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Sample records for ius

  1. Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) software analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grayson, W. L.; Nickel, C. E.; Rose, P. L.; Singh, R. P.

    1979-01-01

    The Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) System, an extension of the Space Transportation System (STS) operating regime to include higher orbits, orbital plane changes, geosynchronous orbits, and interplanetary trajectories is presented. The IUS software design, the IUS software interfaces with other systems, and the cost effectiveness in software verification are described. Tasks of the IUS discussed include: (1) design analysis; (2) validation requirements analysis; (3) interface analysis; and (4) requirements analysis.

  2. Orbiter CIU/IUS communications hardware evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huth, G. K.

    1979-01-01

    The DOD and NASA inertial upper stage communication system design, hardware specifications and interfaces were analyzed to determine their compatibility with the Orbiter payload communications equipment (Payload Interrogator, Payload Signal Processors, Communications Interface Unit, and the Orbiter operational communications equipment (the S-Band and Ku-band systems). Topics covered include (1) IUS/shuttle Orbiter communications interface definition; (2) Orbiter avionics equipment serving the IUS; (3) IUS communication equipment; (4) IUS/shuttle Orbiter RF links; (5) STDN/TDRS S-band related activities; and (6) communication interface unit/Orbiter interface issues. A test requirement plan overview is included.

  3. Astronomy education awards in the IUSE:EHR portfolio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kevin M.

    2017-01-01

    Improving Undergraduate STEM Education (IUSE) is a National Science Foundation (NSF) program that addresses immediate challenges and opportunities facing undergraduate STEM education. IUSE endeavors to support faculty as they incorporate educational research results into the classroom and advance our understanding of effective teaching and learning. Note that IUSE is an NSF-wide framework. This paper will focus upon IUSE:EHR - the IUSE program administered from NSF's Education and Human Resources Directorate (EHR) through the Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE). Other branches of IUSE operating within this framework include IUSE:RED in the Engineering Directorate and IUSE:GEOPATHS in the Geosciences Directorate.

  4. Orbiter CIU/IUS communications hardware evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huth, G. K.

    1979-01-01

    Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) and DoD Communication Interface Unit (CIU) communication system design, hardware specifications, and interfaces were evaluated to determine their compatibility with the Orbiter payload communication and data handling equipment and the Orbiter network communication equipment.

  5. Shuttle/IUS performance for planetary missions. [Interim Upper Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cork, M. J.; Driver, J. M.; Wright, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    Potential requirements for planetary missions in the 1980s, capabilities of the Interim Upper Stage (IUS) candidates to perform those missions, and Shuttle/IUS mission profile options for performance enhancement are examined. The most demanding planetary missions are the Pioneer Saturn/Uranus/Titan Probe and the Mariner-class orbiters of Mercury, Jupiter, and Saturn. Options available to designers of these missions will depend on the specific IUS selected for development and the programmatic phasing of the IUS and the NASA Tug. Use of Shuttle elliptic orbits as initial conditions for IUS ignition offers significant performance improvements; specific values are mission dependent.

  6. Therapeutic use of the LNG IUS, and counseling.

    PubMed

    Pakarinen, P; Toivonen, J; Luukkainen, T

    2001-12-01

    The intrauterine release of levonorgestrel (LNG) alters the function of the endometrium. This phenomenon offers special health benefits for users and a manner of local intrauterine therapy. In this review we discuss use of LNG-releasing intrauterine system (LNG IUS) in treatment and prevention of anemia and in the therapy of menorrhagia and dysmenorrhea. The antiproliferative effect of the LNG IUS on the endometrium offers targeted therapy against the proliferative action of estrogen on the endometrium during hormone replacement therapy. The LNG IUS as an alternative to sterilization is also discussed. There are also promising therapeutic fields such as use of the LNG IUS in the treatment of endometriosis and in the protection of endometrium exposed to tamoxifen during breast cancer treatment. Special attention is paid to counseling because successful use of the LNG IUS requires good training of the providers and extensive counseling of users.

  7. A Real-Time Telemetry Simulator of the IUS Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drews, Michael E.; Forman, Douglas A.; Baker, Damon M.; Khazoyan, Louis B.; Viazzo, Danilo

    1998-01-01

    A real-time telemetry simulator of the IUS spacecraft has recently entered operation to train Flight Control Teams for the launch of the AXAF telescope from the Shuttle. The simulator has proven to be a successful higher fidelity implementation of its predecessor, while affirming the rapid development methodology used in its design. Although composed of COTS hardware and software, the system simulates the full breadth of the mission: Launch, Pre-Deployment-Checkout, Burn Sequence, and AXAF/IUS separation. Realism is increased through patching the system into the operations facility to simulate IUS telemetry, Shuttle telemetry, and the Tracking Station link (commands and status message).

  8. STS-44 Defense Support Program (DSP) / IUS during preflight operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-44 Defense Support Program (DSP) satellite atop the inertial upper stage (IUS) is prepared for transfer in a processing facility at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Clean-suited technicians overseeing the operation are dwarfed by the size of the 5,200-pound DSP satellite and the IUS. The underside of the IUS (bottom) mounted in the airborne support equipment (ASE) aft frame tilt actuator (AFTA) table and ASE forward frame is visible at the base. The umbilical boom between the two ASE frames and the forward frame keel trunnion are visible. DSP, a surveillance satellite that can detect missle and space launches as well as nuclear detonations will be boosted into geosynchronous Earth orbit by the IUS. View provided by KSC with alternate number KSC-91PC-1749.

  9. Navigation for IUS deployment. TDRSS navigation accuracy in support of IUS deployment, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wylie, A. D.

    1977-01-01

    The navigation accuracy for tracking the orbiter prior to interim upper stage (IUS) deployment using the tracking data relay satellite system (TDRSS) was studied. The orbiter navigation accuracy for both one and two TDRSS satellites, for short and long data arcs, and for Doppler-only and Doppler-plus range solutions was examined. All test cases were run with the orbiter in a 150-n. mi. circular orbit, 28.5 degree inclination, at the time interval from the completion of the orbital maneuvering system (OMS)-2 maneuver to OMS-2 plus 2 hours (approximate time for IUS deployment). The data used were simulated by the simulation navigation (SIMNAV) program. The software tool used to process the TDRS data was the Shuttle Navigation Analysis Program (SNAP), a Kalman filter tool used to solve for the orbiter position and velocity. Results summarize the expected navigation accuracy using the TDRS system. It was concluded that: (1) data from both TDRS satellites were essential for accurate navigation results: (2) range data were essential for the short arc test case but were not needed for the long arc test case; and (3) with Doppler and range data from both TDRS satellites, the results converged to a reasonable solution after 5 to 10 minutes of data.

  10. IUS/TUG orbital operations and mission support study. Volume 2: Interim upper stage operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Background data and study results are presented for the interim upper stage (IUS) operations phase of the IUS/tug orbital operations study. The study was conducted to develop IUS operational concepts and an IUS baseline operations plan, and to provide cost estimates for IUS operations. The approach used was to compile and evaluate baseline concepts, definitions, and system, and to use that data as a basis for the IUS operations phase definition, analysis, and costing analysis. Both expendable and reusable IUS configurations were analyzed and two autonomy levels were specified for each configuration. Topics discussed include on-orbit operations and interfaces with the orbiter, the tracking and data relay satellites and ground station support capability analysis, and flight control center sizing to support the IUS operations.

  11. Does an intraabdominally placed LNG-IUS have an adverse effect on fertility? A case report.

    PubMed

    Doris, Nadine; Shabib, Gihad; Corbett, Shannon; Leader, Arthur; Black, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    This case of secondary infertility with an associated intraabdominal levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) demonstrates the importance of adequate imaging in women with a missing intrauterine contraceptive device and the possible fertility implications of an extrauterine LNG-IUS.

  12. Ius Chasma by Day and Night

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 18 June 2004 This pair of images shows part of Ius Chasma.

    Day/Night Infrared Pairs

    The image pairs presented focus on a single surface feature as seen in both the daytime and nighttime by the infrared THEMIS camera. The nighttime image (right) has been rotated 180 degrees to place north at the top.

    Infrared image interpretation

    Daytime: Infrared images taken during the daytime exhibit both the morphological and thermophysical properties of the surface of Mars. Morphologic details are visible due to the effect of sun-facing slopes receiving more energy than antisun-facing slopes. This creates a warm (bright) slope and cool (dark) slope appearance that mimics the light and shadows of a visible wavelength image. Thermophysical properties are seen in that dust heats up more quickly than rocks. Thus dusty areas are bright and rocky areas are dark.

    Nighttime: Infrared images taken during the nighttime exhibit only the thermophysical properties of the surface of Mars. The effect of sun-facing versus non-sun-facing energy dissipates quickly at night. Thermophysical effects dominate as different surfaces cool at different rates through the nighttime hours. Rocks cool slowly, and are therefore relatively bright at night (remember that rocks are dark during the day). Dust and other fine grained materials cool very quickly and are dark in nighttime infrared images.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -1, Longitude 276 East (84 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the

  13. IUS/TUG orbital operations and mission support study. Volume 4: Project planning data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Planning data are presented for the development phases of interim upper stage (IUS) and tug systems. Major project planning requirements, major event schedules, milestones, system development and operations process networks, and relevant support research and technology requirements are included. Topics discussed include: IUS flight software; tug flight software; IUS/tug ground control center facilities, personnel, data systems, software, and equipment; IUS mission events; tug mission events; tug/spacecraft rendezvous and docking; tug/orbiter operations interface, and IUS/orbiter operations interface.

  14. STS-44 DSP / IUS spacecraft tilted to deployment position in OV-104's PLB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-44 Defense Support Program (DSP) / Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) spacecraft, with forward airborne support equipment (ASE) payload retention latch actuator and umbilical boom released (foreground), is raised to a 58 degree deployment position by the ASE aft frame tilt actuator (AFTA) table in the payload bay (PLB) of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104. The IUS is supported in the ASE AFTA table and is inscribed with USAF. Above the IUS is the DSP satellite with stowed solar paddles (box-like structure) visible just above the DSP/IUS interface. Lights illuminate the PLB and highlight the IUS and some DSP components against the blackness of space.

  15. Contamination measurements during IUS thermal vacuum tests in a large space chamber. [IUS equipment support system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, C. R.; Shaw, C. G.

    1984-01-01

    The levels of contamination that originate from inside the IUS equipment support section (ESS) due to outgassing from electronics components and wiring operating at elevated temperatures (80-160 F) were investigated. Pressure was measured inside and outside the ESS. Mass deposition measurements were made with quartz crystal microbalances (QCM) facing into and away from ESS vents. The OCM's were operated at -50 C and -180 C using thermoelectrically and cryogenically cooled QCM's. Gaseous nitrogen flow inside the ESS was used to obtain the effective molecular flow vent area of the ESS, which was evaluated to be 359 sq cm (56 sq in) compared to the 978 sq cm (150 sq in) estimated by an earlier atmosphere pressure billowing test. The total outgassing rate of the ESS materials at a temperature of 60 C (140 F) decays with a time constant of 11.5 hours based on pressure measurements during the hot cycle. A time constant of 22 hours was estimated for the fraction of the outgassing which will condense on a -50 C surface. In contrast, the time constant is only 10.1 hours for the outgassing material which condenses on a surface at -180 C. A surface at -180 C collects approximately one half of the material vented from the ESS which impinges on it. Pressure measurements show very good correlation with the mass deposition measurements.

  16. IUS/TUG orbital operations and mission support study. Volume 5: Cost estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The costing approach, methodology, and rationale utilized for generating cost data for composite IUS and space tug orbital operations are discussed. Summary cost estimates are given along with cost data initially derived for the IUS program and space tug program individually, and cost estimates for each work breakdown structure element.

  17. Hydrated mineral stratigraphy of Ius Chasma, Valles Marineris

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roach, L.H.; Mustard, J.F.; Swayze, G.; Milliken, R.E.; Bishop, J.L.; Murchie, S.L.; Lichtenberg, K.

    2010-01-01

    New high-resolution spectral and morphologic imaging of deposits on walls and floor of Ius Chasma extend previous geomorphic mapping, and permit a new interpretation of aqueous processes that occurred during the development of Valles Marineris. We identify hydrated mineralogy based on visible-near infrared (VNIR) absorptions. We map the extents of these units with CRISM spectral data as well as morphologies in CTX and HiRISE imagery. Three cross-sections across Ius Chasma illustrate the interpreted mineral stratigraphy. Multiple episodes formed and transported hydrated minerals within Ius Chasma. Polyhydrated sulfate and kieserite are found within a closed basin at the lowest elevations in the chasma. They may have been precipitates in a closed basin or diagenetically altered after deposition. Fluvial or aeolian processes then deposited layered Fe/Mg smectite and hydrated silicate on the chasma floor, postdating the sulfates. The smectite apparently was weathered out of Noachian-age wallrock and transported to the depositional sites. The overlying hydrated silicate is interpreted to be an acid-leached phyllosilicate transformed from the underlying smectite unit, or a smectite/jarosite mixture. The finely layered smectite and massive hydrated silicate units have an erosional unconformity between them, that marks a change in surface water chemistry. Landslides transported large blocks of wallrock, some altered to contain Fe/Mg smectite, to the chasma floor. After the last episode of normal faulting and subsequent landslides, opal was transported short distances into the chasma from a few m-thick light-toned layer near the top of the wallrock, by sapping channels in Louros Valles. Alternatively, the material was transported into the chasma and then altered to opal. The superposition of different types of hydrated minerals and the different fluvial morphologies of the units containing them indicate sequential, distinct aqueous environments, characterized by alkaline

  18. Shuttle orbiter - IUS/DSP satellite interface contamination study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rantanen, R. O.; Strange, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    The results of a contamination analysis on the Defense Support Program (DSP) satellite during launch and deployment by the Space Transportation System (STS) are presented. Predicted contaminant deposition was also included on critical DSP surfaces during the period soon after launch when the DSP is in the shuttle orbiter bay with the doors closed, the bay doors open, and during initial deployment. Additionally, a six sided box was placed at the spacecraft position to obtain directional contaminant flux information for a general payload while in the bay and during deployment. The analysis included contamination sources from the shuttle orbiter, IUS and cradle, the DSP sensor and the DSP support package.

  19. STS-44 DSP / IUS spacecraft tilted to deployment position in OV-104's PLB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-44 Defense Support Program (DSP) / Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) spacecraft, with forward airborne support equipment (ASE) payload retention latch actuator and umbilical boom released, is raised to a 58 degree deployment position by the ASE aft frame tilt actuator (AFTA) table in the payload bay (PLB) of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104. The IUS is supported in the ASE AFTA table and is inscribed with USAF. Above the IUS is the DSP satellite with stowed solar paddles (box-like structure) visible just above the DSP/IUS interface. The cylinder at the very top of the DSP satellite is the Infrared (IR) Sensor. Lights illuminate the PLB and highlight the IUS and some DSP components against the blackness of space.

  20. Emerging indications for the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS).

    PubMed

    Heikinheimo, Oskari; Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    The levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS), originally designed for long-term contraceptive use, has been on the Scandinavian market for approximately 20 years. Novel clinical indications for the LNG-IUS, derived mainly from investigator-initiated studies, are emerging. These include heavy menstrual bleeding associated with uterine fibroids, endometriosis, adenomyosis, as well as endometrial hyperplasia. In both cohort and randomized studies, the LNG-IUS is effective in decreasing heavy menstrual bleeding, also in women diagnosed with uterine fibroids. In randomized studies the LNG-IUS has shown comparable clinical efficacy to GnRH analogues or progestins for the symptomatic treatment of endometriosis. Experience with LNG-IUS in adenomyosis is based on prospective cohort studies. Dysmenorrhea has been reported to decrease in all women, and uterine volume was seen to diminish in some of these studies. In the treatment of endometrial hyperplasias, including atypical hyperplasia, the LNG-IUS is equal or superior to treatment with systemic progestins. Further studies are needed to examine the full potential of the LNG-IUS in such common clinical situations.

  1. STS-44 DSP / IUS spacecraft tilted to predeployment position in OV-104's PLB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-44 Defense Support Program (DSP) / Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) spacecraft, with forward airborne support equipment (ASE) payload retention latch actuator released (foreground), is raised to a 29 degree predeployment position by the ASE aft frame tilt actuator (AFTA) table in the payload bay (PLB) of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104. Underneath the DSP / IUS combination, the umbilical boom is connected to the IUS. DSP components include Infrared (IR) sensor (top), AR I, SHF Antenna, EHF Antenna, Link 2 High-Gain Antenna, star sensor, and stowed solar paddles (box-like structure around the base). The Earth's limb and the blackness of space create the backdrop for this deployment scene.

  2. Technicians listen to instructions during STS-44 DSP / IUS transfer operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Clean-suited technicians, wearing headsets, listen to instructions during Defense Support Program (DSP) satellite / inertial upper stage (IUS) transfer operations in a processing facility at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. In the background, the DSP satellite atop an inertial upper stage (IUS) is readied for transfer to a payload canister transporter. DSP, a surveillance satellite that can detect missle and space launches as well as nuclear detonations will be boosted into geosynchronous Earth orbit by the IUS during STS-44 mission. View provided by the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) with alternate number KSC-91PC-1748.

  3. Analysis of the NSF IUSE Physics & Astronomy Education Portfolio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kevin M.

    2017-01-01

    The National Science Foundation’s IUSE:EHR (Improving Undergraduate STEM Education) Program is now over 3 years old. This presentation will describe the characteristics of the awards presently in the physics & astronomy portfolio. Awards will be described based upon a) general characteristics (duration, total funding, PI rank, type of institution, etc.), b) applicability (intended audience, level, and arena of implementation), c) nature of project (educational research, practical implementation, or both), and d) pedagogical focus (curriculum, STEM recruitment, STEM retention, information collection, and tools and/or skills development). General trends and exemplars will be identified as well as voids in the portfolio. Understanding what has been funded will help attendees design future proposals that will make innovative contributions to the portfolio.

  4. Glacial landforms in Ius Chasma, Mars — Indicators of Two Glaciation Episodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dębniak, K. T.; Kromuszczyńska, O.

    2016-06-01

    Results of geomorphological mapping of glacial landforms in Ius Chasma, Valles Marineris, Mars are presented. The results indicate at least two episodes of glaciations which occurred in the trough system.

  5. Effects of LNG-IUS on nerve growth factor and its receptors expression in patients with adenomyosis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young Sik; Cho, Sihyun; Lim, Kyung Jin; Jeon, Young Eun; Yang, Hyo In; Lee, Kyung Eun; Heena, Kamdar; Seo, Seok Kyo; Kim, Hye Yeon; Lee, Byung Seok

    2010-12-01

    The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) is effective in the treatment of dysmenorrhea associated with adenomyosis. However, the mechanism of pain relief of LNG-IUS in patients with adenomyosis is unclear. We aimed to investigate the effects of LNG-IUS on the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) and its receptors, NGFR p75 and TrkA in patients with adenomyosis. Endometrial and myometrial tissues were prepared from 17 LNG-IUS-treated patients and 15 hormonally untreated patients who had undergone hysterectomies for adenomyosis. Immunohistochemistry with antibodies against NGF, NGFR p75, and TrkA, was performed. The expression of NGF, NGFR p75, and TrkA in endometrium and myometrium of LNG-IUS-treated patients was significantly decreased compared to those of hormonally untreated patients. Our findings may indicate that the suppression of NGF and its receptors by LNG-IUS is another possible mechanism of relieving pain in patients with adenomyosis.

  6. Non-contraceptive uses of levonorgestrel-releasing hormone system (LNG-IUS)--a systematic enquiry and overview.

    PubMed

    Varma, Rajesh; Sinha, Deepali; Gupta, Janesh K

    2006-03-01

    Levonorgestrel releasing-intrauterine systems (LNG-IUS) were originally developed as a method of contraception in the mid 1970s. The only LNG-IUS approved for general public use is the Mirena LNG-IUS, which releases 20 mcg of levonorgestrel per day directly in to the uterine cavity. However, new lower dose (10 and 14 mcg per day) and smaller sized LNG-IUS (MLS, FibroPlant-LNG) are currently under clinical development and investigation. Research into the non-contraceptive uses of LNG-IUS is rapidly expanding. In the UK, LNG-IUS is licensed for use in menorrhagia and to provide endometrial protection to perimenopausal and postmenopausal women on estrogen replacement therapy. There is limited evidence to suggest that LNG-IUS may also be beneficial in women with endometriosis, adenomyosis, fibroids, endometrial hyperplasia and early stage endometrial cancer (where the patient is deemed unfit for primary surgical therapy). This systematic enquiry and overview evaluates the quality of evidence relating to the non-contraceptive therapeutic uses of LNG-IUS in gynaecology.

  7. STS-44 DSP satellite and IUS during preflight processing at Cape Canaveral

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    In a processing facility at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, clean-suited technicians oversee the transfer of the Defense Support Program (DSP) satellite atop an inertial upper stage (IUS) into a payload canister transporter for shipment to Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Launch Complex (LC) Pad 39A. During the transfer, the underside of the IUS mounted in the airborne support equipment (ASE) aft frame tilt actuactor (AFTA) table (bottom) and ASE forward frame (middle) is visible. The umbilical boom between the two frames and forward frame keel trunnion are visible. DSP, a surveillance satellite that can detect missle and space launches as well as nuclear detonations will be boosted into its proper orbital position by the IUS during STS-44. View provided by KSC with alternate number KSC-91PC-1751.

  8. The new LNG-releasing IUS: a new opportunity to reduce the burden of unintended pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Cristobal, Ignacio; Neyro, José-Luis; Lete, Iñaki

    2015-07-01

    Unintended pregnancies still remain a worldwide public health problem. They have received much attention in adolescents given the strong impact they have on their present and future lives. Young women wishing to delay maternity are also especially vulnerable to unintended pregnancies. Studies have revealed a pattern of use of contraceptive methods that is likely to increase this risk. Methods of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC), among which copper and levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine devices (IUD and IUS) are the most common, have been widely recommended to avoid unintended pregnancy at any age. Despite this, the use of these devices is very limited. Several barriers to their wide spread use have been identified, which specially affect a higher use by nulliparous women. A new levonorgestrel-releasing IUS containing only 13.5mg of levonorgestrel (IUS12) recently marketed as Jaydess® in Europe, has a smaller size, provides a shorter duration of action, and a lower hormonal content compared to Mirena®, along with a similar efficacy and safety profile, may offer a long-term option that better addresses the needs of nulliparous women. Evidence on the risk of unintended pregnancies in young women--with a special emphasis in Europe, barriers associated with a lower-than-desirable use of LARC methods--especially intrauterine devices (IUD and IUS), and the potential benefits of the new IUS12 including changes in bleeding pattern, safety and user satisfaction--especially with respect to nulliparous and adolescents--are reviewed here. Evidence supports that IUS12 may offer a LARC option that better addresses the needs of these women.

  9. Mechanisms to deploy the two-stage IUS from the shuttle cargo bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynie, H. T.

    1980-01-01

    The Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) is a two-stage or three-stage booster used to transport spacecraft from the space shuttle orbit to synchronous orbit or on an interplanetary trajectory. The mechanisms which were designed specifically to perform the two-stage IUS required functions while contained within the cargo bay of the space shuttle during the boost phase and while in a low Earth orbit are discussed. The requirements, configuration, and operation of the mechanisms are described, with particular emphasis on the tilt actuator and the mechanism for decoupling the actuators during boost to eliminate redundant load paths.

  10. STS-29 crewmembers inspect TDRS-D inertial upper stage (IUS) at KSC VPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Astronaut Mae C. Jemison and STS-29 Mission Specialist (MS) James P. Bagian and MS Robert C. Springer inspect the interface between the tracking and data relay satellite D (TDRS-D) and inertial upper stage (IUS-9) in a test cell located in the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Vertical Processing Facility (VPF). The clean-suited astronauts, engineers, and technicians discuss the payload. Springer and Bagian are responsible for deployment of IUS / TDRS-D from Discovery's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103's, payload bay (PLB) on STS-29. View provided by KSC with alternate number KSC-89PC-16.

  11. Hydraulic mechanism to limit torsional loads between the IUS and space transportation system orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, James R.

    1986-01-01

    The Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) is a two-stage booster used by NASA and the Defense Department to insert payloads into geosynchronous orbit from low-Earth orbit. The hydraulic mechanism discussed here was designed to perform a specific dynamic and static interface function within the Space Transportation System's Orbiter. Requirements, configuration, and application of the hydraulic mechanism with emphasis on performance and methods of achieving zero external hydraulic leakage are discussed. The hydraulic load-leveler mechanism meets the established design requirements for operation in a low-Earth orbit. Considerable testing was conducted to demonstrate system performance and verification that external leakage had been reduced to zero. Following each flight use of an ASE, all hydraulic mechanism components are carefully inspected for leakage. The ASE, including the hydraulic mechanism, has performed without any anomalies during all IUS flights.

  12. STS-44 DSP satellite and IUS during preflight processing at Cape Canaveral

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Overall view shows the Defense Support Program (DSP) satellite atop an inertial upper stage (IUS) during transfer operations in a processing facility at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Clean-suited technicians monitor the operations to prepare the 5,200-pound DSP satellite for transfer to Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Launch Complex (LC) Pad 39A. DSP solar paddles are in stowed position around the base of the satellite with the Infrared (IR) sensor hidden by a protective cover at the top of the satellite. DSP, a surveillance satellite that can detect missle and space launches as well as nuclear detonations will be boosted into geosynchronous orbit by the IUS during the STS-44 mission. View provided by the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) with alternate number KSC-91PC-1747.

  13. Shuttle program. STS-7 conceptual flight profile. IUS/TDRS-A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The Space Transportation System (STS) Flight Assignment Manifest has has scheduled a Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) spacecraft for a February 1981 launch on STS Flight 7. The preliminary flight profile that conceptually implements the flight requirements and constraints levied by the STS, inertial upper stage (IUS), and the TDRS spacecraft is presented. The integrated major flight design guidelines and requirements used in the development of the flight profile are included together with a flight sequence of events and time line that describe the profile and reflect implementation of the integrated set of requirements.

  14. Potential problems relative to TDRS/IUS tilt table elevation with failed VRCS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, J.

    1980-01-01

    Operational concerns and preliminary solution alternatives related to elevating the inertial upper stage/tracking and data relay satellite (IUS/TDRS) with a failed orbiter vernier reaction control system (VRCS) are presented. Problems arise from the combination of TDRS thermal constraints and tilt table constraints (the primary reaction control system (PRCS) cannot be used to hold attitude while the tilt table is being elevated), and the problems are compounded by the minimum PRCS attitude deadband. The potential solution options are affected by the launch window, flight profile, crew procedures, vehicle capability and constraints, and flight rules.

  15. [Changes of menstruation patterns and adverse effects during the treatment of LNG-IUS for symptomatic adenomyosis].

    PubMed

    Li, L; Leng, J H; Zhang, J J; Jia, S Z; Li, X Y; Shi, J H; Dai, Y; Zhang, J R; Li, T; Xu, X X; Liu, Z Z; You, S S; Chang, X Y; Lang, J H

    2016-09-25

    Objective: To investigate the changes of mestruation patterns and adverse effects during the treatment of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system(LNG-IUS)for symptomatic adenomyosis in a prospective cohort study. Methods: From December, 2006 to December, 2014, patients of symptomatic adenomyosis diagnosed by transvaginal ultrasound in Peking Union Medical College Hospital were given LNG-IUS. Before and after placement of IUS, all patients' parameters were recorded, including carrying status of IUS, symptoms and scores of dysmenorrhea, menstruation scores, biochemical indicators, physical parameters, menstruation patterns and adverse effects. Risk factors for changes of menstruation patterns and adverse effects, and their impact on treatment effects were analyzed. Results: Totally 1 100 cases met inclusion criteria, with median age 36 years(range 20-44 years), median follow-up 35 months(range 1 -108 months). During follow-up changes of menstruation patterns increased significantly with amenorrhea and shortened-menstruation being the most common manifestations. On 3, 6, 12, 24, 36, 48 and 60 months after the placement of LNG-IUS, 0, 5.8%(43/744), 6.9%(47/682), 10.1%(60/595), 17.3%(87/502), 27.2%(104/383)and 29.6%(82/277)patients achieved amenorrhea respectively(P<0.01). Total and subclassification of adverse effects decreased significantly(P<0.01). Within 12 months and >12 months after placement, abdominal pain and body weight increasing ≥5 kg/year were the most common adverse effects. Changes of menstruation patterns, total and subclassifications of adverse effects were neither dependent on patient parameters, treatment modes and treatment effects, nor could predict future LNG-IUS carrying status(all P> 0.05). After taking out of LNG-IUS, most changes of menstruation and adverse effects disappeared. Conclusions: During the treatment of LNG-IUS for symptomatic adenomyosis, changes of menstruation patterns increase gradually with amenorrhea and shortened

  16. A case of endometrial carcinoma in a long-term Levonorgestrel Intrauterine System (LNG 52 mg-IUS) user.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Melisa; Briggs, Paula

    2017-03-01

    This report describes a 50-year-old woman who presented to a community gynaecology clinic complaining of persistent heavy vaginal bleeding with an LNG 52 mg-IUS in situ. She was subsequently found to have stage 1 grade 1a endometrioid carcinoma. From the literature, we have identified five similar cases. This case highlights the possibility of endometrial carcinoma despite treatment with an LNG 52 mg-IUS and reinforces the importance of investigating women who present with unusual persistent or heavy vaginal bleeding.

  17. Submucosal uterine fibroid prolapsed into vagina in a symptomatic patient with IUS

    PubMed Central

    Matytsina-Quinlan, Lyubov; Matytsina, Laura

    2014-01-01

    A female patient in her mid 40s presents with heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) and a history of spotting/irregular light per vagina (PV) bleeding since intrauterine system (IUS) insertion 1 year ago. She is known to have submucosal uterine fibroid (SMUF). The patient reported abdominal pain and sudden onset of ‘miscarriage-like’ HMB with clots 2 days ago. On speculum examination there was a smooth round-shaped mass lying over the external cervical os. On bimanual examination PV, a round-shaped smooth mass of a walnut's size was palpable in the upper third of the vagina. Subsequent ultrasound imaging revealed an SMUF prolapsed into the vagina. Further surgical treatment was undertaken. Histology showed a fibroid (leiomyoma) with no evidence of malignancy. PMID:24739657

  18. Investigation of storage system designs and techniques for optimizing energy conservation in integrated utility systems. Volume 2: (Application of energy storage to IUS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The applicability of energy storage devices to any energy system depends on the performance and cost characteristics of the larger basic system. A comparative assessment of energy storage alternatives for application to IUS which addresses the systems aspects of the overall installation is described. Factors considered include: (1) descriptions of the two no-storage IUS baselines utilized as yardsticks for comparison throughout the study; (2) discussions of the assessment criteria and the selection framework employed; (3) a summary of the rationale utilized in selecting water storage as the primary energy storage candidate for near term application to IUS; (4) discussion of the integration aspects of water storage systems; and (5) an assessment of IUS with water storage in alternative climates.

  19. Preliminary analysis of selected gas dynamic problems. [space shuttle main engine main combustion transients and IUS nozzle flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prozan, R. J.; Farmer, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    The VAST computer code was used to analyze SSME main combustion chamber start-up transients and the IUS flow field for a damaged nozzle was investigated to better understand the gas dynamic considerations involved in vehicle problems, the effect of start transients on the nozzle flow field for the SSME, and the possibility that a damaged nozzle could account for the acceleration anomaly noted on IUS burn. The results obtained were compared with a method of characteristics prediction. Pressure solutions from both codes were in very good agreement and the Mach number solution on the nozzle centerline deviates substantially for the high expansions for the SSME. Since this deviation was unexpected, the phenomenon is being further examined.

