Science.gov

Sample records for iterative spectrum shaping

  1. ITER Shape Controller and Transport Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Casper, T A; Meyer, W H; Pearlstein, L D; Portone, A

    2007-05-31

    We currently use the CORSICA integrated modeling code for scenario studies for both the DIII-D and ITER experiments. In these simulations, free- or fixed-boundary equilibria are simultaneously converged with thermal evolution determined from transport models providing temperature and current density profiles. Using a combination of fixed boundary evolution followed by free-boundary calculation to determine the separatrix and coil currents. In the free-boundary calculation, we use the state-space controller representation with transport simulations to provide feedback modeling of shape, vertical stability and profile control. In addition to a tightly coupled calculation with simulator and controller imbedded inside CORSICA, we also use a remote procedure call interface to couple the CORSICA non-linear plasma simulations to the controller environments developed within the Mathworks Matlab/Simulink environment. We present transport simulations using full shape and vertical stability control with evolution of the temperature profiles to provide simulations of the ITER controller and plasma response.

  2. An iterative multidisciplinary analysis for rotor blade shape determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahajan, Aparajit J.; Stefko, George L.

    1993-01-01

    A CFD solver called ADPAC-APES is coupled with a NASTRAN structural analysis and a MARC thermal/heat transfer analysis to determine rotor blade shape. Nonlinear blade displacements due to centrifugal loads, aerodynamic pressures, and nonuniform temperature distribution are determined simultaneously. The effect of blade displacements on aerodynamic pressures and temperatures is then analyzed. These calculations are iterated till a steady state is reached across all the disciplines. This iterative procedure is applied to a ducted fan rotor blade and the manufactured shape is determined from a given operating shape. Effect of a part-span shroud on blade deflections is also analyzed.

  3. Shape reanalysis and sensitivities utilizing preconditioned iterative boundary solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guru Prasad, K.; Kane, J. H.

    1992-01-01

    The computational advantages associated with the utilization of preconditined iterative equation solvers are quantified for the reanalysis of perturbed shapes using continuum structural boundary element analysis (BEA). Both single- and multi-zone three-dimensional problems are examined. Significant reductions in computer time are obtained by making use of previously computed solution vectors and preconditioners in subsequent analyses. The effectiveness of this technique is demonstrated for the computation of shape response sensitivities required in shape optimization. Computer times and accuracies achieved using the preconditioned iterative solvers are compared with those obtained via direct solvers and implicit differentiation of the boundary integral equations. It is concluded that this approach employing preconditioned iterative equation solvers in reanalysis and sensitivity analysis can be competitive with if not superior to those involving direct solvers.

  4. Estimated spectrum adaptive postfilter and the iterative prepost filtering algirighms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linares, Irving (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The invention presents The Estimated Spectrum Adaptive Postfilter (ESAP) and the Iterative Prepost Filter (IPF) algorithms. These algorithms model a number of image-adaptive post-filtering and pre-post filtering methods. They are designed to minimize Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) blocking distortion caused when images are highly compressed with the Joint Photographic Expert Group (JPEG) standard. The ESAP and the IPF techniques of the present invention minimize the mean square error (MSE) to improve the objective and subjective quality of low-bit-rate JPEG gray-scale images while simultaneously enhancing perceptual visual quality with respect to baseline JPEG images.

  5. A modified iterative closest point algorithm for shape registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tihonkih, Dmitrii; Makovetskii, Artyom; Kuznetsov, Vladislav

    2016-09-01

    The iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm is one of the most popular approaches to shape registration. The algorithm starts with two point clouds and an initial guess for a relative rigid-body transformation between them. Then it iteratively refines the transformation by generating pairs of corresponding points in the clouds and by minimizing a chosen error metric. In this work, we focus on accuracy of the ICP algorithm. An important stage of the ICP algorithm is the searching of nearest neighbors. We propose to utilize for this purpose geometrically similar groups of points. Groups of points of the first cloud, that have no similar groups in the second cloud, are not considered in further error minimization. To minimize errors, the class of affine transformations is used. The transformations are not rigid in contrast to the classical approach. This approach allows us to get a precise solution for transformations such as rotation, translation vector and scaling. With the help of computer simulation, the proposed method is compared with common nearest neighbor search algorithms for shape registration.

  6. Iter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iotti, Robert

    2015-04-01

    been present at the beginning, ITER would be in far better shape. As is, it can provide good lessons to avoid the same problems in the future. The ITER Council is now applying those lessons. A very experienced new Director General has just been appointed. He has instituted a number of drastic changes, but still within the governance of the JIA. Will there changes be effective? Only time will tell, but I am optimistic.

  7. Cochlea segmentation using iterated random walks with shape prior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Pujadas, Esmeralda; Kjer, Hans Martin; Vera, Sergio; Ceresa, Mario; González Ballester, Miguel Ángel

    2016-03-01

    Cochlear implants can restore hearing to deaf or partially deaf patients. In order to plan the intervention, a model from high resolution µCT images is to be built from accurate cochlea segmentations and then, adapted to a patient-specific model. Thus, a precise segmentation is required to build such a model. We propose a new framework for segmentation of µCT cochlear images using random walks where a region term is combined with a distance shape prior weighted by a confidence map to adjust its influence according to the strength of the image contour. Then, the region term can take advantage of the high contrast between the background and foreground and the distance prior guides the segmentation to the exterior of the cochlea as well as to less contrasted regions inside the cochlea. Finally, a refinement is performed preserving the topology using a topological method and an error control map to prevent boundary leakage. We tested the proposed approach with 10 datasets and compared it with the latest techniques with random walks and priors. The experiments suggest that this method gives promising results for cochlea segmentation.

  8. Motion and shape recovery based on iterative stabilization for modest deviation from planar motion.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Isao; Arakawa, Kenichi

    2006-07-01

    We describe an iterative stabilization method that can simultaneously recover camera motion and 3D shape from an image sequence captured under modest deviation from planar motion. This technique iteratively applies a factorization method based on planar motion and can approximate the observed image points to the 2D points projected under planar motion by stabilizing the camera motion. We apply the proposed method to aerial images acquired by a helicopter-borne camera and show better reconstruction of both motion and shape than Christy-Horaud's perspective factorization. Moreover, we confirm that the reprojection errors calculated from the recovered camera motion and 3D shape are very similar to the optimum results yielded by bundle adjustment.

  9. A noise power spectrum study of a new model-based iterative reconstruction system: Veo 3.0.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang; Liu, Xinming; Dodge, Cristina T; Jensen, Corey T; Rong, X John

    2016-09-08

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate performance of the third generation of model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) system, Veo 3.0, based on noise power spectrum (NPS) analysis with various clinical presets over a wide range of clinically applicable dose levels. A CatPhan 600 surrounded by an oval, fat-equivalent ring to mimic patient size/shape was scanned 10 times at each of six dose levels on a GE HD 750 scanner. NPS analysis was performed on images reconstructed with various Veo 3.0 preset combinations for comparisons of those images reconstructed using Veo 2.0, filtered back projection (FBP) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruc-tion (ASiR). The new Target Thickness setting resulted in higher noise in thicker axial images. The new Texture Enhancement function achieved a more isotropic noise behavior with less image artifacts. Veo 3.0 provides additional reconstruction options designed to allow the user choice of balance between spatial resolution and image noise, relative to Veo 2.0. Veo 3.0 provides more user selectable options and in general improved isotropic noise behavior in comparison to Veo 2.0. The overall noise reduction performance of both versions of MBIR was improved in comparison to FBP and ASiR, especially at low-dose levels.

  10. Iterative most-likely point registration (IMLP): a robust algorithm for computing optimal shape alignment.

    PubMed

    Billings, Seth D; Boctor, Emad M; Taylor, Russell H

    2015-01-01

    We present a probabilistic registration algorithm that robustly solves the problem of rigid-body alignment between two shapes with high accuracy, by aptly modeling measurement noise in each shape, whether isotropic or anisotropic. For point-cloud shapes, the probabilistic framework additionally enables modeling locally-linear surface regions in the vicinity of each point to further improve registration accuracy. The proposed Iterative Most-Likely Point (IMLP) algorithm is formed as a variant of the popular Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm, which iterates between point-correspondence and point-registration steps. IMLP's probabilistic framework is used to incorporate a generalized noise model into both the correspondence and the registration phases of the algorithm, hence its name as a most-likely point method rather than a closest-point method. To efficiently compute the most-likely correspondences, we devise a novel search strategy based on a principal direction (PD)-tree search. We also propose a new approach to solve the generalized total-least-squares (GTLS) sub-problem of the registration phase, wherein the point correspondences are registered under a generalized noise model. Our GTLS approach has improved accuracy, efficiency, and stability compared to prior methods presented for this problem and offers a straightforward implementation using standard least squares. We evaluate the performance of IMLP relative to a large number of prior algorithms including ICP, a robust variant on ICP, Generalized ICP (GICP), and Coherent Point Drift (CPD), as well as drawing close comparison with the prior anisotropic registration methods of GTLS-ICP and A-ICP. The performance of IMLP is shown to be superior with respect to these algorithms over a wide range of noise conditions, outliers, and misalignments using both mesh and point-cloud representations of various shapes.

  11. Impact of a narrow limiter SOL heat flux channel on the ITER first wall panel shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocan, M.; Pitts, R. A.; Arnoux, G.; Balboa, I.; de Vries, P. C.; Dejarnac, R.; Furno, I.; Goldston, R. J.; Gribov, Y.; Horacek, J.; Komm, M.; Labit, B.; LaBombard, B.; Lasnier, C. J.; Mitteau, R.; Nespoli, F.; Pace, D.; Panek, R.; Stangeby, P. C.; Terry, J. L.; Tsui, C.; Vondracek, P.

    2015-03-01

    The inboard limiters for ITER were initially designed on the assumption that the parallel heat flux density in the scrape-off layer (SOL) could be approximated by a single exponential with decay length λq. This assumption was found not to be adequate in 2012, when infra-red (IR) thermography measurements on the inner column during JET limiter discharges clearly revealed the presence of a narrow heat flux channel adjacent to the last closed flux surface. This near-SOL decay occurs with λq ∼ few mm, much shorter than the main SOL λq, and can raise the heat flux at the limiter apex a factor up to ∼4 above the value expected from a single, broader exponential. The original logarithmically shaped ITER inner wall first wall panels (FWPs) would be unsuited to handling the power loads produced by such a narrow feature. A multi-machine study involving the C-Mod, COMPASS, DIII-D and TCV tokamaks, employing inner wall IR measurements and/or inner wall reciprocating probes, was initiated to investigate the narrow limiter SOL heat flux channel. This paper describes the new results which have provided an experimental database for the narrow feature and presents an ITER inner wall FWP toroidal shape optimized for a double-exponential profile with λq = 4 (narrow feature) and 50 mm (main-SOL), the latter also derived from a separate multi-machine database constituted recently within the International Tokamak Physics Activity. It is shown that the new shape allows the power handling capability of the original shape design to be completely recovered for a wide variety of limiter start-up equilibria in the presence of a narrow feature, even taking assembly tolerances into account. It is, moreover, further shown that the new shape has the interesting property of both mitigating the impact of the narrow feature and resulting in only a very modest increase in heat load, compared to the current design, if the narrow feature is not eventually found on ITER.

  12. A statistical iterative reconstruction framework for dual energy computed tomography without knowing tube spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shaojie; Mou, Xuanqin

    2016-09-01

    Dual energy computed tomography (DECT) has significant impacts on material characterization, bone mineral density inspection, nondestructive evaluation and so on. In spite of great progress has been made recently on reconstruction algorithms for DECT, there still exist two main problems: 1) For polyenergetic X-ray source, the tube spectrum needed in reconstruction is not always available. 2) The reconstructed image of DECT is very sensitive to noise which demands special noise suppression strategy in reconstruction algorithm design. In this paper, we propose a novel method for DECT reconstruction that reconstructs tube spectrum from projection data and suppresses image noise by introducing l1-norm based regularization into statistical reconstruction for polychromatic DECT. The contribution of this work is twofold. 1) A three parameters model is devised to represent spectrum of ployenergetic X-ray source. And the parameters can be estimated from projection data by solving an optimization problem. 2) With the estimated tube spectrum, we propose a computation framework of l1-norm regularization based statistical iterative reconstruction for polychromatic DECT. Simulation experiments with two phantoms were conducted to evaluate the proposed method. Experimental results demonstrate the accuracy and robustness of the spectrum model in terms of that comparable reconstruction image quality can be achieved with the estimated and ideal spectrum, and validate that the proposed method works with attractive performance in terms of accuracy of reconstructed image. The root mean square error (RMSE) between the reconstructed image and the ground truth image are 7.648 × 10-4 and 2.687 x 10-4 for the two phantoms, respectively.

  13. Hybrid iterative wavefront shaping for high-speed focusing through scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemphill, Ashton S.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-03-01

    A major limiting factor of optical imaging in biological applications is the diffusion of light by tissue, preventing focusing at depths greater than ~1 mm in the body. To overcome this issue, phase-based wavefront shaping alters the phase of sections of the incident wavefront to counteract aberrations in phase caused by scattering. This enables focusing through scattering media beyond the optical diffusion limit and increases signal compared to amplitude-based compensation. However, in previous studies, speed of optimization has typically been limited by the use of a liquid crystal spatial light modulator (SLM) for measurement and display. SLMs usually have refresh rates of less than 100 Hz and require much longer than the speckle correlation time of tissue in vivo, usually on the order of milliseconds, to determine the optimal wavefront. Here, we present a phase-based iterative wavefront shaping method based on an onaxis digital micromirror device (DMD) in conjunction with an electro-optic modulator (EOM) for measurement and a fast SLM for display. By combining phase modulation from an EOM with the modal selection of the DMD, we take advantage of DMDs higher refresh rate, approximately 23 kHz, for iterative phase measurement. The slower SLM requires one update for display following the rapid determination of the optimal wavefront via the DMD, allowing for high-speed wavefront shaping. Using this system, we are able to focus through scattering media using 64 modes in under 8 milliseconds, on the order of the speckle correlation time for tissue in vivo.

  14. Energy Confinement Recovery in Low Collisionality ITER Shape Plasmas with Applied Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, L.; Grierson, B.; Logan, N.; Nazikian, R.

    2016-10-01

    Application of RMPs to low collisionality (ν*e < 0.4) ITER shape plasmas on DIII-D leads to a rapid reduction in stored energy due to density pumpout that is sometimes followed by a gradual recovery in the plasma stored energy. Understanding this confinement recovery is essential to optimize the confinement of RMP plasmas in present and future devices such as ITER. Transport modeling using TRANSP+TGLF indicates that the core a/LTi is stiff in these plasmas while the ion temperature gradient is much less stiff in the pedestal region. The reduction in the edge density during pumpout leads to an increase in the core ion temperature predicted by TGLF based on experimental data. This is correlated to the increase in the normalized ion heat flux. Transport stiffness in the core combined with an increase in the edge a/LTi results in an increase of the plasma stored energy, consistent with experimental observations. For plasmas where the edge density is controlled using deuterium gas puffs, the effect of the RMP on ion thermal confinement is significantly reduced. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  15. Reactor Antineutrino Flux and Spectrum Shape from Daya Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napolitano, Jim; Daya Bay Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment has collected very large samples of νe p ->e+ n events, where the νe are from the cores of six power plant reactors that undergo regular refueling. With 621 days of data, more than 1.2 million events of this type were detected. The collaboration has analyzed these data in terms of the absolute flux (addressing the ``Reactor Neutrino Anomaly''), the spectrum shape (including the excess in the region of 5 MeV prompt energy), and other effects. This talk will summarize the results from our most recent analyses, and discuss new initiatives aimed at continuing to understand the fine detail of the reactor νe spectrum.

  16. Spectrum fatigue testing of T-shaped tension clips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmberg, Bjoern; Wallstenius, Bengt

    1992-12-01

    An investigation of strain distributions during static loading and crack propagation and fatigue lives under spectrum loading of T-shaped tension clips was carried out. Three slightly different, with respect to geometry, T shaped tension clips made of aluminum alloy 7010-T73651 were studied. The type 1 and 4 test specimens were different only with respect to the web thickness of the clamping end. The type 1 and 2 test specimens were different with repect to milled flat circular countersink around the holes in the type 2 specimens and with respect to the radius between the web and foot. The spectrum fatigue loading consisted of a load sequence representative for the wing root, lower side, of a fighter aircraft. Tests were made at two different load levels for each specimen type. The strain measurements show that the countersink in the type 2 specimens increases the stresses in the fatigue critical region. This is also manifested in the spectrum fatigue life results, where type 2 specimens show the shortest fatigue lives. The strain measurements show that the torque used for the bolts in joining two test specimens or one test specimen and a dummy has a rather large impact on the strain in the fatigue region. The strains decrease with increasing torque. The spectrum fatigue loading resulted in approximately an equal number of flights to obtain a 10.0 mm crack for specimens of type 1 and 4. This suggests that the type 1 configuration is superior since the web thickness is smaller for this type as compared to the type 4 specimens. In other words, the type 4 specimens have an unnecessary oversize of the clamping end web thickness.

  17. Laser with rapid tuning of the spectrum shape.

    PubMed

    Parkhomenko, Y N; Galkin, O N; Gorbenko, O V; Sokolov, V A

    1998-11-20

    We have studied a laser system with quick electronic tuning of the spectrum shape and continuous distribution. The proposed method is based on separate control of phase and amplitude spatial distributions of resonator transmittance. Evolution of the spectral function of the diffractively coupled dispersive resonators and the model for the formation of the resonator with the spectral function given by its moments are studied theoretically. The synthesis of continuous spectra is investigated experimentally in the laser with a novel control element including a spatial acousto-optic modulator and a tunable lens telescope.

  18. [Novel method of noise power spectrum measurement for computed tomography images with adaptive iterative reconstruction method].

    PubMed

    Nishimaru, Eiji; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Hara, Takanori; Terakawa, Shoichi; Yokomachi, Kazushi; Fujioka, Chikako; Kiguchi, Masao; Ishifuro, Minoru

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive iterative reconstruction techniques (IRs) can decrease image noise in computed tomography (CT) and are expected to contribute to reduction of the radiation dose. To evaluate the performance of IRs, the conventional two-dimensional (2D) noise power spectrum (NPS) is widely used. However, when an IR provides an NPS value drop at all spatial frequency (which is similar to NPS changes by dose increase), the conventional method cannot evaluate the correct noise property because the conventional method does not correspond to the volume data natures of CT images. The purpose of our study was to develop a new method for NPS measurements that can be adapted to IRs. Our method utilized thick multi-planar reconstruction (MPR) images. The thick images are generally made by averaging CT volume data in a direction perpendicular to a MPR plane (e.g. z-direction for axial MPR plane). By using this averaging technique as a cutter for 3D-NPS, we can obtain adequate 2D-extracted NPS (eNPS) from 3D NPS. We applied this method to IR images generated with adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D (AIDR-3D, Toshiba) to investigate the validity of our method. A water phantom with 24 cm-diameters was scanned at 120 kV and 200 mAs with a 320-row CT (Acquilion One, Toshiba). From the results of study, the adequate thickness of MPR images for eNPS was more than 25.0 mm. Our new NPS measurement method utilizing thick MPR images was accurate and effective for evaluating noise reduction effects of IRs.

  19. Evaluating the performance of two neutron spectrum unfolding codes based on iterative procedures and artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Rodríguez, J. M.; Reyes Alfaro, A.; Reyes Haro, A.; Solís Sánches, L. O.; Miranda, R. Castañeda; Cervantes Viramontes, J. M.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.

    2013-07-01

    In this work the performance of two neutron spectrum unfolding codes based on iterative procedures and artificial neural networks is evaluated. The first one code based on traditional iterative procedures and called Neutron spectrometry and dosimetry from the Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas (NSDUAZ) use the SPUNIT iterative algorithm and was designed to unfold neutron spectrum and calculate 15 dosimetric quantities and 7 IAEA survey meters. The main feature of this code is the automated selection of the initial guess spectrum trough a compendium of neutron spectrum compiled by the IAEA. The second one code known as Neutron spectrometry and dosimetry with artificial neural networks (NDSann) is a code designed using neural nets technology. The artificial intelligence approach of neural net does not solve mathematical equations. By using the knowledge stored at synaptic weights on a neural net properly trained, the code is capable to unfold neutron spectrum and to simultaneously calculate 15 dosimetric quantities, needing as entrance data, only the rate counts measured with a Bonner spheres system. Similarities of both NSDUAZ and NSDann codes are: they follow the same easy and intuitive user's philosophy and were designed in a graphical interface under the LabVIEW programming environment. Both codes unfold the neutron spectrum expressed in 60 energy bins, calculate 15 dosimetric quantities and generate a full report in HTML format. Differences of these codes are: NSDUAZ code was designed using classical iterative approaches and needs an initial guess spectrum in order to initiate the iterative procedure. In NSDUAZ, a programming routine was designed to calculate 7 IAEA instrument survey meters using the fluence-dose conversion coefficients. NSDann code use artificial neural networks for solving the ill-conditioned equation system of neutron spectrometry problem through synaptic weights of a properly trained neural network. Contrary to iterative procedures, in neural

  20. Evaluating the performance of two neutron spectrum unfolding codes based on iterative procedures and artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz-Rodriguez, J. M.; Reyes Alfaro, A.; Reyes Haro, A.; Solis Sanches, L. O.; Miranda, R. Castaneda; Cervantes Viramontes, J. M.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.

    2013-07-03

    In this work the performance of two neutron spectrum unfolding codes based on iterative procedures and artificial neural networks is evaluated. The first one code based on traditional iterative procedures and called Neutron spectrometry and dosimetry from the Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas (NSDUAZ) use the SPUNIT iterative algorithm and was designed to unfold neutron spectrum and calculate 15 dosimetric quantities and 7 IAEA survey meters. The main feature of this code is the automated selection of the initial guess spectrum trough a compendium of neutron spectrum compiled by the IAEA. The second one code known as Neutron spectrometry and dosimetry with artificial neural networks (NDSann) is a code designed using neural nets technology. The artificial intelligence approach of neural net does not solve mathematical equations. By using the knowledge stored at synaptic weights on a neural net properly trained, the code is capable to unfold neutron spectrum and to simultaneously calculate 15 dosimetric quantities, needing as entrance data, only the rate counts measured with a Bonner spheres system. Similarities of both NSDUAZ and NSDann codes are: they follow the same easy and intuitive user's philosophy and were designed in a graphical interface under the LabVIEW programming environment. Both codes unfold the neutron spectrum expressed in 60 energy bins, calculate 15 dosimetric quantities and generate a full report in HTML format. Differences of these codes are: NSDUAZ code was designed using classical iterative approaches and needs an initial guess spectrum in order to initiate the iterative procedure. In NSDUAZ, a programming routine was designed to calculate 7 IAEA instrument survey meters using the fluence-dose conversion coefficients. NSDann code use artificial neural networks for solving the ill-conditioned equation system of neutron spectrometry problem through synaptic weights of a properly trained neural network. Contrary to iterative procedures, in neural

  1. 20F beta spectrum shape and weak interaction tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voytas, Paul; George, Elizabeth; Chuna, Thomas; Naviliat-Cuncic, Oscar; Hughes, Max; Huyan, Xueying; Minamisono, Kei; Paulauskas, Stanley

    2016-09-01

    Precision measurements of the shape of beta spectra can test our understanding of the weak interaction. We are carrying out a measurement of the shape of the energy spectrum of β particles from 20F decay. The primary motivation is to test the so-called strong form of the conserved vector current (CVC) hypothesis. The measurement should also enable us to place competitive limits on the contributions of exotic tensor couplings in beta decay. We aim to achieve a relative precision better than 3% on the linear contribution to the shape. This represents an order of magnitude improvement compared to previous experiments in 20F. In order to control systematic effects, we are using a technique that takes advantage of high energy radioactive beams at the NSCL to implant the decaying nuclei in scintillation detectors deeply enough that the emitted beta particles cannot escape. The β-particle energy is measured with the implantation detector after switching off the implantation beam. Ancillary detectors are used to identify the 1.633-MeV γ-rays following the 20F β decay for coincidence measurements in order to tag the transition of interest and to reduce backgrounds. We report on the status of the analysis. Supported in part with Awards from the NSCL PAC and the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1506084.

  2. Phase retrieval with the transport-of-intensity equation in an arbitrarily-shaped aperture by iterative discrete cosine transforms

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Lei; Zuo, Chao; Idir, Mourad; ...

    2015-04-21

    A novel transport-of-intensity equation (TIE) based phase retrieval method is proposed with putting an arbitrarily-shaped aperture into the optical wavefield. In this arbitrarily-shaped aperture, the TIE can be solved under non-uniform illuminations and even non-homogeneous boundary conditions by iterative discrete cosine transforms with a phase compensation mechanism. Simulation with arbitrary phase, arbitrary aperture shape, and non-uniform intensity distribution verifies the effective compensation and high accuracy of the proposed method. Experiment is also carried out to check the feasibility of the proposed method in real measurement. Comparing to the existing methods, the proposed method is applicable for any types of phasemore » distribution under non-uniform illumination and non-homogeneous boundary conditions within an arbitrarily-shaped aperture, which enables the technique of TIE with hard aperture become a more flexible phase retrieval tool in practical measurements.« less

  3. Phase retrieval with the transport-of-intensity equation in an arbitrarily-shaped aperture by iterative discrete cosine transforms

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lei; Zuo, Chao; Idir, Mourad; Qu, Weijuan; Asundi, Anand

    2015-04-21

    A novel transport-of-intensity equation (TIE) based phase retrieval method is proposed with putting an arbitrarily-shaped aperture into the optical wavefield. In this arbitrarily-shaped aperture, the TIE can be solved under non-uniform illuminations and even non-homogeneous boundary conditions by iterative discrete cosine transforms with a phase compensation mechanism. Simulation with arbitrary phase, arbitrary aperture shape, and non-uniform intensity distribution verifies the effective compensation and high accuracy of the proposed method. Experiment is also carried out to check the feasibility of the proposed method in real measurement. Comparing to the existing methods, the proposed method is applicable for any types of phase distribution under non-uniform illumination and non-homogeneous boundary conditions within an arbitrarily-shaped aperture, which enables the technique of TIE with hard aperture become a more flexible phase retrieval tool in practical measurements.

  4. Shaping the Future for Children with Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, Carolyn; Carpenter, Barry; Egerton, Jo

    2010-01-01

    This article describes work undertaken in connection with an ongoing research project funded by the Training and Development Agency for Schools. It illustrates the educational implications of foetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) and its implications for the educational workforce in seeking to meet the needs of those children who are affected.

  5. Performance of Coded Offset Quadrature Phase-Shift Keying (OQPSK) and MIL-STD Shaped OQPSK (SOQPSK) with Iterative Decoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Simon, M. K.

    2004-02-01

    We show that, similar to the trellis-coded modulation representation of MIL-STD shaped offset quadrature phase-shift keying (SOQPSK), offset quadrature phase-shift keying (OQPSK) can be decomposed into a "degraded" trellis encoder and a memoryless mapper. Based on the representations of OQPSK and MIL-STD SOQPSK as trellis-coded modulations, we investigate the potential coding gains achievable from the application of simple outer codes to form a concatenated coding structure with iterative decoding. For MIL-STD SOQPSK, we describe the optimum receiver corresponding to its trellis-coded modulation form and then propose a simplified receiver. The bit-error-rate (BER) performances of both receivers for uncoded and coded MIL-STD SOQPSK are simulated and compared to those of OQPSK and Feher-patented quadrature phase-shift keying (FQPSK). The asymptotic BER performance of MIL-STD SOQPSK also is analyzed and compared to that of OQPSK and FQPSK. Simulation results show that, compared to their uncoded systems, both OQPSK and MIL-STD SOQPSK obtain significant coding gains by applying iterative decoding to either the parallel concatenated coding scheme or the serial one, even when very simple outer codes are used.

  6. Iterative reconstruction of SiPM light response functions in a square-shaped compact gamma camera.

    PubMed

    Morozov, Andrey; Alves, Francisco; Marcos, Joao; Martins, Raimundo; Pereira, Luis; Solovov, Vladimir; Chepel, Vitaly

    2017-02-13

    Compact gamma cameras with a square-shaped monolithic scintillator crystal and an array of silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are actively being developed for applications in areas such as small animal imaging, cancer diagnostics and radiotracer guided surgery. Statistical methods of position reconstruction, which are potentially superior to the traditional centroid method, require accurate knowledge of the spatial response of each photomultiplier. Using both Monte Carlo simulations and experimental data obtained with a camera prototype, we show that the spatial response of all photomultipliers (light response functions) can be parameterized with axially symmetric functions obtained iteratively from flood field irradiation data. The study was performed with a camera prototype equipped with a 30 x 30 x 2 mm3 LYSO crystal and an 8 x 8 array of SiPMs for 140 keV gamma rays. The simulations demonstrate that the images, reconstructed with the maximum likelihood method using the response obtained with the iterative approach, exhibit only minor distortions: the average difference between the reconstructed and the true positions in X and Y directions does not exceed 0.2 mm in the central area of 22 x 22 mm2 and 0.4 mm at the periphery of the camera. A similar level of image distortions is shown experimentally with the camera prototype.

  7. Joint envelope and frequency order spectrum analysis based on iterative generalized demodulation for planetary gearbox fault diagnosis under nonstationary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhipeng; Chen, Xiaowang; Liang, Ming

    2016-08-01

    Planetary gearbox vibration signals under nonstationary conditions are characterized by time-varying nature and complex multi-components, making it very difficult to extract features for fault diagnosis. Order spectrum analysis is one of the effective approaches for nonstationary signal analysis of rotating machinery. The main idea of order analysis is to map the time-varying frequency components into constant ones. Inspired by this idea, we propose a new order spectrum analysis method to exploit the unique property of iterative generalized demodulation in converting arbitrary instantaneous frequency trajectories of multi-component signals into constant frequency lines on the time-frequency plane. This new method is completely algorithm-based and tachometer/encoder-free, thus easy to implement. It does not involve equi-angular resampling commonly required by most order tracking methods and is hence free from the decimation and/or interpolation error. The proposed order analysis method can eliminate the time-variation effect of frequency and thus can effectively reveal the harmonic order constituents of nonstationary multi-component signals. However, the planetary gearbox vibration signals also lead to complex sideband orders. As such, we further propose to analyze the order spectrum of amplitude envelope. This will eliminate the complex sideband orders in the order spectrum of original signals, leading to a substantially simplified and more reliable gear characteristic frequency identification process. Nevertheless, the gear and/or planet carrier rotating frequency orders, which are irrelevant to gear fault, may still exist. To avoid possible misleading results due to such frequency orders, we also propose to analyze the order spectrum of instantaneous frequency. Theoretically, the peaks present in frequency order spectrum directly correspond to the gear characteristic frequency orders, which can be used to extract gear fault signature more explicitly. The proposed

  8. Investigations of castellated structures for ITER: The effect of castellation shaping and alignment on fuel retention and impurity deposition in gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litnovsky, A.; Wienhold, P.; Philipps, V.; Krieger, K.; Kirschner, A.; Matveev, D.; Borodin, D.; Sergienko, G.; Schmitz, O.; Kreter, A.; Samm, U.; Richter, S.; Breuer, U.; Textor Team

    2009-06-01

    Castellation will be used in divertor and first wall components to provide thermo-mechanical stability of ITER. Radioactive fuel may be stored in the gaps of castellated structures representing a safety issue for ITER. Tungsten castellated structures with different shapes were exposed in TEXTOR to investigate the impact of cell shaping on impurity transport and fuel deposition in the gaps. After exposure a significant intermixing of tungsten was detected in carbon deposits in the gaps reaching 70 at.% of W in the deposited layer. This will provide difficulties in cleaning the gaps in ITER. Poloidal gaps of shaped cells contained a factor or 3 less deuterium than those of rectangular cells, the carbon deposition exhibited only marginal advantages of a new geometry. Poloidal and toroidal gaps contained comparable amount of C and D. Significant deposition at the bottom of gaps was measured which could only partly be reproduced by modeling.

  9. Deformation of Brillouin gain spectrum shape caused by strain varying linearly with respect to time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naruse, Hiroshi; Komatsu, Ayako; Tateda, Mitsuhiro

    2015-09-01

    The shape of the Brillouin gain spectrum (BGS) that is produced in an optical fiber undergoing strain varying linearly with respect to time, which is a typical example of temporally non-uniform strain, is theoretically derived through an analysis similar to that by which the BGS under spatially non-uniform strain would be derived. The BGS shape that is theoretically derived agrees well with the shape experimentally observed. The characteristics of the BGS deformation and strain measurement error under the temporally linear strain are discussed based on their similarity to the BGS shape derived under spatially linear strain.

  10. Analysis of the phase control of the ITER ICRH antenna array. Influence on the load resilience and radiated power spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Messiaen, A. Ongena, J.; Vervier, M.; Swain, D.

    2015-12-10

    The paper analyses how the phasing of the ITER ICRH 24 strap array evolves from the power sources up to the strap currents of the antenna. The study of the phasing control and coherence through the feeding circuits with prematching and automatic matching and decoupling network is made by modeling starting from the TOPICA matrix of the antenna array for a low coupling plasma profile and for current drive phasing (worst case for mutual coupling effects). The main results of the analysis are: (i) the strap current amplitude is well controlled by the antinode V{sub max} amplitude of the feeding lines, (ii) the best toroidal phasing control is done by the adjustment of the mean phase of V{sub max} of each poloidal straps column, (iii) with well adjusted system the largest strap current phasing error is ±20°, (iv) the effect on load resilience remains well below the maximum affordable VSWR of the generators, (v) the effect on the radiated power spectrum versus k{sub //} computed by means of the coupling code ANTITER II remains small for the considered cases.

  11. Analysis of the phase control of the ITER ICRH antenna array. Influence on the load resilience and radiated power spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Messiaen, Andre; Swain, David W; Ongena, Jef; Vervier, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The paper analyses how the phasing of the ITER ICRH 24 strap array evolves from the power sources up to the strap currents of the antenna. The study of the phasing control and coherence through the feeding circuits with prematching and automatic matching and decoupling network is made by modeling starting from the TOPICA matrix of the antenna array for a low coupling plasma profile and for current drive phasing (worst case for mutual coupling effects). The main results of the analysis are: (i) the strap current amplitude is well controlled by the antinode V-max amplitude of the feeding lines, (ii) the best toroidal phasing control is done by the adjustment of the mean phase of V-max of each poloidal straps column, (iii) with well adjusted system the largest strap current phasing error is +/- 20 degrees, (iv) the effect on load resilience remains well below the maximum affordable VSWR of the generators, (v) the effect on the radiated power spectrum versus k//computed by means of the coupling code ANTITER II remains small for the considered cases. [GRAPHICS] .

  12. Basal Ganglia Shapes Predict Social, Communication, and Motor Dysfunctions in Boys with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qiu, Anqi; Adler, Marcy; Crocetti, Deana; Miller, Michael I.; Mostofsky, Stewart H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Basal ganglia abnormalities have been suggested as contributing to motor, social, and communicative impairments in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Volumetric analyses offer limited ability to detect localized differences in basal ganglia structure. Our objective was to investigate basal ganglia shape abnormalities and their association…

  13. Palm-shaped spectrum generation for dual-band millimeter wave and baseband signals over fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, R.; Feng, Z.; Tang, M.; Wang, R.; Fu, S.; Shum, P.; Liu, D.; Chen, J.

    2016-05-01

    In order to offer abundant available bandwidth for radio access networks satisfying future 5G requirements on capacity, this paper proposes a simple and cost-effective palm-shaped spectrum generation scheme that can be used for high capacity radio over fiber (RoF) system. The proposed scheme can simultaneously generate an optical carrier used for upstream and two bands of millimeter wave (MMW) that are capable of carrying different downstream data. The experiment results show that the proposed palm-shaped spectrum generation scheme outperforms optical frequency comb (OFC) based multi-band MMW generation in terms of upstream transmission performance. Furthermore, simulation is carried out with different dual-band MMW configurations to verify the feasibility of using the proposed spectrum generation scheme in the RoF system.

  14. Do Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders Show a Shape Bias in Word Learning?

    PubMed Central

    Tek, Saime; Jaffery, Gul; Fein, Deborah; Naigles, Letitia R.

    2009-01-01

    Many children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) acquire a sizeable lexicon. However, these children also seem to understand and/or store the meanings of words differently from typically developing children. One of the mechanisms that helps typically developing children learn novel words is the shape bias, in which the referent of a noun is mapped onto the shape of an object, rather than onto its color, texture, or size. We hypothesized that children with Autistic Disorder would show reduced or absent shape bias. Using the Intermodal Preferential Looking Paradigm (IPL), we compared the performance of young children with ASD and typically developing children (TYP), across four time points, in their use of shape bias. Neither group showed a shape bias at Visit 1, when half of the children in both groups produced fewer than 50 count nouns. Only the TYP group showed a shape bias at Visits 2, 3, and 4. According to growth curve analyses, the rate of increase in the shape bias scores over time was significant for the TYP children. The fact that the TYP group showed a shape bias at 24 months of age, whereas children with ASD did not demonstrate a shape bias despite a sizeable vocabulary, supports a dissociation between vocabulary size and principles governing acquisition in ASD children from early in language development. PMID:19360671

  15. Frequency-doubled triangular-shaped waveform generation based on spectrum manipulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Sun, Jian; Xu, Weiwei; Ning, Tigang; Pei, Li; Yuan, Jin; Li, Yueqin

    2016-01-15

    In this approach, spectrum manipulation is employed in triangular-shaped waveform generation. By aligning the power of five primary modulation sidebands, optical intensity with expression corresponding to the first two-term Fourier expansion of triangular-shaped waveform can be obtained. It is found that the modulation index in this Letter is no longer a fixed one, but should be within a proper range (2-3). Triangular-shaped waveform signals can be generated by using a single-drive Mach-Zehnder modulator, a standard optical interleaver, and a grating. The principle is illustrated by theory, simulation, and experiment. A 20 GHz triangular-shaped waveform signal is experimentally generated by using a 10 GHz sinusoid signal, which agrees well with the theoretical prediction and shows great potential in generating a high-quality intensity profile.

  16. On the Phase-Averaged Spectrum of Pulsars and Shape of Their Cutoffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celik, O.; Thomas, T. J.

    2010-01-01

    All gamma ray pulsars exhibit an exponential cutoff in their spectra and for bright pulsars the statistics are sufficiently high to study the detailed shape of the cutoff. The phase averaged spectra of some pulsars exhibit a sub-exponential cutoff, not predicted by any single physical mechanism. Further studies clarified that (his gentler average cutoff is a consequence of having significant variations of the cutoff energy in the phase-resolved spectrum. In conclusion, the phase-averaged spectrum of a pulsar is not a physical quantity to test high-energy emission models.

  17. Synchrotron X-ray diagnostics of cutoff shape of nonthermal electron spectrum at young supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Ryo; Ohira, Yutaka; Sawada, Makoto; Bamba, Aya

    2014-02-01

    Synchrotron X-rays can be a useful tool to investigate electron acceleration at young supernova remnants (SNRs). At present, since the magnetic field configuration around the shocks of SNRs is uncertain, it is not clear whether electron acceleration is limited by SNR age, synchrotron cooling, or even escape from the acceleration region. We study whether the acceleration mechanism can be constrained by the cutoff shape of the electron spectrum around the maximum energy. We derive analytical formulae of the cutoff shape in each case where the maximum electron energy is determined by SNR age, synchrotron cooling and escape from the shock. They are related to the energy dependence of the electron diffusion coefficient. Next, we discuss whether information on the cutoff shape can be provided by observations in the near future which will simply give the photon indices and the flux ratios in the soft and hard X-ray bands. We find that if the power-law index of the electron spectrum is independently determined by other observations, then we can constrain the cutoff shape by comparing theoretical predictions of the photon indices and/or the flux ratios with observed data which will be measured by NuSTAR and/or ASTRO-H. Such study is helpful in understanding the acceleration mechanism. In particular, it will supply another independent constraint on the magnetic field strength around the shocks of SNRs.

  18. Quantitative Estimation of the Amount of Fibrosis in the Rat Liver Using Fractal Dimension of the Shape of Power Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Tsuneo; Nakazawa, Toshihiro; Furukawa, Tetsuo; Higuchi, Toshiyuki; Maruyama, Yukio; Sato, Sojun

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes the quantitative measurement of the amount of fibrosis in the rat liver using the fractal dimension of the shape of power spectrum. The shape of the power spectrum of the scattered echo from biotissues is strongly affected by its internal structure. The fractal dimension, which is one of the important parameters of the fractal theory, is useful to express the complexity of shape of figures such as the power spectrum. From in vitro experiments using rat liver, it was found that this method can be used to quantitatively measure the amount of fibrosis in the liver, and has the possibility for use in the diagnosis of human liver cirrhosis.

  19. SU-F-18C-02: Evaluations of the Noise Power Spectrum of a CT Iterative Reconstruction Technique for Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dolly, S; Chen, H; Anastasio, M; Mutic, S; Li, H

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To quantitatively assess the noise power spectrum (NPS) of the new, commercially released CT iterative reconstruction technique, iDose{sup 4} from Philips, to compare it with filtered back-projection techniques (FBP), and to provide clinical practice suggestions for radiation therapy. Methods: A uniform phantom was CT imaged with 120kVp tube potential over a range of mAs (250-3333). The image sets were reconstructed using two reconstruction algorithms (FBP and iDose{sup 4} with noise reduction levels 1, 3, and 6) and three reconstruction filters (standard B, smooth A, and sharp C), after which NPS variations were analyzed and compared on region of interest (ROI) sizes (16×16 to 128×128 pixels), ROI radii (0–65 mm), reconstruction algorithms, reconstruction filters, and mAs. Results: The NPS magnitude and shape depended considerably on ROI size and location for both reconstruction algorithms. Regional noise variance became more stationary as ROI size decreased, minimizing NPS artifacts. The optimal 32×32-pixel ROI size balanced the trade-off between stationary noise and adequate sampling. NPS artifacts were greatest at the center of reconstruction space and decreased with increasing ROI distance from the center. The optimal ROI position was located near the phantom's radial midpoint (∼40mm). For sharper filters, the NPS magnitude and the maximum magnitude frequency increased. Higher dose scans yielded lower NPS magnitudes for both reconstruction algorithms and all filters. Compared to FBP, the iDose{sup 4} algorithm reduced the NPS magnitude while preferentially reducing noise at mid-range spatial frequencies, altering noise texture. This reduction was more significant with increasing iDose{sup 4} noise reduction level. Conclusion: Compared to pixel standard deviation, NPS has greater clinical potential for task-based image quality assessment, describing both the magnitude and spatial frequency characteristics of image noise. While iDose{sup 4

  20. Shaping the joint spectrum of down-converted photons through optimized custom poling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosseva, Annamaria; Cincio, Łukasz; Brańczyk, Agata M.

    2016-01-01

    We present a scheme for engineering the joint spectrum of photon pairs created via spontaneous parametric down-conversion. Our method relies on customizing the poling configuration of a quasi-phase-matched crystal. We use simulated annealing to find an optimized poling configuration which allows almost arbitrary shaping of the crystal's phase-matching function. This has direct application in the creation of pure single photons—currently one of the most important goals of single-photon quantum optics. We describe the general algorithm and provide code, written in C++, that outputs an optimized poling configuration given specific experimental parameters.

  1. The real-time quantification of autofluorescence spectrum shape for the monitoring of mitochondrial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Long, Zac; Maltas, Jeff; Zatt, Michael C; Cheng, Jun; Alquist, Erik J; Brest, Alex; Urayama, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The cellular proportion of free and protein-bound NADH complexes is increasingly recognized as a metabolic indicator and biomarker. Because free and bound forms exhibit different fluorescence spectra, we consider whether autofluorescence shape sufficiently correlates with mitochondrial metabolism to be useful for monitoring in cellular suspensions. Several computational approaches for rapidly quantifying spectrum shape are used to detect Saccharomyces cereviseae response to oxygenation, and to the addition of mitochondrial functional modifiers and metabolic substrates. Observed changes appear consistent with previous studies probing free/protein-bound proportions, making this a potentially useful approach for the real-time monitoring of metabolism. (© 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH &Co. KGaA, Weinheim).

  2. Spectrum shape-analysis techniques applied to the Hanford Tank Farms spectral gamma logs

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.D.

    1997-05-01

    Gamma-ray spectra acquired with high-energy resolution by the spectral gamma logging systems (SGLSs) at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Tank Farms, Richland, Washington, are being analyzed for spectral shape characteristics. These spectral shapes, together with a conventional peak-area analysis, enable an analyst not only to identify the gamma-emitting species but also to determine in many instances its spatial distribution around a borehole and to identify the presence of the bremsstrahlung-producing contaminant {sup 90}Sr. The analysis relies primarily on the results of computer simulations of gamma spectra from the predominant radionuclide {sup 137}Cs for various spatial distributions. This log analysis methodology has evolved through an examination of spectral features from spectral logs taken at the SX, BY, and U Tank Farms at the Hanford Site. Initial results determined with this technique show it is possible, in most cases, to distinguish between concentrations of {sup 137}Cs. Work is continuing by experimentally measuring shape factors, incorporating spectrum shape processing in routine log analysis, and extending the techniques to additional radionuclides.

  3. Attentional Learning Helps Language Acquisition Take Shape for Atypically Developing Children, Not Just Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Charlotte; Allen, Melissa L.; Lewis, Charlie

    2016-01-01

    The shape bias--generalising labels to same shaped objects--has been linked to attentional learning or referential intent. We explore these origins in children with typical development (TD), autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and other developmental disorders (DD). In two conditions, a novel object was presented and either named or described.…

  4. The mutation spectrum in genomic late replication domains shapes mammalian GC content

    PubMed Central

    Kenigsberg, Ephraim; Yehuda, Yishai; Marjavaara, Lisette; Keszthelyi, Andrea; Chabes, Andrei; Tanay, Amos; Simon, Itamar

    2016-01-01

    Genome sequence compositions and epigenetic organizations are correlated extensively across multiple length scales. Replication dynamics, in particular, is highly correlated with GC content. We combine genome-wide time of replication (ToR) data, topological domains maps and detailed functional epigenetic annotations to study the correlations between replication timing and GC content at multiple scales. We find that the decrease in genomic GC content at large scale late replicating regions can be explained by mutation bias favoring A/T nucleotide, without selection or biased gene conversion. Quantification of the free dNTP pool during the cell cycle is consistent with a mechanism involving replication-coupled mutation spectrum that favors AT nucleotides at late S-phase. We suggest that mammalian GC content composition is shaped by independent forces, globally modulating mutation bias and locally selecting on functional element. Deconvoluting these forces and analyzing them on their native scales is important for proper characterization of complex genomic correlations. PMID:27085808

  5. Robust 9-QAM digital recovery for spectrum shaped coherent QPSK signal.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bo; Zhang, Junwen; Yu, Jianjun; Dong, Ze; Li, Xinying; Ou, Haiyan; Chi, Nan; Liu, Wen

    2013-03-25

    We propose 9-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (9-QAM) data recovery for polarization multiplexing-quadrature phase shift keying (PM-QPSK) signal in presence of strong filtering to approach Nyquist bandwidth. The decision-directed least radius distance (DD-LRD) algorithm for blind equalization is used for 9-QAM recovery and intersymbol interference (ISI) compression. It shows the robustness under strong filtering to recover 9-QAM signal rather than QPSK. We demonstrate 112 Gb/s spectrum shaped PM-QPSK signal by wavelength selective switch (WSS) in a 25-GHz channel spacing Nyquist wavelength division multiplexing (NWDM). The final equalized signal is detected by maximum likelihood sequence decision (MLSD) for data bit-error-ratio (BER) measurement. Optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) tolerance is improved by 0.5 dB at a BER of 1x10(-3) compared to constant modulus algorithm (CMA) plus post-filter algorithm.

  6. Statistical characteristics of the observed Ly-α forest and the shape of initial power spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demiański, M.; Doroshkevich, A. G.; Turchaninov, V.

    2003-04-01

    Properties of approximately 4500 observed Ly α absorbers are investigated using the model of formation and evolution of dark matter (DM) structure elements based on the modified Zel'dovich theory. This model is generally consistent with simulations of absorber formation, describes the large-scale structure (LSS) observed in the galaxy distribution at small redshifts reasonably well and emphasizes the generic similarity of the LSS and absorbers. The simple physical model of absorbers asserts that they are composed of DM and gaseous matter. It allows us to estimate the column density and overdensity of DM and gaseous components and the entropy of the gas trapped within the DM potential wells. The parameters of the DM component are found to be consistent with theoretical expectations for the Gaussian initial perturbations with the warm dark matter-like power spectrum. The basic physical factors responsible for the evolution of the absorbers are discussed. The analysis of redshift distribution of absorbers confirms the self-consistency of the adopted physical model, Gaussianity of the initial perturbations and allows one to estimate the shape of the initial power spectrum at small scales that, in turn, restricts the mass of the dominant fraction of DM particles to MDM>= 1.5-5 keV. Our results indicate a possible redshift variations of intensity of the ultraviolet background by approximately a factor of 2-3 at redshifts z~ 2-3.

  7. Shaped singular spectrum analysis for quantifying gene expression, with application to the early Drosophila embryo.

    PubMed

    Shlemov, Alex; Golyandina, Nina; Holloway, David; Spirov, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, with the development of automated microscopy technologies, the volume and complexity of image data on gene expression have increased tremendously. The only way to analyze quantitatively and comprehensively such biological data is by developing and applying new sophisticated mathematical approaches. Here, we present extensions of 2D singular spectrum analysis (2D-SSA) for application to 2D and 3D datasets of embryo images. These extensions, circular and shaped 2D-SSA, are applied to gene expression in the nuclear layer just under the surface of the Drosophila (fruit fly) embryo. We consider the commonly used cylindrical projection of the ellipsoidal Drosophila embryo. We demonstrate how circular and shaped versions of 2D-SSA help to decompose expression data into identifiable components (such as trend and noise), as well as separating signals from different genes. Detection and improvement of under- and overcorrection in multichannel imaging is addressed, as well as the extraction and analysis of 3D features in 3D gene expression patterns.

  8. A design of beam shaping unit for 193nm lithography illumination system using angular spectrum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Gong, Yan; Li, Shun; Zhang, Wei

    2010-08-01

    Off-axis illumination (OAI) technology is widely used to enhance resolution for deep ultraviolet lithography. The realizing methods of OAI include geometrical optics method and physical optics method. However, the former has the disadvantage of weak intensity distribution controlling ability, and the latter introduces simulation errors evidently when dealing with near field diffraction propagation. A diffractive optical element (DOE) designing method using plane wave angular spectrum theory is presented in this paper. Several kinds of OAI modes at near field away from DOE can be realized, and simulation errors and the size of illuminator are also reduced. According to studying the relationships of the sampling point distance of DOE, light beam propagation distance, and the structure of the beam shaping unit, a method of determining the designing parameters is discussed. Using this method, several illumination modes are realized, and simulation results show that all diffraction efficiencies reach up to 84%. The method of DOE manufacturing is analyzed at last, and it is proven to be feasible.

  9. Search for new physics in a precise 20F beta spectrum shape measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Elizabeth; Voytas, Paul; Chuna, Thomas; Naviliat-Cuncic, Oscar; Gade, Alexandra; Hughes, Max; Huyan, Xueying; Liddick, Sean; Minamisono, Kei; Paulauskas, Stanley; Weisshaar, Dirk; Ban, Gilles; Flechard, Xavier; Lienard, Etienne

    2015-10-01

    We are carrying out a measurement of the shape of the energy spectrum of β particles from 20F decay. We aim to achieve a relative precision below 3%, representing an order of magnitude improvement compared to previous experiments. This level of precision will enable a test of the so-called strong form of the conserved vector current (CVC) hypothesis, and should also enable us to place competitive limits on the contributions of exotic tensor couplings in beta decay. In order to control systematic effects, we are using a technique that takes advantage of high energy radioactive beams at the NSCL to implant the decaying nuclei in a scintillation detector deep enough that the emitted beta particles cannot escape. The β-particle energy is measured with the implantation detector after switching off the beam implantation. Ancillary detectors are used to tag the 1.633-MeV γ-rays following the β decay for coincidence measurements in order to reduce backgrounds. We will give an overview and report on the status of the experiment.

  10. Spacing and shape of random peaks in non-parametric spectrum estimates

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, D. J.; Haley, C. L.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, expressions are derived for the expected number of spurious peaks in a spectrum estimate, that is, crossings above a given significance level per frequency unit, as well as the expected width of these peaks. In numerous scientific applications, spectrum estimates are used for the purpose of identifying sinusoidal or modal components, often thinning large sets of candidate frequencies with coincidence detection. Because one always expects numerous false peaks in a spectrum estimate, knowing the expected rate of false peaks helps to decide whether the number observed is abnormal and hence determine the true nature of the process. An example using solar wind data from the Advanced Composition Explorer is given where spectra display pathological numbers of significant peaks, while temporally permuted versions of the data possess spectra with the number expected for a white, Gaussian process. The permutation test is a valuable diagnostic for processes suspected to contain many line components. PMID:25002827

  11. Simple Shapes Elicit Different Emotional Responses in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Neurotypical Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Belin, Laurine; Henry, Laurence; Destays, Mélanie; Hausberger, Martine; Grandgeorge, Marine

    2017-01-01

    According to the literature, simple shapes induce emotional responses. Current evaluations suggest that humans consider angular shapes as “bad” and curvilinear forms as “good,” but no behavioral data are available to support this hypothesis. Atypical development, such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD), could modify humans’ perception of visual stimuli and thereby their emotional effect. This study assessed the effects of simple stimuli (i.e., jagged edges shape, disk, star, spiral, eye-like shape, and head character) on the emotional responses of different groups of humans. First, we assessed the effects of a looming movement on neurotypical adults’ emotional responses. Second, we assessed the effects of atypical development on emotional responses by comparing the reactions of neurotypical children and of children with ASD. We used different methodological approaches: self-evaluation through questionnaires and direct observation of participants’ behavior. We found that (1) neurotypical adults tended to perceive looming stimuli negatively as they associated more negative feelings with them although few behavioral responses could be evidenced and (2) the emotional responses of neurotypical children and of children with ASD differed significantly. Neurotypical children perceived the spiral stimulus positively, i.e., a curvilinear shape, whereas children with ASD perceived the jagged edges stimulus positively, i.e., an angular shape. Although neurotypical children and children with ASD presented some behavioral responses in common, children with ASD smiled and vocalized more than did neurotypical children during stimuli presentations. We discuss our results in relation to the literature on humans’ perception of simple shapes and we stress the importance of studying behavioral components for visual cognition research. PMID:28194129

  12. Perception of Shapes Targeting Local and Global Processes in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grinter, Emma J.; Maybery, Murray T.; Pellicano, Elizabeth; Badcock, Johanna C.; Badcock, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Several researchers have found evidence for impaired global processing in the dorsal visual stream in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). However, support for a similar pattern of visual processing in the ventral visual stream is less consistent. Critical to resolving the inconsistency is the assessment of local and…

  13. Shaping the X-ray spectrum of galaxy clusters with AGN feedback and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspari, M.

    2015-07-01

    The hot plasma filling galaxy clusters emits copious X-ray radiation. The classic unheated and unperturbed cooling flow model predicts dramatic cooling rates and an isobaric X-ray spectrum with constant differential luminosity distribution. The observed cores of clusters (and groups) show instead a strong deficit of soft X-ray emission: dLx/dT ∝ (T/Thot)α = 2 ± 1. Using 3D hydrodynamic simulations, we show that such deficit arises from the tight self-regulation between thermal instability condensation and AGN outflow injection: condensing clouds boost the AGN outflows, which quench cooling as they thermalize through the core. The resultant average distribution slope is α ≃ 2, oscillating within the observed 1 < α < 3. In the absence of thermal instability, the X-ray spectrum remains isothermal (α ≳ 8), while unopposed cooling drives a too shallow slope, α < 1. AGN outflows deposit their energy inside-out, releasing more heat in the inner cooler phase; radially distributed heating alone induces a declining spectrum, 1 < α < 2. Turbulence further steepens the spectrum and increases the scatter: the turbulent Mach number in the hot phase is subsonic, while it becomes transonic in the cooler phase, making perturbations to depart from the isobaric mode. Such increase in dln P/dln T leads to α ≈ 3. Self-regulated AGN outflow feedback can address the soft X-ray problem through the interplay of heating and turbulence.

  14. Excitation function shape and neutron spectrum of the 7Li(p ,n )7Be reaction near threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Hernández, Guido; Mastinu, Pierfrancesco; Maggiore, Mario; Pranovi, Lorenzo; Prete, Gianfranco; Praena, Javier; Capote-Noy, Roberto; Gramegna, Fabiana; Lombardi, Augusto; Maran, Luca; Scian, Carlo; Munaron, Enrico

    2016-09-01

    The forward-emitted low energy tail of the neutron spectrum generated by the 7Li(p ,n )7Be reaction on a thick target at a proton energy of 1893.6 keV was measured by time-of-flight spectroscopy. The measurement was performed at BELINA (Beam Line for Nuclear Astrophysics) of the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro. Using the reaction kinematics and the proton on lithium stopping power the shape of the excitation function is calculated from the measured neutron spectrum. Good agreement with two reported measurements was found. Our data, along with the previous measurements, are well reproduced by the Breit-Wigner single-resonance formula for s -wave particles. The differential yield of the reaction is calculated and the widely used neutron spectrum at a proton energy of 1912 keV was reproduced. Possible causes regarding part of the 6.5% discrepancy between the 197Au(n ,γ ) cross section measured at this energy by Ratynski and Kappeler [Phys. Rev. C 37, 595 (1988), 10.1103/PhysRevC.37.595] and the one obtained using the Evaluated Nuclear Data File version B-VII.1 are given.

  15. Total Absorption Spectroscopy Study of (92)Rb Decay: A Major Contributor to Reactor Antineutrino Spectrum Shape.

    PubMed

    Zakari-Issoufou, A-A; Fallot, M; Porta, A; Algora, A; Tain, J L; Valencia, E; Rice, S; Bui, V M; Cormon, S; Estienne, M; Agramunt, J; Äystö, J; Bowry, M; Briz, J A; Caballero-Folch, R; Cano-Ott, D; Cucoanes, A; Elomaa, V-V; Eronen, T; Estévez, E; Farrelly, G F; Garcia, A R; Gelletly, W; Gomez-Hornillos, M B; Gorlychev, V; Hakala, J; Jokinen, A; Jordan, M D; Kankainen, A; Karvonen, P; Kolhinen, V S; Kondev, F G; Martinez, T; Mendoza, E; Molina, F; Moore, I; Perez-Cerdán, A B; Podolyák, Zs; Penttilä, H; Regan, P H; Reponen, M; Rissanen, J; Rubio, B; Shiba, T; Sonzogni, A A; Weber, C

    2015-09-04

    The antineutrino spectra measured in recent experiments at reactors are inconsistent with calculations based on the conversion of integral beta spectra recorded at the ILL reactor. (92)Rb makes the dominant contribution to the reactor antineutrino spectrum in the 5-8 MeV range but its decay properties are in question. We have studied (92)Rb decay with total absorption spectroscopy. Previously unobserved beta feeding was seen in the 4.5-5.5 region and the GS to GS feeding was found to be 87.5(25)%. The impact on the reactor antineutrino spectra calculated with the summation method is shown and discussed.

