489) evaluated steaks for tenderness, juiciness, and flavor using nine-point hedonic scales (1 = like extremely and 9 = dislike extremely) and for overall steak acceptance (satisfied or not satisfied). Predicted acceptance of steaks by consumers was high (> 85%) when the mean consumer sensory rating for tenderness,juiciness, or flavor for a steak was 3 or lower on the hedonic scale. Conversely, predicted consumer acceptance of steaks was low (< or = 10%) when the mean consumer rating for tenderness, juiciness, or flavor for a steak was 5 or higher on the hedonic scale. As mean consumer sensory ratings for tenderness, juiciness, or flavor decreased from 3 to 5, the probability of acceptance of steaks by consumers diminished rapidly in a linear fashion. These results suggest that small changes in consumer sensory ratings for these sensory traits have dramatic effects on the probability of acceptance of steaks by consumers. Marbling score displayed a weak (adjusted R2 = 0.053), yet significant (P < 0.01), relationship to acceptance of steaks by consumers, and the shape of the predicted probability curve for steak acceptance was approximately linear over the entire range of marbling scores (Traces67 to Slightly Abundant97), suggesting that the likelihood of consumer acceptance of steaks increases approximately 10% for each full marbling score increase between Slight to Slightly Abundant. The predicted probability curve for consumer acceptance of steaks was sigmoidal for the WBSF model, with a steep decline in predicted probability of acceptance as WBSF values increased from 3.0 to 5.5 kg. Changes in WBSF within the high (> 5.5 kg) or low (< 3.0 kg

  5. Populations and productivity of seabirds at South Marble Island, Glacier Bay, Alaska, during May-July, 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zador, Stephani G.; Piatt, John F.

    1999-01-01

    In the course of directed research on glaucous-winged gulls, we investigated the numbers and activities of all breeding and non-breeding seabirds associated with South Marble Island in Glacier Bay, Alaska, during mid-May to late July, 1999. Most observations were made from the island; additional observations were made during transportation to and from the island. Data were collected on the presence and numbers of all seabirds observed. Detailed information on breeding chronology and productivity were also collected for glaucous-winged gulls (Larus glaucescens), pigeon guillemots (Cepphus columba), black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla), and black oystercatchers (Haemantopus bachmani).

  6. Weight losses of marble and limestone briquettes exposed to outdoor environments in the eastern United States. Results of exposures, 1984--1988

    SciTech Connect

    Reimann, K.J.

    1991-09-01

    Gravimetric changes in marble and limestone briquettes exposed to outdoor environment at five sites in the eastern United States have been monitored since 1984. An earlier report describes procedures and results obtained in 1984--1988. This report presents the results of the exposure period 1984--1988 and reviews and summarizes those of prior years. A linear relationship was found between cumulative gravimetric losses and exposure period or rain depth. These losses resulted in an average recession rate of 14 to 24 {mu}m/yr for marble and twice that for limestone. Variations in recession among the various exposure sites can be ascribed to differences in rain depth and hydrogen ion concentration. The annual recession rates obtained from gravimetry yielded rates that were for marble twice those obtained from runoff experiments, and more than three times those for limestone; this indicates that physical erosion plays an important role. Gravimetric monitoring of exposed briquettes is continuing in a planned 10-yr program.

  7. Italy: old problems, new books.

    PubMed

    Agazzi, Evandro

    1989-01-01

    Agazzi's bibliographic essay of recent titles in Italian on biomedical issues also discusses the Catholic versus the secular approaches to bioethics in Italy. Among the publications mentioned are several of a philosophical or theological nature: M. Mori's volume on artificial insemination, and second editions of well-established textbooks on biomedical ethics by S. Leone, E. Sgreccia, S. Spinsanti, and D. Tettamanzi. Legal issues in reproductive technologies are addressed in the Santosuosso Commission's report on regulating artificial procreation, and in a book discussing the report. Secular writings on ethical issues have appeared in issues cited here of the journals Prospettive Settanta and Biblioteca della Libertà. Also mentioned in Agazzi's essay are a critique of the Vatican Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith's Instruction on Respect for Human Life, and a booklet of articles related to the 20th anniversary of the encyclical Humanae Vitae.

  8. The complete mitochondrial genome of the marbled rockfish Sebastiscus marmoratus (Scorpaeniformes, Scorpaenidae): genome characterization and phylogenetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tian-Jun; Cheng, Yuan-Zhi; Liu, Xue-Zhu; Shi, Ge; Wang, Ri-Xin

    2011-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the marbled rockfish Sebastiscus marmoratus (Scorpaeniformes, Scorpaenidae) was determined and phylogenetic analysis was conducted to elucidate the evolutionary relationship of the marbled rockfish with other Sebastinae species. This mitochondrial genome, consisting of 17301 bp, is highly similar to that of most other vertebrates, containing the same gene order and an identical number of genes or regions, including 13 protein-coding genes, two ribosomal RNAs, 22 transfer RNAs, and one putative control region. Most of the genes are encoded on the H-strand, while the ND6 and seven tRNA genes (for Gln, Ala, Asn, Tyr, Ser (UCA), Glu, and Pro) are encoded on the L-strand. The reading frame of two pairs of genes overlapped on the same strand (the ATPase 8 and 6 genes overlapped by ten nucleotides; ND4L and ND4 genes overlapped by seven nucleotides). The possibly nonfunctional light-strand replication origin folded into a typical stem-loop secondary structure and a conserved motif (5'-GCCGG-3') was found at the base of the stem within the tRNA(Cys) gene. An extent termination-associated sequence (ETAS) and conserved sequence blocks (CSB) were identified in the control region, except for CSB-1; unusual long tandem repeats were found at the 3' end of the control region. Phylogenetic analyses supported the view that Sebastinae comprises four genera (Sebates, Hozukius, Helicolenus, and Sebasticus).

  9. Strain localization in ultramylonitic marbles by simultaneous activation of dislocation motion and grain boundary sliding (Syros, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogowitz, A.; White, J. C.; Grasemann, B.

    2016-03-01

    Extreme strain localization occurred in the centre of the cross-cutting element of a flanking structure in almost pure calcite marbles from Syros, Greece. At the maximum displacement of 120 cm along the cross-cutting element, evidence of grain size sensitive deformation mechanisms can be found in the ultramylonitic marbles, which are characterized by (1) an extremely small grain size ( ˜ 3 µm), (2) grain boundary triple junctions with nearly 120° angles, (3) a weak crystallographic preferred orientation with very low texture index (J = 1.4), (4) a random misorientation angle distribution curve and (5) the presence of small cavities. Using transmission electron microscopy, a deformation sequence is observed comprising recrystallization dominantly by bulging, resulting in the development of the fine-grained ultramylonite followed by the development of a high dislocation density ( ˜ 1013 m-2) with ongoing deformation of the fine-grained ultramylonite. The arrangement of dislocations in the extremely fine-grain-sized calcite differs from microstructures created by classical dislocation creep mediated by combined glide and thermally activated climb. Instead, it exhibits extensive glide and dislocation networks characteristic of recovery accommodated by cross-slip and network-assisted dislocation movement without formation of idealized subgrain walls. The enabling of grain boundary sliding to dislocation activity is deemed central to initiating and sustaining strain softening and is argued to be an important strain localization process in calcite rocks, even at a high strain rate ( ˜ 10-9 s-1) and low temperature (300 °C).

  10. Strain localization in ultramylonitic marbles by simultaneous activation of dislocation motion and grain boundary sliding (Syros, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogowitz, A.; White, J. C.; Grasemann, B.

    2015-09-01

    Extreme strain localization occurred in the center of the cross-cutting element of a flanking structure in almost pure calcite marbles from Syros, Greece. At the maximum displacement of 120 cm along the cross-cutting element evidence of grain size sensitive deformation mechanisms can be found in the ultramylonitic marbles, which are characterized by (1) an extremely small grain size (∼3 μm), (2) grain boundary triple junctions with nearly 120° angles, (3) a weak crystallographic preferred orientation with very low texture index (J=1.4), (4) a random misorientation angle distribution curve and (5) the presence of small cavities. Using transmission electron microscopy a deformation sequence is observed comprising, first recrystallization by bulging resulting in the development of the fine-grained ultramylonite followed by the evolution of a high dislocation density (∼1013 m-2) with ongoing deformation of the fine-grained ultramylonite. The arrangement of dislocations in the extremely fine grain sized calcite differs from microstructures created by classical dislocation creep mediated by combined glide and thermally activated climb. Instead, it exhibits extensive glide and dislocation networks characteristic of recovery accommodated by cross-slip and network-assisted dislocation movement without formation of idealized subgrain walls. The enabling of grain boundary sliding to dislocation activity is deemed central to initiating and sustaining strain softening and is argued to be an important strain localization process in calcite rocks, even at high strain rate (10-9 s-1) and low temperature (300 °C).

  11. Characterization of cholinesterases in marbled sole, Limanda yokohamae, and their inhibition in vitro by the fungicide iprobenfos.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jee-Hyun; Addison, R F; Shim, Won Joon

    2007-06-01

    Cholinesterases (ChEs) have been characterized in marbled sole (Limanda yokohamae) for use as a possible biomarker of pollution exposure. In brain, ChEs existed almost exclusively (>95%) as acetylcholinesterase (AChE) whereas in muscle, about 20-30% of ChE activity was in the form of butyrylcholinesterase (BChE; pseudocholinesterase). Acetylthiocholine and butyrylthiocholine (identified in mammalian studies as diagnostic substrates for AChE and BChE respectively) were hydrolyzed mainly, but not exclusively, by these enzymes. The inhibitors BW284C51 and iso-OMPA (identified in mammalian studies as diagnostic inhibitors of AChE and BChE respectively) were not specific for these enzymes in marbled sole. Brain AChE and muscle AChE and BChE were characterized in terms of their kinetic properties (KM etc.) and optimal conditions (substrate concentration, protein concentration, pH etc.) were established to allow routine assays of ChE activity to proceed under pseudo-first order conditions. The sensitivity of ChEs to a locally significant pesticide, iprobenfos (IBP; kitazin) was established in terms of IC50 concentrations. Brain AChE was relatively insensitive to IBP, but muscle AChE and BChE were sensitive to IBP concentrations in the high nM range. However, ambient IBP concentrations in Korean coastal waters are usually not high enough to cause detectable ChE inhibition in this species.

  12. Effects of Cryptocaryon irritans infection on the survival, feeding, respiratory rate and ionic regulation of the marbled rockfish Sebastiscus marmoratus.

    PubMed

    Yin, Fei; Gong, Qiyang; Li, Yanwei; Dan, Xueming; Sun, Peng; Gao, Quanxin; Shi, Zhaohong; Peng, Shiming; Li, Anxing

    2014-02-01

    To clarify the effects of a Cryptocaryon irritans infection on the physiological functions of the marbled rockfish Sebastiscus marmoratus, this study utilized C. irritans at concentrations of 2500; 5000; 7500; 10,000; 20,000; and 30,000 theronts/fish to infect marbled rockfish weighing 45 ± 3 g. The survival rate, food intake, respiratory rate, serum ion concentrations and gill Na+/K+-ATPase activity were determined. With the increase of the infection concentration and the passage of time, the survival rate of the rockfish gradually decreased. The groups infected with more than 5000 theronts/fish had stopped feeding within 4 days. The respiratory rates of the fish in the groups infected with 2500 and 5000 theronts/fish initially increased and then decreased. In contrast, the respiratory rate of the fish in the groups infected with more than 7500 theronts/fish was elevated to levels significantly higher than the control group after 12 h. The Na+/K+-ATPase activity and serum Na+ and Cl- concentrations increased with increasing infection concentration. In conclusion, the physiological functions of the fish infected with low concentrations of C. irritans can be effectively restored, whereas a high concentration infection induced severe stress. The declined food intake and accelerated respiratory rate could be useful for an early warning system as important indicators.

  13. Reproductive movement, residency and fisheries vulnerability of brown-marbled grouper, Epinephelus fuscoguttatus (Forsskål, 1775)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, K. L.; McIlwain, J.; Joseph, E.; Nemeth, R. S.

    2012-06-01

    The brown-marbled grouper, Epinephelus fuscoguttatus, is a long-lived, late-maturing protogynous species listed as Near Threatened by the IUCN. In Pohnpei, Micronesia, reproductively active brown-marbled grouper were tagged with acoustic and spaghetti-type tags at a multi-species fish spawning aggregation (FSA) site to establish patterns of movement, residency and seasonality. Telemetry confirmed the use of common reproductive migratory corridors and significant sex-specific variations in residency at the FSA. Combined underwater visual census and telemetry data verified a 3-month peak aggregation period, with aggregations forming and persisting over ca . 12 days prior to full moon between January and May. FSA formation coincided with seasonally low and relatively stable seawater temperatures. Some males frequented the FSA site during each aggregation month over two consecutive years. Conversely, most females were present at the FSA during only a single aggregation period, with the month of visitation consistent among years. Nearly two-thirds of tagged fish were relocated or recaptured within 11 km of the aggregation site, with a maximum detected distance of 26 km and a minimum estimated catchment area of 100-175 km2. Findings highlight the need for a combined approach to management that prohibits the capture and sale of reproductive adults and protects both spawning sites and common reproductive migratory corridors during aggregation periods.

  14. Effect of marble industry effluent on seed germination, post germinative growth and productivity of Zea mays L.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Fazal; Hadi, Fazal; Ullah, Zakir; Zia, Muhammad Amir

    2007-11-15

    A green house study was conducted at the University of Malakand, NWFP, Pakistan to evaluate the effect of marble industry effluent on soil pH, germination, post germinative growth and productivity of maize. The experiment was conducted in triplicate form for each treatment and tape water was used as control (T0). Effluents were diluted with tap water at concentration of 20% (T1), 40% (T2), 60% (T3), 80% (T4) and also used 100% (T5) concentration in 4 kg soil pot(-1) and plants were grown for 90 days. Results showed that there was a linear increase in pH of soil with increase in effluent concentration while germination, root length and stem girth was enhanced and found maximum at 40% concentration of effluent applied. The shoot length and root dry biomass was depressed as compared to control. It is concluded from the present study that marble industry effluent can be used as a fertilizer in low concentration especially for highly acidic soil but there is still need to carry out series of greenhouse and field trials to ascertain the fertilizer potentials of this effluent for maize crop.

  15. Statistical Characterization of the Mechanical Parameters of Intact Rock Under Triaxial Compression: An Experimental Proof of the Jinping Marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Quan; Zhong, Shan; Cui, Jie; Feng, Xia-Ting; Song, Leibo

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the statistical characteristics and probability distribution of the mechanical parameters of natural rock using triaxial compression tests. Twenty cores of Jinping marble were tested under each different levels of confining stress (i.e., 5, 10, 20, 30, and 40 MPa). From these full stress-strain data, we summarized the numerical characteristics and determined the probability distribution form of several important mechanical parameters, including deformational parameters, characteristic strength, characteristic strains, and failure angle. The statistical proofs relating to the mechanical parameters of rock presented new information about the marble's probabilistic distribution characteristics. The normal and log-normal distributions were appropriate for describing random strengths of rock; the coefficients of variation of the peak strengths had no relationship to the confining stress; the only acceptable random distribution for both Young's elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio was the log-normal function; and the cohesive strength had a different probability distribution pattern than the frictional angle. The triaxial tests and statistical analysis also provided experimental evidence for deciding the minimum reliable number of experimental sample and for picking appropriate parameter distributions to use in reliability calculations for rock engineering.

  16. The chronic effects of terbuthylazine-2-hydroxy on early life stages of marbled crayfish (Procambarus fallax f. virginalis).

    PubMed

    Koutnik, Dalibor; Stara, Alzbeta; Zuskova, Eliska; Kouba, Antonin; Velisek, Josef

    2017-03-01

    This study assessed the chronic effects of terbuthylazine-2-hydroxy (T2H), one of the main terbuthylazine degradation products, on early life stages of marbled crayfish (Procambarus fallax f. virginalis) by means of mortality, growth rate, early ontogeny, oxidative stress, antioxidant defence and histopathology. The crayfish were exposed to four concentrations of the tested substance as follows: 0.75μg/l (environmental concentration), 75, 375 and 750μg/l for 62days. Concentrations over 75μg/l caused lower weight compared to the control group. T2H at 750μg/l caused delay in ontogenetic development. Levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and total superoxide dismutase activity were significantly (p<0.01) lower in groups exposed to 375 and 750μg/l T2H. Crayfish in these treatments also showed alteration of tubular system including disintegration of tubular epithelium with complete loss of structure in some places of hepatopancreas and wall thinning up to disintegration of branchial filaments with focal infiltrations of hemocytes. In conclusion, chronic terbuthylazine-2-hydroxy exposure in concentrations up 75μg/l (100 times higher than environmental concentration) affected growth, ontogenetic development, antioxidant system, caused oxidative stress and pathological changes in hepatopancreas of early life stages of marbled crayfish.

  17. Psychosurgery in Italy, 1936-39.

    PubMed

    Kotowicz, Zbigniew

    2008-12-01

    In 1936 Egas Moniz introduced a new method for treating mental illness--psychosurgery. This new procedure was taken up immediately in a number of countries, including Italy. In most countries its introduction was slow and the numbers of operations were in single figures, but in Italy the introduction was rapid and around a dozen neuropsychiatrists reported much higher numbers of operations performed. Also in Italy the first innovations to the technique, notably the transorbital variation, were introduced. Moreover, all these activities took place without any sign of the protest seen elsewhere. Conditions that allowed the acceptance of this risky procedure seemed to be a consequence of the way in which the professions of neurology and psychiatry had been merged in Italy.

  18. Demoiselles and Drafts from Italy and France.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Picard, M. Dane

    1988-01-01

    Recounts the adventures of a journey taken through France and Italy. Makes an analogy of this trip to that of the one Charles Dickens took in 1844. Describes silicified horizons of the southern Paris Basin, moraines, outcrops, and "Hoodoos." (RT)

  19. The health of foreign workers in Italy.

    PubMed

    Capacci, Fabio; Carnevale, Francesco; Gazzano, Noel

    2005-01-01

    At the beginning of 2002, there were 1,600,000 foreign-born persons living in Italy; the majority from countries outside Europe. Those residing in the country for working purposes were 800,680. Italy's shift to a tertiary and service-oriented economy has considerably modified the working market, concentrating demand at two extremes: on one hand, a highly specialized workforce, and on the other, a totally unqualified, mobile, and flexible one, which includes most immigrants.

  20. [Rosenfeld in Italy (1978 to 1985)].

    PubMed

    de Masi, Franco

    2015-01-01

    In this paper I try to throw some light on Rosenfeld's thought and his way of working when he came to Italy. I would like to show, in a sketchy way, the evolution of his thought and in particular the new way he looked at clinical practice at that time. My point is that the Rosenfeld we met in Italy was able to open new horizons in clinical practice, implicitly questioning some of his own or his circle's previous viewpoints.

  1. Robotic surgery in Italy national survey (2011).

    PubMed

    Santoro, Eugenio; Pansadoro, Vito

    2013-03-01

    Robotic surgery in Italy has become a clinical reality that is gaining increasing acceptance. As of 2011 after the United States, Italy together with Germany is the country with the largest number of active Robotic centers, 46, and da Vinci Robots installed, with at least 116 operators already trained. The number of interventions performed in Italy in 2011 exceeded 6,000 and in 2010 were 4,784, with prevalence for urology, general surgery and gynecology, however these interventions have also begun to be applied in other fields such as cervicofacial, cardiothoracic and pediatric surgery. In Italy Robotic centers are mostly located in Northern Italy, while in the South there are only a few centers, and four regions are lacking altogether. Of the 46 centers which were started in 1999, the vast majority is still operational and almost half handle over 200 cases a year. The quality of the work is also especially high with large diffusion of radical prostatectomy in urology and liver resection and colic in general surgery. The method is very well accepted among operators, over 80 %, and among patients, over 95 %. From the analysis of world literature and a survey carried out in Italy, Robotic surgery, which at the moment could be better defined as telesurgery, represents a significant advantage for operators and a consistent gain for the patient. However, it still has important limits such as high cost and non-structured training of operators.