  20. Prognostic significance of estrogen and progesterone receptor expression in LNG-IUS (Mirena) treatment of endometrial hyperplasia: an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Akesson, Emelie; Gallos, Ioannis D; Ganesan, Raji; Varma, Rajesh; Gupta, Janesh K

    2010-03-01

    We performed immunohistochemical analysis of estrogen (ERalpha) and progesterone receptors (PRA and PRB), phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and aromatase in endometrial hyperplasia treated with Mirena (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system; LNG-IUS) and explored their prognostic significance. The baseline pre-treatment endometrial hyperplasia of a selected prospective cohort was analyzed [complex (n = 29) and atypical (n = 5)]. Study participants were categorized into those that showed endometrial regression (responders, n = 28) and those that showed non-regression or histological progression to atypia or malignancy (non-responders, n = 6). Immunohistochemical expression was expressed as a histological score (HS). Responders compared to non-responders showed significantly higher HSs for estrogen and progesterone receptors. Absence of estrogen and progesterone receptors predicted non-responder status with likelihood ratios of 9.33 (95% CI 2.19-39.81) and 2.92 (95% CI 1.47-5.79), respectively. Neither PTEN nor aromatase expression were associated with LNG-IUS therapy responsiveness. Responsiveness of endometrial hyperplasia to LNG-IUS therapy may be determined through analysis of baseline estrogen and progesterone receptors, but these exploratory findings require confirmation in a larger dataset.

  1. Migration of levonorgestrel IUS in a patient with complex medical problems: what should be done?

    PubMed

    Soleymani Majd, Hooman; El Hamamy, Essam; Chandrasekar, Ramya; Ismail, Lamiese

    2009-03-01

    Patients with complex medical problems should be counselled about the need for highly effective contraception. As failure resulting in pregnancy, could cause significant morbidity and mortality. The LNG-IUS has gained great popularity and generally has a low side effect profile; however, perforation of the uterus and migration of the device is a potentially serious complication known to be associated with its use. The current accepted management is removal of the device from the abdominal cavity in order to prevent further morbidity. However this is not always a simple matter in patients who have complex medical problems and who are deemed unfit for surgery. Each time the patient comes for renewal of the contraceptive method, clinicians need to reassess the risks and benefits. This is particularly relevant in patients who have complex medical problems where special attention needs to be given, not only to immediate risks but also to long-term ones. Careful individualised counselling and consideration are paramount and perhaps it would have been prudent to discuss vasectomy with this patient and her husband (as the first line of contraception), as this may have avoided the ensuing complications arising from the chosen method.

  2. The NSF IUSE-EHR Program: What's New (and Old) About It, and Resources for Geoscience Proposers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, J.; Ryan, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    The NSF Division of Undergraduate Education recently released a new solicitation for the IUSE program -- the latest iteration in a succession of funding programs dating back over 30 years (including the Instrumentation and Laboratory Improvement Program (ILI), the Course and Curriculum Development Program (CCD), the Course Curriculum and Laboratory Improvement Program (CCLI), and the Transforming Undergraduate STEM Education Program (TUES). All of these programs sought/seek to support high quality STEM education for majors and non-majors in lower- and upper-division undergraduate courses. The current IUSE-EHR program is described in a 2-year solicitation that includes two tracks: Engaged Student Learning, and Institutional & Community Transformation. Each track has several options for funding level and project duration. A wide range of activities can be proposed for funding, and the program recognizes the varying needs across STEM disciplines. Geoscientists and other potential IUSE proposers are strongly encouraged to form collaborations with colleagues that conduct educational research and to propose projects that build upon the educational knowledge base in the discipline as well as contribute to it. Achieving this may not be immediately obvious to many geoscientists who have interests in improving student learning in their courses, but are not fluent in the scholarship of education in their field. To lower the barriers that have historically prevented larger numbers of geoscientists from developing their ideas into competitive education-related proposals, we have explored strategies for building and leveraging partnerships, sought to identify available resources for proposers, and explored a range of strategies for engaging and supporting larger numbers of potential geoscience proposers.

  3. Efficacy of the levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) in the prevention of the atypical endometrial hyperplasia and endometrial cancer: retrospective data from selected obese menopausal symptomatic women.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Michele; Di Cello, Annalisa; Venturella, Roberta; Mocciaro, Rita; D'Alessandro, Pietro; Zullo, Fulvio

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the efficacy of levonorgestrel intrauterine system-releasing (LNG-IUS) insertion in preventing atypical endometrial hyperplasia (AH) and endometrial cancer (EC) in symptomatic postmenopausal overweight/obese women. A total of 34 overweight/obese postmenopausal women, presenting abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) and endometrial hyperplasia (EH), and who were submitted to LNG-IUS insertion, were identified from registry data. Endometrial histology at LNG-IUS insertion showed simple EH in 20 cases (58.8%), complex EH in 14 cases (41.2%). At 36 months, 91% of patients showed no recurrence of AUB and a significant reduction in the mean endometrial thickness (from 8.2 ± 2.2 to 3.2 ± 1.5 mm, p < 0.05) was observed. Histologic regression of EH was observed in 27 (79.4%) and 33 (97.5%) cases at 12 and 36 months, respectively. None of the women in which EH persisted, reported cellular atypia or cancer progression at 12 and 36 months of follow-up. LNG-IUS represents an effective treatment option to manage postmenopausal obese women affected by AUB and EH. The device seems to be able to prevent the onset of AH and EC in women at high risk. Further prospective controlled studies in a well selected group of women are needed.

  4. STS-43 TDRS-E / IUS in OV-104's PLB ASE aft frame tilt actuator (AFTA) table

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    During STS-43 the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite E (TDRS-E) atop the inertial upper stage (IUS) and positioned in the airborne support equipment (ASE) aft frame tilt actuator (AFTA) table with the forward frame ASE latch actuator released and umbilical cables separated is raised by the aft frame ASE electromechanical tilt actuator to a 58-degree deployment position. The scene is highlighted against the Earth's limb. In the foreground on the port side and mounted on a getaway special (GAS) adapter beam are (forward to aft) the two Shuttle Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SSBUV) GAS canisters (one with motorized door assembly (MDA)) and the Tank Pressure Control Experiment (TPCE) GAS canister. Along the starboard sill longeron is the Space Station Heat Pipe Advanced Radiator Element II (SHARE-II).

  5. Workers in the VPF observe the lower end of the IUS to be mated to the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Workers in the Vertical Processing Facility observe the lower end of the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) that will be mated with the Chandra X-ray Observatory (out of sight above it). After the two components are mated, they will undergo testing to validate the IUS/Chandra connections and to check the orbiter avionics interfaces. Following that, an end-to-end test (ETE) will be conducted to verify the communications path to Chandra, commanding it as if it were in space. With the world's most powerful X-ray telescope, Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe. Chandra is scheduled for launch July 22 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93.

  6. Use of a frameless LNG-IUS as conservative treatment for a pre-malignant uterine polyp in a premenopausal woman - a case report.

    PubMed

    Janssens, D; Verbeeck, G; Wildemeersch, D

    2015-12-28

    Prevention of progression to invasive carcinoma in patients with a premalignant endometrial lesion using longterm treatment with levonorgestrel (LNG) releasing intrauterine systems (IUS) remains controversial, especially when manifest cellular atypia has been found in the endometrial biopsy specimen. We present a case of a 44-year old premenopausal woman with a premalignant uterine polyp who declined hysterectomy and was followed-up for more than 12 years after the first LNG-IUS was inserted. Endometrial atrophy installed, no pathology was detected and hysterectomy was thereby successfully avoided. The positive experience in this case should encourage further studies as literature data indicate that conservative treatment of premalignant endometrial pathology is a real option with a high success rate for women who have a contra-indication for surgery, refuse the classical approach for personal reasons or want to preserve their fertility.

  7. Recent volcanism in Ius and Tithonium Chasmata, Valles Marineris, Mars? First views from the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauber, E.; Masson, P.; Kronberg, P.; Gwinner, K.; Jaumann, R.; Neukum, G.; HRSC Co-Investigator Team

    The Valles Marineris in the western equatorial region of Mars are a system of ~4000 km long, up to several hundred km wide and up to 10,000 m deep linear E-W trending troughs. Two main processes have been proposed to explain their origin: Tectonism/rifting and erosion/collapse. Firm evidence of volcanic structures within the troughs would support a rifting contribution to their formation, since volcanism occurs frequently along terrestrial continental rifts. While several studies reported possible volcanic structures in the Valles Marineris (e.g., Lucchitta, 1987, 1990), no unambiguous identification has been possible yet. The first image of Valles Marineris taken through the HRSC camera on mars Express crosses Ius and Tithonium Chasmata at a longitude of about 280°E (resolution about 12 m/pixel). On the floor of Ius Chasma, several dark and circular structures with positive topographic relief can be distinguished. Some of them overlap each other. There are circular depressions on the summits of some of these cones. We tentatively interpret these features, which have not been reported before, as cinder cones. Such edifices are made up by more or less unconsolidated volcanic ash and glass particles. They can be eroded very easily, so their presence suggests a relatively recent origin. The cones are associated with a very bright material. This material is often aligned along possible faults which are strike parallel to the trend of the canyons. At least in one place it seems to be erosion-resistant. This material might be the product of (silicic) volcanism. Alternatives include, e.g., evaporitic products, since several sapping valleys debouch into the main trough very nearby. We also investigate a large mound in Tithonium Chasma. It is very bright and has a surface which is affected by eolian erosion. This mound has been suggested to be of volcanic origin before (Lucchitta, 1990). We could determine its area (270 km2), volume (200 km3), and slope angles in HRSC

  8. Safety, efficacy and patient acceptability of the contraceptive and non-contraceptive uses of the LNG-IUS.

    PubMed

    Bednarek, Paula H; Jensen, Jeffrey T

    2010-08-09

    Intrauterine devices (IUDs) provide highly effective, long-term, safe, reversible contraception, and are the most widely used reversible contraceptive method worldwide. The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) is a T-shaped IUD with a steroid reservoir containing 52 mg of levonorgestrel that is released at an initial rate of 20 μg daily. It is highly effective, with a typical-use first year pregnancy rate of 0.1% - similar to surgical tubal occlusion. It is approved for 5 years of contraceptive use, and there is evidence that it can be effective for up to 7 years of continuous use. After removal, there is rapid return to fertility, with 1-year life-table pregnancy rates of 89 per 100 for women less than 30 years of age. Most users experience a dramatic reduction in menstrual bleeding, and about 15% to 20% of women become amenorrheic 1 year after insertion. The device's strong local effects on the endometrium benefit women with various benign gynecological conditions such as menorrhagia, dysmenorrhea, leiomyomata, adenomyosis, and endometriosis. There is also evidence to support its role in endometrial protection during postmenopausal estrogen replacement therapy, and in the treatment of endometrial hyperplasia.

  9. Usual medical treatments or levonorgestrel-IUS for women with heavy menstrual bleeding: long-term randomised pragmatic trial in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Kai, Joe; Middleton, Lee; Daniels, Jane; Pattison, Helen; Tryposkiadis, Konstantinos; Gupta, Janesh

    2016-01-01

    Background Heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) is a common, chronic problem affecting women and health services. However, long-term evidence on treatment in primary care is lacking. Aim To assess the effectiveness of commencing the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) or usual medical treatments for women presenting with HMB in general practice. Design and setting A pragmatic, multicentre, parallel, open-label, long term, randomised controlled trial in 63 primary care practices across the English Midlands. Method In total, 571 women aged 25–50 years, with HMB were randomised to LNG-IUS or usual medical treatment (tranexamic/mefenamic acid, combined oestrogen–progestogen, or progesterone alone). The primary outcome was the patient reported Menorrhagia Multi-Attribute Scale (MMAS, measuring effect of HMB on practical difficulties, social life, psychological and physical health, and work and family life; scores from 0 to 100). Secondary outcomes included surgical intervention (endometrial ablation/hysterectomy), general quality of life, sexual activity, and safety. Results At 5 years post-randomisation, 424 (74%) women provided data. While the difference between LNG-IUS and usual treatment groups was not significant (3.9 points; 95% confidence interval = −0.6 to 8.3; P = 0.09), MMAS scores improved significantly in both groups from baseline (mean increase, 44.9 and 43.4 points, respectively; P<0.001 for both comparisons). Rates of surgical intervention were low in both groups (surgery-free survival was 80% and 77%; hazard ratio 0.90; 95% CI = 0.62 to 1.31; P = 0.6). There was no difference in generic quality of life, sexual activity scores, or serious adverse events. Conclusion Large improvements in symptom relief across both groups show treatment for HMB can be successfully initiated with long-term benefit and with only modest need for surgery. PMID:27884916

  10. Investigation of storage system designs and techniques for optimizing energy conservation in integrated utility systems. Volume 3: (Assessment of technical and cost characteristics of candidate IUS energy storage devices)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Six energy storage technologies (inertial, superconducting magnetic, electrochemical, chemical, compressed air, and thermal) were assessed and evaluated for specific applicability to the IUS. To provide a perspective for the individual storage technologies, a brief outline of the general nature of energy storage and its significance to the user is presented.

  11. [Clinical study of high intensity focused ultrasound ablation combined with GnRH-a and LNG-IUS for the treatment of adenomyosis].

    PubMed

    Ye, M Z; Deng, X L; Zhu, X G; Xue, M

    2016-09-25

    Objective: To investigate the clinical effect of dysmenorrhea in patients with adenomyosis treated by high intensity focused ultrasound(HIFU)ablation combined with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist(GnRH-a)and levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system(LNG-IUS). Methods: From April 2012 to December 2015, 477 cases of adenomyosis patients with dysmenorrhea were treated by HIFU in the Third Xiangya Hospital. Among them, some patients were treated with HIFU alone, some of them were treated with HIFU combined with GnRH-a and(or)LNG-IUS, thus were classified as H group, H+G group, H+M group and H+G+M group. The improvements of clinical results were compared among the four groups and the influencing factors of HIFU treatment for adenomyosis were also analyzed. Results: During the follow-up period, the overall effective rates of the treatment decreased with time, 3 months 89.4%(345/386), 12 months 84.0%(221/263), 24 months 74.2%(98/132), and the overall recurrence rate was 12.9%(39/303). The significant difference in the curative at 3 months[H group 83.7%(170/203), H+M group 95.0%(95/100), H+G group 100.0%(43/43), H+G+M group 96.8%(30/31)], 12 months[H group 79.4%(123/155), H+M group 93.2%(69/74), H+G group 11/12, H+G+M group 15/17], and 24 months[H group 68.0%(51/75), H+M group 96.4%(27/28), H+G group 6/12, H+G+M group 15/15]after HIFU treatment and recurrence rate[H group 19.0%(29/153), H+M group 3.3%(3/90), H+G group 19.4%(6/31), H+G+M group 4.5%(1/22)]were observed among the four groups(P<0.05). Pairwise comparison further showed that, in 3 months after the treatment, the effect of H group was significantly lower than those of H+M group and H+G group(P= 0.003, P=0.005); in 12 months after the treatment, the effect of H group was significantly lower than that of H+M group(P=0.006); while in 24 months after treatment, the effect of H group was significantly lower than that of H+G+M group(P=0.005), and the effect of H+G group was lower than that of H+G+M group(P= 0

  12. Shuttle program. STS-7 feasibility assessment: IUS/TDRS-A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    This Space Transportation System 7 (STS-7) Flight Feasibility Assessment (FFA) provides a base from which the various design, operation, and integration elements associated with Tracking and Data Relay Satellite-A can perform mission planning and analysis. The STS-7 FFA identifies conflicts, issues, and concerns associated with the integrated flight design requirements and constraints.

  13. Copper IUD and LNG IUS compared with tubal occlusion.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Diana

    2007-06-01

    This article will cover current contraceptive use around the world, then examine the advantages and disadvantages of female sterilization, the hormonal intrauterine system and the copper intrauterine device. Finally, the need for contraceptive choice will be discussed along with a discussion on the cost-effectiveness of these methods.

  14. MObIUS (Massive Object Integrated Universal Store): A Survey Toward a More General Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Sirp, J K; Brugger, S T

    2004-06-07

    General frameworks for distributed computing are slowly evolving out of Grid, Peer Architecture, and Web Services. The following results from a summer long survey into distributing computing practices have revealed three things. One, that Legion and Cactus-G have achieved the most in terms of providing an all-purpose application environment. Two, that extending a local programming environment to operate in a highly distributed fashion can be facilitated with toolkits like Globus. Three, that building a new system from the ground up could be realized, in part, by using some of the following components; an Object Oriented Database, Tapestry, JXTA, BOINC, Globus, component architecture technology, XML and related libraries, Condor-G, Proteus, and ParMETIS.

  15. IUS/TUG orbital operations and mission support study. Volume 3: Space tug operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A study was conducted to develop space tug operational concepts and baseline operations plan, and to provide cost estimates for space tug operations. Background data and study results are presented along with a transition phase analysis (the transition from interim upper state to tug operations). A summary is given of the tug operational and interface requirements with emphasis on the on-orbit checkout requirements, external interface operational requirements, safety requirements, and system operational interface requirements. Other topics discussed include reference missions baselined for the tug and details for the mission functional flows and timelines derived for the tug mission, tug subsystems, tug on-orbit operations prior to the tug first burn, spacecraft deployment and retrieval by the tug, operations centers, mission planning, potential problem areas, and cost data.

  16. Insights into Fourier Synthesis and Analysis: Part I--Using Simple Programs and Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Guy S. M.

    1988-01-01

    Introduced is a unique generation method of Fourier series requiring simple mathematical skills and using computer programs. Discusses Fourier synthesis by microcomputer, and Fourier analysis with simple equipment. Shown are a circuit diagram, computer programs, monitor displays and tables of data. (YP)

  17. Equations for calculating orbiter surface erosion and breakage rates in IUS and SSUS SRM exhaust plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, S. W.

    1978-01-01

    Equations and coefficients for calculating the flux of solid particles in the exhaust plumes of the interim upper stage and SSUS solid rocket motors (SRM) are considered. Modifications required to account for the independent motions of the orbiter and the SRM, such as will result during an on-orbit SRM firing are described.

  18. IUS/TUG Orbital Operations and Mission Support Study. Volume 1; Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The space transportation system (STS) is discussed which will include a propulsive stage that is carried into low earth orbit by the space shuttle. Data were accumulated from the analyses of various stage concepts, operating modes, and projected missions (space tug systems studies, growth stage studies, engine studies, and critical area studies). The foundation formulated by these studies aided in establishing a tentative two-phase approach for the extension of the STS operating regime beyond the space shuttle including plane changes, higher orbits, geosynchronous orbits and beyond. The orbital operations study, was conducted to provide the generation and analysis of operational plans, requirement, and concepts for the utilization of these vehicles. Primary emphasis was placed on methods and techniques to provide a sound technical approach to operations at reduced cost for the STS mission period.

  19. Ultrasound Location of Misplaced Levonorgestrel Releasing Intrauterine System (LNG-IUS) - is it easy?

    PubMed

    Gowri, Vaidyanathan; Mathew, Mariam

    2009-01-01

    The Levonorgestrel intrauterine device (LNG-IUD) is a hormone-containing device licensed for treatment of menorrhagia and contraception. Though complications such as perforation have been reported similar to other non-hormonal intrauterine devices, the diagnosis of such complications is difficult with this device because the LNG-IUD has a different ultrasound appearance compared to copper devices and these case reports are intended to emphasize this point.

  20. IUS/payload communication system simulator configuration definition study. [payload simulator for pcm telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Udalov, S.; Springett, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    The requirements and specifications for a general purpose payload communications system simulator to be used to emulate those communications system portions of NASA and DOD payloads/spacecraft that will in the future be carried into earth orbit by the shuttle are discussed. For the purpose of on-orbit checkout, the shuttle is required to communicate with the payloads while they are physically located within the shuttle bay (attached) and within a range of 20 miles from the shuttle after they have been deployed (detached). Many of the payloads are also under development (and many have yet to be defined), actual payload communication hardware will not be available within the time frame during which the avionic hardware tests will be conducted. Thus, a flexible payload communication system simulator is required.

  1. Performance evaluation of fault-tolerant systems with application to the IUS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Missana, J.-O.; Walker, Bruce K.

    1988-01-01

    A new method for quantitatively evaluating the performance of fault-tolerant systems is developed and applied to an example. The method assumes that the random failure and diagnostic decision behavior of the system can be modeled by a finite state Markov process. A performance value must be assigned to each of the states of the model. The method then generates the moments of the probability mass function of the cumulative performance and uses these to generate a maximum entropy approximation to the performance PMF. Some computational considerations are discussed. The method is applied to a typical mission for the Inertial Upper Stage to examine the attitude accuracy performance of the inertial system.

  2. AUTOMOTIVE DIESEL MAINTENANCE 1, UNIT XVI, I--USE AND CARE OF SMALL HAND TOOLS, II--PRINCIPLES OF THE POWER DIVIDER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Education, St. Paul. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    THIS MODULE OF A 30-MODULE COURSE IS DESIGNED TO DEVELOP AN UNDERSTANDING OF SMALL HAND TOOLS USED IN DIESEL ENGINE MAINTENANCE AND THE OPERATING PRINCIPLES AND MAINTENANCE OF POWER DIVIDERS (GEAR BOXES) USED IN DIESEL ENGINE POWER DISTRIBUTION. TOPICS ARE (1) UNDERSTANDING TORQUE AND HOW IT IS MEASURED, (2) REPAIRING AND REPLACING THREADED…

  3. An evaluation of the simultaneous use of the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device (LNG-IUS, Mirena®) combined with endometrial ablation in the management of menorrhagia.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, D; Byrne, P

    2012-05-01

    The objective of our study was to document the efficacy and possible complications in women who were treated for menorrhagia with the simultaneous use of endometrial ablation and the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device. Women were offered this combined treatment if they complained of menorrhagia and needed contraception. A structured questionnaire was mailed to 150 women who had undergone this combined treatment; 105 (70%) returned a completed questionnaire. The mean duration of follow-up was 25 months (range 6-54 months). Following treatment, 53 women (50.5%) described their periods as being lighter than normal and 49 (46%) had become amenorrhoeic. Overall, 101 (96%) stated that they were satisfied with the treatment. Of the women, 95 (90.5%) said that the treatment had been a 'complete success'; eight (7.6%) 'partly successful' and two women (1.9%) said the treatment had been a 'failure'. One woman subsequently required a hysterectomy. This observational study supports the hypothesis that combined endometrial ablation and insertion of a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device is an effective treatment for menorrhagia and has some advantages when compared with the individual use of these treatments.

  4. The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system is associated with delayed endocervical clearance of Chlamydia trachomatis without alterations in vaginal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Liechty, Emma R.; Bergin, Ingrid L.; Bassis, Christine M.; Chai, Daniel; LeBar, William; Young, Vincent B.; Bell, Jason D.

    2015-01-01

    Progestin-based contraception may impact women's susceptibility to sexually transmitted infection. We evaluated the effect of the levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) on cervical persistence of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) in a baboon model. Female olive baboons (Papio anubis) with or without an LNG-IUS received CT or sham inoculations. CT was detected in cervical epithelium with weekly nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) and culture. Presence of the LNG-IUS was associated with prolonged persistence of CT. Median time to post-inoculation clearance of CT as detected by NAAT was 10 weeks (range 7–12) for animals with an LNG-IUS and 3 weeks (range 0–12) for non-LNG-IUS animals (P = 0.06). Similarly, median time to post-inoculation clearance of CT by culture was 9 weeks (range 3–12) for LNG-IUS animals and 1.5 weeks (range 0–10) for non-LNG-IUS animals (P = 0.04). We characterized the community structure of the vaginal microbiota with the presence of the LNG-IUS to determine if alterations in CT colonization dynamics were associated with changes in vaginal commensal bacteria. Vaginal swabs were collected weekly for microbiome analysis. Endocervical CT infection was not correlated with alterations in the vaginal microbiota. Together, these results suggest that LNG-IUS may facilitate CT endocervical persistence through a mechanism distinct from vaginal microbial alterations. PMID:26371177

  5. The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system is associated with delayed endocervical clearance of Chlamydia trachomatis without alterations in vaginal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Liechty, Emma R; Bergin, Ingrid L; Bassis, Christine M; Chai, Daniel; LeBar, William; Young, Vincent B; Bell, Jason D

    2015-11-01

    Progestin-based contraception may impact women's susceptibility to sexually transmitted infection. We evaluated the effect of the levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) on cervical persistence of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) in a baboon model. Female olive baboons (Papio anubis) with or without an LNG-IUS received CT or sham inoculations. CT was detected in cervical epithelium with weekly nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) and culture. Presence of the LNG-IUS was associated with prolonged persistence of CT. Median time to post-inoculation clearance of CT as detected by NAAT was 10 weeks (range 7-12) for animals with an LNG-IUS and 3 weeks (range 0-12) for non-LNG-IUS animals (P = 0.06). Similarly, median time to post-inoculation clearance of CT by culture was 9 weeks (range 3-12) for LNG-IUS animals and 1.5 weeks (range 0-10) for non-LNG-IUS animals (P = 0.04). We characterized the community structure of the vaginal microbiota with the presence of the LNG-IUS to determine if alterations in CT colonization dynamics were associated with changes in vaginal commensal bacteria. Vaginal swabs were collected weekly for microbiome analysis. Endocervical CT infection was not correlated with alterations in the vaginal microbiota. Together, these results suggest that LNG-IUS may facilitate CT endocervical persistence through a mechanism distinct from vaginal microbial alterations.

  6. Solar Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A medical refrigeration and a water pump both powered by solar cells that convert sunlight directly into electricity are among the line of solar powered equipment manufactured by IUS (Independent Utility Systems) for use in areas where conventional power is not available. IUS benefited from NASA technology incorporated in the solar panel design and from assistance provided by Kerr Industrial Applications Center.

  7. A Comparison of the 27-Item and 12-Item Intolerance of Uncertainty Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khawaja, Nigar G.; Yu, Lai Ngo Heidi

    2010-01-01

    The 27-item Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale (IUS) has become one of the most frequently used measures of Intolerance of Uncertainty. More recently, an abridged, 12-item version of the IUS has been developed. The current research used clinical (n = 50) and non-clinical (n = 56) samples to examine and compare the psychometric properties of both…

  8. Beyond Acculturation: Political "Change", Indigenous Knowledges, and Intercultural Higher Education in Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez-Aguilera, Dulce Abigail; Figueroa-Helland, Leonardo E.

    2011-01-01

    This article critiques the evolution of higher education in Mexico in light of the political "change" that led to the establishment of Intercultural Universities (IUs) for Indigenous communities. We argue that the "change" touted by the post-2000 regime isn't as profound or beneficial as claimed. Although IUs embody valuable…

  9. The Marketability of Integrated Energy/Utility Systems: A Guide to the Dollar Savings Potential in Integrated Energy/Utility Systems; for Campuses, Medical Complexes, and Communities; Architect/Engineers, Industrial and Power Plant Owners; Suppliers; and Constructors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coxe, Edwin F.; Hill, David E.

    This publication acquaints the prospective marketplace with the potential and underlying logic of the Integrated Utility System (IUS) concept. This system holds promise for educational and medical institutions seeking to reduce their energy costs. The generic IUS concept is described and how it can be incorporated into existing heating and…

  10. A Factor Analytic Study of the Internet Usage Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monetti, David M.; Whatley, Mark A.; Hinkle, Kerry T.; Cunningham, Kerry T.; Breneiser, Jennifer E.; Kisling, Rhea

    2011-01-01

    This study developed an Internet Usage Scale (IUS) for use with adolescent populations. The IUS is a 26-item scale that measures participants' beliefs about how their Internet usage impacts their behavior. The sample for this study consisted of 947 middle school students. An exploratory factor analysis with varimax rotation was conducted on the…

  11. Psychophysics of Complex Auditory and Speech Stimuli

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-31

    indices (dl were then calculated from this matrix following the ABX response model suggested by Macmillan 5 and Creelman (1991: also Pierce & Gilbert, 1958...ofSpechi Pceceptio Thle Htague: Nijhoff Macmillan, N. A, & Creelman , C. D (1990). Detection Tbeorx,. A IUs,-es Cnide Cambnidge: Cambridge. Mart, 1). (1982

  12. User benefits and funding strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beauchamp, N. A.

    1975-01-01

    A three-step, systematic method is described for selecting relevant and highly beneficial payloads for the Interim Upper Stage (IUS) that will be used with the space shuttle until the space tug becomes available. Viable cost-sharing strategies which would maximize the number of IUS payloads and the benefits obtainable under a limited NASA budget were also determined.

  13. In Utero Smoke Exposure and Impaired Response to Inhaled Corticosteroids in Children with Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Robyn T.; Raby, Benjamin A.; Van Steen, Kristel; Fuhlbrigge, Anne L.; Celedón, Juan C.; Rosner, Bernard A.; Strunk, Robert C.; Zeiger, Robert S.; Weiss, Scott T.

    2010-01-01

    Background Few studies have examined the effects of in utero smoke exposure (IUS) on lung function in children with asthma, and there are no published data on the impact of IUS on treatment outcomes in asthmatic children. Objectives To explore whether IUS exposure is associated with increased airway responsiveness among children with asthma, and whether IUS modifies the response to treatment with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS). Methods To assess the impact of parent-reported IUS exposure on airway responsiveness in childhood asthma we performed a repeated-measures analysis of methacholine PC20 data from the Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP), a four-year, multicenter, randomized double masked placebo controlled trial of 1041 children ages 5–12 comparing the long term efficacy of ICS with mast cell stabilizing agents or placebo. Results Although improvement was seen in both groups, asthmatic children with IUS exposure had on average 26% less of an improvement in airway responsiveness over time compared to unexposed children (p=.01). Moreover, while children who were not exposed to IUS who received budesonide experienced substantial improvement in PC20 compared to untreated children (1.25 fold-increase, 95% CI 1.03, 1.50, p=.02) the beneficial effects of budesonide were attenuated among children with a history of IUS exposure (1.04 fold-increase, 95% CI 0.65, 1.68, p=.88). Conclusions IUS reduces age-related improvements in airway responsiveness among asthmatic children. Moreover, IUS appears to blunt the beneficial effects of ICS use on airways responsiveness. These results emphasize the importance of preventing this exposure through smoking cessation counseling efforts with pregnant women. PMID:20673983

  14. The Effect of Age, Parity and Body Mass Index on the Efficacy, Safety, Placement and User Satisfaction Associated With Two Low-Dose Levonorgestrel Intrauterine Contraceptive Systems: Subgroup Analyses of Data From a Phase III Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina; Apter, Dan; Hauck, Brian; Schmelter, Thomas; Rybowski, Sarah; Rosen, Kimberly; Nelson, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Objective Two low-dose levonorgestrel intrauterine contraceptive systems (LNG-IUSs; total content 13.5 mg [average approx. 8 μg/24 hours over the first year; LNG-IUS 8] and total content 19.5 mg [average approx. 13 μg/24 hours over the first year; LNG-IUS 13]) have previously been shown to be highly effective (3-year Pearl Indices: 0.33 and 0.31, respectively), safe and well tolerated. The present subgroup analyses evaluated whether or not outcomes were affected by parity, age (18–25 vs 26–35 years), or body mass index (BMI, <30 vs ≥30 kg/m2). Methods Nulliparous and parous women aged 18‒35 years with regular menstrual cycles (21‒35 days) requesting contraception were randomized to 3 years of LNG-IUS 8 or LNG-IUS 13 use. Results In the LNG-IUS 8 and LNG-IUS 13 groups, 1432 and 1452 women, respectively, had a placement attempted and were included in the full analysis set; 39.2%, 39.2% and 17.1% were 18–25 years old, nulliparous and had a BMI ≥30 kg/m2, respectively. Both systems were similarly effective regardless of age, parity or BMI; the subgroup Pearl Indices had widely overlapping 95% confidence intervals. Placement of LNG-IUS 8 and LNG-IUS 13 was easier (p < 0.0001) and less painful (p < 0.0001) in women who had delivered vaginally than in women who had not. The complete/partial expulsion rate was 2.2–4.2% across all age and parity subgroups and higher in parous than in nulliparous women (p = 0.004). The incidence of pelvic inflammatory disease was 0.1–0.6% across all age and parity subgroups: nulliparous and younger women were not at higher risk than parous and older women, respectively. The ectopic pregnancy rate was 0.3–0.4% across all age and parity subgroups. Across all age and parity subgroups, the 3-year completion rate was 50.9–61.3% for LNG-IUS 8 and 57.9–61.1% for LNG-IUS 13, and was higher (p = 0.0001) among older than younger women in the LNG-IUS 8 group only. Conclusions LNG-IUS 8 and LNG-IUS 13 were highly effective

  15. Flight Results of the Chandra X-ray Observatory Inertial Upper Stage Space Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tillotson, R.; Walter, R.

