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Sample records for iv collagen disorganization

  1. Increased Goodpasture Antigen-Binding Protein Expression Induces Type IV Collagen Disorganization and Deposit of Immunoglobulin A in Glomerular Basement Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Revert, Fernando; Merino, Ramón; Monteagudo, Carlos; Macias, Jesús; Peydró, Amando; Alcácer, Javier; Muniesa, Pedro; Marquina, Regina; Blanco, Mario; Iglesias, Marcos; Revert-Ros, Francisco; Merino, Jesús; Saus, Juan

    2007-01-01

    Increased expression of Goodpasture antigen-binding protein (GPBP), a protein that binds and phosphorylates basement membrane collagen, has been associated with immune complex-mediated pathogenesis. However, recent reports have questioned this biological function and proposed that GPBP serves as a cytosolic ceramide transporter (CERTL). Thus, the role of GPBP in vivo remains unknown. New Zealand White (NZW) mice are considered healthy animals although they convey a genetic predisposition for immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis. Here we show that NZW mice developed age-dependent lupus-prone autoimmune response and immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis characterized by elevated GPBP, glomerular basement membrane (GBM) collagen disorganization and expansion, and deposits of IgA on disrupted GBM. Transgenic overexpression of human GPBP (hGPBP) in non-lupus-prone mice triggered similar glomerular abnormalities including deposits of IgA on a capillary GBM that underwent dissociation, in the absence of an evident autoimmune response. We provide in vivo evidence that GPBP regulates GBM collagen organization and its elevated expression causes dissociation and subsequent accumulation of IgA on the GBM. Finally, we describe a previously unrecognized pathogenic mechanism that may be relevant in human primary immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis. PMID:17916599

  2. Degradation of type IV collagen by neoplastic human skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Sheela, S.; Barrett, J.C.

    1985-02-01

    An assay for the degradation of type IV (basement membrane) collagen was developed as a biochemical marker for neoplastic cells from chemically transformed human skin fibroblasts. Type IV collagen was isolated from basement membrane of Syrian hamster lung and type I collagen was isolated from rat tails; the collagens were radioactively labelled by reductive alkylation. The abilities of normal (KD) and chemically transformed (Hut-11A) human skin fibroblasts to degrade the collagens were studied. A cell-associated assay was performed by growing either normal or transformed cells in the presence of radioactively labelled type IV collagen and measuring the released soluble peptides in the medium. This assay also demonstrated that KD cells failed to synthesize an activity capable of degrading type IV collagen whereas Hut-11A cells degraded type IV collagen in a linear manner for up to 4 h. Human serum at very low concentrations, EDTA and L-cysteine inhibited the enzyme activity, whereas protease inhibitors like phenylmethyl sulfonyl fluoride, N-ethyl maleimide or soybean trypsin inhibitor did not inhibit the enzyme from Hut-11A cells. These results suggest that the ability to degrade specifically type IV collagen may be an important marker for neoplastic human fibroblasts and supports a role for this collagenase in tumor cell invasion.

  3. The collagen binding domain of gelatinase A modulates degradation of collagen IV by gelatinase B.

    PubMed

    Gioia, Magda; Monaco, Susanna; Van Den Steen, Philippe E; Sbardella, Diego; Grasso, Giuseppe; Marini, Stefano; Overall, Christopher M; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Coletta, Massimo

    2009-02-20

    Type IV collagen remodeling plays a critical role in inflammatory responses, angiogenesis and metastasis. Its remodeling is executed by a family of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), of which the constitutive gelatinase A (MMP2) and the inducible gelatinase B (MMP9) are key examples. Thus, in many pathological conditions, both gelatinases act together. Kinetic data are reported for the enzymatic processing at 37 degrees C of type IV collagen from human placenta by MMP9 and its modulation by the fibronectin-like collagen binding domain (CBD) of MMP2. The alpha1 and alpha2 chain components of type IV collagen were cleaved by gelatinases and identified by mass spectrometry as well as Edman sequencing. Surface plasmon resonance interaction assays showed that CBD bound type IV collagen at two topologically distinct sites. On the basis of linked-function analysis, we demonstrated that CBD of MMP2 tuned the cleavage of collagen IV by MMP9, presumably by inducing a ligand-linked structural change on the type IV collagen. At low concentrations, the CBD bound the first site and thereby allosterically modulated the binding of MMP9 to collagen IV, thus enhancing the collagenolytic activity of MMP9. At high concentrations, CBD binding to the second site interfered with MMP9 binding to collagen IV, acting as a competitive inhibitor. Interestingly, modulation of collagen IV degradation by inactive forms of MMP2 also occurred in a cell-based system, revealing that this interrelationship affected neutrophil migration across a collagen IV membrane. The regulation of the proteolytic processing by a catalytically inactive domain (i.e., CBD) suggests that the two gelatinases might cooperate in degrading substrates even when either one is inactive. This observation reinforces the idea of exosite targets for MMP inhibitors, which should include all macromolecular substrate recognition sites.

  4. Post-Irradiated Human Submandibular Glands Display High Collagen Deposition, Disorganized Cell Junctions, and an Increased Number of Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Nam, Kihoon; Maruyama, Christina L; Trump, Bryan G; Buchmann, Luke; Hunt, Jason P; Monroe, Marcus M; Baker, Olga J

    2016-06-01

    Salivary glands are vital for maintaining oral health. Head and neck radiation therapy is one of the most common causes of salivary gland hypofunction. Little is known about the structural changes that occur in salivary glands after radiation therapy. The aim of this study is to understand the structural changes that occur in post-irradiated human (submandibular gland [SMG]) as compared with untreated ones. We determined changes in epithelial polarity, presence of collagen deposition, and alteration in adipose tissue. We used formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded human SMG from two female subjects exposed to head and neck irradiation. We utilized hematoxylin and eosin staining and Masson's Trichrome staining. The immunostained tissue sections were examined using confocal microscopy. The number and size of adipocytes per tissue section were calculated using ImageJ, Prism, and SPSS software. Post-irradiated human SMG displayed high collagen deposition, disorganized cell junctions, and an increased number of adipocytes as compared with non-irradiated controls. These findings are important to improve our understanding of the individual risk and variation in radiation-related salivary gland dysfunction.

  5. Genetic elimination of α3(IV) collagen fails to rescue anti-collagen B cells

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Amy G.; Mackin, Katherine M.; Foster, Mary H.

    2011-01-01

    Organ deposition of autoantibodies against the noncollagenous-1 domain of the α3 chain of type IV collagen leads to severe kidney and lung injury in anti-glomerular basement membrane disease. The origin and regulation of these highly pathogenic autoantibodies remains unknown. Anti-α3(IV) collagen B lymphocytes are predicted to mature in vivo ignorant of target antigen because α3(IV) collagen expression is highly tissue restricted and pathogenic epitopes are cryptic. However, a recent analysis of an anti-α3(IV)NC1 collagen autoantibody transgenic mouse model revealed that developing B cells are rapidly silenced by deletion and editing in the bone marrow. To dissect the role of collagen as central tolerogen in this model, we determined B cell fate in autoantibody transgenic mice genetically lacking α3(IV) collagen. We found that absence of the tissue target autoantigen has little impact on the fate of anti-α3(IV)NC1 B cells. This implies a more complex regulatory mechanism for preventing anti-glomerular basement membrane disease than has been previously considered, including the possibility that a second antigen present in bone marrow engages and tolerizes anti-α3(IV)NC1 collagen B cells. PMID:21963654

  6. Attachment Disorganization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Judith, Ed.; George, Carol, Ed.

    Disorganized attachment relationships were first formally identified on the basis of the anomalous behavior of some infants during laboratory separations and reunions with the parent. This book presents new research and theory on the topic of attachment disorganization, an area of investigation that is of increasing importance in the study of…

  7. Type IV Collagen Controls the Axogenesis of Cerebellar Granule Cells by Regulating Basement Membrane Integrity in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Miki; Yamaguchi, Shingo; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Kakiguchi, Kisa; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Takashi; Hibi, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Granule cells (GCs) are the major glutamatergic neurons in the cerebellum, and GC axon formation is an initial step in establishing functional cerebellar circuits. In the zebrafish cerebellum, GCs can be classified into rostromedial and caudolateral groups, according to the locations of their somata in the corresponding cerebellar lobes. The axons of the GCs in the caudolateral lobes terminate on crest cells in the dorsal hindbrain, as well as forming en passant synapses with Purkinje cells in the cerebellum. In the zebrafish mutant shiomaneki, the caudolateral GCs extend aberrant axons. Positional cloning revealed that the shiomaneki (sio) gene locus encodes Col4a6, a subunit of type IV collagen, which, in a complex with Col4a5, is a basement membrane (BM) component. Both col4a5 and col4a6 mutants displayed similar abnormalities in the axogenesis of GCs and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Although type IV collagen is reported to control axon targeting by regulating the concentration gradient of an axonal guidance molecule Slit, Slit overexpression did not affect the GC axons. The structure of the BM surrounding the tectum and dorsal hindbrain was disorganized in the col4a5 and col4a6 mutants. Moreover, the abnormal axogenesis of the caudolateral GCs and the RGCs was coupled with aberrant BM structures in the type IV collagen mutants. The regrowth of GC axons after experimental ablation revealed that the original and newly formed axons displayed similar branching and extension abnormalities in the col4a6 mutants. These results collectively suggest that type IV collagen controls GC axon formation by regulating the integrity of the BM, which provides axons with the correct path to their targets. PMID:26451951

  8. Biosynthesis of alpha2(IV) and alpha1(IV) chains of collagen IV and interactions with matrix metalloproteinase-9.

    PubMed

    Toth, M; Sado, Y; Ninomiya, Y; Fridman, R

    1999-07-01

    In vitro binding studies with latent matrix metalloproteinase-9 (pro-MMP-9) have revealed the existence of nondisulfide-bonded alpha2(IV) chains on the cell surface capable of forming a high-affinity complex with the enzyme. Here we investigated the biosynthesis and cellular distribution of alpha2(IV) and alpha1(IV) chains in breast epithelial (MCF10A and MDA-MB-231) and fibrosarcoma (HT1080) cells by pulse-chase analysis followed by immunoprecipitation with chain-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb). These studies showed that whereas the alpha1(IV) chain remained in the intracellular compartment, nondisulfide-bonded alpha2(IV) chains were secreted into the media in a stable form. Consistently, only alpha2(IV) was detected on the cell surface by surface biotinylation or indirect immunofluorescence. In agreement with the pulse-chase analysis, media subjected to co-precipitation experiments with pro-MMP-9 or pro-MMP-9-affinity chromatography followed by immunoblotting with chain-specific mAbs resulted in the detection of alpha2(IV). A preferential secretion of nondisulfide-bonded alpha2(IV) chains was also observed in CHO-K1 cells transiently transfected with full-length mouse alpha2(IV) or alpha (IV) cDNAs. However, a complex of mouse alpha1(IV) with pro-MMP-9 was coprecipitated with exogenous enzyme from lysates of CHO-K1 cells transfected with mouse alpha1(IV), suggesting that under overexpression conditions the enzyme can also interact with the alpha1 (IV) chain. Collectively, these studies further demonstrate the interactions of pro-MMP-9 with collagen IV chains and a unique processing and targeting of nondisulfide-bonded alpha2(IV) chains that may play a role in the surface/matrix association of pro-MMP-9.

  9. Type IV Collagen is a Novel DEJ Biomarker that is Reduced by Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, J.D.; Gorski, J.P.; Dusevich, V.; Wang, Y.; Walker, M.P.

    2014-01-01

    The dental basement membrane (BM) is composed of collagen types IV, VI, VII, and XVII, fibronectin, and laminin and plays an inductive role in epithelial-mesenchymal interactions during tooth development. The BM is degraded and removed during later-stage tooth morphogenesis; however, its original position defines the location of the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) in mature teeth. We recently demonstrated that type VII collagen is a novel component of the inner enamel organic matrix layer contiguous with the DEJ. Since it is frequently co-expressed with and forms functional complexes with type VII collagen, we hypothesized that type IV collagen should also be localized to the DEJ in mature human teeth. To identify collagen IV, we first evaluated defect-free erupted teeth from various donors. To investigate a possible stabilizing role, we also evaluated extracted teeth exposed to high-dose radiotherapy – teeth that manifest post-radiotherapy DEJ instability. We now show that type IV collagen is a component within the morphological DEJ of posterior and anterior teeth from individuals aged 18 to 80 yr. Confocal microscopy revealed that immunostained type IV collagen was restricted to the 5- to 10-µm-wide optical DEJ, while collagenase treatment or previous in vivo tooth-level exposure to > 60 Gray irradiation severely reduced immunoreactivity. This assignment was confirmed by Western blotting with whole-tooth crown and enamel extracts. Without reduction, type IV collagen contained macromolecular α-chains of 225 and 250 kDa. Compositionally, our results identify type IV collagen as the first macromolecular biomarker of the morphological DEJ of mature teeth. Given its network structure and propensity to stabilize the dermal-epidermal junction, we propose that a collagen-IV-enriched DEJ may, in part, explain its well-known fracture toughness, crack propagation resistance, and stability. In contrast, loss of type IV collagen may represent a biochemical rationale for the

  10. Cells that emerge from embryonic explants produce fibers of type IV collagen.

    PubMed

    Chen, J M; Little, C D

    1985-10-01

    Double immunofluorescence staining experiments designed to examine the synthesis and deposition of collagen types I and IV in cultured explants of embryonic mouse lung revealed the presence of connective tissue-like fibers that were immunoreactive with anti-type IV collagen antibodies. This observation is contrary to the widely accepted belief that type IV collagen is found only in sheet-like arrangements beneath epithelia or as a sheath-like layer enveloping bundles of nerve or muscle cells. The extracellular matrix produced by cells that migrate from embryonic mouse lung rudiments in vitro was examined by double indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. Affinity-purified monospecific polyclonal antibodies were used to examine cells after growth on glass or native collagen substrata. The data show that embryonic mesenchymal cells can produce organized fibers of type IV collagen that are not contained within a basement membrane, and that embryonic epithelial cells deposit fibers and strands of type IV collagen beneath their basal surface when grown on glass; however, when grown on a rat tail collagen substratum the epithelial cells produce a fine meshwork. To our knowledge this work represents the first report that type IV collagen can be organized by cells into a fibrous extracellular matrix that is not a basement membrane.

  11. Binding of human plasminogen to basement-membrane (type IV) collagen.

    PubMed

    Stack, M S; Moser, T L; Pizzo, S V

    1992-05-15

    Plasminogen, the zymogen form of the serine proteinase plasmin, has been implicated in numerous physiological and pathological processes involving extracellular-matrix remodelling. We have previously demonstrated that the activation of plasminogen catalysed by tissue plasminogen activator is dramatically stimulated in the presence of basement-membrane-specific type IV collagen [Stack, Gonzalez-Gronow & Pizzo (1990) Biochemistry 29, 4966-4970]. The present paper describes the binding of plasminogen to type IV collagen. Plasminogen binds to both the alpha 1(IV) and alpha 2(IV) chains of basement-membrane collagen, with binding to the alpha 2(IV) chain preferentially inhibited by 6-aminohexanoic acid. This binding is specific and saturable, with Kd,app. values of 11.5 and 12.7 nM for collagen and gelatin respectively. Although collagen also binds to immobilized plasminogen, this interaction is unaffected by 6-aminohexanoic acid. Limited elastase proteolysis of plasminogen generated distinct collagen-binding fragments, which were identified as the kringle 1-3 and kringle 4 domains. No binding of collagen to mini-plasminogen was observed. These studies demonstrate a specific interaction between plasminogen and type IV collagen and provide further evidence for regulation of plasminogen activation by protein components of the extracellular matrix. PMID:1599390

  12. Collagen IV-Modified Scaffolds Improve Islet Survival and Function and Reduce Time to Euglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Woon Teck; Salvay, David M.; Silliman, Michael A.; Zhang, Xiaomin; Bannon, Zachary G.; Kaufman, Dixon B.; Lowe, William L.

    2013-01-01

    Islet transplantation on extracellular matrix (ECM) protein-modified biodegradable microporous poly(lactide-co-glycolide) scaffolds is a potential curative treatment for type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Collagen IV-modified scaffolds, relative to control scaffolds, significantly decreased the time required to restore euglycemia from 17 to 3 days. We investigated the processes by which collagen IV-modified scaffolds enhanced islet function and mediated early restoration of euglycemia post-transplantation. We characterized the effect of collagen IV-modified scaffolds on islet survival, metabolism, and insulin secretion in vitro and early- and intermediate-term islet mass and vascular density post-transplantation and correlated these with early restoration of euglycemia in a syngeneic mouse model. Control scaffolds maintained native islet morphologies and architectures as well as collagen IV-modified scaffolds in vivo. The islet size and vascular density increased, while β-cell proliferation decreased from day 16 to 113 post-transplantation. Collagen IV-modified scaffolds promoted islet cell viability and decreased early-stage apoptosis in islet cells in vitro—phenomena that coincided with enhanced islet metabolic function and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. These findings suggest that collagen IV-modified scaffolds promote the early restoration of euglycemia post-transplantation by enhancing islet metabolism and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. These studies of ECM proteins, in particular collagen IV, and islet function provide key insights for the engineering of a microenvironment that would serve as a platform for enhancing islet transplantation as a viable clinical therapy for T1DM. PMID:23713524

  13. SPARC Promotes Cell Invasion In Vivo by Decreasing Type IV Collagen Levels in the Basement Membrane.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, Meghan A; Jayadev, Ranjay; Miley, Ginger R; Blebea, Catherine A; Chi, Qiuyi; Ihara, Shinji; Sherwood, David R

    2016-02-01

    Overexpression of SPARC, a collagen-binding glycoprotein, is strongly associated with tumor invasion through extracellular matrix in many aggressive cancers. SPARC regulates numerous cellular processes including integrin-mediated cell adhesion, cell signaling pathways, and extracellular matrix assembly; however, the mechanism by which SPARC promotes cell invasion in vivo remains unclear. A main obstacle in understanding SPARC function has been the difficulty of visualizing and experimentally examining the dynamic interactions between invasive cells, extracellular matrix and SPARC in native tissue environments. Using the model of anchor cell invasion through the basement membrane (BM) extracellular matrix in Caenorhabditis elegans, we find that SPARC overexpression is highly pro-invasive and rescues BM transmigration in mutants with defects in diverse aspects of invasion, including cell polarity, invadopodia formation, and matrix metalloproteinase expression. By examining BM assembly, we find that overexpression of SPARC specifically decreases levels of BM type IV collagen, a crucial structural BM component. Reduction of type IV collagen mimicked SPARC overexpression and was sufficient to promote invasion. Tissue-specific overexpression and photobleaching experiments revealed that SPARC acts extracellularly to inhibit collagen incorporation into BM. By reducing endogenous SPARC, we also found that SPARC functions normally to traffic collagen from its site of synthesis to tissues that do not express collagen. We propose that a surplus of SPARC disrupts extracellular collagen trafficking and reduces BM collagen incorporation, thus weakening the BM barrier and dramatically enhancing its ability to be breached by invasive cells. PMID:26926673

  14. SPARC Promotes Cell Invasion In Vivo by Decreasing Type IV Collagen Levels in the Basement Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Morrissey, Meghan A.; Jayadev, Ranjay; Miley, Ginger R.; Blebea, Catherine A.; Chi, Qiuyi; Ihara, Shinji; Sherwood, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of SPARC, a collagen-binding glycoprotein, is strongly associated with tumor invasion through extracellular matrix in many aggressive cancers. SPARC regulates numerous cellular processes including integrin-mediated cell adhesion, cell signaling pathways, and extracellular matrix assembly; however, the mechanism by which SPARC promotes cell invasion in vivo remains unclear. A main obstacle in understanding SPARC function has been the difficulty of visualizing and experimentally examining the dynamic interactions between invasive cells, extracellular matrix and SPARC in native tissue environments. Using the model of anchor cell invasion through the basement membrane (BM) extracellular matrix in Caenorhabditis elegans, we find that SPARC overexpression is highly pro-invasive and rescues BM transmigration in mutants with defects in diverse aspects of invasion, including cell polarity, invadopodia formation, and matrix metalloproteinase expression. By examining BM assembly, we find that overexpression of SPARC specifically decreases levels of BM type IV collagen, a crucial structural BM component. Reduction of type IV collagen mimicked SPARC overexpression and was sufficient to promote invasion. Tissue-specific overexpression and photobleaching experiments revealed that SPARC acts extracellularly to inhibit collagen incorporation into BM. By reducing endogenous SPARC, we also found that SPARC functions normally to traffic collagen from its site of synthesis to tissues that do not express collagen. We propose that a surplus of SPARC disrupts extracellular collagen trafficking and reduces BM collagen incorporation, thus weakening the BM barrier and dramatically enhancing its ability to be breached by invasive cells. PMID:26926673

  15. Production and characterization of a monoclonal antibody to human Type IV collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, L. Y.; Engvall, E.; Hollister, D. W.; Burgeson, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    We have produced a monoclonal antibody to human basement membrane Type IV collagen. The antibody reacts with the pepsin-resistant, collagenase-sensitive domain of Type IV collagen isolated from placental membranes, but not with human collagens of Types I, II, III, V, 1alpha, 2alpha, and 3alpha. The antibody precipitates biosynthetically labeled human Type IV procollagen, and the precipitate contains both the alpha1 (IV) and alpha2 (IV) chains, suggesting the occurrence of both of these chains within the same triple-helical molecule. When used in indirect immunofluorescence, the antibody gives brilliant staining of basement membranes from a variety of human tissues but does not stain tissues of bovine, canine, rabbit, rat, or mouse origin. It is suggested that this antibody will be of value in research on the structure of human basement membrane collagen, on the distribution of this collagen in various basement membranes, and particularly for the study of basement membranes in normal human development and pathologic processes. Images Figure 1 Figure 5 PMID:6287846

  16. Crucial role for the VWF A1 domain in binding to type IV collagen.

    PubMed

    Flood, Veronica H; Schlauderaff, Abraham C; Haberichter, Sandra L; Slobodianuk, Tricia L; Jacobi, Paula M; Bellissimo, Daniel B; Christopherson, Pamela A; Friedman, Kenneth D; Gill, Joan Cox; Hoffmann, Raymond G; Montgomery, Robert R

    2015-04-01

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) contains binding sites for platelets and for vascular collagens to facilitate clot formation at sites of injury. Although previous work has shown that VWF can bind type IV collagen (collagen 4), little characterization of this interaction has been performed. We examined the binding of VWF to collagen 4 in vitro and extended this characterization to a murine model of defective VWF-collagen 4 interactions. The interactions of VWF and collagen 4 were further studied using plasma samples from a large study of both healthy controls and subjects with different types of von Willebrand disease (VWD). Our results show that collagen 4 appears to bind VWF exclusively via the VWF A1 domain, and that specific sequence variations identified through VWF patient samples and through site-directed mutagenesis in the VWF A1 domain can decrease or abrogate this interaction. In addition, VWF-dependent platelet binding to collagen 4 under flow conditions requires an intact VWF A1 domain. We observed that decreased binding to collagen 4 was associated with select VWF A1 domain sequence variations in type 1 and type 2M VWD. This suggests an additional mechanism through which VWF variants may alter hemostasis. PMID:25662333

  17. Abortion in mice induced by intravenous injections of antibodies to type IV collagen or laminin.

    PubMed

    Foidart, J M; Yaar, M; Figueroa, A; Wilk, A; Brown, K S; Liotta, L A

    1983-03-01

    Purified antibodies to laminin or Type IV collagen administered intravenously to pregnant mice were found to localize in the basement membranes of all maternal tissues as well as the parietal and visceral yolk sacs and trophoblast basement membranes but not in embryonic tissues. Antibodies to Type IV collagen induced a higher incidence of abortions, retroplacental hematomas and fetal deaths. When administered intraamniotically, both antiserums were embryotoxic. The functional consequences of the attachment of antibodies to these specific basement membrane antigens appear to be hemorrhage within the parietal and visceral yolk sacs and separation of fetal from maternal tissues. Complement activation appears to play an important role in the interruptions of pregnancy, because this was not observed in strains of mice lacking C5, the fifth component of complement, in mice depleted of C3 by administration of cobra venom factor, or in mice injected with the F(ab) fragments of antibody to Type IV collagen or laminin.

  18. Collagen IV and tenascin immunoreactivity as prognostic determinant in benign and malignant salivary gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Kärjä, V; Syrjänen, K; Syrjänen, S

    1995-07-01

    The expression of collagen IV and tenascin was studied in a series of 219 salivary gland tumours with special emphasis on the prognostic significance of these extracellular matrix constituents. Continuous and uninterrupted staining of the basal membrane with collagen IV antibody was found in 62% (64/103) of the carcinomas and in 92% (107/116) of the benign tumours, the staining being weak and interrupted in 38% (39/103) and 8% (9/116) of cases, respectively. Weak immunoreactivity for collagen IV was significantly (p = 0.05) associated with recurrences of the malignant salivary gland tumours. Intense collagen IV staining of the basal membrane was more frequent (35.9%) in patients who were alive, as compared with that (19.4%) of the patients who died of salivary gland cancer (p = 0.03). Similarly, the intactness of the basal membrane was directly related to patient survival. In benign tumours, no such differences were found. In multivariate analysis, collagen IV immunoreactivity was related to the age of the patients (p = 0.007) and to tumour diameter > 4.0 cm (p = 0.005). Intense tenascin immunoreactivity was found in 45% (46/103) of the carcinomas and in 43% (50/116) of the benign tumours, 55% (57/103) and 57% (66/116) of the cases being entirely tenascin-negative, respectively. Tenascin immunoreactivity was not related to the clinical behaviour of malignant salivary gland tumours. In benign tumours, an intense staining for tenascin was a determinant of recurrent disease (p = 0.05). In multivariate analysis, tenascin immunoreactivity was intimately associated with erbB-2 positivity (p = 0.03) and weak staining of collagen IV (p = 0.02).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Decreased interaction of fibronectin, type IV collagen, and heparin due to nonenzymatic glycation. Implications for diabetes mellitus

    SciTech Connect

    Tarsio, J.F.; Reger, L.A.; Furcht, L.T.

    1987-02-24

    The nonenzymatic glycation of basement membrane proteins, such as fibronectin and type IV collagen, occurs in diabetes mellitus. These proteins are nonenzymatically glycated in vivo and can also be nonenzymatically glycated in vitro. After 12 days of incubation at 37 /sup 0/C with 500 mM glucose, purified samples of human plasma fibronectin and native type IV collagen showed a 13.0- and 4.2-fold increase, respectively, in glycated amino acid levels in comparison to control samples incubated in the absence of glucose. Gelatin (denatured calfskin collagen) was glycated 22.3-fold under the same conditions. Scatchard analyses were performed on the binding of radiolabeled fibronectin to gelatin or type IV collagen. It was found that there is a 3-fold reduction in the affinity of fibronectin to type IV collagen due to the nonenzymatic glycation of fibronectin. The molecular association of control fibronectin or its glycated counterpart with (/sup 3/H)heparin was also determined. Scatchard analyses of this interaction showed no difference between control fibronectin and glycated fibronectin in (/sup 3/H)heparin binding. When fibronectin and (/sup 3/H)heparin were incubated together with type IV collagen at fixed concentrations, the binding of (/sup 3/H)heparin to fibronectin was significantly enhanced by the addition of type IV collagen. This positive cooperative binding of heparin with fibronectin and type IV collagen was reduced approximately 36% when fibronectin was nonenzymatically glycated, 64% when type IV collagen was nonenzymatically glycated, and 70% when both fibronectin and type IV collagen were nonenzymatically glycated. These observations with native type IV collagen are discussed relevant to changes in the molecular composition of basement membranes that occur in diabetes mellitus.

  20. Complete primary structure of the triple-helical region and the carboxyl-terminal domain of a new type IV collagen chain, alpha 5(IV).

    PubMed

    Pihlajaniemi, T; Pohjolainen, E R; Myers, J C

    1990-08-15

    We have isolated and characterized overlapping cDNA clones which code for a previously unidentified human collagen chain. Although the cDNA-derived primary structure of this new polypeptide is very similar to the basement membrane collagen alpha 1(IV) and alpha 2(IV) chains, the carboxyl-terminal collagenous/non-collagenous junction sequence does not correspond to the junction sequence in either of the newly described alpha 3(IV) or alpha 4(IV) chains (Butkowski, R.J., Langeveld, J.P.M., Wieslander, J., Hamilton, J., and Hudson, B. G. (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 7874-7877). Thus the protein presented here has been designated the alpha 5 chain of type IV collagen. Four clones encode an open reading frame of 1602 amino acids that cover about 95% of the entire chain including half of the amino-terminal 7S domain and all of the central triple-helical region and carboxyl-terminal NC1 domain. The collagenous region of the alpha 5(IV) chain contains 22 interruptions which are in most cases identical in distribution to those in both the alpha 1(IV) and alpha 2(IV) chains. Despite the relatively low degree of conservation among the amino acids in the triple-helical region of the three type IV collagen chains, analysis of the sequences clearly showed that alpha 5(IV) is more related to alpha 1(IV) than to alpha 2(IV). This similarity between the alpha 5(IV) and alpha 1(IV) chains is particularly evident in the NC1 domains where the two polypeptides are 83% identical in contrast to the alpha 5(IV) and alpha 2(IV) identity of 63%. In addition to greatly increasing the complexity of basement membranes, the alpha 5 chain of type IV collagen may be responsible for specialized functions of some of these extracellular matrices. In this regard, it is important to note that we have recently assigned the alpha 5(IV) gene to the region of the X chromosome containing the locus for a familial type of hereditary nephritis known as Alport syndrome (Myers, J.C., Jones, T.A., Pohjalainen, E

  1. Central tolerance regulates B cells reactive with Goodpasture antigen alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Su, Susan C.; Hecox, Douglas B.; Brady, Graham F.; Mackin, Katherine M.; Clark, Amy G.; Foster, Mary H.

    2008-01-01

    Patients and rodents with Goodpasture’s syndrome (GPS) develop severe autoimmune crescentic glomerulonephritis, kidney failure, and lung hemorrhage due to binding of pathogenic autoantibodies to the NC1 domain of the alpha3 chain of type IV collagen. Target epitopes are cryptic, normally hidden from circulating antibodies by protein-protein interactions and the highly tissue-restricted expression of the alpha3(IV) collagen chain. Based on this limited antigen exposure, it has been suggested that target epitopes are not available as B cell tolerogens. To determine how pathogenic anti-GPS autoantibody responses are regulated, we generated an immunoglobulin (Ig) transgenic (Tg) mouse model that expresses an Ig that binds alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen epitopes recognized by serum IgG of patients with GPS. Phenotypic analysis reveals B cell depletion and light chain editing in Tg mice. To determine the default tolerance phenotype in the absence of receptor editing and endogenous lymphocyte populations, we crossed Tg mice two generations with mice deficient in recombinase activating gene (Rag). Resulting Tg Rag-deficient mice have central B cell deletion. Thus development of Tg anti-alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen B cells is halted in the bone marrow, at which point the cells are deleted unless rescued by a Rag enzyme-dependent process, such as editing. The central tolerance phenotype implies that tolerizing self antigen is expressed in bone marrow. PMID:18941198

  2. The hydrolyzation of collagen by fucoidan oligosaccharide's complex with CeIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiachao; Gao, Xin; Zhang, Zhaohui; Li, Zhaojie; Huo, Lihua; Xue, Changhu

    2006-04-01

    Fucoidan is such a polysaccharide that its hydroxies are easy to combine with lanthanons ion (CeIV) to form complex. This work obtained the complexes of three fucoidan oligosaccharides with different molecular weights F1 (>5000), F2 (1000 5000) and F3 (<1000) by hydrolyzing Oligosaccharide collagen with sulfuric acid. It is found that the fucoidan oligosaccharide F3 can form complex with more CeIV than F1 and F2. Hydrolyzing collagen with the complex was carried out to produce amino acid and peptides. All the three fucoidan oligosaccharide complexes with CeIV (F1, F2, F3) can catalyze by the artificial hydrolytic enzyme, and the activity of the complex of F3 is the highest.

  3. Type IV collagen mRNA accumulates in the mesenchymal compartment at early stages of murine developing intestine

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The expression of type IV collagen mRNA during mouse intestinal morphogenesis was examined by in situ hybridization using a cDNA probe corresponding to mRNA for alpha 1 (IV) chain. Type IV collagen mRNA is detected in the embryonic mesenchymal cells at early stages of development (12 d of gestation). A segregation of mesenchymal cells expressing high levels of type IV collagen mRNA in close vicinity of the epithelium occurs just before villus formation. During villus outgrowth, type IV collagen mRNA, still confined to mesenchyme-derived tissues, is progressively restricted to the mucosal connective tissue (the lamina propria) and to a lesser extent to the muscular layers. In the adult, the amount of messenger is quite low as compared to the level found in the developing intestine and the in situ hybridization signal, indistinguishable from the background, is uniform throughout the whole intestinal wall. At all developmental stages no detectable specific hybridization signal is virtually observed over the epithelium cell layer. These results show that high amounts of the type IV collagen messenger are detected during phases of intensive morphogenetic events. Furthermore, they reinforce the notion already gained previously (Simon-Assmann et al. 1988) that the mesenchymal compartment is the principal endogenous source of type IV collagen. They also indicate that the continuous migration of epithelial cells along the basement membrane of intestinal villi in the mature organ is not accompanied by a significant remodeling of the collagen IV network. PMID:2307711

  4. The contribution of increased collagen synthesis to human glomerulosclerosis: a quantitative analysis of alpha 2IV collagen mRNA expression by competitive polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We previously reported that one of the main components of the sclerotic material in human glomerular diseases was type IV collagen. In this study we examined the contribution of increased synthesis to this process at the gene expression level. Sufficient material has not been available to study type IV collagen synthesis by normal or sclerotic glomeruli in humans. We took advantage of the availability of nephrectomy specimens from patients with renal carcinoma, and of the observation that approximately 50% of these patients develop varying degrees of glomerulosclerosis. We microdissected glomeruli from 10 patients and analyzed them using in situ reverse transcription coupled with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses (in situ RT-PCR). alpha 2IV collagen mRNA, after reverse transcription into cDNA, was detected in all patients and appeared to be increased in those with glomerulosclerosis (n = 5). A competitive PCR assay was developed to quantitate this change. There was an average 3.7-fold increase in glomerular type IV collagen cDNA in patients with significant sclerosis. This change was not due to an increased number of glomerular cells. Thus, glomerulosclerosis in humans is associated with an elevation of glomerular type IV collagen gene expression, suggesting that increased synthesis of type IV collagen may represent one component of this process. PMID:1281210

  5. Collagen-IV supported embryoid bodies formation and differentiation from buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Taru Sharma, G.; Dubey, Pawan K.; Verma, Om Prakash; Pratheesh, M.D.; Nath, Amar; Sai Kumar, G.

    2012-08-03

    Graphical abstract: EBs formation, characterization and expression of germinal layers marker genes of in vivo developed teratoma using four different types of extracellular matrices. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Collagen-IV matrix is found cytocompatible for EBs formation and differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Established 3D microenvironment for ES cells development and differentiation into three germ layers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Collagen-IV may be useful as promising candidate for ES cells based therapeutic applications. -- Abstract: Embryoid bodies (EBs) are used as in vitro model to study early extraembryonic tissue formation and differentiation. In this study, a novel method using three dimensional extracellular matrices for in vitro generation of EBs from buffalo embryonic stem (ES) cells and its differentiation potential by teratoma formation was successfully established. In vitro derived inner cell masses (ICMs) of hatched buffalo blastocyst were cultured on buffalo fetal fibroblast feeder layer for primary cell colony formation. For generation of EBs, pluripotent ES cells were seeded onto four different types of extracellular matrices viz; collagen-IV, laminin, fibronectin and matrigel using undifferentiating ES cell culture medium. After 5 days of culture, ESCs gradually grew into aggregates and formed simple EBs having circular structures. Twenty-six days later, they formed cystic EBs over collagen matrix with higher EBs formation and greater proliferation rate as compared to other extracellular matrices. Studies involving histological observations, fluorescence microscopy and RT-PCR analysis of the in vivo developed teratoma revealed that presence of all the three germ layer derivatives viz. ectoderm (NCAM), mesoderm (Flk-1) and endoderm (AFP). In conclusion, the method described here demonstrates a simple and cost-effective way of generating EBs from buffalo ES cells. Collagen-IV matrix was found cytocompatible as it

  6. Arrangement of type IV collagen on NH₂ and COOH functionalized surfaces.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Nuno Miranda; González-García, Cristina; Salmerón-Sánchez, Manuel; Altankov, George

    2011-12-01

    Apart from the paradigm that cell-biomaterials interaction depends on the adsorption of soluble adhesive proteins we anticipate that upon distinct conditions also other, less soluble ECM proteins such as collagens, associate with the biomaterials interface with consequences for cellular response that might be of significant bioengineering interest. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM) we seek to follow the nanoscale behavior of adsorbed type IV collagen (Col IV)--a unique multifunctional matrix protein involved in the organization of basement membranes (BMs) including vascular ones. We have previously shown that substratum wettability significantly affects Col IV adsorption pattern, and in turn alters endothelial cells interaction. Here we introduce two new model surfaces based on self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), a positively charged -NH(2) , and negatively charged -COOH surface, to learn more about their particular effect on Col IV behavior. AFM studies revealed distinct pattern of Col IV assembly onto the two SAMs resembling different aspects of network-like structure or aggregates (suggesting altered protein conformation). Moreover, the amount of adsorbed FITC-labeled Col IV was quantified and showed about twice more protein on NH(2) substrata. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells attached less efficiently to Col IV adsorbed on negatively charged COOH surface judged by altered cell spreading, focal adhesions formation, and actin cytoskeleton development. Immunofluorescence studies also revealed better Col IV recognition by both α(1) and α(2) integrins on positively charged NH(2) substrata resulting in higher phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase recruitment in the focal adhesion complexes. On COOH surface, no integrin clustering was observed. Taken altogether these results, point to the possibility that combined NH(2) and Col IV functionalization may support endothelization of cardiovascular implants.

  7. The human alpha 2(IV) collagen gene, COL4A2, is syntenic with the alpha 1(IV) gene, COL4A1, on chromosome 13.

    PubMed

    Solomon, E; Hall, V; Kurkinen, M

    1987-05-01

    We have previously assigned the gene for the alpha 1 chain of type IV collagen to chromosome 13. In this report we show that the gene coding for the second chain of this heterotrimer is on the same chromosome. This is the first example of the genes for both chains of one collagen molecule being syntenic. PMID:3674752

  8. Basement membrane proteins in salivary gland tumours. Distribution of type IV collagen and laminin.

    PubMed

    Skalova, A; Leivo, I

    1992-01-01

    Immunohistochemical localization of type IV collagen and laminin in normal salivary glands and in salivary gland tumours of various types was studied using rabbit antisera. In normal salivary glands, type IV collagen and laminin were co-localized in basement membranes surrounding acini, ducts, fat cells and peripheral nerves. In salivary gland tumours, three main patterns of co-expression of these basement membrane proteins were distinguished. Linear basement membrane-like staining was detected in duct-cell-derived benign salivary gland tumours and in acinic cell carcinomas. In invasive lesions, however, these basement membrane proteins were distributed in an irregular, interrupted manner, and in many cases they were completely absent. Both benign and malignant salivary gland tumours which have a prominent myoepithelial cell component display a particular deposition of basement membrane molecules adjacent to the modified myoepithelial cells, and at the margins of extracellular matrix deposits within these tumours.

  9. Basement membrane structure in situ: evidence for lateral associations in the type IV collagen network

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    To determine molecular architecture of the type IV collagen network in situ, the human amniotic basement membrane has been studied en face in stereo relief by high resolution unidirectional metal shadow casting aided by antibody decoration and morphometry. The appearance of the intact basement membrane is that of a thin sheet in which there are regions of branching strands. Salt extraction further exposes these strands to reveal an extensive irregular polygonal network that can be specifically decorated with gold-conjugated anti-type IV collagen antibody. At high magnification one sees that the network, which contains integral (9-11 nm net diameter) globular domains, is formed in great part by lateral association of monomolecular filaments to form branching strands of variable but narrow diameters. Branch points are variably spaced apart by an average of 45 nm with 4.4 globular domains per micron of strand length. Monomolecular filaments (1.7-nm net diameter) often appear to twist around each other along the strand axis; we propose that super helix formation is an inherent characteristic of lateral assembly. A previous study (Yurchenco, P. D., and H. Furthmayr. 1984. Biochemistry. 23:1839) presented evidence that purified murine type IV collagen dimers polymerize to form polygonal arrays of laterally as well as end-domain-associated molecules. The architecture of this polymer is similar to the network seen in the amnion, with lateral binding a major contributor to each. Thus, to a first approximation, isolated type IV collagen can reconstitute in vitro the polymeric molecular architecture it assumes in vivo. PMID:3693393

  10. Irradiation Alters MMP-2/TIMP-2 System and Collagen Type IV Degradation in Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Won Hee; Warrington, Junie P.; Sonntag, William E.; Lee, Yong Woo

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption is one of the major consequences of radiation-induced normal tissue injury in the central nervous system. We examined the effects of whole-brain irradiation on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)/tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) and extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation in the brain. Methods and Materials: Animals received either whole-brain irradiation (a single dose of 10 Gy {gamma}-rays or a fractionated dose of 40 Gy {gamma}-rays, total) or sham-irradiation and were maintained for 4, 8, and 24 h following irradiation. mRNA expression levels of MMPs and TIMPs in the brain were analyzed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The functional activity of MMPs was measured by in situ zymography, and degradation of ECM was visualized by collagen type IV immunofluorescent staining. Results: A significant increase in mRNA expression levels of MMP-2, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 was observed in irradiated brains compared to that in sham-irradiated controls. In situ zymography revealed a strong gelatinolytic activity in the brain 24 h postirradiation, and the enhanced gelatinolytic activity mediated by irradiation was significantly attenuated in the presence of anti-MMP-2 antibody. A significant reduction in collagen type IV immunoreactivity was also detected in the brain at 24 h after irradiation. In contrast, the levels of collagen type IV were not significantly changed at 4 and 8 h after irradiation compared with the sham-irradiated controls. Conclusions: The present study demonstrates for the first time that radiation induces an imbalance between MMP-2 and TIMP-2 levels and suggests that degradation of collagen type IV, a major ECM component of BBB basement membrane, may have a role in the pathogenesis of brain injury.

  11. Aging decreases collagen IV expression in vivo in the dermo-epidermal junction and in vitro in dermal fibroblasts: possible involvement of TGF-β1.

    PubMed

    Feru, Jezabel; Delobbe, Etienne; Ramont, Laurent; Brassart, Bertrand; Terryn, Christine; Dupont-Deshorgue, Aurelie; Garbar, Christian; Monboisse, Jean-Claude; Maquart, Francois-Xavier; Brassart-Pasco, Sylvie

    2016-08-01

    Collagen IV is a major component of the dermo-epidermal junction (DEJ). To study expression of collagen IV upon aging in the DEJ and dermal fibroblasts isolated from the same patients. A model of senescent fibroblasts was developed in order to identify biological compounds that might restore the level of collagen IV. Skin fragments of women (30 to 70 years old) were collected. Localisation of collagen IV expression in the DEJ was studied by immunofluorescence. Fibroblast collagen IV expression was studied by real-time PCR, ELISA, and western blotting. Premature senescence was simulated by exposing fibroblasts to subcytotoxic H2O2 concentrations. Collagen IV decreased in the DEJ and fibroblasts relative to age. TGF-β1 treatment significantly increased collagen IV gene and protein expression in fibroblasts and restored expression in the model of senescence. Addition of TGF-β1-neutralizing antibody to fibroblast cultures decreased collagen IV expression. Taken together, the results suggest that the decrease in collagen IV in the DEJ, relative to age, could be due to a decrease in collagen IV expression by senescent dermal fibroblasts and may involve TGF-β1 signalling. PMID:27124123

  12. Dynamic Reorganization and Enzymatic Remodeling of Type IV Collagen at Cell-Biomaterial Interface.

    PubMed

    Coelho, N M; Llopis-Hernández, V; Salmerón-Sánchez, M; Altankov, G

    2016-01-01

    Vascular basement membrane remodeling involves assembly and degradation of its main constituents, type IV collagen (Col IV) and laminin, which is critical during development, angiogenesis, and tissue repair. Remodeling can also occur at cell-biomaterials interface altering significantly the biocompatibility of implants. Here we describe the fate of adsorbed Col IV in contact with endothelial cells adhering on positively charged NH2 or hydrophobic CH3 substrata, both based on self-assembly monolayers (SAMs) and studied alone or mixed in different proportions. AFM studies revealed distinct pattern of adsorbed Col IV, varying from single molecular deposition on pure NH2 to network-like assembly on mixed SAMs, turning to big globular aggregates on bare CH3. Human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVECs) interact better with Col IV adsorbed as single molecules on NH2 surface and readily rearrange it in fibril-like pattern that coincide with secreted fibronectin fibrils. The cells show flattened morphology and well-developed focal adhesion complexes that are rich on phosphorylated FAK while expressing markedly low pericellular proteolytic activity. Conversely, on hydrophobic CH3 substrata HUVECs showed abrogated spreading and FAK phosphorylation, combined with less reorganization of the aggregated Col IV and significantly increased proteolytic activity. The later involves both MMP-2 and MMP-9, as measured by zymography and FITC-Col IV release. The mixed SAMs support intermediate remodeling activity. Taken together these results show that chemical functionalization combined with Col IV preadsorption provides a tool for guiding the endothelial cells behavior and pericellular proteolytic activity, events that strongly affect the fate of cardiovascular implants. PMID:27567485

  13. Phorbol esters enhance attachment of NIH/3T3 cells to laminin and type IV collagen substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Shigemi; Ben, T.L.; De Luca, L.M. )

    1988-11-01

    The effect of phorbol esters on the adhesive properties of NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts was investigated using plastic substrates precoated with the extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin, collagen, and laminin. Treatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) enhanced NIH/3T3 cell attachment to laminin and type IV collagen substrates but had little or no effect on attachment to fibronectin and type I collagen substrates. The effect of PMA in enhancing cell attachment to laminin and type IV collagen substrates was dose dependent between 10{sup {minus}9} and 10{sup {minus}7} M. PMA was effective as early as 30 min; the effect reached a maximum at 2 h and decreased gradually. Phorbol 12, 13-dibenzoate and phorbol 12, 13-diacetate were effective but to a lesser extent and phorbol 12-myristate and phorbol 13-acetate showed little or no effect. These results suggest that PMA may enhance NIH/3T3 cell adhesion through effects on laminin and type IV collagen receptors. Retinoic acid, which itself requires at least 6 h to show an effect on attachment, did not have any effect on cell attachment in 2 h and, if anything, slightly inhibited PMA-enhanced cell attachment to laminin and type IV collagen substrates.

  14. Role of 17 beta-estradiol on type IV collagen fibers volumetric density in the basement membrane of bladder wall.

    PubMed

    de Fraga, Rogerio; Dambros, Miriam; Miyaoka, Ricardo; Riccetto, Cássio Luís Zanettini; Palma, Paulo César Rodrigues

    2007-10-01

    The authors quantified the type IV collagen fibers volumetric density in the basement membrane of bladder wall of ovariectomized rats with and without estradiol replacement. This study was conducted on 40 Wistar rats (3 months old) randomly divided in 4 groups: group 1, remained intact (control); group 2, submitted to bilateral oophorectomy and daily replacement 4 weeks later of 17 beta-estradiol for 12 weeks; group 3, sham operated and daily replacement 4 weeks later of sesame oil for 12 weeks; and group 4, submitted to bilateral oophorectomy and killed after 12 weeks. It was used in immunohistochemistry evaluation using type IV collagen polyclonal antibody to stain the fibers on paraffin rat bladder sections. The M-42 stereological grid system was used to analyze the fibers. Ovariectomy had an increase effect on the volumetric density of the type IV collagen fibers in the basement membrane of rat bladder wall. Estradiol replacement in castrated animals demonstrated a significative difference in the stereological parameters when compared to the castrated group without hormonal replacement. Surgical castration performed on rats induced an increasing volumetric density of type IV collagen fibers in the basement membrane of rats bladder wall and the estradiol treatment had a significant effect in keeping a low volumetric density of type IV collagen fibers in the basement membrane of rats bladder wall.

  15. Type IV collagen is an activating ligand for the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor GPR126.

    PubMed

    Paavola, Kevin J; Sidik, Harwin; Zuchero, J Bradley; Eckart, Michael; Talbot, William S

    2014-08-12

    GPR126 is an orphan heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is essential for the development of diverse organs. We found that type IV collagen, a major constituent of the basement membrane, binds to Gpr126 and activates its signaling function. Type IV collagen stimulated the production of cyclic adenosine monophosphate in rodent Schwann cells, which require Gpr126 activity to differentiate, and in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells expressing exogenous Gpr126. Type IV collagen specifically bound to the extracellular amino-terminal region of Gpr126 containing the CUB (complement, Uegf, Bmp1) and pentraxin domains. Gpr126 derivatives lacking the entire amino-terminal region were constitutively active, suggesting that this region inhibits signaling and that ligand binding relieves this inhibition to stimulate receptor activity. A new zebrafish mutation that truncates Gpr126 after the CUB and pentraxin domains disrupted development of peripheral nerves and the inner ear. Thus, our findings identify type IV collagen as an activating ligand for GPR126, define its mechanism of activation, and highlight a previously unrecognized signaling function of type IV collagen in basement membranes. PMID:25118328

  16. L-arginine mediated renaturation enhances yield of human, α6 Type IV collagen non-collagenous domain from bacterial inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Gunda, Venugopal; Boosani, Chandra Shekhar; Verma, Raj Kumar; Guda, Chittibabu; Sudhakar, Yakkanti Akul

    2012-10-01

    The anti-angiogenic, carboxy terminal non-collagenous domain (NC1) derived from human Collagen type IV alpha 6 chain, [α6(IV)NC1] or hexastatin, was earlier obtained using different recombinant methods of expression in bacterial systems. However, the effect of L-arginine mediated renaturation in enhancing the relative yields of this protein from bacterial inclusion bodies has not been evaluated. In the present study, direct stirring and on-column renaturation methods using L-arginine and different size exclusion chromatography matrices were applied for enhancing the solubility in purifying the recombinant α6(IV)NC1 from bacterial inclusion bodies. This methodology enabled purification of higher quantities of soluble protein from inclusion bodies, which inhibited endothelial cell proliferation, migration and tube formation. Thus, the scope for L-arginine mediated renaturation in obtaining higher yields of soluble, biologically active NC1 domain from bacterial inclusion bodies was evaluated.

  17. Bromine is an essential trace element for assembly of collagen IV scaffolds in tissue development and architecture.

    PubMed

    McCall, A Scott; Cummings, Christopher F; Bhave, Gautam; Vanacore, Roberto; Page-McCaw, Andrea; Hudson, Billy G

    2014-06-01

    Bromine is ubiquitously present in animals as ionic bromide (Br(-)) yet has no known essential function. Herein, we demonstrate that Br(-) is a required cofactor for peroxidasin-catalyzed formation of sulfilimine crosslinks, a posttranslational modification essential for tissue development and architecture found within the collagen IV scaffold of basement membranes (BMs). Bromide, converted to hypobromous acid, forms a bromosulfonium-ion intermediate that energetically selects for sulfilimine formation. Dietary Br deficiency is lethal in Drosophila, whereas Br replenishment restores viability, demonstrating its physiologic requirement. Importantly, Br-deficient flies phenocopy the developmental and BM defects observed in peroxidasin mutants and indicate a functional connection between Br(-), collagen IV, and peroxidasin. We establish that Br(-) is required for sulfilimine formation within collagen IV, an event critical for BM assembly and tissue development. Thus, bromine is an essential trace element for all animals, and its deficiency may be relevant to BM alterations observed in nutritional and smoking-related disease. PAPERFLICK:

  18. Structure and biology of the globular domain of basement membrane type IV collagen.

    PubMed

    Timpl, R; Oberbäumer, I; von der Mark, H; Bode, W; Wick, G; Weber, S; Engel, J

    1985-01-01

    A procedure was developed for purifying the globular domain NC1 of basement membrane collagen from collagenase digests of a variety of tissues. The globule (Mr = 170,000) is a hexameric structure originating from two collagen IV molecules that are cross-linked at their COOH-terminal ends. Dissociation into subunits derived from alpha 1(IV) and alpha 2(IV) chains occurs at a pH below 4 and after denaturation (8 M urea). The subunits obtained include monomers (Mr = 28,000) and two different dimers (Da,Db) which are connected by disulfide bonds (Db) and/or nonreducible bonds (Da). Almost perfect reconstitution to hexamers is obtained in neutral buffer with mixtures of the subunits or purified dimers but not with purified monomers. Stabilization by dimer formation and other physical data suggest conformationally distinct segments within the subunits, which is also supported by a repeating subdomain structure deduced from cDNA sequences. Monocline crystals of NC1 give a sufficiently detailed X-ray diffraction pattern that should permit elucidation of the three-dimensional structure of the hexamer. Antibodies raised against the globular domain react with all subunits and mainly recognize epitopes stabilized by internal disulfide bridges and/or the hexameric assembly. Immunoprecipitation tests with these antibodies demonstrated a slightly larger subunit size of NC1 in PYS-2 cell culture and the rapid release of precursor-specific segments prior to secretion from the cells. Autoantibodies against mouse tumor NC1 were produced in mice and were detected both in the blood and as tissue-bound forms (kidney, lung). The autoantibody response is accompanied by certain pathological alterations mimicking Goodpasture's syndrome. The possible relationship between the two diseases is substantiated by reaction of Goodpasture antisera with the globular domain obtained from various tissue sources. PMID:2421628

  19. Immunohistochemical Analysis of Collagen IV and Laminin Expression in Spontaneous Melanoma Regression in the Melanoma-Bearing Libechov Minipig.

    PubMed

    Planska, Daniela; Burocziova, Monika; Strnadel, Jan; Horak, Vratislav

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous regression (SR) of human melanoma is a rare, well-documented phenomenon that is not still fully understood. Its detailed study cannot be performed in patients due to ethical reasons. Using the Melanoma-bearing Libechov Minipig (MeLiM) animals of various ages (from 3 weeks to 8 months) we implemented a long-term monitoring of melanoma growth and SR. We focused on immunohistochemical detection of two important extracellular matrix proteins, collagen IV and laminin, which are associated with cancer. We showed that SR of melanoma is a highly dynamic process. The expression of collagen IV and laminin correlated with changes in population of melanoma cells. Tumours of 3-week-old animals consisted primarily of melanoma cells with a granular expression of collagen IV and laminin around them. Thereafter, melanoma cells were gradually destroyed and tumour tissue was rebuilt into the connective tissue. Collagen IV expression slightly increased in tumours of 10-week-old pigs showing extracellular fibrous appearance. In tumours of older animals, areas lacking melanoma cells demonstrated a low expression and areas still containing melanoma cells a high expression of both proteins. We considered the age of 10 weeks as a turning point in the transition between tumour growth and SR of the MeLiM melanoma.

  20. Genes for collagen types I, IV, and V are transcribed in HeLa cells but a postinitiation block prevents the accumulation of type I mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, J.J.; Wroth, T.H.; Ackerman, S. )

    1991-01-01

    Collagen mRNA synthesis in HeLa cells was evaluated by in vitro transcription of type I collagen DNA, nuclear run-on studies, and steady-state mRNA analysis. Type I collagen mRNA was accurately initiated by HeLa cell RNQA polymerase II in nuclear extracts, and run-on analysis indicated that mRNAs for collagen types {alpha}1(I), {alpha}2(I), {alpha}1(III), {alpha}1(IV), and {alpha}2(V) were synthesized in HeLa cells. However, on assessing the steady-state levels of mRNAs of collagen types {alpha}1(I), {alpha}2(I), {alpha}1(IV), and {alpha}2(V), no type I mRNA was found in HeLa cells while types {alpha}1(IV) and {alpha}2(V) collagen mRNAs were observed. These results suggest that a postinitiation process prevents the accumulation of type I collagen mRNAs in HeLa cells. Persistence of types IV and V collagen mRNAs is consistent with the involvement of types IV and V collagen in adhesion of HeLa cells to glass or plastic.

  1. Human collagen genes encoding basement membrane. cap alpha. 1(IV) and. cap alpha. 2(IV) chains map to the distal long arm of chromosome 13

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, C.A.; Emanuel, B.S.; Hansen, J.R.; Cavenee, W.K.; Myers, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    At least 20 genes encode the structurally related collagen chains that comprise > 10 homo- or heterotrimeric types. Six members of this multigene family have been assigned to five chromosomes in the human genome. The two type I genes, ..cap alpha..1 and ..cap alpha..2, are located on chromosomes 17 and 7, respectively, and the ..cap alpha..1(II) gene is located on chromosome 12. Their recent mapping of the ..cap alpha..1(III) and ..cap alpha..2(V) genes to the q24.3 ..-->.. q31 region of chromosome 2 provided the only evidence that the collagen genes are not entirely dispersed. To further determine their organization, the authors and others localized the ..cap alpha..1(IV) gene to chromosome 13 and in their experiments sublocalized the gene to band q34 by in situ hybridization. Here they show the presence of the ..cap alpha..2 type IV locus also on the distal long arm of chromosome 13 by hybridizing a human ..cap alpha..2(IV) cDNA clone to rodent-human hybrids and to metaphase chromosomes. These studies represent the only demonstration of linkage between genes encoding both polypeptide chains of the same collagen type.

  2. Type IV Collagens and Basement Membrane Diseases: Cell Biology and Pathogenic Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mao, Mao; Alavi, Marcel V; Labelle-Dumais, Cassandre; Gould, Douglas B

    2015-01-01

    Basement membranes are highly specialized extracellular matrices. Once considered inert scaffolds, basement membranes are now viewed as dynamic and versatile environments that modulate cellular behaviors to regulate tissue development, function, and repair. Increasing evidence suggests that, in addition to providing structural support to neighboring cells, basement membranes serve as reservoirs of growth factors that direct and fine-tune cellular functions. Type IV collagens are a major component of all basement membranes. They evolved along with the earliest multicellular organisms and have been integrated into diverse fundamental biological processes as time and evolution shaped the animal kingdom. The roles of basement membranes in humans are as complex and diverse as their distributions and molecular composition. As a result, basement membrane defects result in multisystem disorders with ambiguous and overlapping boundaries that likely reflect the simultaneous interplay and integration of multiple cellular pathways and processes. Consequently, there will be no single treatment for basement membrane disorders, and therapies are likely to be as varied as the phenotypes. Understanding tissue-specific pathology and the underlying molecular mechanism is the present challenge; personalized medicine will rely upon understanding how a given mutation impacts diverse cellular functions.

  3. Assembly of lamina-specific neuronal connections by Slit bound to type IV Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Tong; Staub, Wendy; Robles, Estuardo; Gosse, Nathan J.; Cole, Gregory J.; Baier, Herwig

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms that generate specific neuronal connections in the brain are under intense investigation. In zebrafish, retinal ganglion cells project their axons into at least six layers within the neuropil of the midbrain tectum. Each axon elaborates a single, planar arbor in one of the target layers and forms synapses onto the dendrites of tectal neurons. We show that the laminar specificity of retinotectal connections does not depend on self-sorting interactions among RGC axons. Rather, tectum-derived Slit1, signaling through axonal Robo2, guides neurites to their target layer. Genetic and biochemical studies indicate that Slit binds to Dragnet (Col4a5), a type IV Collagen, which forms the basement membrane on the surface of the tectum. We further show that radial glial endfeet are required for the basement-membrane anchoring of Slit. We propose that Slit1 signaling, perhaps in the form of a superficial-to-deep gradient, presents laminar positional cues to ingrowing retinal axons. PMID:21729787

  4. Liver fibrosis in elderly cadavers: localization of collagen types I, III, and IV, α-smooth muscle actin, and elastic fibers.

    PubMed

    Mak, Ki M; Chu, Edward; Lau, K H Vincent; Kwong, Allison J

    2012-07-01

    We have shown a high prevalence of liver fibrosis in elderly cadavers with diverse causes of death by Sirius red stain; however, the various collagen types in these samples have yet to be evaluated. To further characterize the histopathology of the fibrotic lesions in the livers of these elderly cadavers, this study used immunohistochemistry and histochemistry to identify the principal collagens produced in liver fibrosis, fibrogenic cells and elastic fibers. Collagen I and III immunoreactions were found to colocalize in collagen fibers of fibrotic central veins, perisinusoidal fibrotic foci, portal tract stroma, and fibrous septa. α-Smooth muscle actin-expressing perisinusoidal hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), as well as perivenular, portal, and septal myofibroblasts, were closely associated with collagen fibers, reflecting their fibrogenic functions. HSCs and myofibroblasts were also noted to express collagen IV, which may contribute to production of basal lamina-like structures. In fibrotic livers, the sinusoidal lining showed variable immunostaining for collagen IV. Collagen IV immunostaining revealed vascular proliferation and atypical ductular reaction at the portal-septal parenchymal borders, as well as capillary-like vessels in the lobular parenchyma. While elastic fibers were absent in the space of Disse, they were found to codistribute with collagens in portal tracts, fibrous septa and central veins. Our combined assessment of collagen types, HSCs, myofibroblasts, and elastic fibers is significant in understanding the histopathology of fibrosis in the aging liver.

  5. Bromine is an essential trace element for assembly of collagen IV scaffolds in tissue development and architecture

    PubMed Central

    McCall, A. Scott; Cummings, Christopher F.; Bhave, Gautam; Vanacore, Roberto; Page-McCaw, Andrea; Hudson, Billy G.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Bromine is ubiquitously present in animals as ionic bromide (Br−) yet has no known essential function. Herein, we demonstrate that Br− is a required cofactor for peroxidasin-catalyzed formation of sulfilimine crosslinks, a post-translational modification essential for tissue development and architecture found within the collagen IV scaffold of basement membranes (BMs). Bromide, converted to hypobromous acid, forms a bromosulfonium-ion intermediate that energetically selects for sulfilimine formation. Dietary Br-deficiency is lethal in Drosophila while Br-replenishment restores viability, demonstrating its physiologic requirement. Importantly, Br-deficient flies phenocopy the developmental and BM defects observed in peroxidasin mutants and indicate a functional connection between Br−, collagen IV, and peroxidasin. We establish that Br− is required for sulfilimine formation within collagen IV, an event critical for BM assembly and tissue development. Thus, bromine is an essential trace element for all animals and its deficiency may be relevant to BM alterations observed in nutritional and smoking related disease. PMID:24906154

  6. Lsa63, a newly identified surface protein of Leptospira interrogans binds laminin and collagen IV.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Monica L; de Morais, Zenaide M; Gonçales, Amane P; Romero, Eliete C; Vasconcellos, Silvio A; Nascimento, Ana L T O

    2010-01-01

    Leptospira interrogans is the etiological agent of leptospirosis, a zoonotic disease that affects populations worldwide. We have identified in proteomic studies a protein that is encoded by the gene LIC10314 and expressed in virulent strain of L. interrogans serovar Pomona. This protein was predicted to be surface exposed by PSORT program and contains a p83/100 domain identified by BLAST analysis that is conserved in protein antigens of several strains of Borrelia and Treponema spp. The proteins containing this domain have been claimed antigen candidates for serodiagnosis of Lyme borreliosis. Thus, we have cloned the LIC10314 and expressed the protein in Escherichia coli BL21-SI strain by using the expression vector pAE. The recombinant protein tagged with N-terminal hexahistidine was purified by metal-charged chromatography and characterized by circular dichroism spectroscopy. This protein is conserved among several species of pathogenic Leptospira and absent in the saprophytic strain L. biflexa. We confirm by liquid-phase immunofluorescence assays with living organisms that this protein is most likely a new surface leptospiral protein. The ability of the protein to mediate attachment to ECM components was evaluated by binding assays. The leptospiral protein encoded by LIC10314, named Lsa63 (Leptospiral surface adhesin of 63kDa), binds strongly to laminin and collagen IV in a dose-dependent and saturable fashion. In addition, Lsa63 is probably expressed during infection since it was recognized by antibodies of serum samples of confirmed-leptospirosis patients in convalescent phase of the disease. Altogether, the data suggests that this novel identified surface protein may be involved in leptospiral pathogenesis.

  7. Altered spatiotemporal expression of collagen types I, III, IV, and VI in Lpar3-deficient peri-implantation mouse uterus.

    PubMed

    Diao, Honglu; Aplin, John D; Xiao, Shuo; Chun, Jerold; Li, Zuguo; Chen, Shiyou; Ye, Xiaoqin

    2011-02-01

    Lpar3 is upregulated in the preimplantation uterus, and deletion of Lpar3 leads to delayed uterine receptivity in mice. Microarray analysis revealed that there was higher expression of Col3a1 and Col6a3 in the Preimplantation Day 3.5 Lpar3(-/-) uterus compared to Day 3.5 wild-type (WT) uterus. Since extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling is indispensable during embryo implantation, and dynamic spatiotemporal alteration of specific collagen types is part of this process, this study aimed to characterize the expression of four main uterine collagen types: fibril-forming collagen (COL) I and COL III, basement membrane COL IV, and microfibrillar COL VI in the peri-implantation WT and Lpar3(-/-) uterus. An observed delay of COL III and COL VI clearance in the Lpar3(-/-) uterus may be associated with higher preimplantation expression of Col3a1 and Col6a3. There was also delayed clearance of COL I and delayed deposition of COL IV in the decidual zone in the Lpar3(-/-) uterus. These changes were different from the effects of 17beta-estradiol and progesterone on uterine collagen expression in ovariectomized WT uterus, indicating that the altered collagen expression in Lpar3(-/-) uterus is unlikely to be a result of alterations in ovarian hormones. Decreased expression of several genes encoding matrix-degrading metallo- and serine proteinases was observed in the Lpar3(-/-) uterus. These results demonstrate that pathways downstream of LPA3 are involved in the dynamic remodeling of ECM in the peri-implantation uterus.

  8. The genes for the alpha 1(IV) and alpha 2(IV) chains of human basement membrane collagen type IV are arranged head-to-head and separated by a bidirectional promoter of unique structure.

    PubMed Central

    Pöschl, E; Pollner, R; Kühn, K

    1988-01-01

    The human basement membrane specific collagen type IV is a heterotrimer composed of two alpha 1(IV) chains and one alpha 2(IV) chain. A partial genomic EcoRI library was screened with cDNA clones representing the 5' end regions of the alpha 1(IV) and the alpha 2(IV) mRNA. A 2.2-kb genomic fragment was isolated and sequenced, which contains the 5' terminal exons of both genes located in close vicinity. The two genes were found to be arranged in opposite direction, head-to-head, separated only by a short region of 127 bp, apparently representing promoters of both genes as indicated by the existence of typical sequence motifs (CAT-box, SP1 consensus sequence). These data suggest that the alpha 1(IV) and alpha 2(IV) genes use a common, bidirectional promoter. The striking symmetrical arrangement of sequence elements within the promoter may be of basic importance for the coordination of bidirectional transcription. The promoter region had no detectable transcriptional activity in transient gene expression assays after fusion to the chloramphenicol acetylase (CAT) gene in either direction, indicating the necessity of additional elements for efficient and tissue-specific expression of both genes. Constructs containing different segments of both genes failed to identify regions with enhancing activity for the homologous collagen type IV promoter. When the heterologous HSV thymidine kinase promoter was used, a negatively acting region was identified. This indicates that the alpha 1(IV) and alpha 2(IV) promoter activity is controlled by additional regulatory elements present on distant portions of both genes. Images PMID:2846280

  9. Native type IV collagen induces cell migration through a CD9 and DDR1-dependent pathway in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Castro-Sanchez, Luis; Soto-Guzman, Adriana; Navarro-Tito, Napoleon; Martinez-Orozco, Raul; Salazar, Eduardo Perez

    2010-11-01

    CD9 is a member of the tetraspanin family and is widely expressed in the plasma membrane of several cell types as well as malignant cells. CD9 associates with a number of transmembrane proteins, which facilitates biological processes, including cell signaling, adhesion, migration and proliferation. DDR1 is activated by native type IV collagen and overexpressed in human breast cancer. Type IV collagen is the main component of basement membranes, and may interact with cell surface biomolecules, promoting adhesion and motility. However, the role of DDR1 and type IV collagen in the regulation of CD9-cell surface levels and migration in breast cancer cells has not been studied in detail. We demonstrate here that native type IV collagen induces a transient increase of CD9-cell surface levels through a DDR1-dependent pathway in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, as revealed by flow cytometry and Western blotting using specific antibodies that recognize CD9. In contrast, type IV collagen does not induce any increase of CD9-cell surface levels in the mammary non-tumorigenic epithelial cells MCF10A and MCF12A. Transient increase of CD9-cell surface levels is coupled with clathrin-mediated endocytosis and it is dependent of DDR1 expression. In addition, type IV collagen induces cell migration through a DDR1 and CD9-dependent pathway. In summary, our data demonstrate, for the first time, that native type IV collagen induces a transient increase of CD9-cell surface levels and cell migration through a DDR1 and CD9-dependent pathway in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.

  10. Molecular characterization of collagen IV evidences early transcription expression related to the immune response against bacterial infection in the red abalone (Haliotis rufescens).

    PubMed

    Chovar-Vera, Ornella; Valenzuela-Muñoz, Valentina; Gallardo-Escárate, Cristian

    2015-02-01

    Collagen IV has been described as a structural protein of the basement membrane, which as a whole forms a specialized extracellular matrix. Recent studies have indicated a possible relationship between collagen IV and the innate immune response of invertebrate organisms. The present study characterized the alpha-1 chain of collagen IV in the red abalone Haliotis rufescens (Hr-ColIV) and evaluated its association with the innate immune response against Vibrio anguillarum. To further evidence the immune response, the matrix metalloproteinase-1 (Hr-MMP-1) and C-type lectin (Hr-CLEC) genes were also assessed. The complete sequence of Hr-ColIV was composed of 6658 bp, with a 5'UTR of 154 bp, a 3'UTR of 1177 bp, and an ORF of 5327 bp that coded for 1776 amino acids. The innate immune response generated against V. anguillarum resulted in a significant increase in the transcript levels of Hr-ColIV between 3 and 6 hpi, whereas Hr-MMP-1 and Hr-CLEC had the highest transcript activity 6 and 12 hpi, respectively. The results obtained in this study propose a putative biological function for collagen IV involved in the early innate immune response of the red abalone H. rufescens. PMID:25463284

  11. NMR Studies Demonstrate a Unique AAB Composition and Chain Register for a Heterotrimeric Type IV Collagen Model Peptide Containing a Natural Interruption Site*

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jianxi; Sun, Xiuxia; Madhan, Balaraman; Brodsky, Barbara; Baum, Jean

    2015-01-01

    All non-fibrillar collagens contain interruptions in the (Gly-X-Y)n repeating sequence, such as the more than 20 interruptions found in chains of basement membrane type IV collagen. Two selectively doubly labeled peptides are designed to model a site in type IV collagen with a GVG interruption in the α1(IV) and a corresponding GISLK sequence within the α2(IV) chain. CD and NMR studies on a 2:1 mixture of these two peptides support the formation of a single-component heterotrimer that maintains the one-residue staggering in the triple-helix, has a unique chain register, and contains hydrogen bonds at the interruption site. Formation of hydrogen bonds at interruption sites may provide a driving force for self-assembly and chain register in type IV and other non-fibrillar collagens. This study illustrates the potential role of interruptions in the structure, dynamics, and folding of natural collagen heterotrimers and forms a basis for understanding their biological role. PMID:26209635

  12. Lysyl oxidase-like protein-2 regulates sprouting angiogenesis and type IV collagen assembly in the endothelial basement membrane.