  2. Dynamic Strength and Fracturing Behavior of Single-Flawed Prismatic Marble Specimens Under Impact Loading with a Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xibing; Zhou, Tao; Li, Diyuan

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic impact tests are performed on prismatic marble specimens containing a single flaw using a modified split-Hopkinson pressure bar device. The effects of pre-existing flaws with different flaw angles and lengths on the dynamic mechanical properties are analyzed. The results demonstrate that the dynamic strength of marble is influenced by the flaw geometry. The dynamic fracturing process of flawed specimens is monitored and characterized with the aid of a high-speed camera. Cracking of marble specimens with a single pre-existing flaw under impact loading is analyzed based on experimental investigations. Cracking involves two major stages: formation of white patches and development of macrocracks. Six typical crack types are identified on the basis of their trajectories and initiation mechanisms. The presence of an artificial flaw may change the failure mode of marble from splitting-dominated for an intact specimen to shear-dominated for a flawed specimen under dynamic loading. Nevertheless, the geometry of the flaws appears to have a slight influence on the failure modes of flawed specimens under impact loading.

  3. Relationship between Japanese beef marbling standard and intramuscular lipid in the M. longissimus thoracis of Japanese Black and American Wagyu Cattle.

    PubMed

    Cameron, P J; Zembayashi, M; Lunt, D K; Mitsuhashi, T; Mitsumoto, M; Ozawa, S; Smith, S B

    1994-01-01

    Japanese Black and American Wagyu steers (n = 155) were slaughtered and graded under typical Japanese production conditions, and then analyzed for percentage ether-extractable fat at the 6th thoracic vertebra. The percentage of intramuscular lipid was used to develop a prediction equation for the Japanese beef marbling standard (BMS) with R(2) = 0·7619.

  4. Fukushima fallout at Milano, Italy.

    PubMed

    Ioannidou, Alexandra; Manenti, Simone; Gini, Luigi; Groppi, Flavia

    2012-12-01

    The radionuclides (131)I, (137)Cs and (134)Cs were observed in the Milano region (45°) of Italy early after the nuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan. Increased atmospheric radioactivity was observed on an air filter taken on 30 March 2011, while the maximum activity of 467 μBq m(-3) for (131)I was recorded at April 3-4, 2011. The first evidence of Fukushima fallout was confirmed with (131)I and (137)Cs measured in precipitation at two sampling sites at Milano on 28 March, 2011, with the concentrations of (131)I and (137)Cs in the rainwater equal to 0.89 Bq L(-1) and 0.12 Bq L(-1), respectively. A sample of dry deposition that was collected 9 days after the first rainfall event of 27-28 March, 2011 showed that the dry deposition was more effective in the case of (137)Cs than it was for (131)I, probably because iodine was mainly in gaseous form whereas caesium was rapidly bound to aerosols and thus highly subject to dry deposition. The relatively high observed values of (137)Cs in grass, soil and fresh goat and cow milk samples were probably from Chernobyl fallout and global fallout from past nuclear tests rather than from the Fukushima accident. Finally, a dose assessment for the region of investigation showed clearly that the detected activities in all environmental samples were very far below levels of concern.

  5. Induced damage in Carrara Marble as a result of long-term low-magnitude environmental stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigtlaender, Anne; Leith, Kerry; Krautblatter, Michael; Walter, Jens M.

    2015-04-01

    Damage of intact rock is commonly driven by the interaction of long-term low-magnitude external environmental stresses in combination with surface chemistry, rather than short-term loading in excess of intact rock strength. In order to determine the contribution of environmental stresses to the propagation of micro- and macroscopic fractures under natural environmental conditions we undertook long-term three-point bending tests on large size Carrara Marble specimens. The interaction of mechanical stresses induced by external loading and corrosive conditions (e.g. the presence of water) at the tip of a pre-existing crack is termed stress corrosion. We investigate stress corrosion below saw cut notches in wet and dry samples of Carrara Marble (M1-5, each 10cm x 10cm x 110cm). These were pre-loaded to about 66% of their assumed ultimate strength (determined by the fracture toughness (Kic) calculated for the crack tip). Two marble beams (M1, M3) were initially loaded to 22% and three (M2, M4, M5) to 55% of Kic. CaC03 saturated water was continuously dripped in the notch of samples --M1-4 to create corrosive conditions, while M5 was kept dry. After a three-week bedding period, loading on sample M1 was increased to 55%, M2 and M5 to 77% and M3 and M4 to 85% of Kic respectively. The tests were interrupted prior to failure of the specimens in order to allow the assessment of the crack-tip structure. During the testing period we used classical strain gages and acoustic emission sensors to measure strain and elastic stress changes through coda wave interferometry. Temperature and humidity were monitored and the outflowing fluid was collected for future analysis, throughout. The effect of induced damage on residual intrinsic stresses was evaluated using neutron diffraction on the SALSA instrument at the Institute Laue-Langevin (ILL, Grenoble, France), while texture measurements were undertaken using the X-ray goniometer at the Geoscience Center, University Göttingen, and

  6. The effect of variation at the retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor C gene on intramuscular fat percent and marbling score in Australian cattle.

    PubMed

    Barendse, W; Bunch, R J; Harrison, B E

    2010-01-01

    Variation at the retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor C (RORC) gene was previously associated with marbling score in a large sample of Australian taurine feedlot cattle of Angus and Shorthorn breeds. The T allele at the SNP RORC:g.3290T > G increased marbling score in Angus and Shorthorn cattle. We genotyped this SNP in an independent sample of 2,741 Australian cattle of Angus, Brahman, and Hereford breeds, and tested the association of this SNP with marbling score in all animals and with intramuscular fat (IMF) measurements in 2,104 animals. We found an allele frequency of the G allele of p(G) = 0.57 in Angus, p(G) = 0.09 in Hereford, and p(G) = 0.64 in Brahman. The regression of marbling score against number of copies of the G allele was significant (P = 0.033) in the combined sample after accounting for ancestry, breed, and the contemporary group structure of the data. All breeds had the same favorable homozygote; the regression on alleles showed a trend in Angus and Brahman cattle (P < 0.1), but not in Hereford cattle (P = 0.912). The regression of IMF against number of copies of the G allele was significant (P = 0.018) after accounting for ancestry, breed, and contemporary group structure. All breeds had the same favorable homozygote and the regression on alleles was significant (P = 0.024) in the Angus breed. In all breeds tested in this study, the T allele increased both marbling score and IMF. This polymorphism explained 0.3% of the phenotypic variance for IMF in this sample.

  7. Use of Composite Fingerprinting Technique to Determine Contribution of Paria River Sediments to Dam-Release Flood Deposits in Marble Canyon, Grand Canyon, Az

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, K.; Parnell, R. A.; Smith, M. E.; Grams, P. E.; Mueller, E. R.

    2015-12-01

    The 1963 closure of Glen Canyon Dam drastically reduced the downstream sediment supply and altered daily flow regimes of the Colorado River through Grand Canyon, resulting in significant sandbar erosion downstream of the dam. Dam-release floods, known as High Flow Experiments (HFEs), have occurred six times since 1996 and are intended to rebuild Grand Canyon sandbars using tributary-supplied sediment. In Marble Canyon (first 100 km of Grand Canyon) the targeted tributary is the Paria River which supplies approximately 90% of the annual suspended sediment flux through Marble Canyon; the same input contributed less than 6% prior to the dam. Annual topographic surveys have established that HFEs are effective at rebuilding sandbars. However, the long-term viability of using HFEs for sandbar maintenance is dependent on a sustainable source of sediments comprising HFE deposits. Significant use of non-tributary, main-stem sediments (i.e. pre-dam sand stored in eddies or the channel bed) in HFE deposits would indicate reliance on a limited resource, and diminishing returns in the ability of HFEs to rebuild sandbars. In this study, we sampled vertically throughout 12 bars in Marble Canyon to document temporal and downstream changes in the proportion of sediment sourced from the Paria River during the 2013 and 2014 HFEs. Preliminary data suggest that heavy mineral compositions and concentrations of Ti, S, Cr and Rb, all of which are influenced by grainsize, could be sufficiently capable of differentiating Paria-derived and main-stem sediments when combined into a composite fingerprint (CF). A multivariate mixing model using these CFs quantitatively determines the contribution of Paria-derived sediment in each HFE deposit sample. Mixing model endmembers for non-Paria sand include pre-dam flood deposits in Glen and Marble Canyons, and Marble Canyon dredge samples. These results elucidate the role of contemporary versus legacy sediment in long-term sandbar maintenance.

  8. The Gruta de las Maravillas (Aracena, South-West Iberia): Setting and origin of a cave in marbles from dissolution of pyrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Moreno, F. J.; Pedrera, A.; Galindo-Zaldívar, J.; López-Chicano, M.; Azor, A.; Martín-Rosales, W.; Ruano, P.; Calaforra, J. M.; Hódar-Pérez, A.

    2016-01-01

    The Gruta de las Maravillas cave is located at the WNW side of the Cerro del Castillo hill in Aracena (Huelva, SW Spain). The cavity is hosted within marbles included in a strip of high-grade metamorphic rocks belonging to the so-called Aracena Massif in the southernmost Ossa-Morena Zone. The hill is made up of granodiorites, marbles, quartzites, and gneisses, with the foliation trending N110°E and dipping roughly 60-80° towards NE. The marbles appear highly deformed in ductile conditions, with isoclinal folds of different sizes, boudins, porphyroblasts with sigmoidal morphology, and left-lateral S-C shear fabrics. Close to the granodiorite contact, the marbles include a thin band of disseminated and massive pyrite, partially transformed to Fe-oxides. Analysis of the brittle deformation and the associated paleostresses indicates a NE-SW oriented maximum compression, probably related to the latest Variscan collisional tectonics (300 Ma; Late Carboniferous). The Gruta de las Maravillas is divided into three main levels (located at 650, 665 and 685 m a.s.l.), the dissolution having progressed from top to bottom in different stages of stability of the water table. The initial dissolution phases were probably favoured by the presence of pyrite in the host rock, which, in turn, would have caused acidification of the circulating water. Favouring this hypothesis, a thin layer of Fe-oxides, locally including gypsum, covers some parts of the cave walls. The morphology and structure of the cavity result from interaction between the general NNE dipping foliation with sub-perpendicular joints, the pyrite-bearing band in the host marbles, and the descending water table.

  9. Tuberculosis and leprosy in Italy: new skeletal evidence.

    PubMed

    Rubini, Mauro; Zaio, Paola; Roberts, Charlotte

    2014-02-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) and leprosy are infections caused by Mycobacteria. This paper documents new skeletal evidence in Italy from the Iron Age site of Corvaro (Central Italy; 5th century BCE) and the Roman site of Palombara (Central Italy; 4th-5th century CE), and briefly reviews the extant evidence for these infections in Italy. The skeletal evidence for TB in Italy is more ancient than for leprosy, and is more common. The oldest evidence for both mycobacterial diseases is in the North of Italy, but this could be by chance, even if biomolecular models suggest a land route from the East to central Europe, especially for leprosy.

  10. Effects of post-mortem aging time and type of aging on palatability of low marbled beef loins.

    PubMed

    Lepper-Blilie, A N; Berg, E P; Buchanan, D S; Berg, P T

    2016-02-01

    The study objective was to evaluate the effect of post-mortem aging period (14 to 49days), dry vs. wet (D vs W) type of aging on the palatability of bone-in (BI) beef short loins (n=96) and boneless (BL) strip loins (n=96) possessing United States Department of Agriculture marbling scores between Slight and Small. Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF) scores decreased linearly over time (P=0.0001). WBSF was not influenced by aging method or loin type. Aged flavor was higher for DBL than for DBI with WBL and WBI intermediate. Dry aging strip loins increase aged flavor yet did not improve beefy flavor compared to wet aging. Based on objective data and panelist's scores for tenderness, juiciness and aged flavor, a boneless, 28days wet aged strip steak, cooked to 71°C would provide the best combination of eating satisfaction and value.

  11. Temporal changes in allele frequencies in a small marble trout Salmo marmoratus population threatened by extreme flood events.

    PubMed

    Pujolar, J M; Vincenzi, S; Zane, L; Crivelli, A J

    2016-03-01

    The effect of extreme floods on the genetic composition of marble trout Salmo marmoratus living in Lipovscek, a tributary of the Soca River in Slovenia, which has been affected by multiple destructive flood events for centuries was investigated. By monitoring genetic variability during the period 2004-2011, apparent signatures of genetic erosion including a decline in observed and expected heterozygosities and allelic richness were observed. Contemporary effective population size was estimated between 11 and 55 individuals, which is congruent with census data. The data suggest asymmetric gene flow between the two sections of the river. The existence of substantial downstream migration (15-19%) was confirmed by paternity analysis. A small (1-3%) upstream migration was also suggested, which was confirmed by tagging data. Overall, low genetic diversity has not prevented the survival of the Lipovscek population, which might be a common feature of salmonid freshwater populations.

  12. Effects of genetic variants in the promoter region of the bovine adiponectin (ADIPOQ) gene on marbling of Hanwoo beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoonjeong; Davis, Michael E; Chung, Hoyoung

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to verify genetic effects of the bovine adiponectin (ADIPOQ) gene on carcass traits of Hanwoo cattle. The measured carcass traits were marbling score (MAR), backfat thickness (BFT), loineye area (LEA), and carcass weight (CAW). Selection of primers was based on the bovine ADIPOQ sequence, and the analysis amplified approximately 267 and 333 bp genomic segments, including 67 bp of insertions in the promoter region. Sequencing analysis confirmed genetic variants (g.81966235C>T, g.81966377T>C, and g.81966364D>I) that showed significant effects on MAR. The present results suggest that the identified SNPs are useful genetic markers for the improvement of carcass traits in Hanwoo cattle.

  13. Methods of chemical analysis for selected species in marble and limestone surfaces exposed to the acidic outdoor environment

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, K.J.; Williams, F.L.; Huff, E.A.; Youngdahl, C.A.

    1986-03-01

    There is concern for marble and limestone exposed to the acidic outdoor environment because they are widely used as the exterior structures of buildings and monuments and because the calcium carbonate stones are especially sensitive to acid. Field tests of these building materials under carefully monitored environmental conditions are being conducted to measure damage rates and ultimately to quantify the individual effects of the important damage mechanisms. The development of further quantitative understanding will provide an improved basis for control strategies. The demonstration, verification, and application of a technique to measure selected surface anionic and cationic species are important contributions to this study. These methods of stone surface chemical analysis, developed for and applied in the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP), are appropriate to monitor selected species of program interest and are sufficient to determine surface sulfate and nitrate reaction products.

  14. Cleaning Of Black Crust From Marble Substrate By Short Free Running {mu}s Nd: YAG Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Khedr, A.; Harith, M. A.; Pouli, P.; Fotakis, C.

    2009-09-27

    One of the most important aspects in laser cleaning of artworks is the possibility for on-line monitoring the cleaning process. This ensures that the cleaning intervention is satisfactory without any damage to the underlying original surface. In this work it is shown that following and observing the integrated densities of the plumes generated during laser cleaning may be a simple, safe and straightforward methodology to monitor the removal process. A series of experiments on reference marble with simulated thick encrustation were considered to evaluate the plume monitoring technique. Parameters influencing the cleaning process and ablation threshold of the black crust (such as laser fluence, number of pulses etc.) were considered while the results were also evaluated under the microscope. The results of this study will be presented and discussed with the aim to establish accurate and reliable monitoring tools to follow the laser cleaning process.

  15. Marbles in the façade of the "Certosa di Pavia": a physico-chemical study.

    PubMed

    Ferloni, Paolo; Chierichetti, Andrea; Tomasi, Corrado; Ricci, Oronzo

    2005-01-01

    In the framework of an interdisciplinary research project on the well known monastery "Certosa di Pavia", the thermal and structural properties of marbles employed in the construction of the façade of the basilica were investigated in order to detect the main decomposition phenomena occurring on the monument surface. The results obtained by means of thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses, as well as by means of X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopy, allowed one to characterize samples taken from various sculptures of the façade and to bring out the degradation phenomena occurring in some of them, in particular the formation of "black crusts" with a high content in gypsum. The present findings are in fair agreement with those reported by other research groups which also studied with different techniques the construction materials of this monument.

  16. Characterization of upland habitat of the marbled murrelet in the Exxon Valdez oil spill area. Restoration project 93051b (forest service component). Exxon Valdez oil spill restoration project final report

    SciTech Connect

    DeVelice, R.L.; Hubbard, C.; Potkin, M.; Boucher, T.; Davidson, D.

    1995-04-01

    This study documents ecological characteristics of areas in the Exxon Valdez oil spill area in southcentral Alaska with contrasting marbled murelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus) detection levels. A total of 73 vegetation and 41 physical site variables were evaluated. Marbled murrelet activity level (number of detections) and the frequency of occupied behavior (behaviors indicative of nesting) increased with increasing area of coniferous forest. There was a positive relationship between activity level and the number of mossy platforms in trees. Significant correlations with an index of incoming solar radiation are interpreted as indicating a preference of marbled murrelets for sites sheltered from high winds and severe cold during the nesting period.

  17. Effects of increased temperature on metabolic activity and oxidative stress in the first life stages of marble trout (Salmo marmoratus).

    PubMed

    Simčič, Tatjana; Jesenšek, Dušan; Brancelj, Anton

    2015-08-01

    Climate change may result in future alterations in thermal regime which could markedly affect the early developmental stages of cold water fish due to their expected high sensitivity to increasing temperature. In the present study, the effect of temperature increase of 2, 4 and 6°C on the oxygen consumption rate (R), the activity of respiratory electron transport system (ETS) and oxidative stress have been studied in four developmental stages of the marble trout (Salmo marmoratus)-eyed eggs, yolk-sac larvae and juveniles of 1 and 3 months. Oxygen consumption rate and ETS activity increased with level of development and with temperature in all four stages. ETS/R ratios decreased during development and correlated with temperature in eyed eggs, larvae and juveniles of 1 month, but not in juveniles of 3 months. Low ETS/R ratios at higher temperatures indicate stress response in eyed eggs, the most temperature sensitive developmental stage. Catalase (CAT) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities increased during development, but responded differently to elevated temperature in the different developmental stages. Stress in eyed eggs, caused by higher temperatures, resulted in increased oxygen consumption rate and increased activities of CAT and GR. Larvae were sensitive to increased temperature only at the highest experimental temperature of 16°C. Increased temperature did not stress the metabolism of the juveniles, since they were able to compensate their metabolic activity. The earlier developmental stages of marble trout are thus more sensitive to temperature increase than juveniles and therefore more endangered by higher water temperatures. This is the first report connecting oxygen consumption, ETS activity and ETS/R ratio with the activities of antioxidant enzymes in relation to increased temperature in salmonids.