    2000-01-01

    Under contract to NASA, a specially configured version of the Boeing developed Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) booster was provided by Boeing to deliver NASA's 1.5 billion dollar Chandra X-Ray Observatory satellite into a highly elliptical transfer orbit from a Shuttle provided circular park orbit. Subsequently, the final orbit of the Chandra satellite was to be achieved using the Chandra Integral Propulsion System (IPS) through a series of IPS burns. On 23 July 1999 the Shuttle Columbia (STS-93) was launched with the IUS/Chandra stack in the Shuttle payload bay. Unfortunately, the Shuttle Orbiter was unexpectantly inserted into an off-nominal park orbit due to a Shuttle propulsion anomaly occurring during ascent. Following the IUS/Chandra on-orbit deployment from the Shuttle, at seven hours from liftoff, the flight proven IUS GN&C system successfully injected Chandra into the targeted transfer orbit, in spite of the off-nominal park orbit. This paper describes the IUS GN&C system, discusses the specific IUS GN&C mission data load development, analyses and testing for the Chandra mission, and concludes with a summary of flight results for the IUS part of the Chandra mission.

  16. Introduction of the levonorgestrel intrauterine system in Kenya through mobile outreach: review of service statistics and provider perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Hubacher, David; Akora, Vitalis; Masaba, Rose; Chen, Mario; Veena, Valentine

    2014-01-01

    Background: The levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG IUS) was developed over 30 years ago, but the product is currently too expensive for widespread use in many developing countries. In Kenya, one organization has received donated commodities for 5 years, providing an opportunity to assess impact and potential future role of the product. Methods: We reviewed service statistics on insertions of the LNG IUS, copper intrauterine device (IUD), and subdermal implant from 15 mobile outreach teams during the 2011 calendar year. To determine the impact of the LNG IUS introduction, we analyzed changes in uptake and distribution of the copper IUD and subdermal implant by comparing periods of time when the LNG IUS was available with periods when it was not available. In addition, we interviewed 27 clinicians to assess their views of the product and of its future role. Results: When the LNG IUS was not available, intrauterine contraception accounted for 39% of long-acting method provision. The addition of the LNG IUS created a slight rise in intrauterine contraception uptake (to 44%) at the expense of the subdermal implant, but the change was only marginally significant (P = .08) and was largely attributable to the copper IUD. All interviewed providers felt that the LNG IUS would increase uptake of long-acting methods, and 70% felt that the noncontraceptive benefits of the product are important to clients. Conclusions: The LNG IUS was well-received among providers and family planning clients in this population in Kenya. Although important changes in service statistics were not apparent from this analysis (perhaps due to the small quantity of LNG IUS that was available), provider enthusiasm for the product was high. This finding, above all, suggests that a larger-scale introduction effort would have strong support from providers and thus increase the chances of success. Adding another proven and highly acceptable long-acting contraceptive technology to the method mix

  17. Investigation of storage system designs and techniques for optimizing energy conservation in integrated utility systems. Volume 1: (Executive summary)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Integrated Utility Systems (IUS) have been suggested as a means of reducing the cost and conserving the nonrenewable energy resources required to supply utility services (energy, water, and waste disposal) to developments of limited size. The potential for further improving the performance and reducing the cost of IUS installations through the use of energy storage devices is examined and the results are summarized. Candidate energy storage concepts in the general areas of thermal, inertial, superconducting magnetic, electrochemical, chemical, and compressed air energy storage are assessed and the storage of thermal energy as the sensible heat of water is selected as the primary candidate for near term application to IUS.

  18. Space Transportation System Cargo projects: inertial stage/spacecraft integration plan. Volume 1: Management plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Management System for the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) - spacecraft processing from KSC arrival through launch is described. The roles and responsibilities of the agencies and test team organizations involved in IUS-S/C processing at KSC for non-Department of Defense missions are described. Working relationships are defined with respect to documentation preparation, coordination and approval, schedule development and maintenance, test conduct and control, configuration management, quality control and safety. The policy regarding the use of spacecraft contractor test procedures, IUS contractor detailed operating procedures and KSC operations and maintenance instructions is defined. Review and approval requirements for each documentation system are described.

  19. Pyrolysis system evaluation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An evaluation of two different pyrolysis concepts which recover energy from solid waste was conducted in order to determine the merits of each concept for integration into a Integrated Utility System (IUS). The two concepts evaluated were a Lead Bath Furnace Pyrolysis System and a Slagging Vertical Shaft, Partial Air Oxidation Pyrolysis System. Both concepts will produce a fuel gas from the IUS waste and sewage sludge which can be used to offset primary fuel consumption in addition to the sanitary disposal of the waste. The study evaluated the thermal integration of each concept as well as the economic impact on the IUS resulting from integrating each pyrolysis concepts. For reference, the pyrolysis concepts were also compared to incineration which was considered the baseline IUS solid waste disposal system.

  20. Levonorgestrel intrauterine system: Current role in management of heavy menstrual bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Magon, Navneet; Chauhan, Monica; Goel, Poonam; Malik, Sonia; Kapur, Krishan; Kriplani, Alka; Dhaliwal, Lakhbir; Pandit, Suchitra N.

    2013-01-01

    A review of literature was conducted to report on the effectiveness of levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) in women with heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB). The relevant data were obtained by computerized searches of PubMed up to December 2012 and other references available with the authors. Information was obtained from references listed. Studies and case reports were excluded if they did not specifically provide information about LNG-IUS usage in women with HMB. After perusal, each relevant publication was summarized and appraised in terms of whether it contained information relevant to the stated objective. Available data shows that LNG-IUS therapy is effective and safe, providing significant reduction of menstrual bleeding in patients with HMB. LNG-IUS is a good strategy to reduce the number of hysterectomies in women with HMB. PMID:23833527

  1. The Industrial User Permitting Guidance Manual

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Provides guidance for control authorities to effectively develop and issue control mechanisms to IUs discharging to the POTW and covers developing and implementing control mechanisms for both SIUs and non-SIUs.

  2. Speeding the Recovery from Ultraslow Inactivation of Voltage-Gated Na+ Channels by Metal Ion Binding to the Selectivity Filter: A Foot-on-the-Door?

    PubMed Central

    Szendroedi, Julia; Sandtner, Walter; Zarrabi, Touran; Zebedin, Eva; Hilber, Karlheinz; Dudley, Samuel C.; Fozzard, Harry A.; Todt, Hannes

    2007-01-01

    Slow inactivated states in voltage-gated ion channels can be modulated by binding molecules both to the outside and to the inside of the pore. Thus, external K+ inhibits C-type inactivation in Shaker K+ channels by a “foot-in-the-door” mechanism. Here, we explore the modulation of a very long-lived inactivated state, ultraslow inactivation (IUS), by ligand binding to the outer vestibule in voltage-gated Na+ channels. Blocking the outer vestibule by a mutant μ-conotoxin GIIIA substantially accelerated recovery from IUS. A similar effect was observed if Cd2+ was bound to a cysteine engineered to the selectivity filter (K1237C). In K1237C channels, exposed to 30 μM Cd2+, the time constant of recovery from IUS was decreased from 145.0 ± 10.2 s to 32.5 ± 3.3 s (P < 0.001). Recovery from IUS was only accelerated if Cd2+ was added to the bath solution during recovery (V = −120 mV) from IUS, but not when the channels were selectively exposed to Cd2+ during the development of IUS (−20 mV). These data could be explained by a kinetic model in which Cd2+ binds with high affinity to a slow inactivated state (IS), which is transiently occupied during recovery from IUS. A total of 50 μM Cd2+ produced an ∼8 mV hyperpolarizing shift of the steady-state inactivation curve of IS, supporting this kinetic model. Binding of lidocaine to the internal vestibule significantly reduced the number of channels entering IUS, suggesting that IUS is associated with a conformational change of the internal vestibule of the channel. We propose a molecular model in which slow inactivation (IS) occurs by a closure of the outer vestibule, whereas IUS arises from a constriction of the internal vestibule produced by a widening of the selectivity filter region. Binding of Cd2+ to C1237 promotes the closure of the selectivity filter region, thereby hastening recovery from IUS. Thus, Cd2+ ions may act like a foot-on-the-door, kicking the IS gate to close. PMID:17720727

  3. Acceptability of long-acting, progestin-only contraception in Europe: a two-year prospective, non-interventional study.

    PubMed

    Short, Mary; Dallay, Dominique; Omokanye, Salmon; Stauch, Kathrin; Inki, Pirjo

    2014-02-01

    OBJECTIVES To compare two-year continuation rates and user satisfaction with the levonorgestrel releasing-intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) and the etonogestrel releasing-subdermal implant (ENG implant) in women in Europe. METHODS This prospective, non-interventional study was undertaken at 72 sites in France (n = 61), Great Britain (n = 2), Ireland (n = 3) and Slovakia (n = 6). Women opting to switch their method of contraception to the LNG-IUS or the ENG implant were followed-up over 24 months to document continuation and satisfaction with their chosen contraceptive method. Reasons for discontinuation were documented. RESULTS The data analysed were based on 363 women (LNG-IUS [n = 247] and ENG implant [n = 116]), aged 20 to 45 years, with at least one follow-up visit after contraceptive placement. The documented cumulative continuation rate was 82% in the LNG-IUS group and 67% in the ENG implant group at 24 months. The documented discontinuation rates were 13% and 17%, respectively. Bleeding problems were cited as reason for discontinuation in 4% and 11% of women in the LNG-IUS and ENG implant groups, respectively. CONCLUSIONS The LNG-IUS is associated with higher continuation rates and user satisfaction than the ENG implant in this study of women in Europe, though the groups were not similar in all respects. Bleeding problems with the ENG implant account for most of the reasons for discontinuing its use.

  4. Tug fleet and ground operations schedules and controls. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    This study presents Tug Fleet and Ground Operations Schedules and Controls plan. This plan was developed and optimized out of a combination of individual Tug program phased subplans, special emphasis studies, contingency analyses and sensitivity analyses. The subplans cover the Tug program phases: (1) Tug operational, (2) Interim Upper Stage (IUS)/Tug fleet utilization, (3) and IUS/Tug payload integration, (4) Tug site activation, (5) IUS/Tug transition, (6) Tug acquisition. Resource requirements (facility, GSE, TSE, software, manpower, logistics) are provided in each subplan, as are appropriate Tug processing flows, active and total IUS and Tug fleet requirements, fleet management and Tug payload integration concepts, facility selection recommendations, site activation and IUS to Tug transition requirements. The impact of operational concepts on Tug acquisition is assessed and the impact of operating Tugs out of KSC and WTR is analyzed and presented showing WTR as a delta. Finally, cost estimates for fleet management and ground operations of the DDT&E and operational phases of the Tug program are given.

  5. Impact of a Hormone-Releasing Intrauterine System on the Vaginal Microbiome: A Prospective Baboon Model

    PubMed Central

    Hashway, Sara A.; Bergin, Ingrid L.; Bassis, Christine M.; Uchihashi, Mayu; Schmidt, Kelsey C.; Young, Vincent B.; Aronoff, David M.; Patton, Dorothy L.; Bell, Jason D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Use of a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) in humans may alter vaginal microbial populations and susceptibility to pathogens. This study evaluated the time-dependent effects of an LNG-IUS on the vaginal microbiome of the baboon, a useful animal model for reproductive studies. Methods LNG-IUS were inserted into three reproductively mature, female baboons. The animals were evaluated for six months by physical examination and Gram-stained cytology. The vaginal microbiota was characterized at each timepoint by culture-independent analysis of the16S rRNA-encoding gene. Results Each baboon harbored a diverse vaginal microbiome. Inter-individual variation exceeded intra-individual variation. Diversity declined over time in one baboon and showed mild fluctuations in the other two. There were no significant community differences from early to late post LNG-IUS placement. Conclusions The baboon vaginal microbiome is unique to each individual and is polymicrobial. In this pilot study, the vaginal microbiome remained stable from early to late post LNG-IUS placement. PMID:24266633

  6. A numerical algorithm to propagate navigation error covariance matrices associated with generalized strapdown inertial measurement units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weir, Kent A.; Wells, Eugene M.

    1990-01-01

    The design and operation of a Strapdown Navigation Analysis Program (SNAP) developed to perform covariance analysis on spacecraft inertial-measurement-unit (IMU) navigation errors are described and demonstrated. Consideration is given to the IMU modeling subroutine (with user-specified sensor characteristics), the data input procedures, state updates and the simulation of instrument failures, the determination of the nominal trajectory, the mapping-matrix and Monte Carlo covariance-matrix propagation methods, and aided-navigation simulation. Numerical results are presented in tables for sample applications involving (1) the Galileo/IUS spacecraft from its deployment from the Space Shuttle to a point 10 to the 8th ft from the center of the earth and (2) the TDRS-C/IUS spacecraft from Space Shuttle liftoff to a point about 2 h before IUS deployment. SNAP is shown to give reliable results for both cases, with good general agreement between the mapping-matrix and Monte Carlo predictions.

  7. Geoscience Education Programs in the NSF Division of Undergraduate Education: Different Acronyms with Similar Intent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, J.; Ryan, J. G.

    2014-12-01

    For the past three decades, the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) has administered a succession of programs intended to improve undergraduate STEM education for all students. The IUSE (Improving Undergraduate STEM Education) program is the latest program in this succession, and reflects an expanded, NSF-wide effort to make sustainable improvements in STEM education on a national scale. The origins and thinking behind IUSE can be in part traced back to precursor programs including: ILI (Instrumentation and Laboratory Improvement), CCD (Course and Curriculum Development), UFE (Undergraduate Faculty Enhancement), CCLI (Course, Curriculum and Laboratory Improvement), and TUES (Transforming Undergraduate Education in STEM), all of which sought to support faculty efforts to investigate and improve curriculum and instructional practice in undergraduate STEM education, and to disseminate effective STEM educational practices for broad adoption. IUSE, like its predecessor programs, is open to all STEM fields, and as such is intended to support improvements in geoscience education, spanning the atmospheric, ocean, and Earth sciences, as well as in environmental science, GIS science, climate change and sustainability/resilience. An emphasis on discipline-based research on learning that had origins in the CCLI and TUES programs is a new priority area in IUSE, with the ambition that projects will take advantage of the integrated expertise of domain scientists, educational practioners, and experts in learning science. We trace and describe the history of undergraduate education efforts with an emphasis placed on the recently introduced IUSE program. Understanding the origin of DUE's IUSE program can provide insights for faculty interested in developing proposals for submission and gain a greater appreciation of trends and priorities within the division.

  8. Intrauterine levonorgestrel delivery with frameless fibrous delivery system: review of clinical experience

    PubMed Central

    Wildemeersch, Dirk; Andrade, Amaury; Goldstuck, Norman D; Hasskamp, Thomas; Jackers, Geert

    2017-01-01

    The concept of using a frameless intrauterine device (IUD) instead of the conventional plastic framed IUD is not new. Frameless copper IUDs have been available since the late 1990s. They rely on an anchoring system to retain in the uterine cavity. The clinical experience with these IUDs suggests that frameless IUDs fit better as they are thin and, therefore, do not disturb or irritate the uterus. High tolerance and continuation rates have been achieved as complaints of pain are virtually nonexistent and the impact on menstrual blood loss is minimal. Conventional levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine systems (LNG-IUSs) are very popular as they significantly reduce menstrual bleeding and provide highly effective contraception. However, continuation of use remains problematic, particularly in young users. Total or partial expulsion and displacement of the LNG-IUS also occur too often due to spatial incompatibility within a small uterine cavity, as strong uterine contractions originate, attempting to get rid of the bothersome IUD/IUS. If not expelled, embedment ensues, often leading to chronic pain and early removal of the IUD/IUS. Several studies conducted recently have requested attention to the relationship between the LNG-IUS and the endometrial cavity. Some authors have proposed to measure the cavity width prior to inserting an IUD, as many uterine cavities are much smaller than the currently existing LNG-IUSs. A frameless fibrous drug delivery system fits, in principle, in all uterine cavities and may therefore be preferable to framed drug delivery systems. This review examines the clinical performance, acceptability, and potential of the frameless LNG-IUS (FibroPlant®) when used for contraception, treatment of heavy menstrual bleeding, dysmenorrhea, and endometrial suppression in women using estrogen replacement therapy, endometrial hyperplasia, and other gynecological conditions. The review concludes that FibroPlant LNG-IUS offers unique advantages in reducing

  9. Levonorgestrel-Releasing Intrauterine System (52 mg) for Idiopathic Heavy Menstrual Bleeding: A Health Technology Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Schaink, Alexis; Chan, Brian; Higgins, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Background Heavy menstrual bleeding affects as many as one in three women and has negative physical, economic, and psychosocial impacts including activity limitations and reduced quality of life. The goal of treatment is to make menstruation manageable, and options include medical therapy or surgery such as endometrial ablation or hysterectomy. This review examined the evidence of effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the 52-mg levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) as a treatment alternative for idiopathic heavy menstrual bleeding. Methods We conducted a systematic review of the clinical and economic evidence comparing LNG-IUS with usual medical therapy, endometrial ablation, or hysterectomy. Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane, and the Centres for Reviews and Dissemination were searched from inception to August 2015. The quality of the evidence was assessed according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group criteria. We also completed an economic evaluation to determine the cost-effectiveness and budget impact of the LNG-IUS compared with endometrial ablation and with hysterectomy. The economic evaluation was conducted from the perspective the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. Results Relevant systematic reviews (n = 18) returned from the literature search were used to identify eligible randomized controlled trials, and 16 trials were included. The LNG-IUS improved quality of life and reduced menstrual blood loss better than usual medical therapy. There was no evidence of a significant difference in these outcomes compared with the improvements offered by endometrial ablation or hysterectomy. Mild hormonal side effects were the most commonly reported. The quality of the evidence varied from very low to moderate across outcomes. Results from the economic evaluation showed the LNG-IUS was less costly (incremental saving of $372 per person) and more effective providing higher quality

  10. ISTAR: Intelligent System for Telemetry Analysis in Real-time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, Charles

    1994-01-01

    The intelligent system for telemetry analysis in real-time (ISTAR) is an advanced vehicle monitoring environment incorporating expert systems, analysis tools, and on-line hypermedia documentation. The system was developed for the Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center (SMC) in Los Angeles, California, in support of the inertial upper stage (IUS) booster vehicle. Over a five year period the system progressed from rapid prototype to operational system. ISTAR has been used to support five IUS missions and countless mission simulations. There were a significant number of lessons learned with respect to integrating an expert system capability into an existing ground system.

  11. Analytical investigation of solid rocket nozzle failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccoy, K. E.; Hester, J.

    1985-01-01

    On April 5, 1983, an Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) spacecraft experienced loss of control during the burn of the second of two solid rocket motors. The anomaly investigation showed the cause to be a malfunction of the solid rocket motor. This paper presents a description of the IUS system, a failure analysis summary, an account of the thermal testing and computer modeling done at Marshall Space Flight Center, a comparison of analysis results with thermal data obtained from motor static tests, and describes some of the design enhancement incorporated to prevent recurrence of the anomaly.

  12. Medical treatment of a grossly enlarged adenomyotic uterus with the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system.

    PubMed

    Fong, Y F; Singh, K

    1999-09-01

    Adenomyosis is an important cause of menorrhagia. Besides hysterectomy, the treatment options for adenomyosis have been limited. Presented here is the successful treatment of adenomyosis in a woman presenting with menorrhagia, dysmenorrhea, and an enlarging uterus, for whom conservative therapy initiated with mefenamic acid was unsatisfactory. The patient had insertion of the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS). A marked decrease in uterine size occurred within 12 months of insertion accompanied by resolution of the menorrhagia and dysmenorrhea. Thus, the LNG-IUS is a viable option and represents a real advance in the treatment of adenomyosis.

  13. Effect of the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system on uterine myomas in a renal transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Fong, Y F; Singh, K

    1999-07-01

    The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) has been used in the treatment of both idiopathic menorrhagia and adenomyosis. An electronic search of the on-line medical literature revealed no reports of its use for menorrhagia secondary to uterine myomas. Presented here is the successful treatment of uterine myomas with menorrhagia in a woman with a renal transplant. There was a significant reduction in menorrhagia, dysmenorrhea, and uterine and myoma size with the use of the LNG-IUS. We believe that this system provides an alternative to conventional hysterectomy and gonadotrophin-releasing hormonal analog medical treatment for uterine myomas, with a possibly inhibitory effect on myoma growth.

  14. Use of frameless intrauterine devices and systems in young nulliparous and adolescent women: results of a multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Wildemeersch, Dirk; Jandi, Sohela; Pett, Ansgar; Nolte, Kilian; Hasskamp, Thomas; Vrijens, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to provide additional data on the experience with frameless copper and levonorgestrel (LNG) intrauterine devices (IUDs) in nulliparous and adolescent women. Methods Nulliparous and adolescent women, 25 years of age or younger, using the frameless copper IUD or the frameless LNG-releasing intrauterine system (IUS), were selected from previous studies and a current multicenter post-marketing study with the frameless copper IUD. The small copper-releasing GyneFix® 200 IUD consists of four copper cylinders, each 5 mm long and only 2.2 mm wide. The frameless FibroPlant® LNG-IUS consists of a fibrous delivery system releasing the hormone levonorgestrel (LNG-IUS). The main features of these intrauterine contraceptives are that they are frameless, flexible, and anchored to the fundus of the uterus. Results One hundred and fifty-four nulliparous and adolescent women participated in the combined study. One pregnancy occurred with the GyneFix 200 IUD after unnoticed early expulsion of the device (cumulative pregnancy rate 1.1 at one year). Two further expulsions were reported, one with the GyneFix 200 IUD and the other with the FibroPlant LNG-IUS. The cumulative expulsion rate at one year was 1.1 with the copper IUD and 2.2 with the LNG-IUS. The total discontinuation rate at one year was low (3.3 and 4.3 with the copper IUD and LNG-IUS, respectively) and resulted in a high rate of continuation of use at one year (96.7 with the copper IUD and 95.7 with the LNG-IUS, respectively). Continuation rates for both frameless copper IUD and frameless LNG-IUS remained high at 3 years (>90%). There were no cases of perforations or pelvic inflammatory disease reported during or following insertion. Conclusion This report confirms earlier studies with frameless devices and suggests that the high user continuation rate is attributable to the optimal relationship between the IUD and the uterine cavity. IUD studies have shown that an IUD that does

  15. Femilis® 60 Levonorgestrel-Releasing Intrauterine System—A Review of 10 Years of Clinical Experience

    PubMed Central

    Wildemeersch, Dirk; Andrade, Amaury; Goldstuck, Norman

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to update the clinical experience with the Femilis® 60 levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS), now up to 10 years in parous and nulliparous women, particularly with regard to ease and safety of insertion, contraceptive performance, retention, acceptability, continuation of use, impact on menstrual blood loss (MBL), and duration of action. STUDY DESIGN Using the Femilis® 60 LNG-IUS releasing 20 µg of levonorgestrel/day, the following studies were conducted: an open, prospective noncomparative contraceptive study, an MBL study, a perimenopausal study, a study for the treatment of endometrial hyperplasia, and early cancer of the uterus, a residue study. RESULTS A total of 599 Femilis LNG-IUS were inserted in various clinical trials, the majority for contraceptive purposes. The total exposure in the first and second contraceptive studies, covering 558 parous and nulliparous women, was 32,717 woman-months. Femilis has high contraceptive effectiveness as only one pregnancy occurred. Expulsion of the LNG-IUS was rare with only two total and no partial expulsions (stem protruding through the cervical canal) occurred. Femilis was well tolerated, with continuation rates remaining high. Several MBL studies were conducted, totaling 80 heavy and normal menstrual bleeders, using the pictorial bleeding assessment chart method or the quantitative alkaline hematin technique. Virtually all women responded well with strongly reduced menstrual bleeding. Amenorrhea rates were high, up to 80% after three months, and ferritin levels simultaneously increased significantly. The Femilis LNG-IUS was tested in 104 symptomatic perimenopausal women for seamless transition to and through menopause, adding estrogen therapy when required. Patient tolerability appeared high as >80% requested a second and a third LNG-IUS. Twenty women presenting with nonatypical and atypical hyperplasia and one woman presenting with early endometrial carcinoma

  16. Environmental Impact Statement for the Modernization and Enhancement of Ranges, Airspace, and Training Areas in the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex in Alaska. Volume 1 - Executive Summary, Chapters 1 through 10

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    environment in relation to long-term productivity and irreversible or irretrievable commitment of resources. Chapter 6: I I Chapter 7: I I Chapter 8: I...Uses and Long-Term Productivity ....................................................................................................... 5-3 5.1.2...3-62 Figure 3-13. Energy and Productive Uses in the Fox 3 MOA Expansion and New Paxon MOA Proposal Area

  17. Improved Polyurethane Storage Tank Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-30

    onto the berm liner next to tank. 5.3.4.2 Pump Pressure and Volume Totalizing Discharge flow rate or total volumetric flow and pressure are...exist per sample. For example, a dead load sample which undergoes an IUS may also exhibit TA and SKEW, like cylinder 12 in Table 6.1.4.a. A seen in

  18. STS-6 sixth Space Shuttle mission. First flight of the Challenger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A prelaunch summary of the sixth Space Shuttle mission is provided. The Challenger orbiter; launching; uprated engines; lighter weight boosters; lightweight tank; external tank reduction; landing; the tracking and data relay satellite system (TDRSS), TDRS-1 deployment; the inertial upper stage (IUS), the spacewalk;electrophoresis, monodisperse latex reactor, night time/day time optical survey of lightning, and getaway special experiments are described.

  19. Role of the levonorgestrel intrauterine system in effective contraception

    PubMed Central

    Attia, Abdelhamid M; Ibrahim, Magdy M; Abou-Setta, Ahmed M

    2013-01-01

    Norgestrel, a synthetic progestin chemically derived from 19-nortestosterone, is six times more potent than progesterone, with variable binding affinity to various steroid receptors. The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG IUS) provides a long-acting, highly effective, and reversible form of contraception, with a pearl index of 0.18 per 100 women-years. The locally released hormone leads to endometrial concentrations that are 200–800 times those found after daily oral use and a plasma level that is lower than that with other forms of levonorgestrel-containing contraception. The contraceptive effect of the LNG IUS is achieved mainly through its local suppressive effect on the endometrium, leading to endometrial thinning, glandular atrophy, and stromal decidualization without affecting ovulation. The LNG IUS is generally well tolerated. The main side effects are related to its androgenic activity, which is usually mild and transient, resolving after the first few months. Menstrual abnormalities are also common but well tolerated, and even become desirable (eg, amenorrhea, hypomenorrhea, and oligomenorrhea) with proper counseling of the patient during the choice of the method of contraception. The satisfaction rates after 3 years of insertion are high, reaching between 77% and 94%. The local effect of the LNG IUS on the endometrium and low rates of systemic adverse effects have led to its use in other conditions rather than contraception, as for the treatment of endometrial hyperplasia, benign menorrhagia, endometriosis, adenomyosis, and uterine fibroids. PMID:23990713

  20. Reflected view of the TDRS in the STS-6 Challengers payload bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The stowed tracking and data relay satellite (TDRS) and its inertial upper stage (IUS) are seen in duplicate in the frame taken by the STS-6 crew. A reflection in the aft window of the flight deck resulted in the mirage effect of the 'second' TDRS. The three canisters in the aft foreground contain experiments of participants in the STS getaway special (GAS) program.

  1. Evaluation of model-based deformation correction in image-guided liver surgery via tracked intraoperative ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Logan W.; Collins, Jarrod A.; Weis, Jared A.; Simpson, Amber L.; Adams, Lauryn B.; Jarnagin, William R.; Miga, Michael I.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Soft-tissue deformation represents a significant error source in current surgical navigation systems used for open hepatic procedures. While numerous algorithms have been proposed to rectify the tissue deformation that is encountered during open liver surgery, clinical validation of the proposed methods has been limited to surface-based metrics, and subsurface validation has largely been performed via phantom experiments. The proposed method involves the analysis of two deformation-correction algorithms for open hepatic image-guided surgery systems via subsurface targets digitized with tracked intraoperative ultrasound (iUS). Intraoperative surface digitizations were acquired via a laser range scanner and an optically tracked stylus for the purposes of computing the physical-to-image space registration and for use in retrospective deformation-correction algorithms. Upon completion of surface digitization, the organ was interrogated with a tracked iUS transducer where the iUS images and corresponding tracked locations were recorded. Mean closest-point distances between the feature contours delineated in the iUS images and corresponding three-dimensional anatomical model generated from preoperative tomograms were computed to quantify the extent to which the deformation-correction algorithms improved registration accuracy. The results for six patients, including eight anatomical targets, indicate that deformation correction can facilitate reduction in target error of ∼52%. PMID:27081664

  2. The New Cosmopolitan Monolingualism: On Linguistic Citizenship in Twenty-First Century Germany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gramling, David

    2009-01-01

    In the early years of the twenty-first century, being German has become a matter of linguistic competence and performance. An acute shift in citizenship statutes at the end of the 1990s brought about a peripatetic departure from Germany's "right of blood" ("ius sanguinis") toward a French-inspired "right of territory"…

  3. Measuring the Productivity of First-Term Navy Enlistees

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    tMlnland, M>art S., "A SoMahat DIffarant Vla« of Tha Optlaal Naval Postura ," 37 pp., Jun 1978 (Prasantad at ftn 1976 Convantlon of 1tm Hmrican Political...Sclanca Associa- tion (APSA/IUS Panal on "Oianglng Stratagle Raqulramnts and Military Postura "), Chicago, III., Saptaaibar 2, 1976), fO AOSe 228 PP

  4. Integrated Utility Systems Feasibility Study and Conceptual Design at the University of Florida. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirmse, Dale W.; Manyimo, Steve B.

    This executive summary presents a brief analysis of findings and recommendations. The concept of the Integrated Utility System (IUS) is to consider the interaction and mutual support of five utility subsystems needed by a campus complex of buildings. The subsystems are: (1) Electric power service; (2) Heating - ventilating - air conditioning and…

  5. Defining Distinct Negative Beliefs about Uncertainty: Validating the Factor Structure of the Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sexton, Kathryn A.; Dugas, Michel J.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the factor structure of the English version of the Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale (IUS; French version: M. H. Freeston, J. Rheaume, H. Letarte, M. J. Dugas, & R. Ladouceur, 1994; English version: K. Buhr & M. J. Dugas, 2002) using a substantially larger sample than has been used in previous studies. Nonclinical…

  6. Mutual-information-corrected tumor displacement using intraoperative ultrasound for brain shift compensation in image-guided neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Songbai; Hartov, Alex; Roberts, David; Paulsen, Keith

    2008-03-01

    Intraoperative ultrasound (iUS) has emerged as a practical neuronavigational tool for brain shift compensation in image-guided tumor resection surgeries. The use of iUS is optimized when coregistered with preoperative magnetic resonance images (pMR) of the patient's head. However, the fiducial-based registration alone does not necessarily optimize the alignment of internal anatomical structures deep in the brain (e.g., tumor) between iUS and pMR. In this paper, we investigated and evaluated an image-based re-registration scheme to maximize the normalized mutual information (nMI) between iUS and pMR to improve tumor boundary alignment using the fiducial registration as a starting point for optimization. We show that this scheme significantly (p<<0.001) reduces tumor boundary misalignment pre-durotomy. The same technique was employed to measure tumor displacement post-durotomy, and the locally measured tumor displacement was assimilated into a biomechanical model to estimate whole-brain deformation. Our results demonstrate that the nMI re-registration pre-durotomy is critical for obtaining accurate measurement of tumor displacement, which significantly improved model response at the craniotomy when compared with stereopsis data acquired independently from the tumor registration. This automatic and computationally efficient (<2min) re-registration technique is feasible for routine clinical use in the operating room (OR).