    PubMed

    Bignon, Marine; Pichol-Thievend, Cathy; Hardouin, Julie; Malbouyres, Marilyne; Bréchot, Nicolas; Nasciutti, Luiz; Barret, Alain; Teillon, Jérémie; Guillon, Emilie; Etienne, Eric; Caron, Michel; Joubert-Caron, Raymonde; Monnot, Catherine; Ruggiero, Florence; Muller, Laurent; Germain, Stéphane

    2011-10-01

    Sprouting angiogenesis is associated with extensive extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. The molecular mechanisms involved in building the vascular microenvironment and its impact on capillary formation remain elusive. We therefore performed a proteomic analysis of ECM from endothelial cells maintained in hypoxia, a major stimulator of angiogenesis. Here, we report the characterization of lysyl oxidase-like protein-2 (LOXL2) as a hypoxia-target expressed in neovessels and accumulated in the endothelial ECM. LOXL2 belongs to the lysyl oxidase family of secreted enzymes involved in ECM crosslinking. Knockdown experiments in Tg(fli1:egfp)y1 zebrafish embryos resulted in lack of intersegmental vessel circulation and demonstrated LOXL2 involvement in proper capillary formation. Further investigation in vitro by loss and gain of function experiments confirmed that LOXL2 was required for tubulogenesis in 3D fibrin gels and demonstrated that this enzyme was required for collagen IV assembly in the ECM. In addition, LOXL2 depletion down-regulated cell migration and proliferation. These data suggest a major role for LOXL2 in the organization of endothelial basal lamina and in the downstream mechanotransductive signaling. Altogether, our study provides the first evidence for the role of LOXL2 in regulating angiogenesis through collagen IV scaffolding.

  13. Incidence and specificity of antibodies to types I, II, III, IV, and V collagen in rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic diseases as measured by 125I-radioimmunoassay

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, J.M.; Huffstutter, E.H.; Townes, A.S.; Kang, A.H.

    1983-07-01

    Antibodies to human native and denatured types I, II, III, IV, and V collagens were measured using 125I-radioimmunoassay. Mean levels of binding by sera from 30 rheumatoid arthritis patients were significantly higher than those from 20 normal subjects against all of the collagens tested. The relative antibody concentration was higher in synovial fluid than in simultaneously obtained serum. Many patients with gout or various other rheumatic diseases also had detectable anticollagen antibodies. With a few notable exceptions, the majority of the reactivity detected in all patient groups was directed against covalent structural determinants present on all of the denatured collagens, suggesting a secondary reaction to tissue injury.

  14. CD44/chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan and alpha 2 beta 1 integrin mediate human melanoma cell migration on type IV collagen and invasion of basement membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Knutson, J R; Iida, J; Fields, G B; McCarthy, J B

    1996-01-01

    Tumor cell invasion of basement membranes (BM) represents one of the critical steps in the metastatic process. Tumor cell recognition of individual BM matrix components may involve individual cell adhesion receptors, such as integrins or cell surface proteoglycans, or may involve a coordinate action of both types of receptors. In this study, we have focused on the identification of a cell surface CD44/chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) and alpha 2 beta 1 integrin on human melanoma cells that are both directly involved in the in vitro invasion of reconstituted BM via a type IV collagen-dependent mechanism. Interfering with cell surface expression of human melanoma CSPG with either p-nitro-phenyl-beta-D-xylopyranoside treatment or anti-CD44 monoclonal antibody (mAb) preincubation (mAb) preincubation inhibits melanoma cell invasion through reconstituted BM. These treatments also strongly inhibit melanoma cell migration on type IV collagen, however, they are ineffective at inhibiting cell adhesion to type IV collagen. Purified melanoma cell surface CD44/CSPG, or purified chondroitin sulfate, bind to type IV collagen affinity columns, consistent with a role for CD44/CSPG-type IV collagen interactions in mediating tumor cell invasion. In contrast, melanoma cell migration on laminin (LM) does not involve CD44/CSPG, nor does CD44/CSPG bind to LM, suggesting that CD44/CSPG-type IV collagen interactions are specific in nature. Additionally, anti-alpha 2 and anti-beta 1 integrin mAbs are capable of blocking melanoma cell invasion of reconstituted BM. Both of these anti-integrin mAbs inhibit melanoma cell adhesion and migration on type IV collagen, whereas only anti-beta 1 mAb inhibits cell adhesion to LM. Collectively, these results indicate that melanoma cell adhesion to type IV collagen is an important consideration in invasion of reconstituted BM in vitro, and suggest that CD44/CSPG and alpha 2 beta 1 integrin may collaborate to promote human melanoma cell adhesion

  15. Myocardial infarction resulting from coronary artery dissection in an adolescent with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV due to a type III collagen mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Adès, L. C.; Waltham, R. D.; Chiodo, A. A.; Bateman, J. F.

    1995-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome encompasses a group of inherited disorders of connective tissue, some of which are characterised by abnormalities of collagen metabolism. The chromosomal location, identified genes and biochemical defects, inheritance pattern, and clinical features for the various known subtypes are outlined. Prenatal diagnosis is possible for types IV, VI, VIIA1, and VIIA2. An unusual presentation of type IV Ehlers-Danlos syndrome in a 16 year old boy with an anterior myocardial infarction resulting from dissection of the left anterior descending coronary artery is reported here. A clinical diagnosis of type IV Ehlers-Danlos syndrome was made subsequently and confirmed by the reduced production, impaired secretion, and abnormally slow electrophoretic migration of type III collagen, indicating an underlying mutation in the COL3A1 gene. This patient represents the first case of type IV Ehlers-Danlos syndrome with symptomatic coronary artery dissection. Images PMID:7546986

  16. WOUND HEALING AND COLLAGEN FORMATION. IV. DISTORTION OF RIBOSOMAL PATTERNS OF FIBROBLASTS IN SCURVY.

    PubMed

    ROSS, R; BENDITT, E P

    1964-08-01

    The changes in scorbutic wounds following the administration of ascorbic acid have been investigated using the techniques of electron microscopy, histochemistry, and autoradioggraphy. Particular attention has been paid to the changes seen in the endoplasmic reticulum of the fibroblasts and to the identity of the extracellular filamentous material characteristic of scorbutic wounds. Seven-day-old wounds in scorbutic guinea pigs were examined prior to and from one to 72 hours following the administration of vitamin C. Fibroblasts from wounds of normal animals demonstrate a characteristic configuration of the ribosomes of the endoplasmic reticulum which is suggested to be analogous to polyribosomes described in cells synthesizing protein such as the reticulocyte. Tangential views of the membranes of the ergastoplasm show the ribosomes to be grouped in paired rows which take both straight and curved paths. This configuration is lost in scurvy and can be seen to begin to reappear as early as 4 hours after giving ascorbic acid. With increasing time, the morphology of the ribosomal aggregates approximates that seen in normal cells, so that by 24 hours their reorientation is complete. It is suggested that one of the disturbances in scurvy may relate to an alteration either in messenger RNA, in the ability of the ribosomes to relate to the messenger, or in the membranes of the ergastoplasm. In addition, the lack of formation of hydroxyamino acids necessary for completing collagen synthesis may be related to the architecture of the ribosomal aggregates. Extracellular collagen fibrils appear concomitant with the restoration of ribosomal and ergastoplasmic morphology as early as 12 hours after administration of ascorbic acid, with complete disappearance of the scorbutic extracellular material within 24 hours. Observations of this scorbutic material do not support the concept that it is a collagen precursor.

  17. A Trypanosoma cruzi-secreted 80 kDa proteinase with specificity for human collagen types I and IV.

    PubMed Central

    Santana, J M; Grellier, P; Schrével, J; Teixeira, A R

    1997-01-01

    Specific interactions between parasites and extracellular matrix components are an important mechanism in the dissemination of Chagas' disease. Binding of the extracellular matrix proteins to Trypanosoma cruzi receptors has been described as a significant step in this phenomenon. In this study, a specific proteinase activity was identified in cell-free extracts of amastigote, trypomastigote and epimastigote forms of T. cruzi using the collagenase fluorogenic substrate N-Suc-Gly-Pro-Leu-Gly-Pro-7-amido-4-methylcoumarin. Isolation of this activity was achieved by a four-step FPLC procedure. Optimal enzyme activity was found to occur at pH 8.0 and was associated with a single T. cruzi 80 kDa protein (Tc 80 proteinase) on SDS/PAGE under reducing conditions. An internal peptide sequence of Tc 80 proteinase was obtained (AGDNYTPPE), and no similarity was found to previously described proteinases of T. cruzi. This enzyme activity is strongly inhibited by HgCl2, tosyl-lysylchloromethane ('TLCK') p-chloromercuribenzoate and benzyloxycarbonyl-Phe-Ala-diazomethane. The purified enzyme was able to hydrolyse purified human [14C]collagen types I and IV at neutral pH, but not 14C-labelled BSA, rat laminin, rabbit IgG or small proteins such as insulin or cytochrome c. In addition, Tc 80 proteinase activity was found to be secreted by T. cruzi forms infective to mammalian cells. Furthermore we demonstrated that purified Tc 80 proteinase mediates native collagen type I hydrolysis in rat mesentery. This feature is compared with that of Clostridium histolyticum collagenase. These findings suggest that Tc 80 proteinase may facilitate T. cruzi host-cell infection by degrading the collagens of the extracellular matrix and could represent a good target for Chagas' disease chemotherapy. PMID:9224638

  18. Serum anti-collagen type IV IgM antibodies and development of diabetic nephropathy in diabetics with essential hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Tsinlikov, Ivan; Tsinlikova, Ivanka; Nicoloff, George; Blazhev, Alexander; Garev, Antoan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and aims Arterial hypertension and diabetic vascular complications are connected with an elevated degradation of elastic tissue. This process leads to an increased production of antibodies to collagen type IV (ACIV Abs). In the present investigation we studied whether the serum levels of antibodies (IgG, IgM and IgA) to collagen are related with microvascular complications. Material and methods Serum levels of antibodies to collagen type IV (ACIV) IgG, IgM and IgA were measured using an ELISA method in 93 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and arterial hypertension (AH) (mean age 61.4 ±11.3 years, diabetes duration 9.88 ±3.12 years; hypertension duration 9.28 ±4.98). These values were compared to serum antibodies to CIV in 42 age and sex matched controls. Results ACIV IgM antibodies levels in patients with AH and T2DM were statisticaly significantly higher than controls 0.178 (0.145÷0.220) vs. 0.142 (0.118÷0.173) (KW = 6.31; p = 0.01). Group 1 (patients with microvascular complications) showed significantly higher levels of ACIV IgM than controls 0.180 (0.136÷0.223) vs. 0.142 (0.118÷0.173) (KW = 5.03; p = 0.02). Patients from Group 2 showed statistically significantly higher levels of ACIV IgM than controls 0.176 (0.151÷0.202) vs. 0.142 (0.118÷0.173) (KW = 6.15; p = 0.01). ACIV IgM antibodies showed correlation with microalbuminuria (r = 0.21); (p = 0.04), BMI (r = 0.19); (p = 0.04), creatinine clearance (r = –0.36); (p = 0.01) and GFR (r = –0.34); (p = 0.02). Conclusions Our study showed an association between elevation of serum levels of ACIV IgM and development of diabetic nephropathy. We suggest that levels of ACIV IgM can be useful method for identfying a high risk for development of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:27095927

  19. Enhanced healing of segmental tibial defects in sheep by a composite bone substitute composed of tricalcium phosphate cylinder, bone morphogenetic protein, and type IV collagen.

    PubMed

    Gao, T J; Lindholm, T S; Kommonen, B; Ragni, P; Paronzini, A; Lindholm, T C; Jämsä, T; Jalovaara, P

    1996-12-01

    Diaphyseal segmental defects in the tibia of 18 sheep were used to evaluate the healing potential of a composite bone substitute device (CBS) composed of a tricalcium phosphate cylinder (TCP), naturally occurring sheep bone morphogenetic protein (sBMP), and type IV collagen. A total of 100 mg of sBMP and 20 mg of type IV collagen in the high-dose group (CBSH), and 13 mg of sBMP and 2.5 mg of type IV collagen in the low-dose group (CBSL) were adsorbed to TCP cylinders, respectively. TCP cylinders impregnated with type IV collagen alone (TCPC) were used as control. A significantly larger area and more highly integrated intensity of newly formed external callus between CBSH and CBSL or TCPC group were quantified by computerized image analyzer at both 3 and 6 weeks. A torsion test showed that the maximal torque capacity, maximal angular deformation, and bone stiffness of healed osteotomized tibia with implants recovered 117-125% in CBSH, 72-109% in CBSL, and 63-80% in TCPC, compared with the corresponding contralateral tibia at 16 weeks. A healing superiority of the segmental bone defects replaced by the implants was demonstrated in the CBSH group. Thus, the composite bone substitute device defined in this study was shown to possess osteoinductivity, osteoconductivity, and mechanical strength.

  20. Artesunate modulates expression of matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors as well as collagen-IV to attenuate pulmonary fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Huang, G; Mo, B; Wang, C

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of artesunate on extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation and the expression of collagen-IV, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP) to understand the pharmacological role of artesunate in pulmonary fibrosis. Eighty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to four groups that were administered saline alone, bleomycin (BLM) alone, BLM + artesunate, or artesunate alone for 28 days. Lung tissues from 10 rats in each group were used to obtain lung fibroblast (LF) primary cells, and the rest were used to analyze protein expression. The mRNA expression of collagen-IV, MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 in lung fibroblasts was detected by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The protein levels of collagen-IV, MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 protein in lung tissues were analyzed by western blotting. Artesunate treatment alleviated alveolitis and pulmonary fibrosis induced by bleomycin in rats, as indicated by a decreased lung coefficient and improvement of lung tissue morphology. Artesunate treatment also led to decreased collagen-IV protein levels, which might be a result of its downregulated expression and increased MMP-2 and MMP-9 protein and mRNA levels. Increased TIMP-1 and TIMP- 2 protein and mRNA levels were detected after artesunate treatment in lung tissues and primary lung fibroblast cells and may contribute to enhanced activity of MMP-2 and -9. These findings suggested that artesunate attenuates alveolitis and pulmonary fibrosis by regulating expression of collagen-IV, TIMP-1 and 2, as well as MMP-2 and -9, to reduce ECM accumulation. PMID:27323108

  1. Circadian Disorganization Alters Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Robin M.; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Green, Stefan J.; Mutlu, Ece; Engen, Phillip; Vitaterna, Martha H.; Turek, Fred W.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis and circadian rhythm disruption are associated with similar diseases including obesity, metabolic syndrome, and inflammatory bowel disease. Despite the overlap, the potential relationship between circadian disorganization and dysbiosis is unknown; thus, in the present study, a model of chronic circadian disruption was used to determine the impact on the intestinal microbiome. Male C57BL/6J mice underwent once weekly phase reversals of the light:dark cycle (i.e., circadian rhythm disrupted mice) to determine the impact of circadian rhythm disruption on the intestinal microbiome and were fed either standard chow or a high-fat, high-sugar diet to determine how diet influences circadian disruption-induced effects on the microbiome. Weekly phase reversals of the light:dark (LD) cycle did not alter the microbiome in mice fed standard chow; however, mice fed a high-fat, high-sugar diet in conjunction with phase shifts in the light:dark cycle had significantly altered microbiota. While it is yet to be established if some of the adverse effects associated with circadian disorganization in humans (e.g., shift workers, travelers moving across time zones, and in individuals with social jet lag) are mediated by dysbiosis, the current study demonstrates that circadian disorganization can impact the intestinal microbiota which may have implications for inflammatory diseases. PMID:24848969

  2. Circadian disorganization alters intestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Robin M; Forsyth, Christopher B; Green, Stefan J; Mutlu, Ece; Engen, Phillip; Vitaterna, Martha H; Turek, Fred W; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis and circadian rhythm disruption are associated with similar diseases including obesity, metabolic syndrome, and inflammatory bowel disease. Despite the overlap, the potential relationship between circadian disorganization and dysbiosis is unknown; thus, in the present study, a model of chronic circadian disruption was used to determine the impact on the intestinal microbiome. Male C57BL/6J mice underwent once weekly phase reversals of the light:dark cycle (i.e., circadian rhythm disrupted mice) to determine the impact of circadian rhythm disruption on the intestinal microbiome and were fed either standard chow or a high-fat, high-sugar diet to determine how diet influences circadian disruption-induced effects on the microbiome. Weekly phase reversals of the light:dark (LD) cycle did not alter the microbiome in mice fed standard chow; however, mice fed a high-fat, high-sugar diet in conjunction with phase shifts in the light:dark cycle had significantly altered microbiota. While it is yet to be established if some of the adverse effects associated with circadian disorganization in humans (e.g., shift workers, travelers moving across time zones, and in individuals with social jet lag) are mediated by dysbiosis, the current study demonstrates that circadian disorganization can impact the intestinal microbiota which may have implications for inflammatory diseases. PMID:24848969

  3. Radiation-induced changes in collagen isotypes I, III, and IV in the lung of LAF1 mouse: effects of time, dose, and WR-2721

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G.G.; Kenning, J.M.; Dawson, D.T.

    1988-09-01

    Alterations in the amount and distribution of pulmonary connective tissue are commonly observed subsequent to thoracic radiotherapy. The extent to which these changes are important in the expression of radiation damage and its repair remains unclear. We have quantitated changes in the parenchymal levels of collagen types I, III, and IV in the lungs of LAF1 mice at intervals to 1 year, following doses of 0-14 Gy, 300 kV X rays, or 0-18 Gy in the presence of the radioprotective compound, WR-2721. The method of quantitation, which involves video image analysis of fluorescent antibody stained, cryostat tissue sections, provides both quantitative and morphological information for the three collagen isotypes. Type I collagen peaked in tissue content at 15 and 30 weeks postirradiation (p.i.), with transient return to control values 20-25 weeks p.i. Type III collagen peaked at 15 and 25 weeks p.i. and declined in tissue content at 20 and 30 weeks. Type IV peaked 15-20 weeks following irradiation, returned to control levels at 25 weeks, and reached a plateau above control values after 30 weeks. Fluctuations in collagen levels in the parenchyma were dose dependent but were not simultaneous, indicating a radiation response characterized by alpha-chain-specific regulation of collagen biosynthesis and breakdown. In general, WR-2721, which enhanced postirradiation survival (DMF, 1.3), reduced the magnitude and altered the timing of collagen fluctuations; again, the effects were type specific. The results clearly demonstrate that the postirradiation response of the connective tissue is dose dependent, is specific to each macromolecule, and involves both deposition and removal of extracellular matrix. These processes are independently influenced by the presence during irradiation of WR-2721.

  4. Investigation of enhanced hemocompatibility and tissue compatibility associated with multi-functional coating based on hyaluronic acid and Type IV collagen

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingan; Zhang, Kun; Ma, Wenyong; Wu, Feng; Yang, Ping; He, Zikun; Huang, Nan

    2016-01-01

    The biocompatibility of cardiovascular devices has always been considered crucial for their clinical efficacy. Therefore, a biofunctional coating composed of Type IV collagen (CoIV) and hyaluronan (HA) was previously fabricated onto the titanium (Ti) substrate for the application of promoting vascular smooth muscle cell contractile phenotype and improving surface endothelialization. However, the anti-inflammation property, blood compatibility and in vivo tissue compatibility of the HA/CoIV coating, as paramount consideration of cardiovascular materials surface coating, have not been investigated. Thus, in this study, the three crucial properties of the HA/CoIV coating were tested. The platelet adhesion/activation test and the dynamic whole blood experiment implied that the HA/CoIV coating had better blood compatibility compared with Ti substrate and pure CoIV coating. The macrophage adhesion/activation and inflammatory cytokine release (tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1) results indicated that the HA/CoIV coating could significantly improve the anti-inflammation property of the Ti substrate. The in vivo implantation of SD rats for 3 weeks’ results demonstrated that the HA/CoIV coating caused milder tissue response. All these results suggested that the multi-functional HA/CoIV coating possessed good biocompatibility. This research is anticipated to be potentially applied for the surface modification of cardiovascular stents. PMID:27252884

  5. Investigation of enhanced hemocompatibility and tissue compatibility associated with multi-functional coating based on hyaluronic acid and Type IV collagen.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingan; Zhang, Kun; Ma, Wenyong; Wu, Feng; Yang, Ping; He, Zikun; Huang, Nan

    2016-09-01

    The biocompatibility of cardiovascular devices has always been considered crucial for their clinical efficacy. Therefore, a biofunctional coating composed of Type IV collagen (CoIV) and hyaluronan (HA) was previously fabricated onto the titanium (Ti) substrate for the application of promoting vascular smooth muscle cell contractile phenotype and improving surface endothelialization. However, the anti-inflammation property, blood compatibility and in vivo tissue compatibility of the HA/CoIV coating, as paramount consideration of cardiovascular materials surface coating, have not been investigated. Thus, in this study, the three crucial properties of the HA/CoIV coating were tested. The platelet adhesion/activation test and the dynamic whole blood experiment implied that the HA/CoIV coating had better blood compatibility compared with Ti substrate and pure CoIV coating. The macrophage adhesion/activation and inflammatory cytokine release (tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1) results indicated that the HA/CoIV coating could significantly improve the anti-inflammation property of the Ti substrate. The in vivo implantation of SD rats for 3 weeks' results demonstrated that the HA/CoIV coating caused milder tissue response. All these results suggested that the multi-functional HA/CoIV coating possessed good biocompatibility. This research is anticipated to be potentially applied for the surface modification of cardiovascular stents. PMID:27252884

  6. Polarity and transport properties of rabbit kidney proximal tubule cells on collagen IV-coated porous membranes.

    PubMed

    Genestie, I; Morin, J P; Vannier, B; Lorenzon, G

    1995-07-01

    A high degree of functional polarity has been obtained in primary cultures of rabbit kidney proximal tubule cells grown on collagen IV-coated porous membranes. Tight confluency was attained 6 days after seeding and maintained for at least 6 more days, as shown by analysis of paracellular inulin diffusion. From day 6 onward, L-lactate, ammonia, and D-glucose concentration gradient and a pH difference of approximately 1 unit developed between the two nutrient medium compartments. Confluent monolayers expressed organic ion transport properties higher than those formerly reported for other cell models. Transcellular transport of 20 microM tetraethylammonium was directed from basal to apical compartment and was specifically inhibited by mepiperphenidol (1 mM). Unidirectional transport of 2.4 microM p-aminohippurate also occurred from basal to apical compartment, was saturable, and specifically inhibited by probenecid (1 mM). These results suggest that rabbit kidney proximal tubule cells, cultured under the experimental conditions described here, may be a useful model for the in vitro study of highly polarized renal transport processes.

  7. Comparative analysis of the noncollagenous NC1 domain of type IV collagen: identification of structural features important for assembly, function, and pathogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Netzer, K. O.; Suzuki, K.; Itoh, Y.; Hudson, B. G.; Khalifah, R. G.

    1998-01-01

    Type IV collagen alpha1-alpha6 chains have important roles in the assembly of basement membranes and are implicated in the pathogenesis of Goodpasture syndrome, an autoimmune disorder, and Alport syndrome, a hereditary renal disease. We report comparative sequence analyses and structural predictions of the noncollagenous C-terminal globular NC1 domain (28 sequences). The inferred tree verified that type IV collagen sequences fall into two groups, alpha1-like and alpha2-like, and suggested that vertebrate alpha3/alpha4 sequences evolved before alpha1/alpha2 and alpha5/alpha6. About one fifth of NC1 residues were identified to confer either the alpha1 or alpha2 group-specificity. These residues accumulate opposite charge in subdomain B of alpha1 (positive) and alpha2 (negative) sequences and may play a role in the stoichiometric chain selection upon type IV collagen assembly. Neural network secondary structure prediction on multiple aligned sequences revealed a subdomain core structure consisting of six hydrophobic beta-strands and one short alpha-helix with a significant hydrophobic moment. The existence of opposite charges in the alpha-helices may carry implications for intersubdomain interactions. The results provide a rationale for defining the epitope that binds Goodpasture autoantibodies and a framework for understanding how certain NC1 mutations may lead to Alport syndrome. A search algorithm, based entirely on amino acid properties, yielded a possible similarity of NC1 to tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP) and prompted an investigation of a possible functional relationship. The results indicate that NC1 preparations decrease the activity of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 3 (MMP-2, MMP-3) toward a peptide substrate, though not to [14C]-gelatin. We suggest that an ancestral NC1 may have been incorporated into type IV collagen as an evolutionarily mobile domain carrying proteinase inhibitor function. PMID:9655338

  8. Phlorizin, an Active Ingredient of Eleutherococcus senticosus, Increases Proliferative Potential of Keratinocytes with Inhibition of MiR135b and Increased Expression of Type IV Collagen.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hye-Ryung; Nam, Kyung-Mi; Lee, Hyun-Sun; Yang, Seung-Hye; Kim, Young-Soo; Lee, Jongsung; Date, Akira; Toyama, Kazumi; Park, Kyoung-Chan

    2016-01-01

    E. senticosus extract (ESE), known as antioxidant, has diverse pharmacologic effects. It is also used as an antiaging agent for the skin and phlorizin (PZ) is identified as a main ingredient. In this study, the effects of PZ on epidermal stem cells were investigated. Cultured normal human keratinocytes and skin equivalents are used to test whether PZ affects proliferative potential of keratinocytes and how it regulates these effects. Skin equivalents (SEs) were treated with ESE and the results showed that the epidermis became slightly thickened on addition of 0.002% ESE. The staining intensity of p63 as well as proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is increased, and integrin α6 was upregulated. Analysis of ESE confirmed that PZ is the main ingredient. When SEs were treated with PZ, similar findings were observed. In particular, the expression of integrin α6, integrin β1, and type IV collagen was increased. Levels of mRNA for type IV collagen were increased and levels of miR135b were downregulated. All these findings suggested that PZ can affect the proliferative potential of epidermal cells in part by microenvironment changes via miR135b downregulation and following increased expression of type IV collagen. PMID:27042261

  9. Phlorizin, an Active Ingredient of Eleutherococcus senticosus, Increases Proliferative Potential of Keratinocytes with Inhibition of MiR135b and Increased Expression of Type IV Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hye-Ryung; Nam, Kyung-Mi; Lee, Hyun-Sun; Yang, Seung-Hye; Kim, Young-Soo; Lee, Jongsung; Date, Akira; Toyama, Kazumi; Park, Kyoung-Chan

    2016-01-01

    E. senticosus extract (ESE), known as antioxidant, has diverse pharmacologic effects. It is also used as an antiaging agent for the skin and phlorizin (PZ) is identified as a main ingredient. In this study, the effects of PZ on epidermal stem cells were investigated. Cultured normal human keratinocytes and skin equivalents are used to test whether PZ affects proliferative potential of keratinocytes and how it regulates these effects. Skin equivalents (SEs) were treated with ESE and the results showed that the epidermis became slightly thickened on addition of 0.002% ESE. The staining intensity of p63 as well as proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is increased, and integrin α6 was upregulated. Analysis of ESE confirmed that PZ is the main ingredient. When SEs were treated with PZ, similar findings were observed. In particular, the expression of integrin α6, integrin β1, and type IV collagen was increased. Levels of mRNA for type IV collagen were increased and levels of miR135b were downregulated. All these findings suggested that PZ can affect the proliferative potential of epidermal cells in part by microenvironment changes via miR135b downregulation and following increased expression of type IV collagen. PMID:27042261

  10. Distinct functions of the laminin β LN domain and collagen IV during cardiac extracellular matrix formation and stabilization of alary muscle attachments revealed by EMS mutagenesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Drosophila heart (dorsal vessel) is a relatively simple tubular organ that serves as a model for several aspects of cardiogenesis. Cardiac morphogenesis, proper heart function and stability require structural components whose identity and ways of assembly are only partially understood. Structural components are also needed to connect the myocardial tube with neighboring cells such as pericardial cells and specialized muscle fibers, the so-called alary muscles. Results Using an EMS mutagenesis screen for cardiac and muscular abnormalities in Drosophila embryos we obtained multiple mutants for two genetically interacting complementation groups that showed similar alary muscle and pericardial cell detachment phenotypes. The molecular lesions underlying these defects were identified as domain-specific point mutations in LamininB1 and Cg25C, encoding the extracellular matrix (ECM) components laminin β and collagen IV α1, respectively. Of particular interest within the LamininB1 group are certain hypomorphic mutants that feature prominent defects in cardiac morphogenesis and cardiac ECM layer formation, but in contrast to amorphic mutants, only mild defects in other tissues. All of these alleles carry clustered missense mutations in the laminin LN domain. The identified Cg25C mutants display weaker and largely temperature-sensitive phenotypes that result from glycine substitutions in different Gly-X-Y repeats of the triple helix-forming domain. While initial basement membrane assembly is not abolished in Cg25C mutants, incorporation of perlecan is impaired and intracellular accumulation of perlecan as well as the collagen IV α2 chain is detected during late embryogenesis. Conclusions Assembly of the cardiac ECM depends primarily on laminin, whereas collagen IV is needed for stabilization. Our data underscore the importance of a correctly assembled ECM particularly for the development of cardiac tissues and their lateral connections. The mutational

  11. A novel coating of type IV collagen and hyaluronic acid on stent material-titanium for promoting smooth muscle cell contractile phenotype.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingan; Zhang, Kun; Chen, Huiqing; Liu, Tao; Yang, Ping; Zhao, Yuancong; Huang, Nan

    2014-05-01

    The method of stent implantation is currently considered an effective means of treating atherosclerosis. However, implanting of cardiovascular stent often leads to intimal breakage and hyperplasia. The phenomenon that vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) transform from contractile to synthetic phenotype becomes a serious obstacle to intimal recovery. To improve how SMCs transform from a synthetic to contractile phenotype, a technique of coimmobilization was used to form type IV collagen (CoIV) and hyaluronic acid (HA) coating on the widely used stent material, titanium (Ti). In this work, several bio-functional coatings made of CoIV/HA mixtures in different ratios were fabricated on the Ti surface. The quantitative characterization of CoIV showed that introducing HA could enhance the amount of the immobilized CoIV on the alkali activated Ti (TiOH) surface. The immunofluorescence staining results of myosin heavy chain (MHC) and DAPI showed that the coating of CoIV/HA in ratios of 200 μg/ml (M200) and 500 μg/ml (M500) also could promote SMCs expressing more contractile phenotype compared with TiOH/CoIV control samples, while the AO/PI staining results indicated that SMCs on the M200 and M500 samples showed less apoptosis ratio. Thus, we hope that this study can provide more helpful exploration and application for promoting the SMC contractile phenotype on the cardiovascular stents. PMID:24656374

  12. Structure and function of collagen types

    SciTech Connect

    Mayne, R.; Burgeson, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Classical Collagens: Types I, II, and III; Type IV Collagen; Type IX Collagen; and Analysis of Collagen Structure by Molecular Biology Techniques.

  13. Effect of immobilized collagen type IV on biological properties of endothelial cells for the enhanced endothelialization of synthetic vascular graft materials.

    PubMed

    Heo, Yunhoe; Shin, Young Min; Lee, Yu Bin; Lim, Youn Mook; Shin, Heungsoo

    2015-10-01

    Regeneration of healthy endothelium onto vascular graft materials is imperative for prevention of intimal hyperplasia and thrombogenesis. In this study, we investigated the effect of collagen type IV (COL-IV) immobilized onto electrospun nanofibers on modulation of endothelial cell (EC) function, as a potential signal to rapid endothelialization of vascular grafts. COL-IV is assembled in basement membrane underneath intimal layer and regulates morphogenesis of blood vessels. For immobilization of COL-IV, poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) nanofibers (PL) were prepared as a model vascular graft substrate, onto which acrylic acid (AAc) was then grafted by using gamma-ray irradiation. AAc graft was dependent on irradiation doses and AAc concentrations, which allowed us to select the condition of 5% (v/v) AAc and 10 kGy for further conjugation of COL-IV. COL-IV immobilization was proportionally controlled as a function of its concentration. Atomic force microscope (AFM) analysis qualitatively supported immobilization of COL-IV, demonstrating increase in root mean square roughness of the PL from 665.37 ± 13.20 nm to 1440.74 ± 33.24. However, the Young's modulus of nanofibers was retained as approximately 1 MPa, regardless of surface modification. The number of ECs attached on the nanofibers with immobilized COL-IV was significantly increased by 5 times (1052 ± 138 cells/mm(2)) from pristine PL (234 ± 41 cells/mm(2)). In addition, the effect of immobilized COL-IV was profound for enhancing proliferation and up-regulation of markers implicated in rapid endothelialization. Collectively, our results suggest that COL-IV immobilized onto electrospun PLLA nanofibers may serve as a promising instructive cue used in vascular graft materials.

  14. Effect of immobilized collagen type IV on biological properties of endothelial cells for the enhanced endothelialization of synthetic vascular graft materials.

    PubMed

    Heo, Yunhoe; Shin, Young Min; Lee, Yu Bin; Lim, Youn Mook; Shin, Heungsoo

    2015-10-01

    Regeneration of healthy endothelium onto vascular graft materials is imperative for prevention of intimal hyperplasia and thrombogenesis. In this study, we investigated the effect of collagen type IV (COL-IV) immobilized onto electrospun nanofibers on modulation of endothelial cell (EC) function, as a potential signal to rapid endothelialization of vascular grafts. COL-IV is assembled in basement membrane underneath intimal layer and regulates morphogenesis of blood vessels. For immobilization of COL-IV, poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) nanofibers (PL) were prepared as a model vascular graft substrate, onto which acrylic acid (AAc) was then grafted by using gamma-ray irradiation. AAc graft was dependent on irradiation doses and AAc concentrations, which allowed us to select the condition of 5% (v/v) AAc and 10 kGy for further conjugation of COL-IV. COL-IV immobilization was proportionally controlled as a function of its concentration. Atomic force microscope (AFM) analysis qualitatively supported immobilization of COL-IV, demonstrating increase in root mean square roughness of the PL from 665.37 ± 13.20 nm to 1440.74 ± 33.24. However, the Young's modulus of nanofibers was retained as approximately 1 MPa, regardless of surface modification. The number of ECs attached on the nanofibers with immobilized COL-IV was significantly increased by 5 times (1052 ± 138 cells/mm(2)) from pristine PL (234 ± 41 cells/mm(2)). In addition, the effect of immobilized COL-IV was profound for enhancing proliferation and up-regulation of markers implicated in rapid endothelialization. Collectively, our results suggest that COL-IV immobilized onto electrospun PLLA nanofibers may serve as a promising instructive cue used in vascular graft materials. PMID:26196092

  15. Genetic and Environmental Influence on Attachment Disorganization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spangler, Gottfried; Johann, Monika; Ronai, Zsolt; Zimmermann, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Background: Empirical studies demonstrate that maternal sensitivity is associated with attachment security in infancy, while maternal frightening/frightened behavior is related to attachment disorganization. However, attachment disorganization is also predicted by individual dispositions in infancy. Indeed, recent studies indicate a link between…

  16. Biomimetic collagen I and IV double layer Langmuir-Schaefer films as microenvironment for human pluripotent stem cell derived retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sorkio, Anni E; Vuorimaa-Laukkanen, Elina P; Hakola, Hanna M; Liang, Huamin; Ujula, Tiina A; Valle-Delgado, Juan José; Österberg, Monika; Yliperttula, Marjo L; Skottman, Heli

    2015-05-01

    The environmental cues received by the cells from synthetic substrates in vitro are very different from those they receive in vivo. In this study, we applied the Langmuir-Schaefer (LS) deposition, a variant of Langmuir-Blodgett technique, to fabricate a biomimetic microenvironment mimicking the structure and organization of native Bruch's membrane for the production of the functional human embryonic stem cell derived retinal pigment epithelial (hESC-RPE) cells. Surface pressure-area isotherms were measured simultaneously with Brewster angle microscopy to investigate the self-assembly of human collagens type I and IV on air-subphase interface. Furthermore, the structure of the prepared collagen LS films was characterized with scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, surface plasmon resonance measurements and immunofluorescent staining. The integrity of hESC-RPE on double layer LS films was investigated by measuring transepithelial resistance and permeability of small molecular weight substance. Maturation and functionality of hESC-RPE cells on double layer collagen LS films was further assessed by RPE-specific gene and protein expression, growth factor secretion, and phagocytic activity. Here, we demonstrated that the prepared collagen LS films have layered structure with oriented fibers corresponding to architecture of the uppermost layers of Bruch's membrane and result in increased barrier properties and functionality of hESC-RPE cells as compared to the commonly used dip-coated controls. PMID:25771016

  17. Biomimetic collagen I and IV double layer Langmuir-Schaefer films as microenvironment for human pluripotent stem cell derived retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sorkio, Anni E; Vuorimaa-Laukkanen, Elina P; Hakola, Hanna M; Liang, Huamin; Ujula, Tiina A; Valle-Delgado, Juan José; Österberg, Monika; Yliperttula, Marjo L; Skottman, Heli

    2015-05-01

    The environmental cues received by the cells from synthetic substrates in vitro are very different from those they receive in vivo. In this study, we applied the Langmuir-Schaefer (LS) deposition, a variant of Langmuir-Blodgett technique, to fabricate a biomimetic microenvironment mimicking the structure and organization of native Bruch's membrane for the production of the functional human embryonic stem cell derived retinal pigment epithelial (hESC-RPE) cells. Surface pressure-area isotherms were measured simultaneously with Brewster angle microscopy to investigate the self-assembly of human collagens type I and IV on air-subphase interface. Furthermore, the structure of the prepared collagen LS films was characterized with scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, surface plasmon resonance measurements and immunofluorescent staining. The integrity of hESC-RPE on double layer LS films was investigated by measuring transepithelial resistance and permeability of small molecular weight substance. Maturation and functionality of hESC-RPE cells on double layer collagen LS films was further assessed by RPE-specific gene and protein expression, growth factor secretion, and phagocytic activity. Here, we demonstrated that the prepared collagen LS films have layered structure with oriented fibers corresponding to architecture of the uppermost layers of Bruch's membrane and result in increased barrier properties and functionality of hESC-RPE cells as compared to the commonly used dip-coated controls.

  18. New lethal disease involving type I and III collagen defect resembling geroderma osteodysplastica, De Barsy syndrome, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome IV.

    PubMed

    Jukkola, A; Kauppila, S; Risteli, L; Vuopala, K; Risteli, J; Leisti, J; Pajunen, L

    1998-06-01

    We describe the clinical findings and biochemical features of a male child suffering from a so far undescribed lethal connective tissue disorder characterised by extreme hypermobility of the joints, lax skin, cataracts, severe growth retardation, and insufficient production of type I and type III procollagens. His features are compared with Ehlers-Danlos type IV, De Barsy syndrome, and geroderma osteodysplastica, as these disorders show some symptoms and signs shared with our patient. The child died because of failure of the connective tissue structures joining the skull and the spine, leading to progressive spinal stenosis. The aortic valve was translucent and insufficient. The clinical symptoms and signs, together with histological findings, suggested a collagen defect. Studies on both skin fibroblast cultures and the patient's serum showed reduced synthesis of collagen types I and III at the protein and RNA levels. The sizes of the mRNAs and newly synthesised proteins were normal, excluding gross structural abnormalities. These findings are not in accordance with any other collagen defect characterised so far.

  19. A comprehensive survey of the laminins and collagens type IV expressed in mouse Leydig cells and their regulation by LH/hCG.

    PubMed

    Mazaud Guittot, Séverine; Vérot, Adélie; Odet, Fanny; Chauvin, Marie-Agnès; le Magueresse-Battistoni, Brigitte

    2008-04-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins have been shown to alter Leydig cell steroidogenesis in vitro, substantiating the hypothesis that Leydig cell steroidogenic activity and matrix environment are interdependent events. However, the nature of the ECM components synthesized by Leydig cells and their regulation by LH/human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) remain unknown. Here, we examine the occurrence of the 11 laminin subunits and the 6 alpha chains of collagen IV (COL4A1-6) by RT-PCR in Leydig cells cultured with or without LH/hCG. Leydig cells were a tumor Leydig cell line (mLTC-1) or 8-week-old mice Leydig cells. Based on PCR data, it is suggested that normal Leydig cells may synthesize a maximum of 11 laminin heterotrimers and the 6 alpha chains of collagen IV. They also may synthesize various proteases and inhibitors of the metzincin family. The mLTC-1 cells have a limited repertoire as compared with normal Leydig cells. Interestingly, none of the ten proteases and inhibitors monitored is under LH-hCG regulation whereas every protease and inhibitor of the serine protease family yet identified in Leydig cells is under gonadotropin regulation. In addition, a few laminin and collagen subunit genes are regulated by LH/hCG. These are laminins alpha3 and gamma3 (Lama3 and Lamc3), Col4a3, and Col4a6, which are negatively regulated by LH/hCG in both Leydig cell types, and Col4a4, which was downregulated in primary cultures but not in mLTC-1 cells. Collectively, the present study suggests that Leydig cells modulate in a selective fashion their matrix environment in response to their trophic hormone. This may alter the steroidogenic outcome of Leydig cells. PMID:18367508

  20. Decreased collagen types I and IV, laminin, CK-19 and α-SMA expression after bone marrow cell transplantation in rats with liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, S N; Lira, D C; Oliveira, G P; Thole, A A; Stumbo, A C; Caetano, C E; Marques, R G; Carvalho, L

    2010-11-01

    Bone marrow cells have frequently been tested in animal models of liver fibrosis to assess their role in hepatic regeneration. The mononuclear fraction of bone marrow cells is of particular interest, as many studies show that these cells may be beneficial to treat hepatic fibrosis. In this study, we used the bile duct ligation model to induce hepatic fibrosis in an irreversible manner, and rats were treated with bone marrow mononuclear (BMMN) cells after fibrosis was established. Analysis of collagen types I and IV, laminin and α-SMA showed a decreased expression of these proteins in fibrotic livers after 7 days of BMMN cell injection. Moreover, cytokeratin-19 analysis showed a reduction in bile ducts in the BMMN cell-treated group. These results were accompanied by ameliorated levels of hepatic enzymes GPT (Glutamic-pyruvic transaminase), GOT (glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase) and alkaline phosphatase (AP). Therefore, we showed that BMMN cells decrease hepatic fibrosis by significantly reducing myofibroblast numbers and through reduction of the collagen and laminin-rich extracellular matrix of fibrotic septa and hepatic sinusoids.

  1. Novel form of X-linked nonsyndromic hearing loss with cochlear malformation caused by a mutation in the type IV collagen gene COL4A6.

    PubMed

    Rost, Simone; Bach, Elisa; Neuner, Cordula; Nanda, Indrajit; Dysek, Sandra; Bittner, Reginald E; Keller, Alexander; Bartsch, Oliver; Mlynski, Robert; Haaf, Thomas; Müller, Clemens R; Kunstmann, Erdmute

    2014-02-01

    Hereditary hearing loss is the most common human sensorineural disorder. Genetic causes are highly heterogeneous, with mutations detected in >40 genes associated with nonsyndromic hearing loss, to date. Whereas autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant inheritance is prevalent, X-linked forms of nonsyndromic hearing impairment are extremely rare. Here, we present a Hungarian three-generation family with X-linked nonsyndromic congenital hearing loss and the underlying genetic defect. Next-generation sequencing and subsequent segregation analysis detected a missense mutation (c.1771G>A, p.Gly591Ser) in the type IV collagen gene COL4A6 in all affected family members. Bioinformatic analysis and expression studies support this substitution as being causative. COL4A6 encodes the alpha-6 chain of type IV collagen of basal membranes, which forms a heterotrimer with two alpha-5 chains encoded by COL4A5. Whereas mutations in COL4A5 and contiguous X-chromosomal deletions involving COL4A5 and COL4A6 are associated with X-linked Alport syndrome, a nephropathy associated with deafness and cataract, mutations in COL4A6 alone have not been related to any hereditary disease so far. Moreover, our index patient and other affected family members show normal renal and ocular function, which is not consistent with Alport syndrome, but with a nonsyndromic type of hearing loss. In situ hybridization and immunostaining demonstrated expression of the COL4A6 homologs in the otic vesicle of the zebrafish and in the murine inner ear, supporting its role in normal ear development and function. In conclusion, our results suggest COL4A6 as being the fourth gene associated with X-linked nonsyndromic hearing loss. PMID:23714752

  2. Novel form of X-linked nonsyndromic hearing loss with cochlear malformation caused by a mutation in the type IV collagen gene COL4A6.

    PubMed

    Rost, Simone; Bach, Elisa; Neuner, Cordula; Nanda, Indrajit; Dysek, Sandra; Bittner, Reginald E; Keller, Alexander; Bartsch, Oliver; Mlynski, Robert; Haaf, Thomas; Müller, Clemens R; Kunstmann, Erdmute

    2014-02-01

    Hereditary hearing loss is the most common human sensorineural disorder. Genetic causes are highly heterogeneous, with mutations detected in >40 genes associated with nonsyndromic hearing loss, to date. Whereas autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant inheritance is prevalent, X-linked forms of nonsyndromic hearing impairment are extremely rare. Here, we present a Hungarian three-generation family with X-linked nonsyndromic congenital hearing loss and the underlying genetic defect. Next-generation sequencing and subsequent segregation analysis detected a missense mutation (c.1771G>A, p.Gly591Ser) in the type IV collagen gene COL4A6 in all affected family members. Bioinformatic analysis and expression studies support this substitution as being causative. COL4A6 encodes the alpha-6 chain of type IV collagen of basal membranes, which forms a heterotrimer with two alpha-5 chains encoded by COL4A5. Whereas mutations in COL4A5 and contiguous X-chromosomal deletions involving COL4A5 and COL4A6 are associated with X-linked Alport syndrome, a nephropathy associated with deafness and cataract, mutations in COL4A6 alone have not been related to any hereditary disease so far. Moreover, our index patient and other affected family members show normal renal and ocular function, which is not consistent with Alport syndrome, but with a nonsyndromic type of hearing loss. In situ hybridization and immunostaining demonstrated expression of the COL4A6 homologs in the otic vesicle of the zebrafish and in the murine inner ear, supporting its role in normal ear development and function. In conclusion, our results suggest COL4A6 as being the fourth gene associated with X-linked nonsyndromic hearing loss.

  3. Diffuse alveolar damage and acute interstitial pneumonitis: histochemical evaluation with lectins and monoclonal antibodies against surfactant apoprotein and collagen type IV.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, K; Kawai, T

    1993-05-01

    Diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) and acute interstitial pneumonitis (AIP) often present clinically as the adult respiratory distress syndrome. To evaluate the usefulness of histochemical techniques and to better understand the histopathologic changes of these diffuse lung injuries, postmortem lung sections of 14 and 33 patients who had been diagnosed as having DAD in organizing stage and AIP, respectively, were studied with the use of lectins and monoclonal antibodies against surfactant apoprotein (PE-10) and collagen type IV. On hematoxylin-eosin stained sections, type II pneumocyte hyperplasia and hyaline membrane formation were the major histopathologic findings in both DAD and AIP. The binding rates of type II pneumocytes to Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I) in both DAD (64%) and AIP (45%) cases were significantly higher than those of type I pneumocytes or alveolar macrophages (both P < 0.001). Reactions of type II pneumocytes to PE-10 varied from 40 to 44% in DAD and 0 to 100% in AIP cases depending on the use of respirator and steroid medication. Therefore, it may be said that UEA-I and PE-10 are useful methods for outlining hyperplastic type II pneumocytes in both DAD and AIP. Hyaline membrane coating alveolar septal surfaces and exudate in alveolar air spaces were also stainable with PE-10. Surfactant apoprotein remained demonstrable histochemically within type II pneumocytes and hyaline membrane despite severe inflammatory injuries of the lungs. The immunohistochemical stain using anti-collagen type IV antibody revealed discontinuous alveolar basement membrane in 50% of DAD patients with respirator use and 80% of AIP patients with steroid medication.

  4. Novel form of X-linked nonsyndromic hearing loss with cochlear malformation caused by a mutation in the type IV collagen gene COL4A6

    PubMed Central

    Rost, Simone; Bach, Elisa; Neuner, Cordula; Nanda, Indrajit; Dysek, Sandra; Bittner, Reginald E; Keller, Alexander; Bartsch, Oliver; Mlynski, Robert; Haaf, Thomas; Müller, Clemens R; Kunstmann, Erdmute

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary hearing loss is the most common human sensorineural disorder. Genetic causes are highly heterogeneous, with mutations detected in >40 genes associated with nonsyndromic hearing loss, to date. Whereas autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant inheritance is prevalent, X-linked forms of nonsyndromic hearing impairment are extremely rare. Here, we present a Hungarian three-generation family with X-linked nonsyndromic congenital hearing loss and the underlying genetic defect. Next-generation sequencing and subsequent segregation analysis detected a missense mutation (c.1771G>A, p.Gly591Ser) in the type IV collagen gene COL4A6 in all affected family members. Bioinformatic analysis and expression studies support this substitution as being causative. COL4A6 encodes the alpha-6 chain of type IV collagen of basal membranes, which forms a heterotrimer with two alpha-5 chains encoded by COL4A5. Whereas mutations in COL4A5 and contiguous X-chromosomal deletions involving COL4A5 and COL4A6 are associated with X-linked Alport syndrome, a nephropathy associated with deafness and cataract, mutations in COL4A6 alone have not been related to any hereditary disease so far. Moreover, our index patient and other affected family members show normal renal and ocular function, which is not consistent with Alport syndrome, but with a nonsyndromic type of hearing loss. In situ hybridization and immunostaining demonstrated expression of the COL4A6 homologs in the otic vesicle of the zebrafish and in the murine inner ear, supporting its role in normal ear development and function. In conclusion, our results suggest COL4A6 as being the fourth gene associated with X-linked nonsyndromic hearing loss. PMID:23714752

  5. Loss and Disorganization from an Attachment Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Paula

    2010-01-01

    In this article, it is hypothesized that disorganizing, disorienting, and unresolved states of mind about loss experiences, as classified by the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) coding system, may offer insight into the bereaved mind and may guide clinical treatment approaches. This article discusses pre-loss attachment organizations and the…

  6. Expression of receptors of advanced glycation end product (RAGE) and types I, III and IV collagen in the vastus lateralis muscle of men in early stages of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Serrão, Paula Regina M S; Vasilceac, Fernando A; Gramani-Say, Karina; Lessi, Giovanna C; Reiff, Rodrigo B M; Mattiello-Sverzut, Ana Cláudia; Mattiello, Stela M

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in the contractile and non-contractile proteins of the skeletal muscle may reduce muscle function in knee osteoarthritis (OA), and the formation and accumulation of advanced glycation end products, particularly in collagen, can influence the quality of these muscle proteins. The objective of this study was to evaluate the reactivity of types I, III and IV collagen and the expression and localization of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) in the vastus lateralis (VL) muscle in early stages of knee OA. The hypothesis was that these patients present a higher expression of RAGE and increased immunoreactivity in the collagen. Thirty-five men were divided into two groups: the control group (CG; n = 17) and the osteoarthritis group (OAG; n = 18). All participants were submitted to a biopsy of the VL. The muscle samples were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for collagen and for RAGE and laminin. The expression of RAGE was counted (intracellular, extracellular and total). Student's t-test for independent samples and Mann-Whitney U test were used for the RAGE's intergroup analysis (α ≤ 0.05). A semiquantitative analysis was performed to assess the collagen reactivity. No significant differences were observed in the intracellular, extracellular or total localization of RAGE (p > 0.05). Higher immunoreactivity was observed in the OAG for all types of collagen, with more reactivity for collagen III and IV. We concluded that in the initial stages of knee OA, no differences were observed for RAGE levels between the groups. However, the OAG's higher collagen expression may represent adaptations for reducing muscle stiffness and avoiding injury.

  7. Structure of the human type IV collagen COL4A6 gene, which is mutated in Alport syndrome-associated leiomyomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xu |; Zhou, Jing; Reeders, S.T.

    1996-05-01

    Basement membrane (type IV) collagen, a subfamily of the collagen protein family, is encoded by six distinct genes in mammals. Three of those, COL4A3, COL4A4, and COL4A5, are linked with Alport syndrome (hereditary nephritis). Patients with leimoyomatosis associated with Alport syndrome have been shown to have deletions in the 5{prime} end of the COL4A6 gene, in addition to having deletions in COL4A6. The human COL4A6 gene is reported to be 425 kb as determined by mapping of overlapping YAC clones by probes for its 5{prime} and 3{prime} ends. In the present study we describe the complete exon/intron size pattern of the human COL4A6 gene. The 12 {lambda} phage clones characterized in the study spanned a total of 110 kb, including 85 kb of the actual gene and 25 kb of flanking sequences. The overlapping clones contained all 46 exons of the gene and all introns, except for intron 2. Since the total size of the exons and all introns except for intron 2 is about 85 kb, intron 2 must be about 340 kb. All exons of the gene were assigned to EcoRI restriction fragments to facilitate analysis of the gene in patients with leiomyomatosis associated with Alport syndrome. The exon size pattern of COL4A6 is highly homologous with that of the human and mouse COL4A2 genes, with 27 of the 46 exons of COL4A6 being identical in size between the genes. 42 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. A novel COL4A1 frameshift mutation in familial kidney disease: the importance of the C-terminal NC1 domain of type IV collagen

    PubMed Central

    Gale, Daniel P.; Oygar, D. Deren; Lin, Fujun; Oygar, P. Derin; Khan, Nadia; Connor, Thomas M.F.; Lapsley, Marta; Maxwell, Patrick H.; Neild, Guy H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hereditary microscopic haematuria often segregates with mutations of COL4A3, COL4A4 or COL4A5 but in half of families a gene is not identified. We investigated a Cypriot family with autosomal dominant microscopic haematuria with renal failure and kidney cysts. Methods We used genome-wide linkage analysis, whole exome sequencing and cosegregation analyses. Results We identified a novel frameshift mutation, c.4611_4612insG:p.T1537fs, in exon 49 of COL4A1. This mutation predicts truncation of the protein with disruption of the C-terminal part of the NC1 domain. We confirmed its presence in 20 family members, 17 with confirmed haematuria, 5 of whom also had stage 4 or 5 chronic kidney disease. Eleven family members exhibited kidney cysts (55% of those with the mutation), but muscle cramps or cerebral aneurysms were not observed and serum creatine kinase was normal in all individuals tested. Conclusions Missense mutations of COL4A1 that encode the CB3 [IV] segment of the triple helical domain (exons 24 and 25) are associated with HANAC syndrome (hereditary angiopathy, nephropathy, aneurysms and cramps). Missense mutations of COL4A1 that disrupt the NC1 domain are associated with antenatal cerebral haemorrhage and porencephaly, but not kidney disease. Our findings extend the spectrum of COL4A1 mutations linked with renal disease and demonstrate that the highly conserved C-terminal part of the NC1 domain of the α1 chain of type IV collagen is important in the integrity of glomerular basement membrane in humans. PMID:27190376

  9. In situ hybridization reveals temporal and spatial changes in cellular expression of mRNA for a laminin receptor, laminin, and basement membrane (type IV) collagen in the developing kidney

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The appearance of extracellular matrix molecules and their receptors represent key events in the differentiation of cells of the kidney. Steady-state mRNA levels for a laminin receptor, the laminin B1, B2, and A chains, and the alpha 1-chain of collagen IV (alpha 1[IV]), were examined in mouse kidneys at 16 d gestation and birth, when cell differentiation is active, and 1-3 wk after birth when this activity has subsided. Northern analysis revealed that mRNA expression of laminin receptor precedes the alpha 1(IV) and laminin B chains whereas laminin A chain mRNA expression was very low. In situ hybridization reflected this pattern and revealed the cells responsible for expression. At 16 d gestation, laminin receptor mRNA was elevated in cells of newly forming glomeruli and proximal and distal tubules of the nephrogenic zone located in the kidney cortex. These cells also expressed mRNA for alpha 1(IV) and laminin chains. At birth, mRNA expression of receptor and all chains remained high in glomeruli but was reduced in proximal and distal tubules. At 1 wk after birth, expression was located in the medulla over collecting ducts and loops of Henle. Little expression was detectable by 3 wk. These results suggest that cellular expression of steady-state mRNA for laminin receptor, laminin, and collagen IV is temporally linked, with laminin receptor expression proceeding first and thereafter subsiding. PMID:2527859

  10. Alport alloantibodies but not Goodpasture autoantibodies induce murine glomerulonephritis: Protection by quinary crosslinks locking cryptic α3(IV) collagen autoepitopes in vivo 1

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wentian; Wang, Xu-Ping; Kashtan, Clifford E.; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan

    2010-01-01

    The noncollagenous (NC1) domains of α3α4α5(IV) collagen in the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) are targets of Goodpasture autoantibodies or Alport post-transplant nephritis alloantibodies mediating rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Because the autoepitopes but not the alloepitopes become cryptic upon assembly of α3α4α5NC1 hexamers, we investigated how the accessibility of B cell epitopes in vivo influences the development of glomerulonephritis in mice passively immunized with human anti-GBM antibodies. Alport alloantibodies, which bound to native murine α3α4α5NC1 hexamers in vitro, deposited linearly along the mouse GBM in vivo, eliciting crescentic glomerulonephritis in Fcgr2b−/− mice susceptible to antibody-mediated inflammation. Goodpasture autoantibodies, which bound to murine α3NC1 monomer and dimer subunits but not to native α3α4α5NC1 hexamers in vitro, neither bound to the mouse GBM in vivo nor induced experimental glomerulonephritis. This was due to quinary NC1 cross-links, recently identified as sulfilimine bonds, which comprehensively locked the cryptic Goodpasture autoepitopes in the mouse GBM. In contrast, non-crosslinked α3NC1 subunits were identified as a native target of Goodpasture autoantibodies in the GBM of squirrel monkeys—a species susceptible to Goodpasture autoantibody-mediated nephritis. Thus, crypticity of B cell autoepitopes in tissues uncouples potentially pathogenic autoantibodies from autoimmune disease. Crosslinking of α3α4α5NC1 hexamers represents a novel mechanism averting autoantibody binding and subsequent tissue injury by post-translational modifications of an autoantigen. PMID:20709951

  11. Abnormal type III collagen produced by an exon-17-skipping mutation of the COL3A1 gene in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV is not incorporated into the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed Central

    Chiodo, A A; Sillence, D O; Cole, W G; Bateman, J F

    1995-01-01

    A novel heterozygous mutation of the COL3A1 gene that encodes the alpha 1(III) chains of type III collagen was identified in a family with the acrogeric form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV (EDS-IV). Cultured dermal fibroblasts produced normal and shortened alpha 1(III) chains. The triple helix of the latter chain was shortened owing to a 33 amino acid deletion of Gly-184 to Pro-216. The corresponding region of cDNA lacked 99 base pairs from nucleotides 1051 to 1149. The deletions corresponded exactly to the normal sequence encoded by exon 17 of the COL3A1 gene. The proband was heterozygous for a T to G transversion at position +2 of intron 17, which resulted in skipping of exon 17. The splicing defect was not corrected by growing the fibroblasts at 33 degrees C and no other splicing variants were identified at 33 or 37 degrees C. The affected brother had the same mutation but his unaffected mother did not. Heterotrimeric type III collagen molecules containing normal and mutant chains were retained within the cell. The mutant homotrimeric molecules were modified and secreted normally and were thermally stable. These normal characteristics of the mutant homotrimers suggested that the loss of ten Gly-Xaa-Yaa triplets (where Gly-Xaa-Yaa is a repetitive amino acid triplet structure in which Xaa and Yaa are other amino acids, proline and hydroxyproline being more common in the Yaa position) did not adversely affect the formation and stability of the triple helix or the structural requirements for secretion. However, the mutant homotrimers were not incorporated into the extracellular matrix of an in vitro model of EDS-IV dermis. The EDS-IV phenotype in this family was probably due to a deficiency in the amount of normal type III collagen available for formation of the heterotypic collagen fibrils of the extracellular matrix. Intracellular and extracellular quality-control mechanisms prevented the incorporation of heterotrimeric and homotrimeric mutant type III collagen

  12. Disorganization, COMT, and Children's Social Behavior: The Norwegian Hypothesis of Legacy of Disorganized Attachment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi; Hygen, Beate W.; Widaman, Keith F.; Berg-Nielsen, Turid S.; Wichstrøm, Lars; Belsky, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Why is disorganized attachment associated with punitive-controlling behavior in some, but caregiving-controlling in others? Hygen et al. (2014) proposed that variation in the Catechol-O-methyl transferase(COMT) Val158Met genotype explains this variation, providing preliminary data to this effect. We offer a conceptual replication, analyzing data on 560 children (males: 275) drawn from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development. As predicted, competitive model-fitting indicated that disorganized infants carrying Met alleles engage in more positive behavior and less negative behavior than other children at age 5 and 11, with the reverse true of Val/Val homozygotes, seemingly consistent with caregiving-controlling and punitive-controlling styles, respectively, but only in the case of maternal and not teacher reports, thereby confirmating a relationship-specific hypothesis. PMID:27462283

  13. A Threshold Approach to Understanding the Origins of Attachment Disorganization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernier, Annie; Meins, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Disorganized attachment in infancy is known to predict a wide range of maladaptive outcomes, but its origins are poorly understood. Parental lack of resolution concerning loss or trauma has been proposed to result in atypical parenting behaviors, which in turn have a disorganizing effect on the parent-child relationship. The authors review the…

  14. Maternal Antenatal Depression and Infant Disorganized Attachment at 12 months

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Lisa J.; Goodman, Sherryl H.; Carlson, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Although high rates of attachment disorganization have been observed in infants of depressed mothers, little is known about the role of antenatal depression as a precursor to infant attachment disorganization. The primary aim of this study was to examine associations between maternal antenatal depression and infant disorganization at 12 months in a sample of women (N = 79) at risk for perinatal depression. A secondary aim was to test the roles of maternal postpartum depression and maternal parenting quality as potential moderators of this predicted association. Among women with histories of major depressive episodes, maternal depressive symptoms were assessed at multiple times during pregnancy and the first year postpartum, maternal parenting quality was measured at 3 months postpartum, and attachment disorganization was assessed at 12 months postpartum. Results revealed that infants classified as disorganized had mothers with higher levels of depressive symptoms during pregnancy compared to infants classified as organized. Maternal parenting quality moderated this association, as exposure to higher levels of maternal depressive symptoms during pregnancy was only associated with higher rates of infant disorganized attachment when maternal parenting at 3 months was less optimal. These findings suggest that enhancing maternal parenting behaviors during this early period in development has the potential to alter pathways to disorganized attachment among infants exposed to antenatal maternal depressive symptoms, which could have enduring consequences for child wellbeing. PMID:23216358

  15. Extracellular collagenous spherules in salivary gland tumors. Immunohistochemical analysis of laminin and various types of collagen.

    PubMed

    Skalova, A; Leivo, I

    1992-06-01

    Collagenous spherulosis is a benign breast lesion involving lobular acini and ductules and containing eosinophilic spherules measuring up to 100 microns in diameter. We present an immunohistochemical analysis of similar collagen-rich spherules that are also found in salivary gland tumors. These collagenous spherules contain varying amounts of acidic mucins, elastin, basement membrane proteins including type IV collagen and laminin, and considerable amounts of interstitial collagen types I and III. Types II and VI collagen were not detected in collagenous spherules of salivary gland tumors. The cells surrounding these collagenous spherules expressed muscle actin, S100 protein, vimentin, and cytokeratins 8, 18, and 19, indicating that these cells have myoepithelial characteristics.

  16. Disorganized junior doctors fail the MRCP (UK).

    PubMed

    Stanley, Adrian G; Khan, Khalid M; Hussain, Walayat; Tweed, Michael

    2006-02-01

    Career progression during undergraduate and early postgraduate years is currently determined by successfully passing examinations. Both academic factors (secondary school examination results, learning style and training opportunities) and non-academic factors (maturity, ethnic origin, gender and motivation) have been identified as predicting examination outcome. Few studies have examined organization skills. Disorganized medical students are more likely to perform poorly in end-of-year examinations but this observation has not been examined in junior doctors. This study asked whether organization skills relate to examination outcome amongst junior doctors taking the clinical Part II examination for the Membership of the Royal College of Physicians (Practical Assessment of Clinical Examination Skills). The study was conducted prospectively at four consecutive clinical courses that provided clinical teaching and practice to prepare trainees for the examination. Arrival time at registration for the course was the chosen surrogate for organization skills. Trainees were advised that they should arrive promptly at 8.00 a.m. for registration and it was explained that the course would start at 8.30 a.m. Recorded arrival times were compared with the pass lists published by the Royal College of Physicians. The mean arrival time was 8.17 a.m. A total of 81 doctors (53.3%) passed the examination with a mean arrival time of 8.14 a.m. However, 71 doctors failed the exam and arrived, on average, six minutes later than doctors who passed (p?=?0.006). Better-prepared junior doctors were more likely to pass the final examination. Arriving on time represents a composite of several skills involved in the planning of appropriate travel arrangements and is therefore a valid marker of organization skills and preparation. This novel study has shown that good time-keeping skills are positively associated with examination outcome. PMID:16627323

  17. Mapping structural landmarks, ligand binding sites and missense mutations to the collagen IV heterotrimers predicts major functional domains, novel interactions and variation in phenotypes in inherited diseases affecting basement membranes

    PubMed Central

    Des Parkin, J.; San Antonio, James D.; Pedchenko, Vadim; Hudson, Billy; Jensen, Shane T.; Savige, Judy

    2016-01-01

    Collagen IV is the major protein found in basement membranes. It comprises 3 heterotrimers (α1α1α2, α3α4α5, and α5α5α6) that form distinct networks, and are responsible for membrane strength and integrity. We constructed linear maps of the collagen IV heterotrimers (‘interactomes’) that indicated major structural landmarks, known and predicted ligand-binding sites, and missense mutations, in order to identify functional and disease-associated domains, potential interactions between ligands, and genotype-phenotype relationships. The maps documented more than 30 known ligand-binding sites as well as motifs for integrins, heparin, von Willebrand factor (VWF), decorin and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP). They predicted functional domains for angiogenesis and haemostasis, and disease domains for autoimmunity, tumor growth and inhibition, infection and glycation. Cooperative ligand interactions were indicated by binding site proximity, for example, between integrins, matrix metalloproteinases and heparin. The maps indicated that mutations affecting major ligand-binding sites, for example for Von Hippel Lindau (VHL) protein in the α1 chain or integrins in the α5 chain, resulted in distinctive phenotypes (Hereditary Angiopathy, Nephropathy, Aneurysms and muscle Cramps (HANAC) syndrome, and early onset Alport syndrome respectively). These maps further our understanding of basement membrane biology and disease, and suggest novel membrane interactions, functions, and therapeutic targets. PMID:21280145

  18. Disorganized Cortical Patches Suggest Prenatal Origin of Autism

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain tissue revealed patch-like areas of disorganized neurons. Arrows show a patch of decreased or absent ... autistic brain is speckled with patches of abnormal neurons, according to research partially funded by the National ...

  19. Social Disorganization, Drug Market Activity, and Neighborhood Violent Crime

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Ramiro; Rosenfeld, Richard; Mares, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Although illicit drug activity occurs within local communities, past quantitative research on drug markets and violent crime in the United States has been conducted mainly at the city level. The authors use neighborhood-level data from the city of Miami to test hypotheses regarding the effect of drug activity and traditional indicators of social disorganization on rates of aggravated assault and robbery. The results show that drug activity has robust effects on violent crime that are independent of other disorganization indicators. The authors also find that drug activity is concentrated in neighborhoods with low rates of immigration, less linguistic isolation and ethnic heterogeneity, and where nondrug accidental deaths are prevalent. The authors find no independent effect of neighborhood racial composition on drug activity or violent crime. The results suggest that future neighborhood-level research on social disorganization and violent crime should devote explicit attention to the disorganizing and violence-producing effects of illicit drug activity. PMID:19655037

  20. Trypanosoma cruzi induces tissue disorganization and destruction of chorionic villi in an ex vivo infection model of human placenta.

    PubMed

    Duaso, J; Rojo, G; Cabrera, G; Galanti, N; Bosco, C; Maya, J D; Morello, A; Kemmerling, U

    2010-08-01

    Congenital Chagas' disease, endemic in Latin America and also present with lower frequency in other countries, is associated with premature labor, miscarriage, and placentitis. The mechanism of tissue invasion and infection of human placenta by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) remains unclear. In order to explore some morphological aspects of this infection in the placenta, we incubated chorionic villous explants from normal human placentae ex vivo with the parasite and studied the resulting effects by immunohistochemical and histochemical methods. Infection of the chorionic villi with the parasite was confirmed by immunofluoresence and PCR. T. cruzi induces syncytiotrophoblast destruction and detachment, selective disorganization of basal lamina and disorganization of collagen I in the connective tissue of villous stroma. These effects are a function of the number of parasites used for the infection. Our results suggest a participation of the proteolytic activity of the parasite on the placental basal lamina and connective tissue in the mechanism of infection of the fetus by T. cruzi.

  1. Collagenous gastroduodenitis.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Rai, Mridula; Scholes, John V

    2011-10-01

    Collagenous gastroduodenitis is a rare histopathologic entity characterized by marked subepithelial collagen deposition with associated mucosal inflammatory infiltrate. Only 4 cases have been reported, of which 3 had associated collagenous colitis. Collagenous gastroduodenitis without colonic involvement is exceptionally rare with only 1 case reported so far in the literature. We present a case of a 68-year-old woman with dyspepsia and mild anemia, who was found to have nodular gastric and duodenal mucosa on endoscopic examination. Histopathology showed collagenous gastroduodenitis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second (and first in English literature) reported case of isolated collagenous gastroduodenitis.

  2. Collagenous gastroduodenitis.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Rai, Mridula; Scholes, John V

    2011-10-01

    Collagenous gastroduodenitis is a rare histopathologic entity characterized by marked subepithelial collagen deposition with associated mucosal inflammatory infiltrate. Only 4 cases have been reported, of which 3 had associated collagenous colitis. Collagenous gastroduodenitis without colonic involvement is exceptionally rare with only 1 case reported so far in the literature. We present a case of a 68-year-old woman with dyspepsia and mild anemia, who was found to have nodular gastric and duodenal mucosa on endoscopic examination. Histopathology showed collagenous gastroduodenitis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second (and first in English literature) reported case of isolated collagenous gastroduodenitis. PMID:21346601

  3. Collagens in the aged human macula.

    PubMed

    Marshall, G E; Konstas, A G; Reid, G G; Edwards, J G; Lee, W R

    1994-03-01

    Immunogold cytochemistry was used to investigate the fine structural distribution of collagen types I-VI in Bruch's membrane and choroid of the aged human macula. Macular tissue was obtained from ten eyes, and processed for cryoultramicrotomy and London Resin white embedding. Striated collagen fibrils within the inner and outer collagenous layers were found to contain collagen types I, III and V. In addition, type V collagen was also present in the basement membrane of the choriocapillaris. Gross thickening of the choriocapillaris basement membrane was attributed to the deposition of type IV collagen. However, type IV collagen appeared to be absent from the basement membrane of the retinal pigment epithelium. The interesting location of type VI collagen on the choroidal side of the choriocapillaris suggested that its function is to anchor the choriocapillaris onto the choroid. The collagens studied were absent from fibrous banded material, long-spacing collagen, the elastic layer and amorphous granular material. It was concluded that, of the collagen types studied, only the deposition of type IV collagen contributes to the age-related thickening of Bruch's membrane.

