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Sample records for iterative finite element

  1. An iterative algorithm for finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laouafa, F.; Royis, P.

    2004-03-01

    In this paper, we state in a new form the algebraic problem arising from the one-field displacement finite element method (FEM). The displacement approach, in this discrete form, can be considered as the dual approach (force or equilibrium) with subsidiary constraints. This approach dissociates the nonlinear operator to the linear ones and their sizes are linear functions of integration rule which is of interest in the case of reduced integration. This new form of the problem leads to an inexpensive improvement of FEM computations, which acts at local, elementary and global levels. We demonstrate the numerical performances of this approach which is independent of the mesh structure. Using the GMRES algorithm we build, for nonsymmetric problems, a new algorithm based upon the discretized field of strain. The new algorithms proposed are more closer to the mechanical problem than the classical ones because all fields appear during the resolution process. The sizes of the different operators arising in these new forms are linear functions of integration rule, which is of great interest in the case of reduced integration.

  2. Parallel iterative procedures for approximate solutions of wave propagation by finite element and finite difference methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.

    1994-12-31

    Parallel iterative procedures based on domain decomposition techniques are defined and analyzed for the numerical solution of wave propagation by finite element and finite difference methods. For finite element methods, in a Lagrangian framework, an efficient way for choosing the algorithm parameter as well as the algorithm convergence are indicated. Some heuristic arguments for finding the algorithm parameter for finite difference schemes are addressed. Numerical results are presented to indicate the effectiveness of the methods.

  3. Iterative methods for elliptic finite element equations on general meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolaides, R. A.; Choudhury, Shenaz

    1986-01-01

    Iterative methods for arbitrary mesh discretizations of elliptic partial differential equations are surveyed. The methods discussed are preconditioned conjugate gradients, algebraic multigrid, deflated conjugate gradients, an element-by-element techniques, and domain decomposition. Computational results are included.

  4. Elastic-plastic mixed-iterative finite element analysis: Implementation and performance assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutjahjo, Edhi; Chamis, Christos C.

    1993-01-01

    An elastic-plastic algorithm based on Von Mises and associative flow criteria is implemented in MHOST-a mixed iterative finite element analysis computer program developed by NASA Lewis Research Center. The performance of the resulting elastic-plastic mixed-iterative analysis is examined through a set of convergence studies. Membrane and bending behaviors of 4-node quadrilateral shell finite elements are tested for elastic-plastic performance. Generally, the membrane results are excellent, indicating the implementation of elastic-plastic mixed-iterative analysis is appropriate.

  5. Design of computer-generated beam-shaping holograms by iterative finite-element mesh adaption.

    PubMed

    Dresel, T; Beyerlein, M; Schwider, J

    1996-12-10

    Computer-generated phase-only holograms can be used for laser beam shaping, i.e., for focusing a given aperture with intensity and phase distributions into a pregiven intensity pattern in their focal planes. A numerical approach based on iterative finite-element mesh adaption permits the design of appropriate phase functions for the task of focusing into two-dimensional reconstruction patterns. Both the hologram aperture and the reconstruction pattern are covered by mesh mappings. An iterative procedure delivers meshes with intensities equally distributed over the constituting elements. This design algorithm adds new elementary focuser functions to what we call object-oriented hologram design. Some design examples are discussed.

  6. Augmented weak forms and element-by-element preconditioners: Efficient iterative strategies for structural finite elements. A preliminary study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, A.; Hughes, T. J. R.

    1984-01-01

    A weak formulation in structural analysis that provides well conditioned matrices suitable for iterative solutions is presented. A mixed formulation ensures the proper representation of the problem and the constitutive relations are added in a penalized form. The problem is solved by a double conjugate gradient algorithm combined with an element by element approximate factorization procedure. The double conjugate gradient strategy resembles Uzawa's variable-length type algorithms the main difference is the presence of quadratic terms in the mixed variables. In the case of shear deformable beams these terms ensure that the proper finite thickness solution is obtained.

  7. Helicopter trim analysis by shooting and finite element methods with optimally damped Newton iterations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achar, N. S.; Gaonkar, G. H.

    1993-01-01

    Helicopter trim settings of periodic initial state and control inputs are investigated for convergence of Newton iteration in computing the settings sequentially and in parallel. The trim analysis uses a shooting method and a weak version of two temporal finite element methods with displacement formulation and with mixed formulation of displacements and momenta. These three methods broadly represent two main approaches of trim analysis: adaptation of initial-value and finite element boundary-value codes to periodic boundary conditions, particularly for unstable and marginally stable systems. In each method, both the sequential and in-parallel schemes are used, and the resulting nonlinear algebraic equations are solved by damped Newton iteration with an optimally selected damping parameter. The impact of damped Newton iteration, including earlier-observed divergence problems in trim analysis, is demonstrated by the maximum condition number of the Jacobian matrices of the iterative scheme and by virtual elimination of divergence. The advantages of the in-parallel scheme over the conventional sequential scheme are also demonstrated.

  8. Optimal design of a shape memory alloy actuated composite structure with iterative finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widdle, Richard D., Jr.; Grimshaw, Matthew T.; Shome, Moushumi

    2009-03-01

    A method is described for solving an inverse design problem to find the unassembled, stress-free component shapes of a structure thatis integrally actuated with shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators. Morphing and multifunctional structures are of interest in the aerospace industry becasue of the potential for improving structural and aerodynamic performance across multiple operating conditions. The focus of this work is on structures that are morphed with SMA flexural actuators. For the case where the geometry is known for unassembled components, assembly can be simulated to find the assembled shapes of the morphing structure. In the usual design case, however, only the desired shapes as assembled are known in multiple actuation states, and the corresponding unassembled shapes must be determined by an iterative solution process. An iterative finite element analysis approach to this problem is reported here. First an initial guess for the unassembled shapes is made and assembly is simulated with the finite element method. The resulting shapes are found for both SMA phases and compared with the desired shapes. A gradient-based optimization method is employed to update the initial geometry and iteration continues until the desired shapes are achieved. A simplified method of modeling the SMA material behavior is used for computational efficiently. It is found that this approach provides a practical way to solve the inverse design problem for structures that are integrally actuated with SMA material.

  9. Iterative and multigrid methods in the finite element solution of incompressible and turbulent fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavery, N.; Taylor, C.

    1999-07-01

    Multigrid and iterative methods are used to reduce the solution time of the matrix equations which arise from the finite element (FE) discretisation of the time-independent equations of motion of the incompressible fluid in turbulent motion. Incompressible flow is solved by using the method of reduce interpolation for the pressure to satisfy the Brezzi-Babuska condition. The k-l model is used to complete the turbulence closure problem. The non-symmetric iterative matrix methods examined are the methods of least squares conjugate gradient (LSCG), biconjugate gradient (BCG), conjugate gradient squared (CGS), and the biconjugate gradient squared stabilised (BCGSTAB). The multigrid algorithm applied is based on the FAS algorithm of Brandt, and uses two and three levels of grids with a V-cycling schedule. These methods are all compared to the non-symmetric frontal solver. Copyright

  10. A block iterative finite element algorithm for numerical solution of the steady-state, compressible Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, C. H.

    1976-01-01

    An iterative method for numerically solving the time independent Navier-Stokes equations for viscous compressible flows is presented. The method is based upon partial application of the Gauss-Seidel principle in block form to the systems of nonlinear algebraic equations which arise in construction of finite element (Galerkin) models approximating solutions of fluid dynamic problems. The C deg-cubic element on triangles is employed for function approximation. Computational results for a free shear flow at Re = 1,000 indicate significant achievement of economy in iterative convergence rate over finite element and finite difference models which employ the customary time dependent equations and asymptotic time marching procedure to steady solution. Numerical results are in excellent agreement with those obtained for the same test problem employing time marching finite element and finite difference solution techniques.

  11. An iterative finite-element collocation method for parabolic problems using domain decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, M.C.

    1992-01-01

    Advection-dominated flows occur widely in the transport of groundwater contaminants, the movements of fluids in enhanced oil recovery projects, and many other contexts. In numerical models of such flows, adaptive local grid refinement is a conceptually attractive approach for resolving the sharp fronts or layers that tend to characterize the solutions. However, this approach can be difficult to implement in practice. A domain decomposition method developed by Bramble, Ewing, Pasciak, and Schatz, known as the BEPS method, overcomes many of the difficulties. We demonstrate the applicability of the iterative BEPS ideas to finite-element collocation on trial spaces of piecewise Hermite bicubics. The resulting scheme allows one to refine selected parts of a spatial grid without destroying algebraic efficiencies associated with the original coarse grid. We apply the method to two dimensional time-dependent advection-diffusion problems.

  12. An iterative finite-element collocation method for parabolic problems using domain decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, M.C.

    1992-11-01

    Advection-dominated flows occur widely in the transport of groundwater contaminants, the movements of fluids in enhanced oil recovery projects, and many other contexts. In numerical models of such flows, adaptive local grid refinement is a conceptually attractive approach for resolving the sharp fronts or layers that tend to characterize the solutions. However, this approach can be difficult to implement in practice. A domain decomposition method developed by Bramble, Ewing, Pasciak, and Schatz, known as the BEPS method, overcomes many of the difficulties. We demonstrate the applicability of the iterative BEPS ideas to finite-element collocation on trial spaces of piecewise Hermite bicubics. The resulting scheme allows one to refine selected parts of a spatial grid without destroying algebraic efficiencies associated with the original coarse grid. We apply the method to two dimensional time-dependent advection-diffusion problems.

  13. Domain decomposition based iterative methods for nonlinear elliptic finite element problems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, X.C.

    1994-12-31

    The class of overlapping Schwarz algorithms has been extensively studied for linear elliptic finite element problems. In this presentation, the author considers the solution of systems of nonlinear algebraic equations arising from the finite element discretization of some nonlinear elliptic equations. Several overlapping Schwarz algorithms, including the additive and multiplicative versions, with inexact Newton acceleration will be discussed. The author shows that the convergence rate of the Newton`s method is independent of the mesh size used in the finite element discretization, and also independent of the number of subdomains into which the original domain in decomposed. Numerical examples will be presented.

  14. An iterative parallel sparse matrix equation solver with application to finite element modeling of electromagnetic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cwik, T.; Jamnejad, V.; Zuffada, C.

    1994-12-31

    The usefulness of finite element modeling follows from the ability to accurately simulate the geometry and three-dimensional fields on the scale of a fraction of a wavelength. To make this modeling practical for engineering design, it is necessary to integrate the stages of geometry modeling and mesh generation, numerical solution of the fields-a stage heavily dependent on the efficient use of a sparse matrix equation solver, and display of field information. The stages of geometry modeling, mesh generation, and field display are commonly completed using commercially available software packages. Algorithms for the numerical solution of the fields need to be written for the specific class of problems considered. Interior problems, i.e. simulating fields in waveguides and cavities, have been successfully solved using finite element methods. Exterior problems, i.e. simulating fields scattered or radiated from structures, are more difficult to model because of the need to numerically truncate the finite element mesh. To practically compute a solution to exterior problems, the domain must be truncated at some finite surface where the Sommerfeld radiation condition is enforced, either approximately or exactly. Approximate methods attempt to truncate the mesh using only local field information at each grid point, whereas exact methods are global, needing information from the entire mesh boundary. In this work, a method that couples three-dimensional finite element (FE) solutions interior to the bounding surface, with an efficient integral equation (IE) solution that exactly enforces the Sommerfeld radiation condition is developed. The bounding surface is taken to be a surface of revolution (SOR) to greatly reduce computational expense in the IE portion of the modeling.

  15. Electrical defibrillation optimization: An automated, iterative parallel finite-element approach

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, S.A.; Shadid, J.N.; Ng, K.T.; Nadeem, A.

    1997-04-01

    To date, optimization of electrode systems for electrical defibrillation has been limited to hand-selected electrode configurations. In this paper we present an automated approach which combines detailed, three-dimensional (3-D) finite element torso models with optimization techniques to provide a flexible analysis and design tool for electrical defibrillation optimization. Specifically, a parallel direct search (PDS) optimization technique is used with a representative objective function to find an electrode configuration which corresponds to the satisfaction of a postulated defibrillation criterion with a minimum amount of power and a low possibility of myocardium damage. For adequate representation of the thoracic inhomogeneities, 3-D finite-element torso models are used in the objective function computations. The CPU-intensive finite-element calculations required for the objective function evaluation have been implemented on a message-passing parallel computer in order to complete the optimization calculations in a timely manner. To illustrate the optimization procedure, it has been applied to a representative electrode configuration for transmyocardial defibrillation, namely the subcutaneous patch-right ventricular catheter (SP-RVC) system. Sensitivity of the optimal solutions to various tissue conductivities has been studied. 39 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. An Arnoldi-Based Iterative Scheme for Nonsymmetric Matrix Pencils Arising in Finite Element Stability Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Ramesh

    1992-05-01

    A method for computing the desired eigenvalues and corresponding eigenvectors of a large-scale, nonsymmetric, complex generalized eigenvalue problem is described. This scheme is primarily intended for the normal mode analysis and the stability characterization of the stationary states of parameterized time-dependent partial differential equations, in particular, when a finite element method is used for the numerical discretization. The algorithm, which is based on the previous work of Saad, may be succintly described as a multiple shift-and-invert, restarted Arnoldi procedure which uses reorthogonalization and automatic shift selection to provide stability and convergence, while minimizing the overall computational effort. The application and efficiency of the method is illustrated using two representative test problems.

  17. Proposed damage evolution model for large-scale finite element modeling of the dual coolant US-ITER TBM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharafat, S.; El-Awady, J.; Liu, S.; Diegele, E.; Ghoniem, N. M.

    2007-08-01

    Large-scale finite element modeling (FEM) of the US Dual Coolant Lead Lithium ITER Test Blanket Module including damage evolution is under development. A comprehensive rate-theory based radiation damage creep deformation code was integrated with the ABACUS FEM code. The advantage of this approach is that time-dependent in-reactor deformations and radiation damage can now be directly coupled with 'material properties' of FEM analyses. The coupled FEM-Creep damage model successfully simulated the simultaneous microstructure and stress evolution in small tensile test-bar structures. Applying the integrated Creep/FEM code to large structures is still computationally prohibitive. Instead, for thermo-structural analysis of the DCLL TBM structure the integrated FEM-creep damage model was used to develop true stress-strain behavior of F82H ferritic steel. Based on this integrated damage evolution-FEM approach it is proposed to use large-scale FEM analysis to identify and isolate critical stress areas for follow up analysis using detailed and fully integrated creep-FEM approach.

  18. Automatic finite element generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, P. S.

    1984-01-01

    The design and implementation of a software system for generating finite elements and related computations are described. Exact symbolic computational techniques are employed to derive strain-displacement matrices and element stiffness matrices. Methods for dealing with the excessive growth of symbolic expressions are discussed. Automatic FORTRAN code generation is described with emphasis on improving the efficiency of the resultant code.

  19. First-Order Systems Least-Squares Finite Element Methods and Nested Iteration for Electromagnetic Two-Fluid Kinetic-Based Plasma Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibs, Christopher A.

    Efforts are currently being directed towards a fully implicit, electromagnetic, JFNK-based solver, motivating the necessity of developing a fluid-based, electromag- netic, preconditioning strategy. The two-fluid plasma (TFP) model is an ideal approximation to the kinetic Jacobian. The TFP model couples both an ion and an electron fluid with Maxwell's equations. The fluid equations consist of the conservation of momentum and number density. A Darwin approximation of Maxwell is used to eliminate light waves from the model in order to facilitate coupling to non-relativistic particle models. We analyze the TFP-Darwin system in the context of a stand-alone solver with consideration of preconditioning a kinetic-JFNK approach. The TFP-Darwin system is addressed numerically by use of nested iteration (NI) and a First-Order Systems Least Squares (FOSLS) discretization. An important goal of NI is to produce an approximation that is within the basis of attraction for Newton's method on a relatively coarse mesh and, thus, on all subsequent meshes. After scaling and modification, the TFP-Darwin model yields a nonlinear, first-order system of equa- tions whose Frechet derivative is shown to be uniformly H1-elliptic in a neighborhood of the exact solution. H1 ellipticity yields optimal finite element performance and lin- ear systems amenable to solution with Algebraic Multigrid (AMG). To efficiently focus computational resources, an adaptive mesh refinement scheme, based on the accuracy per computational cost, is leveraged. Numerical tests demonstrate the efficacy of the approach, yielding an approximate solution within discretization error in a relatively small number of computational work units.

  20. Finite elements and finite differences for transonic flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M. M.; Murman, E. M.; Wellford, L. C.

    1978-01-01

    The paper reviews the chief finite difference and finite element techniques used for numerical solution of nonlinear mixed elliptic-hyperbolic equations governing transonic flow. The forms of the governing equations for unsteady two-dimensional transonic flow considered are the Euler equation, the full potential equation in both conservative and nonconservative form, the transonic small-disturbance equation in both conservative and nonconservative form, and the hodograph equations for the small-disturbance case and the full-potential case. Finite difference methods considered include time-dependent methods, relaxation methods, semidirect methods, and hybrid methods. Finite element methods include finite element Lax-Wendroff schemes, implicit Galerkin method, mixed variational principles, dual iterative procedures, optimal control methods and least squares.

  1. Finite Element Analysis Code

    2006-03-08

    MAPVAR-KD is designed to transfer solution results from one finite element mesh to another. MAPVAR-KD draws heavily from the structure and coding of MERLIN II, but it employs a new finite element data base, EXODUS II, and offers enhanced speed and new capabilities not available in MERLIN II. In keeping with the MERLIN II documentation, the computational algorithms used in MAPVAR-KD are described. User instructions are presented. Example problems are included to demonstrate the operationmore » of the code and the effects of various input options. MAPVAR-KD is a modification of MAPVAR in which the search algorithm was replaced by a kd-tree-based search for better performance on large problems.« less

  2. Finite Element Analysis Code

    SciTech Connect

    Sjaardema, G.; Wellman, G.; Gartling, D.

    2006-03-08

    MAPVAR-KD is designed to transfer solution results from one finite element mesh to another. MAPVAR-KD draws heavily from the structure and coding of MERLIN II, but it employs a new finite element data base, EXODUS II, and offers enhanced speed and new capabilities not available in MERLIN II. In keeping with the MERLIN II documentation, the computational algorithms used in MAPVAR-KD are described. User instructions are presented. Example problems are included to demonstrate the operation of the code and the effects of various input options. MAPVAR-KD is a modification of MAPVAR in which the search algorithm was replaced by a kd-tree-based search for better performance on large problems.

  3. Finite Element Analysis Code

    SciTech Connect

    Forsythe, C.; Smith, M.; Sjaardema, G.

    2005-06-26

    Exotxt is an analysis code that reads finite element results data stored in an exodusII file and generates a file in a structured text format. The text file can be edited or modified via a number of text formatting tools. Exotxt is used by analysis to translate data from the binary exodusII format into a structured text format which can then be edited or modified and then either translated back to exodusII format or to another format.

  4. Finite Element Analysis Code

    2005-06-26

    Exotxt is an analysis code that reads finite element results data stored in an exodusII file and generates a file in a structured text format. The text file can be edited or modified via a number of text formatting tools. Exotxt is used by analysis to translate data from the binary exodusII format into a structured text format which can then be edited or modified and then either translated back to exodusII format or tomore » another format.« less

  5. Finite Element Analysis Code

    SciTech Connect

    Sjaardema, G.; Forsythe, C.

    2005-05-07

    CONEX is a code for joining sequentially in time multiple exodusll database files which all represent the same base mesh topology and geometry. It is used to create a single results or restart file from multiple results or restart files which typically arise as the result of multiple restarted analyses. CONEX is used to postprocess the results from a series of finite element analyses. It can join sequentially the data from multiple results databases into a single database which makes it easier to postprocess the results data.

  6. Finite Element Analysis Code

    2005-05-07

    CONEX is a code for joining sequentially in time multiple exodusll database files which all represent the same base mesh topology and geometry. It is used to create a single results or restart file from multiple results or restart files which typically arise as the result of multiple restarted analyses. CONEX is used to postprocess the results from a series of finite element analyses. It can join sequentially the data from multiple results databases intomore » a single database which makes it easier to postprocess the results data.« less

  7. Non-oscillatory and non-diffusive solution of convection problems by the iteratively reweighted least-squares finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan

    1993-01-01

    A comparative description is presented for the least-squares FEM (LSFEM) for 2D steady-state pure convection problems. In addition to exhibiting better control of the streamline derivative than the streamline upwinding Petrov-Galerkin method, numerical convergence rates are obtained which show the LSFEM to be virtually optimal. The LSFEM is used as a framework for an iteratively reweighted LSFEM yielding nonoscillatory and nondiffusive solutions for problems with contact discontinuities; this method is shown to convect contact discontinuities without error when using triangular and bilinear elements.

  8. Finite element analysis of wrinkling membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. K.; Hedgepeth, J. M.; Weingarten, V. I.; Das, P.; Kahyai, S.

    1984-01-01

    The development of a nonlinear numerical algorithm for the analysis of stresses and displacements in partly wrinkled flat membranes, and its implementation on the SAP VII finite-element code are described. A comparison of numerical results with exact solutions of two benchmark problems reveals excellent agreement, with good convergence of the required iterative procedure. An exact solution of a problem involving axisymmetric deformations of a partly wrinkled shallow curved membrane is also reported.

  9. Solving finite element equations on concurrent computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nour-Omid, B.; Raefsky, A.; Lyzenga, G.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a concurrent algorithm for the solution of systems of equations arising in finite element applications. The approach is based on a hybrid of direct elimination method and preconditioned conjugate iteration. Two different preconditioners are used; diagonal scaling and a concurrent implementation of incomplete LU factorization. First, an automatic procedure is used to partition the finite element mesh into sub-structures. The particular mesh partition is chosen to minimize an estimate of the cost for evaluating the solution using this algorithm on a concurrent computer. These procedures are implemented in a finite element program on the JPL/CalTech MARK III hypercube computer. An overview of the structure of this program is presented. The performance of the solution method is demonstrated with the aid of a number of numerical test runs, and its advantages for concurrent implementations are discussed. Efficiency and speed-up factors over sequential machines for the numerical examples are highlighted.

  10. Parallel processing in finite element structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.

    1987-01-01

    A brief review is made of the fundamental concepts and basic issues of parallel processing. Discussion focuses on parallel numerical algorithms, performance evaluation of machines and algorithms, and parallelism in finite element computations. A computational strategy is proposed for maximizing the degree of parallelism at different levels of the finite element analysis process including: 1) formulation level (through the use of mixed finite element models); 2) analysis level (through additive decomposition of the different arrays in the governing equations into the contributions to a symmetrized response plus correction terms); 3) numerical algorithm level (through the use of operator splitting techniques and application of iterative processes); and 4) implementation level (through the effective combination of vectorization, multitasking and microtasking, whenever available).

  11. Finite element computational fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Finite element analysis as applied to the broad spectrum of computational fluid mechanics is analyzed. The finite element solution methodology is derived, developed, and applied directly to the differential equation systems governing classes of problems in fluid mechanics. The heat conduction equation is used to reveal the essence and elegance of finite element theory, including higher order accuracy and convergence. The algorithm is extended to the pervasive nonlinearity of the Navier-Stokes equations. A specific fluid mechanics problem class is analyzed with an even mix of theory and applications, including turbulence closure and the solution of turbulent flows.

  12. Toward automatic finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kela, Ajay; Perucchio, Renato; Voelcker, Herbert

    1987-01-01

    Two problems must be solved if the finite element method is to become a reliable and affordable blackbox engineering tool. Finite element meshes must be generated automatically from computer aided design databases and mesh analysis must be made self-adaptive. The experimental system described solves both problems in 2-D through spatial and analytical substructuring techniques that are now being extended into 3-D.

  13. Second order tensor finite element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. Tinsley; Fly, J.; Berry, C.; Tworzydlo, W.; Vadaketh, S.; Bass, J.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a research and software development effort are presented for the finite element modeling of the static and dynamic behavior of anisotropic materials, with emphasis on single crystal alloys. Various versions of two dimensional and three dimensional hybrid finite elements were implemented and compared with displacement-based elements. Both static and dynamic cases are considered. The hybrid elements developed in the project were incorporated into the SPAR finite element code. In an extension of the first phase of the project, optimization of experimental tests for anisotropic materials was addressed. In particular, the problem of calculating material properties from tensile tests and of calculating stresses from strain measurements were considered. For both cases, numerical procedures and software for the optimization of strain gauge and material axes orientation were developed.

  14. Modélisation du transport réactif en milieu poreux : schéma itératif associé à une combinaison d'éléments finis discontinus et mixtes-hybridesModelling reactive transport in porous media: iterative scheme and combination of discontinuous and mixed-hybrid finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrayrou, Jérôme; Mosé, Robert; Behra, Philippe

    2003-03-01

    The sequential iterative approach (SIA) scheme is the most efficient method for modelling reactive transport in porous media with the operator-splitting approach. A combination of finite discontinuous and finite mixed-hybrid elements is a powerful method for solving solute transport in porous media, but the use of this method for SIA scheme induces numerical difficulties. In this paper, a new method is developed to solve reactive transport by using both the SIA scheme and a combination of finite discontinuous and finite mixed elements. The proposed method is tested by modelling a column experiment. To cite this article: J. Carrayrou et al., C. R. Mecanique 331 (2003).

  15. Finite element shell instability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Formulation procedures and the associated computer program for finite element thin shell instability analysis are discussed. Data cover: (1) formulation of basic element relationships, (2) construction of solution algorithms on both the conceptual and algorithmic levels, and (3) conduction of numerical analyses to verify the accuracy and efficiency of the theory and related programs therein are described.

  16. Adaptive finite-element ballooning analysis of bipolar ionized fields

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Hamouz, Z.M.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents an adaptive finite-element iterative method for the analysis of the ionized field around high-voltage bipolar direct-current (HVDC) transmission line conductors without resort to Deutsch`s assumption. A new iterative finite-element ballooning technique is proposed to solve Poisson`s equation wherein the commonly used artificial boundary around the transmission line conductors is simulated at infinity. Unlike all attempts reported in the literature for the solution of ionized field, the constancy of the conductors` surface field at the corona onset value is directly implemented in the finite-element formulation. In order to investigate the effectiveness of the proposed method, a laboratory model was built. It has been found that the calculated V-I characteristics and the ground-plane current density agreed well with those measured experimentally. The simplicity in computer programming in addition to the low number of iterations required to achieve convergence characterize this method of analysis.

  17. Nonlinear, finite deformation, finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nhung; Waas, Anthony M.

    2016-06-01

    The roles of the consistent Jacobian matrix and the material tangent moduli, which are used in nonlinear incremental finite deformation mechanics problems solved using the finite element method, are emphasized in this paper, and demonstrated using the commercial software ABAQUS standard. In doing so, the necessity for correctly employing user material subroutines to solve nonlinear problems involving large deformation and/or large rotation is clarified. Starting with the rate form of the principle of virtual work, the derivations of the material tangent moduli, the consistent Jacobian matrix, the stress/strain measures, and the objective stress rates are discussed and clarified. The difference between the consistent Jacobian matrix (which, in the ABAQUS UMAT user material subroutine is referred to as DDSDDE) and the material tangent moduli ( C e ) needed for the stress update is pointed out and emphasized in this paper. While the former is derived based on the Jaumann rate of the Kirchhoff stress, the latter is derived using the Jaumann rate of the Cauchy stress. Understanding the difference between these two objective stress rates is crucial for correctly implementing a constitutive model, especially a rate form constitutive relation, and for ensuring fast convergence. Specifically, the implementation requires the stresses to be updated correctly. For this, the strains must be computed directly from the deformation gradient and corresponding strain measure (for a total form model). Alternatively, the material tangent moduli derived from the corresponding Jaumann rate of the Cauchy stress of the constitutive relation (for a rate form model) should be used. Given that this requirement is satisfied, the consistent Jacobian matrix only influences the rate of convergence. Its derivation should be based on the Jaumann rate of the Kirchhoff stress to ensure fast convergence; however, the use of a different objective stress rate may also be possible. The error associated

  18. Adaptive mesh generation for edge-element finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuboi, Hajime; Gyimothy, Szabolcs

    2001-06-01

    An adaptive mesh generation method for two- and three-dimensional finite element methods using edge elements is proposed. Since the tangential component continuity is preserved when using edge elements, the strategy of creating new nodes is based on evaluation of the normal component of the magnetic vector potential across element interfaces. The evaluation is performed at the middle point of edge of a triangular element for two-dimensional problems or at the gravity center of triangular surface of a tetrahedral element for three-dimensional problems. At the boundary of two elements, the error estimator is the ratio of the normal component discontinuity to the maximum value of the potential in the same material. One or more nodes are set at the middle points of the edges according to the value of the estimator as well as the subdivision of elements where new nodes have been created. A final mesh will be obtained after several iterations. Some computation results of two- and three-dimensional problems using the proposed method are shown.

  19. Solution algorithms for nonlinear transient heat conduction analysis employing element-by-element iterative strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winget, J. M.; Hughes, T. J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The particular problems investigated in the present study arise from nonlinear transient heat conduction. One of two types of nonlinearities considered is related to a material temperature dependence which is frequently needed to accurately model behavior over the range of temperature of engineering interest. The second nonlinearity is introduced by radiation boundary conditions. The finite element equations arising from the solution of nonlinear transient heat conduction problems are formulated. The finite element matrix equations are temporally discretized, and a nonlinear iterative solution algorithm is proposed. Algorithms for solving the linear problem are discussed, taking into account the form of the matrix equations, Gaussian elimination, cost, and iterative techniques. Attention is also given to approximate factorization, implementational aspects, and numerical results.

  20. Infinite Possibilities for the Finite Element.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finlayson, Bruce A.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the uses of finite element methods in solving problems of heat transfer, fluid flow, etc. Suggests that engineers should know the general concepts and be able to apply the principles of finite element methods. (Author/WB)

  1. SUPG Finite Element Simulations of Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, Brnjamin, S.

    2006-01-01

    The Streamline-Upwind Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) finite element simulations of compressible flows is presented. The topics include: 1) Introduction; 2) SUPG Galerkin Finite Element Methods; 3) Applications; and 4) Bibliography.

  2. Peridynamic Multiscale Finite Element Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, Timothy; Bond, Stephen D.; Littlewood, David John; Moore, Stan Gerald

    2015-12-01

    The problem of computing quantum-accurate design-scale solutions to mechanics problems is rich with applications and serves as the background to modern multiscale science research. The prob- lem can be broken into component problems comprised of communicating across adjacent scales, which when strung together create a pipeline for information to travel from quantum scales to design scales. Traditionally, this involves connections between a) quantum electronic structure calculations and molecular dynamics and between b) molecular dynamics and local partial differ- ential equation models at the design scale. The second step, b), is particularly challenging since the appropriate scales of molecular dynamic and local partial differential equation models do not overlap. The peridynamic model for continuum mechanics provides an advantage in this endeavor, as the basic equations of peridynamics are valid at a wide range of scales limiting from the classical partial differential equation models valid at the design scale to the scale of molecular dynamics. In this work we focus on the development of multiscale finite element methods for the peridynamic model, in an effort to create a mathematically consistent channel for microscale information to travel from the upper limits of the molecular dynamics scale to the design scale. In particular, we first develop a Nonlocal Multiscale Finite Element Method which solves the peridynamic model at multiple scales to include microscale information at the coarse-scale. We then consider a method that solves a fine-scale peridynamic model to build element-support basis functions for a coarse- scale local partial differential equation model, called the Mixed Locality Multiscale Finite Element Method. Given decades of research and development into finite element codes for the local partial differential equation models of continuum mechanics there is a strong desire to couple local and nonlocal models to leverage the speed and state of the

  3. A finite element model with nonviscous damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roussos, L. A.; Hyer, M. W.; Thornton, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    A constitutive law by which structural damping is modeled as a relationship between stress, strain, and strain rate in a material is used in conjunction with the finite element method to develop general integral expressions for viscous and nonviscous damping matrices. To solve the set of nonlinear equations resulting from the presence of nonviscous damping, a solution technique is developed by modifying the Newmark method to accommodate an iterative solution and treat the nonviscous damping as a pseudo-force. The technique is then checked for accuracy and convergence in single- and multi-degree-of-freedom problems, and is found to be accurate and efficient for initial-condition problems with small nonviscous damping.

  4. Finite-element solutions for geothermal systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. C.; Conel, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Vector potential and scalar potential are used to formulate the governing equations for a single-component and single-phase geothermal system. By assuming an initial temperature field, the fluid velocity can be determined which, in turn, is used to calculate the convective heat transfer. The energy equation is then solved by considering convected heat as a distributed source. Using the resulting temperature to compute new source terms, the final results are obtained by iterations of the procedure. Finite-element methods are proposed for modeling of realistic geothermal systems; the advantages of such methods are discussed. The developed methodology is then applied to a sample problem. Favorable agreement is obtained by comparisons with a previous study.

  5. Fourier analysis of finite element preconditioned collocation schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deville, Michel O.; Mund, Ernest H.

    1990-01-01

    The spectrum of the iteration operator of some finite element preconditioned Fourier collocation schemes is investigated. The first part of the paper analyses one-dimensional elliptic and hyperbolic model problems and the advection-diffusion equation. Analytical expressions of the eigenvalues are obtained with use of symbolic computation. The second part of the paper considers the set of one-dimensional differential equations resulting from Fourier analysis (in the tranverse direction) of the 2-D Stokes problem. All results agree with previous conclusions on the numerical efficiency of finite element preconditioning schemes.

  6. User's Guide for ENSAERO_FE Parallel Finite Element Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldred, Lloyd B.; Guruswamy, Guru P.

    1999-01-01

    A high fidelity parallel static structural analysis capability is created and interfaced to the multidisciplinary analysis package ENSAERO-MPI of Ames Research Center. This new module replaces ENSAERO's lower fidelity simple finite element and modal modules. Full aircraft structures may be more accurately modeled using the new finite element capability. Parallel computation is performed by breaking the full structure into multiple substructures. This approach is conceptually similar to ENSAERO's multizonal fluid analysis capability. The new substructure code is used to solve the structural finite element equations for each substructure in parallel. NASTRANKOSMIC is utilized as a front end for this code. Its full library of elements can be used to create an accurate and realistic aircraft model. It is used to create the stiffness matrices for each substructure. The new parallel code then uses an iterative preconditioned conjugate gradient method to solve the global structural equations for the substructure boundary nodes.

  7. Probabilistic finite element analysis of a craniofacial finite element model.

    PubMed

    Berthaume, Michael A; Dechow, Paul C; Iriarte-Diaz, Jose; Ross, Callum F; Strait, David S; Wang, Qian; Grosse, Ian R

    2012-05-01

    We employed a probabilistic finite element analysis (FEA) method to determine how variability in material property values affects stress and strain values in a finite model of a Macaca fascicularis cranium. The material behavior of cortical bone varied in three ways: isotropic homogeneous, isotropic non-homogeneous, and orthotropic non-homogeneous. The material behavior of the trabecular bone and teeth was always treated as isotropic and homogeneous. All material property values for the cranium were randomized with a Gaussian distribution with either coefficients of variation (CVs) of 0.2 or with CVs calculated from empirical data. Latin hypercube sampling was used to determine the values of the material properties used in the finite element models. In total, four hundred and twenty six separate deterministic FE simulations were executed. We tested four hypotheses in this study: (1) uncertainty in material property values will have an insignificant effect on high stresses and a significant effect on high strains for homogeneous isotropic models; (2) the effect of variability in material property values on the stress state will increase as non-homogeneity and anisotropy increase; (3) variation in the in vivo shear strain values reported by Strait et al. (2005) and Ross et al. (2011) is not only due to variations in muscle forces and cranial morphology, but also due to variation in material property values; (4) the assumption of a uniform coefficient of variation for the material property values will result in the same trend in how moderate-to-high stresses and moderate-to-high strains vary with respect to the degree of non-homogeneity and anisotropy as the trend found when the coefficients of variation for material property values are calculated from empirical data. Our results supported the first three hypotheses and falsified the fourth. When material properties were varied with a constant CV, as non-homogeneity and anisotropy increased the level of variability in

  8. Solution of a tridiagonal system of equations on the finite element machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bostic, S. W.

    1984-01-01

    Two parallel algorithms for the solution of tridiagonal systems of equations were implemented on the Finite Element Machine. The Accelerated Parallel Gauss method, an iterative method, and the Buneman algorithm, a direct method, are discussed and execution statistics are presented.

  9. Domain decomposition methods for mortar finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Widlund, O.

    1996-12-31

    In the last few years, domain decomposition methods, previously developed and tested for standard finite element methods and elliptic problems, have been extended and modified to work for mortar and other nonconforming finite element methods. A survey will be given of work carried out jointly with Yves Achdou, Mario Casarin, Maksymilian Dryja and Yvon Maday. Results on the p- and h-p-version finite elements will also be discussed.

  10. FDIPS: Finite Difference Iterative Potential-field Solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, Gabor; van der Holst, Bartholomeus; Huang, Zhenguang

    2016-06-01

    FDIPS is a finite difference iterative potential-field solver that can generate the 3D potential magnetic field solution based on a magnetogram. It is offered as an alternative to the spherical harmonics approach, as when the number of spherical harmonics is increased, using the raw magnetogram data given on a grid that is uniform in the sine of the latitude coordinate can result in inaccurate and unreliable results, especially in the polar regions close to the Sun. FDIPS is written in Fortran 90 and uses the MPI library for parallel execution.

  11. A mixed finite element domain decomposition method for nearly elastic wave equations in the frequency domain

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Xiaobing

    1996-12-31

    A non-overlapping domain decomposition iterative method is proposed and analyzed for mixed finite element methods for a sequence of noncoercive elliptic systems with radiation boundary conditions. These differential systems describe the motion of a nearly elastic solid in the frequency domain. The convergence of the iterative procedure is demonstrated and the rate of convergence is derived for the case when the domain is decomposed into subdomains in which each subdomain consists of an individual element associated with the mixed finite elements. The hybridization of mixed finite element methods plays a important role in the construction of the discrete procedure.

  12. A finite-element analysis of bipolar ionized field

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Salam, M.; Al-Hamouz, Z.

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes a new iterative method for the analysis of the bipolar ionized field in HVDC transmission lines without resorting to Deutsch`s assumption. The finite-element technique (FET) is used to solve Poisson`s equation where the constancy of the conductors` surface field at the corona inception value is directly implemented in the finite-element formulation. The proposed method has been tested on laboratory and full-scale models. The calculated V-I characteristics agreed well with those calculated and measured previously. The dependence of the corona current as well as its monopolar and bipolar components on the conductor height is discussed. The simplicity in computer programming in addition to the low number of iterations required to achieve convergence characterize the proposed method of analysis.

  13. Implicit extrapolation methods for multilevel finite element computations

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, M.; Ruede, U.

    1994-12-31

    The finite element package FEMGP has been developed to solve elliptic and parabolic problems arising in the computation of magnetic and thermomechanical fields. FEMGP implements various methods for the construction of hierarchical finite element meshes, a variety of efficient multilevel solvers, including multigrid and preconditioned conjugate gradient iterations, as well as pre- and post-processing software. Within FEMGP, multigrid {tau}-extrapolation can be employed to improve the finite element solution iteratively to higher order. This algorithm is based on an implicit extrapolation, so that the algorithm differs from a regular multigrid algorithm only by a slightly modified computation of the residuals on the finest mesh. Another advantage of this technique is, that in contrast to explicit extrapolation methods, it does not rely on the existence of global error expansions, and therefore neither requires uniform meshes nor global regularity assumptions. In the paper the authors will analyse the {tau}-extrapolation algorithm and present experimental results in the context of the FEMGP package. Furthermore, the {tau}-extrapolation results will be compared to higher order finite element solutions.

  14. Finite-Element Composite-Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, David E.

    1990-01-01

    Finite Element Composite Analysis Program, FECAP, special-purpose finite-element program for analyzing behavior of composite material with microcomputer. Procedure leads to set of linear simultaneous equations relating unknown nodal displacement to applied loads. Written in HP BASIC 3.0.

  15. 3-D Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    1996-07-15

    TAURUS is an interactive post-processing application supporting visualization of finite element analysis results on unstructured grids. TAURUS provides the ability to display deformed geometries and contours or fringes of a large number of derived results on meshes consisting of beam, plate, shell, and solid type finite elements. Time history plotting is also available.

  16. Element-topology-independent preconditioners for parallel finite element computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. C.; Alexander, Scott

    1992-01-01

    A family of preconditioners for the solution of finite element equations are presented, which are element-topology independent and thus can be applicable to element order-free parallel computations. A key feature of the present preconditioners is the repeated use of element connectivity matrices and their left and right inverses. The properties and performance of the present preconditioners are demonstrated via beam and two-dimensional finite element matrices for implicit time integration computations.

  17. Books and monographs on finite element technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.

    1985-01-01

    The present paper proviees a listing of all of the English books and some of the foreign books on finite element technology, taking into account also a list of the conference proceedings devoted solely to finite elements. The references are divided into categories. Attention is given to fundamentals, mathematical foundations, structural and solid mechanics applications, fluid mechanics applications, other applied science and engineering applications, computer implementation and software systems, computational and modeling aspects, special topics, boundary element methods, proceedings of symmposia and conferences on finite element technology, bibliographies, handbooks, and historical accounts.

  18. Will Finite Elements Replace Structural Mechanics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojalvo, I. U.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents a personal view regarding the need for a continued interest and activity in structural methods in general, while viewing finite elements and the computer as simply two specific tools for assisting in this endeavor. An attempt is made to provide some insight as to why finite element methods seem to have "won the war," and to give examples of their more (and less) intelligent use. Items addressed include a highlight of unnecessary limitations of many existing standard finite element codes and where it is felt that further development work is needed.

  19. Assignment Of Finite Elements To Parallel Processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Moktar A.; Flower, Jon W.; Otto, Steve W.

    1990-01-01

    Elements assigned approximately optimally to subdomains. Mapping algorithm based on simulated-annealing concept used to minimize approximate time required to perform finite-element computation on hypercube computer or other network of parallel data processors. Mapping algorithm needed when shape of domain complicated or otherwise not obvious what allocation of elements to subdomains minimizes cost of computation.

  20. Visualization of higher order finite elements.

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, David C.; Pebay, Philippe Pierre; Crawford, Richard H.; Khardekar, Rahul Vinay

    2004-04-01

    Finite element meshes are used to approximate the solution to some differential equation when no exact solution exists. A finite element mesh consists of many small (but finite, not infinitesimal or differential) regions of space that partition the problem domain, {Omega}. Each region, or element, or cell has an associated polynomial map, {Phi}, that converts the coordinates of any point, x = ( x y z ), in the element into another value, f(x), that is an approximate solution to the differential equation, as in Figure 1(a). This representation works quite well for axis-aligned regions of space, but when there are curved boundaries on the problem domain, {Omega}, it becomes algorithmically much more difficult to define {Phi} in terms of x. Rather, we define an archetypal element in a new coordinate space, r = ( r s t ), which has a simple, axis-aligned boundary (see Figure 1(b)) and place two maps onto our archetypal element:

  1. Hybrid finite element-finite difference method for thermal analysis of blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, C H; Gutierrez, G; White, J A; Roemer, R B

    2000-01-01

    A hybrid finite-difference/finite-element technique for the thermal analysis of blood vessels embedded in perfused tissue has been developed and evaluated. This method provides efficient and accurate solutions to the conjugated heat transfer problem of convection by blood coupled to conduction in the tissue. The technique uses a previously developed 3D automatic meshing method for creating a finite element mesh in the tissue surrounding the vessels, coupled iteratively with a 1-D marching finite difference method for the interior of the vessels. This hybrid technique retains the flexibility and ease of automated finite-element meshing techniques for modelling the complex geometry of blood vessels and irregularly shaped tissues, and speeds the solution time by using a simple finite-difference method to calculate the bulk mean temperatures within all blood vessels. The use of the 1D finite-difference technique in the blood vessels also eliminates the large computer memory requirements needed to accurately solve large vessel network problems when fine FE meshes are used in the interior of vessels. The accuracy of the hybrid technique has been verified against previously verified numerical solutions. In summary, the hybrid technique combines the accuracy and flexibility found in automated finite-element techniques, with the speed and reduction of computational memory requirements associated with the 1D finite-difference technique, something which has not been done before. This method, thus, has the potential to provide accurate, flexible and relatively fast solutions for the thermal analysis of coupled perfusion/blood vessel problems, and large vessel network problems.

  2. A survey of mixed finite element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brezzi, F.

    1987-01-01

    This paper is an introduction to and an overview of mixed finite element methods. It discusses the mixed formulation of certain basic problems in elasticity and hydrodynamics. It also discusses special techniques for solving the discrete problem.

  3. Finite element modeling of the human pelvis

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, B.

    1995-11-01

    A finite element model of the human pelvis was created using a commercial wire frame image as a template. To test the final mesh, the model`s mechanical behavior was analyzed through finite element analysis and the results were displayed graphically as stress concentrations. In the future, this grid of the pelvis will be integrated with a full leg model and used in side-impact car collision simulations.

  4. Multigrid waveform relaxation on spatial finite element meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, J.; Vandewalle, S.

    1994-12-31

    The authors shall discuss the numerical solution of a parabolic partial differential equation {partial_derivative}u/{partial_derivative}t(x,t) = Lu(x,t) + f(x,t), x{element_of}{Omega}, t>0, (1) supplied with a boundary condition and given initial values. The spatial finite element discretization of (1) on a discrete grid {Omega}{sub h} leads to an initial value problem of the form B{dot u} + Au = f, u(0) = u{sub o}, t > 0, (2) with B a non-singular matrix. The waveform relaxation method is a method for solving ordinary differential equations. It differs from most standard iterative techniques in that it is a continuous-time method, iterating with functions in time, and thereby well-suited for parallel computation.

  5. Finite Element Vibration Analysis of Rectangular Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. H.; Lin, W. J.; Leung, A. Y. T.

    2010-05-01

    Some pre-tensioned 4-node rectangular elements and 8-node triangular elements are constructed for the free vibration analysis of membranes by finite element. The shape functions are given to derive the element stiffness and mass matrices in accordance with the minimum potential energy principle. Two typical examples show that the calculation by the 4-node rectangular element is very close to the theoretical solution, and 8-node rectangular element has higher accuracy than the 4-node rectangular element. For dense grid, the result is almost consistent with the theoretical solution.

  6. Finite element analysis of flexible, rotating blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, Oliver G.

    1987-01-01

    A reference guide that can be used when using the finite element method to approximate the static and dynamic behavior of flexible, rotating blades is given. Important parameters such as twist, sweep, camber, co-planar shell elements, centrifugal loads, and inertia properties are studied. Comparisons are made between NASTRAN elements through published benchmark tests. The main purpose is to summarize blade modeling strategies and to document capabilities and limitations (for flexible, rotating blades) of various NASTRAN elements.

  7. Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Alan

    2005-03-18

    Sparse systems of linear equations arise in many engineering applications, including finite elements, finite volumes, and others. The solution of linear systems is often the most computationally intensive portion of the application. Depending on the complexity of problems addressed by the application, there may be no single solver capable of solving all of the linear systems that arise. This motivates the desire to switch an application from one solver librwy to another, depending on the problem being solved. The interfaces provided by solver libraries differ greatly, making it difficult to switch an application code from one library to another. The amount of library-specific code in an application Can be greatly reduced by having an abstraction layer between solver libraries and the application, putting a common "face" on various solver libraries. One such abstraction layer is the Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers (EEl), which has seen significant use by finite element applications at Sandia National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  8. Finite-Element Analysis of Multiphase Immiscible Flow Through Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuppusamy, T.; Sheng, J.; Parker, J. C.; Lenhard, R. J.

    1987-04-01

    A finite-element model is developed for multiphase flow through soil involving three immiscible fluids: namely, air, water, and a nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL). A variational method is employed for the finite-element formulation corresponding to the coupled differential equations governing flow in a three-fluid phase porous medium system with constant air phase pressure. Constitutive relationships for fluid conductivities and saturations as functions of fluid pressures, which are derived in a companion paper by J. C. Parker et al. (this issue) and which may be calibrated from two-phase laboratory measurements, are employed in the finite-element program. The solution procedure uses backward time integration with iteration by a modified Picard method to handle the nonlinear properties. Laboratory experiments involving water displacement from soil columns by p cymene (a benzene-derivative hydrocarbon) under constant pressure were simulated by the finite-element program to validate the numerical model and formulation for constitutive properties. Transient water outflow predicted using independently measured saturation-capillary head data agreed with observed outflow data within the limits of precision of the predictions as estimated by a first-order Taylor series approximation considering parameter uncertainty due to experimental reproducability and constitutive model accuracy. Two-dimensional simulations are presented for a hypothetical field case involving introduction of NAPL near the soil surface due to leakage from an underground storage tank. Subsequent transport of NAPL in the variably saturated vadose and groundwater zones is analyzed.

  9. Finite-element models of continental extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, H. David; Morgan, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Numerical models of the initial deformation of extending continental lithosphere, computed to investigate the control of preexisting thermal and mechanical heterogeneities on the style of deformation, are presented. The finite element method is used to calculate deformation with a viscoelastic-plastic model for the lithosphere. Comparisons of the results of analytic models and finite-element models using this method show that good results may be obtained by the numerical technique, even with elements containing both brittle and viscoelastic sampling points. It is shown that the gross style of initial extensional deformation is controlled by the depth and width of the initial heterogeneity which localizes deformation.

  10. Design Optimization of Coronary Stent Based on Finite Element Models

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Tianshuang; Zhu, Bao; Wu, Jinying

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an effective optimization method using the Kriging surrogate model combing with modified rectangular grid sampling to reduce the stent dogboning effect in the expansion process. An infilling sampling criterion named expected improvement (EI) is used to balance local and global searches in the optimization iteration. Four commonly used finite element models of stent dilation were used to investigate stent dogboning rate. Thrombosis models of three typical shapes are built to test the effectiveness of optimization results. Numerical results show that two finite element models dilated by pressure applied inside the balloon are available, one of which with the artery and plaque can give an optimal stent with better expansion behavior, while the artery and plaque unincluded model is more efficient and takes a smaller amount of computation. PMID:24222743

  11. Surface subsidence prediction by nonlinear finite-element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Najjar, Y. . Dept. of Civil Engineering); Zaman, M. . School of Civil Engineering and Environmental Science)

    1993-11-01

    An improved two-dimensional plane-strain numerical procedure based on the incremental-iterative nonlinear finite-element is developed to predict ground subsidence caused by underground mining. The procedure emphasizes the use of the following features: (1) an appropriate constitutive model that can accurately describe the nonlinear behavior of geological strata; and (2) an accurate algorithm for simulation of excavation sequences consistent with the actual underground mining process. The computer code is used to analyze a collapse that occurred in the Blue Goose Lease [number sign]1 Mine in northeastern Oklahoma. A parametric study is conducted to investigate the effects of some selected factors on the shape and extent of subsidence profiles. Analyses of the numerical results indicate that the nonlinear finite-element technique can be employed to meaningfully predict and characterize the potential for ground subsidence due to underground mining.

  12. Quadrilateral finite element mesh coarsening

    DOEpatents

    Staten, Matthew L; Dewey, Mark W; Benzley, Steven E

    2012-10-16

    Techniques for coarsening a quadrilateral mesh are described. These techniques include identifying a coarsening region within the quadrilateral mesh to be coarsened. Quadrilateral elements along a path through the coarsening region are removed. Node pairs along opposite sides of the path are identified. The node pairs along the path are then merged to collapse the path.