  16. Toward a fractal spectrum approach for neutron and gamma pulse shape discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming-Zhe; Liu, Bing-Qi; Zuo, Zhuo; Wang, Lei; Zan, Gui-Bin; Tuo, Xian-Guo

    2016-06-01

    Accurately selecting neutron signals and discriminating γ signals from a mixed radiation field is a key research issue in neutron detection. This paper proposes a fractal spectrum discrimination approach by means of different spectral characteristics of neutrons and γ rays. Figure of merit and average discriminant error ratio are used together to evaluate the discrimination effects. Different neutron and γ signals with various noise and pulse pile-up are simulated according to real data in the literature. The proposed approach is compared with the digital charge integration and pulse gradient methods. It is found that the fractal approach exhibits the best discrimination performance, followed by the digital charge integration method and the pulse gradient method, respectively. The fractal spectrum approach is not sensitive to high frequency noise and pulse pile-up. This means that the proposed approach has superior performance for effective and efficient anti-noise and high discrimination in neutron detection. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (41274109), Sichuan Youth Science and Technology Innovation Research Team (2015TD0020), Scientific and Technological Support Program of Sichuan Province (2013FZ0022), and the Creative Team Program of Chengdu University of Technology.

  17. Influence of phase cancellation and pulse shape artifacts on ultrasonic spectrum analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.; Cantrell, J. H., Jr.; Winfree, W. P.

    1979-01-01

    Both continuous wave and Fourier transformed pulse ultrasonic spectroscopy are being applied to material and flow characterization. Ideal samples and flaws (flat, parallel, and homogeneous) and ideal ultrasonic apparatus (producing delta function stress waves) provide acoustic spectra which can be partially inverted. However, in the presence of material inhomogeneity, lack of sample flatness or parallelism, or finite risetime pulses, the spectra become quite complex and produce phase cancellations at the transducer as well as pulse shape spectral artifacts. In this paper, we examine the nature of these artifacts for both simple and practical samples. Sample spectra are contrasted for several different transducer/electronic systems. Spectra obtained with a phase insensitive acousto-electric transducer (AET) combined with a frequency tracked tone-burst spectroscopy (TBS) method are presented. Analysis of the test configuration is shown to produce spectra consistent with that obtained with the AET-TBS combination.

  18. Reducing aberration effect of Fourier transform lens by modifying Fourier spectrum of diffractive optical element in beam shaping optical system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Zhu, Jing; Song, Qiang; Yue, Weirui; Liu, Jingdan; Wang, Jian; Situ, Guohai; Huang, Huijie

    2015-10-20

    In general, Fourier transform lenses are considered as ideal in the design algorithms of diffractive optical elements (DOEs). However, the inherent aberrations of a real Fourier transform lens disturb the far field pattern. The difference between the generated pattern and the expected design will impact the system performance. Therefore, a method for modifying the Fourier spectrum of DOEs without introducing other optical elements to reduce the aberration effect of the Fourier transform lens is proposed. By applying this method, beam shaping performance is improved markedly for the optical system with a real Fourier transform lens. The experiments carried out with a commercial Fourier transform lens give evidence for this method. The method is capable of reducing the system complexity as well as improving its performance.

  19. Statistical characteristics of the observed Lyα forest and the shape of the initial power spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demiański, M.; Doroshkevich, A. G.; Turchaninov, V. I.

    2006-09-01

    We analyse the basic properties of about 6000 Lyman α absorbers observed in the high-resolution spectra of 19 quasars. We compare their observed characteristics with the predictions of our model of formation and evolution of absorbers and dark matter (DM) pancakes and voids based on the Zel'dovich theory of gravitational instability. This model asserts that absorbers are formed in the course of both linear and non-linear adiabatic and shock compression of DM and gaseous matter. Our model is consistent with simulations of structure formation, describes reasonably well the large-scale structure (LSS) observed in the distribution of galaxies at small redshifts, and emphasizes the generic similarity of the process of formation of LSS and absorbers. Using this model, we are able to link the column density and overdensity of the DM and gaseous components with the observed column density of neutral hydrogen, redshifts and Doppler parameters of absorbers. We show that the colder absorbers are associated with rapidly expanded underdense regions of galactic scale. We extend an existing method of measuring the power spectrum of initial perturbations. The observed separations between absorbers and their DM column density are linked with the correlation function of the initial velocity field. Applying this method to our sample of absorbers, we recover the cold dark matter (CDM) like power spectrum at scales of 10h-1 >= D >= 0.15h-1Mpc with a precision of ~15 per cent. However, at scales of ~3-150h-1kpc, the measured and CDM-like spectra are different. This result suggests a possible complex inflation with generation of excess power at small scales. Both confirmation of the CDM-like shape of the initial power spectrum and detection of its distortions at small scales are equally important for the widely discussed problems of physics of the early Universe, galaxy formation, and reheating of the Universe.

  20. Cognitive Radio Low-Energy Signal Analysis Sensor Integrated Circuits (CLASIC): A Broadband Mixed-Signal Iterative Down Conversion Spectrum Analyzer for Signal Recognition Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    mechanisms described in the previous section, this would result in signal leakage for every band. We propose a 3-way IDC architecture (shown in Fig. 42 (a...AFRL-RY-WP-TR-2015-0144 COGNITIVE RADIO LOW- ENERGY SIGNAL ANALYSIS SENSOR INTEGRATED CIRCUITS (CLASIC) A Broadband Mixed-Signal Iterative Down...See additional restrictions described on inside pages STINFO COPY AIR FORCE RESEARCH LABORATORY SENSORS DIRECTORATE WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE

  1. Shaped 3D singular spectrum analysis for quantifying gene expression, with application to the early zebrafish embryo.

    PubMed

    Shlemov, Alex; Golyandina, Nina; Holloway, David; Spirov, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in microscopy technologies, biological markers, and automated processing methods is making possible the development of gene expression atlases at cellular-level resolution over whole embryos. Raw data on gene expression is usually very noisy. This noise comes from both experimental (technical/methodological) and true biological sources (from stochastic biochemical processes). In addition, the cells or nuclei being imaged are irregularly arranged in 3D space. This makes the processing, extraction, and study of expression signals and intrinsic biological noise a serious challenge for 3D data, requiring new computational approaches. Here, we present a new approach for studying gene expression in nuclei located in a thick layer around a spherical surface. The method includes depth equalization on the sphere, flattening, interpolation to a regular grid, pattern extraction by Shaped 3D singular spectrum analysis (SSA), and interpolation back to original nuclear positions. The approach is demonstrated on several examples of gene expression in the zebrafish egg (a model system in vertebrate development). The method is tested on several different data geometries (e.g., nuclear positions) and different forms of gene expression patterns. Fully 3D datasets for developmental gene expression are becoming increasingly available; we discuss the prospects of applying 3D-SSA to data processing and analysis in this growing field.

  2. Preconditioned iterations to calculate extreme eigenvalues

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, C.W.; Petrova, S.

    1994-12-31

    Common iterative algorithms to calculate a few extreme eigenvalues of a large, sparse matrix are Lanczos methods or power iterations. They converge at a rate proportional to the separation of the extreme eigenvalues from the rest of the spectrum. Appropriate preconditioning improves the separation of the eigenvalues. Davidson`s method and its generalizations exploit this fact. The authors examine a preconditioned iteration that resembles a truncated version of Davidson`s method with a different preconditioning strategy.

  3. Neutron cameras for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.C.; Barnes, C.W.; Batistoni, P.

    1998-12-31

    Neutron cameras with horizontal and vertical views have been designed for ITER, based on systems used on JET and TFTR. The cameras consist of fan-shaped arrays of collimated flight tubes, with suitably chosen detectors situated outside the biological shield. The sight lines view the ITER plasma through slots in the shield blanket and penetrate the vacuum vessel, cryostat, and biological shield through stainless steel windows. This paper analyzes the expected performance of several neutron camera arrangements for ITER. In addition to the reference designs, the authors examine proposed compact cameras, in which neutron fluxes are inferred from {sup 16}N decay gammas in dedicated flowing water loops, and conventional cameras with fewer sight lines and more limited fields of view than in the reference designs. It is shown that the spatial sampling provided by the reference designs is sufficient to satisfy target measurement requirements and that some reduction in field of view may be permissible. The accuracy of measurements with {sup 16}N-based compact cameras is not yet established, and they fail to satisfy requirements for parameter range and time resolution by large margins.

  4. The ITER project construction status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motojima, O.

    2015-10-01

    The pace of the ITER project in St Paul-lez-Durance, France is accelerating rapidly into its peak construction phase. With the completion of the B2 slab in August 2014, which will support about 400 000 metric tons of the tokamak complex structures and components, the construction is advancing on a daily basis. Magnet, vacuum vessel, cryostat, thermal shield, first wall and divertor structures are under construction or in prototype phase in the ITER member states of China, Europe, India, Japan, Korea, Russia, and the United States. Each of these member states has its own domestic agency (DA) to manage their procurements of components for ITER. Plant systems engineering is being transformed to fully integrate the tokamak and its auxiliary systems in preparation for the assembly and operations phase. CODAC, diagnostics, and the three main heating and current drive systems are also progressing, including the construction of the neutral beam test facility building in Padua, Italy. The conceptual design of the Chinese test blanket module system for ITER has been completed and those of the EU are well under way. Significant progress has been made addressing several outstanding physics issues including disruption load characterization, prediction, avoidance, and mitigation, first wall and divertor shaping, edge pedestal and SOL plasma stability, fuelling and plasma behaviour during confinement transients and W impurity transport. Further development of the ITER Research Plan has included a definition of the required plant configuration for 1st plasma and subsequent phases of ITER operation as well as the major plasma commissioning activities and the needs of the accompanying R&D program to ITER construction by the ITER parties.

  5. Spectroscopic problems in ITER diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisitsa, V. S.; Bureyeva, L. A.; Kukushkin, A. B.; Kadomtsev, M. B.; Krupin, V. A.; Levashova, M. G.; Medvedev, A. A.; Mukhin, E. E.; Shurygin, V. A.; Tugarinov, S. N.; Vukolov, K. Yu

    2012-12-01

    Problems of spectroscopic diagnostics of ITER plasma are under consideration. Three types of diagnostics are presented: 1) Balmer lines spectroscopy in the edge and divertor plasmas; 2) Thomson scattering, 3) charge exchange recombination spectroscopy. The Zeeman-Stark structure of line shapes is discussed. The overlapping of isotopes H-D-T spectral line shapes are presented for the SOL and divertor conditions. The polarization measurements of H-alpha spectral lines for H-D mixture on T-10 tokamak are shown in order to separate Zeeman splitting in more details. The problem of plasma background radiation emission for Thomson scattering in ITER is discussed in details. The line shape of P-7 hydrogen spectral line having a wave length close to laser one is presented together with continuum radiation. The charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) is discussed in details. The data on Dα, HeII and CVI measurements in CXRS experiments on T-10 tokamak are presented.

  6. ITER Central Solenoid Module Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, John

    2016-09-23

    The fabrication of the modules for the ITER Central Solenoid (CS) has started in a dedicated production facility located in Poway, California, USA. The necessary tools have been designed, built, installed, and tested in the facility to enable the start of production. The current schedule has first module fabrication completed in 2017, followed by testing and subsequent shipment to ITER. The Central Solenoid is a key component of the ITER tokamak providing the inductive voltage to initiate and sustain the plasma current and to position and shape the plasma. The design of the CS has been a collaborative effort between the US ITER Project Office (US ITER), the international ITER Organization (IO) and General Atomics (GA). GA’s responsibility includes: completing the fabrication design, developing and qualifying the fabrication processes and tools, and then completing the fabrication of the seven 110 tonne CS modules. The modules will be shipped separately to the ITER site, and then stacked and aligned in the Assembly Hall prior to insertion in the core of the ITER tokamak. A dedicated facility in Poway, California, USA has been established by GA to complete the fabrication of the seven modules. Infrastructure improvements included thick reinforced concrete floors, a diesel generator for backup power, along with, cranes for moving the tooling within the facility. The fabrication process for a single module requires approximately 22 months followed by five months of testing, which includes preliminary electrical testing followed by high current (48.5 kA) tests at 4.7K. The production of the seven modules is completed in a parallel fashion through ten process stations. The process stations have been designed and built with most stations having completed testing and qualification for carrying out the required fabrication processes. The final qualification step for each process station is achieved by the successful production of a prototype coil. Fabrication of the first

  7. Are Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Initially Attuned to Object Function Rather than Shape for Word Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Charlotte; Allen, Melissa L.; Lewis, Charlie

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the function bias--generalising words to objects with the same function--in typically developing (TD) children, children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and children with other developmental disorders. Across four trials, a novel object was named and its function was described and demonstrated. Children then selected the other…

  8. US ITER Moving Forward

    ScienceCinema

    US ITER / ORNL

    2016-07-12

    US ITER Project Manager Ned Sauthoff, joined by Wayne Reiersen, Team Leader Magnet Systems, and Jan Berry, Team Leader Tokamak Cooling System, discuss the U.S.'s role in the ITER international collaboration.

  9. Total Absorption Spectroscopy Study of ⁹²Rb Decay: A Major Contributor to Reactor Antineutrino Spectrum Shape

    DOE PAGES

    Sonzogni, A.; Zakari-Issoufou, A. -A.; Fallot, M.; ...

    2015-03-09

    The accurate determination of the emitted reactor antineutrino flux is still a major challenge for actual and future neutrino experiments at reactors, especially after the evidence of a disagreement between the measured antineutrino energy spectrum by Double Chooz, Daya Bay, and Reno and calculated antineutrino spectra obtained from the conversion of the unique integral beta spectra measured at the ILL reactor. Using nuclear data to compute reactor antineutrino spectra may help understanding this bias, with the study of the underlying nuclear physics. Summation calculations allow identifying a list of nuclei that contribute importantly to the antineutrino energy spectra emitted aftermore » the fission of ²³⁹,²⁴¹Pu and ²³⁵,²³⁸U, and whose beta decay properties might deserve new measurements. Among these nuclei, ⁹²Rb exhausts by itself about 16% of of the antineutrino energy spectrum emitted by Pressurized Water Reactors in the 5 to 8 MeV range. In this Letter, we report new Total Absorption Spectroscopy (TAS) results for this important contributor. The obtained beta feeding from ⁹²Rb shows beta intensity unobserved before in the 4.5 to 5.5 MeV energy region and gives a ground state to ground state branch of 87.5 % ± 3%. These new data induce a dramatic change in recent summation calculations where a 51% GS to GS branch was considered for ⁹²Rb, increasing the summation antineutrino spectrum in the region nearby the observed bias.The new data still have an important impact on other summation calculations in which more recent data were considered« less

  10. Total Absorption Spectroscopy Study of ⁹²Rb Decay: A Major Contributor to Reactor Antineutrino Spectrum Shape

    SciTech Connect

    Sonzogni, A.; Zakari-Issoufou, A. -A.; Fallot, M.; Porta, A.; Algora, A.; Tain, J. L.; Valencia, E.; Rice, S.; Bui, V. M.; Cormon, S.; Estienne, M.; Agramunt, J.; Aysto, J.; Bowry, M.; Briz Monago, J. A.; Caballero-Folch, R.; Cano-Ott, D.; Cucoanes, A.; Eloma, V.; Estvez, E.; Farrelly, G. F.; Garcia, A.; Gelletly, W.; Gomez-Hornillos, M. B.; Gorlychev, V.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Jordan, M. D.; Kankainen, A.; Kondev, F. G.; Martinez, T.; Mendoza, E.; Molina, F.; Moore, I.; Perez, A.; Podolyak, Zs.; Penttil, H.; Regan, P. H.; Shiba, T.; Rissanen, J.; Rubio, B.; Weber, C.

    2015-03-09

    The accurate determination of the emitted reactor antineutrino flux is still a major challenge for actual and future neutrino experiments at reactors, especially after the evidence of a disagreement between the measured antineutrino energy spectrum by Double Chooz, Daya Bay, and Reno and calculated antineutrino spectra obtained from the conversion of the unique integral beta spectra measured at the ILL reactor. Using nuclear data to compute reactor antineutrino spectra may help understanding this bias, with the study of the underlying nuclear physics. Summation calculations allow identifying a list of nuclei that contribute importantly to the antineutrino energy spectra emitted after the fission of ²³⁹,²⁴¹Pu and ²³⁵,²³⁸U, and whose beta decay properties might deserve new measurements. Among these nuclei, ⁹²Rb exhausts by itself about 16% of of the antineutrino energy spectrum emitted by Pressurized Water Reactors in the 5 to 8 MeV range. In this Letter, we report new Total Absorption Spectroscopy (TAS) results for this important contributor. The obtained beta feeding from ⁹²Rb shows beta intensity unobserved before in the 4.5 to 5.5 MeV energy region and gives a ground state to ground state branch of 87.5 % ± 3%. These new data induce a dramatic change in recent summation calculations where a 51% GS to GS branch was considered for ⁹²Rb, increasing the summation antineutrino spectrum in the region nearby the observed bias.The new data still have an important impact on other summation calculations in which more recent data were considered

  11. Iterative consolidation of unorganized point clouds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shengjun; Chan, Kwan-Chung; Wang, Charlie C L

    2012-01-01

    Unorganized point clouds obtained from 3D shape acquisition devices usually present noise, outliers, and nonuniformities. The proposed framework consolidates unorganized points through an iterative procedure of interlaced downsampling and upsampling. Selection operations remove outliers while preserving geometric details. The framework improves the uniformity of points by moving the downsampled particles and refining point samples. Surface extrapolation fills missed regions. Moreover, an adaptive sampling strategy speeds up the iterations. Experimental results demonstrate the framework's effectiveness.

  12. Iter and Ornl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uckan, N. A.; Milora, S. L.

    2004-11-01

    ITER (means ``the way''), a tokamak burning plasma experiment, is the next step device toward making fusion energy a reality. The programmatic objective of ITER is to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy for peaceful purposes. ITER began in 1985 as collaboration between the Russian Federation (former Soviet Union), the USA, European Union, and Japan. ITER conceptual and engineering design activities led to a detailed design in 2001. The USA opted out of the project between 1999-2003, but rejoined in 2004 for site selection and construction negotiations. China and Korea joined the project in 2003. Negotiations are continuing and a decision on the site for ITER construction [France versus Japan] is pending. The ITER international undertaking is an unprecedented scale and the six ITER parties represent 40% of the world population. By 2018, ITER will produce a fusion power of 500 million Watts for time periods up to an hour with one-tenth of the power needed to sustain it. Steady state operation is also possible at lower power levels with higher fraction of circulated power. The ITER parties invested about $1 billion into the research and development (R) and related fusion experiments to establish the ITER's feasibility. ORNL has been a key player in the ITER project and contributed to its physics and engineering design and related R since its inception. Recently, the U.S. DOE selected the PPPL/ORNL partnership to lead the U.S. project office for ITER.

  13. Plasmonic spectrum on 1D and 2D periodic arrays of rod-shape metal nanoparticle pairs with different core patterns for biosensor and solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumara, N. T. R. N.; Chou Chau, Yuan-Fong; Huang, Jin-Wei; Huang, Hung Ji; Lin, Chun-Ting; Chiang, Hai-Pang

    2016-11-01

    Simulations of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) on the near field intensity and absorption spectra of one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) periodic arrays of rod-shape metal nanoparticle (MNP) pairs using the finite element method (FEM) and taking into account the different core patterns for biosensor and solar cell applications are investigated. A tunable optical spectrum corresponding to the transverse SPR modes is observed. The peak resonance wavelength (λ res) can be shifted to red as the core patterns in rod-shape MNPs have been changed. We find that the 2D periodic array of core-shell MNP pairs (case 2) exhibit a red shifted SPR that can be tuned the gap enhancement and absorption efficiency simultaneously over an extended wavelength range. The tunable optical performances give us a qualitative idea of the geometrical properties of the periodic array of rod-shape MNP pairs on SPRs that can be as a promising candidate for plasmonic biosensor and solar cell applications.

  14. Enhanced lines and box-shaped features in the gamma-ray spectrum from annihilating dark matter in the NMSSM

    SciTech Connect

    Cerdeño, D.G.; Peiró, M.; Robles, S. E-mail: miguel.peiro@uam.es

    2016-04-01

    We study spectral features in the gamma-ray emission from dark matter (DM) annihilation in the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM), with either neutralino or right-handed (RH) sneutrino DM . We perform a series of scans over the NMSSM parameter space, compute the DM annihilation cross section into two photons and the contribution of box-shaped features, and compare them with the limits derived from the Fermi-LAT search for gamma-ray lines using the latest Pass 8 data. We implement the LHC bounds on the Higgs sector and on the masses of supersymmetric particles as well as the constraints on low-energy observables. We also consider the recent upper limits from the Fermi-LAT satellite on the continuum gamma-ray emission from dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). We show that in the case of the RH sneutrino the constraint on gamma-ray spectral features can be more stringent than the dSph bounds. This is due to the Breit-Wigner enhancement near the ubiquitous resonances with a CP even Higgs and the contribution of scalar and pseudoscalar Higgs final states to box-shaped features. By contrast, for neutralino DM, the di-photon final state is only enhanced in the resonance with a Z boson and box-shaped features are even more suppressed. Therefore, the observation of spectral features could constitute a discriminating factor between both models. In addition, we compare our results with direct DM searches, including the SuperCDMS and LUX limits on the elastic DM-nucleus scattering cross section and show that some of these scenarios would be accessible to next generation experiments. Thus, our findings strengthen the idea of complementarity among distinct DM search strategies.

  15. Application of a Class of Nonstationary Iterative Methods to Flow Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Xiuren; Peng, Hong

    Convergence of a certain class of nonstationary iterative methods applied to the numerical solution of algebraic linear systems arising in flow problems is studied. The iteration matrix of these methods can be expressed by a constant matrix plus a variable matrix tending to zero. The conclusions of convergence based on the matrix spectrum are given and applied to a class of semi-iterative methods. Keywords: algebraic linear system, iterative method, convergence, matrix spectrum

  16. Controlling the influence of SPM in fiber-based chirped-pulse amplification systems by using an actively shaped parabolic spectrum.

    PubMed

    Schimpf, Damian N; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2007-12-10

    We report on the experimental demonstration of the control of the influence of nonlinearity in fiber-based chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) using active spectral amplitude shaping. By applying a liquid crystal spatial light modulator, the influence of the spectral profile on the recompressed pulse quality is experimentally revealed. The parabolic spectrum is experimentally determined to be very suitable for CPA-systems in which nonlinearity is present. The corresponding nonlinear phase contribution can be efficiently compensated by a conventional grating compressor. In a proof-of-principle experiment using an Yb-doped fiber- CPA-system, control at a B-integral as high as 16 rad is demonstrated. The method allows significant performance improvement of fiber-based chirpedpulse amplification.

  17. A two-dimensional spectrum analysis for sedimentation velocity experiments of mixtures with heterogeneity in molecular weight and shape.

    PubMed

    Brookes, Emre; Cao, Weiming; Demeler, Borries

    2010-02-01

    We report a model-independent analysis approach for fitting sedimentation velocity data which permits simultaneous determination of shape and molecular weight distributions for mono- and polydisperse solutions of macromolecules. Our approach allows for heterogeneity in the frictional domain, providing a more faithful description of the experimental data for cases where frictional ratios are not identical for all components. Because of increased accuracy in the frictional properties of each component, our method also provides more reliable molecular weight distributions in the general case. The method is based on a fine grained two-dimensional grid search over s and f/f (0), where the grid is a linear combination of whole boundary models represented by finite element solutions of the Lamm equation with sedimentation and diffusion parameters corresponding to the grid points. A Monte Carlo approach is used to characterize confidence limits for the determined solutes. Computational algorithms addressing the very large memory needs for a fine grained search are discussed. The method is suitable for globally fitting multi-speed experiments, and constraints based on prior knowledge about the experimental system can be imposed. Time- and radially invariant noise can be eliminated. Serial and parallel implementations of the method are presented. We demonstrate with simulated and experimental data of known composition that our method provides superior accuracy and lower variance fits to experimental data compared to other methods in use today, and show that it can be used to identify modes of aggregation and slow polymerization.

  18. SU-C-207-06: In Vivo Quantification of Gold Nanoparticles Using K-Edge Imaging Via Spectrum Shaping by Gold Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Cormack, R; Bhagwat, M; Berbeco, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Gold nanoparticles (AuNP) are multifunctional platforms ideal for drug delivery, targeted imaging and radiosensitization. We have investigated quantitative imaging of AuNPs using on board imager (OBI) cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). To this end, we also present, for the first time, a novel method for k-edge imaging of AuNP by filter-based spectral shaping. Methods: We used a digital 25 cm diameter water phantom, embedded with 3 cm spheres filled with AuNPs of different concentrations (0 mg/ml – 16 mg/ml). A poly-energetic X-ray spectrum of 140 kVp from a conventional X-ray tube is shaped by balanced K-edge filters to create an excess of photons right above the K-edge of gold at 80.7 keV. The filters consist of gold, tin, copper and aluminum foils. The phantom with appropriately assigned attenuation coefficients is forward projected onto a detector for each energy bin and then integrated. FKD reconstruction is performed on the integrated projections. Scatter, detector efficiency and noise are included. Results: We found that subtracting the results of two filter sets (Filter A:127 µm gold foil with 254 µm tin, 330 µm copper and 1 mm aluminum, and Filter B: 635 µm tin with 264 µm copper and 1 mm aluminum), provides substantial image contrast. The resulting filtered spectra match well below 80.7 keV, while maintaining sufficient X-ray quanta just above that. Voxel intensities of AuNP containing spheres increase linearly with AuNP concentration. K-edge imaging provides 18% more sensitivity than the tin filter alone, and 38% more sensitivity than the gold filter alone. Conclusion: We have shown that it is feasible to quantitatively detect AuNP distributions in a patient-sized phantom using clinical CBCT and K-edge spectral shaping.

  19. ITER Plasma Control System Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snipes, Joseph; ITER PCS Design Team

    2015-11-01

    The development of the ITER Plasma Control System (PCS) continues with the preliminary design phase for 1st plasma and early plasma operation in H/He up to Ip = 15 MA in L-mode. The design is being developed through a contract between the ITER Organization and a consortium of plasma control experts from EU and US fusion laboratories, which is expected to be completed in time for a design review at the end of 2016. This design phase concentrates on breakdown including early ECH power and magnetic control of the poloidal field null, plasma current, shape, and position. Basic kinetic control of the heating (ECH, ICH, NBI) and fueling systems is also included. Disruption prediction, mitigation, and maintaining stable operation are also included because of the high magnetic and kinetic stored energy present already for early plasma operation. Support functions for error field topology and equilibrium reconstruction are also required. All of the control functions also must be integrated into an architecture that will be capable of the required complexity of all ITER scenarios. A database is also being developed to collect and manage PCS functional requirements from operational scenarios that were defined in the Conceptual Design with links to proposed event handling strategies and control algorithms for initial basic control functions. A brief status of the PCS development will be presented together with a proposed schedule for design phases up to DT operation.

  20. Iteration, Not Induction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbs, David E.

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of this note is to present and justify proof via iteration as an intuitive, creative and empowering method that is often available and preferable as an alternative to proofs via either mathematical induction or the well-ordering principle. The method of iteration depends only on the fact that any strictly decreasing sequence of…

  1. The ITER design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aymar, R.; Barabaschi, P.; Shimomura, Y.

    2002-05-01

    In 1998, after six years of joint work originally foreseen under the ITER engineering design activities (EDA) agreement, a design for ITER had been developed fulfilling all objectives and the cost target adopted by the ITER parties in 1992 at the start of the EDA. While accepting this design, the ITER parties recognized the possibility that they might be unable, for financial reasons, to proceed to the construction of the then foreseen device. The focus of effort in the ITER EDA since 1998 has been the development of a new design to meet revised technical objectives and a cost reduction target of about 50% of the previously accepted cost estimate. The rationale for the choice of parameters of the design has been based largely on system analysis drawing on the design solutions already developed and using the latest physics results and outputs from technology R&D projects. In so doing the joint central team and home teams converge towards a new design which will allow the exploration of a range of burning plasma conditions. The new ITER design, whilst having reduced technical objectives from its predecessor, will nonetheless meet the programmatic objective of providing an integrated demonstration of the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy. Background, design features, performance, safety features, and R&D and future perspectives of the ITER design are discussed.

  2. Perl Modules for Constructing Iterators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilmes, Curt

    2009-01-01

    The Iterator Perl Module provides a general-purpose framework for constructing iterator objects within Perl, and a standard API for interacting with those objects. Iterators are an object-oriented design pattern where a description of a series of values is used in a constructor. Subsequent queries can request values in that series. These Perl modules build on the standard Iterator framework and provide iterators for some other types of values. Iterator::DateTime constructs iterators from DateTime objects or Date::Parse descriptions and ICal/RFC 2445 style re-currence descriptions. It supports a variety of input parameters, including a start to the sequence, an end to the sequence, an Ical/RFC 2445 recurrence describing the frequency of the values in the series, and a format description that can refine the presentation manner of the DateTime. Iterator::String constructs iterators from string representations. This module is useful in contexts where the API consists of supplying a string and getting back an iterator where the specific iteration desired is opaque to the caller. It is of particular value to the Iterator::Hash module which provides nested iterations. Iterator::Hash constructs iterators from Perl hashes that can include multiple iterators. The constructed iterators will return all the permutations of the iterations of the hash by nested iteration of embedded iterators. A hash simply includes a set of keys mapped to values. It is a very common data structure used throughout Perl programming. The Iterator:: Hash module allows a hash to include strings defining iterators (parsed and dispatched with Iterator::String) that are used to construct an overall series of hash values.

  3. Iterated learning and the evolution of language.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Simon; Griffiths, Tom; Smith, Kenny

    2014-10-01

    Iterated learning describes the process whereby an individual learns their behaviour by exposure to another individual's behaviour, who themselves learnt it in the same way. It can be seen as a key mechanism of cultural evolution. We review various methods for understanding how behaviour is shaped by the iterated learning process: computational agent-based simulations; mathematical modelling; and laboratory experiments in humans and non-human animals. We show how this framework has been used to explain the origins of structure in language, and argue that cultural evolution must be considered alongside biological evolution in explanations of language origins.

  4. ITER Cryoplant Infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauve, E.; Monneret, E.; Voigt, T.; Vincent, G.; Forgeas, A.; Simon, M.

    2017-02-01

    The ITER Tokamak requires an average 75 kW of refrigeration power at 4.5 K and 600 kW of refrigeration Power at 80 K to maintain the nominal operation condition of the ITER thermal shields, superconducting magnets and cryopumps. This is produced by the ITER Cryoplant, a complex cluster of refrigeration systems including in particular three identical Liquid Helium Plants and two identical Liquid Nitrogen Plants. Beyond the equipment directly part of the Cryoplant, colossal infrastructures are required. These infrastructures account for a large part of the Cryoplants lay-out, budget and engineering efforts. It is ITER Organization responsibility to ensure that all infrastructures are adequately sized and designed to interface with the Cryoplant. This proceeding presents the overall architecture of the cryoplant. It provides order of magnitude related to the cryoplant building and utilities: electricity, cooling water, heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC).

  5. Diagnostics for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Donne, A. J. H.; Hellermann, M. G. von; Barnsley, R.

    2008-10-22

    After an introduction into the specific challenges in the field of diagnostics for ITER (specifically high level of nuclear radiation, long pulses, high fluxes of particles to plasma facing components, need for reliability and robustness), an overview will be given of the spectroscopic diagnostics foreseen for ITER. The paper will describe both active neutral-beam based diagnostics as well as passive spectroscopic diagnostics operating in the visible, ultra-violet and x-ray spectral regions.

  6. Iterative Reconstruction of Coded Source Neutron Radiographs

    SciTech Connect

    Santos-Villalobos, Hector J; Bingham, Philip R; Gregor, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Use of a coded source facilitates high-resolution neutron imaging through magnifications but requires that the radiographic data be deconvolved. A comparison of direct deconvolution with two different iterative algorithms has been performed. One iterative algorithm is based on a maximum likelihood estimation (MLE)-like framework and the second is based on a geometric model of the neutron beam within a least squares formulation of the inverse imaging problem. Simulated data for both uniform and Gaussian shaped source distributions was used for testing to understand the impact of non-uniformities present in neutron beam distributions on the reconstructed images. Results indicate that the model based reconstruction method will match resolution and improve on contrast over convolution methods in the presence of non-uniform sources. Additionally, the model based iterative algorithm provides direct calculation of quantitative transmission values while the convolution based methods must be normalized base on known values.

  7. Robust iterative methods

    SciTech Connect

    Saadd, Y.

    1994-12-31

    In spite of the tremendous progress achieved in recent years in the general area of iterative solution techniques, there are still a few obstacles to the acceptance of iterative methods in a number of applications. These applications give rise to very indefinite or highly ill-conditioned non Hermitian matrices. Trying to solve these systems with the simple-minded standard preconditioned Krylov subspace methods can be a frustrating experience. With the mathematical and physical models becoming more sophisticated, the typical linear systems which we encounter today are far more difficult to solve than those of just a few years ago. This trend is likely to accentuate. This workshop will discuss (1) these applications and the types of problems that they give rise to; and (2) recent progress in solving these problems with iterative methods. The workshop will end with a hopefully stimulating panel discussion with the speakers.

  8. Rescheduling with iterative repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweben, Monte; Davis, Eugene; Daun, Brian; Deale, Michael

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to rescheduling called constraint-based iterative repair. This approach gives our system the ability to satisfy domain constraints, address optimization concerns, minimize perturbation to the original schedule, and produce modified schedules quickly. The system begins with an initial, flawed schedule and then iteratively repairs constraint violations until a conflict-free schedule is produced. In an empirical demonstration, we vary the importance of minimizing perturbation and report how fast the system is able to resolve conflicts in a given time bound. These experiments were performed within the domain of Space Shuttle ground processing.

  9. Rescheduling with iterative repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweben, Monte; Davis, Eugene; Daun, Brian; Deale, Michael

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to rescheduling called constraint-based iterative repair. This approach gives our system the ability to satisfy domain constraints, address optimization concerns, minimize perturbation to the original schedule, produce modified schedules, quickly, and exhibits 'anytime' behavior. The system begins with an initial, flawed schedule and then iteratively repairs constraint violations until a conflict-free schedule is produced. In an empirical demonstration, we vary the importance of minimizing perturbation and report how fast the system is able to resolve conflicts in a given time bound. We also show the anytime characteristics of the system. These experiments were performed within the domain of Space Shuttle ground processing.

  10. Iterated multidimensional wave conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Brizard, A. J.; Tracy, E. R.; Johnston, D.; Kaufman, A. N.; Richardson, A. S.; Zobin, N.

    2011-12-23

    Mode conversion can occur repeatedly in a two-dimensional cavity (e.g., the poloidal cross section of an axisymmetric tokamak). We report on two novel concepts that allow for a complete and global visualization of the ray evolution under iterated conversions. First, iterated conversion is discussed in terms of ray-induced maps from the two-dimensional conversion surface to itself (which can be visualized in terms of three-dimensional rooms). Second, the two-dimensional conversion surface is shown to possess a symplectic structure derived from Dirac constraints associated with the two dispersion surfaces of the interacting waves.

  11. Spectrum synthesis for a spectrally tunable light source based on a DMD-convex grating Offner configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Suodong; Pan, Qiao; Shen, Weimin

    2016-09-01

    As one kind of light source simulation devices, spectrally tunable light sources are able to generate specific spectral shape and radiant intensity outputs according to different application requirements, which have urgent demands in many fields of the national economy and the national defense industry. Compared with the LED-type spectrally tunable light source, the one based on a DMD-convex grating Offner configuration has advantages of high spectral resolution, strong digital controllability, high spectrum synthesis accuracy, etc. As a key link of the above type light source to achieve target spectrum outputs, spectrum synthesis algorithm based on spectrum matching is therefore very important. An improved spectrum synthesis algorithm based on linear least square initialization and Levenberg-Marquardt iterative optimization is proposed in this paper on the basis of in-depth study of the spectrum matching principle. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by a series of simulations and experimental works.

  12. Fourier mode analysis of source iteration in spatially periodic media

    SciTech Connect

    Zika, M.R.; Larsen, E.W.

    1998-12-31

    The standard Fourier mode analysis is an indispensable tool when designing acceleration techniques for transport iterations; however, it requires the assumption of a homogeneous infinite medium. For problems of practical interest, material heterogeneities may significantly impact iterative performance. Recent work has applied a Fourier analysis to the discretized two-dimensional transport operator with heterogeneous material properties. The results of these analyses may be difficult to interpret because the heterogeneity effects are inherently coupled to the discretization effects. Here, the authors describe a Fourier analysis of source iteration (SI) that allows the calculation of the eigenvalue spectrum for the one-dimensional continuous transport operator with spatially periodic heterogeneous media.

  13. Iterative software kernels

    SciTech Connect

    Duff, I.

    1994-12-31

    This workshop focuses on kernels for iterative software packages. Specifically, the three speakers discuss various aspects of sparse BLAS kernels. Their topics are: `Current status of user lever sparse BLAS`; Current status of the sparse BLAS toolkit`; and `Adding matrix-matrix and matrix-matrix-matrix multiply to the sparse BLAS toolkit`.

  14. ITER Fusion Energy

    ScienceCinema

    Dr. Norbert Holtkamp

    2016-07-12

    ITER (in Latin “the way”) is designed to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy. Fusion is the process by which two light atomic nuclei combine to form a heavier over one and thus release energy. In the fusion process two isotopes of hydrogen – deuterium and tritium – fuse together to form a helium atom and a neutron. Thus fusion could provide large scale energy production without greenhouse effects; essentially limitless fuel would be available all over the world. The principal goals of ITER are to generate 500 megawatts of fusion power for periods of 300 to 500 seconds with a fusion power multiplication factor, Q, of at least 10. Q ? 10 (input power 50 MW / output power 500 MW). The ITER Organization was officially established in Cadarache, France, on 24 October 2007. The seven members engaged in the project – China, the European Union, India, Japan, Korea, Russia and the United States – represent more than half the world’s population. The costs for ITER are shared by the seven members. The cost for the construction will be approximately 5.5 billion Euros, a similar amount is foreseen for the twenty-year phase of operation and the subsequent decommissioning.

  15. Performance analysis of a mirror by numerical iterative method.

    PubMed

    Park, Kwijong; Cho, Myung; Lee, Dae-Hee; Moon, Bongkon

    2014-12-29

    Zernike polynomials are generally used to predict the optical performance of a mirror. However, it can also be done by a numerical iterative method. As piston, tip, tilt, and defocus (P.T.T.F) aberrations can be easily removed by optical alignment, we iteratively used a rotation transformation and a paraboloid graph subtraction for removal of the aberrations from a raw deformation of the optical surface through a Finite Element Method (FEM). The results of a 30 cm concave circular mirror corrected by the iterative method were almost the same as those yielded by Zernike polynomial fitting, and the computational time was fast. In addition, a concave square mirror whose surface area is π was analyzed in order to visualize the deformation maps of a general mirror aperture shape. The iterative method can be applicable efficiently because it does not depend on the mirror aperture shape.

  16. The Iterate Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    is probably a bad idea. A better versica would use a temporary: (defmacro sum-of-squares (expr) (let ((temp ( gensym ))) ’(lot (,temp ,expr)) (sum...val ( gensym )) (tempi ( gensym )) (temp2 ( gensym )) (winner (or var iterate::*result-var*))) ’(progn (with ,max-val - nil) (with ,winner = nil) (cond ((null...the elements of a vector (disregards fill-pointer)" (let ((vect ( gensym )) (end ( gensym )) (index ( gensym ))) ’(progn (with ,vect - v) (with ,end = (array

  17. Simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique for diffuse optical tomography imaging: iteration criterion and image recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zong-Han; Wu, Chun-Ming; Lin, Yo-Wei; Chuang, Ming-Lung; Tsai, Jui-che; Sun, Chia-Wei

    2008-02-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is an emerging technique for biomedical imaging. The imaging quality of the DOT strongly depends on the reconstruction algorithm. In this paper, four inhomogeneities with various shapes of absorption distributions are simulated by a continues-wave DOT system. The DOT images are obtained based on the simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT) method. To solve the trade-off problem between time consumption of reconstruction process and accuracy of reconstructed image, the iteration process needs a optimization criterion in algorithm. In this paper, the comparison between the root mean square error (RMSE) and the convergence rate (CR) in SIRT algorithm are demonstrated. From the simulation results, the CR reveals the information of global minimum in the iteration process. Based on the CR calculation, the SIRT can offer higher efficient image reconstructing in DOT system.

  18. Neutron activation for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.W.; Loughlin, M.J.; Nishitani, Takeo

    1996-04-29

    There are three primary goals for the Neutron Activation system for ITER: maintain a robust relative measure of fusion power with stability and high dynamic range (7 orders of magnitude); allow an absolute calibration of fusion power (energy); and provide a flexible and reliable system for materials testing. The nature of the activation technique is such that stability and high dynamic range can be intrinsic properties of the system. It has also been the technique that demonstrated (on JET and TFTR) the highest accuracy neutron measurements in DT operation. Since the gamma-ray detectors are not located on the tokamak and are therefore amenable to accurate characterization, and if material foils are placed very close to the ITER plasma with minimum scattering or attenuation, high overall accuracy in the fusion energy production (7--10%) should be achievable on ITER. In the paper, a conceptual design is presented. A system is shown to be capable of meeting these three goals, also detailed design issues remain to be solved.

  19. Searching with iterated maps

    PubMed Central

    Elser, V.; Rankenburg, I.; Thibault, P.

    2007-01-01

    In many problems that require extensive searching, the solution can be described as satisfying two competing constraints, where satisfying each independently does not pose a challenge. As an alternative to tree-based and stochastic searching, for these problems we propose using an iterated map built from the projections to the two constraint sets. Algorithms of this kind have been the method of choice in a large variety of signal-processing applications; we show here that the scope of these algorithms is surprisingly broad, with applications as diverse as protein folding and Sudoku. PMID:17202267

  20. Iterative Magnetometer Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedlak, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an iterative method for three-axis magnetometer (TAM) calibration that makes use of three existing utilities recently incorporated into the attitude ground support system used at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The method combines attitude-independent and attitude-dependent calibration algorithms with a new spinning spacecraft Kalman filter to solve for biases, scale factors, nonorthogonal corrections to the alignment, and the orthogonal sensor alignment. The method is particularly well-suited to spin-stabilized spacecraft, but may also be useful for three-axis stabilized missions given sufficient data to provide observability.

  1. Runaway electrons and ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boozer, Allen

    2016-10-01

    ITER planning for avoiding runaway damage depends on magnetic surface breakup in fast relaxations. These arise in thermal quenches and in the spreading of impurities from massive gas injection or shattered pellets. Surface breakup would prevent a runaway to relativistic energies were it not for non-intercepting flux tubes, which contain magnetic field lines that do not intercept the walls. Such tubes persist near the magnetic axis and in the cores of islands but must dissipate before any confining surfaces re-form. Otherwise, a highly dangerous situation arises. Electrons that were trapped and accelerated in these flux tubes can fill a large volume of stochastic field lines and serve as a seed for the transfer of the full plasma current to runaways. If the outer confining surfaces are punctured, as by a drift into the wall, then the full runaway inventory will be lost in a short pulse along a narrow flux tube. Although not part of ITER planning, currents induced in the walls by the fast magnetic relaxation could be used to passively prevent outer surfaces re-forming. If magnetic surface breakup can be avoided during impurity injection, the plasma current could be terminated in tens of milliseconds by plasma cooling with no danger of runaway. Support by DoE Office of Fusion Energy Science Grant De-FG02-03ER54696.

  2. Microtearing instability in ITER*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, King-Lap; Mikkelsen, David; Budny, Robert; Breslau, Joshua

    2010-11-01

    Microtearing modes are found to be unstable in some regions of a simulated ITER H-mode plasma [1] with the GS2 code [2]. Modes with kρs>1 are in the interior (r/a˜0.65-0.85) while longer wavelength modes are in the pedestal region. This instability may keep the pedestal within the peeling-ballooning stability boundary [3]. Microtearing modes can produce stochastic magnetic field similar to RMP coils; they may have similar effects on ELMs by increasing the pedestal width. The possibility of using this technique for ELM mitigation in ITER is explored. We propose to use a deuterium gas jet to control the microtearing instability and the Chirikov parameter at the edge. Preliminary evaluation of its effectiveness will be presented and the limitations of the GS2 code will be discussed based on our understanding from NSTX [4]. *This work is supported by USDoE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466. [4pt] [1] R. V. Budny, Nucl. Fusion (2009)[0pt] [2] W. Dorland et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. (2000).[0pt] [3] P. B. Snyder et al.,Nucl. Fusion (2009).[0pt] [4] K. L. Wong et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. (2007).

  3. NREL Spectrum of Innovation

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    There are many voices calling for a future of abundant clean energy. The choices are difficult and the challenges daunting. How will we get there? The National Renewable Energy Laboratory integrates the entire spectrum of innovation including fundamental science, market relevant research, systems integration, testing and validation, commercialization and deployment. The innovation process at NREL is interdependent and iterative. Many scientific breakthroughs begin in our own laboratories, but new ideas and technologies come to NREL at any point along the innovation spectrum to be validated and refined for commercial use.

  4. NREL Spectrum of Innovation

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    There are many voices calling for a future of abundant clean energy. The choices are difficult and the challenges daunting. How will we get there? The National Renewable Energy Laboratory integrates the entire spectrum of innovation including fundamental science, market relevant research, systems integration, testing and validation, commercialization and deployment. The innovation process at NREL is interdependent and iterative. Many scientific breakthroughs begin in our own laboratories, but new ideas and technologies come to NREL at any point along the innovation spectrum to be validated and refined for commercial use.

  5. Conformal mapping and convergence of Krylov iterations

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, T.A.; Trefethen, L.N.

    1994-12-31

    Connections between conformal mapping and matrix iterations have been known for many years. The idea underlying these connections is as follows. Suppose the spectrum of a matrix or operator A is contained in a Jordan region E in the complex plane with 0 not an element of E. Let {phi}(z) denote a conformal map of the exterior of E onto the exterior of the unit disk, with {phi}{infinity} = {infinity}. Then 1/{vert_bar}{phi}(0){vert_bar} is an upper bound for the optimal asymptotic convergence factor of any Krylov subspace iteration. This idea can be made precise in various ways, depending on the matrix iterations, on whether A is finite or infinite dimensional, and on what bounds are assumed on the non-normality of A. This paper explores these connections for a variety of matrix examples, making use of a new MATLAB Schwarz-Christoffel Mapping Toolbox developed by the first author. Unlike the earlier Fortran Schwarz-Christoffel package SCPACK, the new toolbox computes exterior as well as interior Schwarz-Christoffel maps, making it easy to experiment with spectra that are not necessarily symmetric about an axis.

  6. Iteration of ultrasound aberration correction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maasoey, Svein-Erik; Angelsen, Bjoern; Varslot, Trond

    2004-05-01

    Aberration in ultrasound medical imaging is usually modeled by time-delay and amplitude variations concentrated on the transmitting/receiving array. This filter process is here denoted a TDA filter. The TDA filter is an approximation to the physical aberration process, which occurs over an extended part of the human body wall. Estimation of the TDA filter, and performing correction on transmit and receive, has proven difficult. It has yet to be shown that this method works adequately for severe aberration. Estimation of the TDA filter can be iterated by retransmitting a corrected signal and re-estimate until a convergence criterion is fulfilled (adaptive imaging). Two methods for estimating time-delay and amplitude variations in receive signals from random scatterers have been developed. One method correlates each element signal with a reference signal. The other method use eigenvalue decomposition of the receive cross-spectrum matrix, based upon a receive energy-maximizing criterion. Simulations of iterating aberration correction with a TDA filter have been investigated to study its convergence properties. A weak and strong human-body wall model generated aberration. Both emulated the human abdominal wall. Results after iteration improve aberration correction substantially, and both estimation methods converge, even for the case of strong aberration.

  7. Iterated crowdsourcing dilemma game

    PubMed Central

    Oishi, Koji; Cebrian, Manuel; Abeliuk, Andres; Masuda, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    The Internet has enabled the emergence of collective problem solving, also known as crowdsourcing, as a viable option for solving complex tasks. However, the openness of crowdsourcing presents a challenge because solutions obtained by it can be sabotaged, stolen, and manipulated at a low cost for the attacker. We extend a previously proposed crowdsourcing dilemma game to an iterated game to address this question. We enumerate pure evolutionarily stable strategies within the class of so-called reactive strategies, i.e., those depending on the last action of the opponent. Among the 4096 possible reactive strategies, we find 16 strategies each of which is stable in some parameter regions. Repeated encounters of the players can improve social welfare when the damage inflicted by an attack and the cost of attack are both small. Under the current framework, repeated interactions do not really ameliorate the crowdsourcing dilemma in a majority of the parameter space. PMID:24526244

  8. Iterated crowdsourcing dilemma game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Koji; Cebrian, Manuel; Abeliuk, Andres; Masuda, Naoki

    2014-02-01

    The Internet has enabled the emergence of collective problem solving, also known as crowdsourcing, as a viable option for solving complex tasks. However, the openness of crowdsourcing presents a challenge because solutions obtained by it can be sabotaged, stolen, and manipulated at a low cost for the attacker. We extend a previously proposed crowdsourcing dilemma game to an iterated game to address this question. We enumerate pure evolutionarily stable strategies within the class of so-called reactive strategies, i.e., those depending on the last action of the opponent. Among the 4096 possible reactive strategies, we find 16 strategies each of which is stable in some parameter regions. Repeated encounters of the players can improve social welfare when the damage inflicted by an attack and the cost of attack are both small. Under the current framework, repeated interactions do not really ameliorate the crowdsourcing dilemma in a majority of the parameter space.

  9. Automatic shape model building based on principal geodesic analysis bootstrapping.

    PubMed

    Dam, Erik B; Fletcher, P Thomas; Pizer, Stephen M

    2008-04-01

    We present a novel method for automatic shape model building from a collection of training shapes. The result is a shape model consisting of the mean model and the major modes of variation with a dense correspondence map between individual shapes. The framework consists of iterations where a medial shape representation is deformed into the training shapes followed by computation of the shape mean and modes of shape variation. In the first iteration, a generic shape model is used as starting point - in the following iterations in the bootstrap method, the resulting mean and modes from the previous iteration are used. Thereby, we gradually capture the shape variation in the training collection better and better. Convergence of the method is explicitly enforced. The method is evaluated on collections of artificial training shapes where the expected shape mean and modes of variation are known by design. Furthermore, collections of real prostates and cartilage sheets are used in the evaluation. The evaluation shows that the method is able to capture the training shapes close to the attainable accuracy already in the first iteration. Furthermore, the correspondence properties measured by generality, specificity, and compactness are improved during the shape model building iterations.

  10. Resonances in the Photoionization Cross Sections of Atomic Nitrogen Shape the Far-ultraviolet Spectrum of the Bright Star in 47 Tucanae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, William V.; Chayer, Pierre

    2013-08-01

    The far-ultraviolet spectrum of the Bright Star (B8 III) in 47 Tuc (NGC 104) shows a remarkable pattern: it is well fit by local thermodynamic equilibrium models at wavelengths longer than Lyβ, but at shorter wavelengths it is fainter than the models by a factor of two. A spectrum of this star obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer shows broad absorption troughs with sharp edges at 995 and 1010 Å and a deep absorption feature at 1072 Å none of which are predicted by the models. We find that these features are caused by resonances in the photoionization cross sections of the first and second excited states of atomic nitrogen (2s 2 2p 3 2 D 0 and 2 P 0). Using cross sections from the Opacity Project, we can reproduce these features, but only if we use the cross sections at their full resolution, rather than the resonance-averaged cross sections usually employed to model stellar atmospheres. These resonances are strongest in stellar atmospheres with enhanced nitrogen and depleted carbon abundances, a pattern typical of post-asymptotic giant branch stars.

  11. RESONANCES IN THE PHOTOIONIZATION CROSS SECTIONS OF ATOMIC NITROGEN SHAPE THE FAR-ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRUM OF THE BRIGHT STAR IN 47 TUCANAE

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, William V.; Chayer, Pierre E-mail: chayer@stsci.edu

    2013-08-10

    The far-ultraviolet spectrum of the Bright Star (B8 III) in 47 Tuc (NGC 104) shows a remarkable pattern: it is well fit by local thermodynamic equilibrium models at wavelengths longer than Ly{beta}, but at shorter wavelengths it is fainter than the models by a factor of two. A spectrum of this star obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer shows broad absorption troughs with sharp edges at 995 and 1010 A and a deep absorption feature at 1072 A; none of which are predicted by the models. We find that these features are caused by resonances in the photoionization cross sections of the first and second excited states of atomic nitrogen (2s {sup 2} 2p {sup 3} {sup 2} D {sup 0} and {sup 2} P {sup 0}). Using cross sections from the Opacity Project, we can reproduce these features, but only if we use the cross sections at their full resolution, rather than the resonance-averaged cross sections usually employed to model stellar atmospheres. These resonances are strongest in stellar atmospheres with enhanced nitrogen and depleted carbon abundances, a pattern typical of post-asymptotic giant branch stars.

  12. Physics of ECE Temperature Measurements and Prospects for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Luna, E. de la

    2008-03-12

    The physics of the electron cyclotron emission (ECE) temperature measurements is reviewed. The current understanding of the expected ECE spectra in ITER is summarized, for perpendicular as well as oblique propagation. The relevance of the use of oblique ECE for investigating the shape of the electron distribution function at low energies is discussed.

  13. ITER CS Intermodule Support Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Myatt, R.; Freudenberg, Kevin D

    2011-01-01

    With five independently driven, bi-polarity power supplies, the modules of the ITER central solenoid (CS) can be energized in aligned or opposing field directions. This sets up the possibility for repelling modules, which indeed occurs, particularly between CS2L and CS3L around the End of Burn (EOB) time point. Light interface compression between these two modules at EOB and wide variations in these coil currents throughout the pulse produce a tendency for relative motion or slip. Ideally, the slip is purely radial as the modules breathe without any accumulative translational motion. In reality, however, asymmetries such as nonuniformity in intermodule friction, lateral loads from a plasma Vertical Disruption Event (VDE), magnetic forces from manufacturing and assembly tolerances, and earthquakes can all contribute to a combination of radial and lateral module motion. This paper presents 2D and 3D, nonlinear, ANSYS models which simulate these various asymmetries and determine the lateral forces which must be carried by the intermodule structure. Summing all of these asymmetric force contributions leads to a design-basis lateral load which is used in the design of various support concepts: the CS-CDR centering rings and a variation, the 2001 FDR baseline radial keys, and interlocking castles structures. Radial key-type intermodule structure interface slip and stresses are tracked through multiple 15 MA scenario current pulses to demonstrate stable motion following the first few cycles. Detractions and benefits of each candidate intermodule structure are discussed, leading to the simplest and most robust configuration which meets the design requirements: match-drilled radial holes and pin-shaped keys.

  14. CT performance as a variable function of resolution, noise, and task property for iterative reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Baiyu; Richard, Samuel; Christianson, Olav; Zhou, Xiaodong; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-03-01

    The increasing availability of iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms on clinical scanners is creating a demand for effectively and efficiently evaluating imaging performance and potential dose reduction. In this study, the location- and task-specific evaluation was performed using detectability index (d') by combining a task function, the task transfer function (TTF), and the noise power spectrum (NPS). Task function modeled a wide variety detection tasks in terms of shape and contrast. The TTF and NPS were measured from a physical phantom as a function of contrast and dose levels. Measured d' values were compared between three IRs (IRIS, SAFIRE3 and SAFIRE5) and conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) at various dose levels, showing an equivalent performance of IR at lower dose levels. AUC further calculated from d' showed that compared to FBP, SAFIRE5 may reduce dose by up to 50-60%; SAFIRE3 and IRIS by up to 20-30%. This study provides an initial framework for the localized and task-specific evaluation of IRs in CT and a guideline for the identification of optimal operating dose point with iterative reconstructions.

  15. Iterative marker excision system.

    PubMed

    Myronovskyi, Maksym; Rosenkränzer, Birgit; Luzhetskyy, Andriy

    2014-05-01

    The deletions of large genomic DNA fragments and consecutive gene knockouts are prerequisites for the generation of organisms with improved properties. One of the key issues in this context is the removal of antibiotic resistance markers from engineered organisms without leaving an active recombinase recognition site. Here, we report the establishment of an iterative marker excision system (IMES) that solves this problem. Based on the phiC31 integrase and its mutant att sites, IMES can be used for highly effective deletion of DNA fragments between inversely oriented B-CC and P-GG sites. The B-CC and P-GG sites are derived from attB and attP by substitution of the central core TT dinucleotide with CC and GG, respectively. An unnatural RR site that resides in the chromosome following deletion is the joining product of the right shoulders of B-CC and P-GG. We show that the RR sites do not recombine with each other as well as the RR site recombines with B-CC. The recombination efficiencies between RR and P-GG or RR and LL are only 0.1 % and 1 %, respectively. Thus, IMES can be used for multistep genomic engineering without risking unwanted DNA recombination. The fabrication of multi-purpose antibiotic cassettes and examples of the utilisation of IMES are described.

  16. Mode conversion in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, L. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2006-10-01

    Fast magnetosonic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) can convert to much shorter wavelength modes such as ion Bernstein waves (IBW) and ion cyclotron waves (ICW) [1]. These modes are potentially useful for plasma control through the generation of localized currents and sheared flows. As part of the SciDAC Center for Simulation of Wave-Plasma Interactions project, the AORSA global-wave solver [2] has been ported to the new, dual-core Cray XT-3 (Jaguar) at ORNL where it demonstrates excellent scaling with the number of processors. Preliminary calculations using 4096 processors have allowed the first full-wave simulations of mode conversion in ITER. Mode conversion from the fast wave to the ICW is observed in mixtures of deuterium, tritium and helium3 at 53 MHz. The resulting flow velocity and electric field shear will be calculated. [1] F.W. Perkins, Nucl. Fusion 17, 1197 (1977). [2] E.F. Jaeger, L.A. Berry, J.R. Myra, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 195001-1 (2003).

  17. Technology Tips: Using the Iterate Command to Construct Recursive Geometric Sketches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Suzanne R.; Driskell, Shannon

    2006-01-01

    How to iterate geometric shapes to construct Baravelle spirals and Pythagorean trees is demonstrated in this article. The "Surfing Note" sends readers to a site with applets that will generate fractals such as the Sierpinski gasket or the Koch snowflake.

  18. The first fusion reactor: ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, D. J.

    2016-11-01

    Established by the signature of the ITER Agreement in November 2006 and currently under construction at St Paul-lez-Durance in southern France, the ITER project [1,2] involves the European Union (including Switzerland), China, India, Japan, the Russian Federation, South Korea and the United States. ITER (`the way' in Latin) is a critical step in the development of fusion energy. Its role is to provide an integrated demonstration of the physics and technology required for a fusion power plant based on magnetic confinement.