  4. Collagen fillers.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Leslie; Kaufman, Joely; Saghari, Sogol

    2006-01-01

    Collagen implants, both animal and human derived, have been used for soft tissue augmentation for many years. Bovine collagen fillers were the most popular injectable implants for nearly two decades in the United States. Since then, human bioengineered collagen products have been available in addition to hyaluronic acid-containing fillers. This article outlines the different types of injectable collagen implants, injection techniques, preferred methods of treatment, and possible adverse reactions to the injectable materials.

  5. Metacognition, memory disorganization and rumination in posttraumatic stress symptoms.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Hazel; Wells, Adrian

    2010-04-01

    The present study aimed to assess the relative contribution of memory disorganization and beliefs about trauma memory in the prediction of posttraumatic stress symptoms. A sample of 95 student nurses and midwives narrated their memory of the most distressing placement related event they had experienced. Several questionnaires were administered, including the Beliefs about Memory Questionnaire (BAMQ), which was devised for the study. Pearson's correlations, hierarchical analyses and mediation analyses were performed on the data. The reliability and validity of the BAMQ gained preliminary support. Beliefs about the trauma memory, but not memory disorganization within the trauma narrative, predicted a significant proportion of the variance in posttraumatic stress symptoms after control variables were accounted for. Consistent with the metacognitive model of PTSD, the use of rumination mediated the relationship between beliefs about the trauma memory and PTSD symptoms. The findings provide preliminary support for the role of meta-memory in the maintenance of PTSD symptoms and question the importance of memory disorganization.

  6. Complications of collagen fillers.

    PubMed

    Lucey, Patricia; Goldberg, David J

    2014-12-01

    As the skin ages, a deficiency in collagen occurs, thus injectable collagen products have become a sensible and popular option for dermal filling and volume enhancement. Several types of collagen have been developed over the years, including animal sources such as bovine and porcine collagen, as well as human-based sources derived from pieces of the patient's own skin, cadaver skin, and later cultured from human dermal fibroblasts. While collagen overall has a relatively safe, side effect profile, there are several complications, both early and late onset, that practitioners and patients should be aware of. Early complications, occurring within days of the procedure, can be divided into non-hypersensitivity and hypersensitivity reactions. The non-hypersensitive reactions include injection site reactions, discoloration, maldistribution, infection, skin necrosis, and the very rare but dreaded risk of vision loss, whereas the hypersensitivity reactions present usually as delayed type IV reactions, but can also rarely present as an immediate type I reaction. Late complications, occurring within weeks to even years after injection, include granuloma formation, foreign body reactions, and infection secondary to atypical mycobacteria or biofilms. This review will give a detailed overview of the complications secondary to cutaneous collagen injections.

  7. Parental somatic and germ-line mosaicism for a multiexon deletion with unusual endpoints in a type III collagen (COL3Al) allele produces ehlers-danlos syndrome type IV in the heterozygous offspring

    SciTech Connect

    McGookey Milewicz, D.; Witz, A.M.; Byers, P.H. ); Smith, A.C.M.; Manchester, D.K.; Waldstein, G. )

    1993-07-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type IV is a dominantly inherited disorder that results from mutation in the type III collagen gene (COL3A1). The authors studied the structure of the COL3A1 gene of an individual with EDS type IV and that of her phenotypically normal parents. The proband was heterozygous for a 2-kb deletion in COL3A1, while her father was mosaic for the same deletion in somatic and germ cells. In fibroblasts from the father, approximately two-fifths of the COL3A1 alleles carried the deletion, but only 10% of the COL3A1 alleles in white blood cells were of the mutant species. The deletion in the mutant allele extended from intron 7 into intron 11. There was a 12-bp direct repeat in intron 7 and intron 11, the latter about 60 bp 5' to the junction. At the breakpoint there was a duplication of 10 bp from intron 11 separated by an insertion of 4 bp contained within the duplicated sequence. The father was mosaic for the deletion so that the gene rearrangement occurred during his early embryonic development prior to lineage allocation. These findings suggest that at least some of the deletions seen in human genes may occur during replication, rather than as a consequence of meiotic crossing-over, and that they thus have a risk for recurrence when observed de novo. 71 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Parental somatic and germ-line mosaicism for a multiexon deletion with unusual endpoints in a type III collagen (COL3A1) allele produces Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV in the heterozygous offspring.

    PubMed Central

    Milewicz, D M; Witz, A M; Smith, A C; Manchester, D K; Waldstein, G; Byers, P H

    1993-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type IV is a dominantly inherited disorder that results from mutations in the type III collagen gene (COL3A1). We studied the structure of the COL3A1 gene of an individual with EDS type IV and that of her phenotypically normal parents. The proband was heterozygous for a 2-kb deletion in COL3A1, while her father was mosaic for the same deletion in somatic and germ cells. In fibroblasts from the father, approximately two-fifths of the COL3A1 alleles carried the deletion, but only 10% of the COL3A1 alleles in white blood cells were of the mutant species. The deletion in the mutant allele extended from intron 7 into intron 11. There was a 12-bp direct repeat in intron 7 and intron 11, the latter about 60 bp 5' to the junction. At the breakpoint there was a duplication of 10 bp from intron 11 separated by an insertion of 4 bp contained within the duplicated sequence. The father was mosaic for the deletion so that the gene rearrangement occurred during his early embryonic development prior to lineage allocation. These findings suggest that at least some of the deletions seen in human genes may occur during replication, rather than as a consequence of meiotic crossing-over, and that they thus have a risk for recurrence when observed de novo. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8317500

  9. An RNA-splicing mutation (G+5IVS20) in the type II collagen gene (COL2A1) in a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita.

    PubMed

    Tiller, G E; Weis, M A; Polumbo, P A; Gruber, H E; Rimoin, D L; Cohn, D H; Eyre, D R

    1995-02-01

    Defects in type II collagen have been demonstrated in a phenotypic continuum of chondrodysplasias that includes achondrogenesis II, hypochondrogenesis, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita (SEDC), Kniest dysplasia, and Stickler syndrome. We have determined that cartilage from a terminated fetus with an inherited form of SEDC contained both normal alpha 1(II) collagen chains and chains that lacked amino acids 256-273 of the triple-helical domain. PCR amplification of this region of COL2A1, from genomic DNA, yielded products of normal size, while amplification of cDNA yielded a normal sized species and a shorter fragment missing exon 20. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA from the fetus revealed a G-->T transversion at position +5 of intron 20; the affected father was also heterozygous for the mutation. Allele-specific PCR and heteroduplex analysis of a VNTR in COL2A1 independently confirmed the unaffected status of a fetus in a subsequent pregnancy. Thermodynamic calculations suggest that the mutation prevents normal splicing of exon 20 by interfering with binding of U1 small-nuclear RNA to pre-mRNA, thus leading to skipping of exon 20 in transcripts from the mutant allele. Electron micrographs of diseased cartilage showed intracellular inclusion bodies, which were stained by an antibody to alpha 1(II) procollagen. Our findings support the hypothesis that alpha-chain length alterations that preserve the Gly-X-Y repeat motif of the triple helix result in partial intracellular retention of alpha 1(II) procollagen and produce mild to moderate chondrodysplasia phenotypes. PMID:7847372

  10. An RNA-splicing mutation (G+5IVS20) in the type II collagen gene (COL2A1) in a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita.

    PubMed Central

    Tiller, G E; Weis, M A; Polumbo, P A; Gruber, H E; Rimoin, D L; Cohn, D H; Eyre, D R

    1995-01-01

    Defects in type II collagen have been demonstrated in a phenotypic continuum of chondrodysplasias that includes achondrogenesis II, hypochondrogenesis, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita (SEDC), Kniest dysplasia, and Stickler syndrome. We have determined that cartilage from a terminated fetus with an inherited form of SEDC contained both normal alpha 1(II) collagen chains and chains that lacked amino acids 256-273 of the triple-helical domain. PCR amplification of this region of COL2A1, from genomic DNA, yielded products of normal size, while amplification of cDNA yielded a normal sized species and a shorter fragment missing exon 20. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA from the fetus revealed a G-->T transversion at position +5 of intron 20; the affected father was also heterozygous for the mutation. Allele-specific PCR and heteroduplex analysis of a VNTR in COL2A1 independently confirmed the unaffected status of a fetus in a subsequent pregnancy. Thermodynamic calculations suggest that the mutation prevents normal splicing of exon 20 by interfering with binding of U1 small-nuclear RNA to pre-mRNA, thus leading to skipping of exon 20 in transcripts from the mutant allele. Electron micrographs of diseased cartilage showed intracellular inclusion bodies, which were stained by an antibody to alpha 1(II) procollagen. Our findings support the hypothesis that alpha-chain length alterations that preserve the Gly-X-Y repeat motif of the triple helix result in partial intracellular retention of alpha 1(II) procollagen and produce mild to moderate chondrodysplasia phenotypes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7847372

  11. Disorganized attachment and inhibitory capacity: predicting externalizing problem behaviors.

    PubMed

    Bohlin, Gunilla; Eninger, Lilianne; Brocki, Karin Cecilia; Thorell, Lisa B

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether attachment insecurity, focusing on disorganized attachment, and the executive function (EF) component of inhibition, assessed at age 5, were longitudinally related to general externalizing problem behaviors as well as to specific symptoms of ADHD and Autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and callous-unemotional (CU) traits. General externalizing problem behaviors were also measured at age 5 to allow for a developmental analysis. Outcome variables were rated by parents and teachers. The sample consisted of 65 children with an oversampling of children with high levels of externalizing behaviors. Attachment was evaluated using a story stem attachment doll play procedure. Inhibition was measured using four different tasks. The results showed that both disorganized attachment and poor inhibition were longitudinally related to all outcome variables. Controlling for initial level of externalizing problem behavior, poor inhibition predicted ADHD symptoms and externalizing problem behaviors, independent of disorganized attachment, whereas for ASD symptoms no predictive relations remained. Disorganized attachment independently predicted CU traits. PMID:21947617

  12. Disorganized attachment and inhibitory capacity: predicting externalizing problem behaviors.

    PubMed

    Bohlin, Gunilla; Eninger, Lilianne; Brocki, Karin Cecilia; Thorell, Lisa B

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether attachment insecurity, focusing on disorganized attachment, and the executive function (EF) component of inhibition, assessed at age 5, were longitudinally related to general externalizing problem behaviors as well as to specific symptoms of ADHD and Autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and callous-unemotional (CU) traits. General externalizing problem behaviors were also measured at age 5 to allow for a developmental analysis. Outcome variables were rated by parents and teachers. The sample consisted of 65 children with an oversampling of children with high levels of externalizing behaviors. Attachment was evaluated using a story stem attachment doll play procedure. Inhibition was measured using four different tasks. The results showed that both disorganized attachment and poor inhibition were longitudinally related to all outcome variables. Controlling for initial level of externalizing problem behavior, poor inhibition predicted ADHD symptoms and externalizing problem behaviors, independent of disorganized attachment, whereas for ASD symptoms no predictive relations remained. Disorganized attachment independently predicted CU traits.

  13. Disorganized Attachment and Inhibitory Capacity: Predicting Externalizing Problem Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohlin, Gunilla; Eninger, Lilianne; Brocki, Karin Cecilia; Thorell, Lisa B.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether attachment insecurity, focusing on disorganized attachment, and the executive function (EF) component of inhibition, assessed at age 5, were longitudinally related to general externalizing problem behaviors as well as to specific symptoms of ADHD and Autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and…

  14. Family Disorganization, Sleep Hygiene, and Adolescent Sleep Disturbance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billows, Michael; Gradisar, Michael; Dohnt, Hayley; Johnston, Anna; McCappin, Stephanie; Hudson, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    The link between sleep hygiene and adolescent sleep is well documented, though evidence suggests contributions from other factors, particularly the family environment. The present study examined whether sleep hygiene mediated the relationship between family disorganization and self-reported sleep onset latency, total sleep time, and daytime…

  15. Collagenous gastritis.

    PubMed

    Colletti, R B; Trainer, T D

    1989-12-01

    Subepithelial fibrosis has previously been reported in the small intestine (collagenous sprue) and colon (collagenous colitis). We report a 15-yr-old girl with chronic gastritis and subepithelial fibrosis of the gastric corpus who presented with recurrent abdominal pain and acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Nodularity and erythema of the gastric corpus were persistent endoscopic findings. Biopsies revealed patchy chronic active gastritis with a striking focal thick band of collagen immediately beneath the surface epithelial cells that did not extend to deeper portions of the lamina propria. Contrast radiography demonstrated an abnormal mucosa of the gastric corpus with a mosaiclike surface pattern. Numerous studies have failed to elucidate the etiology. Despite treatment with ranitidine, sucralfate, and furazolidone, there has been no clinical or pathologic improvement. The pathogenesis and prognosis of collagenous gastritis, and its relationship to collagenous sprue and collagenous colitis, remain to be defined. PMID:2583419

  16. Collagenous gastritis.

    PubMed

    Jain, Richa; Chetty, Runjan

    2010-12-01

    A 25-year-old patient presented with epigastric pain, which on gastric biopsy revealed the characteristic appearance of collagenous gastritis. There was a thick prominent subepithelial band that was confirmed to be collagen with a Masson's trichrome stain. There was associated Helicobacter pylori gastritis but no evidence of a lymphocytic gastritis. The patient did not have watery diarrhea. Collagenous gastritis can occur in young patients, be restricted to the stomach, and can be associated with celiac disease. PMID:19103610

  17. Bioengineered collagens

    PubMed Central

    Ramshaw, John AM; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Dumsday, Geoff J

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian collagen has been widely used as a biomedical material. Nevertheless, there are still concerns about the variability between preparations, particularly with the possibility that the products may transmit animal-based diseases. Many groups have examined the possible application of bioengineered mammalian collagens. However, translating laboratory studies into large-scale manufacturing has often proved difficult, although certain yeast and plant systems seem effective. Production of full-length mammalian collagens, with the required secondary modification to give proline hydroxylation, has proved difficult in E. coli. However, recently, a new group of collagens, which have the characteristic triple helical structure of collagen, has been identified in bacteria. These proteins are stable without the need for hydroxyproline and are able to be produced and purified from E. coli in high yield. Initial studies indicate that they would be suitable for biomedical applications. PMID:24717980

  18. Conceptual disorganization weakens links in cognitive pathways: Disentangling neurocognition, social cognition, and metacognition in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Minor, Kyle S; Marggraf, Matthew P; Davis, Beshaun J; Luther, Lauren; Vohs, Jenifer L; Buck, Kelly D; Lysaker, Paul H

    2015-12-01

    Disentangling links between neurocognition, social cognition, and metacognition offers the potential to improve interventions for these cognitive processes. Disorganized symptoms have shown promise for explaining the limiting relationship that neurocognition holds with both social cognition and metacognition. In this study, primary aims included: 1) testing whether conceptual disorganization, a specific disorganized symptom, moderated relationships between cognitive processes, and 2) examining the level of conceptual disorganization necessary for links between cognitive processes to break down. To accomplish these aims, comprehensive assessments of conceptual disorganization, neurocognition, social cognition, and metacognition were administered to 67 people with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. We found that conceptual disorganization significantly moderated the relationship between neurocognition and metacognition, with links between cognitive processes weakening when conceptual disorganization is present even at minimal levels of severity. There was no evidence that conceptual disorganization-or any other specific disorganized symptom-drove the limiting relationship of neurocognition on social cognition. Based on our findings, conceptual disorganization appears to be a critical piece of the puzzle when disentangling the relationship between neurocognition and metacognition. Roles of specific disorganized symptoms in the neurocognition - social cognition relationship were less clear. Findings from this study suggest that disorganized symptoms are an important treatment consideration when aiming to improve cognitive impairments.

  19. Collagenous gastroduodenitis on collagenous colitis.

    PubMed

    Stolte, M; Ritter, M; Borchard, F; Koch-Scherrer, G

    1990-07-01

    We report on a case of collagenous gastroduodenitis with concomitant collagenous colitis in a 75-year-old woman with watery diarrhea of approximately six months' standing. The step biopsy material obtained from the colon revealed continuous collagenous colitis with thickening of the basal membrane to 30 microns. The biopsies taken from the stomach and duodenum also revealed a band-like deposition of collagen in the duodenum (bulb and proximal portion of the descending portion) along the basal membrane of the lining epithelium, associated with partial atrophy of the villi. In the stomach, this band of collagen was located, parallel to the mucosal surface, at the level of the floor of the foveolae. PMID:2209504

  20. Cell adhesion promoting peptide GVKGDKGNPGWPGAP from the collagen type IV triple helix: Cis/trans proline-induced multiple sup 1 H NMR conformations and evidence for a KG/PG multiple turn repeat motif in the all-trans proline state

    SciTech Connect

    Mayo, K.H.; Parra-Diaz, D. ); McCarthy, J.B.; Chelberg, M. )

    1991-08-20

    Peptide GVKGDKGNPGWPGAPY (called peptide IV-H1), derived from the protein sequence of human collagen type IV, triple-helix domain residues 1263-1277, represents an RGD-independent, cell-specific, adhesion, spreading, and motility promoting domain in type IV collagen. In this study, peptide IV-H1 has been investigated by {sup 1}H NMR (500 MHz) spectroscopy. Cis-trans proline isomerization at each of the three proline residues gives rise to a number of slowly exchanging (500-MHz NMR time scale) conformation states. The presence of more than two sets of resonances for residues sequentially proximal to a proline, e.g., A14-cis-P15 K3, indicates long range conformation interactions and the presence of preferred structure in this short linear peptide. Many resonances belonging to these multiple species have been assigned by using mono-proline-substituted analogues. Conformational (isomer) state-specific 2D {sup 1}H NMR assignments for the combination of cis and trans proline states have been made via analysis of COSY-type, HOHAHA, and NOESY spectra. The NMR data indicate significant {beta}-turn populations centered at K3-G4, K5-G6, P9-G10, and P12-G13, and a C-terminal {gamma}-turn within the A14-P15-Y16 sequence. These NMR data are supported by circular dichroic studies which indicate the presence of 52% {beta}-turn, 10% helix, and 38% random coil structural populations. Since equally spaced KG and PG residues are found on both sides of peptide IV-H1 in the native collagen type IV sequence, this multiple turn repeat motif may continue through a longer segment of the protein.

  1. Disorganized attachment in infancy predicts greater amygdala volume in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Lyons-Ruth, K; Pechtel, P; Yoon, S A; Anderson, C M; Teicher, M H

    2016-07-15

    Early life stress in rodents is associated with increased amygdala volume in adulthood. In humans, the amygdala develops rapidly during the first two years of life. Thus, disturbed care during this period may be particularly important to amygdala development. In the context of a 30-year longitudinal study of impoverished, highly stressed families, we assessed whether disorganization of the attachment relationship in infancy was related to amygdala volume in adulthood. Amygdala volumes were assessed among 18 low-income young adults (8M/10F, 29.33±0.49years) first observed in infancy (8.5±5.6months) and followed longitudinally to age 29. In infancy (18.58±1.02mos), both disorganized infant attachment behavior and disrupted maternal communication were assessed in the standard Strange Situation Procedure (SSP). Increased left amygdala volume in adulthood was associated with both maternal and infant components of disorganized attachment interactions at 18 months of age (overall r=0.679, p<0.004). Later stressors, including childhood maltreatment and attachment disturbance in adolescence, were not significantly related to left amygdala volume. Left amygdala volume was further associated with dissociation and limbic irritability in adulthood. Finally, left amygdala volume mediated the prediction from attachment disturbance in infancy to limbic irritability in adulthood. Results point to the likely importance of quality of early care for amygdala development in human children as well as in rodents. The long-term prediction found here suggests that the first two years of life may be an early sensitive period for amygdala development during which clinical intervention could have particularly important consequences for later child outcomes.

  2. Disorganized attachment in infancy predicts greater amygdala volume in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Lyons-Ruth, K; Pechtel, P; Yoon, S A; Anderson, C M; Teicher, M H

    2016-07-15

    Early life stress in rodents is associated with increased amygdala volume in adulthood. In humans, the amygdala develops rapidly during the first two years of life. Thus, disturbed care during this period may be particularly important to amygdala development. In the context of a 30-year longitudinal study of impoverished, highly stressed families, we assessed whether disorganization of the attachment relationship in infancy was related to amygdala volume in adulthood. Amygdala volumes were assessed among 18 low-income young adults (8M/10F, 29.33±0.49years) first observed in infancy (8.5±5.6months) and followed longitudinally to age 29. In infancy (18.58±1.02mos), both disorganized infant attachment behavior and disrupted maternal communication were assessed in the standard Strange Situation Procedure (SSP). Increased left amygdala volume in adulthood was associated with both maternal and infant components of disorganized attachment interactions at 18 months of age (overall r=0.679, p<0.004). Later stressors, including childhood maltreatment and attachment disturbance in adolescence, were not significantly related to left amygdala volume. Left amygdala volume was further associated with dissociation and limbic irritability in adulthood. Finally, left amygdala volume mediated the prediction from attachment disturbance in infancy to limbic irritability in adulthood. Results point to the likely importance of quality of early care for amygdala development in human children as well as in rodents. The long-term prediction found here suggests that the first two years of life may be an early sensitive period for amygdala development during which clinical intervention could have particularly important consequences for later child outcomes. PMID:27060720

  3. Collagenous gastritis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaoyi; Koike, Tomoyuki; Chiba, Takashi; Kondo, Yutaka; Ara, Nobuyuki; Uno, Kaname; Asano, Naoki; Iijima, Katsunori; Imatani, Akira; Watanabe, Mika; Shirane, Akio; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2013-09-01

    In the present paper, we report a case of rare collagenous gastritis. The patient was a 25-year-old man who had experienced nausea, abdominal distention and epigastralgia since 2005. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) carried out at initial examination by the patient's local doctor revealed an extensively discolored depression from the upper gastric body to the lower gastric body, mainly including the greater curvature, accompanied by residual mucosa with multiple islands and nodularity with a cobblestone appearance. Initial biopsies sampled from the nodules and accompanying atrophic mucosa were diagnosed as chronic gastritis. In August, 2011, the patient was referred to Tohoku University Hospital for observation and treatment. EGD at our hospital showed the same findings as those by the patient's local doctor. Pathological findings included a membranous collagen band in the superficial layer area of the gastric mucosa, which led to a diagnosis of collagenous gastritis. Collagenous gastritis is an extremely rare disease, but it is important to recognize its characteristic endoscopic findings to make a diagnosis. PMID:23363075

  4. [Collagenous crystalloids and collagenous spherules in salivary gland tumors. A light microscopy and immunohistochemistry study].

    PubMed

    Skálová, A; Michal, M; Leivo, I

    1993-04-01

    In a series of 354 salivary gland tumors, the morphological and immunohistochemical study of two distinctive types of extracellular matrix deposits was carried out. First, collagenous crystalloids, distinct spherical crystalloids composed of radially arranged needle-shaped collagen fibres, were found in twelve cases of benign salivary gland tumors. Second, collagenous spherules, globoid structures often showing concentric lamellar or radial pattern, were found in 46 cases of both benign and malignant salivary gland tumors. Immunohistochemically, collagenous crystalloids and collagenous spherules contain varying amounts of type I and III collagens, proteoglycans and elastic fibres but not collagen types II and VI. Strong linear deposition of basement membrane proteins, collagen type IV and laminin, surrounded collagenous spherules. Discontinuous patchy deposits of both proteins were, however, found near collagenous crystalloids. The cells surrounding these collagenous crystalloids and collagenous spherules showed immunohistochemical and morphological features of modified myoepithelial cells. Our observations may improve a terminology of the structures in question. Proposed active role of modified myoepithelial cells in the origin of these extracellular deposits still remains open for discussion.

  5. Social disorganization and unfounded sexual assault case clearances.

    PubMed

    Mustaine, Elizabeth Ehrhardt; Tewksbury, Richard; Corzine, Jay; Huff-Corzine, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Despite much research and policy development, it remains true that less than one half of all reported sexual assaults are cleared by arrest (Federal Bureau of Investigation [FBI], 2011). Compounding this issue, many sexual assaults are not cleared by an arrest, but rather by being classified as "unfounded" by law enforcement (Soulliere, 1994, 2005; Tellis & Spohn, 2008). Grounded in the social disorganization perspective, this article examines the relationships between case-related and extralegal community-level characteristics and use of the designation of unfounded by the police. Contrary to initial expectations, findings show that communities with higher levels of concentrated disadvantage, immigrant concentration, and residential instability are less likely to have sexual assaults deemed unfounded by law enforcement.

  6. Maternal Frightened, Frightening, or Atypical Behavior and Disorganized Infant Attachment Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons-Ruth, Karlen; Bronfman, Elisa; Parsons, Elizabeth

    1999-01-01

    Studied mothers' behavior toward their infants with disorganized (type D) attachment strategies. Found that mothers whose infants are classified disorganized exhibit an elevated level of atypical maternal behaviors in the Strange Situation test. Mothers of type D Forced Insecure infants showed more negative-intrusive behaviors and role confusion…

  7. ADHD and Infant Disorganized Attachment: A Prospective Study of Children Next-Born after Stillbirth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Carmen; Turton, Penelope; Hughes, Patricia; White, Sarah; Gillberg, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether infant disorganized attachment predicts ADHD at school age. Method: A cohort of 53 children who had been identified as having significant levels of disorganized attachment in infancy is compared to a control group. Symptoms and signs of ADHD at age 7 are evaluated together with a range of relevant maternal variables.…

  8. THE EMERGENCE OF THE DISORGANIZED/DISORIENTED (D) ATTACHMENT CLASSIFICATION, 1979–1982

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the emergence of the concept of infant disorganized/disoriented attachment, drawing on published and archival texts and interviews. Since this new classification was put forward by Main and Solomon (1986), “disorganized/disoriented attachment” has become an important concept in clinical and social intervention contexts. Yet whereas Main and Solomon have often been misunderstood to have introduced disorganized/disoriented attachment in order to produce an exhaustive, categorical system of infant classifications, this article will suggest quite a different account. Attention will be paid to the emergence of disorganized attachment as a classification out of results and reflections in the late 1970s regarding the limits of an alarmed infant’s capacities for maintaining behavioral and attentional avoidance. In contrasting this interpretation of Main and Solomon’s work with current, widespread misunderstandings, the article will critically examine tendencies that have supported the reification and misapplication of the concept of disorganized/disoriented attachment. PMID:25664884

  9. Collagen studies in newborn rat kidneys with incomplete ureteric obstruction.

    PubMed

    Haralambous-Gasser, A; Chan, D; Walker, R G; Powell, H R; Becker, G J; Jones, C L

    1993-09-01

    Collagen studies in newborn rats with incomplete ureteric obstruction were performed to describe and quantify changes in collagen deposition resulting from urinary tract obstruction at an early developmental age. Incomplete ureteric obstruction was created in three-day-old rats by placing the left ureter in a tunnel formed by the psoas muscle, and sham-operated controls underwent a laparotomy. The rats were sacrificed at 10, 17, 24 or 31 days. Collagen types I, III, IV, and V were localized by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, the total collagen content of the kidney was quantitated using hydroxyproline analysis, and collagen types I and III were quantitated using cyanogen bromide (CNBr) peptide analysis. Increased immunofluorescent staining for all of the collagens was found in the diffusely widened medullary interstitium of the obstructed kidney, and more focally in the cortical interstitium. Collagen types I, III and V, but not collagen type IV, were also found in bands in the interstitium at the junction of the cortex with the medulla. Increased staining for collagen type IV was found in thickened and tortuous tubular basement membranes (TBM) of the obstructed kidneys. The total collagen content of the obstructed kidney was significantly increased compared to the amounts in both the contralateral kidneys and in the kidneys from sham-operated controls at 24 and 31 days of age (P < 0.01 in each case, Wilcoxon matched pairs rank sum test and Mann Whitney U-test, respectively). The amount of collagen in the kidneys correlated with the degree of hydronephrosis (Spearman correlation test, r = 0.78, P < 0.02). CNBr peptide analysis demonstrated that over 50% of the collagen in the normal neonatal rat kidney was collagen type I and approximately 25% was collagen type III. In the obstructed kidneys most of the collagen was also collagen type I and collagen type III, although the proportion of total collagen comprised by these collagen types was decreased compared

  10. Frightened versus not frightened disorganized infant attachment: Newborn characteristics and maternal caregiving.

    PubMed

    Padrón, Elena; Carlson, Elizabeth A; Sroufe, L Alan

    2014-03-01

    The disorganized infant has been described as experiencing "fright without solution" (Hesse & Main, 1999, p. 484) within the attachment relationship. Using a sample at risk because of poverty (n = 157), this study evaluated the role of newborn characteristics in predicting disorganized attachment and explored the existence of 2 subgroups of disorganized infants, based on whether they display direct indices of fear. For the entire sample, regression analyses revealed that newborn characteristics did not predict ratings of disorganization directly or via moderation by caregiving. Regarding subgroups, it was hypothesized that, if direct expressions of fear resulted from interaction with a frightening or frightened caregiver, it could be expected that infants in the Not Frightened subgroup would become disorganized in part because of other factors, such as compromised regulatory abilities at birth. Results supported this hypothesis for emotional regulation, but not for orientation; infants in the Not Frightened subgroup displayed limited emotional regulation as newborns. Findings suggest that the disorganized attachment category may be comprised of 2 subgroups, with direct expressions of fear as the key differentiating factor. Specifically, disorganized infants who do not display direct fear in the presence of the caregiver may have started out with compromised emotional regulation abilities at birth.

  11. Differentiating single and multiple victim child sexual abuse cases: a research note considering social disorganization theory.

    PubMed

    Mustaine, Elizabeth Ehrhardt; Tewksbury, Richard; Corzine, Jay; Huff-Corzine, Lin

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the utility of social disorganization theory as an explanation for child sexual abuse with a focus on differentiating single and multiple victim cases. Drawing on 1,172 child sexual abuse cases (including 159 cases with multiple victims) in Orange County, Florida, from 2004 to 2006, the present study considered case characteristics and elements of social disorganization as potential predictors of child sexual abuse cases involving single and multiple victims. We found that social disorganization theory does not successfully predict the locations of multiple victim child sexual abuse incidents and is not useful for distinguishing between child sexual abuse incidents with single or multiple victims.

  12. On the Origins of Disorganized Attachment and Internal Working Models: Paper I. A Dyadic Systems Approach

    PubMed Central

    Beebe, Beatrice; Lachmann, Frank; Markese, Sara; Bahrick, Lorraine

    2014-01-01

    Despite important recent progress in understanding disorganized attachment, we still lack a full understanding of the mechanisms of disorganized attachment formation and transmission prior to 12 months. In this paper we lay out our recommendations for the study of the 4-month origins of disorganized attachment. In our subsequent Paper II we report on the results of a large empirical study that was conducted along the lines we recommend in Paper I. Both Papers I and II are based on Beebe, Jaffe, Markese, Buck, Chen, Cohen, Bahrick, Andrews, Feldstein (2010). In Paper I we describe our proposal that a detailed microanalysis of 4-month mother-infant face-to-face communication would further inform our understanding of the process of disorganized attachment formation between mother and infant. Such a microanalysis would allow us to characterize the nature of the 4-month infant’s procedural representations, or emerging “internal working models” of attachment. PMID:25392604

  13. Collagen arrangement in space of Disse correlates with fluid flow in normal and cirrhotic rat livers.

    PubMed

    Poonkhum, Raksawan; Showpittapornchai, Udomsri; Pradidarcheep, Wisuit

    2015-02-01

    Little is known about collagen arrangement in the space of Disse was related to the fluid flow both in normal and cirrhotic liver. We examined the changes in the arrangement of type-I collagen in thioacetamide-induced cirrhotic rat livers with immunohistochemistry and SEM after maceration of the noncollagenous tissues with NaOH. The sparse bundles of collagen fibers in the spaces of Disse were mostly elongated fibers with a disorganized arrangement in each nodule. They connected with the broad fibrous septa. Based on a comparison of the architecture of the collagen fibers and the established flow of fluid in the space of Disse, we hypothesize that the fluid in the space of Disse streams along collagen fibers in all directions to broad fibrous septa. The appearance of perinodular plexus in cirrhotic rat livers probably helps to reduce portal hypertension.

  14. Collagenous gastrobulbitis and collagenous colitis. Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Castellano, V M; Muñoz, M T; Colina, F; Nevado, M; Casis, B; Solís-Herruzo, J A

    1999-06-01

    A case is reported of collagenous gastrobulbitis on collagenous colitis in a 57-year-old woman with a 6-month history of watery diarrhea. Low serum levels of total proteins and albumin and increased fecal elimination of alpha1-antitrypsin were the only abnormal laboratory test results. Biopsy specimens from the colon, rectum, antrum, fundus, and duodenal bulb showed a thick subepithelial band composed of ultrastructurally normal collagen immunohistochemically negative for collagen IV and laminin. The diarrhea resolved with prednisone and responded to this treatment after a relapse 6 months later. One year later the patient developed severe alimentary intolerance and secondary weight loss. This symptom also responded to the same treatment. However, the collagen deposition did not disappear in the second biopsy samples of colonic and gastric mucosa. Only six cases have been previously reported with gastric and/or duodenal subepithelial collagenous deposition. Four were associated with collagenous colitis. One of these presented a subepithelial collagenous band in the terminal ileum. All these features suggest that this collagen deposition may affect the entire digestive tract with variable intensity, extension, and symptoms. PMID:10440616

  15. Very extensive nonmaternal care predicts mother-infant attachment disorganization: Convergent evidence from two samples.

    PubMed

    Hazen, Nancy L; Allen, Sydnye D; Christopher, Caroline Heaton; Umemura, Tomotaka; Jacobvitz, Deborah B

    2015-08-01

    We examined whether a maximum threshold of time spent in nonmaternal care exists, beyond which infants have an increased risk of forming a disorganized infant-mother attachment. The hours per week infants spent in nonmaternal care at 7-8 months were examined as a continuous measure and as a dichotomous threshold (over 40, 50 and 60 hr/week) to predict infant disorganization at 12-15 months. Two different samples (Austin and NICHD) were used to replicate findings and control for critical covariates: mothers' unresolved status and frightening behavior (assessed in the Austin sample, N = 125), quality of nonmaternal caregiving (assessed in the NICHD sample, N = 1,135), and family income and infant temperament (assessed in both samples). Only very extensive hours of nonmaternal care (over 60 hr/week) and mothers' frightening behavior independently predicted attachment disorganization. A polynomial logistic regression performed on the larger NICHD sample indicated that the risk of disorganized attachment exponentially increased after exceeding 60 hr/week. In addition, very extensive hours of nonmaternal care only predicted attachment disorganization after age 6 months (not prior). Findings suggest that during a sensitive period of attachment formation, infants who spend more than 60 hr/week in nonmaternal care may be at an increased risk of forming a disorganized attachment. PMID:25212870

  16. Cervical collagen imaging for determining preterm labor risks using a colposcope with full Mueller matrix capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoff, Susan; Chue-Sang, Joseph; Holness, Nola A.; Gandjbakhche, Amir; Chernomordik, Viktor; Ramella-Roman, Jessica

    2016-02-01

    Preterm birth is a worldwide health issue, as the number one cause of infant mortality and neurological disorders. Although affecting nearly 10% of all births, an accurate, reliable diagnostic method for preterm birth has, yet, to be developed. The primary constituent of the cervix, collagen, provides the structural support and mechanical strength to maintain cervical closure, through specific organization, during fetal gestation. As pregnancy progresses, the disorganization of the cervical collagen occurs to allow eventual cervical pliability so the baby can be birthed through the cervical opening. This disorganization of collagen affects the mechanical properties of the cervix and, if the changes occur prematurely, may be a significant factor leading to preterm birth. The organization of collagen can be analyzed through the use of Mueller Matrix Polarimetric imaging of the characteristic birefringence of collagen. In this research, we have built a full Mueller Matrix Polarimetry attachment to a standard colposcope to enable imaging of human cervixes during standard prenatal exams at various stages of fetal gestation. Analysis of the polarimetric images provides information of quantity and organization of cervical collagen at specific gestational stages of pregnancy. This quantitative information may provide an indication of risk of preterm birth.

  17. Catechol-O-methyltransferase Val158Met genotype moderates the effect of disorganized attachment on social development in young children.

    PubMed

    Hygen, Beate Wold; Guzey, Ismail Cuneyt; Belsky, Jay; Berg-Nielsen, Turid Suzanne; Wichstrøm, Lars

    2014-11-01

    Children with histories of disorganized attachment exhibit diverse problems, possibly because disorganization takes at least two distinctive forms as children age: controlling-punitive and controlling-caregiving. This variation in the developmental legacy of disorganization has been attributed primarily to variations in children's rearing experiences. Here an alternative explanation of these divergent sequelae of disorganization is evaluated: one focused on genotype. Structural equation modeling was applied to data on 704 Norwegian children to test whether the catechol-O-methyltransferase Val158Met genotype moderates the effect of disorganized attachment, which was measured dimensionally at 4 years of age using the Manchester Child Attachment Story Task, on changes in aggressive behavior and social competence from ages 4 to 6. Children who scored high on disorganization and were homozygous for the valine allele displayed significantly greater increases in aggression and decreases in self-oriented social skills (e.g., self-regulation and assertiveness) over time than did their disorganized counterparts carrying the methionine allele, whereas disorganized children carrying the methionine allele increased their other-oriented social skill (e.g., cooperation and responsibility) scores more than did valine-homozygous children. These results are consistent with the controlling-punitive and controlling-caregiving behaviors observed in disorganized children, suggesting that the children's genotype contributed to variations in the social development of disorganized children. PMID:24914507

  18. Collagen vascular disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001223.htm Collagen vascular disease To use the sharing features on ... were previously said to have "connective tissue" or "collagen vascular" disease. We now have names for many ...

  19. Disorganized attachment representation and atypical parenting in young school age children with externalizing disorder.

    PubMed

    Green, Jonathan; Stanley, Charlie; Peters, Sarah

    2007-09-01

    We investigated the relationship of child attachment representation, psychopathology, and maternal atypical parenting in a high risk sample. Sixty-one consecutive clinical referrals with externalizing disorder aged 4 - 9 years were assessed for attachment representations measured with Manchester Child Attachment Story Task (MCAST), atypical parental expressed emotion (EE), maternal mood, and parent and teacher ratings of child behaviour. Disorganized attachment representations were found in 58% of cases, independent of ADHD symptoms. Pervasive disorganization was associated with very high maternal EE. Attachment status, maternal depression, and ADHD diagnosis were independently associated with parent-rated child behaviour problems; teacher ratings were associated with child's age and ADHD status. Disorganized attachment shows a high prevalence and independent associations with attention deficit symptomatology and maternal EE.

  20. Necessary, but not sufficient: links between neurocognition, social cognition, and metacognition in schizophrenia are moderated by disorganized symptoms.

    PubMed

    Minor, Kyle S; Lysaker, Paul H

    2014-10-01

    Intact neurocognition has been posited as a necessary, but not sufficient prerequisite for efficient social cognition and metacognition in schizophrenia. Disorganized symptoms likely play a prominent role in these cognitive processes, given the detrimental effects of disorganization on one's ability to synthesize discrete information into an organized whole. However, the relationship between disorganized symptoms and cognitive processes remains unclear. In this study, we examined whether disorganized symptoms: 1) exhibited stronger inverse relationships with cognitive processes than other symptoms, and 2) moderated links between neurocognition and a) social cognition, and b) metacognition. Trained raters assessed psychotic symptoms, neurocognition, social cognition, and metacognition in patients with schizophrenia from a Midwestern VA Medical Center (n=68) using validated, clinician-rated instruments. We observed significantly greater inverse associations with cognitive processes for disorganized compared to reality distortion symptoms; inverse associations with neurocognition and social cognition were significantly greater for disorganized than negative symptoms. Our hypotheses that disorganized symptoms would moderate relationships between neurocognition and a) social cognition, and b) metacognition were also supported. These findings highlight the importance of disorganized symptoms in elucidating links between neurocognition and social cognitive and metacognitive abilities. Future work should assess whether similar findings occur across the schizophrenia-spectrum, and investigate if targeting disorganization can ameliorate social cognitive and metacognitive impairments in schizophrenia.

  1. Biophysiochemical properties of endothelial cells cultured on bio-inspired collagen films

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In this study, we investigated the effect of the extracellular matrix on endothelial dysfunction by careful observation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) cultured on denatured collagen film. Results HUVECs on denatured collagen film showed relatively high surface roughness compared with normal HUVECs. The expression levels of MMP-1, MMP-2 and CD146 increased in the ECs on denatured collagen film. In addition, we examined the accumulation of fluorescent beads on HUVEC layers subjected to circulatory flow. The number of accumulated fluorescent beads increased on the disorganized HUVEC layers. Conclusions The proposed in vitro study using bio-inspired collagen films could potentially be used in the size- and ligand-based design of drugs to treat endothelial dysfunction caused by circulatory vascular diseases. PMID:24984812

  2. Collagenous gastritis: reports and systematic review.

    PubMed

    Brain, Oliver; Rajaguru, Chandima; Warren, Bryan; Booth, Jonathan; Travis, Simon

    2009-12-01

    Collagenous gastritis is a rare disorder first described in 1989. After encountering two cases, we decided to review the literature and evaluate the collagen band. A systematic review of PubMed and EMBASE databases was performed. Twenty-eight cases have been previously described and two patterns of presentations are identifiable: children or young adults (median age 12 years, range 2-22 years) presenting with symptoms attributable to the gastritis (anaemia and pain); and older adults (median age 52 years, range 35-77 years) presenting with loose stools, often associated with collagenous colitis or coeliac disease. Our two cases (one child and one adult) matched this pattern. Immunostaining of the collagen band for collagens II, III, IV and VI, and tenascin showed that the band in our cases was predominantly tenascin. In conclusion, collagenous gastritis is a rare entity whose presentation depends on the age of the patient. An autoimmune aetiology seems possible given its associations. Treatment is empirical. The 30 cases now reported show that the disorder can relapse or persist for years. PMID:19730387

  3. Complications of collagenous colitis.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Hugh-James

    2008-03-21

    Microscopic forms of colitis have been described, including collagenous colitis. This disorder generally has an apparently benign clinical course. However, a number of gastric and intestinal complications, possibly coincidental, may develop with collagenous colitis. Distinctive inflammatory disorders of the gastric mucosa have been described, including lymphocytic gastritis and collagenous gastritis. Celiac disease and collagenous sprue (or collagenous enteritis) may occur. Colonic ulceration has been associated with use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, while other forms of inflammatory bowel disease, including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, may evolve from collagenous colitis. Submucosal "dissection", colonic fractures or mucosal tears and perforation from air insufflation during colonoscopy may occur and has been hypothesized to be due to compromise of the colonic wall from submucosal collagen deposition. Similar changes may result from increased intraluminal pressure during barium enema contrast studies. Finally, malignant disorders have also been reported, including carcinoma and lymphoproliferative disease. PMID:18350593

  4. An Examination of Social Disorganization and Pluralistic Neighborhood Theories with Rural Mothers and Their Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witherspoon, Dawn; Ennett, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Neighborhoods matter for youth; yet, most literature focuses on neighborhood deficits rather than strengths. To understand how best to capture neighborhoods, this study used census- and perception-based measures of neighborhood characteristics as suggested by social disorganization and pluralistic neighborhood theories, respectively, to determine…

  5. Emotion Socialization as a Framework for Understanding the Development of Disorganized Attachment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeOliveira, Carey Anne; Bailey, Heidi Neufeld; Moran, Greg; Pederson, David R.

    2004-01-01

    Recent years have seen the emergence of accounts of the origins of the Disorganized attachment relationship in early mother-infant interaction, each building on the pioneering work of Main and Hesse--dysfunctional emotional processes figure prominently in all these accounts. This paper applies a framework based on two complementary theories of…

  6. Disorganized symptoms and executive functioning predict impaired social functioning in subjects at risk for psychosis.

    PubMed

    Eslami, Ali; Jahshan, Carol; Cadenhead, Kristin S

    2011-01-01

    Predictors of social functioning deficits were assessed in 22 individuals "at risk" for psychosis. Disorganized symptoms and executive functioning predicted social functioning at follow-up. Early intervention efforts that focus on social and cognitive skills are indicated in this vulnerable population.

  7. Social Disorganization Theory and the Contextual Nature of Crime in Nonmetropolitan Counties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Cynthia; Mencken, F. Carson

    2002-01-01

    This research explores violent and property crime rates in nonmetropolitan counties. It is argued that crime rates are lower in these counties because of higher levels of social integration. We test the hypothesis that predictors of crime from social disorganization theory exert different effects on violent and property crimes at different levels…

  8. Emotional and Adrenocortical Regulation in Early Adolescence: Prediction by Attachment Security and Disorganization in Infancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spangler, Gottfried; Zimmermann, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine differences in emotion expression and emotion regulation in emotion-eliciting situations in early adolescence from a bio-psycho-social perspective, specifically investigating the influence of early mother-infant attachment and attachment disorganization on behavioural and adrenocortical responses. The…

  9. Unresolved States of Mind, Disorganized Attachment Relationships, and Disrupted Interactions of Adolescent Mothers and their Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madigan, Sheri; Moran, Greg; Pederson, David R.

    2006-01-01

    The links between unresolved maternal attachment status, disrupted maternal interaction in play situations, and disorganized attachment relationships were examined in a study of 82 adolescent mother-infant dyads. Maternal interactive behavior was measured using the Atypical Maternal Behavior Instrument for Assessment and Classification coding…

  10. The Importance of Parenting in the Development of Disorganized Attachment: Evidence from a Preventive Intervention Study in Adoptive Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juffer, Femmie; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.

    2005-01-01

    Background: As infant disorganized attachment is a serious risk factor for later child psychopathology, it is important to examine whether attachment disorganization can be prevented or reduced. Method: In a randomized intervention study involving 130 families with 6-month-old adopted infants, two attachment-based intervention programs were…

  11. Characterization of the collagen phenotype of rabbit proximal tubule cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, S R; Goins, R A; Belvin, E L; Dimari, S J; Merriam, A P; Bowling-Brown, S; Harris, R C; Haralson, M A

    1999-01-01

    Studies were performed to characterize the collagen phenotype of cultured rabbit proximal tubule (RPT) epithelial cells grown on plastic and on the reconstituted basement membrane preparation, Matrigel. When grown on a plastic substratum, RPT cells display a cobblestone appearance characteristic of glomerular epithelial cells. While initially forming an interlocking network of cells after subculture on Matrigel, this pattern of culture morphology rapidly develops into one characterized by isolated, organized groups of cells. Notwithstanding the effects of Matrigel on culture morphology, total cellular proliferation was reduced only 25% when RPT cells were grown on this substrate. Greater than 90% of the collagen synthesized by RPT cells grown on plastic was secreted into the culture medium. Qualitative analysis by SDS-PAGE revealed components exhibiting electrophoretic mobilities corresponding to the chains present in type IV and type I collagens. Quantitative analysis by CM-Trisacryl chromatography established that approximately 2/3 of the total collagen synthesized by RPT cells grown on plastic was type IV and approximately 1/3 type I. Quantitative analysis of the collagens produced by RPT cells grown on Matrigel again indicated the synthesis of only type IV and type I molecules but in a slightly more equal ratio of both collagen types and in the ratio of secreted to cell-associated molecules. However, the total amount of collagen synthesized by RPT cells grown on Matrigel was reduced to approximately 1% of the level synthesized by the cells grown on plastic. On plastic, approximately 3/4 of the type I collagen produced was recovered as the type I homotrimer, but on Matrigel type I homotrimers represented only approximately 55% of the total type I collagen synthesized. On Matrigel, the majority of the type IV collagen was recovered as heterotrimers containing alpha1(IV) and alpha2(IV) chains. In contrast, RTP cells grown on plastic predominantly produced type IV

  12. Enigmatic insight into collagen.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Shrutal Narendra; Dive, Alka M; Moharil, Rohit; Munde, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is a unique, triple helical molecule which forms the major part of extracellular matrix. It is the most abundant protein in the human body, representing 30% of its dry weight. It is the fibrous structural protein that makes up the white fibers (collagen fibers) of skin, tendons, bones, cartilage and all other connective tissues. Collagens are not only essential for the mechanical resistance and resilience of multicellular organisms, but are also signaling molecules defining cellular shape and behavior. The human body has at least 16 types of collagen, but the most prominent types are I, II and III. Collagens are produced by several cell types and are distinguishable by their molecular compositions, morphologic characteristics, distribution, functions and pathogenesis. This is the major fibrous glycoprotein present in the extracellular matrix and in connective tissue and helps in maintaining the structural integrity of these tissues. It has a triple helical structure. Various studies have proved that mutations that modify folding of the triple helix result in identifiable genetic disorders. Collagen diseases share certain similarities with autoimmune diseases, because autoantibodies specific to each collagen disease are produced. Therefore, this review highlights the role of collagen in normal health and also the disorders associated with structural and functional defects in collagen. PMID:27601823

  13. Enigmatic insight into collagen

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Shrutal Narendra; Dive, Alka M; Moharil, Rohit; Munde, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is a unique, triple helical molecule which forms the major part of extracellular matrix. It is the most abundant protein in the human body, representing 30% of its dry weight. It is the fibrous structural protein that makes up the white fibers (collagen fibers) of skin, tendons, bones, cartilage and all other connective tissues. Collagens are not only essential for the mechanical resistance and resilience of multicellular organisms, but are also signaling molecules defining cellular shape and behavior. The human body has at least 16 types of collagen, but the most prominent types are I, II and III. Collagens are produced by several cell types and are distinguishable by their molecular compositions, morphologic characteristics, distribution, functions and pathogenesis. This is the major fibrous glycoprotein present in the extracellular matrix and in connective tissue and helps in maintaining the structural integrity of these tissues. It has a triple helical structure. Various studies have proved that mutations that modify folding of the triple helix result in identifiable genetic disorders. Collagen diseases share certain similarities with autoimmune diseases, because autoantibodies specific to each collagen disease are produced. Therefore, this review highlights the role of collagen in normal health and also the disorders associated with structural and functional defects in collagen.

  14. Enigmatic insight into collagen

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Shrutal Narendra; Dive, Alka M; Moharil, Rohit; Munde, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is a unique, triple helical molecule which forms the major part of extracellular matrix. It is the most abundant protein in the human body, representing 30% of its dry weight. It is the fibrous structural protein that makes up the white fibers (collagen fibers) of skin, tendons, bones, cartilage and all other connective tissues. Collagens are not only essential for the mechanical resistance and resilience of multicellular organisms, but are also signaling molecules defining cellular shape and behavior. The human body has at least 16 types of collagen, but the most prominent types are I, II and III. Collagens are produced by several cell types and are distinguishable by their molecular compositions, morphologic characteristics, distribution, functions and pathogenesis. This is the major fibrous glycoprotein present in the extracellular matrix and in connective tissue and helps in maintaining the structural integrity of these tissues. It has a triple helical structure. Various studies have proved that mutations that modify folding of the triple helix result in identifiable genetic disorders. Collagen diseases share certain similarities with autoimmune diseases, because autoantibodies specific to each collagen disease are produced. Therefore, this review highlights the role of collagen in normal health and also the disorders associated with structural and functional defects in collagen. PMID:27601823

  15. Assessment of atherosclerotic plaque collagen content and architecture using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doradla, Pallavi; Villiger, Martin; Tshikudi, Diane M.; Bouma, Brett E.; Nadkarni, Seemantini K.

    2016-02-01

    Acute myocardial infarction, caused by the rupture of vulnerable coronary plaques, is the leading cause of death worldwide. Collagen is the primary extracellular matrix macromolecule that imparts the mechanical stability to a plaque and its reduction causes plaque instability. Intracoronary polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) measures the polarization states of the backscattered light from the tissue to evaluate plaque birefringence, a material property that is elevated in proteins such as collagen with an ordered structure. Here we investigate the dependence of the PS-OCT parameters on the quantity of the plaque collagen and fiber architecture. In this study, coronary arterial segments from human cadaveric hearts were evaluated with intracoronary PS-OCT and compared with Histopathological assessment of collagen content and architecture from picrosirius-red (PSR) stained sections. PSR sections were visualized with circularly-polarized light microscopy to quantify collagen birefringence, and the additional assessment of color hue indicated fibril thickness. Due to the ordered architecture of thick collagen fibers, a positive correlation between PS-OCT retardation and quantity of thick collagen fibers (r=0.54, p=0.04), and similarly with the total collagen content (r=0.51, p=0.03) was observed. In contrast, there was no perceivable relationship between PS-OCT retardation and the presence of thin collagen fibers (r=0.08, p=0.07), suggesting that thin and disorganized collagen fiber architecture did not significantly contribute to the PS-OCT retardation. Further analysis will be performed to assess the relationship between PS-OCT retardation and collagen architecture based on immunohistochemical analysis of collagen type. These results suggest that intracoronary PS-OCT may open the opportunity to assess collagen architecture in addition total collagen content, potentially enabling an improved understanding of coronary plaque rupture.

  16. Collagenous gastritis: Review

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Kenya; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Sato, Yuichi; Aoyagi, Yutaka; Terai, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    Collagenous gastritis is a rare disease characterized by the subepithelial deposition of collagen bands thicker than 10 μm and the infiltration of inflammatory mononuclear cells in the lamina propria. Collagenous colitis and collagenous sprue have similar histological characteristics to collagenous gastritis and are thought to be part of the same disease entity. However, while collagenous colitis has become more common in the field of gastroenterology, presenting with clinical symptoms of chronic diarrhea in older patients, collagenous gastritis is rare. Since the disease was first reported in 1989, only 60 cases have been documented in the English literature. No safe and effective treatments have been identified from randomized, controlled trials. Therefore, better understanding of the disease and the reporting of more cases will help to establish diagnostic criteria and to develop therapeutic strategies. Therefore, here we review the clinical characteristics, endoscopic and histological findings, treatment, and clinical outcomes from case reports and case series published to date, and provide a summary of the latest information on the disease. This information will contribute to improved knowledge of collagenous gastritis so physicians can recognize and correctly diagnose the disease, and will help to develop a standard therapeutic strategy for future clinical trials. PMID:25789098

  17. Collagenous gastritis: Review.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Kenya; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Sato, Yuichi; Aoyagi, Yutaka; Terai, Shuji

    2015-03-16

    Collagenous gastritis is a rare disease characterized by the subepithelial deposition of collagen bands thicker than 10 μm and the infiltration of inflammatory mononuclear cells in the lamina propria. Collagenous colitis and collagenous sprue have similar histological characteristics to collagenous gastritis and are thought to be part of the same disease entity. However, while collagenous colitis has become more common in the field of gastroenterology, presenting with clinical symptoms of chronic diarrhea in older patients, collagenous gastritis is rare. Since the disease was first reported in 1989, only 60 cases have been documented in the English literature. No safe and effective treatments have been identified from randomized, controlled trials. Therefore, better understanding of the disease and the reporting of more cases will help to establish diagnostic criteria and to develop therapeutic strategies. Therefore, here we review the clinical characteristics, endoscopic and histological findings, treatment, and clinical outcomes from case reports and case series published to date, and provide a summary of the latest information on the disease. This information will contribute to improved knowledge of collagenous gastritis so physicians can recognize and correctly diagnose the disease, and will help to develop a standard therapeutic strategy for future clinical trials. PMID:25789098

  18. The disorganized visual cortex in reelin-deficient mice is functional and allows for enhanced plasticity.

    PubMed

    Pielecka-Fortuna, Justyna; Wagener, Robin Jan; Martens, Ann-Kristin; Goetze, Bianka; Schmidt, Karl-Friedrich; Staiger, Jochen F; Löwel, Siegrid

    2015-11-01

    A hallmark of neocortical circuits is the segregation of processing streams into six distinct layers. The importance of this layered organization for cortical processing and plasticity is little understood. We investigated the structure, function and plasticity of primary visual cortex (V1) of adult mice deficient for the glycoprotein reelin and their wild-type littermates. In V1 of rl-/- mice, cells with different laminar fates are present at all cortical depths. Surprisingly, the (vertically) disorganized cortex maintains a precise retinotopic (horizontal) organization. Rl-/- mice have normal basic visual capabilities, but are compromised in more challenging perceptual tasks, such as orientation discrimination. Additionally, rl-/- animals learn and memorize a visual task as well as their wild-type littermates. Interestingly, reelin deficiency enhances visual cortical plasticity: juvenile-like ocular dominance plasticity is preserved into late adulthood. The present data offer an important insight into the capabilities of a disorganized cortical system to maintain basic functional properties.

  19. Collagen: Biochemistry, biomechanics, biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Nimni, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    This book is an up-to-date reference for new ideas, information, and concepts in collagen research. The first volume emphasizes the relationship between the molecular structure and function of collagen, including descriptions of collagen types which exist in tissues as well as how these molecules organize into fibrils and the nature of the chemical crosslinks which stabilize them. In Volume II the biomechanical behavior of various specialized tissues, abnormal accumulation of collagen in the form of scars of fibrous infiltration are examined/and wound healing, tissue regulation and repair are covered in detail. Volume III explores the increasing application of collagen technology to the field of bioprosthesis, including the production of heart valve bioprosthesis, blood vessels, ligament substitutes, and bone substitutes.

  20. Backbone dynamics in collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, Abil E.

    2004-11-01

    Peptide backbone motions of collagen have been extensively studied in the past. The experimental results were interpreted using a model of a collagen rod librating about its helix axis. Considering the size of the collagen molecule and the presence of cross-linked molecules, motional amplitudes derived for the helix axis libration were unusually high. Using solid-state NMR 13C chemical shift anisotropy and 2H quadrupolar lineshape analysis for five different isotope labelled collagens we show that motional averaging of the NMR interactions occurs primarily via small-angle librations about internal bond directions. This type of dynamics is compatible with both the presence of cross-links in collagen and the X-ray data, as well as dynamic models used for other proteins.

  1. Rape and its relation to social disorganization, pornography and inequality in the USA.

    PubMed

    Baron, L; Straus, M A

    1989-01-01

    A theoretical model seeks to integrate social disorganization and feminist theories of rape, reporting an empirical test of that model using data on rapes per 100,000 population known to the police in the 50 states of the United States. The model includes the following aspects of the social organization of the states: social disorganization (measured by a six item index), sexual inequality (measured by a status of women index to men), pornography (measured by a sex magazine circulation index for eight sexually explicit magazines) and the level of culturally legitimate violence (measured by a 12 item legitimate violence index using indicators like corporal punishment in schools. There were marked differences between states of the USA in the incidence of rape during the 1980-82. Path analysis was used to test the theoretical model, which posits rape as a function of the direct and indirect effects of social disorganization, sexual inequality, pornography, legitimate violence and seven control variables. The results show that all four variables play an important part in explaining differences between states in rape; and that together, the variables in the model explain 83 per cent of the state-to-state variation in rape. Women are in much greater danger of being raped in some American states than in others. Since the FBI began compiling statistics on rape, states like Alaska, Nevada, and California have consistently registered many more rapes per capita than North Dakota, Maine, and Iowa. What factors account for such differences between states? Could the variation in the rape rate be explained by four aspects of the social structure of states: (1) the proliferation of pornography (2) sexual inequality (3) culturally legitimate violence and (4) social disorganization. Each factor represents a theory which will be examined within the context of an integrated theory on rape.

  2. Collagen II Is Essential for the Removal of the Notochord and the Formation of Intervertebral Discs

    PubMed Central

    Aszódi, Attila; Chan, Danny; Hunziker, Ernst; Bateman, John F.; Fässler, Reinhard

    1998-01-01

    Collagen II is a fibril-forming collagen that is mainly expressed in cartilage. Collagen II–deficient mice produce structurally abnormal cartilage that lacks growth plates in long bones, and as a result these mice develop a skeleton without endochondral bone formation. Here, we report that Col2a1-null mice are unable to dismantle the notochord. This defect is associated with the inability to develop intervertebral discs (IVDs). During normal embryogenesis, the nucleus pulposus of future IVDs forms from regional expansion of the notochord, which is simultaneously dismantled in the region of the developing vertebral bodies. However, in Col2a1-null mice, the notochord is not removed in the vertebral bodies and persists as a rod-like structure until birth. It has been suggested that this regional notochordal degeneration results from changes in cell death and proliferation. Our experiments with wild-type mice showed that differential proliferation and apoptosis play no role in notochordal reorganization. An alternative hypothesis is that the cartilage matrix exerts mechanical forces that induce notochord removal. Several of our findings support this hypothesis. Immunohistological analyses, in situ hybridization, and biochemical analyses demonstrate that collagens I and III are ectopically expressed in Col2a1-null cartilage. Assembly of the abnormal collagens into a mature insoluble matrix is retarded and collagen fibrils are sparse, disorganized, and irregular. We propose that this disorganized abnormal cartilage collagen matrix is structurally weakened and is unable to constrain proteoglycan-induced osmotic swelling pressure. The accumulation of fluid leads to tissue enlargement and a reduction in the internal swelling pressure. These changes may be responsible for the abnormal notochord removal in Col2a1-null mice. Our studies also show that chondrocytes do not need a collagen II environment to express cartilage-specific matrix components and to hypertrophy

  3. Broadly defined risk mental states during adolescence: disorganization mediates positive schizotypal expression.

    PubMed

    Debbané, Martin; Badoud, Deborah; Balanzin, Dario; Eliez, Stephan

    2013-06-01

    While schizotypal features are common during adolescence, they can also signal increased risk for the onset of schizophreniform disorders. Most studies with adolescents find that hallucination and delusion-like symptoms (positive schizotypal features) best predict future psychopathology. Still, the developmental process of positive schizotypy remains elusive, specifically with regards to 1) its relationships to negative and disorganization schizotypal dimensions; 2) its associations to maladaptive functioning during adolescence. This longitudinal study aimed to further characterize these relationships, thereby delineating "early and broadly defined psychosis risk mental states" (Keshavan et al., 2011). The current study presents the 3-year course of schizotypal trait expression in 34 clinical adolescents aged 12 to 18 years consulting for non-psychotic difficulties. Schizotypal expression was assessed twice using the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire, accompanied by an examination of internalizing/externalizing problems using the Achenbach scales. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses were conducted to assess the expression and course of schizotypal dimensions; mediation analyses were further employed to highlight the developmental interactions promoting the maintenance of positive schizotypal expression. The results reveal that positive schizotypy, and more specifically unusual perceptual experiences, significantly declined during the study interval. Disorganization features were found to mediate the relationships between the negative and positive dimensions of schizotypy within and across evaluations. Somatic complaints and attentional difficulties further strengthened the expression of positive schizotypy during the study interval. These results suggest that the relationship between disorganization features and positive schizotypy may play a central role in establishing risk for psychosis during adolescence.

  4. Bidirectional encroachment of collagen into the tunica media in cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hairong; Blaivas, Mila; Wang, Michael M

    2012-05-25

    Arteries in cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) are susceptible to smooth muscle loss and fibrosis, but the molecular components underlying these dramatic vascular changes are not well characterized. The purpose of this study was to investigate the distribution of collagen isoforms in the cerebral vessels of North American CADASIL patients with classical NOTCH3 mutations. Expression of types I-VI collagen in brains obtained at autopsy from six CADASIL patients with cysteine-altering mutations in NOTCH3 was compared to control brain expression. We identified a consistent increase of types I, III, IV, and VI collagen in CADASIL brains. Strong accumulation of types I, III, IV and VI collagen was noted in all calibers of vessels, including small and medium-sized leptomeningeal arteries, small penetrating white matter arteries, and capillaries. Within leptomeningeal arteries, where we could define the three tunicae of each vessel, we found distinct collagen subtype distribution patterns in CADASIL. Types I and III collagen were largely found in either adventitial/medial or transmural locations. Type IV collagen was strictly intimal/medial. Type VI collagen was adventitial or adventitial/medial. Within the thickened penetrating arteries of CADASIL patients, all four collagens extended through most of the arterial wall. We observed increased staining of capillaries in CADASIL for types I, IV, and VI collagen. In conclusion, brain vascular collagen subtypes are increased in CADASIL in multiple layers of all sizes of arteries, with disease-specific changes most prominent in the tunica media and thickened small penetrating vessels. In diseased arteries, types I, III, and VI collagen spreads from an external location (adventitia) into the vascular media, while type IV collagen accumulates in an internal pattern (intima and media). These observations are consistent with a pathological role for collagen

  5. Welding IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding IV, a competency-based course in advanced arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with proficiency in: (1) single vee groove welding using code specifications established by the American Welding Society…

  6. In vitro properties of crosslinked, reconstituted collagen sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Morykwas, M.J. )

    1990-08-01

    Reconstituted, 100-microns-thick collagen sheets were crosslinked with either UV light, chromium, or cysteine for use as a burn covering. The sheets were also exposed to a surface agent (hydroxyproline, fibronectin, or soluble basement membrane matrix containing Type IV collagen) as a preliminary step in planned adherence studies. Since some chemicals render the collagen toxic, the modified sheets were tested for cytotoxicity using human keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Autoradiography and {sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation were used to quantitate the proliferative rate of these cells in vitro. There was a universal depression of keratinocyte incorporation of {sup 3}H-thymidine following a 1-day exposure to any collagen sheet when compared to cells not exposed to any collagen. This effect had lessened by 5 days' exposure to the collagen. Conversely, the fibroblasts the collagen. Conversely, the fibroblasts showed an enhancement in rate of incorporation after 1-day exposure, especially for cells exposed to collagen sheets cross-linked by UV light. This effect had also lessened by 5 days' exposure. Autoradiography showed few significant variations for any of the cells exposed for either time period. Chromium leaching was determined, with no values greater than 30% of the allowable maximum set by both the British and American Pharmacopeia.

  7. The fibrillar collagen family.

    PubMed

    Exposito, Jean-Yves; Valcourt, Ulrich; Cluzel, Caroline; Lethias, Claire

    2010-01-01

    Collagens, or more precisely collagen-based extracellular matrices, are often considered as a metazoan hallmark. Among the collagens, fibrillar collagens are present from sponges to humans, and are involved in the formation of the well-known striated fibrils. In this review we discuss the different steps in the evolution of this protein family, from the formation of an ancestral fibrillar collagen gene to the formation of different clades. Genomic data from the choanoflagellate (sister group of Metazoa) Monosiga brevicollis, and from diploblast animals, have suggested that the formation of an ancestral alpha chain occurred before the metazoan radiation. Phylogenetic studies have suggested an early emergence of the three clades that were first described in mammals. Hence the duplication events leading to the formation of the A, B and C clades occurred before the eumetazoan radiation. Another important event has been the two rounds of "whole genome duplication" leading to the amplification of fibrillar collagen gene numbers, and the importance of this diversification in developmental processes. We will also discuss some other aspects of fibrillar collagen evolution such as the development of the molecular mechanisms involved in the formation of procollagen molecules and of striated fibrils. PMID:20386646

  8. IVS Organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    International VLBI Service (IVS) is an international collaboration of organizations which operate or support Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) components. The goals are: To provide a service to support geodetic, geophysical and astrometric research and operational activities. To promote research and development activities in all aspects of the geodetic and astrometric VLBI technique. To interact with the community of users of VLBI products and to integrate VLBI into a global Earth observing system.

  9. Immunomodulatory effects of amniotic membrane matrix incorporated into collagen scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Hortensius, Rebecca A; Ebens, Jill H; Harley, Brendan A C

    2016-06-01

    Adult tendon wound repair is characterized by the formation of disorganized collagen matrix which leads to decreases in mechanical properties and scar formation. Studies have linked this scar formation to the inflammatory phase of wound healing. Instructive biomaterials designed for tendon regeneration are often designed to provide both structural and cellular support. In order to facilitate regeneration, success may be found by tempering the body's inflammatory response. This work combines collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffolds, previously developed for tissue regeneration, with matrix materials (hyaluronic acid and amniotic membrane) that have been shown to promote healing and decreased scar formation in skin studies. The results presented show that scaffolds containing amniotic membrane matrix have significantly increased mechanical properties and that tendon cells within these scaffolds have increased metabolic activity even when the media is supplemented with the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 beta. Collagen scaffolds containing hyaluronic acid or amniotic membrane also temper the expression of genes associated with the inflammatory response in normal tendon healing (TNF-α, COLI, MMP-3). These results suggest that alterations to scaffold composition, to include matrix known to decrease scar formation in vivo, can modify the inflammatory response in tenocytes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1332-1342, 2016.

  10. Biochemical and biophysical characterization of collagens of marine sponge, Ircinia fusca (Porifera: Demospongiae: Irciniidae).

    PubMed

    Pallela, Ramjee; Bojja, Sreedhar; Janapala, Venkateswara Rao

    2011-07-01

    Collagens were isolated and partially characterized from the marine demosponge, Ircinia fusca from Gulf of Mannar (GoM), India, with an aim to develop potentially applicable collagens from unused and under-used resources. The yield of insoluble, salt soluble and acid soluble forms of collagens was 31.71 ± 1.59, 20.69 ± 1.03, and 17.38 ± 0.87 mg/g dry weight, respectively. Trichrome staining, Scanning & Transmission Electron microscopic (SEM & TEM) studies confirmed the presence of collagen in the isolated, terminally globular irciniid filaments. The partially purified (gel filtration chromatography), non-fibrillar collagens appeared as basement type collagenous sheets under light microscopy whereas the purified fibrillar collagens appeared as fibrils with a repeated band periodicity of 67 nm under Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The non-fibrillar and fibrillar collagens were seen to have affinity for anti-collagen type IV and type I antibodies raised against human collagens, respectively. The macromolecules, i.e., total protein, carbohydrate and lipid contents within the tissues were also quantified. The present information on the three characteristic irciniid collagens (filamentous, fibrillar and non-fibrillar) could assist the future attempts to unravel the therapeutically important, safer collagens from marine sponges for their use in pharmaceutical and cosmeceutical industries.