  13. A Decoupled Finite Element Heterogeneous Coarse Mesh Transport Method.

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, S. W.; Rahnema, Farzad

    2005-01-01

    In a recent paper, an original finite element (FE) method was presented for solving eigenvalue transport problems on a coarse spatial mesh. The method employed a surface Green's function expansion of the angular flux trial functions, so that heterogeneous coarse-meshes could be treated with relative ease. Numerical problems were solved using the multigroup discrete ordinates approximation in one-dimensional (1-D) slab geometry. Unfortunately, difficulties were encountered in finding solutions to the algebraic finite element equations, which led to sizeable angular flux discontinuities at coarse-mesh interfaces and significant errors. For this reason, a nonvariational iterative technique was ultimately favored for converging the angular flux distribution, and was used in conjunction with a Rayleigh quotient for converging the eigenvalue. In this paper, a new derivation of finite element equations is presented, which seems to offer a remedy for at least some of the numerical ills that plagued the previous work. First, the equations are derived in terms of a generalized response function expansion. This allows a more efficient response basis to be employed and vastly reduces the overall computational effort without a substantial loss of accuracy. Second, the tight coupling between coarse-meshes in the original equations is effectively broken by assuming that an accurate estimate of the flux distribution entering a given coarse-mesh is known. With an additional assumption that an accurate eigenvalue estimate is known, an iterative approach to solving these decoupled finite element (DFE) equations is developed. The DFE method has been applied to both 1- and 2-D heterogeneous coarse-mesh problems with a far greater degree of success than the original FE method. However, some numerical difficulties remain to be overcome before the new approach can be considered robust.

  14. Massively parallel computation of RCS with finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Jay

    1993-01-01

    One of the promising combinations of finite element approaches for scattering problems uses Whitney edge elements, spherical vector wave-absorbing boundary conditions, and bi-conjugate gradient solution for the frequency-domain near field. Each of these approaches may be criticized. Low-order elements require high mesh density, but also result in fast, reliable iterative convergence. Spherical wave-absorbing boundary conditions require additional space to be meshed beyond the most minimal near-space region, but result in fully sparse, symmetric matrices which keep storage and solution times low. Iterative solution is somewhat unpredictable and unfriendly to multiple right-hand sides, yet we find it to be uniformly fast on large problems to date, given the other two approaches. Implementation of these approaches on a distributed memory, message passing machine yields huge dividends, as full scalability to the largest machines appears assured and iterative solution times are well-behaved for large problems. We present times and solutions for computed RCS for a conducting cube and composite permeability/conducting sphere on the Intel ipsc860 with up to 16 processors solving over 200,000 unknowns. We estimate problems of approximately 10 million unknowns, encompassing 1000 cubic wavelengths, may be attempted on a currently available 512 processor machine, but would be exceedingly tedious to prepare. The most severe bottlenecks are due to the slow rate of mesh generation on non-parallel machines and the large transfer time from such a machine to the parallel processor. One solution, in progress, is to create and then distribute a coarse mesh among the processors, followed by systematic refinement within each processor. Elimination of redundant node definitions at the mesh-partition surfaces, snap-to-surface post processing of the resulting mesh for good modelling of curved surfaces, and load-balancing redistribution of new elements after the refinement are auxiliary

  15. Finite element formulations for compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tezduyar, Tayfun E.

    1989-01-01

    Researchers started their studies on the development and application of computational methods for compressible flows. Particular attention was given to proper numerical treatment of sharp layers occurring in such problems and to general mesh generation capabilities for intricate computational geometries. Mainly finite element methods enhanced with several state-of-the art techniques (such as the streamline-upwind/Petrov-Galerkin, discontinuity capturing, adaptive implicit-explicit, and trouped element-by-element approximate factorization schemes) were employed.

  16. Finite-approximation-error-based discrete-time iterative adaptive dynamic programming.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qinglai; Wang, Fei-Yue; Liu, Derong; Yang, Xiong

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, a new iterative adaptive dynamic programming (ADP) algorithm is developed to solve optimal control problems for infinite horizon discrete-time nonlinear systems with finite approximation errors. First, a new generalized value iteration algorithm of ADP is developed to make the iterative performance index function converge to the solution of the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation. The generalized value iteration algorithm permits an arbitrary positive semi-definite function to initialize it, which overcomes the disadvantage of traditional value iteration algorithms. When the iterative control law and iterative performance index function in each iteration cannot accurately be obtained, for the first time a new "design method of the convergence criteria" for the finite-approximation-error-based generalized value iteration algorithm is established. A suitable approximation error can be designed adaptively to make the iterative performance index function converge to a finite neighborhood of the optimal performance index function. Neural networks are used to implement the iterative ADP algorithm. Finally, two simulation examples are given to illustrate the performance of the developed method. PMID:25265640

  17. Finite element radiation transport in one dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Painter, J.F.

    1997-05-09

    A new physics package solves radiation transport equations in one space dimension, multiple energy groups and directions. A discontinuous finite element method discretizes radiation intensity with respect to space and angle, and a continuous finite element method discretizes electron temperature `in space. A splitting method solves the resulting linear equations. This is a one-dimensional analog of Kershaw and Harte`s two-dimensional package. This package has been installed in a two-dimensional inertial confinement fusion code, and has given excellent results for both thermal waves and highly directional radiation. In contrast, the traditional discrete ordinate and spherical harmonic methods show less accurate results in both cases.

  18. Numerical computation of transonic flows by finite-element and finite-difference methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M. M.; Wellford, L. C.; Merkle, C. L.; Murman, E. M.

    1978-01-01

    Studies on applications of the finite element approach to transonic flow calculations are reported. Different discretization techniques of the differential equations and boundary conditions are compared. Finite element analogs of Murman's mixed type finite difference operators for small disturbance formulations were constructed and the time dependent approach (using finite differences in time and finite elements in space) was examined.

  19. Slave finite elements: The temporal element approach to nonlinear analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gellin, S.

    1984-01-01

    A formulation method for finite elements in space and time incorporating nonlinear geometric and material behavior is presented. The method uses interpolation polynomials for approximating the behavior of various quantities over the element domain, and only explicit integration over space and time. While applications are general, the plate and shell elements that are currently being programmed are appropriate to model turbine blades, vanes, and combustor liners.

  20. Adaptive finite element strategies for shell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, G.; Levit, I.; Stehlin, B.; Hurlbut, B.

    1992-01-01

    The present paper extends existing finite element adaptive refinement (AR) techniques to shell structures, which have heretofore been neglected in the AR literature. Specific challenges in applying AR to shell structures include: (1) physical discontinuities (e.g., stiffener intersections); (2) boundary layers; (3) sensitivity to geometric imperfections; (4) the sensitivity of most shell elements to mesh distortion, constraint definition and/or thinness; and (5) intrinsic geometric nonlinearity. All of these challenges but (5) are addressed here.

  1. A multidimensional finite element method for CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, Darrell W.; Humphrey, Joseph W.

    1991-01-01

    A finite element method is used to solve the equations of motion for 2- and 3-D fluid flow. The time-dependent equations are solved explicitly using quadrilateral (2-D) and hexahedral (3-D) elements, mass lumping, and reduced integration. A Petrov-Galerkin technique is applied to the advection terms. The method requires a minimum of computational storage, executes quickly, and is scalable for execution on computer systems ranging from PCs to supercomputers.

  2. Quadrilateral/hexahedral finite element mesh coarsening

    DOEpatents

    Staten, Matthew L; Dewey, Mark W; Scott, Michael A; Benzley, Steven E

    2012-10-16

    A technique for coarsening a finite element mesh ("FEM") is described. This technique includes identifying a coarsening region within the FEM to be coarsened. Perimeter chords running along perimeter boundaries of the coarsening region are identified. The perimeter chords are redirected to create an adaptive chord separating the coarsening region from a remainder of the FEM. The adaptive chord runs through mesh elements residing along the perimeter boundaries of the coarsening region. The adaptive chord is then extracted to coarsen the FEM.

  3. Finite element modeling of nonisothermal polymer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roylance, D.

    1981-01-01

    A finite element formulation designed to simulate polymer melt flows in which both conductive and convective heat transfer are important is described, and the numerical model is illustrated by means of computer experiments using extruder drag flow and entry flow as trial problems. Fluid incompressibility is enforced by a penalty treatment of the element pressures, and the thermal convective transport is modeled by conventional Galerkin and optimal upwind treatments.

  4. Least-squares finite element methods for quantum chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ketelsen, Christian; Brannick, J; Manteuffel, T; Mccormick, S

    2008-01-01

    A significant amount of the computational time in large Monte Carlo simulations of lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) is spent inverting the discrete Dirac operator. Unfortunately, traditional covariant finite difference discretizations of the Dirac operator present serious challenges for standard iterative methods. For interesting physical parameters, the discretized operator is large and ill-conditioned, and has random coefficients. More recently, adaptive algebraic multigrid (AMG) methods have been shown to be effective preconditioners for Wilson's discretization of the Dirac equation. This paper presents an alternate discretization of the Dirac operator based on least-squares finite elements. The discretization is systematically developed and physical properties of the resulting matrix system are discussed. Finally, numerical experiments are presented that demonstrate the effectiveness of adaptive smoothed aggregation ({alpha}SA ) multigrid as a preconditioner for the discrete field equations resulting from applying the proposed least-squares FE formulation to a simplified test problem, the 2d Schwinger model of quantum electrodynamics.

  5. Animation of finite element models and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipman, Robert R.

    1992-01-01

    This is not intended as a complete review of computer hardware and software that can be used for animation of finite element models and results, but is instead a demonstration of the benefits of visualization using selected hardware and software. The role of raw computational power, graphics speed, and the use of videotape are discussed.

  6. Finite element displacement analysis of a lung.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, F. L.; West, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    A method is given based on the technique of finite elements which determines theoretically the mechanical behavior of a lung-shaped body loaded by its own weight. The results of this theoretical analysis have been compared with actual measurements of alveolar size and pleural pressures in animal lungs.

  7. Finite element analysis of a meniscus mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Y.

    1989-10-01

    Finite element analyses were carried out for a 7.5 m meniscus mirror of 20 cm thickness. Calculations were made for deformations of the mirror surface due to the gravity and the effect of a hole through which a lateral supporting mechanism would be installed. Vibrational eigenmodes were also calculated when the mirror is fixed by three axial and three lateral hard points.

  8. Direct finite element equation solving algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melosh, R. J.; Utku, S.; Salama, M.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents and examines direct solution algorithms for the linear simultaneous equations that arise when finite element models represent an engineering system. It identifies the mathematical processing of four solution methods and assesses their data processing implications using concurrent processing.

  9. A combined finite element-boundary element formulation for solution of axially symmetric bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Jeffrey D.; Volakis, John L.

    1991-01-01

    A new method is presented for the computation of electromagnetic scattering from axially symmetric bodies. To allow the simulation of inhomogeneous cross sections, the method combines the finite element and boundary element techniques. Interior to a fictitious surface enclosing the scattering body, the finite element method is used which results in a sparce submatrix, whereas along the enclosure the Stratton-Chu integral equation is enforced. By choosing the fictitious enclosure to be a right circular cylinder, most of the resulting boundary integrals are convolutional and may therefore be evaluated via the FFT with which the system is iteratively solved. In view of the sparce matrix associated with the interior fields, this reduces the storage requirement of the entire system to O(N) making the method attractive for large scale computations. The details of the corresponding formulation and its numerical implementation are described.

  10. A finite element thermal analysis procedure for several temperature-dependent parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Wieting, A. R.

    1978-01-01

    A finite-element thermal analysis procedure for elements with several temperature-dependent thermal parameters is presented. The procedure, based on an application of the Newton-Raphson iteration technique, is formulated by resolving element matrices into component matrices, one component for each thermal parameter. Component conductance matrices are evaluated by assuming constant thermal parameters within an element and are computed once per unit thermal parameter. Significant savings in computer time result from the unit thermal parameter concept. The solution procedure applied to a convectively cooled structure with significantly varying thermal parameters converged in four iterations.

  11. On Hybrid and mixed finite element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, T. H. H.

    1981-01-01

    Three versions of the assumed stress hybrid model in finite element methods and the corresponding variational principles for the formulation are presented. Examples of rank deficiency for stiffness matrices by the hybrid stress model are given and their corresponding kinematic deformation modes are identified. A discussion of the derivation of general semi-Loof elements for plates and shells by the hybrid stress method is given. It is shown that the equilibrium model by Fraeijs de Veubeke can be derived by the approach of the hybrid stress model as a special case of semi-Loof elements.

  12. Finite element computation with parallel VLSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgregor, J.; Salama, M.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes a parallel processing computer consisting of a 16-bit microcomputer as a master processor which controls and coordinates the activities of 8086/8087 VLSI chip set slave processors working in parallel. The hardware is inexpensive and can be flexibly configured and programmed to perform various functions. This makes it a useful research tool for the development of, and experimentation with parallel mathematical algorithms. Application of the hardware to computational tasks involved in the finite element analysis method is demonstrated by the generation and assembly of beam finite element stiffness matrices. A number of possible schemes for the implementation of N-elements on N- or n-processors (N is greater than n) are described, and the speedup factors of their time consumption are determined as a function of the number of available parallel processors.

  13. Revolution in Orthodontics: Finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Johar Rajvinder; Kambalyal, Prabhuraj; Jain, Megha; Khandelwal, Piyush

    2016-01-01

    Engineering has not only developed in the field of medicine but has also become quite established in the field of dentistry, especially Orthodontics. Finite element analysis (FEA) is a computational procedure to calculate the stress in an element, which performs a model solution. This structural analysis allows the determination of stress resulting from external force, pressure, thermal change, and other factors. This method is extremely useful for indicating mechanical aspects of biomaterials and human tissues that can hardly be measured in vivo. The results obtained can then be studied using visualization software within the finite element method (FEM) to view a variety of parameters, and to fully identify implications of the analysis. This is a review to show the applications of FEM in Orthodontics. It is extremely important to verify what the purpose of the study is in order to correctly apply FEM. PMID:27114948

  14. Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers

    2005-03-18

    Sparse systems of linear equations arise in many engineering applications, including finite elements, finite volumes, and others. The solution of linear systems is often the most computationally intensive portion of the application. Depending on the complexity of problems addressed by the application, there may be no single solver capable of solving all of the linear systems that arise. This motivates the desire to switch an application from one solver librwy to another, depending on themore » problem being solved. The interfaces provided by solver libraries differ greatly, making it difficult to switch an application code from one library to another. The amount of library-specific code in an application Can be greatly reduced by having an abstraction layer between solver libraries and the application, putting a common "face" on various solver libraries. One such abstraction layer is the Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers (EEl), which has seen significant use by finite element applications at Sandia National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.« less

  15. Finite Element Heat & Mass Transfer Code

    1996-10-10

    FEHM is a numerical simulation code for subsurface transport processes. It models 3-D, time-dependent, multiphase, multicomponent, non-isothermal, reactive flow through porous and fractured media. It can accurately represent complex 3-D geologic media and structures and their effects on subsurface flow and transport. Its capabilities include flow of gas, water, and heat; flow of air, water, and heat; multiple chemically reactive and sorbing tracers; finite element/finite volume formulation; coupled stress module; saturated and unsaturated media; andmore » double porosity and double porosity/double permeability capabilities.« less

  16. Finite element analysis of human joints

    SciTech Connect

    Bossart, P.L.; Hollerbach, K.

    1996-09-01

    Our work focuses on the development of finite element models (FEMs) that describe the biomechanics of human joints. Finite element modeling is becoming a standard tool in industrial applications. In highly complex problems such as those found in biomechanics research, however, the full potential of FEMs is just beginning to be explored, due to the absence of precise, high resolution medical data and the difficulties encountered in converting these enormous datasets into a form that is usable in FEMs. With increasing computing speed and memory available, it is now feasible to address these challenges. We address the first by acquiring data with a high resolution C-ray CT scanner and the latter by developing semi-automated method for generating the volumetric meshes used in the FEM. Issues related to tomographic reconstruction, volume segmentation, the use of extracted surfaces to generate volumetric hexahedral meshes, and applications of the FEM are described.

  17. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forcesmore » along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.« less

  18. Finite Element Analysis of Honeycomb Impact Attenuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Seung-Yong; Choi, Seung-Kyu; Kim, Nohyu

    To participate in Student Formula Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) competitions, it is necessary to build an impact attenuator that would give an average deceleration not to exceed 20g when it runs into a rigid wall. Students can use numerical simulations or experimental test data to show that their car satisfies this safety requirement. A student group to study formula cars at the Korea University of Technology and Education has designed a vehicle to take part in a SAE competition, and a honeycomb structure was adopted as the impact attenuator. In this paper, finite element calculations were carried out to investigate the dynamic behavior of the honeycomb attenuator. Deceleration and deformation behaviors were studied. Effect of the yield strength was checked by comparing the numerical results. ABAQUS/Explicit finite element code was used.

  19. Finite element-wavelet hybrid algorithm for atmospheric tomography.

    PubMed

    Yudytskiy, Mykhaylo; Helin, Tapio; Ramlau, Ronny

    2014-03-01

    Reconstruction of the refractive index fluctuations in the atmosphere, or atmospheric tomography, is an underlying problem of many next generation adaptive optics (AO) systems, such as the multiconjugate adaptive optics or multiobject adaptive optics (MOAO). The dimension of the problem for the extremely large telescopes, such as the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT), suggests the use of iterative schemes as an alternative to the matrix-vector multiply (MVM) methods. Recently, an algorithm based on the wavelet representation of the turbulence has been introduced in [Inverse Probl.29, 085003 (2013)] by the authors to solve the atmospheric tomography using the conjugate gradient iteration. The authors also developed an efficient frequency-dependent preconditioner for the wavelet method in a later work. In this paper we study the computational aspects of the wavelet algorithm. We introduce three new techniques, the dual domain discretization strategy, a scale-dependent preconditioner, and a ground layer multiscale method, to derive a method that is globally O(n), parallelizable, and compact with respect to memory. We present the computational cost estimates and compare the theoretical numerical performance of the resulting finite element-wavelet hybrid algorithm with the MVM. The quality of the method is evaluated in terms of an MOAO simulation for the E-ELT on the European Southern Observatory (ESO) end-to-end simulation system OCTOPUS. The method is compared to the ESO version of the Fractal Iterative Method [Proc. SPIE7736, 77360X (2010)] in terms of quality.

  20. Finite element-wavelet hybrid algorithm for atmospheric tomography.

    PubMed

    Yudytskiy, Mykhaylo; Helin, Tapio; Ramlau, Ronny

    2014-03-01

    Reconstruction of the refractive index fluctuations in the atmosphere, or atmospheric tomography, is an underlying problem of many next generation adaptive optics (AO) systems, such as the multiconjugate adaptive optics or multiobject adaptive optics (MOAO). The dimension of the problem for the extremely large telescopes, such as the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT), suggests the use of iterative schemes as an alternative to the matrix-vector multiply (MVM) methods. Recently, an algorithm based on the wavelet representation of the turbulence has been introduced in [Inverse Probl.29, 085003 (2013)] by the authors to solve the atmospheric tomography using the conjugate gradient iteration. The authors also developed an efficient frequency-dependent preconditioner for the wavelet method in a later work. In this paper we study the computational aspects of the wavelet algorithm. We introduce three new techniques, the dual domain discretization strategy, a scale-dependent preconditioner, and a ground layer multiscale method, to derive a method that is globally O(n), parallelizable, and compact with respect to memory. We present the computational cost estimates and compare the theoretical numerical performance of the resulting finite element-wavelet hybrid algorithm with the MVM. The quality of the method is evaluated in terms of an MOAO simulation for the E-ELT on the European Southern Observatory (ESO) end-to-end simulation system OCTOPUS. The method is compared to the ESO version of the Fractal Iterative Method [Proc. SPIE7736, 77360X (2010)] in terms of quality. PMID:24690653

  1. Finite Element Analysis of Reverberation Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunting, Charles F.; Nguyen, Duc T.

    2000-01-01

    The primary motivating factor behind the initiation of this work was to provide a deterministic means of establishing the validity of the statistical methods that are recommended for the determination of fields that interact in -an avionics system. The application of finite element analysis to reverberation chambers is the initial step required to establish a reasonable course of inquiry in this particularly data-intensive study. The use of computational electromagnetics provides a high degree of control of the "experimental" parameters that can be utilized in a simulation of reverberating structures. As the work evolved there were four primary focus areas they are: 1. The eigenvalue problem for the source free problem. 2. The development of a complex efficient eigensolver. 3. The application of a source for the TE and TM fields for statistical characterization. 4. The examination of shielding effectiveness in a reverberating environment. One early purpose of this work was to establish the utility of finite element techniques in the development of an extended low frequency statistical model for reverberation phenomena. By employing finite element techniques, structures of arbitrary complexity can be analyzed due to the use of triangular shape functions in the spatial discretization. The effects of both frequency stirring and mechanical stirring are presented. It is suggested that for the low frequency operation the typical tuner size is inadequate to provide a sufficiently random field and that frequency stirring should be used. The results of the finite element analysis of the reverberation chamber illustrate io-W the potential utility of a 2D representation for enhancing the basic statistical characteristics of the chamber when operating in a low frequency regime. The basic field statistics are verified for frequency stirring over a wide range of frequencies. Mechanical stirring is shown to provide an effective frequency deviation.

  2. Finite element based electric motor design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, C. Warren

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this effort was to develop a finite element code for the analysis and design of permanent magnet electric motors. These motors would drive electromechanical actuators in advanced rocket engines. The actuators would control fuel valves and thrust vector control systems. Refurbishing the hydraulic systems of the Space Shuttle after each flight is costly and time consuming. Electromechanical actuators could replace hydraulics, improve system reliability, and reduce down time.

  3. Finite element methods in fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebowitz, H.; Moyer, E. T., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Finite-element methodology specific to the analysis of fracture mechanics problems is reviewed. Primary emphasis is on the important algorithmic developments which have enhanced the numerical modeling of fracture processes. Methodologies to address elastostatic problems in two and three dimensions, elastodynamic problems, elastoplastic problems, special considerations for three-dimensional nonlinear problems, and the modeling of stable crack growth are reviewed. In addition, the future needs of the fracture community are discussed and open questions are identified.

  4. Finite element based electric motor design optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, C. Warren

    1993-11-01

    The purpose of this effort was to develop a finite element code for the analysis and design of permanent magnet electric motors. These motors would drive electromechanical actuators in advanced rocket engines. The actuators would control fuel valves and thrust vector control systems. Refurbishing the hydraulic systems of the Space Shuttle after each flight is costly and time consuming. Electromechanical actuators could replace hydraulics, improve system reliability, and reduce down time.

  5. Finite Element Results Visualization for Unstructured Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Speck, Douglas E.; Dovey, Donald J.

    1996-07-15

    GRIZ is a general-purpose post-processing application supporting interactive visualization of finite element analysis results on unstructured grids. In addition to basic pseudocolor renderings of state variables over the mesh surface, GRIZ provides modern visualization techniques such as isocontours and isosurfaces, cutting planes, vector field display, and particle traces. GRIZ accepts both command-line and mouse-driven input, and is portable to virtually any UNIX platform which provides Motif and OpenGl libraries.

  6. ExodusII Finite Element Data Model

    SciTech Connect

    2005-05-14

    EXODUS II is a model developed to store and retrieve data for finite element analyses. It is used for preprocessing (problem definition), postprocessing (results visualization), as well as code to code data transfer. An EXODUS II data file is a random access, machine independent, binary file that is written and read via C, C++, or Fortran library routines which comprise the Application Programming Interface. (exodus II is based on netcdf)

  7. EXODUS II: A finite element data model

    SciTech Connect

    Schoof, L.A.; Yarberry, V.R.

    1994-09-01

    EXODUS II is a model developed to store and retrieve data for finite element analyses. It is used for preprocessing (problem definition), postprocessing (results visualization), as well as code to code data transfer. An EXODUS II data file is a random access, machine independent, binary file that is written and read via C, C++, or Fortran library routines which comprise the Application Programming Interface (API).

  8. Variational approach to probabilistic finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belytschko, T.; Liu, W. K.; Mani, A.; Besterfield, G.

    1991-01-01

    Probabilistic finite element methods (PFEM), synthesizing the power of finite element methods with second-moment techniques, are formulated for various classes of problems in structural and solid mechanics. Time-invariant random materials, geometric properties and loads are incorporated in terms of their fundamental statistics viz. second-moments. Analogous to the discretization of the displacement field in finite element methods, the random fields are also discretized. Preserving the conceptual simplicity, the response moments are calculated with minimal computations. By incorporating certain computational techniques, these methods are shown to be capable of handling large systems with many sources of uncertainties. By construction, these methods are applicable when the scale of randomness is not very large and when the probabilistic density functions have decaying tails. The accuracy and efficiency of these methods, along with their limitations, are demonstrated by various applications. Results obtained are compared with those of Monte Carlo simulation and it is shown that good accuracy can be obtained for both linear and nonlinear problems. The methods are amenable to implementation in deterministic FEM based computer codes.

  9. FESDIF -- Finite Element Scalar Diffraction theory code

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, H.G.

    1992-09-01

    This document describes the theory and use of a powerful scalar diffraction theory based computer code for calculation of intensity fields due to diffraction of optical waves by two-dimensional planar apertures and lenses. This code is called FESDIF (Finite Element Scalar Diffraction). It is based upon both Fraunhofer and Kirchhoff scalar diffraction theories. Simplified routines for circular apertures are included. However, the real power of the code comes from its basis in finite element methods. These methods allow the diffracting aperture to be virtually any geometric shape, including the various secondary aperture obstructions present in telescope systems. Aperture functions, with virtually any phase and amplitude variations, are allowed in the aperture openings. Step change aperture functions are accommodated. The incident waves are considered to be monochromatic. Plane waves, spherical waves, or Gaussian laser beams may be incident upon the apertures. Both area and line integral transformations were developed for the finite element based diffraction transformations. There is some loss of aperture function generality in the line integral transformations which are typically many times more computationally efficient than the area integral transformations when applicable to a particular problem.

  10. Transient finite element method using edge elements for moving conductor

    SciTech Connect

    Tani, Koji; Nishio, Takayuki; Yamada, Takashi ); Kawase, Yoshihiro . Dept. of Information Science)

    1999-05-01

    For the next generation of high speed railway systems and automobiles new braking systems are currently under development. These braking systems take into account the eddy currents, which are produced by the movement of the conductor in the magnetic field. For their optimum design, it is necessary to know the distribution of eddy currents in the moving conductor. The finite element method (FEM) is often used to simulate them. Here, transient finite element method using edge elements for moving conductor is presented. Here the magnetic vector potential is interpolated at the upwind position and the time derivative term is discretized by the backward difference method. As a result, the system matrix becomes symmetric and the ICCG method is applicable to solve the matrix. This method is used to solve an eddy current rail brake system. The results demonstrate that this approach is suitable to solve transient problems involving movement.

  11. Finite element procedures for coupled linear analysis of heat transfer, fluid and solid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutjahjo, Edhi; Chamis, Christos C.

    1993-01-01

    Coupled finite element formulations for fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and solid mechanics are derived from the conservation laws for energy, mass, and momentum. To model the physics of interactions among the participating disciplines, the linearized equations are coupled by combining domain and boundary coupling procedures. Iterative numerical solution strategy is presented to solve the equations, with the partitioning of temporal discretization implemented.

  12. Finite Element approach for Density Functional Theory calculations on locally refined meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Fattebert, J; Hornung, R D; Wissink, A M

    2007-02-23

    We present a quadratic Finite Element approach to discretize the Kohn-Sham equations on structured non-uniform meshes. A multigrid FAC preconditioner is proposed to iteratively solve the equations by an accelerated steepest descent scheme. The method was implemented using SAMRAI, a parallel software infrastructure for general AMR applications. Examples of applications to small nanoclusters calculations are presented.

  13. Finite Elements approach for Density Functional Theory calculations on locally refined meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Fattebert, J; Hornung, R D; Wissink, A M

    2006-03-27

    We present a quadratic Finite Elements approach to discretize the Kohn-Sham equations on structured non-uniform meshes. A multigrid FAC preconditioner is proposed to iteratively solve the equations by an accelerated steepest descent scheme. The method was implemented using SAMRAI, a parallel software infrastructure for general AMR applications. Examples of applications to small nanoclusters calculations are presented.

  14. Using the finite element method to calculate sound transmission through bounded plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beshenkov, S. N.

    1990-04-01

    A finite element solution is obtained for the problem of sound transmission through a bounded plate mounted in an infinite absolutely rigid screen. Calculations are made of the soundproofing of quadratic and round plates. The convergence behavior of the iteration procedure used in the calculations is briefly discussed.

  15. An iterative finite difference method for solving the quantum hydrodynamic equations of motion

    SciTech Connect

    Kendrick, Brian K

    2010-01-01

    The quantum hydrodynamic equations of motion associated with the de Broglie-Bohm description of quantum mechanics describe a time evolving probability density whose 'fluid' elements evolve as a correlated ensemble of particle trajectories. These equations are intuitively appealing due to their similarities with classical fluid dynamics and the appearance of a generalized Newton's equation of motion in which the total force contains both a classical and quantum contribution. However, the direct numerical solution of the quantum hydrodynamic equations (QHE) is fraught with challenges: the probability 'fluid' is highly-compressible, it has zero viscosity, the quantum potential ('pressure') is non-linear, and if that weren't enough the quantum potential can also become singular during the course of the calculations. Collectively these properties are responsible for the notorious numerical instabilities associated with a direct numerical solution of the QHE. The most successful and stable numerical approach that has been used to date is based on the Moving Least Squares (MLS) algorithm. The improved stability of this approach is due to the repeated local least squares fitting which effectively filters or reduces the numerical noise which tends to accumulate with time. However, this method is also subject to instabilities if it is pushed too hard. In addition, the stability of the MLS approach often comes at the expense of reduced resolution or fidelity of the calculation (i.e., the MLS filtering eliminates the higher-frequency components of the solution which may be of interest). Recently, a promising new solution method has been developed which is based on an iterative solution of the QHE using finite differences. This method (referred to as the Iterative Finite Difference Method or IFDM) is straightforward to implement, computationally efficient, stable, and its accuracy and convergence properties are well understood. A brief overview of the IFDM will be presented

  16. Modelling bucket excavation by finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecingina, O. M.

    2015-11-01

    Changes in geological components of the layers from lignite pits have an impact on the sustainability of the cup path elements and under the action of excavation force appear efforts leading to deformation of the entire assembly. Application of finite element method in the optimization of components leads to economic growth, to increase the reliability and durability of the studied machine parts thus the machine. It is obvious usefulness of knowledge the state of mechanical tensions that the designed piece or the assembly not to break under the action of tensions that must cope during operation. In the course of excavation work on all bucket cutting force components, the first coming into contact with the material being excavated cutting edge. Therefore in the study with finite element analysis is retained only cutting edge. To study the field of stress and strain on the cutting edge will be created geometric patterns for each type of cup this will be subject to static analysis. The geometric design retains the cutting edge shape and on this on the tooth cassette location will apply an areal force on the abutment tooth. The cutting edge real pattern is subjected to finite element study for the worst case of rock cutting by symmetrical and asymmetrical cups whose profile is different. The purpose of this paper is to determine the displacement and tensions field for both profiles considering the maximum force applied on the cutting edge and the depth of the cutting is equal with the width of the cutting edge of the tooth. It will consider the worst case when on the structure will act both the tangential force and radial force on the bucket profile. For determination of stress and strain field on the form design of cutting edge profile will apply maximum force assuming uniform distribution and on the edge surface force will apply a radial force. After geometric patterns discretization on the cutting knives and determining stress field, can be seen that at the

  17. The use of Galerkin finite-element methods to solve mass-transport equations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grove, David B.

    1977-01-01

    The partial differential equation that describes the transport and reaction of chemical solutes in porous media was solved using the Galerkin finite-element technique. These finite elements were superimposed over finite-difference cells used to solve the flow equation. Both convection and flow due to hydraulic dispersion were considered. Linear and Hermite cubic approximations (basis functions) provided satisfactory results: however, the linear functions were computationally more efficient for two-dimensional problems. Successive over relaxation (SOR) and iteration techniques using Tchebyschef polynomials were used to solve the sparce matrices generated using the linear and Hermite cubic functions, respectively. Comparisons of the finite-element methods to the finite-difference methods, and to analytical results, indicated that a high degree of accuracy may be obtained using the method outlined. The technique was applied to a field problem involving an aquifer contaminated with chloride, tritium, and strontium-90. (Woodard-USGS)

  18. Modelling the arterial wall by finite elements.

    PubMed

    Mosora, F; Harmant, A; Bernard, C; Fossion, A; Pochet, T; Juchmes, J; Cescotto, S

    1993-01-01

    The mechanical behaviour of the arterial wall was determined theoretically utilizing some parameters of blood flow measured in vivo. Continuous experimental measurements of pressure and diameter were recorded in anesthetized dogs on the thoracic ascending and midabdominal aorta. The pressure was measured by using a catheter, and the diameter firstly, at the same site, by a plethysmograph with mercury gauge and secondly, by a sonomicrometer with ferroelectric ceramic transducers. The unstressed radius and thickness were measured at the end of each experiment in situ. Considering that the viscous component is not important relatively to the nonlinear component of the elasticity and utilizing several equations for Young modulus calculation (thick and thin wall circular cylindrical tube formulas and Bergel's equation) the following values were obtained for this parameter: 0.6 MPa-2 MPa in midabdominal aorta and 2 MPa-6.5 MPa in thoracic ascending aorta. The behaviour of the aorta wall was modelled considering an elastic law and using the finite element program "Lagamine" working in large deformations. The discretized equilibrium equations are non-linear and a unique axi-symmetric, iso-parametric element of 1 cm in length with 8 knots was used for this bi-dimensional problem. The theoretical estimation of radius vessel, utilizing a constant 5 MPa Young modulus and also a variable one, are in good agreement with the experimental results, showing that this finite element model can be applied to study mechanical properties of the arteries in physiological and pathological conditions.

  19. Solving elliptic finite element systems in near-linear time with support preconditioners.

    SciTech Connect

    Vavasis, Stephen; Hendrickson, Bruce Alan; Boman, Erik Gunnar

    2005-01-01

    We consider linear systems arising from the use of the finite element method for solving a certain class of linear elliptic problems. Our main result is that these linear systems, which are symmetric and positive semidefinite, are well approximated by symmetric diagonally dominant matrices. Our framework for defining matrix approximation is support theory. Significant graph theoretic work has already been developed in the support framework for preconditioners in the diagonally dominant case, and in particular it is known that such systems can be solved with iterative methods in nearly linear time. Thus, our approximation result implies that these graph theoretic techniques can also solve a class of finite element problems in nearly linear time. We show that the quality of our approximation, which controls the number of iterations in the preconditioned iterative solver, depends primarily on a mesh quality measure but not on the problem size or shape of the domain.

  20. The Use of Direct Solver in Vector Finite Element Modeling for Calculating 3-D Magnetotelluric Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prihantoro, Rudy; Sutarno, Doddy; Nurhasan

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we seek numerical solution of 3-D Magnetotelluric (MT) using edge- based finite element method. This approach is a variant of standard finite element method and commonly referred as vector finite-element (VFE) method. Nonphysical solutions usually occurred when the solution is sought using standard finite element which is a node based element. Vector finite element attempt to overcome those nonphysical solutions by using the edges of the element as vector basis. The proposed approach on solving second order Maxwell differential equation of 3-D MT is using direct solver rather than iterative method. Therefore, divergence correction to accelerate the rate of convergence for its iterative solution is no longer needed. The utilization of direct solver has been verified previously for correctness by comparing the resulting solution to those given by analytical solution, as well as the solution come from the other numerical methods, for earth layered model, 2-D models and COMMEMI 3D-2 model. In this work, further verification resulted from recent comparison model of Dublin Test Model 1 (DTM1) is presented.

  1. A multilevel finite element method for Fredholm integral eigenvalue problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hehu; Zhou, Tao

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we proposed a multigrid finite element (MFE) method for solving the Fredholm integral eigenvalue problems. The main motivation for such studies is to compute the Karhunen-Loève expansions of random fields, which play an important role in the applications of uncertainty quantification. In our MFE framework, solving the eigenvalue problem is converted to doing a series of integral iterations and eigenvalue solving in the coarsest mesh. Then, any existing efficient integration scheme can be used for the associated integration process. The error estimates are provided, and the computational complexity is analyzed. It is noticed that the total computational work of our method is comparable with a single integration step in the finest mesh. Several numerical experiments are presented to validate the efficiency of the proposed numerical method.

  2. Finite element implementation of state variable-based viscoplasticity models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iskovitz, I.; Chang, T. Y. P.; Saleeb, A. F.

    1991-01-01

    The implementation of state variable-based viscoplasticity models is made in a general purpose finite element code for structural applications of metals deformed at elevated temperatures. Two constitutive models, Walker's and Robinson's models, are studied in conjunction with two implicit integration methods: the trapezoidal rule with Newton-Raphson iterations and an asymptotic integration algorithm. A comparison is made between the two integration methods, and the latter method appears to be computationally more appealing in terms of numerical accuracy and CPU time. However, in order to make the asymptotic algorithm robust, it is necessary to include a self adaptive scheme with subincremental step control and error checking of the Jacobian matrix at the integration points. Three examples are given to illustrate the numerical aspects of the integration methods tested.

  3. 2-D Finite Element Heat Conduction

    1989-10-30

    AYER is a finite element program which implicitly solves the general two-dimensional equation of thermal conduction for plane or axisymmetric bodies. AYER takes into account the effects of time (transient problems), in-plane anisotropic thermal conductivity, a three-dimensional velocity distribution, and interface thermal contact resistance. Geometry and material distributions are arbitrary, and input is via subroutines provided by the user. As a result, boundary conditions, material properties, velocity distributions, and internal power generation may be mademore » functions of, e.g., time, temperature, location, and heat flux.« less

  4. Chemorheology of reactive systems: Finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, C.; Roylance, D.

    1982-01-01

    The equations which govern the nonisothermal flow of reactive fluids are outlined, and the means by which finite element analysis is used to solve these equations for the sort of arbitrary boundary conditions encountered in industrial practice are described. The performance of the computer code is illustrated by several trial problems, selected more for their value in providing insight to polymer processing flows than as practical production problems. Although a good deal remains to be learned as to the performance and proper use of this numerical technique, it is undeniably useful in providing better understanding of today's complicated polymer processing problems.

  5. A finite element model of ultrasonic extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, M.; Daud, Y.

    2009-08-01

    Since the 1950's researchers have carried out investigations into the effects of applying ultrasonic excitation to metals undergoing elastic and plastic deformation. Experiments have been conducted where ultrasonic excitation is superimposed in complex metalworking operations such as wire drawing and extrusion, to identify the benefits of ultrasonic vibrations. This study presents a finite element analysis of ultrasonic excitation applied to the extrusion of a cylindrical aluminium bar. The effects of friction on the extrusion load are reported for the two excitation configurations of radially and axially applied ultrasonic vibrations and the results are compared with experimental data reported in the literature.

  6. Algebraic surface design and finite element meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bajaj, Chandrajit L.

    1992-01-01

    Some of the techniques are summarized which are used in constructing C sup 0 and C sup 1 continuous meshes of low degree, implicitly defined, algebraic surface patches in three dimensional space. These meshes of low degree algebraic surface patches are used to construct accurate computer models of physical objects. These meshes are also used in the finite element simulation of physical phenomena (e.g., heat dissipation, stress/strain distributions, fluid flow characteristics) required in the computer prototyping of both the manufacturability and functionality of the geometric design.

  7. Moving finite elements in 2-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelinas, R. J.; Doss, S. K.; Vajk, J. P.; Djomehri, J.; Miller, K.

    1983-01-01

    The mathematical background regarding the moving finite element (MFE) method of Miller and Miller (1981) is discussed, taking into account a general system of partial differential equations (PDE) and the amenability of the MFE method in two dimensions to code modularization and to semiautomatic user-construction of numerous PDE systems for both Dirichlet and zero-Neumann boundary conditions. A description of test problem results is presented, giving attention to aspects of single square wave propagation, and a solution of the heat equation.

  8. Aeroelastic Stability of Rotor Blades Using Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chopra, I.; Sivaneri, N.

    1982-01-01

    The flutter stability of flap bending, lead-lag bending, and torsion of helicopter rotor blades in hover is investigated using a finite element formulation based on Hamilton's principle. The blade is divided into a number of finite elements. Quasi-steady strip theory is used to evaluate the aerodynamic loads. The nonlinear equations of motion are solved for steady-state blade deflections through an iterative procedure. The equations of motion are linearized assuming blade motion to be a small perturbation about the steady deflected shape. The normal mode method based on the coupled rotating natural modes is used to reduce the number of equations in the flutter analysis. First the formulation is applied to single-load-path blades (articulated and hingeless blades). Numerical results show very good agreement with existing results obtained using the modal approach. The second part of the application concerns multiple-load-path blades, i.e. bearingless blades. Numerical results are presented for several analytical models of the bearingless blade. Results are also obtained using an equivalent beam approach wherein a bearingless blade is modelled as a single beam with equivalent properties. Results show the equivalent beam model.

  9. A finite element conjugate gradient FFT method for scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Jeffery D.; Zapp, John; Hsa, Chang-Yu; Volakis, John L.

    1990-01-01

    An extension of a two dimensional formulation is presented for a three dimensional body of revolution. With the introduction of a Fourier expansion of the vector electric and magnetic fields, a coupled two dimensional system is generated and solved via the finite element method. An exact boundary condition is employed to terminate the mesh and the fast fourier transformation (FFT) is used to evaluate the boundary integrals for low O(n) memory demand when an iterative solution algorithm is used. By virtue of the finite element method, the algorithm is applicable to structures of arbitrary material composition. Several improvements to the two dimensional algorithm are also described. These include: (1) modifications for terminating the mesh at circular boundaries without distorting the convolutionality of the boundary integrals; (2) the development of nonproprietary mesh generation routines for two dimensional applications; (3) the development of preprocessors for interfacing SDRC IDEAS with the main algorithm; and (4) the development of post-processing algorithms based on the public domain package GRAFIC to generate two and three dimensional gray level and color field maps.

  10. Impeller deflection and modal finite element analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Nathan A.

    2013-10-01

    Deflections of an impeller due to centripetal forces are calculated using finite element analysis. The lateral, or out of plane, deflections are an important design consideration for this particular impeller because it incorporates an air bearing with critical gap tolerances. The target gap distance is approximately 10 microns at a rotational velocity of 2500 rpm. The centripetal forces acting on the impeller cause it deflect in a concave fashion, decreasing the initial gap distance as a function of radial position. This deflection is characterized for a previous and updated impeller design for comparative purposes. The impact of design options such as material selection, geometry dimensions, and operating rotational velocity are also explored, followed by a sensitivity study with these parameters bounded by specific design values. A modal analysis is also performed to calculate the impeller's natural frequencies which are desired to be avoided during operation. The finite element modeling techniques continue to be exercised by the impeller design team to address specific questions and evaluate conceptual designs, some of which are included in the Appendix.

  11. Finite element analysis of bolted flange connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, D. Y.; Stallings, J. M.

    1994-06-01

    A 2-D axisymmetric finite element model and a 3-D solid finite element model of a high pressure bolted flange joint were generated to investigate the stress behaviors. This investigation includes comparisons for axisymmetric loading of both the 2-D and 3-D models, the effects of non-axisymmetric bolt pretensions in the 3-D models, and the differences between 2-D and 3-D models subjected to non-axisymmetric loading. Comparisons indicated differences in von Mises stress up to 12% at various points due to the non-axisymmetric bolt pretensions. Applied bending moments were converted to equivalent axial forces for use in the 2-D model. It was found that the largest von Mises stresses in 3-D model did not occur on the side of the connection where the bending stresses and applied axial stresses were additive. Hence, in the 2-D model where the equivalent axial force (for bending moment) and applied axial forces were added, the 2-D model under estimated the maximum von Mises stress obtained from the 3-D model by 30%.

  12. Finite element analysis of multilayer coextrusion.

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Schunk, Peter Randall; Baer, Thomas A.; Mrozek, Randy A.; Lenhart, Joseph Ludlow; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Collins, Robert; Mondy, Lisa Ann

    2011-09-01

    Multilayer coextrusion has become a popular commercial process for producing complex polymeric products from soda bottles to reflective coatings. A numerical model of a multilayer coextrusion process is developed based on a finite element discretization and two different free-surface methods, an arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) moving mesh implementation and an Eulerian level set method, to understand the moving boundary problem associated with the polymer-polymer interface. The goal of this work is to have a numerical capability suitable for optimizing and troubleshooting the coextrusion process, circumventing flow instabilities such as ribbing and barring, and reducing variability in layer thickness. Though these instabilities can be both viscous and elastic in nature, for this work a generalized Newtonian description of the fluid is used. Models of varying degrees of complexity are investigated including stability analysis and direct three-dimensional finite element free surface approaches. The results of this work show how critical modeling can be to reduce build test cycles, improve material choices, and guide mold design.

  13. Overcoming element erosion limitations within Lagrangian finite element codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignjevic, Rade; Hughes, Kevin; Walker, Andrew; Taylor, Emma A.

    2001-10-01

    Lagrangian finite element methods have been used extensively in the past to study the non-linear transient behaviour of materials, ranging from crash test of cars to simulating bird strikes on planes.... However, as this type of space discretization does not allow for motion of the material through the mesh when modelling extremely large deformations, the mesh becomes highly distorted. This paper describes some limitations and applicability of this type of analysis for high velocity impacts. A method for dealing with this problem is by the erosion of elements is proposed where the main issue is the deformation of element failure strains. Results were compared with empirical perforation results and were found to be in good agreement. The results were then used to simulate high velocity impacts upon a multi-layered aluminium target, in order to predict a ballistic limit curve. LS-DYNA3D was used as the FE solver for all simulations. Meshes were generated with Truegrid.

  14. A multigrid solution method for mixed hybrid finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, W.

    1996-12-31

    We consider the multigrid solution of linear equations arising within the discretization of elliptic second order boundary value problems of the form by mixed hybrid finite elements. Using the equivalence of mixed hybrid finite elements and non-conforming nodal finite elements, we construct a multigrid scheme for the corresponding non-conforming finite elements, and, by this equivalence, for the mixed hybrid finite elements, following guidelines from Arbogast/Chen. For a rectangular triangulation of the computational domain, this non-conforming schemes are the so-called nodal finite elements. We explicitly construct prolongation and restriction operators for this type of non-conforming finite elements. We discuss the use of plain multigrid and the multilevel-preconditioned cg-method and compare their efficiency in numerical tests.

  15. Parallel Finite Element Domain Decomposition for Structural/Acoustic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Duc T.; Tungkahotara, Siroj; Watson, Willie R.; Rajan, Subramaniam D.

    2005-01-01

    A domain decomposition (DD) formulation for solving sparse linear systems of equations resulting from finite element analysis is presented. The formulation incorporates mixed direct and iterative equation solving strategics and other novel algorithmic ideas that are optimized to take advantage of sparsity and exploit modern computer architecture, such as memory and parallel computing. The most time consuming part of the formulation is identified and the critical roles of direct sparse and iterative solvers within the framework of the formulation are discussed. Experiments on several computer platforms using several complex test matrices are conducted using software based on the formulation. Small-scale structural examples are used to validate thc steps in the formulation and large-scale (l,000,000+ unknowns) duct acoustic examples are used to evaluate the ORIGIN 2000 processors, and a duster of 6 PCs (running under the Windows environment). Statistics show that the formulation is efficient in both sequential and parallel computing environmental and that the formulation is significantly faster and consumes less memory than that based on one of the best available commercialized parallel sparse solvers.

  16. Domain decomposition finite element/finite difference method for the conductivity reconstruction in a hyperbolic equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beilina, Larisa

    2016-08-01

    We present domain decomposition finite element/finite difference method for the solution of hyperbolic equation. The domain decomposition is performed such that finite elements and finite differences are used in different subdomains of the computational domain: finite difference method is used on the structured part of the computational domain and finite elements on the unstructured part of the domain. Explicit discretizations for both methods are constructed such that the finite element and the finite difference schemes coincide on the common structured overlapping layer between computational subdomains. Then the resulting approach can be considered as a pure finite element scheme which avoids instabilities at the interfaces. We derive an energy estimate for the underlying hyperbolic equation with absorbing boundary conditions and illustrate efficiency of the domain decomposition method on the reconstruction of the conductivity function in three dimensions.

  17. Nonlinear dynamic fluid-structure interaction calculations with coupled finite element and finite volume programs

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.W.; Kashiwa, B.A.; Meier, R.W.; Bishop, S.

    1994-08-01

    Two- and three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction computer programs for the simulation of nonlinear dynamics were developed and applied to a number of problems. The programs were created by coupling Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian finite volume fluid dynamics programs with strictly Lagrangian finite element structural dynamics programs. The resulting coupled programs can use either fully explicit or implicit time integration. The implicit time integration is accomplished by iterations of the fluid dynamics pressure solver and the structural dynamics system solver. The coupled programs have been used to solve problems involving incompressible fluids, membrane and shell elements, compressible multiphase flows, explosions in both air and water, and large displacements. In this paper, we present the approach used for the coupling and describe test problems that verify the two-dimensional programs against an experiment and an analytical linear problem. The experiment involves an explosion underwater near an instrumented thin steel plate. The analytical linear problem is the vibration of an infinite cylinder surrounded by an incompressible fluid to a given radius.

  18. Nonlinear dynamic fluid-structure interaction calculations with coupled finite element and finite volume programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, M. W.; Kashiwa, B. A.; Meier, R. W.; Bishop, S.

    1994-07-01

    Two- and three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction computer programs for the simulation of nonlinear dynamics were developed and applied to a number of problems. The programs were created by coupling Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian finite volume fluid dynamics programs with strictly Lagrangian finite element structural dynamics programs. The resulting coupled programs can use either fully explicit or implicit time integration. The implicit time integration is accomplished by iterations of the fluid dynamics pressure solver and the structural dynamics system solver. The coupled programs have been used to solve problems involving incompressible fluids, membrane and shell elements, compressible multiphase flows, explosions in both air and water, and large displacements. In this paper, we present the approach used for the coupling and describe test problems that verify the two-dimensional programs against an experiment and an analytical linear problem. The experiment involves an explosion underwater near an instrumented thin steel plate. The analytical linear problem is the vibration of an infinite cylinder surrounded by an incompressible fluid to a given radius.

  19. Improved finite element methodology for integrated thermal structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dechaumphai, P.; Thornton, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    An integrated thermal-structural finite element approach for efficient coupling of thermal and structural analyses is presented. New thermal finite elements which yield exact nodal and element temperature for one dimensional linear steady state heat transfer problems are developed. A nodeless variable formulation is used to establish improved thermal finite elements for one dimensional nonlinear transient and two dimensional linear transient heat transfer problems. The thermal finite elements provide detailed temperature distributions without using additional element nodes and permit a common discretization with lower order congruent structural finite elements. The accuracy of the integrated approach is evaluated by comparisons with analytical solutions and conventional finite element thermal-structural analyses for a number of academic and more realistic problems. Results indicate that the approach provides a significant improvement in the accuracy and efficiency of thermal stress analysis for structures with complex temperature distributions.

  20. Improved finite element methodology for integrated thermal structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dechaumphai, P.; Thornton, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    An integrated thermal-structural finite element approach for efficient coupling of thermal and structural analysis is presented. New thermal finite elements which yield exact nodal and element temperatures for one dimensional linear steady state heat transfer problems are developed. A nodeless variable formulation is used to establish improved thermal finite elements for one dimensional nonlinear transient and two dimensional linear transient heat transfer problems. The thermal finite elements provide detailed temperature distributions without using additional element nodes and permit a common discretization with lower order congruent structural finite elements. The accuracy of the integrated approach is evaluated by comparisons with analytical solutions and conventional finite element thermal structural analyses for a number of academic and more realistic problems. Results indicate that the approach provides a significant improvement in the accuracy and efficiency of thermal stress analysis for structures with complex temperature distributions.

  1. Integrated transient thermal-structural finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Dechaumphai, P.; Wieting, A. R.; Tamma, K. K.

    1981-01-01

    An integrated thermal structural finite element approach for efficient coupling of transient thermal and structural analysis is presented. Integrated thermal structural rod and one dimensional axisymmetric elements considering conduction and convection are developed and used in transient thermal structural applications. The improved accuracy of the integrated approach is illustrated by comparisons with exact transient heat conduction elasticity solutions and conventional finite element thermal finite element structural analyses.