  18. Ellipsoidal Colloids with a Controlled Surface Roughness via Bioinspired Surface Engineering: Building Blocks for Liquid Marbles and Superhydrophobic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengjiao; Yang, Lu; Li, Qiang; Wu, Songhai; Jia, Shaoyi; Li, Zhanyong; Zhang, Zhenkun; Shi, Linqi

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the important role of the surface roughness of nano/colloidal particles and harnessing them for practical applications need novel strategies to control the particles' surface topology. Although there are many examples of spherical particles with a specific surface roughness, nonspherical ones with similar surface features are rare. The current work reports a one-step, straightforward, and bioinspired surface engineering strategy to prepare ellipsoidal particles with a controlled surface roughness. By manipulating the unique chemistry inherent to the oxidation-induced self-polymerization of dopamine into polydopamine (PDA), PDA coating of polymeric ellipsoids leads to a library of hybrid ellipsoidal particles (PS@PDA) with a surface that decorates with nanoscale PDA protrusions of various densities and sizes. Together with the advantages originated from the anisotropy of ellipsoids and rich chemistry of PDA, such a surface feature endows these particles with some unique properties. Evaporative drying of fluorinated PS@PDA particles produces a homogeneous coating with superhydrophobicity that arises from the two-scale hierarchal structure of microscale interparticle packing and nanoscale roughness of the constituent ellipsoids. Instead of water repelling that occurs for most of the lotus leaf-like superhydrophobic surfaces, such coating exhibits strong water adhesion that is observed with certain species of rose pedals. In addition, the as-prepared hybrid ellipsoids are very efficient in preparing liquid marble-isolated droplets covered with solid particles. Such liquid marbles can be placed onto many surfaces and might be useful for the controllable transport and manipulation of small volumes of liquids.

  19. Fatty Acid Profiles of Ten Muscles from High and Low Marbled (Quality Grade 1++ and 2) Hanwoo Steers

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Young-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate: 1) the fatty acid profile of ten muscles from high marbled (HM, quality grade 1++) and low marbled (LM, quality grade 2) Hanwoo carcass, 2) the relationship between the fatty acid profile and sensory traits. There were significant (p<0.001) differences in fat content and fatty acid composition among the 10 muscles obtained from HM and LM Hanwoo steers. The proportions of SFA (saturated fatty acid), MUFA (monounsaturated fatty acid) and PUFA (polyunsaturated fatty acid) were significantly (p<0.001) different among the 10 muscles due to differences in all fatty acids except eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5n-3). The high-fat muscles had a lower n-6/n-3 ratio compared to the low-fat muscles (p<0.001). LM muscles had a significantly (p<0.05) higher proportion of SFA than HM muscles due to a higher proportion of stearic acid (C18:0). On the contrary, HM muscles had a significantly (p<0.01) higher proportion of MUFA than LM muscles due to higher oleic acid (C18:1n-9) proportion. SFA had a significant correlation with CIE a* (r=0.281; p<0.01) and drip loss (%) (r=−0.233; p<0.001). Cooking loss (%) had a significantly (p<0.05) negative correlation with PUFA (r=−0.233; p<0.05). Overall palatability was positively correlated with SFA (r=0.262; p<0.01), but negatively correlated with PUFA (r=−0.567; p<0.001). There was no significant correlation between oleic acid and any of the sensory traits (p>0.05). PMID:27857545

  20. Exhumation of high-P marbles of the Samaná Terrane (Northern Hispaniola): Insights from paleostress and microstructural imprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Francisco José; Rodríguez, Indira; Escuder-Viruete, Javier; Pérez-Estaún, Andrés

    2016-08-01

    Paleostress variations and microstructural imprints of a subducted carbonate slab record changes in mechanical strength during its exhumation. The slab studied here forms part of the high-P Samaná Terrane located on the north-eastern margin of the Hispaniola Island. Cold-cathodoluminescence images reveal relict cataclastic fabrics within the highest-pressure marbles of the Punta Balandra and Santa Bárbara Schists structural units, formed in the early stages of exhumation at P-T conditions ca. 2.0 GPa - 500 °C. Cataclastic flow was triggered after a moderate increase of water content (1.2% < w.t. H2O < 1.8%). Accordingly, grain sizes larger than equivalent radius ri = 40 μm preserve distribution of power law type with fractal dimensions D2 = 2.43 in Punta Balandra unit and D2 = 2.72 in Santa Bárbara unit. After cataclastic flow, the stress dropped and grain comminution conducted the marbles to the dissolution-precipitation domain. Then, as exhumation progressed, the effective stress increased and calcite intracrystalline plasticity process dominated. Calcite-twinning incidence and recrystallized grain-size indicate maximum paleostress ca. 350 MPa and mean flow paleostress ≈ 130 MPa. SEM-EBSD analyses show similar weak type-c calcite fabrics in all high-P carbonate units, even though they record different metamorphic P peak. Therefore, intracrystalline plasticity was probably dominant during the development of the final tectonic fabric. Finer grain-size distributions are out of fractal range, with D1 < 1, because of the further superposed deformation. Most of the data are consistent with an initial forced exhumation model of the carbonate slab in a brittle-ductile rheology of the confined plate interface.

  1. Patterns of Channel and Sandbar Morphologic Response to Sediment Evacuation on the Colorado River in Marble Canyon, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grams, P. E.; Buscombe, D.; Hazel, J. E., Jr.; Kaplinski, M. A.; Topping, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Management goals for the Colorado River in Marble and Grand Canyons include improving the condition of sandbars by the implementation of controlled floods. However, in this system that has been perturbed into fine-sediment deficit by an upstream dam, it is uncertain whether sand supply from tributaries is sufficient to support repeated sandbar building, since dam operations typically export sand. We report on a closed sand budget constructed from flux and morphologic measurements for a 50-km segment of Marble Canyon over a 3-year period. The results provide insight into the location and dynamics of sand-storage locations and places recent changes in sand storage in context with historic measurements of bed elevation. The 2009-2012 study period included the largest annual water releases from Glen Canyon Dam since 1998. The measurements of sand flux and repeat morphologic measurements both indicate that these releases evacuated on the order of 300,000 m3 of sand, approximately equivalent to 20% of the total sand flux for the period. The pattern of sand storage change was different between eddies, where sandbars that are of management interest occur, and the main channel. Among eddies, deposition and erosion were approximately balanced and net change was negligible. Nearly all of the net sand evacuation was the result of erosion from the main channel. We estimate that a minimum of 250,000 m3 of sand remained in storage within eddies. Thus, if the high release volumes continued, sand evacuation would likely have been much larger. This is consistent with the measurements of sand flux, which did not indicate a decline in the rate of evacuation until the dam release rate was reduced. Comparisons between the recent measurements of bed elevation with measurements made in the late 1990's indicate that the 2011 scouring event did not cause greater scour than occurred in the mid-1990s.

  2. Linkages between controlled floods, eddy sandbar dynamics, and riparian vegetation along the Colorado River in Marble Canyon, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, E. R.; Grams, P. E.; Hazel, J. E., Jr.; Schmeeckle, M. W.

    2015-12-01

    Controlled floods are released from Glen Canyon Dam to build and maintain eddy sandbars along the Colorado River in Grand Canyon National Park. Long-term monitoring shows that the topographic response to controlled floods varies considerably between eddies, likely reflecting different geometric configurations and flow hydraulics. Differences in eddy sandbar response also reflect the degree of vegetation establishment since the 1980s when reservoir spills more than double the magnitude of controlled floods cleared most sandbars of vegetation. Here we explore the geomorphology of sandbar responses in the context of controlled floods, debris fan-eddy geometry, and riparian vegetation establishment. In Marble Canyon, the proportion of eddy area stabilized by vegetation is negatively correlated with water surface slope and the rate of stage change with discharge. Less vegetated sites are more dynamic; they tend to build open sandbars during controlled floods and show greater topographic variability in the eddy compared to the main channel. In contrast, deposition of open sandbars is limited where vegetation establishment has decreased channel width, altering the pattern of eddy recirculation and sediment redistribution. In these locations, deposition during controlled floods is more akin to floodplain sedimentation, and the elevation of vegetated bar surfaces increases with successive floods. Changes in sand storage in the main channel are greater than storage change in the eddy at these lower gradient sites, and controlled floods tend to evacuate sand that has accumulated on the bed. The degree to which vegetation has stabilized sandbar surfaces may thus provide a proxy for different hydraulic conditions and a better canyon-wide assessment of controlled flood response. Our results apply primarily to large eddies in Marble Canyon, and ongoing flow modeling and vegetation composition mapping will allow further assessment of eddy sandbar-riparian vegetation interactions

  3. Characterisation of fine-grained tailings from a marble processing plant and their acute effects on the copepod Calanus finmarchicus.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Julia; Altin, Dag; Hammer, Karen M; Hellstrøm, Kaja C; Booth, Andy M; Hansen, Bjørn Henrik

    2017-02-01

    Submarine tailing disposal (STD) of mining waste is practiced as an alternative to land fill disposal in several countries. Knowledge regarding the environmental implications of STD on fjord and other marine ecosystems, including the pelagic environment, is scarce. In this study, we characterised the particle shape, size and metal content of the fine-grained fraction of tailings (FGT) from a Norwegian marble processing plant and investigated their acute toxicity and impact on feeding rate in adult Calanus finmarchicus. Initial tailing dispersions with a concentration of 1 mg mL(-1) contained approximately 72 million particles, with 62% of particles between 0.6 and 1 μm in size. After a sedimentation time of 1 h, 69% of the particles between 0.6 and 5 μm remained dispersed, decreasing to 22% after 6 h. When subjected to low energy turbulence in exposure experiments, the formation of fragile agglomerates was observed. The FGT contained Al, Mn, Fe and Ni, with no detectable dissolution occurring during the 48 h exposure period. Acute exposure (up to 5 g L(-1)) to FGT caused no mortality in C. finmarchicus. Similarly, feeding rates determined during a 40 h depuration period, were not significantly impacted. However, surface attachment and uptake of FGT into the digestive tract of the copepods was observed. This indicates that, whilst marble FGT are not acutely toxic to copepods, chronic effects such as impacts on organism's energy budgets could occur, highlighting the need for further research on potential sublethal effects in organisms exposed to fine inorganic particles.

  4. Malignant pleural mesothelioma in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Claudio; Bianchi, Tommaso

    2009-01-01

    This study reviews a series of 811 malignant pleural mesothelioma cases, diagnosed at hospitals in Trieste and Monfalcone districts of north eastern Italy, a narrow coastal strip with a population of about three lakh, in the period 1968-2008. The diagnosis was based on histological examination in 801 cases, and cytological findings in 10. Necropsy was performed in 610 cases. Occupational histories were obtained directly from the patients or their relatives through personal or telephone interviews. Routine lung sections were examined for asbestos bodies in 500 cases. In 143 cases asbestos bodies were isolated and counted by chemical digestion of the lung tissue using the Smith-Naylor method. The series included 717 men and 94 women aged between 32 and 93 years (mean 69.2 years). Detailed occupational data was obtained for 732 cases. The majority of patients had marine jobs - shipbuilding (449 cases), maritime trades (56 cases), and port activities (39 cases). The nature of work of other patients included a variety of occupations, with non-shipbuilding industries being the most common. Thirty-four women cleaned the work clothes of family members occupationally exposed and hence had a history of asbestos exposure at home. Most of the patients had their first exposure to asbestos before 1960. The latency period ranged between 13 and 73 years (mean 48.2). Latency period among insulators and dock workers were shorter than other categories. Asbestos bodies were detected on routine lung sections in 343 cases (68.6%). Lung asbestos body burdens after isolation ranged between two to 10 millions bodies per gram of dried tissue. Despite some limitations in the use of asbestos in this area since the 1970s, the incidence of tumor remained high during the last years. PMID:20386624

  5. Malignant pleural mesothelioma in Italy.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Claudio; Bianchi, Tommaso

    2009-08-01

    This study reviews a series of 811 malignant pleural mesothelioma cases, diagnosed at hospitals in Trieste and Monfalcone districts of north eastern Italy, a narrow coastal strip with a population of about three lakh, in the period 1968-2008. The diagnosis was based on histological examination in 801 cases, and cytological findings in 10. Necropsy was performed in 610 cases. Occupational histories were obtained directly from the patients or their relatives through personal or telephone interviews. Routine lung sections were examined for asbestos bodies in 500 cases. In 143 cases asbestos bodies were isolated and counted by chemical digestion of the lung tissue using the Smith-Naylor method. The series included 717 men and 94 women aged between 32 and 93 years (mean 69.2 years). Detailed occupational data was obtained for 732 cases.The majority of patients had marine jobs - shipbuilding (449 cases), maritime trades (56 cases), and port activities (39 cases). The nature of work of other patients included a variety of occupations, with non-shipbuilding industries being the most common. Thirty-four women cleaned the work clothes of family members occupationally exposed and hence had a history of asbestos exposure at home. Most of the patients had their first exposure to asbestos before 1960. The latency period ranged between 13 and 73 years (mean 48.2). Latency period among insulators and dock workers were shorter than other categories. Asbestos bodies were detected on routine lung sections in 343 cases (68.6%). Lung asbestos body burdens after isolation ranged between two to 10 millions bodies per gram of dried tissue. Despite some limitations in the use of asbestos in this area since the 1970s, the incidence of tumor remained high during the last years.

  6. Relationship between Latitude and Melanoma in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Crocetti, Emanuele; Buzzoni, Carlotta; Chiarugi, Alessandra; Nardini, Paolo; Pimpinelli, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Evaluate the ecological relationship between skin melanoma epidemiology and latitude in Italy. Methods. We used data from the Italian network of cancer registries (Airtum). In a Poisson model, we evaluated the effect on incidence, mortality, and survival of latitude, adjusting for some demographic, social, phenotypic, and behavioural variables. Results. Incidence increased in Italy by 17% for each degree of increase in latitude. The effect of latitude was statistically significantly present also adjusting for other variables (incidence rate ratio = 1.08). The effect of latitude on increasing mortality (mortality rate ratio = 1.27) and improving survival (relative excess risk of death = 0.93) was no longer present in the multivariate model. Conclusion. Melanoma incidence, mortality, and survival vary in Italy according to latitude. After adjustment for several confounders, incidence still grows with growing latitude. Presumably, latitude expresses other variables that might be related to individual susceptibility and/or local care. PMID:22389841

  7. Relationship between Latitude and Melanoma in Italy.

    PubMed

    Crocetti, Emanuele; Buzzoni, Carlotta; Chiarugi, Alessandra; Nardini, Paolo; Pimpinelli, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Evaluate the ecological relationship between skin melanoma epidemiology and latitude in Italy. Methods. We used data from the Italian network of cancer registries (Airtum). In a Poisson model, we evaluated the effect on incidence, mortality, and survival of latitude, adjusting for some demographic, social, phenotypic, and behavioural variables. Results. Incidence increased in Italy by 17% for each degree of increase in latitude. The effect of latitude was statistically significantly present also adjusting for other variables (incidence rate ratio = 1.08). The effect of latitude on increasing mortality (mortality rate ratio = 1.27) and improving survival (relative excess risk of death = 0.93) was no longer present in the multivariate model. Conclusion. Melanoma incidence, mortality, and survival vary in Italy according to latitude. After adjustment for several confounders, incidence still grows with growing latitude. Presumably, latitude expresses other variables that might be related to individual susceptibility and/or local care.

  8. John Ray in Italy: lost manuscripts rediscovered

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This paper discloses the content of two manuscripts of John Ray that have hitherto been unknown to Ray scholars. The manuscripts survive in the Hampshire Record Office, having descended through the Prideaux-Brune family. They record information about Ray's tour of Italy in the 1660s that does not appear in his Observations … made in a journey through … the Low-countries, Germany, Italy and France (1673), including a visit to the museum of Athanasius Kircher in Rome, and provide clues concerning the composition of Ray's 1673 book. PMID:24921104

  9. Genomic characterization of porcine rotaviruses in Italy.

    PubMed

    Martella, V; Pratelli, A; Greco, G; Tempesta, M; Ferrari, M; Losio, M N; Buonavoglia, C

    2001-01-01

    A total of 23 rotavirus strains isolated from pigs were analyzed. Twenty strains had been isolated from diarrheic piglets from an outbreak that occurred in northern Italy in 1983. Three strains had been isolated in 1984 from swine herds located in distinct areas of northern Italy. All 23 strains were characterized as type G6P[5] by PCR. The isolation from piglets of rotaviruses displaying typical bovine G- and P-type specificities points out the high frequency of rotavirus transmission between cattle and pigs.

  10. John Ray in Italy: lost manuscripts rediscovered.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Michael

    2014-06-20

    This paper discloses the content of two manuscripts of John Ray that have hitherto been unknown to Ray scholars. The manuscripts survive in the Hampshire Record Office, having descended through the Prideaux-Brune family. They record information about Ray's tour of Italy in the 1660s that does not appear in his Observations... made in a journey through... the Low-countries, Germany, Italy and France (1673), including a visit to the museum of Athanasius Kircher in Rome, and provide clues concerning the composition of Ray's 1673 book.

  11. Foreign children with cancer in Italy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There has been a noticeable annual increase in the number of children coming to Italy for medical treatment, just like it has happened in the rest of the European Union. In Italy, the assistance to children suffering from cancer is assured by the current network of 54 centres members of the Italian Association of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology (AIEOP), which has kept records of all demographic and clinical data in the database of Mod.1.01 Registry since 1989. Methods We used the information stored in the already mentioned database to assess the impact of immigration of foreign children with cancer on centres' activity, with the scope of drawing a map of the assistance to these cases. Results Out of 14,738 cases recorded by all centres in the period from 1999 to 2008, 92.2% were born and resident in Italy, 4.1% (608) were born abroad and living abroad and 3.7% (538) were born abroad and living in Italy. Foreign children cases have increased over the years from 2.5% in 1999 to. 8.1% in 2008. Most immigrant children came from Europe (65.7%), whereas patients who came from America, Asia and Oceania amounted to 13.2%, 10.1%, 0.2%, respectively. The immigrant survival rate was lower compared to that of children who were born in Italy. This is especially true for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia patients entered an AIEOP protocol, who showed a 10-years survival rate of 71.0% vs. 80.7% (p < 0.001) for immigrants and patients born in Italy, respectively. Conclusions Children and adolescents are an increasingly important part of the immigration phenomenon, which occurs in many parts of the world. In Italy the vast majority of children affected by malignancies are treated in AIEOP centres. Since immigrant children are predominantly treated in northern Italy, these centres have developed a special expertise in treating immigrant patients, which is certainly very useful for the entire AIEOP network. PMID:21923939

  12. 48 CFR 252.229-7003 - Tax Exemptions (Italy).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Tax Exemptions (Italy... of Provisions And Clauses 252.229-7003 Tax Exemptions (Italy). As prescribed in 229.402-70(c)(1), use the following clause: Tax Exemptions (Italy) (MAR 2012) (a) As the Contractor represented in its...

  13. 48 CFR 252.229-7003 - Tax Exemptions (Italy).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Tax Exemptions (Italy... of Provisions And Clauses 252.229-7003 Tax Exemptions (Italy). As prescribed in 229.402-70(c), use the following clause: Tax Exemptions (Italy) (JAN 2002) (a) The Contractor represents that...

  14. 48 CFR 252.229-7003 - Tax Exemptions (Italy).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Tax Exemptions (Italy... of Provisions And Clauses 252.229-7003 Tax Exemptions (Italy). As prescribed in 229.402-70(c)(1), use the following clause: Tax Exemptions (Italy) (MAR 2012) (a) As the Contractor represented in its...

  15. 78 FR 55095 - Certain Pasta From Italy and Turkey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-09

    ... COMMISSION Certain Pasta From Italy and Turkey Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... countervailing and antidumping duty orders on certain pasta from Italy and Turkey would be likely to lead to... Pasta from Italy and Turkey: Investigation Nos. 701- TA-365-366 and 731-TA-734-735 (Third...

  16. 48 CFR 252.229-7003 - Tax Exemptions (Italy).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tax Exemptions (Italy... of Provisions And Clauses 252.229-7003 Tax Exemptions (Italy). As prescribed in 229.402-70(c), use the following clause: Tax Exemptions (Italy) (JAN 2002) (a) The Contractor represents that...