  19. A study of core Thomson scattering measurements in ITER using a multi-laser approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurskiev, G. S.; Sdvizhenskii, P. A.; Bassan, M.; Andrew, P.; Bazhenov, A. N.; Bukreev, I. M.; Chernakov, P. V.; Kochergin, M. M.; Kukushkin, A. B.; Kukushkin, A. S.; Mukhin, E. E.; Razdobarin, A. G.; Samsonov, D. S.; Semenov, V. V.; Tolstyakov, S. Yu.; Kajita, S.; Masyukevich, S. V.

    2015-05-01

    The electron component is the main channel for anomalous power loss and the main indicator of transient processes in the tokamak plasma. The electron temperature and density profiles mainly determine the operational mode of the machine. This imposes demanding requirements on the precision and on the spatial and temporal resolution of the Thomson scattering (TS) measurements. Measurements of such high electron temperature with good accuracy in a large fusion device such as ITER using TS encounter a number of physical problems. The 40 keV TS spectrum has a significant blue shift. Due to the transmission functions of the fibres and to their darkening that can occur under a strong neutron irradiation, the operational wavelength range is bounded on the blue side. For example, high temperature measurements become impossible with the 1064 nm probing wavelength since the TS signal within the boundaries of the operational window weakly depends on Te. The second problem is connected with the TS calibration. The TS system for a large fusion machine like ITER will have a set of optical components inaccessible for maintenance, and their spectral characteristics may change with time. Since the present concept of the TS system for ITER relies on the classical approach to measuring the shape of the scattered spectra using wide spectral channels, the diagnostic will be very sensitive to the changes in the optical transmission. The third complication is connected with the deviation of the electron velocity distribution function from a Maxwellian that can happen under a strong ECRH/ECCD, and it may additionally hamper the measurements. This paper analyses the advantages of a ‘multi-laser approach’ implementation for the current design of the core TS system. Such an approach assumes simultaneous plasma probing with different wavelengths that allows the measurement accuracy to be improved significantly and to perform the spectral calibration of the TS system. Comparative analysis

  20. Influence of DBT reconstruction algorithm on power law spectrum coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vancamberg, Laurence; Carton, Ann-Katherine; Abderrahmane, Ilyes H.; Palma, Giovanni; Milioni de Carvalho, Pablo; Iordache, Rǎzvan; Muller, Serge

    2015-03-01

    In breast X-ray images, texture has been characterized by a noise power spectrum (NPS) that has an inverse power-law shape described by its slope β in the log-log domain. It has been suggested that the magnitude of the power-law spectrum coefficient β is related to mass lesion detection performance. We assessed β in reconstructed digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) images to evaluate its sensitivity to different typical reconstruction algorithms including simple back projection (SBP), filtered back projection (FBP) and a simultaneous iterative reconstruction algorithm (SIRT 30 iterations). Results were further compared to the β coefficient estimated from 2D central DBT projections. The calculations were performed on 31 unilateral clinical DBT data sets and simulated DBT images from 31 anthropomorphic software breast phantoms. Our results show that β highly depends on the reconstruction algorithm; the highest β values were found for SBP, followed by reconstruction with FBP, while the lowest β values were found for SIRT. In contrast to previous studies, we found that β is not always lower in reconstructed DBT slices, compared to 2D projections and this depends on the reconstruction algorithm. All β values estimated in DBT slices reconstructed with SBP were larger than β values from 2D central projections. Our study also shows that the reconstruction algorithm affects the symmetry of the breast texture NPS; the NPS of clinical cases reconstructed with SBP exhibit the highest symmetry, while the NPS of cases reconstructed with SIRT exhibit the highest asymmetry.

  1. Simulating the ITER Plasma Startup Scenario in the DIII-D Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, G; Casper, T; Luce, T; Humphreys, D; Ferron, J; Hyatt, A; Petrie, T; West, W

    2008-10-13

    DIII-D experiments have investigated ITER startup scenarios, including an initial phase where the plasma was limited on low field side (LFS) poloidal bumper limiters. Both the original ITER 'small-bore' (constant q{sub 95}) startup and a 'large-bore' lower internal inductance (l{sub i}) startup have been simulated. In addition, l{sub i} feedback control has been tested with the goal of producing discharges at the ITER design value, l{sub i}(3) = 0.85. These discharges have been simulated using the Corsica free boundary equilibrium code. High performance hybrid scenario discharges ({beta}{sub N} = 2.8, H{sub 98,y2} = 1.4) and ITER H-mode baseline discharges ({beta}{sub N} > 1.6, H{sub 98,y2} = 1-1.2) have been obtained experimentally in an ITER similar shape after the ITER-relevant startup.

  2. Blind Spread-Spectrum Steganalysis via Iterative Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-17

    multiuser/multi-signature steganography . Then, we developed cOllllter-measures to (optimal multiuser) steganography in the form of active (message...extraction algorithm can destroy conventional SS steganography . However, our own optimal SS embedding is resistant to M -IGLS steganalysis attacks...rate at about 1 % false alarm rate when used on hosts with conventionally embedded messages. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Steganography , steganalysis, data

  3. Evaluation of ITER MSE Viewing Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, S; Lerner, S; Morris, K; Jayakumar, J; Holcomb, C; Makowski, M; Latkowski, J; Chipman, R

    2007-03-26

    image that then was relayed out of the port plug with more ideal (dielectric) mirrors. Engineering models of the optics, port plug, and neutral beam geometry were also created, using the CATIA ITER models. Two video conference calls with the USIPO provided valuable design guidelines, such as the minimum distance of the first optic from the plasma. A second focus of the project was the calibration of the system. Several different techniques are proposed, both before and during plasma operation. Fixed and rotatable polarizers would be used to characterize the system in the no-plasma case. Obtaining the full modulation spectrum from the polarization analyzer allows measurement of polarization effects and also MHD plasma phenomena. Light from neutral beam interaction with deuterium gas (no plasma) has been found useful to determine the wavelength of each spatial channel. The status of the optical design for the edge (upper) and core (lower) systems is included in the following figure. Several issues should be addressed by a follow-on study, including whether the optical labyrinth has sufficient neutron shielding and a detailed polarization characterization of actual mirrors.

  4. ITER safety challenges and opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Piet, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    Results of the Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) suggest challenges and opportunities. ITER is capable of meeting anticipated regulatory dose limits,'' but proof is difficult because of large radioactive inventories needing stringent radioactivity confinement. We need much research and development (R D) and design analysis to establish that ITER meets regulatory requirements. We have a further opportunity to do more to prove more of fusion's potential safety and environmental advantages and maximize the amount of ITER technology on the path toward fusion power plants. To fulfill these tasks, we need to overcome three programmatic challenges and three technical challenges. The first programmatic challenge is to fund a comprehensive safety and environmental ITER R D plan. Second is to strengthen safety and environment work and personnel in the international team. Third is to establish an external consultant group to advise the ITER Joint Team on designing ITER to meet safety requirements for siting by any of the Parties. The first of the three key technical challenges is plasma engineering -- burn control, plasma shutdown, disruptions, tritium burn fraction, and steady state operation. The second is the divertor, including tritium inventory, activation hazards, chemical reactions, and coolant disturbances. The third technical challenge is optimization of design requirements considering safety risk, technical risk, and cost. Some design requirements are now too strict; some are too lax. Fuel cycle design requirements are presently too strict, mandating inappropriate T separation from H and D. Heat sink requirements are presently too lax; they should be strengthened to ensure that maximum loss of coolant accident temperatures drop.

  5. Fusion Power measurement at ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Bertalot, L.; Barnsley, R.; Krasilnikov, V.; Stott, P.; Suarez, A.; Vayakis, G.; Walsh, M.

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear fusion research aims to provide energy for the future in a sustainable way and the ITER project scope is to demonstrate the feasibility of nuclear fusion energy. ITER is a nuclear experimental reactor based on a large scale fusion plasma (tokamak type) device generating Deuterium - Tritium (DT) fusion reactions with emission of 14 MeV neutrons producing up to 700 MW fusion power. The measurement of fusion power, i.e. total neutron emissivity, will play an important role for achieving ITER goals, in particular the fusion gain factor Q related to the reactor performance. Particular attention is given also to the development of the neutron calibration strategy whose main scope is to achieve the required accuracy of 10% for the measurement of fusion power. Neutron Flux Monitors located in diagnostic ports and inside the vacuum vessel will measure ITER total neutron emissivity, expected to range from 1014 n/s in Deuterium - Deuterium (DD) plasmas up to almost 10{sup 21} n/s in DT plasmas. The neutron detection systems as well all other ITER diagnostics have to withstand high nuclear radiation and electromagnetic fields as well ultrahigh vacuum and thermal loads. (authors)

  6. The ITER Radial Neutron Camera Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Marocco, D.; Belli, F.; Esposito, B.; Petrizzi, L.; Riva, M.; Bonheure, G.; Kaschuck, Y.

    2008-03-12

    A multichannel neutron detection system (Radial Neutron Camera, RNC) will be installed on the ITER equatorial port plug 1 for total neutron source strength, neutron emissivity/ion temperature profiles and n{sub t}/n{sub d} ratio measurements [1]. The system is composed by two fan shaped collimating structures: an ex-vessel structure, looking at the plasma core, containing tree sets of 12 collimators (each set lying on a different toroidal plane), and an in-vessel structure, containing 9 collimators, for plasma edge coverage. The RNC detecting system will work in a harsh environment (neutron fiux up to 10{sup 8}-10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2} s, magnetic field >0.5 T or in-vessel detectors), should provide both counting and spectrometric information and should be flexible enough to cover the high neutron flux dynamic range expected during the different ITER operation phases. ENEA has been involved in several activities related to RNC design and optimization [2,3]. In the present paper the up-to-date design and the neutron emissivity reconstruction capabilities of the RNC will be described. Different options for detectors suitable for spectrometry and counting (e.g. scintillators and diamonds) focusing on the implications in terms of overall RNC performance will be discussed. The increase of the RNC capabilities offered by the use of new digital data acquisition systems will be also addressed.

  7. Relaxation Criteria for Iterated Traffic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Terence; Nagel, Kai

    Iterative transportation microsimulations adjust traveler route plans by iterating between a microsimulation and a route planner. At each iteration, the route planner adjusts individuals' route choices based on the preceding microsimulations. Empirically, this process yields good results, but it is usually unclear when to stop the iterative process when modeling real-world traffic. This paper investigates several criteria to judge relaxation of the iterative process, emphasizing criteria related to traveler decision-making.

  8. Construction Safety Forecast for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    cadwallader, lee charles

    2006-11-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project is poised to begin its construction activity. This paper gives an estimate of construction safety as if the experiment was being built in the United States. This estimate of construction injuries and potential fatalities serves as a useful forecast of what can be expected for construction of such a major facility in any country. These data should be considered by the ITER International Team as it plans for safety during the construction phase. Based on average U.S. construction rates, ITER may expect a lost workday case rate of < 4.0 and a fatality count of 0.5 to 0.9 persons per year.

  9. Error Field Correction in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jong-kyu; Boozer, Allen H.; Menard, Jonathan E.; Schaffer, Michael J.

    2008-05-22

    A new method for correcting magnetic field errors in the ITER tokamak is developed using the Ideal Perturbed Equilibrium Code (IPEC). The dominant external magnetic field for driving islands is shown to be localized to the outboard midplane for three ITER equilibria that represent the projected range of operational scenarios. The coupling matrices between the poloidal harmonics of the external magnetic perturbations and the resonant fields on the rational surfaces that drive islands are combined for different equilibria and used to determine an ordered list of the dominant errors in the external magnetic field. It is found that efficient and robust error field correction is possible with a fixed setting of the correction currents relative to the currents in the main coils across the range of ITER operating scenarios that was considered.

  10. Iterative Restoration Of Tomosynthetic Slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruttimann, U. E.; Groenhuis, R. A.; Webber, R. L.

    1984-08-01

    Tomosynthetic reconstructions suffer from the disadvantage that blurred images of object detail lying outside the plane of interest are superimposed over the desired image of structures in the tomosynthetic plane. It is proposed to selectively reduce these undesired superimpositions by a constrained iterative restoration method. Sufficient conditions are derived ensuring the convergence of the iterations to the exact solution in the absence of noise and constraints. Although in practice the restoration process must be left incomplete because of noise and quantization artifacts, the experimental results demonstrate that for reasons of stability these convergence conditions must be satisfied.

  11. The real mission of ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Wurden, G A

    2009-01-01

    For future machines, the plasma stored energy is going up by factors of 20-40x, and plasma currents by 2-3x, while the surface to volume ratio is at the same time decreasing. Therefore the disruption forces, even for constant B, (which scale like IxB), and associated possible localized heating on machine components, are more severe. Notably, Tore Supra has demonstrated removal of more than 1 GJ of input energy, over nearly a 400 second period. However, the instantaneous stored energy in the Tore Supra system (which is most directly related to the potential for disruption damage) is quite small compared to other large tokamaks. The goal of ITER is routinely described as studying DT burning plasmas with a Q {approx} 10. In reality, ITER has a much more important first order mission. In fact, if it fails at this mission, the consequences are that ITER will never get to the eventual stated purpose of studying a burning plasma. The real mission of ITER is to study (and demonstrate successfully) plasma control with {approx}10-17 MA toroidal currents and {approx}100-400 MJ plasma stored energy levels in long-pulse scenarios. Before DT operation is ever given a go-ahead in ITER, the reality is that ITER must demonstrate routine and reliable control of high energy hydrogen (and deuterium) plasmas. The difficulty is that ITER must simultaneously deal with several technical problems: (1) heat removal at the plasma/wall interface, (2) protection of the wall components from off-normal events, and (3) generation of dust/redeposition of first wall materials. All previous tokamaks have encountered hundred's of major disruptions in the course of their operation. The consequences of a few MA of runaway electrons (at 20-50 MeV) being generated in ITER, and then being lost to the walls are simply catastrophic. They will not be deposited globally, but will drift out (up, down, whatever, depending on control system), and impact internal structures, unless 'ameliorated'. Basically, this

  12. Observation of an Anomalous Line Shape of the η'π+π- Mass Spectrum near the p p ¯ Mass Threshold in J /ψ →γ η'π+π-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ahmed, S.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Berger, N.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; de Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Dou, Z. L.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Farinelli, R.; Fava, L.; Fedorov, O.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. L.; Gao, X. Y.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, L.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, R. P.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; Heinsius, F. H.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Holtmann, T.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, Y. P.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, X. Z.; Huang, Y.; Huang, Z. L.; Hussain, T.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiang, X. Y.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kiese, P.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kupsc, A.; Kühn, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leithoff, H.; Leng, C.; Li, C.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, F. Y.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, H. J.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. R.; Li, Q. Y.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Y. B.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, D.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Y. Y.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, M. M.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, Y. M.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Mezzadri, G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales Morales, C.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Musiol, P.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pan, Y.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prasad, V.; Qi, H. R.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Rosner, Ch.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrié, M.; Schnier, C.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shi, M.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. H.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, W. P.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, L. J.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, H.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, J. J.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. J.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zeng, Z.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. Q.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. N.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zotti, L.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Besiii Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Using 1.09 ×109 J /ψ events collected by the BESIII experiment in 2012, we study the J /ψ →γ η'π+π- process and observe a significant abrupt change in the slope of the η'π+π- invariant mass distribution at the proton-antiproton (p p ¯) mass threshold. We use two models to characterize the η'π+π- line shape around 1.85 GeV /c2: one that explicitly incorporates the opening of a decay threshold in the mass spectrum (Flatté formula), and another that is the coherent sum of two resonant amplitudes. Both fits show almost equally good agreement with data, and suggest the existence of either a broad state around 1.85 GeV /c2 with strong couplings to the p p ¯ final states or a narrow state just below the p p ¯ mass threshold. Although we cannot distinguish between the fits, either one supports the existence of a p p ¯ moleculelike state or bound state with greater than 7 σ significance.

  13. Observation of an Anomalous Line Shape of the η^{'}π^{+}π^{-} Mass Spectrum near the pp[over ¯] Mass Threshold in J/ψ→γη^{'}π^{+}π^{-}.

    PubMed

    Ablikim, M; Achasov, M N; Ahmed, S; Ai, X C; Albayrak, O; Albrecht, M; Ambrose, D J; Amoroso, A; An, F F; An, Q; Bai, J Z; Baldini Ferroli, R; Ban, Y; Bennett, D W; Bennett, J V; Berger, N; Bertani, M; Bettoni, D; Bian, J M; Bianchi, F; Boger, E; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Cai, H; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, H Y; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S; Chen, S J; Chen, X; Chen, X R; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, X K; Cibinetto, G; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dbeyssi, A; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; De Mori, F; Ding, Y; Dong, C; Dong, J; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Dou, Z L; Du, S X; Duan, P F; Fan, J Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fang, X; Fang, Y; Farinelli, R; Fava, L; Fedorov, O; Feldbauer, F; Felici, G; Feng, C Q; Fioravanti, E; Fritsch, M; Fu, C D; Gao, Q; Gao, X L; Gao, X Y; Gao, Y; Gao, Z; Garzia, I; Goetzen, K; Gong, L; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, R P; Guo, Y; Guo, Y P; Haddadi, Z; Hafner, A; Han, S; Hao, X Q; Harris, F A; He, K L; Heinsius, F H; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Holtmann, T; Hou, Z L; Hu, C; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Hu, Y; Huang, G S; Huang, Y P; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, X Z; Huang, Y; Huang, Z L; Hussain, T; Ji, Q; Ji, Q P; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L W; Jiang, X S; Jiang, X Y; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Johansson, T; Julin, A; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kang, X L; Kang, X S; Kavatsyuk, M; Ke, B C; Kiese, P; Kliemt, R; Kloss, B; Kolcu, O B; Kopf, B; Kornicer, M; Kupsc, A; Kühn, W; Lange, J S; Lara, M; Larin, P; Leithoff, H; Leng, C; Li, C; Li, Cheng; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, F Y; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, H J; Li, J C; Li, Jin; Li, K; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, P R; Li, Q Y; Li, T; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Y B; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Lin, D X; Liu, B; Liu, B J; Liu, C X; Liu, D; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J B; Liu, J P; Liu, J Y; Liu, K; Liu, K Y; Liu, L D; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, Y B; Liu, Y Y; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lou, X C; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, Y; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lyu, X R; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, L L; Ma, M M; Ma, Q M; Ma, T; Ma, X N; Ma, X Y; Ma, Y M; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Marcello, S; Messchendorp, J G; Mezzadri, G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Mo, Y J; Morales Morales, C; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Musiol, P; Nefedov, Y; Nerling, F; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Nisar, S; Niu, S L; Niu, X Y; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Pan, Y; Patteri, P; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Pettersson, J; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Prasad, V; Qi, H R; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, L Q; Qin, N; Qin, X S; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Redmer, C F; Ripka, M; Rong, G; Rosner, Ch; Ruan, X D; Sarantsev, A; Savrié, M; Schnier, C; Schoenning, K; Schumann, S; Shan, W; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, P X; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shi, M; Song, W M; Song, X Y; Sosio, S; Spataro, S; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, X H; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Tiemens, M; Uman, I; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B L; Wang, D; Wang, D Y; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, S G; Wang, W; Wang, W P; Wang, X F; Wang, Y; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z H; Wang, Z Y; Wang, Z Y; Weber, T; Wei, D H; Wei, J B; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, S P; Wiedner, U; Wolke, M; Wu, L H; Wu, L J; Wu, Z; Xia, L; Xia, L G; Xia, Y; Xiao, D; Xiao, H; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, J J; Xu, L; Xu, Q J; Xu, Q N; Xu, X P; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, W C; Yan, Y H; Yang, H J; Yang, H X; Yang, L; Yang, Y X; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yin, J H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, J S; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Yuncu, A; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zeng, Y; Zeng, Z; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J J; Zhang, J L; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, K; Zhang, L; Zhang, S Q; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y N; Zhang, Y T; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z H; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, J W; Zhao, J Y; Zhao, J Z; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, W J; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhou, L; Zhou, X; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhou, X Y; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S; Zhu, S H; Zhu, X L; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zotti, L; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

    2016-07-22

    Using 1.09×10^{9} J/ψ events collected by the BESIII experiment in 2012, we study the J/ψ→γη^{'}π^{+}π^{-} process and observe a significant abrupt change in the slope of the η^{'}π^{+}π^{-} invariant mass distribution at the proton-antiproton (pp[over ¯]) mass threshold. We use two models to characterize the η^{'}π^{+}π^{-} line shape around 1.85  GeV/c^{2}: one that explicitly incorporates the opening of a decay threshold in the mass spectrum (Flatté formula), and another that is the coherent sum of two resonant amplitudes. Both fits show almost equally good agreement with data, and suggest the existence of either a broad state around 1.85  GeV/c^{2} with strong couplings to the pp[over ¯] final states or a narrow state just below the pp[over ¯] mass threshold. Although we cannot distinguish between the fits, either one supports the existence of a pp[over ¯] moleculelike state or bound state with greater than 7σ significance.

  14. Iterative method for interferogram processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotlyar, Victor V.; Seraphimovich, P. G.; Zalyalov, Oleg K.

    1994-12-01

    We have developed and numerically evaluated an iterative algorithm for interferogram processing including the Fourier-transform method, the Gerchberg-Papoulis algorithm and Wiener's filter-based regularization used in combination. Using a signal-to-noise ratio not less than 1, it has been possible to reconstruct the phase of an object field with accuracy better than 5%.

  15. Energetic ions in ITER plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Pinches, S. D.; Chapman, I. T.; Sharapov, S. E.; Lauber, Ph. W.; Oliver, H. J. C.; Shinohara, K.; Tani, K.

    2015-02-15

    This paper discusses the behaviour and consequences of the expected populations of energetic ions in ITER plasmas. It begins with a careful analytic and numerical consideration of the stability of Alfvén Eigenmodes in the ITER 15 MA baseline scenario. The stability threshold is determined by balancing the energetic ion drive against the dominant damping mechanisms and it is found that only in the outer half of the plasma (r/a>0.5) can the fast ions overcome the thermal ion Landau damping. This is in spite of the reduced numbers of alpha-particles and beam ions in this region but means that any Alfvén Eigenmode-induced redistribution is not expected to influence the fusion burn process. The influence of energetic ions upon the main global MHD phenomena expected in ITER's primary operating scenarios, including sawteeth, neoclassical tearing modes and Resistive Wall Modes, is also reviewed. Fast ion losses due to the non-axisymmetric fields arising from the finite number of toroidal field coils, the inclusion of ferromagnetic inserts, the presence of test blanket modules containing ferromagnetic material, and the fields created by the Edge Localised Mode (ELM) control coils in ITER are discussed. The greatest losses and associated heat loads onto the plasma facing components arise due to the use of the ELM control coils and come from neutral beam ions that are ionised in the plasma edge.

  16. Networking Theories by Iterative Unpacking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koichu, Boris

    2014-01-01

    An iterative unpacking strategy consists of sequencing empirically-based theoretical developments so that at each step of theorizing one theory serves as an overarching conceptual framework, in which another theory, either existing or emerging, is embedded in order to elaborate on the chosen element(s) of the overarching theory. The strategy is…

  17. Zellweger Spectrum

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Conference News Contact Us Donate The Zellweger Spectrum Zellweger Syndrome, Neonatal Adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD), and Infantile Refsum’s ... of severity of disease. What causes the Zellweger spectrum of diseases? As we mentioned, disorders of the ...

  18. Long-pulse stability limits of the ITER baseline scenario

    DOE PAGES

    Jackson, G. L.; Luce, T. C.; Solomon, W. M.; ...

    2015-01-14

    DIII-D has made significant progress in developing the techniques required to operate ITER, and in understanding their impact on performance when integrated into operational scenarios at ITER relevant parameters. We demonstrated long duration plasmas, stable to m/n =2/1 tearing modes (TMs), with an ITER similar shape and Ip/aBT, in DIII-D, that evolve to stationary conditions. The operating region most likely to reach stable conditions has normalized pressure, BN≈1.9–2.1 (compared to the ITER baseline design of 1.6 – 1.8), and a Greenwald normalized density fraction, fGW 0.42 – 0.70 (the ITER design is fGW ≈ 0.8). The evolution of the currentmore » profile, using internal inductance (li) as an indicator, is found to produce a smaller fraction of stable pulses when li is increased above ≈ 1.1 at the beginning of βN flattop. Stable discharges with co-neutral beam injection (NBI) are generally accompanied with a benign n=2 MHD mode. However if this mode exceeds ≈ 10 G, the onset of a m/n=2/1 tearing mode occurs with a loss of confinement. In addition, stable operation with low applied external torque, at or below the extrapolated value expected for ITER has also been demonstrated. With electron cyclotron (EC) injection, the operating region of stable discharges has been further extended at ITER equivalent levels of torque and to ELM free discharges at higher torque but with the addition of an n=3 magnetic perturbation from the DIII-D internal coil set. Lastly, the characterization of the ITER baseline scenario evolution for long pulse duration, extension to more ITER relevant values of torque and electron heating, and suppression of ELMs have significantly advanced the physics basis of this scenario, although significant effort remains in the simultaneous integration of all these requirements.« less

  19. Long-pulse stability limits of the ITER baseline scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, G. L.; Luce, T. C.; Solomon, W. M.; Turco, F.; Buttery, R. J.; Hyatt, A. W.; deGrassie, J. S.; Doyle, E. J.; Ferron, J. R.; La Haye, R. J.; Politzer, P. A.

    2015-01-14

    DIII-D has made significant progress in developing the techniques required to operate ITER, and in understanding their impact on performance when integrated into operational scenarios at ITER relevant parameters. We demonstrated long duration plasmas, stable to m/n =2/1 tearing modes (TMs), with an ITER similar shape and Ip/aBT, in DIII-D, that evolve to stationary conditions. The operating region most likely to reach stable conditions has normalized pressure, BN≈1.9–2.1 (compared to the ITER baseline design of 1.6 – 1.8), and a Greenwald normalized density fraction, fGW 0.42 – 0.70 (the ITER design is fGW ≈ 0.8). The evolution of the current profile, using internal inductance (li) as an indicator, is found to produce a smaller fraction of stable pulses when li is increased above ≈ 1.1 at the beginning of βN flattop. Stable discharges with co-neutral beam injection (NBI) are generally accompanied with a benign n=2 MHD mode. However if this mode exceeds ≈ 10 G, the onset of a m/n=2/1 tearing mode occurs with a loss of confinement. In addition, stable operation with low applied external torque, at or below the extrapolated value expected for ITER has also been demonstrated. With electron cyclotron (EC) injection, the operating region of stable discharges has been further extended at ITER equivalent levels of torque and to ELM free discharges at higher torque but with the addition of an n=3 magnetic perturbation from the DIII-D internal coil set. Lastly, the characterization of the ITER baseline scenario evolution for long pulse duration, extension to more ITER relevant values of torque and electron heating, and suppression of ELMs have significantly advanced the physics basis of this scenario, although significant effort remains in the simultaneous integration of all these requirements.

  20. Reconstruction of missing data using iterative harmonic expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizawa, Atsushi J.; Inoue, Kaiki Taro

    2016-10-01

    In the cosmic microwave background or galaxy density maps, missing fluctuations in masked regions can be reconstructed from fluctuations in the surrounding unmasked regions if the original fluctuations are sufficiently smooth. One reconstruction method involves applying a harmonic expansion iteratively to fluctuations in the unmasked region. In this paper, we discuss how well this reconstruction method can recover the original fluctuations depending on the prior of fluctuations and property of the masked region. The reconstruction method is formulated with an asymptotic expansion in terms of the size of mask for a fixed iteration number. The reconstruction accuracy depends on the mask size, the spectrum of the underlying density fluctuations, the scales of the fluctuations to be reconstructed and the number of iterations. For Gaussian fluctuations with the Harrison-Zel'dovich spectrum, the reconstruction method provides more accurate restoration than naive methods based on brute-force matrix inversion or the singular value decomposition. We also demonstrate that an isotropic non-Gaussian prior does not change the results but an anisotropic non-Gaussian prior can yield a higher reconstruction accuracy compared to the Gaussian prior case.

  1. Conceptual design of a polarimetric Thomson scattering diagnostic in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giudicotti, L.; Bassan, M.; Orsitto, F. P.; Pasqualotto, R.; Kempenaars, M.; Flanagan, J.

    2016-01-01

    Polarimetric Thomson scattering (TS) is a novel diagnostic technique proposed as an alternative to conventional (spectral) TS, for the measurement of the electron temperature Te and density ne in very hot fusion plasmas. Contrary to spectral TS, which is based on the reconstruction of the Doppler broadened frequency spectrum, in polarimetric TS Te is determined from the depolarization of the scattered radiation. The technique is suitable for ITER, where it is expected to be competitive with conventional spectral TS for measurements in the highest Te range, specially in backward-like conditions with the scattering angle 90° ll θ <= 180°. In this paper we consider a hypothetical polarimetric TS diagnostic for ITER and evaluate its performance for the θ = 145° scattering condition typical of the core TS system and also for a different scattering geometry in which, using a tangential laser beam, the central region of the ITER plasma can be observed under a scattering angle θ ~ 75°. In both cases we calculate the expected errors on the measured Te and ne that can be obtained with a simple, two-channel polarimeter, and taking into account that only a fraction of the TS wavelength spectrum is detected. In both cases the expected performances are compared with those of the conventional spectral core TS diagnostic to determine the plasma conditions in which the polarimetric technique is more advantageous. A measurement of the depolarization effect of the TS radiation using the JET High Resolution TS system of JET is also discussed.

  2. Bioinspired iterative synthesis of polyketides

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Kuan; Xie, Changmin; Hong, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Diverse array of biopolymers and second metabolites (particularly polyketide natural products) has been manufactured in nature through an enzymatic iterative assembly of simple building blocks. Inspired by this strategy, molecules with inherent modularity can be efficiently synthesized by repeated succession of similar reaction sequences. This privileged strategy has been widely adopted in synthetic supramolecular chemistry. Its value also has been reorganized in natural product synthesis. A brief overview of this approach is given with a particular emphasis on the total synthesis of polyol-embedded polyketides, a class of vastly diverse structures and biologically significant natural products. This viewpoint also illustrates the limits of known individual modules in terms of diastereoselectivity and enantioselectivity. More efficient and practical iterative strategies are anticipated to emerge in the future development. PMID:26052510

  3. I-mode for ITER?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whyte, D. G.; Marmar, E.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J.; Dominguez, A.; Greenwald, M.

    2011-10-01

    I-mode is a recently explored confinement regime that features a temperature pedestal and H-mode energy confinement, yet with L-mode particle confinement and no density pedestal nor large ELMs. Experiments on Alcator C-Mod and ASDEX-Upgrade show this leads to a stationary collisionless pedestal that inherently does not require ELMs for core impurity and particle control, possibly making I-mode an attractive operating regime for ITER where ELM heat pulses are expected to surpass material limits. We speculate as to how I-mode could be obtained, maintained and exploited for the ITER burning plasma physics mission. Issues examined include I-mode topology and power threshold requirements, pedestal formation, density control, avoiding H-mode, and the response of I-mode to alpha self-heating. Key uncertainties requiring further investigation are identified. Supported by the US DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  4. Design of ITER Relief Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, N.; Choukekar, K.; Jadon, M.; Sarkar, B.; Joshi, B.; Kanzaria, H.; Gehani, V.; Vyas, H.; Pandya, U.; Panjwani, R.; Badgujar, S.; Monneret, E.

    2017-02-01

    The ITER Cryogenic system is one of the most complex cryogenic systems in the world. It includes roughly 5 km of cryogenic transfer line (cryolines) having large number of layout singularities in terms of bends at odd angles and branches. The relief lines are particularly important cryolines as they collect the helium from outlet of all process safety valves of the cryogenic clients and transfers it back to cryoplant. The total length of ITER relief lines is around 1.6 km with process pipe size varying from DN 50 to DN 200. While some part of relief lines carries warm helium for the recovery system, most part of the relief line is vacuum jacketed cryoline which carries cold helium from the clients. The final detailed design of relief lines has been completed. The paper describes the major input data and constraints for design of relief lines, design steps, flexibility and structural analysis approach and major design outcome.

  5. MO-FG-204-04: How Iterative Reconstruction Algorithms Affect the NPS of CT Images

    SciTech Connect

    Li, G; Liu, X; Dodge, C; Jensen, C; Rong, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate how the third generation model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) compares with filtered back-projection (FBP), adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR), and the second generation MBIR based on noise power spectrum (NPS) analysis over a wide range of clinically applicable dose levels. Methods: The Catphan 600 CTP515 module, surrounded by an oval, fat-equivalent ring to mimic patient size/shape, was scanned on a GE HD750 CT scanner at 1, 2, 3, 6, 12 and 19mGy CTDIvol levels with typical patient scan parameters: 120kVp, 0.8s, 40mm beam width, large SFOV, 0.984 pitch and reconstructed thickness 2.5mm (VEO3.0: Abd/Pelvis with Texture and NR05). At each CTDIvol level, 10 repeated scans were acquired for achieving sufficient data sampling. The images were reconstructed using Standard kernel with FBP; 20%, 40% and 70% ASiR; and two versions of MBIR (VEO2.0 and 3.0). For evaluating the effect of the ROI spatial location to the Result of NPS, 4 ROI groups were categorized based on their distances from the center of the phantom. Results: VEO3.0 performed inferiorly comparing to VEO2.0 over all dose levels. On the other hand, at low dose levels (less than 3 mGy), it clearly outperformed ASiR and FBP, in NPS values. Therefore, the lower the dose level, the relative performance of MBIR improves. However, the shapes of the NPS show substantial differences in horizontal and vertical sampling dimensions. These differences may determine the characteristics of the noise/texture features in images, and hence, play an important role in image interpretation. Conclusion: The third generation MBIR did not improve over the second generation MBIR in term of NPS analysis. The overall performance of both versions of MBIR improved as compared to other reconstruction algorithms when dose was reduced. The shapes of the NPS curves provided additional value for future characterization of the image noise/texture features.

  6. Software for computing eigenvalue bounds for iterative subspace matrix methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepard, Ron; Minkoff, Michael; Zhou, Yunkai

    2005-07-01

    importance in order to provide the modeler with information of the reliability of the computational results. Such applications include using these bounds to terminate the iterative procedure at specified accuracy limits. Method of solution: The Ritz values and their residual norms are computed and used as input for the procedure. While knowledge of the exact eigenvalues is not required, we require that the Ritz values are isolated from the exact eigenvalues outside of the Ritz spectrum and that there are no skipped eigenvalues within the Ritz spectrum. Using a multipass refinement approach, upper and lower bounds are computed for each Ritz value. Typical running time: While typical applications would deal with m<20, for m=100000, the running time is 0.12 s on an Apple PowerBook.

  7. Irradiation tests of ITER candidate Hall sensors using two types of neutron spectra.

    PubMed

    Ďuran, I; Bolshakova, I; Viererbl, L; Sentkerestiová, J; Holyaka, R; Lahodová, Z; Bém, P

    2010-10-01

    We report on irradiation tests of InSb based Hall sensors at two irradiation facilities with two distinct types of neutron spectra. One was a fission reactor neutron spectrum with a significant presence of thermal neutrons, while another one was purely fast neutron field. Total neutron fluence of the order of 10(16) cm(-2) was accumulated in both cases, leading to significant drop of Hall sensor sensitivity in case of fission reactor spectrum, while stable performance was observed at purely fast neutron spectrum. This finding suggests that performance of this particular type of Hall sensors is governed dominantly by transmutation. Additionally, it further stresses the need to test ITER candidate Hall sensors under neutron flux with ITER relevant spectrum.

  8. Irradiation tests of ITER candidate Hall sensors using two types of neutron spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Duran, I.; Viererbl, L.; Lahodova, Z.; Sentkerestiova, J.; Bem, P.

    2010-10-15

    We report on irradiation tests of InSb based Hall sensors at two irradiation facilities with two distinct types of neutron spectra. One was a fission reactor neutron spectrum with a significant presence of thermal neutrons, while another one was purely fast neutron field. Total neutron fluence of the order of 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} was accumulated in both cases, leading to significant drop of Hall sensor sensitivity in case of fission reactor spectrum, while stable performance was observed at purely fast neutron spectrum. This finding suggests that performance of this particular type of Hall sensors is governed dominantly by transmutation. Additionally, it further stresses the need to test ITER candidate Hall sensors under neutron flux with ITER relevant spectrum.

  9. Stepwise Iterative Fourier Transform: The SIFT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benignus, V. A.; Benignus, G.

    1975-01-01

    A program, designed specifically to study the respective effects of some common data problems on results obtained through stepwise iterative Fourier transformation of synthetic data with known waveform composition, was outlined. Included in this group were the problems of gaps in the data, different time-series lengths, periodic but nonsinusoidal waveforms, and noisy (low signal-to-noise) data. Results on sinusoidal data were also compared with results obtained on narrow band noise with similar characteristics. The findings showed that the analytic procedure under study can reliably reduce data in the nature of (1) sinusoids in noise, (2) asymmetric but periodic waves in noise, and (3) sinusoids in noise with substantial gaps in the data. The program was also able to analyze narrow-band noise well, but with increased interpretational problems. The procedure was shown to be a powerful technique for analysis of periodicities, in comparison with classical spectrum analysis techniques. However, informed use of the stepwise procedure nevertheless requires some background of knowledge concerning characteristics of the biological processes under study.

  10. Toroidal modeling of plasma response to RMP fields in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Liu, Y. Q.; Wang, N.; Kirk, A.; Koslowski, H. R.; Liang, Y.; Loarte, A.; Ryan, D.; Zhong, F. C.

    2017-04-01

    A systematic numerical study is carried out, computing the resistive plasma response to the resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields for ITER plasmas, utilizing the toroidal code MARS-F (Liu et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 3681). A number of factors are taken into account, including the variation of the plasma scenarios (from 15 MA Q = 10 inductive scenario to the 9 MA Q = 5 steady state scenario), the variation of the toroidal spectrum of the applied fields (n = 1, 2, 3, 4, with n being the toroidal mode number), the amplitude and phase variation of the currents in three rows of the RMP coils as designed for ITER, and finally a special case of mixed toroidal spectrum between the n = 3 and n = 4 RMP fields. Two-dimensional parameter scans, for the edge safety factor and the coil phasing between the upper and lower rows of coils, yield ‘optimal’ curves that maximize a set of figures of merit, that are defined in this work to measure the plasma response. Other two-dimensional scans of the relative coil current phasing among three rows of coils, at fixed coil currents amplitude, reveal a single optimum for each coil configuration with a given n number, for the 15 MA ITER inductive plasma. On the other hand, scanning of the coil current amplitude, at fixed coil phasing, shows either synergy or cancellation effect, for the field contributions between the off-middle rows and the middle row of the RMP coils. Finally, the mixed toroidal spectrum, by combining the n = 3 and the n = 4 RMP field, results in a substantial local reduction of the amplitude of the plasma surface displacement.

  11. Iterative simulated quenching for designing irregular-spot-array generators.

    PubMed

    Gillet, J N; Sheng, Y

    2000-07-10

    We propose a novel, to our knowledge, algorithm of iterative simulated quenching with temperature rescaling for designing diffractive optical elements, based on an analogy between simulated annealing and statistical thermodynamics. The temperature is iteratively rescaled at the end of each quenching process according to ensemble statistics to bring the system back from a frozen imperfect state with a local minimum of energy to a dynamic state in a Boltzmann heat bath in thermal equilibrium at the rescaled temperature. The new algorithm achieves much lower cost function and reconstruction error and higher diffraction efficiency than conventional simulated annealing with a fast exponential cooling schedule and is easy to program. The algorithm is used to design binary-phase generators of large irregular spot arrays. The diffractive phase elements have trapezoidal apertures of varying heights, which fit ideal arbitrary-shaped apertures better than do trapezoidal apertures of fixed heights.

  12. Decentralized control of sound radiation using iterative loop recovery.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Noah H; Cabell, Randolph H; Fuller, Chris R

    2010-10-01

    A decentralized model-based control strategy is designed to reduce low-frequency sound radiation from periodically stiffened panels. While decentralized control systems tend to be scalable, performance can be limited due to modeling error introduced by the unmodeled interaction between neighboring control units. Since bounds on modeling error are not known in advance, it is difficult to ensure the decentralized control system will be robust without making the controller overly conservative. Therefore an iterative approach is suggested, which utilizes frequency-shaped loop recovery. The approach accounts for modeling error introduced by neighboring control loops, requires no communication between subsystems, and is relatively simple. The control strategy is evaluated numerically using a model of a stiffened aluminum panel that is representative of the sidewall of an aircraft. Simulations demonstrate that the iterative approach can achieve significant reductions in radiated sound power from the stiffened panel without destabilizing neighboring control units.

  13. Decentralized Control of Sound Radiation Using Iterative Loop Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Cabell, Randolph H.; Fuller, Chris R.

    2009-01-01

    A decentralized model-based control strategy is designed to reduce low-frequency sound radiation from periodically stiffened panels. While decentralized control systems tend to be scalable, performance can be limited due to modeling error introduced by the unmodeled interaction between neighboring control units. Since bounds on modeling error are not known in advance, it is difficult to ensure the decentralized control system will be robust without making the controller overly conservative. Therefore an iterative approach is suggested, which utilizes frequency-shaped loop recovery. The approach accounts for modeling error introduced by neighboring control loops, requires no communication between subsystems, and is relatively simple. The control strategy is evaluated numerically using a model of a stiffened aluminum panel that is representative of the sidewall of an aircraft. Simulations demonstrate that the iterative approach can achieve significant reductions in radiated sound power from the stiffened panel without destabilizing neighboring control units.

  14. Spectrum Recombination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Describes several methods of executing lecture demonstrations involving the recombination of the spectrum. Groups the techniques into two general classes: bringing selected portions of the spectrum together using lenses or mirrors and blurring the colors by rapid movement or foreshortening. (JM)

  15. Cryogenic instrumentation for ITER magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poncet, J.-M.; Manzagol, J.; Attard, A.; André, J.; Bizel-Bizellot, L.; Bonnay, P.; Ercolani, E.; Luchier, N.; Girard, A.; Clayton, N.; Devred, A.; Huygen, S.; Journeaux, J.-Y.

    2017-02-01

    Accurate measurements of the helium flowrate and of the temperature of the ITER magnets is of fundamental importance to make sure that the magnets operate under well controlled and reliable conditions, and to allow suitable helium flow distribution in the magnets through the helium piping. Therefore, the temperature and flow rate measurements shall be reliable and accurate. In this paper, we present the thermometric chains as well as the venturi flow meters installed in the ITER magnets and their helium piping. The presented thermometric block design is based on the design developed by CERN for the LHC, which has been further optimized via thermal simulations carried out by CEA. The electronic part of the thermometric chain was entirely developed by the CEA and will be presented in detail: it is based on a lock-in measurement and small signal amplification, and also provides a web interface and software to an industrial PLC. This measuring device provides a reliable, accurate, electromagnetically immune, and fast (up to 100 Hz bandwidth) system for resistive temperature sensors between a few ohms to 100 kΩ. The flowmeters (venturi type) which make up part of the helium mass flow measurement chain have been completely designed, and manufacturing is on-going. The behaviour of the helium gas has been studied in detailed thanks to ANSYS CFX software in order to obtain the same differential pressure for all types of flowmeters. Measurement uncertainties have been estimated and the influence of input parameters has been studied. Mechanical calculations have been performed to guarantee the mechanical strength of the venturis required for pressure equipment operating in nuclear environment. In order to complete the helium mass flow measurement chain, different technologies of absolute and differential pressure sensors have been tested in an applied magnetic field to identify equipment compatible with the ITER environment.

  16. Iterates of maps with symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chossat, Pascal; Golubitsky, Martin

    1988-01-01

    Fixed-point bifurcation, period doubling, and Hopf bifurcation (HB) for iterates of equivariant mappings are investigated analytically, with a focus on HB in the presence of symmetry. An algebraic formulation for the hypotheses of the theorem of Ruelle (1973) is derived, and the case of standing waves in a system of ordinary differential equations with O(2) symmetry is considered in detail. In this case, it is shown that HB can lead directly to motion on an invariant 3-torus, with an unexpected third frequency due to drift of standing waves along the torus.

  17. Enhanced compressive wideband frequency spectrum sensing for dynamic spectrum access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yipeng; Wan, Qun

    2012-12-01

    Wideband spectrum sensing detects the unused spectrum holes for dynamic spectrum access (DSA). Too high sampling rate is the main challenge. Compressive sensing (CS) can reconstruct sparse signal with much fewer randomized samples than Nyquist sampling with high probability. Since survey shows that the monitored signal is sparse in frequency domain, CS can deal with the sampling burden. Random samples can be obtained by the analog-to-information converter. Signal recovery can be formulated as the combination of an L0 norm minimization and a linear measurement fitting constraint. In DSA, the static spectrum allocation of primary radios means the bounds between different types of primary radios are known in advance. To incorporate this a priori information, we divide the whole spectrum into sections according to the spectrum allocation policy. In the new optimization model, the minimization of the L2 norm of each section is used to encourage the cluster distribution locally, while the L0 norm of the L2 norms is minimized to give sparse distribution globally. Because the L2/L0 optimization is not convex, an iteratively re-weighted L2/L1 optimization is proposed to approximate it. Simulations demonstrate the proposed method outperforms others in accuracy, denoising ability, etc.

  18. Iterated Stretching of Viscoelastic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Hsueh-Chia; Demekhin, Evgeny A.; Kalaidin, Evgeny

    1999-01-01

    We examine, with asymptotic analysis and numerical simulation, the iterated stretching dynamics of FENE and Oldroyd-B jets of initial radius r(sub 0), shear viscosity nu, Weissenberg number We, retardation number S, and capillary number Ca. The usual Rayleigh instability stretches the local uniaxial extensional flow region near a minimum in jet radius into a primary filament of radius [Ca(1 - S)/ We](sup 1/2)r(sub 0) between two beads. The strain-rate within the filament remains constant while its radius (elastic stress) decreases (increases) exponentially in time with a long elastic relaxation time 3We(r(sup 2, sub 0)/nu). Instabilities convected from the bead relieve the tension at the necks during this slow elastic drainage and trigger a filament recoil. Secondary filaments then form at the necks from the resulting stretching. This iterated stretching is predicted to occur successively to generate high-generation filaments of radius r(sub n), (r(sub n)/r(sub 0)) = square root of 2[r(sub n-1)/r(sub 0)](sup 3/2) until finite-extensibility effects set in.

  19. ETR/ITER systems code

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, W.L.; Bathke, C.G.; Brooks, J.N.; Bulmer, R.H.; Busigin, A.; DuBois, P.F.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Fink, J.; Finn, P.A.; Galambos, J.D.; Gohar, Y.; Gorker, G.E.; Haines, J.R.; Hassanein, A.M.; Hicks, D.R.; Ho, S.K.; Kalsi, S.S.; Kalyanam, K.M.; Kerns, J.A.; Lee, J.D.; Miller, J.R.; Miller, R.L.; Myall, J.O.; Peng, Y-K.M.; Perkins, L.J.; Spampinato, P.T.; Strickler, D.J.; Thomson, S.L.; Wagner, C.E.; Willms, R.S.; Reid, R.L.

    1988-04-01

    A tokamak systems code capable of modeling experimental test reactors has been developed and is described in this document. The code, named TETRA (for Tokamak Engineering Test Reactor Analysis), consists of a series of modules, each describing a tokamak system or component, controlled by an optimizer/driver. This code development was a national effort in that the modules were contributed by members of the fusion community and integrated into a code by the Fusion Engineering Design Center. The code has been checked out on the Cray computers at the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computing Center and has satisfactorily simulated the Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor II (TIBER) design. A feature of this code is the ability to perform optimization studies through the use of a numerical software package, which iterates prescribed variables to satisfy a set of prescribed equations or constraints. This code will be used to perform sensitivity studies for the proposed International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). 22 figs., 29 tabs.

  20. Status of US ITER Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratton, B.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Hill, K.; Johnson, D.; Pablant, N.; Barnsley, R.; Bertschinger, G.; de Bock, M. F. M.; Reichle, R.; Udintsev, V. S.; Watts, C.; Austin, M.; Phillips, P.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Biewer, T. M.; Hanson, G.; Klepper, C. C.; Carlstrom, T.; van Zeeland, M. A.; Brower, D.; Doyle, E.; Peebles, A.; Ellis, R.; Levinton, F.; Yuh, H.

    2013-10-01

    The US is providing 7 diagnostics to ITER: the Upper Visible/IR cameras, the Low Field Side Reflectometer, the Motional Stark Effect diagnostic, the Electron Cyclotron Emission diagnostic, the Toroidal Interferometer/Polarimeter, the Core Imaging X-Ray Spectrometer, and the Diagnostic Residual Gas Analyzer. The front-end components of these systems must operate with high reliability in conditions of long pulse operation, high neutron and gamma fluxes, very high neutron fluence, significant neutron heating (up to 7 MW/m3) , large radiant and charge exchange heat flux (0.35 MW/m2) , and high electromagnetic loads. Opportunities for repair and maintenance of these components will be limited. These conditions lead to significant challenges for the design of the diagnostics. Space constraints, provision of adequate radiation shielding, and development of repair and maintenance strategies are challenges for diagnostic integration into the port plugs that also affect diagnostic design. The current status of design of the US ITER diagnostics is presented and R&D needs are identified. Supported by DOE contracts DE-AC02-09CH11466 (PPPL) and DE-AC05-00OR22725 (UT-Battelle, LLC).

  1. Challenges for Cryogenics at Iter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serio, L.

    2010-04-01

    Nuclear fusion of light nuclei is a promising option to provide clean, safe and cost competitive energy in the future. The ITER experimental reactor being designed by seven partners representing more than half of the world population will be assembled at Cadarache, South of France in the next decade. It is a thermonuclear fusion Tokamak that requires high magnetic fields to confine and stabilize the plasma. Cryogenic technology is extensively employed to achieve low-temperature conditions for the magnet and vacuum pumping systems. Efficient and reliable continuous operation shall be achieved despite unprecedented dynamic heat loads due to magnetic field variations and neutron production from the fusion reaction. Constraints and requirements of the largest superconducting Tokamak machine have been analyzed. Safety and technical risks have been initially assessed and proposals to mitigate the consequences analyzed. Industrial standards and components are being investigated to anticipate the requirements of reliable and efficient large scale energy production. After describing the basic features of ITER and its cryogenic system, we shall present the key design requirements, improvements, optimizations and challenges.

  2. ITER Port Interspace Pressure Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Carbajo, Juan J; Van Hove, Walter A

    2016-01-01

    The ITER Vacuum Vessel (VV) is equipped with 54 access ports. Each of these ports has an opening in the bioshield that communicates with a dedicated port cell. During Tokamak operation, the bioshield opening must be closed with a concrete plug to shield the radiation coming from the plasma. This port plug separates the port cell into a Port Interspace (between VV closure lid and Port Plug) on the inner side and the Port Cell on the outer side. This paper presents calculations of pressures and temperatures in the ITER (Ref. 1) Port Interspace after a double-ended guillotine break (DEGB) of a pipe of the Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS) with high temperature water. It is assumed that this DEGB occurs during the worst possible conditions, which are during water baking operation, with water at a temperature of 523 K (250 C) and at a pressure of 4.4 MPa. These conditions are more severe than during normal Tokamak operation, with the water at 398 K (125 C) and 2 MPa. Two computer codes are employed in these calculations: RELAP5-3D Version 4.2.1 (Ref. 2) to calculate the blowdown releases from the pipe break, and MELCOR, Version 1.8.6 (Ref. 3) to calculate the pressures and temperatures in the Port Interspace. A sensitivity study has been performed to optimize some flow areas.

  3. Communication-optimal iterative methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demmel, J.; Hoemmen, M.; Mohiyuddin, M.; Yelick, K.

    2009-07-01

    Data movement, both within the memory system of a single processor node and between multiple nodes in a system, limits the performance of many Krylov subspace methods that solve sparse linear systems and eigenvalue problems. Here, s iterations of algorithms such as CG, GMRES, Lanczos, and Arnoldi perform s sparse matrix-vector multiplications and Ω(s) vector reductions, resulting in a growth of Ω(s) in both single-node and network communication. By reorganizing the sparse matrix kernel to compute a set of matrix-vector products at once and reorganizing the rest of the algorithm accordingly, we can perform s iterations by sending O(log P) messages instead of Ω(s·log P) messages on a parallel machine, and reading the on-node components of the matrix A from DRAM to cache just once on a single node instead of s times. This reduces communication to the minimum possible. We discuss both algorithms and an implementation of GMRES on a single node of an 8-core Intel Clovertown. Our implementations achieve significant speedups over the conventional algorithms.

  4. Design of the DEMO Fusion Reactor Following ITER

    PubMed Central

    Garabedian, Paul R.; McFadden, Geoffrey B.

    2009-01-01

    Runs of the NSTAB nonlinear stability code show there are many three-dimensional (3D) solutions of the advanced tokamak problem subject to axially symmetric boundary conditions. These numerical simulations based on mathematical equations in conservation form predict that the ITER international tokamak project will encounter persistent disruptions and edge localized mode (ELMS) crashes. Test particle runs of the TRAN transport code suggest that for quasineutrality to prevail in tokamaks a certain minimum level of 3D asymmetry of the magnetic spectrum is required which is comparable to that found in quasiaxially symmetric (QAS) stellarators. The computational theory suggests that a QAS stellarator with two field periods and proportions like those of ITER is a good candidate for a fusion reactor. For a demonstration reactor (DEMO) we seek an experiment that combines the best features of ITER, with a system of QAS coils providing external rotational transform, which is a measure of the poloidal field. We have discovered a configuration with unusually good quasisymmetry that is ideal for this task. PMID:27504224

  5. Iterative Beam Hardening Correction for Multi-Material Objects.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunsong; Li, Mengfei

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an iterative beam hardening correction method that is applicable for the case with multiple materials. By assuming that the materials composing scanned object are known and that they are distinguishable by their linear attenuation coefficients at some given energy, the beam hardening correction problem is converted into a nonlinear system problem, which is then solved iteratively. The reconstructed image is the distribution of linear attenuation coefficient of the scanned object at a given energy. So there are no beam hardening artifacts in the image theoretically. The proposed iterative scheme combines an accurate polychromatic forward projection with a linearized backprojection. Both forward projection and backprojection have high degree of parallelism, and are suitable for acceleration on parallel systems. Numerical experiments with both simulated data and real data verifies the validity of the proposed method. The beam hardening artifacts are alleviated effectively. In addition, the proposed method has a good tolerance on the error of the estimated x-ray spectrum.

  6. Design Aspects of an MSE Diagnostic for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Casper, T; Jayakumar, J; Makowski, M; Ellis, R

    2004-04-19

    The Motional Stark Effect (MSE) diagnostic is unique in its ability to measure the current profile and will be essential in ITER for detailed analysis of Advanced Tokamak (AT) and other types of discharges. However, design of a MSE diagnostic for ITER presents many unique challenges. Among these is optical analysis for the convoluted optical path, required for effective neutron shielding, that employs several reflective optics arranged to form a labyrinth. The geometry of the diagnostic has been laid out and the expected Doppler shifts and channel resolution calculated. A model of the optical train has also been developed based on the Mueller matrix formalism. Unfolding the pitch angle for this complicated geometry is not straightforward and possible methods are evaluated. The CORSICA code is used to model a variety of ITER discharges including start-up, Ipramp and reverse shear. The code also incorporates a synthetic MSE diagnostic that can be used to evaluate different viewing locations and optimize channel locations for the above discharges. Simulation of the optical emission spectrum is also underway.

  7. Influence of the finite linewidth of the laser radiation spectrum on the shape of the coherent population trapping resonance line in an optically dense medium with a buffer gas

    SciTech Connect

    Barantsev, K. A. Popov, E. N.; Litvinov, A. N.

    2015-11-15

    The theory of coherent population trapping resonance is developed for the finite linewidth of the laser radiation spectrum in an optically dense medium of Λ atoms in a cell with a buffer gas. Equations are derived for the atomic density matrix and laser emission spectrum transfer in a cell with working and buffer gases at a finite temperature. The dependence of the quality factor of coherent population trapping resonance on the linewidth of the laser radiation spectrum is studied by measuring transmitted radiation and fluorescence signals.

  8. Lower hybrid assisted plasma current ramp-up in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. H.; Artaud, J. F.; Basiuk, V.; Bécoulet, A.; Dokuka, V.; Hoang, G. T.; Imbeaux, F.; Khayrutdinov, R. R.; Lister, J. B.; Lukash, V. E.

    2009-06-01

    Lower hybrid (LH) assisted plasma current ramp-up in ITER is demonstrated using a free-boundary full tokamak discharge simulator which combines the DINA-CH and CRONOS codes. LH applied from the initial phase of the plasma current ramp-up increases the safety margins in operating the superconducting poloidal field coils both by reducing resistive ohmic flux consumption and by providing non-inductively driven plasma current. Loss of vertical control associated with high plasma internal inductance is avoided by tailoring the plasma current density profiles. Effects of early LH application on the plasma shape evolution are identified by the free-boundary plasma simulation.

  9. Iterative phase retrieval without support.

    PubMed

    Wu, J S; Weierstall, U; Spence, J C H; Koch, C T

    2004-12-01

    An iterative phase retrieval method for nonperiodic objects has been developed from the charge-flipping algorithm proposed in crystallography. A combination of the hybrid input-output (HIO) algorithm and the flipping algorithm has greatly improved performance. In this combined algorithm the flipping algorithm serves to find the support (object boundary) dynamically, and the HIO part improves convergence and moves the algorithm out of local minima. It starts with a single intensity measurement in the Fourier domain and does not require a priori knowledge of the support in the image domain. This method is suitable for general image recovery from oversampled diffuse elastic x-ray and electron-diffraction intensities. The relationship between this algorithm and the output-output algorithm is elucidated.

  10. Iterative phase retrieval without support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J. S.; Weierstall, U.; Spence, J. C. H.; Koch, C. T.

    2004-12-01

    An iterative phase retrieval method for nonperiodic objects has been developed from the charge-flipping algorithm proposed in crystallography. A combination of the hybrid input-output (HIO) algorithm and the flipping algorithm has greatly improved performance. In this combined algorithm the flipping algorithm serves to find the support (object boundary) dynamically, and the HIO part improves convergence and moves the algorithm out of local minima. It starts with a single intensity measurement in the Fourier domain and does not require a priori knowledge of the support in the image domain. This method is suitable for general image recovery from oversampled diffuse elastic x-ray and electron-diffraction intensities. The relationship between this algorithm and the output-output algorithm is elucidated.