  11. Nanomechanics of collagen microfibrils

    PubMed Central

    Vesentini, Simone; Redaelli, Alberto; Gautieri, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Summary Collagen constitutes one third of the human proteome, providing mechanical stability, elasticity and strength to organisms and is thus the prime construction material in biology. Collagen is also the dominating material in the extracellular matrix where its stiffness controls cell differentiation, growth and pathology. We use atomistic-based hierarchical multiscale modeling to describe this complex biological material from the bottom up. This includes the use and development of large-scale computational modeling tools to investigate several aspects related to collagen-based tissues, including source of visco-elasticity and deformation mechanisms at the nanoscale level. The key innovation of this research is that until now, collagen materials have primarily been described at macroscopic scales, without explicitly understanding the mechanical contributions at the molecular and fibrillar levels. The major impact of this research will be the development of fundamental models of collagenous tissues, important to the design of new scaffolding biomaterials for regenerative medicine as well as for the understanding of collagen-related diseases. PMID:23885342

  12. Understanding the structural disorganization of starch in water-ionic liquid solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Binjia; Chen, Ling; Xie, Fengwei; Li, Xiaoxi; Truss, Rowan W; Halley, Peter J; Shamshina, Julia L; Rogers, Robin D; McNally, Tony

    2015-06-01

    Using synchrotron X-ray scattering analyses and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, this work provides insights into the solvent effects of water : [C2mim][OAc] solutions on the disorganization of a starch semi-crystalline structure. When a certain ratio (10.2 : 1 mol/mol) of water : [C2mim][OAc] solution is used, the preferential hydrogen bonding between starch hydroxyls and [OAc](-) anions results in the breakage of the hydrogen bonding network of starch and thus the disruption of starch lamellae. This greatly facilitates the disorganization of starch, which occurs much easier than in pure water. In contrast, when 90.8 : 1 (mol/mol) water : [C2mim][OAc] solution is used, the interactions between [OAc](-) anions and water suppress the solvent effects on starch, thereby making the disorganization of starch less easy than in pure water. All these differences can be shown by changes in the lamellar and fractal structures: firstly, a preferable increase in the thickness of the crystalline lamellae rather than that of the amorphous lamellae causes an overall increase in the thickness of the semi-crystalline lamellae; then, the amorphous lamellae start to decrease probably due to the out-phasing of starch molecules from them; this forms a fractal gel on a larger scale (than the lamellae) which gradually decreases to a stable value as the temperature increases further. It is noteworthy that these changes occur at temperatures far below the transition temperature that is thermally detectable as is normally described. This hints to our future work that using certain aqueous ionic liquids for destructuration of the starch semi-crystalline structure is the key to realize green processes to obtain homogeneous amorphous materials. PMID:25899721

  13. Type V collagen controls the initiation of collagen fibril assembly.

    PubMed

    Wenstrup, Richard J; Florer, Jane B; Brunskill, Eric W; Bell, Sheila M; Chervoneva, Inna; Birk, David E

    2004-12-17

    Vertebrate collagen fibrils are heterotypically composed of a quantitatively major and minor fibril collagen. In non-cartilaginous tissues, type I collagen accounts for the majority of the collagen mass, and collagen type V, the functions of which are poorly understood, is a minor component. Type V collagen has been implicated in the regulation of fibril diameter, and we reported recently preliminary evidence that type V collagen is required for collagen fibril nucleation (Wenstrup, R. J., Florer, J. B., Cole, W. G., Willing, M. C., and Birk, D. E. (2004) J. Cell. Biochem. 92, 113-124). The purpose of this study was to define the roles of type V collagen in the regulation of collagen fibrillogenesis and matrix assembly. Mouse embryos completely deficient in pro-alpha1(V) chains were created by homologous recombination. The col5a1-/- animals die in early embryogenesis, at approximately embryonic day 10. The type V collagen-deficient mice demonstrate a virtual lack of collagen fibril formation. In contrast, the col5a1+/- animals are viable. The reduced type V collagen content is associated with a 50% reduction in fibril number and dermal collagen content. In addition, relatively normal, cylindrical fibrils are assembled with a second population of large, structurally abnormal collagen fibrils. The structural properties of the abnormal matrix are decreased relative to the wild type control animals. These data indicate a central role for the evolutionary, ancient type V collagen in the regulation of fibrillogenesis. The complete dependence of fibril formation on type V collagen is indicative of the critical role of the latter in early fibril initiation. In addition, this fibril collagen is important in the determination of fibril structure and matrix organization. PMID:15383546

  14. Polymorphonuclear leukocyte adhesion triggers the disorganization of endothelial cell-to-cell adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) infiltration into tissues is frequently accompanied by increase in vascular permeability. This suggests that PMN adhesion and transmigration could trigger modifications in the architecture of endothelial cell-to-cell junctions. In the present paper, using indirect immunofluorescence, we found that PMN adhesion to tumor necrosis factor-activated endothelial cells (EC) induced the disappearance from endothelial cell-to-cell contacts of adherens junction (AJ) components: vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, alpha-catenin, beta-catenin, and plakoglobin. Immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis of the VE- cadherin/catenin complex showed that the amount of beta-catenin and plakoglobin was markedly reduced from the complex and from total cell extracts. In contrast, VE-cadherin and alpha-catenin were only partially affected. Disorganization of endothelial AJ by PMN was not accompanied by EC retraction or injury and was specific for VE- cadherin/catenin complex, since platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1) distribution at cellular contacts was unchanged. PMN adhesion to EC seems to be a prerequisite for VE-cadherin/catenin complex disorganization. This phenomenon could be fully inhibited by blocking PMN adhesion with an anti-integrin beta 2 mAb, while it could be reproduced by any condition that induced increase of PMN adhesion, such as addition of PMA or an anti-beta 2-activating mAb. The effect on endothelial AJ was specific for PMN since adherent activated lymphocytes did not induce similar changes. High concentrations of protease inhibitors and oxygen metabolite scavengers were unable to prevent AJ disorganization mediated by PMN. PMN adhesion to EC was accompanied by increase in EC permeability in vitro. This effect was dependent on PMN adhesion, was not mediated by proteases and oxygen- reactive metabolites, and could be reproduced by EC treatment with EGTA. Finally, immunohistochemical analysis showed that VE

  15. Collagen immunostains can distinguish capsular fibrous tissue from septal fibrosis and may help stage liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Rock, Jonathan B; Yearsley, Martha M; Hanje, A James; Frankel, Wendy L

    2014-01-01

    Core-needle biopsy remains essential for diagnosis of cirrhosis; however, evaluation of fibrosis in such biopsies is often challenging due to the fragmented nature of cirrhotic liver specimens. It is also common to see portions of liver capsules present in the biopsy which adds to the diagnostic challenge. The distinction between capsular/subcapsular fibrous tissue and septal fibrosis is critical to avoid potential overstaging of liver fibrosis. We compared the differential immunostaining in liver capsular and septal areas for collagens III, IV, V, VI, vitronectin, laminin, Orcein, and Trichrome in 15 whole sections of explanted cirrhotic livers and 5 simulated liver biopsies. Collagens III, IV, V, VI, Trichrome, and Orcein show distinct staining patterns in capsular fibrous tissue and septal fibrosis. Collagen IV shows strong diffuse septal staining and consistently weak to negative capsular staining. Collagens III and VI stain similar to IV for septal fibrosis, whereas collagen V, Trichrome, and Orcein show strong staining in both areas. Collagen IV, possibly with III or VI in addition to the routine Trichrome and hematoxylin and eosin stain, is useful in differentiating capsular fibrous tissue from septal fibrosis on challenging and fragmented liver biopsies.

  16. Structural disorganization of pronephric glomerulus in zebrafish mpp5a/nagie oko mutant

    PubMed Central

    Ichimura, Koichiro; Fukuyo, Yayoi; Nakamura, Tomomi; Powell, Rebecca; Sakai, Tatsuo; Obara, Tomoko

    2012-01-01

    Background The podocyte slit diaphragm (SD) is an essential component of the selective filtration barrier in the glomerulus. Several structural proteins required for formation and maintenance of SD have been identified; however, molecular mechanisms regulating these proteins are still limited. Results Here, we demonstrate that MAGUK p55 subfamily member 5a (Mpp5a)/Nagie oko, a component of the Crb multi-protein complex, was colocalized with an SD-associated protein ZO-1 in the zebrafish pronephric glomerulus. To characterize the function of Mpp5a, zebrafish mpp5am520 mutant embryos, which are known to have defects in cardiac and neuronal morphogenesis, were analyzed. These mutants failed to merge the bilateral glomerular primordia and to form the glomerular capillary and mesangium, but the foot processes and SD showed normal appearance. The structural disorganization in the mpp5am520 mutant glomerulus was quite similar to that of a cardiac troponin T2a/tnnt2a/silent heart knockdown zebrafish, which exhibited circulatory failure due to lack of heart beating. Conclusions Mpp5a is not prerequisite to form podocyte slit diaphragm in the pronephric glomerular development in zebrafish. The structural disorganization of the pronephric glomerulus in the mpp5am520 mutant is likely to result from circulatory failure, rather than the anomaly of Mpp5a protein in the glomerulus. PMID:23027442

  17. A Jungian contribution to a dynamic systems understanding of disorganized attachment.

    PubMed

    Carter, Linda

    2011-06-01

    This panel emerged from shared clinical concerns when working with adult patients whose presentation style was reminiscent of a disorganized (Type D) infant attachment pattern. Psychotherapeutic work with such patients poses complicated transference and countertransference dilemmas which are addressed by all four panellists via theory and clinical vignettes. In common is an interest in contemporary attachment, neuroscience and trauma theories and their relationship to analytical psychology. Intergenerational trauma seems to be a salient factor in the evolution of fragmented and fragmenting interactions that lead to failures in self-coherence and healthy interpersonal relationships. Such early relational trauma is compounded by further episodes of abuse and neglect leading to failure in a core sense of self. These clinicians share how they have integrated theory and practice in order to help dissociated and disorganized patients to transform their dark and extraordinary suffering through implicit and explicit experiences with the analyst into new, life giving patterns of relationship with self and others. The alchemy of transformation, both positive and negative, is evident in the case material presented. PMID:21675978

  18. Defence sugarcane glycoproteins disorganize microtubules and prevent nuclear polarization and germination of Sporisorium scitamineum teliospores.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Elordi, Elena; Baluška, František; Echevarría, Clara; Vicente, Carlos; Legaz, M Estrella

    2016-08-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are involved in the germination of Sporisorium scitamineum teliospores. Resistant varieties of sugar cane plants produce defence glycoproteins that prevent the infection of the plants by the filamentous fungi Sporisorium scitamineum. Here, we show that a fraction of these glycoproteins prevents the correct arrangement of MTs and causes nuclear fragmentation defects. As a result, nuclei cannot correctly migrate through the growing hyphae, causing germinative failure. Arginase activity contained in defence glycoproteins is already described for preventing fungal germination. Now, its enzymatically active form is presented as a link between the defensive capacity of glycoproteins and the MT disorganization in fungal cells. Active arginase is produced in healthy and resistant plants; conversely, it is not detected in the juice from susceptible varieties, which explains why MT depolarization, nuclear disorganization as well as germination of teliospores are not significantly affected by glycoproteins from non-resistant plants. Our results also suggest that susceptible plants try to increase their levels of arginase after detecting the presence of the pathogen. However, this signal comes "too late" and such defensive mechanism fails. PMID:27372179

  19. Disorganized attachment in young adulthood as a partial mediator of relations between severity of childhood abuse and dissociation.

    PubMed

    Byun, Sooyeon; Brumariu, Laura E; Lyons-Ruth, Karlen

    2016-01-01

    Disorganized attachment has been proposed as a mediating mechanism in the relation between childhood abuse and dissociation. However, support for mediation has been mixed when interview or self-report measures of attachment have been used. In the current work, relations among severity of abuse, attachment disorganization, and dissociation were assessed in young adulthood using both interview and interaction-based measures of attachment. A total of 112 low-income young adults were assessed for socioeconomic stresses, abusive experiences in childhood, and attachment disorganization at age 20. Attachment disorganization was assessed with the Adult Attachment Interview, coded independently for Unresolved states of mind and for Hostile-Helpless states of mind. Attachment disorganization was also measured using a newly validated assessment of young adult-parent interaction during a conflict discussion. Mediation analyses revealed that the link between childhood abuse and dissociation was partially explained by disturbances in young adult-parent interaction. Narrative disturbances on the Adult Attachment Interview were related to abuse and to dissociation but did not mediate the link between the two. Results are discussed in relation to the role of parent-child communication processes in pathways to dissociation.

  20. Collagen Fibrils: Nanoscale Ropes

    PubMed Central

    Bozec, Laurent; van der Heijden, Gert; Horton, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The formation of collagen fibrils from staggered repeats of individual molecules has become “accepted” wisdom. However, for over thirty years now, such a model has failed to resolve several structural and functional questions. In a novel approach, it was found, using atomic force microscopy, that tendon collagen fibrils are composed of subcomponents in a spiral disposition—that is, their structure is similar to that of macroscale ropes. Consequently, this arrangement was modeled and confirmed using elastic rod theory. This work provides new insight into collagen fibril structure and will have wide application—from the design of scaffolds for tissue engineering and a better understanding of pathogenesis of diseases of bone and tendon, to the conservation of irreplaceable parchment-based museum exhibits. PMID:17028135

  1. Collagen in organ development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, P.; Spooner, B. S.

    1992-01-01

    It is important to know whether microgravity will adversely affect developmental processes. Collagens are macromolecular structural components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) which may be altered by perturbations in gravity. Interstitial collagens have been shown to be necessary for normal growth and morphogenesis in some embryonic organs, and in the mouse salivary gland, the biosynthetic pattern of these molecules changes during development. Determination of the effects of microgravity on epithelial organ development must be preceded by crucial ground-based studies. These will define control of normal synthesis, secretion, and deposition of ECM macromolecules and the relationship of these processes to morphogenesis.

  2. Regulation of post-Golgi LH3 trafficking is essential for collagen homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Banushi, Blerida; Forneris, Federico; Straatman-Iwanowska, Anna; Strange, Adam; Lyne, Anne-Marie; Rogerson, Clare; Burden, Jemima J; Heywood, Wendy E; Hanley, Joanna; Doykov, Ivan; Straatman, Kornelis R; Smith, Holly; Bem, Danai; Kriston-Vizi, Janos; Ariceta, Gema; Risteli, Maija; Wang, Chunguang; Ardill, Rosalyn E; Zaniew, Marcin; Latka-Grot, Julita; Waddington, Simon N; Howe, S J; Ferraro, Francesco; Gjinovci, Asllan; Lawrence, Scott; Marsh, Mark; Girolami, Mark; Bozec, Laurent; Mills, Kevin; Gissen, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modifications are necessary for collagen precursor molecules (procollagens) to acquire final shape and function. However, the mechanism and contribution of collagen modifications that occur outside the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi are not understood. We discovered that VIPAR, with its partner proteins, regulate sorting of lysyl hydroxylase 3 (LH3, also known as PLOD3) into newly identified post-Golgi collagen IV carriers and that VIPAR-dependent sorting is essential for modification of lysines in multiple collagen types. Identification of structural and functional collagen abnormalities in cells and tissues from patients and murine models of the autosomal recessive multisystem disorder Arthrogryposis, Renal dysfunction and Cholestasis syndrome caused by VIPAR and VPS33B deficiencies confirmed our findings. Thus, regulation of post-Golgi LH3 trafficking is essential for collagen homeostasis and for the development and function of multiple organs and tissues. PMID:27435297

  3. Regulation of post-Golgi LH3 trafficking is essential for collagen homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Banushi, Blerida; Forneris, Federico; Straatman-Iwanowska, Anna; Strange, Adam; Lyne, Anne-Marie; Rogerson, Clare; Burden, Jemima J.; Heywood, Wendy E.; Hanley, Joanna; Doykov, Ivan; Straatman, Kornelis R.; Smith, Holly; Bem, Danai; Kriston-Vizi, Janos; Ariceta, Gema; Risteli, Maija; Wang, Chunguang; Ardill, Rosalyn E.; Zaniew, Marcin; Latka-Grot, Julita; Waddington, Simon N.; Howe, S. J.; Ferraro, Francesco; Gjinovci, Asllan; Lawrence, Scott; Marsh, Mark; Girolami, Mark; Bozec, Laurent; Mills, Kevin; Gissen, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modifications are necessary for collagen precursor molecules (procollagens) to acquire final shape and function. However, the mechanism and contribution of collagen modifications that occur outside the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi are not understood. We discovered that VIPAR, with its partner proteins, regulate sorting of lysyl hydroxylase 3 (LH3, also known as PLOD3) into newly identified post-Golgi collagen IV carriers and that VIPAR-dependent sorting is essential for modification of lysines in multiple collagen types. Identification of structural and functional collagen abnormalities in cells and tissues from patients and murine models of the autosomal recessive multisystem disorder Arthrogryposis, Renal dysfunction and Cholestasis syndrome caused by VIPAR and VPS33B deficiencies confirmed our findings. Thus, regulation of post-Golgi LH3 trafficking is essential for collagen homeostasis and for the development and function of multiple organs and tissues. PMID:27435297

  4. Binding of Clostridium perfringens to collagen correlates with the ability to cause necrotic enteritis in chickens.

    PubMed

    Wade, B; Keyburn, A L; Seemann, T; Rood, J I; Moore, R J

    2015-11-18

    This study investigated the ability of Clostridium perfringens isolates derived from chickens to bind to collagen types I-V and gelatin. In total 21 strains from three distinct backgrounds were studied: (i) virulent strains isolated from birds suffering from necrotic enteritis, (ii) avirulent strains isolated from birds suffering from necrotic enteritis and (iii) strains isolated from healthy birds. All strains isolated from diseased birds had been assessed for virulence in a disease induction model. The virulent isolates all displayed collagen binding ability. However, most strains in the other two classes showed negligible binding to collagen. The prevalence of a previously described C. perfringens putative collagen adhesin-encoding gene was investigated by PCR screening. It was found that five of the strains carried the putative collagen adhesin-encoding gene and that all of these strains were virulent isolates. Based on these studies it is postulated that collagen adhesion may play a role in the pathogenesis of necrotic enteritis.

  5. Identification of collagen types in tissues using HPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Pataridis, Statis; Eckhardt, Adam; Mikulíková, Katerina; Sedláková, Pavla; Miksík, Ivan

    2008-10-01

    A method for the determination and quantification of collagen types I-V in rat tissues has been developed. This method is based on collagen fragmentation by cyanogen bromide followed by trypsin digestion. After that, HPLC-MS/MS (HPLC coupled to an IT mass spectrometer) analyses of the resulting peptide mixtures (peptide maps) were performed. Specific peptides for each collagen type were selected. According to online databases, these peptides are present in human, bovine, and rat collagens. As a result, this method can be potentially applied to other species' tissues as well, such as human tissues, and provides a universal and simple method of quantifying collagen types. The applicability of this method for analyzing collagen types was demonstrated on rat tissues (skin, tendon, and aorta).

  6. Genetic disorders of collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Tsipouras, P; Ramirez, F

    1987-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and Marfan syndrome form a group of genetic disorders of connective tissue. These disorders exhibit remarkable clinical heterogeneity which reflects their underlying biochemical and molecular differences. Defects in collagen types I and III have been found in all three syndromes. PMID:3543367

  7. Collagen hydrolysate based collagen/hydroxyapatite composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ficai, Anton; Albu, Madalina Georgiana; Birsan, Mihaela; Sonmez, Maria; Ficai, Denisa; Trandafir, Viorica; Andronescu, Ecaterina

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to study the influence of collagen hydrolysate (HAS) on the formation of ternary collagen-hydrolysate/hydroxyapatite composite materials (COLL-HAS/HA). During the precipitation process of HA, a large amount of brushite is resulted at pH = 7 but, practically pure HA is obtained at pH ⩾ 8. The FTIR data reveal the duplication of the most important collagen absorption bands due to the presence of the collagen hydrolysate. The presence of collagen hydrolysate is beneficial for the management of bone and joint disorders such as osteoarthritis and osteoporosis.

  8. Age-associated reduction of cellular spreading/mechanical force up-regulates matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression and collagen fibril fragmentation via c-Jun/AP-1 in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhaoping; Voorhees, John J; Fisher, Gary J; Quan, Taihao

    2014-12-01

    The dermal compartment of human skin is largely composed of dense collagen-rich fibrils, which provide structural and mechanical support. Skin dermal fibroblasts, the major collagen-producing cells, are interact with collagen fibrils to maintain cell spreading and mechanical force for function. A characteristic feature of aged human skin is fragmentation of collagen fibrils, which is initiated by matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1). Fragmentation impairs fibroblast attachment and thereby reduces spreading. Here, we investigated the relationship among fibroblast spreading, mechanical force, MMP-1 expression, and collagen fibril fragmentation. Reduced fibroblast spreading due to cytoskeletal disruption was associated with reduced cellular mechanical force, as determined by atomic force microscopy. These reductions substantially induced MMP-1 expression, which led to collagen fibril fragmentation and disorganization in three-dimensional collagen lattices. Constraining fibroblast size by culturing on slides coated with collagen micropatterns also significantly induced MMP-1 expression. Reduced spreading/mechanical force induced transcription factor c-Jun and its binding to a canonical AP-1 binding site in the MMP-1 proximal promoter. Blocking c-Jun function with dominant negative mutant c-Jun significantly reduced induction of MMP-1 expression in response to reduced spreading/mechanical force. Furthermore, restoration of fibroblast spreading/mechanical force led to decline of c-Jun and MMP-1 levels and eliminated collagen fibril fragmentation and disorganization. These data reveal a novel mechanism by which alteration of fibroblast shape/mechanical force regulates c-Jun/AP-1-dependent expression of MMP-1 and consequent collagen fibril fragmentation. This mechanism provides a foundation for understanding the cellular and molecular basis of age-related collagen fragmentation in human skin.

  9. Asteroids IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Patrick; DeMeo, Francesca E.; Bottke, William F.

    . Asteroids, like planets, are driven by a great variety of both dynamical and physical mechanisms. In fact, images sent back by space missions show a collection of small worlds whose characteristics seem designed to overthrow our preconceived notions. Given their wide range of sizes and surface compositions, it is clear that many formed in very different places and at different times within the solar nebula. These characteristics make them an exciting challenge for researchers who crave complex problems. The return of samples from these bodies may ultimately be needed to provide us with solutions. In the book Asteroids IV, the editors and authors have taken major strides in the long journey toward a much deeper understanding of our fascinating planetary ancestors. This book reviews major advances in 43 chapters that have been written and reviewed by a team of more than 200 international authorities in asteroids. It is aimed to be as comprehensive as possible while also remaining accessible to students and researchers who are interested in learning about these small but nonetheless important worlds. We hope this volume will serve as a leading reference on the topic of asteroids for the decade to come. We are deeply indebted to the many authors and referees for their tremendous efforts in helping us create Asteroids IV. We also thank the members of the Asteroids IV scientific organizing committee for helping us shape the structure and content of the book. The conference associated with the book, "Asteroids Comets Meteors 2014" held June 30-July 4, 2014, in Helsinki, Finland, did an outstanding job of demonstrating how much progress we have made in the field over the last decade. We are extremely grateful to our host Karri Muinonnen and his team. The editors are also grateful to the Asteroids IV production staff, namely Renée Dotson and her colleagues at the Lunar and Planetary Institute, for their efforts, their invaluable assistance, and their enthusiasm; they made life as

  10. Asteroids IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Patrick; DeMeo, Francesca E.; Bottke, William F.

    . Asteroids, like planets, are driven by a great variety of both dynamical and physical mechanisms. In fact, images sent back by space missions show a collection of small worlds whose characteristics seem designed to overthrow our preconceived notions. Given their wide range of sizes and surface compositions, it is clear that many formed in very different places and at different times within the solar nebula. These characteristics make them an exciting challenge for researchers who crave complex problems. The return of samples from these bodies may ultimately be needed to provide us with solutions. In the book Asteroids IV, the editors and authors have taken major strides in the long journey toward a much deeper understanding of our fascinating planetary ancestors. This book reviews major advances in 43 chapters that have been written and reviewed by a team of more than 200 international authorities in asteroids. It is aimed to be as comprehensive as possible while also remaining accessible to students and researchers who are interested in learning about these small but nonetheless important worlds. We hope this volume will serve as a leading reference on the topic of asteroids for the decade to come. We are deeply indebted to the many authors and referees for their tremendous efforts in helping us create Asteroids IV. We also thank the members of the Asteroids IV scientific organizing committee for helping us shape the structure and content of the book. The conference associated with the book, "Asteroids Comets Meteors 2014" held June 30-July 4, 2014, in Helsinki, Finland, did an outstanding job of demonstrating how much progress we have made in the field over the last decade. We are extremely grateful to our host Karri Muinonnen and his team. The editors are also grateful to the Asteroids IV production staff, namely Renée Dotson and her colleagues at the Lunar and Planetary Institute, for their efforts, their invaluable assistance, and their enthusiasm; they made life as

  11. Poverty, violence, and family disorganization: Three "Hydras" and their role in children's street movement in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Reza, Md Hasan

    2016-05-01

    The increasing number of children running away from home in Bangladesh is a major concern, and in need of critical attention. This yearlong study explores why children leave home with a sample of street children in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Purposive sampling from three locations in Dhaka yielded a sample of 75 homeless children aged 10-17. For each participant, a 60-90min in-depth qualitative interview was conducted multiple times. While the dominant explanations rely on poverty or abuse, the findings of this study reveal that the cause is actually three heads of a Hydra monster: poverty, abuse, and family disorganization and their interactions. It shows that the primary reasons for children breaking from their family are all interrelated. The findings from this study are likely to add knowledge regarding the issues and may lead to preventative interventions for street children and their families.

  12. An examination of social disorganization and pluralistic neighborhood theories with rural mothers and their adolescents.

    PubMed

    Witherspoon, Dawn; Ennett, Susan

    2011-09-01

    Neighborhoods matter for youth; yet, most literature focuses on neighborhood deficits rather than strengths. To understand how best to capture neighborhoods, this study used census- and perception-based measures of neighborhood characteristics as suggested by social disorganization and pluralistic neighborhood theories, respectively, to determine the association between structural characteristics and perceptions of positive and negative neighborhood characteristics. The ethnically diverse (59% White and 34% African American) sample (N = 1,414) consisted of early adolescents (53% female) and their mothers. We found that participants perceived distinct positive and negative neighborhood characteristics. For adolescents and mothers, neighborhood structural characteristics were positively associated with risk perceptions (e.g., physical and social disorder) but differently associated with positive neighborhood characteristics. In addition, participants perceived their neighborhoods differently (e.g., adolescents perceived less informal social control but more cohesion than their mothers). We discuss the importance of the neighborhood context, particularly positive neighborhood characteristics, for rural families.

  13. Metacognitive Reflection and Insight Therapy (MERIT) With a Patient With Severe Symptoms of Disorganization.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Steven; van Donkersgoed, Rozanne; Pijnenborg, G H M; Lysaker, Paul H

    2016-02-01

    One recent development within the realm of psychotherapeutic interventions for schizophrenia has been a shift in focus from symptom management to consideration of metacognition, or the processes by which people synthesize information about themselves and others in an integrated manner. One such approach, metacognitive reflection and insight therapy (MERIT); in particular, offers a description of 8 therapeutic activities that should occur in each session, resulting in the stimulation and growth of metacognitive capacity. In this report, we present a description of 12 sessions with a patient suffering from schizophrenia manifesting significantly disorganized symptoms. Each MERIT element is described along with observed clinical and metacognitive gains. As illustrated in this report, these procedures helped the patient move from a state of having no complex ideas about himself or others, to one in which he could begin to develop integrated and realistic ideas about himself and others and use that capacity to think about life challenges.

  14. Atrial fibrillation disorganization is reduced by catheter ablation: a standard ECG study.

    PubMed

    Bonizzi, Pietro; Meste, Olivier; Zarzoso, Vicente; Latcu, Decebal Gabriel; Popescu, Irina; Ricard, Philippe; Saoudi, Nadir

    2010-01-01

    Selection of candidates to catheter ablation (CA) of long-lasting persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) is challenging, since success is not guaranteed. In this study, we put forward an automated method for noninvasively evaluating the reduction of the complexity of the AF organization following CA. Complexity is meant as the amount of disorganization observed on the ECG, supposed to be directly correlated to the number and interactions of atrial wavefronts. By means of PCA, the complexity of the AF organization is evaluated quantitatively from a 12-lead ECG recording. Preliminary results show that CA is able to reduce the complexity of AF organization in the atrial wavefront pattern propagation, despite the persistence of AF in most cases. This can be viewed as a first clinical validation of this parameter. Whether AF complexity and its reduction by CA are predictive of long-term outcome is thus still to be determined.

  15. Poverty, violence, and family disorganization: Three "Hydras" and their role in children's street movement in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Reza, Md Hasan

    2016-05-01

    The increasing number of children running away from home in Bangladesh is a major concern, and in need of critical attention. This yearlong study explores why children leave home with a sample of street children in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Purposive sampling from three locations in Dhaka yielded a sample of 75 homeless children aged 10-17. For each participant, a 60-90min in-depth qualitative interview was conducted multiple times. While the dominant explanations rely on poverty or abuse, the findings of this study reveal that the cause is actually three heads of a Hydra monster: poverty, abuse, and family disorganization and their interactions. It shows that the primary reasons for children breaking from their family are all interrelated. The findings from this study are likely to add knowledge regarding the issues and may lead to preventative interventions for street children and their families. PMID:27101351

  16. Raft disorganization leads to reduced plasmin activity in Alzheimer's disease brains.

    PubMed

    Ledesma, Maria Dolores; Abad-Rodriguez, José; Galvan, Cristian; Biondi, Elisa; Navarro, Pilar; Delacourte, Andre; Dingwall, Colin; Dotti, Carlos G

    2003-12-01

    The serine protease plasmin can efficiently degrade amyloid peptide in vitro, and is found at low levels in the hippocampus of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The cause of such paucity remains unknown. We show here that the levels of total brain plasminogen and plasminogen-binding molecules are normal in these brain samples, yet plasminogen membrane binding is greatly reduced. Biochemical analysis reveals that the membranes of these brains have a mild, still significant, cholesterol reduction compared to age-matched controls, and anomalous raft microdomains. This was reflected by the loss of raft-enriched proteins, including plasminogen-binding and -activating molecules. Using hippocampal neurons in culture, we demonstrate that removal of a similar amount of membrane cholesterol is sufficient to induce raft disorganization, leading to reduced plasminogen membrane binding and low plasmin activity. These results suggest that brain raft alterations may contribute to AD by rendering the plasminogen system inefficient.

  17. Topographic mapping of collagenous gastritis.

    PubMed

    Freeman, H J

    2001-07-01

    A 74-year-old woman was investigated for abdominal pain and diarrhea. Endoscopic examinations including biopsies of the stomach and colon demonstrated the typical subepithelial deposits characteristic of collagenous gastritis and collagenous colitis. Histochemical and ultrastructural methods confirmed the presence of collagen in the subepithelial deposits. The topographic distribution of these collagen deposits and their relationship to the inflammatory process in the stomach were then defined by endoscopic mapping and multiple site biopsies of the mucosa in the gastric body and antrum. These studies indicate that collagenous gastritis not only is distinctive, but also is a far more extensive and diffuse inflammatory process than has previously been appreciated. PMID:11493952

  18. Collagen Homeostasis and Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, S Peter; Heinemeier, Katja M; Kjaer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The musculoskeletal system and its collagen rich tissue is important for ensuring architecture of skeletal muscle, energy storage in tendon and ligaments, joint surface protection, and for ensuring the transfer of muscular forces into resulting limb movement. Structure of tendon is stable and the metabolic activity is low, but mechanical loading and subsequent mechanotransduction and molecular anabolic signaling can result in some adaptation of the tendon especially during youth and adolescence. Within short time, tendon will get stiffer with training and lack of mechanical tissue loading through inactivity or immobilization of the human body will conversely result in a dramatic loss in tendon stiffness and collagen synthesis. This illustrates the importance of regular mechanical load in order to preserve the stabilizing role of the connective tissue for the overall function of the musculoskeletal system in both daily activity and exercise. Adaptive responses may vary along the tendon, and differ between mid-substance and insertional areas of the tendon. PMID:27535245

  19. The heterogeneity of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms and conduct problems: Cognitive inhibition, emotion regulation, emotionality, and disorganized attachment.

    PubMed

    Forslund, Tommie; Brocki, Karin C; Bohlin, Gunilla; Granqvist, Pehr; Eninger, Lilianne

    2016-09-01

    This study examined the contributions of several important domains of functioning to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms and conduct problems. Specifically, we investigated whether cognitive inhibition, emotion regulation, emotionality, and disorganized attachment made independent and specific contributions to these externalizing behaviour problems from a multiple pathways perspective. The study included laboratory measures of cognitive inhibition and disorganized attachment in 184 typically developing children (M age = 6 years, 10 months, SD = 1.7). Parental ratings provided measures of emotion regulation, emotionality, and externalizing behaviour problems. Results revealed that cognitive inhibition, regulation of positive emotion, and positive emotionality were independently and specifically related to ADHD symptoms. Disorganized attachment and negative emotionality formed independent and specific relations to conduct problems. Our findings support the multiple pathways perspective on ADHD, with poor regulation of positive emotion and high positive emotionality making distinct contributions to ADHD symptoms. More specifically, our results support the proposal of a temperamentally based pathway to ADHD symptoms. The findings also indicate that disorganized attachment and negative emotionality constitute pathways specific to conduct problems rather than to ADHD symptoms. PMID:26895773

  20. Dopaminergic, Serotonergic, and Oxytonergic Candidate Genes Associated with Infant Attachment Security and Disorganization? In Search of Main and Interaction Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luijk, Maartje P. C. M.; Roisman, Glenn I.; Haltigan, John D.; Tiemeier, Henning; Booth-LaForce, Cathryn; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Belsky, Jay; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; Hofman, Albert; Verhulst, Frank C.; Tharner, Anne; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.

    2011-01-01

    Background and methods: In two birth cohort studies with genetic, sensitive parenting, and attachment data of more than 1,000 infants in total, we tested main and interaction effects of candidate genes involved in the dopamine, serotonin, and oxytocin systems ("DRD4", "DRD2", "COMT", "5-HTT", "OXTR") on attachment security and disorganization.…

  1. Disordered Semantic Activation in Disorganized Discourse in Schizophrenia: A New Pragma-Linguistic Tool for Structure and Meaning Reconstruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hella, Pertti; Niemi, Jussi; Hintikka, Jukka; Otsa, Lidia; Tirkkonen, Jani-Matti; Koponen, Hannu

    2013-01-01

    Background: Disorganized speech, manifested as derailment, tangentiality, incoherence and loss of goal, occurs commonly in schizophrenia. Studies of language processing have demonstrated that semantic activation in schizophrenia is often disordered and, moreover, the ability to use contextual cues is impaired. Aims: To reconstruct the origins and…

  2. You never know where you are going until you know where you have been: Disorganized search after stroke.

    PubMed

    Ten Brink, Antonia F; Van der Stigchel, Stefan; Visser-Meily, Johanna M A; Nijboer, Tanja C W

    2016-09-01

    Disorders in spatial exploration can be expressed in a disorganized fashion of target cancellation. There is debate regarding whether disorganized search is related to stroke in general, to right brain damage or to unilateral spatial neglect (USN) in particular. In this study, 280 stroke patients and 37 healthy control subjects performed a computerized shape cancellation test. We investigated the number of perseverations and several outcome measures regarding disorganized search: Consistency of search direction (best r), distance between consecutive cancelled targets and intersections with paths between previous cancelled targets. We compared performance between patients with left and right brain damage (L, R) and with and without USN (USN+, USN-), resulting in four subgroups: LUSN-, RUSN-, LUSN+, and RUSN+. Higher numbers of intersections were found for the left brain- and right brain-damaged patients with USN and for the right brain-damaged patients without USN, compared to healthy control subjects. Furthermore, right brain-damaged patients with USN showed a higher number of intersections compared to right brain-damaged patients without USN and compared to left brain-damaged patients with USN. To conclude, disorganized search was most strongly related to the neglect syndrome, and patients with more severe USN were even more impaired. PMID:25757841

  3. The heterogeneity of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms and conduct problems: Cognitive inhibition, emotion regulation, emotionality, and disorganized attachment.

    PubMed

    Forslund, Tommie; Brocki, Karin C; Bohlin, Gunilla; Granqvist, Pehr; Eninger, Lilianne

    2016-09-01

    This study examined the contributions of several important domains of functioning to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms and conduct problems. Specifically, we investigated whether cognitive inhibition, emotion regulation, emotionality, and disorganized attachment made independent and specific contributions to these externalizing behaviour problems from a multiple pathways perspective. The study included laboratory measures of cognitive inhibition and disorganized attachment in 184 typically developing children (M age = 6 years, 10 months, SD = 1.7). Parental ratings provided measures of emotion regulation, emotionality, and externalizing behaviour problems. Results revealed that cognitive inhibition, regulation of positive emotion, and positive emotionality were independently and specifically related to ADHD symptoms. Disorganized attachment and negative emotionality formed independent and specific relations to conduct problems. Our findings support the multiple pathways perspective on ADHD, with poor regulation of positive emotion and high positive emotionality making distinct contributions to ADHD symptoms. More specifically, our results support the proposal of a temperamentally based pathway to ADHD symptoms. The findings also indicate that disorganized attachment and negative emotionality constitute pathways specific to conduct problems rather than to ADHD symptoms.

  4. The Significance of Insecure Attachment and Disorganization in the Development of Children's Externalizing Behavior: A Meta-Analytic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fearon, R. Pasco; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Lapsley, Anne-Marie; Roisman, Glenn I.

    2010-01-01

    This study addresses the extent to which insecure and disorganized attachments increase risk for externalizing problems using meta-analysis. From 69 samples (N = 5,947), the association between insecurity and externalizing problems was significant, d = 0.31 (95% CI: 0.23, 0.40). Larger effects were found for boys (d = 0.35), clinical samples (d =…

  5. Different collagen types show distinct rates of increase from early to late stages of hepatitis C-related liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Rock, Jonathan B; Yearsley, Martha M; Ferrell, Linda D; Frankel, Wendy L

    2014-01-01

    During progression from normal liver to cirrhosis, total collagen increases nearly 10-fold with an abnormal increase in fibril-forming collagen and other extracellular matrix molecules. However, little is known regarding the changes each collagen type undergoes during fibrogenesis. We assessed the different collagen types by immunohistochemistry at various stages of hepatitis C-related liver fibrosis in core biopsies and compared changes in each with trichrome stain to better understand fibrogenesis. The possible utility in staging fibrosis was investigated. We found collagens III, IV, V, VI, vitronectin, and trichrome all showed statistically significant increases from early to late stages of fibrosis, but with temporal and quantitative differences. During the transition from early to late fibrosis, trichrome (stains primarily collagen I) and collagen IV showed the steepest increase and appear to be the most useful discriminators between early and late stages of fibrosis. Collagens V and VI have strong reactivity even in stage 1, which may be helpful in identifying early fibrosis when trichrome is weak or negative. Collagen III and vitronectin showed the most gradual increase. Interestingly, collagen V also showed increased staining in areas around inflammation/edema, which may overestimate established fibrosis as compared with trichrome.

  6. Heterogeneity of collagens in rabbit cornea: type III collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Cintron, C.; Hong, B.S.; Covington, H.I.; Macarak, E.J.

    1988-05-01

    Whole neonate rabbit corneas and adult corneas containing 2-week-old scars were incubated in the presence of (/sup 14/C) glycine. Radiolabeled collagen extracted from the corneas and scar tissue were analyzed by sodium dodecylsulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography to determine the types and relative quantity of collagen polypeptides present and synthesized by these tissues. In addition to other collagen types, type III was found in both neonate cornea and scar tissue from adult cornea, albeit in relatively small quantities. Type III collagen in normal cornea was associated with the residue after pepsin digestion and formic acid extraction of the tissue, and the same type of collagen was extracted from scar tissue after similar treatment. Type III collagen-specific monoclonal antibody bound to developing normal corneas and healing adult tissue sections, as determined by immunofluorescence. Antibody binding was localized to the endothelium and growing Descemet's membrane in fetal and neonate corneas, and restricted to the most posterior region of the corneal scar tissue. Although monoclonal antibody to keratan sulfate, used as a marker for stromal fibroblasts, bound to most of the scar tissue, the antibody failed to bind to the posterior scar tissue positive for type III collagen. We conclude that endothelial cells from fetal and neonate rabbit cornea and endothelium-derived fibroblasts from healing wounds of adult cornea synthesize and deposit type III collagen. Moreover, this collagen appears to be incorporated into the growing Descemet's membrane of normal corneas and narrow posterior portion of the scar tissue.

  7. Collagen macromolecular drug delivery systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine collagen for use as a macromolecular drug delivery system by determining the mechanism of release through a matrix. Collagen membranes varying in porosity, crosslinking density, structure and crosslinker were fabricated. Collagen characterized by infrared spectroscopy and solution viscosity was determined to be pure and native. The collagen membranes were determined to possess native vs. non-native quaternary structure and porous vs. dense aggregate membranes by electron microscopy. Collagen monolithic devices containing a model macromolecule (inulin) were fabricated. In vitro release rates were found to be linear with respect to t{sup {1/2}} and were affected by crosslinking density, crosslinker and structure. The biodegradation of the collagen matrix was also examined. In vivo biocompatibility, degradation and {sup 14}C-inulin release rates were evaluated subcutaneously in rats.

  8. Calcific Aortic Valve Disease Is Associated with Layer-Specific Alterations in Collagen Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Hutson, Heather N.; Marohl, Taylor; Anderson, Matthew; Eliceiri, Kevin; Campagnola, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Disorganization of the valve extracellular matrix (ECM) is a hallmark of calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD). However, while microarchitectural features of the ECM can strongly influence the biological and mechanical behavior of tissues, little is known about the ECM microarchitecture in CAVD. In this work, we apply advanced imaging techniques to quantify spatially heterogeneous changes in collagen microarchitecture in CAVD. Human aortic valves were obtained from individuals between 50 and 75 years old with no evidence of valvular disease (healthy) and individuals who underwent valve replacement surgery due to severe stenosis (diseased). Second Harmonic Generation microscopy and subsequent image quantification revealed layer-specific changes in fiber characteristics in healthy and diseased valves. Specifically, the majority of collagen fiber changes in CAVD were found to occur in the spongiosa, where collagen fiber number increased by over 2-fold, and fiber width and density also significantly increased. Relatively few fibrillar changes occurred in the fibrosa in CAVD, where fibers became significantly shorter, but did not otherwise change in terms of number, width, density, or alignment. Immunohistochemical staining for lysyl oxidase showed localized increased expression in the diseased fibrosa. These findings reveal a more complex picture of valvular collagen enrichment and arrangement in CAVD than has previously been described using traditional analysis methods. Changes in fiber architecture may play a role in regulating the pathobiological events and mechanical properties of valves during CAVD. Additionally, characterization of the ECM microarchitecture can inform the design of fibrous scaffolds for heart valve tissue engineering. PMID:27685946

  9. Type XIV Collagen Regulates Fibrillogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ansorge, Heather L.; Meng, Xianmin; Zhang, Guiyun; Veit, Guido; Sun, Mei; Klement, John F.; Beason, David P.; Soslowsky, Louis J.; Koch, Manuel; Birk, David E.

    2009-01-01

    Type XIV collagen is a fibril-associated collagen with an interrupted triple helix. This collagen interacts with the fibril surface and has been implicated as a regulator of fibrillogenesis; however, a specific role has not been elucidated. Functional roles for type XIV collagen were defined utilizing a new type XIV collagen-deficient mouse line. This line was produced using a conventional targeted knock-out approach. Col14a1(–/–) mice were devoid of type XIV collagen, whereas heterozygous mice had reduced synthesis. Both mutant Col14a1 genotypes were viable with a grossly normal phenotype; however, mature skin exhibited altered mechanical properties. Prior to evaluating tendon fibrillogenesis in type XIV collagen-deficient mice, the developmental expression patterns were analyzed in wild-type flexor digitorum longus (FDL) tendons. Analyses of mRNA and protein expression indicated tissue-specific temporal expression that was associated with the early stages in fibrillogenesis. Ultrastructural analyses of wild-type and null tendons demonstrated premature fibril growth and larger fibril diameters in tendons from null mice at postnatal day 4 (P4). However, fibril structure in mature tendons was normal. Biomechanical studies established a direct structure/function relationship with reduced strength in P7-null tendons. However, the biomechanical properties in P60 tendons were comparable in null and wild-type mice. Our results indicate a regulatory function for type XIV collagen in early stages of collagen fibrillogenesis with tissue differences. PMID:19136672

  10. Arterial calcification: Conscripted by collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jordan D.

    2016-03-01

    In atherosclerotic plaques, patterns of calcification -- which have profound implications for plaque stability and vulnerability to rupture -- are determined by the collagen's content and patterning throughout the plaque.

  11. Myofibroblast expression in skin wounds is enhanced by collagen III suppression.

    PubMed

    Al-Qattan, Mohammed M; Abd-Elwahed, Mervat M; Hawary, Khalid; Arafah, Maha M; Shier, Medhat K

    2015-01-01

    Generally speaking, the excessive expression of myofibroblasts is associated with excessive collagen production. One exception is seen in patients and animal models of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV in which the COL3A1 gene mutation results in reduced collagen III but with concurrent increased myofibroblast expression. This paradox has not been examined with the use of external drugs/modalities to prevent hypertrophic scars. In this paper, we injected the rabbit ear wound model of hypertrophic scarring with two doses of a protein called nAG, which is known to reduce collagen expression and to suppress hypertrophic scarring in that animal model. The higher nAG dose was associated with significantly less collagen III expression and concurrent higher degree of myofibroblast expression. We concluded that collagen III content of the extracellular matrix may have a direct or an indirect effect on myofibroblast differentiation. However, further research is required to investigate the pathogenesis of this paradoxical phenomenon. PMID:25789326

  12. Collagen types analysis and differentiation by FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Belbachir, Karima; Noreen, Razia; Gouspillou, Gilles; Petibois, Cyril

    2009-10-01

    Abnormal formation and organization of collagen network is commonly observed in many organ pathologies, but analytical techniques able to reveal the collagen biodistribution are still lacking. In this study, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy has been used to analyze type I, III, IV, V, and VI collagens, the most important compounds of connective tissues. A robust classification of 30 FTIR spectra per collagen type could be obtained by using a combination of four spectral intervals [nu(C=O) absorption of amide I (1,700-1,600 cm(-1)), delta(CH(2)), and delta(CH(3)) absorptions (1,480-1,350 cm(-1)), nu(C-N), and delta(N-H) absorptions of amide III (1,300-1,180 cm(-1)), and nu(C-O) and nu(C-O-C) absorptions of carbohydrate moieties (1,100-1,005 cm(-1))]. Then, a submolecular justification of this classification model was sought using a curve fitting analysis of the four spectral intervals. Results demonstrated that every spectral interval used for the classification contained highly discriminant absorption bands between all collagen types (multivariate analysis of variance, p < 0.01; Dunnett's T3 post hoc test, p < 0.05). All conditions seem thus joined to make FTIR spectroscopy and imaging major tools for implementing innovative methods in the field of molecular histology, which would be very helpful for the diagnosis of a wide range of pathologies.

  13. Visual context processing deficits in schizophrenia: effects of deafness and disorganization.

    PubMed

    Horton, Heather K; Silverstein, Steven M

    2011-07-01

    Visual illusions allow for strong tests of perceptual functioning. Perceptual impairments can produce superior task performance on certain tasks (i.e., more veridical perception), thereby avoiding generalized deficit confounds while tapping mechanisms that are largely outside of conscious control. Using a task based on the Ebbinghaus illusion, a perceptual phenomenon where the perceived size of a central target object is affected by the size of surrounding inducers, we tested hypotheses related to visual integration in deaf (n = 31) and hearing (n = 34) patients with schizophrenia. In past studies, psychiatrically healthy samples displayed increased visual integration relative to schizophrenia samples and thus were less able to correctly judge target sizes. Deafness, and especially the use of sign language, leads to heightened sensitivity to peripheral visual cues and increased sensitivity to visual context. Therefore, relative to hearing subjects, deaf subjects were expected to display increased context sensitivity (ie, a more normal illusion effect as evidenced by a decreased ability to correctly judge central target sizes). Confirming the hypothesis, deaf signers were significantly more sensitive to the illusion than nonsigning hearing patients. Moreover, an earlier age of sign language acquisition, higher levels of linguistic ability, and shorter illness duration were significantly related to increased context sensitivity. As predicted, disorganization was associated with reduced context sensitivity for all subjects. The primary implications of these data are that perceptual organization impairment in schizophrenia is plastic and that it is related to a broader failure in coordinating cognitive activity. PMID:21700590

  14. A social disorganization perspective on bullying-related attitudes and behaviors: the influence of school context.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Catherine P; Sawyer, Anne L; O'Brennan, Lindsey M

    2009-06-01

    Social disorganization theory suggests that certain school-level indicators of disorder may be important predictors of bullying-related attitudes and behaviors. Multilevel analyses were conducted on bullying-related attitudes and experiences among 22,178 students in 95 elementary and middle schools. The intraclass correlation coefficients indicated that 0.6-2% of the variance in victimization, 5-10% of the variance in retaliatory attitudes, 5-6% of the variance in perceptions of safety, and 0.9% of the variance in perpetration of bullying was associated with the clustering of students within schools. Although the specific associations varied somewhat for elementary schools as compared to middle schools, the hierarchical linear modeling analyses generally suggested that school-level indicators of disorder (e.g., student-teacher ratio, concentration of student poverty, suspension rate, and student mobility) were significant predictors of bullying-related attitudes and experiences. Student-level characteristics (i.e., sex, ethnicity, status in school) were also relevant to students' retaliatory attitudes, perceptions of safety, and involvement in bullying. Implications for school-based research and violence prevention are provided.

  15. Leiomodin-3 dysfunction results in thin filament disorganization and nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Michaela; Sandaradura, Sarah A; Dowling, James J; Kostyukova, Alla S; Moroz, Natalia; Quinlan, Kate G; Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Todd, Emily J; Ceyhan-Birsoy, Ozge; Gokhin, David S; Maluenda, Jérome; Lek, Monkol; Nolent, Flora; Pappas, Christopher T; Novak, Stefanie M; D'Amico, Adele; Malfatti, Edoardo; Thomas, Brett P; Gabriel, Stacey B; Gupta, Namrata; Daly, Mark J; Ilkovski, Biljana; Houweling, Peter J; Davidson, Ann E; Swanson, Lindsay C; Brownstein, Catherine A; Gupta, Vandana A; Medne, Livija; Shannon, Patrick; Martin, Nicole; Bick, David P; Flisberg, Anders; Holmberg, Eva; Van den Bergh, Peter; Lapunzina, Pablo; Waddell, Leigh B; Sloboda, Darcée D; Bertini, Enrico; Chitayat, David; Telfer, William R; Laquerrière, Annie; Gregorio, Carol C; Ottenheijm, Coen A C; Bönnemann, Carsten G; Pelin, Katarina; Beggs, Alan H; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Romero, Norma B; Laing, Nigel G; Nishino, Ichizo; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina; Melki, Judith; Fowler, Velia M; MacArthur, Daniel G; North, Kathryn N; Clarke, Nigel F

    2014-11-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a genetic muscle disorder characterized by muscle dysfunction and electron-dense protein accumulations (nemaline bodies) in myofibers. Pathogenic mutations have been described in 9 genes to date, but the genetic basis remains unknown in many cases. Here, using an approach that combined whole-exome sequencing (WES) and Sanger sequencing, we identified homozygous or compound heterozygous variants in LMOD3 in 21 patients from 14 families with severe, usually lethal, NM. LMOD3 encodes leiomodin-3 (LMOD3), a 65-kDa protein expressed in skeletal and cardiac muscle. LMOD3 was expressed from early stages of muscle differentiation; localized to actin thin filaments, with enrichment near the pointed ends; and had strong actin filament-nucleating activity. Loss of LMOD3 in patient muscle resulted in shortening and disorganization of thin filaments. Knockdown of lmod3 in zebrafish replicated NM-associated functional and pathological phenotypes. Together, these findings indicate that mutations in the gene encoding LMOD3 underlie congenital myopathy and demonstrate that LMOD3 is essential for the organization of sarcomeric thin filaments in skeletal muscle. PMID:25250574

  16. Fatal Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Causes Specific Patterns of Splenic Architectural Disorganization

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Britta C.; Hien, Tran T.; Day, Nicholas P.; Phu, Nguyen H.; Roberts, Rachel; Pongponratn, Emsri; Jones, Margret; Mai, Nguyen T. H.; Bethell, Delia; Turner, Gareth D. H.; Ferguson, David; White, Nicholas J.; Roberts, David J.

    2005-01-01

    The spleen is critical for host defense against pathogens, including Plasmodium falciparum. It has a dual role, not only removing aged or antigenically altered erythrocytes from the blood but also as the major lymphoid organ for blood-borne or systemic infections. The human malaria parasite P. falciparum replicates within erythrocytes during asexual blood stages and causes repeated infections that can be associated with severe disease. In spite of the crucial role of the spleen in the innate and acquired immune response to malaria, there is little information on the pathology of the spleen in human malaria. We performed a histological and quantitative immunohistochemical study of spleen sections from Vietnamese adults dying from severe falciparum malaria and compared the findings with the findings for spleen sections from control patients and patients dying from systemic bacterial sepsis. Here we report that the white pulp in the spleens of patients dying from malaria showed a marked architectural disorganization. We observed a marked dissolution of the marginal zones with relative loss of B cells. Furthermore, we found strong HLA-DR expression on sinusoidal lining cells but downregulation on cordal macrophages. P. falciparum infection results in alterations in splenic leukocytes, many of which are not seen in sepsis. PMID:15784539

  17. Complex I inhibition in the visual pathway induces disorganization of the node of Ranvier.

    PubMed

    Marella, Mathieu; Patki, Gaurav; Matsuno-Yagi, Akemi; Yagi, Takao

    2013-10-01

    Mitochondrial defects can have significant consequences on many aspects of neuronal physiology. In particular, deficiencies in the first enzyme complex of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (complex I) are considered to be involved in a number of human neurodegenerative diseases. The current work highlights a tight correlation between the inhibition of complex I and the state of axonal myelination of the optic nerve. Exposing the visual pathway of rats to rotenone, a complex I inhibitor, resulted in disorganization of the node of Ranvier. The structure and function of the node depend on specific cell adhesion molecules, among others, CASPR (contactin associated protein) and contactin. CASPR and contactin are both on the axonal surfaces and need to be associated to be able to anchor their myelin counterpart. Here we show that inhibition of mitochondrial complex I by rotenone in rats induces reactive oxygen species, disrupts the interaction of CASPR and contactin couple, and thus damages the organization and function of the node of Ranvier. Demyelination of the optic nerve occurs as a consequence which is accompanied by a loss of vision. The physiological impairment could be reversed by introducing an alternative NADH dehydrogenase to the mitochondria of the visual system. The restoration of the nodal structure was specifically correlated with visual recovery in the treated animal. PMID:23816754

  18. Complex I inhibition in the visual pathway induces disorganization of the node of Ranvier

    PubMed Central

    Marella, Mathieu; Patki, Gaurav; Matsuno-Yagi, Akemi; Yagi, Takao

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial defects can have significant consequences on many aspects of neuronal physiology. In particular, deficiencies in the first enzyme complex of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (complex I) are considered to be involved in a number of human neurodegenerative diseases. The current work highlights a tight correlation between the inhibition of complex I and the state of axonal myelination of the optic nerve. Exposing the visual pathway of rats to rotenone, a complex I inhibitor, resulted in disorganization of the node of Ranvier. The structure and function of the node depends on specific cell adhesion molecules, among others, CASPR (contactin associated protein) and contactin. CASPR and contactin are both on the axonal surface and need to be associated to be able to anchor their myelin counter part. Here we show that inhibition of mitochondrial complex I by rotenone in rats induces reactive oxygen species, disrupts the interaction of CASPR and contactin couple, and thus damages the organization and function of the node of Ranvier. Demyelination of the optic nerve occurs as a consequence which is accompanied by a loss of vision. The physiological impairment could be reversed by introducing an alternative NADH dehydrogenase to the mitochondria of the visual system. The restoration of the nodal structure was specifically correlated with visual recovery in the treated animal. PMID:23816754

  19. Leiomodin-3 dysfunction results in thin filament disorganization and nemaline myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Michaela; Sandaradura, Sarah A.; Dowling, James J.; Kostyukova, Alla S.; Moroz, Natalia; Quinlan, Kate G.; Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Todd, Emily J.; Ceyhan-Birsoy, Ozge; Gokhin, David S.; Maluenda, Jérome; Lek, Monkol; Nolent, Flora; Pappas, Christopher T.; Novak, Stefanie M.; D’Amico, Adele; Malfatti, Edoardo; Thomas, Brett P.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Gupta, Namrata; Daly, Mark J.; Ilkovski, Biljana; Houweling, Peter J.; Davidson, Ann E.; Swanson, Lindsay C.; Brownstein, Catherine A.; Gupta, Vandana A.; Medne, Livija; Shannon, Patrick; Martin, Nicole; Bick, David P.; Flisberg, Anders; Holmberg, Eva; Van den Bergh, Peter; Lapunzina, Pablo; Waddell, Leigh B.; Sloboda, Darcée D.; Bertini, Enrico; Chitayat, David; Telfer, William R.; Laquerrière, Annie; Gregorio, Carol C.; Ottenheijm, Coen A.C.; Bönnemann, Carsten G.; Pelin, Katarina; Beggs, Alan H.; Hayashi, Yukiko K.; Romero, Norma B.; Laing, Nigel G.; Nishino, Ichizo; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina; Melki, Judith; Fowler, Velia M.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; North, Kathryn N.; Clarke, Nigel F.

    2014-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a genetic muscle disorder characterized by muscle dysfunction and electron-dense protein accumulations (nemaline bodies) in myofibers. Pathogenic mutations have been described in 9 genes to date, but the genetic basis remains unknown in many cases. Here, using an approach that combined whole-exome sequencing (WES) and Sanger sequencing, we identified homozygous or compound heterozygous variants in LMOD3 in 21 patients from 14 families with severe, usually lethal, NM. LMOD3 encodes leiomodin-3 (LMOD3), a 65-kDa protein expressed in skeletal and cardiac muscle. LMOD3 was expressed from early stages of muscle differentiation; localized to actin thin filaments, with enrichment near the pointed ends; and had strong actin filament-nucleating activity. Loss of LMOD3 in patient muscle resulted in shortening and disorganization of thin filaments. Knockdown of lmod3 in zebrafish replicated NM-associated functional and pathological phenotypes. Together, these findings indicate that mutations in the gene encoding LMOD3 underlie congenital myopathy and demonstrate that LMOD3 is essential for the organization of sarcomeric thin filaments in skeletal muscle. PMID:25250574

  20. Effect of structural change of collagen fibrils on the durability of dentin bonding.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Adelung, Rainer; Ludwig, Klaus; Bössmann, Klaus; Pashley, David H; Kern, Matthias

    2005-08-01

    This study investigates the effect of structural changes of collagen fibrils on the bonding durability of a total etch luting resin (Super-Bond C&B) and a self-etching luting resin (Panavia F 2.0) to dentin. An atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to observe structural changes of intact dentin collagen fibrils after acidic conditionings of two bonding systems. After 90 d water storage and 15,000 thermal cycles (TC) as artificial aging, micro-tensile bond strength (microTBS) was utilized to evaluate the bonding durability of the two bonding systems to dentin. microTBS after 1 d or 90 d water storage without TC were separately measured in control groups. A cross-banding periodicity of about 67 nm along collagen fibrils was seen on demineralized intertubular dentin surfaces in AFM images. For both luting resins, thermal cycling decreased (p < 0.05) microTBS of 1 d and 90 d, compared to controls. Scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscopic examinations revealed that the top and bottom of hybrid layer (HL) were weak links in the bonding interface over time. The results suggest that the top of HL contains disorganized collagen fibrils from the smear layer which degrade over time. AFM results indicate that the demineralized intact collagen fibrils beneath the smear layer were not denatured during acidic conditioning. However, these collagen fibrils may be structurally unstable due to poor infiltration by resin or loss of resin protection within the HL over time, reducing the long-term microTBS. This process was accelerated by thermal fatigue cycling.

  1. From disorganized capitalism to transnational fine tuning? Recent trends in wage development, industrial relations, and 'work' as a sociological category.

    PubMed

    Hasse, Raimund; Leiulfsrud, Håkon

    2002-03-01

    The disorganization thesis concentrates upon globalization and market dynamics, which are believed to trigger the breakdown of any kind of institutional structures. The diversity of capitalism approach, by contrast, places much emphasis on the persistence of distinct paths of national economies. Referring to comparative data from the OECD and other sources it is shown that some variables indicate a robustness of national styles of capitalism. Others hint at resemblance: e.g. there is a striking synchronization of the overall and sectoral wage development, there is a significant decrease in industrial disputes, and the class composition tends to become more similar. A move beyond the disorganization thesis and diversity of capitalism approach is suggested. Special attention should be paid to the profound impacts of transnational institutions and knowledge carriers in the form of experts and guidelines.

  2. Collagen for bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana Marina; Gentile, Piergiorgio; Chiono, Valeria; Ciardelli, Gianluca

    2012-09-01

    In the last decades, increased knowledge about the organization, structure and properties of collagen (particularly concerning interactions between cells and collagen-based materials) has inspired scientists and engineers to design innovative collagen-based biomaterials and to develop novel tissue-engineering products. The design of resorbable collagen-based medical implants requires understanding the tissue/organ anatomy and biological function as well as the role of collagen's physicochemical properties and structure in tissue/organ regeneration. Bone is a complex tissue that plays a critical role in diverse metabolic processes mediated by calcium delivery as well as in hematopoiesis whilst maintaining skeleton strength. A wide variety of collagen-based scaffolds have been proposed for different tissue engineering applications. These scaffolds are designed to promote a biological response, such as cell interaction, and to work as artificial biomimetic extracellular matrices that guide tissue regeneration. This paper critically reviews the current understanding of the complex hierarchical structure and properties of native collagen molecules, and describes the scientific challenge of manufacturing collagen-based materials with suitable properties and shapes for specific biomedical applications, with special emphasis on bone tissue engineering. The analysis of the state of the art in the field reveals the presence of innovative techniques for scaffold and material manufacturing that are currently opening the way to the preparation of biomimetic substrates that modulate cell interaction for improved substitution, restoration, retention or enhancement of bone tissue function. PMID:22705634

  3. H-ras oncogene-transformed human bronchial epithelial cells (TBE-1) secrete a single metalloprotease capable of degrading basement membrane collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, I.E.; Wilhelm, S.M.; Eisen, A.Z.; Marmer, B.L.; Grant, G.A.; Seltzer, J.L.; Kronberger, A.; He, C.; Bauer, E.A.; Goldberg, G.I.

    1988-05-15

    H-ras transformed human bronchial epithelial cells (TBE-1) secrete a single major extracellular matrix metalloprotease which is not found in the normal parental cells. The enzyme is secreted in a latent form which can be activated to catalyze the cleavage of the basement membrane macromolecule type IV collagen. The substrates in their order of preference are: gelatin, type IV collagen, type V collagen, fibronectin, and type VII collagen; but the enzyme does not cleave the interstitial collagens or laminin. This protease is identical to gelatinase isolated from normal human skin explants, normal human skin fibroblasts, and SV40-transformed human lung fibroblasts. Based on this ability to initiate the degradation of type IV collagen in a pepsin-resistant portion of the molecule, it will be referred to as type IV collagenase. This enzyme is most likely the human analog of type IV collagenase detected in several rodent tumors. Type IV collagenase consists of three domains. Type IV collagenase represents the third member of a newly recognized gene family coding for secreted extracellular matrix metalloproteases, which includes interstitial fibroblast collagenase and stromelysin.

  4. Exploring links between juvenile offenders and social disorganization at a large map scale: a Bayesian spatial modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Jane; Quick, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    This paper adopts a Bayesian spatial modeling approach to investigate the distribution of young offender residences in York Region, Southern Ontario, Canada, at the census dissemination area level. Few geographic researches have analyzed offender (as opposed to offense) data at a large map scale (i.e., using a relatively small areal unit of analysis) to minimize aggregation effects. Providing context is the social disorganization theory, which hypothesizes that areas with economic deprivation, high population turnover, and high ethnic heterogeneity exhibit social disorganization and are expected to facilitate higher instances of young offenders. Non-spatial and spatial Poisson models indicate that spatial methods are superior to non-spatial models with respect to model fit and that index of ethnic heterogeneity, residential mobility (1 year moving rate), and percentage of residents receiving government transfer payments are, respectively, the most significant explanatory variables related to young offender location. These findings provide overwhelming support for social disorganization theory as it applies to offender location in York Region, Ontario. Targeting areas where prevalence of young offenders could or could not be explained by social disorganization through decomposing the estimated risk map are helpful for dealing with juvenile offenders in the region. Results prompt discussion into geographically targeted police services and young offender placement pertaining to risk of recidivism. We discuss possible reasons for differences and similarities between the previous findings (that analyzed offense data and/or were conducted at a smaller map scale) and our findings, limitations of our study, and practical outcomes of this research from a law enforcement perspective.

  5. Dopaminergic, Serotonergic, and Oxytonergic Candidate Genes Associated with Infant Attachment Security and Disorganization? In Search of Main and Interaction Effects

    PubMed Central

    Luijk, Maartje P. C. M.; Roisman, Glenn I.; Haltigan, John D.; Tiemeier, Henning; Booth-LaForce, Cathryn; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Belsky, Jay; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Jaddoe, Vincent W.V.; Hofman, Albert; Verhulst, Frank C.; Tharner, Anne; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.

    2011-01-01

    Background and methods In two birth cohort studies with genetic, sensitive parenting, and attachment data of more than 1,000 infants in total, we tested main and interaction effects of candidate genes involved in the dopamine, serotonin, and oxytocin systems (DRD4, DRD2, COMT, 5-HTT, OXTR) on attachment security and disorganization. Parenting was assessed using observational rating scales for parental sensitivity (Ainsworth, Bell, & Stayton, 1974), and infant attachment was assessed with the Strange Situation Procedure. Results We found no consistent additive genetic associations for attachment security and attachment disorganization. However, specific tests revealed evidence for a co-dominant risk model for COMT Val158Met, consistent across both samples. Children with the Val/Met genotype showed higher disorganization scores (combined effect size d = 0.22, CI = 0.10; 0.34, p < .001). Gene-by-environment interaction effects were not replicable across the two samples. Conclusions This unexpected finding might be explained by a broader range of plasticity in heterozygotes, which may increase susceptibility to environmental influences or to dysregulation of emotional arousal. This study is unique in combining the two largest attachment cohorts with molecular genetic and observed rearing environment data to date. PMID:21749372

  6. Human-initiated disaster, social disorganization and post-traumatic stress disorder above Nigeria's oil basins.

    PubMed

    Beiser, Morton; Wiwa, Owens; Adebajo, Sylvia

    2010-07-01

    Survivors of human-initiated disaster are at high risk for mental disorder, most notably post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Studies of PTSD have tended to focus on soldiers returning home after combat or on refugees living in resettlement countries under conditions of relative safety. However, most survivors of human-initiated disasters continue to live in or near the places where they initially experienced trauma. Insufficient attention has been paid to social disorganization in situations of continuing unrest and to its role in creating or stabilizing the symptoms of PTSD. The current study took place in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria, the scene of long-standing violence and human rights abuse that reached its apogee in 1995. The investigation, which took place in 2002, focused on two villages, one that was heavily exposed to the conflict (A, the affected village), the other relatively spared (NA, not affected). Probability samples of 45 adult residents from A and 55 from NA were interviewed with a schedule that contained the PTSD module from the WHO Diagnostic Interview Schedule. The schedule also contained a measure of exposure to the violence and abuses during the height of the conflict, as well as measures of structural and social capital that are components of community resilience. These included economic security, a sense of moral order, a sense of safety and perceived social support. The six month period prevalence of PTSD was 60 percent in A, and 14.5 percent in NA. Degree of exposure to stress as well as compromised sense of moral order, not feeling safe, and perceived lack of social support were independent predictors of PTSD. In places like the Niger Delta, where people do not physically escape from past trauma, sociocultural disintegration may interfere with communal functioning, thereby eroding community capacity to promote self-healing.

  7. Untangling the associations among distrust, race, and neighborhood social environment: a social disorganization perspective.

    PubMed

    Shoff, Carla; Yang, Tse-Chuan

    2012-05-01

    Over the past decade, interest in exploring how health care system distrust is associated with individual health outcomes and behaviors has grown substantially, and the racial difference in distrust has been well documented, with African Americans demonstrating higher distrust than whites. However, relatively little is known about whether the individual-level determinants of distrust differ by various dimensions of distrust, and even less is understood regarding whether the race-distrust association could be moderated by the neighborhood social environment. This study used a dual-dimensional distrust scale (values and competence distrust), and applied social disorganization theory to address these gaps. We combined the 2008 Philadelphia Health Management Corporation's household survey (N = 3746 adult respondents, 51% of which are of African American race) with neighborhood-level data (N = 45 neighborhoods) maintained by the 2000 U.S. Census and the Philadelphia Police Department. Using multilevel modeling, we found that first, after controlling for individual- and neighborhood-level covariates, African American residents have greater values distrust than whites, but no racial difference was found in competence distrust; second, competence distrust is more likely to be determined by personal health status and access to health care services than is values distrust; and third, ceteris paribus, the association between race and values distrust was weakened by the increasing level of neighborhood stability. These results not only indicate that different aspects of distrust may be determined via different mechanisms, but also suggest that establishing a stable neighborhood may ameliorate the level of distrust in the health care system among African Americans. As distrust has been identified as a barrier to medical research, the insight provided by this study can be applied to develop a health care system that is trusted, which will, in turn, improve population health.

  8. Untangling the associations among distrust, race, and neighborhood social environment: A social disorganization perspective

    PubMed Central

    Shoff, Carla; Yang, Tse-Chuan

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, interest in exploring how health care system distrust is associated with individual health outcomes and behaviors has grown substantially, and the racial difference in distrust has been well documented, with African Americans demonstrating higher distrust than whites. However, relatively little is known about whether the individual-level determinants of distrust differ by various dimensions of distrust, and even less is understood regarding whether the race-distrust association could be moderated by the neighborhood social environment. This study used a dual-dimensional distrust scale (values and competence distrust), and applied social disorganization theory to address these gaps. We combined the 2008 Philadelphia Health Management Corporation’s household survey (N=3,746 adult respondents, 51% of which are of African American race) with neighborhood-level data (N= 45 neighborhoods) maintained by the 2000 US Census and the Philadelphia Police Department. Using multilevel modeling, we found that first, after controlling for individual- and neighborhood-level covariates, African American residents have greater values distrust than whites, but no racial difference was found in competence distrust; second, competence distrust is more likely to be determined by personal health status and access to health care services than is values distrust; and third, ceteris paribus, the association between race and values distrust was weakened by the increasing level of neighborhood stability. These results not only indicate that different aspects of distrust may be determined via different mechanisms, but also suggest that establishing a stable neighborhood may ameliorate the level of distrust in the health care system among African Americans. As distrust has been identified as a barrier to medical research, the insight provided by this study can be applied to develop a health care system that is trusted, which will, in turn, improve population health. PMID

  9. Human-initiated disaster, social disorganization and post-traumatic stress disorder above Nigeria's oil basins.

    PubMed

    Beiser, Morton; Wiwa, Owens; Adebajo, Sylvia

    2010-07-01

    Survivors of human-initiated disaster are at high risk for mental disorder, most notably post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Studies of PTSD have tended to focus on soldiers returning home after combat or on refugees living in resettlement countries under conditions of relative safety. However, most survivors of human-initiated disasters continue to live in or near the places where they initially experienced trauma. Insufficient attention has been paid to social disorganization in situations of continuing unrest and to its role in creating or stabilizing the symptoms of PTSD. The current study took place in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria, the scene of long-standing violence and human rights abuse that reached its apogee in 1995. The investigation, which took place in 2002, focused on two villages, one that was heavily exposed to the conflict (A, the affected village), the other relatively spared (NA, not affected). Probability samples of 45 adult residents from A and 55 from NA were interviewed with a schedule that contained the PTSD module from the WHO Diagnostic Interview Schedule. The schedule also contained a measure of exposure to the violence and abuses during the height of the conflict, as well as measures of structural and social capital that are components of community resilience. These included economic security, a sense of moral order, a sense of safety and perceived social support. The six month period prevalence of PTSD was 60 percent in A, and 14.5 percent in NA. Degree of exposure to stress as well as compromised sense of moral order, not feeling safe, and perceived lack of social support were independent predictors of PTSD. In places like the Niger Delta, where people do not physically escape from past trauma, sociocultural disintegration may interfere with communal functioning, thereby eroding community capacity to promote self-healing. PMID:20471148

  10. Untangling the associations among distrust, race, and neighborhood social environment: a social disorganization perspective.