  2. TAP 2: A finite element program for thermal analysis of convectively cooled structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.

    1980-01-01

    A finite element computer program (TAP 2) for steady-state and transient thermal analyses of convectively cooled structures is presented. The program has a finite element library of six elements: two conduction/convection elements to model heat transfer in a solid, two convection elements to model heat transfer in a fluid, and two integrated conduction/convection elements to represent combined heat transfer in tubular and plate/fin fluid passages. Nonlinear thermal analysis due to temperature-dependent thermal parameters is performed using the Newton-Raphson iteration method. Transient analyses are performed using an implicit Crank-Nicolson time integration scheme with consistent or lumped capacitance matrices as an option. Program output includes nodal temperatures and element heat fluxes. Pressure drops in fluid passages may be computed as an option. User instructions and sample problems are presented in appendixes.

  3. Structural optimization of thin shells using finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascal K.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the present work was the structural optimization of thin shell structures that are subjected to stress and displacement constraints. In order to accomplish this, the structural optimization computer program DESAP1 was modified and improved. In the static analysis part of the DESAP1 computer program the torsional spring elements, which are used to analyze thin, shallow shell structures, were eliminated by modifying the membrane stiffness matrix of the triangular elements in the local coordinate system and adding a fictitious rotational stiffness matrix. This simplified the DESAP1 program input, improved the accuracy of the analysis, and saved computation time. In the optimization part of the DESAP1 program the stress ratio formula, which redesigns the thickness of each finite element of the structure, was solved by an analytical method. This scheme replaced the iterative solution that was previously used in the DESAP1 program, thus increasing the accuracy and speed of the design. The modified program was used to design a thin, cylindrical shell structure with optimum weight, and the results are reported in this paper.

  4. Asymmetric quadrilateral shell elements for finite strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Areias, P.; Dias-da-Costa, D.; Pires, E. B.; Van Goethem, N.

    2013-07-01

    Very good results in infinitesimal and finite strain analysis of shells are achieved by combining either the enhanced-metric technique or the selective-reduced integration for the in-plane shear energy and an assumed natural strain technique (ANS) in a non-symmetric Petrov-Galerkin arrangement which complies with the patch-test. A recovery of the original Wilson incompatible mode element is shown for the trial functions in the in-plane components. As a beneficial side-effect, Newton-Raphson convergence behavior for non-linear problems is improved with respect to symmetric formulations. Transverse-shear and in-plane patch tests are satisfied while distorted-mesh accuracy is higher than with symmetric formulations. Classical test functions with assumed-metric components are required for compatibility reasons. Verification tests are performed with advantageous comparisons being observed in all of them. Applications to large displacement elasticity and finite strain plasticity are shown with both low sensitivity to mesh distortion and (relatively) high accuracy. A equilibrium-consistent (and consistently linearized) updated-Lagrangian algorithm is proposed and tested. Concerning the time-step dependency, it was found that the consistent updated-Lagrangian algorithm is nearly time-step independent and can replace the multiplicative plasticity approach if only moderate elastic strains are present, as is the case of most metals.

  5. Finite-element modeling of nanoindentation

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, J.A.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Myers, S.M.; Barbour, J.C.; Friedmann, T.A.

    1999-02-01

    Procedures have been developed based on finite-element modeling of nanoindentation data to obtain the mechanical properties of thin films and ion-beam-modified layers independently of the properties of the underlying substrates. These procedures accurately deduce the yield strength, Young{close_quote}s elastic modulus, and layer hardness from indentations as deep as 50{percent} of the layer thickness or more. We have used these procedures to evaluate materials ranging from ion implanted metals to deposited, diamond-like carbon layers. The technique increases the applicability of indentation testing to very thin layers, composite layers, and modulated compositions. This article presents an overview of the procedures involved and illustrates them with selected examples. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Finite element simulation of pipe dynamic response

    SciTech Connect

    Slagis, G.C.; Litton, R.W.

    1996-12-01

    Nonlinear finite element dynamic analyses of the response of a pipe span to controlled-displacement, sinusoidal vibration have been performed. The objective of this preliminary study is to compare strain and acceleration response data to those generated by Beaney in the Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories experiments. Results for an unpressurized, 5 Hz, carbon steel pipe are in good agreement with the experiments. Hence, it appears that analytical simulation will be useful to assess seismic margins. Recommendations for additional studies are provided. The analyses confirm the test results--dynamic response is greatly attenuated by material plasticity. Analytical strains and accelerations are about 30% higher than test data. There are several possible explanations for the differences. To assess the effect of frequency on response, the length of the pipe span was increased. Analysis of the longer, 2 Hz, pipe span shows significantly greater cyclic strains than the 5 Hz span at the same input excitation levels.

  7. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer

    1992-02-01

    TOPAZ3D is a three-dimensional implicit finite element computer code for heat transfer analysis. TOPAZ3D can be used to solve for the steady-state or transient temperature field on three-dimensional geometries. Material properties may be temperature-dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. By implementing the user subroutine feature, users can model chemical reaction kinetics and allow for any type of functionalmore » representation of boundary conditions and internal heat generation. TOPAZ3D can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in the material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluids, phase change, and energy balances.« less

  8. Immersed molecular electrokinetic finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopacz, Adrian M.; Liu, Wing K.

    2013-07-01

    A unique simulation technique has been developed capable of modeling electric field induced detection of biomolecules such as viruses, at room temperatures where thermal fluctuations must be considered. The proposed immersed molecular electrokinetic finite element method couples electrokinetics with fluctuating hydrodynamics to study the motion and deformation of flexible objects immersed in a suspending medium under an applied electric field. The force induced on an arbitrary object due to an electric field is calculated based on the continuum electromechanics and the Maxwell stress tensor. The thermal fluctuations are included in the Navier-Stokes fluid equations via the stochastic stress tensor. Dielectrophoretic and fluctuating forces acting on the particle are coupled through the fluid-structure interaction force calculated within the surrounding environment. This method was used to perform concentration and retention efficacy analysis of nanoscale biosensors using gold particles of various sizes. The analysis was also applied to a human papillomavirus.

  9. Finite element analyses of CCAT preliminary design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarawit, Andrew T.; Kan, Frank W.

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes the development of the CCAT telescope finite element model (FEM) and the analyses performed to support the preliminary design work. CCAT will be a 25 m diameter telescope operating in the 0.2 to 2 mm wavelength range. It will be located at an elevation of 5600 m on Cerro Chajnantor in Northern Chile, near ALMA. The telescope will be equipped with wide-field cameras and spectrometers mounted at the two Nasmyth foci. The telescope will be inside an enclosure to protect it from wind buffeting, direct solar heating, and bad weather. The main structures of the telescope include a steel Mount and a carbon-fiber-reinforced-plastic (CFRP) primary truss. The finite element model developed in this study was used to perform modal, frequency response, seismic response spectrum, stress, and deflection analyses of telescope. Modal analyses of telescope were performed to compute the structure natural frequencies and mode shapes and to obtain reduced order modal output at selected locations in the telescope structure to support the design of the Mount control system. Modal frequency response analyses were also performed to compute transfer functions at these selected locations. Seismic response spectrum analyses of the telescope subject to the Maximum Likely Earthquake were performed to compute peak accelerations and seismic demand stresses. Stress analyses were performed for gravity load to obtain gravity demand stresses. Deflection analyses for gravity load, thermal load, and differential elevation drive torque were performed so that the CCAT Observatory can verify that the structures meet the stringent telescope surface and pointing error requirements.

  10. Metamodel based optimization of material parameters in a finite element simulation of tensile tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Justin; McKay, Cavendish

    2010-04-01

    We determine the optimum set of parameters for simulating a tensile test of a sample of Zytelnylon resin in a finite element model. Using manufacturer supplied data and initial tensile measurements as starting data, we use a metamodel based optimization scheme to iteratively improve the choice of parameters. The commercial finite element solver LS-DYNA and optimization package LS-Opt are used to assess the quality of the material parameter choice. A map of the response surface is presented to illustrate some challenges with the metamodel based approach.

  11. The MHOST finite element program: 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 3: Systems' manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, Shohei

    1989-01-01

    The internal structure is discussed of the MHOST finite element program designed for 3-D inelastic analysis of gas turbine hot section components. The computer code is the first implementation of the mixed iterative solution strategy for improved efficiency and accuracy over the conventional finite element method. The control structure of the program is covered along with the data storage scheme and the memory allocation procedure and the file handling facilities including the read and/or write sequences.

  12. An atomic finite element model for biodegradable polymers. Part 1. Formulation of the finite elements.

    PubMed

    Gleadall, Andrew; Pan, Jingzhe; Ding, Lifeng; Kruft, Marc-Anton; Curcó, David

    2015-11-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are widely used to analyse materials at the atomic scale. However, MD has high computational demands, which may inhibit its use for simulations of structures involving large numbers of atoms such as amorphous polymer structures. An atomic-scale finite element method (AFEM) is presented in this study with significantly lower computational demands than MD. Due to the reduced computational demands, AFEM is suitable for the analysis of Young's modulus of amorphous polymer structures. This is of particular interest when studying the degradation of bioresorbable polymers, which is the topic of an accompanying paper. AFEM is derived from the inter-atomic potential energy functions of an MD force field. The nonlinear MD functions were adapted to enable static linear analysis. Finite element formulations were derived to represent interatomic potential energy functions between two, three and four atoms. Validation of the AFEM was conducted through its application to atomic structures for crystalline and amorphous poly(lactide).

  13. A comparative study of finite element and finite difference methods for Cauchy-Riemann type equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fix, G. J.; Rose, M. E.

    1983-01-01

    A least squares formulation of the system divu = rho, curlu = zeta is surveyed from the viewpoint of both finite element and finite difference methods. Closely related arguments are shown to establish convergence estimates.

  14. Survey and development of finite elements for nonlinear structural analysis. Volume 2: Nonlinear shell finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The development of two new shell finite elements for applications to large deflection problems is considered. The elements in question are doubly curved and of triangular and quadrilateral planform. They are restricted to small strains of elastic materials, and can accommodate large rotations. The elements described, which are based on relatively simple linear elements, make use of a new displacement function approach specifically designed for strongly nonlinear problems. The displacement function development for nonlinear applications is based on certain beam element formulations, and the strain-displacement equations are of a shallow shell type. Additional terms were included in these equations in an attempt to avoid the large errors characteristic of shallow shell elements in certain types of problems. An incremental nonlinear solution procedure specifically adopted to the element formulation was developed. The solution procedure is of combined incremental and total Lagrangian type, and uses a new updating scheme. A computer program was written to evaluate the developed formulations. This program can accommodate small element groups in arbitrary arrangements. Two simple programs were successfully solved. The results indicate that this new type of element has definite promise and should be a fruitful area for further research.

  15. An implicit stabilized finite element method for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations using finite calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouhi, Mohammad; Oñate, Eugenio

    2015-07-01

    A new implicit stabilized formulation for the numerical solution of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations is presented. The method is based on the finite calculus (FIC) scheme using the Galerkin finite element method (FEM) on triangular grids. Via the FIC formulation, two stabilization terms, called streamline term and transverse term, are added to the original conservation equations in the space-time domain. The non-linear system of equations resulting from the spatial discretization is solved implicitly using a damped Newton method benefiting from the exact Jacobian matrix. The matrix system is solved at each iteration with a preconditioned GMRES method. The efficiency of the proposed stabilization technique is checked out in the solution of 2D inviscid and laminar viscous flow problems where appropriate solutions are obtained especially near the boundary layer and shock waves. The work presented here can be considered as a follow up of a previous work of the authors Kouhi, Oñate (Int J Numer Methods Fluids 74:872-897, 2014). In that paper, the stabilized Galerkin FEM based on the FIC formulation was derived for the Euler equations together with an explicit scheme. In the present paper, the extension of this work to the Navier-Stokes equations using an implicit scheme is presented.

  16. Ablative Thermal Response Analysis Using the Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dec John A.; Braun, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    A review of the classic techniques used to solve ablative thermal response problems is presented. The advantages and disadvantages of both the finite element and finite difference methods are described. As a first step in developing a three dimensional finite element based ablative thermal response capability, a one dimensional computer tool has been developed. The finite element method is used to discretize the governing differential equations and Galerkin's method of weighted residuals is used to derive the element equations. A code to code comparison between the current 1-D tool and the 1-D Fully Implicit Ablation and Thermal Response Program (FIAT) has been performed.

  17. Matrix equation decomposition and parallel solution of systems resulting from unstructured finite element problems in electromagnetics

    SciTech Connect

    Cwik, T.; Katz, D.S.

    1996-12-31

    Finite element modeling has proven useful for accurately simulating scattered or radiated electromagnetic fields from complex three-dimensional objects whose geometry varies on the scale of a fraction of an electrical wavelength. An unstructured finite element model of realistic objects leads to a large, sparse, system of equations that needs to be solved efficiently with regard to machine memory and execution time. Both factorization and iterative solvers can be used to produce solutions to these systems of equations. Factorization leads to high memory requirements that limit the electrical problem size of three-dimensional objects that can be modeled. An iterative solver can be used to efficiently solve the system without excessive memory use and in a minimal amount of time if the convergence rate is controlled.

  18. TACO: a finite element heat transfer code

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E. Jr.

    1980-02-01

    TACO is a two-dimensional implicit finite element code for heat transfer analysis. It can perform both linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady state problems. Either plane or axisymmetric geometries can be analyzed. TACO has the capability to handle time or temperature dependent material properties and materials may be either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature dependent loadings and boundary conditions are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additionally, TACO has some specialized features such as internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance), bulk nodes, enclosure radiation with view factor calculations, and chemical reactive kinetics. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A bandwidth and profile minimization option is also available in the code. Graphical representation of data generated by TACO is provided by a companion post-processor named POSTACO. The theory on which TACO is based is outlined, the capabilities of the code are explained, the input data required to perform an analysis with TACO are described. Some simple examples are provided to illustrate the use of the code.

  19. Finite element modeling of retinal prosthesis mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basinger, B. C.; Rowley, A. P.; Chen, K.; Humayun, M. S.; Weiland, J. D.

    2009-10-01

    Epiretinal prostheses used to treat degenerative retina diseases apply stimulus via an electrode array fixed to the ganglion cell side of the retina. Mechanical pressure applied by these arrays to the retina, both during initial insertion and throughout chronic use, could cause sufficient retinal damage to reduce the device's effectiveness. In order to understand and minimize potential mechanical damage, we have used finite element analysis to model mechanical interactions between an electrode array and the retina in both acute and chronic loading configurations. Modeling indicates that an acute tacking force distributes stress primarily underneath the tack site and heel edge of the array, while more moderate chronic stresses are distributed more evenly underneath the array. Retinal damage in a canine model chronically implanted with a similar array occurred in correlating locations, and model predictions correlate well with benchtop eyewall compression tests. This model provides retinal prosthesis researchers with a tool to optimize the mechanical electrode array design, but the techniques used here represent a unique effort to combine a modifiable device and soft biological tissues in the same model and those techniques could be extended to other devices that come into mechanical contact with soft neural tissues.

  20. Three-dimensional finite element simulation of viscoelastic fluid flow using the EVSS-G

    SciTech Connect

    Benard, A.; Lovalenti, P.M.; Tullock, D.L.; Montalbano, E.D.; Guell, D.C.

    1996-10-01

    An implementation of the EVSS-G method in a finite element framework is presented for modeling three-dimensional viscoelastic flows. The extension from two to three dimensions is discussed, along with the use of the Picard and Newton-Raphson iterative techniques. A selection of benchmark problems, with known analytical solutions are presented as validation of the implementation as well as results for secondary flows in rectangular ducts. 7 refs.

  1. An efficient finite element solution for gear dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooley, C. G.; Parker, R. G.; Vijayakar, S. M.

    2010-06-01

    A finite element formulation for the dynamic response of gear pairs is proposed. Following an established approach in lumped parameter gear dynamic models, the static solution is used as the excitation in a frequency domain solution of the finite element vibration model. The nonlinear finite element/contact mechanics formulation provides accurate calculation of the static solution and average mesh stiffness that are used in the dynamic simulation. The frequency domain finite element calculation of dynamic response compares well with numerically integrated (time domain) finite element dynamic results and previously published experimental results. Simulation time with the proposed formulation is two orders of magnitude lower than numerically integrated dynamic results. This formulation admits system level dynamic gearbox response, which may include multiple gear meshes, flexible shafts, rolling element bearings, housing structures, and other deformable components.

  2. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) in Design and Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waggoner, Todd C.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA) enables industrial designers to analyze complex components by dividing them into smaller elements, then assessing stress and strain characteristics. Traditionally mainframe based, FEA is being increasingly used in microcomputers. (SK)

  3. Application of edge-based finite elements and vector ABCs in 3D scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, A.; Jin, J. M.; Volakis, John L.

    1992-01-01

    A finite element absorbing boundary condition (FE-ABC) solution of the scattering by arbitrary 3-D structures is considered. The computational domain is discretized using edge-based tetrahedral elements. In contrast to the node-based elements, edge elements can treat geometries with sharp edges, are divergence-less, and easily satisfy the field continuity condition across dielectric interfaces. They do, however, lead to a higher unknown count but this is balanced by the greater sparsity of the resulting finite element matrix. Thus, the computation time required to solve such a system iteratively with a given degree of accuracy is less than the traditional node-based approach. The purpose is to examine the derivation and performance of the ABC's when applied to 2-D and 3-D problems and to discuss the specifics of our FE-ABC implementation.

  4. Integrated transient thermal-structural finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Decahaumphai, P.; Tamma, K. K.; Wieting, A. R.

    1981-01-01

    An integrated thermal-structural finite element approach for efficient coupling of transient thermal and structural analysis is presented. New integrated thermal-structural rod and one dimensional axisymmetric elements considering conduction and convection are developed and used in transient thermal-structural applications. The improved accuracy of the integrated approach is illustrated by comparisons with exact transient heat conduction-elasticity solutions and conventional finite element thermal-finite element structural analyses. Results indicate that the approach offers significant potential for further development with other elements.

  5. Finite Element Model of Cardiac Electrical Conduction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, John Zhihao

    1994-01-01

    In this thesis, we develop mathematical models to study electrical conduction of the heart. One important pattern of wave propagation of electrical excitation in the heart is reentry which is believed to be the underlying mechanism of some dangerous cardiac arhythmias such as ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. We present in this thesis a new ionic channel model of the ventricular cardiac cell membrane to study the microscopic electrical properties of myocardium. We base our model on recent single channel experiment data and a simple physical diffusion model of the calcium channel. Our ionic channel model of myocardium has simpler differential equations and fewer parameters than previous models. Further more, our ionic channel model achieves better results in simulating the strength-interval curve when we connect the membrane patch model to form a one dimensional cardiac muscle strand. We go on to study a finite element model which uses multiple states and non-nearest neighbor interactions to include curvature and dispersion effects. We create a generalized lattice randomization to overcome the artifacts generated by the interaction between the local dynamics and the regularities of the square lattice. We show that the homogeneous model does not display spontaneous wavefront breakup in a reentrant wave propagation once the lattice artifacts have been smoothed out by lattice randomization with a randomization scale larger than the characteristic length of the interaction. We further develop a finite 3-D 3-state heart model which employs a probability interaction rule. This model is applied to the simulation of Body Surface Laplacian Mapping (BSLM) using a cylindrical volume conductor as the torso model. We show that BSLM has a higher spatial resolution than conventional mapping methods in revealing the underlying electrical activities of the heart. The results of these studies demonstrate that mathematical modeling and computer simulation are very

  6. Solution-adaptive finite element method in computational fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Bass, J. M.; Spradley, L. W.

    1993-01-01

    Some recent results obtained using solution-adaptive finite element method in linear elastic two-dimensional fracture mechanics problems are presented. The focus is on the basic issue of adaptive finite element method for validating the applications of new methodology to fracture mechanics problems by computing demonstration problems and comparing the stress intensity factors to analytical results.

  7. Modular Finite Element Methods Library Version: 1.0

    2010-06-22

    MFEM is a general, modular library for finite element methods. It provides a variety of finite element spaces and bilinear/linear forms in 2D and 3D. MFEM also includes classes for dealing with various types of meshes and their refinement.

  8. Finite Element analyses of soil bioengineered slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamagnini, Roberto; Switala, Barbara Maria; Sudan Acharya, Madhu; Wu, Wei; Graf, Frank; Auer, Michael; te Kamp, Lothar

    2014-05-01

    Soil Bioengineering methods are not only effective from an economical point of view, but they are also interesting as fully ecological solutions. The presented project is aimed to define a numerical model which includes the impact of vegetation on slope stability, considering both mechanical and hydrological effects. In this project, a constitutive model has been developed that accounts for the multi-phase nature of the soil, namely the partly saturated condition and it also includes the effects of a biological component. The constitutive equation is implemented in the Finite Element (FE) software Comes-Geo with an implicit integration scheme that accounts for the collapse of the soils structure due to wetting. The mathematical formulation of the constitutive equations is introduced by means of thermodynamics and it simulates the growth of the biological system during the time. The numerical code is then applied in the analysis of an ideal rainfall induced landslide. The slope is analyzed for vegetated and non-vegetated conditions. The final results allow to quantitatively assessing the impact of vegetation on slope stability. This allows drawing conclusions and choosing whenever it is worthful to use soil bioengineering methods in slope stabilization instead of traditional approaches. The application of the FE methods show some advantages with respect to the commonly used limit equilibrium analyses, because it can account for the real coupled strain-diffusion nature of the problem. The mechanical strength of roots is in fact influenced by the stress evolution into the slope. Moreover, FE method does not need a pre-definition of any failure surface. FE method can also be used in monitoring the progressive failure of the soil bio-engineered system as it calculates the amount of displacements and strains of the model slope. The preliminary study results show that the formulated equations can be useful for analysis and evaluation of different soil bio

  9. Nondestructive Evaluation Correlated with Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdul-Azid, Ali; Baaklini, George Y.

    1999-01-01

    Advanced materials are being developed for use in high-temperature gas turbine applications. For these new materials to be fully utilized, their deformation properties, their nondestructive evaluation (NDE) quality and material durability, and their creep and fatigue fracture characteristics need to be determined by suitable experiments. The experimental findings must be analyzed, characterized, modeled and translated into constitutive equations for stress analysis and life prediction. Only when these ingredients - together with the appropriate computational tools - are available, can durability analysis be performed in the design stage, long before the component is built. One of the many structural components being evaluated by the NDE group at the NASA Lewis Research Center is the flywheel system. It is being considered as an energy storage device for advanced space vehicles. Such devices offer advantages over electrochemical batteries in situations demanding high power delivery and high energy storage per unit weight. In addition, flywheels have potentially higher efficiency and longer lifetimes with proper motor-generator and rotor design. Flywheels made of fiber-reinforced polymer composite material show great promise for energy applications because of the high energy and power densities that they can achieve along with a burst failure mode that is relatively benign in comparison to those of flywheels made of metallic materials Therefore, to help improve durability and reduce structural uncertainties, we are developing a comprehensive analytical approach to predict the reliability and life of these components under these harsh loading conditions. The combination of NDE and two- and three-dimensional finite element analyses (e.g., stress analyses and fracture mechanics) is expected to set a standardized procedure to accurately assess the applicability of using various composite materials to design a suitable rotor/flywheel assembly.

  10. FEWA: a Finite Element model of Water flow through Aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.; Huff, D.D.

    1983-11-01

    This report documents the implementation and demonstration of a Finite Element model of Water flow through Aquifers (FEWA). The particular features of FEWA are its versatility and flexibility to deal with as many real-world problems as possible. Point as well as distributed sources/sinks are included to represent recharges/pumpings and rainfall infiltrations. All sources/sinks can be transient or steady state. Prescribed hydraulic head on the Dirichlet boundaries and fluxes on Neumann or Cauchy boundaries can be time-dependent or constant. Source/sink strength over each element and node, hydraulic head at each Dirichlet boundary node, and flux at each boundary segment can vary independently of each other. Either completely confined or completely unconfined aquifers, or partially confined and partially unconfined aquifers can be dealt with effectively. Discretization of a compound region with very irregular curved boundaries is made easy by including both quadrilateral and triangular elements in the formulation. Large-field problems can be solved efficiently by including a pointwise iterative solution strategy as an optional alternative to the direct elimination solution method for the matrix equation approximating the partial differential equation of groundwater flow. FEWA also includes transient flow through confining leaky aquifers lying above and/or below the aquifer of interest. The model is verified against three simple cases to which analytical solutions are available. It is then demonstrated by two examples of how the model can be applied to heterogeneous and anisotropic aquifers with transient boundary conditions, time-dependent sources/sinks, and confining aquitards for a confined aquifer of variable thickness and for a free surface problem in an unconfined aquifer, respectively. 20 references, 25 figures, 8 tables.

  11. Three dimensional inelastic finite element analysis of laminated composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, O. H., Jr.; Kamat, M. P.

    1980-01-01

    Formulations of the inelastic response of laminated composites to thermal and mechanical loading are used as the basis for development of the computer NALCOM (Nonlinear Analysis of Laminated Composites) computer program which uses a fully three dimensional isoparametric finite element with 24 nodes and 72 degrees of freedom. An incremental solution is performed with nonlinearities introduced as pseudoloads computed for initial strains. Equilibrium iteration may be performed at every step. Elastic and elastic-plastic response of boron/epoxy and graphite/epoxy graphite/epoxy and problems of curing 0/90 sub s Gr/Ep laminates with and without circular holes are analyzed. Mechanical loading of + or - 45sub s Gr/Ep laminates is modeled and symmetry conditions which exist in angle-ply laminates are discussed. Results are compared to experiments and other analytical models when possible. All models are seen to agree reasonably well with experimetnal results for off-axis tensile coupons. The laminate analyses show the three dimensional effects which are present near holes and free corners.

  12. ELLIPT2D: A Flexible Finite Element Code Written Python

    SciTech Connect

    Pletzer, A.; Mollis, J.C.

    2001-03-22

    The use of the Python scripting language for scientific applications and in particular to solve partial differential equations is explored. It is shown that Python's rich data structure and object-oriented features can be exploited to write programs that are not only significantly more concise than their counter parts written in Fortran, C or C++, but are also numerically efficient. To illustrate this, a two-dimensional finite element code (ELLIPT2D) has been written. ELLIPT2D provides a flexible and easy-to-use framework for solving a large class of second-order elliptic problems. The program allows for structured or unstructured meshes. All functions defining the elliptic operator are user supplied and so are the boundary conditions, which can be of Dirichlet, Neumann or Robbins type. ELLIPT2D makes extensive use of dictionaries (hash tables) as a way to represent sparse matrices.Other key features of the Python language that have been widely used include: operator over loading, error handling, array slicing, and the Tkinter module for building graphical use interfaces. As an example of the utility of ELLIPT2D, a nonlinear solution of the Grad-Shafranov equation is computed using a Newton iterative scheme. A second application focuses on a solution of the toroidal Laplace equation coupled to a magnetohydrodynamic stability code, a problem arising in the context of magnetic fusion research.

  13. Thermal Analysis of Thin Plates Using the Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Er, G. K.; Iu, V. P.; Liu, X. L.

    2010-05-01

    The isotropic thermal plate is analyzed with finite element method. The solution procedure is presented. The elementary stiffness matrix and loading vector are derived rigorously with variation principle and the principle of minimum potential energy. Numerical results are obtained based on the derived equations and tested with available exact solutions. The problems in the finite element analysis are figured out. It is found that the finite element solutions can not converge as the number of elements increases around the corners of the plate. The derived equations presented in this paper are fundamental for our further study on more complicated thermal plate analysis.

  14. The L sub 1 finite element method for pure convection problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan

    1991-01-01

    The least squares (L sub 2) finite element method is introduced for 2-D steady state pure convection problems with smooth solutions. It is proven that the L sub 2 method has the same stability estimate as the original equation, i.e., the L sub 2 method has better control of the streamline derivative. Numerical convergence rates are given to show that the L sub 2 method is almost optimal. This L sub 2 method was then used as a framework to develop an iteratively reweighted L sub 2 finite element method to obtain a least absolute residual (L sub 1) solution for problems with discontinuous solutions. This L sub 1 finite element method produces a nonoscillatory, nondiffusive and highly accurate numerical solution that has a sharp discontinuity in one element on both coarse and fine meshes. A robust reweighting strategy was also devised to obtain the L sub 1 solution in a few iterations. A number of examples solved by using triangle and bilinear elements are presented.

  15. Mixed finite element - discontinuous finite volume element discretization of a general class of multicontinuum models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Baier, Ricardo; Lunati, Ivan

    2016-10-01

    We present a novel discretization scheme tailored to a class of multiphase models that regard the physical system as consisting of multiple interacting continua. In the framework of mixture theory, we consider a general mathematical model that entails solving a system of mass and momentum equations for both the mixture and one of the phases. The model results in a strongly coupled and nonlinear system of partial differential equations that are written in terms of phase and mixture (barycentric) velocities, phase pressure, and saturation. We construct an accurate, robust and reliable hybrid method that combines a mixed finite element discretization of the momentum equations with a primal discontinuous finite volume-element discretization of the mass (or transport) equations. The scheme is devised for unstructured meshes and relies on mixed Brezzi-Douglas-Marini approximations of phase and total velocities, on piecewise constant elements for the approximation of phase or total pressures, as well as on a primal formulation that employs discontinuous finite volume elements defined on a dual diamond mesh to approximate scalar fields of interest (such as volume fraction, total density, saturation, etc.). As the discretization scheme is derived for a general formulation of multicontinuum physical systems, it can be readily applied to a large class of simplified multiphase models; on the other, the approach can be seen as a generalization of these models that are commonly encountered in the literature and employed when the latter are not sufficiently accurate. An extensive set of numerical test cases involving two- and three-dimensional porous media are presented to demonstrate the accuracy of the method (displaying an optimal convergence rate), the physics-preserving properties of the mixed-primal scheme, as well as the robustness of the method (which is successfully used to simulate diverse physical phenomena such as density fingering, Terzaghi's consolidation

  16. Application of the Finite Element Method to Rotary Wing Aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straub, F. K.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1982-01-01

    A finite element method for the spatial discretization of the dynamic equations of equilibrium governing rotary-wing aeroelastic problems is presented. Formulation of the finite element equations is based on weighted Galerkin residuals. This Galerkin finite element method reduces algebraic manipulative labor significantly, when compared to the application of the global Galerkin method in similar problems. The coupled flap-lag aeroelastic stability boundaries of hingeless helicopter rotor blades in hover are calculated. The linearized dynamic equations are reduced to the standard eigenvalue problem from which the aeroelastic stability boundaries are obtained. The convergence properties of the Galerkin finite element method are studied numerically by refining the discretization process. Results indicate that four or five elements suffice to capture the dynamics of the blade with the same accuracy as the global Galerkin method.

  17. A finite element conjugate gradient FFT method for scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Jeffery D.; Ross, Dan; Jin, J.-M.; Chatterjee, A.; Volakis, John L.

    1991-01-01

    Validated results are presented for the new 3D body of revolution finite element boundary integral code. A Fourier series expansion of the vector electric and mangnetic fields is employed to reduce the dimensionality of the system, and the exact boundary condition is employed to terminate the finite element mesh. The mesh termination boundary is chosen such that is leads to convolutional boundary operatores of low O(n) memory demand. Improvements of this code are discussed along with the proposed formulation for a full 3D implementation of the finite element boundary integral method in conjunction with a conjugate gradiant fast Fourier transformation (CGFFT) solution.

  18. Nonlinear finite element modeling of THUNDER piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taleghani, Barmac K.; Campbell, Joel F.

    1999-06-01

    A NASTRAN non-linear finite element model has been developed for predicting the dome heights of THUNDER (Thin Layer Unimorph Ferroelectric Driver) piezoelectric actuators. To analytically validate the finite element model, a comparison was made with a non-linear plate solution using Von Karmen's approximation. A 500 volt input was used to examine the actuator deformation. The NASTRAN finite element model was also compared with experimental results. Four groups of specimens were fabricated and tested. Four different input voltages, which included 120, 160, 200, and 240 Vp-p with a 0 volts offset, were used for this comparison.

  19. Non-Linear Finite Element Modeling of THUNDER Piezoelectric Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taleghani, Barmac K.; Campbell, Joel F.

    1999-01-01

    A NASTRAN non-linear finite element model has been developed for predicting the dome heights of THUNDER (THin Layer UNimorph Ferroelectric DrivER) piezoelectric actuators. To analytically validate the finite element model, a comparison was made with a non-linear plate solution using Von Karmen's approximation. A 500 volt input was used to examine the actuator deformation. The NASTRAN finite element model was also compared with experimental results. Four groups of specimens were fabricated and tested. Four different input voltages, which included 120, 160, 200, and 240 Vp-p with a 0 volts offset, were used for this comparison.

  20. Wavelet and Multiresolution Analysis for Finite Element Networking Paradigms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurdila, Andrew J.; Sharpley, Robert C.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a final report on Wavelet and Multiresolution Analysis for Finite Element Networking Paradigms. The focus of this research is to derive and implement: 1) Wavelet based methodologies for the compression, transmission, decoding, and visualization of three dimensional finite element geometry and simulation data in a network environment; 2) methodologies for interactive algorithm monitoring and tracking in computational mechanics; and 3) Methodologies for interactive algorithm steering for the acceleration of large scale finite element simulations. Also included in this report are appendices describing the derivation of wavelet based Particle Image Velocity algorithms and reduced order input-output models for nonlinear systems by utilizing wavelet approximations.

  1. A diffusion synthetic acceleration scheme for rectangular geometries based on bilinear discontinuous finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Turcksin, B.; Ragusa, J. C.

    2013-07-01

    A DSA technique to accelerate the iterative convergence of S{sub n} transport solves is derived for bilinear discontinuous (BLD) finite elements on rectangular grids. The diffusion synthetic acceleration equations are discretized using BLD elements by adapting the Modified Interior Penalty technique, introduced in [4] for triangular grids. The MIP-DSA equations are SPD and thus are solved using a preconditioned CG technique. Fourier analyses and implementation of the technique in a BLD S{sub n} transport code show that the technique is stable is effective. (authors)

  2. Finite elements and the method of conjugate gradients on a concurrent processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyzenga, G. A.; Raefsky, A.; Hager, G. H.

    1985-01-01

    An algorithm for the iterative solution of finite element problems on a concurrent processor is presented. The method of conjugate gradients is used to solve the system of matrix equations, which is distributed among the processors of a MIMD computer according to an element-based spatial decomposition. This algorithm is implemented in a two-dimensional elastostatics program on the Caltech Hypercube concurrent processor. The results of tests on up to 32 processors show nearly linear concurrent speedup, with efficiencies over 90 percent for sufficiently large problems.

  3. Finite elements and the method of conjugate gradients on a concurrent processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyzenga, G. A.; Raefsky, A.; Hager, B. H.

    1984-01-01

    An algorithm for the iterative solution of finite element problems on a concurrent processor is presented. The method of conjugate gradients is used to solve the system of matrix equations, which is distributed among the processors of a MIMD computer according to an element-based spatial decomposition. This algorithm is implemented in a two-dimensional elastostatics program on the Caltech Hypercube concurrent processor. The results of tests on up to 32 processors show nearly linear concurrent speedup, with efficiencies over 90% for sufficiently large problems.

  4. A comparative study of an ABC and an artificial absorber for truncating finite element meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oezdemir, T.; Volakis, John L.

    1993-01-01

    The type of mesh termination used in the context of finite element formulations plays a major role on the efficiency and accuracy of the field solution. The performance of an absorbing boundary condition (ABC) and an artificial absorber (a new concept) for terminating the finite element mesh was evaluated. This analysis is done in connection with the problem of scattering by a finite slot array in a thick ground plane. The two approximate mesh truncation schemes are compared with the exact finite element-boundary integral (FEM-BI) method in terms of accuracy and efficiency. It is demonstrated that both approximate truncation schemes yield reasonably accurate results even when the mesh is extended only 0.3 wavelengths away from the array aperture. However, the artificial absorber termination method leads to a substantially more efficient solution. Moreover, it is shown that the FEM-BI method remains quite competitive with the FEM-artificial absorber method when the FFT is used for computing the matrix-vector products in the iterative solution algorithm. These conclusions are indeed surprising and of major importance in electromagnetic simulations based on the finite element method.

  5. Design of fast tuning elements for the ITER ICH system

    SciTech Connect

    Swain, D.W.; Goulding, R.H.

    1996-05-01

    The coupling between the ion cyclotron (IC) antenna and the ITER plasma (as expressed by the load resistance the antenna sees) will experience relatively fast variations due to plasma edge profile modifications. If uncompensated, these will cause an increase in the amount of power reflected back to the transmitter and ultimately a decrease in the amount of radio frequency (rf) power to the plasma caused by protective suppression of the amount of rf power generated by the transmitter. The goals of this task were to study several alternate designs for a tuning and matching (T&M) system and to recommend some research and development (R&D) tasks that could be carried out to test some of the most promising concepts. Analyses of five different T&M configurations are presented in this report. They each have different advantages and disadvantages, and the choice among them must be made depending on the requirements for the IC system. Several general conclusions emerge from our study: The use of a hybrid splitter as a passive reflected-power dump [``edge localized mode (ELM)-dump``] appears very promising; this configuration will protect the rf power sources from reflected power during changes in plasma loading due to plasma motion or profile changes (e.g., ELM- induced changes in the plasma scrape-off region) and requires no active control of the rf system. Trade-offs between simplicity of design and capability of the system must be made. Simple system designs with few components near the antenna either have high voltages over considerable distances of transmission lines, or they are not easily tuned to operate at different frequencies. Designs using frequency shifts and/or fast tuning elements can provide fast matching over a wide range of plasma loading; however, the designs studied here require components near the antenna, complicating assembly and maintenance. Capacitor-tuned resonant systems may offer a good compromise.

  6. Application of Mass Lumped Higher Order Finite Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Strauss, H. R.; Jardin, S. C.; Park, W.; Sugiyama, L. E.; G. Fu; Breslau, J.

    2005-11-01

    There are many interesting phenomena in extended-MHD such as anisotropic transport, mhd, 2-fluid effects stellarator and hot particles. Any one of them challenges numerical analysts, and researchers are seeking for higher order methods, such as higher order finite difference, higher order finite elements and hp/spectral elements. It is true that these methods give more accurate solution than their linear counterparts. However, numerically they are prohibitively expensive. Here we give a successful solution of this conflict by applying mass lumped higher order finite elements. This type of elements not only keep second/third order accuracy but also scale closely to linear elements by doing mass lumping. This is especially true for second order lump elements. Full M3D and anisotropic transport models are studied.

  7. Optimal least-squares finite element method for elliptic problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1991-01-01

    An optimal least squares finite element method is proposed for two dimensional and three dimensional elliptic problems and its advantages are discussed over the mixed Galerkin method and the usual least squares finite element method. In the usual least squares finite element method, the second order equation (-Delta x (Delta u) + u = f) is recast as a first order system (-Delta x p + u = f, Delta u - p = 0). The error analysis and numerical experiment show that, in this usual least squares finite element method, the rate of convergence for flux p is one order lower than optimal. In order to get an optimal least squares method, the irrotationality Delta x p = 0 should be included in the first order system.

  8. Validation of high displacement piezoelectric actuator finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taleghani, Barmac K.

    2000-08-01

    The paper presents the results obtained by using NASTRAN and ANSYS finite element codes to predict doming of the THUNDER piezoelectric actuators during the manufacturing process and subsequent straining due to an applied input voltage. To effectively use such devices in engineering applications, modeling and characterization are essential. Length, width, dome height, and thickness and important parameters for users of such devices. Therefore, finite element models were used to assess the effects of these parameters. NASTRAN and ANSYS used different methods for modeling piezoelectric effects. In NASTRAN, a thermal analogy was used to represent voltage at nodes as equivalent temperatures, while ANSYS processed the voltage directly using piezoelectric finite elements. The results of finite element models were validated by using the experimental results.

  9. Comparison of different precondtioners for nonsymmtric finite volume element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Mishev, I.D.

    1996-12-31

    We consider a few different preconditioners for the linear systems arising from the discretization of 3-D convection-diffusion problems with the finite volume element method. Their theoretical and computational convergence rates are compared and discussed.

  10. Validation of High Displacement Piezoelectric Actuator Finite Element Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taleghani, B. K.

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents the results obtained by using NASTRAN(Registered Trademark) and ANSYS(Regitered Trademark) finite element codes to predict doming of the THUNDER piezoelectric actuators during the manufacturing process and subsequent straining due to an applied input voltage. To effectively use such devices in engineering applications, modeling and characterization are essential. Length, width, dome height, and thickness are important parameters for users of such devices. Therefore, finite element models were used to assess the effects of these parameters. NASTRAN(Registered Trademark) and ANSYS(Registered Trademark) used different methods for modeling piezoelectric effects. In NASTRAN(Registered Trademark), a thermal analogy was used to represent voltage at nodes as equivalent temperatures, while ANSYS(Registered Trademark) processed the voltage directly using piezoelectric finite elements. The results of finite element models were validated by using the experimental results.

  11. Scalable, Finite Element Analysis of Electromagnetic Scattering and Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, T.; Lou, J.; Katz, D.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper a method for simulating electromagnetic fields scattered from complex objects is reviewed; namely, an unstructured finite element code that does not use traditional mesh partitioning algorithms.

  12. Examples of finite element mesh generation using SDRC IDEAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zapp, John; Volakis, John L.

    1990-01-01

    IDEAS (Integrated Design Engineering Analysis Software) offers a comprehensive package for mechanical design engineers. Due to its multifaceted capabilities, however, it can be manipulated to serve the needs of electrical engineers, also. IDEAS can be used to perform the following tasks: system modeling, system assembly, kinematics, finite element pre/post processing, finite element solution, system dynamics, drafting, test data analysis, and project relational database.

  13. Finite Element Analysis for Pseudo Hyperbolic Integral-Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xia

    The finite element method and its analysis for pseudo-hyperbolic integral-differential equations with nonlinear boundary conditions is considered. A new projection is introduced to obtain optimal L2 convergence estimates. The present techniques can be applied to treat elastic wave problems with absorbing boundary conditions in porous media. Keywords: pseudo-hyperbolic integral-differential equation, finite element, Sobolev-Volterra projection, convergence analysis

  14. Simulation of two-dimensional waterflooding using mixed finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Chavent, G.; Jaffre, J.; Cohen, G.; Dupuy, M.; Dieste, I.

    1982-01-01

    A new method for the simulation of incompressible diphasic flows in two dimensions is presented, the distinctive features of which are: (1) reformation of the basic equation and specific choices of the finite element approximation of the same; (11) use of a mixed finite elements method, approximating both scalar and vector functions. Several test examples are shown, including gravity and capillary effects. The use of discontinuous basis functions proved successful for an accurate representation of sharp fronts. 16 refs.

  15. Integration of geometric modeling and advanced finite element preprocessing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shephard, Mark S.; Finnigan, Peter M.

    1987-01-01

    The structure to a geometry based finite element preprocessing system is presented. The key features of the system are the use of geometric operators to support all geometric calculations required for analysis model generation, and the use of a hierarchic boundary based data structure for the major data sets within the system. The approach presented can support the finite element modeling procedures used today as well as the fully automated procedures under development.

  16. Finite element analysis of vibration and damping of laminated composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rikards, Rolands

    Simple finite elements are used to form a special laminated beam and plate superelements excluding all degrees of freedom in the nodes of the middle layer, and the finite element analysis of this structure is performed. To estimate damping of structures, modal loss factors are calculated, using two methods: the 'exact' method of complex eigenvalues and the approximate energy method. It was found that both methods give satisfactory results. However, the energy method needs less computer time than the exact method.

  17. Finite element analysis of a composite wheelchair wheel design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, Rene

    1994-01-01

    The finite element analysis of a composite wheelchair wheel design is presented. The design is the result of a technology utilization request. The designer's intent is to soften the riding feeling by incorporating a mechanism attaching the wheel rim to the spokes that would allow considerable deflection upon compressive loads. A finite element analysis was conducted to verify proper structural function. Displacement and stress results are presented and conclusions are provided.

  18. Mathematical aspects of finite element methods for incompressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunzburger, M. D.

    1986-01-01

    Mathematical aspects of finite element methods are surveyed for incompressible viscous flows, concentrating on the steady primitive variable formulation. The discretization of a weak formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations are addressed, then the stability condition is considered, the satisfaction of which insures the stability of the approximation. Specific choices of finite element spaces for the velocity and pressure are then discussed. Finally, the connection between different weak formulations and a variety of boundary conditions is explored.

  19. Finite element simulation of arcuates for astigmatism correction.

    PubMed

    Lanchares, Elena; Calvo, Begoña; Cristóbal, José A; Doblaré, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    In order to simulate the corneal incisions used to correct astigmatism, a three-dimensional finite element model was generated from a simplified geometry of the anterior half of the ocular globe. A hyperelastic constitutive behavior was assumed for cornea, limbus and sclera, which are collagenous materials with a fiber structure. Due to the preferred orientations of the collagen fibrils, corneal and limbal tissues were considered anisotropic, whereas the sclera was simplified to an isotropic one assuming that fibrils are randomly disposed. The reference configuration, which includes the initial strain distribution that balances the intraocular pressure, is obtained by an iterative process. Then the incisions are simulated. The final positions of the nodes belonging to the incised meridian and to the perpendicular one are fitted by both radii of curvature, which are used to calculate the optical power. The simulated incisions were those specified by Lindstrom's nomogram [Chu, Y., Hardten, D., Lindquist, T., Lindstrom, R., 2005. Astigmatic keratotomy. Duane's Ophthalmology. Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, Philadelphia] to achieve 1.5, 2.25, 3.0, 4.5 and 6.0D of astigmatic change, using the next values for the parameters: length of 45 degrees , 60 degrees and 90 degrees , an optical zone of 6mm, single or paired incisions. The model gives results similar to those in Lindstrom's nomogram [Chu et al., 2005] and can be considered a useful tool to plan and simulate refractive surgery by predicting the outcomes of different sorts of incisions and to optimize the values for the parameters involved: depth, length, position. PMID:18177656

  20. Least-squares finite element methods for compressible Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Carey, G. F.

    1990-01-01

    A method based on backward finite differencing in time and a least-squares finite element scheme for first-order systems of partial differential equations in space is applied to the Euler equations for gas dynamics. The scheme minimizes the L-sq-norm of the residual within each time step. The method naturally generates numerical dissipation proportional to the time step size. An implicit method employing linear elements has been implemented and proves robust. For high-order elements, computed solutions based on the L-sq method may have oscillations for calculations at similar time step sizes. To overcome this difficulty, a scheme which minimizes the weighted H1-norm of the residual is proposed and leads to a successful scheme with high-degree elements. Finally, a conservative least-squares finite element method is also developed. Numerical results for two-dimensional problems are given to demonstrate the shock resolution of the methods and compare different approaches.

  1. SULEC: Benchmarking a new ALE finite-element code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buiter, S.; Ellis, S.

    2012-04-01

    We have developed a 2-D/3-D arbitrary lagrangian-eulerian (ALE) finite-element code, SULEC, based on known techniques from literature. SULEC is successful in tackling many of the problems faced by numerical models of lithosphere and mantle processes, such as the combination of viscous, elastic, and plastic rheologies, the presence of a free surface, the contrast in viscosity between lithosphere and the underlying asthenosphere, and the occurrence of large deformations including viscous flow and offset on shear zones. The aim of our presentation is (1) to describe SULEC, and (2) to present a set of analytical and numerical benchmarks that we use to continuously test our code. SULEC solves the incompressible momentum equation coupled with the energy equation. It uses a structured mesh that is built of quadrilateral or brick elements that can vary in size in all dimensions, allowing to achieve high resolutions where required. The elements are either linear in velocity with constant pressure, or quadratic in velocity with linear pressure. An accurate pressure field is obtained through an iterative penalty (Uzawa) formulation. Material properties are carried on tracer particles that are advected through the Eulerian mesh. Shear elasticity is implemented following the approach of Moresi et al. [J. Comp. Phys. 184, 2003], brittle materials deform following a Drucker-Prager criterion, and viscous flow is by temperature- and pressure-dependent power-law creep. The top boundary of our models is a true free surface (with free surface stabilisation) on which simple surface processes models may be imposed. We use a set of benchmarks that test viscous, viscoelastic, elastic and plastic deformation, temperature advection and conduction, free surface behaviour, and pressure computation. Part of our benchmark set is automated allowing easy testing of new code versions. Examples include Poiseuille flow, Couette flow, Stokes flow, relaxation of viscous topography, viscous pure shear

  2. Performance analysis of high quality parallel preconditioners applied to 3D finite element structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kolotilina, L.; Nikishin, A.; Yeremin, A.

    1994-12-31

    The solution of large systems of linear equations is a crucial bottleneck when performing 3D finite element analysis of structures. Also, in many cases the reliability and robustness of iterative solution strategies, and their efficiency when exploiting hardware resources, fully determine the scope of industrial applications which can be solved on a particular computer platform. This is especially true for modern vector/parallel supercomputers with large vector length and for modern massively parallel supercomputers. Preconditioned iterative methods have been successfully applied to industrial class finite element analysis of structures. The construction and application of high quality preconditioners constitutes a high percentage of the total solution time. Parallel implementation of high quality preconditioners on such architectures is a formidable challenge. Two common types of existing preconditioners are the implicit preconditioners and the explicit preconditioners. The implicit preconditioners (e.g. incomplete factorizations of several types) are generally high quality but require solution of lower and upper triangular systems of equations per iteration which are difficult to parallelize without deteriorating the convergence rate. The explicit type of preconditionings (e.g. polynomial preconditioners or Jacobi-like preconditioners) require sparse matrix-vector multiplications and can be parallelized but their preconditioning qualities are less than desirable. The authors present results of numerical experiments with Factorized Sparse Approximate Inverses (FSAI) for symmetric positive definite linear systems. These are high quality preconditioners that possess a large resource of parallelism by construction without increasing the serial complexity.

  3. Dynamical observer for a flexible beam via finite element approximations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manitius, Andre; Xia, Hong-Xing

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this view-graph presentation is a computational investigation of the closed-loop output feedback control of a Euler-Bernoulli beam based on finite element approximation. The observer is part of the classical observer plus state feedback control, but it is finite-dimensional. In the theoretical work on the subject it is assumed (and sometimes proved) that increasing the number of finite elements will improve accuracy of the control. In applications, this may be difficult to achieve because of numerical problems. The main difficulty in computing the observer and simulating its work is the presence of high frequency eigenvalues in the finite-element model and poor numerical conditioning of some of the system matrices (e.g. poor observability properties) when the dimension of the approximating system increases. This work dealt with some of these difficulties.

  4. Finite element methods for enhanced oil recovery Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.F.

    1985-02-01

    A general, finite element procedure for reservoir simulation is presented. This effort is directed toward improving the numerical behavior of standard upstream, or upwind, finite difference techniques, without significantly increasing the computational costs. Two methods from previous authors' work are modified and developed: upwind finite elements and the Petrov-Galerkin method. These techniques are applied in a one- and two-dimensional, surfactant/ polymer simulator. The paper sets forth the mathematical formulation and several details concerning the implementation. The results indicate that the PetrovGalerkin method does significantly reduce numericaldiffusion errors, while it retains the stability of the first-order, upwind methods. It is also relatively simple to implement. Both the upwind, and PetrovGalerkin, finite element methods demonstrate little sensitivity to grid orientation.

  5. Two-dimensional finite element neutron diffusion analysis using hierarchic shape functions

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, D.C.