  11. Planning as an Iterative Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Activity planning for missions such as the Mars Exploration Rover mission presents many technical challenges, including oversubscription, consideration of time, concurrency, resources, preferences, and uncertainty. These challenges have all been addressed by the research community to varying degrees, but significant technical hurdles still remain. In addition, the integration of these capabilities into a single planning engine remains largely unaddressed. However, I argue that there is a deeper set of issues that needs to be considered namely the integration of planning into an iterative process that begins before the goals, objectives, and preferences are fully defined. This introduces a number of technical challenges for planning, including the ability to more naturally specify and utilize constraints on the planning process, the ability to generate multiple qualitatively different plans, and the ability to provide deep explanation of plans.

  12. Benchmarking ICRF simulations for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    R. V. Budny, L. Berry, R. Bilato, P. Bonoli, M. Brambilla, R.J. Dumont, A. Fukuyama, R. Harvey, E.F. Jaeger, E. Lerche, C.K. Phillips, V. Vdovin, J. Wright, and members of the ITPA-IOS

    2010-09-28

    Abstract Benchmarking of full-wave solvers for ICRF simulations is performed using plasma profiles and equilibria obtained from integrated self-consistent modeling predictions of four ITER plasmas. One is for a high performance baseline (5.3 T, 15 MA) DT H-mode plasma. The others are for half-field, half-current plasmas of interest for the pre-activation phase with bulk plasma ion species being either hydrogen or He4. The predicted profiles are used by seven groups to predict the ICRF electromagnetic fields and heating profiles. Approximate agreement is achieved for the predicted heating power partitions for the DT and He4 cases. Profiles of the heating powers and electromagnetic fields are compared.

  13. Shake table tests and analytical simulations of a steel structure with shape memory alloy dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parulekar, Y. M.; Kiran, A. Ravi; Reddy, G. R.; Singh, R. K.; Vaze, K. K.

    2014-12-01

    This study uses the pseudoelastic properties of Ni-Ti shape memory alloy wires for attenuation of the seismic response of a steel structure and evaluates its effectiveness and applicability in seismic response control. In this paper, shake table tests, carried out on a model of a steel structure with and without wire-based shape memory alloy dampers, are discussed in detail. Shake table tests, comprised of free vibration tests and spectrum compatible time history tests, were carried out. The former were used for the evaluation of the frequency and damping, and the later were used to prove the efficacy of the shape memory alloy dampers. Further analytical simulations are carried out using detailed time history analysis utilizing a thermomechanical model of an SMA and taking into account the residual martensite accumulation, which is irreversibly due to cyclic forward/reverse martensitic transformation. Moreover, a simple iterative response spectrum (IRS) method with equivalent damping and stiffness is also used to evaluate the response of the structure with SMA dampers, and it is proved that the method can be conservatively used by designers.

  14. Conditions for Lower Hybrid Current Drive in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesario, R.; Amicucci, L.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Ceccuzzi, S.; Napoli, F.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Galli, A.; Schettini, G.

    2012-12-01

    To control the plasma current profile represents one of the most important problems of the research of nuclear fusion energy based on the tokamak concept, as in the plasma column the necessary conditions of stability and confinement should be satisfied. This problem can be solved by using the lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) effect, which was demonstrated to occur also at reactor grade high plasma densities provided that a proper method should be utilised, as assessed on FTU (Frascati Tokamak Upgrade). This method, based on theoretical predictions confirmed by experiment, produces relatively high electron temperature at the plasma periphery and scrape-off layer (SOL), consequently reducing the broadening of the spectrum launched by the antenna produced by parasitic wave physics of the edge, namely parametric instability (PI). The new results presented here show that, for kinetic profiles now foreseen for the SOL of ITER, PI is expected to hugely broaden the antenna spectrum and prevent any penetration in the core of the coupled LH power. However, considering the FTU method and assuming higher electron temperature at the edge (which would be however reasonable for ITER) the PI-produced spectral broadening would be mitigated, and enable the penetration of the coupled LH power in the main plasma. By successful LHCD effect, the control of the plasma current profile at normalised minor radius of about 0.8 would be possible, with much higher efficiency than that obtainable by other tools. A very useful reinforce of bootstrap current effects would be thus possible by LHCD in ITER.

  15. Real-time feedback from iterative electronic structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Vaucher, Alain C; Haag, Moritz P; Reiher, Markus

    2016-04-05

    Real-time feedback from iterative electronic structure calculations requires to mediate between the inherently unpredictable execution times of the iterative algorithm used and the necessity to provide data in fixed and short time intervals for real-time rendering. We introduce the concept of a mediator as a component able to deal with infrequent and unpredictable reference data to generate reliable feedback. In the context of real-time quantum chemistry, the mediator takes the form of a surrogate potential that has the same local shape as the first-principles potential and can be evaluated efficiently to deliver atomic forces as real-time feedback. The surrogate potential is updated continuously by electronic structure calculations and guarantees to provide a reliable response to the operator for any molecular structure. To demonstrate the application of iterative electronic structure methods in real-time reactivity exploration, we implement self-consistent semiempirical methods as the data source and apply the surrogate-potential mediator to deliver reliable real-time feedback.

  16. New concurrent iterative methods with monotonic convergence

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Qingchuan

    1996-12-31

    This paper proposes the new concurrent iterative methods without using any derivatives for finding all zeros of polynomials simultaneously. The new methods are of monotonic convergence for both simple and multiple real-zeros of polynomials and are quadratically convergent. The corresponding accelerated concurrent iterative methods are obtained too. The new methods are good candidates for the application in solving symmetric eigenproblems.

  17. An accelerated subspace iteration for eigenvector derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, Tienko

    1991-01-01

    An accelerated subspace iteration method for calculating eigenvector derivatives has been developed. Factors affecting the effectiveness and the reliability of the subspace iteration are identified, and effective strategies concerning these factors are presented. The method has been implemented, and the results of a demonstration problem are presented.

  18. Rater Variables Associated with ITER Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paget, Michael; Wu, Caren; McIlwrick, Joann; Woloschuk, Wayne; Wright, Bruce; McLaughlin, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Advocates of holistic assessment consider the ITER a more authentic way to assess performance. But this assessment format is subjective and, therefore, susceptible to rater bias. Here our objective was to study the association between rater variables and ITER ratings. In this observational study our participants were clerks at the University of…

  19. Iterative methods for weighted least-squares

    SciTech Connect

    Bobrovnikova, E.Y.; Vavasis, S.A.

    1996-12-31

    A weighted least-squares problem with a very ill-conditioned weight matrix arises in many applications. Because of round-off errors, the standard conjugate gradient method for solving this system does not give the correct answer even after n iterations. In this paper we propose an iterative algorithm based on a new type of reorthogonalization that converges to the solution.

  20. Development of RF Tools and Scenarios for ITER on JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Mantsinen, M.; Bobkov, V.; Ekedahl, A.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Lamalle, P. U.; Lyssoivan, A.; Mailloux, J.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Meo, F.; Monakhov, I.; Rantamaki, K.; Salmi, A.; Santala, M.; Sharapov, S.; Jet-Efda Task Force H; Jet-Efda Contributors

    2005-09-01

    The improvement of LH coupling with local puffing of D2 gas, which made operation at ITER relevant distances (10 cm) and with ELMs a reality, has been extended to ITER- like plasma shapes with higher triangularity. With ICRF, we developed tools such as (1) localized direct electron heating using the 3He mode conversion scenario for electron heat transport studies, (2) the production of 4He ions with energies in the MeV range by 3 ωc acceleration of beam injected ions at 120 keV to investigate Alfven instabilities and test α diagnostics, (3) the stabilisation and destabilisation of sawteeth and (4) ICRF as as a wall conditioning. Several ITER relevant scenarios were tested. The (3He)H minority heating scenario, considered for the non-activated start-up phase of ITER, produces at very low concentration energetic 3He which heat the electrons indirectly. For n3He/ne > 2%, the scenario transforms to a mode conversion scenario where the electrons are heated directly. The (D)H minority heating is not accessible as the concentration of C6+ dominates the wave propagation and always leads to mode conversion. The minority heating of T in D is very effective heating for ions and producing neutrons. New results were obtained in several areas of ICRF physics. Experimental evidence confirmed the theoretical prediction that, as the larmor radius increases beyond 0.5 times the perpendicular wavelength of the wave, the second harmonic acceleration of the ions decreases to very small levels. An exotic fusion reaction (pT) must be taken into account when evaluating neutron rates. The contribution of fast particles accelerated by ICRF to the plasma rotation was clearly identified, but it is only part of an underlying, and not yet understood, co-current plasma rotation. Progress was made in the physics of ELMs while their effect on the ICRF coupling could be minimized with the conjugate-T matching scheme. The addition of 3 dB couplers is a step in increasing the power capability of

  1. NREL Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-09-01

    This brochure describes the NREL Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation, which includes analysis and decision support, fundamental science, market relevant research, systems integration, testing and validation, commercialization and deployment. Through deep technical expertise and an unmatched breadth of capabilities, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) leads an integrated approach across the spectrum of renewable energy innovation. From scientific discovery to accelerating market deployment, NREL works in partnership with private industry to drive the transformation of our nation's energy systems. NREL integrates the entire spectrum of innovation, including fundamental science, market relevant research, systems integration, testing and validation, commercialization, and deployment. Our world-class analysis and decision support informs every point on the spectrum. The innovation process at NREL is inter-dependent and iterative. Many scientific breakthroughs begin in our own laboratories, but new ideas and technologies may come to NREL at any point along the innovation spectrum to be validated and refined for commercial use.

  2. Statistical iterative reconstruction using fast optimization transfer algorithm with successively increasing factor in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shiyu; Zhang, Zhenxi; Chen, Ying

    2014-03-01

    Statistical iterative reconstruction exhibits particularly promising since it provides the flexibility of accurate physical noise modeling and geometric system description in transmission tomography system. However, to solve the objective function is computationally intensive compared to analytical reconstruction methods due to multiple iterations needed for convergence and each iteration involving forward/back-projections by using a complex geometric system model. Optimization transfer (OT) is a general algorithm converting a high dimensional optimization to a parallel 1-D update. OT-based algorithm provides a monotonic convergence and a parallel computing framework but slower convergence rate especially around the global optimal. Based on an indirect estimation on the spectrum of the OT convergence rate matrix, we proposed a successively increasing factor- scaled optimization transfer (OT) algorithm to seek an optimal step size for a faster rate. Compared to a representative OT based method such as separable parabolic surrogate with pre-computed curvature (PC-SPS), our algorithm provides comparable image quality (IQ) with fewer iterations. Each iteration retains a similar computational cost to PC-SPS. The initial experiment with a simulated Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) system shows that a total 40% computing time is saved by the proposed algorithm. In general, the successively increasing factor-scaled OT exhibits a tremendous potential to be a iterative method with a parallel computation, a monotonic and global convergence with fast rate.

  3. Progress Update on Iterative Reconstruction of Neutron Tomographic Images

    SciTech Connect

    Hausladen, Paul; Gregor, Jens

    2016-09-15

    This report satisfies the fiscal year 2016 technical deliverable to report on progress in development of fast iterative reconstruction algorithms for project OR16-3DTomography-PD2Jb, "3D Tomography and Image Processing Using Fast Neutrons." This project has two overall goals. The first of these goals is to extend associated-particle fast neutron transmission and, particularly, induced-reaction tomographic imaging algorithms to three dimensions. The second of these goals is to automatically segment the resultant tomographic images into constituent parts, and then extract information about the parts, such as the class of shape and potentially shape parameters. This report addresses of the component of the project concerned with three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction.

  4. On the interplay between inner and outer iterations for a class of iterative methods

    SciTech Connect

    Giladi, E.

    1994-12-31

    Iterative algorithms for solving linear systems of equations often involve the solution of a subproblem at each step. This subproblem is usually another linear system of equations. For example, a preconditioned iteration involves the solution of a preconditioner at each step. In this paper, the author considers algorithms for which the subproblem is also solved iteratively. The subproblem is then said to be solved by {open_quotes}inner iterations{close_quotes} while the term {open_quotes}outer iteration{close_quotes} refers to a step of the basic algorithm. The cost of performing an outer iteration is dominated by the solution of the subproblem, and can be measured by the number of inner iterations. A good measure of the total amount of work needed to solve the original problem to some accuracy c is then, the total number of inner iterations. To lower the amount of work, one can consider solving the subproblems {open_quotes}inexactly{close_quotes} i.e. not to full accuracy. Although this diminishes the cost of solving each subproblem, it usually slows down the convergence of the outer iteration. It is therefore interesting to study the effect of solving each subproblem inexactly on the total amount of work. Specifically, the author considers strategies in which the accuracy to which the inner problem is solved, changes from one outer iteration to the other. The author seeks the `optimal strategy`, that is, the one that yields the lowest possible cost. Here, the author develops a methodology to find the optimal strategy, from the set of slowly varying strategies, for some iterative algorithms. This methodology is applied to the Chebychev iteration and it is shown that for Chebychev iteration, a strategy in which the inner-tolerance remains constant is optimal. The author also estimates this optimal constant. Then generalizations to other iterative procedures are discussed.

  5. Iterants, Fermions and Majorana Operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffman, Louis H.

    Beginning with an elementary, oscillatory discrete dynamical system associated with the square root of minus one, we study both the foundations of mathematics and physics. Position and momentum do not commute in our discrete physics. Their commutator is related to the diffusion constant for a Brownian process and to the Heisenberg commutator in quantum mechanics. We take John Wheeler's idea of It from Bit as an essential clue and we rework the structure of that bit to a logical particle that is its own anti-particle, a logical Marjorana particle. This is our key example of the amphibian nature of mathematics and the external world. We show how the dynamical system for the square root of minus one is essentially the dynamics of a distinction whose self-reference leads to both the fusion algebra and the operator algebra for the Majorana Fermion. In the course of this, we develop an iterant algebra that supports all of matrix algebra and we end the essay with a discussion of the Dirac equation based on these principles.

  6. Progress on ITER Diagnostic Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, David; Feder, Russ; Klabacha, Jonathan; Loesser, Doug; Messineo, Mike; Stratton, Brentley; Wood, Rick; Zhai, Yuhu; Andrew, Phillip; Barnsley, Robin; Bertschinger, Guenter; Debock, Maarten; Reichle, Roger; Udintsev, Victor; Vayakis, George; Watts, Christopher; Walsh, Michael

    2013-10-01

    On ITER, front-end components must operate reliably in a hostile environment. Many will be housed in massive port plugs, which also shield the machine from radiation. Multiple diagnostics reside in a single plug, presenting new challenges for developers. Front-end components must tolerate thermally-induced stresses, disruption-induced mechanical loads, stray ECH radiation, displacement damage, and degradation due to plasma-induced coatings. The impact of failures is amplified due to the difficulty in performing robotic maintenance on these large structures. Motivated by needs to minimize disruption loads on the plugs, standardize the handling of shield modules, and decouple the parallel efforts of the many parties, the packaging strategy for diagnostics has recently focused on the use of 3 vertical shield modules inserted from the plasma side into each equatorial plug structure. At the front of each is a detachable first wall element with customized apertures. Progress on US equatorial and upper plugs will be used as examples, including the layout of components in the interspace and port cell regions. Supported by PPPL under contract DE-AC02-09CH11466 and UT-Battelle, LLC under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the U.S. DOE.

  7. Analysis and Simulation of ITER Steady-State Discharges on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diem, S. J.; Murakami, M.; Park, J. M.; Sontag, A. C.

    2013-10-01

    One of the primary goals of the ITER project is to demonstrate a reactor scale steady-state operation for future tokamaks. This is a challenging task which requires simultaneous operation with fully noninductive current drive, a fusion gain of Q >= 5 and IBS for discharges approximately 3000s in length. Previously, DIII-D has demonstrated fully noninductive scenario in ITER-like shaped plasmas at relatively high q95 ~ 6 . 5 and moderate βN ~ 3 but with low fusion performance (G =βNH89 /q952 ~ 0 . 15). Recent high qmin experiment and modeling indicate that the goal of G = 0 . 3 predicted for Q = 5 operation on ITER can be achieved noninductively at reduced q95 and at higher βN. An optimum choice of q95 and βN for the ITER steady-state mission will be discussed based on the experimental scaling from ITER demonstration discharges on DIII-D, as well as predictive FASTRAN scenario modeling using TGLF coupled to the Integrated Plasma Simulator. FASTRAN is a new iterative numerical procedure that integrates a variety of models (transport, heating, CD, equilibrium and stability) and has been shown to reproduce most features of DIII-D high beta discharges with a stationary current profile. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for the US DOE under DE-AC02-05ER22725 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  8. New stopping criteria for iterative root finding

    PubMed Central

    Nikolajsen, Jorgen L.

    2014-01-01

    A set of simple stopping criteria is presented, which improve the efficiency of iterative root finding by terminating the iterations immediately when no further improvement of the roots is possible. The criteria use only the function evaluations already needed by the root finding procedure to which they are applied. The improved efficiency is achieved by formulating the stopping criteria in terms of fractional significant digits. Test results show that the new stopping criteria reduce the iteration work load by about one-third compared with the most efficient stopping criteria currently available. This is achieved without compromising the accuracy of the extracted roots. PMID:26064544

  9. Iterative restoration algorithms for nonlinear constraint computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szu, Harold

    A general iterative-restoration principle is introduced to facilitate the implementation of nonlinear optical processors. The von Neumann convergence theorem is generalized to include nonorthogonal subspaces which can be reduced to a special orthogonal projection operator by applying an orthogonality condition. This principle is shown to permit derivation of the Jacobi algorithm, the recursive principle, the van Cittert (1931) deconvolution method, the iteration schemes of Gerchberg (1974) and Papoulis (1975), and iteration schemes using two Fourier conjugate domains (e.g., Fienup, 1981). Applications to restoring the image of a double star and division by hard and soft zeros are discussed, and sample results are presented graphically.

  10. Bayesian Vision for Shape Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalobeanu, André

    2004-11-01

    We present a new Bayesian vision technique that aims at recovering a shape from two or more noisy observations taken under similar lighting conditions. The shape is parametrized by a piecewise linear height field, textured by a piecewise linear irradiance field, and we assume Gaussian Markovian priors for both shape vertices and irradiance variables. The modeled observation process, equivalent to rendering, is modeled by a non-affine projection (e.g. perspective projection) followed by a convolution with a piecewise linear point spread function, and contamination by additive Gaussian noise. We assume that the observation parameters are calibrated beforehand. The major novelty of the proposed method consists of marginalizing out the irradiances considered as nuisance parameters, which is achieved by a hierarchy of approximations. This reduces the inference to minimizing an energy that only depends on the shape vertices, and therefore allows an efficient Iterated Conditional Mode (ICM) optimization scheme to be implemented. A Gaussian approximation of the posterior shape density is computed, thus providing estimates of both the geometry and its uncertainty. We illustrate the effectiveness of the new method by shape reconstruction results in a 2D case. A 3D version is currently under development and aims at recovering a surface from multiple images, reconstructing the topography by marginalizing out both albedo and shading.

  11. Bayesian Vision for Shape Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalobeanu, Andre

    2004-01-01

    We present a new Bayesian vision technique that aims at recovering a shape from two or more noisy observations taken under similar lighting conditions. The shape is parametrized by a piecewise linear height field, textured by a piecewise linear irradiance field, and we assume Gaussian Markovian priors for both shape vertices and irradiance variables. The observation process. also known as rendering, is modeled by a non-affine projection (e.g. perspective projection) followed by a convolution with a piecewise linear point spread function. and contamination by additive Gaussian noise. We assume that the observation parameters are calibrated beforehand. The major novelty of the proposed method consists of marginalizing out the irradiances considered as nuisance parameters, which is achieved by Laplace approximations. This reduces the inference to minimizing an energy that only depends on the shape vertices, and therefore allows an efficient Iterated Conditional Mode (ICM) optimization scheme to be implemented. A Gaussian approximation of the posterior shape density is computed, thus providing estimates both the geometry and its uncertainty. We illustrate the effectiveness of the new method by shape reconstruction results in a 2D case. A 3D version is currently under development and aims at recovering a surface from multiple images, reconstructing the topography by marginalizing out both albedo and shading.

  12. An iterative method for the solution of nonlinear systems using the Faber polynomials for annular sectors

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, N.J.

    1994-12-31

    The author gives a hybrid method for the iterative solution of linear systems of equations Ax = b, where the matrix (A) is nonsingular, sparse and nonsymmetric. As in a method developed by Starke and Varga the method begins with a number of steps of the Arnoldi method to produce some information on the location of the spectrum of A. This method then switches to an iterative method based on the Faber polynomials for an annular sector placed around these eigenvalue estimates. The Faber polynomials for an annular sector are used because, firstly an annular sector can easily be placed around any eigenvalue estimates bounded away from zero, and secondly the Faber polynomials are known analytically for an annular sector. Finally the author gives three numerical examples, two of which allow comparison with Starke and Varga`s results. The third is an example of a matrix for which many iterative methods would fall, but this method converges.

  13. Scaling Properties of the Number of Random Sequential Adsorption Iterations Needed to Generate Saturated Random Packing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieśla, Michał

    2017-01-01

    The properties of the number of iterations in random sequential adsorption protocol needed to generate finite saturated random packing of spherically symmetric shapes were studied. Numerical results obtained for one, two, and three dimensional packings were supported by analytical calculations valid for any dimension d. It has been shown that the number of iterations needed to generate finite saturated packing is subject to Pareto distribution with exponent -1-1/d and the median of this distribution scales with packing size according to the power-law characterized by exponent d. Obtained results can be used in designing effective random sequential adsorption simulations.

  14. The Physics Basis of ITER Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, F.

    2009-02-19

    ITER will be the first fusion reactor and the 50 year old dream of fusion scientists will become reality. The quality of magnetic confinement will decide about the success of ITER, directly in the form of the confinement time and indirectly because it decides about the plasma parameters and the fluxes, which cross the separatrix and have to be handled externally by technical means. This lecture portrays some of the basic principles which govern plasma confinement, uses dimensionless scaling to set the limits for the predictions for ITER, an approach which also shows the limitations of the predictions, and describes briefly the major characteristics and physics behind the H-mode--the preferred confinement regime of ITER.

  15. Archimedes' Pi--An Introduction to Iteration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lotspeich, Richard

    1988-01-01

    One method (attributed to Archimedes) of approximating pi offers a simple yet interesting introduction to one of the basic ideas of numerical analysis, an iteration sequence. The method is described and elaborated. (PK)

  16. Anderson Acceleration for Fixed-Point Iterations

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Homer F.

    2015-08-31

    The purpose of this grant was to support research on acceleration methods for fixed-point iterations, with applications to computational frameworks and simulation problems that are of interest to DOE.

  17. ITER Magnet Feeder: Design, Manufacturing and Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CHEN, Yonghua; ILIN, Y.; M., SU; C., NICHOLAS; BAUER, P.; JAROMIR, F.; LU, Kun; CHENG, Yong; SONG, Yuntao; LIU, Chen; HUANG, Xiongyi; ZHOU, Tingzhi; SHEN, Guang; WANG, Zhongwei; FENG, Hansheng; SHEN, Junsong

    2015-03-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) feeder procurement is now well underway. The feeder design has been improved by the feeder teams at the ITER Organization (IO) and the Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (ASIPP) in the last 2 years along with analyses and qualification activities. The feeder design is being progressively finalized. In addition, the preparation of qualification and manufacturing are well scheduled at ASIPP. This paper mainly presents the design, the overview of manufacturing and the status of integration on the ITER magnet feeders. supported by the National Special Support for R&D on Science and Technology for ITER (Ministry of Public Security of the People's Republic of China-MPS) (No. 2008GB102000)

  18. On the safety of ITER accelerators.

    PubMed

    Li, Ge

    2013-01-01

    Three 1 MV/40A accelerators in heating neutral beams (HNB) are on track to be implemented in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). ITER may produce 500 MWt of power by 2026 and may serve as a green energy roadmap for the world. They will generate -1 MV 1 h long-pulse ion beams to be neutralised for plasma heating. Due to frequently occurring vacuum sparking in the accelerators, the snubbers are used to limit the fault arc current to improve ITER safety. However, recent analyses of its reference design have raised concerns. General nonlinear transformer theory is developed for the snubber to unify the former snubbers' different design models with a clear mechanism. Satisfactory agreement between theory and tests indicates that scaling up to a 1 MV voltage may be possible. These results confirm the nonlinear process behind transformer theory and map out a reliable snubber design for a safer ITER.

  19. Accelerated Schwarz iterations for Helmholtz equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagid, Nabila; Belhadj, Hassan; Amattouch, Mohamed Ridouan

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the Restricted additive Schwarz (RAS) method is applied to solve Helmholtz equation. To accelerate the RAS iterations, we propose to apply the vector ɛ-algorithm. Some convergence analysis of the proposed method is presented, and applied succeffully to Helmholtz problem. The obtained results show the efficiency of the proposed approach. Moreover, the algorithm yields much faster convergence than the classical Schwarz iterations.

  20. Programmable Iterative Optical Image And Data Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Deborah J.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed method of iterative optical image and data processing overcomes limitations imposed by loss of optical power after repeated passes through many optical elements - especially, beam splitters. Involves selective, timed combination of optical wavefront phase conjugation and amplification to regenerate images in real time to compensate for losses in optical iteration loops; timing such that amplification turned on to regenerate desired image, then turned off so as not to regenerate other, undesired images or spurious light propagating through loops from unwanted reflections.

  1. Novel aspects of plasma control in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, D.; Ambrosino, G.; de Vries, P.; Felici, F.; Kim, S. H.; Jackson, G.; Kallenbach, A.; Kolemen, E.; Lister, J.; Moreau, D.; Pironti, A.; Raupp, G.; Sauter, O.; Schuster, E.; Snipes, J.; Treutterer, W.; Walker, M.; Welander, A.; Winter, A.; Zabeo, L.

    2015-02-01

    ITER plasma control design solutions and performance requirements are strongly driven by its nuclear mission, aggressive commissioning constraints, and limited number of operational discharges. In addition, high plasma energy content, heat fluxes, neutron fluxes, and very long pulse operation place novel demands on control performance in many areas ranging from plasma boundary and divertor regulation to plasma kinetics and stability control. Both commissioning and experimental operations schedules provide limited time for tuning of control algorithms relative to operating devices. Although many aspects of the control solutions required by ITER have been well-demonstrated in present devices and even designed satisfactorily for ITER application, many elements unique to ITER including various crucial integration issues are presently under development. We describe selected novel aspects of plasma control in ITER, identifying unique parts of the control problem and highlighting some key areas of research remaining. Novel control areas described include control physics understanding (e.g., current profile regulation, tearing mode (TM) suppression), control mathematics (e.g., algorithmic and simulation approaches to high confidence robust performance), and integration solutions (e.g., methods for management of highly subscribed control resources). We identify unique aspects of the ITER TM suppression scheme, which will pulse gyrotrons to drive current within a magnetic island, and turn the drive off following suppression in order to minimize use of auxiliary power and maximize fusion gain. The potential role of active current profile control and approaches to design in ITER are discussed. Issues and approaches to fault handling algorithms are described, along with novel aspects of actuator sharing in ITER.

  2. Iterative methods for design sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belegundu, A. D.; Yoon, B. G.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical method is presented for design sensitivity analysis, using an iterative-method reanalysis of the structure generated by a small perturbation in the design variable; a forward-difference scheme is then employed to obtain the approximate sensitivity. Algorithms are developed for displacement and stress sensitivity, as well as for eignevalues and eigenvector sensitivity, and the iterative schemes are modified so that the coefficient matrices are constant and therefore decomposed only once.

  3. Novel aspects of plasma control in ITER

    DOE PAGES

    Humphreys, David; Ambrosino, G.; de Vries, Peter; ...

    2015-02-12

    ITER plasma control design solutions and performance requirements are strongly driven by its nuclear mission, aggressive commissioning constraints, and limited number of operational discharges. In addition, high plasma energy content, heat fluxes, neutron fluxes, and very long pulse operation place novel demands on control performance in many areas ranging from plasma boundary and divertor regulation to plasma kinetics and stability control. Both commissioning and experimental operations schedules provide limited time for tuning of control algorithms relative to operating devices. Although many aspects of the control solutions required by ITER have been well-demonstrated in present devices and even designed satisfactorily formore » ITER application, many elements unique to ITER including various crucial integration issues are presently under development. We describe selected novel aspects of plasma control in ITER, identifying unique parts of the control problem and highlighting some key areas of research remaining. Novel control areas described include control physics understanding (e.g. current profile regulation, tearing mode suppression (TM)), control mathematics (e.g. algorithmic and simulation approaches to high confidence robust performance), and integration solutions (e.g. methods for management of highly-subscribed control resources). We identify unique aspects of the ITER TM suppression scheme, which will pulse gyrotrons to drive current within a magnetic island, and turn the drive off following suppression in order to minimize use of auxiliary power and maximize fusion gain. The potential role of active current profile control and approaches to design in ITER are discussed. Finally, issues and approaches to fault handling algorithms are described, along with novel aspects of actuator sharing in ITER.« less

  4. Numerical Analysis on Neutron Shielding Structure of ITER Vacuum Vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Changle; Wu, Songtao; Yu, Jie; Sheng, Daolin

    2008-06-01

    The neutron shielding component of ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) vacuum vessel is a kind of structure resembling a wall in appearance. A FE (finite element) model is set up by using ANSYS code in terms of its structural features. Static analysis, thermal expansion analysis and dynamic analysis are performed. The static results show that the stress and displacement distribution are allowable, but the high stress appears in the junction between the upper and lower parts. The modal analysis indicates that the biggest deformation exists in the port area. Through modal superposition, the single-point response has been found with the lower rank frequency of the acceleration seismic response spectrum. But the deformation and the stress values are within the permissible limit. The analysis results would benefit the work in the next step and provide some reference for the implementation of the engineering plan in the future.

  5. Modelling the physics in iterative reconstruction for transmission computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Nuyts, Johan; De Man, Bruno; Fessler, Jeffrey A.; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Beekman, Freek J.

    2013-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in iterative reconstruction (IR) as a key tool to improve quality and increase applicability of X-ray CT imaging. IR has the ability to significantly reduce patient dose, it provides the flexibility to reconstruct images from arbitrary X-ray system geometries and it allows to include detailed models of photon transport and detection physics, to accurately correct for a wide variety of image degrading effects. This paper reviews discretisation issues and modelling of finite spatial resolution, Compton scatter in the scanned object, data noise and the energy spectrum. Widespread implementation of IR with highly accurate model-based correction, however, still requires significant effort. In addition, new hardware will provide new opportunities and challenges to improve CT with new modelling. PMID:23739261

  6. Stationary shapes of deformable particles moving at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boltz, Horst-Holger; Kierfeld, Jan

    2016-11-01

    We introduce an iterative solution scheme in order to calculate stationary shapes of deformable elastic capsules which are steadily moving through a viscous fluid at low Reynolds numbers. The iterative solution scheme couples hydrodynamic boundary integral methods and elastic shape equations to find the stationary axisymmetric shape and the velocity of an elastic capsule moving in a viscous fluid governed by the Stokes equation. We use this approach to systematically study dynamical shape transitions of capsules with Hookean stretching and bending energies and spherical resting shape sedimenting under the influence of gravity or centrifugal forces. We find three types of possible axisymmetric stationary shapes for sedimenting capsules with fixed volume: a pseudospherical state, a pear-shaped state, and buckled shapes. Capsule shapes are controlled by two dimensionless parameters, the Föppl-von-Kármán number characterizing the elastic properties and a Bond number characterizing the driving force. For increasing gravitational force the spherical shape transforms into a pear shape. For very large bending rigidity (very small Föppl-von-Kármán number) this transition is discontinuous with shape hysteresis. The corresponding transition line terminates, however, in a critical point, such that the discontinuous transition is not present at typical Föppl-von-Kármán numbers of synthetic capsules. In an additional bifurcation, buckled shapes occur upon increasing the gravitational force.

  7. Application of conditional shape invariance symmetry to obtain the eigen-spectrum of the mixed potential V (r) = ar + br2 + c/r + l(l + 1)/r2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Sudesna; Chakrabarti, Barnali; Das, T. K.

    2017-04-01

    We show that the conditional shape invariance symmetry can be used as a very powerful tool to calculate the eigenvalues of the mixed potential V (r) = ar + br2 + c/r + l (l + 1)/r2 for a restricted set of potential parameters. The energy for any state can be obtained algebraically, albeit for a severely restricted set of potential parameters. We also indicate that each member of the hierarchy of Hamiltonians is basically conditionally translational shape invariant. Comparison of analytically obtained results with numerical results is also presented. Our present methodology can be taken as an alternative treatment for the calculation of any higher order excited states of conditionally exactly solvable (CES) potentials.

  8. A hybrid-iterative approach for RCS modeling on super computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiele, G. A.; Murthy, P. K.; Penno, R. P.

    1988-05-01

    An iterative method is developed for computing the current induced by plane wave excitation on conducting bodies of arbitrary shape. In this method, the scattering body is divided into lit- and shadow-side regions separated by the geometric optics boundary. An MFIE is written for each region. Each MFIE is solved by iteration (i.e., method of successive substitutions). In order to accomplish this, it is often necessary to have an initial estimate of the shadow side current. This estimate is obtained from edge diffraction theory or Fock theory. Hence, the method is called a hybrid-iterative method (HIM). The HIM is well-suited for use on a super computer like the Cray XMP. Results will be shown for 2-dimensional objects whose size varies from 0.6 wavelengths to 440 wavelengths, all with CPU times under one minute.

  9. Fission Spectrum

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Bloch, F.; Staub, H.

    1943-08-18

    Measurements of the spectrum of the fission neutrons of 25 are described, in which the energy of the neutrons is determined from the ionization produced by individual hydrogen recoils. The slow neutrons producing fission are obtained by slowing down the fast neutrons from the Be-D reaction of the Stanford cyclotron. In order to distinguish between fission neutrons and the remaining fast cyclotron neutrons both the cyclotron current and the pusle amplifier are modulated. A hollow neutron container, in which slow neutrons have a lifetime of about 2 milliseconds, avoids the use of large distances. This method results in much higher intensities than the usual modulation arrangement. The results show a continuous distribution of neutrons with a rather wide maximum at about 0.8 MV falling off to half of its maximum value at 2.0 MV. The total number of netrons is determined by comparison with the number of fission fragments. The result seems to indicate that only about 30% of the neutrons have energies below .8 MV. Various tests are described which were performed in order to rule out modification of the spectrum by inelastic scattering. Decl. May 4, 1951

  10. CORSICA modelling of ITER hybrid operation scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. H.; Bulmer, R. H.; Campbell, D. J.; Casper, T. A.; LoDestro, L. L.; Meyer, W. H.; Pearlstein, L. D.; Snipes, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    The hybrid operating mode observed in several tokamaks is characterized by further enhancement over the high plasma confinement (H-mode) associated with reduced magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) instabilities linked to a stationary flat safety factor (q ) profile in the core region. The proposed ITER hybrid operation is currently aiming at operating for a long burn duration (>1000 s) with a moderate fusion power multiplication factor, Q , of at least 5. This paper presents candidate ITER hybrid operation scenarios developed using a free-boundary transport modelling code, CORSICA, taking all relevant physics and engineering constraints into account. The ITER hybrid operation scenarios have been developed by tailoring the 15 MA baseline ITER inductive H-mode scenario. Accessible operation conditions for ITER hybrid operation and achievable range of plasma parameters have been investigated considering uncertainties on the plasma confinement and transport. ITER operation capability for avoiding the poloidal field coil current, field and force limits has been examined by applying different current ramp rates, flat-top plasma currents and densities, and pre-magnetization of the poloidal field coils. Various combinations of heating and current drive (H&CD) schemes have been applied to study several physics issues, such as the plasma current density profile tailoring, enhancement of the plasma energy confinement and fusion power generation. A parameterized edge pedestal model based on EPED1 added to the CORSICA code has been applied to hybrid operation scenarios. Finally, fully self-consistent free-boundary transport simulations have been performed to provide information on the poloidal field coil voltage demands and to study the controllability with the ITER controllers. Extended from Proc. 24th Int. Conf. on Fusion Energy (San Diego, 2012) IT/P1-13.

  11. Energetic particle physics issues for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.; Budny, R.; Fu, G.Y.

    1996-12-31

    This paper summarizes our present understanding of the following energetic/alpha particle physics issues for the 21 MA, 20 TF coil ITER Interim Design configuration and operational scenarios: (a) toroidal field ripple effects on alpha particle confinement, (b) energetic particle interaction with low frequency MHD modes, (c) energetic particle excitation of toroidal Alfven eigenmodes, and (d) energetic particle transport due to MHD modes. TF ripple effects on alpha loss in ITER under a number of different operating conditions are found to be small with a maximum loss of 1%. With careful plasma control in ITER reversed-shear operation, TF ripple induced alpha loss can be reduced to below the nominal ITER design limit of 5%. Fishbone modes are expected to be unstable for {beta}{sub {alpha}} > 1%, and sawtooth stabilization is lost if the ideal kink growth rate exceeds 10% of the deeply trapped alpha precessional drift frequency evaluated at the q = 1 surface. However, it is expected that the fishbone modes will lead only to a local flattening of the alpha profile due to small banana size. MHD modes observed during slow decrease of stored energy after fast partial electron temperature collapse in JT-60U reversed-shear experiments may be resonant type instabilities; they may have implications on the energetic particle confinement in ITER reversed-shear operation. From the results of various TAE stability code calculations, ITER equilibria appear to lie close to TAE linear stability thresholds. However, the prognosis depends strongly on q profile and profiles of alpha and other high energy particles species. If TAE modes are unstable in ITER, the stochastic diffusion is the main loss mechanism, which scales with ({delta}B{sub r}/B){sup 2}, because of the relatively small alpha particle banana orbit size. For isolated TAE modes the particle loss is very small, and TAE modes saturate via the resonant wave-particle trapping process at very small amplitude.

  12. Status of the ITER heating neutral beam system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemsworth, R.; Decamps, H.; Graceffa, J.; Schunke, B.; Tanaka, M.; Dremel, M.; Tanga, A.; DeEsch, H. P. L.; Geli, F.; Milnes, J.; Inoue, T.; Marcuzzi, D.; Sonato, P.; Zaccaria, P.

    2009-04-01

    The ITER neutral beam (NB) injectors are the first injectors that will have to operate under conditions and constraints similar to those that will be encountered in a fusion reactor. These injectors will have to operate in a hostile radiation environment and they will become highly radioactive due to the neutron flux from ITER. The injectors will use a single large ion source and accelerator that will produce 40 A 1 MeV D- beams for pulse lengths of up to 3600 s. Significant design changes have been made to the ITER heating NB (HNB) injector over the past 4 years. The main changes are: Modifications to allow installation and maintenance of the beamline components with an overhead crane. The beam source vessel shape has been changed and the beam source moved to allow more space for the connections between the 1 MV bushing and the beam source. The RF driven negative ion source has replaced the filamented ion source as the reference design. The ion source and extractor power supplies will be located in an air insulated high voltage (-1 MV) deck located outside the tokamak building instead of inside an SF6 insulated HV deck located above the injector. Introduction of an all metal absolute valve to prevent any tritium in the machine to escape into the NB cell during maintenance. This paper describes the status of the design as of December 2008 including the above mentioned changes. The very important power supply system of the neutral beam injectors is not described in any detail as that merits a paper beyond the competence of the present authors. The R&D required to realize the injectors described in this paper must be carried out on a dedicated neutral beam test facility, which is not described here.

  13. The Biokinetic Spectrum for Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Corkrey, Ross; McMeekin, Tom A.; Bowman, John P.; Ratkowsky, David A.; Olley, June; Ross, Tom

    2016-01-01

    We identify and describe the distribution of temperature-dependent specific growth rates for life on Earth, which we term the biokinetic spectrum for temperature. The spectrum has the potential to provide for more robust modeling in thermal ecology since any conclusions derived from it will be based on observed data rather than using theoretical assumptions. It may also provide constraints for systems biology model predictions and provide insights in physiology. The spectrum has a Δ-shape with a sharp peak at around 42°C. At higher temperatures up to 60°C there was a gap of attenuated growth rates. We found another peak at 67°C and a steady decline in maximum rates thereafter. By using Bayesian quantile regression to summarise and explore the data we were able to conclude that the gap represented an actual biological transition between mesophiles and thermophiles that we term the Mesophile-Thermophile Gap (MTG). We have not identified any organism that grows above the maximum rate of the spectrum. We used a thermodynamic model to recover the Δ-shape, suggesting that the growth rate limits arise from a trade-off between activity and stability of proteins. The spectrum provides underpinning principles that will find utility in models concerned with the thermal responses of biological processes. PMID:27088362

  14. The Biokinetic Spectrum for Temperature.

    PubMed

    Corkrey, Ross; McMeekin, Tom A; Bowman, John P; Ratkowsky, David A; Olley, June; Ross, Tom

    2016-01-01

    We identify and describe the distribution of temperature-dependent specific growth rates for life on Earth, which we term the biokinetic spectrum for temperature. The spectrum has the potential to provide for more robust modeling in thermal ecology since any conclusions derived from it will be based on observed data rather than using theoretical assumptions. It may also provide constraints for systems biology model predictions and provide insights in physiology. The spectrum has a Δ-shape with a sharp peak at around 42°C. At higher temperatures up to 60°C there was a gap of attenuated growth rates. We found another peak at 67°C and a steady decline in maximum rates thereafter. By using Bayesian quantile regression to summarise and explore the data we were able to conclude that the gap represented an actual biological transition between mesophiles and thermophiles that we term the Mesophile-Thermophile Gap (MTG). We have not identified any organism that grows above the maximum rate of the spectrum. We used a thermodynamic model to recover the Δ-shape, suggesting that the growth rate limits arise from a trade-off between activity and stability of proteins. The spectrum provides underpinning principles that will find utility in models concerned with the thermal responses of biological processes.

  15. High Precision Assembly Line Synthesis for Molecules with Tailored Shapes

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Matthew; Essafi, Stephanie; Bame, Jessica R.; Bull, Stephanie P.; Webster, Matthew P.; Balieu, Sebastien; Dale, James W.; Butts, Craig P.; Harvey, Jeremy N.; Aggarwal, Varinder K.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular assembly lines, where molecules undergo iterative processes involving chain elongation and functional group manipulation are hallmarks of many processes found in Nature. We have sought to emulate Nature in the development of our own molecular assembly line through iterative homologations of boronic esters. Here we report a reagent (α-lithioethyl triispopropylbenzoate) which inserts into carbon-boron bonds with exceptionally high fidelity and stereocontrol. Through repeated iteration we have converted a simple boronic ester into a complex molecule (a carbon chain with ten contiguous methyl groups) with remarkably high precision over its length, its stereochemistry and therefore its shape. Different stereoisomers were targeted and it was found that they adopted different shapes (helical/linear) according to their stereochemistry. This work should now enable scientists to rationally design and create molecules with predictable shape, which could have an impact in all areas of molecular sciences where bespoke molecules are required. PMID:25209797

  16. Comparison of Iterative and Non-Iterative Strain-Gage Balance Load Calculation Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, N.

    2010-01-01

    The accuracy of iterative and non-iterative strain-gage balance load calculation methods was compared using data from the calibration of a force balance. Two iterative and one non-iterative method were investigated. In addition, transformations were applied to balance loads in order to process the calibration data in both direct read and force balance format. NASA's regression model optimization tool BALFIT was used to generate optimized regression models of the calibration data for each of the three load calculation methods. This approach made sure that the selected regression models met strict statistical quality requirements. The comparison of the standard deviation of the load residuals showed that the first iterative method may be applied to data in both the direct read and force balance format. The second iterative method, on the other hand, implicitly assumes that the primary gage sensitivities of all balance gages exist. Therefore, the second iterative method only works if the given balance data is processed in force balance format. The calibration data set was also processed using the non-iterative method. Standard deviations of the load residuals for the three load calculation methods were compared. Overall, the standard deviations show very good agreement. The load prediction accuracies of the three methods appear to be compatible as long as regression models used to analyze the calibration data meet strict statistical quality requirements. Recent improvements of the regression model optimization tool BALFIT are also discussed in the paper.

  17. [The ideographic iteration mark in Senkinho].

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Takanori; Yamashita, Koichi; Murasaki, Toru

    2006-06-01

    In the 7th century, Senkinho was written by Sonshibaku in the Tang dynasty China. This book that was altered in 1066 in the north Sung dynasty China has become known in the world now. However four series of books remained intact, as they were not modified. The names of each book were Senkinho Kentoushi-syouraibon, the Shincho-sonshinjin senkinho, Stein book, and the Kozlov book. Senkinho Kentoushi-syouraibon and Shincho-sonshinjin Senkinho are in Japan, while Stein and the Kozlov books are in the United Kingdom and Russia respectively. We researched the ideographic iteration marks in these books. In Senkinho Kentoushi-syouraibon, several ideographic iteration marks were used. But in Shincho-sonshinjin senkinho and the Kozlov book, only one ideographic iteration mark was used. Furthermore, there were two types of ideographic iteration marks in the Chinese character text of Senkinho Kentoushi-syouraibon. We estimated that the ideographic iteration marks in the Katakana character were transcribed between the middle era of Kamakura Japan and the early era of Muromachi Japan.

  18. Efficient iterative image reconstruction algorithm for dedicated breast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antropova, Natalia; Sanchez, Adrian; Reiser, Ingrid S.; Sidky, Emil Y.; Boone, John; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2016-03-01

    Dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT) is currently being studied as a potential screening method for breast cancer. The X-ray exposure is set low to achieve an average glandular dose comparable to that of mammography, yielding projection data that contains high levels of noise. Iterative image reconstruction (IIR) algorithms may be well-suited for the system since they potentially reduce the effects of noise in the reconstructed images. However, IIR outcomes can be difficult to control since the algorithm parameters do not directly correspond to the image properties. Also, IIR algorithms are computationally demanding and have optimal parameter settings that depend on the size and shape of the breast and positioning of the patient. In this work, we design an efficient IIR algorithm with meaningful parameter specifications and that can be used on a large, diverse sample of bCT cases. The flexibility and efficiency of this method comes from having the final image produced by a linear combination of two separately reconstructed images - one containing gray level information and the other with enhanced high frequency components. Both of the images result from few iterations of separate IIR algorithms. The proposed algorithm depends on two parameters both of which have a well-defined impact on image quality. The algorithm is applied to numerous bCT cases from a dedicated bCT prototype system developed at University of California, Davis.

  19. Surface heat loads on the ITER divertor vertical targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, J. P.; Carpentier-Chouchana, S.; Escourbiac, F.; Hirai, T.; Panayotis, S.; Pitts, R. A.; Corre, Y.; Dejarnac, R.; Firdaouss, M.; Kočan, M.; Komm, M.; Kukushkin, A.; Languille, P.; Missirlian, M.; Zhao, W.; Zhong, G.

    2017-04-01

    The heating of tungsten monoblocks at the ITER divertor vertical targets is calculated using the heat flux predicted by three-dimensional ion orbit modelling. The monoblocks are beveled to a depth of 0.5 mm in the toroidal direction to provide magnetic shadowing of the poloidal leading edges within the range of specified assembly tolerances, but this increases the magnetic field incidence angle resulting in a reduction of toroidal wetted fraction and concentration of the local heat flux to the unshadowed surfaces. This shaping solution successfully protects the leading edges from inter-ELM heat loads, but at the expense of (1) temperatures on the main loaded surface that could exceed the tungsten recrystallization temperature in the nominal partially detached regime, and (2) melting and loss of margin against critical heat flux during transient loss of detachment control. During ELMs, the risk of monoblock edge melting is found to be greater than the risk of full surface melting on the plasma-wetted zone. Full surface and edge melting will be triggered by uncontrolled ELMs in the burning plasma phase of ITER operation if current models of the likely ELM ion impact energies at the divertor targets are correct. During uncontrolled ELMs in pre-nuclear deuterium or helium plasmas at half the nominal plasma current and magnetic field, full surface melting should be avoided, but edge melting is predicted.

  20. Chevron beam dump for ITER edge Thomson scattering system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsuka, E.; Hatae, T.; Vayakis, G.; Bassan, M.; Itami, K.

    2013-10-01

    This paper contains the design of the beam dump for the ITER edge Thomson scattering system and mainly concerns its lifetime under the harsh thermal and electromagnetic loads as well as tight space allocation. The lifetime was estimated from the multi-pulse laser-induced damage threshold. In order to extend its lifetime, the structure of the beam dump was optimized. A number of bent sheets aligned parallel in the beam dump form a shape called a chevron which enables it to avoid the concentration of the incident laser pulse energy. The chevron beam dump is expected to withstand thermal loads due to nuclear heating, radiation from the plasma, and numerous incident laser pulses throughout the entire ITER project with a reasonable margin for the peak factor of the beam profile. Structural analysis was also carried out in case of electromagnetic loads during a disruption. Moreover, detailed issues for more accurate assessments of the beam dump's lifetime are clarified. Variation of the bi-directional reflection distribution function (BRDF) due to erosion by or contamination of neutral particles derived from the plasma is one of the most critical issues that needs to be resolved. In this paper, the BRDF was assumed, and the total amount of stray light and the absorbed laser energy profile on the beam dump were evaluated.

  1. Kleene Monads: Handling Iteration in a Framework of Generic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, Sergey; Schröder, Lutz; Mossakowski, Till

    Monads are a well-established tool for modelling various computational effects. They form the semantic basis of Moggi’s computational metalanguage, the metalanguage of effects for short, which made its way into modern functional programming in the shape of Haskell’s do-notation. Standard computational idioms call for specific classes of monads that support additional control operations. Here, we introduce Kleene monads, which additionally feature nondeterministic choice and Kleene star, i.e. nondeterministic iteration, and we provide a metalanguage and a sound calculus for Kleene monads, the metalanguage of control and effects, which is the natural joint extension of Kleene algebra and the metalanguage of effects. This provides a framework for studying abstract program equality focussing on iteration and effects. These aspects are known to have decidable equational theories when studied in isolation. However, it is well known that decidability breaks easily; e.g. the Horn theory of continuous Kleene algebras fails to be recursively enumerable. Here, we prove several negative results for the metalanguage of control and effects; in particular, already the equational theory of the unrestricted metalanguage of control and effects over continuous Kleene monads fails to be recursively enumerable. We proceed to identify a fragment of this language which still contains both Kleene algebra and the metalanguage of effects and for which the natural axiomatisation is complete, and indeed the equational theory is decidable.

  2. The Dynamics of Some Iterative Implicit Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sweby, P. K.

    1994-01-01

    The global asymptotic nonlinear behavior of some standard iterative procedures in solving nonlinear systems of algebraic equations arising from four implicit linear multistep methods (LMMs) in discretizing 2 x 2 systems of first-order autonomous nonlinear ordinary differential equations is analyzed using the theory of dynamical systems. With the aid of parallel Connection Machines (CM-2 and CM-5), the associated bifurcation diagrams as a function of the time step, and the complex behavior of the associated 'numerical basins of attraction' of these iterative implicit schemes are revealed and compared. Studies showed that all of the four implicit LMMs exhibit a drastic distortion and segmentation but less shrinkage of the basin of attraction of the true solution than standard explicit methods. The numerical basins of attraction of a noniterative implicit procedure mimic more closely the basins of attraction of the differential equations than the iterative implicit procedures for the four implicit LMMs.

  3. The ITER in-vessel system

    SciTech Connect

    Lousteau, D.C.

    1994-09-01

    The overall programmatic objective, as defined in the ITER Engineering Design Activities (EDA) Agreement, is to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy for peaceful purposes. The ITER EDA Phase, due to last until July 1998, will encompass the design of the device and its auxiliary systems and facilities, including the preparation of engineering drawings. The EDA also incorporates validating research and development (R&D) work, including the development and testing of key components. The purpose of this paper is to review the status of the design, as it has been developed so far, emphasizing the design and integration of those components contained within the vacuum vessel of the ITER device. The components included in the in-vessel systems are divertor and first wall; blanket and shield; plasma heating, fueling, and vacuum pumping equipment; and remote handling equipment.

  4. Re-starting an Arnoldi iteration

    SciTech Connect

    Lehoucq, R.B.

    1996-12-31

    The Arnoldi iteration is an efficient procedure for approximating a subset of the eigensystem of a large sparse n x n matrix A. The iteration produces a partial orthogonal reduction of A into an upper Hessenberg matrix H{sub m} of order m. The eigenvalues of this small matrix H{sub m} are used to approximate a subset of the eigenvalues of the large matrix A. The eigenvalues of H{sub m} improve as estimates to those of A as m increases. Unfortunately, so does the cost and storage of the reduction. The idea of re-starting the Arnoldi iteration is motivated by the prohibitive cost associated with building a large factorization.

  5. Selection of plasma facing materials for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrickson, M.; Barabash, V.; Chiocchio, S.

    1996-10-01

    ITER will be the first tokamak having long pulse operation using deuterium-tritium fuel. The problem of designing heat removal structures for steady state in a neutron environment is a major technical goal for the ITER Engineering Design Activity (EDA). The steady state heat flux specified for divertor components is 5 MW/m{sup 2} for normal operation with transients to 15 MW/m{sup 2} for up to 10 s. The selection of materials for plasma facing components is one of the major research activities. Three materials are being considered for the divertor; carbon fiber composites, beryllium, and tungsten. This paper discusses the relative advantages and disadvantages of these materials. The final section of plasma facing materials for the ITER divertor will not be made until the end of the EDA.

  6. Global Asymptotic Behavior of Iterative Implicit Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sweby, P. K.

    1994-01-01

    The global asymptotic nonlinear behavior of some standard iterative procedures in solving nonlinear systems of algebraic equations arising from four implicit linear multistep methods (LMMs) in discretizing three models of 2 x 2 systems of first-order autonomous nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs) is analyzed using the theory of dynamical systems. The iterative procedures include simple iteration and full and modified Newton iterations. The results are compared with standard Runge-Kutta explicit methods, a noniterative implicit procedure, and the Newton method of solving the steady part of the ODEs. Studies showed that aside from exhibiting spurious asymptotes, all of the four implicit LMMs can change the type and stability of the steady states of the differential equations (DEs). They also exhibit a drastic distortion but less shrinkage of the basin of attraction of the true solution than standard nonLMM explicit methods. The simple iteration procedure exhibits behavior which is similar to standard nonLMM explicit methods except that spurious steady-state numerical solutions cannot occur. The numerical basins of attraction of the noniterative implicit procedure mimic more closely the basins of attraction of the DEs and are more efficient than the three iterative implicit procedures for the four implicit LMMs. Contrary to popular belief, the initial data using the Newton method of solving the steady part of the DEs may not have to be close to the exact steady state for convergence. These results can be used as an explanation for possible causes and cures of slow convergence and nonconvergence of steady-state numerical solutions when using an implicit LMM time-dependent approach in computational fluid dynamics.

  7. Iterative Vessel Segmentation of Fundus Images.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, Sohini; Koozekanani, Dara D; Parhi, Keshab K

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a novel unsupervised iterative blood vessel segmentation algorithm using fundus images. First, a vessel enhanced image is generated by tophat reconstruction of the negative green plane image. An initial estimate of the segmented vasculature is extracted by global thresholding the vessel enhanced image. Next, new vessel pixels are identified iteratively by adaptive thresholding of the residual image generated by masking out the existing segmented vessel estimate from the vessel enhanced image. The new vessel pixels are, then, region grown into the existing vessel, thereby resulting in an iterative enhancement of the segmented vessel structure. As the iterations progress, the number of false edge pixels identified as new vessel pixels increases compared to the number of actual vessel pixels. A key contribution of this paper is a novel stopping criterion that terminates the iterative process leading to higher vessel segmentation accuracy. This iterative algorithm is robust to the rate of new vessel pixel addition since it achieves 93.2-95.35% vessel segmentation accuracy with 0.9577-0.9638 area under ROC curve (AUC) on abnormal retinal images from the STARE dataset. The proposed algorithm is computationally efficient and consistent in vessel segmentation performance for retinal images with variations due to pathology, uneven illumination, pigmentation, and fields of view since it achieves a vessel segmentation accuracy of about 95% in an average time of 2.45, 3.95, and 8 s on images from three public datasets DRIVE, STARE, and CHASE_DB1, respectively. Additionally, the proposed algorithm has more than 90% segmentation accuracy for segmenting peripapillary blood vessels in the images from the DRIVE and CHASE_DB1 datasets.

  8. Accelerated iterative beam angle selection in IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Bangert, Mark; Unkelbach, Jan

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: Iterative methods for beam angle selection (BAS) for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning sequentially construct a beneficial ensemble of beam directions. In a naïve implementation, the nth beam is selected by adding beam orientations one-by-one from a discrete set of candidates to an existing ensemble of (n − 1) beams. The best beam orientation is identified in a time consuming process by solving the fluence map optimization (FMO) problem for every candidate beam and selecting the beam that yields the largest improvement to the objective function value. This paper evaluates two alternative methods to accelerate iterative BAS based on surrogates for the FMO objective function value. Methods: We suggest to select candidate beams not based on the FMO objective function value after convergence but (1) based on the objective function value after five FMO iterations of a gradient based algorithm and (2) based on a projected gradient of the FMO problem in the first iteration. The performance of the objective function surrogates is evaluated based on the resulting objective function values and dose statistics in a treatment planning study comprising three intracranial, three pancreas, and three prostate cases. Furthermore, iterative BAS is evaluated for an application in which a small number of noncoplanar beams complement a set of coplanar beam orientations. This scenario is of practical interest as noncoplanar setups may require additional attention of the treatment personnel for every couch rotation. Results: Iterative BAS relying on objective function surrogates yields similar results compared to naïve BAS with regard to the objective function values and dose statistics. At the same time, early stopping of the FMO and using the projected gradient during the first iteration enable reductions in computation time by approximately one to two orders of magnitude. With regard to the clinical delivery of noncoplanar IMRT treatments, we could

  9. Iterative method for generating correlated binary sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usatenko, O. V.; Melnik, S. S.; Apostolov, S. S.; Makarov, N. M.; Krokhin, A. A.

    2014-11-01

    We propose an efficient iterative method for generating random correlated binary sequences with a prescribed correlation function. The method is based on consecutive linear modulations of an initially uncorrelated sequence into a correlated one. Each step of modulation increases the correlations until the desired level has been reached. The robustness and efficiency of the proposed algorithm are tested by generating sequences with inverse power-law correlations. The substantial increase in the strength of correlation in the iterative method with respect to single-step filtering generation is shown for all studied correlation functions. Our results can be used for design of disordered superlattices, waveguides, and surfaces with selective transport properties.

  10. Modified Iterative Extended Hueckel. 1: Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aronowitz, S.

    1980-01-01

    Iterative Extended Huekel is modified by inclusion of explicit effective internuclear and electronic interactions. The one electron energies are shown to obey a variational principle because of the form of the effective electronic interactions. The modifications permit mimicking of aspects of valence bond theory with the additional feature that the energies associated with valence bond type structures are explicitly calculated. In turn, a hybrid molecular, orbital valence, bond scheme is introduced which incorporates variant total molecular electronic density distributions similar to the way that Iterative Extended Hueckel incorporates atoms.