    PubMed

    Shoff, Carla; Yang, Tse-Chuan

    2012-05-01

    Over the past decade, interest in exploring how health care system distrust is associated with individual health outcomes and behaviors has grown substantially, and the racial difference in distrust has been well documented, with African Americans demonstrating higher distrust than whites. However, relatively little is known about whether the individual-level determinants of distrust differ by various dimensions of distrust, and even less is understood regarding whether the race-distrust association could be moderated by the neighborhood social environment. This study used a dual-dimensional distrust scale (values and competence distrust), and applied social disorganization theory to address these gaps. We combined the 2008 Philadelphia Health Management Corporation's household survey (N = 3746 adult respondents, 51% of which are of African American race) with neighborhood-level data (N = 45 neighborhoods) maintained by the 2000 U.S. Census and the Philadelphia Police Department. Using multilevel modeling, we found that first, after controlling for individual- and neighborhood-level covariates, African American residents have greater values distrust than whites, but no racial difference was found in competence distrust; second, competence distrust is more likely to be determined by personal health status and access to health care services than is values distrust; and third, ceteris paribus, the association between race and values distrust was weakened by the increasing level of neighborhood stability. These results not only indicate that different aspects of distrust may be determined via different mechanisms, but also suggest that establishing a stable neighborhood may ameliorate the level of distrust in the health care system among African Americans. As distrust has been identified as a barrier to medical research, the insight provided by this study can be applied to develop a health care system that is trusted, which will, in turn, improve population health

  11. Type I Collagen and Collagen Mimetics as Angiogenesis Promoting Superpolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Twardowski, T.; Fertala, A.; Orgel, J.P.R.O.; San Antonio, J.D.

    2008-07-18

    Angiogenesis, the development of blood vessels from the pre-existing vasculature, is a key component of embryogenesis and tissue regeneration. Angiogenesis also drives pathologies such as tumor growth and metastasis, and hemangioma development in newborns. On the other hand, promotion of angiogenesis is needed in tissues with vascular insufficiencies, and in bioengineering, to endow tissue substitutes with appropriate microvasculatures. Therefore, much research has focused on defining mechanisms of angiogenesis, and identifying pro- and anti-angiogenic molecules. Type I collagen, the most abundant protein in humans, potently stimulates angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Crucial to its angiogenic activity appears to be ligation and possibly clustering of endothelial cell (EC) surface {alpha}1{beta}1/{alpha}2{beta}1 integrin receptors by the GFPGER502-507 sequence of the collagen fibril. However, additional aspects of collagen structure and function that may modulate its angiogenic properties are discussed. Moreover, type I collagen and fibrin, another angiogenic polymer, share several structural features. These observations suggest strategies for creating 'angiogenic superpolymers', including: modifying type I collagen to influence its biological half-life, immunogenicity, and integrin binding capacity; genetically engineering fibrillar collagens to include additional integrin binding sites or angiogenic determinants, and remove unnecessary or deleterious sequences without compromising fibril integrity; and exploring the suitability of poly(ortho ester), PEG-lysine copolymer, tubulin, and cholesteric cuticle as collagen mimetics, and suggesting means of modifying them to display ideal angiogenic properties. The collagenous and collagen mimetic angiogenic superpolymers described here may someday prove useful for many applications in tissue engineering and human medicine.

  12. Lymphocytic and Collagenous Colitis.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Correa; Giardiello

    2000-06-01

    Patients with symptomatic collagenous-lymphocytic colitis should eliminate dietary secretagogues such as caffeine- or lactose-containing food from their diet. When possible, use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs should be discontinued. If steatorrhea is documented, a low-fat diet may be helpful. In the presence of bile salt malabsorption, binding resins such as cholestyramine might be useful. Nonspecific diarrheal agents such as loperamide hydrochloride, diphenoxylate hydrochloride and atropine, deodorized tincture of opium, or codeine might prove effective in some patients. Antibacterial agents such as bismuth subsalicylate (8 chewable 262-mg tablets daily) have been effective in symptom control. Metronidazole and erythromycin achieve response rates of 60%. Sulfasalazine, at the usual dose of 2 to 4 g daily, used in collagenous-lymphocytic colitis, demonstrated cessation of diarrhea in 1 to 2 weeks for 50% of patients. Other 5-aminosalicylic (5-ASA) compounds are preferred for patients with a history of sulfa allergy, and those who experience adverse reactions to sulfasalazine. Adrenocorticoid medication is reserved for patients whose conventional treatment with sulfasalazine or 5-ASA has failed. Resolution of diarrhea has been documented in 80% to 90% of patients within 1 week of treatment, however, in most patients, long-term therapy is required. Surgical management is reserved for those patients with disease refractory to medical therapy. Colectomy with ileostomy resulted in clinical and histologic resolution in small case series. If there is no abatement of symptoms, rule out other etiologies of diarrhea such as thyroid dysfunction, celiac disease, or bacterial overgrowth. PMID:11097741

  13. Influence of collagen gel on the orientation of epithelial cell polarity: follicle formation from isolated thyroid cells and from preformed monolayers

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The influence of collagen gels on the orientation of the polarity of epithelial thyroid cells in culture was studied under four different conditions. (a) Isolated cells cultured on the surface of a collagen gel formed a monolayer. The apical pole was in contact with the culture medium and the basal membrane was attached to the substratum. (b) Isolated cells embedded inside the gel organized within 8 into follicles. The basal pole was in contact with collagen and the apical pole was oriented towards the interior of the follicular lumen. (c) Cells were first organized into floating vesicles, structures in which the apical surface is in contact with the culture medium, and the vesicles were embedded inside the collagen gel. After 3 d, cell polarity was inverted, the apical pole being oriented towards the cavity encompassed by cells. Vesicles had been transformed into follicles. (d) Monolayers formed on collagen gels as in a were overlaid with a second layer of collagen, which was polymerized in contact with the apical cell surface. A disorganization of the continuous pavement occurred within 24 h; cells attached to the upper layer of collagen and reorganized into follicles in the collagen sandwich within 4-8 d. A similar process occurred when the monolayer was grown on plastic and overlaid with collagen, or grown on collagen and covered with small pieces of glass cover slips. No reorganization was observed between two glass surfaces. In conclusion, first, a basal pole was always formed in the area of contact between the cell membrane and an adhesive surface and, second, the interaction of a preformed apical pole with an adhesive surface was not compatible with the stability of this domain of the plasma membrane. The interaction of the cell membrane with extracellular components having adhesive properties appears to be a determinant factor in the orientation and stabilization of epithelial cell polarity. PMID:7298715

  14. Intelligent Virtual Station (IVS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Intelligent Virtual Station (IVS) is enabling the integration of design, training, and operations capabilities into an intelligent virtual station for the International Space Station (ISS). A viewgraph of the IVS Remote Server is presented.

  15. Collagen fibril formation during development

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischmajer, R.; Perlish, J.S.; Timpl, R.; Olsen, B.R.

    1987-05-01

    Studies with embryonic skin and bone suggested that the aminopropeptide (AP) and carboxylpropeptide (CP) of type I pro-callagen (pro-col) play a role in fibril formation. Chick leg metatarsal tendons were studied by electron microscopy. AP and CP of type I pro-col were purified from chick leg tendons; antibodies developed in rabbits and purity tested by radioimmunoassays. Antibodies were used for immunofluorescence microscopy (IFM) and immunoblotting (IB). The peritendineum, consisting of thin 20-30 nm fibrils, revealed the AP of type I and type III procol. In the tendon area, collagen fibrils were arranged within small compartments and were of uniform diameter at 10d, 14d and 18d. However, beyond 21d, there was confluency of the compartments and a wide range of fibril diameters. IFM revealed fine streaks of collagen, staining with the AP of type I throughout the tendon. The CP was mainly intracellular with only a small amount present in the extracellular space. IB revealed procollagen, pN-collagen (AP+collagen) and pC-collagen, (CP+collagen) at all stages of development. Ratios of pN/pC collagen, determined by spectrophotometric scanning of autoradiographs, correlated well with the distribution of fibril diameter. This study suggests the hypothesis that AP initiates fibrillogenesis while CP may regulate additional fibril growth.

  16. Ovarian Cancer Stage IV

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage IV Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1200x1335 View Download Large: 2400x2670 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage IV Description: Drawing of stage IV shows ...

  17. Degradation of basement membrane collagens by metalloproteases released by human, murine and amphibian tumours.

    PubMed

    Shields, S E; Ogilvie, D J; McKinnell, R G; Tarin, D

    1984-07-01

    In this investigation it has been found that naturally-occurring (i.e. indigenous, not transplanted) tumours of diverse organs in a spectrum of vertebrates from frogs to man can secrete enzymes which degrade basement membrane collagens (type IV and V). The enzymes are inhibited by chelating agents (EDTA) but not by other protease antagonists and are, therefore, specific metalloproteases. Individual tumours do not necessarily secrete collagenases active against all collagen types (I, IV and V) and release of these different enzymes does not, therefore, appear to be coordinated. These biochemical findings support those reported for serially transplanted tumour cell lines and provide a plausible mechanism for the destruction of basement membranes and stromal collagen fibres observed morphologically in tumour spread.

  18. Nonlinear microscopy of collagen fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strupler, M.; Pena, A.-M.; Hernest, M.; Tharaux, P.-L.; Fabre, A.; Marchal-Somme, J.; Crestani, B.; Débarre, D.; Martin, J.-L.; Beaurepaire, E.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2007-02-01

    We used intrinsic Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) by fibrillar collagen to visualize the three-dimensional architecture of collagen fibrosis at the micrometer scale using laser scanning nonlinear microscopy. We showed that SHG signals are highly specific to fibrillar collagen and provide a sensitive probe of the micrometer-scale structural organization of collagen in tissues. Moreover, recording simultaneously other nonlinear optical signals in a multimodal setup, we visualized the tissue morphology using Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence (2PEF) signals from endogenous chromophores such as NADH or elastin. We then compared different methods to determine accurate indexes of collagen fibrosis using nonlinear microscopy, given that most collagen fibrils are smaller than the microscope resolution and that second harmonic generation is a coherent process. In order to define a robust method to process our three-dimensional images, we either calculated the fraction of the images occupied by a significant SHG signal, or averaged SHG signal intensities. We showed that these scores provide an estimation of the extension of renal and pulmonary fibrosis in murine models, and that they clearly sort out the fibrotic mice.

  19. Analysis of human collagen sequences.

    PubMed

    Nassa, Manisha; Anand, Pracheta; Jain, Aditi; Chhabra, Aastha; Jaiswal, Astha; Malhotra, Umang; Rani, Vibha

    2012-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is fast emerging as important component mediating cell-cell interactions, along with its established role as a scaffold for cell support. Collagen, being the principal component of extracellular matrix, has been implicated in a number of pathological conditions. However, collagens are complex protein structures belonging to a large family consisting of 28 members in humans; hence, there exists a lack of in depth information about their structural features. Annotating and appreciating the functions of these proteins is possible with the help of the numerous biocomputational tools that are currently available. This study reports a comparative analysis and characterization of the alpha-1 chain of human collagen sequences. Physico-chemical, secondary structural, functional and phylogenetic classification was carried out, based on which, collagens 12, 14 and 20, which belong to the FACIT collagen family, have been identified as potential players in diseased conditions, owing to certain atypical properties such as very high aliphatic index, low percentage of glycine and proline residues and their proximity in evolutionary history. These collagen molecules might be important candidates to be investigated further for their role in skeletal disorders. PMID:22359431

  20. Human collagen produced in plants

    PubMed Central

    Shoseyov, Oded; Posen, Yehudit; Grynspan, Frida

    2014-01-01

    Consequential to its essential role as a mechanical support and affinity regulator in extracellular matrices, collagen constitutes a highly sought after scaffolding material for regeneration and healing applications. However, substantiated concerns have been raised with regard to quality and safety of animal tissue-extracted collagen, particularly in relation to its immunogenicity, risk of disease transmission and overall quality and consistency. In parallel, contamination with undesirable cellular factors can significantly impair its bioactivity, vis-a-vis its impact on cell recruitment, proliferation and differentiation. High-scale production of recombinant human collagen Type I (rhCOL1) in the tobacco plant provides a source of an homogenic, heterotrimeric, thermally stable “virgin” collagen which self assembles to fine homogenous fibrils displaying intact binding sites and has been applied to form numerous functional scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In addition, rhCOL1 can form liquid crystal structures, yielding a well-organized and mechanically strong membrane, two properties indispensable to extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicry. Overall, the shortcomings of animal- and cadaver-derived collagens arising from their source diversity and recycled nature are fully overcome in the plant setting, constituting a collagen source ideal for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. PMID:23941988

  1. Characterisations of collagen-silver-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciobanu, C. S.; Popa, C. L.; Petre, C. C.; Jiga, G.; Trusca, R.; Predoi, D.

    2016-05-01

    The XRD analysis were performed to confirm the formation of hydroxyapatite structure in collagen-silver-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites. The molecular interaction in collagen-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites was highlighted by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. The SEM showed a nanostructure of collagen-silverhydroxyapatite nanocomposites composed of nano needle-like particles in a veil with collagen texture. The presence of vibrational groups characteristics to the hydroxyapatite structure in collagen-silver-hydroxyapatite (AgHApColl) nanocomposites was investigated by FTIR.

  2. The interplay of birth weight, dopamine receptor D4 gene (DRD4), and early maternal care in the prediction of disorganized attachment at 36 months of age.

    PubMed

    Wazana, Ashley; Moss, Ellen; Jolicoeur-Martineau, Alexis; Graffi, Justin; Tsabari, Gal; Lecompte, Vanessa; Pascuzzo, Katherine; Babineau, Vanessa; Gordon-Green, Cathryn; Mileva, Viara; Atkinson, Leslie; Minde, Klaus; Bouvette-Turcot, André Anne; Sassi, Roberto; St-André, Martin; Carrey, Normand; Matthews, Stephen; Sokolowski, Marla; Lydon, John; Gaudreau, Helene; Steiner, Meir; Kennedy, James L; Fleming, Alison; Levitan, Robert; Meaney, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    Disorganized attachment is an important early risk factor for socioemotional problems throughout childhood and into adulthood. Prevailing models of the etiology of disorganized attachment emphasize the role of highly dysfunctional parenting, to the exclusion of complex models examining the interplay of child and parental factors. Decades of research have established that extreme child birth weight may have long-term effects on developmental processes. These effects are typically negative, but this is not always the case. Recent studies have also identified the dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) as a moderator of childrearing effects on the development of disorganized attachment. However, there are inconsistent findings concerning which variant of the polymorphism (seven-repeat long-form allele or non-seven-repeat short-form allele) is most likely to interact with caregiving in predicting disorganized versus organized attachment. In this study, we examined possible two- and three-way interactions and child DRD4 polymorphisms and birth weight and maternal caregiving at age 6 months in longitudinally predicting attachment disorganization at 36 months. Our sample is from the Maternal Adversity, Vulnerability and Neurodevelopment project, a sample of 650 mother-child dyads. Birth weight was cross-referenced with normative data to calculate birth weight percentile. Infant DRD4 was obtained with buccal swabs and categorized according to the presence of the putative allele seven repeat. Macroanalytic and microanalytic measures of maternal behavior were extracted from a videotaped session of 20 min of nonfeeding interaction followed by a 10-min divided attention maternal task at 6 months. Attachment was assessed at 36 months using the Strange Situation procedure, and categorized into disorganized attachment and others. The results indicated that a main effect for DRD4 and a two-way interaction of birth weight and 6-month maternal attention (frequency of maternal looking away

  3. Perineurial cells coexpress genes encoding interstitial collagens and basement membrane zone components

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Perineurial cell cultures were established from the sciatic nerves of adult Wistar rats. Highly enriched cultures were studied with respect to the production of extracellular matrix components under conditions free from the influence of Schwann cells, axons, or the extracellular matrix of peripheral nerves. Indirect immunofluorescence staining revealed the presence of collagen type IV epitopes, and electron microscopy demonstrated patches of basement membrane on the perineurial cell surfaces. Collagenous fibrils with a diameter of 15-20 nm were also observed in the intracellular space. SDS-PAGE of radiolabeled medium proteins showed a pattern of bands suggesting the synthesis and secretion of fibronectin, and type I and IV collagens. Northern hybridizations revealed characteristic polymorphic mRNA transcripts corresponding to fibronectin, laminin B2 chain, as well as to the alpha- chain subunits of type I, III, and IV collagens. Furthermore, in situ hybridizations suggested expression of these genes by cultured perineurial cells without apparent heterogeneity within the cell populations. In situ hybridizations of sciatic nerve tissue from 2-wk- old rats also suggested that perineurial cells express alpha 1(I) and alpha 2(IV) collagen, as well as laminin B2 chain genes in vivo. This profile of matrix gene expression is different from that of Schwann cells, which do not synthesize fibronectin, or that of fibroblastic cells, which do not form a cell surface basement membrane. The capability of perineurial cells to express genes for the basement membrane zone and for interstitial collagens further adds to our understanding of the functional role of perineurial cells in developing and healing peripheral nerve, as well as in certain neoplastic lesions of neural origin, such as von Recklinghausen's neurofibromas. PMID:2921281

  4. Cathepsin B Regulates Collagen Expression by Fibroblasts via Prolonging TLR2/NF-κB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue; Ni, Junjun; Meng, Jie; Yu, Weixian; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblasts are essential for tissue repair due to producing collagens, and lysosomal proteinase cathepsin B (CatB) is involved in promoting chronic inflammation. We herein report that CatB regulates the expression of collagens III and IV by fibroblasts in response to a TLR2 agonist, lipopolysaccharide from Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g. LPS). In cultured human BJ fibroblasts, mRNA expression of CatB was significantly increased, while that of collagens III and IV was significantly decreased at 24 h after challenge with P.g. LPS (1 μg/mL). The P.g. LPS-decreased collagen expression was completely inhibited by CA-074Me, the specific inhibitor of CatB. Surprisingly, expression of collagens III and IV was significantly increased in the primary fibroblasts from CatB-deficient mice after challenge with P.g. LPS. The increase of CatB was accompanied with an increase of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and a decrease of IκBα. Furthermore, the P.g. LPS-increased 8-OHdG and decreased IκBα were restored by CA-074Me. Moreover, 87% of CatB and 86% of 8-OHdG were colocalized with gingival fibroblasts of chronic periodontitis patients. The findings indicate the critical role of CatB in regulating the expression of collagens III and IV by fibroblasts via prolonging TLR2/NF-κB activation and oxidative stress. CatB-specific inhibitors may therefore improve chronic inflammation-delayed tissue repair. PMID:27648120

  5. Cathepsin B Regulates Collagen Expression by Fibroblasts via Prolonging TLR2/NF-κB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue; Ni, Junjun; Meng, Jie; Yu, Weixian; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblasts are essential for tissue repair due to producing collagens, and lysosomal proteinase cathepsin B (CatB) is involved in promoting chronic inflammation. We herein report that CatB regulates the expression of collagens III and IV by fibroblasts in response to a TLR2 agonist, lipopolysaccharide from Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g. LPS). In cultured human BJ fibroblasts, mRNA expression of CatB was significantly increased, while that of collagens III and IV was significantly decreased at 24 h after challenge with P.g. LPS (1 μg/mL). The P.g. LPS-decreased collagen expression was completely inhibited by CA-074Me, the specific inhibitor of CatB. Surprisingly, expression of collagens III and IV was significantly increased in the primary fibroblasts from CatB-deficient mice after challenge with P.g. LPS. The increase of CatB was accompanied with an increase of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and a decrease of IκBα. Furthermore, the P.g. LPS-increased 8-OHdG and decreased IκBα were restored by CA-074Me. Moreover, 87% of CatB and 86% of 8-OHdG were colocalized with gingival fibroblasts of chronic periodontitis patients. The findings indicate the critical role of CatB in regulating the expression of collagens III and IV by fibroblasts via prolonging TLR2/NF-κB activation and oxidative stress. CatB-specific inhibitors may therefore improve chronic inflammation-delayed tissue repair.

  6. Cathepsin B Regulates Collagen Expression by Fibroblasts via Prolonging TLR2/NF-κB Activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue; Wu, Zhou; Ni, Junjun; Liu, Yicong; Meng, Jie; Yu, Weixian; Nakanishi, Hiroshi; Zhou, Yanmin

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblasts are essential for tissue repair due to producing collagens, and lysosomal proteinase cathepsin B (CatB) is involved in promoting chronic inflammation. We herein report that CatB regulates the expression of collagens III and IV by fibroblasts in response to a TLR2 agonist, lipopolysaccharide from Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g. LPS). In cultured human BJ fibroblasts, mRNA expression of CatB was significantly increased, while that of collagens III and IV was significantly decreased at 24 h after challenge with P.g. LPS (1 μg/mL). The P.g. LPS-decreased collagen expression was completely inhibited by CA-074Me, the specific inhibitor of CatB. Surprisingly, expression of collagens III and IV was significantly increased in the primary fibroblasts from CatB-deficient mice after challenge with P.g. LPS. The increase of CatB was accompanied with an increase of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and a decrease of IκBα. Furthermore, the P.g. LPS-increased 8-OHdG and decreased IκBα were restored by CA-074Me. Moreover, 87% of CatB and 86% of 8-OHdG were colocalized with gingival fibroblasts of chronic periodontitis patients. The findings indicate the critical role of CatB in regulating the expression of collagens III and IV by fibroblasts via prolonging TLR2/NF-κB activation and oxidative stress. CatB-specific inhibitors may therefore improve chronic inflammation-delayed tissue repair. PMID:27648120

  7. Plasma membrane overgrowth causes fibrotic collagen accumulation and immune activation in Drosophila adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Yiran; Wan, Ming; Liu, Min; Ke, Hongmei; Ma, Shuangchun; Liu, Lu-Ping; Ni, Jian-Quan; Carlos Pastor-Pareja, José

    2015-01-01

    Many chronic diseases are associated with fibrotic deposition of Collagen and other matrix proteins. Little is known about the factors that determine preferential onset of fibrosis in particular tissues. Here we show that plasma membrane (PM) overgrowth causes pericellular Collagen accumulation in Drosophila adipocytes. We found that loss of Dynamin and other endocytic components causes pericellular trapping of outgoing Collagen IV due to dramatic cortex expansion when endocytic removal of PM is prevented. Deposits also form in the absence of negative Toll immune regulator Cactus, excess PM being caused in this case by increased secretion. Finally, we show that trimeric Collagen accumulation, downstream of Toll or endocytic defects, activates a tissue damage response. Our work indicates that traffic imbalances and PM topology may contribute to fibrosis. It also places fibrotic deposits both downstream and upstream of immune signaling, consistent with the chronic character of fibrotic diseases. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07187.001 PMID:26090908

  8. A biomaterial composed of collagen and solubilized elastin enhances angiogenesis and elastic fiber formation without calcification.

    PubMed

    Daamen, Willeke F; Nillesen, Suzan T M; Wismans, Ronnie G; Reinhardt, Dieter P; Hafmans, Theo; Veerkamp, Jacques H; van Kuppevelt, Toin H

    2008-03-01

    Elastin is the prime protein in elastic tissues that contributes to elasticity of, for example, lung, aorta, and skin. Upon injury, elastic fibers are not readily replaced, which hampers tissue regeneration. Incorporation of solubilized elastin (hydrolyzed insoluble elastin fibers or elastin peptides) in biomaterials may improve regeneration, because solubilized elastin is able to promote proliferation as well as elastin synthesis. Porous biomaterials composed of highly purified collagen without and without elastin fibers or solubilized elastin were prepared by freezing and lyophilization. Solubilized elastin formed spherical structures that were incorporated in the collagenous part of the scaffolds and that persisted after chemical crosslinking of the scaffolds. Crosslinked scaffolds were subcutaneously implanted in young Sprague Dawley rats. Collagen-solubilized elastin and collagen scaffolds showed no calcification in this sensitive calcification model, in contrast to scaffolds containing elastin fibers. Collagen-solubilized elastin scaffolds also induced angiogenesis, as revealed by type IV collagen staining, and promoted elastic fiber synthesis, as shown with antibodies against rat elastin and fibrillin-1. It is concluded that scaffolds produced from collagen and solubilized elastin present a non-calcifying biomaterial with a capacity for soft-tissue regeneration, especially in relation to elastic fiber synthesis.

  9. Nanomechanics of Type I Collagen.

    PubMed

    Varma, Sameer; Orgel, Joseph P R O; Schieber, Jay D

    2016-07-12

    Type I collagen is the predominant collagen in mature tendons and ligaments, where it gives them their load-bearing mechanical properties. Fibrils of type I collagen are formed by the packing of polypeptide triple helices. Higher-order structures like fibril bundles and fibers are assembled from fibrils in the presence of other collagenous molecules and noncollagenous molecules. Curiously, however, experiments show that fibrils/fibril bundles are less resistant to axial stress compared to their constituent triple helices-the Young's moduli of fibrils/fibril bundles are an order-of-magnitude smaller than the Young's moduli of triple helices. Given the sensitivity of the Young's moduli of triple helices to solvation environment, a plausible explanation is that the packing of triple helices into fibrils perhaps reduces the Young's modulus of an individual triple helix, which results in fibrils having smaller Young's moduli. We find, however, from molecular dynamics and accelerated conformational sampling simulations that the Young's modulus of the buried core of the fibril is of the same order as that of a triple helix in aqueous phase. These simulations, therefore, suggest that the lower Young's moduli of fibrils/fibril bundles cannot be attributed to the specific packing of triple helices in the fibril core. It is not the fibril core that yields initially to axial stress. Rather, it must be the portion of the fibril exposed to the solvent and/or the fibril-fibril interface that bears the initial strain. Overall, this work provides estimates of Young's moduli and persistence lengths at two levels of collagen's structural assembly, which are necessary to quantitatively investigate the response of various biological factors on collagen mechanics, including congenital mutations, posttranslational modifications and ligand binding, and also engineer new collagen-based materials. PMID:27410733

  10. Surface modification of PVDF using non-mammalian sources of collagen for enhancement of endothelial cell functionality.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun Kit; Xiong, Gordon Minru; Luo, Baiwen; Choo, Chee Chong; Yuan, Shaojun; Tan, Nguan Soon; Choong, Cleo

    2016-03-01

    Although polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) is non-toxic and stable in vivo, its hydrophobic surface has limited its bio-applications due to poor cell-material interaction and thrombus formation when used in blood contacting devices. In this study, surface modification of PVDF using naturally derived non-mammalian collagen was accomplished via direct surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerisation (SI-ATRP) to enhance its cytocompatibility and hemocompatibility. Results showed that Type I collagen was successfully extracted from fish scales and bullfrog skin. The covalent immobilisation of fish scale-derived collagen (FSCOL) and bullfrog skin-derived collagen (BFCOL) onto the PVDF surface improves the attachment and proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Furthermore, both FSCOL and BFCOL had comparable anti-thrombogenic profiles to that of commercially available bovine collagen (BVCOL). Also, cell surface expression of the leukocyte adhesion molecule was lower on HUVECs cultured on non-mammalian collagen surfaces than on BVCOL, which is an indication of lower pro-inflammatory response. Overall, results from this study demonstrated that non-mammalian sources of collagen could be used to confer bioactivity to PVDF, with comparable cell-material interactions and hemocompatibility to BVCOL. Additionally, higher expression levels of Type IV collagen in HUVECs cultured on FSCOL and BFCOL were observed as compared to BVCOL, which is an indication that the non-mammalian sources of collagen led to a better pro-angiogenic properties, thus making them suitable for blood contacting applications.

  11. Enhanced stabilization of collagen by furfural.

    PubMed

    Lakra, Rachita; Kiran, Manikantan Syamala; Usha, Ramamoorthy; Mohan, Ranganathan; Sundaresan, Raja; Korrapati, Purna Sai

    2014-04-01

    Furfural (2-furancarboxaldehyde), a product derived from plant pentosans, has been investigated for its interaction with collagen. Introduction of furfural during fibril formation enhanced the thermal and mechanical stability of collagen. Collagen films treated with furfural exhibited higher denaturation temperature (Td) (p<0.04) and showed a 3-fold increase in Young's modulus (p<0.04) at higher concentration. Furfural and furfural treated collagen films did not have any cytotoxic effect. Rheological characterization showed an increase in shear stress and shear viscosity with increasing shear rate for treated collagen. Circular dichroism (CD) studies indicated that the furfural did not have any impact on triple helical structure of collagen. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of furfural treated collagen exhibited small sized porous structure in comparison with untreated collagen. Thus this study provides an alternate ecologically safe crosslinking agent for improving the stability of collagen for biomedical and industrial applications.

  12. Energy levels and lifetimes of Nd IV, Pm IV, Sm IV, and Eu IV

    SciTech Connect

    Dzuba, V. A.; Safronova, U. I.; Johnson, W. R.

    2003-09-01

    To address the shortage of experimental data for electron spectra of triply ionized rare-earth elements we have calculated energy levels and lifetimes of 4f{sup n+1} and 4f{sup n}5d configurations of Nd IV (n=2), Pm IV (n=3), Sm IV (n=4), and Eu IV (n=5) using Hartree-Fock and configuration-interaction methods. To control the accuracy of our calculations we also performed similar calculations for Pr III, Nd III, and Sm III, for which experimental data are available. The results are important, in particular, for physics of magnetic garnets.

  13. Excessive collagen turnover products are released during colorectal cancer progression and elevated in serum from metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kehlet, S N; Sanz-Pamplona, R; Brix, S; Leeming, D J; Karsdal, M A; Moreno, V

    2016-01-01

    During cancer progression, the homeostasis of the extracellular matrix becomes imbalanced with an excessive collagen remodeling by matrix metalloproteinases. As a consequence, small protein fragments of degraded collagens are released into the circulation. We have investigated the potential of protein fragments of collagen type I, III and IV as novel biomarkers for colorectal cancer. Specific fragments of degraded type I, III and IV collagen (C1M, C3M, C4M) and type III collagen formation (Pro-C3) were assessed in serum from colorectal cancer patients, subjects with adenomas and matched healthy controls using well-characterized and validated ELISAs. Serum levels of the biomarkers were significantly elevated in colorectal cancer patients compared to subjects with adenomas (C1M, Pro-C3, C3M) and controls (C1M, Pro-C3). When patients were stratified according to their tumour stage, all four biomarkers were able to differentiate stage IV metastatic patients from all other stages. Combination of all markers with age and gender in a logistic regression model discriminated between metastatic and non-metastatic patients with an AUROC of 0.80. The data suggest that the levels of these collagen remodeling biomarkers may be a measure of tumour activity and invasiveness and may provide new clinical tools for monitoring of patients with advanced stage colorectal cancer. PMID:27465284

  14. Excessive collagen turnover products are released during colorectal cancer progression and elevated in serum from metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Kehlet, S. N.; Sanz-Pamplona, R.; Brix, S.; Leeming, D. J.; Karsdal, M. A.; Moreno, V.

    2016-01-01

    During cancer progression, the homeostasis of the extracellular matrix becomes imbalanced with an excessive collagen remodeling by matrix metalloproteinases. As a consequence, small protein fragments of degraded collagens are released into the circulation. We have investigated the potential of protein fragments of collagen type I, III and IV as novel biomarkers for colorectal cancer. Specific fragments of degraded type I, III and IV collagen (C1M, C3M, C4M) and type III collagen formation (Pro-C3) were assessed in serum from colorectal cancer patients, subjects with adenomas and matched healthy controls using well-characterized and validated ELISAs. Serum levels of the biomarkers were significantly elevated in colorectal cancer patients compared to subjects with adenomas (C1M, Pro-C3, C3M) and controls (C1M, Pro-C3). When patients were stratified according to their tumour stage, all four biomarkers were able to differentiate stage IV metastatic patients from all other stages. Combination of all markers with age and gender in a logistic regression model discriminated between metastatic and non-metastatic patients with an AUROC of 0.80. The data suggest that the levels of these collagen remodeling biomarkers may be a measure of tumour activity and invasiveness and may provide new clinical tools for monitoring of patients with advanced stage colorectal cancer. PMID:27465284

  15. Influence of saline and pH on collagen type I fibrillogenesis in vitro: fibril polymorphism and colloidal gold labelling.

    PubMed

    Harris, J Robin; Reiber, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    We have produced different collagen type I fibrils by in vitro fibrillogenesis of acetic acid-soluble collagen within the pH range 2.5-9.0, in the presence and absence of 150 mM NaCl. The varying relatively stable molecular assemblies and polymorphic fibrillar end-products produced after 24 h incubation have been assessed and compared by the TEM study of specimens negatively stained with uranyl acetate. In the presence of 150 mM NaCl, the assembly of collagen at low pH (2.5) leads to the formation of initial molecular aggregates that progressively link together at slightly higher pH (5.0) to form sub-fibrils and spindle-shaped D-banded bundles of sub-fibrils. At pH 6.0 these D-banded bundles aggregate into larger spindle-shaped fibrils with lateral misalignment of the D-banding across the bundle. However, at pH 7.0 and 8.0, in the presence of 150 mM NaCl, the characteristic parallel-sided mature D-banded collagen type I fibres are formed. At pH 9.0 more loosely formed parallel-sided D-banded collagen fibrils are present, within which the spindle-shaped sub-fibrils can be defined by negative staining more convincingly than at pH 7-8. In the presence of 50 mM buffer at pH 2.5, but absence of 150 mM NaCl, collagen type I forms disorganized periodic initial molecular aggregates, which have a tendency to link together to form sub-fibrils. Flexuous collagen type I sub-fibrils predominate at pH 5.0, alongside large spindle-shaped fibrils that possess a regular transverse approximately 10 nm periodicity, with an oblique approximately 67 nm periodicity, significantly different to the D-banding periodicity. At pH 7.0 and pH 8 in the absence of saline loosely-formed flexuous and spindle-shaped fibres co-exist, with underlying sub-fibrils visible, but at pH 9.0 only disorganized flexuous fibrillar aggregates are present. Colloidal gold labelling of the characteristic D-banded collagen type I fibrils with 5 nm and 2 nm chemically reactive gold particles reveals a periodic

  16. Hostile-Helpless state of mind as further evidence of adult disorganized states of mind in neglecting families.

    PubMed

    Milot, Tristan; Lorent, Andra; St-Laurent, Diane; Bernier, Annie; Tarabulsy, George; Lemelin, Jean-Pascal; Ethier, Louise S

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to assess disorganized states of mind in a sample of neglecting and at-risk of neglecting mothers using the recently developed Hostile-Helpless (HH) coding system (Lyons-Ruth et al., 2006) for the Adult Attachment Interview (Main & Goldwyn, 1998). The relation between HH states of mind and mothers' childhood traumas was also examined. Participants were 70 neglecting mothers and at-risk of neglecting mothers. Childhood traumas were assessed using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. HH states of mind were coded from Adult Attachment Interview transcripts by two reliable coders. Results revealed a high prevalence of disorganized states of mind in this sample. Forty-five mothers were classified HH, representing 64% of the entire sample. Most mothers reported at least one form of childhood trauma, with a mean of 2.9 different forms of trauma. Mothers classified HH reported having been emotionally abused, sexually abused and physically neglected more frequently than non-HH mothers. There was no difference between neglecting and at-risk of neglect mothers on HH states of mind and childhood experiences of trauma. These findings are in line with theorization on maltreating mothers' psychological background and they provide further empirical support to the validation of the HH classification system with at-risk populations.

  17. Prior participation in the strange situation and overstress jointly facilitate disorganized behaviours: implications for theory, research and practice.

    PubMed

    Granqvist, Pehr; Hesse, Erik; Fransson, Mari; Main, Mary; Hagekull, Berit; Bohlin, Gunilla

    2016-01-01

    We seek to understand why a relatively high percentage (39%; vs the meta-analytic average, 15-18%) of disorganized/disoriented (D) classifications has accrued in the low-risk Uppsala Longitudinal Study (ULS) study, using experienced D coders. Prior research indicates that D behaviours do not always indicate attachment disorganization stemming from a history of frightening caregiving. We examined the role of two other presumed factors: participation in a previous strange situation and overstress. Our findings indicate that both factors were highly prevalent in the ULS sample and that they jointly predicted higher rates of D. First, participation in a previous strange situation was associated with significantly higher distress displays during the second visit than occurred among previously untested children, suggesting that prior participation in the strange situation had a sensitizing effect on child distress during the second visit. Second, unless separations were cut short in lieu of high distress during the second visit, re-tested children were disproportionately likely (ca 60%) to be classified D. We argue that these findings have important implications for theory, research, and practice. In particular, we conclude that practitioners must refrain from misattributing the appearance of any D behaviors observed to a history of maltreatment. PMID:26982875

  18. On the Origins of Disorganized Attachment and Internal Working Models: Paper II. An Empirical Microanalysis of 4-Month Mother-Infant Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Beebe, Beatrice; Lachmann, Frank; Markese, Sara; Buck, Karen A.; Bahrick, Lorraine E.; Chen, Henian; Cohen, Patricia; Andrews, Howard; Feldstein, Stanley; Jaffe, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    A microanalysis of 4-month mother-infant face-to-face communication predicted 12-month infant disorganized (vs. secure) attachment outcomes in an urban community sample. We documented a dyadic systems view of the roles of both partners, the roles of both self- and interactive contingency, and the importance of attention, orientation and touch, and as well as facial and vocal affect, in the co-construction of attachment disorganization. The analysis of different communication modalities identified striking intrapersonal and interpersonal intermodal discordance or conflict, in the context of intensely distressed infants, as the central feature of future disorganized dyads at 4 months. Lowered maternal contingent coordination, and failures of maternal affective correspondence, constituted maternal emotional withdrawal from distressed infants. This maternal withdrawal compromises infant interactive agency and emotional coherence. We characterize of the nature of emerging internal working models of future disorganized infants as follows: Future disorganized infants represent states of not being sensed and known by their mothers, particularly in moments of distress; they represent confusion about both their own and their mothers’ basic emotional organization, and about their mothers’ response to their distress. This internal working model sets a trajectory in development which may disturb the fundamental integration of the person. The remarkable specificity of our findings has the potential to lead to more finely-focused clinical interventions. PMID:23066334

  19. Collagen shield delivery of trifluorothymidine.

    PubMed

    Gussler, J R; Ashton, P; VanMeter, W S; Smith, T J

    1990-11-01

    Corneal and aqueous levels of topically applied trifluorothymidine (F3T) were compared with and without the collagen shield in normal and damaged rabbit eyes. Shields were presoaked in 1% F3T for 15 minutes prior to application. Rabbits received either a presoaked shield, 1% F3T drops every two hours, or both. Corneal and aqueous levels of F3T were measured at 30 minutes, two, four, and eight hours. If 5 mm epithelial defects were created, the collagen shield and topical F3T drops produced significantly higher levels of F3T than drops alone at all periods tested (P less than .05). A presoaked shield alone produced greater levels of F3T than drops alone at 30 minutes and two hours (P less than .05). Collagen shields did not enhance F3T levels in eyes with intact epithelium. Implications for treatment of herpetic keratouveitis are discussed.

  20. Differential expression of collagen types I and III in consequential and primary fibrosis in irradiated mouse colon

    SciTech Connect

    Followill, D.S.; Travis, E.L.

    1995-12-01

    These studies were undertaken to understand further the pathogenesis of consequential and primary fibrosis in mouse colon after irradiation. The distal 2.5 cm of colon of C3Hf/Kam mice was irradiated with either a single dose of 27 Gy or a split dose of 2 x 14.75 Gy separated by 10 days to induce a consequential or primary fibrotic lesion, respectively. The amount of total collagen in the two lesions was quantified by hydroxyproline, and tensile strength, an assay of tissue rigidity, was measured as a function of dose and time after irradiation. The relative distribution of collagen types I, III and IV in the colon was visualized by immunohistochemistry. Collagen types I, III and IV were quantified by immunoblot techniques, and in situ hybridization was used to identify and score the cells producing procollagen mRNA types I and III as a function of time after irradiation. The hydroxyproline and tensile strength measurements demonstrated that both lesions contained significantly increased amounts of collagen compared to controls. However, the ulcerated lesion of consequential fibrosis contained three times as much collagen and required a three- to fourfold increase in the peak force to rupture the colon as did the non-ulcerative lesion of primary fibrosis. The fibrosis accompanying the consequential lesion contained elevated levels of both collagen types I and III, but primary fibrosis contained only elevated levels of type I collagen compared to controls. The in situ hybridization studies showed cells producing increased amounts of procollagen mRNA 8 and 25 weeks before the elevated levels of collagen were detected for consequential and primary fibrosis, respectively. The cells producing the excess collagen mRNA were identified as fibroblasts. No distinction between the two lesions could be made based on the cell types producing the collagen. 48 refs., 7 figs.

  1. Using PLATO IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meller, David V.

    This beginning reference manual describes PLATO IV hardware for prospective users and provides an introduction to PLATO for new authors. The PLATO terminal is described in detail in Chapter 1. Chapter 2 provides a block diagram of the PLATO IV system. Procedures for getting on line are described in Chapter 3, and Chapter 4 provides references to…

  2. Collagen VI related muscle disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lampe, A; Bushby, K

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding collagen VI (COL6A1, COL6A2, and COL6A3) cause Bethlem myopathy (BM) and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), two conditions which were previously believed to be completely separate entities. BM is a relatively mild dominantly inherited disorder characterised by proximal weakness and distal joint contractures. UCMD was originally described as an autosomal recessive condition causing severe muscle weakness with proximal joint contractures and distal hyperlaxity. Here we review the clinical phenotypes of BM and UCMD and their diagnosis and management, and provide an overview of the current knowledge of the pathogenesis of collagen VI related disorders. PMID:16141002

  3. The evolution of fibrillar collagens: a sea-pen collagen shares common features with vertebrate type V collagen.

    PubMed

    Tillet, E; Franc, J M; Franc, S; Garrone, R

    1996-02-01

    The extracellular matrix of marine primitive invertebrates (sponges, polyps and jellyfishes) contains collagen fibrils with narrow diameters. From various data, it has been hypothesized that these primitive collagens could represent ancestral forms of the vertebrate minor collagens, i.e., types V or XI. Recently we have isolated a primitive collagen from the soft tissues of the sea-pen Veretillum cynomorium. This report examines whether the sea-pen collagen shares some features with vertebrate type V collagen. Rotary shadowed images of acid-soluble collagen molecules extracted from beta-APN treated animals, positive staining of segment-long-spacing crystallites precipitated from pepsinized collagen, Western blots of the pepsinized alpha1 and alpha2 chains with antibodies to vertebrate types I, III and V collagens, and in situ gold immunolabeling of ECM collagen fibrils were examined. Our results showed that the tissue form of the sea-pen collagen is a 340-nm threadlike molecule, which is close to the vertebrate type V collagen with its voluminous terminal globular domain, the distribution of most of its polar amino-acid residues, and its antigenic properties.

  4. The evolution of fibrillar collagens: a sea-pen collagen shares common features with vertebrate type V collagen.

    PubMed

    Tillet, E; Franc, J M; Franc, S; Garrone, R

    1996-02-01

    The extracellular matrix of marine primitive invertebrates (sponges, polyps and jellyfishes) contains collagen fibrils with narrow diameters. From various data, it has been hypothesized that these primitive collagens could represent ancestral forms of the vertebrate minor collagens, i.e., types V or XI. Recently we have isolated a primitive collagen from the soft tissues of the sea-pen Veretillum cynomorium. This report examines whether the sea-pen collagen shares some features with vertebrate type V collagen. Rotary shadowed images of acid-soluble collagen molecules extracted from beta-APN treated animals, positive staining of segment-long-spacing crystallites precipitated from pepsinized collagen, Western blots of the pepsinized alpha1 and alpha2 chains with antibodies to vertebrate types I, III and V collagens, and in situ gold immunolabeling of ECM collagen fibrils were examined. Our results showed that the tissue form of the sea-pen collagen is a 340-nm threadlike molecule, which is close to the vertebrate type V collagen with its voluminous terminal globular domain, the distribution of most of its polar amino-acid residues, and its antigenic properties. PMID:8653581

  5. Biology, chemistry and pathology of collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischmajer, R.; Olsen, B.R.; Kuhn, K.

    1985-01-01

    This book consists of five parts and a section of poster papers. Some of the articles are: Structure of the Type II Collagen Gene; Structural and Functional Analysis of the Genes for ..cap alpha..2(1) and ..cap alpha..1(III) collagens; Structure and Expression of the Collagen Genes of C. Elegans; Molecular Basis of Clinical Heterogeneity in the Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome; and Normal and Mutant Human Collagen Genes.

  6. Exon/intron structure of the human alpha 3(IV) gene encompassing the Goodpasture antigen (alpha 3(IV)NC1). Identification of a potentially antigenic region at the triple helix/NC1 domain junction.

    PubMed

    Quinones, S; Bernal, D; García-Sogo, M; Elena, S F; Saus, J

    1992-10-01

    The Goodpasture antigen has been identified as the non-collagenous (NC1) domain of alpha 3(IV), a novel collagen IV chain (Saus, J., Wieslander, J., Langeveld, J., Quinones, S., and Hudson, B.G. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 13374-13380). In the present study, the exon/intron structure and sequence for 285 amino acids of human alpha 3(IV), comprising 53 amino acids of the triple-helical domain and the complete NC1 domain (232 amino acids), were determined. Based on the comparison of the amino acid sequences of the alpha 1(IV), alpha 2(IV), alpha 3(IV), and alpha 5(IV) NC1 domains, a phylogenetic tree was constructed which indicates that alpha 2(IV) was the first chain to evolve, followed by alpha 3(IV), and then by alpha 1(IV) and alpha 5(IV). The exon/intron structure of these domains is consistent with this evolution model. In addition, it appears that alpha 3(IV) changed most after diverging from the parental gene. Analysis of its primary structure reveals that, at the junction between the triple-helical and NC1 domains, there exists a previously unrecognized, highly hydrophilic region (GLKGKRGDSGSPATWTTR) which is unique to the human alpha 3(IV) chain, containing a cell adhesion motif (RGD) as an integral part of a sequence (KRGDSGSP) conforming to a number of protein kinase recognition sites. Based on primary structure data, we outline new aspects to be explored concerning the molecular basis of collagen IV function and Goodpasture syndrome.

  7. Inhibition of collagen-induced platelet aggregation by antibodies to distinct types of collagens.

    PubMed Central

    Balleisen, L; Nowack, H; Gay, S; Timpl, R

    1979-01-01

    Aggregation of platelets by fibrils formed from collagens type I, II and III could be inhibited by coating the fibrils with anti-collagen antibodies or Fab fragments. Similar results were obtained in a clot-retraction assay. Inhibition was achieved with stoichiometric amounts of antibodies and was specific for each type of collagen. Aggregation caused by a mixture of type-I and -III collagens could only be inhibited by a mixture of antibodies against both collagens. The data show that each interstitial collagen is capable of interacting with platelets and do not support the concept of an outstanding activity of type-III collagen. Images PLATE 1 PMID:395952

  8. Collagen binding to OSCAR: the odd couple.

    PubMed

    An, Bo; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    In this issue of Blood, Zhou et al reported the high-resolution structure of the collagen-activated osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) bound to a collagen model peptide. Together with binding studies, the results confirm a novel recognition mechanism for collagen by immunoglobulin-like motifs. PMID:26847065

  9. Exposure to Mimivirus Collagen Promotes Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nikunj; Hülsmeier, Andreas J.; Hochhold, Nina; Neidhart, Michel; Gay, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Collagens, the most abundant proteins in animals, also occur in some recently described nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses such as Mimiviridae, which replicate in amoebae. To clarify the impact of viral collagens on the immune response of animals exposed to Mimiviridae, we have investigated the localization of collagens in Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus particles and the response of mice to immunization with mimivirus particles. Using protein biotinylation, we have first shown that viral collagen encoded by open reading frame L71 is present at the surface of mimivirus particles. Exposure to mimivirus collagens elicited the production of anti-collagen antibodies in DBA/1 mice immunized intradermally with mimivirus protein extracts. This antibody response also targeted mouse collagen type II and was accompanied by T-cell reactivity to collagen and joint inflammation, as observed in collagen-induced arthritis following immunization of mice with bovine collagen type II. The broad distribution of nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses in the environment suggests that humans are constantly exposed to such large virus particles. A survey of blood sera from healthy human subjects and from rheumatoid arthritis patients indeed demonstrated that 30% of healthy-subject and 36% of rheumatoid arthritis sera recognized the major mimivirus capsid protein L425. Moreover, whereas 6% of healthy-subject sera recognized the mimivirus collagen protein L71, 22% of rheumatoid arthritis sera were positive for mimivirus L71. Accordingly, our study shows that environmental exposure to mimivirus represents a risk factor in triggering autoimmunity to collagens. PMID:24173233

  10. Manipulation and assembly of small objects in liquid crystals by dynamical disorganizing effect of push-pull-azobenzene-dye.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Seiji; Ohta, Kazuhiro; Oda, Takahiro; Izumi, Ryo; Kuwahara, Yutaka; Ogata, Tomonari; Kim, Sun-Nam

    2013-01-01

    The phase transition of a nematic liquid crystal containing a push-pull azobenzene dye could be induced efficiently during irradiation with visible light. The dynamical disorganizing effect of the push-pull azobenzene dye on the liquid crystalline order through its trans-cis-trans photoisomerizaion cycle under visible light was contributed to the efficient phase transition. Then, the effects of light irradiation on the motion of small objects dispersed in the liquid crystals containing the push-pull azobenzene were explored, and the manipulation and assembly of those objects were successfully achieved in the nematic phase but also in the smectic phase. The combination of the photo-controlled dynamical change in the liquid crystalline order and the intrinsic self-assembly property of a liquid crystal is promising for use in technologies that require not only the organization of small objects but also the photo-driving of nano- and micro-sized mechanical materials.

  11. Manipulation and assembly of small objects in liquid crystals by dynamical disorganizing effect of push-pull-azobenzene-dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurihara, Seiji; Ohta, Kazuhiro; Oda, Takahiro; Izumi, Ryo; Kuwahara, Yutaka; Ogata, Tomonari; Kim, Sun-Nam

    2013-07-01

    The phase transition of a nematic liquid crystal containing a push-pull azobenzene dye could be induced efficiently during irradiation with visible light. The dynamical disorganizing effect of the push-pull azobenzene dye on the liquid crystalline order through its trans-cis-trans photoisomerizaion cycle under visible light was contributed to the efficient phase transition. Then, the effects of light irradiation on the motion of small objects dispersed in the liquid crystals containing the push-pull azobenzene were explored, and the manipulation and assembly of those objects were successfully achieved in the nematic phase but also in the smectic phase. The combination of the photo-controlled dynamical change in the liquid crystalline order and the intrinsic self-assembly property of a liquid crystal is promising for use in technologies that require not only the organization of small objects but also the photo-driving of nano- and micro-sized mechanical materials.

  12. Manipulation and assembly of small objects in liquid crystals by dynamical disorganizing effect of push-pull-azobenzene-dye

    PubMed Central

    Kurihara, Seiji; Ohta, Kazuhiro; Oda, Takahiro; Izumi, Ryo; Kuwahara, Yutaka; Ogata, Tomonari; Kim, Sun-Nam

    2013-01-01

    The phase transition of a nematic liquid crystal containing a push-pull azobenzene dye could be induced efficiently during irradiation with visible light. The dynamical disorganizing effect of the push-pull azobenzene dye on the liquid crystalline order through its trans-cis-trans photoisomerizaion cycle under visible light was contributed to the efficient phase transition. Then, the effects of light irradiation on the motion of small objects dispersed in the liquid crystals containing the push-pull azobenzene were explored, and the manipulation and assembly of those objects were successfully achieved in the nematic phase but also in the smectic phase. The combination of the photo-controlled dynamical change in the liquid crystalline order and the intrinsic self-assembly property of a liquid crystal is promising for use in technologies that require not only the organization of small objects but also the photo-driving of nano- and micro-sized mechanical materials. PMID:23835605

  13. Life satisfaction and adjustment of children of alcoholics: the effects of parental drinking, family disorganization and survival roles.

    PubMed

    Braithwaite, V; Devine, C

    1993-11-01

    The stress paradigm was used to investigate the extent to which parental alcohol dependency, family disorganization ana Black's (1979) and Wegscheider's (1976) survival roles affected the adjustment of children of alcoholics (COAs). The study was cross-sectional based on the responses of a non-random community sample of 112 adolescents. The predictors of life satisfaction differed from the predictors of minor psychiatric symptoms. Parental alcohol dependency had no direct effect on minor psychiatric symptoms, with low family cohesiveness and intimacy being the major determinants of psychopathology. In contrast, parental alcohol dependency and family disharmony had an additive effect on level of life satisfaction. Family variables did not buffer children from the effects of alcohol once they recognized parental drinking as a problem. Nor did the survival roles protect children in any way. Indeed, the roles of the 'lost' child, the 'acting-out' child, and the 'clown' were detrimental to well-being.

  14. Evaluation and Comparison of the Biopathology of Collagen and Inflammation in the Extracellular Matrix of Oral Epithelial Dysplasias and Inflammatory Fibrous Hyperplasia Using Picrosirius Red Stain and Polarising Microscopy: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Soma Susan; Sarojini, Sreenivasan Bargavan; George, Giju Baby; Vinod, Sankar; Mathew, Philips; Babu, Anulekh; Sebastian, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Background: The role of tumour inflammation and the dysplastic epithelial-stromal interactions on the nature of collagen fibres in the extracellular matrix of dysplastic epithelium is not fully understood. The present study was aimed to evaluate and compare the inflammation and pathological stromal collagen (loosely packed thin disorganized collagen) present in mild, moderate and severe epithelial dysplasias with that of inflammatory fibrous hyperplasias. The basement membrane intactness of epithelial dysplasias was also evaluated to determine if dysplastic epithelial mesenchymal interaction has any role in the integrity of stromal collagen in epithelial dysplasia. Methods: Oral epithelial dysplasias, inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia and normal oral mucosal samples were used for the study. Packing, thickness and orientation of collagen fibres in mild, moderate and severe grades of oral epithelial dysplasias (n = 24), inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia (n = 8) and normal oral mucosal samples (n = 8) were analysed based on the polarisation of collagen fibres in picrosirius red polarising stain under polarising microscope. Results: All the grades of epithelial dysplasias showed greenish yellow birefringence confirming the presence of loosely arranged pathological collagen in the presence of moderate inflammation. All the cases of inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia showed red polarisation hue and moderate inflammation. A statistically significant difference was found in the packing and orientation of collagen when epithelial dysplasias and inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia were compared (P < 0.01). When the intactness of basement membrane integrity was compared in all the groups of epithelial dysplasia, a statistically significant result was obtained (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Presence of significant amount of loosely packed thin disoriented collagen even in mild epithelial dysplasia suggests that tumourigenic factors are released to connective tissue stroma much earlier than

  15. Chondroitin sulfate cluster of epiphycan from salmon nasal cartilage defines binding specificity to collagens.

    PubMed

    Tatara, Yota; Kakizaki, Ikuko; Suto, Shinichiro; Ishioka, Haruna; Negishi, Mika; Endo, Masahiko

    2015-05-01

    Epiphycan (EPY) from salmon nasal cartilage has a glycosaminoglycan (GAG) domain that is heavily modified by chondroitin 4-sulfate and chondroitin 6-sulfate. The functional role of the GAG domain has not been investigated. The interaction of EPY with collagen was examined in vitro using surface plasmon resonance analysis. EPY was found to bind to type I collagen via clustered chondroitin sulfate (CS), while a single chain of CS was unable to bind. Types I, III, VII, VIII and X collagen showed high binding affinity with EPY, whereas types II, IV, V, VI and IX showed low binding affinities. Chemical modification of lysine residues in collagen decreased the affinity with the clustered CS. These results suggest that lysine residues of collagen are involved in the interaction with the clustered CS, and the difference in lysine modification defines the binding affinity to EPY. The clustered CS was also involved in an inter-saccharide interaction, and formed self-associated EPY. CS of EPY promoted fibril formation of type I collagen.

  16. [Periodontal diseases in adults. Immunohistochemical study of inflammatory cells and of collagen].

    PubMed

    Chomette, G; Auriol, M; Armbruster, D; Szpirglas, H; Vaillant, J M

    1987-01-01

    An immunohistochemical study was performed on 9 gingival biopsy specimens from patients suffering of a periodontal disease comparatively to 7 control specimens from patients with inflammatory gingival hyperplasia of various causes and from healthy gums. We used mono or polyclonal antibodies as markers of the different types of inflammatory cells (T-1 lymphocytes and their subsets, B-lymphocytes, macrophages, plasma cells). In patients with periodontal disease, the high percentage of transformed T-lymphocytes with a majority of helpers was obvious. In controls, the inflammatory cells were principally B-lymphocytes, macrophages and plasma cells. The characterization of different types of collagen produced by periodontal fibroblasts was performed by specific antibodies (anti I, III, V collagen sera). The respective ratio and the topographic distribution of those collagen substances were different in patients with periodontal disease and controls. In the first eventuality, one could find quite exclusively type I collagen. In the other group, type I collagen was associated with type III sub epithelial and type IV perivasor ar collagen. By means of these findings, the pathogenesis of the periodontal disease was discussed and its immune mechanism was suggested.

  17. Hemispheric language asymmetry in first episode psychosis and schizotypy: the role of cannabis consumption and cognitive disorganization.

    PubMed

    Herzig, Daniela A; Sullivan, Sarah; Lewis, Glyn; Corcoran, Rhiannon; Drake, Richard; Evans, Jonathan; Nutt, David; Mohr, Christine

    2015-03-01

    Cannabis use has been related to an elevated psychosis risk and attenuated cognitive functioning. Cannabis-related cognitive impairments are also observed in populations along the psychosis dimension. We here investigated whether a potential behavioral marker of the psychosis dimension (attenuated functional hemispheric asymmetry) is even further attenuated in individuals using cannabis (CU) vs those not using cannabis (nCU). We tested 29 patients with first-episode psychosis (FEP; 11 CU) and 90 healthy controls (38 CU) on lateralized lexical decisions assessing left-hemisphere language dominance. In patients, psychotic symptoms were assessed by Positive & Negative Symptom Scale (PANSS). In controls, self-reported schizotypy was assessed (The Oxford-Liverpool Inventory of Feelings and Experiences: O-LIFE). Results indicated that nCU FEP patients had a relative reduced hemispheric asymmetry, as did controls with increasing cognitive disorganization (CogDis) scores, in particular when belonging to the group of nCU controls. Positive, disorganized and negative PANSS scores in patients and negative and positive schizotypy in controls were unrelated to hemispheric asymmetry. These findings suggest that cannabis use potentially balances rather than exacerbates uncommon hemispheric laterality patterns. Moreover, in healthy populations, the potential stabilization of typical hemispheric asymmetry in CU might be most relevant to individuals with elevated CogDis. We discuss the potential beneficial and harmful effects of cannabis use along the psychosis dimension together with propositions for future studies that should account for the mediating role of additional substances (eg nicotine), cannabis composition (eg cannabidiol content), and individual differences (eg physical health, or absence of significant polysubstance use). PMID:25543118

  18. Hemispheric language asymmetry in first episode psychosis and schizotypy: the role of cannabis consumption and cognitive disorganization.

    PubMed

    Herzig, Daniela A; Sullivan, Sarah; Lewis, Glyn; Corcoran, Rhiannon; Drake, Richard; Evans, Jonathan; Nutt, David; Mohr, Christine

    2015-03-01

    Cannabis use has been related to an elevated psychosis risk and attenuated cognitive functioning. Cannabis-related cognitive impairments are also observed in populations along the psychosis dimension. We here investigated whether a potential behavioral marker of the psychosis dimension (attenuated functional hemispheric asymmetry) is even further attenuated in individuals using cannabis (CU) vs those not using cannabis (nCU). We tested 29 patients with first-episode psychosis (FEP; 11 CU) and 90 healthy controls (38 CU) on lateralized lexical decisions assessing left-hemisphere language dominance. In patients, psychotic symptoms were assessed by Positive & Negative Symptom Scale (PANSS). In controls, self-reported schizotypy was assessed (The Oxford-Liverpool Inventory of Feelings and Experiences: O-LIFE). Results indicated that nCU FEP patients had a relative reduced hemispheric asymmetry, as did controls with increasing cognitive disorganization (CogDis) scores, in particular when belonging to the group of nCU controls. Positive, disorganized and negative PANSS scores in patients and negative and positive schizotypy in controls were unrelated to hemispheric asymmetry. These findings suggest that cannabis use potentially balances rather than exacerbates uncommon hemispheric laterality patterns. Moreover, in healthy populations, the potential stabilization of typical hemispheric asymmetry in CU might be most relevant to individuals with elevated CogDis. We discuss the potential beneficial and harmful effects of cannabis use along the psychosis dimension together with propositions for future studies that should account for the mediating role of additional substances (eg nicotine), cannabis composition (eg cannabidiol content), and individual differences (eg physical health, or absence of significant polysubstance use).

  19. The impact of neighborhood disorganization on neighborhood exposure to violence, trauma symptoms, and social relationships among at-risk youth.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Fredrick; Galanek, Joseph D; Kretschmar, Jeff M; Flannery, Daniel J

    2015-12-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that exposure to violence (ETV) is a serious concern across the north-south socioeconomic divide. While studies have found that social support is a protective factor for youth exposed to violence and trauma, little is known about the impact of trauma symptoms on forming and maintaining social relationships which are key to accessing a vital social resource that fosters resilience in youth experiencing trauma symptomatology. Building on previous models that examine the impact of neighborhoods on exposure to violence and trauma, the current study examines the impact of neighborhood disorganization on ETV among youth and ETV's effects on trauma symptoms and social relationships. Data were collected on 2242 juvenile justice-involved youth with behavioral health issues in 11 urban and rural counties in the Midwestern United States. Using structural equation modeling (SEM), our data demonstrated that living in highly disorganized neighborhoods was associated with higher levels of ETV and that ETV was positively associated with trauma symptoms. Mediational analysis showed that trauma symptoms strongly mediated the effect of ETV on social relationships. Freely estimating structural paths by gender revealed that hypothesized associations between these variables were stronger for females than males. Findings here highlight the need to provide trauma-informed care to help youth to build and maintain social relationships. Identification and treatment of trauma symptoms that is culturally informed is a critical first step in ensuring that identified protective factors in local contexts, such as social relations and social support, have opportunities to minimize the impact of ETV among youth across northern and southern nations. PMID:26477854

  20. The impact of neighborhood disorganization on neighborhood exposure to violence, trauma symptoms, and social relationships among at-risk youth.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Fredrick; Galanek, Joseph D; Kretschmar, Jeff M; Flannery, Daniel J

    2015-12-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that exposure to violence (ETV) is a serious concern across the north-south socioeconomic divide. While studies have found that social support is a protective factor for youth exposed to violence and trauma, little is known about the impact of trauma symptoms on forming and maintaining social relationships which are key to accessing a vital social resource that fosters resilience in youth experiencing trauma symptomatology. Building on previous models that examine the impact of neighborhoods on exposure to violence and trauma, the current study examines the impact of neighborhood disorganization on ETV among youth and ETV's effects on trauma symptoms and social relationships. Data were collected on 2242 juvenile justice-involved youth with behavioral health issues in 11 urban and rural counties in the Midwestern United States. Using structural equation modeling (SEM), our data demonstrated that living in highly disorganized neighborhoods was associated with higher levels of ETV and that ETV was positively associated with trauma symptoms. Mediational analysis showed that trauma symptoms strongly mediated the effect of ETV on social relationships. Freely estimating structural paths by gender revealed that hypothesized associations between these variables were stronger for females than males. Findings here highlight the need to provide trauma-informed care to help youth to build and maintain social relationships. Identification and treatment of trauma symptoms that is culturally informed is a critical first step in ensuring that identified protective factors in local contexts, such as social relations and social support, have opportunities to minimize the impact of ETV among youth across northern and southern nations.

  1. IV treatment at home

    MedlinePlus

    ... home; PICC line - home; Infusion therapy - home; Home health care - IV treatment ... Often, home health care nurses will come to your home to give you the medicine. Sometimes, a family member, a friend, or ...

  2. GCF Mark IV development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mortensen, L. O.

    1982-01-01

    The Mark IV ground communication facility (GCF) as it is implemented to support the network consolidation program is reviewed. Changes in the GCF are made in the area of increased capacity. Common carrier circuits are the medium for data transfer. The message multiplexing in the Mark IV era differs from the Mark III era, in that all multiplexing is done in a GCF computer under GCF software control, which is similar to the multiplexing currently done in the high speed data subsystem.

  3. The collagenous gastroenteritides: similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Purva; McKenna, Barbara J

    2010-10-01

    Collagenous gastritis, collagenous sprue, and collagenous colitis share striking histologic similarities and occur together in some patients. They also share some drug and disease associations. Pediatric cases of collagenous gastritis, however, lack most of these associations. The etiologies of the collagenous gastroenteritides are not known, so it is not clear whether they are similar because they share pathogeneses, or because they indicate a common histologic response to varying injuries. The features, disease and drug associations, and the inquiries into the pathogenesis of these disorders are reviewed. PMID:20923305

  4. Forelimb contractures and abnormal tendon collagen fibrillogenesis in fibulin-4 null mice.

    PubMed

    Markova, Dessislava Z; Pan, Te-Cheng; Zhang, Rui-Zhu; Zhang, Guiyun; Sasaki, Takako; Arita, Machiko; Birk, David E; Chu, Mon-Li

    2016-06-01

    Fibulin-4 is an extracellular matrix glycoprotein essential for elastic fiber formation. Mice deficient in fibulin-4 die perinatally because of severe pulmonary and vascular defects associated with the lack of intact elastic fibers. Patients with fibulin-4 mutations demonstrate similar defects, and a significant number die shortly after birth or in early childhood from cardiopulmonary failure. The patients also demonstrate skeletal and other systemic connective tissue abnormalities, including joint laxity and flexion contractures of the wrist. A fibulin-4 null mouse strain was generated and used to analyze the roles of fibulin-4 in tendon fibrillogenesis. This mouse model displayed bilateral forelimb contractures, in addition to pulmonary and cardiovascular defects. The forelimb and hindlimb tendons exhibited disruption in collagen fibrillogenesis in the absence of fibulin-4 as analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. Fewer fibrils were assembled, and fibrils were disorganized compared with wild-type controls. The organization of developing tenocytes and compartmentalization of the extracellular space was also disrupted. Fibulin-4 was co-localized with fibrillin-1 and fibrillin-2 in limb tendons by using immunofluorescence microscopy. Thus, fibulin-4 seems to play a role in regulating tendon collagen fibrillogenesis, in addition to its essential function in elastogenesis. PMID:26711913

  5. Collagen interactions: Drug design and delivery.

    PubMed

    An, Bo; Lin, Yu-Shan; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    Collagen is a major component in a wide range of drug delivery systems and biomaterial applications. Its basic physical and structural properties, together with its low immunogenicity and natural turnover, are keys to its biocompatibility and effectiveness. In addition to its material properties, the collagen triple-helix interacts with a large number of molecules that trigger biological events. Collagen interactions with cell surface receptors regulate many cellular processes, while interactions with other ECM components are critical for matrix structure and remodeling. Collagen also interacts with enzymes involved in its biosynthesis and degradation, including matrix metalloproteinases. Over the past decade, much information has been gained about the nature and specificity of collagen interactions with its partners. These studies have defined collagen sequences responsible for binding and the high-resolution structures of triple-helical peptides bound to its natural binding partners. Strategies to target collagen interactions are already being developed, including the use of monoclonal antibodies to interfere with collagen fibril formation and the use of triple-helical peptides to direct liposomes to melanoma cells. The molecular information about collagen interactions will further serve as a foundation for computational studies to design small molecules that can interfere with specific interactions or target tumor cells. Intelligent control of collagen biological interactions within a material context will expand the effectiveness of collagen-based drug delivery.

  6. The Respiratory Pathogen Moraxella catarrhalis Targets Collagen for Maximal Adherence to Host Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Birendra; Alvarado-Kristensson, Maria; Johansson, Martin; Hallgren, Oskar; Westergren-Thorsson, Gunilla; Mörgelin, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Moraxella catarrhalis is a human respiratory pathogen that causes acute otitis media in children and is associated with exacerbations in patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The first step in M. catarrhalis colonization is adherence to the mucosa, epithelial cells, and extracellular matrix (ECM). The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of M. catarrhalis interactions with collagens from various angles. Clinical isolates (n = 43) were tested for collagen binding, followed by a detailed analysis of protein-protein interactions using recombinantly expressed proteins. M. catarrhalis-dependent interactions with collagen produced by human lung fibroblasts and tracheal tissues were studied by utilizing confocal immunohistochemistry and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. A mouse smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) model was used to estimate the adherence of M. catarrhalis in vivo. We found that all M. catarrhalis clinical isolates tested adhered to fibrillar collagen types I, II, and III and network-forming collagens IV and VI. The trimeric autotransporter adhesins ubiquitous surface protein A2 (UspA2) and UspA2H were identified as major collagen-binding receptors. M. catarrhalis wild type adhered to human tracheal tissue and collagen-producing lung fibroblasts, whereas UspA2 and UspA2H deletion mutants did not. Moreover, in the COPD mouse model, bacteria devoid of UspA2 and UspA2H had a reduced level of adherence to the respiratory tract compared to the adherence of wild-type bacteria. Our data therefore suggest that the M. catarrhalis UspA2 and UspA2H-dependent interaction with collagens is highly critical for adherence in the host and, furthermore, may play an important role in the establishment of disease. PMID:27006460

  7. The Roles of Perceived Neighborhood Disorganization, Social Cohesion, and Social Control in Urban Thai Adolescents' Substance Use and Delinquency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrnes, Hilary F.; Miller, Brenda A.; Chamratrithirong, Aphichat; Rhucharoenpornpanich, Orratai; Cupp, Pamela K.; Atwood, Katharine A.; Fongkaew, Warunee; Rosati, Michael J.; Chookhare, Warunee

    2013-01-01

    Substance use and delinquency in Thai adolescents are growing public health concerns. Research has linked neighborhood characteristics to these outcomes, with explanations focused on neighborhood disorganization, social cohesion, and social control. This study examines the independent associations of these neighborhood constructs with Thai…

  8. Impact of Institutional Care on Attachment Disorganization and Insecurity of Ukrainian Preschoolers: Protective Effect of the Long Variant of the Serotonin Transporter Gene (5HTT)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; Dobrova-Krol, Natasha; van IJzendoorn, Marinus

    2012-01-01

    Institutional care has been shown to lead to insecure and disorganized attachments and indiscriminate friendliness. Some children, however, are surprisingly resilient to the adverse environment. Here the protective role of the long variant of the serotonin receptor gene (5HTT) is explored in a small hypothesis-generating study of 37 Ukrainian…

  9. Attachment at Early School Age and Developmental Risk: Examining Family Contexts and Behavior Problems of Controlling-Caregiving, Controlling-Punitive, and Behaviorally Disorganized Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Ellen; Cyr, Chantal; Dubois-Comtois, Karine

    2004-01-01

    Preschool to school-age trajectories of 242 children, including 37 with insecure-disorganized and 66 with insecure-organized attachment patterns, were examined. Child attachment and stressful life events (the latter retrospectively) were measured at ages 5-7, and mother-child interactive quality, parenting stress, marital satisfaction, and…

  10. WOUND HEALING AND COLLAGEN FORMATION

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Russell; Benditt, Earl P.