    1997-04-01

    Recent advances have been made in the use of p-type finite element method (FEM) for structural and fluid dynamics problems that hold promise for reactor physics problems. These advances include using hierarchic shape functions, element-by-element iterative solvers and more powerful mapping techniques. Use of the hierarchic shape functions allows greater flexibility and efficiency in implementing energy-dependent flux expansions and incorporating localized refinement of the solution space. The irregular matrices generated by the p-type FEM can be solved efficiently using element-by-element conjugate gradient iterative solvers. These solvers do not require storage of either the global or local stiffness matrices and can be highly vectorized. Mapping techniques based on blending function interpolation allow exact representation of curved boundaries using coarse element grids. These features were implemented in a developmental two-dimensional neutron diffusion program based on the use of hierarchic shape functions (FEM2DH). Several aspects in the effective use of p-type analysis were explored. Two choices of elemental preconditioning were examined--the proper selection of the polynomial shape functions and the proper number of functions to use. Of the five shape function polynomials tested, the integral Legendre functions were the most effective. The serendipity set of functions is preferable over the full tensor product set. Two global preconditioners were also examined--simple diagonal and incomplete Cholesky. The full effectiveness of the finite element methodology was demonstrated on a two-region, two-group cylindrical problem but solved in the x-y coordinate space, using a non-structured element grid. The exact, analytic eigenvalue solution was achieved with FEM2DH using various combinations of element grids and flux expansions.

  6. The accuracy of finite element solutions of Stokes's flow with strongly varying viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moresi, Louis; Zhong, Shijie; Gurnis, Michael

    1996-10-01

    We provide benchmark comparisons of two finite element (FE) mantle convection codes, CITCOM and CONMAN, against analytic solutions for Stokes' flow for strongly varying viscosity in the horizontal and vertical directions. The two codes use a similar FE formulation but different methods for solving the resulting equations. They both obtain accurate velocity, pressure and surface topography for viscosity structures which vary rapidly over a short distance, or discontinuously. The benchmarks help determine how many elements are needed to resolve a region of, for example, a convection simulation with high viscosity gradients. The overall accuracy does not depend on the global viscosity variation but on the gradients within individual elements. As a rule of thumb, accuracy can fall below 1% when there is a viscosity variation greater than a factor of two or three in an element. For iterative solution methods, necessary in three-dimensional modelling, these guidelines are required to determine the number of iterations to perform. We discuss a penalty based technique which improves the convergence of iterative solvers for general problems in which high viscosity gradients occurs spontaneously.

  7. An alternative Laplacian electrostatic field finite element formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, P.F.; Lauber, T.S.

    1987-01-01

    An alternative finite element method for calculating three-dimensional electrostatic fields is described. The matrix equation is assembled using linear tetrahedral elements and an electrical network solution techniques known as impedance matrix building with axis discarding. The solutions of sample problems are described.

  8. Grid generation for two-dimensional finite element flowfield computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatum, K. E.

    1980-01-01

    The finite element method for fluid dynamics was used to develop a two dimensional mesh generation scheme. The method consists of shearing and conformal maps with upper and lower surfaces handled independently to allow sharp leading edges. The method also generates meshes of triangular or quadrilateral elements.

  9. Adaptive grid finite element model of the tokamak scrapeoff layer

    SciTech Connect

    Kuprat, A.P.; Glasser, A.H.

    1995-07-01

    The authors discuss unstructured grids for application to transport in the tokamak edge SOL. They have developed a new metric with which to judge element elongation and resolution requirements. Using this method, the authors apply a standard moving finite element technique to advance the SOL equations while inserting/deleting dynamically nodes that violate an elongation criterion. In a tokamak plasma, this method achieves a more uniform accuracy, and results in highly stretched triangular finite elements, except near separatrix X-point where transport is more isotropic.

  10. Finite element analysis of two disk rotor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Harsh Kumar

    2016-05-01

    A finite element model of simple horizontal rotor system is developed for evaluating its dynamic behaviour. The model is based on Timoshenko beam element and accounts for the effect of gyroscopic couple and other rotational forces. Present rotor system consists of single shaft which is supported by bearings at both ends and two disks are mounted at different locations. The natural frequencies, mode shapes and orbits of rotating system for a specific range of rotation speed are obtained by developing a MATLAB code for solving the finite element equations of rotary system. Consequently, Campbell diagram is plotted for finding a relationship between natural whirl frequencies and rotation of the rotor.

  11. Preconditioned CG-solvers and finite element grids

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, R.; Selberherr, S.

    1994-12-31

    To extract parasitic capacitances in wiring structures of integrated circuits the authors developed the two- and three-dimensional finite element program SCAP (Smart Capacitance Analysis Program). The program computes the task of the electrostatic field from a solution of Poisson`s equation via finite elements and calculates the energies from which the capacitance matrix is extracted. The unknown potential vector, which has for three-dimensional applications 5000-50000 unknowns, is computed by a ICCG solver. Currently three- and six-node triangular, four- and ten-node tetrahedronal elements are supported.

  12. GPU-Accelerated Finite Element Method for Modelling Light Transport in Diffuse Optical Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Schweiger, Martin

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a GPU-accelerated finite element forward solver for the computation of light transport in scattering media. The forward model is the computationally most expensive component of iterative methods for image reconstruction in diffuse optical tomography, and performance optimisation of the forward solver is therefore crucial for improving the efficiency of the solution of the inverse problem. The GPU forward solver uses a CUDA implementation that evaluates on the graphics hardware the sparse linear system arising in the finite element formulation of the diffusion equation. We present solutions for both time-domain and frequency-domain problems. A comparison with a CPU-based implementation shows significant performance gains of the graphics accelerated solution, with improvements of approximately a factor of 10 for double-precision computations, and factors beyond 20 for single-precision computations. The gains are also shown to be dependent on the mesh complexity, where the largest gains are achieved for high mesh resolutions. PMID:22013431

  13. A singular finite element technique for calculating continuum damping of Alfvén eigenmodes

    SciTech Connect

    Bowden, G. W.; Hole, M. J.

    2015-02-15

    Damping due to continuum resonances can be calculated using dissipation-less ideal magnetohydrodynamics provided that the poles due to these resonances are properly treated. We describe a singular finite element technique for calculating the continuum damping of Alfvén waves. A Frobenius expansion is used to determine appropriate finite element basis functions on an inner region surrounding a pole due to the continuum resonance. The location of the pole due to the continuum resonance and mode frequency is calculated iteratively using a Galerkin method. This method is used to find the complex frequency and mode structure of a toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmode in a large aspect ratio circular tokamak and is shown to agree closely with a complex contour technique.

  14. GPU-Accelerated Finite Element Method for Modelling Light Transport in Diffuse Optical Tomography.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Martin

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a GPU-accelerated finite element forward solver for the computation of light transport in scattering media. The forward model is the computationally most expensive component of iterative methods for image reconstruction in diffuse optical tomography, and performance optimisation of the forward solver is therefore crucial for improving the efficiency of the solution of the inverse problem. The GPU forward solver uses a CUDA implementation that evaluates on the graphics hardware the sparse linear system arising in the finite element formulation of the diffusion equation. We present solutions for both time-domain and frequency-domain problems. A comparison with a CPU-based implementation shows significant performance gains of the graphics accelerated solution, with improvements of approximately a factor of 10 for double-precision computations, and factors beyond 20 for single-precision computations. The gains are also shown to be dependent on the mesh complexity, where the largest gains are achieved for high mesh resolutions.

  15. Three-dimensional reconstruction of surface-breaking flaws using finite element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladchtein, R. Schifini; Bruno, A. C.

    2000-05-01

    We present an iterative algorithm that reconstructs the geometry of three-dimensional surface-breaking flaws from measurements using an NDE magnetic flux leakage technique. Several surface-breaking flaws in a ferromagnetic sample have been modeled using the finite element method and later reconstructed by an optimization routine. This reconstruction was achieved by modifying the coordinates of several surface nodes of the finite element mesh, solving the magnetostatic problem, and optimizing it by a least-squares method. The magnetic field was measured above the surface of the sample. This inverse solution algorithm might be particularly useful to characterize flaws detected by magnetic in-line inspection tools in oil and gas pipelines.

  16. Finite element-integral acoustic simulation of JT15D turbofan engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Horowitz, S. J.

    1984-07-01

    An iterative finite element integral technique is used to predict the sound field radiated from the JT15D turbofan inlet. The sound field is divided into two regions: the sound field within and near the inlet which is computed using the finite element method and the radiation field beyond the inlet which is calculated using an integral solution technique. The velocity potential formulation of the acoustic wave equation was employed in the program. For some single mode JT15D data, the theory and experiment are in good agreement for the far field radiation pattern as well as suppressor attenuation. Also, the computer program is used to simulate flight effects that cannot be performed on a ground static test stand.

  17. MHOST: An efficient finite element program for inelastic analysis of solids and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, S.

    1988-01-01

    An efficient finite element program for 3-D inelastic analysis of gas turbine hot section components was constructed and validated. A novel mixed iterative solution strategy is derived from the augmented Hu-Washizu variational principle in order to nodally interpolate coordinates, displacements, deformation, strains, stresses and material properties. A series of increasingly sophisticated material models incorporated in MHOST include elasticity, secant plasticity, infinitesimal and finite deformation plasticity, creep and unified viscoplastic constitutive model proposed by Walker. A library of high performance elements is built into this computer program utilizing the concepts of selective reduced integrations and independent strain interpolations. A family of efficient solution algorithms is implemented in MHOST for linear and nonlinear equation solution including the classical Newton-Raphson, modified, quasi and secant Newton methods with optional line search and the conjugate gradient method.

  18. Finite element study of plate buckling induced by spatial temperature gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, E.A.; Kolenski, J.D.; Marino, R.P.

    1993-01-01

    Finite element analyses of thermal buckling of thin metallic plates with prescribed spatial temperature distributions are described. Thermally induced compressive membrane stresses and transverse plate displacement imperfections initiate plates buckling. A finite element formulation based on von Karman plate theory is presented. The resulting nonlinear equations are solved for incremental temperature increases by Newton-Raphson iteration. The computational method is used to investigate the buckling response of rectangular plates with steady and unsteady spatially varying temperature distributions. The role of initial plate imperfections and temperature distributions on the nonlinear response of plate displacements and stresses is described. The relatively high levels of stress induced by spatial temperature gradients should be considered carefully in the postbuckling design of panels for aerospace vehicles subjected to combined mechanical and thermal loads. 31 refs.

  19. Iter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iotti, Robert

    2015-04-01

    ITER is an international experimental facility being built by seven Parties to demonstrate the long term potential of fusion energy. The ITER Joint Implementation Agreement (JIA) defines the structure and governance model of such cooperation. There are a number of necessary conditions for such international projects to be successful: a complete design, strong systems engineering working with an agreed set of requirements, an experienced organization with systems and plans in place to manage the project, a cost estimate backed by industry, and someone in charge. Unfortunately for ITER many of these conditions were not present. The paper discusses the priorities in the JIA which led to setting up the project with a Central Integrating Organization (IO) in Cadarache, France as the ITER HQ, and seven Domestic Agencies (DAs) located in the countries of the Parties, responsible for delivering 90%+ of the project hardware as Contributions-in-Kind and also financial contributions to the IO, as ``Contributions-in-Cash.'' Theoretically the Director General (DG) is responsible for everything. In practice the DG does not have the power to control the work of the DAs, and there is not an effective management structure enabling the IO and the DAs to arbitrate disputes, so the project is not really managed, but is a loose collaboration of competing interests. Any DA can effectively block a decision reached by the DG. Inefficiencies in completing design while setting up a competent organization from scratch contributed to the delays and cost increases during the initial few years. So did the fact that the original estimate was not developed from industry input. Unforeseen inflation and market demand on certain commodities/materials further exacerbated the cost increases. Since then, improvements are debatable. Does this mean that the governance model of ITER is a wrong model for international scientific cooperation? I do not believe so. Had the necessary conditions for success

  20. Exponential convergence through linear finite element discretization of stratified subdomains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guddati, Murthy N.; Druskin, Vladimir; Vaziri Astaneh, Ali

    2016-10-01

    Motivated by problems where the response is needed at select localized regions in a large computational domain, we devise a novel finite element discretization that results in exponential convergence at pre-selected points. The key features of the discretization are (a) use of midpoint integration to evaluate the contribution matrices, and (b) an unconventional mapping of the mesh into complex space. Named complex-length finite element method (CFEM), the technique is linked to Padé approximants that provide exponential convergence of the Dirichlet-to-Neumann maps and thus the solution at specified points in the domain. Exponential convergence facilitates drastic reduction in the number of elements. This, combined with sparse computation associated with linear finite elements, results in significant reduction in the computational cost. The paper presents the basic ideas of the method as well as illustration of its effectiveness for a variety of problems involving Laplace, Helmholtz and elastodynamics equations.

  1. Design and finite element analysis of oval man way

    SciTech Connect

    Hari, Y.; Gryder, B.

    1996-12-01

    This paper presents the design of an oval man way in the side wall of a cylindrical pressure vessel. ASME Code Section 8 is used to obtain the design parameters of the oval man way, man way cover and bolts. The code calculations require some assumptions which may not be valid. A typical design example is taken. STAAD III finite element code with plate elements is used to model the oval man way, man way cover and bolts. The stresses calculated using ASME Code Section 8 and other analytical formulas for plate and shells are compared with the stresses obtained by Finite Element Modeling. This paper gives the designer of oval man way the ability to perform a finite element analysis and compare it with the analytical calculations and assumptions made. This gives added confidence to the designer as to the validity of his calculations and assumptions.

  2. A finite element implementation for biphasic contact of hydrated porous media under finite deformation and sliding

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongqiang; Shah, Mitul; Spilker, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    The study of biphasic soft tissues contact is fundamental to understanding the biomechanical behavior of human diarthrodial joints. However, to date, few biphasic finite element contact analysis for 3D physiological geometries under finite deformation has been developed. The objective of this paper is to develop a hyperelastic biphasic contact implementation for finite deformation and sliding problem. An augmented Lagrangian method was used to enforce the continuity of contact traction and fluid pressure across the contact interface. The finite element implementation was based on a general purpose software, COMSOL Multiphysics. The accuracy of the implementation is verified using example problems, for which solutions are available by alternative analyses. The implementation was proven to be robust and able to handle finite deformation and sliding. PMID:24496915

  3. Deformation modes in the finite element absolute nodal coordinate formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Hiroyuki; Gerstmayr, Johannes; Shabana, Ahmed A.

    2006-12-01

    The objective of this study is to provide interpretation of the deformation modes in the finite element absolute nodal coordinate formulation using several strain definitions. In this finite element formulation, the nodal coordinates consist of absolute position coordinates and gradients that can be used to define a unique rotation and deformation fields within the element as well as at the nodal points. The results obtained in this study clearly show cross-section deformation modes eliminated when the number of the finite element nodal coordinates is systematically and consistently reduced. Using the procedure discussed in this paper one can obtain a reduced order dynamic model, eliminate position vector gradients that introduce high frequencies to the solution of some problems, achieve the continuity of the remaining gradients at the nodal points, and obtain a formulation that automatically satisfies the principle of work and energy. Furthermore, the resulting dynamic model, unlike large rotation finite element formulations, leads to a unique rotation field, and as a consequence, the obtained formulation does not suffer from the problem of coordinate redundancy that characterizes existing large deformation finite element formulations. In order to accurately define strain components that can have easy physical interpretation, a material coordinate system is introduced to define the material element rotation and deformation. Using the material coordinate system, the Timoshenko-Reissner and Euler -Bernoulli beam models can be systematically obtained as special cases of the absolute nodal coordinate formulation beam models. While a constraint approach is used in this study to eliminate the cross-section deformation modes, it is important to point out as mentioned in this paper that lower-order finite elements, some of which already presented in previous investigations, can be efficiently used in thin and stiff structure applications.

  4. New triangular and quadrilateral plate-bending finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanaswami, R.

    1974-01-01

    A nonconforming plate-bending finite element of triangular shape and associated quadrilateral elements are developed. The transverse displacement is approximated within the element by a quintic polynomial. The formulation takes into account the effects of transverse shear deformation. Results of the static and dynamic analysis of a square plate, with edges simply supported or clamped, are compared with exact solutions. Good accuracy is obtained in all calculations.

  5. Variational formulation of high performance finite elements: Parametrized variational principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felippa, Carlos A.; Militello, Carmello

    1991-01-01

    High performance elements are simple finite elements constructed to deliver engineering accuracy with coarse arbitrary grids. This is part of a series on the variational basis of high-performance elements, with emphasis on those constructed with the free formulation (FF) and assumed natural strain (ANS) methods. Parametrized variational principles that provide a foundation for the FF and ANS methods, as well as for a combination of both are presented.

  6. Spectral finite-element methods for parametric constrained optimization problems.

    SciTech Connect

    Anitescu, M.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2009-01-01

    We present a method to approximate the solution mapping of parametric constrained optimization problems. The approximation, which is of the spectral finite element type, is represented as a linear combination of orthogonal polynomials. Its coefficients are determined by solving an appropriate finite-dimensional constrained optimization problem. We show that, under certain conditions, the latter problem is solvable because it is feasible for a sufficiently large degree of the polynomial approximation and has an objective function with bounded level sets. In addition, the solutions of the finite-dimensional problems converge for an increasing degree of the polynomials considered, provided that the solutions exhibit a sufficiently large and uniform degree of smoothness. Our approach solves, in the case of optimization problems with uncertain parameters, the most computationally intensive part of stochastic finite-element approaches. We demonstrate that our framework is applicable to parametric eigenvalue problems.

  7. A modular finite-element model (MODFE) for areal and axisymmetric ground-water-flow problems, Part 2: Derivation of finite-element equations and comparisons with analytical solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooley, Richard L.

    1992-01-01

    MODFE, a modular finite-element model for simulating steady- or unsteady-state, area1 or axisymmetric flow of ground water in a heterogeneous anisotropic aquifer is documented in a three-part series of reports. In this report, part 2, the finite-element equations are derived by minimizing a functional of the difference between the true and approximate hydraulic head, which produces equations that are equivalent to those obtained by either classical variational or Galerkin techniques. Spatial finite elements are triangular with linear basis functions, and temporal finite elements are one dimensional with linear basis functions. Physical processes that can be represented by the model include (1) confined flow, unconfined flow (using the Dupuit approximation), or a combination of both; (2) leakage through either rigid or elastic confining units; (3) specified recharge or discharge at points, along lines, or areally; (4) flow across specified-flow, specified-head, or head-dependent boundaries; (5) decrease of aquifer thickness to zero under extreme water-table decline and increase of aquifer thickness from zero as the water table rises; and (6) head-dependent fluxes from springs, drainage wells, leakage across riverbeds or confining units combined with aquifer dewatering, and evapotranspiration. The matrix equations produced by the finite-element method are solved by the direct symmetric-Doolittle method or the iterative modified incomplete-Cholesky conjugate-gradient method. The direct method can be efficient for small- to medium-sized problems (less than about 500 nodes), and the iterative method is generally more efficient for larger-sized problems. Comparison of finite-element solutions with analytical solutions for five example problems demonstrates that the finite-element model can yield accurate solutions to ground-water flow problems.

  8. A finite element formulation for scattering from electrically large 2-dimensional structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Daniel C.; Volakis, John L.

    1992-01-01

    A finite element formulation is given using the scattered field approach with a fictitious material absorber to truncate the mesh. The formulation includes the use of arbitrary approximation functions so that more accurate results can be achieved without any modification to the software. Additionally, non-polynomial approximation functions can be used, including complex approximation functions. The banded system that results is solved with an efficient sparse/banded iterative scheme and as a consequence, large structures can be analyzed. Results are given for simple cases to verify the formulation and also for large, complex geometries.

  9. An arbitrary lagrangian-eulerian finite element approach to non-steady state fluid flows. Application to mould filling

    SciTech Connect

    Gaston, L.; Glut, B.; Bellet, M.; Chenot, J.L.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents a two-dimensional lagrangian-eulerian finite element approach of non-steady state Navier-Stokes fluid flows with free surfaces, like those occurring during the mould filling stage in casting processes. The proposed model is based on a mixed velocity-pressure finite element formulation, including an augmented Lagrangian technique and an iterative solver of Uzawa type. Mesh updating is carried out through an arbitrary lagrangian-eulerian method in order to describe properly the free surface evolution. Heat transfer through the fluid flow is solved by a convection-diffusion splitting technique. The efficiency of the method is illustrated on an example of gravity casting.

  10. MP Salsa: a finite element computer program for reacting flow problems. Part 1--theoretical development

    SciTech Connect

    Shadid, J.N.; Moffat, H.K.; Hutchinson, S.A.; Hennigan, G.L.; Devine, K.D.; Salinger, A.G.

    1996-05-01

    The theoretical background for the finite element computer program, MPSalsa, is presented in detail. MPSalsa is designed to solve laminar, low Mach number, two- or three-dimensional incompressible and variable density reacting fluid flows on massively parallel computers, using a Petrov-Galerkin finite element formulation. The code has the capability to solve coupled fluid flow, heat transport, multicomponent species transport, and finite-rate chemical reactions, and to solver coupled multiple Poisson or advection-diffusion- reaction equations. The program employs the CHEMKIN library to provide a rigorous treatment of multicomponent ideal gas kinetics and transport. Chemical reactions occurring in the gas phase and on surfaces are treated by calls to CHEMKIN and SURFACE CHEMKIN, respectively. The code employs unstructured meshes, using the EXODUS II finite element data base suite of programs for its input and output files. MPSalsa solves both transient and steady flows by using fully implicit time integration, an inexact Newton method and iterative solvers based on preconditioned Krylov methods as implemented in the Aztec solver library.

  11. Finite Element Method for Capturing Ultra-relativistic Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, G. A.; Chung, T. J.

    2003-01-01

    While finite element methods are used extensively by researchers solving computational fluid dynamics in fields other than astrophysics, their use in astrophysical fluid simulations has been predominantly overlooked. Current simulations using other methods such as finite difference and finite volume (based on finite difference) have shown remarkable results, but these methods are limited by their fundamental properties in aspects that are important for simulations with complex geometries and widely varying spatial and temporal scale differences. We have explored the use of finite element methods for astrophysical fluids in order to establish the validity of using such methods in astrophysical environments. We present our numerical technique applied to solving ultra-relativistic (Lorentz Factor Gamma >> 1) shocks which are prevalent in astrophysical studies including relativistic jets and gamma-ray burst studies. We show our finite element formulation applied to simulations where the Lorentz factor ranges up to 2236 and demonstrate its stability in solving ultra-relativistic flows. Our numerical method is based on the Flowfield Dependent Variation (FDV) Method, unique in that numerical diffusion is derived from physical parameters rather than traditional artificial viscosity methods. Numerical instabilities account for most of the difficulties when capturing shocks in this regime. Our method results in stable solutions and accurate results as compared with other methods.

  12. On nonlinear finite element analysis in single-, multi- and parallel-processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Utku, S.; Melosh, R.; Islam, M.; Salama, M.

    1982-01-01

    Numerical solution of nonlinear equilibrium problems of structures by means of Newton-Raphson type iterations is reviewed. Each step of the iteration is shown to correspond to the solution of a linear problem, therefore the feasibility of the finite element method for nonlinear analysis is established. Organization and flow of data for various types of digital computers, such as single-processor/single-level memory, single-processor/two-level-memory, vector-processor/two-level-memory, and parallel-processors, with and without sub-structuring (i.e. partitioning) are given. The effect of the relative costs of computation, memory and data transfer on substructuring is shown. The idea of assigning comparable size substructures to parallel processors is exploited. Under Cholesky type factorization schemes, the efficiency of parallel processing is shown to decrease due to the occasional shared data, just as that due to the shared facilities.

  13. Prediction of metallic nano-optical trapping forces by finite element-boundary integral method.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiao-Min; Xu, Kai-Jiang; Yang, Ming-Lin; Sheng, Xin-Qing

    2015-03-01

    The hybrid of finite element and boundary integral (FE-BI) method is employed to predict nano-optical trapping forces of arbitrarily shaped metallic nanostructures. A preconditioning strategy is proposed to improve the convergence of the iterative solution. Skeletonization is employed to speed up the design and optimization where iteration has to be repeated for each beam configuration. The radiation pressure force (RPF) is computed by vector flux of the Maxwell's stress tensor. Numerical simulations are performed to validate the developed method in analyzing the plasmonic effects as well as the optical trapping forces. It is shown that the proposed method is capable of predicting the trapping forces of complex metallic nanostructures accurately and efficiently.

  14. Flow Applications of the Least Squares Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan

    1998-01-01

    The main thrust of the effort has been towards the development, analysis and implementation of the least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) for fluid dynamics and electromagnetics applications. In the past year, there were four major accomplishments: 1) special treatments in computational fluid dynamics and computational electromagnetics, such as upwinding, numerical dissipation, staggered grid, non-equal order elements, operator splitting and preconditioning, edge elements, and vector potential are unnecessary; 2) the analysis of the LSFEM for most partial differential equations can be based on the bounded inverse theorem; 3) the finite difference and finite volume algorithms solve only two Maxwell equations and ignore the divergence equations; and 4) the first numerical simulation of three-dimensional Marangoni-Benard convection was performed using the LSFEM.

  15. Finite element method for eigenvalue problems in electromagnetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. J.; Deshpande, Manohar D.; Cockrell, C. R.; Beck, Fred B.

    1994-01-01

    Finite element method (FEM) has been a very powerful tool to solve many complex problems in electromagnetics. The goal of the current research at the Langley Research Center is to develop a combined FEM/method of moments approach to three-dimensional scattering/radiation problem for objects with arbitrary shape and filled with complex materials. As a first step toward that goal, an exercise is taken to establish the power of FEM, through closed boundary problems. This paper demonstrates the developed of FEM tools for two- and three-dimensional eigenvalue problems in electromagnetics. In section 2, both the scalar and vector finite elements have been used for various waveguide problems to demonstrate the flexibility of FEM. In section 3, vector finite element method has been extended to three-dimensional eigenvalue problems.

  16. An Object Oriented, Finite Element Framework for Linear Wave Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Koning, Joseph M.

    2004-03-01

    This dissertation documents an object oriented framework which can be used to solve any linear wave equation. The linear wave equations are expressed in the differential forms language. This differential forms expression allows a strict discrete interpretation of the system. The framework is implemented using the Galerkin Finite Element Method to define the discrete differential forms and operators. Finite element basis functions including standard scalar Nodal and vector Nedelec basis functions are used to implement the discrete differential forms resulting in a mixed finite element system. Discretizations of scalar and vector wave equations in the time and frequency domains will be demonstrated in both differential forms and vector calculi. This framework conserves energy, maintains physical continuity, is valid on unstructured grids, conditionally stable and second order accurate. Examples including linear electrodynamics, acoustics, elasticity and magnetohydrodynamics are demonstrated.

  17. Electrical and Joule heating relationship investigation using Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thangaraju, S. K.; Munisamy, K. M.

    2015-09-01

    The finite element method is vastly used in material strength analysis. The nature of the finite element solver, which solves the Fourier equation of stress and strain analysis, made it possible to apply for conduction heat transfer Fourier Equation. Similarly the Current and voltage equation is also liner Fourier equation. The nature of the governing equation makes it possible to numerical investigate the electrical joule heating phenomena in electronic component. This paper highlights the Finite Element Method (FEM) application onto semiconductor interconnects to determine the specific contact resistance (SCR). Metal and semiconductor interconnects is used as model. The result confirms the possibility and validity of FEM utilization to investigate the Joule heating due electrical resistance.

  18. Optimal mapping of irregular finite element domains to parallel processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, J.; Otto, S.; Salama, M.

    1987-01-01

    Mapping the solution domain of n-finite elements into N-subdomains that may be processed in parallel by N-processors is an optimal one if the subdomain decomposition results in a well-balanced workload distribution among the processors. The problem is discussed in the context of irregular finite element domains as an important aspect of the efficient utilization of the capabilities of emerging multiprocessor computers. Finding the optimal mapping is an intractable combinatorial optimization problem, for which a satisfactory approximate solution is obtained here by analogy to a method used in statistical mechanics for simulating the annealing process in solids. The simulated annealing analogy and algorithm are described, and numerical results are given for mapping an irregular two-dimensional finite element domain containing a singularity onto the Hypercube computer.

  19. Derivation of a Tappered p-Version Beam Finite Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinnant, Howard E.

    1989-01-01

    A tapered p-version beam finite element suitable for dynamic applications is derived. The taper in the element is represented by allowing the area moments of inertia to vary as quartic polynomials along the length of the beam, and the cross-sectional area to vary as a quadratic polynomial. The p-version finite-element characteristics are implemented through a set of polynomial shape functions. The lower-order shape functions are identical to the classical cubic and linear shape functions normally associated with a beam element. The higher-order shape functions are a hierarchical set of polynomials that are integrals of orthogonal polynomials. Explicit expressions for the mass and stiffness matrices are presented for an arbitrary value of p. The element has been verified to be numerically stable using shape functions through 22nd order.

  20. Finite element methods for nonlinear elastostatic problems in rubber elasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. T.; Becker, E. B.; Miller, T. H.; Endo, T.; Pires, E. B.

    1983-01-01

    A number of finite element methods for the analysis of nonlinear problems in rubber elasticity are outlined. Several different finite element schemes are discussed. These include the augmented Lagrangian method, continuation or incremental loading methods, and associated Riks-type methods which have the capability of incorporating limit point behavior and bifurcations. Algorithms for the analysis of limit point behavior and bifurcations are described and the results of several numerical experiments are presented. In addition, a brief survey of some recent work on modelling contact and friction in elasticity problems is given. These results pertain to the use of new nonlocal and nonlinear friction laws.

  1. Substructure System Identification for Finite Element Model Updating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Roy R., Jr.; Blades, Eric L.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted under a NASA grant on the topic 'Substructure System Identification for Finite Element Model Updating.' The research concerns ongoing development of the Substructure System Identification Algorithm (SSID Algorithm), a system identification algorithm that can be used to obtain mathematical models of substructures, like Space Shuttle payloads. In the present study, particular attention was given to the following topics: making the algorithm robust to noisy test data, extending the algorithm to accept experimental FRF data that covers a broad frequency bandwidth, and developing a test analytical model (TAM) for use in relating test data to reduced-order finite element models.

  2. Adaptive multiscale model reduction with Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Eric; Efendiev, Yalchin; Hou, Thomas Y.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we discuss a general multiscale model reduction framework based on multiscale finite element methods. We give a brief overview of related multiscale methods. Due to page limitations, the overview focuses on a few related methods and is not intended to be comprehensive. We present a general adaptive multiscale model reduction framework, the Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Method. Besides the method's basic outline, we discuss some important ingredients needed for the method's success. We also discuss several applications. The proposed method allows performing local model reduction in the presence of high contrast and no scale separation.

  3. Correlation of composite material test results with finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guƫu, M.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper are presented some aspects regarding the method of simulation of composite materials testing with finite element analysis software. There were simulated tensile and shear tests of specimens manufactured from glass fiber reinforced polyester. For specimens manufacturing two types of fabrics were used: unidirectional and bidirectional. Experimentally determined elastic properties of composite material were used as input data. Modeling of composite architecture of the specimens was performed with ANSYS Composite PrepPost software. Finite element analysis stresses and strains on strain gauges bonding area were considered and compared with the real values in a diagram. After results comparison, potential causes of deviations were identified.

  4. A weak Galerkin generalized multiscale finite element method

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mu, Lin; Wang, Junping; Ye, Xiu

    2016-03-31

    In this study, we propose a general framework for weak Galerkin generalized multiscale (WG-GMS) finite element method for the elliptic problems with rapidly oscillating or high contrast coefficients. This general WG-GMS method features in high order accuracy on general meshes and can work with multiscale basis derived by different numerical schemes. A special case is studied under this WG-GMS framework in which the multiscale basis functions are obtained by solving local problem with the weak Galerkin finite element method. Convergence analysis and numerical experiments are obtained for the special case.

  5. Experimentally validated finite element model of electrocaloric multilayer ceramic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, N. A. S. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk Correia, T. M. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk; Rokosz, M. K. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk

    2014-07-28

    A novel finite element model to simulate the electrocaloric response of a multilayer ceramic capacitor (MLCC) under real environment and operational conditions has been developed. The two-dimensional transient conductive heat transfer model presented includes the electrocaloric effect as a source term, as well as accounting for radiative and convective effects. The model has been validated with experimental data obtained from the direct imaging of MLCC transient temperature variation under application of an electric field. The good agreement between simulated and experimental data, suggests that the novel experimental direct measurement methodology and the finite element model could be used to support the design of optimised electrocaloric units and operating conditions.

  6. Development of non-linear finite element computer code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, E. B.; Miller, T.

    1985-01-01

    Recent work has shown that the use of separable symmetric functions of the principal stretches can adequately describe the response of certain propellant materials and, further, that a data reduction scheme gives a convenient way of obtaining the values of the functions from experimental data. Based on representation of the energy, a computational scheme was developed that allows finite element analysis of boundary value problems of arbitrary shape and loading. The computational procedure was implemental in a three-dimensional finite element code, TEXLESP-S, which is documented herein.

  7. Finite element models of the space shuttle main engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, G. R.

    1980-01-01

    Finite element models were developed as input to dynamic simulations of the high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP), the high pressure oxidizer turbopump (HPOTP), and the space shuttle main engine (SSME). Descriptions are provided for the five basic finite element models: HPFTP rotor, HPFTP case, HPOTP rotor, HPOTP case, and SSME (excluding turbopumps). Modal results are presented for the HPFTP rotor, HPFTP case, HPOTP rotor, coupled HPFTP rotor and case, HPOTP case, coupled HPOTP rotor and case, SSME (excluding turbopumps), and SSME (including turbopumps). Results for the SSME (including turbopumps) model are compared to data from a SSME HPOTP modal survey.

  8. Diffusive mesh relaxation in ALE finite element numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Dube, E.I.

    1996-06-01

    The theory for a diffusive mesh relaxation algorithm is developed for use in three-dimensional Arbitary Lagrange/Eulerian (ALE) finite element simulation techniques. This mesh relaxer is derived by a variational principle for an unstructured 3D grid using finite elements, and incorporates hourglass controls in the numerical implementation. The diffusive coefficients are based on the geometric properties of the existing mesh, and are chosen so as to allow for a smooth grid that retains the general shape of the original mesh. The diffusive mesh relaxation algorithm is then applied to an ALE code system, and results from several test cases are discussed.

  9. Discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods for gradient plasticity.

    SciTech Connect

    Garikipati, Krishna.; Ostien, Jakob T.

    2010-10-01

    In this report we apply discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods to the equations of an incompatibility based formulation of gradient plasticity. The presentation is motivated with a brief overview of the description of dislocations within a crystal lattice. A tensor representing a measure of the incompatibility with the lattice is used in the formulation of a gradient plasticity model. This model is cast in a variational formulation, and discontinuous Galerkin machinery is employed to implement the formulation into a finite element code. Finally numerical examples of the model are shown.

  10. Robust Hybrid Finite Element Methods for Antennas and Microwave Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, J.; Volakis, John L.

    1996-01-01

    One of the primary goals in this dissertation is concerned with the development of robust hybrid finite element-boundary integral (FE-BI) techniques for modeling and design of conformal antennas of arbitrary shape. Both the finite element and integral equation methods will be first overviewed in this chapter with an emphasis on recently developed hybrid FE-BI methodologies for antennas, microwave and millimeter wave applications. The structure of the dissertation is then outlined. We conclude the chapter with discussions of certain fundamental concepts and methods in electromagnetics, which are important to this study.

  11. Two-dimensional finite-element temperature variance analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heuser, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    The finite element method is extended to thermal analysis by forming a variance analysis of temperature results so that the sensitivity of predicted temperatures to uncertainties in input variables is determined. The temperature fields within a finite number of elements are described in terms of the temperatures of vertices and the variational principle is used to minimize the integral equation describing thermal potential energy. A computer calculation yields the desired solution matrix of predicted temperatures and provides information about initial thermal parameters and their associated errors. Sample calculations show that all predicted temperatures are most effected by temperature values along fixed boundaries; more accurate specifications of these temperatures reduce errors in thermal calculations.

  12. Finite element microscopic stress analysis of cracked composite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    This paper considers the stress concentration problems of two types of cracked composite systems: (1) a composite system with a broken fiber (a penny-shaped crack problem), and (2) a composite system with a cracked matrix (an annular crack problem). The cracked composite systems are modeled with triangular and trapezoidal ring finite elements. Using NASTRAN (NASA Structural Analysis) finite element computer program, the stress and deformation fields in the cracked composite systems are calculated. The effect of fiber-matrix material combination on the stress concentrations and on the crack opening displacements is studied.

  13. Modal Substructuring of Geometrically Nonlinear Finite-Element Models

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kuether, Robert J.; Allen, Matthew S.; Hollkamp, Joseph J.

    2016-02-01

    The efficiency of a modal substructuring method depends on the component modes used to reduce each subcomponent model. Methods such as Craig–Bampton have been used extensively to reduce linear finite-element models with thousands or even millions of degrees of freedom down orders of magnitude while maintaining acceptable accuracy. A novel reduction method is proposed here for geometrically nonlinear finite-element models using the fixed-interface and constraint modes of the linearized system to reduce each subcomponent model. The geometric nonlinearity requires an additional cubic and quadratic polynomial function in the modal equations, and the nonlinear stiffness coefficients are determined by applying amore » series of static loads and using the finite-element code to compute the response. The geometrically nonlinear, reduced modal equations for each subcomponent are then coupled by satisfying compatibility and force equilibrium. This modal substructuring approach is an extension of the Craig–Bampton method and is readily applied to geometrically nonlinear models built directly within commercial finite-element packages. The efficiency of this new approach is demonstrated on two example problems: one that couples two geometrically nonlinear beams at a shared rotational degree of freedom, and another that couples an axial spring element to the axial degree of freedom of a geometrically nonlinear beam. The nonlinear normal modes of the assembled models are compared with those of a truth model to assess the accuracy of the novel modal substructuring approach.« less

  14. Finite Element Model Development and Validation for Aircraft Fuselage Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehrle, Ralph D.; Fleming, Gary A.; Pappa, Richard S.; Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    2000-01-01

    The ability to extend the valid frequency range for finite element based structural dynamic predictions using detailed models of the structural components and attachment interfaces is examined for several stiffened aircraft fuselage structures. This extended dynamic prediction capability is needed for the integration of mid-frequency noise control technology. Beam, plate and solid element models of the stiffener components are evaluated. Attachment models between the stiffener and panel skin range from a line along the rivets of the physical structure to a constraint over the entire contact surface. The finite element models are validated using experimental modal analysis results. The increased frequency range results in a corresponding increase in the number of modes, modal density and spatial resolution requirements. In this study, conventional modal tests using accelerometers are complemented with Scanning Laser Doppler Velocimetry and Electro-Optic Holography measurements to further resolve the spatial response characteristics. Whenever possible, component and subassembly modal tests are used to validate the finite element models at lower levels of assembly. Normal mode predictions for different finite element representations of components and assemblies are compared with experimental results to assess the most accurate techniques for modeling aircraft fuselage type structures.

  15. Least-squares finite element solution of 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Lin, Tsung-Liang; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1992-01-01

    Although significant progress has been made in the finite element solution of incompressible viscous flow problems. Development of more efficient methods is still needed before large-scale computation of 3D problems becomes feasible. This paper presents such a development. The most popular finite element method for the solution of incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is the classic Galerkin mixed method based on the velocity-pressure formulation. The mixed method requires the use of different elements to interpolate the velocity and the pressure in order to satisfy the Ladyzhenskaya-Babuska-Brezzi (LBB) condition for the existence of the solution. On the other hand, due to the lack of symmetry and positive definiteness of the linear equations arising from the mixed method, iterative methods for the solution of linear systems have been hard to come by. Therefore, direct Gaussian elimination has been considered the only viable method for solving the systems. But, for three-dimensional problems, the computer resources required by a direct method become prohibitively large. In order to overcome these difficulties, a least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) has been developed. This method is based on the first-order velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation. In this paper the LSFEM is extended for the solution of three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations written in the following first-order quasi-linear velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation.

  16. A finite element based method for solution of optimal control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bless, Robert R.; Hodges, Dewey H.; Calise, Anthony J.

    1989-01-01

    A temporal finite element based on a mixed form of the Hamiltonian weak principle is presented for optimal control problems. The mixed form of this principle contains both states and costates as primary variables that are expanded in terms of elemental values and simple shape functions. Unlike other variational approaches to optimal control problems, however, time derivatives of the states and costates do not appear in the governing variational equation. Instead, the only quantities whose time derivatives appear therein are virtual states and virtual costates. Also noteworthy among characteristics of the finite element formulation is the fact that in the algebraic equations which contain costates, they appear linearly. Thus, the remaining equations can be solved iteratively without initial guesses for the costates; this reduces the size of the problem by about a factor of two. Numerical results are presented herein for an elementary trajectory optimization problem which show very good agreement with the exact solution along with excellent computational efficiency and self-starting capability. The goal is to evaluate the feasibility of this approach for real-time guidance applications. To this end, a simplified two-stage, four-state model for an advanced launch vehicle application is presented which is suitable for finite element solution.

  17. A nonlinear, implicit, three-dimensional finite element code for solid and structural mechanics - User`s Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Maker, B.N.

    1995-04-14

    This report provides a user`s manual for NIKE3D, a fully implicit three-dimensional finite element code for analyzing the finite strain static and dynamic response of inelastic solids, shells, and beams. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 8-node solid elements, 2-node truss and beam elements, and 4-node membrane and shell elements. Over twenty constitutive models are available for representing a wide range of elastic, plastic, viscous, and thermally dependent material behavior. Contact-impact algorithms permit gaps, frictional sliding, and mesh discontinuities along material interfaces. Several nonlinear solution strategies are available, including Full-, Modified-, and Quasi-Newton methods. The resulting system of simultaneous linear equations is either solved iteratively by an element-by-element method, or directly by a factorization method, for which case bandwidth minimization is optional. Data may be stored either in or out of core memory to allow for large analyses.

  18. Numerical techniques in linear duct acoustics. [finite difference and finite element analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1980-01-01

    Both finite difference and finite element analyses of small amplitude (linear) sound propagation in straight and variable area ducts with flow, as might be found in a typical turboject engine duct, muffler, or industrial ventilation system, are reviewed. Both steady state and transient theories are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the advantages and limitations associated with the various numerical techniques. Examples of practical problems are given for which the numerical techniques have been applied.

  19. New hybrid quadrilateral finite element for Mindlin plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Yi; Zhang, Jingyu

    1994-02-01

    A new quadrilateral plate element concerning the effect of transverse shear strain was presented. It was derived from the hybrid finite element model based on the principles of virtual work. The outstanding advantage of this element was to use more rational trial functions of the displacements. For this reason, every variety of plate deformation can be simulated really while the least degrees of freedom was employed. A wide range of numerical tests was conducted and the results illustrate that this element has a very wide application scope to the thickness of plates and satisfactory accuracy can be obtained by coarse mesh for all kinds of examples.

  20. FINITE ELEMENT IMPLEMENTATION OF MECHANO-CHEMICAL PHENOMENA IN NEUTRAL DEFORMABLE POROUS MEDIA UNDER FINITE DEFORMATION

    PubMed Central

    ATESHIAN, GERARD A.; ALBRO, MICHAEL B.; MAAS, STEVE; WEISS, JEFFREY A.

    2012-01-01

    Biological soft tissues and cells may be subjected to mechanical as well as chemical (osmotic) loading under their natural physiological environment or various experimental conditions. The interaction of mechanical and chemical effects may be very significant under some of these conditions, yet the highly nonlinear nature of the set of governing equations describing these mechanisms poses a challenge for the modeling of such phenomena. This study formulated and implemented a finite element algorithm for analyzing mechano-chemical events in neutral deformable porous media under finite deformation. The algorithm employed the framework of mixture theory to model the porous permeable solid matrix and interstitial fluid, where the fluid consists of a mixture of solvent and solute. A special emphasis was placed on solute-solid matrix interactions, such as solute exclusion from a fraction of the matrix pore space (solubility) and frictional momentum exchange that produces solute hindrance and pumping under certain dynamic loading conditions. The finite element formulation implemented full coupling of mechanical and chemical effects, providing a framework where material properties and response functions may depend on solid matrix strain as well as solute concentration. The implementation was validated using selected canonical problems for which analytical or alternative numerical solutions exist. This finite element code includes a number of unique features that enhance the modeling of mechano-chemical phenomena in biological tissues. The code is available in the public domain, open source finite element program FEBio (http://mrl.sci.utah.edu/software). PMID:21950898

  1. A General-Purpose Mesh Generator for Finite Element Codes.

    1984-02-28

    Version 00 INGEN is a general-purpose mesh generator for use in conjunction with two and three dimensional finite element programs. The basic components of INGEN are surface and three-dimensional region generators that use linear-blending interpolation formulae. These generators are based on an i, j, k index scheme, which is used to number nodal points, construct elements, and develop displacement and traction boundary conditions.

  2. A finite element code for electric motor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, C. Warren

    1994-01-01

    FEMOT is a finite element program for solving the nonlinear magnetostatic problem. This version uses nonlinear, Newton first order elements. The code can be used for electric motor design and analysis. FEMOT can be embedded within an optimization code that will vary nodal coordinates to optimize the motor design. The output from FEMOT can be used to determine motor back EMF, torque, cogging, and magnet saturation. It will run on a PC and will be available to anyone who wants to use it.

  3. HEAT2. Two-Dimensional Heat Transfer Finite Element Code

    SciTech Connect

    Charman, C.

    1993-08-01

    HEAT2 is a finite element program for the transient and steady-state, thermal analysis of two-dimensional solids. Calculates detailed temperature distributions in MHTGR prismatic fuel elements side reflector and core support blocks. Non-linear effects of time and temperature dependent boundary conditions, and heat source generation and material properties are included with user supplied subroutines NPBC, QAREA, SOURCE, and MPROP.

  4. Finite Element Modeling of the Buckling Response of Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, Cheryl A.; Moore, David F.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Rankin, Charles C.

    2002-01-01

    A comparative study of different modeling approaches for predicting sandwich panel buckling response is described. The study considers sandwich panels with anisotropic face sheets and a very thick core. Results from conventional analytical solutions for sandwich panel overall buckling and face-sheet-wrinkling type modes are compared with solutions obtained using different finite element modeling approaches. Finite element solutions are obtained using layered shell element models, with and without transverse shear flexibility, layered shell/solid element models, with shell elements for the face sheets and solid elements for the core, and sandwich models using a recently developed specialty sandwich element. Convergence characteristics of the shell/solid and sandwich element modeling approaches with respect to in-plane and through-the-thickness discretization, are demonstrated. Results of the study indicate that the specialty sandwich element provides an accurate and effective modeling approach for predicting both overall and localized sandwich panel buckling response. Furthermore, results indicate that anisotropy of the face sheets, along with the ratio of principle elastic moduli, affect the buckling response and these effects may not be represented accurately by analytical solutions. Modeling recommendations are also provided.

  5. The strain-based beam finite elements in multibody dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gams, M.; Planinc, I.; Saje, M.

    2007-08-01

    We present a strain-based finite-element formulation for the dynamic analysis of flexible elastic planar multibody systems, composed of planar beams. We consider finite displacements, rotations and strains. The discrete dynamic equations of motion are obtained by the collocation method. The strains are the basic interpolated variables, which makes the formulation different from other formulations. The further speciality of the formulation is the strong satisfaction of the cross-sectional constitutive conditions at collocation points. In order to avoid the nested integrations, a special algorithm for the numerical integration over the length of the finite element is proposed. The midpoint scheme is used for the time integration. The performance of the formulation is illustrated via numerical examples, including a stiff multibody system.

  6. A split finite element algorithm for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.

    1979-01-01

    An accurate and efficient numerical solution algorithm is established for solution of the high Reynolds number limit of the Navier-Stokes equations governing the multidimensional flow of a compressible essentially inviscid fluid. Finite element interpolation theory is used within a dissipative formulation established using Galerkin criteria within the Method of Weighted Residuals. An implicit iterative solution algorithm is developed, employing tensor product bases within a fractional steps integration procedure, that significantly enhances solution economy concurrent with sharply reduced computer hardware demands. The algorithm is evaluated for resolution of steep field gradients and coarse grid accuracy using both linear and quadratic tensor product interpolation bases. Numerical solutions for linear and nonlinear, one, two and three dimensional examples confirm and extend the linearized theoretical analyses, and results are compared to competitive finite difference derived algorithms.

  7. Finite element forced vibration analysis of rotating cyclic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elchuri, V.; Smith, G. C. C.

    1981-01-01

    A capability was added to the general purpose finite element program NASTRAN Level 17.7 to conduct forced vibration analysis of tuned cyclic structures rotating about their axes of symmetry. The effects of Coriolis and centripetal accelerations together with those due to linear acceleration of the axis of rotation were included. The theoretical development of this capability is presented.

  8. Spanwise variation of potential form drag. [finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clever, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    The finite element method is used to calculate the spanwise variation of potential form drag of a wing at subsonic and supersonic speeds using linearly varying panels. The wing may be of arbitrary planform and nonplanar provided the wing panels are parallel to the aircraft axis.

  9. Experiences in interfacing NASTRAN with another finite element program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwerzler, D. D.; Leverenz, R. K.

    1972-01-01

    The coupling of NASTRAN to another finite element program developed for the static analysis of automotive structures is discussed. The two programs were coupled together to use the substructuring capability of the in-house program and the normal mode analysis capability of NASTRAN. Modifications were made to the NASTRAN program in order to make the coupling feasible.

  10. Finite-element analysis of end-notch flexure specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Kochhar, N. K.

    1986-01-01

    A finite-element analysis of the end-notch flexure specimen for Mode II interlaminar fracture toughness measurement was conducted. The effects of friction between the crack faces and large deflection on the evaluation of G(IIc) from this specimen were investigated. Results of this study are presented in this paper.

  11. Finite element analysis of end notch flexure specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Kochhar, N. K.

    1986-01-01

    A finite element analysis of the end notch flexure specimen for mode II interlaminar fracture toughness measurement was conducted. The effect of friction between the crack faces and large deflection on the evaluation of G sub IIc from this specimen were investigated. Results of this study are presented in this paper.

  12. SUPG Finite Element Simulations of Compressible Flows for Aerothermodynamic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, Benjamin S.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Streamline-Upwind Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) Finite Element Simulation. It covers the background, governing equations, weak formulation, shock capturing, inviscid flux discretization, time discretization, linearization, and implicit solution strategies. It also reviews some applications such as Type IV Shock Interaction, Forward-Facing Cavity and AEDC Sharp Double Cone.

  13. Boundary control of parabolic systems - Finite-element approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasiecka, I.

    1980-01-01

    The finite element approximation of a Dirichlet type boundary control problem for parabolic systems is considered. An approach based on the direct approximation of an input-output semigroup formula is applied. Error estimates are derived for optimal state and optimal control, and it is noted that these estimates are actually optimal with respect to the approximation theoretic properties.

  14. Finite Element Studies Of Tangent Mounted Conical Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoneking, J.; Casstevens, J.; Stillman, D.

    1982-12-01

    This paper presents experimental and analytical results from a study investigating the effect of centrifugal force and gravity on two candidate mirror fixture designs to be used on a diamond-turning ma-chine. The authors illustrate and discuss the use of the finite element method as an aid in the design and fabrication of high precision metallic optical components.

  15. A finite element approach for prediction of aerothermal loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Dechaumphai, P.; Vemaganti, G.

    1986-01-01

    A Taylor-Galerkin finite element approach is presented for analysis of high speed viscous flows with an emphasis on predicting heating rates. Five computational issues relevant to the computation of steady flows are examined. Numerical results for supersonic and hypersonic problems address the computational issues and demonstrate the validity for the approach for analysis of high speed flows.

  16. A three-dimensional hybrid finite element/spectral analysis of noise radiation from turbofan inlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duta, M. C.; Giles, M. B.