  11. Hierarchical cosmic shear power spectrum inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsing, Justin; Heavens, Alan; Jaffe, Andrew H.; Kiessling, Alina; Wandelt, Benjamin; Hoffmann, Till

    2016-02-01

    We develop a Bayesian hierarchical modelling approach for cosmic shear power spectrum inference, jointly sampling from the posterior distribution of the cosmic shear field and its (tomographic) power spectra. Inference of the shear power spectrum is a powerful intermediate product for a cosmic shear analysis, since it requires very few model assumptions and can be used to perform inference on a wide range of cosmological models a posteriori without loss of information. We show that joint posterior for the shear map and power spectrum can be sampled effectively by Gibbs sampling, iteratively drawing samples from the map and power spectrum, each conditional on the other. This approach neatly circumvents difficulties associated with complicated survey geometry and masks that plague frequentist power spectrum estimators, since the power spectrum inference provides prior information about the field in masked regions at every sampling step. We demonstrate this approach for inference of tomographic shear E-mode, B-mode and EB-cross power spectra from a simulated galaxy shear catalogue with a number of important features; galaxies distributed on the sky and in redshift with photometric redshift uncertainties, realistic random ellipticity noise for every galaxy and a complicated survey mask. The obtained posterior distributions for the tomographic power spectrum coefficients recover the underlying simulated power spectra for both E- and B-modes.

  12. Simultaneous determination of electron beam profile and material response using self-consistent iterative method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Yudhishthir; Denbeaux, Gregory

    2016-08-01

    We develop a novel iterative method to accurately measure electron beam shape (current density distribution) and monotonic material response as a function of position. A common method is to scan an electron beam across a knife edge along many angles to give an approximate measure of the beam profile, however such scans are not easy to obtain in all systems. The present work uses only an electron beam and multiple exposed regions of a thin film of photoresist to measure the complete beam profile for any beam shape, where the material response is characterized externally. This simplifies the setup of new experimental tools. We solve for self-consistent photoresist thickness loss response to dose and the electron beam profile simultaneously by optimizing a novel functional iteratively. We also show the successful implementation of the method in a real world data set corrupted by noise and other experimental variabilities.

  13. Ocean color spectrum calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccluney, W. R.

    1974-01-01

    There is obvious value in developing the means for measuring a number of subsurface oceanographic parameters using remotely sensed ocean color data. The first step in this effort should be the development of adequate theoretical models relating the desired oceanographic parameters to the upwelling radiances to be observed. A portion of a contributory theoretical model can be described by a modified single scattering approach based on a simple treatment of multiple scattering. The resulting quasisingle scattering model can be used to predict the upwelling distribution of spectral radiance emerging from the sea. The shape of the radiance spectrum predicted by this model for clear ocean water shows encouraging agreement with measurements made at the edge of the Sargasso Sea off Cape Hatteras.

  14. ITER Cryoplant Final Design and Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monneret, E.; Benkheira, L.; Fauve, E.; Henry, D.; Voigt, T.; Badgujar, S.; Chang, H.-S.; Vincent, G.; Forgeas, A.; Navion-Maillot, N.

    2017-02-01

    The ITER Tokamak supraconducting magnets, thermal shields and cryopumps will require tremendous amount of cooling power. With an average need of 75 kW at 4.5 K and of 600 kW at 80 K, ITER requires a world class cryogenic complex. ITER then relies on a Cryoplant which consists in a cluster of systems dedicated to the management of all fluids required for the Tokamak operation. From storage and purification to liquefaction and refrigeration, the Cryoplant will supply to the distribution system, all fluids to be circulated in the Tokamak. It includes Liquid Helium Plants and Liquid Nitrogen Plants, which generate all of the refrigeration power, an 80 K helium loop capable to circulate large quantities of helium through thermal shields, and all the auxiliaries required for gas storage, purification, and onsite nitrogen production. From the conceptual phase, the design of the Cryoplant has evolved and is now nearing completion. This proceeding will present the final design of the Cryoplant and the organization for the construction phase. Also the latest status of the ITER Cryogenic System will be introduced.

  15. Iteration and Anxiety in Mathematical Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capezzi, Rita; Kinsey, L. Christine

    2016-01-01

    We describe our experiences in team-teaching an honors seminar on mathematics and literature. We focus particularly on two of the texts we read: Georges Perec's "How to Ask Your Boss for a Raise" and Alain Robbe-Grillet's "Jealousy," both of which make use of iterative structures.

  16. ITER faces further five-year delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clery, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    The €14bn ITER fusion reactor currently under construction in Cadarache, France, will require an additional cash injection of €4.6bn if it is to start up in 2025 - a target date that is already five years later than currently scheduled.

  17. Microtearing Instability In The ITER Pedestal

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, K. L.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Rewoldt, G. M.; Budny, R.

    2010-12-01

    Unstable microtearing modes are discovered by the GS2 gyrokinetic siimulation code, in the pedestal region of a simulated ITER H-mode plasma with approximately 400 WM DT fusion power. Existing nonlinear theory indicates that these instabilities should produce stochastic magnetic fields and broaden the pedestal. The resulted electron thermal conductivity is estimated and the implications of these findings are discussed.

  18. Constructing Easily Iterated Functions with Interesting Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprows, David J.

    2009-01-01

    A number of schools have recently introduced new courses dealing with various aspects of iteration theory or at least have found ways of including topics such as chaos and fractals in existing courses. In this note, we will consider a family of functions whose members are especially well suited to illustrate many of the concepts involved in these…

  19. On the safety of ITER accelerators

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ge

    2013-01-01

    Three 1 MV/40A accelerators in heating neutral beams (HNB) are on track to be implemented in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). ITER may produce 500 MWt of power by 2026 and may serve as a green energy roadmap for the world. They will generate −1 MV 1 h long-pulse ion beams to be neutralised for plasma heating. Due to frequently occurring vacuum sparking in the accelerators, the snubbers are used to limit the fault arc current to improve ITER safety. However, recent analyses of its reference design have raised concerns. General nonlinear transformer theory is developed for the snubber to unify the former snubbers' different design models with a clear mechanism. Satisfactory agreement between theory and tests indicates that scaling up to a 1 MV voltage may be possible. These results confirm the nonlinear process behind transformer theory and map out a reliable snubber design for a safer ITER. PMID:24008267

  20. Matched filter based iterative adaptive approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepal, Ramesh; Zhang, Yan Rockee; Li, Zhengzheng; Blake, William

    2016-05-01

    Matched Filter sidelobes from diversified LPI waveform design and sensor resolution are two important considerations in radars and active sensors in general. Matched Filter sidelobes can potentially mask weaker targets, and low sensor resolution not only causes a high margin of error but also limits sensing in target-rich environment/ sector. The improvement in those factors, in part, concern with the transmitted waveform and consequently pulse compression techniques. An adaptive pulse compression algorithm is hence desired that can mitigate the aforementioned limitations. A new Matched Filter based Iterative Adaptive Approach, MF-IAA, as an extension to traditional Iterative Adaptive Approach, IAA, has been developed. MF-IAA takes its input as the Matched Filter output. The motivation here is to facilitate implementation of Iterative Adaptive Approach without disrupting the processing chain of traditional Matched Filter. Similar to IAA, MF-IAA is a user parameter free, iterative, weighted least square based spectral identification algorithm. This work focuses on the implementation of MF-IAA. The feasibility of MF-IAA is studied using a realistic airborne radar simulator as well as actual measured airborne radar data. The performance of MF-IAA is measured with different test waveforms, and different Signal-to-Noise (SNR) levels. In addition, Range-Doppler super-resolution using MF-IAA is investigated. Sidelobe reduction as well as super-resolution enhancement is validated. The robustness of MF-IAA with respect to different LPI waveforms and SNR levels is also demonstrated.

  1. Solving Differential Equations Using Modified Picard Iteration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robin, W. A.

    2010-01-01

    Many classes of differential equations are shown to be open to solution through a method involving a combination of a direct integration approach with suitably modified Picard iterative procedures. The classes of differential equations considered include typical initial value, boundary value and eigenvalue problems arising in physics and…

  2. Iteration of Complex Functions and Newton's Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, Jerry; Barnard, Roger; Cook, David; Corte, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses some common iterations of complex functions. The presentation is such that similar processes can easily be implemented and understood by undergraduate students. The aim is to illustrate some of the beauty of complex dynamics in an informal setting, while providing a couple of results that are not otherwise readily available in…

  3. Iterated rippled noise discrimination at long durations.

    PubMed

    Yost, William A

    2009-09-01

    Iterated rippled noise (IRN) was used to study discrimination of IRN stimuli with a lower number of iterations from IRN stimuli with a higher number of iterations as a function of stimulus duration (100-2000 ms). Such IRN stimuli differ in the strength of the repetition pitch. In some cases, the gain used to generate IRN stimuli was adjusted so that both IRN stimuli in the discrimination task had the same height of the first peak in the autocorrelation function or autocorrelogram. In previous work involving short-duration IRN stimuli (<500 ms), listeners were not able to discriminate between IRN stimuli that had different numbers of iterations but the same height of the first peak in the autocorrelation function. In the current study, IRN discrimination performance improved with increases in duration, even in cases when the height of the first peak in the autocorrelation was the same for the two IRN stimuli. Thus, future studies involving discrimination of IRN stimuli may need to use longer durations (1 s or greater) than those that have been used in the past.

  4. Iterative solution of the Helmholtz equation

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, E.; Otto, K.

    1996-12-31

    We have shown that the numerical solution of the two-dimensional Helmholtz equation can be obtained in a very efficient way by using a preconditioned iterative method. We discretize the equation with second-order accurate finite difference operators and take special care to obtain non-reflecting boundary conditions. We solve the large, sparse system of equations that arises with the preconditioned restarted GMRES iteration. The preconditioner is of {open_quotes}fast Poisson type{close_quotes}, and is derived as a direct solver for a modified PDE problem.The arithmetic complexity for the preconditioner is O(n log{sub 2} n), where n is the number of grid points. As a test problem we use the propagation of sound waves in water in a duct with curved bottom. Numerical experiments show that the preconditioned iterative method is very efficient for this type of problem. The convergence rate does not decrease dramatically when the frequency increases. Compared to banded Gaussian elimination, which is a standard solution method for this type of problems, the iterative method shows significant gain in both storage requirement and arithmetic complexity. Furthermore, the relative gain increases when the frequency increases.

  5. Continuous Spectrum of Trigonometric Rosen-Morse and Eckart Potentials from Free Particle Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panahi, H.; Pouraram, H.

    2011-06-01

    The shape invariant symmetry of the Trigonometric Rosen-Morse and Eckart potentials has been studied through realization of so(3) and so(2,1) Lie algebras respectively. In this work, by using the free particle eigenfunction, we obtain continuous spectrum of these potentials by means of their shape invariance symmetry in an algebraic method.

  6. Reducing the effects of acoustic heterogeneity with an iterative reconstruction method from experimental data in microwave induced thermoacoustic tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jinguo; Zhao, Zhiqin Song, Jian; Chen, Guoping; Nie, Zaiping; Liu, Qing-Huo

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: An iterative reconstruction method has been previously reported by the authors of this paper. However, the iterative reconstruction method was demonstrated by solely using the numerical simulations. It is essential to apply the iterative reconstruction method to practice conditions. The objective of this work is to validate the capability of the iterative reconstruction method for reducing the effects of acoustic heterogeneity with the experimental data in microwave induced thermoacoustic tomography. Methods: Most existing reconstruction methods need to combine the ultrasonic measurement technology to quantitatively measure the velocity distribution of heterogeneity, which increases the system complexity. Different to existing reconstruction methods, the iterative reconstruction method combines time reversal mirror technique, fast marching method, and simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique to iteratively estimate the velocity distribution of heterogeneous tissue by solely using the measured data. Then, the estimated velocity distribution is used subsequently to reconstruct the highly accurate image of microwave absorption distribution. Experiments that a target placed in an acoustic heterogeneous environment are performed to validate the iterative reconstruction method. Results: By using the estimated velocity distribution, the target in an acoustic heterogeneous environment can be reconstructed with better shape and higher image contrast than targets that are reconstructed with a homogeneous velocity distribution. Conclusions: The distortions caused by the acoustic heterogeneity can be efficiently corrected by utilizing the velocity distribution estimated by the iterative reconstruction method. The advantage of the iterative reconstruction method over the existing correction methods is that it is successful in improving the quality of the image of microwave absorption distribution without increasing the system complexity.

  7. An iterative approach of protein function prediction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Current approaches of predicting protein functions from a protein-protein interaction (PPI) dataset are based on an assumption that the available functions of the proteins (a.k.a. annotated proteins) will determine the functions of the proteins whose functions are unknown yet at the moment (a.k.a. un-annotated proteins). Therefore, the protein function prediction is a mono-directed and one-off procedure, i.e. from annotated proteins to un-annotated proteins. However, the interactions between proteins are mutual rather than static and mono-directed, although functions of some proteins are unknown for some reasons at present. That means when we use the similarity-based approach to predict functions of un-annotated proteins, the un-annotated proteins, once their functions are predicted, will affect the similarities between proteins, which in turn will affect the prediction results. In other words, the function prediction is a dynamic and mutual procedure. This dynamic feature of protein interactions, however, was not considered in the existing prediction algorithms. Results In this paper, we propose a new prediction approach that predicts protein functions iteratively. This iterative approach incorporates the dynamic and mutual features of PPI interactions, as well as the local and global semantic influence of protein functions, into the prediction. To guarantee predicting functions iteratively, we propose a new protein similarity from protein functions. We adapt new evaluation metrics to evaluate the prediction quality of our algorithm and other similar algorithms. Experiments on real PPI datasets were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed approach in predicting unknown protein functions. Conclusions The iterative approach is more likely to reflect the real biological nature between proteins when predicting functions. A proper definition of protein similarity from protein functions is the key to predicting functions iteratively. The

  8. Adaptive spatial filtering for off-axis digital holographic microscopy based on region recognition approach with iterative thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xuefei; Nguyen, Chuong Vinh; Pratap, Mrinalini; Zheng, Yujie; Wang, Yi; Nisbet, David R.; Rug, Melanie; Maier, Alexander G.; Lee, Woei Ming

    2016-12-01

    Here we propose a region-recognition approach with iterative thresholding, which is adaptively tailored to extract the appropriate region or shape of spatial frequency. In order to justify the method, we tested it with different samples and imaging conditions (different objectives). We demonstrate that our method provides a useful method for rapid imaging of cellular dynamics in microfluidic and cell cultures.

  9. Solution of five dimensional Dirac equation with Asymtotic Iteration Method in the case of pseudo spin symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurniawan, Y. A.; Suparmi, A.; Cari, C.

    2017-01-01

    The relativistic energies of 5 dimensional Dirac equation in the case of pseudo spin symmetry which governed by a sparable non central using the asymtotic iteration method (AIM).The separable five dimensional shape invariant potentials consisted of Hulthen radial potential and Manning-Rosen angular potentials. The relativistic energies were calculated numerically from the relativistic energy equation.

  10. Testing Short Samples of ITER Conductors and Projection of Their Performance in ITER Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, N N

    2007-08-20

    Qualification of the ITER conductor is absolutely necessary. Testing large scale conductors is expensive and time consuming. To test straight 3-4m long samples in a bore of a split solenoid is a relatively economical way in comparison with fabrication of a coil to be tested in a bore of a background field solenoid. However, testing short sample may give ambiguous results due to different constraints in current redistribution in the cable or other end effects which are not present in the large magnet. This paper discusses processes taking place in the ITER conductor, conditions when conductor performance could be distorted and possible signal processing to deduce behavior of ITER conductors in ITER magnets from the test data.

  11. Reducing the latency of the Fractal Iterative Method to half an iteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béchet, Clémentine; Tallon, Michel

    2013-12-01

    The fractal iterative method for atmospheric tomography (FRiM-3D) has been introduced to solve the wavefront reconstruction at the dimensions of an ELT with a low-computational cost. Previous studies reported the requirement of only 3 iterations of the algorithm in order to provide the best adaptive optics (AO) performance. Nevertheless, any iterative method in adaptive optics suffer from the intrinsic latency induced by the fact that one iteration can start only once the previous one is completed. Iterations hardly match the low-latency requirement of the AO real-time computer. We present here a new approach to avoid iterations in the computation of the commands with FRiM-3D, thus allowing low-latency AO response even at the scale of the European ELT (E-ELT). The method highlights the importance of "warm-start" strategy in adaptive optics. To our knowledge, this particular way to use the "warm-start" has not been reported before. Futhermore, removing the requirement of iterating to compute the commands, the computational cost of the reconstruction with FRiM-3D can be simplified and at least reduced to half the computational cost of a classical iteration. Thanks to simulations of both single-conjugate and multi-conjugate AO for the E-ELT,with FRiM-3D on Octopus ESO simulator, we demonstrate the benefit of this approach. We finally enhance the robustness of this new implementation with respect to increasing measurement noise, wind speed and even modeling errors.

  12. Scene-based nonuniformity correction using multiframe registration and iteration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jianle; Chen, Qian; Qian, Weixian; Yu, Xuelian; Li, Danping

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, an improved scene-based nonuniformity correction (NC) algorithm for infrared focal plane arrays (IRFPAs) using multiframe registration and iteration method is proposed. This method estimates the global translation and iterates between several adjacent frames. Then mean square error between any two properly registered images is minimized to obtain nonuniformity correction parameters. The detailed method includes three main steps: First, we assume that brightness along the motion trajectory is constant, and a linear detector response and model the nonuniformity of each detector with a gain and a bias. Second, several adjacent frames are used to compute relative motion of any two adjacent frames. Here we use the Fourier shift theorem, their relative translation can be obtained by calculating their normalized cross-power spectrum. We choose K adjacent frames, so the total number of iteration is K*(K-1)/2. Then the mean square error function is defined as the corresponding difference between the two adjacent corrected frames, and it is minimized making use of the least mean square algorithm. The use of correlation of adjacent frames sufficiently, together with iteration strategy between them, can get fast and reliable fixed-pattern noise reduction with low few ghosting artifacts. We define the algorithm and present a number of experimental results to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed method in comparison to several previously published methods. The performance of the proposed method is thoroughly evaluated with clean infrared image sequences with synthetic nonuniformity and real infrared imagery.

  13. Overview on Experiments On ITER-like Antenna On JET And ICRF Antenna Design For ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Nightingale, M. P. S.; Blackman, T.; Edwards, D.; Fanthome, J.; Graham, M.; Hamlyn-Harris, C.; Hancock, D.; Jacquet, P.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Monakhov, I.; Nicholls, K.; Stork, D.; Whitehurst, A.; Wilson, D.; Wooldridge, E.

    2009-11-26

    Following an overview of the ITER Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) system, the JET ITER-like antenna (ILA) will be described. The ILA was designed to test the following ITER issues: (a) reliable operation at power densities of order 8 MW/m{sup 2} at voltages up to 45 kV using a close-packed array of straps; (b) powering through ELMs using an internal (in-vacuum) conjugate-T junction; (c) protection from arcing in a conjugate-T configuration, using both existing and novel systems; and (d) resilience to disruption forces. ITER-relevant results have been achieved: operation at high coupled power density; control of the antenna matching elements in the presence of high inter-strap coupling, use of four conjugate-T systems (as would be used in ITER, should a conjugate-T approach be used); operation with RF voltages on the antenna structures up to 42 kV; achievement of ELM tolerance with a conjugate-T configuration by operating at 3{omega} real impedance at the conjugate-T point; and validation of arc detection systems on conjugate-T configurations in ELMy H-mode plasmas. The impact of these results on the predicted performance and design of the ITER antenna will be reviewed. In particular, the implications of the RF coupling measured on JET will be discussed.

  14. Multiwavelength digital holography for polishing tool shape measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lédl, Vít.; Psota, Pavel; Václavík, Jan; Doleček, Roman; Vojtíšek, Petr

    2013-09-01

    Classical mechano-chemical polishing is still a valuable technique, which gives unbeatable results for some types of optical surfaces. For example, optics for high power lasers requires minimized subsurface damage, very high cosmetic quality, and low mid spatial frequency error. One can hardly achieve this with use of subaperture polishing. The shape of the polishing tool plays a crucial role in achieving the required form of the optical surface. Often the shape of the polishing tool or pad is not known precisely enough during the manufacturing process. The tool shape is usually premachined and later is changed during the polishing procedure. An experienced worker could estimate the shape of the tool indirectly from the shape of the polished element, and that is why he can achieve the required shape in few reasonably long iterative steps. Therefore the lack of the exact tool shape knowledge is tolerated. Sometimes, this indirect method is not feasible even if small parts are considered. Moreover, if processes on machines like planetary (continuous) polishers are considered, the incorrect shape of the polishing pad could extend the polishing times extremely. Every iteration step takes hours. Even worse, polished piece could be wasted if the pad has a poor shape. The ability of the tool shape determination would be very valuable in those types of lengthy processes. It was our primary motivation to develop a contactless measurement method for large diffusive surfaces and demonstrate its usability. The proposed method is based on application of multiwavelength digital holographic interferometry with phase shift.

  15. Model Based Iterative Reconstruction for Bright Field Electron Tomography (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    Reconstruction Technique ( SIRT ) are applied to the data. Model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) provides a powerful framework for tomographic...the reconstruction when the typical algorithms such as Filtered Back Projection (FBP) and Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique ( SIRT ) are

  16. The Iterative Structure Analysis of Montgomery Modular Multiplication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinbo, Wang

    2007-09-01

    Montgomery modular multiplication (MMM) plays a crucial role in the implementation of modular exponentiations of public-key cryptography. In this paper, we discuss the iterative structure and extend the iterative bound condition of MMM. It can be applied to complicated modular exponentiations. Based on the iterative condition of MMM, we can directly use non-modular additions, subtractions and even simple multiplications instead of the modular forms, which make modular exponentiation operation very efficient but more importantly iterative applicability of MMM.

  17. Iterative performance of various formulations of the SPN equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunhuang; Ragusa, Jean C.; Morel, Jim E.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, the Standard, Composite, and Canonical forms of the Simplified PN (SPN) equations are reviewed and their corresponding iterative properties are compared. The Gauss-Seidel (FLIP), Explicit, and preconditioned Source Iteration iterative schemes have been analyzed for both isotropic and highly anisotropic (Fokker-Planck) scattering. The iterative performance of the various SPN forms is assessed using Fourier analysis, corroborated with numerical experiments.

  18. Primordial power spectrum from Planck

    SciTech Connect

    Hazra, Dhiraj Kumar; Shafieloo, Arman; Souradeep, Tarun E-mail: arman@apctp.org

    2014-11-01

    Using modified Richardson-Lucy algorithm we reconstruct the primordial power spectrum (PPS) from Planck Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature anisotropy data. In our analysis we use different combinations of angular power spectra from Planck to reconstruct the shape of the primordial power spectrum and locate possible features. Performing an extensive error analysis we found the dip near ℓ ∼ 750–850 represents the most prominent feature in the data. Feature near ℓ ∼ 1800–2000 is detectable with high confidence only in 217 GHz spectrum and is apparently consequence of a small systematic as described in the revised Planck 2013 papers. Fixing the background cosmological parameters and the foreground nuisance parameters to their best fit baseline values, we report that the best fit power law primordial power spectrum is consistent with the reconstructed form of the PPS at 2σ C.L. of the estimated errors (apart from the local features mentioned above). As a consistency test, we found the reconstructed primordial power spectrum from Planck temperature data can also substantially improve the fit to WMAP-9 angular power spectrum data (with respect to power-law form of the PPS) allowing an overall amplitude shift of ∼ 2.5%. In this context low-ℓ and 100 GHz spectrum from Planck which have proper overlap in the multipole range with WMAP data found to be completely consistent with WMAP-9 (allowing amplitude shift). As another important result of our analysis we do report the evidence of gravitational lensing through the reconstruction analysis. Finally we present two smooth form of the PPS containing only the important features. These smooth forms of PPS can provide significant improvements in fitting the data (with respect to the power law PPS) and can be helpful to give hints for inflationary model building.

  19. Primordial power spectrum from Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, Dhiraj Kumar; Shafieloo, Arman; Souradeep, Tarun

    2014-11-01

    Using modified Richardson-Lucy algorithm we reconstruct the primordial power spectrum (PPS) from Planck Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature anisotropy data. In our analysis we use different combinations of angular power spectra from Planck to reconstruct the shape of the primordial power spectrum and locate possible features. Performing an extensive error analysis we found the dip near l ~ 750-850 represents the most prominent feature in the data. Feature near l ~ 1800-2000 is detectable with high confidence only in 217 GHz spectrum and is apparently consequence of a small systematic as described in the revised Planck 2013 papers. Fixing the background cosmological parameters and the foreground nuisance parameters to their best fit baseline values, we report that the best fit power law primordial power spectrum is consistent with the reconstructed form of the PPS at 2σ C.L. of the estimated errors (apart from the local features mentioned above). As a consistency test, we found the reconstructed primordial power spectrum from Planck temperature data can also substantially improve the fit to WMAP-9 angular power spectrum data (with respect to power-law form of the PPS) allowing an overall amplitude shift of ~ 2.5%. In this context low-l and 100 GHz spectrum from Planck which have proper overlap in the multipole range with WMAP data found to be completely consistent with WMAP-9 (allowing amplitude shift). As another important result of our analysis we do report the evidence of gravitational lensing through the reconstruction analysis. Finally we present two smooth form of the PPS containing only the important features. These smooth forms of PPS can provide significant improvements in fitting the data (with respect to the power law PPS) and can be helpful to give hints for inflationary model building.

  20. Application Of Iterative Reconstruction Techniques To Conventional Circular Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh Roy, D. N.; Kruger, R. A.; Yih, B. C.; Del Rio, S. P.; Power, R. L.

    1985-06-01

    Two "point-by-point" iteration procedures, namely, Iterative Least Square Technique (ILST) and Simultaneous Iterative Reconstructive Technique (SIRT) were applied to classical circular tomographic reconstruction. The technique of tomosynthetic DSA was used in forming the tomographic images. Reconstructions of a dog's renal and neck anatomy are presented.

  1. Iterative Brinkman penalization for remeshed vortex methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejlesen, Mads Mølholm; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Leonard, Anthony; Walther, Jens Honoré

    2015-01-01

    We introduce an iterative Brinkman penalization method for the enforcement of the no-slip boundary condition in remeshed vortex methods. In the proposed method, the Brinkman penalization is applied iteratively only in the neighborhood of the body. This allows for using significantly larger time steps, than what is customary in the Brinkman penalization, thus reducing its computational cost while maintaining the capability of the method to handle complex geometries. We demonstrate the accuracy of our method by considering challenging benchmark problems such as flow past an impulsively started cylinder and normal to an impulsively started and accelerated flat plate. We find that the present method enhances significantly the accuracy of the Brinkman penalization technique for the simulations of highly unsteady flows past complex geometries.

  2. New iterative solvers for the NAG Libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Salvini, S.; Shaw, G.

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the work which has been carried out at NAG Ltd to update the iterative solvers for sparse systems of linear equations, both symmetric and unsymmetric, in the NAG Fortran 77 Library. Our current plans to extend this work and include it in our other numerical libraries in our range are also briefly mentioned. We have added to the Library the new Chapter F11, entirely dedicated to sparse linear algebra. At Mark 17, the F11 Chapter includes sparse iterative solvers, preconditioners, utilities and black-box routines for sparse symmetric (both positive-definite and indefinite) linear systems. Mark 18 will add solvers, preconditioners, utilities and black-boxes for sparse unsymmetric systems: the development of these has already been completed.

  3. Linear iterative solvers for implicit ODE methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saylor, Paul E.; Skeel, Robert D.

    1990-01-01

    The numerical solution of stiff initial value problems, which lead to the problem of solving large systems of mildly nonlinear equations are considered. For many problems derived from engineering and science, a solution is possible only with methods derived from iterative linear equation solvers. A common approach to solving the nonlinear equations is to employ an approximate solution obtained from an explicit method. The error is examined to determine how it is distributed among the stiff and non-stiff components, which bears on the choice of an iterative method. The conclusion is that error is (roughly) uniformly distributed, a fact that suggests the Chebyshev method (and the accompanying Manteuffel adaptive parameter algorithm). This method is described, also commenting on Richardson's method and its advantages for large problems. Richardson's method and the Chebyshev method with the Mantueffel algorithm are applied to the solution of the nonlinear equations by Newton's method.

  4. Iterative Reconstruction of Coded Source Neutron Radiographs

    SciTech Connect

    Santos-Villalobos, Hector J; Bingham, Philip R; Gregor, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Use of a coded source facilitates high-resolution neutron imaging but requires that the radiographic data be deconvolved. In this paper, we compare direct deconvolution with two different iterative algorithms, namely, one based on direct deconvolution embedded in an MLE-like framework and one based on a geometric model of the neutron beam and a least squares formulation of the inverse imaging problem.

  5. Iterative solution of high order compact systems

    SciTech Connect

    Spotz, W.F.; Carey, G.F.

    1996-12-31

    We have recently developed a class of finite difference methods which provide higher accuracy and greater stability than standard central or upwind difference methods, but still reside on a compact patch of grid cells. In the present study we investigate the performance of several gradient-type iterative methods for solving the associated sparse systems. Both serial and parallel performance studies have been made. Representative examples are taken from elliptic PDE`s for diffusion, convection-diffusion, and viscous flow applications.

  6. Disruptions, loads, and dynamic response of ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, B.; Riemer, B.; Sayer, R.; Strickler, D.; Barabaschi, P.; Ioki, K.; Johnson, G.; Shimizu, K.; Williamson, D.

    1995-12-31

    Plasma disruptions and the resulting electromagnetic loads are critical to the design of the vacuum vessel and in-vessel components of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). This paper describes the status of plasma disruption simulations and related analysis, including the dynamic response of the vacuum vessel and in-vessel components, stresses and deflections in the vacuum vessel, and reaction loads in the support structures.

  7. Iterates of a Berezin-type transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Congwen

    2007-05-01

    Let be the open unit ball of and dV denote the Lebesgue measure on normalized so that the measure of equals 1. Suppose . The Berezin-type transform of f is defined by We prove that if then the iterates converge to the Poisson extension of the boundary values of f, as k-->[infinity]. This can be viewed as a higher dimensional generalization of a previous result obtained independently by Englis and Zhu.

  8. Iterative solution of the supereigenvalue model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plefka, Jan C.

    1995-02-01

    An integral form of the discrete superloop equations for the supereigenvalue model of Alvarez-Gaumé, Itoyama, Mañes and Zadra is given. By a change of variables from coupling constants to moments we find a compact form of the planar solution for general potentials. In this framework an iterative scheme for the calculation of higher genera contributions to the free energy and the multi-loop correlators is developed. We present explicit results for genus one.

  9. Fourier analysis of the SOR iteration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leveque, R. J.; Trefethen, L. N.

    1986-01-01

    The SOR iteration for solving linear systems of equations depends upon an overrelaxation factor omega. It is shown that for the standard model problem of Poisson's equation on a rectangle, the optimal omega and corresponding convergence rate can be rigorously obtained by Fourier analysis. The trick is to tilt the space-time grid so that the SOR stencil becomes symmetrical. The tilted grid also gives insight into the relation between convergence rates of several variants.

  10. ICRF Review: From ERASMUS To ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Weynants, R. R.

    2009-11-26

    This is a personal account of how I saw ICRF evolve since 1974, with a presentation that is ordered according to the topics: heating, antenna coupling, impurity generation/mitigation and system technology. The nature of the main issues is each time reviewed, recent findings are incorporated, and it is shown how the ICRF community has been able to react to sometimes rapidly changing demands and is indeed resolutely preparing ITER.

  11. Automated quantum mechanical total line shape fitting model for quantitative NMR-based profiling of human serum metabolites.

    PubMed

    Mihaleva, Velitchka V; Korhonen, Samuli-Petrus; van Duynhoven, John; Niemitz, Mathias; Vervoort, Jacques; Jacobs, Doris M

    2014-05-01

    An automated quantum mechanical total line shape (QMTLS) fitting model was implemented for quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based profiling of 42 metabolites in ultrafiltrated human serum samples. Each metabolite was described by a set of chemical shifts, J-couplings, and line widths. These parameters were optimized for each metabolite in each sample by iteratively minimizing the difference between the calculated and the experimental spectrum. In total, 92.0 to 98.1 % of the signal intensities in the experimental spectrum could be explained by the calculated spectrum. The model was validated by comparison to signal integration of metabolites with isolated signals and by means of standard additions. Metabolites present at average concentration higher than 50 μM were quantified with average absolute relative error less than 10 % when using different initial parameters for the fitting procedure. Furthermore, the biological applicability of the QMTLS model was demonstrated on 287 samples from an intervention study in 37 human volunteers undergoing an exercise challenge. Our automated QMTLS model was able to cope with the large dynamic range of metabolite concentrations in serum and proved to be suitable for high-throughput analysis.

  12. The dynamics of iterated transportation simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, K.; Rickert, M.; Simon, P.M.

    1998-12-01

    Transportation-related decisions of people often depend on what everybody else is doing. For example, decisions about mode choice, route choice, activity scheduling, etc., can depend on congestion, caused by the aggregated behavior of others. From a conceptual viewpoint, this consistency problem causes a deadlock, since nobody can start planning because they do not know what everybody else is doing. It is the process of iterations that is examined in this paper as a method for solving the problem. In this paper, the authors concentrate on the aspect of the iterative process that is probably the most important one from a practical viewpoint, and that is the ``uniqueness`` or ``robustness`` of the results. Also, they define robustness more in terms of common sense than in terms of a mathematical formalism. For this, they do not only want a single iterative process to converge, but they want the result to be independent of any particular implementation. The authors run many computational experiments, sometimes with variations of the same code, sometimes with totally different code, in order to see if any of the results are robust against these changes.

  13. Iterative pass optimization of sequence data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Ward C.

    2003-01-01

    The problem of determining the minimum-cost hypothetical ancestral sequences for a given cladogram is known to be NP-complete. This "tree alignment" problem has motivated the considerable effort placed in multiple sequence alignment procedures. Wheeler in 1996 proposed a heuristic method, direct optimization, to calculate cladogram costs without the intervention of multiple sequence alignment. This method, though more efficient in time and more effective in cladogram length than many alignment-based procedures, greedily optimizes nodes based on descendent information only. In their proposal of an exact multiple alignment solution, Sankoff et al. in 1976 described a heuristic procedure--the iterative improvement method--to create alignments at internal nodes by solving a series of median problems. The combination of a three-sequence direct optimization with iterative improvement and a branch-length-based cladogram cost procedure, provides an algorithm that frequently results in superior (i.e., lower) cladogram costs. This iterative pass optimization is both computation and memory intensive, but economies can be made to reduce this burden. An example in arthropod systematics is discussed. c2003 The Willi Hennig Society. Published by Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  14. Iterative pass optimization of sequence data.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Ward C

    2003-06-01

    The problem of determining the minimum-cost hypothetical ancestral sequences for a given cladogram is known to be NP-complete. This "tree alignment" problem has motivated the considerable effort placed in multiple sequence alignment procedures. Wheeler in 1996 proposed a heuristic method, direct optimization, to calculate cladogram costs without the intervention of multiple sequence alignment. This method, though more efficient in time and more effective in cladogram length than many alignment-based procedures, greedily optimizes nodes based on descendent information only. In their proposal of an exact multiple alignment solution, Sankoff et al. in 1976 described a heuristic procedure--the iterative improvement method--to create alignments at internal nodes by solving a series of median problems. The combination of a three-sequence direct optimization with iterative improvement and a branch-length-based cladogram cost procedure, provides an algorithm that frequently results in superior (i.e., lower) cladogram costs. This iterative pass optimization is both computation and memory intensive, but economies can be made to reduce this burden. An example in arthropod systematics is discussed.

  15. Iterative solution of the semiconductor device equations

    SciTech Connect

    Bova, S.W.; Carey, G.F.

    1996-12-31

    Most semiconductor device models can be described by a nonlinear Poisson equation for the electrostatic potential coupled to a system of convection-reaction-diffusion equations for the transport of charge and energy. These equations are typically solved in a decoupled fashion and e.g. Newton`s method is used to obtain the resulting sequences of linear systems. The Poisson problem leads to a symmetric, positive definite system which we solve iteratively using conjugate gradient. The transport equations lead to nonsymmetric, indefinite systems, thereby complicating the selection of an appropriate iterative method. Moreover, their solutions exhibit steep layers and are subject to numerical oscillations and instabilities if standard Galerkin-type discretization strategies are used. In the present study, we use an upwind finite element technique for the transport equations. We also evaluate the performance of different iterative methods for the transport equations and investigate various preconditioners for a few generalized gradient methods. Numerical examples are given for a representative two-dimensional depletion MOSFET.

  16. Recent ADI iteration analysis and results

    SciTech Connect

    Wachspress, E.L.

    1994-12-31

    Some recent ADI iteration analysis and results are discussed. Discovery that the Lyapunov and Sylvester matrix equations are model ADI problems stimulated much research on ADI iteration with complex spectra. The ADI rational Chebyshev analysis parallels the classical linear Chebyshev theory. Two distinct approaches have been applied to these problems. First, parameters which were optimal for real spectra were shown to be nearly optimal for certain families of complex spectra. In the linear case these were spectra bounded by ellipses in the complex plane. In the ADI rational case these were spectra bounded by {open_quotes}elliptic-function regions{close_quotes}. The logarithms of the latter appear like ellipses, and the logarithms of the optimal ADI parameters for these regions are similar to the optimal parameters for linear Chebyshev approximation over superimposed ellipses. W.B. Jordan`s bilinear transformation of real variables to reduce the two-variable problem to one variable was generalized into the complex plane. This was needed for ADI iterative solution of the Sylvester equation.

  17. Iterative Decoding of Concatenated Codes: A Tutorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regalia, Phillip A.

    2005-12-01

    The turbo decoding algorithm of a decade ago constituted a milestone in error-correction coding for digital communications, and has inspired extensions to generalized receiver topologies, including turbo equalization, turbo synchronization, and turbo CDMA, among others. Despite an accrued understanding of iterative decoding over the years, the "turbo principle" remains elusive to master analytically, thereby inciting interest from researchers outside the communications domain. In this spirit, we develop a tutorial presentation of iterative decoding for parallel and serial concatenated codes, in terms hopefully accessible to a broader audience. We motivate iterative decoding as a computationally tractable attempt to approach maximum-likelihood decoding, and characterize fixed points in terms of a "consensus" property between constituent decoders. We review how the decoding algorithm for both parallel and serial concatenated codes coincides with an alternating projection algorithm, which allows one to identify conditions under which the algorithm indeed converges to a maximum-likelihood solution, in terms of particular likelihood functions factoring into the product of their marginals. The presentation emphasizes a common framework applicable to both parallel and serial concatenated codes.

  18. ITER Creation Safety File Expertise Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrault, D.

    2013-06-01

    In March 2010, the ITER operator delivered the facility safety file to the French "Autorité de Sûreté Nucléaire" (ASN) as part of its request for the creation decree, legally necessary before building works can begin on the site. The French "Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire" (IRSN), in support to the ASN, recently completed its expertise of the safety measures proposed for ITER, on the basis of this file and of additional technical documents from the operator. This paper presents the IRSN's main conclusions. In particular, they focus on the radioactive materials involved, the safety and radiation protection demonstration (suitability of risk management measures…), foreseeable accidents, building and safety important component design and, finally, wastes and effluents to be produced. This assessment was just the first legally-required step in on-going safety monitoring of the ITER project, which will include other complete regulatory re-evaluations.

  19. Superordinate Shape Classification Using Natural Shape Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilder, John; Feldman, Jacob; Singh, Manish

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the classification of shapes into broad natural categories such as "animal" or "leaf". We asked whether such coarse classifications can be achieved by a simple statistical classification of the shape skeleton. We surveyed databases of natural shapes, extracting shape skeletons and tabulating their…

  20. Iterative Fourier transform algorithm: different approaches to diffractive optical element design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skeren, Marek; Richter, Ivan; Fiala, Pavel

    2002-10-01

    This contribution focuses on the study and comparison of different design approaches for designing phase-only diffractive optical elements (PDOEs) for different possible applications in laser beam shaping. Especially, new results and approaches, concerning the iterative Fourier transform algorithm, are analyzed, implemented, and compared. Namely, various approaches within the iterative Fourier transform algorithm (IFTA) are analyzed for the case of phase-only diffractive optical elements with quantizied phase levels (either binary or multilevel structures). First, the general scheme of the IFTA iterative approach with partial quantization is briefly presented and discussed. Then, the special assortment of the general IFTA scheme is given with respect to quantization constraint strategies. Based on such a special classification, the three practically interesting approaches are chosen, further-analyzed, and compared to eachother. The performance of these algorithms is compared in detail in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio characteristic developments with respect to the numberof iterations, for various input diffusive-type objects chose. Also, the performance is documented on the complex spectra developments for typical computer reconstruction results. The advantages and drawbacks of all approaches are discussed, and a brief guide on the choice of a particular approach for typical design tasks is given. Finally, the two ways of amplitude elimination within the design procedure are considered, namely the direct elimination and partial elimination of the amplitude of the complex hologram function.

  1. Fast inverse scattering solutions using the distorted Born iterative method and the multilevel fast multipole algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Hesford, Andrew J.; Chew, Weng C.

    2010-01-01

    The distorted Born iterative method (DBIM) computes iterative solutions to nonlinear inverse scattering problems through successive linear approximations. By decomposing the scattered field into a superposition of scattering by an inhomogeneous background and by a material perturbation, large or high-contrast variations in medium properties can be imaged through iterations that are each subject to the distorted Born approximation. However, the need to repeatedly compute forward solutions still imposes a very heavy computational burden. To ameliorate this problem, the multilevel fast multipole algorithm (MLFMA) has been applied as a forward solver within the DBIM. The MLFMA computes forward solutions in linear time for volumetric scatterers. The typically regular distribution and shape of scattering elements in the inverse scattering problem allow the method to take advantage of data redundancy and reduce the computational demands of the normally expensive MLFMA setup. Additional benefits are gained by employing Kaczmarz-like iterations, where partial measurements are used to accelerate convergence. Numerical results demonstrate both the efficiency of the forward solver and the successful application of the inverse method to imaging problems with dimensions in the neighborhood of ten wavelengths. PMID:20707438

  2. Fast inverse scattering solutions using the distorted Born iterative method and the multilevel fast multipole algorithm.

    PubMed

    Hesford, Andrew J; Chew, Weng C

    2010-08-01

    The distorted Born iterative method (DBIM) computes iterative solutions to nonlinear inverse scattering problems through successive linear approximations. By decomposing the scattered field into a superposition of scattering by an inhomogeneous background and by a material perturbation, large or high-contrast variations in medium properties can be imaged through iterations that are each subject to the distorted Born approximation. However, the need to repeatedly compute forward solutions still imposes a very heavy computational burden. To ameliorate this problem, the multilevel fast multipole algorithm (MLFMA) has been applied as a forward solver within the DBIM. The MLFMA computes forward solutions in linear time for volumetric scatterers. The typically regular distribution and shape of scattering elements in the inverse scattering problem allow the method to take advantage of data redundancy and reduce the computational demands of the normally expensive MLFMA setup. Additional benefits are gained by employing Kaczmarz-like iterations, where partial measurements are used to accelerate convergence. Numerical results demonstrate both the efficiency of the forward solver and the successful application of the inverse method to imaging problems with dimensions in the neighborhood of ten wavelengths.

  3. Precise and fast spatial-frequency analysis using the iterative local Fourier transform.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sukmock; Choi, Heejoo; Kim, Dae Wook

    2016-09-19

    The use of the discrete Fourier transform has decreased since the introduction of the fast Fourier transform (fFT), which is a numerically efficient computing process. This paper presents the iterative local Fourier transform (ilFT), a set of new processing algorithms that iteratively apply the discrete Fourier transform within a local and optimal frequency domain. The new technique achieves 210 times higher frequency resolution than the fFT within a comparable computation time. The method's superb computing efficiency, high resolution, spectrum zoom-in capability, and overall performance are evaluated and compared to other advanced high-resolution Fourier transform techniques, such as the fFT combined with several fitting methods. The effectiveness of the ilFT is demonstrated through the data analysis of a set of Talbot self-images (1280 × 1024 pixels) obtained with an experimental setup using grating in a diverging beam produced by a coherent point source.

  4. The role of ITER in the US MFE Program Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, A.J.

    1992-07-01

    I want to discuss the role of ITER in the US MFE Program Strategy. I should stress that any opinions I present are purely my own. I`m not speaking ex cathedra, I`m not speaking for the ITER Home Team, and I`m not speaking for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. I`m giving my own personal opinions. In discussing the role of ITER, we have to recognize that ITER plays several roles, and I want to identify how ITER influences MFE program strategy through each of its roles.

  5. The role of ITER in the US MFE Program Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, A.J.

    1992-07-01

    I want to discuss the role of ITER in the US MFE Program Strategy. I should stress that any opinions I present are purely my own. I'm not speaking ex cathedra, I'm not speaking for the ITER Home Team, and I'm not speaking for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. I'm giving my own personal opinions. In discussing the role of ITER, we have to recognize that ITER plays several roles, and I want to identify how ITER influences MFE program strategy through each of its roles.

  6. Speeding up Newton-type iterations for stiff problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Pinto, S.; Rojas-Bello, R.

    2005-09-01

    Iterative schemes based on the Cooper and Butcher iteration [5] are considered, in order to implement highly implicit Runge-Kutta methods on stiff problems. By introducing two appropriate parameters in the scheme, a new iteration making use of the last two iterates, is proposed. Specific schemes of this type for the Gauss, Radau IA-IIA and Lobatto IIIA-B-C processes are developed. It is also shown that in many situations the new iteration presents a faster convergence than the original.

  7. FASART: An iterative reconstruction algorithm with inter-iteration adaptive NAD filter.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ziying; Li, Yugang; Zhang, Fa; Wan, Xiaohua

    2015-01-01

    Electron tomography (ET) is an essential imaging technique for studying structures of large biological specimens. These structures are reconstructed from a set of projections obtained at different sample orientations by tilting the specimen. However, most of existing reconstruction methods are not appropriate when the data are extremely noisy and incomplete. A new iterative method has been proposed: adaptive simultaneous algebraic reconstruction with inter-iteration adaptive non-linear anisotropic diffusion (NAD) filter (FASART). We also adopted an adaptive parameter and discussed the step for the filter in this reconstruction method. Experimental results show that FASART can restrain the noise generated in the process of iterative reconstruction and still preserve the more details of the structure edges.

  8. Iterative methods for symmetric ill-conditioned Toeplitz matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Huckle, T.

    1996-12-31

    We consider ill-conditioned symmetric positive definite, Toeplitz systems T{sub n}x = b. If we want to solve such a system iteratively with the conjugate gradient method, we can use band-Toeplitz-preconditioners or Sine-Transform-peconditioners M = S{sub n}{Lambda}S{sub n}, S{sub n} the Sine-Transform-matrix and {Lambda} a diagonal matrix. A Toeplitz matrix T{sub n} = (t{sub i-j)}{sub i}{sup n},{sub j=1} is often related to an underlying function f defined by the coefficients t{sub j}, j = -{infinity},..,-1,0, 1,.., {infinity}. There are four cases, for which we want to determine a preconditioner M: - T{sub n} is related to an underlying function which is given explicitly; - T{sub n} is related to an underlying function that is given by its Fourier coefficients; - T{sub n} is related to an underlying function that is unknown; - T{sub n} is not related to an underlying function. Especially for the first three cases we show how positive definite and effective preconditioners based on the Sine-Transform can be defined for general nonnegative underlying function f. To define M, we evaluate or estimate the values of f at certain positions, and build a Sine-transform matrix with these values as eigenvalues. Then, the spectrum of the preconditioned system is bounded from above and away from zero.

  9. Analysis of the ITER ICRH Decoupling and Matching System

    SciTech Connect

    Vervier, M.; Messiaen, A.; Dumortier, P.

    2009-11-26

    The reference ITER ICRH load resilient matching system uses four 3dB hybrid power splitters. It is proposed to use a 'double stub' tuner (DST) configuration for the matching on the reference load and a decoupling system placed between the antenna plug and the matching system to reduce the mutual coupling effects and also to actively control the array current spectrum while requesting the same forward power from all 4 power sources. The paper analyzes (i) the optimization of the matching layout e.g. by varying the distance between the stubs and by the use of two capacitors taking into account the role of the decouplers on the matching requirements; (ii) the practical realization of the decouplers and their insertion into the circuit; (iii) the requests in voltage and current capabilities in the different parts of the system. The paper presents solutions for saving space and to decrease the ratings of the components. The computations are done with the array loading simulated by the TOPICA matrix.

  10. Alcator C-Mod: research in support of ITER and steps beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmar, E. S.; Baek, S. G.; Barnard, H.; Bonoli, P.; Brunner, D.; Candy, J.; Canik, J.; Churchill, R. M.; Cziegler, I.; Dekow, G.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Diallo, A.; Edlund, E.; Ennever, P.; Faust, I.; Fiore, C.; Gao, Chi; Golfinopoulos, T.; Greenwald, M.; Hartwig, Z. S.; Holland, C.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Hutchinson, I. H.; Irby, J.; LaBombard, B.; Lin, Yijun; Lipschultz, B.; Loarte, A.; Mumgaard, R.; Parker, R. R.; Porkolab, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Rice, J. E.; Scott, S.; Shiraiwa, S.; Snyder, P.; Sorbom, B.; Terry, D.; Terry, J. L.; Theiler, C.; Vieira, R.; Walk, J. R.; Wallace, G. M.; White, A.; Whyte, D.; Wolfe, S. M.; Wright, G. M.; Wright, J.; Wukitch, S. J.; Xu, P.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents an overview of recent highlights from research on Alcator C-Mod. Significant progress has been made across all research areas over the last two years, with particular emphasis on divertor physics and power handling, plasma-material interaction studies, edge localized mode-suppressed pedestal dynamics, core transport and turbulence, and RF heating and current drive utilizing ion cyclotron and lower hybrid tools. Specific results of particular relevance to ITER include: inner wall SOL transport studies that have led, together with results from other experiments, to the change of the detailed shape of the inner wall in ITER; runaway electron studies showing that the critical electric field required for runaway generation is much higher than predicted from collisional theory; core tungsten impurity transport studies reveal that tungsten accumulation is naturally avoided in typical C-Mod conditions.

  11. Modeling Tokamak Discharges during Startup in DIII-D and Predictions for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budny, R. V.; Andre, R.; Kessel, C. E.; McCune, D.; Jackson, G. L.; Humphreys, D. A.; Luce, T. C.; Politzer, P. A.

    2009-11-01

    The PTRANSP code is being developed for improving predictions of ITER and future Tokamaks [1]. Important goals are predicting plasma performance as well as safe and efficient startup and termination. PTRANSP is being tested on experiments in DIII-D to explore and optimize plasma startup and termination, and to benchmark of transport. An important aspect is to model the boundary accurately since parameters such as the flux consumption and induction li can vary sensitively on the boundary shape. PTRANSP is being modified to allow for direct input of the flux in R, Z space (from EFIT) instead of using Fourier moments of the boundary. PTRANSP will write quantities such as the inductance and surface voltage at the separatrix surface as well as the flux boundary usually used in TRANSP. The predictive capabilities are being improved also. These include models for predicting temperatures, densities, and toroidal momentum. Predictions for ITER will be discussed. [1] R.V. Budny, Nuclear Fusion 49 (2009) 085008.

  12. Current Control in ITER Steady State Plasmas With Neutral Beam Steering

    SciTech Connect

    R.V. Budny

    2009-09-10

    Predictions of quasi steady state DT plasmas in ITER are generated using the PTRANSP code. The plasma temperatures, densities, boundary shape, and total current (9 - 10 MA) anticipated for ITER steady state plasmas are specified. Current drive by negative ion neutral beam injection, lower-hybrid, and electron cyclotron resonance are calculated. Four modes of operation with different combinations of current drive are studied. For each mode, scans with the NNBI aimed at differing heights in the plasma are performed to study effects of current control on the q profile. The timeevolution of the currents and q are calculated to evaluate long duration transients. Quasi steady state, strongly reversed q profiles are predicted for some beam injection angles if the current drive and bootstrap currents are sufficiently large.

  13. Corneal topography matching by iterative registration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junjie; Elsheikh, Ahmed; Davey, Pinakin G; Wang, Weizhuo; Bao, Fangjun; Mottershead, John E

    2014-11-01

    Videokeratography is used for the measurement of corneal topography in overlapping portions (or maps) which must later be joined together to form the overall topography of the cornea. The separate portions are measured from different viewpoints and therefore must be brought together by registration of measurement points in the regions of overlap. The central map is generally the most accurate, but all maps are measured with uncertainty that increases towards the periphery. It becomes the reference (or static) map, and the peripheral (or dynamic) maps must then be transformed by rotation and translation so that the overlapping portions are matched. The process known as registration, of determining the necessary transformation, is a well-understood procedure in image analysis and has been applied in several areas of science and engineering. In this article, direct search optimisation using the Nelder-Mead algorithm and several variants of the iterative closest/corresponding point routine are explained and applied to simulated and real clinical data. The measurement points on the static and dynamic maps are generally different so that it becomes necessary to interpolate, which is done using a truncated series of Zernike polynomials. The point-to-plane iterative closest/corresponding point variant has the advantage of releasing certain optimisation constraints that lead to persistent registration and alignment errors when other approaches are used. The point-to-plane iterative closest/corresponding point routine is found to be robust to measurement noise, insensitive to starting values of the transformation parameters and produces high-quality results when using real clinical data.

  14. Adaptable Iterative and Recursive Kalman Filter Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanetti, Renato

    2014-01-01

    Nonlinear filters are often very computationally expensive and usually not suitable for real-time applications. Real-time navigation algorithms are typically based on linear estimators, such as the extended Kalman filter (EKF) and, to a much lesser extent, the unscented Kalman filter. The Iterated Kalman filter (IKF) and the Recursive Update Filter (RUF) are two algorithms that reduce the consequences of the linearization assumption of the EKF by performing N updates for each new measurement, where N is the number of recursions, a tuning parameter. This paper introduces an adaptable RUF algorithm to calculate N on the go, a similar technique can be used for the IKF as well.

  15. Iterative repair for scheduling and rescheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweben, Monte; Davis, Eugene; Deale, Michael

    1991-01-01

    An iterative repair search method is described called constraint based simulated annealing. Simulated annealing is a hill climbing search technique capable of escaping local minima. The utility of the constraint based framework is shown by comparing search performance with and without the constraint framework on a suite of randomly generated problems. Results are also shown of applying the technique to the NASA Space Shuttle ground processing problem. These experiments show that the search methods scales to complex, real world problems and reflects interesting anytime behavior.

  16. Unifying iteration rule for fractal objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittel, A.; Parisi, J.; Peinke, J.; Baier, G.; Klein, M.; Rössler, O. E.

    1997-03-01

    We introduce an iteration rule for real numbers capable to generate attractors with dragon-, snowflake-, sponge-, or Swiss-flag-like cross sections. The idea behind it is the mapping of a torus into two (or more) shrunken and twisted tori located inside the previous one. Three distinct parameters define the symmetry, the dimension, and the connectedness or disconnectedness of the fractal object. For some selected triples of parameter values, a couple of well known fractal geometries (e.g. the Cantor set, the Sierpinski gasket, or the Swiss flag) can be gained as special cases.

  17. Design of the ITER ICRF Antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, D.; Nightingale, M.; Bamber, R.; Dalton, N.; Lister, J.; Porton, M.; Shannon, M.; Wilson, D.; Wooldridge, E.; Winkler, K.

    2011-12-23

    The CYCLE consortium has been designing the ITER ICRF antenna since March 2010, supported by an F4E grant. Following a brief introduction to the consortium, this paper: describes the present status and layout of the design; highlights the key mechanical engineering features; shows the expected impact of cooling and radiation issues on the design and outlines the need for future R and D to support the design process. A key design requirement is the need for the mechanical design and analysis to be consistent with all requirements following from the RF physics and antenna layout optimisation. As such, this paper complements that of Durodie et al.

  18. Ice Shape Characterization Using Self-Organizing Maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClain, Stephen T.; Tino, Peter; Kreeger, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    A method for characterizing ice shapes using a self-organizing map (SOM) technique is presented. Self-organizing maps are neural-network techniques for representing noisy, multi-dimensional data aligned along a lower-dimensional and possibly nonlinear manifold. For a large set of noisy data, each element of a finite set of codebook vectors is iteratively moved in the direction of the data closest to the winner codebook vector. Through successive iterations, the codebook vectors begin to align with the trends of the higher-dimensional data. In information processing, the intent of SOM methods is to transmit the codebook vectors, which contains far fewer elements and requires much less memory or bandwidth, than the original noisy data set. When applied to airfoil ice accretion shapes, the properties of the codebook vectors and the statistical nature of the SOM methods allows for a quantitative comparison of experimentally measured mean or average ice shapes to ice shapes predicted using computer codes such as LEWICE. The nature of the codebook vectors also enables grid generation and surface roughness descriptions for use with the discrete-element roughness approach. In the present study, SOM characterizations are applied to a rime ice shape, a glaze ice shape at an angle of attack, a bi-modal glaze ice shape, and a multi-horn glaze ice shape. Improvements and future explorations will be discussed.

  19. Final Report on ITER Task Agreement 81-08

    SciTech Connect

    Richard L. Moore

    2008-03-01

    As part of an ITER Implementing Task Agreement (ITA) between the ITER US Participant Team (PT) and the ITER International Team (IT), the INL Fusion Safety Program was tasked to provide the ITER IT with upgrades to the fusion version of the MELCOR 1.8.5 code including a beryllium dust oxidation model. The purpose of this model is to allow the ITER IT to investigate hydrogen production from beryllium dust layers on hot surfaces inside the ITER vacuum vessel (VV) during in-vessel loss-of-cooling accidents (LOCAs). Also included in the ITER ITA was a task to construct a RELAP5/ATHENA model of the ITER divertor cooling loop to model the draining of the loop during a large ex-vessel pipe break followed by an in-vessel divertor break and compare the results to a simular MELCOR model developed by the ITER IT. This report, which is the final report for this agreement, documents the completion of the work scope under this ITER TA, designated as TA 81-08.

  20. Solution of three dimensional Schrodinger equation for Eckart and Manning-Rosen non-central potential using asymptotic iteration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farizky, M. N.; Suparmi, A.; Cari, C.; Yunianto, M.

    2016-11-01

    Solution of Schrodinger equation in three dimensions for Eckart and Manning-Rosen potential has been obtained by using the asymptotic iteration method. Energy spectrum and wave function for these potentials was obtained. It is known that the wave function for the corresponding potentials contains hypergeometric series due to the type of Schrodinger equation. However, the wave function for radial part is not normalizable, due to its equation that reaches to infinity when r equals to zero. The energy spectrum and wave function for corresponding potentials had also been analyzed with the help of Matlab R2013a software.

  1. Optimized input shaping for a single flexible robot link

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.G.; Stokes, D.; Starr, G.; Robinett, R.D.

    1996-03-01

    This paper will discuss the design of an input shaped open-loop control for a single flexible robot link. The authors develop the equations of motion, including the first flexible mode shape and the actuator dynamics. Additional content includes the hardware system identification iterative runs used to update the model. Optimized input shaped commands for the flexible robot link to produce a rest-to-rest, residual vibration-free, 90 degree maneuver are developed. Correlation between both experimental and analytical results of the 90{degree} slew, using two different identification models, are reviewed.