  17. The University in Italy: Historical Background and Changing Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todeschini, Marco

    1999-01-01

    Traces the history of higher education in Italy. Discusses the nature and function of the Italian university; changes in Italy's system of higher education over the years; the issue of academic autonomy in Italy; and reform in Italian universities over the next few years (going corporate and walking the tightrope between autonomy and national…

  18. Linguistic Classification in Italy: Problems and Predictions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, John Earl

    1980-01-01

    The schema generally used to describe the linguistic situation in Italy includes two categories: dialetto regionale (regional dialect) and italiano regionale (regional Italian). These stand apart from the widely accepted sociolinguistic model "variety--dialect--language." It is demonstrated that both these categories should be treated…

  19. Parapoxvirus infections of red deer, Italy.

    PubMed

    Scagliarini, Alessandra; Vaccari, Francesca; Turrini, Filippo; Bianchi, Alessandro; Cordioli, Paolo; Lavazza, Antonio

    2011-04-01

    To characterize parapoxviruses causing severe disease in wild ruminants in Stelvio Park, Italy, we sequenced and compared the DNA of several isolates. Results demonstrated that the red deer isolates are closely related to the parapox of red deer in New Zealand virus.

  20. Parapoxvirus Infections of Red Deer, Italy

    PubMed Central

    Vaccari, Francesca; Turrini, Filippo; Bianchi, Alessandro; Cordioli, Paolo; Lavazza, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    To characterize parapoxviruses causing severe disease in wild ruminants in Stelvio Park, Italy, we sequenced and compared the DNA of several isolates. Results demonstrated that the red deer isolates are closely related to the parapox of red deer in New Zealand virus. PMID:21470460

  1. An Urban Renewal School Project in Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponti, Giorgio

    2005-01-01

    The restoration of an historic school building in Battipaglia, Italy, will provide new public facilities and is hoped to boost urban renewal. The municipality of Battipaglia, in the province of Salerno, held an architectural competition for renovating the E. De Amicis Primary School and the surrounding area. The winning project, submitted by a…

  2. Actors in Corruption: Business Politicians in Italy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    della Porta, Donatella

    1996-01-01

    Argues that the development of political corruption brings about important changes in the political system and in the characteristics of the political class. Describes the emergence and activities of a group of "business politicians" in Italy who have transformed political parties into socializing agencies for illicit activities. (MJP)

  3. Italy's Treasures Are in Their Hands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rocca, Francis X.

    2007-01-01

    Each year more than 300 applicants vie for 18 slots at the Central Institute of Restoration, the program responsible for the restoration of many of Italy's greatest works of art, and the training of experts in the repair of objects of artistic and/or cultural significance. Successful candidates must demonstrate knowledge of art history, chemistry,…

  4. A Critical Bibliography of Materials on Italy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witzel, Anne; Chapman, Rosemary

    This ungraded, annotated bibliography includes books of history and society, literature and culture and a special section devoted to the southern part of Italy. Filmstrips, slides and films are listed in the audiovisual materials bibliography. Also included is a list of sources of books and audio-visual materials that are included in a multi-media…

  5. Is There an America in Italy's Future?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilpatrick, William K.

    2005-01-01

    When the author first heard that Italy wants to adopt the American model of education, his immediate reaction was, "Why would you want to do that?" American schools can scarcely teach students to read and write. American students are abysmally ignorant about history, geography, and world affairs. In international assessments of…

  6. The Study of Behavioural Development in Italy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battacchi, Marco W.

    1984-01-01

    Examines professional education and current research trends in developmental psychology in Italy. Current trends have been investigated by a multi-dimensional content analysis of the studies published or accepted for publication in qualified journals between 1978-May 1983. (Author/AS)

  7. Bedbug infestations recorded in Central Italy.

    PubMed

    Masetti, Massimo; Bruschi, Fabrizio

    2007-03-01

    In summer 2003 two separate infestations due to the common bedbug (Cimex lectularius) occurred in Pisa, Italy. Cutaneous reaction was evident and one patient developed a severe bullous eruption. In both cases there was circumstantial evidence for association with international travel.

  8. How America Saved Italy and the World

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-21

    wrote about Naples post-Allied liberation. There, mobs of men, women and children beat each other over candy Allied soldiers threw their way, and boys...Sicily and Italy. For further reading see Gene Santoro’s Mafia Allies: The True Story of America’s Secret Alliance with the Mob in World War II. 73

  9. Weight losses of marble and limestone briquettes exposed to outdoor environment in the eastern United States: Results of exposure 1988--1992

    SciTech Connect

    Reimann, K.J.

    1995-04-01

    Monitoring continued on weight changes in marble and limestone briquettes exposed to the outdoor environment at sites in the eastern US. This report presents data for the exposure period 1988--1992 and summarizes results for the entire period from 1984. Since 1989, only three exposure sites have remained active, but briquettes from preexposed material were added at those sites. A linear relationship was found between cumulative gravimetric losses and exposure period. These losses resulted in an average recession rate of 11 to 21 {micro}m/yr for marble and 21 to 45 {micro}m/yr for limestone. The recession rates are site-dependent and can be described with respect to rain depth and other atmospheric conditions, as evidenced by the very low rates at the Ohio site on the movable rack, dry regime. Weight monitoring is continuing in a planned 10-year program.

  10. Evaluation of implant strategies in Angus-sired steers with high or low genetic potential for marbling and gain.

    PubMed

    Black, D N; Neville, B W; Crosswhite, M R; Dahlen, C R

    2015-11-01

    Sixty-nine Angus-sired steer calves (332.3 kg initial BW) were used to determine the effects of single or double implant strategies on steers of high or low genetic potential (GP) determined by the GeneMax (Zoetis, Florham Park, NJ) genetic profiling test. Steers were assigned to treatments in a 2 × 2 factorial design with factors of 1) composite GP score (high, mean GP score of 86.5 [HI]; low, mean GP score of 25.3[LO]) and 2) implant strategy (single, steers implanted on d 70 [1X], or double, steers implanted d 0 and 70 [2X]). All steers were given the same implant (Revalor-S; Merck Animal Health, Summit, NJ), with the 2X group implanted on d 0 and 70 and the 1X group implanted only on d 70. A diet containing 1.38 Mcal NEg/kg DM was fed ad libitum, once daily. Ultrasound was used to measure body composition characteristics on d 0 and 70. Steers were harvested after 140 d on feed. At both the d-0 and d-70 ultrasound, HI steers had greater ( < 0.001) percent intramuscular fat (IMF) than LO steers, but no differences ( ≥ 0.24) were observed in LM area (LMA), rib fat thickness (RF), or rump fat thickness (RMFT). Steers in the 2X group had larger ( = 0.02) LMA and less ( = 0.03) IMF on d 70 than 1X steers and no differences ( ≥ 0.50) in RF or RMFT were observed. From d 0 to 70, HI steers had ADG, DMI, and G:F ( ≥ 0.60) similar to LO steers; however, 2X steers had greater ( < 0.001) ADG and were more ( < 0.001) feed efficient compared with 1X steers during the same interval. Over the entire 140-d feeding period, there were no differences ( ≥ 0.6) in BW, ADG, DMI, or G:F between GP groups; however, 2X steers had greater ( = 0.03) ADG compared with 1X steers and still had similar ( ≥ 0.12) DMI and G:F. Upon slaughter, marbling score tended to be impacted by a GP × implant interaction (499.9 ± 18.5, 545.6 ± 18.5, 487.1 ± 18.5, and 469.8 ± 18.5 for HI and 2X, HI and 1X, LO and 2X, and LO and 1X, respectively; = 0.06). No differences ( ≥ 0.7) were observed

  11. Use of flux and morphologic sediment budgets for sandbar monitoring on the Colorado River in Marble Canyon, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grams, Paul E.; Buscombe, Daniel D.; Topping, David J.; Hazel, Joseph E.; Kaplinski, Matt

    2015-01-01

    The magnitude and pfattern of streamflow and sediment supply of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon (Figure 1) has been affected by the existence and operations of Glen Canyon Dam since filling of Lake Powell Reservoir began in March 1963. In the subsequent 30 years, fine sediment was scoured from the downstream channel (Topping et al., 2000; Grams et al., 2007), resulting in a decline in the number and size of sandbars in the eastern half of Grand Canyon National Park (Wright et al., 2005; Schmidt et al., 2004). The Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program (GCDAMP) administered by the U.S. Department of Interior oversees efforts to manage the Colorado River ecosystem downstream from Glen Canyon Dam. One of the goals of the GCDAMP is to maintain and increase the number and size of sandbars in this context of a limited sand supply. Management actions to benefit sandbars have included curtailment of daily streamflow fluctuations, which occur for hydropower generation, and implementation of controlled floods, also called high-flow experiments.Studies of controlled floods, defined as intentional releases that exceed the maximum discharge capacity of the Glen Canyon Dam powerplant, implemented between 1996 and 2008, have demonstrated that these events cause increases in sandbar size throughout Marble and Grand Canyons (Hazel et al., 2010; Schmidt and Grams, 2011; Mueller et al., 2014), although the magnitude of response is spatially variable (Hazel et al., 1999; 2010). Controlled floods may build some sandbars at the expense of erosion of sand from other, upstream, sandbars (Schmidt, 1999). To increase the frequency and effectiveness of sandbar building, the U.S. Department of Interior adopted a “high-flow experimental protocol” to implement controlled floods regularly under conditions of enriched sand supply (U.S. Department of Interior, 2012). Because the supply of sand available to build sandbars has been substantially reduced by Glen Canyon Dam (Topping et al

  12. Very high geothermal gradient during mantle exhumation recorded in mylonitic marbles and carbonate breccias from a Mesozoic Pyrenean palaeomargin (Lherz area, North Pyrenean Zone, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagabrielle, Yves; Clerc, Camille; Vauchez, Alain; Lahfid, Abdeltif; Labaume, Pierre; Azambre, Bernard; Fourcade, Serge; Dautria, Jean-Marie

    2016-03-01

    Although they are famous among Earth scientists, the Lherz peridotites are exposed within geological formations of the North Pyrenean Zone (NPZ) still lacking detailed investigations. Our study focuses on the metasediments of the Aulus basin hosting the Lherz peridotite body and associated ultramafic fragments of smaller size. The new data set comprises of structural analysis and detailed geological mapping of the massive Mesozoic marbles that form the prerift sequence typical of the NPZ and of the ultramafic-rich clastic breccia formations surrounding the peridotite bodies. The massive marbles display an evolution from hot and ductile to cold and brittle deformation, indicative of an exhumation process ending with the sedimentary reworking of both the deformed Mesozoic metasediments and the exhumed ultramafic rocks. Crystal Preferred Orientations (CPO) measured in the marbles support a deformation mechanism by dislocation creep of calcite, which is dominant between 400 °C and 600 °C; these deformation temperatures are within the range determined earlier by Clerc et al. (2015), using RSCM (Raman Spectroscopy of Carbonaceous Material) geothermometry. As a consequence, we better describe the transition from ductile to brittle deformation in the prerift marbles and clarify the origin of the syn-rift breccias. Due to continuous exhumation along detachments' faults, the brecciated metamorphic carbonates of the prerift NPZ sedimentary cover were passively uplifted towards shallower levels and progressively unroofed, while transported passively on the back of the exhumed ultramafic footwall. These results are consistent with the recent interpretations of the North Pyrenean peridotites as remnants of subcontinental mantle rocks exhumed within the pre-Pyrenean rift system. We emphasize the importance of tectonic decoupling between the Mesozoic sedimentary cover and the Palaeozoic basement, which leads to the juxtaposition of metamorphosed and deformed Mesozoic sediments

  13. [Effect of population density on enzymatic activity of antioxidative and phenol oxidase systems of imagoes and nymphs of the marble cockroach Nauphoeta cinerea].

    PubMed

    Murzagulov, G S; Saltykova, E S; Gaĭfullina, L R; Nikolenko, A G

    2013-01-01

    The work deals with effect of density of population on functional activity of components pf protective system of adult individuals and nymphs of the marble cockroach. The resistance of individuals has been noted to decrease both at individual maintenance and under conditions of overpopulation. Changes in activities of enzymes of antioxidative and phenoloxidase systems are studied ion the insect hemolymph and intestine. Possible consequences of isolation and overpopulation are discussed both for stability and for individual development.

  14. Induced abortion and contraception in Italy.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, A; Grandolfo, M E

    1991-09-01

    This article discusses the legal and epidemiologic status of abortion in Italy, and its relationship to fertility and contraception. Enacted in May 1978, Italy's abortion law allows the operation to be performed during the 1st 90 days of gestation for a broad range of health, social, and psychological reasons. Women under 18 must receive written permission from a parent, guardian, or judge in order to undergo an abortion. The operation is free of charge. Health workers who object to abortion because of religious or moral reasons are exempt from participating. Regional differences exist concerning the availability of abortion, easy to procure in some places and difficult to obtain in others. After an initial increase following legalization, the abortion rate was 13.5/1000 women aged 15-44 and the abortion ratio was 309/1000 live births -- an intermediate rate and ratio compared to other countries. By the time the Abortion Act of 1978 was adopted, Italy already had one of the lowest fertility levels in Europe. Thus, the legalization of abortion has had no impact on fertility trends. Contrary to initial fears that the legalization of abortion would make abortion a method of family planning, 80% of the women who sought an abortion in 1983-88 were using birth control at the time (withdrawal being the most common method used by this group). In fact, most women who undergo abortions are married, between the ages of 25-34, and with at least one child. Evidence indicates widespread ignorance concerning reproduction. In a 1989 survey, only 65% of women could identify the fertile period of the menstrual cycle. Italy has no sex education in schools or national family planning programs. Compared to most of Europe, Italy still has low levels of reliable contraceptive usage. This points to the need to guarantee the availability of abortion.

  15. Reconciling historical and contemporary evidence of aeolian-based, gully annealing processes in Glen, Marble, and Grand Canyon, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankey, J. B.; Draut, A. E.

    2013-12-01

    In the absence of large Colorado River floods in Glen, Marble, and Grand Canyons since the completion of Glen Canyon Dam, the geomorphic process most able to counteract the effects of gully incision on terraces and slopes above the contemporary active Colorado River channel is aeolian sand transport that can partially or entirely fill (anneal) small gullies. Whereas gully-formation processes have been much studied, relatively little is known about processes of gully annealing. Aeolian-based annealing has been observed in several instances in the modern Colorado River corridor operating on time scales of months. However, individual, short-term occurrences of aeolian deposition that counteract gully erosion have not yet been expanded into a landscape-scale evaluation of the prevalence of gully-annealing processes over longer time scales (years-decades) along the post-dam corridor. The extent that aeolian or other annealing processes might slow, or temporarily reverse, gully incision and erosion is important in this system because of the propensity for erosion damage to locations of cultural significance that are extensive on terraces and slopes above the contemporary active Colorado River channel. Moreover, the reduction of mainstem fluvial sediment inputs to the system since completion of Glen Canyon Dam might impact the potential of aeolian redistribution of Colorado River-derived sediment as an effective gully annealing mechanism on upper slopes and terraces. We present an investigation of the extent that observations of (i) historical annealing and (ii) contemporary annealing potential, reconcile with (iii) literature and/or model-based estimates of relative rates of gully formation and aeolian deposition in this system. The central question of this work is whether these complimentary lines of evidence support aeolian infilling as a viable mechanism for annealing gullies in Glen, Marble, and Grand Canyons, and analogous systems. We examine the evidence for

  16. The Effect of Selected Cleaning Techniques on Berkshire Lee Marble: A Scientific Study at Philadelphia City Hall

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mossotti, Victor G.; Eldeeb, A. Raouf; Fries, Terry L.; Coombs, Mary Jane; Naude, Virginia N.; Soderberg, Lisa; Wheeler, George S.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes a scientific investigation of the effects of eight different cleaning techniques on the Berkshire Lee marble component of the facade of the East Center Pavilion at Philadelphia City Hall; the study was commissioned by the city of Philadelphia. The eight cleaning techniques evaluated in this study were power wash (proprietary gel detergent followed by water rinse under pressure), misting (treatment with potable, nebulized water for 24-36 hours), gommage (proprietary Thomann-Hanry low-pressure, air-driven, small-particle, dry abrasion), combination (gommage followed by misting), Armax (sodium bicarbonate delivered under pressure in a water wash), JOS (dolomite powder delivered in a low-pressure, rotary-vortex water wash), laser (thermal ablation), and dry ice (powdered-dry-ice abrasion delivered under pressure). In our study approximately 160 cores were removed from the building for laboratory analysis. We developed a computer program to analyze scanning-electron-micrograph images for the microscale surface roughness and other morphologic parameters of the stone surface, including the near-surface fracture density of the stone. An analysis of more than 1,100 samples cut from the cores provided a statistical basis for crafting the essential elements of a reduced-form, mixed-kinetics conceptual model that represents the deterioration of calcareous stone in terms of self-organized soiling and erosion patterns. This model, in turn, provided a basis for identifying the variables that are affected by the cleaning techniques and for evaluating the extent to which such variables influence the stability of the stone. The model recognizes three classes of variables that may influence the soiling load on the stone, including such exogenous environmental variables as airborne moisture, pollutant concentrations, and local aerodynamics, and such endogenous stone variables as surface chemistry and microstructure (fracturing, roughness, and so on). This study

  17. Reclamation of acidic mine residues by creation of technosoils with the addition of biochar and marble waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Barriga, Fabián; Díaz, Vicente; Acosta, José; Faz, Ángel; Zornoza, Raul

    2016-04-01

    This study reports the short-term effect of biochar and marble waste addition for the reclamation of acidic mine residues. A lab incubation was carried out for 90 days. Biochars derived from pig manure (PM), crop residues (CR) and municipal solid waste (MSW) were added to the soil at a rate of 20 g kg-1. The marble waste (MW) was added at a rate of 200 g kg-1. Bochars and MW were applied independently and combined. A control soil was used without application of amendments. The evolution of different physical, chemical and biochemical properties and availability of heavy metals was periodically monitored. Results showed that original pH (2.8) was increased with all amendments, those samples containing MW being the ones with the highest pH (~8.0). The electrical conductivity (EC) decreased from 6.6 to 3.0-4.5 mS cm-1 in all the treatments receiving MW. Soil organic C (SOC) increased in all samples receiving biochar up to 18-20 g kg-1, with no shifts during the 90 d incubation, indicating the high stability of the C supplied. Recalcitrant organic C accounted for ~90-98% of the SOC. No significant effect of amendment addition was observed for carbohydrates, soluble C, microbial biomass C and β-glucosidase activity. However, arylesterase activity increased with amendments, highly related to pH. The availability of heavy metals decreased up to 90-95% owing to the addition of amendments, mainly in samples containing MW. The MW provided conditions to increase pH and decrease EC and metals mobility. Biochar was an effective strategy to increase SOC, recalcitrant C and AS, essential to create soil structure. However, a labile source of organic matter should be added together with the proposed amendments to promote the activation of microbial communities. Acknowledgement : This work has been funded by Fundación Séneca (Agency of Science and Technology of the Region of Murcia, Spain) by the project 18920/JLI/13

  18. Supplementation of glycerol or fructose via drinking water to enhance marbling deposition and meat quality of finishing cattle.