    2006-09-01

    This paper describes a new three-dimensional (3D) analysis of tonal noise radiated from non-axisymmetric turbofan inlets. The novelty of the method is in combining a standard finite element discretisation of the acoustic field in the axial and radial coordinates with a Fourier spectral representation in the circumferential direction. The boundary conditions at the farfield, fan face and acoustic liners are treated using the same spectral representation. The resulting set of discrete acoustic equations are solved employing the well-established BICGSTAB or QMR iterative algorithms and a very effective specialised preconditioner based on the axisymmetric mean geometry and flow field. Numerical examples demonstrate the suitability of the new method to engine configurations with realistic 3D features, such as relatively large degrees of asymmetry and spliced acoustic liners. The examples also illustrate the two advantages of the new method over a traditional 3D finite element approach. The new method requires a significantly smaller number of unknowns as relatively few circumferential Fourier modes in the spectral solution ensure an accurate field representation. Also, due to the effective preconditioner, the spectral linear solver benefits from stable iterations at a high rate of convergence.

  17. Finite element, stream function-vorticity solution of steady laminar natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, W. N. R.

    1982-12-01

    Stream function-vorticity finite element solution of two-dimensional incompressible viscous flow and natural convection is considered. Steady state solutions of the natural convection problem have been obtained for a wide range of the two independent parameters. Use of boundary vorticity formulae or iterative satisfaction of the no-slip boundary condition is avoided by application of the finite element discretization and a displacement of the appropriate discrete equations. Solution is obtained by Newton-Raphson iteration of all equations simultaneously. The method then appears to give a steady solution whenever the flow is physically steady, but it does not give a steady solution when the flow is physically unsteady. In particular, no form of asymmetric differencing is required. The method offers a degree of economy over primitive variable formulations. Physical results are given for the square cavity convection problem. The paper also reports on earlier work in which the most commonly used boundary vorticity formula was found not to satisfy the no-slip condition, and in which segregated solution procedures were attempted with very minimal success.

  18. A 2-D Interface Element for Coupled Analysis of Independently Modeled 3-D Finite Element Subdomains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.

    1998-01-01

    Over the past few years, the development of the interface technology has provided an analysis framework for embedding detailed finite element models within finite element models which are less refined. This development has enabled the use of cascading substructure domains without the constraint of coincident nodes along substructure boundaries. The approach used for the interface element is based on an alternate variational principle often used in deriving hybrid finite elements. The resulting system of equations exhibits a high degree of sparsity but gives rise to a non-positive definite system which causes difficulties with many of the equation solvers in general-purpose finite element codes. Hence the global system of equations is generally solved using, a decomposition procedure with pivoting. The research reported to-date for the interface element includes the one-dimensional line interface element and two-dimensional surface interface element. Several large-scale simulations, including geometrically nonlinear problems, have been reported using the one-dimensional interface element technology; however, only limited applications are available for the surface interface element. In the applications reported to-date, the geometry of the interfaced domains exactly match each other even though the spatial discretization within each domain may be different. As such, the spatial modeling of each domain, the interface elements and the assembled system is still laborious. The present research is focused on developing a rapid modeling procedure based on a parametric interface representation of independently defined subdomains which are also independently discretized.

  19. Advance finite element modeling of rotor blade aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straub, F. K.; Sangha, K. B.; Panda, B.

    1994-01-01

    An advanced beam finite element has been developed for modeling rotor blade dynamics and aeroelasticity. This element is part of the Element Library of the Second Generation Comprehensive Helicopter Analysis System (2GCHAS). The element allows modeling of arbitrary rotor systems, including bearingless rotors. It accounts for moderately large elastic deflections, anisotropic properties, large frame motion for maneuver simulation, and allows for variable order shape functions. The effects of gravity, mechanically applied and aerodynamic loads are included. All kinematic quantities required to compute airloads are provided. In this paper, the fundamental assumptions and derivation of the element matrices are presented. Numerical results are shown to verify the formulation and illustrate several features of the element.

  20. High-order Finite Element Analysis of Boundary Layer Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Alvin; Sahni, Onkar

    2014-11-01

    Numerical analysis of boundary layer flows requires careful approximations, specifically the use of a mesh with layered and graded elements near the (viscous) walls. This is referred to as a boundary layer mesh, which for complex geometries is composed of triangular elements on the walls that are inflated or extruded into the volume along the wall-normal direction up to a desired height while the rest of the domain is filled with unstructured tetrahedral elements. Linear elements with C0 inter-element continuity are employed and in some situations higher order C0 elements are also used. However, these elements only enforce continuity whereas high-order smoothness is not attained as will be the case with C1 inter-element continuity and higher. As a result, C0 elements result in a poor approximation of the high-order boundary layer behavior. To achieve greater inter-element continuity in boundary layer region, we employ B-spline basis functions along the wall-normal direction (i.e., only in the layered portion of the mesh). In the rest of the fully unstructured mesh, linear or higher order C0 elements are used as appropriate. In this study we demonstrate the benefits of finite-element analysis based on such higher order and continuity basis functions for boundary layer flows.

  1. Discontinuous dual-primal mixed finite elements for elliptic problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bottasso, Carlo L.; Micheletti, Stefano; Sacco, Riccardo

    2000-01-01

    We propose a novel discontinuous mixed finite element formulation for the solution of second-order elliptic problems. Fully discontinuous piecewise polynomial finite element spaces are used for the trial and test functions. The discontinuous nature of the test functions at the element interfaces allows to introduce new boundary unknowns that, on the one hand enforce the weak continuity of the trial functions, and on the other avoid the need to define a priori algorithmic fluxes as in standard discontinuous Galerkin methods. Static condensation is performed at the element level, leading to a solution procedure based on the sole interface unknowns. The resulting family of discontinuous dual-primal mixed finite element methods is presented in the one and two-dimensional cases. In the one-dimensional case, we show the equivalence of the method with implicit Runge-Kutta schemes of the collocation type exhibiting optimal behavior. Numerical experiments in one and two dimensions demonstrate the order accuracy of the new method, confirming the results of the analysis.

  2. Finite Element Modeling of the NASA Langley Aluminum Testbed Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Pritchard, Joselyn I.; Buehrle, Ralph D.; Pappa, Richard S.

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Langley Aluminum Testbed Cylinder (ATC) was designed to serve as a universal structure for evaluating structural acoustic codes, modeling techniques and optimization methods used in the prediction of aircraft interior noise. Finite element models were developed for the components of the ATC based on the geometric, structural and material properties of the physical test structure. Numerically predicted modal frequencies for the longitudinal stringer, ring frame and dome component models, and six assembled ATC configurations were compared with experimental modal survey data. The finite element models were updated and refined, using physical parameters, to increase correlation with the measured modal data. Excellent agreement, within an average 1.5% to 2.9%, was obtained between the predicted and measured modal frequencies of the stringer, frame and dome components. The predictions for the modal frequencies of the assembled component Configurations I through V were within an average 2.9% and 9.1%. Finite element modal analyses were performed for comparison with 3 psi and 6 psi internal pressurization conditions in Configuration VI. The modal frequencies were predicted by applying differential stiffness to the elements with pressure loading and creating reduced matrices for beam elements with offsets inside external superelements. The average disagreement between the measured and predicted differences for the 0 psi and 6 psi internal pressure conditions was less than 0.5%. Comparably good agreement was obtained for the differences between the 0 psi and 3 psi measured and predicted internal pressure conditions.

  3. Finite element dynamic analysis on CDC STAR-100 computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Lambiotte, J. J., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Computational algorithms are presented for the finite element dynamic analysis of structures on the CDC STAR-100 computer. The spatial behavior is described using higher-order finite elements. The temporal behavior is approximated by using either the central difference explicit scheme or Newmark's implicit scheme. In each case the analysis is broken up into a number of basic macro-operations. Discussion is focused on the organization of the computation and the mode of storage of different arrays to take advantage of the STAR pipeline capability. The potential of the proposed algorithms is discussed and CPU times are given for performing the different macro-operations for a shell modeled by higher order composite shallow shell elements having 80 degrees of freedom.

  4. PWSCC Assessment by Using Extended Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung-Jun; Lee, Sang-Hwan; Chang, Yoon-Suk

    2015-12-01

    The head penetration nozzle of control rod driving mechanism (CRDM) is known to be susceptible to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) due to the welding-induced residual stress. Especially, the J-groove dissimilar metal weld regions have received many attentions in the previous studies. However, even though several advanced techniques such as weight function and finite element alternating methods have been introduced to predict the occurrence of PWSCC, there are still difficulties in respect of applicability and efficiency. In this study, the extended finite element method (XFEM), which allows convenient crack element modeling by enriching degree of freedom (DOF) with special displacement function, was employed to evaluate structural integrity of the CRDM head penetration nozzle. The resulting stress intensity factors of surface cracks were verified for the reliability of proposed method through the comparison with those suggested in the American Society of Mechanical Engineering (ASME) code. The detailed results from the FE analyses are fully discussed in the manuscript.

  5. Finite Element Modelling of Fluid Coupling in the Coiled Cochlea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Guangjian; Elliott, S. J.; Lineton, B.; Saba, R.

    2011-11-01

    A finite element model is first used to calculate the modal pressure difference for a box model of the cochlea, which shows that the number of fluid elements across the width of the cochlea determines the accuracy with which the near field, or short wavenumber, component of the fluid coupling is reproduced. Then results are compared with the analytic results to validate the accuracy of the FE model. It is, however, the far field, or long wavelength, component of the fluid coupling that is most affected by the geometry. A finite element model of the coiled cochlea is then used to calculate fluid coupling in this case, which has similar characteristics to the uncoiled model.

  6. EXODUS: A finite element file format for pre- and postprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Mills-Curran, W.C.; Gilkey, A.P.; Flanagan, D.P.

    1988-09-01

    The EXODUS format defines a binary file which is used for finite element analysis pre- and postprocessing. It includes data to define the finite element mesh and label both boundary condition and load application points. EXODUS accommodates multiple element types and is sufficiently general format for analysis results. A benefit of combining the mesh definition data and the results data in the same file is that the user is assured that the results data are consistent with the model. EXODUS is currently in use by the entire range of Department 1520 codes (including preprocessors, translators, linear and nonlinear analyses, and postprocessors) and is finding applications in codes outside Department 1520. 2 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Calculation of compressible boundary layer flow about airfoils by a finite element/finite difference method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, Stuart L.; Meade, Andrew J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented of a finite element/finite difference method (semidiscrete Galerkin method) used to calculate compressible boundary layer flow about airfoils, in which the group finite element scheme is applied to the Dorodnitsyn formulation of the boundary layer equations. The semidiscrete Galerkin (SDG) method promises to be fast, accurate and computationally efficient. The SDG method can also be applied to any smoothly connected airfoil shape without modification and possesses the potential capability of calculating boundary layer solutions beyond flow separation. Results are presented for low speed laminar flow past a circular cylinder and past a NACA 0012 airfoil at zero angle of attack at a Mach number of 0.5. Also shown are results for compressible flow past a flat plate for a Mach number range of 0 to 10 and results for incompressible turbulent flow past a flat plate. All numerical solutions assume an attached boundary layer.

  8. Finite element analysis of inviscid subsonic boattail flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, R. V.; Gerhart, P. M.

    1981-01-01

    A finite element code for analysis of inviscid subsonic flows over arbitrary nonlifting planar or axisymmetric bodies is described. The code solves a novel primitive variable formulation of the coupled irrotationality and compressible continuity equations. Results for flow over a cylinder, a sphere, and a NACA 0012 airfoil verify the code. Computed subcritical flows over an axisymmetric boattailed afterbody compare well with finite difference results and experimental data. Interative coupling with an integral turbulent boundary layer code shows strong viscous effects on the inviscid flow. Improvements in code efficiency and extensions to transonic flows are discussed.

  9. Hierarchicalp-version finite elements for radiation heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Dana Craig

    Methods to compute surface-to-surface radiation heat transfer between diffuse-gray surfaces using hierarchical p-version finite elements have been developed and applied to the analysis of a high-speed aircraft wing. A review of traditional methods for surface-to-surface radiation exchange is given. Traditional methods rely on the assumption of isothermal surfaces with incoming and outgoing radiation heat flux assumed constant over the surface. These assumptions are not appropriate for p-version finite elements, so new methods for evaluating the incoming and outgoing radiation flux over a finite element surface were required. Two methods for computing the surface-to-surface radiation heat transfer that do not rely on the above assumptions are developed and validated. The first approach uses traditional methods to compute the radiation exchange on an element sub-mesh, then transfers this data back to the parent element for the computation of the radiation heat flux. The second method requires the numerical integration of the net radiation exchange equation for each element. The methods are validated and evaluated using simple problems with analytical solutions. The radiation sub-element method is less costly than the direct integration method, but it is also less accurate. Both methods are computationally more expensive than traditional methods for a given number of degrees of freedom; however, for a given accuracy, they are less expensive. The new methods are used to analyze the wing of a High Speed Civil Transport vehicle. The p-elements were effective in capturing significant temperature variations over large sections of the wing and reduced the mesh complexity and associated modeling time while maintaining accuracy.

  10. Stabilized tetrahedral elements for crystal plasticity finite element analysis overcoming volumetric locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jiahao; Shahba, Ahmad; Ghosh, Somnath

    2016-05-01

    Image-based CPFE modeling involves computer generation of virtual polycrystalline microstructures from experimental data, followed by discretization into finite element meshes. Discretization is commonly accomplished using three-dimensional four-node tetrahedral or TET4 elements, which conform to the complex geometries. It has been commonly observed that TET4 elements suffer from severe volumetric locking when simulating deformation of incompressible or nearly incompressible materials. This paper develops and examines three locking-free stabilized finite element formulations in the context of crystal plasticity finite element analysis. They include a node-based uniform strain (NUS) element, a locally integrated B-bar (LIB) based element and a F-bar patch (FP) based element. All three formulations are based on the partitioning of TET4 element meshes and integrating over patches to obtain favorable incompressibility constraint ratios without adding large degrees of freedom. The results show that NUS formulation introduces unstable spurious energy modes, while the LIB and FP elements stabilize the solutions and are preferred for reliable CPFE analysis. The FP element is found to be computationally efficient over the LIB element.

  11. Finite element evaluation of erosion/corrosion affected reducing elbow

    SciTech Connect

    Basavaraju, C.

    1996-12-01

    Erosion/corrosion is a primary source for wall thinning or degradation of carbon steel piping systems in service. A number of piping failures in the power industry have been attributed to erosion/corrosion. Piping elbow is one of such susceptible components for erosion/corrosion because of increased flow turbulence due to its geometry. In this paper, the acceptability of a 12 in. x 8 in. reducing elbow in RHR service water pump discharge piping, which experienced significant degradation due to wall thinning in localized areas, was evaluated using finite element analysis methodology. Since the simplified methods showed very small margin and recommended replacement of the elbow, a detailed 3-D finite element model was built using shell elements and analyzed for internal pressure and moment loadings. The finite element analysis incorporated the U.T. measured wall thickness data at various spots that experienced wall thinning. The results showed that the elbow is acceptable as-is until the next fuel cycle. FEA, though cumbersome, and time consuming is a valuable analytical tool in making critical decisions with regard to component replacement of border line situation cases, eliminating some conservatism while not compromising the safety.

  12. Modeling and analysis of the space shuttle nose-gear tire with semianalytic finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Kyun O.; Noor, Ahmed K.; Tanner, John A.

    1990-01-01

    A computational procedure is presented for the geometrically nonlinear analysis of aircraft tires. The Space Shuttle Orbiter nose gear tire was modeled by using a two-dimensional laminated anisotropic shell theory with the effects of variation in material and geometric parameters included. The four key elements of the procedure are: (1) semianalytic finite elements in which the shell variables are represented by Fourier series in the circumferential direction and piecewise polynominals in the meridional direction; (2) a mixed formulation with the fundamental unknowns consisting of strain parameters, stress-resultant parameters, and generalized displacements; (3) multilevel operator splitting to effect successive simplifications, and to uncouple the equations associated with different Fourier harmonics; and (4) multilevel iterative procedures and reduction techniques to generate the response of the shell. Numerical results of the Space Shuttle Orbiter nose gear tire model are compared with experimental measurements of the tire subjected to inflation loading.

  13. Partitioning strategy for efficient nonlinear finite element dynamic analysis on multiprocessor computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    1989-01-01

    A computational procedure is presented for the nonlinear dynamic analysis of unsymmetric structures on vector multiprocessor systems. The procedure is based on a novel hierarchical partitioning strategy in which the response of the unsymmetric and antisymmetric response vectors (modes), each obtained by using only a fraction of the degrees of freedom of the original finite element model. The three key elements of the procedure which result in high degree of concurrency throughout the solution process are: (1) mixed (or primitive variable) formulation with independent shape functions for the different fields; (2) operator splitting or restructuring of the discrete equations at each time step to delineate the symmetric and antisymmetric vectors constituting the response; and (3) two level iterative process for generating the response of the structure. An assessment is made of the effectiveness of the procedure on the CRAY X-MP/4 computers.

  14. FECAP - FINITE ELEMENT COMPOSITE ANALYSIS PROGRAM FOR A MICROCOMPUTER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    Advanced composite materials have gained use in the aerospace industry over the last 20 years because of their high specific strength and stiffness, and low coefficient of thermal expansion. Design of composite structures requires the analysis of composite material behavior. The Finite Element Composite Analysis Program, FECAP, is a special purpose finite element analysis program for analyzing composite material behavior with a microcomputer. Composite materials, in regard to this program, are defined as the combination of at least two distinct materials to form one nonhomogeneous anisotropic material. FECAP assumes a state of generalized plane strain exists in a material consisting of two or more orthotropic phases, subjected to mechanical and/or thermal loading. The finite element formulation used in FECAP is displacement based and requires the minimization of the total potential energy for each element with respect to the unknown variables. This procedure leads to a set of linear simultaneous equations relating the unknown nodal displacements to the applied loads. The equations for each element are assembled into a global system, the boundary conditions are applied, and the system is solved for the nodal displacements. The analysis may be performed using either 4-mode linear or 8-mode quadratic isoparametric elements. Output includes the nodal displacements, and the element stresses and strains. FECAP was written for a Hewlett Packard HP9000 Series 200 Microcomputer with the HP Basic operating system. It was written in HP BASIC 3.0 and requires approximately 0.5 Mbytes of RAM in addition to what is required for the operating system. A math coprocessor card is highly recommended. FECAP was developed in 1988.

  15. Finite element structural redesign by large admissible perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernitsas, Michael M.; Beyko, E.; Rim, C. W.; Alzahabi, B.

    1991-01-01

    In structural redesign, two structural states are involved; the baseline (known) State S1 with unacceptable performance, and the objective (unknown) State S2 with given performance specifications. The difference between the two states in performance and design variables may be as high as 100 percent or more depending on the scale of the structure. A Perturbation Approach to Redesign (PAR) is presented to relate any two structural states S1 and S2 that are modeled by the same finite element model and represented by different values of the design variables. General perturbation equations are derived expressing implicitly the natural frequencies, dynamic modes, static deflections, static stresses, Euler buckling loads, and buckling modes of the objective S2 in terms of its performance specifications, and S1 data and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) results. Large Admissible Perturbation (LEAP) algorithms are implemented in code RESTRUCT to define the objective S2 incrementally without trial and error by postprocessing FEA results of S1 with no additional FEAs. Systematic numerical applications in redesign of a 10 element 48 degree of freedom (dof) beam, a 104 element 192 dof offshore tower, a 64 element 216 dof plate, and a 144 element 896 dof cylindrical shell show the accuracy, efficiency, and potential of PAR to find an objective state that may differ 100 percent from the baseline design.

  16. An Overview of the Object-Oriented Iterative Model for the Analytic Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, J. R.; Jankovic, I.

    2002-05-01

    The Analytic Element Method (AEM) models groundwater flow via the superposition of analytic functions ("elements") which represent hydrologic features. Conventionally, the method has utilized explicit methods for solving for unknown coefficients. Purely explicit methods are traditionally characterized by fully populated matrices, strict adherence to linear boundary conditions, and highly coupled relationships between all of the elements in the system. The development of iterative solution methods for AEM in the last few years, demonstrated by the public domain code SPLIT, has resolved some of the dependence upon fully linear systems of equations. At the same time, it has been able to introduce implementations of higher-order representations and high-speed solution algorithms for extremely large-scale systems. AEM as a whole suggests fruitful application of object-orientation constructs such as inheritance and data encapsulation. In an iterative method, elements may individually solve for themselves and have minimal coupling with other elements, further lending credence to an object-oriented representation. The tradeoff is that the implementation of iterative methods requires more sophisticated comprehension of the convergence behavior of systems. The development of a fully object-oriented program, BlueBird, has exploited the high modularity of the iterative model. The developers have had to consider how to generalize rules for systems with complex convergence behavior. Likewise, new techniques have been developed which take advantage of both the iterative framework and object organization. Such techniques are based upon extensive discussion within the AEM community of object orientation and organizational opportunity associated with a purely iterative model.

  17. Structural health monitoring system design using finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stinemates, D. W.; Bennett, J. G.

    2002-01-01

    The project described in this report was performed to couple experimental and analytical techniques in the field of structural health monitoring and damage identification. To do this, a finite element model was constructed of a simulated three-story building used for damage identification experiments. The model was used in conjunction with data from the physical structure to research damage identification algorithms. Of particular interest was modeling slip in joints as a function of bolt torque and predicting the smallest change of torque that could be detected experimentally. After being validated with results from the physical structure, the model was used to produce data to test the capabilities of damage identification algorithms. This report describes the finite element model constructed, the results obtained, and proposed future use of the model.

  18. A fast hidden line algorithm for plotting finite element models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, G. K.

    1982-01-01

    Effective plotting of finite element models requires the use of fast hidden line plot techniques that provide interactive response. A high speed hidden line technique was developed to facilitate the plotting of NASTRAN finite element models. Based on testing using 14 different models, the new hidden line algorithm (JONES-D) appears to be very fast: its speed equals that for normal (all lines visible) plotting and when compared to other existing methods it appears to be substantially faster. It also appears to be very reliable: no plot errors were observed using the new method to plot NASTRAN models. The new algorithm was made part of the NPLOT NASTRAN plot package and was used by structural analysts for normal production tasks.

  19. Finite element thermo-viscoplastic analysis of aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, Ajay K.; Dechaumphai, Pramote; Thornton, Earl A.

    1990-01-01

    The time-dependent thermo-viscoplastic response of aerospace structures subjected to intense aerothermal loads is predicted using the finite-element method. The finite-element analysis uses the Bodner-Partom unified viscoplastic constitutive relations to determine rate-dependent nonlinear material behavior. The methodology is verified by comparison with experimental data and other numerical results for a uniaxially-loaded bar. The method is then used (1) to predict the structural response of a rectangular plate subjected to line heating along a centerline, and (2) to predict the thermal-structural response of a convectively-cooled engine cowl leading edge subjected to aerodynamic shock-shock interference heating. Compared to linear elastic analysis, the viscoplastic analysis results in lower peak stresses and regions of plastic deformations.

  20. Finite element model of magnetoconvection of a ferrofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Suzanne M.; Cader, Tahir; Finlayson, Bruce A.

    2003-06-01

    Combined natural and magnetic convective heat transfer through a ferrofluid in a cubic enclosure is simulated numerically. The momentum equation includes a magnetic term that arises when a magnetic fluid is in the presence of a magnetic field gradient and a temperature gradient. In order to validate the theory, the wall temperature isotherms and Nusselt numbers are compared to experimental work of Sawada et al. (Int. J. Appl. Electromagn. Mater. 4 (1994) 329). Results are obtained using standard computational fluid dynamics codes, with modifications to account for the Langevin factor when needed. The CFD code FIDAP uses the finite element method, sometimes with a user-defined subroutine. The CFD code FEMLAB uses the finite element method with a user-supplied body force.

  1. Parallel, adaptive finite element methods for conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Devine, Karen D.; Flaherty, Joseph E.

    1994-01-01

    We construct parallel finite element methods for the solution of hyperbolic conservation laws in one and two dimensions. Spatial discretization is performed by a discontinuous Galerkin finite element method using a basis of piecewise Legendre polynomials. Temporal discretization utilizes a Runge-Kutta method. Dissipative fluxes and projection limiting prevent oscillations near solution discontinuities. A posteriori estimates of spatial errors are obtained by a p-refinement technique using superconvergence at Radau points. The resulting method is of high order and may be parallelized efficiently on MIMD computers. We compare results using different limiting schemes and demonstrate parallel efficiency through computations on an NCUBE/2 hypercube. We also present results using adaptive h- and p-refinement to reduce the computational cost of the method.

  2. Weak Hamiltonian finite element method for optimal control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Dewey H.; Bless, Robert R.

    1991-01-01

    A temporal finite element method based on a mixed form of the Hamiltonian weak principle is developed for dynamics and optimal control problems. The mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle contains both displacements and momenta as primary variables that are expanded in terms of nodal values and simple polynomial shape functions. Unlike other forms of Hamilton's principle, however, time derivatives of the momenta and displacements do not appear therein; instead, only the virtual momenta and virtual displacements are differentiated with respect to time. Based on the duality that is observed to exist between the mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle and variational principles governing classical optimal control problems, a temporal finite element formulation of the latter can be developed in a rather straightforward manner. Several well-known problems in dynamics and optimal control are illustrated. The example dynamics problem involves a time-marching problem. As optimal control examples, elementary trajectory optimization problems are treated.

  3. A weak Hamiltonian finite element method for optimal control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Dewey H.; Bless, Robert R.

    1990-01-01

    A temporal finite element method based on a mixed form of the Hamiltonian weak principle is developed for dynamics and optimal control problems. The mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle contains both displacements and momenta as primary variables that are expanded in terms of nodal values and simple polynomial shape functions. Unlike other forms of Hamilton's principle, however, time derivatives of the momenta and displacements do not appear therein; instead, only the virtual momenta and virtual displacements are differentiated with respect to time. Based on the duality that is observed to exist between the mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle and variational principles governing classical optimal control problems, a temporal finite element formulation of the latter can be developed in a rather straightforward manner. Several well-known problems in dynamics and optimal control are illustrated. The example dynamics problem involves a time-marching problem. As optimal control examples, elementary trajectory optimization problems are treated.

  4. A weak Hamiltonian finite element method for optimal control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Dewey H.; Bless, Robert R.

    1989-01-01

    A temporal finite element method based on a mixed form of the Hamiltonian weak principle is developed for dynamics and optimal control problems. The mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle contains both displacements and momenta as primary variables that are expanded in terms of nodal values and simple polynomial shape functions. Unlike other forms of Hamilton's principle, however, time derivatives of the momenta and displacements do not appear therein; instead, only the virtual momenta and virtual displacements are differentiated with respect to time. Based on the duality that is observed to exist between the mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle and variational principles governing classical optimal control problems, a temporal finite element formulation of the latter can be developed in a rather straightforward manner. Several well-known problems in dynamics and optimal control are illustrated. The example dynamics problem involves a time-marching problem. As optimal control examples, elementary trajectory optimization problems are treated.

  5. Finite element solution of transient fluid-structure interaction problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everstine, Gordon C.; Cheng, Raymond S.; Hambric, Stephen A.

    1991-01-01

    A finite element approach using NASTRAN is developed for solving time-dependent fluid-structure interaction problems, with emphasis on the transient scattering of acoustic waves from submerged elastic structures. Finite elements are used for modeling both structure and fluid domains to facilitate the graphical display of the wave motion through both media. For the liquid, the use of velocity potential as the fundamental unknown results in a symmetric matrix equation. The approach is illustrated for the problem of transient scattering from a submerged elastic spherical shell subjected to an incident tone burst. The use of an analogy between the equations of elasticity and the wave equation of acoustics, a necessary ingredient to the procedure, is summarized.

  6. Sensitive analysis of a finite element model of orthogonal cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocail, J.; Watremez, M.; Dubar, L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional finite element model of orthogonal cutting. The proposed model has been developed with Abaqus/explicit software. An Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) formulation is used to predict chip formation, temperature, chip-tool contact length, chip thickness, and cutting forces. This numerical model of orthogonal cutting will be validated by comparing these process variables to experimental and numerical results obtained by Filice et al. [1]. This model can be considered to be reliable enough to make qualitative analysis of entry parameters related to cutting process and frictional models. A sensitivity analysis is conducted on the main entry parameters (coefficients of the Johnson-Cook law, and contact parameters) with the finite element model. This analysis is performed with two levels for each factor. The sensitivity analysis realised with the numerical model on the entry parameters has allowed the identification of significant parameters and the margin identification of parameters.

  7. A finite element model of ferroelectric/ferroelastic polycrystals

    SciTech Connect

    HWANG,STEPHEN C.; MCMEEKING,ROBERT M.

    2000-02-17

    A finite element model of polarization switching in a polycrystalline ferroelectric/ferroelastic ceramic is developed. It is assumed that a crystallite switches if the reduction in potential energy of the polycrystal exceeds a critical energy barrier per unit volume of switching material. Each crystallite is represented by a finite element with the possible dipole directions assigned randomly subject to crystallographic constraints. The model accounts for both electric field induced (i.e. ferroelectric) switching and stress induced (i.e. ferroelastic) switching with piezoelectric interactions. Experimentally measured elastic, dielectric, and piezoelectric constants are used consistently, but different effective critical energy barriers are selected phenomenologically. Electric displacement versus electric field, strain versus electric field, stress versus strain, and stress versus electric displacement loops of a ceramic lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) are modeled well below the Curie temperature.

  8. Finite element modelling of the 1969 Portuguese tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guesmia, M.; Heinrich, Ph.; Mariotti, C.

    1996-03-01

    On the 28 th February 1969, the coasts of Portugal, Spain and Morocco were affected by water waves generated by a submarine earthquake (Ms=7.3) with epicenter located off Portugal. The propagation of this tsunami has been simulated by a finite element numerical model solving the Boussinesq equations. These equations have been discretized using the finite element Galerkin method and a Crank-Nicholson scheme in time. The 2-D simulation of the 1969 tsunami is carried out using the hydraulic source calculated from the geophysical model of Okada and seismic parameters of Fukao. The modeled waves are compared with the recorded waves with respect to the travel times, the maximum amplitudes, the periods of the signal. Good agreement is found for most of the studied gauges. The comparison between Boussinesq and shallow-water models shows that the effects of frequency dispersion are minor using Fukao's seismic parameters.

  9. Finite element calculation of residual stress in dental restorative material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassia, Luigi; D'Amore, Alberto

    2012-07-01

    A finite element methodology for residual stresses calculation in dental restorative materials is proposed. The material under concern is a multifunctional methacrylate-based composite for dental restorations, activated by visible light. Reaction kinetics, curing shrinkage, and viscoelastic relaxation functions were required as input data on a structural finite element solver. Post cure effects were considered in order to quantify the residual stresses coming out from natural contraction with respect to those debited to the chemical shrinkage. The analysis showed for a given test case that residual stresses frozen in the dental restoration at uniform temperature of 37°C are of the same order of magnitude of the strength of the dental composite material per se.

  10. Exemplifying Quantum Systems in a Finite Element Basis

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Toby D.

    2009-08-13

    This paper presents a description of the abstractions required for the expression and solution of the linear single-particle Schroedinger equation in a finite element basis. This paper consists of two disparate themes: First, to layout and establish the foundations of finite element analysis as an approximate numerical solution to extendable quantum mechanical systems; and second, to promote a high-performance open-source computational model for the approximate numerical solution to quantum mechanical systems. The structural foundation of the one-and two-dimensional time-independent Schroedinger equation describing an infinite potential well is explored and a brief overview of the hierarchal design of the computational library written in C++ is given.

  11. An emulator for minimizing computer resources for finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melosh, R.; Utku, S.; Islam, M.; Salama, M.

    1984-01-01

    A computer code, SCOPE, has been developed for predicting the computer resources required for a given analysis code, computer hardware, and structural problem. The cost of running the code is a small fraction (about 3 percent) of the cost of performing the actual analysis. However, its accuracy in predicting the CPU and I/O resources depends intrinsically on the accuracy of calibration data that must be developed once for the computer hardware and the finite element analysis code of interest. Testing of the SCOPE code on the AMDAHL 470 V/8 computer and the ELAS finite element analysis program indicated small I/O errors (3.2 percent), larger CPU errors (17.8 percent), and negligible total errors (1.5 percent).

  12. An emulator for minimizing finite element analysis implementation resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melosh, R. J.; Utku, S.; Salama, M.; Islam, M.

    1982-01-01

    A finite element analysis emulator providing a basis for efficiently establishing an optimum computer implementation strategy when many calculations are involved is described. The SCOPE emulator determines computer resources required as a function of the structural model, structural load-deflection equation characteristics, the storage allocation plan, and computer hardware capabilities. Thereby, it provides data for trading analysis implementation options to arrive at a best strategy. The models contained in SCOPE lead to micro-operation computer counts of each finite element operation as well as overall computer resource cost estimates. Application of SCOPE to the Memphis-Arkansas bridge analysis provides measures of the accuracy of resource assessments. Data indicate that predictions are within 17.3 percent for calculation times and within 3.2 percent for peripheral storage resources for the ELAS code.

  13. A finite element analysis of fatigue crack closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Experiments have shown that fatigue cracks close at positive loads during constant-amplitude load cycling. The crack-closure phenomenon is caused by residual plastic deformations remaining in the wake of an advancing crack tip. The present paper is concerned with the application of a two-dimensional, nonlinear, finite-element analysis for predicting crack-closure and crack-opening stresses during cyclic loading. A two-dimensional finite-element computer program, which accounts for both elastic-plastic material behavior and changing boundary conditions associated with crack extension and intermittent contact of the crack surfaces under cyclic loading, has been developed. An efficient technique to account for changing boundary conditions was also incorporated into the nonlinear analysis program. This program was subsequently used to study crack extension and crack closure under constant-amplitude and two-level block loading. The calculated crack-closure and crack-opening stresses were qualitatively consistent with experimental observations.

  14. Finite element analyses of two antirotational designs of implant fixtures.

    PubMed

    Akour, Salih N; Fayyad, Mohammed A; Nayfeh, Jamal F

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of cyclic compressive forces on loosening of the abutment retaining screw of dental implant fixtures with two different antirotational designs using the finite element analysis. A three-dimensional model of externally hexed and trichannel dental implant fixtures with their corresponding abutments and retaining screws was developed. Comparison between the two designs was carried out using finite element analysis. The results revealed that the externally hexed design has significantly higher overall stress, contact stress, and deflection compared with the trichannel design. The trichannel antirotational design has the least potential for fracture of the implant/abutment assembly in addition to its capability for preventing rotation of the prosthesis and loosening of the screw.

  15. Finite Element Analysis Applied to Dentoalveolar Trauma: Methodology Description

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, B. R.; Moreira Neto, J. J. S.; da Silva, F. I.; de Aguiar, A. S. W.

    2011-01-01

    Dentoalveolar traumatic injuries are among the clinical conditions most frequently treated in dental practice. However, few studies so far have addressed the biomechanical aspects of these events, probably as a result of difficulties in carrying out satisfactory experimental and clinical studies as well as the unavailability of truly scientific methodologies. The aim of this paper was to describe the use of finite element analysis applied to the biomechanical evaluation of dentoalveolar trauma. For didactic purposes, the methodological process was divided into steps that go from the creation of a geometric model to the evaluation of final results, always with a focus on methodological characteristics, advantages, and disadvantages, so as to allow the reader to customize the methodology according to specific needs. Our description shows that the finite element method can faithfully reproduce dentoalveolar trauma, provided the methodology is closely followed and thoroughly evaluated. PMID:21991463

  16. A finite element model for residual stress in repair welds

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Z.; Wang, X.L.; Spooner, S.; Goodwin, G.M.; Maziasz, P.J.; Hubbard, C.R.; Zacharia, T.

    1996-03-28

    This paper describes a three-dimensional finite element model for calculation of the residual stress distribution caused by repair welding. Special user subroutines were developed to simulate the continuous deposition of filler metal during welding. The model was then tested by simulating the residual stress/strain field of a FeAl weld overlay clad on a 2{1/4}Cr-1 Mo steel plate, for which neutron diffraction measurement data of the residual strain field were available. It is shown that the calculated residual stress distribution was consistent with that determined with neutron diffraction. High tensile residual stresses in both the longitudinal and transverse directions were observed around the weld toe at the end of the weld. The strong spatial dependency of the residual stresses in the region around the weld demonstrates that the common two-dimensional cross-section finite element models should not be used for repair welding analysis.

  17. Tube Bulge Process : Theoretical Analysis And Finite Element Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Velasco, Raphaeel; Boudeau, Nathalie

    2007-04-07

    This paper is focused on the determination of mechanics characteristics for tubular materials, using tube bulge process. A comparative study is made between two different models: theoretical model and finite element analysis. The theoretical model is completely developed, based first on a geometrical analysis of the tube profile during bulging, which is assumed to strain in arc of circles. Strain and stress analysis complete the theoretical model, which allows to evaluate tube thickness and state of stress, at any point of the free bulge region. Free bulging of a 304L stainless steel is simulated using Ls-Dyna 970. To validate FE simulations approach, a comparison between theoretical and finite elements models is led on several parameters such as: thickness variation at the free bulge region pole with bulge height, tube thickness variation with z axial coordinate, and von Mises stress variation with plastic strain.

  18. Finite element modeling of an electrically variable inductor

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, Y.; Jiles, D.C.

    1999-09-01

    A new type of electrically variable inductor has been investigated. This uses an ac excitation field with an orthogonal dc bias field to control the properties of the device. Measurements showed that the effective inductance can be decreased by increasing the orthogonal dc bias field. With an appropriate current in the orthogonal bias coils, an inductance plateau can be reached in which the inductance remains stable over a range of excitation currents. The inductance value can be adjusted by controlling the orthogonal current. Based on an existing anhysteretic magnetization model, nonlinear 3D finite element modeling was successfully used to model the distribution of flux density and to identify the region of saturation which is believed to result in the decrease in effective inductance of the inductor. The effective inductance of the device was also modeled using numerical finite element calculations. The modeled inductance showed broad agreement with experimental results and predicted the observed trend in inductance.

  19. Finite Element Modeling of Micromachined MEMS Photon Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Datskos, P.G.; Evans, B.M.; Schonberger, D.

    1999-09-20

    The technology of microelectronics that has evolved over the past half century is one of great power and sophistication and can now be extended to many applications (MEMS and MOEMS) other than electronics. An interesting application of MEMS quantum devices is the detection of electromagnetic radiation. The operation principle of MEMS quantum devices is based on the photoinduced stress in semiconductors, and the photon detection results from the measurement of the photoinduced bending. These devices can be described as micromechanical photon detectors. In this work, we have developed a technique for simulating electronic stresses using finite element analysis. We have used our technique to model the response of micromechanical photon devices to external stimuli and compared these results with experimental data. Material properties, geometry, and bimaterial design play an important role in the performance of micromechanical photon detectors. We have modeled these effects using finite element analysis and included the effects of bimaterial thickness coating, effective length of the device, width, and thickness.

  20. Finite element analysis of fiber-reinforced fixed partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takashi; Ohyama, Tatsuo; Waki, Tomonori; Kinuta, Soichiro; Wakabayashi, Kazumichi; Takano, Naoki; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2005-06-01

    Two-dimensional finite element models were created for a three-unit posterior fixed partial denture. An experimental resin-impregnated glass fiber was used as the fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) for the framework. The FRC was evaluated using varying combinations of position and thickness, alongside with two types of veneering composite. A load of 50 N simulating bite force was applied at the pontic in a vertical direction. Tensile stress was examined using a finite element analysis program. Model without FRC showed tensile stress concentrations within the veneering composite on the cervical side of the pontic--from the connector area to the bottom of the pontic. Model with FRC at the top of the pontic had almost the same stress distribution as the model without FRC. Models with 0.4-0.8 mm thick FRC positioned at the bottom of the pontic showed maximum tensile stresses reduced by 4-19% within the veneering composite. PMID:16022451

  1. Finite element analysis of electrically excited quartz tuning fork devices.

    PubMed

    Oria, Roger; Otero, Jorge; González, Laura; Botaya, Luis; Carmona, Manuel; Puig-Vidal, Manel

    2013-05-30

    Quartz Tuning Fork (QTF)-based Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) is an important field of research. A suitable model for the QTF is important to obtain quantitative measurements with these devices. Analytical models have the limitation of being based on the double cantilever configuration. In this paper, we present an electromechanical finite element model of the QTF electrically excited with two free prongs. The model goes beyond the state-of-the-art of numerical simulations currently found in the literature for this QTF configuration. We present the first numerical analysis of both the electrical and mechanical behavior of QTF devices. Experimental measurements obtained with 10 units of the same model of QTF validate the finite element model with a good agreement.

  2. Finite-element thermo-viscoplastic analysis of aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, Ajay; Dechaumphai, Pramote; Thornton, Earl A.

    1990-01-01

    The time-dependent thermo-viscoplastic response of aerospace structures subjected to intense aerothermal loads is predicted using the finite-element method. The finite-element analysis uses the Bodner-Partom unified viscoplastic constitutive relations to determine rate-dependent nonlinear material behavior. The methodology is verified by comparison with experimental data and other numerical results for a uniaxially-loaded bar. The method is then used (1) to predict the structural response of a rectangular plate subjected to line heating along a centerline, and (2) to predict the thermal-structural response of a convectively-cooled engine cowl leading edge subjected to aerodynamic shock-shock interference heating. Compared to linear elastic analysis, the viscoplastic analysis results in lower peak stresses and regions of plastic deformations.

  3. ORION96. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L.A.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1992-02-02

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  4. The semi-discrete Galerkin finite element modelling of compressible viscous flow past an airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meade, Andrew J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A method is developed to solve the two-dimensional, steady, compressible, turbulent boundary-layer equations and is coupled to an existing Euler solver for attached transonic airfoil analysis problems. The boundary-layer formulation utilizes the semi-discrete Galerkin (SDG) method to model the spatial variable normal to the surface with linear finite elements and the time-like variable with finite differences. A Dorodnitsyn transformed system of equations is used to bound the infinite spatial domain thereby permitting the use of a uniform finite element grid which provides high resolution near the wall and automatically follows boundary-layer growth. The second-order accurate Crank-Nicholson scheme is applied along with a linearization method to take advantage of the parabolic nature of the boundary-layer equations and generate a non-iterative marching routine. The SDG code can be applied to any smoothly-connected airfoil shape without modification and can be coupled to any inviscid flow solver. In this analysis, a direct viscous-inviscid interaction is accomplished between the Euler and boundary-layer codes, through the application of a transpiration velocity boundary condition. Results are presented for compressible turbulent flow past NACA 0012 and RAE 2822 airfoils at various freestream Mach numbers, Reynolds numbers, and angles of attack. All results show good agreement with experiment, and the coupled code proved to be a computationally-efficient and accurate airfoil analysis tool.

  5. Study of the available finite element software packages at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Chu-Ho

    1990-01-01

    The interaction among the three finite element software packages, SDRCI/I-DEAS, MSC/NASTRAN, and I/FEM, used at NASA, Kennedy Space Center is addressed. The procedures for using more than one of these application software packages to model and analyze a structure design are discussed. Design and stress analysis of a solid rocket booster fixture is illustrated by using four different combinations of the three software packages. Their results are compared and show small yet acceptable differences.

  6. Finite Element Composite Analysis Program (FECAP) for a microcomputer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, David E.

    1988-01-01

    A special purpose finite element composite analysis program for analyzing composite material behavior with a microcomputer is described. The formulation assumes a state of generalized plane strain in a material consisting of two or more orthotropic phases. Loading can be mechanical and/or thermal. The theoretical background, computer implementation, and program users guide are described in detail. A sample program is solved showing the required user input and computer generated output.

  7. [Whiplash injury analysis of cervical vertebra by finite element method].

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Li, Zheng-Dong; Shao, Yu; Chen, Yi-Jiu

    2015-02-01

    Finite element method (FEM) is an effective mathematical method for stress analysis, and has been gradually applied in the study of biomechanics of human body structures. This paper reviews the construction, development, materials assignment and verification of FEM model of cervical vertebra, and it also states the research results of injury mechanism of whiplash injury and biomechanical response analysis of the cervical vertebra using FEM by researchers at home and abroad. PMID:26058135

  8. Parallel finite element simulation of large ram-air parachutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalro, V.; Aliabadi, S.; Garrard, W.; Tezduyar, T.; Mittal, S.; Stein, K.

    1997-06-01

    In the near future, large ram-air parachutes are expected to provide the capability of delivering 21 ton payloads from altitudes as high as 25,000 ft. In development and test and evaluation of these parachutes the size of the parachute needed and the deployment stages involved make high-performance computing (HPC) simulations a desirable alternative to costly airdrop tests. Although computational simulations based on realistic, 3D, time-dependent models will continue to be a major computational challenge, advanced finite element simulation techniques recently developed for this purpose and the execution of these techniques on HPC platforms are significant steps in the direction to meet this challenge. In this paper, two approaches for analysis of the inflation and gliding of ram-air parachutes are presented. In one of the approaches the point mass flight mechanics equations are solved with the time-varying drag and lift areas obtained from empirical data. This approach is limited to parachutes with similar configurations to those for which data are available. The other approach is 3D finite element computations based on the Navier-Stokes equations governing the airflow around the parachute canopy and Newtons law of motion governing the 3D dynamics of the canopy, with the forces acting on the canopy calculated from the simulated flow field. At the earlier stages of canopy inflation the parachute is modelled as an expanding box, whereas at the later stages, as it expands, the box transforms to a parafoil and glides. These finite element computations are carried out on the massively parallel supercomputers CRAY T3D and Thinking Machines CM-5, typically with millions of coupled, non-linear finite element equations solved simultaneously at every time step or pseudo-time step of the simulation.

  9. An interactive virtual environment for finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, S.; Canfield, T.; Kokinis, J.; Disz, T.

    1995-06-01

    Virtual environments (VE) provide a powerful human-computer interface that opens the door to exciting new methods of interaction with high-performance computing applications in several areas of research. The authors are interested in the use of virtual environments as a user interface to real-time simulations used in rapid prototyping procedures. Consequently, the authors are developing methods for coupling finite element models of complex mechanical systems with a VE interface for real-time interaction.

  10. Application of Finite Element Method to Analyze Inflatable Waveguide Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, M. D.

    1998-01-01

    A Finite Element Method (FEM) is presented to determine propagation characteristics of deformed inflatable rectangular waveguide. Various deformations that might be present in an inflatable waveguide are analyzed using the FEM. The FEM procedure and the code developed here are so general that they can be used for any other deformations that are not considered in this report. The code is validated by applying the present code to rectangular waveguide without any deformations and comparing the numerical results with earlier published results.

  11. Piezoelectric theory for finite element analysis of ultrasonic motors

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, J.D.; Mentesana, C.P.

    1997-06-01

    The authors present the fundamental equations of piezoelectricity and references. They show how a second form of the equations and a second set of coefficients can be found, through inversions involving the elasticity tensor. They show how to compute the clamped permittivity matrix from the unclamped matrix. The authors list the program pzansys.ftn and present examples of its use. This program does the conversions and calculations needed by the finite element program ANSYS.

  12. Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element Method for Parabolic Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaneko, Hideaki; Bey, Kim S.; Hou, Gene J. W.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a time and its corresponding spatial discretization scheme, based upon the assumption of a certain weak singularity of parallel ut(t) parallel Lz(omega) = parallel ut parallel2, for the discontinuous Galerkin finite element method for one-dimensional parabolic problems. Optimal convergence rates in both time and spatial variables are obtained. A discussion of automatic time-step control method is also included.

  13. Three-dimensional finite element modeling of liquid crystal devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanbrabant, Pieter J. M.; James, Richard; Beeckman, Jeroen; Neyts, Kristiaan; Willman, Eero; Fernandez, F. Anibal

    2011-03-01

    A finite element framework is presented to combine advanced three-dimensional liquid crystal director calculations with a full-vector beam propagation analysis. This approach becomes especially valuable to analyze and design structures in which disclinations or diffraction effects play an important role. The wide applicability of the approach is illustrated in our overview from several examples including small pixel LCOS microdisplays with homeotropic alignment.

  14. Stability and Convergence of Underintegrated Finite Element Approximations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of underintegration on the numerical stability and convergence characteristics of certain classes of finite element approximations were analyzed. Particular attention is given to hourglassing instabilities that arise from underintegrating the stiffness matrix entries and checkerboard instabilities that arise from underintegrating constrain terms such as those arising from incompressibility conditions. A fundamental result reported here is the proof that the fully integrated stiffness is restored in some cases through a post-processing operation.

  15. An Efficient Vector Finite Element Method for Nonlinear Electromagnetic Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A C; White, D A; Rodrigue, G H

    2006-06-27

    We have developed a mixed Vector Finite Element Method (VFEM) for Maxwell's equations with a nonlinear polarization term. The method allows for discretization of complicated geometries with arbitrary order representations of the B and E fields. In this paper we will describe the method and a series of optimizations that significantly reduce the computational cost. Additionally, a series of test simulations will be presented to validate the method. Finally, a nonlinear waveguide mode mixing example is presented and discussed.

  16. Finite element methods for non-Newtonian flows

    SciTech Connect

    Gartling, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    The application of the finite element method to problems in non-Newtonian fluid mechanics is described. The formulation of the basic equations is presented for both inelastic and viscoelastic constitutive models. Solution algorithms for treating the material nonlinearities associated with inealstic fluids are described; typical solution procedures for the implicit stress-rate equations of viscoelastic fluids are also presented. Simple example analyses are included for both types of fluid models. 65 refs., 21 figs.

  17. A verification procedure for MSC/NASTRAN Finite Element Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockwell, Alan E.

    1995-01-01

    Finite Element Models (FEM's) are used in the design and analysis of aircraft to mathematically describe the airframe structure for such diverse tasks as flutter analysis and actively controlled landing gear design. FEM's are used to model the entire airplane as well as airframe components. The purpose of this document is to describe recommended methods for verifying the quality of the FEM's and to specify a step-by-step procedure for implementing the methods.

  18. Finite Element Method Applied to Fuse Protection Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sen; Song, Zhiquan; Zhang, Ming; Xu, Liuwei; Li, Jinchao; Fu, Peng; Wang, Min; Dong, Lin

    2014-03-01

    In a poloidal field (PF) converter module, fuse protection is of great importance to ensure the safety of the thyristors. The fuse is pre-selected in a traditional way and then verified by finite element analysis. A 3D physical model is built by ANSYS software to solve the thermal-electric coupled problem of transient process in case of external fault. The result shows that this method is feasible.

  19. Enhanced finite element scheme for vibrational and flow induced sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaltenbacher, M.; Triebenbacher, S.; Wohlmuth, B.; Zörnre, S.

    2010-06-01

    The paper presents Finite Element (FE) methods for classical vibroacoustics as well as computational aeroacoustics. Therewith, we can handle different grid sizes in different regions and ensure a correct coupling at the interfaces by applying the Mortar FE method. Furthermore, we can fully take into account free radiation by a new Perfectly Matched Layer (PML) technique, which is stable even for long term computations. The applicability of our developed numerical methods will be demonstrated by simulation results of the human phonation.

  20. Transient Finite Element Computations on a Variable Transputer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolinski, Patrick J.; Lapczyk, Ireneusz

    1993-01-01

    A parallel program to analyze transient finite element problems was written and implemented on a system of transputer processors. The program uses the explicit time integration algorithm which eliminates the need for equation solving, making it more suitable for parallel computations. An interprocessor communication scheme was developed for arbitrary two dimensional grid processor configurations. Several 3-D problems were analyzed on a system with a small number of processors.

  1. Least-squares finite element method for fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1989-01-01

    An overview is given of new developments of the least squares finite element method (LSFEM) in fluid dynamics. Special emphasis is placed on the universality of LSFEM; the symmetry and positiveness of the algebraic systems obtained from LSFEM; the accommodation of LSFEM to equal order interpolations for incompressible viscous flows; and the natural numerical dissipation of LSFEM for convective transport problems and high speed compressible flows. The performance of LSFEM is illustrated by numerical examples.

  2. High speed inviscid compressible flow by the finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zienkiewicz, O. C.; Loehner, R.; Morgan, K.

    1984-01-01

    The finite element method and an explicit time stepping algorithm which is based on Taylor-Galerkin schemes with an appropriate artificial viscosity is combined with an automatic mesh refinement process which is designed to produce accurate steady state solutions to problems of inviscid compressible flow in two dimensions. The results of two test problems are included which demonstrate the excellent performance characteristics of the proposed procedures.