  7. Expanding Access to a New, More Affordable Levonorgestrel Intrauterine System in Kenya: Service Delivery Costs Compared With Other Contraceptive Methods and Perspectives of Key Opinion Leaders

    PubMed Central

    Rademacher, Kate H; Solomon, Marsden; Brett, Tracey; Bratt, John H; Pascual, Claire; Njunguru, Jesse; Steiner, Markus J

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG IUS) is one of the most effective forms of contraception and offers important non-contraceptive health benefits. However, it is not widely available in developing countries, largely due to the high price of existing products. Medicines360 plans to introduce its new, more affordable LNG IUS in Kenya. The public‐sector transfer price will vary by volume between US$12 to US$16 per unit; for an order of 100,000 units, the public-sector transfer price will be approximately US$15 per unit. Methods: We calculated the direct service delivery cost per couple-years of protection (CYP) of various family planning methods. The model includes the costs of contraceptive commodities, consumable supplies, instruments per client visit, and direct labor for counseling, insertion, removal, and resupply, if required. The model does not include costs of demand creation or training. We conducted interviews with key opinion leaders in Kenya to identify considerations for scale-up of a new LNG IUS, including strategies to overcome barriers that have contributed to low uptake of the copper intrauterine device. Results: The direct service delivery cost of Medicines360’s LNG IUS per CYP compares favorably with other contraceptive methods commonly procured for public-sector distribution in Kenya. The cost is slightly lower than that of the 3-month contraceptive injectable, which is currently the most popular method in Kenya. Almost all key opinion leaders agreed that introducing a more affordable LNG IUS could increase demand and uptake of the method. They thought that women seeking the product’s non-contraceptive health benefits would be a key market segment, and most agreed that the reduced menstrual bleeding associated with the method would likely be viewed as an advantage. The key opinion leaders indicated that myths and misconceptions among providers and clients about IUDs must be addressed, and that demand creation

  8. Dilatation and curettage is more accurate than endometrial aspiration biopsy in early-stage endometrial cancer patients treated with high dose oral progestin and levonorgestrel intrauterine system

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine whether less invasive endometrial (EM) aspiration biopsy is adequately accurate for evaluating treatment outcomes compared to the dilatation and curettage (D&C) biopsy in early-stage endometrial cancer (EC) patients treated with high dose oral progestin and levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS). Methods We conducted a prospective observational study with patients younger than 40 years who were diagnosed with clinical stage IA, The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics grade 1 or 2 endometrioid adenocarcinoma and sought to maintain their fertility. The patients were treated with medroxyprogesterone acetate 500 mg/day and LNG-IUS. Treatment responses were evaluated every 3 months. EM aspiration biopsy was conducted after LNG-IUS removal followed D&C. The tissue samples were histologically compared. The diagnostic concordance rate of the two tests was examined with κ statistics. Results Twenty-eight pairs of EM samples were obtained from five patients. The diagnostic concordance rate of D&C and EM aspiration biopsy was 39.3% (κ value=0.26). Of the seven samples diagnosed as normal with D&C, three (42.8%) were diagnosed as normal by using EM aspiration biopsy. Of the eight samples diagnosed with endometrioid adenocarcinoma by using D&C, three (37.5%) were diagnosed with endometrioid adenocarcinoma by using EM aspiration biopsy. Of the 13 complex EM hyperplasia samples diagnosed with the D&C, five (38.5%) were diagnosed with EM hyperplasia by using EM aspiration biopsy. Of the samples obtained through EM aspiration, 46.4% were insufficient for histological evaluation. Conclusion To evaluate the treatment responses of patients with early-stage EC treated with high dose oral progestin and LNG-IUS, D&C should be conducted after LNG-IUS removal. PMID:27670255

  9. STS-93 Mission Specialists Coleman and Tognini check out the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STS-93 Mission Specialists Catherine Coleman (left) and Michel Tognini of France (right), representing the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), look over material on the mission payload behind them, the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Chandra is being mated with the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) before testing to validate the IUS/Chandra connections and to check the orbiter avionics interfaces. Following that, an end-to-end test (ETE) will be conducted to verify the communications path to Chandra, commanding it as if it were in space. With the world's most powerful X-ray telescope, Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe. Chandra is scheduled for launch July 22 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93.

  10. STS-93 Mission Specialists Coleman and Tognini check out a control panel for the Chandra X-ray Obser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STS-93 Mission Specialists Catherine Coleman (left) and Michel Tognini of France (right), who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), look over the controls for the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Chandra is being mated with the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) before testing to validate the IUS/Chandra connections and to check the orbiter avionics interfaces. Following that, an end-to-end test (ETE) will be conducted to verify the communications path to Chandra, commanding it as if it were in space. With the world's most powerful X-ray telescope, Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe. Chandra is scheduled for launch July 22 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93.

  11. Progestin-Containing Contraceptives Alter Expression of Host Defense-Related Genes of the Endometrium and Cervix

    PubMed Central

    Goldfien, Gabriel A.; Barragan, Fatima; Chen, Joseph; Takeda, Margaret; Irwin, Juan C.; Perry, Jean; Greenblatt, Ruth M.; Smith-McCune, Karen K.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that progestin-containing contraceptives increase susceptibility to HIV, although the underlying mechanisms involving the upper female reproductive tract are undefined. To determine the effects of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) and the levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) on gene expression and physiology of human endometrial and cervical transformation zone (TZ), microarray analyses were performed on whole tissue biopsies. In endometrium, activated pathways included leukocyte chemotaxis, attachment, and inflammation in DMPA and LNG-IUS users, and individual genes included pattern recognition receptors, complement components, and other immune mediators. In cervical TZ, progestin treatment altered expression of tissue remodeling and viability but not immune function genes. Together, these results indicate that progestins influence expression of immune-related genes in endometrium relevant to local recruitment of HIV target cells with potential to increase susceptibility and underscore the importance of the upper reproductive tract when assessing the safety of contraceptive products. PMID:25634912

  12. User benefits and funding strategies. [technology assessment and economic analysis of the space shuttles and NASA Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Archer, J. L.; Beauchamp, N. A.; Day, C. F.

    1975-01-01

    The justification, economic and technological benefits of NASA Space Programs (aside from pure scientific objectives), in improving the quality of life in the United States is discussed and outlined. Specifically, a three-step, systematic method is described for selecting relevant and highly beneficial payloads and instruments for the Interim Upper Stage (IUS) that will be used with the space shuttle until the space tug becomes available. Viable Government and private industry cost-sharing strategies which would maximize the number of IUS payloads, and the benefits obtainable under a limited NASA budget were also determined. Charts are shown which list the payload instruments, and their relevance in contributing to such areas as earth resources management, agriculture, weather forecasting, and many others.

  13. Mission summary: Halley flyby/Tempel-2 rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, K.

    1979-01-01

    A unique dual-comet flight opportunity exists in mid-1985 which includes flyby of the large and active comet Halley en route to rendezvous with second comet, Tempel-2. This mission will utilize ion propulsion at a modest performance level, based on proven technology. The Project is planned for FY81 start. Launch occurs in July 1985 via the Shuttle/IUS twin stage. Following IUS injection, the ion propulsion stage provides continuous thrust virtually throughout the 3-year flight until the Tempel-2 rendezvous in 1988. En route, a probe is deployed for encounter with Halley about 4 months after launch at a point 73 days before its perihelion. Rendezvous with Tempel-2 occurs about 60 days before the comet's perihelion during the summer of 1988 and continues for about 1 year. Earth will be in favorable relative positions for observing both the flyby and the rendezvous.

  14. IUE observations of periodic comets Tempel-2, Kopff, and Tempel-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, Paul D.; Festou, Michel C.

    1992-01-01

    We summarize the results of observations made between 10 Jun. - 18 Dec. 1988 with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUS) of comet P/Tempel-2 during its 1988 appearance. The derived water production rate and relative gas/dust ratio are compared with those of P/Halley, observed with IUE in 1985-86, and other potential Comet Rendezvous/Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) target comets, P/Kopff and P/Tempel-1, both observed with IUE in 1983.

  15. Mitigation of Shore Damage Attributed to the Federal Navigation Structures at Hammond Bay Harbor.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-11-01

    arkansara calamint sweet gale S. 7 ths oacidenta7lis but tonbush ’,d’.’W eah .c zyoulata leather leaf rL,, ’roenlandicum Labrador tea ’,noviilfa 7ongifol...ia reed grass A,.;mop£oqo n aop{2rIus little bluestem .’uu~ t~ar~i~a sand cherry ,1 ,m’"sia a’Uata tall wormwood :.i o hispiz hairy goldenrod f lten:i

  16. A Preliminary Report on the Osteogenic Potential of a Biodegradable Copolymer of Polylactide: Polyglycolide (PLA:PGA). Revised.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-22

    KEY WORDS (Continue on roverl aide it neceusary and identify by block number) Biodegradable Copolymer; Polylactic and Polyglycolic Acids;2Osteogenic...KEY WORDS Biodegradable Copolymer; Polylactic and Polyglycolic Acids; Osteogenic; Osseous Wound Repair; Accelerated Bony Healing. *1- I...Using a Biodegradable Material, Polylactic Acid." J Oral Surg 29: 393-397 (1971). 2. D.E. Cutright, J.D. Beasley, III, and B. Perez: "Histologic

  17. Lithuanian Freedom Fighters’ Tactics Resisting the Soviet Occupation 1944-1953

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-14

    Nazi efforts to recruit Lithuanian SS battalions, organizing an underground nationalistic press, etc., the overall goal of clandestine...assign SS -related tasks to the newly formed unit, General Povilas Plechavičius refused to comply. Therefore, soon after creation of the Lithuanian...Territorial Defense Force the Germans realized that the unit was pro-Lithuanian and posed a threat to the Nazi regime. As a result, the Germans arrested

  18. ASTROCAM: An Offner Re-imaging 1024 x 1024 InSb Camera for Near-Infrared Astrometry on the USNO 1.55-m Telescope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    Kosakowskif, C. C. Dudleya and Kenneth Johnstoni aNaval Research Laboratory, Remote Sensing Division, Washington, DC, USA bU.S. Naval Observatory ...Flagstaff Station, PO Box 1149, Flagstaff, AZ, USA cMauna Kea Infrared, LLC, 159 Kalanikoa St, Hilo, HI USA dUniversity of Chicago Engineering Center...gApplied Designs, 3001 Specific Heights Rd, Honolulu, HI, USA hCAD Services, 1158 Mowai St, Kailua, HI, USA iU.S. Naval Observatory , 3450 Massachusetts

  19. Draft Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Impact Statement, Bel Marin Keys Unit 5.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    and Loan Association has applied to the U. S. Army, Corps of Engineers , San Francisco District, for a permit under Section 10 of the River and Harbor...Corps of Engineers Project construction requires a Department of the Army permit under Section 10 of the River and Harbor Act (RHA) of 1899 (33 U.S.C...Marin County Planning Department IUS. Army Corps of Engineers I .44* ~September 1982 IT TORREY & TORREY INC. environmental /urban planning and

  20. GPS/IGS Design Analysis Report. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-15

    Cooponent Temperatures - Hot Case (IGS/SCT Configuration) . . . . . . . .. . 215 Xii. som opmu" sfr •/uuosig dn& Rockwell SjsfI5,gm.n Oew IntematIl LIST OF...The GPS equipment qualification limits are more restrictive. In particular, the cesium clock and rubidium frequency standard temperature variation must...Systems Division 01% International "-Y NUTATION DAMPER GPS REF S ENCO R . ON IUS SCT\\ ... / U~l \\ CONe IG . .. . ... __ (NOT ON IGS ONLY CONFIG) CESIUM

  1. Catalog of Reports, Decisions and Opinions, Testimonies and Speeches, GAO Documents 113171-113401. Volume 5. Number 10.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    Annuits tDect- Army Anament Reeeerh and Develop GAO Views on H.R. 7893 ( Tesi - Sion) 113286 en1 Cotwand. Dover. NJ Protest of Procedures IUsed in Arms% mon...Director. Office of Personnel VA medical centers in the United States. Puerto Rico. and the Phi- ,Management. b llaman L Krieger-. Director. (GAO) Federal...Civil Service career challenges. automobile safety stand- south. and an assessment of the effect of statchood on Puerto Rico. ards. Hispanic

  2. STS-43 TDRS-E during preflight processing at KSC's VPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-43 Tracking and Data Relay Satellite E (TDRS-E) undergoes preflight processing in the Kennedy Space Center's (KSC's) Vertical Processing Facility (VPF) before being loaded into a payload canister for transfer to the launch pad and eventually into Atlantis', Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104's, payload bay (PLB). This side of the TDRS-E will rest at the bottom of the PLB therefore the airborne support equipment (ASE) forward frame keel pin (at center of spacecraft) and the umbilical boom running between the two ASE frames are visible. The solar array panels are covered with protective TRW shields. Above the shields the stowed antenna and solar sail are visible. The inertial upper stage (IUS) booster is the white portion of the spacecraft and rests in the ASE forward frame and ASE aft frame tilt actuator (AFTA) frame (at the bottom of the IUS). The IUS booster nozzle extends beyond the AFTA frame. View provided by KSC with alternate number KSC-91PC-1079.

  3. Use of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system in the prevention and treatment of endometrial hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Ewies, Ayman A A; Alfhaily, Fadi

    2012-11-01

    Endometrial hyperplasia is a commonly seen gynecological condition that affects women of all age groups. Whereas hysterectomy is the most preferred treatment option for complex endometrial hyperplasia with atypia, there is no consensus regarding the first-line management of women with hyperplasia without cytological atypia. Oral progestogen therapy was used with some success. Nonetheless, it may be plausible to argue that women with endometrial hyperplasia need continuous treatment and high level of compliance to ensure complete regression, which may not be guaranteed with oral therapy. Observational studies suggested that levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) has been successfully used to treat endometrial hyperplasia without cytological atypia and selected cases of atypical endometrial hyperplasia. Furthermore, there is strong evidence from randomized controlled trials that LNG-IUS prevents the development of endometrial hyperplasia in exogenous estrogen users; however, its protective role and safety in tamoxifen-treated breast cancer survivors remain uncertain. This article evaluates the current evidence for the use of LNG-IUS, releasing 20 μg of LNG per day, in the prevention and treatment of endometrial hyperplasia.

  4. The Inertial Upper Stage - A space transportation system element nearing first flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohrbaugh, D. J.; Redd, F. J.; Van Rensselaer, F.

    1981-01-01

    The Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) developed by the USAF and NASA is a highly reliable, cost-effective solid propellant upper stage, with inherent flexibility and adaptability for integration with the Space Shuttle. The propulsion system is simple, utilizing safe, solid rocket motors with extremely light-weight nonmetallic cases and nozzles. The IUS can deliver 2268 kg from the Shuttle to geosynchronous altitude; it consists of a 9700 kg propellant weight first stage, an interstage structure, a 2720 kg propellant weight second stage, and an equipment support section. The avionics system includes the electronic and electrical hardware used to perform all signal conditioning, data processing, and software formatting associated with navigation, guidance, control, data management, and redundancy management. The generic thermal design of the IUS is suited to a wide range of thermal environments; the software design provides for selectable thermal maneuvers (rotisserie, reciprocating, toasting, space facing, sun facing) to satisfy different payload thermal requirements. A 1982 launch with the Titan 34D and a 1983 launch with the Shuttle Orbiter are planned.

  5. Levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system vs oral progestins for non-atypical endometrial hyperplasia: a systematic review and metaanalysis of randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Abu Hashim, Hatem; Ghayaty, Essam; El Rakhawy, Mohamed

    2015-10-01

    We sought to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) with oral progestins for treatment of non-atypical endometrial hyperplasia (EH). Searches were conducted on PubMed, SCOPUS, and CENTRAL databases to August 2014, and reference lists of relevant articles were screened. The search was limited to articles conducted on human beings and females. The PRISMA Statement was followed. Seven randomized controlled trials (n = 766 women) were included. Main outcome measures were the therapeutic effect rate (histological response) after 3, 6, 12, and 24 months of treatment; rate of irregular vaginal bleeding; and the hysterectomy rate per woman randomized. The Cochrane Collaboration risk of bias tool was used for quality assessment. Metaanalysis was performed with fixed effects model. LNG-IUS achieved a highly significant therapeutic response rate compared with oral progestins after 3 months of treatment (odds ratio [OR], 2.30; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.39-3.82; P = .001, 5 trials, I(2) = 0%, n = 376), after 6 months of treatment (OR, 3.16; 95% CI, 1.84-5.45; P < .00001, 4 trials, I(2) = 0%, n = 397), after 12 months of treatment (OR, 5.73; 95% CI, 2.67-12.33; P < .00001, 2 trials, I(2) = 0%, n = 224), and after 24 months of treatment (OR, 7.46; 95% CI, 2.55-21.78; P = .0002, 1 trial, n = 104). Subgroup analysis showed evidence of highly significant therapeutic response following LNG-IUS compared with oral progestins for non-atypical simple as well as complex EH (OR, 2.51; 95% CI, 1.14-5.53; P = .02, 6 trials, I(2) = 0%, n = 290; and OR, 3.31; 95% CI, 1.62-6.74; P = .001, 4 trials, I(2) = 0%, n = 216, respectively). Compared with oral progestins, LNG-IUS achieved significantly fewer hysterectomies (OR, 0.26; 95% CI, 0.15-0.45; P < .00001, 3 trials, n = 362, I² = 42%). No difference was observed in the rate of irregular vaginal bleeding between both groups (OR, 1.12; 95% CI, 0.54-2.32; P = .76, 2 trials, n = 207, I

  6. From speech to thought: the neuronal basis of cognitive units in non-experimental, real-life communication investigated using ECoG

    PubMed Central

    Derix, Johanna; Iljina, Olga; Weiske, Johanna; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Aertsen, Ad; Ball, Tonio

    2014-01-01

    Exchange of thoughts by means of expressive speech is fundamental to human communication. However, the neuronal basis of real-life communication in general, and of verbal exchange of ideas in particular, has rarely been studied until now. Here, our aim was to establish an approach for exploring the neuronal processes related to cognitive “idea” units (IUs) in conditions of non-experimental speech production. We investigated whether such units corresponding to single, coherent chunks of speech with syntactically-defined borders, are useful to unravel the neuronal mechanisms underlying real-world human cognition. To this aim, we employed simultaneous electrocorticography (ECoG) and video recordings obtained in pre-neurosurgical diagnostics of epilepsy patients. We transcribed non-experimental, daily hospital conversations, identified IUs in transcriptions of the patients' speech, classified the obtained IUs according to a previously-proposed taxonomy focusing on memory content, and investigated the underlying neuronal activity. In each of our three subjects, we were able to collect a large number of IUs which could be assigned to different functional IU subclasses with a high inter-rater agreement. Robust IU-onset-related changes in spectral magnitude could be observed in high gamma frequencies (70–150 Hz) on the inferior lateral convexity and in the superior temporal cortex regardless of the IU content. A comparison of the topography of these responses with mouth motor and speech areas identified by electrocortical stimulation showed that IUs might be of use for extraoperative mapping of eloquent cortex (average sensitivity: 44.4%, average specificity: 91.1%). High gamma responses specific to memory-related IU subclasses were observed in the inferior parietal and prefrontal regions. IU-based analysis of ECoG recordings during non-experimental communication thus elicits topographically- and functionally-specific effects. We conclude that segmentation of

  7. New frameless and framed intrauterine devices and systems - an overview.

    PubMed

    Wildemeersch, Dirk

    2007-06-01

    There is a need for new, improved birth control methods which are easier to use, with less side effects and which avoid daily action, such as the pill. Perfect use requires consistent daily use or use at every act of intercourse. Long-acting methods eliminate the need for specific action at the time of coitus, or for daily action. Developing a new contraceptive is a major challenge. It is generally estimated that it takes 10-15 years to develop a new method and bring it to the market, at a cost of 200-300 million US dollars, and the industry is reluctant to take the risk of such long-term investment. However, both risk and investment can be reduced by taking small steps. Slight improvements of existing contraceptives could result in a giant step forward. The development of frameless intrauterine systems (IUS) is an attempt to improve the performance and acceptability of intrauterine contraception. Both the frameless GyneFix IUD and the frameless FibroPlant levonorgestrel (LNG)-IUS possess features which may solve the main problems encountered with conventional IUDs (e.g., expulsion, abnormal or excessive bleeding and pain). The performance of frameless devices, however, is dependent on correct anchoring of the device, which requires technical skill. Becoming a proficient GyneFix(R) or FibroPlant provider is easily acquired if the provider follows the procedural instruction strictly. For the less technically skilled provider, the Femilis LNG-IUS, using the new, simplified insertion technique, could be an excellent contraceptive option. It is usually not necessary to provide pain relief for insertion of an IUD/IUS, particularly in parous women. IUD providers should, however, realize that no woman likes to suffer from the insertion of an IUD. Severe discomfort may create a negative attitude towards the method. If the woman is anxious and fears pain (as most nulliparous women do), probably the most convenient, safe and effective method is to use local (intracervical

  8. Magellan Post Launch Mission Operation Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Magellan was successfully launched by the Space Shuttle Atlantis from the Kennedy Space Center at 2:47 p.m. EDT on May 4, 1989. The Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) booster and attached Magellan Spacecraft were successfully deployed from Atlantis on Rev. 5 as planned, at 06:14 hrs Mission Elapsed Time (MET). The two IUS propulsion burns which began at 07:14 hrs MET and were completed at 07:22 hrs MET, placed the Magellan Spacecraft almost perfectly on its preplanned trajectory to Venus. The IUS was jettisoned at 07:40 hrs MET and Magellan telemetry was immediately acquired by the Deep Space Network (DSN). A spacecraft trajectory correction maneuver was performed on May 21 and the spacecraft is in the planned standard cruise configuration with all systems operating nominally. An initial attempt was made to launch Atlantis on April 28, 1989, but the launch was scrubbed at T-31 sec due to a failure of the liquid hydrogen recirculation pump on Space Shuttle Main Engine #1. The countdown had proceeded smoothly until T-20 min when the Magellan radio receiver "locked-on" the MIL 71 Unified S-Band (USB) transmission as the transmitter power was increased fro 2 kw to 10 kw in support of the orbiter launch. During the planned hold at T-9 min, the USB was confirmed as the source of the receiver "lock" and Magellan's launch readiness was reaffirmed. In addition a five-minute extension of the T-9 hold occurred when a range safety computer went off-line, creating a loss of redundancy in the range safety computer network. Following resumption of the countdown, both the orbiter and Magellan flows proceeded smoothly until the launch was scrubbed at T-31 sec.

  9. Orbital Evidence for Clay and Acidic Sulfate Assemblages on Mars and Mineralogical Analogs from Rio Tinto, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, H. H.; Milliken, R.; Fernandez-Remolar, D. C.; Amils, R.; Robertson, K.; Knoll, A. H.

    2015-12-01

    A suite of enigmatic near-infrared reflectance spectra with a 'doublet' absorption between 2.2 and 2.3 µm is observed in CRISM (Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars) hyperspectral images over Ius and Melas Chasma on Mars. The doublet-bearing deposits are found alongside other hydrated minerals including clays, sulfates, and silica, but the mineral(s) responsible for the spectral signature has yet to be identified. Reflectance spectra of rocks and sediments at Rio Tinto, Spain exhibit similar absorptions at airborne, field, and lab spatial scales. Coupled X-ray diffraction and reflectance spectra of these terrestrial examples indicate the absorption arises from a mixture of jarosite, a ferric sulfate, and Al-phyllosilicates (illite/muscovite). Detailed analysis of CRISM data over Ius and Melas Chasma suggests that these deposits also contain mixtures of jarosite and Al-phyllosilicate, where the latter may include halloysite, kaolinite and/or montmorillonite in addition to illite/muscovite. This interpretation is supported because (1) the two absorptions in the doublet feature vary independently, implying the presence of two or more phases, (2) the position of the absorptions is consistent with Al-OH and Fe-OH vibrations in both the Rio Tinto and CRISM spectra and (3) Al-phyllosilicates and jarosite are identified separately in nearby regions. Multiple formation mechanisms are proposed based on stratigraphy in Ius Chasma, where the strength of absorptions varies within a single stratigraphic unit as well as between different units. Mechanisms include authigenic formation of jarosite, which would indicate locally acidic and oxidizing conditions, mixed with detrial Al-phyllosilicates, or authigenic formation of Al-phyllosilicates and jarosite. Each implies different conditions in terms of aqueous geochemistry, redox, and sediment transport. Results from the field, lab, and CRISM analysis will be presented to discuss how placing these spectral

  10. Knowledge and attitudes about long-acting reversible contraception among Latina women who desire sterilization

    PubMed Central

    White, Kari; Hopkins, Kristine; Potter, Joseph E.; Grossman, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Background There is growing interest in increasing the use of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC), and suggestions that such methods may serve as an alternative to sterilization. However, there is little information about whether women who do not want more children would be interested in using LARC methods. Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews with 120 parous Latina women in El Paso, Texas who wanted a sterilization but had not obtained one. We assessed women’s awareness of and interest in using the copper intrauterine device (IUD), levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS), and etonogestrel implant. Findings Overall, 51%, 23% and 47% of women reported they had heard of the copper IUD, LNG-IUS and implant, respectively. More women stated they would use the copper IUD (24%) than the LNG-IUS (14%) or implant (9%). Among women interested in LARC, the most common reasons were that, relative to their current method, LARC methods were more convenient, effective, and provided longer-term protection against pregnancy. Those who had reservations about LARC were primarily concerned with menstrual changes. Women also had concerns about side effects and the methods' effectiveness in preventing pregnancy, preferring to use a familiar method. Conclusions Although these findings indicate many Latina women in this setting do not consider LARC an alternative to sterilization, they point to an existing demand among some who wish to end childbearing. Efforts are needed to improve women’s knowledge and access to a range of methods so they can achieve their childbearing goals. PMID:23816156

  11. Complications and continuation rates associated with two types of long-acting contraception

    PubMed Central

    Berenson, Abbey B.; Tan, Alai; Hirth, Jacqueline M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To compare complication and continuation rates of the levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) with the subdermal etonogestrel (ENG) implant across the US among women 15 – 44 years of age. Study Design A retrospective study of health insurance claims records from 2007–2011 identified a cohort of women who had LNG-IUS (n=79,920) or ENG implants (n=7,374) inserted and had insurance coverage for 12 months post-insertion. Claims for complications were examined 12 months after insertion, or until removal of either device within each of three age groups. Results After its introduction in 2007, the frequency of ENG implants increased each year and almost 1/3 of all insertions were in teenagers. However, among women ≤ 24 years old who had delivered an infant in the prior 8 weeks, a LNG-IUS was more likely to be inserted than an ENG implant (P < .05). The most frequent complications with both methods were related to abnormal menstruation, which was more likely to occur among ENG implant users. Overall, 83–88% of the entire sample used their chosen method for at least 12 months. The odds of continuation were similar for both methods among teenagers, but ENG implants were more likely to be removed prematurely among women 20 – 24 years old (OR 1.21, 95% CI: 1.06–1.39) and 25 – 44 years old (OR 1.49, 95% CI: 1.35–1.64). Conclusions Both of these long-acting contraceptive methods are well tolerated among women of all ages, and demonstrate high continuation rates. PMID:25555662

  12. Different Bleeding Patterns with the Use of Levonorgestrel Intrauterine System: Are They Associated with Changes in Uterine Artery Blood Flow?

    PubMed Central

    Bastianelli, Carlo; Rapiti, Stefania; Bruno Vecchio, Roberta; Benagiano, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Evaluate if different bleeding patterns associated with the use of the levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) are associated with different uterine and endometrial vascularization patterns, as evidenced by ultrasound power Doppler analysis. Methodology. A longitudinal study, with each subject acting as its own control was conducted between January 2010 and December 2012. Healthy volunteers with a history of heavy but cyclic and regular menstrual cycles were enrolled in the study. Ultrasonographic examination was performed before and after six months of LNG-IUS placement: uterine volume, endometrial thickness, and subendometrial and myometrial Doppler blood flow patterns have been evaluated. Results. A total of 32 women were enrolled out of 186 initially screened. At six months of follow-up, all subjects showed a reduction in menstrual blood loss; for analysis, they were retrospectively divided into 3 groups: normal cycling women (Group I), amenorrheic women (Group II), and women with prolonged bleedings (Group III). Intergroup analysis documented a statistically significant difference in endometrial thickness among the three groups; in addition, mean pulsatility index (PI) and resistance index (RI) in the spiral arteries were significantly lower in Group I and Group III compared to Group II. This difference persisted also when comparing—within subjects of Group III—mean PI and RI mean values before and after insertion. Conclusions. The LNG-IUS not only altered endometrial thickness, but—in women with prolonged bleedings—also significantly changed uterine artery blood flow. Further studies are needed to confirm these results and enable gynecologists to properly counsel women, improving initial continuation rates. PMID:24868549

  13. Planetary mission requirements, technology and design considerations for a solar electric propulsion stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cork, M. J.; Hastrup, R. C.; Menard, W. A.; Olson, R. N.

    1979-01-01

    High energy planetary missions such as comet rendezvous, Saturn orbiter and asteroid rendezvous require development of a Solar Electric Propulsion Stage (SEPS) for augmentation of the Shuttle-IUS. Performance and functional requirements placed on the SEPS are presented. These requirements will be used in evolution of the SEPS design, which must be highly interactive with both the spacecraft and the mission design. Previous design studies have identified critical SEPS technology areas and some specific design solutions which are also presented in the paper.

  14. An Analytical and Experimental Investigation of Planar Discontinuities in Coaxial Waveguides.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    AOORESS(JI dflfeent Irm ConItlinhi Office) 1. SECURITY CLASS. (o tlis port) Unclassified OCAS FICATION/00OUNGRAING 0CEDULE ISi . OTS44NM4UIISTATE[ME[NT (at...PEAK AMP -5.749 o.479 % b -.164 x c - .534S5 9..3~ g.2 2 2 k -.8195~ h -SS3e FRONT PLATE co0. W M PmR5c o-t 0.0 .2 a. . . 1.0 bROO IUS NORMA ~LIZED BY

  15. Transactions of the Conference of Army Mathematicians (26th) Held at Hanover, New Hampshire on 10 - 12 June 1980.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    loll Ot thet laitt i, e wiicl contained- one. cr ra)re of these 1 aricil:IIir tYpes, of ose 1 loat iris WithOwi. belaboring the! .etai Ius, we tos11l...defining "logical spring- dampers " that account for certain aspects of inter- mittent motion [7]. In this paper, the method of computer generated equations...incorporating provisions for nonstandard elements that are supplied by the user. In addition to standard constraints, standard spring- damper -actuator

  16. Earth orbital assessment of solar electric and solar sail propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teeter, R. R.

    1977-01-01

    The earth orbital applications potential of Solar Electric (Ion Drive) and Solar Sail low-thrust propulsion systems are evaluated. Emphasis is placed on mission application in the 1980s. The two low-thrust systems are compared with each other and with two chemical propulsion Shuttle upper stages (the IUS and SSUS) expected to be available in the 1980s. The results indicate limited Earth orbital application potential for the low-thrust systems in the 1980s (primarily due to cost disadvantages). The longer term potential is viewed as more promising. Of the two systems, the Ion Drive exhibits better performance and appears to have better overall application potential.