  2. Iterative image reconstruction in spectral CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Daniel; Michel, Eric; Kim, Hye S.; Kim, Jae G.; Han, Byung H.; Cho, Min H.; Lee, Soo Y.

    2012-03-01

    Scan time of spectral-CTs is much longer than conventional CTs due to limited number of x-ray photons detectable by photon-counting detectors. However, the spectral pixel information in spectral-CT has much richer information on physiological and pathological status of the tissues than the CT-number in conventional CT, which makes the spectral- CT one of the promising future imaging modalities. One simple way to reduce the scan time in spectral-CT imaging is to reduce the number of views in the acquisition of projection data. But, this may result in poorer SNR and strong streak artifacts which can severely compromise the image quality. In this work, spectral-CT projection data were obtained from a lab-built spectral-CT consisting of a single CdTe photon counting detector, a micro-focus x-ray tube and scan mechanics. For the image reconstruction, we used two iterative image reconstruction methods, the simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT) and the total variation minimization based on conjugate gradient method (CG-TV), along with the filtered back-projection (FBP) to compare the image quality. From the imaging of the iodine containing phantoms, we have observed that SIRT and CG-TV are superior to the FBP method in terms of SNR and streak artifacts.

  3. ITER Central Solenoid support structure analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Freudenberg, Kevin D; Myatt, R.

    2011-01-01

    The ITER Central Solenoid (CS) is comprised of six independent coils held together by a pre-compression support structure. This structure must provide enough preload to maintain sufficient coil-to-coil contact and interface load throughout the current pulse. End of burn (EOB) represents one of the most extreme time-points doing the reference scenario when the currents in the CS3 coils oppose those of CS1 & CS2. The CS structure is performance limited by the room temperature static yield requirements needed to support the roughly 180 MN preload to resist coil separation during operation. This preload is applied by inner and external tie plates along the length of the coil stack by mechanical fastening methods utilizing Superbolt technology. The preloading structure satisfies the magnet structural design criteria of ITER and will be verified during mockup studies. The solenoid is supported from the bottom of the toroidal field (TF) coil casing in both the vertical radial directions. The upper support of the CS coil structure maintains radial registration with the TF coil in the event of vertical disruptions (VDE) loads and earthquakes. All of these structure systems are analyzed via a global finite element analysis (FEA). The model includes a complete sector of the TF coil and the CS coil/structure in one self-consistent analysis. The corresponding results and design descriptions are described in this report.

  4. ITER plant layout and site services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuyanov, V. A.

    2000-03-01

    The ITER site has not yet been determined. Nevertheless, to develop a construction plan and a cost estimate, it is necessary to have a detailed layout of the buildings, structures and outdoor equipment integrated with the balance of plant service systems prototypical of large fusion power plants. These services include electrical power for magnet feeds and plasma heating systems, cryogenic and conventional cooling systems, compressed air, gas supplies, demineralized water, steam and drainage. Nuclear grade facilities are provided to handle tritium fuel and activated waste, as well as to prevent radiation exposure of workers and the public. To prevent interference between services of different types and for efficient arrangement of buildings, structures and equipment within the site area, a plan was developed which segregated different classes of services to four quadrants surrounding the tokamak building, placed at the approximate geographical centre of the site. The locations of the buildings on the generic site were selected to meet all design requirements at minimum total project cost. A similar approach was used to determine the locations of services above, at and below grade. The generic site plan can be adapted to the site selected for ITER without significant changes to the buildings or equipment. Some rearrangements may be required by site topography, resulting primarily in changes to the length of services that link the buildings and equipment.

  5. Iterative deconvolution methods for ghost imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Situ, Guohai

    2016-10-01

    Ghost imaging (GI) is an important technique in single-pixel imaging. It has been demonstrated that GI has applications in various areas such as imaging through harsh environments and optical encryption. Correlation is widely used to reconstruct the object image in GI. But it only offers the signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of the reconstructed image linearly proportional to the number of measurements. Here, we develop a kind of iterative deconvolution methods for GI. With the known image transmission matrix in GI, the first one uses an iterative algorithm to decrease the error between the reconstructed image and the ground-truth image. Ideally, the error converges to a minimum for speckle patterns when the number of measurements is larger than the number of resolution cells. The second technique, Gerchberg-Saxton (GS) like GI, takes the advantage of the integral property of the Fourier transform, and treats the captured data as constraints for image reconstruction. According to this property, we can regard the data recorded by the bucket detector as the Fourier transform of the object image evaluated at the origin. Each of the speckle patterns randomly selects certain spectral components of the object and shift them to the origin in the Fourier space. One can use these constraints to reconstruct the image with the GS algorithm. This deconvolution method is suitable for any single pixel imaging models. Compared to conventional GI, both techniques offer a nonlinear growth of the SNR value with respect to the number of measurements.

  6. Iterative Mechanism Solutions with Scenario and ADAMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoades, Daren

    2006-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of iterative solutions using Scenario for Motion (UG NX 2 Motion) to assist in designing the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). The MSL will have very unique design requirements, and in order to meet these requirements the system must have the ability to design for static stability, simulate mechanism kinematics, simulate dynamic behaviour and be capable of reconfiguration, and iterations as designed. The legacy process used on the Mars Exploration rovers worked, but it was cumbersome using multiple tools, limited configuration control, with manual process and communication, and multiple steps. The aim is to develop a mechanism that would reduce turn around time, and make more reiterations possible, to improve the quality and quantity of data, and to enhance configuration control. Currently for NX Scenario for Motion uses are in the articulation studies, the simulations of traverse motions,and subsystem simulations. The design of the Rover landing model requires accurate results, flexible elements, such as beams, and the use of the full ADAMS solver has been used. In order to achieve this, when required, there has been a direct translation from Scenario to ADAMS, with additional data in ascii format. The process that has been designed to move from Scenario to ADAMS is reviewed.

  7. Transport analysis of tungsten impurity in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Y.; Amano, T.; Shimizu, K.; Shimada, M.

    2003-03-01

    The radial distribution of tungsten impurity in ITER is calculated by using the 1.5D transport code TOTAL coupled with NCLASS, which can solve the neo-classical impurity flux considering arbitrary aspect ratio and collisionality. An impurity screening effect is observed when the density profile is flat and the line radiation power is smaller than in the case without impurity transport by a factor of 2. It is shown that 90 MW of line radiation power is possible without significant degradation of plasma performance ( HH98( y,2) ˜1) when the fusion power is 700 MW (fusion gain Q=10). The allowable tungsten density is about 7×10 15/m 3, which is 0.01% of the electron density and the increase of the effective ionic charge Zeff is about 0.39. In this case, the total radiation power is more than half of the total heating power 210 MW, and power to the divertor region is less than 100 MW. This operation regime gives an opportunity for high fusion power operation in ITER with acceptable divertor conditions. Simulations for the case with an internal transport barrier (ITB) are also performed and it is found that impurity shielding by an ITB is possible with density profile control.

  8. Intense diagnostic neutral beam development for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Henins, I.; Fonck, R.J.; Kim, Y.J.

    1992-05-01

    For the next-generation, burning tokamak plasmas such as ITER, diagnostic neutral beams and beam spectroscopy will continue to be used to determine a variety of plasma parameters such as ion temperature, rotation, fluctuations, impurity content, current density profile, and confined alpha particle density and energy distribution. Present-day low-current, long-pulse beam technology will be unable to provide the required signal intensities because of higher beam attenuation and background bremsstrahlung radiation in these larger, higher-density plasmas. To address this problem, we are developing a short-pulse, intense diagnostic neutral beam. Protons or deuterons are accelerated using magnetic-insulated ion-diode technology, and neutralized in a transient gas cell. A prototype 25-kA, 100-kV, 1-{mu}s accelerator is under construction at Los Alamos. Initial experiments will focus on ITER-related issues of beam energy distribution, current density, pulse length, divergence, propagation, impurity content, reproducibility, and maintenance.

  9. Intense diagnostic neutral beam development for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Henins, I. ); Fonck, R.J.; Kim, Y.J. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics)

    1992-01-01

    For the next-generation, burning tokamak plasmas such as ITER, diagnostic neutral beams and beam spectroscopy will continue to be used to determine a variety of plasma parameters such as ion temperature, rotation, fluctuations, impurity content, current density profile, and confined alpha particle density and energy distribution. Present-day low-current, long-pulse beam technology will be unable to provide the required signal intensities because of higher beam attenuation and background bremsstrahlung radiation in these larger, higher-density plasmas. To address this problem, we are developing a short-pulse, intense diagnostic neutral beam. Protons or deuterons are accelerated using magnetic-insulated ion-diode technology, and neutralized in a transient gas cell. A prototype 25-kA, 100-kV, 1-{mu}s accelerator is under construction at Los Alamos. Initial experiments will focus on ITER-related issues of beam energy distribution, current density, pulse length, divergence, propagation, impurity content, reproducibility, and maintenance.

  10. Diverse Power Iteration Embeddings and Its Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Huang H.; Yoo S.; Yu, D.; Qin, H.

    2014-12-14

    Abstract—Spectral Embedding is one of the most effective dimension reduction algorithms in data mining. However, its computation complexity has to be mitigated in order to apply it for real-world large scale data analysis. Many researches have been focusing on developing approximate spectral embeddings which are more efficient, but meanwhile far less effective. This paper proposes Diverse Power Iteration Embeddings (DPIE), which not only retains the similar efficiency of power iteration methods but also produces a series of diverse and more effective embedding vectors. We test this novel method by applying it to various data mining applications (e.g. clustering, anomaly detection and feature selection) and evaluating their performance improvements. The experimental results show our proposed DPIE is more effective than popular spectral approximation methods, and obtains the similar quality of classic spectral embedding derived from eigen-decompositions. Moreover it is extremely fast on big data applications. For example in terms of clustering result, DPIE achieves as good as 95% of classic spectral clustering on the complex datasets but 4000+ times faster in limited memory environment.

  11. Pedestal stability comparison and ITER pedestal prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, P. B.; Aiba, N.; Beurskens, M.; Groebner, R. J.; Horton, L. D.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Huysmans, G. T. A.; Kamada, Y.; Kirk, A.; Konz, C.; Leonard, A. W.; Lönnroth, J.; Maggi, C. F.; Maingi, R.; Osborne, T. H.; Oyama, N.; Pankin, A.; Saarelma, S.; Saibene, G.; Terry, J. L.; Urano, H.; Wilson, H. R.

    2009-08-01

    The pressure at the top of the edge transport barrier (or 'pedestal height') strongly impacts fusion performance, while large edge localized modes (ELMs), driven by the free energy in the pedestal region, can constrain material lifetimes. Accurately predicting the pedestal height and ELM behavior in ITER is an essential element of prediction and optimization of fusion performance. Investigation of intermediate wavelength MHD modes (or 'peeling-ballooning' modes) has led to an improved understanding of important constraints on the pedestal height and the mechanism for ELMs. The combination of high-resolution pedestal diagnostics, including substantial recent improvements, and a suite of highly efficient stability codes, has made edge stability analysis routine on several major tokamaks, contributing both to understanding, and to experimental planning and performance optimization. Here we present extensive comparisons of observations to predicted edge stability boundaries on several tokamaks, both for the standard (Type I) ELM regime, and for small ELM and ELM-free regimes. We further discuss a new predictive model for the pedestal height and width (EPED1), developed by self-consistently combining a simple width model with peeling-ballooning stability calculations. This model is tested against experimental measurements, and used in initial predictions of the pedestal height for ITER.

  12. Suboptimal fractal coding scheme using iterative transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyun-Soo; Chung, Jae-won

    2001-05-01

    This paper presents a new fractal coding scheme to find a suboptimal transformation by performing an iterative encoding process. The optimal transformation can be defined as the transformation generating the closest attractor to an original image. Unfortunately, it is impossible in practice to find the optimal transformation, due to the heavy computational burden. In this paper, however, by means of some new theorems related with contractive transformations and attractors. It is shown that for some specific cases the optimal or suboptimal transformations can be obtained. The proposed method obtains a suboptimal transformation by performing iterative processes as is done in decoding. Thus, it requires more computation than the conventional method, but it improves the image quality. For a simple case where the optimal transformation can actually be found, the proposed method is experimentally evaluated against both the optimal method and the conventional method. For a general case where the optimal transformation in unavailable due to heavy computational complexity, the proposed method is also evaluated in comparison with the conventional method.

  13. Laser cleaning of ITER's diagnostic mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, C. H.; Gentile, C. A.; Doerner, R.

    2012-10-01

    Practical methods to clean ITER's diagnostic mirrors and restore reflectivity will be critical to ITER's plasma operations. We report on laser cleaning of single crystal molybdenum mirrors coated with either carbon or beryllium films 150 - 420 nm thick. A 1.06 μm Nd laser system provided 220 ns pulses at 8 kHz with typical power densities of 1-2 J/cm^2. The laser beam was fiber optically coupled to a scanner suitable for tokamak applications. The efficacy of mirror cleaning was assessed with a new technique that combines microscopic imaging and reflectivity measurements [1]. The method is suitable for hazardous materials such as beryllium as the mirrors remain sealed in a vacuum chamber. Excellent restoration of reflectivity for the carbon coated Mo mirrors was observed after laser scanning under vacuum conditions. For the beryllium coated mirrors restoration of reflectivity has so far been incomplete and modeling indicates that a shorter duration laser pulse is needed. No damage of the molybdenum mirror substrates was observed.[4pt][1] C.H. Skinner et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. at press.

  14. A Fully Noninductive, ELM-Suppressed Scenario for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petty, C. C.; Petrie, T. W.; Nazikian, R.; Turco, F.; Lasnier, C.

    2016-10-01

    An attractive regime with beta, collisionality and plasma shape relevant to the ITER steady-state mission has been attained in DIII-D using the hybrid scenario, including complete ELM suppression using resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) coils. Fully noninductive hybrids with simultaneous high beta (βN <= 3.1) and high confinement (H98 y 2 <= 1.4) have achieved zero surface loop voltage for up to two current relaxation times using efficient central current drive from ECCD and NBCD. This steady-state regime has been successfully integrated with ELM suppression by applying an odd parity n=3 RMP, which has only a minor impact on the pedestal pressure ( 15 %) and H98 y 2 ( 10 %) In radiating divertor experiments in hybrids, the combination of Argon seeding and strong Deuterium puffing more than doubles the plasma radiative power, up to 55% of the input power, with less than 10% increase in Zeff. IR camera measurements find that the peak heat flux in the upper, outer divertor falls by a factor of 2 (from 4.6 to 2.3 MW /m2). Work supported by USDOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-AC02-09CH11466, DE-FG02-04ER54761, and DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. 3D modeling and optimization of the ITER ICRH antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louche, F.; Dumortier, P.; Durodié, F.; Messiaen, A.; Maggiora, R.; Milanesio, D.

    2011-12-01

    The prediction of the coupling properties of the ITER ICRH antenna necessitates the accurate evaluation of the resistance and reactance matrices. The latter are mostly dependent on the geometry of the array and therefore a model as accurate as possible is needed to precisely compute these matrices. Furthermore simulations have so far neglected the poloidal and toroidal profile of the plasma, and it is expected that the loading by individual straps will vary significantly due to varying strap-plasma distance. To take this curvature into account, some modifications of the alignment of the straps with respect to the toroidal direction are proposed. It is shown with CST Microwave Studio® [1] that considering two segments in the toroidal direction, i.e. a "V-shaped" toroidal antenna, is sufficient. A new CATIA model including this segmentation has been drawn and imported into both MWS and TOPICA [2] codes. Simulations show a good agreement of the impedance matrices in vacuum. Various modifications of the geometry are proposed in order to further optimize the coupling. In particular we study the effect of the strap box parameters and the recess of the vertical septa.

  16. In situ monitoring hydrogen isotope retention in ITER first wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhin, E. E.; Andrew, P.; Anthoine, A. D.; Bazhenov, A. N.; Barnsley, R.; Bukreev, I. M.; Bukhovets, V. L.; Chernakov, A. P.; Gorodetsky, A. E.; Kochergin, M. M.; Koval, A. N.; Kukushkin, A. B.; Kukushkin, A. S.; Kurskiev, G. S.; Levashova, M. G.; Litvinov, A. E.; Litunovsky, V. N.; Markin, A. V.; Mazul, I. V.; Masyukevich, S. V.; Miroshnikov, I. V.; Nemov, A. S.; Novokhatsky, A. N.; Razdobarin, A. G.; Sherstnev, E. V.; Samsonov, D. S.; Semenov, V. V.; Smirnov, A. S.; De Temmerman, G.; Tolstyakov, S. Yu.; Zalavutdinov, R. Kh.; Walsh, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Tritium retention inside the vacuum vessel is a potentially serious constraint in the operation of large-scale fusion machines like ITER. An in situ diagnostics for first wall H/D/T retention by laser induced desorption spectroscopy (LIDS) is proposed for use between plasma discharges. The technique is based on local baking of the first wall by laser irradiation and subsequent analysis of the in-vessel gas by optical emission spectroscopy of plasma radiation. The local heating implementation, kinetics of H/D/T thermal extraction and the accuracy of optical emission spectroscopy measurements are analysed. To resolve the H/D/T lines spectroscopically, their thermal broadening should be minimized to prevent overlapping of the line shapes. A comparative performance analysis of several types of plasma sources with relatively cold ions is made including the following types of discharges: Penning, RF multipactor, laser torch and ECR. All these radiation sources require rather low power and could be used for remote in situ measurements of relative densities of the thermally extracted hydrogen isotopes.

  17. Towards intelligent spectrum analyzing system for industry-oriented PIXE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, S.; Murozono, K.; Ishii, K.; Kitamura, M.

    1997-02-01

    Outstanding features of a new method called `pattern analysis method' are its analysis speed and easy handling, therefore enabling us to automatize the PIXE spectrum analysis. We address the following tasks within the framework of the pattern analysis method towards realization of more intelligent system for the industrial PIXE: adoption of more detailed models for all the reference X-ray spectra of element, of continuum from the Bremsstrahlung process and of the summing effect; real time inference of the content elements based on the iterative Bayes' theorem, which could be effective in the selection of candidate elements and monitoring the status of the spectrum accumulation; use of the suitable X-ray absorber with accurate data for penetration rate, being indispensable to make PAM analysis more reliable; and development of iterative method for thick sample PIXE where various non-linear effects become significant.

  18. A unified noise analysis for iterative image estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Jinyi

    2003-07-03

    Iterative image estimation methods have been widely used in emission tomography. Accurate estimate of the uncertainty of the reconstructed images is essential for quantitative applications. While theoretical approach has been developed to analyze the noise propagation from iteration to iteration, the current results are limited to only a few iterative algorithms that have an explicit multiplicative update equation. This paper presents a theoretical noise analysis that is applicable to a wide range of preconditioned gradient type algorithms. One advantage is that proposed method does not require an explicit expression of the preconditioner and hence it is applicable to some algorithms that involve line searches. By deriving fixed point expression from the iteration based results, we show that the iteration based noise analysis is consistent with the xed point based analysis. Examples in emission tomography and transmission tomography are shown.

  19. Convergence Results on Iteration Algorithms to Linear Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhuande; Yang, Chuansheng; Yuan, Yubo

    2014-01-01

    In order to solve the large scale linear systems, backward and Jacobi iteration algorithms are employed. The convergence is the most important issue. In this paper, a unified backward iterative matrix is proposed. It shows that some well-known iterative algorithms can be deduced with it. The most important result is that the convergence results have been proved. Firstly, the spectral radius of the Jacobi iterative matrix is positive and the one of backward iterative matrix is strongly positive (lager than a positive constant). Secondly, the mentioned two iterations have the same convergence results (convergence or divergence simultaneously). Finally, some numerical experiments show that the proposed algorithms are correct and have the merit of backward methods. PMID:24991640

  20. Shape-Shifting Plastic

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-20

    A new plastic developed by ORNL and Washington State University transforms from its original shape through a series of temporary shapes and returns to its initial form. The shape-shifting process is controlled through changes in temperature

  1. Shaping Diffraction-Grating Grooves to Optimize Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backlund, John; Wilson, Daniel; Mouroulis, Pantazis; Maker, Paul; Muller, Richard

    2008-01-01

    A method of shaping diffraction-grating grooves to optimize the spectral efficiency, spectral range, and image quality of a spectral imaging instrument is under development. The method is based on the use of an advanced design algorithm to determine the possibly complex shape of grooves needed to obtain a desired efficiency-versus-wavelength response (see figure). Then electron- beam fabrication techniques are used to realize the required groove shape. The method could be used, for example, to make the spectral efficiency of the grating in a given wavelength range proportional to the inverse of the spectral efficiency of a photodetector array so that the overall spectral efficiency of the combination of the grating and the photodetector array would be flat. The method has thus far been applied to one-dimensional gratings only, but in principle, it is also applicable to two-dimensional gratings. The algorithm involves calculations in the spatial-frequency domain. The spatial-frequency spectrum of a grating is represented as a diffraction-order spectral-peak-width function multiplied by an efficiency function for a single grating groove. This representation affords computational efficiency and accuracy by making it possible to consider only the response from one grating groove (one period of the grating), instead of from the whole grating area, in determining the response from the entire grating. This combination of efficiency and accuracy is crucial for future extensions of the algorithm to two-dimensional designs and to designs in which polarization must also be taken into account. The algorithm begins with the definition of target values of relative efficiency that represent the desired spectral response of the grating in certain spectral frequencies calculated from the diffraction order and wavelength. The grating period is divided into a number of cells - typically, 100. The phase contribution from each cell is determined from the phase of the incident

  2. Simulation and Analysis of the Hybrid Operating Mode in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Kessel, C.E.; Budny, R.V.; Indireshkumar, K.

    2005-09-22

    The hybrid operating mode in ITER is examined with 0D systems analysis, 1.5D discharge scenario simulations using TSC and TRANSP, and the ideal MHD stability is discussed. The hybrid mode has the potential to provide very long pulses and significant neutron fluence if the physics regime can be produced in ITER. This paper reports progress in establishing the physics basis and engineering limitation for the hybrid mode in ITER.

  3. Study of Fast, Near-Infrared Photodetectors for the ITER Core LIDAR Thomson Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giudicotti, L.; Pasqualotto, R.; Alfier, A.; Beurskens, M.; Kempenaars, M.; Walsh, M. J.

    2008-03-01

    A key component for the ITER core LIDAR Thomson Scattering (TS) diagnostic would be a detector with good sensitivity in the 850-1060 nm near infrared (NIR) spectral region. Covering this spectral region becomes necessary if a Nd:YAG laser system operating at λ = 1.06 μm is used as the laser source, which is a very attractive choice in terms of available energy, repetition rate, reliability and cost. In this paper we review the state of the art of two types of detectors available for the above spectral range: the transferred electron (TE) InGaAs/InP hybrid photodiode and the InxGa1-xAs microchannel plate (MCP) image intensifier and we describe the advancements necessary for a possible application in the ITER LIDAR TS. In addition we describe the preliminary characterization of new GaAsP fast MCP photomultipliers (PMTs) suitable for the detection of the visible part of the LIDAR TS spectrum in JET and ITER.

  4. Cubic-scaling iterative solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation for finite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ljungberg, M. P.; Koval, P.; Ferrari, F.; Foerster, D.; Sánchez-Portal, D.

    2015-08-01

    The Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE) is currently the state of the art in the description of neutral electronic excitations in both solids and large finite systems. It is capable of accurately treating charge-transfer excitations that present difficulties for simpler approaches. We present a local basis set formulation of the BSE for molecules where the optical spectrum is computed with the iterative Haydock recursion scheme, leading to a low computational complexity and memory footprint. Using a variant of the algorithm we can go beyond the Tamm-Dancoff approximation. We rederive the recursion relations for general matrix elements of a resolvent, show how they translate into continued fractions, and study the convergence of the method with the number of recursion coefficients and the role of different terminators. Due to the locality of the basis functions the computational cost of each iteration scales asymptotically as O (N3) with the number of atoms, while the number of iterations typically is much lower than the size of the underlying electron-hole basis. In practice we see that, even for systems with thousands of orbitals, the runtime will be dominated by the O (N2) operation of applying the Coulomb kernel in the atomic orbital representation.

  5. Solution of Dirac equation for Eckart potential and trigonometric Manning Rosen potential using asymptotic iteration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resita Arum, Sari; A, Suparmi; C, Cari

    2016-01-01

    The Dirac equation for Eckart potential and trigonometric Manning Rosen potential with exact spin symmetry is obtained using an asymptotic iteration method. The combination of the two potentials is substituted into the Dirac equation, then the variables are separated into radial and angular parts. The Dirac equation is solved by using an asymptotic iteration method that can reduce the second order differential equation into a differential equation with substitution variables of hypergeometry type. The relativistic energy is calculated using Matlab 2011. This study is limited to the case of spin symmetry. With the asymptotic iteration method, the energy spectra of the relativistic equations and equations of orbital quantum number l can be obtained, where both are interrelated between quantum numbers. The energy spectrum is also numerically solved using the Matlab software, where the increase in the radial quantum number nr causes the energy to decrease. The radial part and the angular part of the wave function are defined as hypergeometry functions and visualized with Matlab 2011. The results show that the disturbance of a combination of the Eckart potential and trigonometric Manning Rosen potential can change the radial part and the angular part of the wave function. Project supported by the Higher Education Project (Grant No. 698/UN27.11/PN/2015).

  6. The explosive divergence in iterative maps of matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navickas, Zenonas; Ragulskis, Minvydas; Vainoras, Alfonsas; Smidtaite, Rasa

    2012-11-01

    The effect of explosive divergence in generalized iterative maps of matrices is defined and described using formal algebraic techniques. It is shown that the effect of explosive divergence can be observed in an iterative map of square matrices of order 2 if and only if the matrix of initial conditions is a nilpotent matrix and the Lyapunov exponent of the corresponding scalar iterative map is greater than zero. Computational experiments with the logistic map and the circle map are used to illustrate the effect of explosive divergence occurring in iterative maps of matrices.

  7. Bounded-Angle Iterative Decoding of LDPC Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolinar, Samuel; Andrews, Kenneth; Pollara, Fabrizio; Divsalar, Dariush

    2009-01-01

    Bounded-angle iterative decoding is a modified version of conventional iterative decoding, conceived as a means of reducing undetected-error rates for short low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes. For a given code, bounded-angle iterative decoding can be implemented by means of a simple modification of the decoder algorithm, without redesigning the code. Bounded-angle iterative decoding is based on a representation of received words and code words as vectors in an n-dimensional Euclidean space (where n is an integer).

  8. ITER Cryoplant Status and Economics of the LHe plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monneret, E.; Chalifour, M.; Bonneton, M.; Fauve, E.; Voigt, T.; Badgujar, S.; Chang, H.-S.; Vincent, G.

    The ITER cryoplant is composed of helium and nitrogen refrigerators and generator combined with 80 K helium loop plants and external purification systems. Storage and recovery of the helium inventory is provided in warm and cold (80 K and 4.5 K) helium tanks.The conceptual design of the ITER cryoplant has been completed, the technical requirements defined for industrial procurement and contracts signed with industry. Each contract covers the design, manufacturing, installation and commissioning. Design is under finalization and manufacturing has started. First deliveries are scheduled by end of 2015.The various cryoplant systems are designed based on recognized codes and international standards to meet the availability, the reliability and the time between maintenance imposed by the long-term uninterrupted operation of the ITER Tokamak. In addition, ITER has to consider the constraint of a nuclear installation.ITER Organization (IO) is responsible for the liquid helium (LHe) Plants contract signed end of 2012 with industry. It is composed of three LHe Plants, working in parallel and able to provide a total average cooling capacity of 75 kW at 4.5 K. Based on concept designed developed with industries and the procurement phase, ITER has accumulated data to broaden the scaling laws for costing such systems.After describing the status of ITER cryoplant part of the cryogenic system, we shall present the economics of the ITER LHe Plants based on key design requirements, choice and challenges of this ITER Organization procurement.

  9. A synopsis of collective alpha effects and implications for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Sigmar, D.J.

    1990-10-01

    This paper discusses the following: Alpha Interaction with Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes; Alpha Interaction with Ballooning Modes; Alpha Interaction with Fishbone Oscillations; and Implications for ITER.

  10. Extending the physics basis of quiescent H-mode toward ITER relevant parameters

    DOE PAGES

    Solomon, W. M.; Burrell, K. H.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; ...

    2015-06-26

    Recent experiments on DIII-D have addressed several long-standing issues needed to establish quiescent H-mode (QH-mode) as a viable operating scenario for ITER. In the past, QH-mode was associated with low density operation, but has now been extended to high normalized densities compatible with operation envisioned for ITER. Through the use of strong shaping, QH-mode plasmas have been maintained at high densities, both absolute (more » $$\\bar{n}$$e ≈ 7 × 1019 m₋3) and normalized Greenwald fraction ($$\\bar{n}$$e/nG > 0.7). In these plasmas, the pedestal can evolve to very high pressure and edge current as the density is increased. High density QH-mode operation with strong shaping has allowed access to a previously predicted regime of very high pedestal dubbed “Super H-mode”. Calculations of the pedestal height and width from the EPED model are quantitatively consistent with the experimentally observed density evolution. The confirmation of the shape dependence of the maximum density threshold for QH-mode helps validate the underlying theoretical model of peeling- ballooning modes for ELM stability. In general, QH-mode is found to achieve ELM- stable operation while maintaining adequate impurity exhaust, due to the enhanced impurity transport from an edge harmonic oscillation, thought to be a saturated kink- peeling mode driven by rotation shear. In addition, the impurity confinement time is not affected by rotation, even though the energy confinement time and measured E×B shear are observed to increase at low toroidal rotation. Together with demonstrations of high beta, high confinement and low q95 for many energy confinement times, these results suggest QH-mode as a potentially attractive operating scenario for the ITER Q=10 mission.« less

  11. Extending the physics basis of quiescent H-mode toward ITER relevant parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, W. M.; Burrell, K. H.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Garofalo, A. M.; Grierson, B. A.; Loarte, A.; McKee, G. R.; Nazikian, R.; Osborne, T. H.; Snyder, P. B.

    2015-06-26

    Recent experiments on DIII-D have addressed several long-standing issues needed to establish quiescent H-mode (QH-mode) as a viable operating scenario for ITER. In the past, QH-mode was associated with low density operation, but has now been extended to high normalized densities compatible with operation envisioned for ITER. Through the use of strong shaping, QH-mode plasmas have been maintained at high densities, both absolute ($\\bar{n}$e ≈ 7 × 1019 m₋3) and normalized Greenwald fraction ($\\bar{n}$e/nG > 0.7). In these plasmas, the pedestal can evolve to very high pressure and edge current as the density is increased. High density QH-mode operation with strong shaping has allowed access to a previously predicted regime of very high pedestal dubbed “Super H-mode”. Calculations of the pedestal height and width from the EPED model are quantitatively consistent with the experimentally observed density evolution. The confirmation of the shape dependence of the maximum density threshold for QH-mode helps validate the underlying theoretical model of peeling- ballooning modes for ELM stability. In general, QH-mode is found to achieve ELM- stable operation while maintaining adequate impurity exhaust, due to the enhanced impurity transport from an edge harmonic oscillation, thought to be a saturated kink- peeling mode driven by rotation shear. In addition, the impurity confinement time is not affected by rotation, even though the energy confinement time and measured E×B shear are observed to increase at low toroidal rotation. Together with demonstrations of high beta, high confinement and low q95 for many energy confinement times, these results suggest QH-mode as a potentially attractive operating scenario for the ITER Q=10 mission.

  12. An iterative three-dimensional electron density imaging algorithm using uncollimated compton scattered x rays from a polyenergetic primary pencil beam.

    PubMed

    Van Uytven, Eric; Pistorius, Stephen; Gordon, Richard

    2007-01-01

    X-ray film-screen mammography is currently the gold standard for detecting breast cancer. However, one disadvantage is that it projects a three-dimensional (3D) object onto a two-dimensional (2D) image, reducing contrast between small lesions and layers of normal tissue. Another limitation is its reduced sensitivity in women with mammographically dense breasts. Computed tomography (CT) produces a 3D image yet has had a limited role in mammography due to its relatively high dose, low resolution, and low contrast. As a first step towards implementing quantitative 3D mammography, which may improve the ability to detect and specify breast tumors, we have developed an analytical technique that can use Compton scatter to obtain 3D information of an object from a single projection. Imaging material with a pencil beam of polychromatic x rays produces a characteristic scattered photon spectrum at each point on the detector plane. A comparable distribution may be calculated using a known incident x-ray energy spectrum, beam shape, and an initial estimate of the object's 3D mass attenuation and electron density. Our iterative minimization algorithm changes the initially arbitrary electron density voxel matrix to reduce regular differences between the analytically predicted and experimentally measured spectra at each point on the detector plane. The simulated electron density converges to that of the object as the differences are minimized. The reconstruction algorithm has been validated using simulated data produced by the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code system. We applied the imaging algorithm to a cylindrically symmetric breast tissue phantom containing multiple inhomogeneities. A preliminary ROC analysis scores greater than 0.96, which indicate that under the described simplifying conditions, this approach shows promise in identifying and localizing inhomogeneities which simulate 0.5 mm calcifications with an image voxel resolution of 0.25 cm and at a dose comparable to

  13. Identify bipolar spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Mynatt, Sarah; Cunningham, Patricia; Manning, J Sloan

    2002-06-01

    Patients with bipolar spectrum disorders commonly present with depressive symptoms to primary care clinicians. This article details bipolar spectrum disorder assessment, treatment, and treatment response. By intervening early in the course of depressive and hypomanic episodes, you can help decrease the morbidity and suffering associated with bipolar spectrum disorders.

  14. Shapes of sedimenting soft elastic capsules in a viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boltz, Horst-Holger; Kierfeld, Jan

    2015-09-01

    Soft elastic capsules which are driven through a viscous fluid undergo shape deformation coupled to their motion. We introduce an iterative solution scheme which couples hydrodynamic boundary integral methods and elastic shape equations to find the stationary axisymmetric shape and the velocity of an elastic capsule moving in a viscous fluid at low Reynolds numbers. We use this approach to systematically study dynamical shape transitions of capsules with Hookean stretching and bending energies and spherical rest shape sedimenting under the influence of gravity or centrifugal forces. We find three types of possible axisymmetric stationary shapes for sedimenting capsules with fixed volume: a pseudospherical state, a pear-shaped state, and buckled shapes. Capsule shapes are controlled by two dimensionless parameters, the Föppl-von-Kármán number characterizing the elastic properties and a Bond number characterizing the driving force. For increasing gravitational force the spherical shape transforms into a pear shape. For very large bending rigidity (very small Föppl-von-Kármán number) this transition is discontinuous with shape hysteresis. The corresponding transition line terminates, however, in a critical point, such that the discontinuous transition is not present at typical Föppl-von-Kármán numbers of synthetic capsules. In an additional bifurcation, buckled shapes occur upon increasing the gravitational force. This type of instability should be observable for generic synthetic capsules. All shape bifurcations can be resolved in the force-velocity relation of sedimenting capsules, where up to three capsule shapes with different velocities can occur for the same driving force. All three types of possible axisymmetric stationary shapes are stable with respect to rotation during sedimentation. Additionally, we study capsules pushed or pulled by a point force, where we always find capsule shapes to transform smoothly without bifurcations.

  15. Piecewise recognition of bone skeleton profiles via an iterative Hough transform approach without re-voting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricca, Giorgio; Beltrametti, Mauro C.; Massone, Anna Maria

    2015-03-01

    Many bone shapes in the human skeleton are characterized by profiles that can be associated to equations of algebraic curves. Fixing the parameters in the curve equation, by means of a classical pattern recognition procedure like the Hough transform technique, it is then possible to associate an equation to a specific bone profile. However, most skeleton districts are more accurately described by piecewise defined curves. This paper utilizes an iterative approach of the Hough transform without re-voting, to provide an efficient procedure for describing the profile of a bone in the human skeleton as a collection of different but continuously attached curves.

  16. Nuclear shape phase transition within a conjunction of γ-rigid and γ-stable collective behaviors in deformation-dependent mass formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabab, M.; El Batoul, A.; Lahbas, A.; Oulne, M.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we present a theoretical study of a conjunction of γ-rigid and γ-stable collective motions in critical point symmetries of the phase transitions from spherical to deformed shapes of nuclei using an exactly separable version of the Bohr Hamiltonian with a deformation-dependent mass term. The deformation-dependent mass is applied simultaneously to γ-rigid and γ-stable parts of this famous collective Hamiltonian. Moreover, the β part of the problem is described by means of Davidson potential, while the γ-angular part corresponding to axially symmetric shapes is treated by a harmonic oscillator potential. The energy eigenvalues and normalized eigenfunctions of the problem are obtained in compact forms by making use of the asymptotic iteration method. The combined effect of the deformation-dependent mass and rigidity as well as harmonic oscillator stiffness parameters on the energy spectrum and wave functions is duly investigated. Also, the electric quadrupole transition ratios and energy spectrum of some γ-stable and prolate nuclei are calculated and compared with the experimental data as well as with other theoretical models.

  17. Iterative methods for Toeplitz-like matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Huckle, T.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper the author will give a survey on iterative methods for solving linear equations with Toeplitz matrices, Block Toeplitz matrices, Toeplitz plus Hankel matrices, and matrices with low displacement rank. He will treat the following subjects: (1) optimal (w)-circulant preconditioners is a generalization of circulant preconditioners; (2) Optimal implementation of circulant-like preconditioners in the complex and real case; (3) preconditioning of near-singular matrices; what kind of preconditioners can be used in this case; (4) circulant preconditioning for more general classes of Toeplitz matrices; what can be said about matrices with coefficients that are not l{sub 1}-sequences; (5) preconditioners for Toeplitz least squares problems, for block Toeplitz matrices, and for Toeplitz plus Hankel matrices.

  18. Status of ITER Cryodistribution and Cryoline project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, B.; Vaghela, H.; Shah, N.; Bhattacharya, R.; Choukekar, K.; Patel, P.; Kapoor, H.; Srinivasa, M.; Chang, H. S.; Badgujar, S.; Monneret, E.

    2017-02-01

    The system of ITER Cryodistribution (CD) and Cryolines (CLs) is an integral interface between the Cryoplant systems and the superconducting (SC) magnets as well as Cryopumps (CPs). The project has progressed from the conceptual stage to the industrial stage. The subsystems are at various stages of design as defined by the project, namely, preliminary design, final design and formal reviews. Significant progresses have been made in the prototypes studies and design validations, such as the CL and cold circulators. While one of the prototype CL is already tested, the other one is in manufacturing phase. Performance test of two cold circulators have been completed. Design requirements are unique due the complexity arising from load specifications, layout constraints, regulatory compliance, operating conditions as well as several hundred interfaces. The present status of the project in terms of technical achievements, implications of the changes and the technical management as well as the risk assessment and its mitigation including path forward towards realization is described.

  19. Iterated Gate Teleportation and Blind Quantum Computation.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Delgado, Carlos A; Fitzsimons, Joseph F

    2015-06-05

    Blind quantum computation allows a user to delegate a computation to an untrusted server while keeping the computation hidden. A number of recent works have sought to establish bounds on the communication requirements necessary to implement blind computation, and a bound based on the no-programming theorem of Nielsen and Chuang has emerged as a natural limiting factor. Here we show that this constraint only holds in limited scenarios, and show how to overcome it using a novel method of iterated gate teleportations. This technique enables drastic reductions in the communication required for distributed quantum protocols, extending beyond the blind computation setting. Applied to blind quantum computation, this technique offers significant efficiency improvements, and in some scenarios offers an exponential reduction in communication requirements.

  20. Orbit of an image under iterated system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. L.; Mishra, S. N.; Jain, Sarika

    2011-03-01

    An orbital picture depicts the path of an object under semi-group of transformations. The concept initially given by Barnsley [3] has utmost importance in image compression, biological modeling and other areas of fractal geometry. In this paper, we introduce superior iterations to study the role of linear and nonlinear transformations on the orbit of an object. Various characteristics of the computed figures have been discussed to indicate the usefulness of study in mathematical analysis. Modified algorithms are given to compute the orbital picture and V-variable orbital picture. An algorithm to calculate the distance between images makes the study motivating. A brief discussion about the proof of the Cauchy sequence of images is also given.

  1. Iterated Gate Teleportation and Blind Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Delgado, Carlos A.; Fitzsimons, Joseph F.

    2015-06-01

    Blind quantum computation allows a user to delegate a computation to an untrusted server while keeping the computation hidden. A number of recent works have sought to establish bounds on the communication requirements necessary to implement blind computation, and a bound based on the no-programming theorem of Nielsen and Chuang has emerged as a natural limiting factor. Here we show that this constraint only holds in limited scenarios, and show how to overcome it using a novel method of iterated gate teleportations. This technique enables drastic reductions in the communication required for distributed quantum protocols, extending beyond the blind computation setting. Applied to blind quantum computation, this technique offers significant efficiency improvements, and in some scenarios offers an exponential reduction in communication requirements.

  2. Robot Calibration Using Iteration and Differential Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, S. H.; Wang, Y.; Ren, Y. J.; Li, D. K.

    2006-10-01

    In the applications of seam laser tracking welding robot and general measuring robot station based on stereo vision, the robot calibration is the most difficult step during the whole system calibration progress. Many calibration methods were put forward, but the exact location of base frame has to be known no matter which method was employed. However, the accurate base frame location is hard to be known. In order to obtain the position of base coordinate, this paper presents a novel iterative algorithm which can also get parameters' deviations at the same time. It was a method of employing differential kinematics to solve link parameters' deviations and approaching real values step-by-step. In the end, experiment validation was provided.

  3. Robust tooth surface reconstruction by iterative deformation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaotong; Dai, Ning; Cheng, Xiaosheng; Wang, Jun; Peng, Qingjin; Liu, Hao; Cheng, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Digital design technologies have been applied extensively in dental medicine, especially in the field of dental restoration. The all-ceramic crown is an important restoration type of dental CAD systems. This paper presents a robust tooth surface reconstruction algorithm for all-ceramic crown design. The algorithm involves three necessary steps: standard tooth initial positioning and division; salient feature point extraction using Morse theory; and standard tooth deformation using iterative Laplacian Surface Editing and mesh stitching. This algorithm can retain the morphological features of the tooth surface well. It is robust and suitable for almost all types of teeth, including incisor, canine, premolar, and molar. Moreover, it allows dental technicians to use their own preferred library teeth for reconstruction. The algorithm has been successfully integrated in our Dental CAD system, more than 1000 clinical cases have been tested to demonstrate the robustness and effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  4. Learning to improve iterative repair scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweben, Monte; Davis, Eugene

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a general learning method for dynamically selecting between repair heuristics in an iterative repair scheduling system. The system employs a version of explanation-based learning called Plausible Explanation-Based Learning (PEBL) that uses multiple examples to confirm conjectured explanations. The basic approach is to conjecture contradictions between a heuristic and statistics that measure the quality of the heuristic. When these contradictions are confirmed, a different heuristic is selected. To motivate the utility of this approach we present an empirical evaluation of the performance of a scheduling system with respect to two different repair strategies. We show that the scheduler that learns to choose between the heuristics outperforms the same scheduler with any one of two heuristics alone.

  5. Structural analysis of ITER magnet feeders

    SciTech Connect

    Ilyin, Yuri; Gung, Chen-Yu; Bauer, Pierre; Chen, Yonghua; Jong, Cornelis; Devred, Arnaud; Mitchell, Neil; Lorriere, Philippe; Farek, Jaromir; Nannini, Matthieu

    2012-06-15

    This paper summarizes the results of the static structural analyses, which were conducted in support of the ITER magnet feeder design with the aim of validating certain components against the structural design criteria. While almost every feeder has unique features, they all share many common constructional elements and the same functional specifications. The analysis approach to assess the load conditions and stresses that have driven the design is equivalent for all feeders, except for particularities that needed to be modeled in each case. The mechanical analysis of the feeders follows the sub-modeling approach: the results of the global mechanical model of a feeder assembly are used as input for the detailed models of the feeder' sub-assemblies or single components. Examples of such approach, including the load conditions, stress assessment criteria and solutions for the most critical components, are discussed. It has been concluded that the feeder system is safe in the referential operation scenarios. (authors)

  6. Chaos automata: iterated function systems with memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashlock, Dan; Golden, Jim

    2003-07-01

    Transforming biological sequences into fractals in order to visualize them is a long standing technique, in the form of the traditional four-cornered chaos game. In this paper we give a generalization of the standard chaos game visualization for DNA sequences. It incorporates iterated function systems that are called under the control of a finite state automaton, yielding a DNA to fractal transformation system with memory. We term these fractal visualizers chaos automata. The use of memory enables association of widely separated sequence events in the drawing of the fractal, finessing the “forgetfulness” of other fractal visualization methods. We use a genetic algorithm to train chaos automata to distinguish introns and exons in Zea mays (corn). A substantial issue treated here is the creation of a fitness function that leads to good visual separation of distinct data types.

  7. Electron Cyclotron Emission Diagnostics on ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Richard; Austin, Max; Phillips, Perry; Rowan, William; Beno, Joseph; Auroua, Abelhamid; Feder, Russell; Patel, Ashish; Hubbard, Amanda; Pandya, Hitesh

    2010-11-01

    Electron cyclotron emission (ECE) will be employed on ITER to measure the radial profile of electron temperature and non thermal features of the electron distribution as well as measurements of ELMs, magnetic islands, high frequency instabilities, and turbulence. There are two quasioptical systems, designed with Gaussian beam analysis. One view is radial, primarily for temperature profile measurement, the other views at a small angle to radial for measuring non-thermal emission. Radiation is conducted to by a long corrugated waveguide to a multichannel Michelson interferometer which provides wide wavelength coverage but limited time response as well as two microwave radiometers which cover the fundamental and second harmonic ECE and provide excellent time response. Measurements will be made in both X and O mode. In-situ calibration is provided by a novel hot calibration source. We discuss spatial resolution and the implications for physics studies.

  8. ITER L-mode confinement database

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S.M.

    1997-10-06

    This paper describes the content of an L-mode database that has been compiled with data from Alcator C-Mod, ASDEX, DIII, DIII-D, FTU, JET, JFT-2M, JT-60, PBX-M, PDX, T-10, TEXTOR, TFTR, and Tore-Supra. The database consists of a total of 2938 entries, 1881 of which are in the L-phase while 922 are ohmically heated only (OH). Each entry contains up to 95 descriptive parameters, including global and kinetic information, machine conditioning, and configuration. The paper presents a description of the database and the variables contained therein, and it also presents global and thermal scalings along with predictions for ITER.

  9. ITER CENTRAL SOLENOID COIL INSULATION QUALIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, N N; Mann, T L; Miller, J R; Freudenberg, K D; Reed, R P; Walsh, R P; McColskey, J D; Evans, D

    2009-06-11

    An insulation system for ITER Central Solenoid must have sufficiently high electrical and structural strength. Design efforts to bring stresses in the turn and layer insulation within allowables failed. It turned out to be impossible to eliminate high local tensile stresses in the winding pack. When high local stresses can not be designed out, the qualification procedure requires verification of the acceptable structural and electrical strength by testing. We built two 4 x 4 arrays of the conductor jacket with two options of the CS insulation and subjected the arrays to 1.2 million compressive cycles at 60 MPa and at 76 K. Such conditions simulated stresses in the CS insulation. We performed voltage withstand tests and after end of cycling we measured the breakdown voltages between in the arrays. After that we dissectioned the arrays and studied micro cracks in the insulation. We report details of the specimens preparation, test procedures and test results.

  10. Nuclear Forensic Inferences Using Iterative Multidimensional Statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Robel, M; Kristo, M J; Heller, M A

    2009-06-09

    Nuclear forensics involves the analysis of interdicted nuclear material for specific material characteristics (referred to as 'signatures') that imply specific geographical locations, production processes, culprit intentions, etc. Predictive signatures rely on expert knowledge of physics, chemistry, and engineering to develop inferences from these material characteristics. Comparative signatures, on the other hand, rely on comparison of the material characteristics of the interdicted sample (the 'questioned sample' in FBI parlance) with those of a set of known samples. In the ideal case, the set of known samples would be a comprehensive nuclear forensics database, a database which does not currently exist. In fact, our ability to analyze interdicted samples and produce an extensive list of precise materials characteristics far exceeds our ability to interpret the results. Therefore, as we seek to develop the extensive databases necessary for nuclear forensics, we must also develop the methods necessary to produce the necessary inferences from comparison of our analytical results with these large, multidimensional sets of data. In the work reported here, we used a large, multidimensional dataset of results from quality control analyses of uranium ore concentrate (UOC, sometimes called 'yellowcake'). We have found that traditional multidimensional techniques, such as principal components analysis (PCA), are especially useful for understanding such datasets and drawing relevant conclusions. In particular, we have developed an iterative partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) procedure that has proven especially adept at identifying the production location of unknown UOC samples. By removing classes which fell far outside the initial decision boundary, and then rebuilding the PLS-DA model, we have consistently produced better and more definitive attributions than with a single pass classification approach. Performance of the iterative PLS-DA method

  11. Iterative wavelet thresholding for rapid MRI reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayvanrad, Mohammad H.; McKenzie, Charles A.; Peters, Terry M.

    2011-03-01

    According to the developments in the field of compressed sampling and and sparse recovery, one might take advantage of the sparsity of an object, as an additional a priori knowledge about the object, to reconstruct it from fewer samples than that needed by the traditional sampling strategies. Since most magnetic resonance (MR) images are sparse in some domain, in this work we consider the problem of MR reconstruction and how one could apply this idea to accelerate the process of MR image/map acquisition. In particular, based on the Paupolis-Gerchgerg algorithm, an iterative thresholding algorithm for reconstruction of MR images from limited k-space observations is proposed. The proposed method takes advantage of the sparsity of most MR images in the wavelet domain. Initializing with a minimum-energy reconstruction, the object of interest is reconstructed by going through a sequence of thresholding and recovery iterations. Furthermore, MR studies often involve acquisition of multiple images in time that are highly correlated. This correlation can be used as additional knowledge on the object beside the sparsity to further reduce the reconstruction time. The performance of the proposed algorithms is experimentally evaluated and compared to other state-of-the-art methods. In particular, we show that the quality of reconstruction is increased compared to total variation (TV) regularization, and the conventional Papoulis-Gerchberg algorithm both in the absence and in the presence of noise. Also, phantom experiments show good accuracy in the reconstruction of relaxation maps from a set of highly undersampled k-space observations.

  12. Error bounds from extra precise iterative refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Demmel, James; Hida, Yozo; Kahan, William; Li, Xiaoye S.; Mukherjee, Soni; Riedy, E. Jason

    2005-02-07

    We present the design and testing of an algorithm for iterative refinement of the solution of linear equations, where the residual is computed with extra precision. This algorithm was originally proposed in the 1960s [6, 22] as a means to compute very accurate solutions to all but the most ill-conditioned linear systems of equations. However two obstacles have until now prevented its adoption in standard subroutine libraries like LAPACK: (1) There was no standard way to access the higher precision arithmetic needed to compute residuals, and (2) it was unclear how to compute a reliable error bound for the computed solution. The completion of the new BLAS Technical Forum Standard [5] has recently removed the first obstacle. To overcome the second obstacle, we show how a single application of iterative refinement can be used to compute an error bound in any norm at small cost, and use this to compute both an error bound in the usual infinity norm, and a componentwise relative error bound. We report extensive test results on over 6.2 million matrices of dimension 5, 10, 100, and 1000. As long as a normwise (resp. componentwise) condition number computed by the algorithm is less than 1/max{l_brace}10,{radical}n{r_brace} {var_epsilon}{sub w}, the computed normwise (resp. componentwise) error bound is at most 2 max{l_brace}10,{radical}n{r_brace} {center_dot} {var_epsilon}{sub w}, and indeed bounds the true error. Here, n is the matrix dimension and w is single precision roundoff error. For worse conditioned problems, we get similarly small correct error bounds in over 89.4% of cases.

  13. A Numerical Inversion of the Perrin Equations for Rotational Diffusion Constants for Ellipsoids of Revolution by Iterative Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Wright, A. Kent; Duncan, Robert C.; Beekman, Karen A.

    1973-01-01

    The rotational diffusion coefficients R1 and R3 for ellipsoids of revolution are shown to represent another pair of hydrodynamic data to obtain size and shape with theories by Sadron and Scheraga-Mandelkern. An iterative numerical technique is presented which allows the semiaxes to be determined from the Perrin equations for rotational diffusion constants. The use of this inversion technique is illustrated by application to literature data from dielectric dispersion studies. PMID:4726879

  14. Iterative build OMIT maps: Map improvement by iterative model-building and refinement without model bias

    SciTech Connect

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mailstop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Building 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA; Department of Haematology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0XY, England; Terwilliger, Thomas; Terwilliger, T.C.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf Wilhelm; Afonine, P.V.; Moriarty, N.W.; Zwart, P.H.; Hung, L.-W.; Read, R.J.; Adams, P.D.

    2008-02-12

    A procedure for carrying out iterative model-building, density modification and refinement is presented in which the density in an OMIT region is essentially unbiased by an atomic model. Density from a set of overlapping OMIT regions can be combined to create a composite 'Iterative-Build' OMIT map that is everywhere unbiased by an atomic model but also everywhere benefiting from the model-based information present elsewhere in the unit cell. The procedure may have applications in the validation of specific features in atomic models as well as in overall model validation. The procedure is demonstrated with a molecular replacement structure and with an experimentally-phased structure, and a variation on the method is demonstrated by removing model bias from a structure from the Protein Data Bank.

  15. Threshold optimization of cooperative spectrum sensing in cognitive radio networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Jia, Min; Tan, Xuezhi

    2013-01-01

    We consider the threshold optimization problem of cooperative spectrum sensing for cognitive radio (CR) and investigate the threshold optimization algorithm for both single-channel and multichannel cooperative spectrum sensing. In order to obtain the optimal threshold for single-channel cooperative spectrum sensing, we deploy the fusion rules AND Logic, OR Logic, and K-OUT-N Logic. Moreover, an iterative optimization algorithm is proposed to obtain optimal CRs in cooperative spectrum sensing and their optimal thresholds. In multichannel cooperative spectrum sensing, two threshold optimization methods—namely nonrestrained multichannel threshold optimization (NRMTO) and restrained multichannel threshold optimization (RMTO)—have been proposed in order to decrease the total error detection probability of all the subchannels. The simulation results show that in single-channel cooperative spectrum sensing the proposed algorithm outperforms traditional cooperative spectrum sensing with the uniform threshold if the SNR is different, while decreasing the detection performance slightly if the SNR is identical. The results also indicate that the NRMTO can achieve the minimal total error detection probability of multichannel cooperative spectrum sensing, while the RMTO can guarantee the detection performance of each subchannel but with a higher total error detection probability.

  16. From Shape to Letters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiller, Hillel A.

    In order to make letter shape recognition an integral part of perception training, the use of the line in its two basic shapes is proposed. Letter shapes may seem exceedingly complex linear shapes to young minds. Thus instead of instruction in configuration, instruction involving transformational activities to manipulate and create the…

  17. SU-E-I-33: Initial Evaluation of Model-Based Iterative CT Reconstruction Using Standard Image Quality Phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gingold, E; Dave, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare a new model-based iterative reconstruction with existing reconstruction methods (filtered backprojection and basic iterative reconstruction) using quantitative analysis of standard image quality phantom images. Methods: An ACR accreditation phantom (Gammex 464) and a CATPHAN600 phantom were scanned using 3 routine clinical acquisition protocols (adult axial brain, adult abdomen, and pediatric abdomen) on a Philips iCT system. Each scan was acquired using default conditions and 75%, 50% and 25% dose levels. Images were reconstructed using standard filtered backprojection (FBP), conventional iterative reconstruction (iDose4) and a prototype model-based iterative reconstruction (IMR). Phantom measurements included CT number accuracy, contrast to noise ratio (CNR), modulation transfer function (MTF), low contrast detectability (LCD), and noise power spectrum (NPS). Results: The choice of reconstruction method had no effect on CT number accuracy, or MTF (p<0.01). The CNR of a 6 HU contrast target was improved by 1–67% with iDose4 relative to FBP, while IMR improved CNR by 145–367% across all protocols and dose levels. Within each scan protocol, the CNR improvement from IMR vs FBP showed a general trend of greater improvement at lower dose levels. NPS magnitude was greatest for FBP and lowest for IMR. The NPS of the IMR reconstruction showed a pronounced decrease with increasing spatial frequency, consistent with the unusual noise texture seen in IMR images. Conclusion: Iterative Model Reconstruction reduces noise and improves contrast-to-noise ratio without sacrificing spatial resolution in CT phantom images. This offers the possibility of radiation dose reduction and improved low contrast detectability compared with filtered backprojection or conventional iterative reconstruction.

  18. Shape memory polymers

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Thomas S.; Bearinger, Jane P.

    2015-06-09

    New shape memory polymer compositions, methods for synthesizing new shape memory polymers, and apparatus comprising an actuator and a shape memory polymer wherein the shape memory polymer comprises at least a portion of the actuator. A shape memory polymer comprising a polymer composition which physically forms a network structure wherein the polymer composition has shape-memory behavior and can be formed into a permanent primary shape, re-formed into a stable secondary shape, and controllably actuated to recover the permanent primary shape. Polymers have optimal aliphatic network structures due to minimization of dangling chains by using monomers that are symmetrical and that have matching amine and hydroxyl groups providing polymers and polymer foams with clarity, tight (narrow temperature range) single transitions, and high shape recovery and recovery force that are especially useful for implanting in the human body.

  19. U-Shaped Curves in Development: A PDP Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Timothy T.; Rakison, David H.; McClelland, James L.

    2004-01-01

    As the articles in this issue attest, U-shaped curves in development have stimulated a wide spectrum of research across disparate task domains and age groups and have provoked a variety of ideas about their origins and theoretical significance. In the authors' view, the ubiquity of the general pattern suggests that U-shaped curves can arise from…

  20. Magnet design technical report---ITER definition phase

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, C.

    1989-04-28

    This report contains papers on the following topics: conceptual design; radiation damage of ITER magnet systems; insulation system of the magnets; critical current density and strain sensitivity; toroidal field coil structural analysis; stress analysis for the ITER central solenoid; and volt-second capabilities and PF magnet configurations.

  1. A Model and Simple Iterative Algorithm for Redundancy Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fornell, Claes; And Others

    1988-01-01

    This paper shows that redundancy maximization with J. K. Johansson's extension can be accomplished via a simple iterative algorithm based on H. Wold's Partial Least Squares. The model and the iterative algorithm for the least squares approach to redundancy maximization are presented. (TJH)

  2. An Iterative Method for Solving Variable Coefficient ODEs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeba, Elias; Yoon, Jeong-Mi; Zafiris, Vasilis

    2003-01-01

    In this classroom note, the authors present a method to solve variable coefficients ordinary differential equations of the form p(x)y([squared])(x) + q(x)y([superscript 1])(x) + r(x)y(x) = 0. They propose an iterative method as an alternate method to solve the above equation. This iterative method is accessible to an undergraduate student studying…

  3. Language Evolution by Iterated Learning with Bayesian Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Thomas L.; Kalish, Michael L.