  3. Finite element model for brittle fracture and fragmentation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Wei; Delaney, Tristan J.; Jiao, Xiangmin; Samulyak, Roman; Lu, Cao

    2016-06-01

    A new computational model for brittle fracture and fragmentation has been developed based on finite element analysis of non-linear elasticity equations. The proposed model propagates the cracks by splitting the mesh nodes alongside the most over-strained edges based on the principal direction of strain tensor. To prevent elements from overlapping and folding under large deformations, robust geometrical constraints using the method of Lagrange multipliers have been incorporated. In conclusion, the model has been applied to 2D simulations of the formation and propagation of cracks in brittle materials, and the fracture and fragmentation of stretched and compressed materials.

  4. Periodic Boundary Conditions in the ALEGRA Finite Element Code

    SciTech Connect

    AIDUN,JOHN B.; ROBINSON,ALLEN C.; WEATHERBY,JOE R.

    1999-11-01

    This document describes the implementation of periodic boundary conditions in the ALEGRA finite element code. ALEGRA is an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian multi-physics code with both explicit and implicit numerical algorithms. The periodic boundary implementation requires a consistent set of boundary input sets which are used to describe virtual periodic regions. The implementation is noninvasive to the majority of the ALEGRA coding and is based on the distributed memory parallel framework in ALEGRA. The technique involves extending the ghost element concept for interprocessor boundary communications in ALEGRA to additionally support on- and off-processor periodic boundary communications. The user interface, algorithmic details and sample computations are given.

  5. Interactive Finite Elements for General Engine Dynamics Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, M. L.; Padovan, J.; Fertis, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    General nonlinear finite element codes were adapted for the purpose of analyzing the dynamics of gas turbine engines. In particular, this adaptation required the development of a squeeze-film damper element software package and its implantation into a representative current generation code. The ADINA code was selected because of prior use of it and familiarity with its internal structure and logic. This objective was met and the results indicate that such use of general purpose codes is viable alternative to specialized codes for general dynamics analysis of engines.

  6. GPU accelerated spectral finite elements on all-hex meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remacle, J.-F.; Gandham, R.; Warburton, T.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a spectral element finite element scheme that efficiently solves elliptic problems on unstructured hexahedral meshes. The discrete equations are solved using a matrix-free preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm. An additive Schwartz two-scale preconditioner is employed that allows h-independence convergence. An extensible multi-threading programming API is used as a common kernel language that allows runtime selection of different computing devices (GPU and CPU) and different threading interfaces (CUDA, OpenCL and OpenMP). Performance tests demonstrate that problems with over 50 million degrees of freedom can be solved in a few seconds on an off-the-shelf GPU.

  7. Finite Element Method for Thermal Analysis. [with computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heuser, J.

    1973-01-01

    A two- and three-dimensional, finite-element thermal-analysis program which handles conduction with internal heat generation, convection, radiation, specified flux, and specified temperature boundary conditions is presented. Elements used in the program are the triangle and tetrahedron for two- and three-dimensional analysis, respectively. The theory used in the program is developed, and several sample problems demonstrating the capability and reliability of the program are presented. A guide to using the program, description of the input cards, and program listing are included.

  8. A convenient scheme for coupling a finite element curvilinear mesh to a finite element voxel mesh: application to the heart

    PubMed Central

    Hopenfeld, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    Background In some cases, it may be necessary to combine distinct finite element meshes into a single system. The present work describes a scheme for coupling a finite element mesh, which may have curvilinear elements, to a voxel based finite element mesh. Methods The method is described with reference to a sample problem that involves combining a heart, which is defined by a curvilinear mesh, with a voxel based torso mesh. The method involves the creation of a temporary (scaffolding) mesh that couples the outer surface of the heart mesh to a voxel based torso mesh. The inner surface of the scaffolding mesh is the outer heart surface, and the outer surface of the scaffolding mesh is defined by the nodes in the torso mesh that are nearest (but outside of) the heart. The finite element stiffness matrix for the scaffolding mesh is then computed. This stiffness matrix includes extraneous nodes that are then removed, leaving a coupling matrix that couples the original outer heart surface nodes to adjacent nodes in the torso voxel mesh. Finally, a complete system matrix is assembled from the pre-existing heart stiffness matrix, the heart/torso coupling matrix, and the torso stiffness matrix. Results Realistic body surface electrocardiograms were generated. In a test involving a dipole embedded in a spherical shell, relative error of the scheme rapidly converged to slightly over 4%, although convergence thereafter was relatively slow. Conclusion The described method produces reasonably accurate results and may be best suited for problems where computational speed and convenience have a higher priority than very high levels of accuracy. PMID:17112373

  9. Nonlinear vibration of axially moving membrane by finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koivurova, H.; Pramila, A.

    A theoretical and numerical formulation for nonlinear axially moving membrane is presented. The model is based on a Lagrangian description of the continuum problem in the context of dynamics of initially stressed solids. Membrane elasticity is included via a finite strain model and the membrane transport speed is included by using conservation of the membrane mass. Hamilton's principle provides nonlinear equations, which describe the three-dimensional motion of the membrane. The incremental equations of Hamilton's principle are discretized by the finite element method. The formulation includes geometrically nonlinear effects: large displacements, variation of membrane tension and variations in axial velocity due to deformation. Implementation of this novel numerical model was done by adding an axially moving membrane element into a FEM program, which contains acoustic fluid elements and contact algorithms. Hence, analysis of problems containing interaction with the surrounding air field and contact between supporting structures was possible. The model was tested by comparing previous linear and present nonlinear dynamic behaviour of an axially moving web. The effects of contact between finite rolls and the membrane and interaction between the surrounding air and the membrane were included in the model. The results show, that nonlinearities and coupling phenomena have a considerable effect on the dynamic behaviour of the system.

  10. Nonlinear probabilistic finite element models of laminated composite shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelstad, S. P.; Reddy, J. N.

    1993-01-01

    A probabilistic finite element analysis procedure for laminated composite shells has been developed. A total Lagrangian finite element formulation, employing a degenerated 3-D laminated composite shell with the full Green-Lagrange strains and first-order shear deformable kinematics, forms the modeling foundation. The first-order second-moment technique for probabilistic finite element analysis of random fields is employed and results are presented in the form of mean and variance of the structural response. The effects of material nonlinearity are included through the use of a rate-independent anisotropic plasticity formulation with the macroscopic point of view. Both ply-level and micromechanics-level random variables can be selected, the latter by means of the Aboudi micromechanics model. A number of sample problems are solved to verify the accuracy of the procedures developed and to quantify the variability of certain material type/structure combinations. Experimental data is compared in many cases, and the Monte Carlo simulation method is used to check the probabilistic results. In general, the procedure is quite effective in modeling the mean and variance response of the linear and nonlinear behavior of laminated composite shells.

  11. Finite element analysis of the cyclic indentation of bilayer enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yunfei; Xuan, Fu-zhen; Chen, Xiaoping; Yang, Fuqian

    2014-04-01

    Tooth enamel is often subjected to repeated contact and often experiences contact deformation in daily life. The mechanical strength of the enamel determines the biofunctionality of the tooth. Considering the variation of the rod arrangement in outer and inner enamel, we approximate enamel as a bilayer structure and perform finite element analysis of the cyclic indentation of the bilayer structure, to mimic the repeated contact of enamel during mastication. The dynamic deformation behaviour of both the inner enamel and the bilayer enamel is examined. The material parameters of the inner and outer enamel used in the analysis are obtained by fitting the finite element results with the experimental nanoindentation results. The penetration depth per cycle at the quasi-steady state is used to describe the depth propagation speed, which exhibits a two-stage power-law dependence on the maximum indentation load and the amplitude of the cyclic load, respectively. The continuous penetration of the indenter reflects the propagation of the plastic zone during cyclic indentation, which is related to the energy dissipation. The outer enamel serves as a protective layer due to its great resistance to contact deformation in comparison to the inner enamel. The larger equivalent plastic strain and lower stresses in the inner enamel during cyclic indentation, as calculated from the finite element analysis, indicate better crack/fracture resistance of the inner enamel.

  12. Finite element solver for 3-D compressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, K. C.; Reddy, J. N.

    1986-01-01

    The space shuttle main engine (SSME) has extremely complex internal flow structure. The geometry of the flow domain is three-dimensional with complicated topology. The flow is compressible, viscous, and turbulent with large gradients in flow quantities and regions of recirculations. The analysis of the flow field in SSME involves several tedious steps. One is the geometrical modeling of the particular zone of the SSME being studied. Accessing the geometry definition, digitalizing it, and developing surface interpolations suitable for an interior grid generator require considerable amount of manual labor. There are several types of grid generators available with some general-purpose finite element programs. An efficient and robust computational scheme for solving 3D Navier-Stokes equations has to be implemented. Post processing software has to be adapted to visualize and analyze the computed 3D flow field. The progress made in a project to develop software for the analysis of the flow is discussed. The technical approach to the development of the finite element scheme and the relaxation procedure are discussed. The three dimensional finite element code for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations is listed.

  13. Interpreting finite element results for brittle materials in endodontic restorations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Finite element simulation has been used in last years for analysing the biomechanical performance of post-core restorations in endodontics, but results of these simulations have been interpreted in most of the works using von Mises stress criterion. However, the validity of this failure criterion for brittle materials, which are present in these restorations, is questionable. The objective of the paper is to analyse how finite element results for brittle materials of endodontic restorations should be interpreted to obtain correct conclusions about the possible failure in the restoration. Methods Different failure criteria (Von Mises, Rankine, Coulomb-Mohr, Modified Mohr and Christensen) and material strength data (diametral tensile strength and flexural strength) were considered in the study. Three finite element models (FEM) were developed to simulate an endodontic restoration and two typical material tests: diametral tensile test and flexural test. Results Results showed that the Christensen criterion predicts similar results as the Von Mises criterion for ductile components, while it predicts similar results to all other criteria for brittle components. The different criteria predict different failure points for the diametral tensile test, all of them under multi-axial stress states. All criteria except Von Mises predict failure for flexural test at the same point of the specimen, with this point under uniaxial tensile stress. Conclusions From the results it is concluded that the Christensen criterion is recommended for FEM result interpretation in endodontic restorations and that the flexural test is recommended to estimate tensile strength instead of the diametral tensile test. PMID:21635759

  14. Nonlinear explicit transient finite element analysis on the Intel Delta

    SciTech Connect

    Plaskacz, E.J. ); Ramirez, M.R.; Gupta, S. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1993-01-01

    Many large scale finite element problems are intractable on current generation production supercomputers. High-performance computer architectures offer effective avenues to bridge the gap between computational needs and the power of computational hardware. The biggest challenge lies in the substitution of the key algorithms in an application program with redesigned algorithms which exploit the new architectures and use better or more appropriate numerical techniques. A methodology for implementing nonlinear finite element analysis on a homogeneous distributed processing network is discussed. The method can also be extended to heterogeneous networks comprised of different machine architectures provided that they have a mutual communication interface. This unique feature has greatly facilitated the port of the code to the 8-node Intel Touchstone Gamma and then the 512-node Intel Touchstone Delta. The domain is decomposed serially in a preprocessor. Separate input files are written for each subdomain. These files are read in by local copies of the program executable operating in parallel. Communication between processors is addressed utilizing asynchronous and synchronous message passing. The basic kernel of message passing is the internal force exchange which is analogous to the computed interactions between sections of physical bodies in static stress analysis. Benchmarks for the Intel Delta are presented. Performance exceeding 1 gigaflop was attained. Results for two large-scale finite element meshes are presented.

  15. Nonlinear explicit transient finite element analysis on the Intel Delta

    SciTech Connect

    Plaskacz, E.J.; Ramirez, M.R.; Gupta, S.

    1993-03-01

    Many large scale finite element problems are intractable on current generation production supercomputers. High-performance computer architectures offer effective avenues to bridge the gap between computational needs and the power of computational hardware. The biggest challenge lies in the substitution of the key algorithms in an application program with redesigned algorithms which exploit the new architectures and use better or more appropriate numerical techniques. A methodology for implementing nonlinear finite element analysis on a homogeneous distributed processing network is discussed. The method can also be extended to heterogeneous networks comprised of different machine architectures provided that they have a mutual communication interface. This unique feature has greatly facilitated the port of the code to the 8-node Intel Touchstone Gamma and then the 512-node Intel Touchstone Delta. The domain is decomposed serially in a preprocessor. Separate input files are written for each subdomain. These files are read in by local copies of the program executable operating in parallel. Communication between processors is addressed utilizing asynchronous and synchronous message passing. The basic kernel of message passing is the internal force exchange which is analogous to the computed interactions between sections of physical bodies in static stress analysis. Benchmarks for the Intel Delta are presented. Performance exceeding 1 gigaflop was attained. Results for two large-scale finite element meshes are presented.

  16. A phenomenological finite element model of stereolithography processing

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, R.S.; Guess, T.R.; Hinnerichs, T.D.

    1996-03-01

    In the stereolithography process, three dimensional parts are built layer by layer using a laser to selectively cure slices of a photocurable resin, one on top of another. As the laser spot passes over the surface of the resin, the ensuing chemical reaction causes the resin to shrink and stiffen during solidification. When laser paths cross or when new layers are cured on top of existing layers, residual stresses are generated as the cure shrinkage of the freshly gelled resin is constrained by the adjoining previously-cured material. These internal stresses can cause curling in the compliant material. A capability for performing finite element analyses of the stereolithography process has been developed. Although no attempt has been made to incorporate all the physics of the process, a numerical platform suitable for such development has been established. A methodology and code architecture have been structured to allow finite elements to be birthed (activated) according to a prescribed order mimicking the procedure by which a laser is used to cure and build-up surface layers of resin to construct a three dimensional geometry. In its present form, the finite element code incorporates a simple phenomenological viscoelastic material model of solidification that is based on the shrinkage and relaxation observed following isolated, uncoupled laser exposures. The phenomenological material model has been used to analyze the curl in a simple cantilever beam and to make qualitative distinctions between two contrived build styles.

  17. Crystal level simulations using Eulerian finite element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, R; Barton, N R; Benson, D J

    2004-02-06

    Over the last several years, significant progress has been made in the use of crystal level material models in simulations of forming operations. However, in Lagrangian finite element approaches simulation capabilities are limited in many cases by mesh distortion associated with deformation heterogeneity. Contexts in which such large distortions arise include: bulk deformation to strains approaching or exceeding unity, especially in highly anisotropic or multiphase materials; shear band formation and intersection of shear bands; and indentation with sharp indenters. Investigators have in the past used Eulerian finite element methods with material response determined from crystal aggregates to study steady state forming processes. However, Eulerian and Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) finite element methods have not been widely utilized for simulation of transient deformation processes at the crystal level. The advection schemes used in Eulerian and ALE codes control mesh distortion and allow for simulation of much larger total deformations. We will discuss material state representation issues related to advection and will present results from ALE simulations.

  18. Automated Finite Element Modeling of Wing Structures for Shape Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Michael Stephen

    1993-01-01

    The displacement formulation of the finite element method is the most general and most widely used technique for structural analysis of airplane configurations. Modem structural synthesis techniques based on the finite element method have reached a certain maturity in recent years, and large airplane structures can now be optimized with respect to sizing type design variables for many load cases subject to a rich variety of constraints including stress, buckling, frequency, stiffness and aeroelastic constraints (Refs. 1-3). These structural synthesis capabilities use gradient based nonlinear programming techniques to search for improved designs. For these techniques to be practical a major improvement was required in computational cost of finite element analyses (needed repeatedly in the optimization process). Thus, associated with the progress in structural optimization, a new perspective of structural analysis has emerged, namely, structural analysis specialized for design optimization application, or.what is known as "design oriented structural analysis" (Ref. 4). This discipline includes approximation concepts and methods for obtaining behavior sensitivity information (Ref. 1), all needed to make the optimization of large structural systems (modeled by thousands of degrees of freedom and thousands of design variables) practical and cost effective.

  19. HYDRA, A finite element computational fluid dynamics code: User manual

    SciTech Connect

    Christon, M.A.

    1995-06-01

    HYDRA is a finite element code which has been developed specifically to attack the class of transient, incompressible, viscous, computational fluid dynamics problems which are predominant in the world which surrounds us. The goal for HYDRA has been to achieve high performance across a spectrum of supercomputer architectures without sacrificing any of the aspects of the finite element method which make it so flexible and permit application to a broad class of problems. As supercomputer algorithms evolve, the continuing development of HYDRA will strive to achieve optimal mappings of the most advanced flow solution algorithms onto supercomputer architectures. HYDRA has drawn upon the many years of finite element expertise constituted by DYNA3D and NIKE3D Certain key architectural ideas from both DYNA3D and NIKE3D have been adopted and further improved to fit the advanced dynamic memory management and data structures implemented in HYDRA. The philosophy for HYDRA is to focus on mapping flow algorithms to computer architectures to try and achieve a high level of performance, rather than just performing a port.

  20. Finite-element time evolution operator for the anharmonic oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milton, Kimball A.

    1995-01-01

    The finite-element approach to lattice field theory is both highly accurate (relative errors approximately 1/N(exp 2), where N is the number of lattice points) and exactly unitary (in the sense that canonical commutation relations are exactly preserved at the lattice sites). In this talk I construct matrix elements for dynamical variables and for the time evolution operator for the anharmonic oscillator, for which the continuum Hamiltonian is H = p(exp 2)/2 + lambda q(exp 4)/4. Construction of such matrix elements does not require solving the implicit equations of motion. Low order approximations turn out to be extremely accurate. For example, the matrix element of the time evolution operator in the harmonic oscillator ground state gives a results for the anharmonic oscillator ground state energy accurate to better than 1 percent, while a two-state approximation reduces the error to less than 0.1 percent.

  1. A hybrid-stress finite element for linear anisotropic elasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fly, Gerald W.; Oden, J. Tinsley; Pearson, Mark L.

    1988-01-01

    Standard assumed displacement finite elements with anisotropic material properties perform poorly in complex stress fields such as combined bending and shear and combined bending and torsion. A set of three dimensional hybrid-stress brick elements were developed with fully anisotropic material properties. Both eight-node and twenty-node bricks were developed based on the symmetry group theory of Punch and Atluri. An eight-node brick was also developed using complete polynomials and stress basis functions and reducing the order of the resulting stress parameter matrix by applying equilibrium constraints and stress compatibility constraints. Here the stress compatibility constraints must be formulated assuming anisotropic material properties. The performance of these elements was examined in numerical examples covering a broad range of stress distributions. The stress predictions show significant improvement over the assumed displacement elements but the calculation time is increased.

  2. Effect of grid system on finite element calculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. D.; Yen, S. M.

    1980-01-01

    Detailed parametric studies of the effect of grid system on finite element calculation for potential flows were made. These studies led to the formulation of a design criteria for optimum mesh system and the development of two methods to generate the optimum mesh system. The guidelines for optimum mesh system are: (1) the mesh structure should be regular; (2) the element should be as regular and equilateral as possible; (3) the distribution of size of element should be consistent with that of flow variables to insure maximum uniformity in error distribution; (4) for non-Dirichlet boundary conditions, smaller boundary elements or higher order interpolation functions should be used; and (5) the mesh should accommodate the boundary geometry as accurately as possible. The results of the parametric studies are presented.

  3. Higher Order Lagrange Finite Elements In M3D

    SciTech Connect

    J. Chen; H.R. Strauss; S.C. Jardin; W. Park; L.E. Sugiyama; G. Fu; J. Breslau

    2004-12-17

    The M3D code has been using linear finite elements to represent multilevel MHD on 2-D poloidal planes. Triangular higher order elements, up to third order, are constructed here in order to provide M3D the capability to solve highly anisotropic transport problems. It is found that higher order elements are essential to resolve the thin transition layer characteristic of the anisotropic transport equation, particularly when the strong anisotropic direction is not aligned with one of the Cartesian coordinates. The transition layer is measured by the profile width, which is zero for infinite anisotropy. It is shown that only higher order schemes have the ability to make this layer converge towards zero when the anisotropy gets stronger and stronger. Two cases are considered. One has the strong transport direction partially aligned with one of the element edges, the other doesn't have any alignment. Both cases have the strong transport direction misaligned with the grid line by some angles.

  4. Analysis of random structure-acoustic interaction problems using coupled boundary element and finite element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Pates, Carl S., III

    1994-01-01

    A coupled boundary element (BEM)-finite element (FEM) approach is presented to accurately model structure-acoustic interaction systems. The boundary element method is first applied to interior, two and three-dimensional acoustic domains with complex geometry configurations. Boundary element results are very accurate when compared with limited exact solutions. Structure-interaction problems are then analyzed with the coupled FEM-BEM method, where the finite element method models the structure and the boundary element method models the interior acoustic domain. The coupled analysis is compared with exact and experimental results for a simplistic model. Composite panels are analyzed and compared with isotropic results. The coupled method is then extended for random excitation. Random excitation results are compared with uncoupled results for isotropic and composite panels.

  5. Comparison of boundary element and finite element methods in spur gear root stress analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, H.; Mavriplis, D.; Huston, R. L.; Oswald, F. B.

    1989-01-01

    The boundary element method (BEM) is used to compute fillet stress concentration in spur gear teeth. The results are shown to compare favorably with analogous results obtained using the finite element method (FEM). A partially supported thin rim gear is studied. The loading is applied at the pitch point. A three-dimensional analysis is conducted using both the BEM and FEM (NASTRAN). The results are also compared with those of a two-dimensional finite element model. An advantage of the BEM over the FEM is that fewer elements are needed with the BEM. Indeed, in the current study the BEM used 92 elements and 270 nodes whereas the FEM used 320 elements and 2037 nodes. Moreover, since the BEM is especially useful in problems with high stress gradients it is potentially a very useful tool for fillet stress analyses.

  6. A Family of Uniform Strain Tetrahedral Elements and a Method for Connecting Dissimilar Finite Element Meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Dohrmann, C.R.; Heinstein, M.W.; Jung, J.; Key, S.W.

    1999-01-01

    This report documents a collection of papers on a family of uniform strain tetrahedral finite elements and their connection to different element types. Also included in the report are two papers which address the general problem of connecting dissimilar meshes in two and three dimensions. Much of the work presented here was motivated by the development of the tetrahedral element described in the report "A Suitable Low-Order, Eight-Node Tetrahedral Finite Element For Solids," by S. W. Key {ital et al.}, SAND98-0756, March 1998. Two basic issues addressed by the papers are: (1) the performance of alternative tetrahedral elements with uniform strain and enhanced uniform strain formulations, and (2) the proper connection of tetrahedral and other element types when two meshes are "tied" together to represent a single continuous domain.

  7. Finite volume and finite element methods applied to 3D laminar and turbulent channel flows

    SciTech Connect

    Louda, Petr; Příhoda, Jaromír; Sváček, Petr; Kozel, Karel

    2014-12-10

    The work deals with numerical simulations of incompressible flow in channels with rectangular cross section. The rectangular cross section itself leads to development of various secondary flow patterns, where accuracy of simulation is influenced by numerical viscosity of the scheme and by turbulence modeling. In this work some developments of stabilized finite element method are presented. Its results are compared with those of an implicit finite volume method also described, in laminar and turbulent flows. It is shown that numerical viscosity can cause errors of same magnitude as different turbulence models. The finite volume method is also applied to 3D turbulent flow around backward facing step and good agreement with 3D experimental results is obtained.

  8. A Posteriori Error Estimation for Finite Volume and Finite Element Approximations Using Broken Space Approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy J.; Larson, Mats G.

    2000-01-01

    We consider a posteriori error estimates for finite volume and finite element methods on arbitrary meshes subject to prescribed error functionals. Error estimates of this type are useful in a number of computational settings: (1) quantitative prediction of the numerical solution error, (2) adaptive meshing, and (3) load balancing of work on parallel computing architectures. Our analysis recasts the class of Godunov finite volumes schemes as a particular form of discontinuous Galerkin method utilizing broken space approximation obtained via reconstruction of cell-averaged data. In this general framework, weighted residual error bounds are readily obtained using duality arguments and Galerkin orthogonality. Additional consideration is given to issues such as nonlinearity, efficiency, and the relationship to other existing methods. Numerical examples are given throughout the talk to demonstrate the sharpness of the estimates and efficiency of the techniques. Additional information is contained in the original.

  9. Beam and Truss Finite Element Verification for DYNA3D

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbun, H J

    2007-07-16

    The explicit finite element (FE) software program DYNA3D has been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to simulate the dynamic behavior of structures, systems, and components. This report focuses on verification of beam and truss element formulations in DYNA3D. An efficient protocol has been developed to verify the accuracy of these structural elements by generating a set of representative problems for which closed-form quasi-static steady-state analytical reference solutions exist. To provide as complete coverage as practically achievable, problem sets are developed for each beam and truss element formulation (and their variants) in all modes of loading and physical orientation. Analyses with loading in the elastic and elastic-plastic regimes are performed. For elastic loading, the FE results are within 1% of the reference solutions for all cases. For beam element bending and torsion loading in the plastic regime, the response is heavily dependent on the numerical integration rule chosen, with higher refinement yielding greater accuracy (agreement to within 1%). Axial loading in the plastic regime produces accurate results (agreement to within 0.01%) for all integration rules and element formulations. Truss elements are also verified to provide accurate results (within 0.01%) for elastic and elastic-plastic loading. A sample problem to verify beam element response in ParaDyn, the parallel version DYNA3D, is also presented.

  10. Finite Element Solution of the Self-Adjoint Angular Flux Equation for Coupled Electron-Photon Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Liscum-Powell, Jennifer L.; Prinja, Anil B.; Morel, Jim E.; Lorence, Leonard J Jr.

    2002-11-15

    A novel approach is proposed for charged particle transport calculations using a recently developed second-order, self-adjoint angular flux (SAAF) form of the Boltzmann transport equation with continuous slowing-down. A finite element discretization that is linear continuous in space and linear discontinuous (LD) in energy is described and implemented in a one-dimensional, planar geometry, multigroup, discrete ordinates code for charged particle transport. The cross-section generating code CEPXS is used to generate the electron and photon transport cross sections employed in this code. The discrete ordinates SAAF transport equation is solved using source iteration in conjunction with an inner iteration acceleration scheme and an outer iteration acceleration scheme. Outer iterations are required with the LD energy discretization scheme because the two angular flux unknowns within each group are coupled, which gives rise to effective upscattering. The inner iteration convergence is accelerated using diffusion synthetic acceleration, and the outer iteration convergence is accelerated using a diamond difference approximation to the LD energy discretization. Computational results are given that demonstrate the effectiveness of our convergence acceleration schemes and the accuracy of our discretized SAAF equation.

  11. A New Concurrent Multiscale Methodology for Coupling Molecular Dynamics and Finite Element Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamakov, Vesselin; Saether, Erik; Glaessgen, Edward H/.

    2008-01-01

    The coupling of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with finite element methods (FEM) yields computationally efficient models that link fundamental material processes at the atomistic level with continuum field responses at higher length scales. The theoretical challenge involves developing a seamless connection along an interface between two inherently different simulation frameworks. Various specialized methods have been developed to solve particular classes of problems. Many of these methods link the kinematics of individual MD atoms with FEM nodes at their common interface, necessarily requiring that the finite element mesh be refined to atomic resolution. Some of these coupling approaches also require simulations to be carried out at 0 K and restrict modeling to two-dimensional material domains due to difficulties in simulating full three-dimensional material processes. In the present work, a new approach to MD-FEM coupling is developed based on a restatement of the standard boundary value problem used to define a coupled domain. The method replaces a direct linkage of individual MD atoms and finite element (FE) nodes with a statistical averaging of atomistic displacements in local atomic volumes associated with each FE node in an interface region. The FEM and MD computational systems are effectively independent and communicate only through an iterative update of their boundary conditions. With the use of statistical averages of the atomistic quantities to couple the two computational schemes, the developed approach is referred to as an embedded statistical coupling method (ESCM). ESCM provides an enhanced coupling methodology that is inherently applicable to three-dimensional domains, avoids discretization of the continuum model to atomic scale resolution, and permits finite temperature states to be applied.

  12. An Embedded Statistical Method for Coupling Molecular Dynamics and Finite Element Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saether, E.; Glaessgen, E.H.; Yamakov, V.

    2008-01-01

    The coupling of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with finite element methods (FEM) yields computationally efficient models that link fundamental material processes at the atomistic level with continuum field responses at higher length scales. The theoretical challenge involves developing a seamless connection along an interface between two inherently different simulation frameworks. Various specialized methods have been developed to solve particular classes of problems. Many of these methods link the kinematics of individual MD atoms with FEM nodes at their common interface, necessarily requiring that the finite element mesh be refined to atomic resolution. Some of these coupling approaches also require simulations to be carried out at 0 K and restrict modeling to two-dimensional material domains due to difficulties in simulating full three-dimensional material processes. In the present work, a new approach to MD-FEM coupling is developed based on a restatement of the standard boundary value problem used to define a coupled domain. The method replaces a direct linkage of individual MD atoms and finite element (FE) nodes with a statistical averaging of atomistic displacements in local atomic volumes associated with each FE node in an interface region. The FEM and MD computational systems are effectively independent and communicate only through an iterative update of their boundary conditions. With the use of statistical averages of the atomistic quantities to couple the two computational schemes, the developed approach is referred to as an embedded statistical coupling method (ESCM). ESCM provides an enhanced coupling methodology that is inherently applicable to three-dimensional domains, avoids discretization of the continuum model to atomic scale resolution, and permits finite temperature states to be applied.

  13. A finite element boundary integral formulation for radiation and scattering by cavity antennas using tetrahedral elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, J.; Volakis, J. L.; Chatterjee, A.; Jin, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    A hybrid finite element boundary integral formulation is developed using tetrahedral and/or triangular elements for discretizing the cavity and/or aperture of microstrip antenna arrays. The tetrahedral elements with edge based linear expansion functions are chosen for modeling the volume region and triangular elements are used for discretizing the aperture. The edge based expansion functions are divergenceless thus removing the requirement to introduce a penalty term and the tetrahedral elements permit greater geometrical adaptability than the rectangular bricks. The underlying theory and resulting expressions are discussed in detail together with some numerical scattering examples for comparison and demonstration.

  14. A new finite element and finite difference hybrid method for computing electrostatics of ionic solvated biomolecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Jinyong; Xie, Dexuan

    2015-10-01

    The Poisson-Boltzmann equation (PBE) is one widely-used implicit solvent continuum model for calculating electrostatics of ionic solvated biomolecule. In this paper, a new finite element and finite difference hybrid method is presented to solve PBE efficiently based on a special seven-overlapped box partition with one central box containing the solute region and surrounded by six neighboring boxes. In particular, an efficient finite element solver is applied to the central box while a fast preconditioned conjugate gradient method using a multigrid V-cycle preconditioning is constructed for solving a system of finite difference equations defined on a uniform mesh of each neighboring box. Moreover, the PBE domain, the box partition, and an interface fitted tetrahedral mesh of the central box can be generated adaptively for a given PQR file of a biomolecule. This new hybrid PBE solver is programmed in C, Fortran, and Python as a software tool for predicting electrostatics of a biomolecule in a symmetric 1:1 ionic solvent. Numerical results on two test models with analytical solutions and 12 proteins validate this new software tool, and demonstrate its high performance in terms of CPU time and memory usage.

  15. Control volume finite element method with multidimensional edge element Scharfetter-Gummel upwinding. Part 1, formulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston

    2011-06-01

    We develop a new formulation of the Control Volume Finite Element Method (CVFEM) with a multidimensional Scharfetter-Gummel (SG) upwinding for the drift-diffusion equations. The formulation uses standard nodal elements for the concentrations and expands the flux in terms of the lowest-order Nedelec H(curl; {Omega})-compatible finite element basis. The SG formula is applied to the edges of the elements to express the Nedelec element degree of freedom on this edge in terms of the nodal degrees of freedom associated with the endpoints of the edge. The resulting upwind flux incorporates the upwind effects from all edges and is defined at the interior of the element. This allows for accurate evaluation of integrals on the boundaries of the control volumes for arbitrary quadrilateral elements. The new formulation admits efficient implementation through a standard loop over the elements in the mesh followed by loops over the element nodes (associated with control volume fractions in the element) and element edges (associated with flux degrees of freedom). The quantities required for the SG formula can be precomputed and stored for each edge in the mesh for additional efficiency gains. For clarity the details are presented for two-dimensional quadrilateral grids. Extension to other element shapes and three dimensions is straightforward.

  16. A finite element simulation of sound attenuation in a finite duct with a peripherally variable liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    Using multimodal analysis, a variational finite element method is presented for analyzing sound attenuation in a three-dimensional finite duct with a peripherally variable liner in the absence of flow. A rectangular element, with cubic shaped functions, is employed. Once a small portion of a peripheral liner is removed, the attenuation rate near the frequency where maximum attenuation occurs drops significantly. The positioning of the liner segments affects the attenuation characteristics of the liner. Effects of the duct termination are important in the low frequency ranges. The main effect of peripheral variation of the liner is a broadening of the attenuation characteristics in the midfrequency range. Because of matrix size limitations of the presently available computer program, the eigenvalue equations should be solved out of core in order to handle realistic sources.

  17. Simulating Space Capsule Water Landing with Explicit Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, John T.; Lyle, Karen H.

    2007-01-01

    A study of using an explicit nonlinear dynamic finite element code for simulating the water landing of a space capsule was performed. The finite element model contains Lagrangian shell elements for the space capsule and Eulerian solid elements for the water and air. An Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) solver and a penalty coupling method were used for predicting the fluid and structure interaction forces. The space capsule was first assumed to be rigid, so the numerical results could be correlated with closed form solutions. The water and air meshes were continuously refined until the solution was converged. The converged maximum deceleration predicted is bounded by the classical von Karman and Wagner solutions and is considered to be an adequate solution. The refined water and air meshes were then used in the models for simulating the water landing of a capsule model that has a flexible bottom. For small pitch angle cases, the maximum deceleration from the flexible capsule model was found to be significantly greater than the maximum deceleration obtained from the corresponding rigid model. For large pitch angle cases, the difference between the maximum deceleration of the flexible model and that of its corresponding rigid model is smaller. Test data of Apollo space capsules with a flexible heat shield qualitatively support the findings presented in this paper.

  18. Thermal Radiation Transport on Unstructured Finite Element Meshes

    SciTech Connect

    R. P. Smedley-Stevenson

    2000-11-12

    This paper describes investigations on the use of finite element methods to solve the time-dependent thermal radiation transport equations on unstructured meshes. The solution of this equation will be incorporated in AWE's two-dimensional (2-D) arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamic code CORVUS in order to solve complex radiation hydrodynamic problems. A 2-D discretization of the grey transport equation has been studied based on the use of lumped linear DFEs for the spatial variation and piecewise constant finite elements for the angular variation. The use of an adaptive angular approximation has been explored in order to improve the computational efficiency, together with a technique for mitigating the ray effect when it is impractical to converge the angular discretization. A revised spatial discretization is required for the diffusion synthetic acceleration (DSA) equations used to accelerate the solution of the first-order transport equation for quadrilateral elements. So far, this appears to be unconditionally efficient at accelerating the solution of the grey first-order transport equation, n the presence of large aspect ratio and/or distorted elements. The solution of the multigroup equations using the linear multi-frequency grey (LMFG) method is currently under investigation. The pseudoscattering term arising from the LMFG treatment has the same form as the fission source in neutron transport problems. The discretization of the DSA equations described in this paper will be employed for both the within-group coherent scattering contribution and the separate grey acceleration equation used to accelerate the pseudoscattering term.

  19. Finite Element Analysis of the LOLA Receiver Telescope Lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matzinger, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the finite element stress and distortion analysis completed on the Receiver Telescope lens of the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA). LOLA is one of six instruments on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), scheduled to launch in 2008. LOLA's main objective is to produce a high-resolution global lunar topographic model to aid in safe landings and enhance surface mobility in future exploration missions. The Receiver Telescope captures the laser pulses transmitted through a diffractive optical element (DOE) and reflected off the lunar surface. The largest lens of the Receiver Telescope, Lens 1, is a 150 mm diameter aspheric lens originally designed to be made of BK7 glass. The finite element model of the Receiver Telescope Lens 1 is comprised of solid elements and constrained in a manner consistent with the behavior of the mounting configuration of the Receiver Telescope tube. Twenty-one temperature load cases were mapped to the nodes based on thermal analysis completed by LOLA's lead thermal analyst, and loads were applied to simulate the preload applied from the ring flexure. The thermal environment of the baseline design (uncoated BK7 lens with no baffle) produces large radial and axial gradients in the lens. These large gradients create internal stresses that may lead to part failure, as well as significant bending that degrades optical performance. The high stresses and large distortions shown in the analysis precipitated a design change from BK7 glass to sapphire.

  20. IFEMS, an Interactive Finite Element Modeling System Using a CAD/CAM System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckellip, S.; Schuman, T.; Lauer, S.

    1980-01-01

    A method of coupling a CAD/CAM system with a general purpose finite element mesh generator is described. The three computer programs which make up the interactive finite element graphics system are discussed.

  1. Fuzzy logic to improve efficiency of finite element and finite difference schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M.D.; Heger, A.S.

    1994-05-01

    This paper explores possible applications of logic in the areas of finite element and finite difference methods applied to engineering design problems. The application of fuzzy logic to both front-end selection of computational options and within the numerical computation itself are proposed. Further, possible methods of overcoming these limitations through the application of methods are explored. Decision strategy is a fundamental limitation in performing finite element calculations, such as selecting the optimum coarseness of the grid, numerical integration algorithm, element type, implicit versus explicit schemes, and the like. This is particularly true of novice analysts who are confronted with a myriad of choices in performing a calculation. The advantage of having the myriad of options available to the analyst is, however, that it improves and optimizes the design process if the appropriate ones are selected. Unfortunately, the optimum choices are not always apparent and only through the process of elimination or prior extensive experience can the optimum choices or combination of choices be selected. The knowledge of expert analysts could be integrated into a fuzzy ``front-end`` rule-based package to optimize the design process. The use of logic to capture the heuristic and human knowledge for selecting optimum solution strategies sets the framework for these proposed strategies.

  2. Reflections of AE Waves in Finite Plates: Finite Element Modeling and Experimental Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, W. H.; Hamstad, M. A.; Gary, J.; OGallagher, A.

    1999-01-01

    The capability of a three-dimensional dynamic finite element method for predicting far-field acoustic emission signals in thin plates of finite lateral extent, including their reflections from the plate edges, was investigated. A lead break (Hsu-Neilsen) source to simulate AE was modeled and used in the experimental measurements. For the thin plate studied, the signals were primarily composed of the lowest order symmetric (S0) and antisymmetric (A0) Lamb modes. Experimental waveforms were detected with an absolutely calibrated, wideband, conical element transducer. The conditions of lead fractures both on the surface of the plate as well as on the edge of the plate were investigated. Surface lead breaks preferentially generate the A0 mode while edge lead breaks generate the S0 mode. Reflections of developed plate waves from both normal and oblique incidence angles were evaluated. Particularly interesting for the case of the lead break on the plate edge were S0 waves produced by the interaction of a Rayleigh wave with the plate corner and by a bulk shear wave mode converting at the side edge. The Rayleigh wave, in this case, propagated along the specimen edge. For all cases considered, the experimental measurements were in good agreement with the predictions of the finite element model.

  3. Galerkin finite element scheme for magnetostrictive structures and composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, Kidambi Srinivasan

    The ever increasing-role of magnetostrictives in actuation and sensing applications is an indication of their importance in the emerging field of smart structures technology. As newer, and more complex, applications are developed, there is a growing need for a reliable computational tool that can effectively address the magneto-mechanical interactions and other nonlinearities in these materials and in structures incorporating them. This thesis presents a continuum level quasi-static, three-dimensional finite element computational scheme for modeling the nonlinear behavior of bulk magnetostrictive materials and particulate magnetostrictive composites. Models for magnetostriction must deal with two sources of nonlinearities-nonlinear body forces/moments in equilibrium equations governing magneto-mechanical interactions in deformable and magnetized bodies; and nonlinear coupled magneto-mechanical constitutive models for the material of interest. In the present work, classical differential formulations for nonlinear magneto-mechanical interactions are recast in integral form using the weighted-residual method. A discretized finite element form is obtained by applying the Galerkin technique. The finite element formulation is based upon three dimensional eight-noded (isoparametric) brick element interpolation functions and magnetostatic infinite elements at the boundary. Two alternative possibilities are explored for establishing the nonlinear incremental constitutive model-characterization in terms of magnetic field or in terms of magnetization. The former methodology is the one most commonly used in the literature. In this work, a detailed comparative study of both methodologies is carried out. The computational scheme is validated, qualitatively and quantitatively, against experimental measurements published in the literature on structures incorporating the magnetostrictive material Terfenol-D. The influence of nonlinear body forces and body moments of magnetic origin

  4. Elasto-plastic flow in cracked bodies using a new finite element model. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karabin, M. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Cracked geometries were studied by finite element techniques with the aid of a new special element embedded at the crack tip. This model seeked to accurately represent the singular stresses and strains associated with the elasto-plastic flow process. The present model was not restricted to a material type and did not predetermine a singularity. Rather the singularity was treated as an unknown. For each step of the incremental process the nodal degrees of freedom and the unknown singularity were found through minimization of an energy-like functional. The singularity and nodal degrees of freedom were determined by means of an iterative process.

  5. Robust iterative learning protocols for finite-time consensus of multi-agent systems with interval uncertain topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Deyuan; Jia, Yingmin; Du, Junping

    2015-04-01

    This paper is devoted to the robust finite-time output consensus problems of multi-agent systems under directed graphs, where all agents and their communication topologies are subject to interval uncertainties. Distributed protocols are constructed by using iterative learning control (ILC) algorithms, where information is exchanged only at the end of one iteration and learning is used to update the control inputs after each iteration. It is proved that under ILC-based protocols, the finite-time consensus can be achieved with an increasing number of iterations if the communication network of agents is guaranteed to have a spanning tree. Moreover, if the information of any desired terminal output is available to a portion (not necessarily all) of the agents, then the consensus output that all agents finally reach can be enabled to be the desired terminal output. It is also proved that for all ILC-based protocols, gain selections can be provided in terms of bound values, and consensus conditions can be developed associated with bound matrices. Simulation results are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of our theoretical results.

  6. A finite element model for sound transmission through panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramakrishnan, J. V.; Koval, L. R.

    1983-01-01

    A finite element method (FEM) is applied to predicting coupled frequencies and pressures within an acoustic cavity in order to characterize sound transmission through a panel. Structural equations of motion are defined and the FEM model is configured with four-noded plate elements, the lateral displacement and two slopes being the unknowns at every node. Each element then has 12 degrees of freedom (DOF) and the displacement variation is expressed by a 12-term nonconforming polynomial. A consistent mass matrix is used to represent the panel mass matrix and a wave equation governs the acoustic volume. Analysis of pressure and displacement over the panel yields a square coupling matrix, and an eigenanalysis leads to a solution of the forced vibration problem.

  7. Fast intersections on nested tetrahedrons (FINT): An algorithm for adaptive finite element based distributed parameter estimation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Hoon; Joshi, Amit; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M

    2008-01-01

    A variety of biomedical imaging techniques such as optical and fluorescence tomography, electrical impedance tomography, and ultrasound imaging can be cast as inverse problems, wherein image reconstruction involves the estimation of spatially distributed parameter(s) of the PDE system describing the physics of the imaging process. Finite element discretization of imaged domain with tetrahedral elements is a popular way of solving the forward and inverse imaging problems on complicated geometries. A dual-adaptive mesh-based approach wherein, one mesh is used for solving the forward imaging problem and the other mesh used for iteratively estimating the unknown distributed parameter, can result in high resolution image reconstruction at minimum computation effort, if both the meshes are allowed to adapt independently. Till date, no efficient method has been reported to identify and resolve intersection between tetrahedrons in independently refined or coarsened dual meshes. Herein, we report a fast and robust algorithm to identify and resolve intersection of tetrahedrons within nested dual meshes generated by 8-similar subtetrahedron subdivision scheme. The algorithm exploits finite element weight functions and gives rise to a set of weight functions on each vertex of disjoint tetrahedron pieces that completely cover up the intersection region of two tetrahedrons. The procedure enables fully adaptive tetrahedral finite elements by supporting independent refinement and coarsening of each individual mesh while preserving fast identification and resolution of intersection. The computational efficiency of the algorithm is demonstrated by diffuse photon density wave solutions obtained from a single- and a dual-mesh, and by reconstructing a fluorescent inclusion in simulated phantom from boundary frequency domain fluorescence measurements.

  8. Progress on hybrid finite element methods for scattering by bodies of revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Jeffery D.; Volakis, John L.

    1992-01-01

    Progress on the development and implementation of hybrid finite element methods for scattering by bodies of revolution are described. It was found that earlier finite element-boundary integral formulations suffered from convergence difficulties when applied to large and thin bodies of revolution. An alternative implementation is described where the finite element method is terminated with an absorbing termination boundary. In addition, an alternative finite element-boundary integral implementation is discussed for improving the convergence of the original code.

  9. Finite element modeling for validation of structural damage identification experimentation.

    SciTech Connect

    Stinemates, D. W.; Bennett, J. G.

    2001-01-01

    The project described in this report was performed to couple experimental and analytical techniques in the field of structural health monitoring and darnage identification. To do this, a finite dement model was Constructed of a simulated three-story building used for damage identification experiments. The model was used in conjunction with data from thie physical structure to research damage identification algorithms. Of particular interest was modeling slip in joints as a function of bolt torque and predicting the smallest change of torque that could be detected experimentally. After being validated with results from the physical structure, the model was used to produce data to test the capabilities of damage identification algorithms. This report describes the finite element model constructed, the results obtained, and proposed future use of the model.

  10. Large-eddy simulation using the finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    McCallen, R.C.; Gresho, P.M.; Leone, J.M. Jr.; Kollmann, W.

    1993-10-01

    In a large-eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent flows, the large-scale motion is calculated explicitly (i.e., approximated with semi-empirical relations). Typically, finite difference or spectral numerical schemes are used to generate an LES; the use of finite element methods (FEM) has been far less prominent. In this study, we demonstrate that FEM in combination with LES provides a viable tool for the study of turbulent, separating channel flows, specifically the flow over a two-dimensional backward-facing step. The combination of these methodologies brings together the advantages of each: LES provides a high degree of accuracy with a minimum of empiricism for turbulence modeling and FEM provides a robust way to simulate flow in very complex domains of practical interest. Such a combination should prove very valuable to the engineering community.

  11. Improved inhomogeneous finite elements for fabric reinforced composite mechanics analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foye, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    There is a need to do routine stress/failure analysis of fabric reinforced composite microstructures to provide additional confidence in critical applications and guide materials development. Conventional methods of 3-D stress analysis are time consuming to set up, run and interpret. A need exists for simpler methods of modeling these structures and analyzing the models. The principal difficulty is the discrete element mesh generation problem. Inhomogeneous finite elements are worth investigating for application to these problems because they eliminate the mesh generation problem. However, there are penalties associated with these elements. Their convergence rates can be slow compared to homogeneous elements. Also, there is no accepted method for obtaining detailed stresses in the constituent materials of each element. This paper shows that the convergence rate can be significantly improved by a simple device which substitutes homogeneous elements for the inhomogeneous ones. The device is shown to work well in simple one and two dimensional problems. However, demonstration of the application to more complex two and three dimensional problems remains to be done. Work is also progressing toward more realistic fabric microstructural geometries.

  12. Finite Element and Plate Theory Modeling of Acoustic Emission Waveforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, W. H.; Hamstad, M. A.; Gary, J.; OGallagher, A.

    1998-01-01

    A comparison was made between two approaches to predict acoustic emission waveforms in thin plates. A normal mode solution method for Mindlin plate theory was used to predict the response of the flexural plate mode to a point source, step-function load, applied on the plate surface. The second approach used a dynamic finite element method to model the problem using equations of motion based on exact linear elasticity. Calculations were made using properties for both isotropic (aluminum) and anisotropic (unidirectional graphite/epoxy composite) materials. For simulations of anisotropic plates, propagation along multiple directions was evaluated. In general, agreement between the two theoretical approaches was good. Discrepancies in the waveforms at longer times were caused by differences in reflections from the lateral plate boundaries. These differences resulted from the fact that the two methods used different boundary conditions. At shorter times in the signals, before reflections, the slight discrepancies in the waveforms were attributed to limitations of Mindlin plate theory, which is an approximate plate theory. The advantages of the finite element method are that it used the exact linear elasticity solutions, and that it can be used to model real source conditions and complicated, finite specimen geometries as well as thick plates. These advantages come at a cost of increased computational difficulty, requiring lengthy calculations on workstations or supercomputers. The Mindlin plate theory solutions, meanwhile, can be quickly generated on personal computers. Specimens with finite geometry can also be modeled. However, only limited simple geometries such as circular or rectangular plates can easily be accommodated with the normal mode solution technique. Likewise, very limited source configurations can be modeled and plate theory is applicable only to thin plates.

  13. Comparison of hexahedral and tetrahedral elements in finite element analysis of the foot and footwear.

    PubMed

    Tadepalli, Srinivas C; Erdemir, Ahmet; Cavanagh, Peter R

    2011-08-11

    Finite element analysis has been widely used in the field of foot and footwear biomechanics to determine plantar pressures as well as stresses and strains within soft tissue and footwear materials. When dealing with anatomical structures such as the foot, hexahedral mesh generation accounts for most of the model development time due to geometric complexities imposed by branching and embedded structures. Tetrahedral meshing, which can be more easily automated, has been the approach of choice to date in foot and footwear biomechanics. Here we use the nonlinear finite element program Abaqus (Simulia, Providence, RI) to examine the advantages and disadvantages of tetrahedral and hexahedral elements under compression and shear loading, material incompressibility, and frictional contact conditions, which are commonly seen in foot and footwear biomechanics. This study demonstrated that for a range of simulation conditions, hybrid hexahedral elements (Abaqus C3D8H) consistently performed well while hybrid linear tetrahedral elements (Abaqus C3D4H) performed poorly. On the other hand, enhanced quadratic tetrahedral elements with improved stress visualization (Abaqus C3D10I) performed as well as the hybrid hexahedral elements in terms of contact pressure and contact shear stress predictions. Although the enhanced quadratic tetrahedral element simulations were computationally expensive compared to hexahedral element simulations in both barefoot and footwear conditions, the enhanced quadratic tetrahedral element formulation seems to be very promising for foot and footwear applications as a result of decreased labor and expedited model development, all related to facilitated mesh generation.

  14. Optimum element density studies for finite-element thermal analysis of hypersonic aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Olona, Timothy; Muramoto, Kyle M.

    1990-01-01

    Different finite element models previously set up for thermal analysis of the space shuttle orbiter structure are discussed and their shortcomings identified. Element density criteria are established for the finite element thermal modelings of space shuttle orbiter-type large, hypersonic aircraft structures. These criteria are based on rigorous studies on solution accuracies using different finite element models having different element densities set up for one cell of the orbiter wing. Also, a method for optimization of the transient thermal analysis computer central processing unit (CPU) time is discussed. Based on the newly established element density criteria, the orbiter wing midspan segment was modeled for the examination of thermal analysis solution accuracies and the extent of computation CPU time requirements. The results showed that the distributions of the structural temperatures and the thermal stresses obtained from this wing segment model were satisfactory and the computation CPU time was at the acceptable level. The studies offered the hope that modeling the large, hypersonic aircraft structures using high-density elements for transient thermal analysis is possible if a CPU optimization technique was used.