  17. Satellite Altimetry for Naval Oceanography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    mesoscale map. H. Beresford and E. McNutt assisted with analses of An added capability of the SSH residual is the ability herod ad.uttaSs alyesofd to...wave energy. It should be gnd) Gulf of Mexico vmidoon. tal Da, 1536. ihi Day 0󈧴. lei Da. noted that a more sophisticated technioue for determiring...the 1560. (d) Day 1572. lei Day 1602 For contour interval. ee Figure A KINDLF SAMPLING STRArEGiIUS AND Mot As iSMitt IioN of A L risit IRI( D.I A _ (a

  18. Jupiter Orbiter and Probe project - Synthesis of the mission design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckman, J. C.; Roberts, P. H., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The Jupiter Orbiter Probe (JOP), scheduled to be launched by the Shuttle IUS in 1981, is described in terms of its scientific mission objectives. These include: analysis of the chemical composition and physical state of Jupiter's atmosphere, the chemical composition and physical state of Ganymede and Callisto, and the topology and behavior of the magnetic field and energetic particle fluxes. Attention is given to an atmospheric probe which will be launched from the main probe, and to the navigation requirements necessary to 'bounce' the JOP around the Jovian moons.

  19. Laboratory Transmission of Venezuelan Equine Encephalomyelitis Virus by the Tick Hyalomma Truncatum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    equine On day 21 after infestation of the first guinea-pig, none encephalomyelitis virus by the tick of 95 unfed nv mphs sampled contained virus...Epi/ootic strains oft Venezuelan equine encephalo- nymphs [minimum infection rate =2 200 1% I"( 1 contained inveliti. \\EE’ virus Alp/tavirus. family...Togaviridae virus mean titre= 102 1 1PFU ’. About 200 unfed nymphs ý:iuse serious disease tin horse % and humans throughout were placed on a guinea-pig at

  20. Development of Vault Toilet Waste Treatment Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-06-01

    wi nd turbine used was a Savoniut’ Wing Rotor, a vertical axis rotor developed by S. J. Savonius in the early 1920’s and used exten- sively in the...one aoove the other on a common sha rt wi th the upper rotor S. J. Savonius , The Wind Rotor in Theory and P ractice (Savon ius Co. , Finland, 1928...Ben F. Blackwe l l, Wind Tunnel Perfov’mcotce Data for 2~o— ~ id Three— Bucket Savonius Rotors, (Sandia Laboratories, July 1977). 16 _ _ _ _ _ • “I

  1. Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement: U.S. Lake Erie Natural Gas Resource Development in Offshore Waters of New York, Pennsylvania and Ohio

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    federal) MCATION/SITINC S;V[Li•iK of drilling rigs shall meet Corps of Engineers , River And Harbor Act Sec. 10; existingE Section 10, and state...navigable waters and of harbor and river improvements generally. Section 10 of the Act, 33 U.S.C. 403, requires approval by the Chief of Engineers and the... engineers and theQy~- IU.s. environmental protection agency 80 12 03 ;341 U"’CLASS IFI ED SECURITY CLASSiFICATION OF THIS PAGE (41- ... Fn- r..,.dSRFAL) 1𔃻

  2. JSC Mission Control Center (MCC) personnel watch STS-26 landing in FCR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    During STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, landing, personnel in JSC's Mission Control Center (MCC) Bldg 30 flight control room (FCR) monitor heading alignment cone (HAC) diagram and OV-103 runway touch down displayed on front screens. In the foreground is the Specialists Console (BOOSTER, EVA, PDRS, RMS, PAM, IUS) with Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) console next to it. At the MOD console are Flight Crew Operations Directorate (FCOD) Deputy Chief Henry Hartsfield, JSC Director Aaron Cohen, and MOD Director Eugene F. Kranz. In the background, Public Affairs Office (PAO) photographer Andrew R. 'Pat' Patnesky takes a photograph of the FCR activity.

  3. [How safe is magnetic resonance imaging in patients with contraceptive implants?].

    PubMed

    Mühler, M; Taupitz, M

    2006-07-01

    When patients with an implanted contraceptive device undergo MRI, it must be ensured that the examination involves no risk to the patient (MR safety) and that the diagnosis is not affected by artifacts or the function of the device compromised (MR compatibility). Two basic types of intrauterine devices can be distinguished: the metal-containing/metal-free intrauterine device (IUD) and the hormone-containing implant, the fully metal-free intrauterine system (IUS), as well as the ESSURE insert made of stainless steel, which has been approved for use in Europe since February 2001. The metal-containing and metal-free IUDs and ESSURE are MRI compatible up to a magnetic field strength of 1.5 T. They do not interact in any relevant way with the external magnetic or high-frequency field and the temperature increase is within the physiologic range. The implants merely produce a local signal void with a shape that depends on their orientation relative to the magnetic field lines. At 3 T, only the metal-free IUD and the IUS are MRI safe in terms of the material used. In contrast, metal-containing IUDs and the ESSURE have not yet been fully evaluated in the 3 T field, which is why they represent a contraindication to MRI. No data are available on the MRI compatibility at 3 T for any of these devices.

  4. Final safety analysis report for the Galileo Mission: Volume 2: Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-15

    The General Purpose Heat Source Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (GPHS-RTG) will be used as the prime source of electric power for the spacecraft on the Galileo mission. The use of radioactive material in these missions necessitates evaluations of the radiological risks that may be encountered by launch complex personnel and by the Earth's general population resulting from postulated malfunctions or failures occurring in the mission operations. The purpose of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) is to present the analyses and results of the latest evaluation of the nuclear safety potential of the GPHS-RTG as employed in the Galileo mission. This evaluation is an extension of earlier work that addressed the planned 1986 launch using the Space Shuttle Vehicle with the Centaur as the upper stage. This extended evaluation represents the launch by the Space Shuttle/IUS vehicle. The IUS stage has been selected as the vehicle to be used to boost the Galileo spacecraft into the Earth escape trajectory after the parking orbit is attained.

  5. Chandra X-Ray Observatory Pointing Control System Performance During Transfer Orbit and Initial On-Orbit Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quast, Peter; Tung, Frank; West, Mark; Wider, John

    2000-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO, formerly AXAF) is the third of the four NASA great observatories. It was launched from Kennedy Space Flight Center on 23 July 1999 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia and was successfully inserted in a 330 x 72,000 km orbit by the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS). Through a series of five Integral Propulsion System burns, CXO was placed in a 10,000 x 139,000 km orbit. After initial on-orbit checkout, Chandra's first light images were unveiled to the public on 26 August, 1999. The CXO Pointing Control and Aspect Determination (PCAD) subsystem is designed to perform attitude control and determination functions in support of transfer orbit operations and on-orbit science mission. After a brief description of the PCAD subsystem, the paper highlights the PCAD activities during the transfer orbit and initial on-orbit operations. These activities include: CXO/IUS separation, attitude and gyro bias estimation with earth sensor and sun sensor, attitude control and disturbance torque estimation for delta-v burns, momentum build-up due to gravity gradient and solar pressure, momentum unloading with thrusters, attitude initialization with star measurements, gyro alignment calibration, maneuvering and transition to normal pointing, and PCAD pointing and stability performance.

  6. Intolerance of uncertainty correlates with insula activation during affective ambiguity

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Alan; Matthews, Scott C.; Paulus, Martin P.; Stein, Murray B.

    2009-01-01

    Intolerance of uncertainty (IU), or the increased affective response to situations with uncertain outcomes, is an important component process of anxiety disorders. Increased IU is observed in panic disorder (PD), obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and is thought to relate to dysfunctional behaviors and thought patterns in these disorders. Identifying what brain systems are associated with IU would contribute to a comprehensive model of anxiety processing, and increase our understanding of the neurobiology of anxiety disorders. Here, we used a behavioral task, Wall of Faces (WOF), during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), which probes both affect and ambiguity, to examine the neural circuitry of IU in fourteen (10 females) college age (18.8 yrs) subjects. All subjects completed the Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale (IUS), Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI), and a measure of neuroticism (i.e. the NEO-N). IUS scores but neither ASI nor NEO-N scores, correlated positively with activation in bilateral insula during affective ambiguity. Thus, the experience of IU during certain types of emotion processing may relate to the degree to which bilateral insula processes uncertainty. Previously observed insula hyperactivity in anxiety disorder individuals may therefore be directly linked to altered processes of uncertainty. PMID:18079060

  7. Intolerance of uncertainty correlates with insula activation during affective ambiguity.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Alan; Matthews, Scott C; Paulus, Martin P; Stein, Murray B

    2008-01-10

    Intolerance of uncertainty (IU), or the increased affective response to situations with uncertain outcomes, is an important component process of anxiety disorders. Increased IU is observed in panic disorder (PD), obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and is thought to relate to dysfunctional behaviors and thought patterns in these disorders. Identifying what brain systems are associated with IU would contribute to a comprehensive model of anxiety processing, and increase our understanding of the neurobiology of anxiety disorders. Here, we used a behavioral task, Wall of Faces (WOFs), during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), which probes both affect and ambiguity, to examine the neural circuitry of IU in 14 (10 females) college age (18.8 years) subjects. All subjects completed the Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale (IUS), Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI), and a measure of neuroticism (i.e. the NEO-N). IUS scores but neither ASI nor NEO-N scores, correlated positively with activation in bilateral insula during affective ambiguity. Thus, the experience of IU during certain types of emotion processing may relate to the degree to which bilateral insula processes uncertainty. Previously observed insula hyperactivity in anxiety disorder individuals may therefore be directly linked to altered processes of uncertainty.

  8. Ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) as a new drug carrier for 3D printed medical drug delivery devices.

    PubMed

    Genina, Natalja; Holländer, Jenny; Jukarainen, Harri; Mäkilä, Ermei; Salonen, Jarno; Sandler, Niklas

    2016-07-30

    The main purpose of this work was to investigate the printability of different grades of ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) copolymers as new feedstock material for fused-deposition modeling (FDM™)-based 3D printing technology in fabrication of custom-made T-shaped intrauterine systems (IUS) and subcutaneous rods (SR). The goal was to select an EVA grade with optimal properties, namely vinyl acetate content, melting index, flexural modulus, for 3D printing of implantable prototypes with the drug incorporated within the entire matrix of the medical devices. Indomethacin was used as a model drug in this study. Out of the twelve tested grades of the EVA five were printable. One of them showed superior print quality and was further investigated by printing drug-loaded filaments, containing 5% and 15% indomethacin. The feedstock filaments were fabricated by hot-melt extrusion (HME) below the melting point of the drug substance and the IUS and SR were successfully printed at the temperature above the melting point of the drug. As a result, the drug substance in the printed prototypes showed to be at least partly amorphous, while the drug in the corresponding HME filaments was crystalline. This difference affected the drug release profiles from the filaments and printed prototype products: faster release from the prototypes over 30days in the in vitro tests. To conclude, this study indicates that certain grades of EVA were applicable feedstock material for 3D printing to produce drug-loaded implantable prototypes.

  9. Toward a definition of intolerance of uncertainty: a review of factor analytical studies of the Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale.

    PubMed

    Birrell, Jane; Meares, Kevin; Wilkinson, Andrew; Freeston, Mark

    2011-11-01

    Since its emergence in the early 1990s, a narrow but concentrated body of research has developed examining the role of intolerance of uncertainty (IU) in worry, and yet we still know little about its phenomenology. In an attempt to clarify our understanding of this construct, this paper traces the way in which our understanding and definition of IU have evolved throughout the literature. This paper also aims to further our understanding of IU by exploring the latent variables measures by the Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale (IUS; Freeston, Rheaume, Letarte, Dugas & Ladouceur, 1994). A review of the literature surrounding IU confirmed that the current definitions are categorical and lack specificity. A critical review of existing factor analytic studies was carried out in order to determine the underlying factors measured by the IUS. Systematic searches yielded 9 papers for review. Two factors with 12 consistent items emerged throughout the exploratory studies, and the stability of models containing these two factors was demonstrated in subsequent confirmatory studies. It is proposed that these factors represent (i) desire for predictability and an active engagement in seeking certainty, and (ii) paralysis of cognition and action in the face of uncertainty. It is suggested that these factors may represent approach and avoidance responses to uncertainty. Further research is required to confirm the construct validity of these factors and to determine the stability of this structure within clinical samples.

  10. Objective Assessment of Cervical Stiffness after Administration of Misoprostol for Intrauterine Contraceptive Insertion

    PubMed Central

    Badir, S.; Mazza, E.; Bajka, M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to objectively quantify cervical stiffness in misoprostol users prior to IUC insertion and at follow-up consultation to evaluate the feasibility of assessing cervical stiffness and to study the influence of misoprostol on cervical softening. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study that evaluated 40 women who wished to use the LNG IUS. These women were evaluated immediately before LNG IUS insertion and 6 weeks later at follow-up consultation. Participants received 200 μg of misoprostol combined with 75 mg of diclofenac in a single tablet orally (Arthrotec forte 75/200®, Pfizer, USA) 6–12 h prior to insertion in “off label” use. On both occasions, cervical stiffness was determined using a novel medical device based on the aspiration technique. The Wilcoxon rank-sum and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test were applied to compare cervical stiffness assessments at insertion of the IUD and at follow-up. Results: For the first time, cervical stiffness was quantitatively assessed in misoprostol users prior to IUD insertion, proving that the aspiration technique enables detection of pharmacologically induced cervical changes, and also that misoprostol has a detectable softening effect on cervical tissue. Conclusion: The clinical value of the detected cervical softening after misoprostol administration remains unclear. Aspiration measurements could be helpful in searching for the ideal candidate, the appropriate route, dosage and interval of misoprostol intake prior to IUC insertion. PMID:27689173

  11. An executive review of sludge pretreatment by sonication.

    PubMed

    Le, Ngoc Tuan; Julcour-Lebigue, Carine; Delmas, Henri

    2015-11-01

    Ultrasonication (US), which creates hydro-mechanical shear forces in cavitation, is an advanced technology in sludge pretreatment. However, there are many factors affecting the efficacy of cavitation and ultrasonication disintegration of sludge as a consequence. The objective of this work is to present an extensive review of evaluation approaches of sludge US pretreatment efficiency. Besides, optimization methodologies of related parameters, the differences of optimum values and the similarities of affecting trends on cavitation and sludge pretreatment efficiency were specifically pointed out, including ambient conditions, ultrasonic properties, and sludge characteristics. The research is a prerequisite for optimization of sludge US pretreatment efficiency in lab-scale and practical application. There is not-yet a comprehensive method to evaluate the efficiency of sludge US pretreatment, but some main parameters commonly used for this purpose are degree of sludge disintegration, proteins, particle size reduction, etc. Regarding US parameters, power input PUS, intensity IUS, and frequency FS seem to have significant effects. However, the magnitude of the effect of PUS and probe size in terms of IUS has not been clearly detailed. Investigating very low FS seems interesting but has not yet been taken into consideration. In addition, static pressure effect has been marginally studied only and investigation on the effect of pH prior to US process has been restricted. Their effects therefore should be varied separately and simultaneously with other related parameters, i.e. process conditions, ultrasonic properties, and sludge characteristics, to optimize sludge US pretreatment process.

  12. Chandra X-Ray Observatory Arrives at KSC for Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-04-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory, scheduled to launch aboard Space Shuttle Columbia on mission STS-93, arrived at 2:45 p.m. EST today at the Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard an Air Force C-5 Galaxy airplane. The telescope was shipped from the TRW plant in Redondo Beach, CA, with departure from Los Angeles International Airport occurring earlier this morning. A second airplane also brought the necessary ground support equipment to KSC for the campaign of final prelaunch integration and testing. The ground support equipment is being off loaded today. The Chandra Observatory is to be taken off the airplane early Friday morning and transported to the Vertical Processing Facility located in the KSC Industrial Area. There, the telescope will undergo final installation of associated electronic components, be tested, fueled, and mated with the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) booster. A set of integrated tests will follow. A major milestone is the test using the Cargo Integrated Test Equipment (CITE) to verify that Chandra and the Inertial Upper Stage will have the ability to receive and reply to commands once aboard the Space Shuttle. Also, an end-to-end test will verify the communications systems of the payload and its ability to communicate through the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite system with Mission Control in Houston and the Chandra ground station located in Cambridge, MA. The Chandra/IUS combination will then be ready to go to the launch pad. Once in the payload changeout room at Pad 39-B, the protective cocoon will be removed from around the telescope and it will be installed into Space Shuttle Columbia. An Integrated Verification Test will be conducted to check all of the electrical connections and the ability of the astronauts to send and receive commands from Columbia's flight deck. The end-to-end test will be repeated at the pad. Finally the IUS will go through a simulated countdown to verify its readiness for launch. Chandra will use the world

  13. Use of mixed-treatment-comparison methods in estimating efficacy of treatments for heavy menstrual bleeding

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A variety of pharmacological and surgical treatments have been developed for heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB), which can have negative physical, social, psychological, and economic consequences. We conducted a systematic literature review and mixed-treatment-comparison (MTC) meta-analysis of available data from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to derive estimates of efficacy for 8 classes of treatments for HMB, to inform health-economic analysis and future studies. Methods A systematic review identified RCTs that reported data on menstrual blood loss (MBL) at baseline and one or more follow-up times. Eight treatment classes were considered: COCs, danazol, endometrial ablation, LNG-IUS, placebo, progestogens given for less than 2 weeks out of 4 during the menstrual cycle, progestogens given for close to 3 weeks out of 4, and TXA. The primary measure of efficacy was the proportion of women who achieved MBL < 80 mL per cycle (month), as measured by the alkaline hematin method. A score less than 100 on an established pictorial blood-loss assessment chart (PBAC) was considered an acceptable substitute for MBL < 80 mL. Estimates of efficacy by treatment class and time were obtained from a Bayesian MTC model. The model also included effects for treatment class, study, and the combination of treatment class and study and an adjustment for baseline mean MBL. Several methodological challenges complicated the analysis. Some trials reported various summary statistics for MBL or PBAC, requiring estimation (with less precision) of % MBL < 80 mL or % PBAC < 100. Also, reported follow-up times varied substantially. Results The evidence network involved 34 RCTs, with follow-up times from 1 to 36 months. Efficacy at 3 months of follow-up (estimated as the posterior median) ranged from 87.5% for the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) to 14.2% for progestogens administered for less than 2 weeks out of 4 in the menstrual cycle. The 95% credible intervals

  14. Artist concept of STS-35 ASTRO-1 and BBXRT in Columbia's, OV-102's, payload bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Artist concept shows STS-35 Astronomy Laboratory 1 (ASTRO-1) and Broad Band X-Ray Telescope (BBXRT) in Columbia's, OV-102's, payload bay (PLB). ASTRO-1 spacelab pallet in the forward PLB includes three ultraviolet telescopes - Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT), Wisconsin Ultraviolet Photo-Polarimeter Experiment (WUPPE), and Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT) - mounted on the instrument pointing system (IUS). In the aft PLB is the BBXRT mounted on a two-axis pointing system (TAPS). ASTRO-1 instruments will explore the invisible ultraviolet and x-ray universe in greater depth and detail than ever before. Like ground observatories, this new facility will be used by scientists to investigate a variety of astronomical questions. Ultraviolet and x-ray observations will identify hot and energetic sources in the Universe, including astronomical targets within the solar system; individual stars, stellar systems, and nebulae; and distant galactic systems, quasars, and clusters of galaxies. Dr

  15. STS-93: Crew Interview - Cady Coleman

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman is presented. The interview addresses many different questions including why Coleman wanted to be an astronaut, why she wanted to become a chemist, and how this historic flight (first female Commander of a mission) will influence little girls. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is the deployment of the Chandra satellite, why people care about x ray energy, whether or not Chandra will compliment the other X Ray Observatories currently in operation, and her responsibilities during the major events of this mission. Coleman mentions the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) rocket that will deploy Chandra, and the design configuration of Chandra that will allow for the transfer of information. The Southwest Research Ultraviolet Imaging System (SWUIS) Telescope on board Columbia, the Plant Growth Investigation in Microgravity (PGIM) experiment, and the two observatories presently in orbit (Gamma Ray Observatory, and Hubble Space Telescope) are also discussed.

  16. Final safety analysis report for the Galileo Mission: Volume 2, Book 2: Accident model document: Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-15

    This section of the Accident Model Document (AMD) presents the appendices which describe the various analyses that have been conducted for use in the Galileo Final Safety Analysis Report II, Volume II. Included in these appendices are the approaches, techniques, conditions and assumptions used in the development of the analytical models plus the detailed results of the analyses. Also included in these appendices are summaries of the accidents and their associated probabilities and environment models taken from the Shuttle Data Book (NSTS-08116), plus summaries of the several segments of the recent GPHS safety test program. The information presented in these appendices is used in Section 3.0 of the AMD to develop the Failure/Abort Sequence Trees (FASTs) and to determine the fuel releases (source terms) resulting from the potential Space Shuttle/IUS accidents throughout the missions.

  17. STS-121: Discovery Spacewalk Overview Briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The briefing began with the introduction of Tomas Gonzalez-Torres (Lead Extra Vehicular Activity Officer). The spacewalk team included Pierce Sellers (EV-1), Mike Fossum (EV-2) and Mark Kelly (coordinator and pilot). Three new EMU's (space suits) were provided with hardware upgrades (warning systems). The 1st EVA would take place on flight day 5 and would include the exchange of the 3 EMU's. The 1st task was the installation of the blade locker, a device used to prevent severing of cables. The team will also install the Interface Umbilical System (IUS) which is an extension cord for the mobile transporter. EVA-2 task will be to replace the old Trailing Umbilical System (TUS) with a new one.

  18. In-flight rescue of stranded TDRS-1 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmeichel, H.; Ehlers, B. J.

    1984-01-01

    On April 4, 1983, the first Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS-1), one of six to be built for SPACECOM and NASA, was launched by the Space Shuttle Challenger. During the ascent to geosynchronous orbit, the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) booster malfunctioned, leaving TDRS stranded in a low, elliptical orbit. This report describes the amazing satellite recovery from a wild tumble and the dramatic three-month rescue effort to move TDRS into synchronous orbit. It took a total burn time of 44 hours from a pair of tiny one-pound thrusters, about 800 pounds of propellant, an adaptable, robust attitude control system and much resourcefulness from ground operators to accomplish this feat. TDRS-1 reached its proper earth orbit on June 29, 1983 and then began its ten-year mission as a data relay satellite.

  19. STS-41 mission charts, computer-generated and artist concept drawings, photos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-41 related charts, computer-generated and artist concept drawings, and photos of the Ulysses spacecraft and mission flight path provided by the European Space Agency (ESA). Charts show the Ulysses mission flight path and encounter with Jupiter (45980, 45981) and sun (illustrating cosmic dust, gamma ray burst, magnetic field, x-rays, solar energetic particles, visible corona, interstellar gas, plasma wave, cosmic rays, solar radio noise, and solar wind) (45988). Computer-generated view shows the Ulysses spacecraft (45983). Artist concept illustrates Ulysses spacecraft deploy from the space shuttle payload bay (PLB) with the inertial upper stage (IUS) and payload assist module (PAM-S) visible (45984). Ulysses spacecraft is also shown undergoing preflight testing in the manufacturing facility (45985, 45986, 45987).

  20. Tug fleet and ground operations schedules and controls. Volume 2: part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    This Tug Fleet and Ground Operations Schedules and Controls Study addresses both ground operational data and technical requirements that span the Tug planning phase and operations phase. A similar study covering mission operations (by others) provides the complimentary flight operations details. The two studies provide the planning data requirements, resource allocation, and control milestones for supporting the requirements of the STS program. This Tug Fleet and Ground Operations Schedules and Controls Study incorporates the basic ground operations requirements and concepts provided by previous studies with the interrelationships of the planning, IUS transition, and Tug fleet operations phases. The interrelationships of these phases were studied as a system to optimize overall program benefits and minimize operational risk factors.

  1. OAST Space Theme Workshop. Volume 2: Theme summary. 6: Advanced transportation systems. A: Theme statement. B. 26 April 1976 presentation. C. Theme summary. D. Initiative actions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Technology requirements for an integrated space transportation system capability which will allow the nation to use space efficiently, reliably, and routinely in the years between 1985 and 2000 with a significant return on invested resources will build on the currently defined space transportation system using shuttle, the IUS, and the advanced upper stage such as the solar electric propulsion system. Contributing technologies should include those which support (1) total reusability with minimal refurbishment; (2) responsiveness to high launch rate requirements when operation and energy are the predominant recurring costs; and (3) maximum flexibility in operation between earth and LEO and between LEO and GEO. Initiatives undertaken to advance the heavy lift to launch vehicles, single stage to orbit vehicles, and orbit transfer vehicles are listed.

  2. Effects of Depth on Dredging Frequency. Report 3. Evaluation of Advance Maintenance Projects.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-01

    to 1)rovide a p rede te rmi ned amiis’t () If L-;) Lhint c a pa( I it v he Ilow les jgz dtepth.i ItL is exclIus ive of the alIlIowah Ie ulre-lg Iig t...p roject s wh ichi infl tdod advance ma LI t ellal ce w Ii 11 h u h s wh I did ( to . Dlat I. used wv e of) Lb a I ned f rom p red redcge- aInd postdr...was conducted during the period 1978 to 1982 under the di- rection of Messrs. H. B. Simmons and F. A. Herrmann , Jr., former and present Chiefs of the

  3. Second Shuttle Join NASA's STS Fleet: Challenger Launches First New Tracking Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    NASA made a major stride in readying a second delivery vehicle for its Space Transportation System (STS) fleet with the perfect landing of Shuttle Orbiter Challenger at Edwards Air Force Base, California, April 9, 1983. Besides being the first flight test of Challenger's performance, the mission marked the orbiting of the first spacecraft in NASA's new Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). The new family of orbiting space communications platforms is essential to serve future Shuttle missions. Although the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) second stage engine firing failed to place TDRS in its final 35,888 kilometer (22,300 mile) geosynchronous orbit, its release from the orbiter cargo bay went as planned. Launch officials were confident they can achieve its planned orbit in a matter of weeks.

  4. STS-43 Space Shuttle mission report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fricke, Robert W.

    1991-01-01

    The STS-43 Space Shuttle Program Mission Report contains a summary of the vehicle subsystem operations during the forty-second flight of the Space Shuttle Program and the ninth flight of the Orbiter Vehicle Atlantis (OV-104). In addition to the Atlantis vehicle, the flight vehicle consisted of the following: an External Tank (ET) designated as ET-47 (LWT-40); three Space Shuttle main engines (SSME's) (serial numbers 2024, 2012, and 2028 in positions 1, 2, and 3, respectively); and two Solid Rocket Boosters (SRB's) designated as BI-045. The primary objective of the STS-43 mission was to successfully deploy the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite-E/Inertial Upper Stage (TDRS-E/IUS) satellite and to perform all operations necessary to support the requirements of the Shuttle Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SSBUV) payload and the Space Station Heat Pipe Advanced Radiator Element (SHARE-2).

  5. Education in Sustainable Energy by European Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanescu, Corina; Stefureac, Crina

    2010-05-01

    completion. Students also show a great deal of interest towards this course. More information are available on www.school4energy.net/ , www.ises.org/schools/ - The newest is the project "Intelligent Use of Energy in School", starting in this school year. This European project is part of Intelligent Energy program, aims to promote a more efficient way of using energy in every day life among secondary schools students and teachers. IUSES will show secondary school students the basic principles of energy efficiency and give a comprehensive guide to saving energy in their everyday lives. IUSES is currently developing a behaviour-oriented educational kit including: handbooks, multimedia animations and experiment tool-kit. The educational kit will be freely available for downloading on this web site. The project will also include the launch of the European Energy Saving Award in 14 different countries which will reward schools and students that improve their energy efficiency. More information is available on www.iuses.eu or www.iuses.ro

  6. Centaur Propellant Thermal Conditioning Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blatt, M. H.; Pleasant, R. L.; Erickson, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    A wicking investigation revealed that passive thermal conditioning was feasible and provided considerable weight advantage over active systems using throttled vent fluid in a Centaur D-1s launch vehicle. Experimental wicking correlations were obtained using empirical revisions to the analytical flow model. Thermal subcoolers were evaluated parametrically as a function of tank pressure and NPSP. Results showed that the RL10 category I engine was the best candidate for boost pump replacement and the option showing the lowest weight penalty employed passively cooled acquisition devices, thermal subcoolers, dry ducts between burns and pumping of subcooler coolant back into the tank. A mixing correlation was identified for sizing the thermodynamic vent system mixer. Worst case mixing requirements were determined by surveying Centaur D-1T, D-1S, IUS, and space tug vehicles. Vent system sizing was based upon worst case requirements. Thermodynamic vent system/mixer weights were determined for each vehicle.

  7. Space tug/shuttle interface compatibility study. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Shuttle interfaces required for space tug accommodation are primarily involved with supporting and servicing the tug during launch countdown, flight, and postlanding; deploying and retrieving the tug on orbit; and maintaining control over the tug when it is in or near the orbiter. Each of these interface areas was investigated to determine the best physical and operational method of accomplishing the required functions, with an overriding goal of establishing simple and flexible orbiter interface requirements suitable for tug, tug payloads, IUS and other cargo. It is concluded the orbiter payload accommodations and the MSFC baseline tug are generally interface compatible. Specific minor changes to tug and orbiter interfaces were identified to provide full compatibility. A system concept for supporting and deploying tug from orbiter is described.

  8. STS-34 crewmembers during Galileo pre-deployment exercises on flight deck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Having been in space only a few hours, three of the STS-34 astronaut crew prepare for pre-deployment exercises involving one of the most prominent 'passengers' of the flight -- the Galileo payload which was lying in Atlantis', Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104's, payload bay (PLB). Pictured, left to right, are Mission Specialist (MS) Ellen S. Baker, MS Shannon W. Lucid, and Commander Donald E. Williams who guided OV-104's course during the exercise. Baker and Lucid communicated with ground controllers while juggling other Galileo-related chores. Both Baker and Lucid are equipped with SONY Walkmans and are wearing headsets. Lucid wears a pair of sungalsses with brightly colored frames. A tethered inertial upper stage (IUS) deploy checklist (C/L) floats between the two and a spotmeter is velcroed to an onorbit station control panel.

  9. Technology status of a fluorine-hydrazine propulsion system for planetary spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    The basic technology exists and a system integration program is well underway to allow incorporation of a fluorine-hydrazine propulsion system into future spacecraft required for unmanned planetary missions. These spacecraft would be inserted in earth orbit using the Space Transportation System Shuttle and given its initial sendoff by the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS). The design of a typical propulsion system, assessment of thermal and structural impacts on a selected spacecraft and comparative studies with conventional propulsion systems have been completed. A major part of the current JPL Program involves assembly of a 3650 N thrust demonstration system using titanium tanks, flight weight components and structure. This system will be used to demonstrate the state-of-the-art throughout a representative flight system's qualification.

  10. The electric rail gun for space propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, D. P.; Barber, J. P.; Vahlberg, C. J.

    1981-01-01

    An analytic feasibility investigation of an electric propulsion concept for space application is described. In this concept, quasistatic thrust due to inertial reaction to repetitively accelerated pellets by an electric rail gun is used to propel a spacecraft. The study encompasses the major subsystems required in an electric rail gun propulsion system. The mass, performance, and configuration of each subsystem are described. Based on an analytic model of the system mass and performance, the electric rail gun mission performance as a reusable orbital transfer vehicle (OTV) is analyzed and compared to a 30 cm ion thruster system (BIMOD) and a chemical propulsion system (IUS) for payloads with masses of 1150 kg and 2300 kg. For system power levels in the range from 25 kW(e) to 100 kW(e) an electric rail gun OTV is more attractive than a BIMOD system for low Earth orbit to geosynchronous orbit transfer durations in the range from 20 to 120 days.