    PubMed

    Volpi-Lagreca, Gabriela; Duckett, Susan K

    2016-02-01

    Thirty-six Angus-cross steers (667 ± 34.4 kg initial BW, 24.5 mo) were used to assess the impact of short-term glycerin or high-fructose corn syrup administration via drinking water on meat quality and marbling deposition. Steers blocked by BW (3 blocks) were assigned randomly to 1 of 3 drinking water treatments: 1) control (CON), 2) 4.3% crude glycerin (GLYC), or 3) 4.3% high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) for the final 25 d before slaughter. Average daily gain was lower ( = 0.01) and final live weight was lower ( < 0.01) with HFCS administration compared with CON. Dry matter intake and water intake did not differ among treatments. Fat thickness, muscle depth, and intramuscular fat measured by ultrasound did not differ among treatments. Crude glycerin or HFCS via water supplementation did not alter HCW, dressing percentage, rib eye area, fat thickness, KPH, skeletal maturity, or marbling score. Longissimus muscle and subcutaneous fat color (L*, a*, and b*) were not affected by drinking water treatment. Total lipid content, total fatty acid content, and fatty acid composition of the LM did not differ among drinking water treatments. Supplementation of drinking water with GLYC or HFCS did not alter Warner-Bratzler shear force values or water-holding capacity (drip loss, cook shrink). Intramuscular mean adipocyte diameter was greater ( = 0.02) for steers offered HFCS compared with steers offered GLYC, with CON steers being intermediate. These differences in mean adipocyte size were related to changes in the adipocyte size distribution. There were greater proportions of small (20 to 30 μm) adipocytes in GLYC compared with HFCS and CON. In contrast, HFCS and CON had greater proportions of medium (40 to 50 μm) adipocytes than GLYC. The relative mRNA expression of lipogenic genes (acetyl Co-A carboxylase [ACC], fatty acid binding protein 4 [FABP4], fatty acid synthase [FASN], glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase [GPAT], retinol-binding protein 4 [RBP4], and stearoyl

  19. The bovine fatty acid binding protein 4 gene is significantly associated with marbling and subcutaneous fat depth in Wagyu x Limousin F2 crosses.

    PubMed

    Michal, J J; Zhang, Z W; Gaskins, C T; Jiang, Z

    2006-08-01

    Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4), which is expressed in adipose tissue, interacts with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and binds to hormone-sensitive lipase and therefore, plays an important role in lipid metabolism and homeostasis in adipocytes. The objective of this study was to investigate associations of the bovine FABP4 gene with fat deposition. Both cDNA and genomic DNA sequences of the bovine gene were retrieved from the public databases and aligned to determine its genomic organization. Primers targeting two regions of the FABP4 gene were designed: from nucleotides 5433-6106 and from nucleotides 7417-7868 (AAFC01136716). Direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products on two DNA pools from high- and low-marbling animals revealed two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs): AAFC01136716.1:g.7516G>C and g.7713G>C. The former SNP, detected by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism using restriction enzyme MspA1I, was genotyped on 246 F2 animals in a Waygu x Limousin F2 reference population. Statistical analysis showed that the FABP4 genotype significantly affected marbling score (P = 0.0398) and subcutaneous fat depth (P = 0.0246). The FABP4 gene falls into a suggestive/significant quantitative trait loci interval for beef marbling that was previously reported on bovine chromosome 14 in three other populations.

  20. ESR spectroscopy as a tool for identifying joining fragments of antique marbles: the example of a pulpit by Donatello and Michelozzo.

    PubMed

    Attanasio, D; Platania, R

    2000-06-01

    ESR spectroscopy is one of the physicochemical techniques used to characterize archaeological white marbles and obtain information about their quarries of provenance. This is done by measuring selected spectral features of the Mn(2+) impurity ubiquitously present in marbles and developing a statistical classification rule from the variable vectors measured for a significant number of samples of known provenance (the quarry database). Now we show that the overall variability exhibited by the same spectroscopic features decreases rapidly with the linear dimensions of the sampled block and can be used to distinguish fragments belonging to the same piece of stone from those simply originating from the same quarry. Application of the method to the seven marble panels of the Donatello pulpit in Prato (Tuscany) shows that they have all been cut from the same single block and their different degradation must be ascribed to differential weathering and to the different conservation treatments undergone in the past. The limits and possible drawbacks of the method are also discussed.

  1. ESR Spectroscopy as a Tool for Identifying Joining Fragments of Antique Marbles: The Example of a Pulpit by Donatello and Michelozzo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attanasio, Donato; Platania, Rosario

    2000-06-01

    ESR spectroscopy is one of the physicochemical techniques used to characterize archaeological white marbles and obtain information about their quarries of provenance. This is done by measuring selected spectral features of the Mn2+ impurity ubiquitously present in marbles and developing a statistical classification rule from the variable vectors measured for a significant number of samples of known provenance (the quarry database). Now we show that the overall variability exhibited by the same spectroscopic features decreases rapidly with the linear dimensions of the sampled block and can be used to distinguish fragments belonging to the same piece of stone from those simply originating from the same quarry. Application of the method to the seven marble panels of the Donatello pulpit in Prato (Tuscany) shows that they have all been cut from the same single block and their different degradation must be ascribed to differential weathering and to the different conservation treatments undergone in the past. The limits and possible drawbacks of the method are also discussed.

  2. Color measurements on marble and limestone briquettes exposed to outdoor environment in the Eastern United States. Volume I: Results of exposure 1984-1990

    SciTech Connect

    Reimann, K.J.

    1994-04-01

    In a long-term program that began in 1984, limestone and marble briquettes have been exposed to both anthropogenic acid deposition and natural weathering at four field sites in the eastern United States. Similar tests began at an Ohio site in 1986. Effects of exposure on the briquettes and other materials at the sites are evaluated periodically by several federal agencies cooperating in the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). One of the primary contributions of Argonne National Laboratory to the NAPAP has been the measurement of tristimulus color change on samples exposed to the environment. Results from the first six years indicate a yellowing of the marble and a darkening of limestone on both the skyward and groundward surfaces of fresh and preexposed briquettes. The relationship between discoloration and exposure period appears to be linear. Discoloration rates as a function of a cumulative exposure time are almost constant for marble and slightly decreasing for limestone Dark spots on groundward surfaces were measured with tristimulus color equipment prior to chemical analysis to determine if a correlation exists between darkening (change in reflectance) and SO{sub 4} concentration. Taking exposure time into consideration, and assuming that the airborne concentration of dark particles, which cause darkening, is proportional to airborne SO{sub 2} concentration, one can establish a linear relationship between exposure time, darkening, and SO{sub 2} concentration. The program is continuing so that additional data can be obtained.

  3. Identifying Enclosed Chemical Reaction and Dynamics at the Molecular Level Using Shell-Isolated Miniaturized Plasmonic Liquid Marble.

    PubMed

    Han, Xuemei; Lee, Hiang Kwee; Lee, Yih Hong; Hao, Wei; Liu, Yejing; Phang, In Yee; Li, Shuzhou; Ling, Xing Yi

    2016-04-21

    Current microscale tracking of chemical kinetics is limited to destructive ex situ methods. Here we utilize Ag nanocube-based plasmonic liquid marble (PLM) microreactor for in situ molecular-level identification of reaction dynamics. We exploit the ultrasensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) capability imparted by the plasmonic shell to unravel the mechanism and kinetics of aryl-diazonium surface grafting reaction in situ, using just a 2-μL reaction droplet. This reaction is a robust approach to generate covalently functionalized metallic surfaces, yet its kinetics remain unknown to date. Experiments and simulations jointly uncover a two-step sequential grafting process. An initial Langmuir chemisorption of sulfonicbenzene diazonium (dSB) salt onto Ag surfaces forms an intermediate sulfonicbenzene monolayer (Ag-SB), followed by subsequent autocatalytic multilayer growth of Ag-SB3. Kinetic rate constants reveal 19-fold faster chemisorption than multilayer growth. Our ability to precisely decipher molecular-level reaction dynamics creates opportunities to develop more efficient processes in synthetic chemistry and nanotechnology.

  4. Early embryonic development of the central nervous system in the Australian crayfish and the Marbled crayfish (Marmorkrebs).

    PubMed

    Vilpoux, K; Sandeman, R; Harzsch, S

    2006-04-01

    This study sets out to provide a systematic analysis of the development of the primordial central nervous system (CNS) in embryos of two decapod crustaceans, the Australian crayfish Cherax destructor (Malacostraca, Decapoda, Astacida) and the parthenogenetic Marbled crayfish (Marmorkrebs, Malacostraca, Decapoda, Astacida) by histochemical labelling with phalloidin, a general marker for actin. One goal of our study was to examine the neurogenesis in these two organisms with a higher temporal resolution than previous studies did. The second goal was to explore if there are any developmental differences between the parthenogenetic Marmorkrebs and the sexually reproducing Australian crayfish. We found that in the embryos of both species the sequence of neurogenetic events and the architecture of the embryonic CNS are identical. The naupliar neuromeres proto-, deuto-, tritocerebrum, and the mandibular neuromeres emerge simultaneously. After this "naupliar brain" has formed, there is a certain time lag before the maxilla one primordium develops and before the more caudal neuromeres follow sequentially in the characteristic anterior-posterior gradient. Because the malacostracan egg-nauplius represents a re-capitulation of a conserved ancestral information, which is expressed during development, we speculate that the naupliar brain also conserves an ancestral piece of information on how the brain architecture of an early crustacean or even arthropod ancestor may have looked like. Furthermore, we compare the architecture of the embryonic crayfish CNS to that of the brain and thoracic neuromeres in insects and discuss the similarities and differences that we found against an evolutionary background.

  5. Genetic analyses of historic and modern marbled murrelets suggest decoupling of migration and gene flow after habitat fragmentation

    PubMed Central

    Peery, M. Zachariah; Hall, Laurie A.; Sellas, Anna; Beissinger, Steven R.; Moritz, Craig; Bérubé, Martine; Raphael, Martin G.; Nelson, S. Kim; Golightly, Richard T.; McFarlane-Tranquilla, Laura; Newman, Scott; Palsbøll, Per J.

    2010-01-01

    The dispersal of individuals among fragmented populations is generally thought to prevent genetic and demographic isolation, and ultimately reduce extinction risk. In this study, we show that a century of reduction in coastal old-growth forests, as well as a number of other environmental factors, has probably resulted in the genetic divergence of marbled murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus) in central California, despite the fact that 7 per cent of modern-sampled murrelets in this population were classified as migrants using genetic assignment tests. Genetic differentiation appears to persist because individuals dispersing from northern populations contributed relatively few young to the central California population, as indicated by the fact that migrants were much less likely to be members of parent–offspring pairs than residents (10.5% versus 45.4%). Moreover, a recent 1.4 per cent annual increase in the proportion of migrants in central California, without appreciable reproduction, may have masked an underlying decline in the resident population without resulting in demographic rescue. Our results emphasize the need to understand the behaviour of migrants and the extent to which they contribute offspring in order to determine whether dispersal results in gene flow and prevents declines in resident populations. PMID:19906669

  6. Report on technical feasibility of underground pumped hydroelectric storage in a marble quarry site in the Northeast United States

    SciTech Connect

    Chas. T. Main, Inc.

    1982-03-01

    The technical and economic aspects of constructing a very high head underground hydroelectric pumped storage were examined at a prefeasibility level. Excavation of existing caverns in the West Rutland Vermont marble quarry would be used to construct the underground space. A plant capacity of 1200 MW and 12 h of continuous capacity were chosen as plant operating conditions. The site geology, plant design, and electrical and mechanical equipment required were considered. The study concluded that the cost of the 1200 MW underground pumped storage hydro electric project at this site even with the proposed savings from marketable material amounts to between $581 and $595 per kilowatt of installed capacity on a January 1982 pricing level. System studies performed by the planning group of the New England Power System indicate that the system could economically justify up to about $442 per kilowatt on an energy basis with no credit for capacity. To accommodate the plant with the least expensive pumping energy, a coal and nuclear generation mix of approximately 65% would have to be available before the project becomes feasible. It is not expected that this condition can be met before the year 2000 or beyond. It is therefore concluded that the West Rutland underground pumped storage facility is uneconomic at this time. Several variables however could have marked influence on future planning and should be examined on periodic basis.

  7. Raw neutron scattering data for strain measurement of hydraulically loaded granite and marble samples in triaxial stress state

    SciTech Connect

    Polsky, Yarom

    2014-05-23

    This entry contains raw data files from experiments performed on the Vulcan beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using a pressure cell. Cylindrical granite and marble samples were subjected to confining pressures of either 0 psi or approximately 2500 psi and internal pressures of either 0 psi, 1500 psi or 2500 psi through a blind axial hole at the center of one end of the sample. The sample diameters were 1.5" and the sample lengths were 6". The blind hole was 0.25" in diameter and 3" deep. One set of experiments measured strains at points located circumferentially around the center of the sample with identical radii to determine if there was strain variability (this would not be expected for a homogeneous material based on the symmetry of loading). Another set of experiments measured load variation across the radius of the sample at a fixed axial and circumferential location. Raw neutron diffraction intensity files and experimental parameter descriptions are included.

  8. Pulling Marbles from a Bag: Deducing the Regional Impact History of the SPA Basin from Impact Melt Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Barbara A.; Coker, R. F.

    2009-01-01

    The South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin is an important target for absolute age-dating. Vertical and lateral impact mixing ensures that regolith within SPA will contain rock fragments from SPA itself, local impact craters, and faraway giant basins. About 20% of the regolith at any given site is foreign [1, 2], but much of this material will be cold ejecta, not impact melt. We calculated the fraction of contributed impact melt using scaling laws to estimate the amount and provenance of impact melt, demonstrating that SPA melt is the dominant impact melt rock (>70%) likely to be present. We also constructed a statistical model to illustrate how many randomly-selected impact-melt fragments would need to be dated, and with what accuracy, to confidently reproduce the impact history of a site. A detailed impact history becomes recognizable after a few hundred to a thousand randomly-selected marbles, however, it will be useful to have more information (e.g. compositional, mineralogical, remote sensing) to group fragments. These exercises show that SPA melt has a high probability of being present in a scoop sample and that dating of a few hundred to a thousand impact-melt fragments will yield the impact history of the SPA basin.

  9. Metabolic adjustments during semi-aestivation of the marble swamp eel (Synbranchus marmoratus, Bloch 1795)--a facultative air breathing fish.

    PubMed

    Moraes, G; Altran, A E; Avilez, I M; Barbosa, C C; Bidinotto, P M

    2005-05-01

    Metabolic changes, principally in intermediary metabolism and nitrogen excretion, were investigated in the marble swamp eel (Synbranchus marmoratus) after 15 and 45 days of artificially induced semi-aestivation. Glucose, glycogen, lactate, pyruvate, free amino acids, triglycerides, ammonia, urea, and urate contents were determined in liver, kidney, white muscle, heart, brain, and plasma. Lactate dehydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, aspartate amino transferase, alanine amino transferase, glutamine synthase, ornithine carbamoyl transferase, and arginase enzymes were assayed. The teleost S. marmoratus maintained initial energetic demands by lipid oxidation. The course of normal oxidative processes was observed through tissue enzyme profiles. After the lipid stores were exhausted, the fish consumed body proteins. Constant values of hematocrit during induced semi-aestivation suggested that the water balance remained normal. Therefore, the surrounding water was probably did not trigger the semi-aestivation in this teleost. Decrease of ammonia and increase of renal urea synthesis after 45 days of semi-aestivation led to the assumption that an alternative form of eliminating ammonia exists. Metabolic changes entailed by starvation were proposed to explain the biosynthesis of small molecules involved in the semi-aestivation of S. marmoratus.

  10. Kittlitz's and Marbled Murrelets in Kenai Fjords National Park, South-Central Alaska: At-Sea Distribution, Abundance, and Foraging Habitat, 2006-08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arimitsu, M.L.; Piatt, J.F.; Romano, Marc D.; Madison, E.N.; Conaway, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    Kittlitz's murrelets (Brachyramphus brevirostris) and marbled murrelets (B. marmoratus) are small diving seabirds and are of management concern because of population declines in coastal Alaska. In 2006-08, we conducted a study in Kenai Fjords National Park, south-central Alaska, to estimate the recent population size of Brachyramphus murrelets, to evaluate productivity based on juvenile to adult ratios during the fledgling season, and to describe and compare their use of marine habitat. We also attempted a telemetry study to examine Kittlitz's murrelet nesting habitat requirements and at-sea movements. We estimated that the Kittlitz's murrelet population was 671 ? 144 birds, and the marbled murrelet population was 5,855 ? 1,163 birds. Kittlitz's murrelets were limited to the heads of three fjords with tidewater glaciers, whereas marbled murrelets were more widely distributed. Population estimates for both species were lower in 2007 than in 2006 and 2008, possibly because of anomalous oceanographic conditions that may have delayed breeding phenology. During late season surveys, we observed few hatch-year marbled murrelets and only a single hatch-year Kittlitz's murrelet over the course of the study. Using radio telemetry, we found a likely Kittlitz's murrelet breeding site on a mountainside bordering one of the fjords. We never observed radio-tagged Kittlitz's murrelets greater than 10 kilometer from their capture sites, suggesting that their foraging range during breeding is narrow. We observed differences in oceanography between fjords, reflecting differences in sill characteristics and orientation relative to oceanic influence. Acoustic biomass, a proxy for zooplankton and small schooling fish, generally decreased with distance from glaciers in Northwestern Lagoon, but was more variable in Aialik Bay where dense forage fish schools moved into glacial areas late in the summer. Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii), capelin (Mallotus villosus) and Pacific sand lance

  11. Geologic map and upper Paleozoic stratigraphy of the Marble Canyon area, Cottonwood Canyon quadrangle, Death Valley National Park, Inyo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, Paul; Stevens, Calvin H.; Belasky, Paul; Montañez, Isabel P.; Martin, Lauren G.; Wardlaw, Bruce R.; Sandberg, Charles A.; Wan, Elmira; Olson, Holly A.; Priest, Susan S.

    2014-01-01

    This geologic map and pamphlet focus on the stratigraphy, depositional history, and paleogeographic significance of upper Paleozoic rocks exposed in the Marble Canyon area in Death Valley National Park, California. Bedrock exposed in this area is composed of Mississippian to lower Permian (Cisuralian) marine sedimentary rocks and the Jurassic Hunter Mountain Quartz Monzonite. These units are overlain by Tertiary and Quaternary nonmarine sedimentary deposits that include a previously unrecognized tuff to which we tentatively assign an age of late middle Miocene (~12 Ma) based on tephrochronologic analysis, in addition to the previously recognized Pliocene tuff of Mesquite Spring. Mississippian and Pennsylvanian rocks in the Marble Canyon area represent deposition on the western continental shelf of North America. Mississippian limestone units in the area (Tin Mountain, Stone Canyon, and Santa Rosa Hills Limestones) accumulated on the outer part of a broad carbonate platform that extended southwest across Nevada into east-central California. Carbonate sedimentation was interrupted by a major eustatic sea-level fall that has been interpreted to record the onset of late Paleozoic glaciation in southern Gondwana. Following a brief period of Late Mississippian clastic sedimentation (Indian Springs Formation), a rise in eustatic sea level led to establishment of a new carbonate platform that covered most of the area previously occupied by the Mississippian platform. The Pennsylvanian Bird Spring Formation at Marble Canyon makes up the outer platform component of ten third-order (1 to 5 m.y. duration) stratigraphic sequences recently defined for the regional platform succession. The regional paleogeography was fundamentally changed by major tectonic activity along the continental margin beginning in middle early Permian time. As a result, the Pennsylvanian carbonate shelf at Marble Canyon subsided and was disconformably overlain by lower Permian units (Osborne Canyon and

  12. Helium isotopes and tectonics in southern Italy

    SciTech Connect

    Sano, Yuji; Wakita, Hiroshi ); Nuccio, M.P. ); Italiano, F.