  15. Finite element analysis of heat transport in a hydrothermal zone

    SciTech Connect

    Bixler, N.E.; Carrigan, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    Two-phase heat transport in the vicinity of a heated, subsurface zone is important for evaluation of nuclear waste repository design and estimation of geothermal energy recovery, as well as prediction of magma solidification rates. Finite element analyses of steady, two-phase, heat and mass transport have been performed to determine the relative importance of conduction and convection in a permeable medium adjacent to a hot, impermeable, vertical surface. The model includes the effects of liquid flow due to capillarity and buoyancy and vapor flow due to pressure gradients. Change of phase, with its associated latent heat effects, is also modeled. The mechanism of capillarity allows for the presence of two-phase zones, where both liquid and vapor can coexist, which has not been considered in previous investigations. The numerical method employs the standard Galerkin/finite element method, using eight-node, subparametric or isoparametric quadrilateral elements. In order to handle the extreme nonlinearities inherent in two-phase, nonisothermal, porous-flow problems, steady-state results are computed by integrating transients out to a long time (a method that is highly robust).

  16. Merging of intersecting triangulations for finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Cebral, J R; Löhner, R; Choyke, P L; Yim, P J

    2001-06-01

    Surface mesh generation over intersecting triangulations is a problem common to many branches of biomechanics. A new strategy for merging intersecting triangulations is described. The basis of the method is that object surfaces are represented as the zero-level iso-surface of the distance-to-surface function defined on a background grid. Thus, the triangulation of intersecting objects reduces to the extraction of an iso-surface from an unstructured grid. In a first step, a regular background mesh is constructed. For each point of the background grid, the closest distance to the surface of each object is computed. Background points are then classified as external or internal by checking the direction of the surface normal at the closest location and assigned a positive or negative distance, respectively. Finally, the zero-level iso-surface is constructed. This is the final triangulation of the intersecting objects. The overall accuracy is enhanced by adaptive refinement of the background grid elements. The resulting surface models are used as support surfaces to generate three-dimensional grids for finite element analysis. The algorithms are demonstrated by merging arterial branches independently reconstructed from contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images and by adding extra features such as vascular stents. Although the methodology is presented in the context of finite element analysis of blood flow, the algorithms are general and can be applied in other areas as well. PMID:11470121

  17. Elliptic interface problem solved using the mixed finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuqiang

    2007-05-01

    The elliptic boundary value/interface problem is very important in many applications, for example, in incompressible flow and MHD. Many methods are used to solve these problems in a complex domain, including the finite volume method, the finite element method and the boundary element method. For a complex computational domain, the better choice of the partition of the computational domain is to use an unstructured grid. However, it is not a straight forward task to implement a mesh generation program. Such a program requires extra computing time and resources (such as computer memory). Thus people like to use a structured mesh if possible, especially a cartesian mesh. Popular methods using structured cartesian grids for the elliptic boundary value/interface problem include the immersed boundary method, the immersed interface method, the ghost fluid method, and the embedded boundary method. This thesis solves the elliptic problem using several versions of the mixed nite element method on an unstructured mesh. The results are compared for speed and accuracy to the embedded boundary method. A ghost fluid method for elliptic boundary value/interface problems is also investigated. Finally, a simple test of the 2D Rayleigh-Taylor instability is performed using the FronTier-Lite package. Key Words. Elliptic Boundary Value, Interface, Mesh Generation, Quadtree, Octree, Front Tracking.

  18. Curved Thermopiezoelectric Shell Structures Modeled by Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ho-Jun

    2000-01-01

    "Smart" structures composed of piezoelectric materials may significantly improve the performance of aeropropulsion systems through a variety of vibration, noise, and shape-control applications. The development of analytical models for piezoelectric smart structures is an ongoing, in-house activity at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field focused toward the experimental characterization of these materials. Research efforts have been directed toward developing analytical models that account for the coupled mechanical, electrical, and thermal response of piezoelectric composite materials. Current work revolves around implementing thermal effects into a curvilinear-shell finite element code. This enhances capabilities to analyze curved structures and to account for coupling effects arising from thermal effects and the curved geometry. The current analytical model implements a unique mixed multi-field laminate theory to improve computational efficiency without sacrificing accuracy. The mechanics can model both the sensory and active behavior of piezoelectric composite shell structures. Finite element equations are being implemented for an eight-node curvilinear shell element, and numerical studies are being conducted to demonstrate capabilities to model the response of curved piezoelectric composite structures (see the figure).

  19. Automated Finite Element Analysis of Elastically-Tailored Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C. (Technical Monitor); Tatting, Brian F.; Guerdal, Zafer

    2003-01-01

    A procedure for analyzing and designing elastically tailored composite laminates using the STAGS finite element solver has been presented. The methodology used to produce the elastic tailoring, namely computer-controlled steering of unidirectionally reinforced composite material tows, has been reduced to a handful of design parameters along with a selection of construction methods. The generality of the tow-steered ply definition provides the user a wide variety of options for laminate design, which can be automatically incorporated with any finite element model that is composed of STAGS shell elements. Furthermore, the variable stiffness parameterization is formulated so that manufacturability can be assessed during the design process, plus new ideas using tow steering concepts can be easily integrated within the general framework of the elastic tailoring definitions. Details for the necessary implementation of the tow-steering definitions within the STAGS hierarchy is provided, and the format of the ply definitions is discussed in detail to provide easy access to the elastic tailoring choices. Integration of the automated STAGS solver with laminate design software has been demonstrated, so that the large design space generated by the tow-steering options can be traversed effectively. Several design problems are presented which confirm the usefulness of the design tool as well as further establish the potential of tow-steered plies for laminate design.

  20. Binary tree eigen solver in finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akl, F. A.; Janetzke, D. C.; Kiraly, L. J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a transputer-based binary tree eigensolver for the solution of the generalized eigenproblem in linear elastic finite element analysis. The algorithm is based on the method of recursive doubling, which parallel implementation of a number of associative operations on an arbitrary set having N elements is of the order of o(log2N), compared to (N-1) steps if implemented sequentially. The hardware used in the implementation of the binary tree consists of 32 transputers. The algorithm is written in OCCAM which is a high-level language developed with the transputers to address parallel programming constructs and to provide the communications between processors. The algorithm can be replicated to match the size of the binary tree transputer network. Parallel and sequential finite element analysis programs have been developed to solve for the set of the least-order eigenpairs using the modified subspace method. The speed-up obtained for a typical analysis problem indicates close agreement with the theoretical prediction given by the method of recursive doubling.

  1. Power flows and Mechanical Intensities in structural finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hambric, Stephen A.

    1989-01-01

    The identification of power flow paths in dynamically loaded structures is an important, but currently unavailable, capability for the finite element analyst. For this reason, methods for calculating power flows and mechanical intensities in finite element models are developed here. Formulations for calculating input and output powers, power flows, mechanical intensities, and power dissipations for beam, plate, and solid element types are derived. NASTRAN is used to calculate the required velocity, force, and stress results of an analysis, which a post-processor then uses to calculate power flow quantities. The SDRC I-deas Supertab module is used to view the final results. Test models include a simple truss and a beam-stiffened cantilever plate. Both test cases showed reasonable power flow fields over low to medium frequencies, with accurate power balances. Future work will include testing with more complex models, developing an interactive graphics program to view easily and efficiently the analysis results, applying shape optimization methods to the problem with power flow variables as design constraints, and adding the power flow capability to NASTRAN.

  2. Evaluation of a Kinematically-Driven Finite Element Footstrike Model.

    PubMed

    Hannah, Iain; Harland, Andy; Price, Dan; Schlarb, Heiko; Lucas, Tim

    2016-06-01

    A dynamic finite element model of a shod running footstrike was developed and driven with 6 degree of freedom foot segment kinematics determined from a motion capture running trial. Quadratic tetrahedral elements were used to mesh the footwear components with material models determined from appropriate mechanical tests. Model outputs were compared with experimental high-speed video (HSV) footage, vertical ground reaction force (GRF), and center of pressure (COP) excursion to determine whether such an approach is appropriate for the development of athletic footwear. Although unquantified, good visual agreement to the HSV footage was observed but significant discrepancies were found between the model and experimental GRF and COP readings (9% and 61% of model readings outside of the mean experimental reading ± 2 standard deviations, respectively). Model output was also found to be highly sensitive to input kinematics with a 120% increase in maximum GRF observed when translating the force platform 2 mm vertically. While representing an alternative approach to existing dynamic finite element footstrike models, loading highly representative of an experimental trial was not found to be achievable when employing exclusively kinematic boundary conditions. This significantly limits the usefulness of employing such an approach in the footwear development process.

  3. Binary tree eigen solver in finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Akl, F.A.; Janetzke, D.C.; Kiraly, L.J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a transputer-based binary tree eigensolver for the solution of the generalized eigenproblem in linear elastic finite element analysis. The algorithm is based on the method of recursive doubling, which parallel implementation of a number of associative operations on an arbitrary set having N elements is of the order of o(log2N), compared to (N-1) steps if implemented sequentially. The hardware used in the implementation of the binary tree consists of 32 transputers. The algorithm is written in OCCAM which is a high-level language developed with the transputers to address parallel programming constructs and to provide the communications between processors. The algorithm can be replicated to match the size of the binary tree transputer network. Parallel and sequential finite element analysis programs have been developed to solve for the set of the least-order eigenpairs using the modified subspace method. The speed-up obtained for a typical analysis problem indicates close agreement with the theoretical prediction given by the method of recursive doubling. 5 refs.

  4. Finite-element impact response of debonded composite turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Sudip; Karmakar, Amit

    2014-02-01

    This paper investigates on the transient behavior of debonded composite pretwisted rotating shallow conical shells which could be idealized as turbine blades subjected to low velocity normal impact using finite-element method. Lagrange's equation of motion is used to derive the dynamic equilibrium equation and the moderate rotational speeds are considered neglecting the Coriolis effect. An eight-noded isoparametric plate bending element is employed in the finite element formulation incorporating rotary inertia and effects of transverse shear deformation based on Mindlin's theory. The modified Hertzian contact law which accounts for permanent indentation is utilized to compute the impact parameters. The time-dependent equations are solved by using Newmark's time integration scheme. Parametric studies are performed to investigate the effects of triggering parameters like angle of twist, rotational speed, laminate configuration and location of debonding considering low velocity normal impact at the center of eight-layered graphite-epoxy composite cantilevered conical shells with bending stiff ([0o2/{±} 30o]s), torsion stiff ([45°/-45°/-45°/45°]s) and cross-ply ([0°/90°/0°/90°]s) laminate configurations.

  5. Development of a Specific Finite Element for Timber Joint Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descamps, Thierry; Van Parys, Laurent; Datoussaïd, Sélim

    2011-01-01

    Widely used for light frame structures or for heavy laminated wood structures, dowel-type fasteners are the most commonly used kind of connectors in timber construction. The purpose of this work is to develop a tool for the semi-rigid analysis and design of such joints. Firstly, interests and approaches described in literature for the semi-rigid modeling of timber plane frames are summarized. Secondly, for a better understanding of the problem, the main characteristics of wood used as a structural material are presented. Finally, a method for an efficient study of joints built with dowel-type fasteners is proposed and developed. This method consists of the introduction of a specific finite element called "Finite Semi-Rigid Element (FSRE)" between the ends of the jointed members. This joint element consists of two nodes, each with three degrees of freedom. These nodes will be tied with common beamelements during the FE analysis. The stiffness of the FSRE is computed from the geometry of the joints and embedding stiffness of all fasteners, along and perpendicular to the grain. The embedding characteristics of fasteners are defined with help of their experimental load-slip curves (fitted with Foschi's models) leading finally to the resolution of a FE non-linear problem.

  6. Simplified Finite Element Modelling of Acoustically Treated Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carfagni, M.; Citti, P.; Pierini, M.

    1997-07-01

    The application of non-optimized damping and phono-absorbent materials to automotive systems has not proved fully satisfactory in abating noise and vibration. The objective of this work was to develop a simple finite element modelling procedure that would allow optimizing structures such as a car body-in-white in terms of vibroacoustic behavior from the design stage. A procedure was developed to determine the modifications to be made in the mass, stiffness and damping characteristics in the finite element (FE) modelling of a metal structure meshed with shell elements so that the model would describe the behavior of the acoustically treated structure. To validate the modifications, a numerical-experimental comparison of the velocities on the vibrating surface was carried out, followed by a numerical-experimental comparison of the sound pressures generated by the vibrating plate. In the comparison a simple monopole model was used, in which each area of vibrating surface could be likened to a point source. The simulation and experimental procedures, previously validated for the metal structure, were then applied to multi-layered panels. Good agreement between the experimental and simulated velocities and sound pressures resulted for all the multi-layered panel configurations examined.

  7. Numerical algorithms for finite element computations on arrays of microprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The development of a multicolored successive over relaxation (SOR) program for the finite element machine is discussed. The multicolored SOR method uses a generalization of the classical Red/Black grid point ordering for the SOR method. These multicolored orderings have the advantage of allowing the SOR method to be implemented as a Jacobi method, which is ideal for arrays of processors, but still enjoy the greater rate of convergence of the SOR method. The program solves a general second order self adjoint elliptic problem on a square region with Dirichlet boundary conditions, discretized by quadratic elements on triangular regions. For this general problem and discretization, six colors are necessary for the multicolored method to operate efficiently. The specific problem that was solved using the six color program was Poisson's equation; for Poisson's equation, three colors are necessary but six may be used. In general, the number of colors needed is a function of the differential equation, the region and boundary conditions, and the particular finite element used for the discretization.

  8. Progress on a Taylor weak statement finite element algorithm for high-speed aerodynamic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.; Freels, J. D.

    1989-01-01

    A new finite element numerical Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) algorithm has matured to the point of efficiently solving two-dimensional high speed real-gas compressible flow problems in generalized coordinates on modern vector computer systems. The algorithm employs a Taylor Weak Statement classical Galerkin formulation, a variably implicit Newton iteration, and a tensor matrix product factorization of the linear algebra Jacobian under a generalized coordinate transformation. Allowing for a general two-dimensional conservation law system, the algorithm has been exercised on the Euler and laminar forms of the Navier-Stokes equations. Real-gas fluid properties are admitted, and numerical results verify solution accuracy, efficiency, and stability over a range of test problem parameters.

  9. A Least-Squares Finite Element Method for Electromagnetic Scattering Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jie; Jiang, Bo-nan

    1996-01-01

    The least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) is applied to electromagnetic scattering and radar cross section (RCS) calculations. In contrast to most existing numerical approaches, in which divergence-free constraints are omitted, the LSFF-M directly incorporates two divergence equations in the discretization process. The importance of including the divergence equations is demonstrated by showing that otherwise spurious solutions with large divergence occur near the scatterers. The LSFEM is based on unstructured grids and possesses full flexibility in handling complex geometry and local refinement Moreover, the LSFEM does not require any special handling, such as upwinding, staggered grids, artificial dissipation, flux-differencing, etc. Implicit time discretization is used and the scheme is unconditionally stable. By using a matrix-free iterative method, the computational cost and memory requirement for the present scheme is competitive with other approaches. The accuracy of the LSFEM is verified by several benchmark test problems.

  10. Domain decomposition method for nonconforming finite element approximations of anisotropic elliptic problems on nonmatching grids

    SciTech Connect

    Maliassov, S.Y.

    1996-12-31

    An approach to the construction of an iterative method for solving systems of linear algebraic equations arising from nonconforming finite element discretizations with nonmatching grids for second order elliptic boundary value problems with anisotropic coefficients is considered. The technique suggested is based on decomposition of the original domain into nonoverlapping subdomains. The elliptic problem is presented in the macro-hybrid form with Lagrange multipliers at the interfaces between subdomains. A block diagonal preconditioner is proposed which is spectrally equivalent to the original saddle point matrix and has the optimal order of arithmetical complexity. The preconditioner includes blocks for preconditioning subdomain and interface problems. It is shown that constants of spectral equivalence axe independent of values of coefficients and mesh step size.

  11. Investigating size effects of complex nanostructures through Young-Laplace equation and finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Dingjie; Xie, Yi Min; Huang, Xiaodong; Zhou, Shiwei; Li, Qing

    2015-11-28

    Analytical studies on the size effects of a simply-shaped beam fixed at both ends have successfully explained the sudden changes of effective Young's modulus as its diameter decreases below 100 nm. Yet they are invalid for complex nanostructures ubiquitously existing in nature. In accordance with a generalized Young-Laplace equation, one of the representative size effects is transferred to non-uniformly distributed pressure against an external surface due to the imbalance of inward and outward loads. Because the magnitude of pressure depends on the principal curvatures, iterative steps have to be adopted to gradually stabilize the structure in finite element analysis. Computational results are in good agreement with both experiment data and theoretical prediction. Furthermore, the investigation on strengthened and softened Young's modulus for two complex nanostructures demonstrates that the proposed computational method provides a general and effective approach to analyze the size effects for nanostructures in arbitrary shape.

  12. A discontinuous Galerkin finite element discretization of the Euler equations for compressible and incompressible fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Pesch, L. Vegt, J.J.W. van der

    2008-05-10

    Using the generalized variable formulation of the Euler equations of fluid dynamics, we develop a numerical method that is capable of simulating the flow of fluids with widely differing thermodynamic behavior: ideal and real gases can be treated with the same method as an incompressible fluid. The well-defined incompressible limit relies on using pressure primitive or entropy variables. In particular entropy variables can provide numerical methods with attractive properties, e.g. fulfillment of the second law of thermodynamics. We show how a discontinuous Galerkin finite element discretization previously used for compressible flow with an ideal gas equation of state can be extended for general fluids. We also examine which components of the numerical method have to be changed or adapted. Especially, we investigate different possibilities of solving the nonlinear algebraic system with a pseudo-time iteration. Numerical results highlight the applicability of the method for various fluids.

  13. A solution of two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic flow using the finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Verardi, S.L.L.; Cardoso, J.R.; Motta, C.C.

    1998-09-01

    The problem of magnetohydrodynamic flow through channels has become important because of several engineering applications such as design of nuclear reactor cooling systems, electromagnetic pumps, MHD flowmeters, MHD generators, blood flow measurements, etc. A numerical code based on the Finite Element Method (FEM) was developed to solve the two-dimensional, steady-state magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow in a rectangular channel. In order to apply the FEM, the Galerkin Weak Formulation was used. In this analysis, in contrast with the previous works, the thickness of the duct wall is taken into account and the results are compared to those obtained in the limit case when the thickness is much smaller than a characteristic dimension of the duct. In this case, convergence behavior of several iterative methods, for high Hartmann numbers, was also investigated.

  14. Finite element analysis of thumb carpometacarpal joint implants

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, C.

    1995-11-01

    The thumb carpometacarpal joint is frequently replaced in women who have developed severe osteoarthritis of the hand. A new, privately developed implant design consists of two components, trapezial and metacarpal, each with a saddle-shaped articulating surface. A three dimensional finite element model of this implant has been developed to analyze stresses on the device. The first simulations using the model involve loading the implant with forces normal to the trapezial component. Preliminary results show contact stress distributions at the particulating surfaces of the implant.

  15. Finite Element Modeling of Transient Thermography Inspection of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Tsuchin Philip

    1998-01-01

    Several finite element models of defects such as debond and void have been developed for composite panels subjected to transient thermography inspection. Since the exact nature of the heat generated from the flash lamps is unknown, direct comparison between FEA and experimental results is not possible. However, some similarity of the results has been observed. The shape of the time curve that simulates the heat flux from the flash lamps has minimal effect on the temperature profiles. Double the number of flash lamps could increase the contrast of thermal image and define the shape of defect better.

  16. Visualizing Higher Order Finite Elements: FY05 Yearly Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, David; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2005-11-01

    This report contains an algorithm for decomposing higher-order finite elementsinto regions appropriate for isosurfacing and proves the conditions under which thealgorithm will terminate. Finite elements are used to create piecewise polynomialapproximants to the solution of partial differential equations for which no analyticalsolution exists. These polynomials represent fields such as pressure, stress, and mo-mentim. In the past, these polynomials have been linear in each parametric coordinate.Each polynomial coefficient must be uniquely determined by a simulation, and thesecoefficients are called degrees of freedom. When there are not enough degrees of free-dom, simulations will typically fail to produce a valid approximation to the solution.Recent work has shown that increasing the number of degrees of freedom by increas-ing the order of the polynomial approximation (instead of increasing the number offinite elements, each of which has its own set of coefficients) can allow some typesof simulations to produce a valid approximation with many fewer degrees of freedomthan increasing the number of finite elements alone. However, once the simulation hasdetermined the values of all the coefficients in a higher-order approximant, tools donot exist for visual inspection of the solution.This report focuses on a technique for the visual inspection of higher-order finiteelement simulation results based on decomposing each finite element into simplicialregions where existing visualization algorithms such as isosurfacing will work. Therequirements of the isosurfacing algorithm are enumerated and related to the placeswhere the partial derivatives of the polynomial become zero. The original isosurfacingalgorithm is then applied to each of these regions in turn.3 AcknowledgementThe authors would like to thank David Day and Louis Romero for their insight into poly-nomial system solvers and the LDRD Senior Council for the opportunity to pursue thisresearch. The authors were

  17. Assessing performance and validating finite element simulations using probabilistic knowledge

    SciTech Connect

    Dolin, Ronald M.; Rodriguez, E. A.

    2002-01-01

    Two probabilistic approaches for assessing performance are presented. The first approach assesses probability of failure by simultaneously modeling all likely events. The probability each event causes failure along with the event's likelihood of occurrence contribute to the overall probability of failure. The second assessment method is based on stochastic sampling using an influence diagram. Latin-hypercube sampling is used to stochastically assess events. The overall probability of failure is taken as the maximum probability of failure of all the events. The Likelihood of Occurrence simulation suggests failure does not occur while the Stochastic Sampling approach predicts failure. The Likelihood of Occurrence results are used to validate finite element predictions.

  18. Seakeeping with the semi-Lagrangian particle finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadukandi, Prashanth; Servan-Camas, Borja; Becker, Pablo Agustín; Garcia-Espinosa, Julio

    2016-07-01

    The application of the semi-Lagrangian particle finite element method (SL-PFEM) for the seakeeping simulation of the wave adaptive modular vehicle under spray generating conditions is presented. The time integration of the Lagrangian advection is done using the explicit integration of the velocity and acceleration along the streamlines (X-IVAS). Despite the suitability of the SL-PFEM for the considered seakeeping application, small time steps were needed in the X-IVAS scheme to control the solution accuracy. A preliminary proposal to overcome this limitation of the X-IVAS scheme for seakeeping simulations is presented.

  19. Analysis of Waveguide Junction Discontinuities Using Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, Manohar D.

    1997-01-01

    A Finite Element Method (FEM) is presented to determine reflection and transmission coefficients of rectangular waveguide junction discontinuities. An H-plane discontinuity, an E-plane ridge discontinuity, and a step discontinuity in a concentric rectangular waveguide junction are analyzed using the FEM procedure. Also, reflection and transmission coefficients due to presence of a gap between two sections of a rectangular waveguide are determined using the FEM. The numerical results obtained by the present method are in excellent agreement with the earlier published results. The numerical results obtained by the FEM are compared with the numerical results obtained using the Mode Matching Method (MMM) and also with the measured data.

  20. Finite element analysis of laminated plates and shells, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seide, P.; Chang, P. N. H.

    1978-01-01

    The finite element method is used to investigate the static behavior of laminated composite flat plates and cylindrical shells. The analysis incorporates the effects of transverse shear deformation in each layer through the assumption that the normals to the undeformed layer midsurface remain straight but need not be normal to the mid-surface after deformation. A digital computer program was developed to perform the required computations. The program includes a very efficient equation solution code which permits the analysis of large size problems. The method is applied to the problem of stretching and bending of a perforated curved plate.

  1. Modelling the viscoelasticity of ceramic tiles by finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovic, Ana; Fragassa, Cristiano

    2016-05-01

    This research details a numerical method aiming at investigating the viscoelastic behaviour of a specific family of ceramic material, the Grès Porcelain, during an uncommon transformation, known as pyroplasticity, which occurs when a ceramic tile bends under a combination of thermal stress and own weight. In general, the theory of viscoelasticity can be considered extremely large and precise, but its application on real cases is particularly delicate. A time-depending problem, as viscoelasticity naturally is, has to be merged with a temperature-depending situation. This paper investigates how the viscoelastic response of bending ceramic materials can be modelled by commercial Finite Elements codes.

  2. Vector algorithms for geometrically nonlinear 3D finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, John D.

    1989-01-01

    Algorithms for geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis are presented which exploit the vector processing capability of the VPS-32, which is closely related to the CYBER 205. By manipulating vectors (which are long lists of numbers) rather than individual numbers, very high processing speeds are obtained. Long vector lengths are obtained without extensive replication or reordering by storage of intermediate results in strategic patterns at all stages of the computations. Comparisons of execution times with those from programs using either scalar or other vector programming techniques indicate that the algorithms presented are quite efficient.

  3. Finite-element simulation of myocardial electrical excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasserman, I. N.; Matveenko, V. P.; Shardakov, I. N.; Shestakov, A. P.

    2014-01-01

    Based on a single-domain model of myocardial conduction, isotropic and anisotropic finite element models of the myocardium are developed allowing excitation wave propagation to be studied. The Aliev-Panfilov phenomenological equations were used as the relations between the transmembrane current and the transmembrane potential. Interaction of an additional source of initial excitation with an excitation wave that passed and the spread of the excitation wave are studied using heart tomograms. A numerical solution is obtained using a splitting algorithm that allows the nonlinear boundary-value problem to be reduced to a sequence of simpler problems: ordinary differential equations and linear boundary-value problems in partial derivatives.

  4. Finite element model of thermal processes in retinal photocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sramek, Christopher; Paulus, Yannis M.; Nomoto, Hiroyuki; Huie, Phil; Palanker, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    Short duration (< 20 ms) pulses are desirable in patterned scanning laser photocoagulation to confine thermal damage to the photoreceptor layer, decrease overall treatment time and reduce pain. However, short exposures have a smaller therapeutic window (defined as the ratio of rupture threshold power to that of light coagulation). We have constructed a finite-element computational model of retinal photocoagulation to predict spatial damage and improve the therapeutic window. Model parameters were inferred from experimentally measured absorption characteristics of ocular tissues, as well as the thresholds of vaporization, coagulation, and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) damage. Calculated lesion diameters showed good agreement with histological measurements over a wide range of pulse durations and powers.

  5. Finite element modelling of a rotating piezoelectric ultrasonic motor.

    PubMed

    Frangi, A; Corigliano, A; Binci, M; Faure, P

    2005-10-01

    The evaluation of the performance of ultrasonic motors as a function of input parameters such as the driving frequency, voltage input and pre-load on the rotor is of key importance to their development and is here addressed by means of a finite element three-dimensional model. First the stator is simulated as a fully deformable elastic body and the travelling wave dynamics is accurately reproduced; secondly the interaction through contact between the stator and the rotor is accounted for by assuming that the rotor behaves as a rigid surface. Numerical results for the whole motor are finally compared to available experimental data.

  6. Finite element analysis of the stiffness of fabric reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foye, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this work is the prediction of all three dimensional elastic moduli of textile fabric reinforced composites. The analysis is general enough for use with complex reinforcing geometries and capable of subsequent improvements. It places no restrictions on fabric microgeometry except that the unit cell be determinate and rectangular. The unit cell is divided into rectangular subcells in which the reinforcing geometries are easier to define and analyze. The analysis, based on inhomogeneous finite elements, is applied to a variety of weave, braid, and knit reinforced composites. Some of these predictions are correlated to test data.

  7. Finite-element approach to Brownian dynamics of polymers.

    PubMed

    Cyron, Christian J; Wall, Wolfgang A

    2009-12-01

    In the last decades simulation tools for Brownian dynamics of polymers have attracted more and more interest. Such simulation tools have been applied to a large variety of problems and accelerated the scientific progress significantly. However, the currently most frequently used explicit bead models exhibit severe limitations, especially with respect to time step size, the necessity of artificial constraints and the lack of a sound mathematical foundation. Here we present a framework for simulations of Brownian polymer dynamics based on the finite-element method. This approach allows simulating a wide range of physical phenomena at a highly attractive computational cost on the basis of a far-developed mathematical background.

  8. Finite Element Analysis of Brain Injury due to Head Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Chang Min; Kim, Sung Ho; Goldsmith, Werner

    Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) due to head impact by external impactor was analyzed using Finite Element Method (FEM). Two-dimensiona modeling was performed according to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data of Mongolian subject. Pressure variation in a cranium due to external impact was analyzed in order to simulate Nahum et al.'s cadaver test.6 And, analyzed results were compared with Nahum et al.'s experimental data.6 As results, stress and strain behaviors of the brain during impact were accorded with experimental data qualitatively even though there were some differences in quantitative values. In addition, they were accorded with other references about brain injury as well.

  9. Plane-wave fluorescence tomography with adaptive finite elements.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Amit; Bangerth, Wolfgang; Hwang, Kildong; Rasmussen, John; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M

    2006-01-15

    We present three-dimensional fluorescence yield tomography of a tissue phantom in a noncontact reflectance imaging setup. The method employs planar illumination with modulated light and frequency domain fluorescence measurements made on the illumination plane. An adaptive finite-element algorithm is used to handle the ill-posed and computationally demanding inverse image reconstruction problem. Tomographic images of fluorescent targets buried at 1-2 cm depths from the illumination surface demonstrate the feasibility of fluorescence tomography from reflectance tomography in clinically relevant tissue volumes.

  10. Finite element methods for non-Newtonian flows

    SciTech Connect

    Gartling, D.K.

    1992-10-01

    The application of the finite element method to problems in non-Newtonian fluid mechanics is described. The formulation of the basic equations is presented for both inelastic and viscoelastic constitutive models. Solution algorithms for treating the material nonlinearities associated with inelastic fluids are described; typical solution procedures for the implicit stress-rate equations of viscoelastic fluids are also presented. Methods for the simulation of various types of free-surface flows are also outlined. Simple example analyses are included for both types of fluid models.

  11. Finite Element Modeling Techniques for Analysis of VIIP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feola, Andrew J.; Raykin, J.; Gleason, R.; Mulugeta, Lealem; Myers, Jerry G.; Nelson, Emily S.; Samuels, Brian C.; Ethier, C. Ross

    2015-01-01

    Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome is a major health concern for long-duration space missions. Currently, it is thought that a cephalad fluid shift in microgravity causes elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) that is transmitted along the optic nerve sheath (ONS). We hypothesize that this in turn leads to alteration and remodeling of connective tissue in the posterior eye which impacts vision. Finite element (FE) analysis is a powerful tool for examining the effects of mechanical loads in complex geometries. Our goal is to build a FE analysis framework to understand the response of the lamina cribrosa and optic nerve head to elevations in ICP in VIIP.

  12. Dual Formulations of Mixed Finite Element Methods with Applications.

    PubMed

    Gillette, Andrew; Bajaj, Chandrajit

    2011-10-01

    Mixed finite element methods solve a PDE using two or more variables. The theory of Discrete Exterior Calculus explains why the degrees of freedom associated to the different variables should be stored on both primal and dual domain meshes with a discrete Hodge star used to transfer information between the meshes. We show through analysis and examples that the choice of discrete Hodge star is essential to the numerical stability of the method. Additionally, we define interpolation functions and discrete Hodge stars on dual meshes which can be used to create previously unconsidered mixed methods. Examples from magnetostatics and Darcy flow are examined in detail.

  13. SPAR data set contents. [finite element structural analysis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, S. W.

    1981-01-01

    The contents of the stored data sets of the SPAR (space processing applications rocket) finite element structural analysis system are documented. The data generated by each of the system's processors are stored in a data file organized as a library. Each data set, containing a two-dimensional table or matrix, is identified by a four-word name listed in a table of contents. The creating SPAR processor, number of rows and columns, and definitions of each of the data items are listed for each data set. An example SPAR problem using these data sets is also presented.

  14. Galerkin finite-element simulation of a geothermal reservoir

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mercer, J.W.; Pinder, G.F.

    1973-01-01

    The equations describing fluid flow and energy transport in a porous medium can be used to formulate a mathematical model capable of simulating the transient response of a hot-water geothermal reservoir. The resulting equations can be solved accurately and efficiently using a numerical scheme which combines the finite element approach with the Galerkin method of approximation. Application of this numerical model to the Wairakei geothermal field demonstrates that hot-water geothermal fields can be simulated using numerical techniques currently available and under development. ?? 1973.

  15. Finite Element Analysis of 2-D Elastic Contacts Involving FGMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abhilash, M. N.; Murthy, H.

    2014-05-01

    The response of elastic indenters in contact with Functionally Graded Material (FGM) coated homogeneous elastic half space has been presented in the current paper. Finite element analysis has been used due to its ability to handle complex geometry, material, and boundary conditions. Indenters of different typical surface profiles have been considered and the problem has been idealized as a two-dimensional (2D) plane strain problem considering only normal loads. Initially, indenters were considered to be rigid and the results were validated with the solutions presented in the literature. The analysis has then been extended to the case of elastic indenters on FGM-coated half spaces and the results are discussed.

  16. Finite element prediction of vibro-acoustic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hipol, Philip J.

    1989-09-01

    An efficient analytical methodology has been developed with the finite element method which may be used to predict the low frequency vibro-acoustic environment within an aerospace flight vehicle. This methodology includes general purpose capabilities for solving problems involving the effects of structure/acoustic interaction and random excitation pressure fields. Computational efficiency is enhanced by decoupling the structure from the acoustic volume, and taking advantage of reciprocity in the random vibration and vibro-acoustic formulations. The application of the analytical methodology to an example problem found good agreement with previous research, demonstrating the feasibility of the methodology described herein.

  17. Finite Element Algorithm for Frictionless Contact of Porous Permeable Media Under Finite Deformation and Sliding

    PubMed Central

    Ateshian, Gerard A.; Maas, Steve; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    Background This study formulates and implements a finite element contact algorithm for solid-fluid (biphasic) mixtures, accommodating both finite deformation and sliding. The finite element source code is made available to the general public. Methods The algorithm uses a penalty method regularized with an augmented Lagrangian method to enforce the continuity of contact traction and normal component of fluid flux across the contact interface. The formulation addresses the need to automatically enforce free-draining conditions outside of the contact interface. The formulation addresses the need to automatically enforce free-draining conditions outside of the contact interface. Results The accuracy of the implementation is verified using contact problems for which exact solutions are obtained by alternative analyses. Illustrations are also provided that demonstrate large deformations and sliding under configurations relevant to biomechanical applications such as articular contact. Conclusions This study addresses an important computational need in the biomechanics of porous-permeable soft tissues. Placing the source code in the public domain provides a useful resource to the biomechanics community. PMID:20887031

  18. A finite element-boundary element method for advection-diffusion problems with variable advective fields and infinite domains

    SciTech Connect

    Driessen, B.J.; Dohner, J.L.

    1998-08-01

    In this paper a hybrid, finite element--boundary element method which can be used to solve for particle advection-diffusion in infinite domains with variable advective fields is presented. In previous work either boundary element, finite element, or difference methods have been used to solve for particle motion in advective-diffusive domains. These methods have a number of limitations. Due to the complexity of computing spatially dependent Green`s functions, the boundary element method is limited to domains containing only constant advective fields, and due to their inherent formulation, finite element and finite difference methods are limited to only domains of finite spatial extent. Thus, finite element and finite difference methods are limited to finite space problems for which the boundary element method is not, and the boundary element method is limited to constant advection field problems for which finite element and finite difference methods are not. In this paper it is proposed to split a domain into two sub-domains, and for each of these sub domains, apply the appropriate solution method; thereby, producing a method for the total infinite space, variable advective field domain.

  19. Higher order finite element analysis of thick composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goering, J.; Kim, H. J.

    1992-01-01

    A higher order, sub-parametric, laminated, 3D solid finite element was used for the analysis of very thick laminated composite plates. The geometry of this element is defined by four nodes in the X-Y plane which define a prism of material through the thickness of the laminate. There are twenty-four degrees of freedom at each node; translations at the upper and lower surfaces of the laminate in each of the three coordinate directions, and the derivatives of these translations with respect to each coordinate. This choice of degrees of freedom leads to displacement and strain compatibility at the corners. Stacking sequence effects are accounted for by explicitly integrating the strain energy density through the thickness of the element. The laminated solid element was combined with a gap-contact element to analyze thick laminated composite lugs loaded through flexible pins. The resulting model accounts for pin bending effects that produce non-uniform bearing stresses through the thickness of the lug. A thick composite lug experimental test program was performed, and provided data that was used to validate the analytical model. Two lug geometries and three stacking sequences were tested.

  20. Iterative Fourier transform algorithm: different approaches to diffractive optical element design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skeren, Marek; Richter, Ivan; Fiala, Pavel

    2002-10-01

    This contribution focuses on the study and comparison of different design approaches for designing phase-only diffractive optical elements (PDOEs) for different possible applications in laser beam shaping. Especially, new results and approaches, concerning the iterative Fourier transform algorithm, are analyzed, implemented, and compared. Namely, various approaches within the iterative Fourier transform algorithm (IFTA) are analyzed for the case of phase-only diffractive optical elements with quantizied phase levels (either binary or multilevel structures). First, the general scheme of the IFTA iterative approach with partial quantization is briefly presented and discussed. Then, the special assortment of the general IFTA scheme is given with respect to quantization constraint strategies. Based on such a special classification, the three practically interesting approaches are chosen, further-analyzed, and compared to eachother. The performance of these algorithms is compared in detail in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio characteristic developments with respect to the numberof iterations, for various input diffusive-type objects chose. Also, the performance is documented on the complex spectra developments for typical computer reconstruction results. The advantages and drawbacks of all approaches are discussed, and a brief guide on the choice of a particular approach for typical design tasks is given. Finally, the two ways of amplitude elimination within the design procedure are considered, namely the direct elimination and partial elimination of the amplitude of the complex hologram function.

  1. An 8-node tetrahedral finite element suitable for explicit transient dynamic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Key, S.W.; Heinstein, M.W.; Stone, C.M.

    1997-12-31

    Considerable effort has been expended in perfecting the algorithmic properties of 8-node hexahedral finite elements. Today the element is well understood and performs exceptionally well when used in modeling three-dimensional explicit transient dynamic events. However, the automatic generation of all-hexahedral meshes remains an elusive achievement. The alternative of automatic generation for all-tetrahedral finite element is a notoriously poor performer, and the 10-node quadratic tetrahedral finite element while a better performer numerically is computationally expensive. To use the all-tetrahedral mesh generation extant today, the authors have explored the creation of a quality 8-node tetrahedral finite element (a four-node tetrahedral finite element enriched with four midface nodal points). The derivation of the element`s gradient operator, studies in obtaining a suitable mass lumping and the element`s performance in applications are presented. In particular, they examine the 80node tetrahedral finite element`s behavior in longitudinal plane wave propagation, in transverse cylindrical wave propagation, and in simulating Taylor bar impacts. The element only samples constant strain states and, therefore, has 12 hourglass modes. In this regard, it bears similarities to the 8-node, mean-quadrature hexahedral finite element. Given automatic all-tetrahedral meshing, the 8-node, constant-strain tetrahedral finite element is a suitable replacement for the 8-node hexahedral finite element and handbuilt meshes.

  2. Subject specific finite element modeling of periprosthetic femoral fracture using element deactivation to simulate bone failure.

    PubMed

    Miles, Brad; Kolos, Elizabeth; Walter, William L; Appleyard, Richard; Shi, Angela; Li, Qing; Ruys, Andrew J

    2015-06-01

    Subject-specific finite element (FE) modeling methodology could predict peri-prosthetic femoral fracture (PFF) for cementless hip arthoplasty in the early postoperative period. This study develops methodology for subject-specific finite element modeling by using the element deactivation technique to simulate bone failure and validate with experimental testing, thereby predicting peri-prosthetic femoral fracture in the early postoperative period. Material assignments for biphasic and triphasic models were undertaken. Failure modeling with the element deactivation feature available in ABAQUS 6.9 was used to simulate a crack initiation and propagation in the bony tissue based upon a threshold of fracture strain. The crack mode for the biphasic models was very similar to the experimental testing crack mode, with a similar shape and path of the crack. The fracture load is sensitive to the friction coefficient at the implant-bony interface. The development of a novel technique to simulate bone failure by element deactivation of subject-specific finite element models could aid prediction of fracture load in addition to fracture risk characterization for PFF. PMID:25937546

  3. An Approach for Assessing Delamination Propagation Capabilities in Commercial Finite Element Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    An approach to assessing the delamination propagation capabilities in commercial finite element codes is presented and demonstrated for one code. For this investigation, the Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) specimen and the Single Leg Bending (SLB) specimen were chosen for full three-dimensional finite element simulations. First, benchmark results were created for both specimens. Second, starting from an initially straight front, the delamination was allowed to propagate. Good agreement between the load-displacement relationship obtained from the propagation analysis results and the benchmark results could be achieved by selecting the appropriate input parameters. Selecting the appropriate input parameters, however, was not straightforward and often required an iterative procedure. Qualitatively, the delamination front computed for the DCB specimen did not take the shape of a curved front as expected. However, the analysis of the SLB specimen yielded a curved front as may be expected from the distribution of the energy release rate and the failure index across the width of the specimen. Overall, the results are encouraging but further assessment on a structural level is required.

  4. An Approach to Assess Delamination Propagation Simulation Capabilities in Commercial Finite Element Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    An approach for assessing the delamination propagation simulation capabilities in commercial finite element codes is presented and demonstrated. For this investigation, the Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) specimen and the Single Leg Bending (SLB) specimen were chosen for full three-dimensional finite element simulations. First, benchmark results were created for both specimens. Second, starting from an initially straight front, the delamination was allowed to propagate. The load-displacement relationship and the total strain energy obtained from the propagation analysis results and the benchmark results were compared and good agreements could be achieved by selecting the appropriate input parameters. Selecting the appropriate input parameters, however, was not straightforward and often required an iterative procedure. Qualitatively, the delamination front computed for the DCB specimen did not take the shape of a curved front as expected. However, the analysis of the SLB specimen yielded a curved front as was expected from the distribution of the energy release rate and the failure index across the width of the specimen. Overall, the results are encouraging but further assessment on a structural level is required.

  5. Large-scale All-electron Density Functional Theory Calculations using Enriched Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanungo, Bikash; Gavini, Vikram

    We present a computationally efficient method to perform large-scale all-electron density functional theory calculations by enriching the Lagrange polynomial basis in classical finite element (FE) discretization with atom-centered numerical basis functions, which are obtained from the solutions of the Kohn-Sham (KS) problem for single atoms. We term these atom-centered numerical basis functions as enrichment functions. The integrals involved in the construction of the discrete KS Hamiltonian and overlap matrix are computed using an adaptive quadrature grid based on gradients in the enrichment functions. Further, we propose an efficient scheme to invert the overlap matrix by exploiting its LDL factorization and employing spectral finite elements along with Gauss-Lobatto quadrature rules. Finally, we use a Chebyshev polynomial based acceleration technique to compute the occupied eigenspace in each self-consistent iteration. We demonstrate the accuracy, efficiency and scalability of the proposed method on various metallic and insulating benchmark systems, with systems ranging in the order of 10,000 electrons. We observe a 50-100 fold reduction in the overall computational time when compared to classical FE calculations while being commensurate with the desired chemical accuracy. We acknowledge the support of NSF (Grant No. 1053145) and ARO (Grant No. W911NF-15-1-0158) in conducting this work.

  6. Solution of 3D inverse scattering problems by combined inverse equivalent current and finite element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kılıç, Emre Eibert, Thomas F.

    2015-05-01

    An approach combining boundary integral and finite element methods is introduced for the solution of three-dimensional inverse electromagnetic medium scattering problems. Based on the equivalence principle, unknown equivalent electric and magnetic surface current densities on a closed surface are utilized to decompose the inverse medium problem into two parts: a linear radiation problem and a nonlinear cavity problem. The first problem is formulated by a boundary integral equation, the computational burden of which is reduced by employing the multilevel fast multipole method (MLFMM). Reconstructed Cauchy data on the surface allows the utilization of the Lorentz reciprocity and the Poynting's theorems. Exploiting these theorems, the noise level and an initial guess are estimated for the cavity problem. Moreover, it is possible to determine whether the material is lossy or not. In the second problem, the estimated surface currents form inhomogeneous boundary conditions of the cavity problem. The cavity problem is formulated by the finite element technique and solved iteratively by the Gauss–Newton method to reconstruct the properties of the object. Regularization for both the first and the second problems is achieved by a Krylov subspace method. The proposed method is tested against both synthetic and experimental data and promising reconstruction results are obtained.

  7. Superconducting axisymmetric finite elements based on a gauged potential variational principle. Part 1: Formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuler, James J.; Felippa, Carlos A.

    1994-01-01

    The present work is part of a research program for the numerical simulation of electromagnetic (EM) fields within conventional Ginzburg-Landau (GL) superconductors. The final goal of this research is to formulate, develop and validate finite element (FE) models that can accurately capture electromagnetic thermal and material phase changes in a superconductor. The formulations presented here are for a time-independent Ginzburg-Landau superconductor and are derived from a potential-based variational principle. We develop an appropriate variational formulation of time-independent supercontivity for the general three-dimensional case and specialize it to the one-dimensional case. Also developed are expressions for the material-dependent parameters alpha and beta of GL theory and their dependence upon the temperature T. The one-dimensional formulation is then discretized for finite element purposes and the first variation of these equations is obtained. The resultant Euler equations contain nonlinear terms in the primary variables. To solve these equations, an incremental-iterative solution method is used. Expressions for the internal force vector, external force vector, loading vector and tangent stiffness matrix are therefore developed for use with the solution procedure.

  8. An Approach for Assessing Delamination Propagation Capabilities in Commercial Finite Element Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    An approach for assessing the delamination propagation capabilities in commercial finite element codes is presented and demonstrated for one code. For this investigation, the Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) specimen and the Single Leg Bending (SLB) specimen were chosen for full three-dimensional finite element simulations. First, benchmark results were created for both specimens. Second, starting from an initially straight front, the delamination was allowed to propagate. Good agreement between the load-displacement relationship obtained from the propagation analysis results and the benchmark results could be achieved by selecting the appropriate input parameters. Selecting the appropriate input parameters, however, was not straightforward and often required an iterative procedure. Qualitatively, the delamination front computed for the DCB specimen did not take the shape of a curved front as expected. However, the analysis of the SLB specimen yielded a curved front as may be expected from the distribution of the energy release rate and the failure index across the width of the specimen. Overall, the results are encouraging but further assessment on a structural level is required.

  9. Finite element modeling of borehole heat exchanger systems. Part 1. Fundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diersch, H.-J. G.; Bauer, D.; Heidemann, W.; Rühaak, W.; Schätzl, P.

    2011-08-01

    Single borehole heat exchanger (BHE) and arrays of BHE are modeled by using the finite element method. The first part of the paper derives the fundamental equations for BHE systems and their finite element representations, where the thermal exchange between the borehole components is modeled via thermal transfer relations. For this purpose improved relationships for thermal resistances and capacities of BHE are introduced. Pipe-to-grout thermal transfer possesses multiple grout points for double U-shape and single U-shape BHE to attain a more accurate modeling. The numerical solution of the final 3D problems is performed via a widely non-sequential (essentially non-iterative) coupling strategy for the BHE and porous medium discretization. Four types of vertical BHE are supported: double U-shape (2U) pipe, single U-shape (1U) pipe, coaxial pipe with annular (CXA) and centred (CXC) inlet. Two computational strategies are used: (1) The analytical BHE method based on Eskilson and Claesson's (1988) solution, (2) numerical BHE method based on Al-Khoury et al.'s (2005) solution. The second part of the paper focusses on BHE meshing aspects, the validation of BHE solutions and practical applications for borehole thermal energy store systems.

  10. A Newton method with adaptive finite elements for solving phase-change problems with natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danaila, Ionut; Moglan, Raluca; Hecht, Frédéric; Le Masson, Stéphane

    2014-10-01

    We present a new numerical system using finite elements with mesh adaptivity for the simulation of solid-liquid phase change systems. In the liquid phase, the natural convection flow is simulated by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with Boussinesq approximation. A variable viscosity model allows the velocity to progressively vanish in the solid phase, through an intermediate mushy region. The phase change is modeled by introducing an implicit enthalpy source term in the heat equation. The final system of equations describing the liquid-solid system by a single domain approach is solved using a Newton iterative algorithm. The space discretization is based on a P2-P1 Taylor-Hood finite elements and mesh adaptivity by metric control is used to accurately track the solid-liquid interface or the density inversion interface for water flows. The numerical method is validated against classical benchmarks that progressively add strong non-linearities in the system of equations: natural convection of air, natural convection of water, melting of a phase-change material and water freezing. Very good agreement with experimental data is obtained for each test case, proving the capability of the method to deal with both melting and solidification problems with convection. The presented numerical method is easy to implement using FreeFem++ software using a syntax close to the mathematical formulation.

  11. Finite element dependence of stress evaluation for human trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Depalle, B; Chapurlat, R; Walter-Le-Berre, H; Bou-Saïd, B; Follet, H

    2013-02-01

    Numerical simulation using finite element models (FEM) has become more and more suitable to estimate the mechanical properties of trabecular bone. The size and kind of elements involved in the models, however, may influence the results. The purpose of this study is to analyze the influence of hexahedral elements formulation on the evaluation of mechanical stress applied to trabeculae bone during a compression test simulation. Trabecular bone cores were extracted from 18 L2 vertebrae (12 women and 6 men, mean age: 76 ± 11, BV/TV=7.5 ± 1.9%). Samples were micro-CT scanned at 20 μm isotropic voxel size. Micro-CT images have been sub-sampled (20, 40 and 80 μm) to create 5.6 mm cubic FEM. For each sample, a compression test FEM has been created, using either 8-nodes linear hexahedral elements with full or reduced integration or 20-nodes quadratic hexahedral elements fully integrated, resulting in nine models per samples. Bone mechanical properties have been assumed isotropic, homogenous and to follow a linear elastic behavior law (Young modulus: 8 GPa, Poisson ratio: 0.3). Despite micro-architecture modifications (loss of connectivity, trabeculae thickening) due to voxel size increase, apparent mechanical properties calculated with low resolution models are significantly correlated with high resolution results, no matter the element formulation. However, stress distributions are more sensitive to both resolution and element formulation modifications. With linear elements, increasing voxel size leads to an alteration of stress concentration areas due to stiffening errors. On the opposite, the use of reduced integration induces severe smoothing and underestimation of stress fields resulting in stress raisers loss. Notwithstanding their high computational cost, quadratic elements are most appropriate for stress prediction in low resolution trabecular bone FEM. These observations are dependent on trabecular bone micro-architecture, and are more significant for low

  12. An approach to directional drilling simulation: finite element and finite segment methods with contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbatani, Siamak; Callejo, Alfonso; Kövecses, József; Kalantari, Masoud; Marchand, Nick R.; Dargahi, Javad

    2016-06-01

    Directional drilling is a popular technique for oil well drilling. Accurate prediction of the directional performance is critical in order to achieve the desired well profile. Simplified geometry methods are, to date, the industry standard for predicting directional performance. A comprehensive, high-fidelity method for the simulation of directional drilling is presented here. It consists of a detailed discretization of the actual geometry and a rigorous application of two modeling techniques: the finite element and the finite segment methods. By doing so, the dynamic problem is addressed from two different yet complementary perspectives: structural mechanics and rigid-body motion. Collision detection and contact dynamics algorithms are also presented. Results show that both methods agree in terms of the dynamic response, and that the build rate estimations are consistent with available experimental data. Owing to the framework efficiency and physics-based nature, the presented tools are very well-suited for design engineering and real-time simulation.

  13. Finite element treatment of soft elastohydrodynamic lubrication problems in the finite deformation regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupkiewicz, Stanisław

    2009-10-01

    Soft elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) problem is studied for a reciprocating elastomeric seal with full account of finite configuration changes. The fluid part is described by the Reynolds equation which is formulated on the deformed boundary of the seal treated as a hyperelastic body. The paper is concerned with the finite element (FE) treatment of this soft EHL problem. Displacement-based FE discretization is applied for the solid part. The Reynolds equation is discretized using the FE method or, alternatively, the discontinuous Galerkin method, both employing higher-order interpolation of pressure. The performance of both methods is assessed by studying convergence and stability of the solution for a benchmark problem of an O-ring seal. It is shown that the solution may exhibit spurious oscillations which occur in severe lubrication conditions. Mesh refinement results in reduction of these oscillations, while increasing the pressure interpolation order or application of the discontinuous Galerkin method does not help significantly.