  11. Levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine systems for long-acting contraception: current perspectives, safety, and patient counseling

    PubMed Central

    Costescu, Dustin J

    2016-01-01

    Unintended pregnancy is a significant global problem. In 2008, there were over 100 million unplanned pregnancies worldwide, representing approximately 41% of global conceptions. Family planning strategies in many countries are shifting from increasing the uptake of contraception among nonusers to increasing the uptake of the most effective methods among users of less effective methods. One of the most effective and acceptable methods of contraception is the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG IUS); however, its uptake varies widely by country. This article reviews the currently available LNG IUSs, the rationale for increasing uptake of these methods, and evidence regarding safety, and discusses counseling strategies to best inform women about this option for contraception. PMID:27785107

  12. Shuttle Atlantis to deploy Galileo probe toward Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The objectives of Space Shuttle Mission STS-34 are described along with major flight activities, prelaunch and launch operations, trajectory sequence of events, and landing and post-landing operations. The primary objective of STS-34 is to deploy the Galileo planetary exploration spacecraft into low earth orbit. Following deployment, Galileo will be propelled on a trajectory, known as Venus-Earth-Earth Gravity Assist (VEEGA), by an inertial upper stage (IUS). The objectives of the Galileo mission are to study the chemical composition, state, and dynamics of the Jovian atmosphere and satellites, and investigate the structure and physical dynamics of the Jovian magnetosphere. Secondary STS-34 payloads include the Shuttle Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SSBUV) instrument; the Mesoscale Lightning Experiment (MLE); and various other payloads involving polymer morphology, the effects of microgravity on plant growth hormone, and the growth of ice crystals.

  13. Solar electric propulsion combined with earth gravity assist - A new potential for planetary exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, K. L.; Sauer, C. G.; Flandro, G. A.

    1976-01-01

    The need to shorten mission time (travel time to target planet) in missions to the outer planets prompts a search for alternatives to one-way minimum-energy transfers while continuing to minimize on-power thrusts. Gravity assists via swing-bys of inner planets are examined, with emphasis on a projected Venus-earth gravity assist (VEGA) and a combined solar electric propulsion and earth gravity assist (SEEGA). Gravity assists are also examined as essential for missions with sample returns back to earth. Possible use of such techniques in the Shuttle Interim Upper Stage (IUS) program is considered. Various SEEGA and VEGA trajectories are discussed and charted, and time lost in the launch orbit to earth re-encounter time is weighed against time gained by faster speed toward the mission destination.

  14. Prenatal Substance Exposure: What Predicts Behavioral Resilience by Early Adolescence?

    PubMed Central

    Liebschutz, Jane; Crooks, Denise; Rose-Jacobs, Ruth; Cabral, Howard J; Heeren, Timothy C; Gerteis, Jessie; Appugliese, Danielle P.; Heymann, Orlaith D.; Lange, Allison V.; Frank, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding behavioral resilience among at-risk adolescents may guide public policy decisions and future programs. We examined factors predicting behavioral resilience following intrauterine substance exposure (IUSE) in a prospective longitudinal birth-cohort study of 136 early adolescents (age 12.4–15.9) at-risk for poor behavioral outcomes. We defined behavioral resilience as a composite measure of lack of early substance use initiation (before age 14), lack of risky sexual behavior, or lack of delinquency. IUSEs included in this analysis were cocaine (IUCE), tobacco (IUTE), alcohol (IUAE), and marijuana (IUME). We recruited participants from Boston Medical Center as mother-infant dyads between 1990 and 1993. The majority of the sample was African-American/Caribbean (88%) and 49% female. In bivariate analyses, none and lower IUCE level predicted resilience compared to higher IUCE, but this effect was not found in an adjusted model. Instead, strict caregiver supervision (adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=6.02, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.90–19.00, p=0.002), lower violence exposure (AOR=4.07, 95% CI=1.77–9.38, p<0.001), and absence of intrauterine tobacco exposure (AOR=3.71, 95% CI= 1.28–10.74, p=0.02) predicted behavioral resilience. In conclusion, caregiver supervision in early adolescence, lower violence exposure in childhood, and lack of intrauterine tobacco exposure predict behavioral resilience among a cohort of early adolescents with significant social and environmental risk. Future interventions should work to enhance parental supervision as a way to mitigate the effects of adversity on high-risk groups of adolescents. PMID:26076097

  15. Photobiology of vitamin D in mushrooms and its bioavailability in humans

    PubMed Central

    Keegan, Raphael-John H.; Lu, Zhiren; Bogusz, Jaimee M.; Williams, Jennifer E.; Holick, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Mushrooms exposed to sunlight or UV radiation are an excellent source of dietary vitamin D2 because they contain high concentrations of the vitamin D precursor, provitamin D2. When mushrooms are exposed to UV radiation, provitamin D2 is converted to previtamin D2. Once formed, previtamin D2 rapidly isomerizes to vitamin D2 in a similar manner that previtamin D3 isomerizes to vitamin D3 in human skin. Continued exposure of mushrooms to UV radiation results in the production of lumisterol2 and tachysterol2. It was observed that the concentration of lumisterol2 remained constant in white button mushrooms for up to 24 h after being produced. However, in the same mushroom tachysterol2 concentrations rapidly declined and were undetectable after 24 h. Shiitake mushrooms not only produce vitamin D2 but also produce vitamin D3 and vitamin D4. A study of the bioavailability of vitamin D2 in mushrooms compared with the bioavailability of vitamin D2 or vitamin D3 in a supplement revealed that ingestion of 2000 IUs of vitamin D2 in mushrooms is as effective as ingesting 2000 IUs of vitamin D2 or vitamin D3 in a supplement in raising and maintaining blood levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D which is a marker for a person's vitamin D status. Therefore, mushrooms are a rich source of vitamin D2 that when consumed can increase and maintain blood levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D in a healthy range. Ingestion of mushrooms may also provide the consumer with a source of vitamin D3 and vitamin D4. PMID:24494050

  16. Parametric imaging using subharmonic signals from ultrasound contrast agents in patients with breast lesions.

    PubMed

    Eisenbrey, John R; Dave, Jaydev K; Merton, Daniel A; Palazzo, Juan P; Hall, Anne L; Forsberg, Flemming

    2011-01-01

    Parametric maps showing perfusion of contrast media can be useful tools for characterizing lesions in breast tissue. In this study we show the feasibility of parametric subharmonic imaging (SHI), which allows imaging of a vascular marker (the ultrasound contrast agent) while providing near complete tissue suppression. Digital SHI clips of 16 breast lesions from 14 women were acquired. Patients were scanned using a modified LOGIQ 9 scanner (GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) transmitting/receiving at 4.4/2.2 MHz. Using motion-compensated cumulative maximum intensity (CMI) sequences, parametric maps were generated for each lesion showing the time to peak (TTP), estimated perfusion (EP), and area under the time-intensity curve (AUC). Findings were grouped and compared according to biopsy results as benign lesions (n = 12, including 5 fibroadenomas and 3 cysts) and carcinomas (n = 4). For each lesion CMI, TTP, EP, and AUC parametric images were generated. No significant variations were detected with CMI (P = .80), TTP (P = .35), or AUC (P = .65). A statistically significant variation was detected for the average pixel EP (P = .002). Especially, differences were seen between carcinoma and benign lesions (mean ± SD, 0.10 ± 0.03 versus 0.05 ± 0.02 intensity units [IU]/s; P = .0014) and between carcinoma and fibroadenoma (0.10 ± 0.03 versus 0.04 ± 0.01 IU/s; P = .0044), whereas differences between carcinomas and cysts were found to be nonsignificant. In conclusion, a parametric imaging method for characterization of breast lesions using the high contrast to tissue signal provided by SHI has been developed. While the preliminary sample size was limited, results show potential for breast lesion characterization based on perfusion flow parameters.

  17. Hepatic ablation with multiple interstitial ultrasound applicators: initial ex vivo and computational studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Punit; Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Burdette, E. Clif; Diederich, Chris J.

    2011-03-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation has emerged as an effective method for treating liver tumors under 3 cm in diameter. Multiple applicator devices and techniques - using RF, microwave and other modalities - are under development for thermal ablation of large and irregularly-shaped liver tumors. Interstitial ultrasound (IUS) applicators, comprised of linear arrays of independently powered tubular transducers, enable 3D control of the spatial power deposition profile and simultaneous ablation with multiple applicators. We evaluated IUS applicator configurations (parallel, converging and diverging implants) suitable for percutaneous and laparascopic placement with experiments in ex vivo bovine tissue and computational models. Ex vivo ablation zones measured 4.6+/-0.5 x 4.2+/-0.5 × 3.3+/-0.5 cm3 and 5.6+/-0.5 × 4.9+/-0.5 x 2.8+/-0.3 cm3 using three parallel applicators spaced 2 and 3 cm apart, respectively, and 4.0+/-0.3 × 3.2+/-0.4 × 2.9+/-0.2 cm3 using two parallel applicators spaced 2 cm apart. Computational models indicate in vivo ablation zones up to 4.5 × 4.4 × 5.5 cm3 and 5.7 × 4.8 × 5.2 cm3, using three applicators spaced 2 and 3 cm apart, respectively. Converging and diverging implant patterns can also be employed for conformal ablation of irregularly-shaped tumor margins by tailoring power levels along each device. Simultaneously powered interstitial ultrasound devices can create tailored ablation zones comparable to currently available RF devices and similarly sized microwave antennas.

  18. Intrauterine contraception in nulliparous women: a prospective survey

    PubMed Central

    Kutler, Beth A

    2016-01-01

    Background Intrauterine contraception is a first-line option for young women, yet relatively few prospective studies have been performed in nulliparous women using currently available devices, and many providers are still reluctant to provide this option. Methods Between January 2012 and June 2014, 109 nulliparous women, aged 18–30 years, who had an intrauterine device (IUD) placed at a student health clinic [88 levonorgestrel-intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) users and 21 Cu T 380A (IUD) users] were surveyed at 1, 6, 12 and 18 months after insertion. Results Overall satisfaction was high; at follow-up survey 83% of 100 women (mean use 13.4 months) were ‘happy’ or ‘very happy’ with their IUD, and there were no differences in satisfaction between the two IUD types. Some 75% of participants stated that the insertion procedure went ‘very well’, despite 78% rating insertion pain as moderate to severe, and 46% experiencing vasovagal symptoms. The 12-month continuation rate was 89%, with discontinuations for expulsion (3%), side effects (6%), lack of anticipated benefit (1%) and pregnancy (1%). Users of the Cu T 380A were more likely to have heavy menses (74% vs 2%; p<0.0001) or moderate to severe cramping (68% vs 20%; p=0.0002) compared with LNG-IUS users. There were no uterine perforations or diagnoses of pelvic inflammatory disease. The rate of failed insertions during the study period was 6.2%. Conclusions Despite significant symptoms with insertion, intrauterine contraception is safe, effective and ultimately well tolerated in nulliparous women and should be provided to this population in both university and community health settings. PMID:25854550

  19. Orbital evidence for clay and acidic sulfate assemblages on Mars based on mineralogical analogs from Rio Tinto, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Hannah H.; Milliken, Ralph E.; Fernández-Remolar, David; Amils, Ricardo; Robertson, Kevin; Knoll, Andrew H.

    2016-09-01

    Outcrops of hydrated minerals are widespread across the surface of Mars, with clay minerals and sulfates being commonly identified phases. Orbitally-based reflectance spectra are often used to classify these hydrated components in terms of a single mineralogy, although most surfaces likely contain multiple minerals that have the potential to record local geochemical conditions and processes. Reflectance spectra for previously identified deposits in Ius and Melas Chasma within the Valles Marineris, Mars, exhibit an enigmatic feature with two distinct absorptions between 2.2 and 2.3 μm. This spectral 'doublet' feature is proposed to result from a mixture of hydrated minerals, although the identity of the minerals has remained ambiguous. Here we demonstrate that similar spectral doublet features are observed in airborne, field, and laboratory reflectance spectra of rock and sediment samples from Rio Tinto, Spain. Combined visible-near infrared reflectance spectra and X-ray diffraction measurements of these samples reveal that the doublet feature arises from a mixture of Al-phyllosilicate (illite or muscovite) and jarosite. Analyses of orbital data from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) shows that the martian spectral equivalents are also consistent with mixtures of Al-phyllosilicates and jarosite, where the Al-phyllosilicate may also include kaolinite and/or halloysite. A case study for a region within Ius Chasma demonstrates that the relative proportions of the Al-phyllosilicate(s) and jarosite vary within one stratigraphic unit as well as between stratigraphic units. The former observation suggests that the jarosite may be a diagenetic (authigenic) product and thus indicative of local pH and redox conditions, whereas the latter observation may be consistent with variations in sediment flux and/or fluid chemistry during sediment deposition.

  20. Knowledge and attitudes of Latin American obstetricians and gynecologists regarding intrauterine contraceptives

    PubMed Central

    Bahamondes, Luis; Makuch, Maria Y; Monteiro, Ilza; Marin, Victor; Lynen, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Background Intrauterine contraceptives (IUCs), including the copper intrauterine device and the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS), are among the reversible contraceptive methods with high effectiveness. However, use is low in many settings, including some Latin American countries, mainly due to the influences of myths, fears, and negative attitudes, not only of users and potential users, but also of different cadres of health care professionals. The purpose of this study was to assess the knowledge and attitudes of a group of Latin American obstetricians and gynecologists regarding IUCs. Methods A survey was conducted during a scientific meeting organized in Chile in 2014 to present and discuss updated information about contraception. Obstetricians and gynecologists from 12 Latin American countries, who reported that they provide daily contraception services in both the public and private sectors, participated in the meeting. Participants who agreed to take part in the survey responded to a multiple-choice questionnaire on issues regarding knowledge, use, and attitudes about IUCs. Results Of the 210 obstetricians and gynecologists participating in the meeting, the respondents to each question varied from 168 (80.0%) to 205 (97.6%). Almost 50% recognized that the failure rate of combined oral contraceptives, patches, and vaginal rings is 8%–10%. Furthermore, 10% of the participants did not recognize the high contraceptive effectiveness of long-acting reversible contraceptive methods. Additionally, almost 80% of the respondents answered that they did not offer IUCs to nulligravidas and almost 10% did not offer IUCs to adolescents, albeit almost 90% of the respondents reported that nulligravidas are candidates for an LNG-IUS. Conclusion Some deficiencies and contradictions in terms of knowledge and attitudes were identified from the answers of the Latin American obstetricians and gynecologists who participated in the survey. The knowledge and

  1. Reflectance Spectra Comparison of Orbital Debris, Intact Spacecraft, and Intact Rocket Bodies in the GEO Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albercromby, Kira J.; Abell, Paul; Barker, Ed

    2009-03-01

    A key objective of NASA's Orbital Debris program office at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is to characterize the debris environment by way of assessing the physical properties (type, mass, density, and size) of objects in orbit. Knowledge of the geosynchronous orbit (GEO) debris environment in particular can be used to determine the hazard probability at specific GEO altitudes and aid predictions of the future environment. To calculate an optical size from an intensity measurement of an object in the GEO regime, a 0.175 albedo is assumed currently. However, identification of specific material type or types could improve albedo accuracy and yield a more accurate size estimate for the debris piece. Using spectroscopy, it is possible to determine the surface materials of space objects. The study described herein used the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) to record spectral data in the ~ 0.65 to 2.5 micron regime on eight catalogued space objects. For comparison, all of the objects observed were in GEO or near-GEO. The eight objects consisted of two intact spacecraft, three rocket bodies, and three catalogued debris pieces. Two of the debris pieces stemmed from Titan 3C transtage breakup and the third is from COSMOS 2054. The reflectance spectra of the Titan 3C pieces share similar slopes (increasing with wavelength) and lack any strong absorption features. The COSMOS debris spectrum has a slight slope and has no absorption features. In contrast, the intact spacecraft show classic absorption features due to solar cells with a strong band gap feature near 1 micron. The two spacecraft were spin-stabilized objects and therefore have solar panels surrounding the outer surface. Two of the three rocket bodies are inertial upper stage (IUS) rocket bodies and have similar looking spectra. The slopes flatten out near 1.5 microns with absorption features in the near-infrared that are similar to that of white paint. The third rocket body has a similar flattening of slope but

  2. An evaluation of the 30-s chair stand test in older adults: frailty detection based on kinematic parameters from a single inertial unit

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A growing interest in frailty syndrome exists because it is regarded as a major predictor of co-morbidities and mortality in older populations. Nevertheless, frailty assessment has been controversial, particularly when identifying this syndrome in a community setting. Performance tests such as the 30-second chair stand test (30-s CST) are a cornerstone for detecting early declines in functional independence. Additionally, recent advances in body-fixed sensors have enhanced the sensors’ ability to automatically and accurately evaluate kinematic parameters related to a specific movement performance. The purpose of this study is to use this new technology to obtain kinematic parameters that can identify frailty in an aged population through the performance the 30-s CST. Methods Eighteen adults with a mean age of 54 years, as well as sixteen pre-frail and thirteen frail patients with mean ages of 78 and 85 years, respectively, performed the 30-s CST while threir trunk movements were measured by a sensor-unit at vertebra L3. Sit-stand-sit cycles were determined using both acceleration and orientation information to detect failed attempts. Movement-related phases (i.e. impulse, stand-up, and sit-down) were differentiated based on seat off and seat on events. Finally, the kinematic parameters of the impulse, stand-up and sit-down phases were obtained to identify potential differences across the three frailty groups. Results For the stand-up and sit-down phases, velocity peaks and “modified impulse” parameters clearly differentiated subjects with different frailty levels (p < 0.001). The trunk orientation range during the impulse phase was also able to classify a subject according to his frail syndrome (p < 0.001). Furthermore, these parameters derived from the inertial units (IUs) are sensitive enough to detect frailty differences not registered by the number of completed cycles which is the standard test outcome. Conclusions This study shows

  3. Reflectance Spectra Comparison of Orbital Debris, Intact Spacecraft, and Intact Rocket Bodies in the GEO Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, Ed; Abercromby, Kira J.; Abell, Paul

    2009-01-01

    A key objective of NASA s Orbital Debris program office at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is to characterize the debris environment by way of assessing the physical properties (type, mass, density, and size) of objects in orbit. Knowledge of the geosynchronous orbit (GEO) debris environment in particular can be used to determine the hazard probability at specific GEO altitudes and aid predictions of the future environment. To calculate an optical size from an intensity measurement of an object in the GEO regime, a 0.175 albedo is assumed currently. However, identification of specific material type or types could improve albedo accuracy and yield a more accurate size estimate for the debris piece. Using spectroscopy, it is possible to determine the surface materials of space objects. The study described herein used the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) to record spectral data in the 0.6 to 2.5 micron regime on eight catalogued space objects. For comparison, all of the objects observed were in GEO or near-GEO. The eight objects consisted of two intact spacecraft, three rocket bodies, and three catalogued debris pieces. Two of the debris pieces stemmed from Titan 3C transtage breakup and the third is from COSMOS 2054. The reflectance spectra of the Titan 3C pieces share similar slopes (increasing with wavelength) and lack any strong absorption features. The COSMOS debris spectra is flat and has no absorption features. In contrast, the intact spacecraft show classic absorption features due to solar panels with a strong band gap feature near 1 micron. The two spacecraft are spin-stabilized objects and therefore have solar panels surrounding the outer surface. Two of the three rocket bodies are inertial upper stage (IUS) rocket bodies and have similar looking spectra. The slopes flatten out near 1.5 microns with absorption features in the near-infrared that are similar to that of white paint. The third rocket body has a similar flattening of slope but with fewer

  4. Influence of Vitamin D Status and Vitamin D3 Supplementation on Genome Wide Expression of White Blood Cells: A Randomized Double-Blind Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hossein-nezhad, Arash; Spira, Avrum; Holick, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Although there have been numerous observations of vitamin D deficiency and its links to chronic diseases, no studies have reported on how vitamin D status and vitamin D3 supplementation affects broad gene expression in humans. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of vitamin D status and subsequent vitamin D supplementation on broad gene expression in healthy adults. (Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01696409). Methods and Findings A randomized, double-blind, single center pilot trial was conducted for comparing vitamin D supplementation with either 400 IUs (n = 3) or 2000 IUs (n = 5) vitamin D3 daily for 2 months on broad gene expression in the white blood cells collected from 8 healthy adults in the winter. Microarrays of the 16 buffy coats from eight subjects passed the quality control filters and normalized with the RMA method. Vitamin D3 supplementation that improved serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations was associated with at least a 1.5 fold alteration in the expression of 291 genes. There was a significant difference in the expression of 66 genes between subjects at baseline with vitamin D deficiency (25(OH)D<20 ng/ml) and subjects with a 25(OH)D>20 ng/ml. After vitamin D3 supplementation gene expression of these 66 genes was similar for both groups. Seventeen vitamin D-regulated genes with new candidate vitamin D response elements including TRIM27, CD83, COPB2, YRNA and CETN3 which have been shown to be important for transcriptional regulation, immune function, response to stress and DNA repair were identified. Conclusion/Significance Our data suggest that any improvement in vitamin D status will significantly affect expression of genes that have a wide variety of biologic functions of more than 160 pathways linked to cancer, autoimmune disorders and cardiovascular disease with have been associated with vitamin D deficiency. This study reveals for the first time molecular finger prints that help explain the

  5. Morphology, stratigraphy, and mineralogical composition of a layered formation covering the plateaus around Valles Marineris, Mars: Implications for its geological history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Deit, L.; Bourgeois, O.; Mège, D.; Hauber, E.; Le Mouélic, S.; Massé, M.; Jaumann, R.; Bibring, J.-P.

    2010-08-01

    An extensive layered formation covers the high plateaus around Valles Marineris. Mapping based on HiRISE, CTX and HRSC images reveals these layered deposits (LDs) crop out north of Tithonium Chasma, south of Ius Chasma, around West Candor Chasma, and southwest of Juventae Chasma and Ganges Chasma. The estimated area covered by LDs is ˜42,300 km 2. They consist of a series of alternating light and dark beds, a 100 m in total thickness that is covered by a dark unconsolidated mantle possibly resulting from their erosion. Their stratigraphic relationships with the plateaus and the Valles Marineris chasmata indicate that the LDs were deposited during the Early- to Late Hesperian, and possibly later depending on the region, before the end of the backwasting of the walls near Juventae Chasma, and probably before Louros Valles sapping near Ius Chasma. Their large spatial coverage and their location mainly on highly elevated plateaus lead us to conclude that LDs correspond to airfall dust and/or volcanic ash. The surface of LDs is characterized by various morphological features, including lobate ejecta and pedestal craters, polygonal fractures, valleys and sinuous ridges, and a pitted surface, which are all consistent with liquid water and/or water ice filling the pores of LDs. LDs were episodically eroded by fluvial processes and were possibly modified by sublimation processes. Considering that LDs correspond to dust and/or ash possibly mixed with ice particles in the past, LDs may be compared to Dissected Mantle Terrains currently observed in mid- to high latitudes on Mars, which correspond to a mantle of mixed dust and ice that is partially or totally dissected by sublimation. The analysis of CRISM and OMEGA hyperspectral data indicates that the basal layer of LDs near Ganges Chasma exhibits spectra with absorption bands at ˜1.4 μm, and ˜1.9 μm and a large deep band between ˜2.21 and ˜2.26 μm that are consistent with previous spectral analysis in other regions

  6. The combined GnRH-agonist and intrauterine levonorgestrel-releasing system treatment of complicated atypical hyperplasia and endometrial cancer: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Pashov, Alexandr I; Tskhay, Vitaly B; Ionouchene, Svetlana V

    2012-07-01

    In this article, we present the results of organ-preserving treatment applied in 24 patients of reproductive age with atypical endometrial hyperplasia or early-stage endometrial cancer. All of them would like to preserve their reproductive potential. Thirteen women with atypical endometrial hyperplasia were treated with the combination of six intramuscular injections of 3.75 mg gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa)--leuproreline acetate depot every 4 weeks. After the third injection of 3.75 mg of leuproreline acetate, the levonorgestrel intrauterine hormonal system containing 52 mg levonorgestrel (Mirena®, Bayer, Germany) was inserted for at least 6 months. In 11 women with stage IA well-differentiated endometrial adenocarcinoma, hormonal therapy included nine intramuscular injections of 3.75 mg of GnRHa every 4 weeks. After the third injection of 3.75 mg of GnRHa, we also inserted a GnRH-IUS (Mirena®) for at least 12 months. This type of therapy was effective for all these patients and may be offered to be used as an alternative to surgery in women with atypical endometrial hyperplasia or early stage 1A well-differentiated endometrial cancer in women of reproductive age. Three women with endometrial cancer became pregnant and two of them delivered at term and one has an ongoing pregnancy.

  7. Droplet Size and Liquid Water Characteristics of the USAAEFA (CH-47) Helicopter Spray System and Natural Clouds as Sampled by a JUH-1H Helicopter.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    2 AF +n7 u*rL-nl I.1521nI 5. 32. 30 *2eiuE+07 *Q’J7L,(’b *’J02L>01 *13𔃻E- P1 S. 4J3. 33 .22E#)7 *773F*Ot . a 3ft-o I . Ius[ -f0I 5.*1 3o .11IE4(𔄁...P + t .30f -n I . 13 0 F- 01 a.64. 6 0 *3 92 E + .19 bF # 5 . ail 3F-0 1 .2211-n2 5. b9. 81itt+ 3e 64#a .363E-01 8l2f -02 4. 73. 100 A* P1 4 5 . 4 3’*1...MASSG(’-1) FAASS(GM-3J-1 PERCLNI cum PjwctfNI 3 .244JE+08 .(413f*07 .IUSF-cs �F-03 0. 0, Illf +0Q .34ts *0’.950f - P1 .1501-01 s. it. t’Q4L+*0m .?Ib

  8. Sniff and mimic - Intranasal oxytocin increases facial mimicry in a sample of men.

    PubMed

    Korb, Sebastian; Malsert, Jennifer; Strathearn, Lane; Vuilleumier, Patrik; Niedenthal, Paula

    2016-08-01

    The neuropeptide oxytocin (OT) has many potential social benefits. For example, intranasal administration of OT appears to trigger caregiving behavior and to improve the recognition of emotional facial expressions. But the mechanism for these effects is not yet clear. Recent findings relating OT to action imitation and to the visual processing of the eye region of faces point to mimicry as a mechanism through which OT improves processing of emotional expression. To test the hypothesis that increased levels of OT in the brain enhance facial mimicry, 60 healthy male participants were administered, in a double-blind between-subjects design, 24 international units (IUs) of OT or placebo (PLA) through nasal spray. Facial mimicry and emotion judgments were recorded in response to movie clips depicting changing facial expressions. As expected, facial mimicry was increased in the OT group, but effects were strongest for angry infant faces. These findings provide further evidence for the importance of OT in social cognitive skills, and suggest that facial mimicry mediates the effects of OT on improved emotion recognition.

  9. The past and present role of the Sabin-Feldman dye test in the serodiagnosis of toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed Central

    Reiter-Owona, I.; Petersen, E.; Joynson, D.; Aspöck, H.; Dardé, M. L.; Disko, R.; Dreazen, O.; Dumon, H.; Grillo, R.; Gross, U.; Hayde, M.; Holliman, R.; Ho-Yen, D. O.; Janitschke, K.; Jenum, P. A.; Naser, K.; Olszewski, M.; Thulliez, P.; Seitz, H. M.

    1999-01-01

    The dye test for the detection of Toxoplasma-specific antibodies was first described by Sabin and Feldman 50 years ago. The test is highly specific and sensitive and considerable information is available on the development and persistence of dye test antibodies after primary Toxoplasma infection. However, the test uses live Toxoplasma gondii and is now only employed in a few laboratories. It is still the reference method for the serodiagnosis of toxoplasmosis, and a multicentre study comparing dye test results between different laboratories was much needed. We report in this article the results of a multicentre evaluation of the test involving nineteen laboratories in eight countries. The study revealed overall satisfactory standardization between the laboratories, but there were differences in the test protocols, the use of reference/standard preparations and the interpretation of results. There is still no agreement on the level of dye test values which reflect infection with the parasite, and conversion from titres to international units (IUs) did not improve standardization. However, the results indicated that a value of > 4 IU or a titre of 1:16 met the definition of positivity of most participants. We recommend that the dye test be retained as a reference method and that interlaboratory standardization be improved by the use of a common protocol and the expression of results in titres. PMID:10612889

  10. STS-41 Space Shuttle mission report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camp, David W.; Germany, D. M.; Nicholson, Leonard S.

    1990-01-01

    The STS-41 Space Shuttle Program Mission Report contains a summary of the vehicle subsystem activities on this thirty-sixth flight of the Space Shuttle and the eleventh flight of the Orbiter vehicle, Discovery (OV-103). In addition to the Discovery vehicle, the flight vehicle consisted of an External Tank (ET) (designated as ET-39/LWT-32), three Space Shuttle main engines (SSME's) (serial numbers 2011, 2031, and 2107), and two Solid Rocket Boosters (SRB's), designated as BI-040. The primary objective of the STS-41 mission was to successfully deploy the Ulysses/inertial upper stage (IUS)/payload assist module (PAM-S) spacecraft. The secondary objectives were to perform all operations necessary to support the requirements of the Shuttle Backscatter Ultraviolet (SSBUV) Spectrometer, Solid Surface Combustion Experiment (SSCE), Space Life Sciences Training Program Chromosome and Plant Cell Division in Space (CHROMEX), Voice Command System (VCS), Physiological Systems Experiment (PSE), Radiation Monitoring Experiment - 3 (RME-3), Investigations into Polymer Membrane Processing (IPMP), Air Force Maui Optical Calibration Test (AMOS), and Intelsat Solar Array Coupon (ISAC) payloads. The sequence of events for this mission is shown in tabular form. Summarized are the significant problems that occurred in the Orbiter subsystems during the mission. The official problem tracking list is presented. In addition, each Orbiter problem is cited in the subsystem discussion.

  11. Materials, Processes and Manufacturing in Ares 1 Upper Stage: Integration with Systems Design and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.

    2008-01-01

    Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle Upper Stage is designed and developed based on sound systems engineering principles. Systems Engineering starts with Concept of Operations and Mission requirements, which in turn determine the launch system architecture and its performance requirements. The Ares I-Upper Stage is designed and developed to meet these requirements. Designers depend on the support from materials, processes and manufacturing during the design, development and verification of subsystems and components. The requirements relative to reliability, safety, operability and availability are also dependent on materials availability, characterization, process maturation and vendor support. This paper discusses the roles and responsibilities of materials and manufacturing engineering during the various phases of Ares IUS development, including design and analysis, hardware development, test and verification. Emphasis is placed how materials, processes and manufacturing support is integrated over the Upper Stage Project, both horizontally and vertically. In addition, the paper describes the approach used to ensure compliance with materials, processes, and manufacturing requirements during the project cycle, with focus on hardware systems design and development.

  12. Drift-free position estimation for periodic movements using inertial units.

    PubMed

    Millor, Nora; Lecumberri, Pablo; Gomez, Marisol; Martinez-Ramirez, Alicia; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2014-07-01

    Latest advances in microelectromechanical systems have made inertial units (IUs) a powerful tool for human motion analysis. However, difficulties in handling their output signals must be overcome. The purpose of this study was to develop the novel "PB-algorithm" based on polynomial data fitting, splines interpolation, and the wavelet transform, one after the other, to cancel drift disturbances in position estimation for periodic movements. High-accuracy position measurements from an optical system (Vicon Nexus 1.0) were used to validate the proposed method and comparison with another drift-correction algorithm was provided. Results indicate the accuracy with respect to the Vicon's reference signal (euclidean error lower than 54.62 × 10(-3) m and correlation coefficient higher than 0.968). A reduction of the root-mean-square error of 68.74% was obtained when the proposed two-step method was compared with a modified-band limited Fourier linear combiner. All methods were applied to data from the 30-s chair stand test, which is one of the most used clinical tests dealing with lower body strength assessment, falls prediction, and gait disorders in older adults. The relevance of this study is that after cancelling drift disturbances, and obtaining an accurate Z-position estimation, it is possible to evaluate the sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit transitions from the whole test.

  13. Final safety analysis report for the Galileo Mission: Volume 1, Reference design document

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    The Galileo mission uses nuclear power sources called Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) to provide the spacecraft's primary electrical power. Because these generators contain nuclear material, a Safety Analysis Report (SAR) is required. A preliminary SAR and an updated SAR were previously issued that provided an evolving status report on the safety analysis. As a result of the Challenger accident, the launch dates for both Galileo and Ulysses missions were later rescheduled for November 1989 and October 1990, respectively. The decision was made by agreement between the DOE and the NASA to have a revised safety evaluation and report (FSAR) prepared on the basis of these revised vehicle accidents and environments. The results of this latest revised safety evaluation are presented in this document (Galileo FSAR). Volume I, this document, provides the background design information required to understand the analyses presented in Volumes II and III. It contains descriptions of the RTGs, the Galileo spacecraft, the Space Shuttle, the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS), the trajectory and flight characteristics including flight contingency modes, and the launch site. There are two appendices in Volume I which provide detailed material properties for the RTG.