    1989-06-01

    Geodynamic evolution of southern Italy can be understood within the framework of the Mediterranean-Alpine System. Subduction of a plate along the Sicily-Calabrian forearc under the Tyrrhenian Sea has been suggested by many geophysicists, although it is not yet confirmed and remains somewhat controversial. Helium isotope ratios provide useful information on the geotectonic structure of the region. The authors report here the {sup 3}H/{sup 4}He ratios of terrestrial gas samples from southern Italy. The observed {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios are relatively high in the Eolian volcanic arc region and low in the other areas. Dichotomous explanations are presented. Firstly, volcanic arc-forearc hypothesis suggests the subduction along the Sicily-Calabrian forearc. Secondly, horizontal transport hypothesis is described based on the relationship between the ratios and radial distance from the recent spreading basin in Southern Tyrrhenian Sea.

  13. [Haemaphysalis concinna Koch, 1844 in Italy].

    PubMed

    Stella, E; Sobrero, L

    1978-12-01

    The authors provide here the data concerning the first italian finding of tick Hemaphysalis concinna (Ixodidae). Two males of this species--which has a large geographic diffusion--were actually caught for the first time in Italy, in July 1977. They were found on the ground of the Castel Porziano estate (Rome) at sealevel, in two different grassy places. The authors describe their morphological characters and provide some essential data on the environment of Castel Porziano.

  14. Population exposed to landslide risk in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigila, Alessandro; Iadanza, Carla; Munafò, Michele; Baiocco, Fabio; Marinosci, Ines; Chiocchini, Raffaella; Mugnoli, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    Italy is one of the European countries most affected by landslides counting over 486,000 mass movements with a total area of 20,700 square kilometres equal to 6.9% of the national territory. Moreover Italy is a densely urbanized country: 8101 municipalities, about 200 inhabitants per sq. km, 16,000 km of rail network and 180,000 km of road network. Landslides caused more than 5000 fatalities in the last century and considerable damage to urban areas, transport infrastructure and facilities, environmental and cultural heritage. The aim of this work is to estimate the population exposed to landslide risk in Italy. The input data are: the Italian Landslide Inventory, the Italian Population Census data and the high-resolution Artificial surfaces-Imperviousness Layer (Geoland2). The Italian Landslide Inventory (Progetto IFFI) realised by ISPRA (Italian National Institute for Environmental Protection and Research) and the Regions and Self-governing Provinces, identifies landslides occurred in the national territory in accordance with standardized methods and using a detailed landslide mapping (1:10,000 scale). The 14th Population Census, made by ISTAT (Italian National Institute of Statistics) in 2001, contains data of resident population for the 382,534 census tracts in which Italy is divided. The pan-European high-resolution (HR) Artificial surfaces-Imperviousness Layer, realized using remote sensing data within the GMES initiative (Global Monitoring for Environment and Security) by European Commission and European Space Agency, contains the degree of imperviousness (between 0 and 100%). GIS overlay of this information layer (20 x 20 m grid) with census tracts has allowed the spatialization of population within urban settlements of each census tract. This methodology has been particularly useful in the case of rural census tracts characterized by large surface area and low population density. The methodology could be also applied to estimate the population exposed to

  15. Molecular detection of bovine kobuviruses in Italy.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Barbara; Di Profio, Federica; Di Felice, Elisabetta; Ceci, Chiara; Pistilli, Maria Gabriella; Marsilio, Fulvio

    2012-12-01

    Faecal samples obtained from either asymptomatic or diarrhoeic calves in Italy were screened for bovine kobuviruses (BKVs) using specific primers. BKV RNA was detected in 4.9 % of the samples, with higher positivity rates in diarrhoeic calves (5.3 %) than in asymptomatic animals (4.8 %), although the difference was not statistically significant. Upon sequence analysis, all of the Italian viruses formed a tight group along with BKV-like sequences previously detected in Thailand and Japan.

  16. Italy. Section 23. Weather and Climate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1953-09-01

    Tramontana . . . . . .. ...... . 23- 6 (4) Foehn . . . . . . . . . . . . 23. 6 3, Regional discussion of climate ....... . . 23- 6 a. Italian Alps...all of Italy, the Po Valley a cold front, has the most extreme climate. Winters are cild, (4) Poehn - The foehn is a. downslope wind cloudy, and...in Liguria and northern noon. In the western part of the valley, the foggy Tuscany, The foehn is usually associated with the weather may persist for

  17. Malaria in illegal Chinese immigrants, Italy.

    PubMed

    Matteelli, A; Volonterio, A; Gulletta, M; Galimberti, L; Maroccolo, S; Gaiera, G; Giani, G; Rossi, M; Dorigoni, N; Bellina, L; Orlando, G; Bisoffi, Z; Castelli, F

    2001-01-01

    A cluster of 22 imported malaria cases, 21 caused by Plasmodium falciparum, was observed among illegal Chinese immigrants in northern Italy in the summer of 2000. The rate of severe disease was high because the patients were not immune and they sought health-care services late in their illness because of their clandestine status. Recognition of the outbreak was delayed because no regional alert system among infectious diseases hospitals was in place.

  18. Gastroenteritis Outbreak at Holiday Resort, Central Italy

    PubMed Central

    Prencipe, Vincenza; Ripani, Alessandro; Di Francesco, Cristina; Casaccia, Claudia; Crudeli, Silvia; Ferri, Nicola; Giovannini, Armando; Marconi, Maria Maddalena; Marfoglia, Cristina; Melai, Valeria; Savini, Giovanni; Scortichini, Giampiero; Semprini, Primula; Ruggeri, Franco Maria

    2008-01-01

    During the summer of 2003, a gastroenteritis outbreak spread throughout a holiday resort in central Italy. Fecally contaminated groundwater and seawater were leaking into the non–drinking-water system, which was found to be connected to the drinking-water system of a large resort. This contamination had a primary role in the onset of the outbreak and spread of the infection. PMID:18325266

  19. [Consistency and dynamics of immigration in Italy].

    PubMed

    Blangiardo, G C; Terzera, L

    2011-01-01

    According to recent data, foreign population currently in Italy is estimated to be 5,3 million, 550,000 irregular. Migration from Eastern Europe has progressively assumed leading position in the Italian panorama, downsizing other origins: betweenn 2005 and 2010, this component passed from 46% to 50,8% of the total immigrants, whereas all the other macro-areas have lost relative importance. Perspectives of slowing down of migration toward Italy could be real only when significant changes would happen in the areas at the origin of migration flow. In fact, if it is true that the demographic surplus from East Europe is bound to decrease through the process of local turnover of work supply, other great regions will show enormous excess of manpower. In North Africa, 3 million new workplaces will yearly be needed just to absorb excess of young workforce; in Latin America, the new workplaces to create will be almost twice as many. The sub Saharan Africa will however be under special observation, with 15-20 million places to create annually to absorb excess of offer. Italy could play as one of the safety valves of emigration.

  20. [A note on induced abortion in Italy].

    PubMed

    Cagiano De Azevedo, R

    1980-01-01

    The adoption of a recent law on abortion (1978) makes available in Italy new statistics at both the national and regional levels. Following the official source of ISTAT, the abortion rate/100 livebirths in 1979 was about 28%, about 40% in the northern part of Italy, and only 16% in Mezzogiorno. This abortion rate, as an average data at the national level, corresponds to a normal position among similar rates in western countries; closer to EEC member states. But the regional variability seems a very interesting new aspect of the Italian tryptic (north, center, south) largely presented in many demographic indicators. 3 factors are presented as a possible explication of this variability: a real different attitude of women and couples towards abortion from cultural, religious, and political points of view; the coexistence of legal and illegal abortion despite the adoption of a new liberal law; and the very important disequilibrium in the distribution of structures and medical services available to assure abortions in different parts of the country. Some other demographic points related to abortion are also presented here, particularly in connection with age structure of women and their marital status. Future trends in abortion with subsequent effects on fertility are also discussed at the end of this article. The arguments follow 2 alternatives presented in Italy by the National Committee on Population and the Committee of Demographic Studies. (author's modified)

  1. Chapter 44: history of neurology in Italy.

    PubMed

    Bentivoglio, Marina; Mazzarello, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    The chapter starts from the Renaissance (although the origins of Italian neurology can be traced back to the Middle Ages), when treatises of nervous system physiopathology still followed Hippocratic and Galenic "humoral" theories. In Italy, as elsewhere in Europe, the concepts of humoral pathology were abandoned in the 18th century, when neurology was influenced by novel trends. Neurology acquired the status of clinical discipline (as "clinic of mental diseases") after national reunification (declared in 1861 but completed much later). At the end of the 19th and first decades of the 20th century, eminent Italian "neuropsychiatrists" (including, among many others, Ugo Cerletti, who introduced electroconvulsive shock therapy in 1938) stimulated novel knowledge and approaches, "centers of excellence" flourished, and "Neurological Institutes" were founded. In the first half of the 20th century, the history of Italian neurology was dominated by World Wars I and II (which stimulated studies on the wounded) and the fascist regime in-between the Wars (when the flow of information was instead very limited). Italy became a republic in 1946, and modern neurology and its distinction from psychiatry were finally promoted. The chapter also provides detailed accounts of scientific societies and journals dedicated to the neurological sciences in Italy.

  2. Phlogopite and Quartz Lamellae in Diamond-bearing Diopside from Marbles of the Kokchetav Massif Kazakhstan: Exsolution or Replacement Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    L Dobrzhinetskaya; R Wirth; D Rhede; Z Liu; H Green

    2011-12-31

    Exsolution lamellae of pyroxene in garnet (grt), coesite in titanite and omphacite from UHPM terranes are widely accepted as products of decompression. However, interpretation of oriented lamellae of phyllosilicates, framework silicates and oxides as a product of decompression of pyroxene is very often under debate. Results are presented here of FIB-TEM, FEG-EMP and synchrotron-assisted infrared (IR) spectroscopy studies of phlogopite (Phlog) and phlogopite + quartz (Qtz) lamellae in diamond-bearing clinopyroxene (Cpx) from ultra-high pressure (UHP) marble. These techniques allowed collection of three-dimensional information from the grain boundaries of both the single (phlogopite), two-phase lamellae (phlogopite + quartz), and fluid inclusions inside of diamond included in K-rich Cpx and understanding their relationships and mechanisms of formation. The Cpx grains contain in their cores lamellae-I, which are represented by topotactically oriented extremely thin lamellae of phlogopite (that generally are two units cell wide but locally can be seen to be somewhat broader) and microdiamond. The core composition is: (Ca{sub 0.94}K{sub 0.04}Na{sub 0.02})(Al{sub 0.06}Fe{sub 0.08}Mg{sub 0.88})(Si{sub 1.98}Al{sub 0.02})O{sub 6.00}. Fluid inclusions rich in K and Si are recognized in the core of the Cpx, having no visible connections to the lamellae-I. Lamellar-II inclusions consist of micron-size single laths of phlogopite and lens-like quartz or slightly elongated phlogopite + quartz intergrowths; all are situated in the rim zone of the Cpx. The composition of the rim is (Ca{sub 0.95}Fe{sub 0.03}Na{sub 0.02})(Al{sub 0.05}Fe{sub 0.05}Mg{sub 0.90})Si{sub 2}O{sub 6}, and the rim contains more Ca, Mg than the core, with no K there. Such chemical tests support our microstructural observations and conclusion that the phlogopite lamellae-I are exsolved from the K-rich Cpx-precursor during decompression. It is assumed that Cpx-precursor was also enriched in H{sub 2}O, because

  3. Evaluation of Wheel Loaders in Open Pit Marble Quarrying by Using the AHP and Topsis Approaches / Ocena pracy ładowarki na podwoziu kołowym w odkrywkowej kopalni marmuru w oparciu o metody AHP i topsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kun, Mete; Topaloǧlu, Şeyda; Malli, Tahir

    2013-03-01

    The marble mining in Turkey has been rising since the early 80's. In relation to that, the marble income has become noticeably bigger than those of other mining sectors. In recent years, marble and natural stone export composes half of the total mine export with a value of two billion dollars. This rapid development observed in marble operation has increased the importance of mining economics, income-expenditure balance and cost analysis. The most important cost elements observed in marble quarrying are machinery and equipment, labor costs and geological structures of the field. The aim of this study is to is to propose a multi-criteria decision making (MCDM) approach to evaluate the wheel loader alternatives and select the best loader under multiple criteria. A two-step methodology based on two MCDM methods, which are namely the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) and the Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS), are used in the evaluation procedure. More precisely, AHP is applied to determine the relative weights of evaluation criteria and TOPSIS is applied to rank the wheel loader alternatives. The proposed approach also provides a relatively simple and very well suited decision making tool for this type of decision making problems.

  4. Meeting reproductive demands in a dynamic upwelling system: Foraging strategies of a pursuit-diving seabird, the marbled murrelet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peery, M.Z.; Newman, S.H.; Storlazzi, C.D.; Beissinger, S.R.

    2009-01-01

    Seabirds maintain plasticity in their foraging behavior to cope with energy demands and foraging constraints that vary over the reproductive cycle, but behavioral studies comparing breeding and nonbreeding individuals are rare. Here we characterize how Marbled Murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus) adjust their foraging effort in response to changes in reproductive demands in an upwelling system in central California. We radio-marked 32 murrelets of known reproductive status (9 breeders, 12 potential breeders, and 11 nonbreeders) and estimated both foraging ranges and diving rates during the breeding season. Murrelets spent more time diving during upwelling than oceanographic relaxation, increased their foraging ranges as the duration of relaxation grew longer, and reduced their foraging ranges after transitions to upwelling. When not incubating, murrelets moved in a circadian pattern, spending nighttime hours resting near flyways used to reach nesting habitat and foraging during the daytime an average of 5.7 km (SD 6.7 km) from nighttime locations. Breeders foraged close to nesting habitat once they initiated nesting and nest attendance was at a maximum, and then resumed traveling longer distances following the completion of nesting. Nonbreeders had similar nighttime and daytime distributions and tended to be located farther from inland flyways. Breeders increased the amount of time they spent diving by 71-73% when they had an active nest by increasing the number of dives rather than by increasing the frequency of anaerobiosis. Thus, to meet reproductive demands during nesting, murrelets adopted a combined strategy of reducing energy expended commuting to foraging sites and increasing aerobic dive rates. ?? 2009 by The Cooper Ornithological Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Lanthanum from a modified clay used in eutrophication control is bioavailable to the marbled crayfish (Procambarus fallax f. virginalis).

    PubMed

    van Oosterhout, Frank; Goitom, Eyerusalem; Roessink, Ivo; Lürling, Miquel

    2014-01-01

    To mitigate eutrophication in fresh standing waters the focus is on phosphorus (P) control, i.e. on P inflows to a lake as well as a lake's sediment as internal P source. The in-lake application of the lanthanum (La) modified clays - i.e. La modified bentonite (Phoslock) or La modified kaolinite, aim at dephosphatising the water column and at reducing the release of P from a lake's sediment. Application of these clays raises the question whether La from these clays can become bioavailable to biota. We investigated the bioavailability of La from Phoslock in a controlled parallel groups experiment in which we measured the La in carapace, gills, ovaries, hepatopancreas and abdominal muscle after 0, 14 and 28 days of exposure to Phoslock. Expressing the treatment effect as the difference of the median concentration between the two treatment groups (Phoslock minus control group) yield the following effects, the plus sign (+) indicating an increase, concentrations in µg g(-1) dry weight: Day 14: carapace +10.5 µg g(-1), gills +112 µg g(-1), ovaries +2.6 µg g(-1), hepatopancreas +32.9 µg g(-1) and abodminal muscle +3.2 µg g(-1). Day 28: carapace +17.9 µg g(-1); gills +182 µg g(-1); ovaries +2.2 µg g(-1); hepatopancreas +41.9 µg g(-1) and abdominal muscle +7.6 µg g(-1), all effects were statistically significant. As La from Phoslock is bio-available to and taken up by the marbled crayfishes (Procambarus fallax f. virginalis), we advocate that the application of in-lake chemical water treatments to mitigate eutrophication should be accompanied by a thorough study on potential side effects.

  6. Sandbar Response in Marble and Grand Canyons, Arizona, Following the 2008 High-Flow Experiment on the Colorado River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hazel, Joseph E.; Grams, Paul E.; Schmidt, John C.; Kaplinski, Matt

    2010-01-01

    A 60-hour release of water at 1,203 cubic meters per second (m3/s) from Glen Canyon Dam in March 2008 provided an opportunity to analyze channel-margin response at discharge levels above the normal, diurnally fluctuating releases for hydropower plant operations. We compare measurements at sandbars and associated campsites along the mainstem Colorado River, downstream from Glen Canyon Dam, at 57 locations in Marble and Grand Canyons. Sandbar and main-channel response to the 2008 high-flow experiment (2008 HFE) was documented by measuring bar and bed topography at the study sites before and after the controlled flood and twice more in the following 6 months to examine the persistence of flood-formed deposits. The 2008 HFE caused widespread deposition at elevations above the stage equivalent to a flow rate of 227 m3/s and caused an increase in the area and volume of the high-elevation parts of sandbars, thereby increasing the size of campsite areas. In this study, we differentiate between four response styles, depending on how sediment was distributed throughout each study site. Then, we present the longitudinal pattern relevant to the different response styles and place the site responses in context with two previous high-release experiments conducted in 1996 and 2004. We find that (1) nearly every measured sandbar aggraded above the 227-m3/s water-surface elevation, resulting in sandbars as large or larger than occurred following previous high flows; (2) reaches closest to Glen Canyon Dam were characterized by a greater percentage of sites that incurred net erosion, although the total sand volume in all sediment-flux monitoring reaches was greater following the 2008 HFE than following previous high flows; and (3) longitudinal differences in topographic response in eddies and in the channel suggest a greater and more evenly distributed sediment supply than existed during previous controlled floods from Glen Canyon Dam.

  7. The nature of marbled Terra Sigillata slips: a combined μXRF and μXRD investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, Y.; Sciau, P.; Goudeau, P.; Tamura, N.; Webb, S.; Mehta, A.

    2010-05-01

    In addition to the red terra sigillata production, the largest Gallic workshop (La Graufesenque) made a special type of terra sigillata, called “marbled” by the archaeologists. Produced exclusively at this site, this pottery is characterized by a surface finish made of a mixture of yellow and red slips. Because the two slips are intimately mixed, it is difficult to obtain the precise composition of one of the two constituents without contamination from the other. In order to obtain very precise correlation at the appropriate scale between the color aspect and the elemental and mineralogical phase distributions in the slip, combined electron microprobe, X-ray micro spectroscopies and micro diffraction on cross-sectional samples were performed. The aim of this study is to discover how potters were able to produce this unique type of terra sigillata and especially this particular slip of an intense yellow color. Results show that the yellow component of marbled sigillata was made from a titanium-rich clay preparation. The color is due to the formation of a pseudobrookite (TiFe2O5) phase in the yellow part of the slip, the main characteristics of that structure being considered nowadays as essential for the fabrication of stable yellow ceramic pigments. Its physical properties such as high refractive indices and a melting point higher than that of most silicates widely used as ceramic colorants are indeed determinant for this kind of application. Finally, the red parts have a similar composition (elementary and mineralogical) to the one of standard red slip.

  8. Effect of α-tocopherol on lactone formation in marbled beef and changes in lactone volatility during storage.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Akira; Imanari, Mai; Yonai, Miharu; Shiba, Nobuya

    2012-06-01

    Dynamic-headspace sampling with a standard-addition method was employed to quantitatively analyze aliphatic lactones in rendered fat from marbled beef and to evaluate the effect of the matrix on volatility. Further, the effects of different levels of the antioxidant α-tocopherol on lactone formation were examined. The slopes of the linear regression curves from the standard-addition method were significantly changed (P < 0.05 or 0.01) for all lactones after storage, with the exception of γ-octalactone, indicating the volatility of the longer-chain lactones were increased after storage. The concentrations of γ-lactones were increased after 7 d of storage at 2 °C (P < 0.01), and the α-tocopherol content in the meat affected the formation of γ-octalactone (P < 0.05) and γ-nonalactone (P < 0.01). The greatest increase was observed for γ-nonalactone in the lowest α-tocopherol (2.9 ppm) group: the concentration of 51.4 ppb was 11.7-fold higher than that before storage. Meanwhile, δ-tetradecalactone in the highest α-tocopherol (28.8 ppm) group showed the highest concentration for the lactones at 415.8 ppb, which was 2.6-fold higher than the concentration before storage. The effect of α-tocopherol was unclear for the δ-lactones. The results indicate that most of the γ-lactones are produced by oxidation during storage but that the other lactones are also generated by other processes as well.