  14. Finite element-finite difference thermal/structural analysis of large space truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Andrew H.; Arelt, Joseph E.; Eskew, William F.; Rogers, Karen M.

    1992-01-01

    A technique of automated and efficient thermal-structural processing of truss structures that interfaces the finite element and finite difference method was developed. The thermal-structural analysis tasks include development of the thermal and structural math models, thermal analysis, development of an interface and data transfer between the models, and finally an evaluation of the thermal stresses and displacements in the structure. Consequently, the objective of the developed technique was to minimize the model development time, in order to assure an automatic transfer of data between the thermal and structural models as well as to minimize the computer resources needed for the analysis itself. The method and techniques described are illustrated on the thermal/structural analysis of the Space Station Freedom main truss.

  15. Finite element solution of optimal control problems with inequality constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bless, Robert R.; Hodges, Dewey H.

    1990-01-01

    A finite-element method based on a weak Hamiltonian form of the necessary conditions is summarized for optimal control problems. Very crude shape functions (so simple that element numerical quadrature is not necessary) can be used to develop an efficient procedure for obtaining candidate solutions (i.e., those which satisfy all the necessary conditions) even for highly nonlinear problems. An extension of the formulation allowing for discontinuities in the states and derivatives of the states is given. A theory that includes control inequality constraints is fully developed. An advanced launch vehicle (ALV) model is presented. The model involves staging and control constraints, thus demonstrating the full power of the weak formulation to date. Numerical results are presented along with total elapsed computer time required to obtain the results. The speed and accuracy in obtaining the results make this method a strong candidate for a real-time guidance algorithm.

  16. 3D unstructured mesh discontinuous finite element hydro

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, M.K.; Kershaw, D.S.; Shaw, M.J.

    1995-07-01

    The authors present detailed features of the ICF3D hydrodynamics code used for inertial fusion simulations. This code is intended to be a state-of-the-art upgrade of the well-known fluid code, LASNEX. ICF3D employs discontinuous finite elements on a discrete unstructured mesh consisting of a variety of 3D polyhedra including tetrahedra, prisms, and hexahedra. The authors discussed details of how the ROE-averaged second-order convection was applied on the discrete elements, and how the C++ coding interface has helped to simplify implementing the many physics and numerics modules within the code package. The author emphasized the virtues of object-oriented design in large scale projects such as ICF3D.

  17. Automation Tools for Finite Element Analysis of Adhesively Bonded Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tahmasebi, Farhad; Brodeur, Stephen J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This article presents two new automation creation tools that obtain stresses and strains (Shear and peel) in adhesively bonded joints. For a given adhesively bonded joint Finite Element model, in which the adhesive is characterised using springs, these automation tools read the corresponding input and output files, use the spring forces and deformations to obtain the adhesive stresses and strains, sort the stresses and strains in descending order, and generate plot files for 3D visualisation of the stress and strain fields. Grids (nodes) and elements can be numbered in any order that is convenient for the user. Using the automation tools, trade-off studies, which are needed for design of adhesively bonded joints, can be performed very quickly.

  18. Dynamic Analysis of Geared Rotors by Finite Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahraman, A.; Ozguven, H. Nevzat; Houser, D. R.; Zakrajsek, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    A finite element model of a geared rotor system on flexible bearings has been developed. The model includes the rotary inertia of on shaft elements, the axial loading on shafts, flexibility and damping of bearings, material damping of shafts and the stiffness and the damping of gear mesh. The coupling between the torsional and transverse vibrations of gears were considered in the model. A constant mesh stiffness was assumed. The analysis procedure can be used for forced vibration analysis geared rotors by calculating the critical speeds and determining the response of any point on the shafts to mass unbalances, geometric eccentricities of gears, and displacement transmission error excitation at the mesh point. The dynamic mesh forces due to these excitations can also be calculated. The model has been applied to several systems for the demonstration of its accuracy and for studying the effect of bearing compliances on system dynamics.

  19. Probabilistic finite elements for fatigue and fracture analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belytschko, Ted; Liu, Wing Kam

    1993-01-01

    An overview of the probabilistic finite element method (PFEM) developed by the authors and their colleagues in recent years is presented. The primary focus is placed on the development of PFEM for both structural mechanics problems and fracture mechanics problems. The perturbation techniques are used as major tools for the analytical derivation. The following topics are covered: (1) representation and discretization of random fields; (2) development of PFEM for the general linear transient problem and nonlinear elasticity using Hu-Washizu variational principle; (3) computational aspects; (4) discussions of the application of PFEM to the reliability analysis of both brittle fracture and fatigue; and (5) a stochastic computational tool based on stochastic boundary element (SBEM). Results are obtained for the reliability index and corresponding probability of failure for: (1) fatigue crack growth; (2) defect geometry; (3) fatigue parameters; and (4) applied loads. These results show that initial defect is a critical parameter.

  20. Fracture and Fragmentation of Simplicial Finite Elements Meshes using Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Mota, A; Knap, J; Ortiz, M

    2006-10-18

    An approach for the topological representation of simplicial finite element meshes as graphs is presented. It is shown that by using a graph, the topological changes induced by fracture reduce to a few, local kernel operations. The performance of the graph representation is demonstrated and analyzed, using as reference the 3D fracture algorithm by Pandolfi and Ortiz [22]. It is shown that the graph representation initializes in O(N{sub E}{sup 1.1}) time and fractures in O(N{sub I}{sup 1.0}) time, while the reference implementation requires O(N{sub E}{sup 2.1}) time to initialize and O(N{sub I}{sup 1.9}) time to fracture, where NE is the number of elements in the mesh and N{sub I} is the number of interfaces to fracture.

  1. Finite element simulation of adaptive aerospace structures with SMA actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frautschi, Jason; Seelecke, Stefan

    2003-07-01

    The particular demands of aerospace engineering have spawned many of the developments in the field of adaptive structures. Shape memory alloys are particularly attractive as actuators in these types of structures due to their large strains, high specific work output and potential for structural integration. However, the requisite extensive physical testing has slowed development of potential applications and highlighted the need for a simulation tool for feasibility studies. In this paper we present an implementation of an extended version of the M'ller-Achenbach SMA model into a commercial finite element code suitable for such studies. Interaction between the SMA model and the solution algorithm for the global FE equations is thoroughly investigated with respect to the effect of tolerances and time step size on convergence, computational cost and accuracy. Finally, a simulation of a SMA-actuated flexible trailing edge of an aircraft wing modeled with beam elements is presented.

  2. Dynamic analysis of geared rotors by finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahraman, Ahmet; Ozguven, H. Nevzat; Houser, Donald R.; Zakrajsek, James J.

    1990-01-01

    A finite-element model of a geared rotor system on flexible bearings was developed. The model includes the rotary inertia of shaft elements, the axial loading on shafts, flexibility and damping of bearings, material damping of shafts and the stiffness and the damping of gear mesh. The coupling between the torsional and transverse vibrations of gears were considered in the model. A constant mesh stiffness was assumed. The analysis procedure can be used for forced vibration analysis of geared rotors by calculating the critical speeds and determining the response of any point on the shaft to mass unbalances, geometric eccentricities of gears and displacement transmission error excitation at the mesh point. The dynamic mesh forces due to these excitations can also be calculated. The model has been applied to several systems for the demonstration of its accuracy and for studying the effect of bearing compliances on system dynamics.

  3. Finite element simulation of articular contact mechanics with quadratic tetrahedral elements.

    PubMed

    Maas, Steve A; Ellis, Benjamin J; Rawlins, David S; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2016-03-21

    Although it is easier to generate finite element discretizations with tetrahedral elements, trilinear hexahedral (HEX8) elements are more often used in simulations of articular contact mechanics. This is due to numerical shortcomings of linear tetrahedral (TET4) elements, limited availability of quadratic tetrahedron elements in combination with effective contact algorithms, and the perceived increased computational expense of quadratic finite elements. In this study we implemented both ten-node (TET10) and fifteen-node (TET15) quadratic tetrahedral elements in FEBio (www.febio.org) and compared their accuracy, robustness in terms of convergence behavior and computational cost for simulations relevant to articular contact mechanics. Suitable volume integration and surface integration rules were determined by comparing the results of several benchmark contact problems. The results demonstrated that the surface integration rule used to evaluate the contact integrals for quadratic elements affected both convergence behavior and accuracy of predicted stresses. The computational expense and robustness of both quadratic tetrahedral formulations compared favorably to the HEX8 models. Of note, the TET15 element demonstrated superior convergence behavior and lower computational cost than both the TET10 and HEX8 elements for meshes with similar numbers of degrees of freedom in the contact problems that we examined. Finally, the excellent accuracy and relative efficiency of these quadratic tetrahedral elements was illustrated by comparing their predictions with those for a HEX8 mesh for simulation of articular contact in a fully validated model of the hip. These results demonstrate that TET10 and TET15 elements provide viable alternatives to HEX8 elements for simulation of articular contact mechanics.

  4. Distributed Finite Element Analysis Using a Transputer Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, James; Favenesi, James; Danial, Albert; Tombrello, Joseph; Yang, Dabby; Reynolds, Brian; Turrentine, Ronald; Shephard, Mark; Baehmann, Peggy

    1989-01-01

    The principal objective of this research effort was to demonstrate the extraordinarily cost effective acceleration of finite element structural analysis problems using a transputer-based parallel processing network. This objective was accomplished in the form of a commercially viable parallel processing workstation. The workstation is a desktop size, low-maintenance computing unit capable of supercomputer performance yet costs two orders of magnitude less. To achieve the principal research objective, a transputer based structural analysis workstation termed XPFEM was implemented with linear static structural analysis capabilities resembling commercially available NASTRAN. Finite element model files, generated using the on-line preprocessing module or external preprocessing packages, are downloaded to a network of 32 transputers for accelerated solution. The system currently executes at about one third Cray X-MP24 speed but additional acceleration appears likely. For the NASA selected demonstration problem of a Space Shuttle main engine turbine blade model with about 1500 nodes and 4500 independent degrees of freedom, the Cray X-MP24 required 23.9 seconds to obtain a solution while the transputer network, operated from an IBM PC-AT compatible host computer, required 71.7 seconds. Consequently, the $80,000 transputer network demonstrated a cost-performance ratio about 60 times better than the $15,000,000 Cray X-MP24 system.

  5. Finite element visualization in the cave virtual reality environment

    SciTech Connect

    Plaskacz, E.J.; Kuhn, M.A.

    1996-03-01

    Through the use of the post-processing software, Virtual Reality visualization (VRviz), and the Cave Automatic Virtual Environment (CAVE), finite element representations can be viewed as they would be in real life. VRviz is a program written in ANSI C to translate the mathematical results generated by finite element analysis programs into a virtual representation. This virtual representation is projected into the CAVE environment and the results are animated. The animation is fully controllable. A user is able to translate the image, rotate about any axis and scale the image at any time. The user is also able to freeze the animation at any time step and control the image update rate. This allows the user to navigate around, or even inside, the image in order to effectively analyze possible failure points and redesign as necessary. Through the use of the CAVE and the real life image that is being produced by VRviz, engineers are able to save considerable time, money, and effort in the design process.

  6. Finite Element Reconstruction of a Mandibular First Molar

    PubMed Central

    Ehsani, Sara; Mirhashemi, Fatemeh Sadat; Asgary, Saeed

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Mandibular first molar is the most important tooth with complicated morphology. In finite element (FE) studies, investigators usually prefer to model anterior teeth with a simple and single straight root; it makes the results deviate from the actual case. The most complicated and time-consuming step in FE studies is modeling of the desired tooth, thus this study was performed to establish a finite element method (FEM) of reconstructing a mandibular first molar with the greatest precision. Materials and Methods An extracted mandibular first molar was digitized, and then radiographed from different aspects to achieve its outer and inner morphology. The solid model of tooth and root canals were constructed according to this data as well as the anatomy of mandibular first molar described in the literature. Result A three-dimensional model of mandibular first molar was created, giving special consideration to shape and root canal system dimensions. Conclusion This model may constitute a basis for investigating the effect of different clinical situations on mandibular first molars in vitro, especially on its root canal system. The method described here seems feasible and reasonably precise foundation for investigations. PMID:23717327

  7. Immersed finite element method and its applications to biological systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wing Kam; Liu, Yaling; Farrell, David; Zhang, Lucy; Wang, X. Sheldon; Fukui, Yoshio; Patankar, Neelesh; Zhang, Yongjie; Bajaj, Chandrajit; Lee, Junghoon; Hong, Juhee; Chen, Xinyu; Hsu, Huayi

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes the newly developed immersed finite element method (IFEM) and its applications to the modeling of biological systems. This work was inspired by the pioneering work of Professor T.J.R. Hughes in solving fluid–structure interaction problems. In IFEM, a Lagrangian solid mesh moves on top of a background Eulerian fluid mesh which spans the entire computational domain. Hence, mesh generation is greatly simplified. Moreover, both fluid and solid domains are modeled with the finite element method and the continuity between the fluid and solid subdomains is enforced via the interpolation of the velocities and the distribution of the forces with the reproducing Kernel particle method (RKPM) delta function. The proposed method is used to study the fluid–structure interaction problems encountered in human cardiovascular systems. Currently, the heart modeling is being constructed and the deployment process of an angioplasty stent has been simulated. Some preliminary results on monocyte and platelet deposition are presented. Blood rheology, in particular, the shear-rate dependent de-aggregation of red blood cell (RBC) clusters and the transport of deformable cells, are modeled. Furthermore, IFEM is combined with electrokinetics to study the mechanisms of nano/bio filament assembly for the understanding of cell motility. PMID:20200602

  8. Finite element modeling of electrically rectified piezoelectric energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, P. H.; Shu, Y. C.

    2015-09-01

    Finite element models are developed for designing electrically rectified piezoelectric energy harvesters. They account for the consideration of common interface circuits such as the standard and parallel-/series-SSHI (synchronized switch harvesting on inductor) circuits, as well as complicated structural configurations such as arrays of piezoelectric oscillators. The idea is to replace the energy harvesting circuit by the proposed equivalent load impedance together with the capacitance of negative value. As a result, the proposed framework is capable of being implemented into conventional finite element solvers for direct system-level design without resorting to circuit simulators. The validation based on COMSOL simulations carried out for various interface circuits by the comparison with the standard modal analysis model. The framework is then applied to the investigation on how harvested power is reduced due to fabrication deviations in geometric and material properties of oscillators in an array system. Remarkably, it is found that for a standard array system with strong electromechanical coupling, the drop in peak power turns out to be insignificant if the optimal load is carefully chosen. The second application is to design broadband energy harvesting by developing array systems with suitable interface circuits. The result shows that significant broadband is observed for the parallel (series) connection of oscillators endowed with the parallel-SSHI (series-SSHI) circuit technique.

  9. Adaptive Finite Element Methods for Continuum Damage Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Tworzydlo, W. W.; Xiques, K. E.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents an application of adaptive finite element methods to the modeling of low-cycle continuum damage and life prediction of high-temperature components. The major objective is to provide automated and accurate modeling of damaged zones through adaptive mesh refinement and adaptive time-stepping methods. The damage modeling methodology is implemented in an usual way by embedding damage evolution in the transient nonlinear solution of elasto-viscoplastic deformation problems. This nonlinear boundary-value problem is discretized by adaptive finite element methods. The automated h-adaptive mesh refinements are driven by error indicators, based on selected principal variables in the problem (stresses, non-elastic strains, damage, etc.). In the time domain, adaptive time-stepping is used, combined with a predictor-corrector time marching algorithm. The time selection is controlled by required time accuracy. In order to take into account strong temperature dependency of material parameters, the nonlinear structural solution a coupled with thermal analyses (one-way coupling). Several test examples illustrate the importance and benefits of adaptive mesh refinements in accurate prediction of damage levels and failure time.

  10. Validation of a finite element model of the human metacarpal.

    PubMed

    Barker, D S; Netherway, D J; Krishnan, J; Hearn, T C

    2005-03-01

    Implant loosening and mechanical failure of components are frequently reported following metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint replacement. Studies of the mechanical environment of the MCP implant-bone construct are rare. The objective of this study was to evaluate the predictive ability of a finite element model of the intact second human metacarpal to provide a validated baseline for further mechanical studies. A right index human metacarpal was subjected to torsion and combined axial/bending loading using strain gauge (SG) and 3D finite element (FE) analysis. Four different representations of bone material properties were considered. Regression analyses were performed comparing maximum and minimum principal surface strains taken from the SG and FE models. Regression slopes close to unity and high correlation coefficients were found when the diaphyseal cortical shell was modelled as anisotropic and cancellous bone properties were derived from quantitative computed tomography. The inclusion of anisotropy for cortical bone was strongly influential in producing high model validity whereas variation in methods of assigning stiffness to cancellous bone had only a minor influence. The validated FE model provides a tool for future investigations of current and novel MCP joint prostheses.

  11. 3D Finite Element Trajectory Code with Adaptive Meshing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ives, Lawrence; Bui, Thuc; Vogler, William; Bauer, Andy; Shephard, Mark; Beal, Mark; Tran, Hien

    2004-11-01

    Beam Optics Analysis, a new, 3D charged particle program is available and in use for the design of complex, 3D electron guns and charged particle devices. The code reads files directly from most CAD and solid modeling programs, includes an intuitive Graphical User Interface (GUI), and a robust mesh generator that is fully automatic. Complex problems can be set up, and analysis initiated in minutes. The program includes a user-friendly post processor for displaying field and trajectory data using 3D plots and images. The electrostatic solver is based on the standard nodal finite element method. The magnetostatic field solver is based on the vector finite element method and is also called during the trajectory simulation process to solve for self magnetic fields. The user imports the geometry from essentially any commercial CAD program and uses the GUI to assign parameters (voltages, currents, dielectric constant) and designate emitters (including work function, emitter temperature, and number of trajectories). The the mesh is generated automatically and analysis is performed, including mesh adaptation to improve accuracy and optimize computational resources. This presentation will provide information on the basic structure of the code, its operation, and it's capabilities.

  12. Finite element analysis of lightweight active primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wei Xin; Guan, Chun Lin; Rao, Chang Hui

    2012-09-01

    With the increasing requirement on spatial resolution to achieve ideal performance in space-based optical imaging system, there is a need to enlarge primary apertures. However, primary mirrors of such systems cannot maintain its optical tolerances across the mirror surface after sending to space, because of gravity change and varying ambient temperature. It necessitates active optics technology of primary mirror surface correction. Since mass-to-orbit is expensive and limited, lightweight primary mirror is needed. The paper investigates a lightweight, active primary mirror. This primary mirror structure includes lightweight face sheet and substrate with surface-parallel actuators embedded in the recess of web support ribs. Finite element models of lightweight, active primary mirror structures with different structural parameters are established and simulated. Using the response function matrixes acquired from finite element analysis, the fitting errors for Zernike polynomials are computed by MATLAB. Correctability comparisons of lightweight, active primary mirror structures with different parameters are carried out. To get best correctability, the mirrors should have small recess depth, high and thin ribs, thick face sheets and long actuators. The structural analysis result will be valuable for the design of lightweight, active primary mirror.

  13. A Finite Element Model for Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Jie; Xu, Zhijie; Fang, Yilin

    2015-07-23

    We present a hydro-mechanical model, followed by stress, deformation, and shear-slip failure analysis for geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). The model considers the poroelastic effects by taking into account of the two-way coupling between the geomechanical response and the fluid flow process. Analytical solutions for pressure and deformation fields were derived for a typical geological sequestration scenario in our previous work. A finite element approach is introduced here for numerically solving the hydro-mechanical model with arbitrary boundary conditions. The numerical approach was built on an open-source finite element code Elmer, and results were compared to the analytical solutions. The shear-slip failure analysis was presented based on the numerical results, where the potential failure zone is identified. Information is relevant to the prediction of the maximum sustainable injection rate or pressure. The effects of caprock permeability on the fluid pressure, deformation, stress, and the shear-slip failure zone were also quantitatively studied. It was shown that a larger permeability in caprock and base rock leads to a larger uplift but a smaller shear-slip failure zone.

  14. A finite element analysis of masticatory stress hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Chalk, Janine; Richmond, Brian G; Ross, Callum F; Strait, David S; Wright, Barth W; Spencer, Mark A; Wang, Qian; Dechow, Paul C

    2011-05-01

    Understanding how the skull transmits and dissipates forces during feeding provides insights into the selective pressures that may have driven the evolution of primate skull morphology. Traditionally, researchers have interpreted masticatory biomechanics in terms of simple global loading regimes applied to simple shapes (i.e., bending in sagittal and frontal planes, dorsoventral shear, and torsion of beams and cylinders). This study uses finite element analysis to examine the extent to which these geometric models provide accurate strain predictions in the face and evaluate whether simple global loading regimes predict strains that approximate the craniofacial deformation pattern observed during mastication. Loading regimes, including those simulating peak loads during molar chewing and those approximating the global loading regimes, were applied to a previously validated finite element model (FEM) of a macaque (Macaca fascicularis) skull, and the resulting strain patterns were compared. When simple global loading regimes are applied to the FEM, the resulting strains do not match those predicted by simple geometric models, suggesting that these models fail to generate accurate predictions of facial strain. Of the four loading regimes tested, bending in the frontal plane most closely approximates strain patterns in the circumorbital region and lateral face, apparently due to masseter muscle forces acting on the zygomatic arches. However, these results indicate that no single simple global loading regime satisfactorily accounts for the strain pattern found in the validated FEM. Instead, we propose that FE models replace simple cranial models when interpreting bone strain data and formulating hypotheses about craniofacial biomechanics.

  15. Geometrically Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis of a Composite Space Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kee-Joo; Leet, Sung W.; Clark, Greg; Broduer, Steve (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Lightweight aerospace structures, such as low areal density composite space reflectors, are highly flexible and may undergo large deflection under applied loading, especially during the launch phase. Accordingly, geometrically nonlinear analysis that takes into account the effect of finite rotation may be needed to determine the deformed shape for a clearance check and the stress and strain state to ensure structural integrity. In this study, deformation of the space reflector is determined under static conditions using a geometrically nonlinear solid shell finite element model. For the solid shell element formulation, the kinematics of deformation is described by six variables that are purely vector components. Because rotational angles are not used, this approach is free of the limitations of small angle increments. This also allows easy connections between substructures and large load increments with respect to the conventional shell formulation using rotational parameters. Geometrically nonlinear analyses were carried out for three cases of static point loads applied at selected points. A chart shows results for a case when the load is applied at the center point of the reflector dish. The computed results capture the nonlinear behavior of the composite reflector as the applied load increases. Also, they are in good agreement with the data obtained by experiments.

  16. Finite Element Model Calibration Approach for Ares I-X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Reaves, Mercedes C.; Buehrle, Ralph D.; Templeton, Justin D.; Lazor, Daniel R.; Gaspar, James L.; Parks, Russel A.; Bartolotta, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Ares I-X is a pathfinder vehicle concept under development by NASA to demonstrate a new class of launch vehicles. Although this vehicle is essentially a shell of what the Ares I vehicle will be, efforts are underway to model and calibrate the analytical models before its maiden flight. Work reported in this document will summarize the model calibration approach used including uncertainty quantification of vehicle responses and the use of nonconventional boundary conditions during component testing. Since finite element modeling is the primary modeling tool, the calibration process uses these models, often developed by different groups, to assess model deficiencies and to update parameters to reconcile test with predictions. Data for two major component tests and the flight vehicle are presented along with the calibration results. For calibration, sensitivity analysis is conducted using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). To reduce the computational burden associated with ANOVA calculations, response surface models are used in lieu of computationally intensive finite element solutions. From the sensitivity studies, parameter importance is assessed as a function of frequency. In addition, the work presents an approach to evaluate the probability that a parameter set exists to reconcile test with analysis. Comparisons of pre-test predictions of frequency response uncertainty bounds with measured data, results from the variance-based sensitivity analysis, and results from component test models with calibrated boundary stiffness models are all presented.

  17. Finite Element Model Calibration Approach for Area I-X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Reaves, Mercedes C.; Buehrle, Ralph D.; Templeton, Justin D.; Gaspar, James L.; Lazor, Daniel R.; Parks, Russell A.; Bartolotta, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Ares I-X is a pathfinder vehicle concept under development by NASA to demonstrate a new class of launch vehicles. Although this vehicle is essentially a shell of what the Ares I vehicle will be, efforts are underway to model and calibrate the analytical models before its maiden flight. Work reported in this document will summarize the model calibration approach used including uncertainty quantification of vehicle responses and the use of non-conventional boundary conditions during component testing. Since finite element modeling is the primary modeling tool, the calibration process uses these models, often developed by different groups, to assess model deficiencies and to update parameters to reconcile test with predictions. Data for two major component tests and the flight vehicle are presented along with the calibration results. For calibration, sensitivity analysis is conducted using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). To reduce the computational burden associated with ANOVA calculations, response surface models are used in lieu of computationally intensive finite element solutions. From the sensitivity studies, parameter importance is assessed as a function of frequency. In addition, the work presents an approach to evaluate the probability that a parameter set exists to reconcile test with analysis. Comparisons of pretest predictions of frequency response uncertainty bounds with measured data, results from the variance-based sensitivity analysis, and results from component test models with calibrated boundary stiffness models are all presented.

  18. Two-Dimensional Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis of CMC Microstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mital, Subodh K.; Goldberg, Robert K.; Bonacuse, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    A research program has been developed to quantify the effects of the microstructure of a woven ceramic matrix composite and its variability on the effective properties and response of the material. In order to characterize and quantify the variations in the microstructure of a five harness satin weave, chemical vapor infiltrated (CVI) SiC/SiC composite material, specimens were serially sectioned and polished to capture images that detailed the fiber tows, matrix, and porosity. Open source quantitative image analysis tools were then used to isolate the constituents, from which two dimensional finite element models were generated which approximated the actual specimen section geometry. A simplified elastic-plastic model, wherein all stress above yield is redistributed to lower stress regions, is used to approximate the progressive damage behavior for each of the composite constituents. Finite element analyses under in-plane tensile loading were performed to examine how the variability in the local microstructure affected the macroscopic stress-strain response of the material as well as the local initiation and progression of damage. The macroscopic stress-strain response appeared to be minimally affected by the variation in local microstructure, but the locations where damage initiated and propagated appeared to be linked to specific aspects of the local microstructure.

  19. A robust, finite element model for hydrostatic surface water flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, R.A.; Casulli, V.

    1998-01-01

    A finite element scheme is introduced for the 2-dimensional shallow water equations using semi-implicit methods in time. A semi-Lagrangian method is used to approximate the effects of advection. A wave equation is formed at the discrete level such that the equations decouple into an equation for surface elevation and a momentum equation for the horizontal velocity. The convergence rates and relative computational efficiency are examined with the use of three test cases representing various degrees of difficulty. A test with a polar-quadrant grid investigates the response to local grid-scale forcing and the presence of spurious modes, a channel test case establishes convergence rates, and a field-scale test case examines problems with highly irregular grids.A finite element scheme is introduced for the 2-dimensional shallow water equations using semi-implicit methods in time. A semi-Lagrangian method is used to approximate the effects of advection. A wave equation is formed at the discrete level such that the equations decouple into an equation for surface elevation and a momentum equation for the horizontal velocity. The convergence rates and relative computational efficiency are examined with the use of three test cases representing various degrees of difficulty. A test with a polar-quadrant grid investigates the response to local grid-scale forcing and the presence of spurious modes, a channel test case establishes convergence rates, and a field-scale test case examines problems with highly irregular grids.

  20. Geometric Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis of Active Fibre Composite Bimorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kernaghan, Robert

    Active fibre composite-actuated bimorphic actuators were studied in order to measure deflection performance. The deflection of the actuators was a function of the actuating electric potential applied to the active material as well as the magnitude of the axial preload applied to the bimorphic structure. This problem required the use of geometric nonlinear modeling techniques. Geometric nonlinear finite element analysis was undertaken to determine the deflection performance of Macro Fibre Composite (MFC)- and Hollow Active Fibre (HAFC)-actuated bimorphic structures. A physical prototype MFC-actuated bimorphic structure was manufactured in order to verify the results obtained by the finite element analysis. Theses analyses determined that the bimorphic actuators were capable of significant deflection. The analyses determined that the axial preload of the bimorphic actuators significantly amplified the deflection performance of the bimorphic actuators. The deflection performance of the bimorphic actuators suggest that they could be candidates to act as actuators for the morphing wing of a micro unmanned air vehicle.

  1. The application of finite element analysis on polydimethylsiloxane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halim, Siti Aisyah Abdul; Yahud, Shuhaida; Muhamad, Wan Zuki Azman Wan; Daud, Ruslizam; Zain, Noor Alia Md

    2015-05-01

    An artificial skin should have the similarities of the human skin in term of biomechanical properties. In this paper, Polydimethysiloxane (PDMS) have been chosen as artificial skin material. PDMS specimens were prepared and the hardness of the material will be altered by adding different percentages of diluents to the mixture of the base and a cross-linker component. It indicated that the physiological elastic modulus depends strongly on the definition of the stress-strain curve, mixing ratio and strain rate. Tensile and compression test are conducted to find out the Hyperelastic (HE) coefficient and Young's modulus. These material coefficients will be used to define the constitutive model of PDMS for finite element analysis study. In this paper, three dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) stress and displacement analysis were used. Three types of models with different values of height were simulated in COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS. The analysis of the von Mises stress and surface deflection values revealed that maximum stress and maximum deflection concentration were located in the region near line load. PDMS polymer 10:1 is the softer product and can be commercialized as artificial skin material.

  2. Progress in Developing Finite Element Models Replicating Flexural Graphite Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Bratton

    2010-06-01

    This report documents the status of flexural strength evaluations from current ASTM procedures and of developing finite element models predicting the probability of failure. This work is covered under QLD REC-00030. Flexural testing procedures of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) assume a linear elastic material that has the same moduli for tension and compression. Contrary to this assumption, graphite is known to have different moduli for tension and compression. A finite element model was developed and demonstrated that accounts for the difference in moduli tension and compression. Brittle materials such as graphite exhibit significant scatter in tensile strength, so probabilistic design approaches must be used when designing components fabricated from brittle materials. ASTM procedures predicting probability of failure in ceramics were compared to methods from the current version of the ASME graphite core components rules predicting probability of failure. Using the ASTM procedures yields failure curves at lower applied forces than the ASME rules. A journal paper was published in the Journal of Nuclear Engineering and Design exploring the statistical models of fracture in graphite.

  3. Finite Element Modeling of the Posterior Eye in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feola, Andrew; Raykin, Julia; Mulugeta, Lealem; Gleason, Rudolph; Myers, Jerry G.; Nelson, Emily S.; Samuels, Brian; Ethier, C. Ross

    2015-01-01

    Microgravity experienced during spaceflight affects astronauts in various ways, including weakened muscles and loss of bone density. Recently, visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome has become a major concern for space missions lasting longer than 30 days. Astronauts suffering from VIIP syndrome have changes in ocular anatomical and visual impairment that persist after returning to earth. It is hypothesized that a cephalad fluid shift in microgravity may increase the intracranial pressure (ICP), which leads to an altered biomechanical environment of the posterior globe and optic nerve sheath (ONS).Currently, there is a lack of knowledge of how elevated ICP may lead to vision impairment and connective tissue changes in VIIP. Our goal was to develop a finite element model to simulate the acute effects of elevated ICP on the posterior eye and optic nerve sheath. We used a finite element (FE) analysis approach to understand the response of the lamina cribrosa and optic nerve to the elevations in ICP thought to occur in microgravity and to identify which tissue components have the greatest impact on strain experienced by optic nerve head tissues.

  4. Accelerated finite element elastodynamic simulations using the GPU

    SciTech Connect

    Huthwaite, Peter

    2014-01-15

    An approach is developed to perform explicit time domain finite element simulations of elastodynamic problems on the graphical processing unit, using Nvidia's CUDA. Of critical importance for this problem is the arrangement of nodes in memory, allowing data to be loaded efficiently and minimising communication between the independently executed blocks of threads. The initial stage of memory arrangement is partitioning the mesh; both a well established ‘greedy’ partitioner and a new, more efficient ‘aligned’ partitioner are investigated. A method is then developed to efficiently arrange the memory within each partition. The software is applied to three models from the fields of non-destructive testing, vibrations and geophysics, demonstrating a memory bandwidth of very close to the card's maximum, reflecting the bandwidth-limited nature of the algorithm. Comparison with Abaqus, a widely used commercial CPU equivalent, validated the accuracy of the results and demonstrated a speed improvement of around two orders of magnitude. A software package, Pogo, incorporating these developments, is released open source, downloadable from (http://www.pogo-fea.com/) to benefit the community. -- Highlights: •A novel memory arrangement approach is discussed for finite elements on the GPU. •The mesh is partitioned then nodes are arranged efficiently within each partition. •Models from ultrasonics, vibrations and geophysics are run. •The code is significantly faster than an equivalent commercial CPU package. •Pogo, the new software package, is released open source.

  5. Two-Dimensional Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis of CMC Microstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mital, Subodh K.; Goldberg, Robert K.; Bonacuse, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Detailed two-dimensional finite element analyses of the cross-sections of a model CVI (chemical vapor infiltrated) SiC/SiC (silicon carbide fiber in a silicon carbide matrix) ceramic matrix composites are performed. High resolution images of the cross-section of this composite material are generated using serial sectioning of the test specimens. These images are then used to develop very detailed finite element models of the cross-sections using the public domain software OOF2 (Object Oriented Analysis of Material Microstructures). Examination of these images shows that these microstructures have significant variability and irregularity. How these variabilities manifest themselves in the variability in effective properties as well as the stress distribution, damage initiation and damage progression is the overall objective of this work. Results indicate that even though the macroscopic stress-strain behavior of various sections analyzed is very similar, each section has a very distinct damage pattern when subjected to in-plane tensile loads and this damage pattern seems to follow the unique architectural and microstructural details of the analyzed sections.

  6. Large-scale computation of incompressible viscous flow by least-squares finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Lin, T. L.; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1993-01-01

    The least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) based on the velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation is applied to large-scale/three-dimensional steady incompressible Navier-Stokes problems. This method can accommodate equal-order interpolations and results in symmetric, positive definite algebraic system which can be solved effectively by simple iterative methods. The first-order velocity-Bernoulli function-vorticity formulation for incompressible viscous flows is also tested. For three-dimensional cases, an additional compatibility equation, i.e., the divergence of the vorticity vector should be zero, is included to make the first-order system elliptic. The simple substitution of the Newton's method is employed to linearize the partial differential equations, the LSFEM is used to obtain discretized equations, and the system of algebraic equations is solved using the Jacobi preconditioned conjugate gradient method which avoids formation of either element or global matrices (matrix-free) to achieve high efficiency. To show the validity of this scheme for large-scale computation, we give numerical results for 2D driven cavity problem at Re = 10000 with 408 x 400 bilinear elements. The flow in a 3D cavity is calculated at Re = 100, 400, and 1,000 with 50 x 50 x 50 trilinear elements. The Taylor-Goertler-like vortices are observed for Re = 1,000.

  7. High-Order Curvilinear Finite Element Methods for Lagrangian Hydrodynamics [High Order Curvilinear Finite Elements for Lagrangian Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrev, Veselin A.; Kolev, Tzanio V.; Rieben, Robert N.

    2012-09-20

    The numerical approximation of the Euler equations of gas dynamics in a movingLagrangian frame is at the heart of many multiphysics simulation algorithms. Here, we present a general framework for high-order Lagrangian discretization of these compressible shock hydrodynamics equations using curvilinear finite elements. This method is an extension of the approach outlined in [Dobrev et al., Internat. J. Numer. Methods Fluids, 65 (2010), pp. 1295--1310] and can be formulated for any finite dimensional approximation of the kinematic and thermodynamic fields, including generic finite elements on two- and three-dimensional meshes with triangular, quadrilateral, tetrahedral, or hexahedral zones. We discretize the kinematic variables of position and velocity using a continuous high-order basis function expansion of arbitrary polynomial degree which is obtained via a corresponding high-order parametric mapping from a standard reference element. This enables the use of curvilinear zone geometry, higher-order approximations for fields within a zone, and a pointwise definition of mass conservation which we refer to as strong mass conservation. Moreover, we discretize the internal energy using a piecewise discontinuous high-order basis function expansion which is also of arbitrary polynomial degree. This facilitates multimaterial hydrodynamics by treating material properties, such as equations of state and constitutive models, as piecewise discontinuous functions which vary within a zone. To satisfy the Rankine--Hugoniot jump conditions at a shock boundary and generate the appropriate entropy, we introduce a general tensor artificial viscosity which takes advantage of the high-order kinematic and thermodynamic information available in each zone. Finally, we apply a generic high-order time discretization process to the semidiscrete equations to develop the fully discrete numerical algorithm. Our method can be viewed as the high-order generalization of the so-called staggered

  8. Finite Element Transient Dynamic Analysis of Laminated Stiffened Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PRUSTY, B. GANGADHARA; SATSANGI, S. K.

    2001-11-01

    The present work describes the transient dynamic response of unstiffened/stiffened composite plates/shells using finite element method. Composite panels find wide applications in aerospace, marine and other engineering because of its high strength to weight ratios. These structures are often subjected to air-blast loading, underwater shock etc., which requires a thorough dynamic response analysis under such loading. A modified approach of shell and stiffener modelling is adopted here using an eight-noded isoparametric quadratic element for the shell and a three-noded curved stiffener element for the stiffeners on the concept of equal displacements at the shell-stiffener interface. The present formulation obviates the need for imposing the mesh line along the stiffeners; rather it accommodates the stiffeners elegantly anywhere placed arbitrarily inside the element with computational efficiency. Newmarks method for direct time integration has been adopted for the solution of the governing equation for undamped motion. The transient dynamic response of stiffened and unstiffened structures subjected to various kinds of time variant loading has been studied and the results are compared with the published ones.

  9. Finite element prediction of fatigue damage growth in cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Hambli, Ridha; Frikha, Sana; Toumi, Hechmi; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic stresses applied to bones generate fatigue damage that affects the bone stiffness and its elastic modulus. This paper proposes a finite element model for the prediction of fatigue damage accumulation and failure in cancellous bone at continuum scale. The model is based on continuum damage mechanics and incorporates crack closure effects in compression. The propagation of the cracks is completely simulated throughout the damaged area. In this case, the stiffness of the broken element is reduced by 98% to ensure no stress-carrying capacities of completely damaged elements. Once a crack is initiated, the propagation direction is simulated by the propagation of the broken elements of the mesh. The proposed model suggests that damage evolves over a real physical time variable (cycles). In order to reduce the computation time, the integration of the damage growth rate is based on the cycle blocks approach. In this approach, the real number of cycles is reduced (divided) into equivalent blocks of cycles. Damage accumulation is computed over the cycle blocks and then extrapolated over the corresponding real cycles. The results show a clear difference between local tensile and compressive stresses on damage accumulation. Incorporating stiffness reduction also produces a redistribution of the peak stresses in the damaged region, which results in a delay in damage fracture.

  10. High-order finite element methods for cardiac monodomain simulations.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Kevin P; Gonzales, Matthew J; Gillette, Andrew K; Villongco, Christopher T; Pezzuto, Simone; Omens, Jeffrey H; Holst, Michael J; McCulloch, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    Computational modeling of tissue-scale cardiac electrophysiology requires numerically converged solutions to avoid spurious artifacts. The steep gradients inherent to cardiac action potential propagation necessitate fine spatial scales and therefore a substantial computational burden. The use of high-order interpolation methods has previously been proposed for these simulations due to their theoretical convergence advantage. In this study, we compare the convergence behavior of linear Lagrange, cubic Hermite, and the newly proposed cubic Hermite-style serendipity interpolation methods for finite element simulations of the cardiac monodomain equation. The high-order methods reach converged solutions with fewer degrees of freedom and longer element edge lengths than traditional linear elements. Additionally, we propose a dimensionless number, the cell Thiele modulus, as a more useful metric for determining solution convergence than element size alone. Finally, we use the cell Thiele modulus to examine convergence criteria for obtaining clinically useful activation patterns for applications such as patient-specific modeling where the total activation time is known a priori. PMID:26300783

  11. High-order finite element methods for cardiac monodomain simulations

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Kevin P.; Gonzales, Matthew J.; Gillette, Andrew K.; Villongco, Christopher T.; Pezzuto, Simone; Omens, Jeffrey H.; Holst, Michael J.; McCulloch, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Computational modeling of tissue-scale cardiac electrophysiology requires numerically converged solutions to avoid spurious artifacts. The steep gradients inherent to cardiac action potential propagation necessitate fine spatial scales and therefore a substantial computational burden. The use of high-order interpolation methods has previously been proposed for these simulations due to their theoretical convergence advantage. In this study, we compare the convergence behavior of linear Lagrange, cubic Hermite, and the newly proposed cubic Hermite-style serendipity interpolation methods for finite element simulations of the cardiac monodomain equation. The high-order methods reach converged solutions with fewer degrees of freedom and longer element edge lengths than traditional linear elements. Additionally, we propose a dimensionless number, the cell Thiele modulus, as a more useful metric for determining solution convergence than element size alone. Finally, we use the cell Thiele modulus to examine convergence criteria for obtaining clinically useful activation patterns for applications such as patient-specific modeling where the total activation time is known a priori. PMID:26300783

  12. Finite element analysis of (SA) mechanoreceptors in tactile sensing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N, Syamimi; Yahud, S.

    2015-05-01

    This paper addresses the structural design of a fingertip model in order to analyse the sensory function of slow adapting (SA) mechanoreceptors by using the finite element analysis (FEA) method. A biologically inspired tactile sensor was designed to mimic a similar response of the human mechanoreceptors in the human glabrous skin. The simulation work was done by using COMSOL Multiphysics. The artificial skin was modelled as a solid square block of silicone elastomer with a semi cylinder protrusion on top. It was modelled as a nearly incompressible and linear hyperelastic material defined by Neo Hookean constitutive law. The sensing element on the other hand was modelled by using constantan alloy mimicking the SA1 receptor. Boundary loads of 1 N/m² to 4 N/m² with the increment of 1 N/m² were applied to the top surface of the protrusion in z and x-direction for normal and shear stress, respectively. The epidermal model base was constrained to maintain the same boundary conditions throughout all simulations. The changes of length experienced by the sensing element were calculated. The simulations result in terms of strain was identified. The simulated result was plotted in terms of sensing element strain against the boundary load and the graph should produce a linear response.

  13. The MHOST finite element program: 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 1: Theoretical manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, Shohei

    1991-01-01

    Formulations and algorithms implemented in the MHOST finite element program are discussed. The code uses a novel concept of the mixed iterative solution technique for the efficient 3-D computations of turbine engine hot section components. The general framework of variational formulation and solution algorithms are discussed which were derived from the mixed three field Hu-Washizu principle. This formulation enables the use of nodal interpolation for coordinates, displacements, strains, and stresses. Algorithmic description of the mixed iterative method includes variations for the quasi static, transient dynamic and buckling analyses. The global-local analysis procedure referred to as the subelement refinement is developed in the framework of the mixed iterative solution, of which the detail is presented. The numerically integrated isoparametric elements implemented in the framework is discussed. Methods to filter certain parts of strain and project the element discontinuous quantities to the nodes are developed for a family of linear elements. Integration algorithms are described for linear and nonlinear equations included in MHOST program.

  14. Adaptive Surrogate Modeling for Expedited Estimation of Nonlinear Tissue Properties Through Inverse Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Halloran, Jason P.; Erdemir, Ahmet

    2011-01-01

    Simulation-based prediction of specimen-specific biomechanical behavior commonly requires inverse analysis using geometrically consistent finite element (FE) models. Optimization drives such analyses but previous studies have highlighted a large computational cost dictated by iterative use of nonlinear FE models. The goal of this study was to evaluate the performance of a local regression-based adaptive surrogate modeling approach to decrease computational cost for both global and local optimization approaches using an inverse FE application. Nonlinear elastic material parameters for patient-specific heel-pad tissue were found, both with and without the surrogate model. Surrogate prediction replaced a FE simulation using local regression of previous simulations when the corresponding error estimate was less than a given tolerance. Performance depended on optimization type and tolerance value. The surrogate reduced local optimization expense up to 68%, but achieved accurate results for only 1 of 20 initial conditions. Conversely, up to a tolerance value of 20 N2, global optimization with the surrogate yielded consistent parameter predictions with a concurrent decrease in computational cost (up to 77%). However, the local optimization method without the surrogate, although sensitive to the initial conditions, was still on average seven times faster than the global approach. Our results help establish guide-lines for setting acceptable tolerance values while using an adaptive surrogate model for inverse FE analysis. Most important, the study demonstrates the benefits of a surrogate modeling approach for intensive FE-based iterative analysis. PMID:21544674

  15. Finite element-integral simulation of static and flight fan noise radiation from the JT15D turbofan engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Horowitz, S. J.

    An iterative finite element integral technique is used to predict the sound field radiated from the JT15D turbofan inlet. The sound field is divided into two regions: the sound field within and near the inlet which is computed using the finite element method and the radiation field beyond the inlet which is calculated using an integral solution technique. The velocity potential formulation of the acoustic wave equation was employed in the program. For some single mode JT15D data, the theory and experiment are in good agreement for the far field radiation pattern as well as suppressor attenuation. Also, the computer program is used to simulate flight effects that cannot be performed on a ground static test stand.

  16. Applications of finite element simulation in orthopedic and trauma surgery

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Antonio; Ibarz, Elena; Cegoñino, José; Lobo-Escolar, Antonio; Puértolas, Sergio; López, Enrique; Mateo, Jesús; Gracia, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Research in different areas of orthopedic and trauma surgery requires a methodology that allows both a more economic approach and the ability to reproduce different situations in an easy way. Simulation models have been introduced recently in bioengineering and could become an essential tool in the study of any physiological unity, regardless of its complexity. The main problem in modeling with finite elements simulation is to achieve an accurate reproduction of the anatomy and a perfect correlation of the different structures, in any region of the human body. Authors have developed a mixed technique, joining the use of a three-dimensional laser scanner Roland Picza captured together with computed tomography (CT) and 3D CT images, to achieve a perfect reproduction of the anatomy. Finite element (FE) simulation lets us know the biomechanical changes that take place after hip prostheses or osteosynthesis implantation and biological responses of bone to biomechanical changes. The simulation models are able to predict changes in bone stress distribution around the implant, so allowing preventing future pathologies. The development of a FE model of lumbar spine is another interesting application of the simulation. The model allows research on the lumbar spine, not only in physiological conditions but also simulating different load conditions, to assess the impact on biomechanics. Different degrees of disc degeneration can also be simulated to determine the impact on adjacent anatomical elements. Finally, FE models may be useful to test different fixation systems, i.e., pedicular screws, interbody devices or rigid fixations compared with the dynamic ones. We have also developed models of lumbar spine and hip joint to predict the occurrence of osteoporotic fractures, based on densitometric determinations and specific biomechanical models, including approaches from damage and fracture mechanics. FE simulations also allow us to predict the behavior of orthopedic splints

  17. Applications of finite element simulation in orthopedic and trauma surgery.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Antonio; Ibarz, Elena; Cegoñino, José; Lobo-Escolar, Antonio; Puértolas, Sergio; López, Enrique; Mateo, Jesús; Gracia, Luis

    2012-04-18

    Research in different areas of orthopedic and trauma surgery requires a methodology that allows both a more economic approach and the ability to reproduce different situations in an easy way. Simulation models have been introduced recently in bioengineering and could become an essential tool in the study of any physiological unity, regardless of its complexity. The main problem in modeling with finite elements simulation is to achieve an accurate reproduction of the anatomy and a perfect correlation of the different structures, in any region of the human body. Authors have developed a mixed technique, joining the use of a three-dimensional laser scanner Roland Picza captured together with computed tomography (CT) and 3D CT images, to achieve a perfect reproduction of the anatomy. Finite element (FE) simulation lets us know the biomechanical changes that take place after hip prostheses or osteosynthesis implantation and biological responses of bone to biomechanical changes. The simulation models are able to predict changes in bone stress distribution around the implant, so allowing preventing future pathologies. The development of a FE model of lumbar spine is another interesting application of the simulation. The model allows research on the lumbar spine, not only in physiological conditions but also simulating different load conditions, to assess the impact on biomechanics. Different degrees of disc degeneration can also be simulated to determine the impact on adjacent anatomical elements. Finally, FE models may be useful to test different fixation systems, i.e., pedicular screws, interbody devices or rigid fixations compared with the dynamic ones. We have also developed models of lumbar spine and hip joint to predict the occurrence of osteoporotic fractures, based on densitometric determinations and specific biomechanical models, including approaches from damage and fracture mechanics. FE simulations also allow us to predict the behavior of orthopedic splints

  18. Finite element modeling of seismic wave propagation in earthen embankments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadese, Binyam Darsema

    The detection of internal seepage zones in embankments (dams and levees) by geophysical seismic techniques such as seismic refraction is limited by a number of factors. Some factors are associated with inversion and smoothing problems during processing, while others are associated with the natural characteristics of embankments and seepage anomalies. In this research, changes in the seismic response associated with: embankment soil compositions and moisture, characteristics of the seepage zone, presence of water in the reservoir, and shape of embankment was studied via 2D and 3D finite element (FE) embankment models. Artificial reflections from external boundaries and numerical dispersion were first examined in the frame work of COMSOL. A combination of an absorbing layer and dashpot elements produced minimal reflections. The numerical dispersion study suggested a mesh composed of 5 quartic (4th order) elements per wavelength and a time step of 1/4 of 1/20 of the minimum period to be optimal. COMSOL models were verified by comparing to the analytic solutions for a transient point source in an unbounded media. The agreement of arrival times from a point source and a line source were also ascertained for an elastic half space model. The seismic response of dry and wet seepage zones in an embankment were evaluated for 2D longitudinal and transverse models. The zones considered in this study do not cause substantial deviations on the first arrival times but behave as scatters and their signatures were, predominantly, wavelet distortion. Wet (high impedance) zone produces a higher amplitude wavelet that is delayed in time, whereas a dry (low impedance) zone produces an earlier arriving lower amplitude, first arriving wavelet. Processing algorithms such as tomography that can incorporate such finite frequency effects may improve the detection of internal seepage in earthen embankments. The results from preliminary 3D models suggest that the water in the reservoir and the

  19. Energy flow prediction in built-up structures through a hybrid finite element/wave and finite element approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Y.; Collet, M.; Ichchou, M.; Li, L.; Bareille, O.; Dimitrijevic, Z.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a rapid and accurate numerical tool for the energy flow evaluation in a periodic substructure from the near-field to the far-field domain. Here we suppose that the near-field part contains a point source characterized by the injected power in the structure. The near-field part is then modeled by Finite Element Method (FEM) while the periodic structure and the far-field part are regarded as waveguides and modeled by an enhanced Wave and Finite Element Method (WFEM). Enhancements are made on the eigenvalue scheme, the condensation of the unit cell and the consideration of a reduced wave basis. Efforts are made to adapt substructures modeled by different strategies in a multi-scale manner such that the final matrices dimensions of the built-up structure are largely reduced. The method is then validated numerically and theoretically. An application is presented, where a structural dynamical system coupled with periodic resistive piezoelectric shunts is discussed.

  20. Study of ITER plasma position reflectometer using a two-dimensional full-wave finite-difference time domain code

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, F. da

    2008-10-15

    The EU will supply the plasma position reflectometer for ITER. The system will have channels located at different poloidal positions, some of them obliquely viewing a plasma which has a poloidal density divergence and curvature, both adverse conditions for profile measurements. To understand the impact of such topology in the reconstruction of density profiles a full-wave two-dimensional finite-difference time domain O-mode code with the capability for frequency sweep was used. Simulations show that the reconstructed density profiles still meet the ITER radial accuracy specifications for plasma position (1 cm), except for the highest densities. Other adverse effects such as multireflections induced by the blanket, density fluctuations, and MHD activity were considered and a first understanding on their impact obtained.