    1961-01-01

    The regular sequence encountered in healing guinea pig skin wounds has been examined by methods of light and electron microscopy. Observations on cell populations, their fine structure, and fibril formation in the connective tissue have been made. Linear incisions in the skin of normal female guinea pigs weighing 300 to 350 grams were allowed to heal. The wounds were then excised, fixed with buffered 2 per cent osmium tetroxide, and postfixed in neutral buffered formalin, at 16 and 24 hours and at 3, 5, 9, and 14 days after wounding. They were then embedded in epoxy resin. In the inflammatory phase the exudate observed in the early wounds consists largely of polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes, macrophages, fibrin, and free extracellular organelles from the disrupted inflammatory cells. These organelles later appear in vacuoles in the cytoplasm of the macrophages. Fibroblasts first appear at 24 hours, and show extensive development and dilatation of the endoplasmic reticulum, which sometimes contains moderately dense flocculent material. In addition, these fibroblasts have enlarged mitochondria and condensations of filamentous material within the cytoplasm near the cell surface. Occasional myelin figures and moderately dense, 0.5 to 1.0 micron bodies are found within the cytoplasm of the early fibroblasts. Collagen fibrils are first seen at 3 days extracellularly near the cell surfaces. They appear at the later times in two populations of sizes. With increasing wound age the fibroblasts retain their morphology and the wounds decrease in cellularity concomitantly with the formation of increasing amounts of collagen. Several proposed mechanisms of collagen fibril formation are discussed in relation to the observed phenomena. The problem of correlating fibril diameter with the appearance of the periodic structure of collagen in relation to the minimal size fibril which would be anticipated to display this appearance is discussed. PMID:14494202

  11. Asymmetrical hypersensitivity to bovine collagen.

    PubMed

    Somerville, P; Wray, R C

    1993-05-01

    We report a unique patient with true asymmetrical hypersensitivity to bovine collagen. Hypersensitivity is the development of an inflammatory response at a treatment site after a negative skin test. She developed an inflammatory response in only one of two simultaneously injected sites. About 1.5% of patients with a negative skin test have a hypersensitivity reaction consisting of firmness, erythema, and swelling. The signs and symptoms generally resolve spontaneously in a few months.

  12. Collagen telopeptides (cross-linking sites) play a role in collagen gel lattice contraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodley, D. T.; Yamauchi, M.; Wynn, K. C.; Mechanic, G.; Briggaman, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    Solubilized interstitial collagens will form a fibrillar, gel-like lattice when brought to physiologic conditions. In the presence of human dermal fibroblasts the collagen lattice will contract. The rate of contraction can be determined by computer-assisted planemetry. The mechanisms involved in contraction are as yet unknown. Using this system it was found that the rate of contraction was markedly decreased when collagen lacking telopeptides was substituted for native collagen. Histidinohydroxylysinonorleucine (HHL) is a major stable trifunctional collagen cross-link in mature skin that involves a carboxyl terminal, telopeptide site 16c, the sixteenth amino acid residue from the carboxy terminal of the telopeptide region of alpha 1 (I) in type I collagen. Little, if any, HHL was present in native, purified, reconstituted, soluble collagen fibrils from 1% acetic acid-extracted 2-year-old bovine skin. In contrast, HHL cross-links were present (0.22 moles of cross-link per mole of collagen) in lattices of the same collagen contracted by fibroblasts. However, rat tail tendon does not contain HHL cross-links, and collagen lattices made of rat tail tendon collagen are capable of contraction. This suggests that telopeptide sites, and not mature HHL cross-links per se, are essential for fibroblasts to contract collagen lattices. Beta-aminopropionitrile fumarate (BAPN), a potent lathyrogen that perturbs collagen cross-linking by inhibition of lysyl oxidase, also inhibited the rate of lattice cell contraction in lattices composed of native collagen. However, the concentrations of BAPN that were necessary to inhibit the contraction of collagen lattices also inhibited fibroblast growth suggestive of cellular toxicity. In accordance with other studies, we found no inhibition of the rate of lattice contraction when fibronectin-depleted serum was used. Electron microscopy of contracted gels revealed typical collagen fibers with a characteristic axial periodicity. The data

  13. Immunostimulation effect of jellyfish collagen.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, Takuya; Ueno, Masashi; Goto, Yoko; Shiraishi, Ryusuke; Doi, Mikiharu; Akiyama, Koichi; Yamauchi, Satoshi

    2006-09-01

    Certain edible large jellyfishes belonging to the order Rhizostomeae are consumed in large quantities in China and Japan. The exumbrella part of the edible jellyfish Stomolophus nomurai was cut and soaked in dilute hydrochloric acid solution (pH 3.0) for 12 h, and heated at 121 degrees C for 20 min. The immunostimulation effects of the jellyfish extract were examined. The jellyfish extract enhanced IgM production of human hybridoma HB4C5 cells 34-fold. IgM and IgG production of human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were also accelerated, 2.8- and 1.4-fold respectively. Moreover, production of interferon (IFN)-gamma and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha by human PBL was stimulated 100- and 17-fold respectively. Collagenase treatment inactivated the immunostimulation activity of the jellyfish extract. In addition, purified collagen from bovine Achilles' tendon accelerated IgM production of hybridoma cells. These facts mean that collagen has an immunostimulation effect, and that the active substance in jellyfish extract is collagen.

  14. Immunostimulation effect of jellyfish collagen.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, Takuya; Ueno, Masashi; Goto, Yoko; Shiraishi, Ryusuke; Doi, Mikiharu; Akiyama, Koichi; Yamauchi, Satoshi

    2006-09-01

    Certain edible large jellyfishes belonging to the order Rhizostomeae are consumed in large quantities in China and Japan. The exumbrella part of the edible jellyfish Stomolophus nomurai was cut and soaked in dilute hydrochloric acid solution (pH 3.0) for 12 h, and heated at 121 degrees C for 20 min. The immunostimulation effects of the jellyfish extract were examined. The jellyfish extract enhanced IgM production of human hybridoma HB4C5 cells 34-fold. IgM and IgG production of human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were also accelerated, 2.8- and 1.4-fold respectively. Moreover, production of interferon (IFN)-gamma and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha by human PBL was stimulated 100- and 17-fold respectively. Collagenase treatment inactivated the immunostimulation activity of the jellyfish extract. In addition, purified collagen from bovine Achilles' tendon accelerated IgM production of hybridoma cells. These facts mean that collagen has an immunostimulation effect, and that the active substance in jellyfish extract is collagen. PMID:16960386

  15. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillaris, A.; Bouratzis, C.; Nindos, A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts that extend to hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprises 48 interplanetary type IV bursts observed with the Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation (WAVES) instrument onboard Wind in the 13.825 MHz - 20 kHz frequency range. The dynamic spectra of the Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), the Nançay Decametric Array (DAM), the Appareil de Routine pour le Traitement et l' Enregistrement Magnetique de l' Information Spectral (ARTEMIS-IV), the Culgoora, Hiraso, and the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN) Radio Spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona. These were supplemented with soft X-ray (SXR) flux-measurements from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and coronal mass ejections (CME) data from the Large Angle and Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Positional information of the coronal bursts was obtained by the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs, and SXR flares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact, their duration was on average 106 minutes. This type of events was, mostly, associated with M- and X-class flares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs, 32 of these events had CMEs faster than 1000 km s^{-1}. Furthermore, in 43 compact events the CME was possibly subjected to reduced aerodynamic drag as it was propagating in the wake of a previous CME. A minority (three) of long-lived type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts was detected, with durations from 960 minutes to 115 hours. These events are referred to as extended or long duration and appear to replenish their energetic electron content, possibly from electrons escaping from the corresponding coronal

  16. Collagen defects in lethal perinatal osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Bateman, J F; Chan, D; Mascara, T; Rogers, J G; Cole, W G

    1986-12-15

    Quantitative and qualitative abnormalities of collagen were observed in tissues and fibroblast cultures from 17 consecutive cases of lethal perinatal osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). The content of type I collagen was reduced in OI dermis and bone and the content of type III collagen was also reduced in the dermis. Normal bone contained 99.3% type I and 0.7% type V collagen whereas OI bone contained a lower proportion of type I, a greater proportion of type V and a significant amount of type III collagen. The type III and V collagens appeared to be structurally normal. In contrast, abnormal type I collagen chains, which migrated slowly on electrophoresis, were observed in all babies with OI. Cultured fibroblasts from five babies produced a mixture of normal and abnormal type I collagens; the abnormal collagen was not secreted in two cases and was slowly secreted in the others. Fibroblasts from 12 babies produced only abnormal type I collagens and they were also secreted slowly. The slower electrophoretic migration of the abnormal chains was due to enzymic overmodification of the lysine residues. The distribution of the cyanogen bromide peptides containing the overmodified residues was used to localize the underlying structural abnormalities to three regions of the type I procollagen chains. These regions included the carboxy-propeptide of the pro alpha 1(I)-chain, the helical alpha 1(I) CB7 peptide and the helical alpha 1(I) CB8 and CB3 peptides. In one baby a basic charge mutation was observed in the alpha 1(I) CB7 peptide and in another baby a basic charge mutation was observed in the alpha 1(I) CB8 peptide. The primary defects in lethal perinatal OI appear to reside in the type I collagen chains. Type III and V collagens did not appear to compensate for the deficiency of type I collagen in the tissues.

  17. Classical subtypes for schizophrenia: literature review for DSM-IV.

    PubMed

    McGlashan, T H; Fenton, W S

    1991-01-01

    The classical subtypes of schizophrenia include the paranoid, hebephrenic, undifferentiated, residual, catatonic, and simple. This review of studies, especially those conducted during the last decade, supports the validity of the subtypes, particularly the paranoid subtype. To a lesser degree, the same holds for the hebephrenic and undifferentiated subtypes. The catatonic subtype has seldom been studied, perhaps because it is so rare. The residual and simple subtypes have not been the focus of any studies of note. Subtype criteria for DSM-IV are suggested based on the review. The paranoid and undifferentiated subtypes should be retained with criteria identical to those in DSM-III-R. The disorganized subtype also should be retained but with modified criteria that are somewhat more stringent than those in DSM-III-R. Catatonia and residual schizophrenia should remain, but insufficient data exist upon which to base any changes in criteria. Given its historical precedence, as well as the emerging importance of deficit processes in schizophrenia, simple schizophrenia should be renamed and reintroduced as a subtype in DSM-IV. Two variations in criteria are offered.

  18. Uncommon structural motifs dominate the antigen binding site in human autoantibodies reactive with basement membrane collagen.

    PubMed

    Foster, Mary H; Buckley, Elizabeth S; Chen, Benny J; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Clark, Amy G

    2016-08-01

    Autoantibodies mediate organ destruction in multiple autoimmune diseases, yet their origins in patients remain poorly understood. To probe the genetic origins and structure of disease-associated autoantibodies, we engrafted immunodeficient mice with human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells and immunized with the non-collagenous-1 (NC1) domain of the alpha3 chain of type IV collagen. This antigen is expressed in lungs and kidneys and is targeted by autoantibodies in anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) nephritis and Goodpasture syndrome (GPS), prototypic human organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Using Epstein Barr virus transformation and cell fusion, six human anti-alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen monoclonal autoantibodies (mAb) were recovered, including subsets reactive with human kidney and with epitopes recognized by patients' IgG. Sequence analysis reveals a long to exceptionally long heavy chain complementarity determining region3 (HCDR3), the major site of antigen binding, in all six mAb. Mean HCDR3 length is 25.5 amino acids (range 20-36), generated from inherently long DH and JH genes and extended regions of non-templated N-nucleotides. Long HCDR3 are suited to forming noncontiguous antigen contacts and to binding recessed, immunologically silent epitopes hidden from conventional antibodies, as seen with self-antigen crossreactive broadly neutralizing anti-HIV Ig (bnAb). The anti-alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen mAb also show preferential use of unmutated variable region genes that are enriched among human chronic lymphocytic leukemia antibodies that share features with natural polyreactive Ig. Our findings suggest unexpected relationships between pathogenic anti-collagen Ig, bnAb, and autoreactive Ig associated with malignancy, all of which arise from B cells expressing unconventional structural elements that may require transient escape from tolerance for successful expansion. PMID:27450516

  19. Influence of hyperprolactinemia on collagen fibers in the lacrimal gland of female mice

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Ariadne Stavare Leal; de Jesus Simões, Manuel; Verna, Carina; Simões, Ricardo Santos; Júnior, José Maria Soares; Baracat, Edmund Chada; Gomes, Regina Célia Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To quantify the collagen fibers in the lacrimal gland of female mice with hyperprolactinemia. METHODS: Forty adult female mice were randomly divided into two groups with 20 animals each: nonpregnant control (CTR1, control group, 0.2 mL of saline solution) and nonpregnant experimental (HPRL1, experimental group, 200 µg/day metoclopramide). Treatments lasted for 50 consecutive days. On day 50, 10 females from each group (control and experimental) were euthanized in the proestrus phase; then, the blood was collected and the lacrimal glands were removed. Thereafter, the remaining females were placed with the mates and continued to receive treatment with saline solution or metoclopramide. On the 6th post-coital day, 10 pregnant females from the control group (CTR2) and 10 pregnant females from the experimental group (HPRL2) were euthanized, after which blood was collected and the lacrimal glands removed. The lacrimal glands were processed for morphological analyses and collagen quantification, and prolactin and sex steroid levels were measured in the blood samples. Data were statistically analyzed using an unpaired Student t test (p<0.05). RESULTS: Morphological analysis revealed greater structural tissue disorganization of the lacrimal glands in the metoclopramide-treated groups. The total collagen content was significantly higher in the HPRL1 group than in the CTR1 group (p<0.05), whereas the difference between the CTR2 and HPRL2 groups was not significant. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest an impairment in the functioning of the lacrimal gland as a consequence of increased prolactin levels and decreased serum levels of estrogen and progesterone. PMID:26375566

  20. Partial characterization of a low molecular weight human collagen that undergoes alternative splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Pihlajaniemi, T.; Myllylea, R.; Kurkinen, M.; Prockop, D.J.

    1987-02-01

    A cDNA library prepared from RNA isolated from a cultured human tumor cell line, HT-1080, was screened with a mouse cDNA clone coding for part of the -Gly-Xaa-Yaa-domain of the ..cap alpha..2(IV) collagen chain. Four overlapping cDNA clones were characterized that coded for a low molecular weight human collagen. The cDNA clones did not, however, code for the short-chain collagens, types IX and X. The amino acid sequences derived from the clones resembled type IV collagen in that there were short interruptions in the repeating -Gly-Xaa-Yaa-sequence. The noncollagenous, carboxyl-terminal domain was, however, much shorter and contained only 18 amino acid residues. Interestingly, one of the cDNA clones contained an additional 36 nucleotides not found in an overlapping clone. The 36 nucleotides encoded four -Gly-Xaa-Yaa-repeats without changing the reading frame. Nuclease S1 mapping using a /sup 32/P-labelled probe demonstrated that the different between the clones was due to existence of two different mRNAs. A synthetic 24-residue peptide corresponding to the last two -Gly-Xaa-Yaa-triplets and the entire carboxyl-terminal domain was used to generate polyclonal antibodies. Electrophoretic transfer blot analysis of HT-1080 cells and normal human skin fibroblasts identified two polypeptides, M/sub r/ 67,000 and M/sub r/ 62,000, that were sensitive to bacterial collagenase.

  1. Collagen scaffold: a treatment for simulated maternal birth injury in the rat model

    PubMed Central

    Alperin, Marianna; Feola, Andrew; Meyn, Leslie; Duerr, Robert; Abramowitch, Steven; Moalli, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    Objective We sought to determine the impact of a collagen scaffold on the healing response after simulated birth injury in a rodent model. Study design A total of 52 virgin animals were divided into the following groups: control (n = 18), injured untreated (n = 18), and injured treated with porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) (n = 16). Histopathology, immunofluorescence of collagens, and vaginal mechanical properties were used to assess the impact of injury and the subsequent healing response. Results Collagen I/V decreased by 44% after birth injury relative to the controls (P = .001). Birth injury resulted in inferior mechanical properties of the vagina with a decrease of 38% in the tangent modulus and 44% in the tensile strength. SIS improved the collagen I/V and I/III ratios by 28% and 46%, respectively, paralleling the trend in the mechanical properties. Conclusion Simulated birth injury negatively affected vaginal biochemical and biomechanical properties long term. SIS treatment mitigated the impact of birth injury by enhancing tissue quality. PMID:20510960

  2. Collagen-Based Biomaterials for Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Sayani; Raines, Ronald T.

    2014-01-01

    With its wide distribution in soft and hard connective tissues, collagen is the most abundant of animal proteins. In vitro, natural collagen can be formed into highly organized, three-dimensional scaffolds that are intrinsically biocompatible, biodegradable, non-toxic upon exogenous application, and endowed with high tensile strength. These attributes make collagen the material of choice for wound healing and tissue engineering applications. In this article, we review the structure and molecular interactions of collagen in vivo; the recent use of natural collagen in sponges, injectables, films and membranes, dressings, and skin grafts; and the on-going development of synthetic collagen mimetic peptides as pylons to anchor cytoactive agents in wound beds. PMID:24633807

  3. Stress controls the mechanics of collagen networks

    PubMed Central

    Licup, Albert James; Münster, Stefan; Sharma, Abhinav; Sheinman, Michael; Jawerth, Louise M.; Fabry, Ben; Weitz, David A.; MacKintosh, Fred C.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen is the main structural and load-bearing element of various connective tissues, where it forms the extracellular matrix that supports cells. It has long been known that collagenous tissues exhibit a highly nonlinear stress–strain relationship, although the origins of this nonlinearity remain unknown. Here, we show that the nonlinear stiffening of reconstituted type I collagen networks is controlled by the applied stress and that the network stiffness becomes surprisingly insensitive to network concentration. We demonstrate how a simple model for networks of elastic fibers can quantitatively account for the mechanics of reconstituted collagen networks. Our model points to the important role of normal stresses in determining the nonlinear shear elastic response, which can explain the approximate exponential relationship between stress and strain reported for collagenous tissues. This further suggests principles for the design of synthetic fiber networks with collagen-like properties, as well as a mechanism for the control of the mechanics of such networks. PMID:26195769

  4. Capsaicin inhibits collagen fibril formation and increases the stability of collagen fibers.

    PubMed

    Perumal, Sathiamurthi; Dubey, Kriti; Badhwar, Rahul; George, Kodimattan Joseph; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar; Bagler, Ganesh; Madhan, Balaraman; Kar, Karunakar

    2015-02-01

    Capsaicin is a versatile plant product which has been ascribed several health benefits and anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. We have investigated the effect of capsaicin on the molecular stability, self-assembly, and fibril stability of type-I collagen. It was found that capsaicin suppresses collagen fibril formation, increases the stability of collagen fibers in tendons, and has no effect on the molecular stability of collagen. Turbidity assay data show that capsaicin does not promote disassembly of collagen fibrils. However, capsaicin moderately protects collagen fibrils from enzymatic degradation. Computational studies revealed the functions of the aromatic group and amide region of capsaicin in the collagen-capsaicin interaction. The results may have significant implications for capsaicin-based therapeutics that target excess collagen accumulation-linked pathology, for example thrombosis, fibrosis, and sclerosis.

  5. Collagenous skeleton of the rat mystacial pad.

    PubMed

    Haidarliu, Sebastian; Simony, Erez; Golomb, David; Ahissar, Ehud

    2011-05-01

    Anatomical and functional integrity of the rat mystacial pad (MP) is dependent on the intrinsic organization of its extracellular matrix. By using collagen autofluorescence, in the rat MP, we revealed a collagenous skeleton that interconnects whisker follicles, corium, and deep collagen layers. We suggest that this skeleton supports MP tissues, mediates force transmission from muscles to whiskers, facilitates whisker retraction after protraction, and limits MP extensibility.

  6. PLATO IV Accountancy Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pondy, Dorothy, Comp.

    The catalog was compiled to assist instructors in planning community college and university curricula using the 48 computer-assisted accountancy lessons available on PLATO IV (Programmed Logic for Automatic Teaching Operation) for first semester accounting courses. It contains information on lesson access, lists of acceptable abbreviations for…

  7. The PLATO IV Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stifle, Jack

    The PLATO IV computer-based instructional system consists of a large scale centrally located CDC 6400 computer and a large number of remote student terminals. This is a brief and general description of the proposed input/output hardware necessary to interface the student terminals with the computer's central processing unit (CPU) using available…

  8. IVS Technology Coordinator Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Alan

    2013-01-01

    This report of the Technology Coordinator includes the following: 1) continued work to implement the new VLBI2010 system, 2) the 1st International VLBI Technology Workshop, 3) a VLBI Digital- Backend Intercomparison Workshop, 4) DiFX software correlator development for geodetic VLBI, 5) a review of progress towards global VLBI standards, and 6) a welcome to new IVS Technology Coordinator Bill Petrachenko.

  9. A nanostructured synthetic collagen mimic for hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vivek A; Taylor, Nichole L; Jalan, Abhishek A; Hwang, Lyahn K; Wang, Benjamin K; Hartgerink, Jeffery D

    2014-04-14

    Collagen is a major component of the extracellular matrix and plays a wide variety of important roles in blood clotting, healing, and tissue remodeling. Natural, animal derived, collagen is used in many clinical applications but concerns exist with respect to its role in inflammation, batch-to-batch variability, and possible disease transfection. Therefore, development of synthetic nanomaterials that can mimic the nanostructure and properties of natural collagen has been a heavily pursued goal in biomaterials. Previously, we reported on the design and multihierarchial self-assembly of a 36 amino acid collagen mimetic peptide (KOD) that forms nanofibrous triple helices that entangle to form a hydrogel. In this report, we utilize this nanofiber forming collagen mimetic peptide as a synthetic biomimetic matrix useful in thrombosis. We demonstrate that nanofibrous KOD synthetic collagen matrices adhere platelets, activate them (indicated by soluble P-selectin secretion), and clot plasma and blood similar to animal derived collagen and control surfaces. In addition to the thrombotic potential, THP-1 monocytes incubated with our KOD collagen mimetic showed minimal proinflammatory cytokine (TNF-α or IL-1β) production. Together, the data presented demonstrates the potential of a novel synthetic collagen mimetic as a hemostat.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Microscopy of Collagen Mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Chesnick, Ingrid E.; Mason, Jeffrey T.; Giuseppetti, Anthony A.; Eidelman, Naomi; Potter, Kimberlee

    2008-01-01

    A model mineralizing system was subjected to magnetic resonance microscopy to investigate how water proton transverse (T2) relaxation times and magnetization transfer ratios can be applied to monitor collagen mineralization. In our model system, a collagen sponge was mineralized with polymer-stabilized amorphous calcium carbonate. The lower hydration and water proton T2 values of collagen sponges during the initial mineralization phase were attributed to the replacement of the water within the collagen fibrils by amorphous calcium carbonate. The significant reduction in T2 values by day 6 (p < 0.001) was attributed to the appearance of mineral crystallites, which were also detected by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. In the second phase, between days 6 and 13, magnetic resonance microscopy properties appear to plateau as amorphous calcium carbonate droplets began to coalesce within the intrafibrillar space of collagen. In the third phase, after day 15, the amorphous mineral phase crystallized, resulting in a reduction in the absolute intensity of the collagen diffraction pattern. We speculate that magnetization transfer ratio values for collagen sponges, with similar collagen contents, increased from 0.25 ± 0.02 for control strips to a maximum value of 0.31 ± 0.04 at day 15 (p = 0.03) because mineral crystals greatly reduce the mobility of the collagen fibrils. PMID:18487295

  11. A nanostructured synthetic collagen mimic for hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vivek A; Taylor, Nichole L; Jalan, Abhishek A; Hwang, Lyahn K; Wang, Benjamin K; Hartgerink, Jeffery D

    2014-04-14

    Collagen is a major component of the extracellular matrix and plays a wide variety of important roles in blood clotting, healing, and tissue remodeling. Natural, animal derived, collagen is used in many clinical applications but concerns exist with respect to its role in inflammation, batch-to-batch variability, and possible disease transfection. Therefore, development of synthetic nanomaterials that can mimic the nanostructure and properties of natural collagen has been a heavily pursued goal in biomaterials. Previously, we reported on the design and multihierarchial self-assembly of a 36 amino acid collagen mimetic peptide (KOD) that forms nanofibrous triple helices that entangle to form a hydrogel. In this report, we utilize this nanofiber forming collagen mimetic peptide as a synthetic biomimetic matrix useful in thrombosis. We demonstrate that nanofibrous KOD synthetic collagen matrices adhere platelets, activate them (indicated by soluble P-selectin secretion), and clot plasma and blood similar to animal derived collagen and control surfaces. In addition to the thrombotic potential, THP-1 monocytes incubated with our KOD collagen mimetic showed minimal proinflammatory cytokine (TNF-α or IL-1β) production. Together, the data presented demonstrates the potential of a novel synthetic collagen mimetic as a hemostat. PMID:24694012

  12. Collagenous gastritis: a report of six cases.

    PubMed

    Lagorce-Pages, C; Fabiani, B; Bouvier, R; Scoazec, J Y; Durand, L; Flejou, J F

    2001-09-01

    Collagenous gastritis is an exceptional entity with eight cases documented to date characterized by the presence of a thick subepithelial collagen band associated with an inflammatory infiltrate of the gastric mucosa. The aim of our study was to describe the clinical and histologic characteristics of six new cases of collagenous gastritis. All cases showed a subepithelial collagen band that averaged 30 microm but often measured up to 120 microm. This finding was almost always accompanied by mixed chronic inflammation in the lamina propria and by surface epithelial damage of varying severity. Our study seems to delineate two subsets in patients with collagenous gastritis: 1) collagenous gastritis occurring in children and young adults presenting with severe anemia, a nodular pattern on endoscopy, and a disease limited to the gastric mucosa without evidence of colonic involvement, and 2) collagenous gastritis associated with collagenous colitis occurring in adult patients presenting with chronic watery diarrhea. These findings highlight the fact that subepithelial collagen deposition may be a generalized disease affecting the entire gastrointestinal tract. PMID:11688577

  13. Ionic solutes impact collagen scaffold bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Pawelec, K M; Husmann, A; Wardale, R J; Best, S M; Cameron, R E

    2015-02-01

    The structure of ice-templated collagen scaffolds is sensitive to many factors. By adding 0.5 wt% of sodium chloride or sucrose to collagen slurries, scaffold structure could be tuned through changes in ice growth kinetics and interactions of the solute and collagen. With ionic solutes (sodium chloride) the entanglements of the collagen molecule decreased, leading to fibrous scaffolds with increased pore size and decreased attachment of chondrocytes. With non-ionic solutes (sucrose) ice growth was slowed, leading to significantly reduced pore size and up-regulated cell attachment. This highlights the large changes in structure and biological function stimulated by solutes in ice-templating systems. PMID:25649518

  14. Collagenous gastritis and collagenous colitis: a report with sequential histological and ultrastructural findings.

    PubMed

    Pulimood, A B; Ramakrishna, B S; Mathan, M M

    1999-06-01

    The case is reported of a young adult man with collagenous gastritis, an extremely rare disorder with only three case reports in the English literature, who subsequently presented with collagenous colitis. Sequential gastric biopsies showed a notable increase in thickness of the subepithelial collagen band. Ultrastructural study of gastric and rectal mucosa showed the characteristic subepithelial band composed of haphazardly arranged collagen fibres, prominent degranulating eosinophils, and activated pericryptal fibroblasts. PMID:10323893

  15. Social disorganization and history of child sexual abuse against girls in sub-Saharan Africa: a multilevel analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Child sexual abuse (CSA) is a considerable public health problem. Less focus has been paid to the role of community level factors associated with CSA. The aim of this study was to examine the association between neighbourhood-level measures of social disorganization and CSA. Methods We applied multiple multilevel logistic regression analysis on Demographic and Health Survey data for 6,351 adolescents from six countries in sub-Saharan Africa between 2006 and 2008. Results The percentage of adolescents that had experienced CSA ranged from 1.04% to 5.84%. There was a significant variation in the odds of reporting CSA across the communities, suggesting 18% of the variation in CSA could be attributed to community level factors. Respondents currently employed were more likely to have reported CSA than those who were unemployed (odds ratio [OR] = 2.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.48 to 2.83). Respondents from communities with a high family disruption rate were 57% more likely to have reported CSA (OR=1.57, 95% CI 1.14 to 2.16). Conclusion We found that exposure to CSA was associated with high community level of family disruption, thus suggesting that neighbourhoods may indeed have significant important effects on exposure to CSA. Further studies are needed to explore pathways that connect the individual and neighbourhood levels, that is, means through which deleterious neighbourhood effects are transmitted to individuals. PMID:23924347

  16. Disorganized Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses: Time to Systematize the Conduct and Publication of These Study Overviews?

    PubMed

    Riaz, Irbaz Bin; Khan, Muhammad Shahzeb; Riaz, Haris; Goldberg, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    The number of meta-analyses published annually has increased more than 20-fold between 1994 (n = 386) and 2014 (n = 8203). In examining how much of this increase in meta-analysis publication has genuinely represented novel contributions to clinical medicine and public health, it became clear that there was an abundance of redundant and disorganized meta-analyses, creating confusion and generating considerable debate. Ironically, meta-analyses, which should prevent redundant research, have become a victim of it. Recently, 17 meta-analyses were published based on the results of only 3 randomized controlled trials that studied the role of transcatheter closure of patent foramen ovale for prevention of cryptogenic stroke. In our search of the published literature, we identified at least 10 topics that were the subject of 10 meta-analyses. In the context of overlapping meta-analyses, one questions what needs to be done to put this "runaway train" back on track. In this review we examine the practice of redundant meta-analyses and the reasons for its disturbing "popularity." The registration of systematic reviews should be mandatory in prospective registries, such as PROSPERO, and the PRISMA checklist should be updated to incorporate new evidence and mandate the reference of previously published reviews and rationale for any new study. PMID:26522792

  17. Fibulin-2 and fibulin-5 alterations in tsk mice associated with disorganized hypodermal elastic fibers and skin tethering.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Raphael; Korn, Joseph H; Schiemann, William P; Lafyatis, Robert

    2004-12-01

    The Tight skin (Tsk) mouse is an important model of skin fibrosis that occurs in systemic sclerosis. These mice develop skin tethering and thickening associated with expression of a mutant fibrillin-1 gene. We show that Tsk fibrillin-1 leads to marked alterations in elastic fibers of the hypodermis of Tsk animals. In Tsk mice, a prominent elastic fiber layer found normally at the interface between hypodermal muscle and connective tissue was absent from an early age. The lack of elastic fibers at the hypodermal muscle-connective tissue (M-CT) interface was associated with a loss of staining for fibulin-5 in the same region. These mice also formed disorganized elastic fibers throughout hypodermal connective tissue as they aged. The increased elastic fibers in Tsk hypodermal connective tissue was associated with increased fibrillin-1 and fibulin-2 matrices. These results suggest that Tsk fibrillin-1 causes skin tethering by altering matrix protein composition in Tsk hypodermal connective tissues. The closely parallel alterations in elastogenesis associated with increased fibulin-2 in hypodermal connective tissues and decreased fibulin-5 at the hypodermal M-CT interface suggest that these proteins mediate the effect of Tsk-fibrillin-1 on elastogenesis.

  18. Disorganized Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses: Time to Systematize the Conduct and Publication of These Study Overviews?

    PubMed

    Riaz, Irbaz Bin; Khan, Muhammad Shahzeb; Riaz, Haris; Goldberg, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    The number of meta-analyses published annually has increased more than 20-fold between 1994 (n = 386) and 2014 (n = 8203). In examining how much of this increase in meta-analysis publication has genuinely represented novel contributions to clinical medicine and public health, it became clear that there was an abundance of redundant and disorganized meta-analyses, creating confusion and generating considerable debate. Ironically, meta-analyses, which should prevent redundant research, have become a victim of it. Recently, 17 meta-analyses were published based on the results of only 3 randomized controlled trials that studied the role of transcatheter closure of patent foramen ovale for prevention of cryptogenic stroke. In our search of the published literature, we identified at least 10 topics that were the subject of 10 meta-analyses. In the context of overlapping meta-analyses, one questions what needs to be done to put this "runaway train" back on track. In this review we examine the practice of redundant meta-analyses and the reasons for its disturbing "popularity." The registration of systematic reviews should be mandatory in prospective registries, such as PROSPERO, and the PRISMA checklist should be updated to incorporate new evidence and mandate the reference of previously published reviews and rationale for any new study.

  19. The Shp2-induced epithelial disorganization defect is reversed by HDAC6 inhibition independent of Cdc42

    PubMed Central

    Tien, Sui-Chih; Lee, Hsiao-Hui; Yang, Ya-Chi; Lin, Miao-Hsia; Chen, Yu-Ju; Chang, Zee-Fen

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of Shp2, a tyrosine phosphatase, critically influences the development of various diseases. Its role in epithelial lumenogenesis is not clear. Here we show that oncogenic Shp2 dephosphorylates Tuba to decrease Cdc42 activation, leading to the abnormal multi-lumen formation of epithelial cells. HDAC6 suppression reverses oncogenic Shp2-induced multiple apical domains and spindle mis-orientation during division in cysts to acquire normal lumenogenesis. Intriguingly, Cdc42 activity is not restored in this rescued process. We present evidence that simultaneous reduction in myosin II and ERK1/2 activity by HDAC6 inhibition is responsible for the reversion. In HER2-positive breast cancer cells, Shp2 also mediates Cdc42 repression, and HDAC6 inhibition or co-suppression of ERK/myosin II promotes normal epithelial lumen phenotype without increasing Cdc42 activity. Our data suggest a mechanism of epithelial disorganization by Shp2 deregulation, and reveal the cellular context where HDAC6 suppression is capable of establishing normal epithelial lumenogenesis independent of Cdc42. PMID:26783207

  20. Cytokeratin 18-mediated disorganization of intermediate filaments is induced by degradation of plectin in human liver cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Hsiang; Ho, Chin-Chin; Cheng, Chiung-Chi; Chao, Wei-Ting; Pei, Ren-Jeng; Hsu, Yung-Hsiang; Lai, Yih-Shyong

    2011-04-15

    Plectin is a cross-linking protein that organizes the cytoskeleton into a stable meshwork that helps maintain the uniform size and shape of cells. As cells of hepatocellular carcinoma are morphologically different from healthy human hepatocytes, we hypothesized that plectin deficiency and cytoskeletal disorganization underlies this pleomorphic transformation. To test this hypothesis we induced apoptosis as the most accessible pathway for creating plectin deficiency status in vivo. We analyzed expression levels and organization of plectin and other cytoskeletal elements, including intermediate filaments, microfilaments, and microtubules, after staurosporine-induced apoptosis in human Chang liver cells. The results revealed the expression of plectin and cytokeratin 18 were downregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma tissues in vivo. The expression of actin and tubulin, however, were not altered. In vitro analysis indicated that plectin and cytokeratin 18 were cleaved following staurosporine-treatment of human Chang liver cells. Time course experiments revealed that plectin was cleaved 2h earlier than cytokeratin 18. The organization of plectin and cytokeratin 18 networks collapsed after staurosporine-treatment. Conclusively, degradation of plectin induced by staurosporine-treatment in liver cells resulted in cytoskeleton disruption and induced morphological changes in these cells by affecting the expression and organization of cytokeratin 18.

  1. Injectable collagen implant--update.

    PubMed

    Castrow, F F; Krull, E A

    1983-12-01

    Injectable collagen implant (ICI), a new biomaterial reportedly useful for correction of scars and certain aging skin lines (wrinkles), was recently introduced. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of this product. Data for this study were obtained from a survey which was sent to a group of cutaneous surgeons. They were asked about test site and treatment site reactions and about their satisfaction with ICI. The incidence of adverse reactions is low, and the severity of the reactions does not appear to be serious. The long-term benefit of ICI has not been established.

  2. Nanolayered Features of Collagen-like Peptides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valluzzi, Regina; Bini, Elisabetta; Haas, Terry; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2003-01-01

    We have been investigating collagen-like model oligopeptides as molecular bases for complex ordered biomimetic materials. The collagen-like molecules incorporate aspects of native collagen sequence and secondary structure. Designed modifications to native primary and secondary structure have been incorporated to control the nanostructure and microstructure of the collagen-like materials produced. We find that the collagen-like molecules form a number of lyotropic rod liquid crystalline phases, which because of their strong temperature dependence in the liquid state can also be viewed as solvent intercalated thermotropic liquid crystals. The liquid crystalline phases formed by the molecules can be captured in the solid state by drying off solvent, resulting in solid nanopatterned (chemically and physically) thermally stable (to greater than 100 C) materials. Designed sequences which stabilize smectic phases have allowed a variety of nanoscale multilayered biopolymeric materials to be developed. Preliminary investigations suggest that chemical patterns running perpendicular to the smectic layer plane can be functionalized and used to localize a variety of organic, inorganic, and organometallic moieties in very simple multilayered nanocomposites. The phase behavior of collagen-like oligopeptide materials is described, emphasizing the correlation between mesophase, molecular orientation, and chemical patterning at the microscale and nanoscale. In many cases, the textures observed for smectic and hexatic phase collagens are remarkably similar to the complex (and not fully understood) helicoids observed in biological collagen-based tissues. Comparisons between biological morphologies and collagen model liquid crystalline (and solidified materials) textures may help us understand the molecular features which impart order and function to the extracellular matrix and to collagen-based mineralized tissues. Initial studies have utilized synthetic collagen-like peptides while

  3. Collagen structure: new tricks from a very old dog.

    PubMed

    Bella, Jordi

    2016-04-15

    The main features of the triple helical structure of collagen were deduced in the mid-1950s from fibre X-ray diffraction of tendons. Yet, the resulting models only could offer an average description of the molecular conformation. A critical advance came about 20 years later with the chemical synthesis of sufficiently long and homogeneous peptides with collagen-like sequences. The availability of these collagen model peptides resulted in a large number of biochemical, crystallographic and NMR studies that have revolutionized our understanding of collagen structure. High-resolution crystal structures from collagen model peptides have provided a wealth of data on collagen conformational variability, interaction with water, collagen stability or the effects of interruptions. Furthermore, a large increase in the number of structures of collagen model peptides in complex with domains from receptors or collagen-binding proteins has shed light on the mechanisms of collagen recognition. In recent years, collagen biochemistry has escaped the boundaries of natural collagen sequences. Detailed knowledge of collagen structure has opened the field for protein engineers who have used chemical biology approaches to produce hyperstable collagens with unnatural residues, rationally designed collagen heterotrimers, self-assembling collagen peptides, etc. This review summarizes our current understanding of the structure of the collagen triple helical domain (COL×3) and gives an overview of some of the new developments in collagen molecular engineering aiming to produce novel collagen-based materials with superior properties.

  4. Laser welding and collagen crosslinks

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, K.M.; Last, J.A.; Small, W. IV; Maitland, D.J.; Heredia, N.J.; Da Silva, L.B.; Matthews, D.L.

    1997-02-20

    Strength and stability of laser-welded tissue may be influenced, in part, by effects of laser exposure on collagen crosslinking. We therefore studied effects of diode laser exposure (805 nm, 1-8 watts, 30 seconds) + indocyanine green dye (ICG) on calf tail tendon collagen crosslinks. Effect of ICG dye alone on crosslink content prior to laser exposure was investigated; unexpectedly, we found that ICG-treated tissue had significantly increased DHLNL and OHP, but not HLNL. Laser exposure after ICG application reduced elevated DHLNL and OHP crosslink content down to their native levels. The monohydroxylated crosslink HLNL was inversely correlated with laser output (p<0.01 by linear regression analysis). DHLNL content was highly correlated with content of its maturational product, OHP, suggesting that precursor-product relations are maintained. We conclude that: (1)ICG alone induces DHLNL and OHP crosslink formation; (2)subsequent laser exposure reduces the ICG-induced crosslinks down to native levels; (3)excessive diode laser exposure destroys normally occurring HLNL crosslinks.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: collagen VI-related myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions collagen VI-related myopathy collagen VI-related myopathy Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Collagen VI-related myopathy is a group of disorders ...

  6. Prevention of Liver Fibrosis by Triple Helix-Forming Oligodeoxyribonucleotides Targeted to the Promoter Region of Type I Collagen Gene

    PubMed Central

    Koilan, Subramaniyan; Hamilton, David; Baburyan, Narina; Padala, Mythili K.; Weber, Karl T.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis leading to cirrhosis remains a global health problem. The most common etiologies are alcoholism and viral infections. Liver fibrosis is associated with major changes in both quantity and composition of extracellular matix and leads to disorganization of the liver architecture and irreversible damage to the liver function. As of now there is no effective therapy to control fibrosis. The end product of fibrosis is abnormal synthesis and accumulation of type I collagen in the extracellular matrix, which is produced by activated stellate or Ito cells in the damaged liver. Therefore, inhibition of transcription of type I collagen should in principle inhibit its production and accumulation in liver. Normally, DNA exists in a duplex form. However, under some circumstances, DNA can assume triple helical (triplex) structures. Intermolecular triplexes, formed by the addition of a sequence-specific third strand to the major groove of the duplex DNA, have the potential to serve as selective gene regulators. Earlier, we demonstrated efficient triplex formation between the exogenously added triplex-forming oligodeoxyribonucleotides (TFOs) and a specific sequence in the promoter region of the COL1A1 gene. In this study we used a rat model of liver fibrosis, induced by dimethylnitrosamine, to test whether these TFOs prevent liver fibrosis. Our results indicate that both the 25-mer and 18-mer TFOs, specific for the upstream nucleotide sequence from −141 to −165 (relative to the transcription start site) in the 5′ end of collagen gene promoter, effectively prevented accumulation of liver collagen and fibrosis. We also observed improvement in liver function tests. However, mutations in the TFO that eliminated formation of triplexes are ineffective in preventing fibrosis. We believe that these TFOs can be used as potential antifibrotic therapeutic molecules. PMID:20818932

  7. Enhanced Design Alternative IV

    SciTech Connect

    N. E. Kramer

    1999-05-18

    This report evaluates Enhanced Design Alternative (EDA) IV as part of the second phase of the License Application Design Selection (LADS) effort. The EDA IV concept was compared to the VA reference design using criteria from the ''Design Input Request for LADS Phase II EDA Evaluations'' (CRWMS M&O 1999b) and (CRWMS M&O 1999f). Briefly, the EDA IV concept arranges the waste packages close together in an emplacement configuration known as ''line load''. Continuous pre-closure ventilation keeps the waste packages from exceeding the 350 C cladding and 200 C (4.3.13) drift wall temperature limits. This EDA concept keeps relatively high, uniform emplacement drift temperatures (post-closure) to drive water away from the repository and thus dry out the pillars between emplacement drifts. The waste package is shielded to permit human access to emplacement drifts and includes an integral filler inside the package to reduce the amount of water that can contact the waste form. Closure of the repository is desired 50 years after first waste is emplaced. Both backfill and a drip shields will be emplaced at closure to improve post-closure performance.

  8. Collagen breakdown and nitrogen dioxide inhalation.

    PubMed

    Hatton, D V; Leach, C S; Nicogossian, A E

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of urinary hydroxylysine glycosides indicate that considerable collagen degradation occurred during the reentry into the earth's atmosphere of the American astronauts of the Apollo-Soyuz mission. Since the crew accidentally inhaled nitrogen dioxide, a recognized pulmonary irritant, and showed clinical and roentgenographic signs of diffuse chemical pneumonitis, it is likely that collagen degradation occurred in the pulmonary parenchyma.

  9. Cartilage collagen analysis in the chondrodystrophies.

    PubMed

    Horton, W A; Chou, J W; Machado, M A

    1985-09-01

    A simple and reproducible method for analyzing small samples of cartilage collagens was developed. Following extraction with guanidine HCl, the cartilage specimens were digested directly with CNBr and the resultant peptides separated by gel-permeation high-performance liquid chromatography. Resting cartilage collagen CNBr peptide maps differed from normal in two inherited chondrodystrophies, achondrogenesis II and spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita. PMID:4053564

  10. Formation of apatite-collagen complexes.

    PubMed

    Doi, Y; Horiguchi, T; Moriwaki, Y; Kitago, H; Kajimoto, T; Iwayama, Y

    1996-05-01

    An apatite-collagen complex was prepared in calcium beta-glycerophosphate solutions at pH 9.0 and 37 degrees C with the purpose of developing new bone substitutes that more closely resemble bone than currently available materials. Reconstituted type I collagen as well as sheet collagen were crosslinked in the presence of alkaline phosphatase and egg-yolk phosvitin. The crosslinked collagens were immersed in daily-renewed calcium beta-glycerophosphate solutions for 2 and 4 weeks to induce the deposition of apatite on the collagen fibers. After 2 weeks of reaction, for example, apatites deposited approximately two times the crosslinked collagen in weight. With reconstituted collagen, the complex showed some elasticity but no apatite was visually observed to detach under deformation with fingers and forceps. The complex, moreover, did not disintegrate when immersed in saline or animal blood. Nevertheless, the complex resorbed with no evidence of cytotoxicity when implanted in muscle tissues. These findings suggest that the apatite-collagen complex prepared would be useful as bone substitutes, especially for periodontal osseous lesion repair and alveolar ridge augmentation. PMID:8731148

  11. Collagenous gastritis in a young Japanese woman.

    PubMed

    Kajino, Yuri; Kushima, Ryoji; Koyama, Shigeki; Fujiyama, Yoshihide; Okabe, Hidetoshi

    2003-03-01

    Collagenous gastritis, a counterpart of collagenous colitis, is a rare disorder with less than 20 cases reported in the literature. A case of collagenous gastritis in a Japanese woman in her early 20s who had been receiving treatment for atopic dermatitis and bronchial asthma is reported. The patient complained of repeated epigastric pain, and endoscopy revealed multifocal atrophic areas and scars in the gastric body. Biopsy specimens showed a thickened eosinophilic band-like structure with entrapped capillaries approximately 30-70 micro m thick beneath the surface epithelium. It was regarded as a collagen band because it was positive on Azan staining but negative on amyloid staining. This finding was accompanied by marked infiltration of mononuclear cells and eosinophils in the lamina propria; however, no evidence of lymphocytic gastritis was found. Helicobacter pylori infection was not detected and inflammatory cell infiltration was minimal in the mucosa without the collagen band. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the band was positive for type III and type VI collagen. The size of the collagen band did not change for 2 years. These findings suggest that subepithelial collagen deposition was due to an abnormal local immune response based on generalized allergic disorder. PMID:12608899

  12. Influence of collagen source on fibrillar architecture and properties of vitrified collagen membranes.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Shoumyo; Guo, Qiongyu; Garza-Madrid, Marcos; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Duan, Derek; Carbajal, Priscilla; Schein, Oliver; Trexler, Morgana; Elisseeff, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    Collagen vitrigel membranes are transparent biomaterials characterized by a densely organized, fibrillar nanostructure that show promise in the treatment of corneal injury and disease. In this study, the influence of different type I collagen sources and processing techniques, including acid-solubilized collagen from bovine dermis (Bov), pepsin-solubilized collagen from human fibroblast cell culture (HuCC), and ficin-solubilized collagen from recombinant human collagen expressed in tobacco leaves (rH), on the properties of the vitrigel membranes was evaluated. Postvitrification carbodiimide crosslinking (CX) was also carried out on the vitrigels from each collagen source, forming crosslinked counterparts BovXL, HuCCXL, and rHXL, respectively. Collagen membrane ultrastructure and biomaterial properties were found to rely heavily on both collagen source and crosslinking. Bov and HuCC samples showed a random fibrillar organization of collagen, whereas rH vitrigels showed remarkable regional fibril alignment. After CX, light transmission was enhanced in all groups. Denaturation temperatures after CX increased in all membranes, of which the highest increase was seen in rH (14.71°C), suggesting improved thermal stability of the collagen fibrils in the membranes. Noncrosslinked rH vitrigels may be reinforced through CX to reach levels of mechanical strength and thermal stability comparable to Bov.

  13. A novel benign solution for collagen processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnoult, Olivier

    Collagen is the main protein constituting the extracellular matrix (ECM) of tissues in the body (skin, cartilage, blood vessels...). It exists many types of collagen, this work studies only fibrillar collagen (e.g. collagen type I contained in the skin) that exhibits a triple helical structure composed of 3 alpha-helical collagen chains. This particular and defined hierarchical structure is essential to the biological and mechanical properties of the collagen. Processing collagen into scaffolds to mimic the ECM is crucial for successful tissue engineering. Recently collagen was processed into fibrous and porous scaffold using electrospinning process. However the solvent (HFIP) used for electrospinning is extremely toxic for the user and expensive. This work shows that HFIP can be replaced by a benign mixture composed of water, salt and alcohol. Yet only three alcohols (methanol, ethanol and iso-propanol) enable the dissolution of large quantity of collagen in the benign mixture, with a wide range of alcohol to buffer ratio, and conserve the collagen hierarchical structure at least as well as the HFIP. Collagen can be electrospun from the benign mixture into sub-micron fibers with concentrations as low as 6 wt-% for a wide range of alcohol to buffer ratio, with at least 10wt-% of salt, and any of the three alcohols. Specific conditions yield nano size fibers. After processing from HFIP or a benign mixture, collagen is water soluble and needs to be chemically crosslink for tissue engineering application. Post-crosslinking with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) results in the loss of the scaffold fibrous aspect and porosity, hence it is useless for tissue engineering. Such issue could be prevented by incorporating the crosslinker into the mixture prior to electrospinning. When EDC is used alone, collagen forms a gel in the mixture within minutes, preventing electrospinning. The addition of N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) in excess to EDC

  14. The role of Rab6a and phosphorylation of non-muscle myosin IIA tailpiece in alcohol-induced Golgi disorganization

    PubMed Central

    Petrosyan, Armen; Casey, Carol A.; Cheng, Pi-Wan

    2016-01-01

    Abnormalities in the Golgi apparatus function are important to the development of alcoholic liver injury. We recently reported that Golgi disorganization in ethanol (EtOH)-treated hepatocytes is caused by impaired dimerization of the largest Golgi matrix protein, giantin. However, little is known about the mechanism which forces fragmentation. Here, in both HepG2 cells overexpressing alcohol dehydrogenase and in rat hepatocytes, we found that EtOH administration reduces the complex between giantin and Rab6a GTPase and results in the S1943 phosphorylation of non-muscle Myosin IIA (NMIIA) heavy chain, thus facilitating NMIIA association with Golgi enzymes, as detected by biochemical approaches and 3D Structured Illumination Microscopy. We revealed that NMIIA-P-S1943 competes with giantin for the Rab6a dimer, which was converted to monomer after Golgi fragmentation. Therefore, Rab6a plays a dual role in the Golgi, serving as master regulator of Golgi organization and disorganization, and that NMIIA and giantin engage in a “tug-of-war”. However, the inhibition of F-actin and downregulation of NMIIA or overexpression of NMHC-IIAΔtailpiece, as well the overexpression of dominant negative Rab6a(T27N), preserved a compact Golgi phenotype. Thus, the actomyosin complex forces EtOH-induced Golgi disorganization, and the targeting of NMIIA-P-S1943 may be important for preventing the damaging effects of alcohol metabolism on the cell. PMID:27535804

  15. The role of Rab6a and phosphorylation of non-muscle myosin IIA tailpiece in alcohol-induced Golgi disorganization.

    PubMed

    Petrosyan, Armen; Casey, Carol A; Cheng, Pi-Wan

    2016-01-01

    Abnormalities in the Golgi apparatus function are important to the development of alcoholic liver injury. We recently reported that Golgi disorganization in ethanol (EtOH)-treated hepatocytes is caused by impaired dimerization of the largest Golgi matrix protein, giantin. However, little is known about the mechanism which forces fragmentation. Here, in both HepG2 cells overexpressing alcohol dehydrogenase and in rat hepatocytes, we found that EtOH administration reduces the complex between giantin and Rab6a GTPase and results in the S1943 phosphorylation of non-muscle Myosin IIA (NMIIA) heavy chain, thus facilitating NMIIA association with Golgi enzymes, as detected by biochemical approaches and 3D Structured Illumination Microscopy. We revealed that NMIIA-P-S1943 competes with giantin for the Rab6a dimer, which was converted to monomer after Golgi fragmentation. Therefore, Rab6a plays a dual role in the Golgi, serving as master regulator of Golgi organization and disorganization, and that NMIIA and giantin engage in a "tug-of-war". However, the inhibition of F-actin and downregulation of NMIIA or overexpression of NMHC-IIAΔtailpiece, as well the overexpression of dominant negative Rab6a(T27N), preserved a compact Golgi phenotype. Thus, the actomyosin complex forces EtOH-induced Golgi disorganization, and the targeting of NMIIA-P-S1943 may be important for preventing the damaging effects of alcohol metabolism on the cell. PMID:27535804

  16. Proline puckering parameters for collagen structure simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Di

    2015-03-15

    Collagen is made of triple helices rich in proline residues, and hence is influenced by the conformational motions of prolines. Because the backbone motions of prolines are restricted by the helical structures, the only side chain motion—proline puckering—becomes an influential factor that may affect the stability of collagen structures. In molecular simulations, a proper proline puckering population is desired so to yield valid results of the collagen properties. Here we design the proline puckering parameters in order to yield suitable proline puckering populations as demonstrated in the experimental results. We test these parameters in collagen and the proline dipeptide simulations. Compared with the results of the PDB and the quantum calculations, we propose the proline puckering parameters for the selected collagen model simulations.

  17. Collagenous gastritis associated with lymphocytic colitis.

    PubMed

    Groisman, G M; Meyers, S; Harpaz, N

    1996-03-01

    Collagenous sprue and collagenous colitis are two well-recognized idiopathic enteritides whose defining histologic attribute is fibrous thickening of the subepithelial basement membrane. Analogous changes in gastric mucosa seem to be quite rare. The term "collagenous gastritis" was recently applied for the first time to an isolated case of refractory gastritis in which distinctive subepithelial gastric fibrosis was noted. We report an additional case of this entity in a 35-year-old woman with refractory dyspepsia. In contrast to the earlier case of collagenous gastritis, our patient also had lymphocytic colitis, a type of colitis associated with watery diarrhea. Collagenous gastritis appears to be a distinct clinicopathologic entity, the histologic changes of which should be sought in patients with unexplained dyspepsia. Increased awareness of this condition and its possible clinical correlates may provide clues to its etiology and pathogenesis. PMID:8742654

  18. A sputnik IV saga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Charles A.

    2009-12-01

    The Sputnik IV launch occurred on May 15, 1960. On May 19, an attempt to deorbit a 'space cabin' failed and the cabin went into a higher orbit. The orbit of the cabin was monitored and Moonwatch volunteer satellite tracking teams were alerted to watch for the vehicle demise. On September 5, 1962, several team members from Milwaukee, Wisconsin made observations starting at 4:49 a.m. of a fireball following the predicted orbit of Sputnik IV. Requests went out to report any objects found under the fireball path. An early morning police patrol in Manitowoc had noticed a metal object on a street and had moved it to the curb. Later the officers recovered the object and had it dropped off at the Milwaukee Journal. The Moonwarch team got the object and reported the situation to Moonwatch Headquarters at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. A team member flew to Cambridge with the object. It was a solid, 9.49 kg piece of steel with a slag-like layer attached to it. Subsequent analyses showed that it contained radioactive nuclei produced by cosmic ray exposure in space. The scientists at the Observatory quickly recognized that measurements of its induced radioactivity could serve as a calibration for similar measurements of recently fallen nickel-iron meteorites. Concurrently, the Observatory directorate informed government agencies that a fragment from Sputnik IV had been recovered. Coincidently, a debate in the UN Committee on Peaceful Uses of Outer Space involved the issue of liability for damage caused by falling satellite fragments. On September 12, the Observatory delivered the bulk of the fragment to the US Delegation to the UN. Two days later, the fragment was used by US Ambassador Francis Plimpton as an exhibit that the time had come to agree on liability for damage from satellite debris. He offered the Sputnik IV fragment to USSR Ambassador P.D. Morozov, who refused the offer. On October 23, Drs. Alla Massevitch and E.K. Federov of the USSR visited the

  19. MORPHOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL STUDIES OF COLLAGEN FORMATION

    PubMed Central

    Lowther, D. A.; Green, N. M.; Chapman, J. A.

    1961-01-01

    Electron micrographs of thin sections of nuclear, microsomal, and mitochondrial fractions obtained from a carrageenin-induced granuloma showed considerable contamination of the heavier by the lighter fractions. Striated collagen fibrils could be identified in the nuclei + debris fraction. Only a few striated fibrils occurred in the mitochondrial fraction; very fine filaments (diameter 50 A) could be seen in this fraction, but could not be distinguished with certainty from fibrillar material derived from broken nuclei. 35 per cent of the mitochondrial and 80 per cent of the microsomal collagen was extractable by 0.2 M NaCl and could be purified by the standard methods of solution and reprecipitation. The amino acid composition of these collagen fractions determined by ion exchange chromatography was within the range normally found for collagen and gelatin from other mammalian species, allowing for 10 to 20 per cent of some non-collagenous contaminant of the microsomal collagen. Hydroxyproline and proline were isolated by chromatography on paper from hydrolysates of the nuclear, mitochondrial, and microsomal collagen fractions, after incubation of tissue slices with L-14C-proline. The specific activities of the hydroxyproline from these collagens were in the approximate ratio 1:2:6, while that of bound hydroxyproline derived from the supernatant was only 1, indicating primary synthesis of collagen in the microsomes. Attempts to demonstrate incorporation of L-14C-proline into collagen or into free hydroxyproline in cell free systems were unsuccessful, nor was it possible to demonstrate non-specific incorporation of L-14C-valine into TCA-insoluble material by various combinations of subcellular fractions. PMID:13763869

  20. Guide to collagen characterization for biomaterial studies.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Leah C; Zuena, Erin; Perez-Ramirez, Bernardo; Kaplan, David L

    2008-10-01

    The structure and remodeling of collagen in vivo is critical to the pathology and healing of many human diseases, as well as to normal tissue development and regeneration. In addition, collagen matrices in the form of fibers, coatings, and films are used extensively in biomaterial and biomedical applications. The specific properties of these matrices, both in terms of physical and chemical characteristics, have a direct impact on cellular adhesion, spreading, and proliferation rates, and ultimately on the rate and extent of new extracellular matrix formation in vitro or in vivo. In recent studies, it has also been shown that collagen matrix structure has a major impact on cell and tissue outcomes related to cellular aging and differentiation potential. Collagen structure is complex because of both diversity of source materials, chemistry, and structural hierarchy. With such significant impact of collagen features on biological outcomes, it becomes essential to consider an appropriate set of analytical tools, or guide, so that collagens attained from commercial vendors are characterized in a comparative manner as an integral part of studies focused on biological parameters. The analysis should include as a starting point: (a) structural detail-mainly focused on molecular mass, purity, helical content, and bulk thermal properties, (b) chemical features-mainly focused on surface elemental analysis and hydrophobicity, and (c) morphological features at different length scales. The application of these analytical techniques to the characterization of collagen biomaterial matrices is critical in order to appropriately correlate biological responses from different studies with experimental outcomes in vitro or in vivo. As a case study, the analytical tools employed for collagen biomaterial studies are reviewed in the context of collagen remodeling by fibroblasts. The goal is to highlight the necessity of understanding collagen biophysical and chemical features as a

  1. Effects of cis-4-hydroxy-L-proline, an inhibitor of Schwann cell differentiation, on the secretion of collagenous and noncollagenous proteins by Schwann cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eldridge, C.F.; Bunge, R.P.; Bunge, M.B. )

    1988-02-01

    The proline analog cis-4-hydroxy-L-proline (CHP) was previously shown to inhibit both Schwann cell (SC) differentiation and extracellular matrix (ECM) formation in cultures of rat SCs and dorsal root ganglion neurons. The authors confirmed that CHP inhibits basal lamina formation by immunofluorescence with antibodies to laminin, type IV collagen, and heparan sulfate proteoglycan. In order to test the hypothesis that CHP inhibits SC differentiation by specifically inhibiting the secretion of collagen. Cultures grown in the presence or absence of CHP were metabolically labeled with ({sup 3}H)leucine and the media were analyzed for relative amounts of (a) collagenous and noncollagenous proteins by assay with bacterial collagenase and by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), or (b) triple-helical collagen by pepsin digestion followed by SDS-PAGE. The results indicate that although CHP inhibited the accumulation of secreted collagen in the culture medium and disrupted collagen triple-helix formation, it also significantly inhibited the accumulation of secreted noncollagenous proteins in the medium. They conclude that CHP does not act as a specific inhibitor of collagen secretion in this system, and thus data from these experiments cannot be used to relate SC collagen production to other aspects of SC differentiation. They discuss the evidence for and against specificity of CHP action in other systems.

  2. PMD IVS Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tornatore, Vincenza

    2013-01-01

    The main activities carried out at the PMD (Politecnico di Milano DIIAR) IVS Analysis Center during 2012 are briefly higlighted, and future plans for 2013 are sketched out. We principally continued to process European VLBI sessions using different approaches to evaluate possible differences due to various processing choices. Then VLBI solutions were also compared to the GPS ones as well as the ones calculated at co-located sites. Concerning the observational aspect, several tests were performed to identify the most suitable method to achieve the highest possible accuracy in the determination of GNSS (GLOBAL NAVIGATION SATELLITE SYSTEM) satellite positions using the VLBI technique.

  3. Cloning of an annelid fibrillar-collagen gene and phylogenetic analysis of vertebrate and invertebrate collagens.

    PubMed

    Sicot, F X; Exposito, J Y; Masselot, M; Garrone, R; Deutsch, J; Gaill, F

    1997-05-15

    Arenicola marina possesses cuticular and interstitial collagens, which are mostly synthesised by its epidermis. A cDNA library was constructed from the body wall. This annelid cDNA library was screened with a sea-urchin-collagen cDNA probe, and several overlapping clones were isolated. Nucleotide sequencing of these clones revealed an open reading frame of 2052 nucleotides. The translation product exhibits a triple helical domain of 138 Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeats followed by a 269-residue-long C-terminal non-collagenous domain (C-propeptide). The triple helical domain exhibits an imperfection that has been previously described in a peptide produced by cyanogen bromide digestion (CNBr peptide) of A. marina interstitial collagen. This imperfection occurs at the same place in the interstitial collagen of the vestimentiferan Riftia pachyptila. This identifies the clone as coding for the C-terminal part of a fibrillar collagen chain. It was called FAm1alpha, for fibrillar collagen 1alpha chain of A. marina. The non-collagenous domain possesses a structure similar to carboxy-terminal propeptides of fibrillar pro-alpha chains. Only six conserved cysteine residues are observed in A. marina compared with seven or eight in all other known C-propeptides. This provides information on the importance of disulfide bonds in C-propeptide interactions and in the collagen-assembly process. Phylogenetic studies indicate that the fibrillar collagen 1alpha chain of A. marina is homologous to the R. pachyptila interstitial collagen and that the FAm1alpha gene evolved independently from the other alpha-chain genes. Complementary analyses indicate that the vertebrate fibrillar collagen family is composed of two monophyletic subgroups with a specific position of the collagen type-V chains. PMID:9210465

  4. The Mineral–Collagen Interface in Bone

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The interface between collagen and the mineral reinforcement phase, carbonated hydroxyapatite (cAp), is essential for bone’s remarkable functionality as a biological composite material. The very small dimensions of the cAp phase and the disparate natures of the reinforcement and matrix are essential to the material’s performance but also complicate study of this interface. This article summarizes what is known about the cAp-collagen interface in bone and begins with descriptions of the matrix and reinforcement roles in composites, of the phases bounding the interface, of growth of cAp growing within the collagen matrix, and of the effect of intra- and extrafibrilar mineral on determinations of interfacial properties. Different observed interfacial interactions with cAp (collagen, water, non-collagenous proteins) are reviewed; experimental results on interface interactions during loading are reported as are their influence on macroscopic mechanical properties; conclusions of numerical modeling of interfacial interactions are also presented. The data suggest interfacial interlocking (bending of collagen molecules around cAp nanoplatelets) and water-mediated bonding between collagen and cAp are essential to load transfer. The review concludes with descriptions of areas where new research is needed to improve understanding of how the interface functions. PMID:25824581

  5. Single-molecule studies of collagen mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forde, Nancy; Rezaei, Naghmeh; Kirkness, Michael

    Collagen is the fundamental structural protein in vertebrates. Its triple helical structure at the molecular level is believed to be strongly related to its mechanical role in connective tissues. However, the mechanics of collagen at the single-molecule level remain contentious. Estimates of its persistence length span an order of magnitude, from 15-180 nm for this biopolymer of 300 nm contour length. How collagen responds to applied force is also controversial, with different single-molecule studies suggesting one of three different responses: extending entropically, overwinding, or unwinding, all at forces below 10 pN. Using atomic force microscopy to image collagens deposited from solution, we find that their flexibility depends strongly on ionic strength and pH. To study force-dependent structural changes, we are performing highly parallelized enzymatic cleavage assays of triple helical collagen in our new compact centrifuge force microscope. Because proteolytic cleavage requires a locally unwound triple helix, these experiments are revealing how local collagen structure changes in response to applied force. Our results can help to resolve long-standing debates about collagen mechanics and structure at the molecular level.

  6. Fibrillogenesis in Continuously Spun Synthetic Collagen Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Caves, Jeffrey M.; Kumar, Vivek A.; Wen, Jing; Cui, Wanxing; Martinez, Adam; Apkarian, Robert; Coats, Julie E.; Berland, Keith; Chaikof, Elliot L.

    2013-01-01

    The universal structural role of collagen fiber networks has motivated the development of collagen gels, films, coatings, injectables, and other formulations. However, reported synthetic collagen fiber fabrication schemes have either culminated in short, discontinuous fiber segments at unsuitably low production rates, or have incompletely replicated the internal fibrillar structure that dictates fiber mechanical and biological properties. We report a continuous extrusion system with an off-line phosphate buffer incubation step for the manufacture of synthetic collagen fiber. Fiber with a cross-section of 53±14 by 21±3 µm and an ultimate tensile strength of 94±19 MPa was continuously produced at 60 m/hr from an ultrafiltered monomeric collagen solution. The effect of collagen solution concentration, flow rate, and spinneret size on fiber size was investigated. The fiber was further characterized by microdifferential scanning calorimetry, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), second harmonic generation (SHG) analysis, and in a subcutaneous murine implant model. Calorimetry demonstrated stabilization of the collagen triple helical structure, while TEM and SHG revealed a dense, axially aligned D-periodic fibril structure throughout the fiber cross-section. Implantation of glutaraldehyde crosslinked and non-crosslinked fiber in the subcutaneous tissue of mice demonstrated limited inflammatory response and biodegradation after a 6-week implant period. PMID:20024969

  7. The Mineral-Collagen Interface in Bone.

    PubMed

    Stock, S R

    2015-09-01

    The interface between collagen and the mineral reinforcement phase, carbonated hydroxyapatite (cAp), is essential for bone's remarkable functionality as a biological composite material. The very small dimensions of the cAp phase and the disparate natures of the reinforcement and matrix are essential to the material's performance but also complicate study of this interface. This article summarizes what is known about the cAp-collagen interface in bone and begins with descriptions of the matrix and reinforcement roles in composites, of the phases bounding the interface, of growth of cAp growing within the collagen matrix, and of the effect of intra- and extrafibrilar mineral on determinations of interfacial properties. Different observed interfacial interactions with cAp (collagen, water, non-collagenous proteins) are reviewed; experimental results on interface interactions during loading are reported as are their influence on macroscopic mechanical properties; conclusions of numerical modeling of interfacial interactions are also presented. The data suggest interfacial interlocking (bending of collagen molecules around cAp nanoplatelets) and water-mediated bonding between collagen and cAp are essential to load transfer. The review concludes with descriptions of areas where new research is needed to improve understanding of how the interface functions. PMID:25824581

  8. Propranolol-induced elevation of pulmonary collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Lindenschmidt, R.C.; Witschi, H.P.

    1985-01-01

    Current concepts of collagen metabolism suggest that fibroblasts tightly control collagen production. One of the possible mechanisms of control is via the cyclic nucleotides, cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cyclic GMP (cGMP). Beta adrenergic agonists, by elevating intracellular cAMP levels, have been shown in vitro to suppress fibroblast collagen production; whereas beta adrenergic antagonists were effective in removing this suppression by blocking the rise in cAMP. In the present study with mice, the authors showed that administration of the beta adrenergic antagonists, propranolol, at a dose demonstrated to decrease the ratio of cAMP to cGMP, resulted in an elevation in total lung collagen in vivo. The increase in collagen was evident only when propranolol was administered before and during acute lung damage induced by either butylated hydroxytoluene, bleomycin or high concentrations of oxygen. There was no increase in lung collagen when propranolol administration was delayed after injury or when given to an undamaged lung. The authors propose that via beta adrenergic blockage by propranolol, fibroblasts involved in the normal reparative process may have lost a mechanism for regulatory control, resulting in excessive deposition of collagen. 38 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  9. Probing interactions between collagen proteins via microrheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayegan, Marjan; Forde, Nancy R.

    2012-10-01

    Collagen is the major structural protein of our connective tissues. It provides integrity and mechanical strength through its hierarchical organization. Defects in collagen can lead to serious connective tissue diseases. Collagen is also widely used as a biomaterial. Given that mechanical properties are related to the structure of materials, the main goal of our research is to understand how molecular structure correlates with microscale mechanical properties of collagen solutions and networks. We use optical tweezers to trap and monitor thermal fluctuations of an embedded probe particle, from which viscoelastic properties of the solution are extracted. We find that elasticity becomes comparable to viscous behavior at collagen concentrations of 5mg/ml. Furthermore, by simultaneously neutralizing pH and adding salt, we observe changes in viscosity and elasticity of the solution over time. We attribute this to the self-assembly process of collagen molecules into fibrils with different mechanical properties. Self-assembly of collagen under these conditions is verified by turbidity measurements as well as electron microscopy. By comparing results from these local studies of viscoelasticity, we can detect spatial heterogeneity of fibril formation throughout the solution.