  9. Relationship of body mass index with periodontal health status of green marble mine laborers in Kesariyaji, India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santhosh; Dagli, Rushabh J; Dhanni, Chandrakant; Duraiswamy, Prabu

    2009-01-01

    It is evident from literature that an increased body mass index (BMI) may be a potential risk factor for periodontitis. Association between BMI and periodontitis has been ascribed to unhealthy dietary patterns with insufficient micronutrients and excess sugar and fat content. The present study population has been plagued by unhealthy nutritional practices, hence the present study intended to assess the relation between BMI and periodontal status among green marble mine laborers of Kesariyaji, in the Udaipur district of Rajasthan, India. The study sample comprised of 513 subjects aged 18-54 years, drawn using the stratified cluster sampling procedure. BMI was calculated as the ratio of the subject's body weight (in kg) to the square of their height (in meters). Periodontal status was recorded using the Community Periodontal Index (CPI). Binary multiple logistic regression analysis was executed to assess the relation between body mass index and periodontitis. The dependent variable for logistic regression analysis was categorized into control group (scores 0 - 2 of the CPI) and periodontitis group (scores 3 and 4 of the CPI). The overall prevalence of periodontal disease was 98.2%. Caries status and mean number of teeth present deteriorated with the poor periodontal status. Subjects had an increased risk of periodontitis by 57% for each 1kg/m(2) increase in the body mass index, which means that a higher body mass index could be a potential risk factor for periodontitis among the adults aged 18 to 54 years. In conclusion, evaluation of the body mass index could be used in periodontal risk assessment.

  10. A New Species of Eimeria (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the marbled salamander, Ambystoma opacum (Caudata: Ambystomatidae), from northern Louisiana.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chris T; Upton, Steve J

    2008-06-01

    Between December 2002 and June 2004, 10 marbled salamanders, Ambystoma opacum, were examined for coccidian parasites. Salamanders were collected in Bradley (n = 2), Little River (n = 1), Miller (n = 1), and Sevier (n = 1) Counties, Arkansas; Webster Parish, Louisiana (n = 2); and Bowie (n = 1) and Nacogdoches (n = 2) Counties, Texas. Two of 10 (20%) A. opacum from Louisiana harbored an undescribed species of Eimeria. Oocysts of Eimeria trauthi n. sp. were ellipsoidal, 36.6 x 33.1 (33-40 x 29-37) microm, with a thin, single-layered wall; shape index 1.1. Polar granule(s) and micropyle were absent. Oocyst residuum was composed of hundreds of loosely packed homogenous granules of various sizes enclosing a vacuole. Sporocysts were elongate-ellipsoidal, 20.8 x 8.1 (19-22 x 7-9) microm; shape index 2.6. Sporocyst residuum was spherical and composed of a cluster of granules often membrane-bound. This is the first time a coccidium has been reported from an amphibian species in Louisiana and the second time a coccidium has been described from this salamander host. In addition, the following 26 salamanders from various counties in Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Texas were surveyed during the study period and were negative for coccidia: Ambystomatidae, 4 spotted salamanders (Ambystoma maculatum) and 7 mole salamanders (Ambystoma talpoideum); Cryptobranchidae, 4 Ozark hellbenders (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis bishopi); Plethodontidae, 6 spotted dusky salamanders (Desmognathus conanti) and 3 many-ribbed salamanders (Eurycea multiplicata multiplicata); and Salamandridae, 2 central newts (Notophthalmus viridescens louisianensis).

  11. High-pressure deformation of calcite marble and its transformation to aragonite under non-hydrostatic conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hacker, B.R.; Kirby, S.H.

    1993-01-01

    We conducted deformation experiments on Carrara marble in the aragonite and calcite stability fields to observe the synkinematic transformation of calcite to aragonite, and to identify any relationships between transformation and deformation or sample strength. Deformation-induced microstructures in calcite crystals varied most significantly with temperature, ranging from limited slip and twinning at 400??C, limited recrystallization at 500??C, widespread recrystallization at 600 and 700??C, to grain growth at 800-900??C. Variations in confining pressure from 0.3 to 2.0 GPa have no apparent effect on calcite deformation microstructures. Aragonite grew in 10-6-10-7 s-1strain rate tests conducted for 18-524 h at confining pressures of 1.7-2.0 GPa and temperatures of 500-600??C. As in our previously reported hydrostatic experiments on this same transformation, the aragonite nucleated on calcite grain boundaries. The extent of transformation varied from a few percent conversion near pistons at 400??C, 2.0 GPa and 10-4 s-1 strain rate in a 0.8 h long experiment, to 98% transformation in a 21-day test at a strain rate of 10-7 s-7, a temperature of 600??C and a pressure of 2.0 GPa. At 500??C, porphyroblastic 100-200 ??m aragonite crystals grew at a rate faster than 8 ?? 10-1m s-1. At 600??C, the growth of aragonite neoblasts was slower, ???6 ?? 10-1 m s -1, and formed 'glove-and-finger' cellularprecipitation-like textures identical to those observed in hydrostatic experiments. The transformation to aragonite is not accompanied by a shear instability or anisotropic aragonite growth, consistent with its relatively small volume change and latent heat in comparison with compounds that do display those features. ?? 1993.

  12. Involvement of nitric oxide in anticompulsive-like effect of agmatine on marble-burying behaviour in mice.

    PubMed

    Gawali, Nitin B; Chowdhury, Amrita A; Kothavade, Pankaj S; Bulani, Vipin D; Nagmoti, Dnyaneshwar M; Juvekar, Archana R

    2016-01-05

    In view of the reports that nitric oxide modulates the neurotransmitters implicated in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), patients with OCD exhibit higher plasma nitrate levels, and drugs useful in OCD influence nitric oxide. Agmatine is a polyamine and widely distributed in mammalian brain which interacts with nitrergic systems. Hence, the present study was carried out to understand the involvement of nitrergic systems in the anticompulsive-like effect of agmatine. We used marble-burying behaviour (MBB) of mice as the animal model of OCD, and nitric oxide levels in hippocampus (HC) and cortex homogenate were measured. Results revealed that, agmatine (20 and 40mg/kg, i.p) significantly inhibited the MBB. Intraperitoneal administration of nitric oxide enhancers viz. nitric oxide precursor - l-arginine (l-ARG) (400mg/kg and 800mg/kg) increased MBB as well as brain nitrites levels, whereas treatment with N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (30mg/kg and 50mg/kg, i.p.) and 7-nitroindazole (7-NI) (20mg/kg and 40mg/kg) attenuated MBB and nitrites levels in brain. Further, in combination studies, the anticompulsive-like effect of agmatine (20mg/kg, ip) was exacerbated by prior administration of l-ARG (400mg/kg) and conversely l-NAME (15mg/kg) or 7-NI (10.0mg/kg) attenuated OCD-like behaviour with HC and cortex changes in the levels of NO. None of the above treatment had any significant influence on locomotor activity. In conclusion, Agmatine is effective in ameliorating the compulsive-like behaviour in mice which appears to be related to nitric oxide in brain.

  13. Using dye tracing to establish groundwater flow paths in a limestone marble aquifer, University of California, Santa Cruz, California

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, J.; Bertschinger, V. ); Aley, T. )

    1993-04-01

    Areas underlain by karst aquifers are characterized by soluble rock with sinkholes, caves, and a complex underground drainage network. Groundwater issues such as flow direction, well pumping impacts, spring recharge areas, and potential contamination transport routes are greatly complicated by the unique structure of karst aquifers. Standard aquifer analysis techniques cannot be applied unless the structure of the karst aquifer is understood. Water soluble fluorescent dyes are a powerful tool for mapping the irregular subsurface connections and flow paths in karst aquifers. Mapping the subsurface connections allows reasonable estimates of the hydrologic behavior of the aquifer. Two different fluorescent dyes were injected at two points in a limestone karst aquifer system beneath the University of California, Santa Cruz campus. Flow paths in the marble were thought to be closely tied to easily recognized geomorphic alignments of sinkholes associated with fault and fracture zones. The dye tests revealed unexpected and highly complex interconnections. These complex flow paths only partially corresponded to previous surface mapping and aerial photo analysis of fracture systems. Several interfingering but hydrologically unconnected flow paths evidently exist within the cavernous aquifer. For example, dye did not appear at some discharge springs close to the dye injection points, but did appear at more distant springs. This study shows how a dye tracing study in a small, well-defined limestone body can shed light on a variety of environmental and hydrological issues, including potential well pumping impact areas, wellhead protection and recharge areas, parking lot runoff injection to aquifers, and drainage routes from hazardous materials storage areas.

  14. Carbon mineralization, microbial activity and metal dynamics in tailing ponds amended with pig slurry and marble waste.

    PubMed

    Zornoza, Raúl; Faz, Ángel; Carmona, Dora M; Acosta, Jose A; Martínez-Martínez, Silvia; de Vreng, Arno

    2013-03-01

    A field experiment was set up in Cartagena-La Unión Mining District, SE Spain, aimed at evaluating the short-term effects of pig slurry (PS) amendment alone and together with marble waste (MW) on organic matter mineralization, microbial activity and stabilization of heavy metals in two tailing ponds. These structures pose environmental risk owing to high metals contents, low organic matter and nutrients, and null vegetation. Carbon mineralization, exchangeable metals and microbiological properties were monitored during 67 d. The application of amendments led to a rapid decrease of exchangeable metals concentrations, except for Cu, with decreases up to 98%, 75% and 97% for Cd, Pb and Zn, respectively. The combined addition of MW+PS was the treatment with greater reduction in metals concentrations. The addition of PS caused a significant increase in respiration rates, although in MW+PS plots respiration was lower than in PS plots. The mineralized C from the pig slurry was low, approximately 25-30% and 4-12% for PS and MW+PS treatments, respectively. Soluble carbon (Csol), microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and β-galactosidase and β-glucosidase activities increased after the application of the organic amendment. However, after 3d these parameters started a decreasing trend reaching similar values than control from approximately day 25 for Csol and MBC. The PS treatment promoted highest values in enzyme activities, which remained high upon time. Arylesterase activity increased in the MW+PS treatment. Thus, the remediation techniques used improved soil microbiological status and reduced metal availability. The combined application of PS+MW reduced the degradability of the organic compounds.

  15. Chemical alteration of limestone and marble samples exposed to acid rain and weathering in the eastern United States, 1984--1988

    SciTech Connect

    Reimann, K.J.

    1991-06-01

    In a long-term program that began in 1984, limestone and marble briquettes have been exposed to both anthropogenic acid deposition and natural weathering of four field sites in the eastern United States. Similar tests began at an Ohio site in 1986. Effects of exposure on the briquettes and other materials at the sites are evaluated periodically by several federal agencies cooperating in the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). A primary contribution of Argonne National Laboratory to the NAPAP has been chemical analysis to determine changes in the samples caused by exposure to the environment. Wet chemical analysis was used to detect sulfates, nitrates, fluorides, chlorides, and a series of metal cations in sequential layers of stone removed from the briquettes after field exposure. Results from the first four years of the program indicate that rinsing by rain keeps skyward-facing stone relatively clean of reaction products, especially sulfate, the most abundant product. On groundward-facing samples, sulfate concentrations increased linearly with exposure time, and values were proportional to atmospheric SO{sub 2} concentrations at the site. Sulfate concentrations in groundward samples were much higher in limestone than in marble, because of the greater porosity of the limestone. A steep sulfate gradient was seen in both sample types from the surface to the interior. On skyward surfaces, material losses per rain event due to complete dissolution of accumulated sulfates were approximately equal to concentrations measured in runoff. Preexposed limestone samples had sulfate accumulations deep in their interiors, while fresh, unexposed limestone did not. No substantial changes in cation accumulations wee detected in either limestone or marble.

  16. Comparison of pigment cell ultrastructure and organisation in the dermis of marble trout and brown trout, and first description of erythrophore ultrastructure in salmonids.

    PubMed

    Djurdjevič, Ida; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Sušnik Bajec, Simona

    2015-11-01

    Skin pigmentation in animals is an important trait with many functions. The present study focused on two closely related salmonid species, marble trout (Salmo marmoratus) and brown trout (S. trutta), which display an uncommon labyrinthine (marble-like) and spot skin pattern, respectively. To determine the role of chromatophore type in the different formation of skin pigment patterns in the two species, the distribution and ultrastructure of chromatophores was examined with light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The presence of three types of chromatophores in trout skin was confirmed: melanophores; xanthophores; and iridophores. In addition, using correlative microscopy, erythrophore ultrastructure in salmonids was described for the first time. Two types of erythrophores are distinguished, both located exclusively in the skin of brown trout: type 1 in black spot skin sections similar to xanthophores; and type 2 with a unique ultrastructure, located only in red spot skin sections. Morphologically, the difference between the light and dark pigmentation of trout skin depends primarily on the position and density of melanophores, in the dark region covering other chromatophores, and in the light region with the iridophores and xanthophores usually exposed. With larger amounts of melanophores, absence of xanthophores and presence of erythrophores type 1 and type L iridophores in the black spot compared with the light regions and the presence of erythrophores type 2 in the red spot, a higher level of pigment cell organisation in the skin of brown trout compared with that of marble trout was demonstrated. Even though the skin regions with chromatophores were well defined, not all the chromatophores were in direct contact, either homophilically or heterophilically, with each other. In addition to short-range interactions, an important role of the cellular environment and long-range interactions between chromatophores in promoting adult pigment pattern

  17. On the use of a split Hopkinson pressure bar in structural geology: High strain rate deformation of Seeberger sandstone and Carrara marble under uniaxial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwiessler, Ruprecht; Kenkmann, Thomas; Poelchau, Michael H.; Nau, Siegfried; Hess, Sebastian

    2017-04-01

    There is increasing evidence that seismogenic fractures can propagate faster than the shear wave velocity of the surrounding rocks. Strain rates within the tip region of such super-shear earthquake ruptures can reach deformation conditions similar to impact processes, resulting in rock pulverization. The physical response of brittle rocks at high strain rates changes dramatically with respect to quasi-static conditions. Rocks become stiffer and their strength increases. A measure for the dynamic behavior of a rock and its strain dependency is the dynamic increase factor (DIF) which is the ratio of the dynamic compressive strength to the quasi-static uniaxial compressive strength. To investigate deformation in the high strain rate regime experimentally, we introduce the split Hopkinson pressure bar technology to the structural geology community, a method that is frequently used by rock and impact engineers. We measure the stress-strain response of homogeneous, fine-grained Seeberger sandstone and Carrara marble in uniaxial compression at strain rates ranging from 10+1 to 10+2 s-1 with respect to tangent modulus and dynamic uniaxial compressive strength. We present full stress-strain response curves of Seeberger sandstone and Carrara marble at high strain rates and an evaluation method to determine representative rates of deformation. Results indicate a rate-dependent elastic behavior of Carrara marble where an average increase of ∼18% could be observed at high strain rates of about 100 s-1. DIF reaches a factor of 2.2-2.4. Seeberger sandstone does not have a rate-dependent linear stress-strain response at high strain rates. Its DIF was found to be about 1.6-1.7 at rates of 100 s-1. The onset of dynamic behavior is accompanied with changes in the fracture pattern from single to multiple fractures to pervasive pulverization for increasing rates of deformation. Seismogenic shear zones and their associated fragment-size spectra should be carefully revisited in the

  18. Gypsum karst in Italy: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Waele, Jo; Chiarini, Veronica; Columbu, Andrea; D'Angeli, Ilenia M.; Madonia, Giuliana; Parise, Mario; Piccini, Leonardo; Vattano, Marco; Vigna, Bartolomeo; Zini, Luca; Forti, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Although outcropping only rarely in Italy, gypsum karst has been described in detail since the early XXth century (Marinelli, 1917). Gypsum caves are now known from almost all Italian regions (Madonia & Forti, 2003), but are mainly localised along the northern border of the Apennine chain (Emilia Romagna and Marche regions), Calabria, and Sicily, where the major outcrops occur. Recently, important caves have also been discovered in the underground gypsum quarries in Piedmont (Vigna et al., 2010). During the late 80s and 90s several multidisciplinary studies have been carried out in many gypsum areas. All this work converged into a comprehensive overview in 2003 (Madonia & Forti, 2003). Further detailed studies focused on the gypsum areas of Emilia Romagna (Chiesi et al., 2010; Forti & Lucci, 2010; Demaria et al., 2012; De Waele & Pasini, 2013; Ercolani et al., 2013; Columbu et al., 2015; Lucci & Piastra, 2015; Tedeschi et al., 2015) and of Sicily (Madonia & Vattano, 2011). Sinkholes related to Permo-Triassic gypsum have been studied in Friuli Venezia Giulia (Zini et al., 2015). This presentation will review the state of the art regarding different aspects of evaporite karst in Italy focusing on the main new results. References Chiesi M., et al. (2010) - Origin and evolution of a salty gypsum/anhydrite karst spring: the case of Poiano (Northern Apennines, Italy). Hydrogeology Journal, 18, pp. 1111-1124. Columbu A. et al. (2015) - Gypsum caves as indicators of climate-driven river incision and aggradation in a rapidly uplifting region. Geology, 43(6), 539-542. Demaria D. et al. (Eds.) (2012), Le Grotte Bolognesi, GSB-USB, 431 p. De Waele J., Pasini G. (2013) - Intra-messinian gypsum palaeokarst in the northern Apennines and its palaeogeographic implications. Terra Nova 25, pp. 199-205. Ercolani M., et al. (Eds.) (2013), I Gessi e la Cave i Monte Tondo. Studio multidisciplinare di un'area carsica nella Vena del Gesso Romagnola. Memorie Ist. It. Spel. II(26), 559 p

  19. Postweaning substitution of grazed forage with a high-energy concentrate has variable long-term effects on subcutaneous fat and marbling in Bos taurus genotypes.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, P L; Siddell, J P; Walmsley, B J; Geesink, G H; Pethick, D W; McPhee, M J

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the effects and interactions of stage of growth and genotype on commercial carcass traits and intramuscular fat (IMF) content in 5 muscles of steers ( = 165) and to test the hypothesis that substituting pasture with a high-energy concentrate during the immediate postweaning period increases IMF. Cattle of 3 genotypes (Angus, Hereford, and Wagyu × Angus; = 55/genotype) were selected at weaning from commercial herds, targeting genotypic differences in marbling and subcutaneous fatness. Following weaning, steers were fed for 168 d within 2 different improved, temperate pasture-based nutritional systems: a forage-only system (FS) and forage with high-energy supplemented system (SS), with 2 replicates per system. The supplement was fed at a level of 1% of average BW adjusted every 2 wk to provide an estimated 50% of energy requirements for 168 d from weaning. Pasture on offer in both systems was managed to match the BW of the FS and SS steers during the postweaning treatment period to avoid confounding due to differences in growth rate during this period. Steers were then regrouped into 2 replicates and backgrounded on improved, temperate pasture for 158 d and then grain fed within 1 group for 105 d (short fed) or 259 d (long fed). Groups were slaughtered at commencement (d 0) and end of postweaning nutritional treatments (d 168), end of backgrounding (d 326), and after short (d 431) or long feedlotting (d 585). Serial slaughter stage had an effect on all traits assessed ( < 0.01). The FS steers had more rib fat ( < 0.01) and higher Meat Standards Australia marbling score ( < 0.05) and a tendency ( < 0.10) to have greater eye muscle area than the SS steers throughout the study. Genotypic differences were evident ( < 0.05) for all traits assessed except HCW, dressing percentage, rib fat depth, ossification score, ultimate pH, and IMF in the semitendinosus muscle. The results for marbling and IMF do not support the use of a

  20. Radioactivity in honey of the central Italy.

    PubMed

    Meli, Maria Assunta; Desideri, Donatella; Roselli, Carla; Feduzi, Laura; Benedetti, Claudio

    2016-07-01

    Natural radionuclides and (137)Cs in twenty seven honeys produced in a region of the Central Italy were determined by alpha ((235)U, (238)U, (210)Po, (232)Th and (228)Th) and gamma spectrometry ((137)Cs, (40)K, (226)Ra and (228)Ra). The study was carried out in order to estimate the background levels of natural ((40)K, (238)U and (232)Th and their progeny) and artificial radionuclides ((137)Cs) in various honey samples, as well as to compile a data base for radioactivity levels in that region. (40)K showed a mean activity of 28.1±23.0Bqkg(-1) with a range of 7.28-101Bqkg(-1). The mean of (210)Po activity resulted 0.40±0.46Bqkg(-1) with a range of 0.03-1.98Bqkg(-1). The mean of (238)U activity resulted 0.020±0.010Bqkg(-1). (226)Ra and (228)Ra resulted always <0.34 and <0.57Bqkg(-1) respectively, (235)U, (228)Th and (232)Th were always <0.007Bqkg(-1). (137)Cs resulted <0.10Bqkg(-1) in all samples. The committed effective doses due to (210)Po from ingestion of honey for infants, children and adults account for 0.002-5.13% of the natural radiation exposure in Italy. The honeys produced in Central Italy were of good quality in relation to the studied parameters, confirming the general image of a genuine and healthy food associated to this traditional products.