  14. Draft environmental impact statement for the Galileo Mission (Tier 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) addresses the environmental impacts which may be caused by the preparation and operation of the Galileo spacecraft, including its planned launch on the Space Transportation System (STS) Shuttle and the alternative of canceling further work on the mission. The launch configuration will use the STS/Inertial Upper Stage (IUS)/Payload Assist Module-Special (PAM-S) combination. The Tier 1 EIS included a delay alternative which considered the Titan 4 launch vehicle as an alternative booster stage for launch in 1991 or later. However, the U.S. Air Force, which procures the Titan 4 for NASA, could not provide a Titan 4 vehicle for the 1991 launch opportunity because of high priority Department of Defense requirements. The only expected environmental effects of the proposed action are associated with normal Shuttle launch operations. These impacts are limited largely to the near-field at the launch pad, except for temporary stratospheric ozone effects during launch and occasional sonic boom effects near the landing site. These effects have been judged insufficient to preclude Shuttle launches. In the event of: (1) an accident during launch, or (2) reentry of the spacecraft from earth orbit, there are potential adverse health and environmental effects associated with the possible release of plutonium dioxide from the spacecraft's radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG).

  15. Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Galileo Mission (Tier 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) addresses the proposed action of completing the preparation and operation of the Galileo spacecraft, including its planned launch on the Space Transportation System (STS) Shuttle in October 1989, and the alternative of canceling further work on the mission. The Tier 1 (program level) EIS (NASA 1988a) considered the Titan IV launch vehicle as an alternative booster stage for launch in May 1991 or later. The May 1991 Venus launch opportunity is considered a planetary back-up for the Magellan (Venus Radar Mapper) mission, the Galileo mission, and the Ulysses mission. Plans were underway to enable the use of a Titan IV launch vehicle for the planetary back-up. However, in November 1988, the U.S. Air Force, which procures the Titan IV for NASA, notified NASA that it could not provide a Titan IV vehicle for the May 1991 launch opportunity due to high priority Department of Defense requirements. Consequently, NASA terminated all mission planning for the Titan IV planetary back-up. A minimum of 3 years is required to implement mission-specific modifications to the basic Titan IV launch configuration; therefore, insufficient time is available to use a Titan IV vehicle in May 1991. Thus, the Titan IV launch vehicle is no longer a feasible alternative to the STS/Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) for the May 1991 launch opportunity.

  16. Euthanasia of companion animals: a legal and ethical analysis.

    PubMed

    Passantino, Annamaria; Fenga, Carmela; Morciano, Cristina; Morelli, Chiara; Russo, Maria; Di Pietro, Carlotta; Passantino, Michele

    2006-01-01

    In Italy, the conditions under which euthanasia of small pets is justified are only partially regulated by law n. 281/1991, article 2 n. 6 and 9, by the later Ministry Circular n. 9 made on 10/03/1992 and by law n. 189/2004. Law n. 281/1991, besides delegating the job of birth control in cat and dog populations to the regions, has made it statutory that stray dogs may only be euthanised when they are 'seriously or incurably ill or proven to be dangerous'. The Ministry Circular underlines the fact that 'euthanasia of dogs is prohibited except in special justified cases'. On the other hand, due to the legal classification of animals as property, the owner has the right of ownership over his animal so that he can sell it and kill it (ius vitae ac necis). In this view a request for euthanasia is licit, whatever the animal's state of health may be. The authors feel that further legislation to regulate the question more completely would be opportune and thus they analyse the problems of legal-ethics and public health that a veterinarian faces when carrying out euthanasia, also bearing in mind the laws and codes of professional ethics. They suggest possible solutions which could be adopted by the competent authorities.

  17. STS-93: Crew Interview - Steve Hawley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley is presented. The interview addresses many different questions including why Hawley wanted to be an astronaut, his career path, and how this historic flight (first female Commander of a mission) draws attention from the media. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is the deployment of the Chandra satellite, why people care about x ray energy, whether or not Chandra will compliment the other X Ray Observatories currently in operation, and his responsibilities during the major events of this mission. Hawley mentions the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) rocket that will deployed the Chandra Telescope, and the design configuration of Chandra to gather and transfer information. The Southwest Research Ultraviolet Imaging System (SWUIS) Telescope on board Columbia, the Plant Growth Investigation in Microgravity (PGIM) and Gelation of Sols: Applied Microgravity Research (GOSAMR) experiments, and the two observatories presently in orbit (Gamma Ray Observatory, and Hubble Space Telescope) are also discussed.

  18. STS-44 Space Shuttle mission report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fricke, Robert W.

    1992-01-01

    The STS-44 Space Shuttle Program Mission Report is a summary of the vehicle subsystem operations during the forty-fourth flight of the Space Shuttle Program and the tenth flight of the Orbiter vehicle Atlantis (OV-104). In addition to the Atlantis vehicle, the flight vehicle consisted of the following: an External Tank (ET) designated as ET-53 (LWT-46); three Space Shuttle main engines (SSME's) (serial numbers 2015, 2030, and 2029 in positions 1, 2, and 3, respectively); and two Solid Rocket Boosters (SRB's) designated as BI-047. The lightweight redesigned Solid Rocket Motors (RSRM's) installed in each one of the SRB's were designated as 360L019A for the left SRB and 360W019B for the right SRB. The primary objective of the STS-44 mission was to successfully deploy the Department of Defense (DOD) Defense Support Program (DSP) satellite/inertial upper stage (IUS) into a 195 nmi. earth orbit at an inclination of 28.45 deg. Secondary objectives of this flight were to perform all operations necessary to support the requirements of the following: Terra Scout, Military Man in Space (M88-1), Air Force Maui Optical System Calibration Test (AMOS), Cosmic Radiation Effects and Activation Monitor (CREAM), Shuttle Activation Monitor (SAM), Radiation Monitoring Equipment-3 (RME-3), Visual Function Tester-1 (VFT-1), and the Interim Operational Contamination Monitor (IOCM) secondary payloads/experiments.

  19. Spacecraft environmental interactions: A joint Air Force and NASA research and technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, C. P.; Purvis, C. K.; Hudson, W. R.

    1985-01-01

    A joint Air Force/NASA comprehensive research and technology program on spacecraft environmental interactions to develop technology to control interactions between large spacecraft systems and the charged-particle environment of space is described. This technology will support NASA/Department of Defense operations of the shuttle/IUS, shuttle/Centaur, and the force application and surveillance and detection missions, planning for transatmospheric vehicles and the NASA space station, and the AFSC military space system technology model. The program consists of combined contractual and in-house efforts aimed at understanding spacecraft environmental interaction phenomena and relating results of ground-based tests to space conditions. A concerted effort is being made to identify project-related environmental interactions of concern. The basic properties of materials are being investigated to develop or modify the materials as needed. A group simulation investigation is evaluating basic plasma interaction phenomena to provide inputs to the analytical modeling investigation. Systems performance is being evaluated by both groundbased tests and analysis.

  20. Satellite operations support expert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The Satellite Operations Support Expert System is an effort to identify aspects of satellite ground support activity which could profitably be automated with artificial intelligence (AI) and to develop a feasibility demonstration for the automation of one such area. The hydrazine propulsion subsystems (HPS) of the International Sun Earth Explorer (ISEE) and the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUS) were used as applications domains. A demonstration fault handling system was built. The system was written in Franz Lisp and is currently hosted on a VAX 11/750-11/780 family machine. The system allows the user to select which HPS (either from ISEE or IUE) is used. Then the user chooses the fault desired for the run. The demonstration system generates telemetry corresponding to the particular fault. The completely separate fault handling module then uses this telemetry to determine what and where the fault is and how to work around it. Graphics are used to depict the structure of the HPS, and the telemetry values displayed on the screen are continually updated. The capabilities of this system and its development cycle are described.

  1. Modeling of Landslides in Valles Marineris, Mars, and Implications for Initiation Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsige, Meaza; Ruiz, Javier; del Río, Ian A.; Jiménez-Díaz, Alberto

    2016-06-01

    The Valles Marineris canyon system in Mars shows large landslides across its walls, which can be 40 km wide and up to 60 km long, with fall scarps height as high as 7 km. These landslides were produced through a large mass movement at high speed by gravity across the trough floor. Although the triggering factors are unclear, several mechanisms have been proposed as, among others, large amounts of subsurface water, quake produced through normal faulting close to the canyon walls, and meteoritic impacts. In this work we examine the limit equilibrium slope stability of three landslides (placed respectively at Ius, Candor, and Melas Chasmata), which can be considered representative, with the aims of constraining their formation conditions. Our results suggest that external factors (as high pore fluid pressure, seismic loading or rock mass disturbance) do not seem necessary for the failure of slopes if they are composed of unconsolidated materials, while high pore water pressure or ground acceleration are needed to trigger slides in slopes composed of strong basaltic-like materials. Moreover, the presence of sub-surface ice would contribute to slope stability. As a whole, our findings point to ground shaking due to meteorite impacts as the main triggering force for most landslides in the Valles Marineris.

  2. Shuttle Enterprise Mated to 747 SCA for Delivery to Smithsonian

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary

  3. STS-35 Leaves Dryden on 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft (SCA) Bound for Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the Shuttles. Now Kennedy Space Center, Florida, is the primary landing site with Dryden remaining as the principal alternate landing site.

  4. Enabling Field Experiences in Introductory Geoscience Classes through the Use of Immersive Virtual Reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moysey, S. M.; Smith, E.; Sellers, V.; Wyant, P.; Boyer, D. M.; Mobley, C.; Brame, S.

    2015-12-01

    Although field experiences are an important aspect of geoscience education, the opportunity to provide physical world experiences to large groups of introductory students is often limited by access, logistical, and financial constraints. Our project (NSF IUSE 1504619) is investigating the use of immersive virtual reality (VR) technologies as a surrogate for real field experiences in introductory geosciences classes. We are developing a toolbox that leverages innovations in the field of VR, including the Oculus Rift and Google Cardboard, to enable every student in an introductory geology classroom the opportunity to have a first-person virtual field experience in the Grand Canyon. We have opted to structure our VR experience as an interactive game where students must explore the Canyon to accomplish a series of tasks designed to emphasize key aspects of geoscience learning. So far we have produced two demo products for the virtual field trip. The first is a standalone "Rock Box" app developed for the iPhone, which allows students to select different rock samples, examine them in 3D, and obtain basic information about the properties of each sample. The app can act as a supplement to the traditional rock box used in physical geology labs. The second product is a fully functioning VR environment for the Grand Canyon developed using satellite-based topographic and imagery data to retain real geologic features within the experience. Players can freely navigate to explore anywhere they desire within the Canyon, but are guided to points of interest where they are able to complete exercises that will be aligned with specific learning goals. To this point we have integrated elements of the "Rock Box" app within the VR environment, allowing players to examine 3D details of rock samples they encounter within the Grand Canyon. We plan to provide demos of both products and obtain user feedback during our presentation.

  5. One million cubic kilometers of fossil ice in Valles Marineris: Relicts of a 3.5 Gy old glacial landsystem along the Martian equator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourronc, Marine; Bourgeois, Olivier; Mège, Daniel; Pochat, Stéphane; Bultel, Benjamin; Massé, Marion; Le Deit, Laetitia; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Mercier, Denis

    2014-01-01

    Self-consistent landform assemblages suggest that Valles Marineris, the giant valley system that stretches along the Martian equator, was entirely glaciated during Late Noachian to Early Hesperian times and still contains huge volumes of fossil ice. Some of these glacial landform assemblages are illustrated here, with representative examples selected in three regions: Ius Chasma, Central Candor Chasma and the junction between Coprates Chasma and Capri Chasma. A morphological boundary separating an upper spur-and-gully morphology from a smooth basal escarpment has been spectacularly preserved along valley walls throughout Valles Marineris. The boundary winds around topographic obstacles and displays long-wavelength variations in elevation. It is associated with lateral benches, hanging valleys and truncated spurs. Comparisons with terrestrial analogs indicate that it is most reasonably interpreted as a glacial trimline. Chasma floors are covered by various kinds of terrains, including hummocky terrains, platy terrains, lateral banks, layered benches and a draping mantle. Landforms in these terrains and their spatial relationship with the interpreted trimline suggest that they correspond to various disintegration stages of an ancient glacial fill, currently protected by a superficial cover of ablation till. Altogether, these landforms and terrains compose a full glacial landsystem with wet-based glaciers that were able to flow and slide over their beds. It was most probably fed by ice accumulating at low elevations directly from the atmosphere onto valley floors and walls, with only minor contributions from tributary glaciers flowing down from higher elevations. Similar fossil glacial landsystems dating back from the early Martian history are to be expected in many other low-latitude troughs such as chasmata, chaos, valleys, impact craters and other basins.

  6. Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Ulysses Mission (Tier 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) addresses the environmental impacts which may be caused by the preparation and operation of the Ulysses spacecraft, including its planned launch on the Space Transportation System (STS) Shuttle and the alternative of canceling further work on the mission. The launch configuration will use the STS/Inertial Upper Stage (IUS)/Payload Assist Module-Special(PAM-S) combination. The Tier 1 EIS included a delay alternative which considered the Titan 4 launch vehicle as an alternative booster stage for launch in 1991 or later. However, the U.S. Air Force, which procures the Titan 4 for NASA, could not provide a Titan 4 vehicle for the 1991 launch opportunity because of high priority Department of Defense requirements. The only expected environmental effects of the proposed action are associated with normal Shuttle launch operations. These impacts are limited largely to the near-field at the launch pad, except for temporary stratospheric ozone effects during launch and occasional sonic boom effects near the landing site. These effects have been judged insufficient to preclude Shuttle launches. In the event of (1) an accident during launch, or (2) reentry of the spacecraft from earth orbit, there are potential adverse health and environmental effects associated with the possible release of plutonium dioxide from the spacecraft's radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG). The potential effects considered in this EIS include risks of air and water quality impacts, local land area contamination, adverse health and safety impacts, the disturbance of biotic resources, impacts on wetland areas or areas containing historical sites, and socioeconomic impacts. Intensive analysis of the possible accidents associated with the proposed action are underway and preliminary results indicate small health or environmental risks. The results of a Final Safety Analysis Report will be available for inclusion into the final EIS.

  7. Final safety analysis report for the Galileo Mission: Volume 2: Book 1, Accident model document

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-15

    The Accident Model Document (AMD) is the second volume of the three volume Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) for the Galileo outer planetary space science mission. This mission employs Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) as the prime electrical power sources for the spacecraft. Galileo will be launched into Earth orbit using the Space Shuttle and will use the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) booster to place the spacecraft into an Earth escape trajectory. The RTG's employ silicon-germanium thermoelectric couples to produce electricity from the heat energy that results from the decay of the radioisotope fuel, Plutonium-238, used in the RTG heat source. The heat source configuration used in the RTG's is termed General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS), and the RTG's are designated GPHS-RTGs. The use of radioactive material in these missions necessitates evaluations of the radiological risks that may be encountered by launch complex personnel as well as by the Earth's general population resulting from postulated malfunctions or failures occurring in the mission operations. The FSAR presents the results of a rigorous safety assessment, including substantial analyses and testing, of the launch and deployment of the RTGs for the Galileo mission. This AMD is a summary of the potential accident and failure sequences which might result in fuel release, the analysis and testing methods employed, and the predicted source terms. Each source term consists of a quantity of fuel released, the location of release and the physical characteristics of the fuel released. Each source term has an associated probability of occurrence. 27 figs., 11 tabs.

  8. An integrated model-based neurosurgical guidance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Songbai; Fan, Xiaoyao; Fontaine, Kathryn; Hartov, Alex; Roberts, David; Paulsen, Keith

    2010-02-01

    Maximal tumor resection without damaging healthy tissue in open cranial surgeries is critical to the prognosis for patients with brain cancers. Preoperative images (e.g., preoperative magnetic resonance images (pMR)) are typically used for surgical planning as well as for intraoperative image-guidance. However, brain shift even at the start of surgery significantly compromises the accuracy of neuronavigation, if the deformation is not compensated for. Compensating for brain shift during surgical operation is, therefore, critical for improving the accuracy of image-guidance and ultimately, the accuracy of surgery. To this end, we have developed an integrated neurosurgical guidance system that incorporates intraoperative three-dimensional (3D) tracking, acquisition of volumetric true 3D ultrasound (iUS), stereovision (iSV) and computational modeling to efficiently generate model-updated MR image volumes for neurosurgical guidance. The system is implemented with real-time Labview to provide high efficiency in data acquisition as well as with Matlab to offer computational convenience in data processing and development of graphical user interfaces related to computational modeling. In a typical patient case, the patient in the operating room (OR) is first registered to pMR image volume. Sparse displacement data extracted from coregistered intraoperative US and/or stereovision images are employed to guide a computational model that is based on consolidation theory. Computed whole-brain deformation is then used to generate a model-updated MR image volume for subsequent surgical guidance. In this paper, we present the key modular components of our integrated, model-based neurosurgical guidance system.

  9. Graphical user interfaces for simulation of brain deformation in image-guided neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaoyao; Ji, Songbai; Valdes, Pablo; Roberts, David W.; Hartov, Alex; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2010-02-01

    In image-guided neurosurgery, preoperative images are typically used for surgical planning and intraoperative guidance. The accuracy of preoperative images can be significantly compromised by intraoperative brain deformation. To compensate for brain shift, biomechanical finite element models have been used to assimilate intraoperative data to simulate brain deformation. The clinical feasibility of the approach strongly depends on its accuracy and efficiency. In order to facilitate and streamline data flow, we have developed graphical user interfaces (GUIs) to provide efficient image updates in the operating room (OR). The GUIs are organized in a top-down hierarchy with a main control panel that invokes and monitors a series of sub-GUIs dedicated to perform tasks involved in various aspects of computations of whole-brain deformation. These GUIs are used to segment brain, generate case-specific brain meshes, and assign and visualize case-specific boundary conditions (BC). Registration between intraoperative ultrasound (iUS) images acquired pre- and post-durotomy is also facilitated by a dedicated GUI to extract sparse displacement data used to drive a biomechanical model. Computed whole-brain deformation is then used to morph preoperative MR images (pMR) to generate a model-updated image set (i.e., uMR) for intraoperative guidance (accuracy of 1-2 mm). These task-driven GUIs have been designed to be fault-tolerant, user-friendly, and with sufficient automation. In this paper, we present the modular components of the GUIs and demonstrate the typical workflow through a clinical patient case.

  10. Automatizuotas hidrografijos kanalų išskyrimas lietuvos georeferencinio pagrindo duomenų bazėje

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryžanauskas, Audrius; Motiejauskas, Danas

    2010-01-01

    Vykdant georeferencinių duomenų bazės GDB10LT atnaujinimo darbus, linijiniai hidrografiniai objektai buvo skirstomi į tipus: upė, kanalas, griovys. Upės ir upeliai duomenų rinkinyje yra visi objektai, turintys pavadinimus. Kanalo ir griovio tipai išskiriami remiantis šių objektų apibrėžimu LR aplinkos ministro įsakyme. Duomenų prasme kanalų samparata buvo suformuluota kaip atkarpų, kuriomis galima sujungti du hidrografinius objektus, turinčius pavadinimus (upės, upeliai, ežerai), rinkinys. Tokių atkarpų išskyrimą atliekant rankiniu būdu, visoje Lietuvos teritorijoje reikalingos didelės darbo sąnaudos, be to, galima palikti klaidų dėl neatidumo, kurias sunku patikrinti. Kanalų išskyrimas atliktas automatizuotai, grindžiant grafų analize ir specifiniu tinklo jungumo skaičiavimo algoritmu. Buvo išskiriami potencialūs kanalų įtekėjimo į kitus telkinius ta\\vskai bei skaičiuojamos visos galimos jungtys tarp šių ta\\vskų - tai ir buvo ie\\vskomieji kanalai. Straipsnyje išsamiau aptariami su duomenų specifika ir grafų analize susiję klausimai, taip pat kanalų išskyrimo klausimai, padedantys identifikuoti duomenų kokybės problemas.

  11. STS-70 Space Shuttle Mission Report - September 1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fricke, Robert W., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The STS-70 Space Shuttle Program Mission Report summarizes the Payload activities as well as the Orbiter, External Tank (ET), Solid Rocket Booster (SRB), Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM), and the Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) systems performance during the seventieth flight of the Space Shuttle Program, the forty-fifth flight since the return-to-flight, and the twenty-first flight of the Orbiter Discovery (OV-103). In addition to the Orbiter, the flight vehicle consisted of an ET that was designated ET-71; three SSMEs that were designated as serial numbers 2036, 2019, and 2017 in positions 1, 2, and 3, respectively; and two SRBs that were designated 81-073. The RSRMs, designated RSRM-44, were installed in each SRB and were designated as 36OL044A for the left SRB, and 36OL044B for the right SRB. The primary objective of this flight was to deploy the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite-G/Inertial Upper Stage (TDRS-G/IUS). The secondary objectives were to fulfill the requirements of the Physiological and Anatomical Rodent Experiment/National Institutes of Health-Rodents (PARE/NIH-R); Bioreactor Demonstration System (BDS); Commercial Protein Crystal Growth (CPCG) experiment; Space Tissue Loss/National Institutes of Health - Cells (STL/NIH-C) experiment; Biological Research in Canisters (BRIC) experiment; Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment-2 (SAREX-2); Visual Function Tester-4 (VFT-4); Hand-Held, Earth-Oriented, Real-Time, Cooperative, User-Friendly Location-Targeting and Environmental System (HERCULES); Microencapsulation in Space-B (MIS-B) experiment; Window Experiment (WINDEX); Radiation Monitoring Equipment-3 (RME-3); and the Military Applications of Ship Tracks (MAST) payload.

  12. High Estradiol Concentrations Induce Heat Shock Protein 70 Expression and Suppress Nuclear Factor Kappa B Activation in Human Endometrial Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chin-Der; Chen, Shee-Uan; Chou, Chia-Hung; Chen, Mei-Jou; Wen, Wen-Fen; Wu, Szu-Yuan; Yang, Yu-Shih; Yang, Jehn-Hsiahn

    2016-09-07

    The high serum estradiol (E2) concentrations induced during in vitro fertilization are detrimental to endometrial receptivity and may result in lower embryo implantation rates. We have previously found that high E2 concentrations inhibit the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B), which led to endometrial epithelial cells (EECs) apoptosis. The objective of this study is to investigate the signaling pathways through which high E2 results in NF-kappa B downregulation in EECs. Isolated human EECs were cultured in different concentrations of E2 (10(-10), 10(-9), 10(-8), 10(-7) M). The expression of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and heat shock factor 1 (HSF-1) were upregulated under supraphysiological E2 (10(-7) M) concentration, whereas phosphorylated inhibitory kappa B-alpha (pI kappa B-alpha) and NF-kappa B p65 subunits were downregulated. Immunohistochemistry of C57BL/6 mouse EECs, that were exposed in vivo to high serum E2 from the administration of 20 IUs of equine chorionic gonadotropin, also demonstrated the same increase in HSF-1 and Hsp70 expression, and decrease in NF-kappa B. Immunoprecipitation of the induced Hsp70 proteins was achieved with the addition of inhibitory kappa B kinase gamma (IKK-gamma) antibodies, and elimination of this reaction occurred after addition of hsp70 siRNA. In conclusion, high E2 concentrations enhance HSF-1 and Hsp70 expression in EECs. The induced Hsp70 forms a complex with IKK-gamma and inhibits pI kappa B-alpha, which consequently suppresses NF-kappa B activation.

  13. Thin-skinned deformation of sedimentary rocks in Valles Marineris, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metz, Joannah; Grotzinger, John; Okubo, Chris; Milliken, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Deformation of sedimentary rocks is widespread within Valles Marineris, characterized by both plastic and brittle deformation identified in Candor, Melas, and Ius Chasmata. We identified four deformation styles using HiRISE and CTX images: kilometer-scale convolute folds, detached slabs, folded strata, and pull-apart structures. Convolute folds are detached rounded slabs of material with alternating dark- and light-toned strata and a fold wavelength of about 1 km. The detached slabs are isolated rounded blocks of material, but they exhibit only highly localized evidence of stratification. Folded strata are composed of continuously folded layers that are not detached. Pull-apart structures are composed of stratified rock that has broken off into small irregularly shaped pieces showing evidence of brittle deformation. Some areas exhibit multiple styles of deformation and grade from one type of deformation into another. The deformed rocks are observed over thousands of kilometers, are limited to discrete stratigraphic intervals, and occur over a wide range in elevations. All deformation styles appear to be of likely thin-skinned origin. CRISM reflectance spectra show that some of the deformed sediments contain a component of monohydrated and polyhydrated sulfates. Several mechanisms could be responsible for the deformation of sedimentary rocks in Valles Marineris, such as subaerial or subaqueous gravitational slumping or sliding and soft sediment deformation, where the latter could include impact-induced or seismically induced liquefaction. These mechanisms are evaluated based on their expected pattern, scale, and areal extent of deformation. Deformation produced from slow subaerial or subaqueous landsliding and liquefaction is consistent with the deformation observed in Valles Marineris.

  14. Ocean Tracks: College Edition - Promoting Data Literacy in Science Education at the Undergraduate Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochevar, R. E.; Krumhansl, R.; Louie, J.; Aluwihare, L.; Bardar, E. W.; Hirsch, L.; Hoyle, C.; Krumhansl, K.; Madura, J.; Mueller-Northcott, J.; Peach, C. L.; Trujillo, A.; Winney, B.; Zetterlind, V.

    2015-12-01

    Ocean Tracks is a Web-based interactive learning experience which allows users to explore the migrations of marine apex predators, and the way their behaviors relate to the physical and chemical environment surrounding them. Ocean Tracks provides access to data from the Tagging of Pelagic Predators (TOPP) program, NOAA's Global Drifter Program, and Earth-orbiting satellites via the Ocean Tracks interactive map interface; customized data analysis tools; multimedia supports; along with laboratory modules customized for undergraduate student use. It is part of a broader portfolio of projects comprising the Oceans of Data Institute, dedicated to transforming education to prepare citizens for a data-intensive world. Although originally developed for use in high school science classrooms, the Ocean Tracks interface and associated curriculum has generated interest among instructors at the undergraduate level, who wanted to engage their students in hands-on work with real scientific datasets. In 2014, EDC and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography received funding from NSF's IUSE program for Ocean Tracks: College Edition, to investigate how a learning model that includes a data interface, set of analysis tools, and curricula can be used to motivate students to learn and do science with real data; bringing opportunities to engage broad student populations, including both in-classroom and remote, on-line participants, in scientific practice. Phase 1, completed in the summer of 2015, was a needs assessment, consisting of a survey and interviews with students in oceanography classes at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and Palomar Community College; a document review of course syllabi and primary textbooks used in current college marine science courses across the country; and interviews and a national survey of marine science faculty. We will present the results of this work, and will discuss new curriculum materials that are being classroom tested in the fall of 2015.

  15. Integrated Surveys of Neglected Tropical Diseases in Southern Sudan: How Much Do They Cost and Can They Be Refined?

    PubMed Central

    Kolaczinski, Jan H.; Hanson, Kara; Robinson, Emily; Picon, Diana; Sabasio, Anthony; Mpakateni, Martin; Lado, Mounir; Moore, Stephen; Petty, Nora; Brooker, Simon

    2010-01-01

    Background Increasing emphasis on integrated control of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) requires identification of co-endemic areas. Integrated surveys for lymphatic filariasis (LF), schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infection have been recommended for this purpose. Integrated survey designs inevitably involve balancing the costs of surveys against accuracy of classifying areas for treatment, so-called implementation units (IUs). This requires an understanding of the main cost drivers and of how operating procedures may affect both cost and accuracy of surveys. Here we report a detailed cost analysis of the first round of integrated NTD surveys in Southern Sudan. Methods and Findings Financial and economic costs were estimated from financial expenditure records and interviews with survey staff using an ingredients approach. The main outcome was cost per IU surveyed. Uncertain variables were subjected to univariate sensitivity analysis and the effects of modifying standard operating procedures were explored. The average economic cost per IU surveyed was USD 40,206 or USD 9,573, depending on the size of the IU. The major cost drivers were two key categories of recurrent costs: i) survey consumables, and ii) personnel. Conclusion The cost of integrated surveys in Southern Sudan could be reduced by surveying larger administrative areas for LF. If this approach was taken, the estimated economic cost of completing LF, schistosomiasis and STH mapping in Southern Sudan would amount to USD 1.6 million. The methodological detail and costing template provided here could be used to generate cost estimates in other settings and readily compare these to the present study, and may help budget for integrated and single NTDs surveys elsewhere. PMID:20644619

  16. Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Ulysses Mission (Tier 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This Final (Tier 2) Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) addresses the environmental impacts which may be caused by implementation of the Ulysses mission, a space flight mission to observe the polar regions of the Sun. The proposed action is completion of preparation and operation of the Ulysses spacecraft, including its planned launch at the earliest available launch opportunity on the Space Transportation System (STS) Shuttle in October 1990 or in the backup opportunity in November 1991. The alternative is canceling further work on the mission. The Tier 1 EIS included a delay alternative which considered the Titan 4 launch vehicle as an alternative booster stage for launch in 1991 or later. This alternative was further evaluated and eliminated from consideration when, in November 1988, the U.S. Air Force, which procures the Titan 4, notified that it could not provide a Titan 4 vehicle for the 1991 launch opportunity because of high priority Department of Defense requirements. The Titan 4 launch vehicle is no longer a feasible alternative to the STS/Inertial Upper Stage (IUS)/Payload Assist Module-Special (PAM-S) for the November 1991 launch opportunity. The only expected environment effects of the proposed action are associated with normal launch vehicle operation and are treated elsewhere. The environmental impacts of normal Shuttle launches were addressed in existing NEPA documentation and are briefly summarized. These impacts are limited largely to the near-field at the launch pad, except for temporary stratospheric ozone effects during launch and occasional sonic boom effects near the landing site. These effects were judged insufficient to preclude Shuttle launches. There could also be environmental impacts associated with the accidental release of radiological material during launch, deployment, or interplanetary trajectory injection of the Ulysses spacecraft. Intensive analysis indicates that the probability of release is small. There are no environmental

  17. Establishment of the World Health Organization 2(nd) International Standard for Factor XI, Plasma, Human.

    PubMed

    Wilmot, Helen; Hockley, Jason; Rigsby, Peter; Gray, Elaine

    2017-01-01

    The 1(st) International Standard (IS) for blood coagulation factor XI (FXI), plasma, has been successfully used for potency labeling of FXI therapeutics and for diagnosis of FXI deficiency in patients. With stocks of the 1(st) IS near depletion, a replacement is required. In addition to the functional activity value, assignment of an antigen value to the 2(nd) IS would allow harmonization of antigen assay methods and differentiation of patients who have low functional activity but normal antigen FXI levels from patients who have both low functional and antigen FXI levels. The aims of this study were, therefore, to assign FXI functional activity to the 2(nd) IS for FXI, plasma, and to additionally assign a new analyte, FXI antigen, to the same International Standard. The candidate material was prepared from double-spun, virology negative, normal plasma, which was pooled and filled into siliconized glass ampoules and subsequently freeze-dried. Assignment of the functional activity (FXI:C) value in International Units (IUs) was performed by one-stage clotting assay by 29 laboratories, relative to the 1(st) IS. The overall geometric mean (GM) was 0.71 IU/amp with extremely low inter-laboratory variability (expressed as geometric coefficient of variation) of 1.8%. The antigen value assignment was performed by 11 laboratories and was calculated relative to normal plasma pools, as is customary with new coagulation factor analytes. The amount of antigen present in 1 ml of normal plasma was taken to be 1 U. The overall GM for the antigen assays was 0.78 IU/amp with an inter-laboratory variation of 10%. The candidate (National Institute for Biological Standards and Control code, 15/180) was established by the World Health Organization (WHO) Expert Committee on Biological Standardization in 2016 as the WHO 2(nd) IS for blood coagulation FXI, plasma, with a functional activity value (FXI:C) of 0.71 IU/amp and an antigen value (FXI:Ag) of 0.78 IU/amp.