  10. Surgical research IV.

    PubMed

    Toledo-Pereyra, Luis H

    2010-08-01

    Harvey W. Cushing (1869-1939) is the only surgeon represented in Surgical Research IV and one of the most accomplished American contributors to surgical research in general and to neurological and endocrine surgery research in particular. Other surgical research leaders of the 19th and 20th centuries who preceded Harvey Cushing have been introduced before. First, we highlighted the "importance of medical and surgical research" as the basic elements in the advancement of medicine and surgery could be considered as Surgical Research I. Second, in Surgical Research II, we presented William Beaumont, Samuel Gross, and William Halsted as the most important participants of the first wave of American surgical researchers. Next, in Surgical Research III, we considered surgeon researchers who moved ahead in the field of surgery with their research initiatives at the time, including John B. Murphy, the Mayo Brothers William J. and Charles H. Mayo, and George W. Crile. With Harvey Cushing, we enter an era of surgical research associated with neurosurgery and endocrine surgery as part of Surgical Research IV. PMID:20690841

  11. Division Iv: Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbally, Christopher; D'Antona, Francesca; Spite, Monique; Asplund, Martin; Charbonnel, Corinne; Docobo, Jose Angel; Gray, Richard O.; Piskunov, Nikolai E.

    2012-04-01

    This Division IV was started on a trial basis at the General Assembly in The Hague 1994 and was formally accepted at the Kyoto General Assembly in 1997. Its broad coverage of ``Stars'' is reflected in its relatively large number of Commissions and so of members (1266 in late 2011). Its kindred Division V, ``Variable Stars'', has the same history of its beginning. The thinking at the time was to achieve some kind of balance between the number of members in each of the 12 Divisions. Amid the current discussion of reorganizing the number of Divisions into a more compact form it seems advisable to make this numerical balance less of an issue than the rationalization of the scientific coverage of each Division, so providing more effective interaction within a particular field of astronomy. After all, every star is variable to a certain degree and such variability is becoming an ever more powerful tool to understand the characteristics of every kind of normal and peculiar star. So we may expect, after hearing the reactions of members, that in the restructuring a single Division will result from the current Divisions IV and V.

  12. Collagenous spherulosis in an oral mucous cyst.

    PubMed

    Henry, Cathy Renee; Nace, Mindy; Helm, Klaus F

    2008-04-01

    Collagenous spherulosis is a histological pattern that has been described in both benign and malignant salivary gland tumors, proliferative lesions of breast ductal epithelium, chondroid syringomas and schwannomas. Histologic structures of similar appearance have also been reported in oral extravasation mucoceles as questionable myxoglobulosis or myxoglobulosis-like change. We report collagenous spherulosis within a mucocele removed from the lower lip of a 17-year-old female. Based upon histologic appearance, immunophenotypic data and review of the literature, we hypothesize that collagenous spherulosis and myxoglobulosis are morphologically related reaction patterns. PMID:18333906

  13. Collagen stability, hydration and native state.

    PubMed

    Mogilner, Inés G; Ruderman, Graciela; Grigera, J Raúl

    2002-12-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a collagen-like peptide (Pro-Hyp-Gly)4-Pro-Hyp-Ala-(Pro-Hyp-Gly)5 have been done in order to study the contribution of the hydration structure on keeping the native structure of collagen. The simulation shows that the absence of water produces a distortion on the molecular conformation and an increase in the number of intra-molecular hydrogen bonds. This is in agreement with previous experimental results showing the stiffness of collagen under severe drying and its increase in the thermal stability. This dehydrated material does not keep, however, the native structure.

  14. Collagenous spherulosis in an oral mucous cyst.

    PubMed

    Henry, Cathy Renee; Nace, Mindy; Helm, Klaus F

    2008-04-01

    Collagenous spherulosis is a histological pattern that has been described in both benign and malignant salivary gland tumors, proliferative lesions of breast ductal epithelium, chondroid syringomas and schwannomas. Histologic structures of similar appearance have also been reported in oral extravasation mucoceles as questionable myxoglobulosis or myxoglobulosis-like change. We report collagenous spherulosis within a mucocele removed from the lower lip of a 17-year-old female. Based upon histologic appearance, immunophenotypic data and review of the literature, we hypothesize that collagenous spherulosis and myxoglobulosis are morphologically related reaction patterns.

  15. 78 FR 2390 - CSOLAR IV South, LLC, Wistaria Ranch Solar, LLC, CSOLAR IV West, LLC, CSOLAR IV North, LLC v...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-11

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission CSOLAR IV South, LLC, Wistaria Ranch Solar, LLC, CSOLAR IV West, LLC, CSOLAR IV North, LLC v. California Independent System Operator Corporation; Notice of Complaint Take notice... IV South, LLC, Wistaria Ranch Solar, LLC, CSOLAR IV West, LLC and CSOLAR IV North, LLC...

  16. Collagen-silica hybrid materials: sodium silicate and sodium chloride effects on type I collagen fibrillogenesis.

    PubMed

    Eglin, David; Coradin, Thibaud; Giraud Guille, Marie M; Helary, Christophe; Livage, Jacques

    2005-01-01

    Collagen-silica hybrid materials have been considered for potential biomedical applications. Understanding of the collagen-silica interactions is the key to control hybrids structure and properties. For this purpose, the effect of sodium silicate and sodium chloride addition at two concentrations, 0.83 and 10 mM, on the kinetic of the type I collagen fibrillogenesis at 20 degrees C, and pH 7.4 were studied. Absorbance profiles of fibrillogenesis experiments were collected together with measures of silicic acid concentration and transmission electron microscopy analysis. The specific effect of silica addition on the collagen fibrils self-assembly mechanisms was demonstrated by comparison with the sodium chloride. Sodium silicate at 10 mM inhibited the collagen fibrillogenesis. At the same concentration, the sodium chloride decreased the rate of the collagen fibril assembly. Collagen fibrillogenesis kinetic was not significantly disturbed by the presence of 0.83 mM of sodium chloride. However, the same concentration of sodium silicate modified the collagen fibrillogenesis kinetic. Transmission electron microscopy indicated for experiment with 0.83 mM of sodium silicate, the formation of longer and wider fibrils than for the equivalent collagen fibrillogenesis experiment with sodium chloride. The effect of sodium chloride is explained in terms of osmotic exclusion and influence on electrostatic interactions between collagen fibrils. The specific involvement of silicic acid in collagen helices hydrogen-bond interactions is suggested. Finally, the results of this study are discussed regarding the preparation of composites by co-gelation of type I collagen and sodium silicate, for potential application as bone repair device.

  17. Folliculocystic and Collagen Hamartoma: A New Entity?

    PubMed Central

    An, Je Min; Kim, Ye Seul; Park, Young Lip

    2015-01-01

    Folliculocystic and collagen hamartoma is a newly described complex hamartoma characterized by abundant collagen deposition, concentric perifollicular fibrosis, and keratin- filled infundibular cysts that are visible on histopathological examination. Here, we report the case of a 19-year-old Korean man who had large brownish infiltrated plaques with numerous follicular comedo-like openings and subcutaneous cystic masses on his right temporal scalp and ear since birth. Histopathological examination showed abundant collagen deposition in the dermis that extended up to the subcutaneous fat layer, multifocal infundibular cysts packed with keratin, and perifollicular inflammation and fibrosis. Hence, we describe a new type of hamartoma with folliculocystic and collagen components but without tuberous sclerosis. PMID:26512173

  18. In vitro Sirius Red collagen assay measures the pattern shift from soluble to deposited collagen.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun; Yang, Shanmin; Zhang, Mei; Zhang, Zhenhuan; Zhang, Bingrong; Han, Deping; Ma, Jun; Wang, Xiaohui; Hong, Jingshen; Guo, Yansong; Okunieff, Paul; Zhang, Lurong

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we compared two in vitro collagen production assays ([(3)H]-proline incorporation and Sirius Red) for their ability to determine the pattern shift from soluble to deposited collagen. The effect of the antifibrotic agent, triptolide (TPL), on collagen production was also studied. The results showed that: (1) 48 h after NIH 3T3 (murine embryo fibroblast) and HFL-1(human fetal lung fibroblast) were exposed to transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β), there was an increase in soluble collagen in the culture medium; (2) on day 4, soluble collagen declined, whereas deposited collagen increased; (3) Sirius Red was easier to use than [(3)H]-proline incorporation and more consistently reflected the collagen pattern shift from soluble to deposited; (4) the in vitro Sirius Red assay took less time than the in vivo assay to determine the effect of TPL. Our results suggest that: (a) the newly synthesized soluble collagen can sensitively evaluate an agent's capacity for collagen production and (b) Sirius Red is more useful than [(3)H]-proline because it is easier to use, more convenient, less time consuming, and does not require radioactive material.

  19. A first census of collagen interruptions: collagen's own stutters and stammers.

    PubMed

    Bella, Jordi

    2014-06-01

    The repetitive Gly-X-Y sequence is the telltale sign of triple helical domains in collagens and collagen-like proteins. Most collagen sequences contain sporadic interruptions of this pattern, which may have functional roles in molecular flexibility, assembly or molecular recognition. However, the structural signatures of the different interruptions are not well defined. Here, a first comprehensive survey of collagen interruptions on collagen sequences from different taxonomic groups is presented. Amino acid preferences at the sites of interruption and the flanking triplets are analysed separately for metazoan and prokaryotic collagens and the concept of commensurateness between interruptions is introduced. Known structural information from model peptides is used to present a common framework for hydrogen bonding topology and variations in superhelical twist for the different types of interruptions. Several collagen interruptions are further classified here as stutters or stammers in analogy to the heptad breaks observed in alpha-helical coiled coils, and the structural consequences of commensurate interruptions in heterotrimeric collagens are briefly discussed. Data presented here will be useful for further investigation on the relation between structure and function of collagen interruptions.

  20. Collagen Accumulation in Osteosarcoma Cells lacking GLT25D1 Collagen Galactosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Stephan; Hennet, Thierry

    2016-08-26

    Collagen is post-translationally modified by prolyl and lysyl hydroxylation and subsequently by glycosylation of hydroxylysine. Despite the widespread occurrence of the glycan structure Glc(α1-2)Gal linked to hydroxylysine in animals, the functional significance of collagen glycosylation remains elusive. To address the role of glycosylation in collagen expression, folding, and secretion, we used the CRISPR/Cas9 system to inactivate the collagen galactosyltransferase GLT25D1 and GLT25D2 genes in osteosarcoma cells. Loss of GLT25D1 led to increased expression and intracellular accumulation of collagen type I, whereas loss of GLT25D2 had no effect on collagen secretion. Inactivation of the GLT25D1 gene resulted in a compensatory induction of GLT25D2 expression. Loss of GLT25D1 decreased collagen glycosylation by up to 60% but did not alter collagen folding and thermal stability. Whereas cells harboring individually inactivated GLT25D1 and GLT25D2 genes could be recovered and maintained in culture, cell clones with simultaneously inactive GLT25D1 and GLT25D2 genes could be not grown and studied, suggesting that a complete loss of collagen glycosylation impairs osteosarcoma cell proliferation and viability. PMID:27402836

  1. The collagen binding protein Cnm contributes to oral colonization and cariogenicity of Streptococcus mutans OMZ175.

    PubMed

    Miller, James H; Avilés-Reyes, Alejandro; Scott-Anne, Kathy; Gregoire, Stacy; Watson, Gene E; Sampson, Edith; Progulske-Fox, Ann; Koo, Hyun; Bowen, William H; Lemos, José A; Abranches, Jacqueline

    2015-05-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the etiological agent of dental caries and one of the many bacterial species implicated in infective endocarditis. The expression of the collagen-binding protein Cnm by S. mutans has been associated with extraoral infections, but its relevance for dental caries has only been theorized to date. Due to the collagenous composition of dentinal and root tissues, we hypothesized that Cnm may facilitate the colonization of these surfaces, thereby enhancing the pathogenic potential of S. mutans in advancing carious lesions. As shown for extraoral endothelial cell lines, Cnm mediates the invasion of oral keratinocytes and fibroblasts by S. mutans. In this study, we show that in the Cnm(+) native strain, OMZ175, Cnm mediates stringent adhesion to dentinal and root tissues as well as collagen-coated surfaces and promotes both cariogenicity and carriage in vivo. In vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo experiments revealed that while Cnm is not universally required for S. mutans cariogenicity, it contributes to (i) the invasion of the oral epithelium, (ii) enhanced binding on collagenous surfaces, (iii) implantation of oral biofilms, and (IV) the severity of caries due to a native Cnm(+) isolate. Taken together, our findings reveal that Cnm is a colonization factor that contributes to the pathogenicity of certain S. mutans strains in their native habitat, the oral cavity.

  2. Interaction of mouse mammary epithelial cells with collagen substrata: regulation of casein gene expression and secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.Y.H.P.; Lee, W.H.; Kaetzel, C.S.; Parry, G.; Bissell, M.J.

    1985-03-01

    Mouse mammary epithelial cells (MMEC) secrete certain milk proteins only when cultured on floating collagen gels. The authors demonstrate that modulation of milk proteins by substrata is manifested at several regulatory levels; (i) cells cultured on floating collagen gels have 3- to 10-fold more casein mRNA than cells cultured on plastic or attached collagen gels. (ii) Cells on the latter two flat substrata, nevertheless, synthesize a significant amount of caseins, indicating that the remaining mRNA is functional. (iii) Cells on all substrata are inducible for casein mRNA and casein proteins by prolactin, but the extent of induction is greater on collagen than that on plastic - i.e., the substratum confers an altered degree of inducibility. (iv) Cells on all substrata synthesize casein proteins at rates proportional to the amount of casein mRNA, but the newly synthesized caseins in cells on plastic are degraded intracellularly, whereas those synthesized by cells on floating gels are secreted into the medium. (v) Cells on all substrata examined lose virtually all mRNA for whey acidic protein despite the fact that this mRNA is abundant in the mammary gland itself; the authors conclude that additional, as-yet-unknown, factors are necessary for synthesis and secretion of whey acidic protein in culture.

  3. Binding of gelatinases A and B to type-I collagen and other matrix components.

    PubMed Central

    Allan, J A; Docherty, A J; Barker, P J; Huskisson, N S; Reynolds, J J; Murphy, G

    1995-01-01

    Matrix sequestration of matrix metalloproteinases may be important for the facilitation of remodelling events and the migration of cells through the extracellular matrix. Using an ELISA technique we studied the ability of pro and active forms of gelatinases A and B (GLA and GLB) to bind to matrix components and the contribution made by the different enzyme domains. Pro and active forms of GLA and GLB bound to type-I and type-IV collagens, gelatin and laminin films. Binding to collagens occurred exclusively via the N-terminal portion of the molecule in both of the gelatinases; deletion of the fibronectin-like domain in GLA abolished binding. Fibronectin was shown to compete with GLA, confirming that binding occurs through this domain. GLA and GLB competed for binding to collagen type I, whereas collagenase and stromelysin bound to different sites and could be co-localized with the gelatinases. We conclude that gelatinases have different binding specificities from those previously documented for stromelysin and collagenase, which bind through their C-terminal domains to collagen fibrils. Images Figure 1 PMID:7619071

  4. Extracellular matrix of smooth muscle cells: interaction of collagen type V with heparan sulfate proteoglycan

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, S.; Hoeoek, M.; Gay, R.E.; Magargal, W.W.; Reynertson, R.H.

    1986-03-05

    Alteration in the extracellular matrix produced by smooth muscle cells may play a role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. Consequently the authors have initiated studies on the structural organization of the extracellular matrix produced by cultured smooth muscle cells. Immunohisotological examination of this matrix using well-characterized mono- and polyclonal antibodies showed a partial codistribution of heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans with a number of different matrix components including collagen types I, III, IV, V and VI, laminin and fibronectin. Subsequent binding studies between isolated matrix proteins and HS showed that the polysaccharide interacts strongly with type V collagen and to a lesser extent with fibronectin as well as collagen types III and VI. The interaction between type V and HS was readily inhibited by heparin and highly sulfated HS but not be dermatan sulfate, chondroitin sulfate or HS with a low sulfate content. Furthermore, (/sup 35/S)-HS proteoglycans isolated from cultured smooth muscle cells could be adsorbed on a column of sepharose conjugated with native type V collagen and eluted in a salt gradient. Hence, the interaction between type V and HS may play a major part in stabilizing the extracellular matrix of the vessel wall.

  5. The collagen binding protein Cnm contributes to oral colonization and cariogenicity of Streptococcus mutans OMZ175.

    PubMed

    Miller, James H; Avilés-Reyes, Alejandro; Scott-Anne, Kathy; Gregoire, Stacy; Watson, Gene E; Sampson, Edith; Progulske-Fox, Ann; Koo, Hyun; Bowen, William H; Lemos, José A; Abranches, Jacqueline

    2015-05-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the etiological agent of dental caries and one of the many bacterial species implicated in infective endocarditis. The expression of the collagen-binding protein Cnm by S. mutans has been associated with extraoral infections, but its relevance for dental caries has only been theorized to date. Due to the collagenous composition of dentinal and root tissues, we hypothesized that Cnm may facilitate the colonization of these surfaces, thereby enhancing the pathogenic potential of S. mutans in advancing carious lesions. As shown for extraoral endothelial cell lines, Cnm mediates the invasion of oral keratinocytes and fibroblasts by S. mutans. In this study, we show that in the Cnm(+) native strain, OMZ175, Cnm mediates stringent adhesion to dentinal and root tissues as well as collagen-coated surfaces and promotes both cariogenicity and carriage in vivo. In vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo experiments revealed that while Cnm is not universally required for S. mutans cariogenicity, it contributes to (i) the invasion of the oral epithelium, (ii) enhanced binding on collagenous surfaces, (iii) implantation of oral biofilms, and (IV) the severity of caries due to a native Cnm(+) isolate. Taken together, our findings reveal that Cnm is a colonization factor that contributes to the pathogenicity of certain S. mutans strains in their native habitat, the oral cavity. PMID:25733523

  6. The Collagen Binding Protein Cnm Contributes to Oral Colonization and Cariogenicity of Streptococcus mutans OMZ175

    PubMed Central

    Miller, James H.; Avilés-Reyes, Alejandro; Scott-Anne, Kathy; Gregoire, Stacy; Watson, Gene E.; Sampson, Edith; Progulske-Fox, Ann; Koo, Hyun; Bowen, William H.; Lemos, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the etiological agent of dental caries and one of the many bacterial species implicated in infective endocarditis. The expression of the collagen-binding protein Cnm by S. mutans has been associated with extraoral infections, but its relevance for dental caries has only been theorized to date. Due to the collagenous composition of dentinal and root tissues, we hypothesized that Cnm may facilitate the colonization of these surfaces, thereby enhancing the pathogenic potential of S. mutans in advancing carious lesions. As shown for extraoral endothelial cell lines, Cnm mediates the invasion of oral keratinocytes and fibroblasts by S. mutans. In this study, we show that in the Cnm+ native strain, OMZ175, Cnm mediates stringent adhesion to dentinal and root tissues as well as collagen-coated surfaces and promotes both cariogenicity and carriage in vivo. In vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo experiments revealed that while Cnm is not universally required for S. mutans cariogenicity, it contributes to (i) the invasion of the oral epithelium, (ii) enhanced binding on collagenous surfaces, (iii) implantation of oral biofilms, and (IV) the severity of caries due to a native Cnm+ isolate. Taken together, our findings reveal that Cnm is a colonization factor that contributes to the pathogenicity of certain S. mutans strains in their native habitat, the oral cavity. PMID:25733523

  7. Studies on fish scale collagen of Pacific saury (Cololabis saira).

    PubMed

    Mori, Hideki; Tone, Yurie; Shimizu, Kouske; Zikihara, Kazunori; Tokutomi, Satoru; Ida, Tomoaki; Ihara, Hideshi; Hara, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    We purified and characterized Type I collagen from the scales of the Pacific saury (Cololabis saira) and compared it with collagen from other organisms. Subunit composition of C. saira collagen (2α1+α2) was similar to that of red sea bream (Pagrus major) and porcine collagen. C. saira collagen did not form a firm gel after neutralization of pH in solution. The temperature of denaturation (24-25 °C) of C. saira collagen was slightly lower than that of P. major collagen (26-27 °C). The contents of proline and hydroxyproline were lower in red sea bream and Pacific saury collagen than in porcine collagen. Circular dichroism spectra and Fourier-transformed infrared spectra showed that heat denaturation caused unfolding of the triple helices in all three collagens. PMID:25428059

  8. Targeting and mimicking collagens via triple helical peptide assembly

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Yu, S. Michael

    2013-01-01

    As the major structural component of the extracellular matrix, collagen plays a crucial role in tissue development and regeneration. Since structural and metabolic abnormalities of collagen are associated with numerous debilitating diseases and pathologic conditions, the ability to target collagens of diseased tissues could lead to new diagnostics and therapeutics. Collagen is also a natural biomaterial widely used in drug delivery and tissue engineering, and construction of synthetic collagen-like materials is gaining interests in the biomaterials community. The unique triple helical structure of collagen has been explored for targeting collagen strands, and for engineering collagen-like functional assemblies and conjugates. This review focuses on the forefront of research activities in the use of the collagen mimetic peptide for both targeting and mimicking collagens via its triple helix mediated strand hybridization and higher order assembly. PMID:24210894

  9. Differential effect of water-soluble chitin on collagen synthesis of human bone marrow stem cells and human periodontal ligament stem cells.

    PubMed

    Park, So-Yon; Park, Jung-Chul; Kim, Min-Soo; Lee, Sung-Eun; Kim, Ki-Joon; Jung, Byung-Joo; Park, Wonse; Jeon, Dong-Won; Cho, Kyoo-Sung; Kim, Chang-Sung

    2015-02-01

    Human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSCs) represent a promising regenerative material because of their mutipotency, including their ability to regenerate collagenous soft tissues. We previously found that water-soluble chitin (WSC) enhances the ability of human periodontal ligament stem cells (hPDLSCs) to synthesize collagen tissue. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of WSC on hBMSCs and hPDLSCs for the collagen synthesis both in vitro and in vivo. hBMSCs and hPDLSCs were isolated and expanded with or without 0.3 mg/mL WSC. A series of in vitro and in vivo analyses were performed to evaluate their characteristics as stem cell populations. Then, collagen and hydroxyproline assays were conducted using both in vitro and in vivo assay models, and the real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to analyze the expression of collagen-related markers. WSC-treated and nontreated hBMSCs and hPDLSCs were transplanted into immunocompromised mice, and histology and immunohistochemistry analyses were conducted after 8 weeks. The in vitro results showed that those cells possessed the characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells. The amount of soluble collagen synthesized was significantly greater in WSC-treated hBMSCs than in the nontreated group; conversely, treatment of hPDLSCs with WSC decreased the formation of soluble collagen. The amount of insoluble collagen synthesized was greater in the WSC-treated groups than in the nontreated groups for both hBMSCs and hPDLSCs. The hydroxyproline contents of the regenerated soluble and insoluble collagens were similar. The expressions of mRNA for collagen types I-V, hyaluronic acid synthase 1 (HAS1), HAS2, and HAS3, and the LOX family were higher in WSC-treated hPDLSCs than in the nontreated group, whereas WSC increased the expression of collagen type III and decreased that of collagen type I in hBMSCs. The histology and immunohistochemistry results revealed that WSC significantly increased the amount of collagen

  10. Collagenous ileitis: a study of 13 cases.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Blake Hugh; McClymont, Kelly; Brown, Ian

    2011-08-01

    Collagenous ileitis (CI), characterized by subepithelial collagen deposition in the terminal ileum, is an uncommon condition. The few cases reported to date have been associated with collagenous colitis (CC) or lymphocytic colitis. Thirteen cases of CI retrieved over a 9-year period were retrospectively studied. There were 7 female and 6 male patients, with an age range of 39 to 72 years (mean, 64 y). Two groups were identified: (1) CI associated with collagenous or lymphocytic disease elsewhere in the gastrointestinal tract and (2) CI as an isolated process. Diarrhea was the presenting symptom in 11 cases. Most patients had no regular medication use. Subepithelial collagen thickness ranged from 15 to 100 μm (mean, 32 μm) and involved 5% to 80% of the subepithelial region of the submitted biopsies. Six cases had >25 intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs)/100 epithelial cells, and villous blunting was observed in 11 cases. Chronic inflammation of the lamina propria was present in 9 cases, and focal neutrophil infiltration was identified in 3 cases. In biopsies taken from other sites, 7 of 13 colonic biopsies showed CC, 4 of 9 gastric biopsies showed collagenous gastritis, and 2 of 10 duodenal biopsies were abnormal with collagenous sprue (n=1) and partial villous atrophy and increased IELs (n=1) (both celiac disease related). Resolution of the subepithelial collagen deposition was found in the 1 case in which follow-up of terminal ileal biopsies were taken. There was partial or complete resolution of symptoms in 6 of 9 patients for whom follow-up information was available. PMID:21716082

  11. Techniques for Type I Collagen Organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson-Jackson, LaTecia Diamond

    Tissue Engineering is a process in which cells, engineering, and material methods are used in amalgamation to improve biological functions. The purpose of tissue engineering is to develop alternative solutions to treat or cure tissues and organs that have been severely altered or damaged by diseases, congenital defects, trauma, or cancer. One of the most common and most promising biological materials for tissue engineering to develop scaffolds is Type I collagen. A major challenge in biomedical research is aligning Type I collagen to mimic biological structures, such as ligaments, tendons, bones, and other hierarchal aligned structures within the human body. The intent of this research is to examine possible techniques for organizing Type I collagen and to assess which of the techniques is effective for potential biological applications. The techniques used in this research to organize collagen are soft lithography with solution-assisted sonication embossing, directional freezing, and direct poling. The final concentration used for both soft lithography with solution-assisted sonication embossing and direct poling was 1 mg/ml, whereas for directional freezing the final concentration varied between 4mg/ml, 2mg/ml, and 1 mg/ml. These techniques were characterized using the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) and Helium Ion Microscope (HIM). In this study, we have found that out of the three techniques, the soft lithography and directional freezing techniques have been successful in organizing collagen in a particular pattern, but not alignment. We concluded alignment may be dependent on the pH of collagen and the amount of acetic acid used in collagen solution. However, experiments are still being conducted to optimize all three techniques to align collagen in a unidirectional arrangement.

  12. Collagen-like antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Ryo; Kudo, Masakazu; Dazai, Yui; Mima, Takehiko; Koide, Takaki

    2016-11-01

    Combinatorial library composed of rigid rod-like peptides with a triple-helical scaffold was constructed. The component peptides were designed to have various combinations of basic and neutral (or hydrophobic) amino acid residues based on collagen-like (Gly-Pro-Yaa)-repeating sequences, inspired from the basic and amphiphilic nature of naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides. Screening of the peptide pools resulted in identification of antimicrobial peptides. A structure-activity relationship study revealed that the position of Arg-cluster at N-terminus and cystine knots at C-terminus in the triple helix significantly contributed to the antimicrobial activity. The most potent peptide RO-A showed activity against Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis. In addition, Escherichia coli exposed to RO-A resulted in abnormal elongation of the cells. RO-A was also shown to have remarkable stability in human serum and low cytotoxicity to mammalian cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 453-459, 2016. PMID:27271210

  13. Polymethyl methacrylate microspheres in collagen.

    PubMed

    Haneke, Eckart

    2004-12-01

    Artecoll was developed about 20 years ago and underwent a number of production changes until it recently became FDA approved under the new name of Artefill. This product contains 20% polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) microspheres with a diameter of 30 to 40 microm, which are suspended in a 3.5% atelo-collagen solution. The PMMA microspheres are now purified and no longer have an electrostatic charge, which in part was the cause for the early granulomatous reactions. Further, PMMA has long been known as bone cement and has been used in cosmetic surgery with a very good safety record. PMMA microspheres are biologically inert and nondegradable. The treatment results are therefore permanent and technical errors as well as incorrect injections will last. Due to the early record of granuloma formation, there is still a debate as to whether this product-as well as all other permanent fillers-should be injected for cosmetic reasons or not. With proper indications, excellent injection techniques, and realistic expectations as to what can be expected, this product has now proved to be one of the superior permanent filler substances.

  14. Corneal Collagen Cross-Linking

    PubMed Central

    Jankov II, Mirko R.; Jovanovic, Vesna; Nikolic, Ljubisa; Lake, Jonathan C.; Kymionis, Georgos; Coskunseven, Efekan

    2010-01-01

    Corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL) with riboflavin and ultraviolet-A (UVA) is a new technique of corneal tissue strengthening by using riboflavin as a photosensitizer and UVA to increase the formation of intra and interfibrillar covalent bonds by photosensitized oxidation. Keratocyte apoptosis in the anterior segment of the corneal stroma all the way down to a depth of about 300 microns has been described and a demarcation line between the treated and untreated cornea has been clearly shown. It is important to ensure that the cytotoxic threshold for the endothelium has not been exceeded by strictly respecting the minimal corneal thickness. Confocal microscopy studies show that repopulation of keratocytes is already visible 1 month after the treatment, reaching its pre-operative quantity and quality in terms of functional morphology within 6 months after the treatment. The major indication for the use of CXL is to inhibit the progression of corneal ectasias, such as keratoconus and pellucid marginal degeneration. CXL may also be effective in the treatment and prophylaxis of iatrogenic keratectasia, resulting from excessively aggressive photoablation. This treatment has also been used to treat infectious corneal ulcers with apparent favorable results. Combination with other treatments, such as intracorneal ring segment implantation, limited topography-guided photoablation and conductive keratoplasty have been used with different levels of success. PMID:20543933

  15. dBASE IV basics

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, P.

    1994-09-01

    This is a user`s manual for dBASE IV. dBASE IV is a popular software application that can be used on your personal computer to help organize and maintain your database files. It is actually a set of tools with which you can create, organize, select and manipulate data in a simple yet effective manner. dBASE IV offers three methods of working with the product: (1) control center: (2) command line; and (3) programming.

  16. Collagen shield delivery of amphotericin B.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, S D; Harrison, S A; Engstrom, R E; Bawdon, R E; Lee, D A; Mondino, B J

    1990-06-15

    By using a high-pressure liquid chromatography assay, we investigated the ability of collagen shield therapeutic contact lenses to release amphotericin B and deliver it to the anterior segment of rabbit eyes. In vitro studies showed that presoaked collagen shields released most of the amphotericin B within the first hour of elution. We compared the corneal and aqueous humor amphotericin B levels produced by collagen shields soaked in amphotericin B and frequent-drop therapy at four time points over a six-hour period. The collagen shields soaked in amphotericin B produced corneal levels that were higher than those produced by frequent-drop therapy at one hour, equivalent to drop therapy at two and three hours, and lower than drop therapy at six hours. There were no differences in amphotericin B levels in aqueous humor at any time point between rabbits treated with collagen shield delivery and rabbits treated with frequent-drop delivery. The results of this study suggest that amphotericin B delivery to the cornea by collagen shields is comparable to frequent-drop delivery but has the potential benefit of added convenience and compliance.

  17. Marine Origin Collagens and Its Potential Applications

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Tiago H.; Moreira-Silva, Joana; Marques, Ana L. P.; Domingues, Alberta; Bayon, Yves; Reis, Rui L.

    2014-01-01

    Collagens are the most abundant high molecular weight proteins in both invertebrate and vertebrate organisms, including mammals, and possess mainly a structural role, existing different types according with their specific organization in distinct tissues. From this, they have been elected as one of the key biological materials in tissue regeneration approaches. Also, industry is constantly searching for new natural sources of collagen and upgraded methodologies for their production. The most common sources are from bovine and porcine origin, but other ways are making their route, such as recombinant production, but also extraction from marine organisms like fish. Different organisms have been proposed and explored for collagen extraction, allowing the sustainable production of different types of collagens, with properties depending on the kind of organism (and their natural environment) and extraction methodology. Such variety of collagen properties has been further investigated in different ways to render a wide range of applications. The present review aims to shed some light on the contribution of marine collagens for the scientific and technological development of this sector, stressing the opportunities and challenges that they are and most probably will be facing to assume a role as an alternative source for industrial exploitation. PMID:25490254

  18. Thoracic manifestations of collagen vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Capobianco, Julia; Grimberg, Alexandre; Thompson, Bruna M; Antunes, Viviane B; Jasinowodolinski, Dany; Meirelles, Gustavo S P

    2012-01-01

    Collagen vascular diseases are a diverse group of immunologically mediated systemic disorders that often lead to thoracic changes. The collagen vascular diseases that most commonly involve the lung are rheumatoid arthritis, progressive systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, polymyositis and dermatomyositis, mixed connective tissue disease, and Sjögren syndrome. Interstitial lung disease and pulmonary arterial hypertension are the main causes of mortality and morbidity among patients with collagen vascular diseases. Given the broad spectrum of possible thoracic manifestations and the varying frequency with which different interstitial lung diseases occur, the interpretation of thoracic images obtained in patients with collagen vascular diseases can be challenging. The task may be more difficult in the presence of treatment-related complications such as drug toxicity and infections, which are common in this group of patients. Although chest radiography is most often used for screening and monitoring of thoracic alterations, high-resolution computed tomography can provide additional information about lung involvement in collagen vascular diseases and may be especially helpful for differentiating specific disease patterns in the lung. General knowledge about the manifestations of thoracic involvement in collagen vascular diseases allows radiologists to provide better guidance for treatment and follow-up of these patients.

  19. Glucose stabilizes collagen sterilized with gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Ohan, Mark P; Dunn, Michael G

    2003-12-15

    Gamma irradiation sterilization (gamma-irradiation) fragments and denatures collagen, drastically decreasing critical physical properties. Our goal was to maintain strength and stability of gamma-irradiated collagen by adding glucose, which in theory can initiate crosslink formation in collagen during exposure to gamma-irradiation. Collagen films prepared with and without glucose were gamma-irradiated with a standard dose of 2.5 Mrad. Relative amounts of crosslinking and denaturation were approximated based on solubility and the mechanical properties of the films after hydration, heat denaturation, or incubation in enzymes (collagenase and trypsin). After exposure to gamma-irradiation, collagen films containing glucose had significantly higher mechanical properties, greater resistance to enzymatic degradation, and decreased solubility compared with control films. The entire experiment was repeated with a second set of films that were exposed first to ultraviolet irradiation (254 nm) to provide higher initial strength and then gamma-irradiated. Again, films containing glucose had significantly greater mechanical properties and resistance to enzymatic degradation compared with controls. Gel electrophoresis showed that glucose did not prevent peptide fragmentation; therefore, the higher strength and stability in glucose-incorporated films may be due to glucose-derived crosslinks. The results of this study suggest that glucose may be a useful additive to stabilize collagenous materials or tissues sterilized by gamma-irradiation.

  20. Perisigmoid Abscess Leading to a Diagnosis of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type IV

    PubMed Central

    Kesavan, Anil; Srikumar, Pillai B.; McConnie, Randolph M.

    2016-01-01

    The Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS) are a group of connective tissue disorders characterized by triad of joint hypermobility, skin extensibility, and tissue fragility. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV places patients at risk for life-threatening, spontaneous, vascular or visceral rupture due to reduced or abnormal secretion of type III collagen. We present an adolescent male who was found to have a perisigmoid abscess with a fistula connecting to adjacent sigmoid colon secondary to undiagnosed EDS type IV. Conservative management with antibiotics and bowel rest was pursued to allow for elective resection for his acute complicated diverticulitis at a safer time. PMID:26958560

  1. Perisigmoid Abscess Leading to a Diagnosis of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type IV.

    PubMed

    Normatov, Inessa; Kesavan, Anil; Srikumar, Pillai B; McConnie, Randolph M

    2016-01-01

    The Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS) are a group of connective tissue disorders characterized by triad of joint hypermobility, skin extensibility, and tissue fragility. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV places patients at risk for life-threatening, spontaneous, vascular or visceral rupture due to reduced or abnormal secretion of type III collagen. We present an adolescent male who was found to have a perisigmoid abscess with a fistula connecting to adjacent sigmoid colon secondary to undiagnosed EDS type IV. Conservative management with antibiotics and bowel rest was pursued to allow for elective resection for his acute complicated diverticulitis at a safer time. PMID:26958560

  2. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdnack, James A.; Zhou, Xiaobin; Larrabee, Glenn J.; Millis, Scott R.; Salthouse, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-fourth edition (WAIS-IV) and the Wechsler Memory Scale-fourth edition (WMS-IV) were co-developed to be used individually or as a combined battery of tests. The independent factor structure of each of the tests has been identified; however, the combined factor structure has yet to be determined. Confirmatory…

  3. Improving IV-A/IV-D Interface. Trainer Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. for Child Support Enforcement, Chevy Chase, MD.

    Effective interface between the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (IV-A) and the Child Support Enforcement (IV-D) programs is a key factor in assisting families in becoming self-sufficient, reducing welfare expenditures, and enforcing parental responsibility to support their children. Consequently, overcoming the procedural, technological,…

  4. Improving IV-A/IV-D Interface. Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. for Child Support Enforcement, Chevy Chase, MD.

    Effective interface between the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (IV-A) and the Child Support Enforcement (IV-D) programs is a key factor in assisting families in becoming self-sufficient, reducing welfare expenditures, and enforcing parental responsibility to support their children. Consequently, overcoming the procedural, technological,…

  5. Characterization of a non-fibrillar-related collagen in the mollusc Haliotis tuberculata and its biological activity on human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Christophe; Serpentini, Antoine; Kypriotou, Magdalini; Renard, Emmanuelle; Galéra, Philippe; Lebel, Jean-Marc

    2011-10-01

    In invertebrates, members of the collagen family have been found in various phyla. Surprisingly, in mollusc, little is known about such molecules. In this study, we characterize the full-length abalone type IV collagen and we analysed its biological effects on human fibroblast in order to gain insights about this molecule in molluscs and particularly clues about its roles. We screened a cDNA library of Haliotis tuberculata hemocytes. The expression pattern of the transcript is determined using real-time polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization. The close identity between α1(IV) C-terminal domain and the vertebrate homologue led us to produce, purify and test in vitro a recombinant protein corresponding to this region using human dermal fibroblasts cell culture. The biological effects were evaluated on proliferation and on differentiation. We found that the 5,334-bp open reading frame transcript encodes a protein of 1,777 amino acids, including an interrupted 1,502-residue collagenous domain and a 232-residue C-terminal non-collagenous domain. The expression pattern of this transcript is mainly found in the mantle and hemocytes. The recombinant protein corresponding α1(IV) C-terminal domain increased fibroblast proliferation by 69% and doubled collagen synthesis produced in primary cultures. This work provides the first complete primary structure of a mollusc non-fibrillar collagen chain and the biological effects of its C-terminal domain on human cells. In this study, we prove that the NC1 domain from a molluscan collagen can improve human fibroblast proliferation as well as differentiation.

  6. Biology of collagen-proteoglycan interaction.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, L C; Montes, G S

    1983-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to review our knowledge to date of collagen-proteoglycan interaction. Many topics have been taken into account in order to provide a reasonably complete picture of this highly complex subject. Basic information about collagen biology, and an overview of the current concepts and advances regarding proteoglycans, have served as a basis to elucidate collagen-proteoglycan interaction. The bases of some methods of study have been reviewed in order to provide a fuller understanding of the results that are cited in this article. The experimental models and biological examples discussed herein demonstrate that collagen-proteoglycan interaction is essential to the extracellular matrix resiliency. The organization of these macromolecules is critical: collagen molecules become assembled into fibrils, fibrils aggregate to form fibers, fibers associate into bundles of fibers, and proteoglycans in the ground substance play a major role in the ordering process; on the other hand, glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are composed of repeating monomers--GAGs linked to a same protein core form a proteoglycan--which, in turn, may bind to a hyaluronic acid molecule to form a proteoglycan aggregate together with other proteoglycans. Further growth of these complex macromolecules at higher hierarchical levels occurs by interaction of collagen with proteoglycans. A striking correlation between the tissue distribution of the genetically-distinct types of interstitial collagen and the occurrence of the different GAGs (which argues strongly in favour of a specific interaction) is demonstrated comprehensively in this review. Tissues composed of collagen type I possess small amounts of proteoglycans which contain almost exclusively dermatan sulfate; while tissues containing only collagen type II have high amounts of chondroitin sulfates. Collagen type III is the major fibrillary constituent of tissues that possess intermediate levels of proteoglycans, which contain great

  7. Imaging Denatured Collagen Strands In vivo and Ex vivo via Photo-triggered Hybridization of Caged Collagen Mimetic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Foss, Catherine A.; Pomper, Martin G.; Yu, S. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Collagen is a major structural component of the extracellular matrix that supports tissue formation and maintenance. Although collagen remodeling is an integral part of normal tissue renewal, excessive amount of remodeling activity is involved in tumors, arthritis, and many other pathological conditions. During collagen remodeling, the triple helical structure of collagen molecules is disrupted by proteases in the extracellular environment. In addition, collagens present in many histological tissue samples are partially denatured by the fixation and preservation processes. Therefore, these denatured collagen strands can serve as effective targets for biological imaging. We previously developed a caged collagen mimetic peptide (CMP) that can be photo-triggered to hybridize with denatured collagen strands by forming triple helical structure, which is unique to collagens. The overall goals of this procedure are i) to image denatured collagen strands resulting from normal remodeling activities in vivo, and ii) to visualize collagens in ex vivo tissue sections using the photo-triggered caged CMPs. To achieve effective hybridization and successful in vivo and ex vivo imaging, fluorescently labeled caged CMPs are either photo-activated immediately before intravenous injection, or are directly activated on tissue sections. Normal skeletal collagen remolding in nude mice and collagens in prefixed mouse cornea tissue sections are imaged in this procedure. The imaging method based on the CMP-collagen hybridization technology presented here could lead to deeper understanding of the tissue remodeling process, as well as allow development of new diagnostics for diseases associated with high collagen remodeling activity. PMID:24513868

  8. Stable isotope-labeled collagen: a novel and versatile tool for quantitative collagen analyses using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Taga, Yuki; Kusubata, Masashi; Ogawa-Goto, Kiyoko; Hattori, Shunji

    2014-08-01

    Collagens are the most abundant proteins in animals and are involved in many physiological/pathological events. Although various methods have been used to quantify collagen and its post-translational modifications (PTMs) over the years, it is still difficult to accurately quantify type-specific collagen and minor collagen PTMs. We report a novel quantitative method targeting collagen using stable isotope-labeled collagen named "SI-collagen", which was labeled with isotopically heavy lysine, arginine, and proline in fibroblasts culture. We prepared highly labeled and purified SI-collagen for use as an internal standard in mass spectrometric analysis, particularly for a new approach using amino acid hydrolysis. Our method enabled accurate collagen analyses, including quantification of (1) type-specific collagen (types I and III in this paper), (2) total collagen, and (3) collagen PTMs by LC-MS with high sensitivity. SI-collagen is also applicable to other diverse analyses of collagen and can be a powerful tool for various studies, such as detailed investigation of collagen-related disorders.

  9. A collagen-binding EGFR antibody fragment targeting tumors with a collagen-rich extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hui; Li, Xiaoran; Wang, Bin; Chen, Bing; Zhao, Yannan; Sun, Jie; Zhuang, Yan; Shi, Jiajia; Shen, He; Zhang, Zhijun; Dai, Jianwu

    2016-01-01

    Many tumors over-express collagen, which constitutes the physical scaffold of tumor microenvironment. Collagen has been considered to be a target for cancer therapy. The collagen-binding domain (CBD) is a short peptide, which could bind to collagen and achieve the sustained release of CBD-fused proteins in collagen scaffold. Here, a collagen-binding EGFR antibody fragment was designed and expressed for targeting the collagen-rich extracellular matrix in tumors. The antibody fragment (Fab) of cetuximab was fused with CBD (CBD-Fab) and expressed in Pichia pastoris. CBD-Fab maintained antigen binding and anti-tumor activity of cetuximab and obtained a collagen-binding ability in vitro. The results also showed CBD-Fab was mainly enriched in tumors and had longer retention time in tumors in A431 s.c. xenografts. Furthermore, CBD-Fab showed a similar therapeutic efficacy as cetuximab in A431 xenografts. Although CBD-Fab hasn’t showed better therapeutic effects than cetuximab, its smaller molecular and special target may be applicable as antibody–drug conjugates (ADC) or immunotoxins. PMID:26883295

  10. Crystal structure and mapping by site-directed mutagenesis of the collagen-binding epitope of an activated form of BM-40/SPARC/osteonectin.

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, T; Hohenester, E; Göhring, W; Timpl, R

    1998-01-01

    The extracellular calcium-binding domain (positions 138-286) of the matrix protein BM-40 possesses a binding epitope of moderate affinity for several collagen types. This epitope was predicted to reside in helix alphaA and to be partially masked by helix alphaC. Here we show that deletion of helix alphaC produces a 10-fold increase in collagen affinity similar to that seen after proteolytic cleavage of this helix. The predicted removal of the steric constraint was clearly demonstrated by the crystal structure of the mutant at 2.8 A resolution. This constitutively activated mutant was used to map the collagen-binding site following alanine mutagenesis at 13 positions. Five residues were crucial for binding, R149 and N156 in helix alphaA, and L242, M245 and E246 in a loop region connecting the two EF hands of BM-40. These residues are spatially close and form a flat ring of 15 A diameter which matches the diameter of a triple-helical collagen domain. The mutations showed similar effects on binding to collagens I and IV, indicating nearly identical binding sites on both collagens. Selected mutations in the non-activated mutant DeltaI also reduced collagen binding, consistent with the same location of the epitope but in a more cryptic form in intact BM-40. PMID:9501084

  11. Hydroxyapatite-reinforced collagen tissue engineering scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Robert J.

    Scaffolds have been fabricated from a wide variety of materials and most have showed some success, either as bone graft substitutes or as tissue engineering scaffolds. However, all current scaffold compositions and architectures suffer from one or more flaws including poor mechanical properties, lack of biological response, nondegradability, or a scaffold architecture not conducive to osteointegration. Biomimetic approaches to scaffold design using the two main components of bone tissue, collagen and hydroxyapatite, resulted in scaffolds with superior biological properties but relatively poor mechanical properties and scaffold architecture. It was hypothesized that by optimizing scaffold composition and architecture, HA-collagen bone tissue engineering scaffolds could provide both an excellent biological response along with improved structural properties. The mechanical properties of freeze-dried HA-collagen scaffolds, the most common type of porous HA-collagen material, were first shown to be increased by the addition of HA reinforcements, but scaffold stiffness still fell far short of the desired range. Based on limitations inherent in the freeze-dried process, a new type of leached-porogen scaffold fabrication process was developed. Proof-of-concept scaffolds demonstrated the feasibility of producing leached-porogen HA-collagen materials, and the scaffold architecture was optimized though careful selection of porogen particle size and shape along with an improved crosslinking technique. The final scaffolds exhibited substantially increased compressive modulus compared to previous types HA-collagen scaffolds, while the porosity, pore size, and scaffold permeability were tailored to be suitable for bone tissue ingrowth. An in vitro study demonstrated the capacity of the leached-porogen scaffolds to serve as a substrate for the differentiation of osteoblasts and subsequent production of new bone tissue. The new leached-porogen scaffold HA-collagen scaffolds were

  12. NATIONAL COASTAL CONDITION REPORT IV

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Coastal Condition Report IV (NCCR IV) is the fourth in a series of environmental assessments of U.S. coastal waters and the Great Lakes. The report includes assessments of all the nation’s estuaries in the contiguous 48 states and Puerto Rico, south-eastern Alaska, ...

  13. Daily consumption of the collagen supplement Pure Gold Collagen® reduces visible signs of aging.

    PubMed

    Borumand, Maryam; Sibilla, Sara

    2014-01-01

    With age, changes in the metabolic processes of structural components of the skin lead to visible signs of aging, such as increased dryness and wrinkle formation. The nutritional supplement, Pure Gold Collagen(®), which consists of hydrolyzed collagen, hyaluronic acid, vitamins, and minerals, was developed to counteract these signs. An open-label study was conducted to investigate the effects of this nutritional supplement on skin properties. Supplementation with 50 mL of Pure Gold Collagen on a daily basis for 60 days led to a noticeable reduction in skin dryness, wrinkles, and nasolabial fold depth. In addition, a significant increase in collagen density and skin firmness was observed after 12 weeks. The data from this study suggest that Pure Gold Collagen can counteract signs of natural aging.

  14. Plasma clot-promoting effect of collagen in relation to collagen-platelet interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, P.A.; Schneider, M.D.; Miller, J.K.

    1981-01-01

    The hemostatic function of several acid-soluble collagen preparations and a fibrillar-form collagen preparation have been compared. Pepsin-treated acid-soluble collagen isolated from burro and horse aortic tissue and acid-soluble colagen isolated from human umbilical cord readily promoted platelet aggregation, but failed to activate the coagulation mechanism even after prolonged incubation with plasma at 37 C. By contrast, fibrillar-form collagen isolated from burro aorta was both an efficient stimulant for the induction of platelet aggregation and a potent clot-promoting agent. Similar results were found for all the collagen preparations irrespective of whether the studies were conducted with sheep or with burro plasma. Heat denaturation studies showed that the hemostatic functon of the fibrillar-form colagen was dependent on an intact tirple-helical structure.

  15. Daily consumption of the collagen supplement Pure Gold Collagen® reduces visible signs of aging

    PubMed Central

    Borumand, Maryam; Sibilla, Sara

    2014-01-01

    With age, changes in the metabolic processes of structural components of the skin lead to visible signs of aging, such as increased dryness and wrinkle formation. The nutritional supplement, Pure Gold Collagen®, which consists of hydrolyzed collagen, hyaluronic acid, vitamins, and minerals, was developed to counteract these signs. An open-label study was conducted to investigate the effects of this nutritional supplement on skin properties. Supplementation with 50 mL of Pure Gold Collagen on a daily basis for 60 days led to a noticeable reduction in skin dryness, wrinkles, and nasolabial fold depth. In addition, a significant increase in collagen density and skin firmness was observed after 12 weeks. The data from this study suggest that Pure Gold Collagen can counteract signs of natural aging. PMID:25342893

  16. Lipoid proteinosis: an inherited disorder of collagen metabolism?

    PubMed

    Harper, J I; Duance, V C; Sims, T J; Light, N D

    1985-08-01

    The dermal collagen of a patient with lipoid proteinosis was investigated by immunohistochemistry and biochemical analysis. The affected skin was found to contain significantly less collagen per unit dry weight than normal dermis but showed elevated levels of type 3 collagen with respect to type I. Purification of collagen types from affected skin after pepsin digestion showed no novel forms, but a doubling in the yield of type 5 collagen. These results correlated well with those of immunohistochemistry which showed a patchy, diffuse, widely distributed type 3 collagen and an increase in types 4 and 5 collagens associated with 'onion skin' endothelial basement membrane thickening. Estimation of collagen cross-links showed an abnormal pattern with a preponderance of the keto-imine form not normally associated with skin. These results strongly suggest that lipoid proteinosis involves a primary perturbation of collagen metabolism.

  17. Lipoid proteinosis: an inherited disorder of collagen metabolism?

    PubMed

    Harper, J I; Duance, V C; Sims, T J; Light, N D

    1985-08-01

    The dermal collagen of a patient with lipoid proteinosis was investigated by immunohistochemistry and biochemical analysis. The affected skin was found to contain significantly less collagen per unit dry weight than normal dermis but showed elevated levels of type 3 collagen with respect to type I. Purification of collagen types from affected skin after pepsin digestion showed no novel forms, but a doubling in the yield of type 5 collagen. These results correlated well with those of immunohistochemistry which showed a patchy, diffuse, widely distributed type 3 collagen and an increase in types 4 and 5 collagens associated with 'onion skin' endothelial basement membrane thickening. Estimation of collagen cross-links showed an abnormal pattern with a preponderance of the keto-imine form not normally associated with skin. These results strongly suggest that lipoid proteinosis involves a primary perturbation of collagen metabolism. PMID:3896292

  18. Collagenous colitis: new diagnostic possibilities with endomicroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, A.; Goetz, M.; Biesterfeld, S.; Galle, P. R.; Neurath, M. F.; Kiesslich, R.

    2006-02-01

    Collagenous colitis is a kind of microscopic colitis. It is characterized by chronic watery diarrhea and abdominal pain. The etiology is still unknown. So far, for the diagnose a histological evaluation was necessary with the presence of thickened subepithelial collagneous bands in the lamina propria. A new developed endoscope with a confocal laser allows analysing cellular and subcellular details of the mucosal layer at high resolution in vivo. In this case report we describe for the first time to diagnose collagenous colitis during ongoing colonoscopy by using this confocal endomicroscopy. In a 67 year old female patient with typical symptoms the characteristic histological changes could be identified in the endomicroscopic view. Biopsies could be targeted to affected areas and endomicroscopic prediction of the presence of collagenous bands could be confirmed in all targeted biopsies. First endomicroscopic experience in microscopic colitis could be confirmed in four additional patients. Future prospective studies are warranted to further evaluate these initial findings. However, collagenous colitis is frequently missed and endomicroscopy seems to be the ideal tool for accurate diagnosing collagenous colitis during ongoing endoscopy.

  19. New recommendations for measuring collagen solubility.

    PubMed

    Latorre, María E; Lifschitz, Adrian L; Purslow, Peter P

    2016-08-01

    The heat-solubility of intramuscular collagen is usually conducted in 1/4 Ringer's solution at pH7.4, despite this ionic strength and pH being inappropriate for post-rigor meat. The current work studied the percentage of soluble collagen and hydrothermal isometric tension characteristics of perimysial strips on bovine semitendinosus muscles in either 1/4 Ringer's solution, distilled water, PBS, or a solution of the same salt concentration as 1/4 Ringer's but at pH5.6. Values of % soluble collagen were lower at pH7.4 than 5.6. Increasing ionic strength reduced % soluble collagen. The maximum perimysial isometric tension was independent of the bathing medium, but the percent relaxation was higher at pH7.4 than at pH5.6, and increased with ionic strength of the media. It is recommended that future measurements of collagen solubility and tests on connective tissue components of post-rigor meat should be carried out in a solution of concentrations NaCl and KCl equivalent to those in 1/4 Ringer's, but at pH5.6, a pH relevant to post-rigor meat. PMID:27057755

  20. Collagen degrading activity associated with Mycobacterium species

    PubMed Central

    Masso, F; Paez, A; Varela, E; d Diaz; Zenteno, E; Montano, L

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The mechanism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis penetration into tissues is poorly understood but it is reasonable to assume that there is a contribution from proteases capable of disrupting the extracellular matrix of the pulmonary epithelium and the blood vessels. A study was undertaken to identify and characterise collagen degrading activity of M tuberculosis.
METHODS—Culture filtrate protein extract (CFPE) was obtained from reference mycobacterial strains and mycobacteria isolated from patients with tuberculosis. The collagen degrading activity of CFPE was determined according to the method of Johnson-Wint using 3H-type I collagen. The enzyme was identified by the Birkedal-Hansen and Taylor method and its molecular mass determined by SDS-PAGE and Sephacryl S-300 gel filtration chromatography using an electroelution purified enzyme.
RESULTS—CFPE from Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv showed collagenolytic activity that was four times higher than that of the avirulent strain H37Ra. The 75 kDa enzyme responsible was divalent cation dependent. Other mycobacterial species and those isolated from patients with tuberculosis also had collagen degrading activity.
CONCLUSIONS—Mycobacterium species possess a metalloprotease with collagen degrading activity. The highest enzymatic activity was found in the virulent reference strain H37Rv.

 PMID:10212111

  1. Collagenous gastritis: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Ravikumara, Madhur; Ramani, Pramila; Spray, Christine H

    2007-08-01

    In this article, we report a case of collagenous gastritis in a child and review the paediatric cases reported to date. Collagenous gastritis is a rare entity, with only less than 30 cases reported so far, including 12 children, since the first description of this entity by Colletti and Trainer in 1989. This is a histological diagnosis characterised by a dramatically thickened subepithelial collagen band in the gastric mucosa associated with an inflammatory infiltrate. Children with this condition often present with epigastric pain and severe anaemia, with no evidence of extragastric involvement, in contrast to the adult patients, where chronic watery diarrhoea is the main presentation due to associated collagenous colitis. A macroscopic pattern of gastritis with nodularity of gastric mucosa, erythema and erosions are characteristic endoscopic findings in paediatric patients. Specific therapy has not been established and resolution of the abnormalities, either endoscopic or histological, has not been documented. In conclusion, collagenous gastritis is a rare entity of unknown aetiology, pathogenesis and prognosis. Gastroenterologists and pathologists need to be aware of this condition when evaluating a child with epigastric pain, anaemia and upper gastrointestinal bleeding, particularly when endoscopy reveals the nodularity of gastric mucosa. The identification, reporting and long-term follow-up of cases will shed more light on this puzzling condition. PMID:17453238

  2. Jararhagin disruption of endothelial cell anchorage is enhanced in collagen enriched matrices.

    PubMed

    Baldo, C; Lopes, D S; Faquim-Mauro, E L; Jacysyn, J F; Niland, S; Eble, J A; Clissa, P B; Moura-da-Silva, A M

    2015-12-15

    Hemorrhage is one of the most striking effects of bites by viper snakes resulting in fast bleeding and ischemia in affected tissues. Snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) are responsible for hemorrhagic activity, but the mechanisms involved in SVMP-induced hemorrhage are not entirely understood and the study of such mechanisms greatly depends on in vivo experiments. In vivo, hemorrhagic SVMPs accumulate on basement membrane (BM) of venules and capillary vessels allowing the hydrolysis of collagen IV with consequent weakness and rupture of capillary walls. These effects are not reproducible in vitro with conventional endothelial cell cultures. In this study we used two-dimension (2D) or three-dimension (3D) cultures of HUVECs on matrigel and observed the same characteristics as in ex vivo experiments: only the hemorrhagic toxin was able to localize on surfaces or internalize endothelial cells in 2D cultures or in the surface of tubules formed on 3D cultures. The contribution of matrigel, fibronectin and collagen matrices in jararhagin-induced endothelial cell damage was then analyzed. Collagen and matrigel substrates enhanced the endothelial cell damage induced by jararhagin allowing toxin binding to focal adhesions, disruption of stress fibers, detachment and apoptosis. The higher affinity of jararhagin to collagen than to fibronectin explains the localization of the toxin within BM. Moreover, once located in BM, interactions of jararhagin with α2β1 integrin would favor its localization on focal adhesions, as observed in our study. The accumulation of toxin in focal adhesions, observed only in cells grown in collagen matrices, would explain the enhancement of cell damage in these matrices and reflects the actual interaction among toxin, endothelial cells and BM components that occurs in vivo and results in the hemorrhagic lesions induced by viper venoms.

  3. Regional differences in water content, collagen content, and collagen degradation in the cervix of nonpregnant cows.

    PubMed

    Breeveld-Dwarkasing, V N A; de Boer-Brouwer, M; te Koppele, J M; Bank, R A; van der Weijden, G C; Taverne, M A M; van Dissel-Emiliani, F M F

    2003-11-01

    The cow could be a suitable model for studies concerning functional changes of the cervix. However, as in many species, the bovine cervix becomes softer in texture during the follicular phase of the estrous cycle compared to the luteal phase. In the present study, we explored if changes in the collagen network take place that could be responsible for this phenomenon and if regional differences in water content, collagen content, and collagen degradation along the cross-sectional and longitudinal axes of the cervix were present. Two groups of nonpregnant animals with different progesterone status were studied. One group (n = 11) was under high progesterone influence, and the other group (n = 12) was under low progesterone influence. The water content was derived from the weight of the samples before and after lyophilization. The collagen content and the ratio of collagenous to noncollagenous proteins (hydroxyproline:proline ratio) were determined by performing amino acid analysis on hydrolyzed samples using high-performance liquid chromatography. Collagen denaturation was quantified with a colorimetric assay by determining the amount of hydroxyproline released from samples treated with alpha-chymotrypsine. The water content of the superficial layer of the submucosa was always significantly (P < 0.01) higher than the water content of the deep layer in the vaginal, mid, and uterine segments, but this was unrelated to the progesterone status of the animals. No effect of the tissue layers or of the progesterone status of the animals on the collagen content was observed, but an effect of segment was noted. The collagen content (mug/mg dry wt) in the vaginal segment of the cervix was significantly higher than in the mid (P < 0.05) and the uterine (P < 0.01) segments. The hydroxyproline:proline ratio showed the same pattern as the collagen content. The percentage of collagen denaturation in the superficial layer was always significantly (P < 0.01) higher than that in the

  4. Collagens XV and XVIII show different expression and localisation in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma: type XV appears in tumor stroma, while XVIII becomes upregulated in tumor cells and lost from microvessels.

    PubMed

    Karppinen, Sanna-Maria; Honkanen, Hanne-Kaisa; Heljasvaara, Ritva; Riihilä, Pilvi; Autio-Harmainen, Helena; Sormunen, Raija; Harjunen, Vanessa; Väisänen, Marja-Riitta; Väisänen, Timo; Hurskainen, Tiina; Tasanen, Kaisa; Kähäri, Veli-Matti; Pihlajaniemi, Taina

    2016-05-01

    As the second most common skin malignancy, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) is an increasing health concern, while its pathogenesis at molecular level remains largely unknown. We studied the expression and localisation of two homologous basement membrane (BM) collagens, types XV and XVIII, at different stages of cSCC. These collagens are involved in angiogenesis and tumorigenesis, but their role in cancer development is incompletely understood. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed upregulation of collagen XVIII, but not collagen XV, in primary cSCC cells in comparison with normal human epidermal keratinocytes. In addition, the Ha-ras-transformed invasive cell line II-4 expressed high levels of collagen XVIII mRNA, indicating upregulation in the course of malignant transformation. Immunohistochemical analyses of a large human tissue microarray material showed that collagen XVIII is expressed by tumor cells from grade 1 onwards, while keratinocytes in normal skin and in premalignant lesions showed negative staining for it. Collagen XV appeared instead as deposits in the tumor stroma. Our findings in human cSCCs and in mouse cSCCs from the DMBA-TPA skin carcinogenesis model showed that collagen XVIII, but not collagen XV or the BM markers collagen IV or laminin, was selectively reduced in the tumor vasculature, and this decrease associated significantly with cancer progression. Our results demonstrate that collagens XV and XVIII are expressed in different sites of cSCC and may contribute in a distinct manner to processes related to cSCC tumorigenesis, identifying these collagens as potential biomarkers in the disease. PMID:26660139

  5. Aqueous complexation of thorium(IV), uranium(IV), neptunium(IV), plutonium(III/IV), and cerium(III/IV) with DTPA.

    PubMed

    Brown, M Alex; Paulenova, Alena; Gelis, Artem V

    2012-07-16

    Aqueous complexation of Th(IV), U(IV), Np(IV), Pu(III/IV), and Ce(III/IV) with DTPA was studied by potentiometry, absorption spectrophotometry, and cyclic voltammetry at 1 M ionic strength and 25 °C. The stability constants for the 1:1 complex of each trivalent and tetravalent metal were calculated. From the potentiometric data, we report stability constant values for Ce(III)DTPA, Ce(III)HDTPA, and Th(IV)DTPA of log β(101) = 20.01 ± 0.02, log β(111) = 22.0 ± 0.2, and log β(101) = 29.6 ± 1, respectively. From the absorption spectrophotometry data, we report stability constant values for U(IV)DTPA, Np(IV)DTPA, and Pu(IV)DTPA of log β(101) = 31.8 ± 0.1, 32.3 ± 0.1, and 33.67 ± 0.02, respectively. From the cyclic voltammetry data, we report stability constant values for Ce(IV) and Pu(III) of log β(101) = 34.04 ± 0.04 and 20.58 ± 0.04, respectively. The values obtained in this work are compared and discussed with respect to the ionic radius of each cationic metal.

  6. On the Collagen Mineralization. A Review

    PubMed Central

    TOMOAIA, GHEORGHE; PASCA, ROXANA-DIANA

    2015-01-01

    Collagen mineralization (CM) is a challenging process that has received a lot of attention in the past years. Among the reasons for this interest, the key role is the importance of collagen and hydroxyapatite in natural bone, as major constituents. Different protocols of mineralization have been developed, specially using simulated body fluid (SBF) and many methods have been used to characterize the systems obtained, starting with methods of determining the mineral content (XRD, FTIR, Raman, High-Resolution Spectral Ultrasound Imaging), continuing with imaging methods (AFM, TEM, SEM, Fluorescence Microscopy), thermal analysis (DSC and TGA), evaluation of the mechanical and biological properties, including statistical methods and molecular modeling. In spite of the great number of studies regarding collagen mineralization, its mechanism, both in vivo and in vitro, is not completely understood. Some of the methods used in vitro and investigation methods are reviewed here. PMID:26528042

  7. Regulation of collagen synthesis by ascorbic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Murad, S; Grove, D; Lindberg, K A; Reynolds, G; Sivarajah, A; Pinnell, S R

    1981-01-01

    After prolonged exposure to ascorbate, collagen synthesis in cultured human skin fibroblasts increased approximately 8-fold with no significant change in synthesis of noncollagen protein. This effect of ascorbate appears to be unrelated to its cofactor function in collagen hydroxylation. The collagenous protein secreted in the absence of added ascorbate was normal in hydroxylysine but was mildly deficient in hydroxyproline. In parallel experiments, lysine hydroxylase (peptidyllysine, 2-oxoglutarate:oxygen 5-oxidoreductase, EC 1.14.11.4) activity increased 3-fold in response to ascorbate administration whereas proline hydroxylase (prolyl-glycyl-peptide, 2-oxoglutarate:oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.14.11.2) activity decreased considerably. These results suggest that collage polypeptide synthesis, posttranslational hydroxylations, and activities of the two hydroxylases are independently regulated by ascorbate. PMID:6265920

  8. Physical crosslinkings of edible collagen casing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenhang; Zhang, Yi; Ye, Ran; Ni, Yonghao

    2015-11-01

    Although edible collagen casing has been commercially used in meat industry, the safety and effectiveness of collagen cross-linking with minimally invasive treatments are still big concerns for manufacturers. In this study, ultraviolet irradiation (UV) and dehydrothermal treatment (DHT) were used to improve the properties of casing. UV, DHT, and their combination (UV+DHT) significantly increased tensile strength and decreased elongation at break of casing, in which DHT showed the best performance. Swelling of casing was also partially inhibited by the treatments. Furthermore, UV and DHT slightly improved thermal stability of the casings. In addition, X-ray diffraction patterns showed the treatments caused different extents of denaturation of collagen. No obvious effects in thickness and light transparency except for surface roughness were observed in the treated casings. The physical treatments could potentially be used as safe and effective alternatives to chemical cross-linking for the production of collage casing.

  9. Biomimetic silicification of demineralized hierarchical collagenous tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ryou, Heonjune; Diogenes, Anibal; Yiu, Cynthia K.Y.; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Chen, Ji-hua; Arola, Dwayne D.; Hargreaves, Kenneth M.; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2013-01-01

    Unlike man-made composite materials, natural biominerals containing composites usually demonstrate different levels of sophisticated hierarchical structures which are responsible for their mechanical properties and other metabolic functions. However, the complex spatial organizations of the organic-inorganic phases are far beyond what they be achieved by contemporary engineering techniques. Here, we demonstrate that carbonated apatite present in collagen matrices derived from fish scale and bovine bone may be replaced by amorphous silica, using an approach that simulates what is utilized by phylogenetically ancient glass sponges. The structural hierarchy of these collagen-based biomaterials is replicated by the infiltration and condensation of fluidic polymer-stabilized silicic acid precursors within the intrafibrillar milieu of type I collagen fibrils. This facile biomimetic silicification strategy may be used for fabricating silica-based, three-dimensional functional materials with specific morphological and hierarchical requirements. PMID:23586938

  10. Biomimetic silicification of demineralized hierarchical collagenous tissues.

    PubMed

    Niu, Li-na; Jiao, Kai; Ryou, Heonjune; Diogenes, Anibal; Yiu, Cynthia K Y; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Chen, Ji-hua; Arola, Dwayne D; Hargreaves, Kenneth M; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin R

    2013-05-13

    Unlike man-made composite materials, natural biominerals containing composites usually demonstrate different levels of sophisticated hierarchical structures which are responsible for their mechanical properties and other metabolic functions. However, the complex spatial organizations of the organic-inorganic phases are far beyond what they achieved by contemporary engineering techniques. Here, we demonstrate that carbonated apatite present in collagen matrices derived from fish scale and bovine bone may be replaced by amorphous silica, using an approach that simulates what is utilized by phylogenetically ancient glass sponges. The structural hierarchy of these collagen-based biomaterials is replicated by the infiltration and condensation of fluidic polymer-stabilized silicic acid precursors within the intrafibrillar milieu of type I collagen fibrils. This facile biomimetic silicification strategy may be used for fabricating silica-based, three-dimensional functional materials with specific morphological and hierarchical requirements.

  11. Collagenous gastritis in the pediatric age.

    PubMed

    Rosell-Camps, Antonio; Riera-Llodrá, Joana María; Colom-Segui, Marina; Zibetti, Sara; Amengual-Antich, Isabel

    2015-05-01

    Collagenous gastritis (CG) is an uncommon condition known in the pediatric age. It is characterized by the presence of subepithelial collagen bands (> 10 microm) associated with lymphoplasmacytic infiltration of the stomach's lamina propria. Symptoms manifested by patients with CG may be common with many other disorders. It typically manifests with epigastralgia, vomiting, and iron deficiency during pre-adolescence. This condition's pathophysiology remains unclear. In contrast to adults, where association with collagenous colitis and other autoimmune conditions is more common, pediatric involvement is usually confined to the stomach. Drugs of choice include proton pump inhibitors and corticoids. A case is reported of a 12-year-old girl with abdominal pain and ferritin deficiency who was diagnosed with CG based on gastric biopsy and experienced a favorable outcome. PMID:25952808

  12. Reprogramming cellular phenotype by soft collagen gels.

    PubMed

    Ali, M Yakut; Chuang, Chih-Yuan; Saif, M Taher A

    2014-11-28

    A variety of cell types exhibit phenotype changes in response to the mechanical stiffness of the substrate. Many cells excluding neurons display an increase in the spread area, actin stress fiber formation and larger focal adhesion complexes as substrate stiffness increases in a sparsely populated culture. Cell proliferation is also known to directly correlate with these phenotype changes/changes in substrate stiffness. Augmented spreading and proliferation on stiffer substrates require nuclear transcriptional regulator YAP (Yes associated protein) localization in the cell nucleus and is tightly coupled to larger traction force generation. In this study, we show that different types of fibroblasts can exhibit spread morphology, well defined actin stress fibers, and larger focal adhesions even on very soft collagen gels (modulus in hundreds of Pascals) as if they are on hard glass substrates (modulus in GPa, several orders of magnitude higher). Strikingly, we show, for the first time, that augmented spreading and other hard substrate cytoskeleton architectures on soft collagen gels are not correlated with the cell proliferation pattern and do not require YAP localization in the cell nucleus. Finally, we examine the response of human colon carcinoma (HCT-8) cells on soft collagen gels. Recent studies show that human colon carcinoma (HCT-8) cells form multicellular clusters by 2-3 days when cultured on soft polyacrylamide (PA) gels with a wide range of stiffness (0.5-50 kPa) and coated with an extracellular matrix, ECM (collagen monomer/fibronectin). These clusters show limited spreading/wetting on PA gels, form 3D structures at the edges, and eventually display a remarkable, dissociative metastasis like phenotype (MLP), i.e., epithelial to rounded morphological transition after a week of culture on PA gels only, but not on collagen monomer coated stiff polystyrene/glass where they exhibit enhanced wetting and form confluent monolayers. Here, we show that HCT-8 cell

  13. Ordered collagen membranes: production and characterization.

    PubMed

    Ruderman, G; Mogilner, I G; Tolosa, E J; Massa, N; Garavaglia, M; Grigera, J R

    2012-01-01

    A collagen membrane with microscopic order is presented. The membranes were produced with acid-soluble collagen, using two different methods to obtain orientation. The product was characterized by mean of UV and IR spectra, scanning electronic microscopy, optical microscopy and laser diffractometry. The results clearly show a high level of order in the membranes obtained by both techniques. Permeability for rifamycin, ascorbic acid and NaCl was also measured. Due to the characteristics of the membranes, they have a potential application for treatment of surface injuries.