  1. Respiratory nematodes in cat populations of Italy.

    PubMed

    Di Cesare, Angela; Veronesi, Fabrizia; Grillotti, Eleonora; Manzocchi, Simone; Perrucci, Stefania; Beraldo, Paola; Cazzin, Stefania; De Liberato, Claudio; Barros, Luciano A; Simonato, Giulia; Traversa, Donato

    2015-12-01

    The occurrence of common respiratory parasites of domestic cats (the metastrongyloid "cat lungworm" Aelurostrongylus abstrusus and the trichuroid Capillaria aerophila) and of neglected respiratory nematodes of felids (Troglostrongylus brevior, Angiostrongylus chabaudi and Oslerus rostratus) was here evaluated in two and three geographical sites of Northern and Central Italy, respectively. In 2014-2015, individual fecal samples of 868 domestic cats were examined microscopically and genetically, and epidemiological data related to parasitic infections were evaluated as possible risk factors by binary logistic regression models. The most common parasite was A. abstrusus in both mono- and poli-specific infections, followed by T. brevior and C. aerophila, while cats scored negative for other parasites. Cats positive for A. abstrusus (1.9-17 % infection rate) and C. aerophila (0.9-4.8 % infection rate) were found in all examined sites, while cats scored positive for T. brevior (1-14.3 % infection rate) in four sites. Also, T. brevior was here found for the first time in a domestic cat from a mountainous area of Northern Italy. The occurrence of lungworms was statistically related to the presence of respiratory signs and more significant in cats with mixed infection by other lungworms and/or intestinal parasites. Cats living in site C of Central Italy resulted statistically more at risk of infection for lungworms than cats living in the other study sites, while animals ageing less than 1 year were at more risk for troglostrongylosis. Finally, the presence of lungworms was more significant in cats with mixed infection by other lungworms and/or intestinal parasites. These results are discussed under epidemiological and clinical points of views.

  2. Biophysical science in Italy: SIBPA turns 40.

    PubMed

    Giacomazza, Daniela; Musio, Carlo

    2013-12-01

    This Special Issue of Biophysical Chemistry includes a selection of the papers presented at the XXI Congress of the Italian Society of Pure and Applied Biophysics (i.e., SIBPA, Società Italiana di Biofisica Pura ed Applicata) held on September 2012 at the University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy. Topics cover all biophysical disciplines, from molecular to cellular, to integrative biophysics giving an almost comprehensive view of the interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approaches, proper of the modern biophysics. SIBPA, which celebrates its 40th anniversary in 2013, has steadily grown and appeals to both specialists and a wider general audience.

  3. Influenza vaccination among the elderly in Italy.

    PubMed Central

    Pregliasco, F.; Sodano, L.; Mensi, C.; Selvaggi, M. T.; Adamo, B.; D'Argenio, P.; Giussani, F.; Simonetti, A.; Carosella, M. R.; Simeone, R.; Dentizi, C.; Montanaro, C.; Ponzio, G.

    1999-01-01

    This article surveys the attitudes and perceptions of a random sample of the elderly population in three regions of Italy on the use and efficacy of influenza vaccine. The data were collected by direct interviews using a standard questionnaire. The results show that vaccination coverage against influenza is inadequate (26-48.6%). The major reasons for nonvaccination were lack of faith in the vaccine and disbelief that influenza is a dangerous illness. These data emphasize the need for a systematic education programme targeted at the elderly and the provision of influenza vaccination, with the increased cooperation of general practitioners. PMID:10083710

  4. View of northeastern Italy including Venice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A near vertical view of northeastern Italy including the Venice (Venezia) area is seen in this Skylab 3 Earth Resources Experiments Package S190-B (five-inch earth terrain camera) infrared photograph taken from the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. The mountainous area is the Dolomite Alps. The most conspicuous stream northeast of Venice is the Piave River. The city near the center of the picture on the Brenta River is Bassano del Grappa. The large city of Padua (Padova) is on the western bank of the Grenta near the clock.

  5. Urinary capillariosis in six dogs from Italy

    PubMed Central

    Mariacher, A.; Millanta, F.; Guidi, G.; Perrucci, S.

    2016-01-01

    Canine urinary capillariosis is caused by the nematode Pearsonema plica. P. plica infection is seldomly detected in clinical practice mainly due to diagnostic limitations. This report describes six cases of urinary capillariosis in dogs from Italy. Recurrent cystitis was observed in one dog, whereas another patient was affected by glomerular amyloidosis. In the remaining animals, the infection was considered an incidental finding. Immature eggs of the parasite were observed with urine sediment examination in 3/6 patients. Increased awareness of the potential pathogenic role of P. plica and clinical disease presentation could help identify infected animals. PMID:27354971

  6. Italy: abortion and nationalized health care.

    PubMed

    Mori, M

    1984-12-01

    Most of the recent public and scholarly interest in Italy concerning bioethical issues has centered on abortion, general reform of the health care system, and deinstitutionalization of the mentally ill. Medical decisions are thought to concern technical rather than moral issues, and are generally left to physicians. Although ethics is a formal part of the medical curriculum only in Catholic universities, physicians have recently shown more of an interest in bioethical issues, as have philosophers. At present, however, the author is aware of only one non-Catholic institution that is devoted to the study of ethical questions in medicine.

  7. Veneto Region, Italy. Health system review.

    PubMed

    Toniolo, Franco; Mantoan, Domenico; Maresso, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The Health Systems in Transition (HiT) profiles are country-based reports that provide a detailed description of a health system and of policy initiatives in progress or under development. This HiT is one of the first to be written on a subnational level of government and focuses on the Veneto Region of northern Italy. HiTs examine different approaches to the organization, financing and delivery of health services and the role of the main actors in health systems; describe the institutional framework, process, content and implementation of health and health care policies; and highlight challenges and areas that require more in-depth analysis. The Veneto Region is one of Italy's richest regions and the health of its resident population compares favourably with other regions in Italy. Life expectancy for both men and women, now at 79.1 and 85.2 years, respectively, is slightly higher than the national average, while mortality rates are comparable to national ones. The major causes of death are tumours and cardiovascular diseases. Under Italy's National Health Service, the organization and provision of health care is a regional responsibility and regions must provide a nationally defined (with regional input) basic health benefit package to all of their citizens; extra services may be provided if budgets allow. Health care is mainly financed by earmarked central and regional taxes, with regions receiving their allocated share of resources from the National Health Fund. Historically, health budget deficits have been a major problem in most Italian regions, but since the early 2000s the introduction of efficiency measures and tighter procedures on financial management have contributed to a significant decrease in the Veneto Regions health budget deficit.The health system is governed by the Veneto Region government (Giunta) via the Departments of Health and Social Services, which receive technical support from a single General Management Secretariat. Health care is

  8. Louseborne Relapsing Fever among East African Refugees, Italy, 2015

    PubMed Central

    Lipani, Filippo; Costa, Cecilia; Scarvaglieri, Mariaelisabetta; Balbiano, Rosanna; Carosella, Sinibaldo; Calcagno, Andrea; Audagnotto, Sabrina; Barbui, Anna Maria; Brossa, Silvia; Ghisetti, Valeria; Dal Conte, Ivano; Caramello, Pietro; Di Perri, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    During June 9–September 30, 2015, five cases of louseborne relapsing fever were identified in Turin, Italy. All 5 cases were in young refugees from Somalia, 2 of whom had lived in Italy since 2011. Our report seems to confirm the possibility of local transmission of louse-borne relapsing fever. PMID:26812354

  9. Invasive Type e Haemophilus influenzae Disease in Italy

    PubMed Central

    degli Atti, Marta Luisa Ciofi; Cardines, Rita; Salmaso, Stefania; Renna, Giovanna; Mastrantonio, Paola

    2003-01-01

    We describe the first reported cases of invasive type e Haemophilus influenzae disease in Italy. All five cases occurred in adults. The isolates were susceptible to ampicillin and eight other antimicrobial agents. Molecular analysis showed two distinct type e strains circulating in Italy, both containing a single copy of the capsulation locus. PMID:12604001

  10. Mazzini and the Radical Movement in Nineteenth-Century Italy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noether, Emiliana P.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the origins of radicalism in Italy, specifically the emergence in 1831 of Giuseppe Mazzini as the advocate of Italian nationalism and radicalism. Examines Mazzini's role in Italy and among European revolutionaries, concluding that his legacy led to the establishment of the Italian republic in the twentieth century. (GEA)

  11. Young People and Alcohol in Italy: An Evolving Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beccaria, Franca; Prina, Franco

    2010-01-01

    In Italy, commonly held opinions and interpretations about the relationship between young people and alcohol are often expressed as generalizations and approximations. In order to further understanding of the relationship between young people and alcohol in contemporary Italy, we have gathered, compared and discussed all the available data, both…

  12. Large-Scale Assessments and Educational Policies in Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damiani, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    Despite Italy's extensive participation in most large-scale assessments, their actual influence on Italian educational policies is less easy to identify. The present contribution aims at highlighting and explaining reasons for the weak and often inconsistent relationship between international surveys and policy-making processes in Italy.…

  13. The US Mission in Italy's "Partnership for Growth"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spogli, Ronald P.; Truhn, J. Patrick

    2008-01-01

    This paper first examines key differences between the traditional approaches of the USA and Italy in relation to innovation and entrepreneurship. The authors then turn to the specific example of southern Italy, which has experienced higher rates of unemployment, lower US investment and fewer educational and cultural exchanges than the rest of the…

  14. 75 FR 14628 - Pressure Sensitive Plastic Tape From Italy; Determination

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-26

    ... COMMISSION Pressure Sensitive Plastic Tape From Italy; Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed... antidumping duty finding on pressure sensitive plastic tape from Italy would be likely to lead to continuation... Commission are contained in USITC Publication 4128 (March 2010), entitled Pressure Sensitive Plastic...

  15. Reflections of a Lifelong Learner Teaching in Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroth, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This article describes and summarizes the author's experience of teaching in Italy for three months and the impact it had on him and his learning. The author, at the age of 61, lived in Italy for three months and here he reflects on what he learned and how it relates to adult learning theory concepts.

  16. The way forward in Italy for iodine.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Antonella; DI Cosmo, Caterina; DE Angelis, Simona; DA Cas, Roberto; Stacchini, Paolo; Pastorelli, Augusto; Vitti, Paolo

    2017-04-01

    Italy is dealing with iodine deficiency since ancient times. In 1848 an ad hoc committee appointed by the king of Sardinia, identified extensive areas afflicted by endemic goiter and endemic cretinism in Piedmont, Liguria and Sardinia. Since then many epidemiological studies have been conducted in our country. These showed that iodine deficiency was present not only in mountain areas but also in coastal areas. In 1972 the iodization of salt at 15 mg/kg was allowed by law and iodized salt was distributed on request to selected endemic areas. Five years later the distribution was extended to the whole country. However the sale of iodized salt was not mandatory at that time and only a small fraction of the Italian population started using iodized salt. In 1991 the content of iodine in the salt was raised to 30 mg/kg and in 2005 a nationwide salt iodization program was finally implemented. Some years later a nationwide monitoring program of iodine prophylaxis was also implemented. Since 2005 the sale of iodized salt in Italian supermarkets has increased (34% in 2006, 55% in 2012), although it has been observed that the use of iodized salt is still low in the communal eating areas and in the food industry. These data are coherent with recent epidemiological studies showing that some regions in our country are still characterized by mild iodine deficiency and a high frequency of goiter and other iodine deficiency disorders. This implies that further efforts should be made to successfully correct iodine deficiency in Italy.

  17. Human visceral leishmaniasis: a picture from Italy.

    PubMed

    Abdalmaula, Giuma Harun; Barbadoro, Pamela; Marigliano, Anna; Illuminati, Diego; Di Stanislao, Francesco; D'Errico, Marcello Mario; Prospero, Emilia

    2013-12-01

    The aim of our study was to describe the distribution of Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL) in Italy, focusing on HIV-infected patients, to estimate the burden of the disease and the public health actions that should be undertaken. A review of official notifications and hospitalization data has been performed. From 2006 to 2008, a total of 289 cases of VL were notified; the overall notification rate was 1.63/1,000,000 (95% CI 1.45-1.83). In total, 1192 VL-associated hospitalizations were detected, with a hospitalization rate of 6.71/1,000,000 (95% CI 6.34-7.10). For the age group "≤ 24 years", a statistically significant increase was detected (p<0.05). A total of 68.9% (n = 821) of hospitalizations were detected in HIV-positive patients. The geographic distribution of rates revealed a significant increase in the north-eastern area of the country. Our study confirms that the epidemiological pattern of VL is changing and that, in Italy, control measures and preventive strategies should be based on not only the official notification system but also hospital data. This would lead to the identification of areas of parasite spread and to the creation of awareness campaigns geared toward general practitioners in the affected areas. Easy case detection would allow for timely public health actions and strategies for the implementation of more effective interventions for reservoir control.

  18. Genetic parameters for intramuscular fat percentage, marbling score, scrotal circumference, and heifer pregnancy in Red Angus cattle.

    PubMed

    McAllister, C M; Speidel, S E; Crews, D H; Enns, R M

    2011-07-01

    Selection criteria for yearling bulls commonly include indicators of fertility and carcass merit, such as scrotal circumference (SC) and intramuscular fat percentage (IMF). Genetic correlation estimates between ultrasound traits such as IMF and carcass marbling score (MS) with fertility traits SC and heifer pregnancy (HP) have not been reported. Therefore, the objective of this study was to estimate the genetic parameters among the indicator traits IMF and SC, and the economically relevant traits MS and HP. Records for IMF (n=73,051), MS (n=15,260), SC (n=43,487), and HP (n=37,802) were obtained from the Red Angus Association of America, and a 4-generation ancestral pedigree (n=10,460) was constructed from the 8,915 sires represented in the data. (Co)variance components were estimated using a multivariate sire model and average information REML to obtain estimates of heritability and genetic correlations. Fixed effects included contemporary group and the linear effect of age at measurement for all traits, and an additional effect of age of dam for both HP and SC. The random effect of sire was included to estimate additive genetic effects, which were assumed to be continuous for IMF, MS, and SC, but a probit threshold link function was fitted for HP. Generally moderate heritability estimates of 0.29 ± 0.01, 0.35 ± 0.06, 0.32 ± 0.02, and 0.17 ± 0.01 were obtained for IMF, MS, SC, and HP on the underlying scale, respectively. The confidence interval for the estimated genetic correlation between MS and HP (0.10 ± 0.15) included zero, suggesting a negligible genetic association. The genetic correlation between MS and IMF was high (0.80 ± 0.05), but the estimate for HP and SC (0.05 ± 0.09) was near zero, as were the estimated genetic correlations of SC with MS (0.01 ± 0.08) and IMF (0.05 ± 0.06), and for HP with IMF (0.13 ± 0.09). These results suggest that concomitant selection for increased fertility and carcass merit would not be antagonistic.

  19. Surface and volume non-invasive methods for the structural monitoring of the bass-relief 'Madonna con Bambino' (Gorizia, Northern Italy).

    PubMed

    Alberghina, Maria Francesca; Macchia, Andrea; Capizzi, Patrizia; Schiavone, Salvatore; Ruffolo, Silvestro Antonio; Comite, Valeria; Barberio, Marianna; La Russa, Mauro Francesco

    2016-11-23

    Structural analysis of marble statues, carried out by non-invasive and in situ methods, is crucial to define the state of conservation of the artworks and to identify the deterioration phenomena that can affect them. In this work, we combined in situ non-destructive techniques, ultrasonic tomography (US), ultraviolet-induced visible fluorescence (UV-IF) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) to study the bass-relief 'Madonna con Bambino' (Gorizia, Italy). The US revealed the presence of some metallic pivots, associated with areas of high sound velocity; moreover, a more degraded area has been identified in the lower part of the bass-relief. The acquired UV-IF image confirmed the presence of surface degradation, allowing a preliminary evaluation of the extension of a fracture, from surface to bulk. In addition, the different materials (both original and/or integrations) that compose the studied surface have been identified. The XRF has contributed to define the nature of the inorganic materials applied during undocumented previous restoration works on the surface as filler for lacunae.

  20. Micro-scale flood risk estimation in historic centres: a case study in Florence, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelli, Fabio; Arrighi, Chiara; Brugioni, Marcello; Franceschini, Serena; Mazzanti, Bernardo

    2013-04-01

    The route to flood risk assessment is much more than hydraulic modelling of inundation, that is hazard mapping. Flood risk is the product of flood hazard, vulnerability and exposure, all the three to be estimated with comparable level of accuracy. While hazard maps have already been implemented in many countries, quantitative damage and risk maps are still at a preliminary level. Currently one of the main challenges in flood damage estimation resides in the scarce availability of socio-economic data characterizing the monetary value of the exposed assets. When these public-open data are available, the variability of their level of detail drives the need of merging different sources and of selecting an appropriate scale of analysis. In this work a parsimonious quasi-2D hydraulic model is adopted, having many advantages in terms of easy set-up. In order to represent the geometry of the study domain an high-resolution and up-to-date Digital Surface Model (DSM) is used. The accuracy in flood depth estimation is evaluated by comparison with marble-plate records of a historic flood in the city of Florence (Italy). The accuracy is characterized in the downtown most flooded area by a bias of a very few centimetres and a determination coefficient of 0.73. The average risk is found to be about 14 €/m2•year, corresponding to about 8.3% of residents income. The spatial distribution of estimated risk highlights a complex interaction between the flood pattern and the buildings characteristics. Proceeding through the risk estimation steps, a new micro-scale potential damage assessment method is proposed. This method is based on the georeferenced census system considered as optimal compromise between spatial detail and open availability of socio-economic data. The census sections system consist of geographically contiguous polygons that usually coincide with building blocks in dense urban areas. The results of flood risk assessment at the census section scale resolve most of