    2007-01-01

    Languages are transmitted from person to person and generation to generation via a process of iterated learning: people learn a language from other people who once learned that language themselves. We analyze the consequences of iterated learning for learning algorithms based on the principles of Bayesian inference, assuming that learners compute…

  4. Validation of 1-D transport and sawtooth models for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Connor, J.W.; Turner, M.F.; Attenberger, S.E.; Houlberg, W.A.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper the authors describe progress on validating a number of local transport models by comparing their predictions with relevant experimental data from a range of tokamaks in the ITER profile database. This database, the testing procedure and results are discussed. In addition a model for sawtooth oscillations is used to investigate their effect in an ITER plasma with alpha-particles.

  5. Not so Complex: Iteration in the Complex Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Dell, Robin S.

    2014-01-01

    The simple process of iteration can produce complex and beautiful figures. In this article, Robin O'Dell presents a set of tasks requiring students to use the geometric interpretation of complex number multiplication to construct linear iteration rules. When the outputs are plotted in the complex plane, the graphs trace pleasing designs…

  6. Rapid, Reliable Shape Setting of Superelastic Nitinol for Prototyping Robots

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Hunter B.; Webster, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Shape setting Nitinol tubes and wires in a typical laboratory setting for use in superelastic robots is challenging. Obtaining samples that remain superelastic and exhibit desired precurvatures currently requires many iterations, which is time consuming and consumes a substantial amount of Nitinol. To provide a more accurate and reliable method of shape setting, in this paper we propose an electrical technique that uses Joule heating to attain the necessary shape setting temperatures. The resulting high power heating prevents unintended aging of the material and yields consistent and accurate results for the rapid creation of prototypes. We present a complete algorithm and system together with an experimental analysis of temperature regulation. We experimentally validate the approach on Nitinol tubes that are shape set into planar curves. We also demonstrate the feasibility of creating general space curves by shape setting a helical tube. The system demonstrates a mean absolute temperature error of 10°C. PMID:27648473

  7. Rapid, Reliable Shape Setting of Superelastic Nitinol for Prototyping Robots.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Hunter B; Webster, Robert J

    Shape setting Nitinol tubes and wires in a typical laboratory setting for use in superelastic robots is challenging. Obtaining samples that remain superelastic and exhibit desired precurvatures currently requires many iterations, which is time consuming and consumes a substantial amount of Nitinol. To provide a more accurate and reliable method of shape setting, in this paper we propose an electrical technique that uses Joule heating to attain the necessary shape setting temperatures. The resulting high power heating prevents unintended aging of the material and yields consistent and accurate results for the rapid creation of prototypes. We present a complete algorithm and system together with an experimental analysis of temperature regulation. We experimentally validate the approach on Nitinol tubes that are shape set into planar curves. We also demonstrate the feasibility of creating general space curves by shape setting a helical tube. The system demonstrates a mean absolute temperature error of 10°C.

  8. Majorana approach to the stochastic theory of line shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komijani, Yashar; Coleman, Piers

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by recent Mössbauer experiments on strongly correlated mixed-valence systems, we revisit the Kubo-Anderson stochastic theory of spectral line shapes. Using a Majorana representation for the nuclear spin we demonstrate how to recast the classic line-shape theory in a field-theoretic and diagrammatic language. We show that the leading contribution to the self-energy can reproduce most of the observed line-shape features including splitting and line-shape narrowing, while the vertex and the self-consistency corrections can be systematically included in the calculation. This approach permits us to predict the line shape produced by an arbitrary bulk charge fluctuation spectrum providing a model-independent way to extract the local charge fluctuation spectrum of the surrounding medium. We also derive an inverse formula to extract the charge fluctuation from the measured line shape.

  9. Statistical model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) in clinical CT systems: Experimental assessment of noise performance

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ke; Tang, Jie; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To reduce radiation dose in CT imaging, the statistical model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) method has been introduced for clinical use. Based on the principle of MBIR and its nonlinear nature, the noise performance of MBIR is expected to be different from that of the well-understood filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction method. The purpose of this work is to experimentally assess the unique noise characteristics of MBIR using a state-of-the-art clinical CT system. Methods: Three physical phantoms, including a water cylinder and two pediatric head phantoms, were scanned in axial scanning mode using a 64-slice CT scanner (Discovery CT750 HD, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) at seven different mAs levels (5, 12.5, 25, 50, 100, 200, 300). At each mAs level, each phantom was repeatedly scanned 50 times to generate an image ensemble for noise analysis. Both the FBP method with a standard kernel and the MBIR method (Veo{sup ®}, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) were used for CT image reconstruction. Three-dimensional (3D) noise power spectrum (NPS), two-dimensional (2D) NPS, and zero-dimensional NPS (noise variance) were assessed both globally and locally. Noise magnitude, noise spatial correlation, noise spatial uniformity and their dose dependence were examined for the two reconstruction methods. Results: (1) At each dose level and at each frequency, the magnitude of the NPS of MBIR was smaller than that of FBP. (2) While the shape of the NPS of FBP was dose-independent, the shape of the NPS of MBIR was strongly dose-dependent; lower dose lead to a “redder” NPS with a lower mean frequency value. (3) The noise standard deviation (σ) of MBIR and dose were found to be related through a power law of σ ∝ (dose){sup −β} with the component β ≈ 0.25, which violated the classical σ ∝ (dose){sup −0.5} power law in FBP. (4) With MBIR, noise reduction was most prominent for thin image slices. (5) MBIR lead to better noise spatial

  10. Preliminary consideration of CFETR ITER-like case diagnostic system.

    PubMed

    Li, G S; Yang, Y; Wang, Y M; Ming, T F; Han, X; Liu, S C; Wang, E H; Liu, Y K; Yang, W J; Li, G Q; Hu, Q S; Gao, X

    2016-11-01

    Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) is a new superconducting tokamak device being designed in China, which aims at bridging the gap between ITER and DEMO, where DEMO is a tokamak demonstration fusion reactor. Two diagnostic cases, ITER-like case and towards DEMO case, have been considered for CFETR early and later operating phases, respectively. In this paper, some preliminary consideration of ITER-like case will be presented. Based on ITER diagnostic system, three versions of increased complexity and coverage of the ITER-like case diagnostic system have been developed with different goals and functions. Version A aims only machine protection and basic control. Both of version B and version C are mainly for machine protection, basic and advanced control, but version C has an increased level of redundancy necessary for improved measurements capability. The performance of these versions and needed R&D work are outlined.

  11. Final Report on ITER Task Agreement 81-10

    SciTech Connect

    Brad J. Merrill

    2009-01-01

    An International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Implementing Task Agreement (ITA) on Magnet Safety was established between the ITER International Organization (IO) and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Fusion Safety Program (FSP) during calendar year 2004. The objectives of this ITA were to add new capabilities to the MAGARC code and to use this updated version of MAGARC to analyze unmitigated superconductor quench events for both poloidal field (PF) and toroidal field (TF) coils of the ITER design. This report documents the completion of the work scope for this ITA. Based on the results obtained for this ITA, an unmitigated quench event in an ITER larger PF coil does not appear to be as severe an accident as in an ITER TF coil.

  12. Preliminary consideration of CFETR ITER-like case diagnostic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G. S.; Yang, Y.; Wang, Y. M.; Ming, T. F.; Han, X.; Liu, S. C.; Wang, E. H.; Liu, Y. K.; Yang, W. J.; Li, G. Q.; Hu, Q. S.; Gao, X.

    2016-11-01

    Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) is a new superconducting tokamak device being designed in China, which aims at bridging the gap between ITER and DEMO, where DEMO is a tokamak demonstration fusion reactor. Two diagnostic cases, ITER-like case and towards DEMO case, have been considered for CFETR early and later operating phases, respectively. In this paper, some preliminary consideration of ITER-like case will be presented. Based on ITER diagnostic system, three versions of increased complexity and coverage of the ITER-like case diagnostic system have been developed with different goals and functions. Version A aims only machine protection and basic control. Both of version B and version C are mainly for machine protection, basic and advanced control, but version C has an increased level of redundancy necessary for improved measurements capability. The performance of these versions and needed R&D work are outlined.

  13. The Effect of Iteration on the Design Performance of Primary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Looijenga, Annemarie; Klapwijk, Remke; de Vries, Marc J.

    2015-01-01

    Iteration during the design process is an essential element. Engineers optimize their design by iteration. Research on iteration in Primary Design Education is however scarce; possibly teachers believe they do not have enough time for iteration in daily classroom practices. Spontaneous playing behavior of children indicates that iteration fits in…

  14. Eliminating Unpredictable Variation through Iterated Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Kenny; Wonnacott, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Human languages may be shaped not only by the (individual psychological) processes of language acquisition, but also by population-level processes arising from repeated language learning and use. One prevalent feature of natural languages is that they avoid unpredictable variation. The current work explores whether linguistic predictability might…

  15. Fast parareal iterations for fractional diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shu-Lin; Zhou, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Numerical methods for fractional PDEs is a hot topic recently. This work is concerned with the parareal algorithm for system of ODEs u‧ (t) + Au (t) = f that arising from semi-discretizations of time-dependent fractional diffusion equations with nonsymmetric Riemann-Liouville fractional derivatives. The spatial semi-discretization of this kind of fractional derivatives often results in a coefficient matrix A with spectrum σ (A)

  16. Iterative Mesh Transformation for 3D Segmentation of Livers with Cancers in CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Difei; Wu, Yin; Harris, Gordon; Cai, Wenli

    2015-01-01

    Segmentation of diseased liver remains a challenging task in clinical applications due to the high inter-patient variability in liver shapes, sizes and pathologies caused by cancers or other liver diseases. In this paper, we present a multi-resolution mesh segmentation algorithm for 3D segmentation of livers, called iterative mesh transformation that deforms the mesh of a region-of-interest (ROI) in a progressive manner by iterations between mesh transformation and contour optimization. Mesh transformation deforms the 3D mesh based on the deformation transfer model that searches the optimal mesh based on the affine transformation subjected to a set of constraints of targeting vertices. Besides, contour optimization searches the optimal transversal contours of the ROI by applying the dynamic-programming algorithm to the intersection polylines of the 3D mesh on 2D transversal image planes. The initial constraint set for mesh transformation can be defined by a very small number of targeting vertices, namely landmarks, and progressively updated by adding the targeting vertices selected from the optimal transversal contours calculated in contour optimization. This iterative 3D mesh transformation constrained by 2D optimal transversal contours provides an efficient solution to a progressive approximation of the mesh of the targeting ROI. Based on this iterative mesh transformation algorithm, we developed a semi-automated scheme for segmentation of diseased livers with cancers using as little as five user-identified landmarks. The evaluation study demonstrates that this semiautomated liver segmentation scheme can achieve accurate and reliable segmentation results with significant reduction of interaction time and efforts when dealing with diseased liver cases. PMID:25728595

  17. Iterative mesh transformation for 3D segmentation of livers with cancers in CT images.

    PubMed

    Lu, Difei; Wu, Yin; Harris, Gordon; Cai, Wenli

    2015-07-01

    Segmentation of diseased liver remains a challenging task in clinical applications due to the high inter-patient variability in liver shapes, sizes and pathologies caused by cancers or other liver diseases. In this paper, we present a multi-resolution mesh segmentation algorithm for 3D segmentation of livers, called iterative mesh transformation that deforms the mesh of a region-of-interest (ROI) in a progressive manner by iterations between mesh transformation and contour optimization. Mesh transformation deforms the 3D mesh based on the deformation transfer model that searches the optimal mesh based on the affine transformation subjected to a set of constraints of targeting vertices. Besides, contour optimization searches the optimal transversal contours of the ROI by applying the dynamic-programming algorithm to the intersection polylines of the 3D mesh on 2D transversal image planes. The initial constraint set for mesh transformation can be defined by a very small number of targeting vertices, namely landmarks, and progressively updated by adding the targeting vertices selected from the optimal transversal contours calculated in contour optimization. This iterative 3D mesh transformation constrained by 2D optimal transversal contours provides an efficient solution to a progressive approximation of the mesh of the targeting ROI. Based on this iterative mesh transformation algorithm, we developed a semi-automated scheme for segmentation of diseased livers with cancers using as little as five user-identified landmarks. The evaluation study demonstrates that this semi-automated liver segmentation scheme can achieve accurate and reliable segmentation results with significant reduction of interaction time and efforts when dealing with diseased liver cases.

  18. Evaluating iterative reconstruction performance in computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Baiyu Solomon, Justin; Ramirez Giraldo, Juan Carlos; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: Iterative reconstruction (IR) offers notable advantages in computed tomography (CT). However, its performance characterization is complicated by its potentially nonlinear behavior, impacting performance in terms of specific tasks. This study aimed to evaluate the performance of IR with both task-specific and task-generic strategies. Methods: The performance of IR in CT was mathematically assessed with an observer model that predicted the detection accuracy in terms of the detectability index (d′). d′ was calculated based on the properties of the image noise and resolution, the observer, and the detection task. The characterizations of image noise and resolution were extended to accommodate the nonlinearity of IR. A library of tasks was mathematically modeled at a range of sizes (radius 1–4 mm), contrast levels (10–100 HU), and edge profiles (sharp and soft). Unique d′ values were calculated for each task with respect to five radiation exposure levels (volume CT dose index, CTDI{sub vol}: 3.4–64.8 mGy) and four reconstruction algorithms (filtered backprojection reconstruction, FBP; iterative reconstruction in imaging space, IRIS; and sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction with strengths of 3 and 5, SAFIRE3 and SAFIRE5; all provided by Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany). The d′ values were translated into the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) to represent human observer performance. For each task and reconstruction algorithm, a threshold dose was derived as the minimum dose required to achieve a threshold AUC of 0.9. A task-specific dose reduction potential of IR was calculated as the difference between the threshold doses for IR and FBP. A task-generic comparison was further made between IR and FBP in terms of the percent of all tasks yielding an AUC higher than the threshold. Results: IR required less dose than FBP to achieve the threshold AUC. In general, SAFIRE5 showed the most significant dose reduction

  19. Study of the Load Resilient External Matching Circuit for the ITER ICRH/FWCD System by means of its Mock-up

    SciTech Connect

    Messiaen, A.; Dumortier, P.; Lamalle, P. U.; Vervier, M.

    2007-09-28

    The reference matching solution for ITER grouping the 24 straps of the ITER antenna array in 4 'conjugate T' (CT) circuits through pre-matching network is investigated starting from the S matrix measurements versus antenna loading made on the mock-up of the original design. Six decouplers alleviate the mutual coupling effects between the 4 matching circuits and their power sources. All matching actuators are outside the antenna plug. The matching procedure allows the control of load resilience and plasma excitation spectrum for heating and current drive.

  20. Accelerating Spectrum Sharing Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Juan D. Deaton; Lynda L. Brighton; Rangam Subramanian; Hussein Moradi; Jose Loera

    2013-09-01

    Spectrum sharing potentially holds the promise of solving the emerging spectrum crisis. However, technology innovators face the conundrum of developing spectrum sharing technologies without the ability to experiment and test with real incumbent systems. Interference with operational incumbents can prevent critical services, and the cost of deploying and operating an incumbent system can be prohibitive. Thus, the lack of incumbent systems and frequency authorization for technology incubation and demonstration has stymied spectrum sharing research. To this end, industry, academia, and regulators all require a test facility for validating hypotheses and demonstrating functionality without affecting operational incumbent systems. This article proposes a four-phase program supported by our spectrum accountability architecture. We propose that our comprehensive experimentation and testing approach for technology incubation and demonstration will accelerate the development of spectrum sharing technologies.

  1. Shape analysis of corpus callosum in phenylketonuria using a new 3D correspondence algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qing; Christ, Shawn E.; Karsch, Kevin; Peck, Dawn; Duan, Ye

    2010-03-01

    Statistical shape analysis of brain structures has gained increasing interest from neuroimaging community because it can precisely locate shape differences between healthy and pathological structures. The most difficult and crucial problem is establishing shape correspondence among individual 3D shapes. This paper proposes a new algorithm for 3D shape correspondence. A set of landmarks are sampled on a template shape, and initial correspondence is established between the template and the target shape based on the similarity of locations and normal directions. The landmarks on the target are then refined by iterative thin plate spline. The algorithm is simple and fast, and no spherical mapping is needed. We apply our method to the statistical shape analysis of the corpus callosum (CC) in phenylketonuria (PKU), and significant local shape differences between the patients and the controls are found in the most anterior and posterior aspects of the corpus callosum.

  2. Convergence rate calculation of simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique algorithm for diffuse optical tomography image reconstruction: A feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Ching-Cheng; Tsai, Jui-che; Chen, Chung-Ming; Yu, Zong-Han; Sun, Chia-Wei

    2012-04-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is an emerging technique for functional biological imaging. The imaging quality of DOT depends on the imaging reconstruction algorithm. The SIRT has been widely used for DOT image reconstruction but there is no criterion to truncate based on any kind of residual parameter. The iteration loops will always be decided by experimental rule. This work presents the CR calculation that can be great help for SIRT optimization. In this paper, four inhomogeneities with various shapes of absorption distributions are simulated as imaging targets. The images are reconstructed and analyzed based on the simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT) method. For optimization between time consumption and imaging accuracy in reconstruction process, the numbers of iteration loop needed to be optimized with a criterion in algorithm, that is, the root mean square error (RMSE) should be minimized in limited iterations. For clinical applications of DOT, the RMSE cannot be obtained because the measured targets are unknown. Thus, the correlations between the RMSE and the convergence rate (CR) in SIRT algorithm are analyzed in this paper. From the simulation results, the parameter CR reveals the related RMSE value of reconstructed images. The CR calculation offers an optimized criterion of iteration process in SIRT algorithm for DOT imaging. Based on the result, the SIRT can be modified with CR calculation for self-optimization. CR reveals an indicator of SIRT image reconstruction in clinical DOT measurement. Based on the comparison result between RMSE and CR, a threshold value of CR (CRT) can offer an optimized number of iteration steps for DOT image reconstruction. This paper shows the feasibility study by utilizing CR criterion for SIRT in simulation and the clinical application of DOT measurement relies on further investigation.

  3. Progress of ITER Superconducting Magnet Procurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, N.

    The ITER superconducting magnet system consists of 18 Toroidal Field (TF) coils, 1 Central Solenoid (CS), 6 Poloidal Field (PF) coils and 18 Correction coils (CC). The TF conductors will be manufactured by China (7%), EU (20%), Korea (20%), Japan (25%), Russia (20%) and US (8%), TF coils by EU (10 coils) and Japan (9 coils), in which one spare is included, all TF coil cases by Japan, all CS conductors by Japan, all CS (7 modules including a spare), PF conductor by China (65%), EU (21%) and Russia (14%), PF coils by EU (5 coils) and Russia (1 coil), all CCs by China and all feeder by China, respectively. Since the TF coil manufacture is one of long-lead items, procurement of the TF conductors have been started. More than 40 TF conductors have already been fabricated. Large-scale trials for TF coil manufacture have also been started and successful results were obtained in both EU and Japan, such as manufacture of full-scale radial plates. The trials for PF coil and CC has been done by Russia and China.

  4. Iterative phase retrieval algorithms. I: optimization.

    PubMed

    Guo, Changliang; Liu, Shi; Sheridan, John T

    2015-05-20

    Two modified Gerchberg-Saxton (GS) iterative phase retrieval algorithms are proposed. The first we refer to as the spatial phase perturbation GS algorithm (SPP GSA). The second is a combined GS hybrid input-output algorithm (GS/HIOA). In this paper (Part I), it is demonstrated that the SPP GS and GS/HIO algorithms are both much better at avoiding stagnation during phase retrieval, allowing them to successfully locate superior solutions compared with either the GS or the HIO algorithms. The performances of the SPP GS and GS/HIO algorithms are also compared. Then, the error reduction (ER) algorithm is combined with the HIO algorithm (ER/HIOA) to retrieve the input object image and the phase, given only some knowledge of its extent and the amplitude in the Fourier domain. In Part II, the algorithms developed here are applied to carry out known plaintext and ciphertext attacks on amplitude encoding and phase encoding double random phase encryption systems. Significantly, ER/HIOA is then used to carry out a ciphertext-only attack on AE DRPE systems.

  5. Sequence analysis by iterated maps, a review.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Jonas S

    2014-05-01

    Among alignment-free methods, Iterated Maps (IMs) are on a particular extreme: they are also scale free (order free). The use of IMs for sequence analysis is also distinct from other alignment-free methodologies in being rooted in statistical mechanics instead of computational linguistics. Both of these roots go back over two decades to the use of fractal geometry in the characterization of phase-space representations. The time series analysis origin of the field is betrayed by the title of the manuscript that started this alignment-free subdomain in 1990, 'Chaos Game Representation'. The clash between the analysis of sequences as continuous series and the better established use of Markovian approaches to discrete series was almost immediate, with a defining critique published in same journal 2 years later. The rest of that decade would go by before the scale-free nature of the IM space was uncovered. The ensuing decade saw this scalability generalized for non-genomic alphabets as well as an interest in its use for graphic representation of biological sequences. Finally, in the past couple of years, in step with the emergence of BigData and MapReduce as a new computational paradigm, there is a surprising third act in the IM story. Multiple reports have described gains in computational efficiency of multiple orders of magnitude over more conventional sequence analysis methodologies. The stage appears to be now set for a recasting of IMs with a central role in processing nextgen sequencing results.

  6. RF heating needs and plans for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Bora, Dhiraj; Beaumont, B.; Kobayashi, N.; Tanga, A.; Goulding, R.; Swain, D.; Jacquinot, J.

    2007-09-28

    RF heating systems are required to deliver more than half of the total auxiliary power to operate ITER successfully through the different levels. To achieve this goal, systems in the range of ICRF, LHF and ECRF will be implemented for different tasks in different phases of operation. Power levels proposed to be used in different ranges will vary depending on the needs. Different mixes of power will depend on the physics needs of the experimental programmes. Lower Hybrid power of 20 MW at 5.0 GHz is not planned for the startup phase and therefore no procurement scheme exists at the present time. 20 MW will be delivered into the plasma at 40 to 55 MHz as well as at 170 GHz with the help of Ion Cyclotron Heating (ICH) and Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) systems respectively. All the heating systems will have the capability to operate in continuous mode. A dedicated ECH 3.0 MW system at 127.6 GHz will be used for plasma breakdown and start up.

  7. Design and Use of Interactive Social Stories for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sani-Bozkurt, Sunagul; Vuran, Sezgin; Akbulut, Yavuz

    2017-01-01

    The current study aimed to design technology-supported interactive social stories to teach social skills to children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). A design-based research was implemented with children with ASD along with the participation of their mothers, teachers, peers and field experts. An iterative remediation process was followed…

  8. Low-Cost, Net-Shape Ceramic Radial Turbine Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT. TASK Garrett Turbine Engine Company AE OKUI UBR 111 South 34th Street, P.O. Box 2517 Phoenix, Arizona 85010 %I. CONTROLLING...processing iterations. Program management and materials characterization were conducted at Garrett Turbine Engine Company (GTEC), test bar and rotor...automotive gas turbine engine rotor development efforts at ACC. xvii PREFACE This is the final technical report of the Low-Cost, Net- Shape Ceramic

  9. Asymmetric bats characterize universality for parallel iteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoop, R.; Steeb, W.-H.

    1996-07-01

    Generalized Baker maps provide one of the most fundamental mechanisms to dynamically generate fractal structures. We show that in the limit of a large number of maps, the entropy function which describes the composed system converges towards a universal entropy function which, qualitatively, depends only on the grammatical structure of the system but has a characteristic bat-like shape. We present theoretical and numerical results on the universal entropy function for different grammars.

  10. Enhancing the cosmic shear power spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Fergus; Harnois-Déraps, Joachim; Heymans, Catherine; Jimenez, Raul; Joachimi, Benjamin; Verde, Licia

    2016-02-01

    Applying a transformation to a non-Gaussian field can enhance the information content of the resulting power spectrum, by reducing the correlations between Fourier modes. In the context of weak gravitational lensing, it has been shown that this gain in information content is significantly compromised by the presence of shape noise. We apply clipping to mock convergence fields, a technique which is known to be robust in the presence of noise and has been successfully applied to galaxy number density fields. When analysed in isolation the resulting convergence power spectrum returns degraded constraints on cosmological parameters. However, substantial gains can be achieved by performing a combined analysis of the power spectra derived from both the original and transformed fields. Even in the presence of realistic levels of shape noise, we demonstrate that this approach is capable of reducing the area of likelihood contours within the Ωm - σ8 plane by more than a factor of 3.

  11. Mission of ITER and Challenges for the Young

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Kaname

    2009-02-01

    It is recognized that the ongoing effort to provide sufficient energy for the wellbeing of the globe's population and to power the world economy is of the greatest importance. ITER is a joint international research and development project that aims to demonstrate the scientific and technical feasibility of fusion power. It represents the responsible actions of governments whose countries comprise over half the world's population, to create fusion power as a source of clean, economic, carbon dioxide-free energy. This is the most important science initiative of our time. The partners in the Project—the ITER Parties—are the European Union, Japan, the People's Republic of China, India, the Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation and the USA. ITER will be constructed in Europe, at Cadarache in the South of France. The talk will illustrate the genesis of the ITER Organization, the ongoing work at the Cadarache site and the planned schedule for construction. There will also be an explanation of the unique aspects of international collaboration that have been developed for ITER. Although the present focus of the project is construction activities, ITER is also a major scientific and technological research program, for which the best of the world's intellectual resources is needed. Challenges for the young, imperative for fulfillment of the objective of ITER will be identified. It is important that young students and researchers worldwide recognize the rapid development of the project, and the fundamental issues that must be overcome in ITER. The talk will also cover the exciting career and fellowship opportunities for young people at the ITER Organization.

  12. Stokes-Doppler coherence imaging for ITER boundary tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J.; Kocan, M.; Lisgo, S.; Reichle, R.

    2016-11-01

    An optical coherence imaging system is presently being designed for impurity transport studies and other applications on ITER. The wide variation in magnetic field strength and pitch angle (assumed known) across the field of view generates additional Zeeman-polarization-weighting information that can improve the reliability of tomographic reconstructions. Because background reflected light will be somewhat depolarized analysis of only the polarized fraction may be enough to provide a level of background suppression. We present the principles behind these ideas and some simulations that demonstrate how the approach might work on ITER. The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of the ITER Organization.

  13. RF-driven advanced modes of ITER operation

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, J.; Artaud, J. F.; Basiuk, V.; Decker, J.; Giruzzi, G.; Hawkes, N.; Imbeaux, F.; Litaudon, X.; Mailloux, J.; Peysson, Y.; Schneider, M.; Brix, M.

    2009-11-26

    The impact of the Radio Frequency heating and current drive systems on the ITER advanced scenarios is analyzed by means of the CRONOS suite of codes for integrated tokamak modelling. As a first step, the code is applied to analyze a high power advanced scenario discharge of JET in order to validate both the heating and current drive modules and the overall simulation procedure. Then, ITER advanced scenarios, based on Radio Frequency systems, are studied on the basis of previous results. These simulations show that both hybrid and steady-state scenarios could be possible within the ITER specifications, using RF heating and current drive only.

  14. Noise propagation in iterative reconstruction algorithms with line searches

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Jinyi

    2003-11-15

    In this paper we analyze the propagation of noise in iterative image reconstruction algorithms. We derive theoretical expressions for the general form of preconditioned gradient algorithms with line searches. The results are applicable to a wide range of iterative reconstruction problems, such as emission tomography, transmission tomography, and image restoration. A unique contribution of this paper comparing to our previous work [1] is that the line search is explicitly modeled and we do not use the approximation that the gradient of the objective function is zero. As a result, the error in the estimate of noise at early iterations is significantly reduced.

  15. Iterative cross section sequence graph for handwritten character segmentation.

    PubMed

    Dawoud, Amer

    2007-08-01

    The iterative cross section sequence graph (ICSSG) is an algorithm for handwritten character segmentation. It expands the cross section sequence graph concept by applying it iteratively at equally spaced thresholds. The iterative thresholding reduces the effect of information loss associated with image binarization. ICSSG preserves the characters' skeletal structure by preventing the interference of pixels that causes flooding of adjacent characters' segments. Improving the structural quality of the characters' skeleton facilitates better feature extraction and classification, which improves the overall performance of optical character recognition (OCR). Experimental results showed significant improvements in OCR recognition rates compared to other well-established segmentation algorithms.

  16. Perturbation-iteration theory for analyzing microwave striplines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kretch, B. E.

    1985-01-01

    A perturbation-iteration technique is presented for determining the propagation constant and characteristic impedance of an unshielded microstrip transmission line. The method converges to the correct solution with a few iterations at each frequency and is equivalent to a full wave analysis. The perturbation-iteration method gives a direct solution for the propagation constant without having to find the roots of a transcendental dispersion equation. The theory is presented in detail along with numerical results for the effective dielectric constant and characteristic impedance for a wide range of substrate dielectric constants, stripline dimensions, and frequencies.

  17. RF-driven advanced modes of ITER operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, J.; Artaud, J. F.; Basiuk, V.; Brix, M.; Decker, J.; Giruzzi, G.; Hawkes, N.; Imbeaux, F.; Litaudon, X.; Mailloux, J.; Peysson, Y.; Schneider, M.

    2009-11-01

    The impact of the Radio Frequency heating and current drive systems on the ITER advanced scenarios is analyzed by means of the CRONOS suite of codes for integrated tokamak modelling. As a first step, the code is applied to analyze a high power advanced scenario discharge of JET in order to validate both the heating and current drive modules and the overall simulation procedure. Then, ITER advanced scenarios, based on Radio Frequency systems, are studied on the basis of previous results. These simulations show that both hybrid and steady-state scenarios could be possible within the ITER specifications, using RF heating and current drive only.

  18. Integrated Modelling of Iter Hybrid Scenarios with Eccd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giruzzi, G.; Artaud, J. F.; Basiuk, V.; Garcia, J.; Imbeaux, F.; Schneider, M.

    2009-04-01

    ITER hybrid scenarios may require off-axis current drive in order to keep the safety factor above 1. In this type of applications, alignment of the current sources and self-consistency of current and temperature profiles are critical issues, which can only be addressed by integrated modelling. To this end, the CRONOS suite of codes has been applied to the simulation of these scenarios. Results of simulations of ITER hybrid scenarios assisted by ECCD, using the ITER equatorial launcher, for both co- and counter-ECCD, are presented.

  19. Iterative schemes for nonsymmetric and indefinite elliptic boundary value problems

    SciTech Connect

    Bramble, J.H.; Leyk, Z.; Pasciak, J.E.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is twofold. The first is to describe some simple and robust iterative schemes for nonsymmetric and indefinite elliptic boundary value problems. The schemes are based in the Sobolev space H ([Omega]) and require minimal hypotheses. The second is to develop algorithms utilizing a coarse-grid approximation. This leads to iteration matrices whose eigenvalues lie in the right half of the complex plane. In fact, for symmetric indefinite problems, the iteration is reduced to a well-conditioned symmetric positive definite system which can be solved by conjugate gradient interation. Applications of the general theory as well as numerical examples are given. 20 refs., 8 tabs.

  20. Iterative method for elliptic problems on regions partitioned into substructures

    SciTech Connect

    Bramble, J.H.; Pasciak, J.E.; Schatz, A.H.

    1986-04-01

    Some new preconditioners for discretizations of elliptic boundary problems are studied. With these preconditioners, the domain under consideration is broken into subdomains and preconditioners are defined which only require the solution of matrix problems on the subdomains. Analytic estimates are given which guarantee that under appropriate hypotheses, the preconditioned iterative procedure converges to the solution of the discrete equations with a rate per iteration that is independent of the number of unknowns. Numerical examples are presented which illustrate the theoretically predicted iterative convergence rates.

  1. SUMMARY REPORT-FY2006 ITER WORK ACCOMPLISHED

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, N N

    2006-04-11

    Six parties (EU, Japan, Russia, US, Korea, China) will build ITER. The US proposed to deliver at least 4 out of 7 modules of the Central Solenoid. Phillip Michael (MIT) and I were tasked by DoE to assist ITER in development of the ITER CS and other magnet systems. We work to help Magnets and Structure division headed by Neil Mitchell. During this visit I worked on the selected items of the CS design and carried out other small tasks, like PF temperature margin assessment.

  2. Conference on iterative methods for large linear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kincaid, D.R.

    1988-12-01

    This conference is dedicated to providing an overview of the state of the art in the use of iterative methods for solving sparse linear systems with an eye to contributions of the past, present and future. The emphasis is on identifying current and future research directions in the mainstream of modern scientific computing. Recently, the use of iterative methods for solving linear systems has experienced a resurgence of activity as scientists attach extremely complicated three-dimensional problems using vector and parallel supercomputers. Many research advances in the development of iterative methods for high-speed computers over the past forty years are reviewed, as well as focusing on current research.

  3. Impact of irradiation effects on design solutions for ITER diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costley, A.; deKock, L.; Walker, C.; Janeschitz, G.; Yamamoto, S.; Shikama, T.; Belyakov, V.; Farnum, E.; Hodgson, E.; Nishitani, T.; Orlinski, D.; Zinkle, S.; Kasai, S.; Stott, P.; Young, K.; Zaveriaev, V.

    2000-12-01

    An overview of the results of the irradiation tests on diagnostic components under the ITER technology R&D tasks and the solutions for the present diagnostic design are given in the light of these results. A comprehensive irradiation database of diagnostic components has been accumulated and permits conclusions to be drawn on the application of these components in ITER. Under the ITER technology R&D tasks, not only has work been shared among four home teams, but also several bilateral collaborations and round-robin experiments have been performed to enhance the R&D activities.

  4. Radiation detector spectrum simulator

    DOEpatents

    Wolf, M.A.; Crowell, J.M.

    1985-04-09

    A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source generates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith to generate several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

  5. Radiation detector spectrum simulator

    DOEpatents

    Wolf, Michael A.; Crowell, John M.

    1987-01-01

    A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source nerates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith generates several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

  6. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caley, Linda M.; Kramer, Charlotte; Robinson, Luther K.

    2005-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is a serious and widespread problem in this country. Positioned within the community with links to children, families, and healthcare systems, school nurses are a critical element in the prevention and treatment of those affected by fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Although most school nurses are familiar…

  7. The CMBR spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Stebbins, A.

    1997-05-01

    Here we give an introduction to the observed spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR) and discuss what can be learned about it. Particular attention will be given to how Compton scattering can distort the spectrum of the CMBR. An incomplete bibliography of relevant papers is also provided.

  8. The Hue of Shapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albertazzi, Liliana; Da Pos, Osvaldo; Canal, Luisa; Micciolo, Rocco; Malfatti, Michela; Vescovi, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an experimental study on the naturally biased association between shape and color. For each basic geometric shape studied, participants were asked to indicate the color perceived as most closely related to it, choosing from the Natural Color System Hue Circle. Results show that the choices of color for each shape were not…

  9. Wind speed power spectrum analysis for Bushland, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Eggleston, E.D.

    1996-12-31

    Numerous papers and publications on wind turbulence have referenced the wind speed spectrum presented by Isaac Van der Hoven in his article entitled Power Spectrum of Horizontal Wind Speed Spectrum in the Frequency Range from 0.0007 to 900 Cycles per Hour. Van der Hoven used data measured at different heights between 91 and 125 meters above the ground, and represented the high frequency end of the spectrum with data from the peak hour of hurricane Connie. These facts suggest we should question the use of his power spectrum in the wind industry. During the USDA - Agricultural Research Service`s investigation of wind/diesel system power storage, using the appropriate wind speed power spectrum became a significant issue. We developed a power spectrum from 13 years of hourly average data, 1 year of 5 minute average data, and 2 particularly gusty day`s 1 second average data all collected at a height of 10 meters. While the general shape is similar to the Van der Hoven spectrum, few of his peaks were found in the Bushland spectrum. While higher average wind speeds tend to suggest higher amplitudes in the high frequency end of the spectrum, this is not always true. Also, the high frequency end of the spectrum is not accurately described by simple wind statistics such as standard deviation and turbulence intensity. 2 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. The Optical Spectrum of the Geminga Pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Christopher; Halpern, Jules P.; Schiminovich, David; Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum of the isolated pulsar Geminga at the Keck Observatory. The optical object is at the limit of spectroscopic capability of any telescope, with a continuum flux that is approx. 0.5% of the dark sky on Mauna Kea. With particular attention paid to the dominant systematics of sky subtraction in our observing and analysis methods, we attained approx. 0.1% systematics in heavily binned spectra. The resulting spectrum spanning 3700 - 8000 A has a flat power-law shape f(sub nu) proportional to nu(exp -0.8) and a broad dip over 6300 - 6500 A. Thermal radiation cannot explain the optical spectrum of Geminga. The dominant component can be modeled as either electron synchrotron emission and ion (proton) cyclotron absorption, or ion cyclotron emission, the latter in a 10(exp 11) G magnetic field.

  11. ITER neutral beam system US conceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    Purgalis, P.

    1990-09-01

    In this document we present the US conceptual design of a neutral beam system for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The design incorporates a barium surface conversion D{sup {minus}} source feeding a linear array of accelerator channels. The system uses a dc accelerator with electrostatic quadrupoles for strong focusing. A high voltage power supply that is integrated with the accelerator is presented as an attractive option. A gas neutralizer is used and residual ions exiting the neutralizer are deflected to water-cooled dumps. Cryopanels are located at the accelerator exit to pump excess gas from the source and the neutralizer, and in the ion dump cavity to pump re-neutralized ions and neutralizer gas. All the above components are packaged in compact identical, independent modules which can be removed for remote maintenance. The neutral beam system delivers 75 MW of DO at 1.3 MeV, into three ports with a total of 9 modules arranged in stacks of three modules per port . To increase reliability each module is designed to deliver up to 10 MW; this allows eight modules operating at partial capacity to deliver the required power in the event one module is out of service, and provides 20% excess capacity to improve availability. Radiation protection is provided by shielding and by locating critical components in the source and accelerator 46.5 m from the torus centerline. Neutron shielding in the drift duct and neutralizer provides the added feature of limiting conductance and thus reducing gas flow to and from the torus.

  12. Electrostatic Dust Detection and Removal for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    C.H. Skinner; A. Campos; H. Kugel; J. Leisure; A.L. Roquemore; S. Wagner

    2008-09-01

    We present some recent results on two innovative applications of microelectronics technology to dust inventory measurement and dust removal in ITER. A novel device to detect the settling of dust particles on a remote surface has been developed in the laboratory. A circuit board with a grid of two interlocking conductive traces with 25 μm spacing is biased to 30 – 50 V. Carbon particles landing on the energized grid create a transient short circuit. The current flowing through the short circuit creates a voltage pulse that is recorded by standard nuclear counting electronics and the total number of counts is related to the mass of dust impinging on the grid. The particles typically vaporize in a few seconds restoring the previous voltage standoff. Experience on NSTX however, showed that in a tokamak environment it was still possible for large particles or fibers to remain on the grid causing a long term short circuit. We report on the development of a gas puff system that uses helium to clear such particles. Experiments with varying nozzle designs, backing pressures, puff durations, and exit flow orientations have given an optimal configuration that effectively removes particles from an area up to 25 cm² with a single nozzle. In a separate experiment we are developing an advanced circuit grid of three interlocking traces that can generate a miniature electrostatic traveling wave for transporting dust to a suitable exit port. We have fabricated such a 3-pole circuit board with 25 micron insulated traces that operates with voltages up to 200 V. Recent results showed motion of dust particles with the application of only 50 V bias voltage. Such a device could potentially remove dust continuously without dedicated interventions and without loss of machine availability for plasma operations.

  13. Sequence analysis by iterated maps, a review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Among alignment-free methods, Iterated Maps (IMs) are on a particular extreme: they are also scale free (order free). The use of IMs for sequence analysis is also distinct from other alignment-free methodologies in being rooted in statistical mechanics instead of computational linguistics. Both of these roots go back over two decades to the use of fractal geometry in the characterization of phase-space representations. The time series analysis origin of the field is betrayed by the title of the manuscript that started this alignment-free subdomain in 1990, ‘Chaos Game Representation’. The clash between the analysis of sequences as continuous series and the better established use of Markovian approaches to discrete series was almost immediate, with a defining critique published in same journal 2 years later. The rest of that decade would go by before the scale-free nature of the IM space was uncovered. The ensuing decade saw this scalability generalized for non-genomic alphabets as well as an interest in its use for graphic representation of biological sequences. Finally, in the past couple of years, in step with the emergence of BigData and MapReduce as a new computational paradigm, there is a surprising third act in the IM story. Multiple reports have described gains in computational efficiency of multiple orders of magnitude over more conventional sequence analysis methodologies. The stage appears to be now set for a recasting of IMs with a central role in processing nextgen sequencing results. PMID:24162172

  14. Determination of Optimal Blank Shape by Radius Vector Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Hyun Bo; Park, Jong Kyu; Kim, Yang Soo

    2004-06-01

    A new method of optimal blank shape design for stampings of arbitrary shapes has been proposed. Similar to the sensitivity method, a past work of the present author, the basic nature of this method is iterative modification of an undeformed blank shape by adjusting the nodal positions at the boundary of the blank, until the final shape satisfies a target shape. The main difference from the sensitivity method is that both shape error measure and blank shape modification is done along the normal to a boundary direction in the current method instead of nodal moving direction as in the sensitivity method. Even though the sensitivity method has been proven to be excellent through experiment, huge computational effort is still a problem since the method requires a couple of deformation process analyses per each design stage. Differently from the sensitivity method, the present radius vector method requires only a single deformation analysis per each design step and it can handle an extraordinary motion due to a rigid-body rotation during forming. Drawings of L-shaped cup and wheel housing have been chosen as the examples to verify the present method. In every cases the optimal blank shapes have been obtained after a few times of modification. Through the investigation, the present method, which incorporates normal to boundary is found to be an excellent, or better than the sensitivity method, which incorporates moving direction, for the optimal blank design.

  15. ITER-like current ramps in JET with ILW: experiments, modelling and consequences for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Calabrò, G.; Sips, A. C. C.; Maggi, C. F.; De Tommasi, G. M.; Joffrin, E.; Loarte, A.; Maviglia, F.; Mlynar, J.; Rimini, F. G.; Pütterich, Th.; EFDA Contributors, JET

    2015-01-01

    Since the ITER-like wall in JET (JET-ILW) came into operation, dedicated ITER-like plasma current (Ip) ramp-up (RU) and ramp-down (RD) experiments have been performed and matched to similar discharges with the carbon wall (JET-C). The experiments show that access to H-mode early in the Ip RU phase and maintaining H-mode in the Ip RD as long as possible are instrumental to achieve low internal plasma inductance (li) and to minimize flux consumption. In JET-ILW, at a given current rise rate similar variations in li (0.7-0.9) are obtained as in JET-C. In most discharges no strong W accumulation is observed. However, in some low density cases during the early phase of the Ip RU(n_e/n_e^Gw ˜ 0.2) strong core radiation due to W influx led to hollow electron temperature (Te) profiles. In JET-ILW Zeff is significantly lower than in JET-C. W significantly disturbs the discharge evolution when the W concentration approaches 10-4 this threshold is confirmed by predictive transport modelling using the CRONOS code. Ip RD experiments in JET-ILW confirm the result of JET-C that sustained H-mode and elongation reduction are both instrumental in controlling li.

  16. Local Solid Shape

    PubMed Central

    Koenderink, Jan; van Doorn, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Local solid shape applies to the surface curvature of small surface patches—essentially regions of approximately constant curvatures—of volumetric objects that are smooth volumetric regions in Euclidean 3-space. This should be distinguished from local shape in pictorial space. The difference is categorical. Although local solid shape has naturally been explored in haptics, results in vision are not forthcoming. We describe a simple experiment in which observers judge shape quality and magnitude of cinematographic presentations. Without prior training, observers readily use continuous shape index and Casorati curvature scales with reasonable resolution. PMID:27648217

  17. Electron density measurements in the ITER fusion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, Christopher; Udintsev, Victor; Andrew, Philip; Vayakis, George; Van Zeeland, Michael; Brower, David; Feder, Russell; Mukhin, Eugene; Tolstyakov, Sergey

    2013-08-01

    The operation of ITER requires high-quality estimates of the plasma electron density over multiple regions in the plasma for plasma evaluation, plasma control and machine protection purposes. Although the density regimes of ITER are not very different from those of existing tokamaks (1018-1021 m-3), the severe conditions of the fusion plasma environment present particular challenges to implementing these density diagnostics. In this paper we present an overview of the array of ITER electron density diagnostics designed to measure over the entire ITER domain: plasma core, pedestal, edge, scrape-off layer and divertor. It will focus on the challenges faced in making these measurements, and the technical solutions of the current designs.

  18. A Multi-Grid Iterative Method for Photoacoustic Tomography.

    PubMed

    Javaherian, Ashkan; Holman, Sean

    2016-11-04

    Inspired by the recent advances on minimizing nonsmooth or bound-constrained convex functions on models using varying degrees of fidelity, we propose a line search multigrid (MG) method for full-wave iterative image reconstruction in photoacoustic tomography (PAT) in heterogeneous media. To compute the search direction at each iteration, we decide between the gradient at the target level, or alternatively an approximate error correction at a coarser level, relying on some predefined criteria. To incorporate absorption and dispersion, we derive the analytical adjoint directly from the first-order acoustic wave system. The effectiveness of the proposed method is tested on a total-variation penalized Iterative Shrinkage Thresholding algorithm (ISTA) and its accelerated variant (FISTA), which have been used in many studies of image reconstruction in PAT. The results show the great potential of the proposed method in improving speed of iterative image reconstruction.

  19. Approximate inverse preconditioning of iterative methods for nonsymmetric linear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Benzi, M.; Tuma, M.

    1996-12-31

    A method for computing an incomplete factorization of the inverse of a nonsymmetric matrix A is presented. The resulting factorized sparse approximate inverse is used as a preconditioner in the iterative solution of Ax = b by Krylov subspace methods.

  20. Final Report on ITER Task Agreement 81-18

    SciTech Connect

    Brad J. Merrill

    2008-02-01

    During 2007, the US International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Project Office (USIPO) entered into a Task Agreement (TA) with the ITER International Organization (IO) to conduct Research and Development activity and/or Design activity in the area of Safety Analyses. There were four tasks within this TA, which were to provide the ITER IO with: 1) Quality Assurance (QA) documentation for the MELCOR 1.8.2 Fusion code, 2) a pedigreed version of MELCOR 1.8.2, 3) assistance in MELCOR input deck development and accident analyses, and 4) support and assistance in the operation of the MELCOR 1.8.2. This report, which is the final report for this agreement, documents the completion of the work scope under this ITER TA, designated as TA 81-18.

  1. Leapfrog variants of iterative methods for linear algebra equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saylor, Paul E.

    1988-01-01

    Two iterative methods are considered, Richardson's method and a general second order method. For both methods, a variant of the method is derived for which only even numbered iterates are computed. The variant is called a leapfrog method. Comparisons between the conventional form of the methods and the leapfrog form are made under the assumption that the number of unknowns is large. In the case of Richardson's method, it is possible to express the final iterate in terms of only the initial approximation, a variant of the iteration called the grand-leap method. In the case of the grand-leap variant, a set of parameters is required. An algorithm is presented to compute these parameters that is related to algorithms to compute the weights and abscissas for Gaussian quadrature. General algorithms to implement the leapfrog and grand-leap methods are presented. Algorithms for the important special case of the Chebyshev method are also given.

  2. An iterative algorithm for connected structure computer generated holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samus, S. S.; McOwan, P. W.; Hossack, W. J.

    1994-01-01

    An iterative design method for electrically switchable liquid crystal fan-out elements using a constrained growing technique that ensures electrical conductivity is presented. Digital simulations are compared with initial optical results.

  3. Distributed Minimal Residual (DMR) method for acceleration of iterative algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seungsoo; Dulikravich, George S.

    1991-01-01

    A new method for enhancing the convergence rate of iterative algorithms for the numerical integration of systems of partial differential equations was developed. It is termed the Distributed Minimal Residual (DMR) method and it is based on general Krylov subspace methods. The DMR method differs from the Krylov subspace methods by the fact that the iterative acceleration factors are different from equation to equation in the system. At the same time, the DMR method can be viewed as an incomplete Newton iteration method. The DMR method was applied to Euler equations of gas dynamics and incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. All numerical test cases were obtained using either explicit four stage Runge-Kutta or Euler implicit time integration. The formulation for the DMR method is general in nature and can be applied to explicit and implicit iterative algorithms for arbitrary systems of partial differential equations.

  4. ITER research plan of plasma-wall interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, M.; Pitts, R.; Loarte, A.; Campbell, D. J.; Sugihara, M.; Mukhovatov, V.; Kukushkin, A.; Chuyanov, V.

    2009-06-01

    This paper describes an important part of ITER Research Plan, on plasma-wall interaction (PWI). In order to maximize the flexibility of the machine during the initial operation (H and D phases), CFC will be used for the targets. Tungsten will be used for the other plasma-facing components of the divertor. In order to minimize the tritium retention, tungsten will fully cover the divertor targets before the DT phase. Extrapolation of heat loads on plasma-facing components (PFCs) during disruption and ELMs to ITER parameters indicates serious consequences of these phenomena. Therefore schemes for prediction and mitigation or avoidance of these phenomena need to be developed during construction and demonstrated in the early phase of ITER operation. T-retention and dust have important impacts on safety. Therefore the methods of measurement and removal of tritium and dust must be developed during construction and demonstrated in the early phase of ITER operation.

  5. On the Convergence of Iterative Receiver Algorithms Utilizing Hard Decisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rößler, Jürgen F.; Gerstacker, Wolfgang H.

    2010-12-01

    The convergence of receivers performing iterative hard decision interference cancellation (IHDIC) is analyzed in a general framework for ASK, PSK, and QAM constellations. We first give an overview of IHDIC algorithms known from the literature applied to linear modulation and DS-CDMA-based transmission systems and show the relation to Hopfield neural network theory. It is proven analytically that IHDIC with serial update scheme always converges to a stable state in the estimated values in course of iterations and that IHDIC with parallel update scheme converges to cycles of length 2. Additionally, we visualize the convergence behavior with the aid of convergence charts. Doing so, we give insight into possible errors occurring in IHDIC which turn out to be caused by locked error situations. The derived results can directly be applied to those iterative soft decision interference cancellation (ISDIC) receivers whose soft decision functions approach hard decision functions in course of the iterations.

  6. General shape optimization capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chargin, Mladen K.; Raasch, Ingo; Bruns, Rudolf; Deuermeyer, Dawson

    1991-01-01

    A method is described for calculating shape sensitivities, within MSC/NASTRAN, in a simple manner without resort to external programs. The method uses natural design variables to define the shape changes in a given structure. Once the shape sensitivities are obtained, the shape optimization process is carried out in a manner similar to property optimization processes. The capability of this method is illustrated by two examples: the shape optimization of a cantilever beam with holes, loaded by a point load at the free end (with the shape of the holes and the thickness of the beam selected as the design variables), and the shape optimization of a connecting rod subjected to several different loading and boundary conditions.

  7. Subspace Iteration Algorithms in FORTRAN 77 and FORTRAN 8x

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-30

    COMPUTED, 0 .LT. EM .LT. P .LE. N .LE. LDX. C EM AS AN INTEGER OUTPUT VARIABLE IS THE NUMBER OF EIGENVECTORS C COMPUTED THROUGH KM ITERATION STEPS . C X...LT. EM .LT. P .LE. N .LE. LDX. C EM AS AN INTEGER OUTPUT VARIABLE IS THE NUMBER OF EIGENVECTORS C COMPUTED TH{ROUGH KM ITERATION STEPS . C X AS A REAL N

  8. Monte Carlo Simulations: Number of Iterations and Accuracy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    Monte Carlo, confidence interval, central limit theorem, number of iterations, Wilson score method, Wald method, normal probability plot 16. SECURITY...Iterations 16 6. Conclusions 17 7. References and Notes 20 Appendix. MATLAB Code to Produce a Normal Probability Plot for Data in Array A 23...for normality can be performed to quantify the confidence level of a normality assumption. The basic idea of an NPP is to plot the sample data in

  9. Development and test of the ITER SC conductor joints

    SciTech Connect

    Gung, C. Y.; Jayakumar, R.; Manahan, R.; Martovetsky, N.; Michael, P.; Minervini, J.; Randall, A.

    1998-08-05

    Joints for the ITER superconducting Central Solenoid should perform in rapidly varying magnetic field with low losses and low DC resistance. This paper describes the design of the ITER joint and presents its assembly process. Two joints were built and tested at the PTF facility at MIT. Test results are presented; losses in transverse and parallel field and the DC performance are discussed. The developed joint demonstrates sufficient margin for baseline ITRR operating scenarios.

  10. ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) current drive and heating physics

    SciTech Connect

    Nevins, W.M.; Lindquist, W. ); Fujisawa, N.; Kimura, H. ); Hopman, H.; Rebuffi, L.; Wegrowe, J.G. . NET Design Team); Parail, V.; Vdovin, V. . Inst. Atomnoj Ehn

    1990-01-01

    The ITER Current Drive and Heating (CD H) systems are required for: Ionization and current initiation; Non-inductive current ramp-up assist; Heating of the plasma; Steady-state operation with full non-inductive current drive; Current profile control; and Burn control by modulation of the auxiliary power. Steady-state current drive is the most demanding requirement, so this has driven the choice of the ITER current drive and heating systems.

  11. An iterative method for systems of nonlinear hyperbolic equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scroggs, Jeffrey S.

    1989-01-01

    An iterative algorithm for the efficient solution of systems of nonlinear hyperbolic equations is presented. Parallelism is evident at several levels. In the formation of the iteration, the equations are decoupled, thereby providing large grain parallelism. Parallelism may also be exploited within the solves for each equation. Convergence of the interation is established via a bounding function argument. Experimental results in two-dimensions are presented.

  12. Rayleigh Quotient Iteration in 3D, Deterministic Neutron Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Slaybaugh, R; Evans, Thomas M; Davidson, Gregory G; Wilson, P.

    2012-01-01

    Today's "grand challenge" neutron transport problems require 3-D meshes with billions of cells, hundreds of energy groups, and accurate quadratures and scattering expansions. Leadership-class computers provide platforms on which high-fidelity fluxes can be calculated. However, appropriate methods are needed that can use these machines effectively. Such methods must be able to use hundreds of thousands of cores and have good convergence properties. Rayleigh quotient iteration (RQI) is an eigenvalue solver that has been added to the Sn code Denovo to address convergence. Rayleigh quotient iteration is an optimal shifted inverse iteration method that should converge in fewer iterations than the more common power method and other shifted inverse iteration methods for many problems of interest. Denovo's RQI uses a new multigroup Krylov solver for the fixed source solutions inside every iteration that allows parallelization in energy in addition to space and angle. This Krylov solver has been shown to scale successfully to 200,000 cores: for example one test problem scaled from 69,120 cores to 190,080 cores with 98% efficiency. This paper shows that RQI works for some small problems. However, the Krylov method upon which it relies does not always converge because RQI creates ill-conditioned systems. This result leads to the conclusion that preconditioning is needed to allow this method to be applicable to a wider variety of problems.

  13. Visible and Infrared Optical Design for the ITER Upper Ports

    SciTech Connect

    Lasnier, C; Seppala, L; Morris, K; Groth, M; Fenstermacher, M; Allen, S; Synakowski, E; Ortiz, J

    2007-03-01

    This document contains the results of an optical design scoping study of visible-light and infrared optics for the ITER upper ports, performed by LLNL under contract for the US ITER Project Office. ITER is an international collaboration to build a large fusion energy tokamak with a goal of demonstrating net fusion power for pulses much longer than the energy confinement time. At the time of this report, six of the ITER upper ports are planned to each to contain a camera system for recording visible and infrared light, as well as other diagnostics. the performance specifications for the temporal and spatial resolution of this system are shown in the Section II, Functional Specifications. They acknowledge a debt to Y. Corre and co-authors of the CEA Cadarache report ''ITER wide-angle viewing and thermographic and visible system''. Several of the concepts used in this design are derived from that CEA report. The infrared spatial resolution for optics of this design is diffraction-limited by the size of the entrance aperture, at lower resolution than listed in the ITER diagnostic specifications. The size of the entrance aperture is a trade-off between spatial resolution, optics size in the port, and the location of relay optics. The signal-to-noise ratio allows operation at the specified time resolutions.

  14. A generic technique for reducing OPC iteration: fast forward OPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Le; Sturtevant, John

    2007-10-01

    The drive toward advanced technology nodes has drastically increased the computational complexity of optical proximity correction (OPC). Applying full-chip OPC to all critical layers has become the most computational demanding step in the tape-out process. Tuning for fast and accurate OPC recipes is a critical step in the development of a total manufacturing solution. OPC is by design an iterative cycle, where one iteration is a single simulation and polygon fragmentation shift sequence. Typically an accurate OPC recipe requires eight or more iterations to converge to a final best solution. The number of iterations in a recipe directly impacts the full-chip OPC runtime. Engineers often find themselves spending hours tuning an OPC recipe to reduce just one iteration. This paper presents a generic technique called Fast Forward OPC (FFOPC). FFOPC will help to reduce any golden OPC recipe that meets certain requirements to a fixed 4 iterations with minimum accuracy lost. Most importantly this technique can be easily implemented as a plugin with any existing OPC tools.

  15. Progress in LHCD: a tool for advanced regimes on ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuccillo, A. A.; Barbato, E.; Bae, Y. S.; Becoulet, A.; Bernabei, S.; Bibet, P.; Calabrò, G.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Cesario, R.; Cho, M. H.; Cirant, S.; Crisanti, F.; Ekedahl, A.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Farina, D.; Giruzzi, G.; Goniche, M.; Granucci, G.; Ide, S.; Imbeaux, F.; Karttunen, S.; Litaudon, X.; Mailloux, J.; Mazon, D.; Mirizzi, F.; Moreau, D.; Nowak, S.; Namkung, W.; Panaccione, L.; Pericoli-Ridolfini, V.; Peysson, Y.; Petrzilka, V.; Podda, S.; Rantamaki, K.; Santini, F.; Saveliev, A.; Schneider, M.; Sozzi, C.; Suzuki, T.

    2005-12-01

    The recent success in coupling lower hybrid (LH) waves in high performance plasmas at JET together with the first demonstration on FTU of the coupling capability of the new passive active multijunction launcher removed major concerns on the possibility of using LH on ITER. LH exhibits the highest experimental current drive (CD) efficiency at low plasma temperature thus making it the natural candidate for off-axis CD on ITER where current profile control will help in maintaining burning performance on a long-time scale. We review recent LH results: long internal transport barrier obtained in JET with current profile sustained and controlled by LH acting under real time feedback together with first LH control of flat q-profile in a hybrid regime with Te ~ Ti. Minutes long fully non-inductive LH driven discharges on Tore Supra (TS). High CD efficiency with electron cyclotron in synergy with LH obtained in FTU and TS opening the possibility of interesting scenarii on ITER for MHD stabilization. Preliminary results of LH modelling for ITER are also reported. A brief overview of ITER LH system is reported together with some indication of new coming LH experiments, in particular KSTAR where CW klystrons at the foreseen ITER frequency of 5 GHz are being developed.