  18. Atmospheric Effects in IR Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released August 3, 2004 This image shows two representations of the same infra-red image covering parts of Ius Chasma and Oudemans Crater. On the left is a grayscale image showing surface temperature, and on the right is a false-color composite made from 3 individual THEMIS bands. The false-color image is colorized using a technique called decorrelation stretch (DCS), which emphasizes the spectral differences between the bands to highlight compositional variations.

    This image is dominated by atmospheric effects. The pink/magenta colors inside the canyon show areas with a large amount of atmospheric dust. In the bottom half of the image, the patchy blue/cyan colors indicate the presence of water ice clouds out on the plains. Water ice clouds and high amounts of dust do not generally occur at the same place and time on Mars because the dust absorbs sunlight and heats the atmosphere. The more dust that is present, the warmer the atmosphere becomes, sublimating the water ice into water vapor and dissipating any clouds.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -8.2, Longitude 267.9 East (92.1.West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is

  19. Epidemiological Assessment of Eight Rounds of Mass Drug Administration for Lymphatic Filariasis in India: Implications for Monitoring and Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Subramanian; Perumal, Vanamail; Adinarayanan, Srividya; Kaliannagounder, Krishnamoorthy; Rengachari, Ravi; Purushothaman, Jambulingam

    2012-01-01

    Background Monitoring and evaluation guidelines of the programme to eliminate lymphatic filariasis require impact assessments in at least one sentinel and one spot-check site in each implementation unit (IU). Transmission assessment surveys (TAS) that assess antigenaemia (Ag) in children in IUs that have completed at least five rounds of mass drug administration (MDA) each with >65% coverage and with microfilaria (Mf) levels <1% in the monitored sites form the basis for stopping the MDA. Despite its rigour, this multi-step process is likely to miss sites with transmission potential (‘hotspots’) and its statistical assumptions for sampling and threshold levels for decision-making have not been validated. We addressed these issues in a large-scale epidemiological study in two primary health centres in Thanjavur district, India, endemic for bancroftian filariasis that had undergone eight rounds of MDA. Methodology/Principal Findings The prevalence and intensity of Mf (per 60 µl blood) were 0.2% and 0.004 respectively in the survey that covered >70% of 50,363 population. The corresponding values for Ag were 2.3% and 17.3 Ag-units respectively. Ag-prevalence ranged from 0.7 to 0.9%, in children (2–10 years) and 2.7 to 3.0% in adults. Although the Mf-levels in the survey and the sentinel/spot check sites were <1% and Ag-level was <2% in children, we identified 7 “residual” (Mf-prevalence ≥1%, irrespective of Ag-status in children) and 17 “transmission” (at least one Ag-positive child born during the MDA period) hotspots. Antigenaemic persons were clustered both at household and site levels. We identified an Ag-prevalence of ∼1% in children (equivalent to 0.4% community Mf-prevalence) as a possible threshold value for stopping MDA. Conclusions/Significance Existence of ‘hotspots’ and spatial clustering of infections in the study area indicate the need for developing good surveillance strategies for detecting ‘hotspots’, adopting evidence

  20. Establishment of the World Health Organization 2nd International Standard for Factor XI, Plasma, Human

    PubMed Central

    Wilmot, Helen; Hockley, Jason; Rigsby, Peter; Gray, Elaine

    2017-01-01

    The 1st International Standard (IS) for blood coagulation factor XI (FXI), plasma, has been successfully used for potency labeling of FXI therapeutics and for diagnosis of FXI deficiency in patients. With stocks of the 1st IS near depletion, a replacement is required. In addition to the functional activity value, assignment of an antigen value to the 2nd IS would allow harmonization of antigen assay methods and differentiation of patients who have low functional activity but normal antigen FXI levels from patients who have both low functional and antigen FXI levels. The aims of this study were, therefore, to assign FXI functional activity to the 2nd IS for FXI, plasma, and to additionally assign a new analyte, FXI antigen, to the same International Standard. The candidate material was prepared from double-spun, virology negative, normal plasma, which was pooled and filled into siliconized glass ampoules and subsequently freeze-dried. Assignment of the functional activity (FXI:C) value in International Units (IUs) was performed by one-stage clotting assay by 29 laboratories, relative to the 1st IS. The overall geometric mean (GM) was 0.71 IU/amp with extremely low inter-laboratory variability (expressed as geometric coefficient of variation) of 1.8%. The antigen value assignment was performed by 11 laboratories and was calculated relative to normal plasma pools, as is customary with new coagulation factor analytes. The amount of antigen present in 1 ml of normal plasma was taken to be 1 U. The overall GM for the antigen assays was 0.78 IU/amp with an inter-laboratory variation of 10%. The candidate (National Institute for Biological Standards and Control code, 15/180) was established by the World Health Organization (WHO) Expert Committee on Biological Standardization in 2016 as the WHO 2nd IS for blood coagulation FXI, plasma, with a functional activity value (FXI:C) of 0.71 IU/amp and an antigen value (FXI:Ag) of 0.78 IU/amp. PMID:28373973

  1. Identification and spatial distribution of light-toned deposits enriched in Al-phyllosilicates on the plateaus around Valles Marineris, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Deit, L.; Flahaut, J.; Quantin, C.; Allemand, P.

    2009-12-01

    The plateaus around Valles Marineris consist in series of mafic rocks suggested to be flood basalts (McEwen et al., 1998), lavas interbedded with sediments (Malin and Edgett, 2000), layered intrusive rocks (Williams et al., 2003), or lava flows dated from the Noachian to the late Hesperian epochs (Scott and Carr, 1978). Recent studies show the occurrence of light layered deposits of hundred meters thick cropping out on plateaus near Ius Chasma, Melas Chasma, Candor Chasma, Juventae Chasma and Ganges Chasma deposited during the Hesperian epoch by fluvio-lacustrine processes (Weitz et al., 2009), or by air-fall processes (Le Deit et al., 2009). These layered deposits are enriched in hydrated minerals including opaline silica (Milliken et al., 2008), hydroxylated ferric sulfates (Bishop et al., 2009), and possibly Al-rich phyllosilicates (Le Deit et al., 2009). We identified another type of formation corresponding to light-toned massive deposits cropping out around Valles Marineris. It appears that these light-toned deposits are associated to bright, rough, and highly cratered terrains, located beneath a dark and thin capping unit. Previous studies report the occurrence of phyllosilicates on few locations around Valles Marineris based on OMEGA data analyses (Gondet et al., 2007; Carter et al., 2009). The analysis of CRISM data show that the light-toned deposits are associated with spectra displaying absorption bands at 1.4 μm, 1.9 μm, and a narrow band at 2.2 μm. These spectral characteristics are consistent with the presence of Al-rich phyllosilicates such as montmorillonite, or illite in the light-toned deposits. They constitute dozens of outcrops located on the plateaus south and east of Coprates Chasma and Capri Chasma, and west of Ganges Chasma. All outcrops investigated so far are present over Noachian terrains mapped as the unit Npl2 by Scott and Tanaka (1986), and Witbeck et al. (1991). These light-toned deposits could result from in situ aqueous alteration

  2. Lietuvos erdvinės informacijos sklaidos galimybės ir perspektyvos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beconytė, Giedrė; Papšienė, Lina; Kryžanauskas, Audrius

    2010-01-01

    Padidėjęs erdvinių duomenų ir jų naudojimo poreikis paskatino kurti erdvinių duomenų infrastruktūras, leidžiančias teikti erdvinius duomenis aprašančią informaciją bei pačius duomenis iš įvairių šaltinių, nepriklausomai kur jie bebūtų bei duomenų formato ar struktūros. Lietuvoje dauguma erdvinių duomenų rinkinių "izoliuoti", o informacija apie juos sunkiai prieinama, todėl buvo siekiama sukurti modernią visą šalį apimančią vieną viešojo sektoriaus erdvinių duomenų paie\\vskos ir perdavimo sistemą. 2009 m. buvo sukurta Lietuvos erdvinės informacijos infrastruktūra (LEII), suteikianti priemones užtikrinti nacionalinių erdvinių duomenų pasiekiamumą ir teikimą internetu naudotojams jiems priimtinu būdu. Pagrindinis Europos Bendrijos erdvinės informacijos infrastruktūros (INSPIRE) kūrimo tikslas - pasiekti visų Bendrijos narių erdvinės informacijos suderinamumą. Įvairiose šalyse duomenų kaupimo, tvarkymo ir teikimo praktika skirtinga, todėl yra kuriamos bendros, vienijančios INSPIRE temų erdvinių duomenų rinkinių specifikacijos. Europos Bendrijos narės bus įpareigotos teikti duomenis INSPIRE laikantis šių specifkacijų, todėl atsiras galimybė iš skirtingų Europos Bendrijos valstybių gautus erdvinius duomenis sujungti ir naudoti kaip bendrus. Sukūrus LEII, Lietuvoje technologi\\vskai pasirengta teikti erdvinius duomenis bei yra sukaupti 56 oficialių duomenų rinkiniai, atitinkantys INSPIRE temas. Nors kol kas visi duomenų rinkiniai ne visi\\vskai atitinka patvirtintąsias specifikacijas, taikant Lietuvos erdvinės informacijos infrastruktūros technologijas, duomenis galima transformuoti į reikiamą struktūrą teikimo proceso metu.

  3. Data assimilation and determining forms for weakly damped, dispersive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadigov, Tural

    In this work, we show that the global attractor of the 1D damped, driven, nonlinear Schrodinger equations (NLS) is embedded in the long-time dynamics of a determining form. The determining form for the NLS is an ordinary differential equation in a space of trajectories X = Cb 1(R,PmH2) where Pm is the L2-projector onto the span of the ?rst m Fourier modes. Similarly, we also find a determining form for the damped, driven Korteweg de-Vries equations (KdV). This time, the determining form for the KdV is an ordinary differential equation in a space of trajectories X = Cb 1(R,PmH2). In both cases, there is a one-to-one identi?cation with the trajectories in the global attractor of the underlying equations and the steady states of the determining form for the that equation. The determining form for both of these equations is dv(s, t)/ dt= - sup{s∈R} |v( s, t) - PmW (v( s, t))|2(v(s, t) - Pmu* (s, t)), where v( s) ∈ X, u* is a steady state of the underlying equation and W is a special map from X to a different Banach space which contains the relation between the underlying partial differential equation and the determining form. Additionally, we prove that the determining modes property holds for both of these equations. We give an improved estimate for the number of the determining modes for the NLS and we give an estimate for the number of determining modes for the KdV. Moreover, we give a continuous data assimilation algorithm via feedback control approach for the NLS and the KdV using only definitely many modes. The NLS and the KdV equations are ius + uxx + |u|2u + gammau = f, (NLS) us + uux + uxxx + gamma u = f, (KdV) respectively. We prove the following theorem: Theorem. Let u be a solution of the following equation us = F( u), with an initial data u(s 0), where the above equation is either (NLS) or (KdV), and let w be the solution of the corresponding data assimilation equation ws = F(w) - micro Pm(w - u), with an arbitrary initial data w(s0). For micro large

  4. Relative bioavailabilities of natural and synthetic vitamin E formulations containing mixed tocopherols in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Chopra, R K; Bhagavan, H N

    1999-03-01

    There are several reports in the literature on the relative bioavailabilities of RRR (natural) vs. all-rac (synthetic) forms of vitamin E in humans and animal models but none on the bioavailability of alpha-tocopherol in mixed vitamin E formulations. In the present study we examined the bioavailability of alpha-tocopherol in a typical commercially available product containing mixed tocopherols. We also tested a formulation containing all-rac-alpha-tocopherol with mixed tocopherols for purposes of comparison along with straight RRR- and all-rac-alpha-tocopheryl acetate as reference products. Normal male subjects were given one of the four formulations of vitamin E (800 IU per day in softgel capsule form for 10 days): 1. All-rac-alpha-tocopheryl acetate, 2. RRR-alpha-tocopheryl acetate, 3. RRR-alpha-tocopherol with mixed tocopherols, and 4. all-rac-alpha-tocopherol with mixed tocopherols. Both serum alpha- and gamma-tocopherols were determined by HPLC at baseline, and at days 2, 4, 7 and 10. The values for alpha- at baseline and 10 days were 0.80, 0.80, 0.80 & 0.79 mg/dl and 1.67, 1.72, 1.76 & 1.62 mg/dl. The values for gamma- were 0.28, 0.29, 0.30 & 0.29 mg/dl and 0.11, 0.08, 0.10 & 0.10 mg/dl. Thus the data show that a) the bioavailability of RRR- and all-rac-alpha-tocopherols is not affected by other tocopherols, and b) both RRR- and all-rac-alpha-tocopherol (free or esterified) significantly suppress the serum gamma tocopherol to the same extent. Furthermore, since there was no difference in the serum values of alpha-tocopherol between RRR- and all-rac-vitamin E given the same dose as IUs, the data also support the currently accepted ratio of 1.36 for the biopotency of RRR- vs. all-rac-alpha-tocopheryl acetate.

  5. NSF Support for Physics at the Undergraduate Level: A View from Inside

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, Duncan

    2015-03-01

    NSF has supported a wide range of projects in physics that involve undergraduate students. These projects include NSF research grants in which undergraduates participate; Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) centers and supplements; and education grants that range from upper-division labs that may include research, to curriculum development for upper- and lower-level courses and labs, to courses for non-majors, to Physics Education Research (PER). The NSF Divisions of Physics, Materials Research, and Astronomy provide most of the disciplinary research support, with some from other parts of NSF. I recently retired as the permanent physicist in NSF's Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE), which supports the education grants. I was responsible for a majority of DUE's physics grants and was involved with others overseen by a series of physics rotators. There I worked in programs entitled Instrumentation and Laboratory Improvement (ILI); Course and Curriculum Development (CCD); Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI); Transforming Undergraduate STEM Education (TUES); and Improving Undergraduate STEM Education (IUSE). NSF support has enabled physics Principal Investigators to change and improve substantially the way physics is taught and the way students learn physics. The most important changes are increased undergraduate participation in physics research; more teaching using interactive engagement methods in classes; and growth of PER as a legitimate field of physics research as well as outcomes from PER that guide physics teaching. In turn these have led, along with other factors, to students who are better-prepared for graduate school and work, and to increases in the number of undergraduate physics majors. In addition, students in disciplines that physics directly supports, notably engineering and chemistry, and increasingly biology, are better and more broadly prepared to use their physics education in these fields. I will describe NSF

  6. Shuttle Enterprise Mated to 747 SCA on Ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17

  7. Shuttle Enterprise Mated to 747 SCA in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    . When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour

  8. Noctis Landing: A Proposed Landing Site/Exploration Zone for Human Missions to the Surface of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Pascal; Acedillo, Shannen; Braham, Stephen; Brown, Adrian; Elphic, Richard; Fong, Terry; Glass, Brian; Hoftun, Christopher; Johansen, Brage W.; Lorber, Kira; Mittlefehldt, David; Takagi, Yuta; Thomas, Peter; West, Michael; West, Stephen; Zolensky, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The proposed Noctis Landing Site/Exploration Zone (LS/EZ) is shown in Figure 1. Our preliminary study suggests that the proposed site meets all key Science and Resources (incl. Civil Engineering) requirements. The site is of significant interest, as the EZ not only offers a large number and wide range of regions of interest (ROIs) for short-term exploration, it is also located strategically at the crossroads between Tharsis and Valles Marineris, which are key for long-term exploration. The proposed site contains Regions of Interest (ROIs) that meet the following Science requirements: -­- Access to (1) deposits with a high preservation potential for evidence of past habitability and fossil biosignatures and (2) sites that are promising for present habitability. The site presents a wide variety of ROIs qith likely aqueous features and deposits, including sinous channels and valleys, slope gullies, lobate debris aprons, impact craters with lobate ejecta flows, and "bathtub ring" deposits. Neutron spectrometry also suggests hydrogen is present within the topmost 0.3 m or so of 4 to 10 wt% WEH (Water Equivalent Hydrogen). -­- Noachian and/or Hesperian rocks in a stratigraphic context that have a high likelihood of containing trapped atmospheric gases. Collapsed canyon rim material with preserved stratigraphy is abundantly present and accessible. -­- Exposures of at least two crustal units that have regional or global extents, that are suitable for radiometric dating, and that have relative ages that sample a significant range of martian geological time. Canyons floors in Ius Chasma, Tithonium Chasma, and plateau tops on Tharsis and in Sinai Planum offer access to distinct crustal units of regional extent. -­- Access to outcrops with linked morphological and/or geochemical signatures indicative of aqueous or groundwater/ mineral interactions. Iron and sulfur-bearing deposits on canyon floors in Noctis Labyrinthus, and in Ius Chasma (IC) and Tithonium Chasma (TC

  9. STS-68 on Runway with 747 SCA - Columbia Ferry Flyby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981

  10. STS-76 Landing - Space Shuttle Atlantis Lands at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In

  11. STS-76 Landing - Space Shuttle Atlantis Lands at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a

  12. STS-76 Landing - Space Shuttle Atlantis Lands at Edwards Air Force Base, Drag Chute Deploy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the

  13. Progestin-only contraceptives: effects on weight

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Laureen M; Edelman, Alison; Chen, Mario; Otterness, Conrad; Trussell, James; Helmerhorst, Frans M

    2013-01-01

    Background Progestin-only contraceptives (POCs) are appropriate for many women who cannot or should not take estrogen. Many POCs are long-acting, cost-effective methods of preventing pregnancy. However, concern about weight gain can deter the initiation of contraceptives and cause early discontinuation among users. Objectives The primary objective was to evaluate the association between progestin-only contraceptive use and changes in body weight. Search methods Through May 2013, we searched MEDLINE, CENTRAL, POPLINE, LILACS, ClinicalTrials.gov, and ICTRP. The 2010 search also included EMBASE. For the initial review, we contacted investigators to identify other trials. Selection criteria All comparative studies were eligible that examined a POC versus another contraceptive method or no contraceptive. The primary outcome was mean change in body weight or mean change in body composition. We also considered the dichotomous outcome of loss or gain of a specified amount of weight. Data collection and analysis Two authors extracted the data. We computed the mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence interval (CI) for continuous variables. For dichotomous outcomes, the Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio (OR) with 95% CI was calculated. Main results We found 16 studies; one examined progestin-only pills, one studied the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS), four examined an implant, and 10 focused on depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA). Outcomes examined were changes in body weight only (14 studies), changes in both body weight and body composition (1 study), and changes in body composition only (1 study). We did not conduct meta-analysis due to the various contraceptive methods and weight change measures. Comparison groups did not differ significantly for weight change in 12 studies. However, three studies showed weight change differences for POC users compared to women not using a hormonal method. In one study, weight gain (kg) was greater for the DMPA group

  14. STS-51 Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or

  15. Shuttle in Mate-Demate Device being Loaded onto SCA-747 - Rear View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was

  16. Shuttle Endeavour Mated to 747 SCA Taxi to Runway for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in

  17. Shuttle in Mate-Demate Device being Loaded onto SCA-747

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary

  18. STS-66 Edwards Landing Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When Space Shuttle flights began in April 1981, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was the primary landing site for the

  19. Shuttle Atlantis Landing at Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise

  20. STS-31 on Runway 22 at Edwards with Recovery Personnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour with each orbit taking about 90 minutes. A Space Shuttle crew sees a sunrise or sunset every 45 minutes. When

  1. STS-36 on Edwards Runway with Recovery Personnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on future flights. Some of these orbital laboratories, like the Spacelab, provide facilities for several specialists to conduct experiments in such fields as medicine, astronomy, and materials manufacturing. Some types of satellites deployed by Space Shuttles include those involved in environmental and resources protection, astronomy, weather forecasting, navigation, oceanographic studies, and other scientific fields. The Space Shuttles can also launch spacecraft into orbits higher than the Shuttle's altitude limit through the use of Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) propulsion units. After release from the Space Shuttle payload bay, the IUS is ignited to carry the spacecraft into deep space. The Space Shuttles are also being used to carry elements of the International Space Station into space where they are assembled in orbit. The Space Shuttles were built by Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California. Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division (now part of Boeing) builds the three main engines, and Thiokol, Brigham City, Utah, makes the solid rocket booster motors. Martin Marietta Corporation (now Lockheed Martin), New Orleans, Louisiana, makes the external tanks. Each orbiter (Space Shuttle) is 121 feet long, has a wingspan of 78 feet, and a height of 57 feet. The Space Shuttle is approximately the size of a DC-9 commercial airliner and can carry a payload of 65,000 pounds into orbit. The payload bay is 60 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Each main engine is capable of producing a sea level thrust of 375,000 pounds and a vacuum (orbital) thrust of 470,000 pounds. The engines burn a mixture of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In orbit, the Space Shuttles circle the earth at a

  2. Chronicles of recent disasters. Are Agencies and Civil Protections getting sloppy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miozzo, D.; Altamura, M.; Ferraris, L.; Musso, L.

    2010-09-01

    Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models and forecasts have a paramount role in the real time decision making command chain. It is thanks to them that Civil Protection (CP) across Europe and the World were able to redeploy towards preventing calamities rather than passively awaiting for their happening. However, from the implementation of these new methodological and procedural instruments stems the process of codification of a generalized Ius Commune. This natural drive towards Positive Law grants the fruition and tutelage of new rights but, if not adequately controlled, can initiate vicious circles leading towards the overcriminalization of the system. Trials, intended against CP operators and guardians or guarantors, according to civil law acception, showed how meteorological weather prediction can be faulty and dangerously underestimate an incoming event. The margin of error unfolds on both a temporal and a spatial plan. The discrepancy which emerged from ex post analysis (Molini et al. 2009) tells us that state of the art instruments can possibly induce CP operators to make wrong decisions. In addition to these computational and modelling problems, the complex orography of our territories impedes to deterministically asses and characterize hydrometeorological risk. The best instrument in our hands, a part from radar and satellite data (which both have a yet important delay in the acquisition of data due to its transfer), is still represented by NWP models and by the experience of whom, on a daily basis, issues meteorological bulletins and alert whom are the foremost link between CPs and the population. Envisaging the problem of the overcriminalization phenomenon and its social consequences, unpredicted flash floods are extremely rare to count. Nevertheless they do happen and create the basis for a much more dangerous problem: the lowering of the alert threshold to an excessively precautionary level, thus, eliminating any kind of discretionality in assessing

  3. A catalogue of Lithuanian beetles (Insecta, Coleoptera)

    PubMed Central

    Tamutis, Vytautas; Tamutė, Brigita; Ferenca, Romas

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This paper presents the first complete and updated list of all 3597 species of beetles (Insecta: Coleoptera) belonging to 92 familiesfound and published in Lithuania until 2011, with comments also provided on the main systematic and nomenclatural changes since the last monographic treatment in two volumes (Pileckis and Monsevičius 1995, 1997). The introductory section provides a general overview of the main features of the territory of Lithuania, the origins and formation of the beetle fauna and their conservation, the faunistic investigations in Lithuania to date revealing the most important stages of the faunistic research process with reference to the most prominent scientists, an overview of their work, and their contribution to Lithuanian coleopteran faunal research. Species recorded in Lithuania by some authors without reliable evidence and requiring further confirmation with new data are presented in a separate list, consisting of 183 species. For the first time, analysis of errors in works of Lithuanian authors concerning data on coleopteran fauna has been conducted and these errors have been corrected. All available published and Internet sources on beetles found in Lithuania have been considered in the current study. Over 630 literature sources on species composition of beetles, their distribution in Lithuania and neighbouring countries, and taxonomic revisions and changes are reviewed and cited. An alphabetical list of these literature sources is presented. After revision of public beetle collections in Lithuania, the authors propose to remove 43 species from the beetle species list of the country on the grounds, that they have been wrongly identified or published by mistake. For reasons of clarity, 19 previously noted but later excluded species are included in the current checklist with comments. Based on faunal data from neighbouring countries, species expected to occur in Lithuania are matnioned. In total 1390 species are attributed to this

  4. Elektroninės cigaretės: naujas būdas mesti rūkyti ar nauja grėsmė?

    PubMed Central

    Aistė, Aleknaitė; Monika, Andrijauskaitė; Justė, Latauskienė; Viktorija, Andrejevaitė

    2016-01-01

    Nuo 2010 m. tarp suaugusiųjų ir paauglių išaugo elektroninių cigarečių vartojimas. Dauguma el. cigarečių vartotojų anksčiau yra rūkę tradicinius tabako gaminius. Didžioji dalis žmonių el. cigaretes suvokia kaip priemonę, padėsiančią mesti rūkyti ar sumažinti surūkomų įprastinių cigarečių kiekį. Elektroninės cigaretės yra prietaisas, susidedantis iš skysčiu užpildytos kasetės, kaitiklio bei baterijos. Nuspaudus mygtuką įjungiamas kaitiklis, kuris šildo skystį, o, šiam tapus garais, jie įkvepiami. Visų rūšių el. skysčių pagrindinės sudedamosios dalys yra glicerolis arba propileno glikolis, papildomai gali būti pridedama nikotino ir / ar aromatų. Skysčiuose taip pat nustatyta įvairių kitų cheminių medžiagų. Ilgalaikio el. cigarečių vartojimo pasekmės sveikatai nėra išaiškintos, manoma, kad jos turėtų būti saugesnės nei rūkyti įprastines cigaretes. Nėra pakankamai ištirtas el. cigarečių skysčiuose esančių medžiagų toksiškumas. Trūksta duomenų apie el. cigarečių, kaip pagalbinės priemonės norint mesti rūkyti, veiksmingumą ir saugumą. Gydytojas norinčiam mesti rūkyti pacientui pirmiausia turėtų pasiūlyti patvirtintas pakaitinės nikotino terapijos ar kitas pagalbines priemones ir užtikrinti, kad pacientas gautų informaciją apie naujausius medikamentus, galinčius jam padėti. Jei pacientas atsisako šių priemonių ir renkasi el. cigaretes, gydytojas turėtų informuoti apie abejotiną jų saugumą ir veiksmingumą. Visuomenėje kyla susirūpinimas, kad el. cigarečių rūkymas gali paskatinti priklausomybę nikotinui ir padidinti norą išbandyti įprastines cigaretes. Nerimą kelia ir neapribotas el. cigarečių vartojimas viešosiose vietose. Nėra žinoma, kokią įtaką aplinkinių sveikatai gali turėti pasyvus garinimas. El. cigarečių reglamentavimas visame pasaulyje skiriasi ir laikui bėgant kinta. PMID:28356791

  5. CRISM's First 'Targeted' Observation of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This shows the first site on Mars imaged by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) using its full-resolution hyperspectral capability, with a 'targeted image.'

    During a targeted image, CRISM's movable gimbal tracks a point on the surface, and slowly scans across it for about three minutes. The image is built up one line at a time, and each pixel in the image is measured in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers. During this time the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's range to the target starts at about 410 kilometers (250 miles), decreases to about 290 kilometers (190 miles) when the spacecraft makes its closest approach, and increases again to 410 kilometers at the end of the image. The change in geometry during image acquisition gives each CRISM targeted image a characteristic hourglass shape.

    This first targeted image was acquired at 1515 UTC (11:15 a.m. EDT) on Sept. 29, 2006, near 7.7 degrees south latitude, 270.5 degrees east longitude. Only minimal processing and map projection of the data have been done. At the center of the image the spatial resolution is as good as 18 meters (60 feet) per pixel. The three wavelengths shown here provide an approximate true color representation. The hourglass-shaped image covers an area about 13 kilometers (8 miles) north-south and, at the narrowest point, about 9 kilometers (5.6 miles) east-west. The upper left panel shows the image's regional context, on a mosaic from the Mars Odyssey spacecraft's Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) taken in infrared frequencies. This western part of the Valles Marineris canyon system is called Ius Chasma. The canyon system is about five kilometers (about three miles) deep and exposes ancient rocks from deep in the crust. The lower left panel shows local context, using a THEMIS visible-wavelengths image (THEMIS-VIS), which is comparable in resolution to CRISM data. Outcrops of light-toned layered rocks 1-2 kilometers (0.6-1.2 miles) across are

  6. Contraceptive sales in the setting of the Zika virus epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Bahamondes, Luis; Ali, Moazzam; Monteiro, Ilza; Fernandes, Arlete

    2017-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Has there been any influence of the Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak on the sales of contraceptive methods in Brazil? SUMMARY ANSWER Contraceptive sales in the 24 months of evaluation showed little variation and no significant change has been observed since the ZIKV outbreak. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Transmission of ZIKV is primarily by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes; however, sexual transmission has also been described. The association of several birth defects and the ZIKV infection during pregnancy has been established, and it was estimated in Bahia, Brazil that the infection rate could range from 10% to 80%. The World Health Organisation (WHO) declared the cluster of microcephaly cases and other neurological disorders a health emergency on 1 February 2016. The Brazilian government also made recommendations for women who were planning to become pregnant and who reside in ZIKV-affected areas to reconsider or postpone pregnancy. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION The objective of this study was to assess the sales of contraceptive methods in Brazil, tracking it from before and through the ZIKV outbreak. We obtained information from all pharmaceutical companies based in Brazil and from the manufacturers of long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs), including the copper-intrauterine device (IUD), the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) and implants, about contraceptives sales in the public and private sectors between September 2014 and August 2016. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS We analyzed the data for: (i) oral contraceptives, i.e. combined oral contraceptives (COC) and progestin-only pills (POP), and vaginal and transdermal contraceptives, (ii) injectable contraceptives, i.e. once-a-month and depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate, (iii) LARCs and (iv) emergency contraceptive (EC) pills. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Monthly sales of COC, POP, patches and vaginal rings represent the major sales segment of the market, i.e. 12.7–13

  7. Morphology, composition, age and spatial extent of a layered superficial formation covering the plains around Valles Marineris, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Deit, L.; Bourgeois, O.; Le Mouélic, S.; Quantin-Nataf, C.; Mège, D.; Sotin, C.; Massé, M.; Sarago, V.

    2008-09-01

    Introduction An extensive light-toned layered formation covers the plains surrounding Valles Marineris on Mars. It is particularly visible south of Ius Chasma and of Melas Chasma [1], southwest of Juventae Chasma [2,3], north of Tithonium Chasma and west of Ganges Chasma. Some deposits of this formation may be enriched in hydrated silicates such as hydrated glasses, chalcedony, opal or other hydrated Si-rich phases according to CRISM data [1]. From an analysis of HRSC, THEMIS, MOC, HiRISE, MOLA PEDR, OMEGA and CRISM data, we discuss the morphology, the composition, the age, the spatial extent and the emplacement processes of these layered deposits (LDs). Here we focus on two regions where the LDs are particularly spectacular: Ganges Chasma and Juventae Chasma. Regional map We have compiled a regional map of the LDs around Valles Marineris (orange in Fig. 1a). In some cases their spatial extent is unclear due to their being covered either by dark material or by dust that appears yellow on IRB color HiRISE images (Fig 1b). Dashed contours on Fig. 1a outline these poorly constrained boundaries, whereas plain contours correspond to regions where the stratigraphic contact between the LDs and the underlying basement is unambiguous. The light-toned LDs are located stratigraphically and topographically above the basaltic basement that constitutes the plains surrounding Valles Marineris. The total thickness of the LDs does not exceed a hundred meters on average. They consist of subparallel light-toned layers of various thicknesses that are apparently interbedded with darker beds (Fig. 1b). This difference in albedo can be due to variations in mineralogical composition, topographic slope, roughness, grain size or state of erosion of the different layers, or to partial covering of certain layers by a dark mantle. Ganges Chasma West of Ganges Chasma, the LDs rest topographically and stratigraphically above the Noachian plains that have been defined as the Npl2 unit [4] (Fig. 1