  16. Advancing the Physics Basis of Quiescent H-mode through Exploration of ITER Relevant Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, W. M.; Burrell, K. H.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Garofalo, A. M.; Grierson, B. A.; Loarte, A.; McKee, G. R.; Nazikian, R.; Snyder, B. P.

    2014-09-01

    Recent experiments on DIII-D have overcome a long-standing limitation in accessing quiescent H-mode (QH-mode), a high confinement state of the plasma that does not exhibit the explosive instabilities associated with edge localized modes (ELMs). In the past, QH-mode was associated with low density operation, but has now been extended to high normalized densities compatible with operation envisioned for ITER. Through the use of strong shaping, QH-mode plasmas have been maintained at high densities, both absolute (ηe ≈ 7 × 1019 m—3) and normalized Greenwald fraction (ηe/ηG > 0:7) . In these plasmas, the pedestal can evolve to very high pressures and current as the density is increased. Calculations of the pedestal height and width from the EPED model are quantitatively consistent with the experimental observed evolution with density. The comparison of the dependence of the maximum density threshold for QH-mode with plasma shape help validate the underlying theoretical peeling-ballooning models describing ELM stability. High density QH-mode operation with strong shaping has allowed stable access to a previously predicted regime of very high pedestal dubbed \\Super H-mode". In general, QH-mode is found to achieve ELM-stable operation while maintaining adequate impurity exhaust, due to the enhanced impurity transport from an edge harmonic oscillation, thought to be a saturated kink- peeling mode driven by rotation shear. In addition, the impurity confinement time is not affected by rotation, even though the energy confinement time and measured E Χ B shear is observed to increase at low toroidal rotation. Together with demonstrations of high beta, high confinement and low q95 for many energy confinement times, these results suggest QH-mode as a potentially attractive operating scenario for ITER's Q=10 mission.

  17. Potential molecular wires by an iterative divergent/convergent approach. Doubling of molecular length at each iteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Darren L.; Schumm, Jeffry S.; Jones, Leroy, II; Tour, James M.

    1994-06-01

    We have devised an iterative convergent/divergent approach to conjugated oligomers that might serve as molecular wires. The molecular length doubles with each iteration. The systems prepared are completely monodispersed and based upon oligo(thiophene-ethynylene)s (1) and oligo(phenylene-ethynylene)s at 100 A and 128 A long, respectively. The optical and size exclusion chromatography (SEC) properties are discussed. Methods are outlined to attach end groups that might serve as molecular alligator clips.

  18. A qualitative study of a nanotube model using an iterative Taylor method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadella, M.; Lara, L. P.; Negro, J.

    Physical properties of graphene nanotubes may strongly depend on external fields. In a recent paper V. Jakubský, S. Kuru, J. Negro, J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 47, 115307 (2014), the authors have studied a model of carbon nanotubes under the presence of an external magnetic field, chosen for some symmetry properties. The model admits an exact solution, provided that the value of a parameter, here denoted as kz, be equal to zero. This parameter is the eigenvalue of the component of the momentum in the direction of the nanotube axis. However, it seems that this parameter cannot be discarded for physical reasons. The choice of nontrivial values for this parameter produces an equation of motion for electrons in the nanotube (a Dirac-Weyl equation), which cannot be exactly solvable. Then, we proposed some iterative approximate methods to solve this equation and obtaining its eigenvalues. Some tests have shown that an iterative Taylor method is more efficient than some others we have used. For kz≠0, we have found that, excluding the minimal energy eigenvalue, the lowest energy values obtained for kz=0 split into two different ones and, therefore, producing gaps in the energy spectrum.

  19. Convergence estimates for iterative methods via the Kriess Matrix Theorem on a general complex domain

    SciTech Connect

    Toh, K.C.; Trefethen, L.N.

    1994-12-31

    What properties of a nonsymmetric matrix A determine the convergence rate of iterations such as GMRES, QMR, and Arnoldi? If A is far from normal, should one replace the usual Ritz values {r_arrow} eigenvalues notion of convergence of Arnoldi by alternative notions such as Arnoldi lemniscates {r_arrow} pseudospectra? Since Krylov subspace iterations can be interpreted as minimization processes involving polynomials of matrices, the answers to questions such as these depend upon mathematical problems of the following kind. Given a polynomial p(z), how can one bound the norm of p(A) in terms of (1) the size of p(z) on various sets in the complex plane, and (2) the locations of the spectrum and pseudospectra of A? This talk reports some progress towards solving these problems. In particular, the authors present theorems that generalize the Kreiss matrix theorem from the unit disk (for the monomial A{sup n}) to a class of general complex domains (for polynomials p(A)).

  20. Modeling and simulation of a beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic for the ITER prototype neutral beam injector

    SciTech Connect

    Barbisan, M. Zaniol, B.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2014-11-15

    A test facility for the development of the neutral beam injection system for ITER is under construction at Consorzio RFX. It will host two experiments: SPIDER, a 100 keV H{sup −}/D{sup −} ion RF source, and MITICA, a prototype of the full performance ITER injector (1 MV, 17 MW beam). A set of diagnostics will monitor the operation and allow to optimize the performance of the two prototypes. In particular, beam emission spectroscopy will measure the uniformity and the divergence of the fast particles beam exiting the ion source and travelling through the beam line components. This type of measurement is based on the collection of the H{sub α}/D{sub α} emission resulting from the interaction of the energetic particles with the background gas. A numerical model has been developed to simulate the spectrum of the collected emissions in order to design this diagnostic and to study its performance. The paper describes the model at the base of the simulations and presents the modeled H{sub α} spectra in the case of MITICA experiment.

  1. The design of ROM-type holographic memory with iterative Fourier transform algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akamatsu, Hideki; Yamada, Kai; Unno, Noriyuki; Yoshida, Shuhei; Taniguchi, Jun; Yamamoto, Manabu

    2013-03-01

    The research and development of the holographic data storage (HDS) is advanced, as one of the high-speed, mass storage systems of the next generation. Recently, along the development of the write-once system that uses photopolymer media, large capacity ROM type HDS which can replace conventional optical discs becomes important. In this study, we develop the ROM type HDS using a diffractive optical element (DOE), and verify the effectiveness of our approach. In order to design DOE, iterative Fourier transform algorithm was adopted, and DOE is fabricated with electron beam (EB) cutting and nanoimprint lithography. We optimize the phase distribution of the hologram by iterative Fourier transform algorithm known as Gerchberg-Saxton (GS) algorithm with the angular spectrum method. In the fabrication process, the phase distribution of the hologram is implicated as the concavity and convexity structure by the EB cutting and transcribed with nanoimprint lithography. At this time, the mold is formed as multiple-stage concavity and convexity. The purpose of multiple-stage concavity and convexity is to obtain high diffraction efficiency and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Fabricated trial model DOE is evaluated by the experiment.

  2. IRIS Spectrum Line Plot

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows a line plot of the spectrum. The spectra here are shown for various locations on the Sun. The changes in the movie are caused by differing physical conditions in the locations. Cre...

  3. Quantum Spread Spectrum Communication

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that spectral teleportation can coherently dilate the spectral probability amplitude of a single photon. In preserving the encoded quantum information, this variant of teleportation subsequently enables a form of quantum spread spectrum communication.

  4. Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... essential data on ASD, search for factors that put children at risk for ASD and possible causes, ... United States to help identify factors that may put children at risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) ...

  5. Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): Condition Information Skip sharing on ... Restricted interests and repetitive behaviors Different people with autism can have different symptoms. For this reason, autism ...

  6. Improvement of the recursive projection method for linear iterative scheme stabilization based on an approximate eigenvalue problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renac, Florent

    2011-06-01

    An algorithm for stabilizing linear iterative schemes is developed in this study. The recursive projection method is applied in order to stabilize divergent numerical algorithms. A criterion for selecting the divergent subspace of the iteration matrix with an approximate eigenvalue problem is introduced. The performance of the present algorithm is investigated in terms of storage requirements and CPU costs and is compared to the original Krylov criterion. Theoretical results on the divergent subspace selection accuracy are established. The method is then applied to the resolution of the linear advection-diffusion equation and to a sensitivity analysis for a turbulent transonic flow in the context of aerodynamic shape optimization. Numerical experiments demonstrate better robustness and faster convergence properties of the stabilization algorithm with the new criterion based on the approximate eigenvalue problem. This criterion requires only slight additional operations and memory which vanish in the limit of large linear systems.

  7. Analysis of Distribution of Time Scores in Iterative Learning Type Courseware Using Fourier Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hiroyuki

    In this research, an iterative learning type courseware was made, the distribution of time scores in the courseware is gotten by the learning management system. It is a proposed method by which the distribution of time scores is changed to frequency and to power spectrum using Fourier Transform. The learning process continues until students get the passing scores and are classified by using these values, which are related to average time and the average of scores‧ square. Furthermore, the cross-correlation coefficients between the standard student and students are calculated, and delay times are analyzed. Finally, the transfer functions of some students are calculated, and the characteristics of the learning processes are analyzed.

  8. Green`s function of Maxwell`s equations and corresponding implications for iterative methods

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, B.S.; Fainberg, E.B.

    1996-12-31

    Energy conservation law imposes constraints on the norm and direction of the Hilbert space vector representing a solution of Maxwell`s equations. In this paper, we derive these constrains and discuss the corresponding implications for the Green`s function of Maxwell`s equations in a dissipative medium. It is shown that Maxwell`s equations can be reduced to an integral equation with a contracting kernel. The equation can be solved using simple iterations. Software based on this algorithm have successfully been applied to a wide range of problems dealing with high contrast models. The matrix corresponding to the integral equation has a well defined spectrum. The equation can be symmetrized and solved using different approaches, for instance one of the conjugate gradient methods.

  9. Multi-excitation Raman difference spectroscopy based on modified multi-energy constrained iterative deconvolution algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Wenlong; Cai, Zhijian; Zhou, Hongwu; Wu, Jianhong

    2013-12-01

    Raman spectroscopy is fast and nondestructive, and it is widely used in chemistry, biomedicine, food safety and other areas. However, Raman spectroscopy is often hampered by strong fluorescence background, especially in food additives detection and biomedicine researching. In this paper, one efficient technique was the multi-excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (MERDS) which incorporated a series of small wavelength-shift wavelengths as excitation sources. A modified multi-energy constrained iterative deconvolution (MMECID) algorithm was proposed to reconstruct the Raman Spectroscopy. Computer simulation and experiments both demonstrated that the Raman spectrum can be well reconstructed from large fluorescence background. The more excitation sources used, the better signal to noise ratio got. However, many excitation sources were equipped on the Raman spectrometer, which increased the complexity of the experimental system. Thus, a trade-off should be made between the number of excitation frequencies and experimental complexity.

  10. ICRF antenna modifications and additions for TFTR: Relevance to BPX/ITER projections

    SciTech Connect

    Hosea, J.; Phillips, C.K.; Raftopoulos, S.; Stevens, J.; Wilson, J.R. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Bigelow, T.; Goulding, R.; Hoffman, D. )

    1991-01-01

    The TFTR Bay L and M antennas have been modified to improve their power handling capability. In particular, the Bay L antenna, which exhibited a lower than expected loading resistance, now has a configuration similar to that of Bay M -- slotted walls and septum -- and together with Bay M is expected to support 7 MW operations. The in situ loading enhancement achieved for the Modified Bay L design will serve to quantify models for the coupling effects of slots. Also, comparisons with Bay M loading performance will elucidate wave spectrum and antenna location (relative to in-vessel structures) effects. Two new antennas, with single/double row shields slanted at 6{degree} (along B) are to be added in the near future to augment the power capability to {approximately}12.5 MW. The relevance of the four antenna array features to quantifying BPX/ITER antenna characteristic projections for heating and current drive is discussed. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Shape Preserving Spline Interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    A rational spline solution to the problem of shape preserving interpolation is discussed. The rational spline is represented in terms of first derivative values at the knots and provides an alternative to the spline-under-tension. The idea of making the shape control parameters dependent on the first derivative unknowns is then explored. The monotonic or convex shape of the interpolation data can then be preserved automatically through the solution of the resulting non-linear consistency equations of the spline.

  12. Shapes of binary asteroid primaries from photometric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheirich, Peter

    2016-10-01

    I will present results from a method which combine lightcurve inversion for single bodies and the method for inversion of lightcurves of occulting/eclipsing binary systems. A code developed by M. Kaasalainen and J. Durech for inversion of lightcurves of single bodies is adapted to fit our purposes. The original code uses a slightly elongated ellipsoid as an initial shape for optimization. We substituted this ellipsoid with a variety of shapes using Gaussian random spheres. This allowed the optimization algorithm to iterate to a range of final shapes.For each binary system, the short-period (rotational) component of its lightcurve is inverted using this code and a set of possible shapes of the primary are obtained. In the next step these shape models of the primary are, one by one, incorporated into the full model of the binary system and complete photometric data including the mutual events are fitted. Comparing synthetic lightcurves of the best-fit solutions with the observed data enables another narrowing of the selection of the possible shapes of the primary. This process is based on the times of phases of mutual events occurring on different geometries (i.e. the secondary passing in front of/behind the primary not only equator-on).We will also test a hypothesis that most of the primaries of the binary systems are similar in shape to each other. A figure resembling the shape of the primary of 1999 KW4, i.e., the top-shaped object with an equatorial ridge, will be used for the primary's shape. Its main characteristics - a polar flattening and width and height of the equatorial ridge, will be used as independent parameters. A variety of the shapes generated by a combination of these parameters will be used as an initial shapes for the optimization using the code described above.The work is supported by the Grant Agency of the Czech Republic, Grant 15-07193S.

  13. The shape of thought.

    PubMed

    Markson, Lori; Diesendruck, Gil; Bloom, Paul

    2008-03-01

    When children learn the name of a novel object, they tend to extend that name to other objects similar in shape - a phenomenon referred to as the shape bias. Does the shape bias stem from learned associations between names and categories of objects, or does it derive from more general properties of children's understanding of language and the world? We argue here for the second alternative, presenting evidence that the shape bias emerges early in development, is not limited to names, and is intimately related to how children make sense of categories.

  14. New implicitly solvable potential produced by second order shape invariance

    SciTech Connect

    Cannata, F.; Ioffe, M.V.; Kolevatova, E.V.; Nishnianidze, D.N.

    2015-05-15

    The procedure proposed recently by Bougie et al. (2010) to study the general form of shape invariant potentials in one-dimensional Supersymmetric Quantum Mechanics (SUSY QM) is generalized to the case of Higher Order SUSY QM with supercharges of second order in momentum. A new shape invariant potential is constructed by this method. It is singular at the origin, it grows at infinity, and its spectrum depends on the choice of connection conditions in the singular point. The corresponding Schrödinger equation is solved explicitly: the wave functions are constructed analytically, and the energy spectrum is defined implicitly via the transcendental equation which involves Confluent Hypergeometric functions. - Highlights: • New potential with 2nd order irreducible shape invariance was constructed. • The connection conditions at the singularity of potential were obtained. • The explicit expressions for all wave functions were derived. • The implicit equation for the energy spectrum was obtained.

  15. PRISM: Recovery of the primordial spectrum from Planck data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanusse, F.; Paykari, P.; Starck, J.-L.; Sureau, F.; Bobin, J.; Rassat, A.

    2014-11-01

    Aims: The primordial power spectrum describes the initial perturbations that seeded the large-scale structure we observe today. It provides an indirect probe of inflation or other structure-formation mechanisms. In this Letter, we recover the primordial power spectrum from the Planck PR1 dataset, using our recently published algorithm PRISM. Methods: PRISM is a sparsity-based inversion method that aims at recovering features in the primordial power spectrum from the empirical power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This ill-posed inverse problem is regularised using a sparsity prior on features in the primordial power spectrum in a wavelet dictionary. Although this non-parametric method does not assume a strong prior on the shape of the primordial power spectrum, it is able to recover both its general shape and localised features. As a results, this approach presents a reliable way of detecting deviations from the currently favoured scale-invariant spectrum. Results: We applied PRISM to 100 simulated Planck data to investigate its performance on Planck-like data. We then applied PRISM to the Planck PR1 power spectrum to recover the primordial power spectrum. We also tested the algorithm's ability to recover a small localised feature at k ~ 0.125 Mpc-1, which caused a large dip at ℓ ~ 1800 in the angular power spectrum. Conclusions: We find no significant departures from the fiducial Planck PR1 near scale-invariant primordial power spectrum with As = 2.215 × 10-9 and ns = 0.9624.

  16. Asymptotic iteration method for analytical solution of Klein-Gordon equation for trigonometric Pӧschl-Teller potential in D-dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arya Nugraha, Dewanta; Suparmi, A.; Cari, C.; Nur Pratiwi, Beta

    2017-01-01

    Klein-Gordon equation for Trigonometric Pöschl-Teller Potential in D-dimensions was obtained within framework of a centrifugal term approximation. Asymptotic iteration method was used to obtain the relativistic energy spectrum and wave functions. The value of relativistic energy was calculated numerically and the results have shown that in higher dimension the energy level is increased with positive energy states. The wave functions were expressed in hypergeometric term.

  17. Identifying Topological Order from the Entanglement Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldane, F. D. M.

    2011-03-01

    The Schmidt decomposition reveals bipartite entanglement of a quantum state. Calculation of the entanglement entropy reduces it to a single number, which can be studied as a function of the size and shape of the entangled regions. However, this reduction discards additional information contained in the full spectrum of the entanglement, which can be presented as a set of (dimensionless) ``pseudo-energy'' levels spectrum, labeled by quantum numbers such as momentum parallel to the (d - 1) -dimensional boundary along which the bipartite decomposition of a d -dimensional system is made. The nature of the entanglement is revealed by this spectrum, much as the elementary excitations and collective modes characterizes condensed-matter states. (The von Neumann entropy is equivalent to the the thermodynamic entropy of the system of pseudo-energy levels at a particular fictitious ``temperature'' kB T = 1 .) The previously-unrecognized importance of the spectrum (as opposed to just its entropy) became immediately apparent when the entanglement spectrum of a 2D fractional Quantum Hall state along a 1D cut was first plotted. The gapless spectrum of the conformal field theory related to the topological order of the FQHE can be recognized, and is the only spectrum in model states like the Laughlin or Moore-Read wavefunctions related to cft. For realistic states, corrections due to collective-mode fluctuations give rise to high-pseudo-energy modes that are separated from the gapless (topological) modes by a finite gap. Previously, it had been believed that the extensive O(L) (``area law'') part of the entanglement entropy of this spectrum was non-universal, and topological order could only be recognized from the O(1) subleading behavior as the length L of the cut was scaled. However, while the ``pseudo-energy'' distribution appears to be non-universal, the distribution of the spectrum as a function of (true) momentum does not have this drawback, showing that the topological

  18. ITER diagnostic systems in development in Ioffe Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, M.; Afanasyev, V.; Petrov, S.; Mironov, M.; Mukhin, E.; Tolstyakov, S.; Chugunov, I.; Shevelev, A.

    2014-08-21

    Three diagnostic systems are being developed in Ioffe Institute for ITER. Those are Neutral Particle Analysis (NPA), Thomson Scattering in Divertor (TSD) and Gamma Spectroscopy (GS). The main objective of NPA in ITER is to measure D/T fuel ration in plasma on the basis of measurement of neutralized fluxes of D and T ions [1]. Fuel ratio is one of the key parameters needed by ITER control system to provide the optimal conditions in plasma and the most effective plasma burning. Another objective is to measure the distribution function of fast ions (including alpha particles) generated as a result of the additional heating and nuclear fusion reactions. Thomson Scattering in Divertor (TSD) [2] will be used to measure electron temperature and density in the scrape-off layer in outer leg of ITER divertor. The main task of TSD is to protect the machine from divertor overloading. Gamma Spectroscopy (GS) [3] is based on the measurement of spectral lines of MeV range gammas generated in nuclear reactions in plasma. 2-D gamma-ray emission measurements give valuable information on the confined alpha particles in DT plasma. They also provide important information on the location of MeV range runaway electron beams in ITER plasma. For all three cases the physical basis and instrumentation are presented. The simple NPA version for measurements of D/T ratio in DEMO is also briefly described.

  19. NITSOL: A Newton iterative solver for nonlinear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pernice, M.; Walker, H.F.

    1996-12-31

    Newton iterative methods, also known as truncated Newton methods, are implementations of Newton`s method in which the linear systems that characterize Newton steps are solved approximately using iterative linear algebra methods. Here, we outline a well-developed Newton iterative algorithm together with a Fortran implementation called NITSOL. The basic algorithm is an inexact Newton method globalized by backtracking, in which each initial trial step is determined by applying an iterative linear solver until an inexact Newton criterion is satisfied. In the implementation, the user can specify inexact Newton criteria in several ways and select an iterative linear solver from among several popular {open_quotes}transpose-free{close_quotes} Krylov subspace methods. Jacobian-vector products used by the Krylov solver can be either evaluated analytically with a user-supplied routine or approximated using finite differences of function values. A flexible interface permits a wide variety of preconditioning strategies and allows the user to define a preconditioner and optionally update it periodically. We give details of these and other features and demonstrate the performance of the implementation on a representative set of test problems.

  20. Parallelizing iterative solvers for sparse systems of equations and eigenproblems on distributed-memory machines

    SciTech Connect

    Basermann, A.

    1994-12-31

    For the solution of discretized ordinary or partial differential equations it is necessary to solve systems of equations or eigenproblems with coefficient matrices of different sparsity pattern, depending on the discretization method; using the finite element method (FE) results in largely unstructured systems of equations. Sparse eigenproblems play particularly important roles in the analysis of elastic solids and structures. In the corresponding FE models, the natural frequencies and mode shapes of free vibration are determined as are buckling loads and modes. Another class of problems is related to stability analysis, e.g. of electrical networks. Moreover, approximations of extreme eigenvalues are useful for solving sets of linear equations, e.g. for determining condition numbers of symmetric positive definite matrices or for conjugate gradients methods with polynomial preconditioning. Iterative methods for solving linear systems and eigenproblems mainly consist of matrix-vector products and vector-vector operations; the main work in each iteration is usually the computation of matrix-vector products. Therein, accessing the vector is determined by the sparsity pattern and the storage scheme of the matrix.

  1. Material migration studies with an ITER first wall panel proxy on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, R.; Pitts, R. A.; Borodin, D.; Carpentier, S.; Ding, F.; Gong, X. Z.; Guo, H. Y.; Kirschner, A.; Kocan, M.; Li, J. G.; Luo, G.-N.; Mao, H. M.; Qian, J. P.; Stangeby, P. C.; Wampler, W. R.; Wang, H. Q.; Wang, W. Z.

    2015-02-01

    The ITER beryllium (Be) first wall (FW) panels are shaped to protect leading edges between neighbouring panels arising from assembly tolerances. This departure from a perfectly cylindrical surface automatically leads to magnetically shadowed regions where eroded Be can be re-deposited, together with co-deposition of tritium fuel. To provide a benchmark for a series of erosion/re-deposition simulation studies performed for the ITER FW panels, dedicated experiments have been performed on the EAST tokamak using a specially designed, instrumented test limiter acting as a proxy for the FW panel geometry. Carbon coated molybdenum plates forming the limiter front surface were exposed to the outer midplane boundary plasma of helium discharges using the new Material and Plasma Evaluation System (MAPES). Net erosion and deposition patterns are estimated using ion beam analysis to measure the carbon layer thickness variation across the surface after exposure. The highest erosion of about 0.8 µm is found near the midplane, where the surface is closest to the plasma separatrix. No net deposition above the measurement detection limit was found on the proxy wall element, even in shadowed regions. The measured 2D surface erosion distribution has been modelled with the 3D Monte Carlo code ERO, using the local plasma parameter measurements together with a diffusive transport assumption. Excellent agreement between the experimentally observed net erosion and the modelled erosion profile has been obtained.

  2. Material migration studies with an ITER first wall panel proxy on EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, R.; Pitts, R. A.; Borodin, D.; Carpentier, S.; Ding, F.; Gong, X. Z.; Guo, H. Y.; Kirschner, A.; Kocan, M.; Li, J. G.; Luo, G. -N.; Mao, H. M.; Qian, J. P.; Stangeby, P. C.; Wampler, W. R.; Wang, H. Q.; Wang, W. Z.; Chen, J. L.; Gan, K. F.

    2015-01-23

    The ITER beryllium (Be) first wall (FW) panels are shaped to protect leading edges between neighbouring panels arising from assembly tolerances. This departure from a perfectly cylindrical surface automatically leads to magnetically shadowed regions where eroded Be can be re-deposited, together with co-deposition of tritium fuel. To provide a benchmark for a series of erosion/re-deposition simulation studies performed for the ITER FW panels, dedicated experiments have been performed on the EAST tokamak using a specially designed, instrumented test limiter acting as a proxy for the FW panel geometry. Carbon coated molybdenum plates forming the limiter front surface were exposed to the outer midplane boundary plasma of helium discharges using the new Material and Plasma Evaluation System (MAPES). Net erosion and deposition patterns are estimated using ion beam analysis to measure the carbon layer thickness variation across the surface after exposure. The highest erosion of about 0.8 µm is found near the midplane, where the surface is closest to the plasma separatrix. No net deposition above the measurement detection limit was found on the proxy wall element, even in shadowed regions. The measured 2D surface erosion distribution has been modelled with the 3D Monte Carlo code ERO, using the local plasma parameter measurements together with a diffusive transport assumption. In conclusion, excellent agreement between the experimentally observed net erosion and the modelled erosion profile has been obtained.

  3. Material migration studies with an ITER first wall panel proxy on EAST

    DOE PAGES

    Ding, R.; Pitts, R. A.; Borodin, D.; ...

    2015-01-23

    The ITER beryllium (Be) first wall (FW) panels are shaped to protect leading edges between neighbouring panels arising from assembly tolerances. This departure from a perfectly cylindrical surface automatically leads to magnetically shadowed regions where eroded Be can be re-deposited, together with co-deposition of tritium fuel. To provide a benchmark for a series of erosion/re-deposition simulation studies performed for the ITER FW panels, dedicated experiments have been performed on the EAST tokamak using a specially designed, instrumented test limiter acting as a proxy for the FW panel geometry. Carbon coated molybdenum plates forming the limiter front surface were exposed tomore » the outer midplane boundary plasma of helium discharges using the new Material and Plasma Evaluation System (MAPES). Net erosion and deposition patterns are estimated using ion beam analysis to measure the carbon layer thickness variation across the surface after exposure. The highest erosion of about 0.8 µm is found near the midplane, where the surface is closest to the plasma separatrix. No net deposition above the measurement detection limit was found on the proxy wall element, even in shadowed regions. The measured 2D surface erosion distribution has been modelled with the 3D Monte Carlo code ERO, using the local plasma parameter measurements together with a diffusive transport assumption. In conclusion, excellent agreement between the experimentally observed net erosion and the modelled erosion profile has been obtained.« less

  4. Decentralized Control of Sound Radiation from an Aircraft-Style Panel Using Iterative Loop Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Cabell, Randolph H.; Fuller, Chris R.

    2008-01-01

    A decentralized LQG-based control strategy is designed to reduce low-frequency sound transmission through periodically stiffened panels. While modern control strategies have been used to reduce sound radiation from relatively simple structural acoustic systems, significant implementation issues have to be addressed before these control strategies can be extended to large systems such as the fuselage of an aircraft. For instance, centralized approaches typically require a high level of connectivity and are computationally intensive, while decentralized strategies face stability problems caused by the unmodeled interaction between neighboring control units. Since accurate uncertainty bounds are not known a priori, it is difficult to ensure the decentralized control system will be robust without making the controller overly conservative. Therefore an iterative approach is suggested, which utilizes frequency-shaped loop recovery. The approach accounts for modeling error introduced by neighboring control loops, requires no communication between subsystems, and is relatively simple. The control strategy is validated using real-time control experiments performed on a built-up aluminum test structure representative of the fuselage of an aircraft. Experiments demonstrate that the iterative approach is capable of achieving 12 dB peak reductions and a 3.6 dB integrated reduction in radiated sound power from the stiffened panel.

  5. Iterative design of a helically folded aromatic oligoamide sequence for the selective encapsulation of fructose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandramouli, Nagula; Ferrand, Yann; Lautrette, Guillaume; Kauffmann, Brice; Mackereth, Cameron David; Laguerre, Michel; Dubreuil, Didier; Huc, Ivan

    2015-04-01

    The ab initio design of synthetic molecular receptors for a specific biomolecular guest remains an elusive objective, particularly for targets such as monosaccharides, which have very close structural analogues. Here we report a powerful approach to produce receptors with very high selectivity for specific monosaccharides and, as a demonstration, we develop a foldamer that selectively encapsulates fructose. The approach uses an iterative design process that exploits the modular structure of folded synthetic oligomer sequences in conjunction with molecular modelling and structural characterization to inform subsequent refinements. Starting from a first-principles design taking size, shape and hydrogen-bonding ability into account and using the high predictability of aromatic oligoamide foldamer conformations and their propensity to crystallize, a sequence that binds to β-D-fructopyranose in organic solvents with atomic-scale complementarity was obtained in just a few iterative modifications. This scheme, which mimics the adaptable construction of biopolymers from a limited number of monomer units, provides a general protocol for the development of selective receptors.

  6. Guidelines for internal optics optimization of the ITER EC H and CD upper launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Moro, A.; Bruschi, A.; Figini, L.; Farina, D.; Platania, P.; Sozzi, C.; Chavan, R.; Goodman, T. P.; Krause, A.; Landis, J. D.; Sanchez Galan, F.; Toussaint, M.; Henderson, M. A.; Saibene, G.

    2014-02-12

    The importance of localized injection of Electron Cyclotron waves to control Magneto-HydroDynamic instability is well assessed in tokamak physics and the set of four Electron Cyclotron (EC) Upper Launchers (UL) in ITER is mainly designed for this purpose. Each of the 4 ULs uses quasi-optical mirrors (shaping and planes, fixed and steerable) to redirect and focus 8 beams (in two rows, with power close to 1 MW per beam coming from the EC transmission lines) in the plasma region where the instability appears. Small beam dimensions and maximum beam superposition guarantee the necessary localization of the driven current. To achieve the goal of MHD stabilization with minimum EC power to preserve the energy confinement in the outer half of the plasma cross section, optimization of the quasi-optical design is required and a guideline of a strategy is presented. As a result of this process and following the guidelines indicated, modifications of the design (new mirrors positions, rotation axes and/or focal properties) will be proposed for the next step of an iterative process, including the mandatory compatibility check with the mechanical constraints.

  7. Odd Shape Out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cady, Jo Ann; Wells, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    The Odd Shape Out task was an open-ended problem that engaged students in comparing shapes based on their properties. Four teachers submitted the work of 116 students from across the country. This article compares various student's responses to the task. The problem allowed for differentiation, as shown by the many different ways that students…

  8. Crystal Shape Bingo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, Audrey C.

    This document describes a game that provides students with practice in recognizing three dimensional crystal shapes and planar geometric shapes of crystal faces. It contains information on the objective of the game, game preparation, and rules for playing. Play cards are included (four to a page). (ASK)

  9. Impact of quantum entanglement on spectrum of cosmological fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanno, Sugumi

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the effect of entanglement between two causally separated open charts in de Sitter space on the spectrum of vacuum fluctuations. We consider a free massive scalar field, and construct the reduced density matrix by tracing out the vacuum state for one of the open charts, as recently derived by Maldacena and Pimentel. We formulate the mean-square vacuum fluctuations by using the reduced density matrix and show that the scale invariant spectrum of massless scalar field is realized on small scales. On the other hand, we find that the quantum entanglement affects the shape of the spectrum on large scales comparable to or greater than the curvature radius.

  10. Micro acoustic spectrum analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Schubert, W. Kent; Butler, Michael A.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Anderson, Larry F.

    2004-11-23

    A micro acoustic spectrum analyzer for determining the frequency components of a fluctuating sound signal comprises a microphone to pick up the fluctuating sound signal and produce an alternating current electrical signal; at least one microfabricated resonator, each resonator having a different resonant frequency, that vibrate in response to the alternating current electrical signal; and at least one detector to detect the vibration of the microfabricated resonators. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer can further comprise a mixer to mix a reference signal with the alternating current electrical signal from the microphone to shift the frequency spectrum to a frequency range that is a better matched to the resonant frequencies of the microfabricated resonators. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer can be designed specifically for portability, size, cost, accuracy, speed, power requirements, and use in a harsh environment. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer is particularly suited for applications where size, accessibility, and power requirements are limited, such as the monitoring of industrial equipment and processes, detection of security intrusions, or evaluation of military threats.

  11. Pulse shaping system

    DOEpatents

    Skeldon, Mark D.; Letzring, Samuel A.

    1999-03-23

    Temporally shaped electrical waveform generation provides electrical waveforms suitable for driving an electro-optic modulator (EOM) which produces temporally shaped optical laser pulses for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. The temporally shaped electrical waveform generation is carried out with aperture coupled transmission lines having an input transmission line and an aperture coupled output transmission line, along which input and output pulses propagate in opposite directions. The output electrical waveforms are shaped principally due to the selection of coupling aperture width, in a direction transverse to the lines, which varies along the length of the line. Specific electrical waveforms, which may be high voltage (up to kilovolt range), are produced and applied to the EOM to produce specifically shaped optical laser pulses.

  12. Pulse shaping system

    DOEpatents

    Skeldon, M.D.; Letzring, S.A.

    1999-03-23

    Temporally shaped electrical waveform generation provides electrical waveforms suitable for driving an electro-optic modulator (EOM) which produces temporally shaped optical laser pulses for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. The temporally shaped electrical waveform generation is carried out with aperture coupled transmission lines having an input transmission line and an aperture coupled output transmission line, along which input and output pulses propagate in opposite directions. The output electrical waveforms are shaped principally due to the selection of coupling aperture width, in a direction transverse to the lines, which varies along the length of the line. Specific electrical waveforms, which may be high voltage (up to kilovolt range), are produced and applied to the EOM to produce specifically shaped optical laser pulses. 8 figs.

  13. Reconstruction of the primordial power spectrum from CMB data

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Zong-Kuan; Zhang, Yuan-Zhong; Schwarz, Dominik J. E-mail: dschwarz@physik.uni-bielefeld.de

    2011-08-01

    Measuring the deviation from scale invariance of the primordial power spectrum is a critical test of inflation. In this paper we reconstruct the shape of the primordial power spectrum of curvature perturbations from the cosmic microwave background data, including the 7-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe data and the Atacama Cosmology Telescope 148 GHz data, by using a binning method of a cubic spline interpolation in log-log space. We find that the power-law spectrum is preferred by the data and that the Harrison-Zel'dovich spectrum is disfavored at 95% confidence level. These conclusions hold with and without allowing for tensor modes, however the simpler model without tensors is preferred by the data. We do not find evidence for a feature in the primordial power spectrum — in full agreement with generic predictions from cosmological inflation.

  14. Model selection applied to reconstruction of the Primordial Power Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, J. Alberto; Bridges, M.; Hobson, M. P.; Lasenby, A. N.

    2012-06-01

    The preferred shape for the primordial spectrum of curvature perturbations is determined by performing a Bayesian model selection analysis of cosmological observations. We first reconstruct the spectrum modelled as piecewise linear in log k between nodes in k-space whose amplitudes and positions are allowed to vary. The number of nodes together with their positions are chosen by the Bayesian evidence, so that we can both determine the complexity supported by the data and locate any features present in the spectrum. In addition to the node-based reconstruction, we consider a set of parameterised models for the primordial spectrum: the standard power-law parameterisation, the spectrum produced from the Lasenby & Doran (LD) model and a simple variant parameterisation. By comparing the Bayesian evidence for different classes of spectra, we find the power-law parameterisation is significantly disfavoured by current cosmological observations, which show a preference for the LD model.

  15. Scintillation event energy measurement via a pulse model based iterative deconvolution method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zhenzhou; Xie, Qingguo; Duan, Zhiwen; Xiao, Peng

    2013-11-01

    This work focuses on event energy measurement, a crucial task of scintillation detection systems. We modeled the scintillation detector as a linear system and treated the energy measurement as a deconvolution problem. We proposed a pulse model based iterative deconvolution (PMID) method, which can process pileup events without detection and is adaptive for different signal pulse shapes. The proposed method was compared with digital gated integrator (DGI) and digital delay-line clipping (DDLC) using real world experimental data. For singles data, the energy resolution (ER) produced by PMID matched that of DGI. For pileups, the PMID method outperformed both DGI and DDLC in ER and counts recovery. The encouraging results suggest that the PMID method has great potentials in applications like photon-counting systems and pulse height spectrometers, in which multiple-event pileups are common.

  16. Stability of resistive wall modes with plasma rotation and thick wall in ITER scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L. J.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Chu, M.; Chance, M.; Turnbull, A.

    2004-11-01

    The rotation effect on resistive wall modes (RWMs) is examined for realistically shaped, high-beta tokamak equilibria, including reactor relevant cases with low mach number M and realistic thick walls. For low M, Stabilization of RWMs arises from unusually thin inertial layers. The investigation employs the newly developed adaptive eigenvalue code (AEGIS: Adaptive EiGenfunction Independent Solution), which describes both low and high n modes and is in good agreement with GATO in the benchmark studies. AEGIS is unique in using adaptive methods to resolve such inertial layers with low mach number rotation. This feature is even more desirable for transport barrier cases. Additionally, ITER and reactors have thick conducting walls ( ˜.5-1 m) which are not well modeled as a thin shell. Such thick walls are considered here, including semi-analytical approximations to account for the toroidally segmented nature of real walls.

  17. The impact of iterated games on traffic flow at noncontrolled intersections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chao; Jia, Ning

    2015-05-01

    Intersections without signal control widely exist in urban road networks. This paper studied the traffic flow in a noncontrolled intersection within an iterated game framework. We assume drivers have learning ability and can repetitively adjust their strategies (to give way or to rush through) in the intersection according to memories. A cellular automata model is applied to investigate the characteristics of the traffic flow. Numerical experiments indicate two main findings. First, the traffic flow experiences a "volcano-shaped" fundamental diagram with three different phases. Second, most drivers choose to give way in the intersection, but the aggressive drivers cannot be completely eliminated, which is coincident with field observations. Analysis are also given out to explain the observed phenomena. These findings allow deeper insight of the real-world bottleneck traffic flow.

  18. Modelling of 3D fields due to ferritic inserts and test blanket modules in toroidal geometry at ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yueqiang; Äkäslompolo, Simppa; Cavinato, Mario; Koechl, Florian; Kurki-Suonio, Taina; Li, Li; Parail, Vassili; Saibene, Gabriella; Särkimäki, Konsta; Sipilä, Seppo; Varje, Jari

    2016-06-01

    Computations in toroidal geometry are systematically performed for the plasma response to 3D magnetic perturbations produced by ferritic inserts (FIs) and test blanket modules (TBMs) for four ITER plasma scenarios: the 15 MA baseline, the 12.5 MA hybrid, the 9 MA steady state, and the 7.5 MA half-field helium plasma. Due to the broad toroidal spectrum of the FI and TBM fields, the plasma response for all the n  =  1-6 field components are computed and compared. The plasma response is found to be weak for the high-n (n  >  4) components. The response is not globally sensitive to the toroidal plasma flow speed, as long as the latter is not reduced by an order of magnitude. This is essentially due to the strong screening effect occurring at a finite flow, as predicted for ITER plasmas. The ITER error field correction coils (EFCC) are used to compensate the n  =  1 field errors produced by FIs and TBMs for the baseline scenario for the purpose of avoiding mode locking. It is found that the middle row of the EFCC, with a suitable toroidal phase for the coil current, can provide the best correction of these field errors, according to various optimisation criteria. On the other hand, even without correction, it is predicted that these n  =  1 field errors will not cause substantial flow damping for the 15 MA baseline scenario.

  19. An Iterative Brinkman penalization for particle vortex methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, J. H.; Hejlesen, M. M.; Leonard, A.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2013-11-01

    We present an iterative Brinkman penalization method for the enforcement of the no-slip boundary condition in vortex particle methods. This is achieved by implementing a penalization of the velocity field using iteration of the penalized vorticity. We show that using the conventional Brinkman penalization method can result in an insufficient enforcement of solid boundaries. The specific problems of the conventional penalization method is discussed and three examples are presented by which the method in its current form has shown to be insufficient to consistently enforce the no-slip boundary condition. These are: the impulsively started flow past a cylinder, the impulsively started flow normal to a flat plate, and the uniformly accelerated flow normal to a flat plate. The iterative penalization algorithm is shown to give significantly improved results compared to the conventional penalization method for each of the presented flow cases.

  20. Recent progress and advances in iterative software (including parallel aspects)

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, G.; Young, D.M.; Kincaid, D.

    1994-12-31

    The purpose of the workshop is to provide a forum for discussion of the current state of iterative software packages. Of particular interest is software for large scale engineering and scientific applications, especially for distributed parallel systems. However, the authors will also review the state of software development for conventional architectures. This workshop will complement the other proposed workshops on iterative BLAS kernels and applications. The format for the workshop is as follows: To provide some structure, there will be brief presentations, each of less than five minutes duration and dealing with specific facets of the subject. These will be designed to focus the discussion and to stimulate an exchange with the participants. Issues to be covered include: The evolution of iterative packages, current state of the art, the parallel computing challenge, applications viewpoint, standards, and future directions and open problems.

  1. Tomography by iterative convolution - Empirical study and application to interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vest, C. M.; Prikryl, I.

    1984-01-01

    An algorithm for computer tomography has been developed that is applicable to reconstruction from data having incomplete projections because an opaque object blocks some of the probing radiation as it passes through the object field. The algorithm is based on iteration between the object domain and the projection (Radon transform) domain. Reconstructions are computed during each iteration by the well-known convolution method. Although it is demonstrated that this algorithm does not converge, an empirically justified criterion for terminating the iteration when the most accurate estimate has been computed is presented. The algorithm has been studied by using it to reconstruct several different object fields with several different opaque regions. It also has been used to reconstruct aerodynamic density fields from interferometric data recorded in wind tunnel tests.

  2. Experiment of low resistance joints for the ITER correction coil.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huajun; Wu, Yu; Wu, Weiyue; Liu, Bo; Shi, Yi; Guo, Shuai

    2013-01-01

    A test method was designed and performed to measure joint resistance of the ITER correction coil (CC) in liquid helium (LHe) temperature. A 10 kA superconducting transformer was manufactured to provide the joints current. The transformer consisted of two concentric layer-wound superconducting solenoids. NbTi superconducting wire was wound in the primary coil and the ITER CC conductor was wound in the secondary coil. The primary and the secondary coils were both immersed in liquid helium of a 300 mm useful bore diameter cryostat. Two ITER CC joints were assembled in the secondary loop and tested. The current of the secondary loop was ramped to 9 kA in several steps. The two joint resistances were measured to be 1.2 nΩ and 1.65 nΩ, respectively.

  3. Diamond neutral particle spectrometer for fusion reactor ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Krasilnikov, V.; Amosov, V.; Kaschuck, Yu.; Skopintsev, D.

    2014-08-21

    A compact diamond neutral particle spectrometer with digital signal processing has been developed for fast charge-exchange atoms and neutrons measurements at ITER fusion reactor conditions. This spectrometer will play supplementary role for Neutral Particle Analyzer providing 10 ms time and 30 keV energy resolutions for fast particle spectra in non-tritium ITER phase. These data will also be implemented for independent studies of fast ions distribution function evolution in various plasma scenarios with the formation of a single fraction of high-energy ions. In tritium ITER phase the DNPS will measure 14 MeV neutrons spectra. The spectrometer with digital signal processing can operate at peak counting rates reaching a value of 10{sup 6} cps. Diamond neutral particle spectrometer is applicable to future fusion reactors due to its high radiation hardness, fast response and high energy resolution.

  4. A successive overrelaxation iterative technique for an adaptive equalizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosovych, O. S.

    1973-01-01

    An adaptive strategy for the equalization of pulse-amplitude-modulated signals in the presence of intersymbol interference and additive noise is reported. The successive overrelaxation iterative technique is used as the algorithm for the iterative adjustment of the equalizer coefficents during a training period for the minimization of the mean square error. With 2-cyclic and nonnegative Jacobi matrices substantial improvement is demonstrated in the rate of convergence over the commonly used gradient techniques. The Jacobi theorems are also extended to nonpositive Jacobi matrices. Numerical examples strongly indicate that the improvements obtained for the special cases are possible for general channel characteristics. The technique is analytically demonstrated to decrease the mean square error at each iteration for a large range of parameter values for light or moderate intersymbol interference and for small intervals for general channels. Analytically, convergence of the relaxation algorithm was proven in a noisy environment and the coefficient variance was demonstrated to be bounded.

  5. Optimal application of Morrison's iterative noise removal for deconvolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ioup, George E.; Ioup, Juliette W.

    1986-01-01

    Morrison's iterative method of noise removal can be applied for both noise removal alone and noise removal prior to deconvolution. This method is applied to noise of various noise levels added to determine the optimum use of the method. The phase shift method of migration and modeling is evaluated and the results are compared to Stolt's approach. A method is introduced by which the optimum iterative number for deconvolution can be found. Statistical computer simulation is used to describe the optimum use of two convergent iterative techniques for seismic data. The Always-Convergent deconvolution technique was applied to data recorded during the quantitative analysis of materials through NonDestructive Evaluation (NDE) in which ultrasonic signals were used to detect flaws in substances such as composites.

  6. Is Carbon a Realistic Choice for ITER's Divertor?

    SciTech Connect

    C.H. Skinner; G. Federici

    2005-05-13

    Tritium retention by co-deposition with carbon on the divertor target plate is predicted to limit ITER's DT burning plasma operations (e.g. to about 100 pulses for the worst conditions) before the in-vessel tritium inventory limit, currently set at 350 g, is reached. At this point, ITER will only be able to continue its burning plasma program if technology is available that is capable of rapidly removing large quantities of tritium from the vessel with over 90% efficiency. The removal rate required is four orders of magnitude faster than that demonstrated in current tokamaks. Eighteen years after the observation of co-deposition on JET and TFTR, such technology is nowhere in sight. The inexorable conclusion is that either a major initiative in tritium removal should be funded or that research priorities for ITER should focus on metal alternatives.

  7. Impact of W on scenario simulations for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Leonov, V.; Schweinzer, J.; Sips, A. C. C.; Angioni, C.; Calabrò, G.; Dux, R.; Kallenbach, A.; Lerche, E.; Maggi, C.; Pütterich, Th.; ITPA Integrated Operating Scenarios topical Group; ASDEX Upgrade Team; Contributors, JET

    2015-06-01

    In preparation of ITER operation, large machines have replaced their wall and divertor material to W (ASDEX Upgrade) or a combination of Be for the wall and W for the divertor (JET). Operation in these machines has shown that the influx of W can have a significant impact on the discharge evolution, which has made modelling of this impact for ITER an urgent task. This paper reports on such modelling efforts. Maximum tolerable W concentrations have been determined for various scenarios, both for the current ramp-up and flat-top phase. Results of two independent methods are presented, based on the codes ZIMPUR plus ASTRA and CRONOS, respectively. Both methods have been tested and benchmarked against ITER-like Ip RU experiments at JET. It is found that W significantly disturbs the discharge evolution when the W concentration approaches ˜10-4 this critical level varies somewhat between scenarios.

  8. Fully converged iterative method for coupled channel problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Di; Simbotin, I.; Côté, R.

    2016-05-01

    We implemented a numerical method using a distorted-wave perturbative approach for coupled-channel scattering problems. Our new method provides a way to avoid costly computations for the propagation of the full solutions in coupled-channel problems to large distances for slowly vanishing couplings. Thus, instead of dealing with large matrices, all computations are performed in a channel by channel fashion. The distorted wavefunction for each channel is initialized with the appropriate solution (which includes the diagonal element of the coupling potential matrix). We then solve single-channel inhomogeneous radial equations which contain the (off-diagonal) couplings as a perturbation, and we iterate until desired accuracy is achieved. We tested for stability by continuing to iterate even after convergence has been achieved, e.g., for a total of 75 iterations. Partial support from the US Army Research Office (ARO-MURI W911NF-14-1-0378), and from NSF (Grant No. PHY-1415560).

  9. RHIC D0 INSERTION DIPOLE DESIGN ITERATIONS DURING PRODUCTION.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHMALZLE,J.; ANERELLA,M.; GANETIS,G.; GHOSH,A.; GUPTA,R.; JAIN,A.; KAHN,S.; MORGAN,G.; MURATORE,J.; SAMPSON,W.; WANDERER,P.; WILLEN,E.

    1997-05-12

    Iterations to the cross section of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) D0 Insertion Dipole magnets were made during the production. This was included as part of the production plan because no R&D or pre-production magnets were built prior to the start of production. The first magnet produced had the desired coil pre-stress and low field harmonics in the body of the magnet and is therefore being used in the RHIC Machine. On the first eight magnets, iterations were carried out to minimize the iron saturation and to compensate for the end harmonics. This paper will discuss the details of the iterations made, the obstacles encountered, and the results obtained. Also included will be a brief summary of the magnet design and performance.

  10. Iterative reconstruction of a region of interest for transmission tomography.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Andy; Nielsen, Tim; Grass, Michael

    2008-04-01

    It was shown that images reconstructed for transmission tomography with iterative maximum likelihood (ML) algorithms exhibit a higher signal-to-noise ratio than images reconstructed with filtered back-projection type algorithms. However, a drawback of ML reconstruction in particular and iterative reconstruction in general is the requirement that the reconstructed field of view (FOV) has to cover the whole volume that contributes to the absorption. In the case of a high resolution reconstruction, this demands a huge number of voxels. This article shows how an iterative ML reconstruction can be limited to a region of interest (ROI) without losing the advantages of a ML reconstruction. Compared with a full FOV ML reconstruction, the reconstruction speed is mainly increased by reducing the number of voxels which are necessary for a ROI reconstruction. In addition, the speed of convergence is increased.

  11. Normalized iterative denoising ghost imaging based on the adaptive threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gaoliang; Yang, Zhaohua; Zhao, Yan; Yan, Ruitao; Liu, Xia; Liu, Baolei

    2017-02-01

    An approach for improving ghost imaging (GI) quality is proposed. In this paper, an iteration model based on normalized GI is built through theoretical analysis. An adaptive threshold value is selected in the iteration model. The initial value of the iteration model is estimated as a step to remove the correlated noise. The simulation and experimental results reveal that the proposed strategy reconstructs a better image than traditional and normalized GI, without adding complexity. The NIDGI-AT scheme does not require prior information regarding the object, and can also choose the threshold adaptively. More importantly, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the reconstructed image is greatly improved. Therefore, this methodology represents another step towards practical real-world applications.

  12. Description of the prototype diagnostic residual gas analyzer for ITER.

    PubMed

    Younkin, T R; Biewer, T M; Klepper, C C; Marcus, C

    2014-11-01

    The diagnostic residual gas analyzer (DRGA) system to be used during ITER tokamak operation is being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to measure fuel ratios (deuterium and tritium), fusion ash (helium), and impurities in the plasma. The eventual purpose of this instrument is for machine protection, basic control, and physics on ITER. Prototyping is ongoing to optimize the hardware setup and measurement capabilities. The DRGA prototype is comprised of a vacuum system and measurement technologies that will overlap to meet ITER measurement requirements. Three technologies included in this diagnostic are a quadrupole mass spectrometer, an ion trap mass spectrometer, and an optical penning gauge that are designed to document relative and absolute gas concentrations.

  13. Description of the prototype diagnostic residual gas analyzer for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Younkin, T. R.; Biewer, T. M.; Klepper, C. C.; Marcus, C.

    2014-11-15

    The diagnostic residual gas analyzer (DRGA) system to be used during ITER tokamak operation is being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to measure fuel ratios (deuterium and tritium), fusion ash (helium), and impurities in the plasma. The eventual purpose of this instrument is for machine protection, basic control, and physics on ITER. Prototyping is ongoing to optimize the hardware setup and measurement capabilities. The DRGA prototype is comprised of a vacuum system and measurement technologies that will overlap to meet ITER measurement requirements. Three technologies included in this diagnostic are a quadrupole mass spectrometer, an ion trap mass spectrometer, and an optical penning gauge that are designed to document relative and absolute gas concentrations.

  14. Status of research toward the ITER disruption mitigation system

    SciTech Connect

    Hollmann, E. M.; Izzo, V. A.; Aleynikov, P. B.; Lehnen, M.; Snipes, J. A.; Fülöp, T.; Humphreys, D. A.; Lukash, V. E.; Papp, G.; Pautasso, G.; Saint-Laurent, F.

    2015-02-15

    An overview of the present status of research toward the final design of the ITER disruption mitigation system (DMS) is given. The ITER DMS is based on massive injection of impurities, in order to radiate the plasma stored energy and mitigate the potentially damaging effects of disruptions. The design of this system will be extremely challenging due to many physics and engineering constraints such as limitations on port access and the amount and species of injected impurities. Additionally, many physics questions relevant to the design of the ITER disruption mitigation system remain unsolved such as the mechanisms for mixing and assimilation of injected impurities during the rapid shutdown and the mechanisms for the subsequent formation and dissipation of runaway electron current.

  15. Broad spectrum solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw; Yu, Kin Man; Wu, Junqiao; Schaff, William J.

    2007-05-15

    An alloy having a large band gap range is used in a multijunction solar cell to enhance utilization of the solar energy spectrum. In one embodiment, the alloy is In.sub.1-xGa.sub.xN having an energy bandgap range of approximately 0.7 eV to 3.4 eV, providing a good match to the solar energy spectrum. Multiple junctions having different bandgaps are stacked to form a solar cell. Each junction may have different bandgaps (realized by varying the alloy composition), and therefore be responsive to different parts of the spectrum. The junctions are stacked in such a manner that some bands of light pass through upper junctions to lower junctions that are responsive to such bands.

  16. An unusual meteor spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, A. F.; Hemenway, C. L.; Millman, P. M.; Swider, A.

    1973-01-01

    An extraordinary spectrum of a meteor at a velocity of about 18.5 + or - 1.0 km/s was observed with an image orthicon camera. The radiant of the meteor was at an altitude of about 49 deg. It was first seen showing a yellow red continuous spectrum alone at a height of 137 + or - 8 km which is ascribed to the first positive group of nitrogen bands. After the meteor had descended to 116 + or - 6 km above sea level it brightened rapidly from its previous threshold brightness into a uniform continuum, the D-line of neutral sodium appeared, and at height 105 + or - 5 km all the other lines of the spectrum also appeared. The continuum remained dominant to the end. Water of hydration and entrained carbon flakes of characteristic dimension about 0.2 micron or less are proposed as constituents of the meteoroid to explain these phenomena.

  17. A new iterative triclass thresholding technique in image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hongmin; Yang, Zhong; Cao, Xinhua; Xia, Weiming; Xu, Xiaoyin

    2014-03-01

    We present a new method in image segmentation that is based on Otsu's method but iteratively searches for subregions of the image for segmentation, instead of treating the full image as a whole region for processing. The iterative method starts with Otsu's threshold and computes the mean values of the two classes as separated by the threshold. Based on the Otsu's threshold and the two mean values, the method separates the image into three classes instead of two as the standard Otsu's method does. The first two classes are determined as the foreground and background and they will not be processed further. The third class is denoted as a to-be-determined (TBD) region that is processed at next iteration. At the succeeding iteration, Otsu's method is applied on the TBD region to calculate a new threshold and two class means and the TBD region is again separated into three classes, namely, foreground, background, and a new TBD region, which by definition is smaller than the previous TBD regions. Then, the new TBD region is processed in the similar manner. The process stops when the Otsu's thresholds calculated between two iterations is less than a preset threshold. Then, all the intermediate foreground and background regions are, respectively, combined to create the final segmentation result. Tests on synthetic and real images showed that the new iterative method can achieve better performance than the standard Otsu's method in many challenging cases, such as identifying weak objects and revealing fine structures of complex objects while the added computational cost is minimal.

  18. Migration of vectorized iterative solvers to distributed memory architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Pommerell, C.; Ruehl, R.

    1994-12-31

    Both necessity and opportunity motivate the use of high-performance computers for iterative linear solvers. Necessity results from the size of the problems being solved-smaller problems are often better handled by direct methods. Opportunity arises from the formulation of the iterative methods in terms of simple linear algebra operations, even if this {open_quote}natural{close_quotes} parallelism is not easy to exploit in irregularly structured sparse matrices and with good preconditioners. As a result, high-performance implementations of iterative solvers have attracted a lot of interest in recent years. Most efforts are geared to vectorize or parallelize the dominating operation-structured or unstructured sparse matrix-vector multiplication, or to increase locality and parallelism by reformulating the algorithm-reducing global synchronization in inner products or local data exchange in preconditioners. Target architectures for iterative solvers currently include mostly vector supercomputers and architectures with one or few optimized (e.g., super-scalar and/or super-pipelined RISC) processors and hierarchical memory systems. More recently, parallel computers with physically distributed memory and a better price/performance ratio have been offered by vendors as a very interesting alternative to vector supercomputers. However, programming comfort on such distributed memory parallel processors (DMPPs) still lags behind. Here the authors are concerned with iterative solvers and their changing computing environment. In particular, they are considering migration from traditional vector supercomputers to DMPPs. Application requirements force one to use flexible and portable libraries. They want to extend the portability of iterative solvers rather than reimplementing everything for each new machine, or even for each new architecture.

  19. Spectrum of wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Hawking, S.W. Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Silver Street, Cambridge CB3 9EW ); Page, D.N. Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA Theoretical Physics Institute, Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB )

    1990-10-15

    Wormholes have been studied mainly in the semiclassical approximation as solutions of the classical Euclidean field equations. However, such solutions are rather special, and exist only for certain kinds of matter. On the other hand, one can represent wormholes in a more general manner as solutions of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation with appropriate boundary conditions. Minisuperspace models with massless minimal or conformal scalar fields have a discrete spectrum of these solutions. The Giddings-Strominger instanton solution corresponds to a sum of an infinite number of these solutions. Minisuperspace models with a massive scalar field also appear to have a discrete spectrum of such solutions, whose asymptotic form is given.

  20. Improving VHF Spectrum Utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andro, Monty; Orr, Richard; Foore, Larry; Sheehe, Charles; Freeman, Mark; Nguyen, Thanh; Bretmersky, Steven; Laberge, Chuck; Buchanan, David

    2004-01-01

    Limited VHF communications system capacity and increasing air traffic results in congestion of the aviation VHF spectrum. The voice communications errors and delayed channel access create system congestion and air traffic delays. Regulatory subdivision of bands for specific functions limits flexibility in the frequency usage. The objective of this viewgraph presentation is to identify near/mid/far term technologies to improve the performance and spectrum efficiency of current and emerging VHF communications systems. Select technologies with the highest potential, perform research and development to bring them to implementation stage.