  14. Conservative management of small bowel perforation in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV.

    PubMed

    Allaparthi, Satya; Verma, Himanshu; Burns, David L; Joyce, Ann M

    2013-08-16

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a group of inherited connective tissue disorders caused by collagen synthesis defects. EDS type IV, or vascular EDS, is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the type III pro-collagen gene (COL3A1). Common complications of EDS type IV include gastrointestinal bleeding and bowel perforations, posing diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas for both surgeons and gastroenterologists. Here, we describe a complicated case of EDS type IV in a 35-year-old caucasian female who presented with overt gastrointestinal bleeding. The patient had a prior history of spontaneous colonic perforation, and an uncomplicated upper endoscopy was performed. A careful ileoscopy was terminated early due to tachycardia and severe abdominal pain, and a subsequent computed tomography scan confirmed the diagnosis of ileal perforation. The patient was managed conservatively, and demonstrated daily improvement. At the time of hospital discharge, no further episodes of gastrointestinal blood loss had occurred. This case highlights the benefit of conservative management for EDS patients with gastrointestinal hemorrhage. It is recommended that surgical treatment should be reserved for patients who fail conservative treatment or in cases of hemodynamic instability. Finally, this case demonstrates the necessity for a higher threshold of operative or endoscopic interventions in EDS type IV patients. PMID:23951395

  15. Fully automated, quantitative, noninvasive assessment of collagen fiber content and organization in thick collagen gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayan, Christopher; Levitt, Jonathan M.; Miller, Eric; Kaplan, David; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2009-05-01

    Collagen is the most prominent protein of human tissues. Its content and organization define to a large extent the mechanical properties of tissue as well as its function. Methods that have been used traditionally to visualize and analyze collagen are invasive, provide only qualitative or indirect information, and have limited use in studies that aim to understand the dynamic nature of collagen remodeling and its interactions with the surrounding cells and other matrix components. Second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging emerged as a promising noninvasive modality for providing high-resolution images of collagen fibers within thick specimens, such as tissues. In this article, we present a fully automated procedure to acquire quantitative information on the content, orientation, and organization of collagen fibers. We use this procedure to monitor the dynamic remodeling of collagen gels in the absence or presence of fibroblasts over periods of 12 or 14 days. We find that an adaptive thresholding and stretching approach provides great insight to the content of collagen fibers within SHG images without the need for user input. An additional feature-erosion and feature-dilation step is useful for preserving structure and noise removal in images with low signal. To quantitatively assess the orientation of collagen fibers, we extract the orientation index (OI), a parameter based on the power distribution of the spatial-frequency-averaged, two-dimensional Fourier transform of the SHG images. To measure the local organization of the collagen fibers, we access the Hough transform of small tiles of the image and compute the entropy distribution, which represents the probability of finding the direction of fibers along a dominant direction. Using these methods we observed that the presence and number of fibroblasts within the collagen gel significantly affects the remodeling of the collagen matrix. In the absence of fibroblasts, gels contract, especially during the first few

  16. Tumorigenicity and adenovirus-transformed cells: Collagen interaction and cell surface laminin are controlled by the serotype origin of the E1A and E1B genes

    SciTech Connect

    Bober, F.J.; Birk, D.E.; Raska, K. Jr. ); Shenk, T. )

    1988-02-01

    A library of cells transformed with recombinant adenoviruses was used to study tumorigenicity and interaction with extracellular matrix. Cells expressing the complete E1 region of highly oncogenic adenovirus type 12 (Ad12) are tumorigenic, adhere preferentially to type IV collagen, and express cell surface laminin. Weakly tumorigenic cells, which express the E1A oncogene of Ad12 and the E1B genes of Ad5, also attach preferentially to type IV collagen but do not contain laminin on their surface. Cells which express the E1A oncogene of Ad5 and the E1B genes of Ad12 are nontumorigenic and do not preferentially attach to type IV versus type I collagen but have laminin on their surface. There is no significant difference in the amounts of laminin secreted into the culture medium among cells expressing the E1B genes of Ad5 or Ad12. In vitro assays show that cells which express the E1B genes of Ad12, irrespective of the origin of the E1A genes, can bind three times more exogenously added {sup 125}I-laminin than cells expressing the E1B genes of nononcogenic Ad5. The interaction of adenovirus-transformed cells with collagen is controlled by the serotype origin of the E1A oncogene, whereas cell surface laminin is controlled by the serotype origin of the E1B genes.

  17. Probing multiscale mechanics of collagen with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayegan, Marjan; Rezaei, Naghmeh; Lam, Norman H.; Altindal, Tuba; Wieczorek, Andrew; Forde, Nancy R.

    2013-09-01

    How the molecular structure of the structural, extracellular matrix protein collagen correlates with its mechanical properties at different hierarchical structural levels is not known. We demonstrate the utility of optical tweezers to probe collagen's mechanical response throughout its assembly hierarchy, from single molecule force-extension measurements through microrheology measurements on solutions of collagen molecules, collagen fibrillar gels and gelatin. These experiments enable the determination of collagen's flexibility, mechanics, and timescales and strengths of interaction at different levels of hierarchy, information critical to developing models of how collagen's physiological function and stability are influenced by its chemical composition. By investigating how the viscoelastic properties of collagen are affected by the presence of telopeptides, protein domains that strongly influence fibril formation, we demonstrate that these play a role in conferring transient elasticity to collagen solutions.

  18. Fish collagen is an important panallergen in the Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Y; Akiyama, H; Huge, J; Kubota, H; Chikazawa, S; Satoh, T; Miyake, T; Uhara, H; Okuyama, R; Nakagawara, R; Aihara, M; Hamada-Sato, N

    2016-05-01

    Collagen was identified as a fish allergen in early 2000s. Although its allergenic potential has been suggested to be low, risks associated with collagen as a fish allergen have not been evaluated to a greater extent. In this study, we aimed to clarify the importance of collagen as a fish allergen. Our results showed that 50% of Japanese patients with fish allergy had immunoglobulin E (IgE) against mackerel collagen, whereas 44% had IgE against mackerel parvalbumin. IgE inhibition assay revealed high cross-reactivity of mackerel collagen to 22 fish species (inhibition rates: 87-98%). Furthermore, a recently developed allergy test demonstrated that collagen triggered IgE cross-linking on mast cells. These data indicate that fish collagen is an important and very common panallergen in fish consumed in Japan. The high rate of individuals' collagen allergy may be attributable to the traditional Japanese custom of raw fish consumption. PMID:26785247

  19. Visualisation of newly synthesised collagen in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Oostendorp, Corien; Uijtdewilligen, Peter J.E.; Versteeg, Elly M.; Hafmans, Theo G.; van den Bogaard, Ellen H.; de Jonge, Paul K.J.D.; Pirayesh, Ali; Von den Hoff, Johannes W.; Reichmann, Ernst; Daamen, Willeke F.; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying collagen produced de novo by cells in a background of purified collagenous biomaterials poses a major problem in for example the evaluation of tissue-engineered constructs and cell biological studies to tumor dissemination. We have developed a universal strategy to detect and localize newly deposited collagen based on its inherent association with dermatan sulfate. The method is applicable irrespective of host species and collagen source. PMID:26738984

  20. Characterization of pepsin-solubilized bovine heart-valve collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Bashey, R I; Bashey, H M; Jimenez, S A

    1978-01-01

    Collagens extracted from heart valves by using limited pepsin digestion were fractionated by differential salt precipitation. Collagen types were identified by sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis, amino acid analysis and cleavage with CNBr. Heart-valve collagen was heterogeneous in nature, consisting of a mixture of type-I and type-III collagens. The identity of type-III collagen was established on the basis of (a) insolubility in 1.7 M-NaC1 at neutral pH, (b) behaviour of this collagen fraction on gel electrophoresis under reducing and non-reducing conditions, (c) amino acid analysis showing a hydroxyproline/proline ratio greater than 1, and (d) profile of CNBr peptides on sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis showing a peak characteristic for type-III collagen containing peptides alpha1(III)CB8 and alpha1(III)CB3. In addition to types-I and -III collagen, a collagen polypeptide not previously described in heart valves was identified. This polypeptide represented approx. 30% of the collagen fraction precipitated at 4.0 M-NaCl, it migrated between beta- and alpha1-collagen chains on sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and its electrophoretic behaviour was not affected by disulphide-bond reduction. All collagen fractions from the heart valves contained increased amounts of hydroxylysine when compared with type-I and -III collagens from other tissues. The presence of beta- and gamma-chains and higher aggregates in pepsin-solubilized collagen indicated that these collagens were highly cross-linked and suggested that some of these cross-links involved the triple-helical regions of the molecule. It is likely that the higher hydroxylysine content of heart-valve collagen is responsible for the high degree of intermolecular cross-linking and may be the result of an adaptive mechanism for the specialized function of these tissues. Images Fig. 5. PMID:361035

  1. Collagen fibril diameter and leather strength.

    PubMed

    Wells, Hannah C; Edmonds, Richard L; Kirby, Nigel; Hawley, Adrian; Mudie, Stephen T; Haverkamp, Richard G

    2013-11-27

    The main structural component of leather and skin is type I collagen in the form of strong fibrils. Strength is an important property of leather, and the way in which collagen contributes to the strength is not fully understood. Synchrotron-based small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is used to measure the collagen fibril diameter of leather from a range of animals, including sheep and cattle, that had a range of tear strengths. SAXS data were fit to a cylinder model. The collagen fibril diameter and tear strength were found to be correlated in bovine leather (r(2) = 0.59; P = 0.009), with stronger leather having thicker fibrils. There was no correlation between orientation index, i.e., fibril alignment, and fibril diameter for this data set. Ovine leather showed no correlation between tear strength and fibril diameter, nor was there a correlation across a selection of other animal leathers. The findings presented here suggest that there may be a different structural motif in skin compared with tendon, particularly ovine skin or leather, in which the diameter of the individual fibrils contributes less to strength than fibril alignment does.

  2. Peroxidase enzymes regulate collagen extracellular matrix biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    DeNichilo, Mark O; Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Rayner, Timothy E; Borowicz, Romana A; Greenwood, John E; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    Myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase are heme-containing enzymes often physically associated with fibrotic tissue and cancer in various organs, without any direct involvement in promoting fibroblast recruitment and extracellular matrix (ECM) biosynthesis at these sites. We report herein novel findings that show peroxidase enzymes possess a well-conserved profibrogenic capacity to stimulate the migration of fibroblastic cells and promote their ability to secrete collagenous proteins to generate a functional ECM both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic studies conducted using cultured fibroblasts show that these cells are capable of rapidly binding and internalizing both myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase. Peroxidase enzymes stimulate collagen biosynthesis at a post-translational level in a prolyl 4-hydroxylase-dependent manner that does not require ascorbic acid. This response was blocked by the irreversible myeloperoxidase inhibitor 4-amino-benzoic acid hydrazide, indicating peroxidase catalytic activity is essential for collagen biosynthesis. These results suggest that peroxidase enzymes, such as myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase, may play a fundamental role in regulating the recruitment of fibroblast and the biosynthesis of collagen ECM at sites of normal tissue repair and fibrosis, with enormous implications for many disease states where infiltrating inflammatory cells deposit peroxidases.

  3. Temporary granulomatous inflammation following collagen implantation.

    PubMed

    Heise, H; Zimmermann, R; Heise, P

    2001-08-01

    Injections of bovine collagen are a common procedure for correction of folds in the face. However, this therapy is not free from side effects. We present a patient in whom a granulomatous inflammation occurred following implantation of this material. We therefore now insist on an observation interval of 4 weeks between test injection and actual treatment, as is recommended by the manufacturer.

  4. Collagenous spherulosis. A comment on its histogenesis.

    PubMed

    Michal, M; Skálova, A

    1990-06-01

    Collagenous spherulosis is a benign breast lesion involving lobular acini and ductules consisting of eosinophilic spherules measuring up to 100 mu in diameter. It is a myoepithelial product. We described similar lesions in salivary gland tumors and a benign lymphoepithelial lesion of the parotid gland.

  5. Propylthiouracil, independent of its antithyroid effect, decreases VSMC collagen expression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Jan; Pang, Jong-Hwei S; Lin, Kwang-Huei; Yang, Su-Hui

    2009-01-01

    Propylthiouracil (PTU), in addition to its antithyroid effect, is recently found to have a potent antiatherosclerotic effect. Because collagen accumulation is the major contributor to the growth of atherosclerotic lesions and the neointimal formation after arterial injury, the aim of this study is to investigate the impact of PTU on collagen regulation. In the rat carotid injury model, PTU administration reversed the up-regulation of collagen in the neointima induced by balloon injury. In vitro, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), the main origin of arterial collagen, were treated with PTU. Propylthiouracil caused a concentration-dependent decrease in collagen I and III steady-state protein and mRNA levels, as determined by immuno-cytochemistry, Western, and/or Northern blot analyses. Transient transfection experiments using rat type I collagen promoter construct showed that PTU failed to affect collagen gene transcription in VSMCs. Actinomycin D studies demonstrated that the half-life of collagens mRNA decreased with PTU treatment, suggesting that PTU down-regulates collagen expression predominantly at the post-transcriptional level. Taken together, these data suggest that PTU inhibits VSMC collagen production via destabilization of collagen mRNA that contributes to its beneficial effect on atherogenesis and neointimal formation after arterial injury. However, whether the destabilization of collagen may induce plaque rupture in PTU-treated arteries merits further investigation.

  6. Photodynamically crosslinked and chitosan-incorporated dentin collagen.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, A; Friedman, S; Kishen, A

    2011-11-01

    A lingering concern with restored root-filled teeth is the loss of structural integrity of the dentin and dentin-sealer interface over time. We hypothesized that crosslinking of dentin collagen with simultaneous incorporation of a biopolymer into collagen matrix would improve its structural stability. This study aimed to investigate the effects of combining chemical/photodynamic crosslinking of dentin collagen with the incorporation of carboxymethyl-chitosan (CMCS) on the resistance to enzymatic degradation and mechanical properties of dentin collagen. Ninety-six demineralized dentin collagen specimens (human, n = 72; and bovine, n = 24) were prepared and crosslinked chemically/ photodynamically, with/without CMCS. Glutaraldehyde and carbodiimides were used for chemical crosslinking, while rose Bengal activated with a non-coherent light (540 nm) at 20 J/cm(2) was applied for photodynamic crosslinking. The crosslinked human dentin collagen was subjected to chemical characterization, 7 days enzymatic degradation, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), while the bovine dentin collagen was used for tensile-testing. Crosslinked collagen showed significantly higher resistance to enzymatic degradation (p < 0.01), stable ultrastructure, and increased tensile strength (p < 0.05). Crosslinking CMCS with collagen matrix as observed in the TEM further improved the mechanical properties of dentin collagen (p < 0.01). This study highlighted the possibility of improving the resistance and toughness of dentin collagen by chemically/photodynamically crosslinking collagen matrix with CMCS.

  7. Spontaneous Gastric Perforation in a Case of Collagenous Gastritis.

    PubMed

    Appelman, Marly H; de Meij, Tim G J; Neefjes-Borst, E Andra; Kneepkens, C M F

    2016-01-01

    Collagenous gastritis is an extremely rare disease, both in children and adults. Symptoms vary depending on the extent of collagenous changes in the bowel. In most of the children, iron deficiency anemia and abdominal pain are the presenting symptoms. We present a 15-year-old boy with acute abdomen due to gastric perforation the cause of which was collagenous gastritis. PMID:26816680

  8. Urethral tissue regeneration using collagen scaffold modified with collagen binding VEGF in a beagle model.

    PubMed

    Jia, Weisheng; Tang, He; Wu, Jianjian; Hou, Xianglin; Chen, Bing; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Yannan; Shi, Chunying; Zhou, Feng; Yu, Wei; Huang, Shengquan; Ye, Gang; Dai, Jianwu

    2015-11-01

    Extensive urethral defects have a serious impact on quality of life, and treatment is challenging. A shortage of material for reconstruction is a key limitation. Improving the properties of biomaterials and making them suitable for urethral reconstruction will be helpful. Previously, we constructed a fusion protein, collagen-binding VEGF (CBD-VEGF), which can bind to collagen scaffold, stimulate cell proliferation, and promote angiogenesis and tissue regeneration. We proposed that CBD-VEGF could improve the performance of collagen in reconstruction of extensive urethral defects. Our results showed that collagen scaffolds modified with CBD-VEGF could promote urethral tissue regeneration and improve the function of the neo-urethra in a beagle extensive urethral defect model. Thus, modifying biomaterials with bioactive factors provides an alternative strategy for the production of suitable biomaterials for urethral reconstruction.

  9. Post-translationally Abnormal Collagens of Prolyl 3-Hydroxylase-2 Null Mice Offer a Pathobiological Mechanism for the High Myopia Linked to Human LEPREL1 Mutations*

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, David M.; Joeng, Kyu Sang; Werther, Rachel; Rajagopal, Abbhirami; Weis, MaryAnn; Lee, Brendan H.; Eyre, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Myopia, the leading cause of visual impairment worldwide, results from an increase in the axial length of the eyeball. Mutations in LEPREL1, the gene encoding prolyl 3-hydroxylase-2 (P3H2), have recently been identified in individuals with recessively inherited nonsyndromic severe myopia. P3H2 is a member of a family of genes that includes three isoenzymes of prolyl 3-hydroxylase (P3H), P3H1, P3H2, and P3H3. Fundamentally, it is understood that P3H1 is responsible for converting proline to 3-hydroxyproline. This limited additional knowledge also suggests that each isoenzyme has evolved different collagen sequence-preferred substrate specificities. In this study, differences in prolyl 3-hydroxylation were screened in eye tissues from P3h2-null (P3h2n/n) and wild-type mice to seek tissue-specific effects due the lack of P3H2 activity on post-translational collagen chemistry that could explain myopia. The mice were viable and had no gross musculoskeletal phenotypes. Tissues from sclera and cornea (type I collagen) and lens capsule (type IV collagen) were dissected from mouse eyes, and multiple sites of prolyl 3-hydroxylation were identified by mass spectrometry. The level of prolyl 3-hydroxylation at multiple substrate sites from type I collagen chains was high in sclera, similar to tendon. Almost every known site of prolyl 3-hydroxylation in types I and IV collagen from P3h2n/n mouse eye tissues was significantly under-hydroxylated compared with their wild-type littermates. We conclude that altered collagen prolyl 3-hydroxylation is caused by loss of P3H2. We hypothesize that this leads to structural abnormalities in multiple eye tissues, but particularly sclera, causing progressive myopia. PMID:25645914

  10. Factors contributing to perceptions about policies regarding the electronic monitoring of sex offenders: the role of demographic characteristics, victimization experiences, and social disorganization.

    PubMed

    Button, Deeanna M; Tewksbury, Richard; Mustaine, Elizabeth E; Payne, Brian K

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore factors contributing to perceptions about electronic monitoring policies governing sex offenders. Guided by Tannenbaum's theory of attribution and Shaw and McKay's theory of social disorganization, the authors examine the influence of demographic characteristics, victimization experiences, and neighborhood characteristics on perceptions about policies regarding the electronic monitoring of sex offenders. Ordinary least squares regression and logistic regression analyses of stratified telephone survey data reveal that factors associated with favorable views on the use of global positioning satellite monitoring for registered sex offenders appear to stem primarily from individuals' demographic characteristics. Experiential and neighborhood factors do provide some influence over individuals' views of electronic monitoring policies for sex offenders. Theoretical and policy implications are discussed.

  11. Molecular Crowding of Collagen: A Pathway to Produce Highly-Organized Collagenous Structures

    PubMed Central

    Saeidi, Nima; Karmelek, Kathryn N.; Paten, Jeffrey. A; Zareian, Ramin; DiMasi, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    Collagen in vertebrate animals is often arranged in alternating lamellae or in bundles of aligned fibrils which are designed to withstand in vivo mechanical loads. The formation of these organized structures is thought to result from a complex, large-area integration of individual cell motion and locally-controlled synthesis of fibrillar arrays via cell-surface fibripositors (direct matrix printing). The difficulty of reproducing such a process in vitro has prevented tissue engineers from constructing clinically useful load-bearing connective tissue directly from collagen. However, we and others have taken the view that long-range organizational information is potentially encoded into the structure of the collagen molecule itself, allowing the control of fibril organization to extend far from cell (or bounding) surfaces. We here demonstrate a simple, fast, cell-free method capable of producing highly-organized, anistropic collagen fibrillar lamellae de novo which persist over relatively long-distances (tens to hundreds of microns). Our approach to nanoscale organizational control takes advantage of the intrinsic physiochemical properties of collagen molecules by inducing collagen association through molecular crowding and geometric confinement. To mimic biological tissues which comprise planar, aligned collagen lamellae (e.g. cornea, lamellar bone or annulus fibrosus), type I collagen was confined to a thin, planar geometry, concentrated through molecular crowding and polymerized. The resulting fibrillar lamellae show a striking resemblance to native load-bearing lamellae in that the fibrils are small, generally aligned in the plane of the confining space and change direction en masse throughout the thickness of the construct. The process of organizational control is consistent with embryonic development where the bounded planar cell sheets produced by fibroblasts suggest a similar confinement/concentration strategy. Such a simple approach to nanoscale

  12. Ovine-Based Collagen Matrix Dressing: Next-Generation Collagen Dressing for Wound Care

    PubMed Central

    Bohn, Gregory; Liden, Brock; Schultz, Gregory; Yang, Qingping; Gibson, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Broad-spectrum metalloproteinase (MMP) reduction along with inherent aspects of an extracellular matrix (ECM) dressing can bring about improved wound healing outcomes and shorter treatment duration. Initial reports of clinical effectiveness of a new ovine-based collagen extracellular matrix (CECM) dressing demonstrate benefits in chronic wound healing. Recent Advances: CECM dressings are processed differently than oxidized regenerated cellulose/collagen dressings. CECM dressings consist primarily of collagens I and III arranged as native fibers that retain the three-dimensional architecture present in tissue ECM. As such, ovine-based ECM dressings represent a new generation of collagen dressings capable of impacting a broad spectrum of MMP excess known to be present in chronic wounds. Critical Issues: While MMPs are essential in normal healing, elevated presence of MMPs has been linked to wound failure. Collagen has been shown to reduce levels of MMPs, acting as a sacrificial substrate for excessive proteases in a chronic wound. Preserving collagen dressings in a more native state enhances bioactivity in terms of the ability to affect the chronic wound environment. Clinical observation and assessment may not be sufficient to identify a wound with elevated protease activity that can break down ECM, affect wound fibroblasts, and impair growth factor response. Future Directions: Collagen dressings that target broad-spectrum excessive MMP levels and can be applied early in the course of care may positively impact healing rates in difficult wounds. Next-generation collagen dressings offer broader MMP reduction capacity while providing a provisional dermal matrix or ECM. PMID:26858910

  13. Molecular crowding of collagen: a pathway to produce highly-organized collagenous structures.

    PubMed

    Saeidi, Nima; Karmelek, Kathryn P; Paten, Jeffrey A; Zareian, Ramin; DiMasi, Elaine; Ruberti, Jeffrey W

    2012-10-01

    Collagen in vertebrate animals is often arranged in alternating lamellae or in bundles of aligned fibrils which are designed to withstand in vivo mechanical loads. The formation of these organized structures is thought to result from a complex, large-area integration of individual cell motion and locally-controlled synthesis of fibrillar arrays via cell-surface fibripositors (direct matrix printing). The difficulty of reproducing such a process in vitro has prevented tissue engineers from constructing clinically useful load-bearing connective tissue directly from collagen. However, we and others have taken the view that long-range organizational information is potentially encoded into the structure of the collagen molecule itself, allowing the control of fibril organization to extend far from cell (or bounding) surfaces. We here demonstrate a simple, fast, cell-free method capable of producing highly-organized, anistropic collagen fibrillar lamellae de novo which persist over relatively long-distances (tens to hundreds of microns). Our approach to nanoscale organizational control takes advantage of the intrinsic physiochemical properties of collagen molecules by inducing collagen association through molecular crowding and geometric confinement. To mimic biological tissues which comprise planar, aligned collagen lamellae (e.g. cornea, lamellar bone or annulus fibrosus), type I collagen was confined to a thin, planar geometry, concentrated through molecular crowding and polymerized. The resulting fibrillar lamellae show a striking resemblance to native load-bearing lamellae in that the fibrils are small, generally aligned in the plane of the confining space and change direction en masse throughout the thickness of the construct. The process of organizational control is consistent with embryonic development where the bounded planar cell sheets produced by fibroblasts suggest a similar confinement/concentration strategy. Such a simple approach to nanoscale

  14. Nature and specificity of the immune response to collagen in type II collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, J M; Townes, A S; Kang, A H

    1982-01-01

    To determine the role of collagen-immunity in the development of collagen-induced arthritis, DBA/1 mice were immunized with type II collagen and observed for the development of polyarthritis. 96% of the mice immunized with native type II collagen developed inflammatory arthritis between 4 and 5 wk after primary immunization. Immunization with denatured type II collagen in exactly the same manner was not effective in inducing arthritis. Cell-mediated immunity in arthritic mice was assessed by measuring [3H]thymidine incorporation by mononuclear cells cultured in the presence of collagen. The maximal proliferative response to collagen occurred at 2 wk after immunization. Equally good incorporation of label occurred when cells were cultured with native or denatured type II collagen or type I collagen. The cellular response of nonarthritic mice immunized with denatured collagen was indistinguishable from that seen in arthritic mice. Humoral immunity was assessed by an ELISA assay for antibodies to collagen. The immunoglobulin M (IgM) response peaked at 2 wk and the IgG response at 5 wk after immunization. Antisera from arthritic mice immunized with native type II collagen were relatively specific for conformational determinants on the native type II molecule although some reactivity with denatured collagen was noted. Antisera from nonarthritic mice immunized with denatured collagen primarily recognized covalent structural determinants. It was concluded that native type II collagen was essential for the induction of arthritis and that an antibody response specific for native type II collagen may be important for the development of arthritis. Images PMID:6174550

  15. Collagen Micro-Flow Channels as an for In vitro Blood-Brain Barrier Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Katsuya; Terazono, Hideyuki; Hattori, Akihiro; Yasuda, Kenji

    2008-06-01

    An in vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) model is useful for drug discovery and efficacy measurements because it is a simple and convenient model of the in vivo BBB. However, the conventional in vitro BBB model does not account for shear stress to endotherial cell (EC) layers although in vivo ECs are exposed by shear stress. To improve this deficiency, we applied a microfluidics technique to a conventional in vitro BBB model and constructed a new in vitro BBB model. First, we confirmed that ECs can survive and proliferate on a cross-linked collagen gel and on an agarose including microbeads decorated with collagen type IV (CIV). In addition, we found that the cross-linker 1-ethyl-3carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) with N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) is less effective for EC proliferation than glutaraldehyde (GA), ethyleneglycol diglycidyl ether (EGDE), and agarose with microbeads. Applying a focused infrared laser, we fabricated microtunnels within the collagen gel, and we successfully cultured ECs on the inner tunnel wall. The results indicate the potential of gel microstructures for a microfluidic in vitro BBB model.

  16. Microscale Mechanical Testing of Individual Collagen Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poissant, Jeffrey

    Collagen is a key constituent for a large number of biological materials including bone, tendon, cartilage, skin and fish scales. Understanding the mechanical behavior of collagen's microscale structural components (fibers and fibrils) is therefore of utmost importance for fields such as biomimetics and biomedical engineering. However, the mechanics of collagen fibers and fibrils remain largely unexplored. The main research challenges are the small sample sizes (diameters less than 1 im) and the need to maintain physiologically relevant conditions. In this work, a microscale mechanical testing device (MMTD) capable of measuring the stress-strain response of individual collagen fibers and fibrils was developed. The MMTD consists of: (i) a transducer from a commercial nanoindenter to measure load and displacement, (ii) an optical microscope to observe the deformation of the sample in-situ and (iii) micromanipulators to isolate, position and fix samples. Collagen fibers and fibrils were extracted from fish scales using a novel dissection procedure and tested using the MMTD. A variety of tensile tests were performed including monotonic loading and cyclic tests with increasing loading rate or maximum displacement. The monotonic test results found that the elastic modulus, ultimate tensile strength and strain at failure range from 0.5 to 1.3 GPa, 100 to 200 MPa and 20% to 60%, respectively. The cyclic tests revealed that the largest increase in damage accumulation occurs at strains between 10% and 20%, when hydrogen bonds at the molecular level are ruptured. Further straining the fibril causes little additional damage accumulation and signals the approach of failure. The addition of water is shown to increase damage tolerance and strain to failure.

  17. Tuning 3D Collagen Matrix Stiffness Independently of Collagen Concentration Modulates Endothelial Cell Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Brooke N.; Starchenko, Alina; Williams, Rebecca M.; Bonassar, Lawrence J.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have described the effects of matrix stiffening on cell behavior using two dimensional (2D) synthetic surfaces; however less is known about the effects of matrix stiffening on cells embedded in three dimensional (3D) in vivo-like matrices. A primary limitation in investigating the effects of matrix stiffness in 3D is the lack of materials that can be tuned to control stiffness independently of matrix density. Here, we use collagen-based scaffolds where the mechanical properties are tuned using non-enzymatic glycation of the collagen in solution, prior to polymerization. Collagen solutions glycated prior to polymerization result in collagen gels with a 3-fold increase in compressive modulus without significant changes to the collagen architecture. Using these scaffolds, we show that endothelial cell spreading increases with matrix stiffness, as does the number and length of angiogenic sprouts and the overall spheroid outgrowth. Differences in sprout length are maintained even when the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts is inhibited. Our results demonstrate the ability to de-couple matrix stiffness from matrix density and structure in collagen gels, and that increased matrix stiffness results in increased sprouting and outgrowth. PMID:22902816

  18. Collagen sponge: theory and practice of medical applications.

    PubMed

    Chvapil, M

    1977-09-01

    Theoretical as well as practical-clinical applications of one form of collagen (collagen sponge) as a biodegradable material is reviewed. The role of porosity of the sponge and surface characteristics of the meshwork in relation to cell ingrowth are considered essential features of collagen sponge. Rate of resorption and antigenicity could be controlled by graded crosslinking of collagenous framework. Four basic examples of clinical use of collagen sponge are presented: as wound (burn) dressing material, as a matrix, for bone and cartilage repair, as an intravaginal contraceptive diaphragm, and as surgical tampons.

  19. Northern pike (Esox lucius) collagen: Extraction, characterization and potential application.

    PubMed

    Kozlowska, J; Sionkowska, A; Skopinska-Wisniewska, J; Piechowicz, K

    2015-11-01

    Acid soluble collagen (ASC) and pepsin soluble collagen (PSC) from the scales of northern pike (Esox lucius) were extracted and characterized. It was the first time that this species was used as sources of collagen. FT-IR and amino acid analysis results revealed the presence of collagen. Glycine accounts for one-third of its amino acid residues and specific for collagen amino acid - hydroxyproline - is present in isolated protein. The content of imino acid: proline and hydroxyproline in ASC and PSC was similar (12.5% Pro and 6.5% Hyp). Both ASC and PSC were type I collagen. The denaturation temperature of ASC and PSC were 28.5 and 27°C, respectively. Thin collagen films were obtained by casting of collagen solution onto glass plates. The surface properties of ASC and PSC films were different - the surface of ASC collagen film was more polar and less rough than PSC and we can observe the formation of collagen fibrils after solvent evaporation. ASC films showed much higher tensile properties than PSC. The obtained results suggest that northern pike scales have potential as an alternative source of collagen for use in various fields.

  20. Anti-collagen antibodies in sera from rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed Central

    Beard, H K; Ryvar, R; Skingle, J; Greenbury, C L

    1980-01-01

    Anti-cartilage antibodies, demonstrable by immunofluorescence, were found in 3.3% of rheumatoid arthritis patients. In most of these patients antibodies to type II collagen were detected. In specificity studies on these anti-collagen antibodies, they appeared to be type specific, showing no reaction with collagen types I and III. Denatured type II collagen reacted much less well than native type II, but isolated peptides from different regions of the collagen molecule were differentiated by individual sera. Removal of the glycoside side chains from native type II collagen had no effect on its antigenicity. The findings suggest that these patients produce highly specific antibodies which react with the triple helix of type II collagen. PMID:6255015

  1. Anti-collagen antibodies in sera from rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Beard, H K; Ryvar, R; Skingle, J; Greenbury, C L

    1980-11-01

    Anti-cartilage antibodies, demonstrable by immunofluorescence, were found in 3.3% of rheumatoid arthritis patients. In most of these patients antibodies to type II collagen were detected. In specificity studies on these anti-collagen antibodies, they appeared to be type specific, showing no reaction with collagen types I and III. Denatured type II collagen reacted much less well than native type II, but isolated peptides from different regions of the collagen molecule were differentiated by individual sera. Removal of the glycoside side chains from native type II collagen had no effect on its antigenicity. The findings suggest that these patients produce highly specific antibodies which react with the triple helix of type II collagen.

  2. Transdermal Delivery of Functional Collagen Via Polyvinylpyrrolidone Microneedles.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenchao; Inayathullah, Mohammed; Manoukian, Martin A C; Malkovskiy, Andrey V; Manickam, Sathish; Marinkovich, M Peter; Lane, Alfred T; Tayebi, Lobat; Seifalian, Alexander M; Rajadas, Jayakumar

    2015-12-01

    Collagen makes up a large proportion of the human body, particularly the skin. As the body ages, collagen content decreases, resulting in wrinkled skin and decreased wound healing capabilities. This paper presents a method of delivering type I collagen into porcine and human skin utilizing a polyvinylpyrrolidone microneedle delivery system. The microneedle patches were made with concentrations of 1, 2, 4, and 8% type I collagen (w/w). Microneedle structures and the distribution of collagen were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy. Patches were then applied on the porcine and human skin, and their effectiveness was examined using fluorescence microscopy. The results illustrate that this microneedle delivery system is effective in delivering collagen I into the epidermis and dermis of porcine and human skin. Since the technique presented in this paper is quick, safe, effective and easy, it can be considered as a new collagen delivery method for cosmetic and therapeutic applications. PMID:26066056

  3. Recombinant human-like collagen directed growth of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Y.; Cui, F. Z.

    2006-05-01

    Bones are biocomposites with hierarchical structure that require controlled mineral deposition during their self-assembly to form tissues with unique mechanical properties. Type I collagen proteins, acidic extracellular matrix proteins, play a critical role in mineral formation and many researches on artificial bones have been made inspired by nature using type I collagen derived from animal tissues. Here we report that recombinant human-like type I collagen, an acidic protein, can direct growth of hydroxyapatite (HA) nanocrystals in vitro in the form of self-assembly of nano-fibrils of mineralized collagen resembling extracellular matrix. The mineralized collagen fibrils aligned parallel to each other to form mineralized collagen fibers. HA nanocrystals grew on the surface of these collagen fibrils with the c-axis of nanocrystals of HA orienting along the longitudinal axis of the fibrils. These artificial analogs of bone have a potential clinical application in bone repair.

  4. Transdermal Delivery of Functional Collagen Via Polyvinylpyrrolidone Microneedles.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenchao; Inayathullah, Mohammed; Manoukian, Martin A C; Malkovskiy, Andrey V; Manickam, Sathish; Marinkovich, M Peter; Lane, Alfred T; Tayebi, Lobat; Seifalian, Alexander M; Rajadas, Jayakumar

    2015-12-01

    Collagen makes up a large proportion of the human body, particularly the skin. As the body ages, collagen content decreases, resulting in wrinkled skin and decreased wound healing capabilities. This paper presents a method of delivering type I collagen into porcine and human skin utilizing a polyvinylpyrrolidone microneedle delivery system. The microneedle patches were made with concentrations of 1, 2, 4, and 8% type I collagen (w/w). Microneedle structures and the distribution of collagen were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy. Patches were then applied on the porcine and human skin, and their effectiveness was examined using fluorescence microscopy. The results illustrate that this microneedle delivery system is effective in delivering collagen I into the epidermis and dermis of porcine and human skin. Since the technique presented in this paper is quick, safe, effective and easy, it can be considered as a new collagen delivery method for cosmetic and therapeutic applications.

  5. Expanding the concept of unresolved mental states: Hostile/Helpless states of mind on the Adult Attachment Interview are associated with disrupted mother–infant communication and infant disorganization

    PubMed Central

    LYONS–RUTH, KARLEN; YELLIN, CLAUDIA; MELNICK, SHARON; ATWOOD, GWENDOLYN

    2006-01-01

    In a recent meta-analysis, only 53% of disorganized infants were predicted by parental Unresolved states of mind on the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI). The goal of this study was to identify additional predictors of infant disorganization on the AAI by developing and validating an interview-wide coding system for Hostile/Helpless (H/H) parental states of mind with respect to attachment. Maternal AAIs were collected from 45 low-income mothers with high rates of childhood trauma when their children were age 7; Strange Situation assessments had been collected at 18 months of age. AAIs were independently coded using both the Main and Goldwyn coding system and newly developed codes for H/H states of mind. Results indicated that the H/H coding system displayed discriminant validity in that it did not overlap substantially with the Unresolved, Cannot Classify, or Fearfully Preoccupied by Traumatic Events categories in the Main and Goldwyn coding system. Second, H/H states of mind accounted for variance in disorganized infant behavior not associated with the Unresolved classification. Third, H/H states of mind were significantly related to maternal disrupted affective communication as coded by the Atypical Maternal Behavior Instrument for Assessment and Classification coding system, and maternal disrupted communication mediated the relations between H/H states of mind and infant disorganization. PMID:15971757

  6. Confirmatory factor analysis of the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV.

    PubMed

    Holdnack, James A; Xiaobin Zhou; Larrabee, Glenn J; Millis, Scott R; Salthouse, Timothy A

    2011-06-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-fourth edition (WAIS-IV) and the Wechsler Memory Scale-fourth edition (WMS-IV) were co-developed to be used individually or as a combined battery of tests. The independent factor structure of each of the tests has been identified; however, the combined factor structure has yet to be determined. Confirmatory factor analysis was applied to the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV Adult battery (i.e., age 16-69 years) co-norming sample (n = 900) to test 13 measurement models. The results indicated that two models fit the data equally well. One model is a seven-factor solution without a hierarchical general ability factor: Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning, Processing Speed, Auditory Working Memory, Visual Working Memory, Auditory Memory, and Visual Memory. The second model is a five-factor model composed of Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning, Processing Speed, Working Memory, and Memory with a hierarchical general ability factor. Interpretative implications for each model are discussed.

  7. LARP6 Meets Collagen mRNA: Specific Regulation of Type I Collagen Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yujie; Stefanovic, Branko

    2016-01-01

    Type I collagen is the most abundant structural protein in all vertebrates, but its constitutive rate of synthesis is low due to long half-life of the protein (60–70 days). However, several hundred fold increased production of type I collagen is often seen in reparative or reactive fibrosis. The mechanism which is responsible for this dramatic upregulation is complex, including multiple levels of regulation. However, posttranscriptional regulation evidently plays a predominant role. Posttranscriptional regulation comprises processing, transport, stabilization and translation of mRNAs and is executed by RNA binding proteins. There are about 800 RNA binding proteins, but only one, La ribonucleoprotein domain family member 6 (LARP6), is specifically involved in type I collagen regulation. In the 5′untranslated region (5’UTR) of mRNAs encoding for type I and type III collagens there is an evolutionally conserved stem-loop (SL) structure; this structure is not found in any other mRNA, including any other collagen mRNA. LARP6 binds to the 5′SL in sequence specific manner to regulate stability of collagen mRNAs and their translatability. Here, we will review current understanding of how is LARP6 involved in posttranscriptional regulation of collagen mRNAs. We will also discuss how other proteins recruited by LARP6, including nonmuscle myosin, vimentin, serine threonine kinase receptor associated protein (STRAP), 25 kD FK506 binding protein (FKBP25) and RNA helicase A (RHA), contribute to this process. PMID:27011170

  8. Comparative Study of Morphometric and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy Analyses of the Collagen Fibers in the Repair Process of Cutaneous Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Veruska Cronemberger; Raniero, Leandro; Costa, Guilherme Bueno; de Freitas Coelho, Nayana Pinheiro Machado; Miranda, Fernando Cronemberger; Arisawa, Emília Ângela Loschiavo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Compare the efficacy of light-emitting diode (LED) and therapeutic ultrasound (TUS), combined with a semipermeable dressing (D), at forming collagen in skin lesions by morphometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Materials and Methods: Surgical skin wounds (2.5 cm) were created on 84 male Wistar rats divided into four groups (n=21): Group I (Control), Group II (LED), Group III (LED+D), and Group IV (US+D). On days 7, 14, and 21, the tissue samples were removed and divided into two pieces, one was used for histological examination (collagen) and the other for FT-IR. Results: The histomorphometric analysis showed no significant differences among groups for collagen deposition at 7 days. However, at 14 days, more deposition of collagen was noted in the groups LED (p<0.05) and LED+D (p<0.001) than in the control. At 21 days, the groups LED, LED+D, and US+D presented significantly greater deposition of collagen when compared with the control. The FT-IR spectra, at 14 days, LED+D had greater amounts of type I collagen, a better organization of fibers, and greater difference of mean separation between the groups, not observed at 7 and 21 days. Innovation: The histomorphometric and FT-IR analyses suggest that the association of semipermeable dressing to LED therapy and to TUS modulates biological events, increasing fibroblast/collagen response and accelerating dermal maturation. Conclusion: The histomorphometric and FT-IR analyses showed that LED therapy is more efficacious than TUS, when combined with a semipermeable dressing, and induced the collagen production in skin lesions. PMID:26862463

  9. Cryptic Peptides from Collagen: A Critical Review.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Pradipta; Shanthi, C

    2016-01-01

    Collagen, a predominant structural protein in extracellular matrix (ECM), is now considered to have probable roles in many biological activities and hence, in different forms have found application as nutraceutical or pharmaceutical therapy option. Many of the biological properties are believed to be due to small hidden peptide residues in the collagen molecules, which come into play after the biodegradation or biosorption of the parent molecule. These peptide regions are called cryptic peptides or by some, as cryptides. The proteolytic hydrolysis of the ECM protein releases the cryptic peptides with many novel biological activities not exhibited directly by the parental protein which include angiogenic, antimicrobial, mitogenic and chemotactic properties. The research for understanding the role of these cryptic peptide regions and making use of them in medical field is very active. Such an understanding could lead to the development of peptide supplements for many biomedical applications. The prolific research in this area is reviewed in this paper. PMID:27173646

  10. Study of Native Type I Collagen Fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heim, August

    2006-03-01

    Presented in this work is direct imaging and force microscopy of native, intact type I collagen fibrils extracted from the sea cucumber Cucumaria frondosa dermis with affiliated proteoglycan molecules. The prototypical collagen fibril structure is well conserved through higher mammalian species and presents a model for study of the mechanical properties of the primary individual components of the dermis and skeletal ligature. Common practice is to use reconstituted fibrils which lack the precise conformal structure and affiliated proteoglycans. We have performed force microscopy to probe the mechanical properties of native fibrils and extract the elastic modulus under natural conditions. This knowledge is combined transmission and atomic force imaging, in conjunction with applied computation models, to demonstrate an inherent semitubular structure of these fibrils.

  11. About collagen, a tribute to Yves Bouligand.

    PubMed

    Charvolin, Jean; Sadoc, Jean-François

    2012-10-01

    Yves Bouligand's analysis of the organizations of biological materials in relation to those of liquid crystals enabled the development of the idea that physical forces exerting their actions under strong spatial constraints determine the structures and morphologies of these materials. The different levels of organization in collagen have preoccupied him for a long time. We present here our recent works in this domain that we were still discussing with him a few months before his death at the age of 76 on 21 January 2011. After recalling the hierarchical set of structures built by collagen molecules, we analyse them, exploiting the properties of the curved space of the hypersphere and of the algorithm of phyllotaxis. Those two geometrical concepts can be proposed as structural archetypes founding the polymorphism of this complex material of biological origin. PMID:24098840

  12. About collagen, a tribute to Yves Bouligand

    PubMed Central

    Charvolin, Jean; Sadoc, Jean-François

    2012-01-01

    Yves Bouligand's analysis of the organizations of biological materials in relation to those of liquid crystals enabled the development of the idea that physical forces exerting their actions under strong spatial constraints determine the structures and morphologies of these materials. The different levels of organization in collagen have preoccupied him for a long time. We present here our recent works in this domain that we were still discussing with him a few months before his death at the age of 76 on 21 January 2011. After recalling the hierarchical set of structures built by collagen molecules, we analyse them, exploiting the properties of the curved space of the hypersphere and of the algorithm of phyllotaxis. Those two geometrical concepts can be proposed as structural archetypes founding the polymorphism of this complex material of biological origin. PMID:24098840

  13. Crystal and Molecular Structure of a Collagen-Like Peptide at 1.9 overset{circ}{A} Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bella, Jordi; Eaton, Mark; Brodsky, Barbara; Berman, Helen M.

    1994-10-01

    The structure of a protein triple helix has been determined at 1.9 angstrom resolution by x-ray crystallographic studies of a collagen-like peptide containing a single substitution of the consensus sequence. This peptide adopts a triple-helical structure that confirms the basic features determined from fiber diffraction studies on collagen: supercoiling of polyproline II helices and interchain hydrogen bonding that follows the model II of Rich and Crick. In addition, the structure provides new information concerning the nature of this protein fold. Each triple helix is surrounded by a cylinder of hydration, with an extensive hydrogen bonding network between water molecules and peptide acceptor groups. Hydroxyproline residues have a critical role in this water network. The interaxial spacing of triple helices in the crystal is similar to that in collagen fibrils, and the water networks linking adjacent triple helices in the crystal structure are likely to be present in connective tissues. The breaking of the repeating (X-Y-Gly)_n pattern by a Gly-->Ala substitution results in a subtle alteration of the conformation, with a local untwisting of the triple helix. At the substitution site, direct interchain hydrogen bonds are replaced with interstitial water bridges between the peptide groups. Similar conformational changes may occur in Gly-->X mutated collagens responsible for the diseases osteogenesis imperfecta, chondrodysplasias, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome IV.

  14. Efficacy of Annona squamosa L in the synthesis of glycosaminoglycans and collagen during wound repair in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Ponrasu, Thangavel; Suguna, Lonchin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to find out the effects of Annona squamosa on the formation of glycosaminoglycans and collagen during wound healing in normal and diabetic rats. Diabetes induced rats were segregated into 4 groups, each containing six animals. Groups I and III served as the normal and diabetic control while groups II and IV served as normal and diabetic treated. The animals were treated with 200 μL of Annona squamosa extract topically. The granulation tissues formed were removed on the 8th day and the amount of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and collagen formed was evaluated by sequential extraction and SDSPAGE, respectively. Histological evaluation was also carried out using Masson's trichrome stain. In vitro wound healing efficacy of A. squamosa in human dermal fibroblast culture (HDF) was also carried out. The fibroblasts treated with varying concentrations of A. squamosa were examined for proliferation and closure of the wound area and photographed. A. squamosa increased cellular proliferation in HDF culture. The granulation tissues of treated wounds showed increased levels of glycosaminoglycans (P < 0.05) and collagen which were also confirmed by histopathology. The results strongly substantiate the beneficial effects of A. squamosa on the formation of glycosaminoglycans and collagen during wound healing.

  15. Urinary polypeptides related to collagen synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Krane, Stephen M.; Muñoz, Alberto J.; Harris, Edward D.

    1970-01-01

    Of the total urinary hydroxyproline in normal subjects and those with skeletal disorders, between 4 and 20% was nondialyzable. In some patients with Paget's disease of bone, hyperparathyroidism with osteitis fibrosa, hyperphosphatasia, and extensive fibrous dysplasia the total urinary hydroxyproline was sufficiently high to permit purification of this polypeptide hydroxyproline by gel filtration and ion exchange chromatography. The partially purified polypeptides had molecular weights between 4500 and 10,000 and amino acid compositions and physical properties resembling those of gelatin. The polypeptide fractions also contained neutral sugar and glucosamine. These fragments had been shown to be susceptible to cleavage by purified bacterial collagenase suggesting the presence of the sequence-Pro-X-Gly-Pro-Y-. After administration of proline-14C to patients with Paget's disease hydroxyproline-14C was excreted in the urine. The hydroxyproline-14C specific activity reached a peak in 2-4 hr and declined rapidly. The specific activity of the polypeptide (retentate) portion was severalfold greater than that of the raw urine and diffusate. When the labeled urines were subjected to gel filtration the hydroxyproline-14C fractions of highest molecular weight which were eluted first from the columns had the highest specific activities. Exposure of the hydroxyproline-14C-containing polypeptides to bacterial collagenase rendered them dialyzable. Four patients with hyperparathyroidism and osteitis fibrosa were studied before and after removal of a parathyroid adenoma, a period of transition from a predominance of bone collagen resorption to one of relatively increased bone collagen synthesis. The total urinary hydroxyproline fell rapidly after operation whereas the ratio of the polypeptide fraction to the total rose three- to fourfold. The results of these studies suggest that the urinary polypeptides represent fragments of collagen related to collagen synthesis. Changes in the

  16. Dynamics of collagen from bovine connective tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renou, J.-P.; Foucat, L.; Corsaro, C.; Ollivier, J.; Zanotti, J.-M.; Middendorf, H. D.

    2004-07-01

    We present first results from neutron studies of ns to ps relaxations in bovine collagen, comparing data for a minimally cross-linked sample (young calf) with those for a highly cross-linked one (old cow). Proton displacements derived from quasielastic scans (30

  17. Type XII collagen. A large multidomain molecule with partial homology to type IX collagen.

    PubMed

    Gordon, M K; Gerecke, D R; Dublet, B; van der Rest, M; Olsen, B R

    1989-11-25

    Three overlapping cDNAs encoding alpha 1 (XII) collagen have been isolated and sequenced. The DNAs define five sequence domains within the chain. Three domains are nontriple-helical; two are relatively short triple-helical regions. The amino acid sequences of tryptic peptides derived from 16- and 10-kDa pepsin-resistant fragments isolated from tendon extracts are in full agreement with the deduced sequences of the triple-helical regions. Two of the five sequence domains in alpha 1 (XII), one triple-helical and one nontriple-helical, show a high degree of similarity to regions in type IX collagen chains. In addition, examination of seven exons in the alpha 1 (XII) gene shows that the gene is, in part, similar to the structure of type IX collagen genes. Therefore, collagen types IX and XII are partially homologous. The alpha 1 (XII) sequence data predict an asymmetric structure for type XII collagen molecules, fully consistent with the rotary shadowing images. These images show a triple-helical 75-nm tail attached through a central globule to three finger-like structures, each 60 nm long (Dublet, B., Oh, S., Sugrue, S. P., Gordon, M. K., Gerecke, D. R., Olsen, B. R., and van der Rest, M. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 13150-13156).

  18. MORPHOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL STUDIES OF COLLAGEN FORMATION

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, J. A.

    1961-01-01

    This paper describes electron microscopic studies of developing connective tissue in granulomata induced by the subcutaneous injection of carrageenin into guinea pigs. Seven days after injection the granulomata contained many fibroblasts and exhibited rapid production of collagen. The fibroblasts were characterised by an extensively developed endoplasmic reticulum and showed numbers of fine, unstriated filaments in the outer regions of the cytoplasm. The filaments, about 50 A in diameter, tended to lie parallel to and closely adjacent to the cell boundary. The cytoplasmic membrane was frequently ill defined or disrupted, particularly bordering regions in which filaments occurred. In longitudinal sections of extended cell processes, filaments were abundant and, in some instances, the cytoplasmic membrane was barely detectable. In the extracellular space striated collagen fibrils were usually accompanied by filaments, 50 to 100 A in diameter, and these often exhibited the characteristic periodicity of collagen, particularly after intense electron bombardment. Much cellular debris was present in the extracellular space. These observations have led to the suggestion that connective tissue precursors are released from fibroblasts by the disintegration or dissolution of the cytoplasmic membrane and the shedding of cytoplasmic material, as in the apocrine gland cells. In some instances this release may take the form of the elongation from the cell of extended processes; disintegration of the cytoplasmic membrane surrounding these processes then leaves the contents in the extracellular phase. PMID:13692398

  19. Strain-Induced Alignment in Collagen Gels

    PubMed Central

    Vader, David; Kabla, Alexandre; Weitz, David; Mahadevan, Lakshminarayana

    2009-01-01

    Collagen is the most abundant extracellular-network-forming protein in animal biology and is important in both natural and artificial tissues, where it serves as a material of great mechanical versatility. This versatility arises from its almost unique ability to remodel under applied loads into anisotropic and inhomogeneous structures. To explore the origins of this property, we develop a set of analysis tools and a novel experimental setup that probes the mechanical response of fibrous networks in a geometry that mimics a typical deformation profile imposed by cells in vivo. We observe strong fiber alignment and densification as a function of applied strain for both uncrosslinked and crosslinked collagenous networks. This alignment is found to be irreversibly imprinted in uncrosslinked collagen networks, suggesting a simple mechanism for tissue organization at the microscale. However, crosslinked networks display similar fiber alignment and the same geometrical properties as uncrosslinked gels, but with full reversibility. Plasticity is therefore not required to align fibers. On the contrary, our data show that this effect is part of the fundamental non-linear properties of fibrous biological networks. PMID:19529768

  20. Viscoelastic properties of isolated collagen fibrils.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhilei Liu; Kahn, Harold; Ballarini, Roberto; Eppell, Steven J

    2011-06-22

    Understanding the viscoelastic behavior of collagenous tissues with complex hierarchical structures requires knowledge of the properties at each structural level. Whole tissues have been studied extensively, but less is known about the mechanical behavior at the submicron, fibrillar level. Using a microelectromechanical systems platform, in vitro coupled creep and stress relaxation tests were performed on collagen fibrils isolated from the sea cucumber dermis. Stress-strain-time data indicate that isolated fibrils exhibit viscoelastic behavior that could be fitted using the Maxwell-Weichert model. The fibrils showed an elastic modulus of 123 ± 46 MPa. The time-dependent behavior was well fit using the two-time-constant Maxwell-Weichert model with a fast time response of 7 ± 2 s and a slow time response of 102 ± 5 s. The fibrillar relaxation time was smaller than literature values for tissue-level relaxation time, suggesting that tissue relaxation is dominated by noncollagenous components (e.g., proteoglycans). Each specimen was tested three times, and the only statistically significant difference found was that the elastic modulus is larger in the first test than in the subsequent two tests, indicating that viscous properties of collagen fibrils are not sensitive to the history of previous tests.

  1. Viscoelastic Properties of Isolated Collagen Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhilei Liu; Kahn, Harold; Ballarini, Roberto; Eppell, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the viscoelastic behavior of collagenous tissues with complex hierarchical structures requires knowledge of the properties at each structural level. Whole tissues have been studied extensively, but less is known about the mechanical behavior at the submicron, fibrillar level. Using a microelectromechanical systems platform, in vitro coupled creep and stress relaxation tests were performed on collagen fibrils isolated from the sea cucumber dermis. Stress-strain-time data indicate that isolated fibrils exhibit viscoelastic behavior that could be fitted using the Maxwell-Weichert model. The fibrils showed an elastic modulus of 123 ± 46 MPa. The time-dependent behavior was well fit using the two-time-constant Maxwell-Weichert model with a fast time response of 7 ± 2 s and a slow time response of 102 ± 5 s. The fibrillar relaxation time was smaller than literature values for tissue-level relaxation time, suggesting that tissue relaxation is dominated by noncollagenous components (e.g., proteoglycans). Each specimen was tested three times, and the only statistically significant difference found was that the elastic modulus is larger in the first test than in the subsequent two tests, indicating that viscous properties of collagen fibrils are not sensitive to the history of previous tests. PMID:21689535

  2. BJN Awards 2016: IV therapy.

    PubMed

    Rickard, Claire

    2016-07-28

    Claire Rickard Professor of Nursing, National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Centre of Research Excellence in Nursing, Griffith University, was awarded second place in the BJN Awards 2016 for IV Therapy Nurse of the Year. Here she talks about the she has done to be recognised in this field. PMID:27467655

  3. Phase IV of Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Suvarna, Viraj

    2010-04-01

    Not all Phase IV studies are post-marketing surveillance (PMS) studies but every PMS study is a phase IV study. Phase IV is also an important phase of drug development. In particular, the real world effectiveness of a drug as evaluated in an observational, non-interventional trial in a naturalistic setting which complements the efficacy data that emanates from a pre-marketing randomized controlled trial (RCT). No matter how many patients are studied pre-marketing in a controlled environment, the true safety profile of a drug is characterized only by continuing safety surveillance through a spontaneous adverse event monitoring system and a post-marketing surveillance/non-interventional study. Prevalent practice patterns can generate leads that could result in further evaluation of a new indication via the RCT route or even a signal that may necessitate regulatory action (change in labeling, risk management/minimization action plan). Disease registries are another option as are the large simple hybrid trials. Surveillance of spontaneously reported adverse events continues as long as a product is marketed. And so Phase IV in that sense never ends.

  4. The PLATO IV Communications System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherwood, Bruce Arne; Stifle, Jack

    The PLATO IV computer-based educational system contains its own communications hardware and software for operating plasma-panel graphics terminals. Key echoing is performed by the central processing unit: every key pressed at a terminal passes through the entire system before anything appears on the terminal's screen. Each terminal is guaranteed…

  5. The PLATO IV Student Terminal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stifle, Jack

    This report describes the remote computer terminal designed for student use in the PLATO IV computer-assisted instruction system. The terminal features a plasma display panel, self-contained character and line generators, and the ability to communicate over voice grade telephone circuits. Operating modes and control characters are described in…

  6. A Laminin G-EGF-Laminin G module in Neurexin IV is essential for the apico-lateral localization of Contactin and organization of septate junctions.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Swati; Paik, Raehum; Mino, Rosa E; Blauth, Kevin; Fisher, Elizabeth S; Madden, Victoria J; Fanning, Alan S; Bhat, Manzoor A

    2011-01-01

    Septate junctions (SJs) display a unique ultrastructural morphology with ladder-like electron densities that are conserved through evolution. Genetic and molecular analyses have identified a highly conserved core complex of SJ proteins consisting of three cell adhesion molecules Neurexin IV, Contactin, and Neuroglian, which interact with the cytoskeletal FERM domain protein Coracle. How these individual proteins interact to form the septal arrays that create the paracellular barrier is poorly understood. Here, we show that point mutations that map to specific domains of neurexin IV lead to formation of fewer septae and disorganization of SJs. Consistent with these observations, our in vivo domain deletion analyses identified the first Laminin G-EGF-Laminin G module in the extracellular region of Neurexin IV as necessary for the localization of and association with Contactin. Neurexin IV protein that is devoid of its cytoplasmic region is able to create septae, but fails to form a full complement of SJs. These data provide the first in vivo evidence that specific domains in Neurexin IV are required for protein-protein interactions and organization of SJs. Given the molecular conservation of SJ proteins across species, our studies may provide insights into how vertebrate axo-glial SJs are organized in myelinated axons.

  7. Collagenous gastritis: a case report, morphologic evaluation, and review.

    PubMed

    Vesoulis, Z; Lozanski, G; Ravichandran, P; Esber, E

    2000-05-01

    Collagenous gastritis is rare; there are only four previous case reports. Histologic features seem to overlap with the other "collagenous enterocolitides"; however, pathologic criteria are not yet established for the diagnosis of collagenous gastritis. We describe an additional case of ostensible collagenous gastritis in a patient who initially presented with celiac sprue and subsequently developed colonic manifestations of mucosal ulcerative colitis. Endoscopic biopsies of the stomach revealed deposition of patchy, very thick bandlike subepithelial collagen in gastric antral mucosa, focal superficial epithelial degeneration, numerous intraepithelial lymphocytes, and a dense lamina propria lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate. Image analysis evaluation of gastric antral biopsies demonstrated a mean thickness of subepithelial collagen of 27.07 micron. Morphologic comparison was made with age-matched control groups of 10 patients who had normal gastric mucosal biopsies and 10 patients who had "chronic" gastritis, which revealed mean subepithelial collagen measures of 1.37 micron and 1.19 micron, respectively. We compared these morphologic findings with those of all previous case reports of collagenous gastritis and propose a pathologic definition based on the limited combined data. It seems that subepithelial collagen is dramatically thickened in reported cases of collagenous gastritis, with a cumulative mean measure of 36.9 micron. It is also apparent from this and previous reports that the thickened subepithelial collagen is accompanied by a chronic or chronic active gastritis and sometimes intraepithelial lymphocytes and surface epithelial damage. Recently described associations of lymphocytic gastritis, sprue, and lymphocytic colitis as well as collagenous and lymphocytic colitis suggest a common pathogenesis that empirically may include collagenous gastritis in the same disease spectrum. We propose that collagenous gastritis can be confidently identified by using

  8. Type VI Collagen Regulates Dermal Matrix Assembly and Fibroblast Motility.

    PubMed

    Theocharidis, Georgios; Drymoussi, Zoe; Kao, Alexander P; Barber, Asa H; Lee, David A; Braun, Kristin M; Connelly, John T

    2016-01-01

    Type VI collagen is a nonfibrillar collagen expressed in many connective tissues and implicated in extracellular matrix (ECM) organization. We hypothesized that type VI collagen regulates matrix assembly and cell function within the dermis of the skin. In the present study we examined the expression pattern of type VI collagen in normal and wounded skin and investigated its specific function in new matrix deposition by human dermal fibroblasts. Type VI collagen was expressed throughout the dermis of intact human skin, at the expanding margins of human keloid samples, and in the granulation tissue of newly deposited ECM in a mouse model of wound healing. Generation of cell-derived matrices (CDMs) by human dermal fibroblasts with stable knockdown of COL6A1 revealed that type VI collagen-deficient matrices were significantly thinner and contained more aligned, thicker, and widely spaced fibers than CDMs produced by normal fibroblasts. In addition, there was significantly less total collagen and sulfated proteoglycans present in the type VI collagen-depleted matrices. Normal fibroblasts cultured on de-cellularized CDMs lacking type VI collagen displayed increased cell spreading, migration speed, and persistence. Taken together, these findings indicate that type VI collagen is a key regulator of dermal matrix assembly, composition, and fibroblast behavior and may play an important role in wound healing and tissue regeneration. PMID:26763426

  9. In vivo determination of arterial collagen synthesis in atherosclerotic rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Opsahl, W.P.; DeLuca, D.J.; Ehrhart, L.A.

    1986-03-01

    Collagen and non-collagen protein synthesis rates were determined in vivo in tissues from rabbits fed a control or atherogenic diet supplemented with 2% peanut oil and 0.25% cholesterol for 4 months. Rabbits received a bolus intravenous injection of L-(/sup 3/H)-proline (1.0 mCi/kg) and unlabeled L-proline (7 mmoles/kg) in 0.9% NaCl. Plasma proline specific activity decreased only 20% over 5 hr and was similar to the specific activity of free proline in tissues. Thoracic aortas from atherosclerotic rabbits exhibited raised plaques covering at least 75% of the surface. Thoracic intima plus a portion of the media (TIM) was separated from the remaining media plus adventitia (TMA). Dry delipidated weight, total collagen content, and collagen as a percent of dry weight were increased significantly in the TIM of atherosclerotic rabbits. Collagen synthesis rates and collagen synthesis as a percent of total protein synthesis were likewise increased both in the TIM and in the abdominal aortas. No differences from controls either in collagen content or collagen synthesis rates were observed in the TMA, lung or skin. These results demonstrate for the first time in vivo that formation of atherosclerotic plaques is associated with increased rates of collagen synthesis. Furthermore, as previously observed with incubations in vitro, collagen synthesis was elevated to a greater extent than noncollagen protein synthesis in atherosclerotic aortas from rabbits fed cholesterol plus peanut oil.

  10. Binding of collagens to an enterotoxigenic strain of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Visai, L.; Speziale, P.; Bozzini, S. )

    1990-02-01

    An enterotoxigenic strain of Escherichia coli, B34289c, has been shown to bind the N-terminal region of fibronectin with high affinity. We now report that this strain also binds collagen. The binding of 125I-labeled type II collagen to bacteria was time dependent and reversible. Bacteria expressed a limited number of collagen receptors (2.2 x 10(4) per cell) and bound collagen with a Kd of 20 nM. All collagen types tested (I to V) as well as all tested cyanogen bromide-generated peptides (alpha 1(I)CB2, alpha 1(I)CB3, alpha 1(I)CB7, alpha 1(I)CB8, and alpha 2(I)CB4) were recognized by bacterial receptors, as demonstrated by the ability of these proteins to inhibit the binding of 125I-labeled collagen to bacteria. Of several unlabeled proteins tested in competition experiments, fibronectin and its N-terminal region strongly inhibited binding of the radiolabeled collagen to E. coli cells. Conversely, collagen competed with an 125I-labeled 28-kilodalton fibronectin fragment for bacterial binding. Collagen bound to bacteria could be displaced by excess amounts of either unlabeled fibronectin or its N-terminal fragment. Similarly, collagen could displace 125I-labeled N-terminal peptide of fibronectin bound to the bacterial cell surface. Bacteria grown at 41 degrees C or in the presence of glucose did not express collagen or fibronectin receptors. These results indicate the presence of specific binding sites for collagen on the surface of E. coli cells and furthermore that the collagen and fibronectin binding sites are located in close proximity, possibly on the same structure.

  11. Collagen Structural Hierarchy and Susceptibility to Degradation by Ultraviolet Radiation.

    PubMed

    Rabotyagova, Olena S; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L

    2008-12-01

    Collagen type I is the most abundant extracellular matrix protein in the human body, providing the basis for tissue structure and directing cellular functions. Collagen has complex structural hierarchy, organized at different length scales, including the characteristic triple helical feature. In the present study, the relationship between collagen structure (native vs. denatured) and sensitivity to UV radiation was assessed, with a focus on changes in primary structure, changes in conformation, microstructure and material properties. A brief review of free radical reactions involved in collagen degradation is also provided as a mechanistic basis for the changes observed in the study. Structural and functional changes in the collagens were related to the initial conformation (native vs. denatured) and the energy of irradiation. These changes were tracked using SDS-PAGE to assess molecular weight, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to study changes in the secondary structure, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to characterize changes in mechanical properties. The results correlate differences in sensitivity to irradiation with initial collagen structural state: collagen in native conformation vs. heat-treated (denatured) collagen. Changes in collagen were found at all levels of the hierarchical structural organization. In general, the native collagen triple helix is most sensitive to UV-254nm radiation. The triple helix delays single chain degradation. The loss of the triple helix in collagen is accompanied by hydrogen abstraction through free radical mechanisms. The results received suggest that the effects of electromagnetic radiation on biologically relevant extracellular matrices (collagen in the present study) are important to assess in the context of the state of collagen structure. The results have implications in tissue remodeling, wound repair and disease progression.

  12. Nanointerfacial strength between non-collagenous protein and collagen fibrils in antler bone

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Fei; Gupta, Himadri S.; Barber, Asa H.

    2014-01-01

    Antler bone displays considerable toughness through the use of a complex nanofibrous structure of mineralized collagen fibrils (MCFs) bound together by non-collagenous proteins (NCPs). While the NCP regions represent a small volume fraction relative to the MCFs, significant surface area is evolved upon failure of the nanointerfaces formed at NCP–collagen fibril boundaries. The mechanical properties of nanointerfaces between the MCFs are investigated directly in this work using an in situ atomic force microscopy technique to pull out individual fibrils from the NCP. Results show that the NCP–fibril interfaces in antler bone are weak, which highlights the propensity for interface failure at the nanoscale in antler bone and extensive fibril pullout observed at antler fracture surfaces. The adhesion between fibrils and NCP is additionally suggested as being rate dependent, with increasing interfacial strength and fracture energy observed when pullout velocity decreases. PMID:24352676

  13. Collagen chains detected by western blotting using a /sup 125/I-labeled 45K fragment of fibronectin (45K FN)

    SciTech Connect

    Ristagno, R.; Heimer, R.; Fishman, A.P.; Sampson, P.M.

    1987-05-01

    The objective was to improve the sensitivity and specificity of detection of unlabeled collagen chains in biologic fluids. Chains of Types I,II,III,IV and XI (1..cap alpha..2..cap alpha..3..cap alpha..) collagen were separated by SDS PAGE. Their complete transfer to nitrocellulose was obtained by electrophoresis for 16 h at 150 mA with 10 mM Tris, 117 mM glycine, 100 mM cysteine, 0.1% SDS and 10% methanol. The 45K FN was prepared by chymotryptic digestion of fibronectin adsorbed to gelatin-Sepharose, followed by elution with 1.2 M urea, 1 M Tris-NaCl, pH 8.3 and iodination. When exposed to the nitrocellulose transblot at pH 9.5 and 4/sup 0/C, 45K FN did not react with IgG, fibrinogen, myosin, albumin or carbonic anhydrase. These proteins interfere in the assay under conditions of lower pH and higher temperature. The autoradiographs of the transblots were evaluated by densitometry and reflected results also obtained by dot blotting, that chains of collagen Types I,II,III were detectable at 4 ng and those of collagen Type IV at 12 ng. Generally, ..cap alpha..,BETA, and ..gamma.. chains were detectable. The 45K FN reacted equally with ..cap alpha..1(I) and ..cap alpha..2(I), but for Type XI the 1..cap alpha.. chain had considerably more reactivity than 2..cap alpha.. or 3..cap alpha... As the 45K FN was specific for collagens added to plasma, the authors method appears useful for qualitative and quantitative assays of unlabeled collagens in biologic fluids.

  14. Alpha 1(XVIII), a collagen chain with frequent interruptions in the collagenous sequence, a distinct tissue distribution, and homology with type XV collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Rehn, M; Pihlajaniemi, T

    1994-01-01

    We report on the isolation of mouse cDNA clones which encode a collagenous sequence designated here as the alpha 1 chain of type XVIII collagen. The overlapping clones cover 2.8 kilobases and encode an open reading frame of 928 amino acid residues comprising a putative signal peptide of 25 residues, an amino-terminal noncollagenous domain of 301 residues, and a primarily collagenous stretch of 602 residues. The clones do not cover the carboxyl-terminal end of the polypeptide, since the translation stop codon is absent. Characteristic of the deduced polypeptide is the possession of eight noncollagenous interruptions varying in length from 10 to 24 residues in the collagenous amino acid sequence. Other features include the presence of several putative sites for both N-linked glycosylation and O-linked glycosaminoglycan attachment and homology of the amino-terminal noncollagenous domain with thrombospondin. It is of particular interest that five of the eight collagenous sequences of type XVIII show homology to the previously reported type XV collagen, suggesting that the two form a distinct subgroup among the diverse family of collagens. Northern blot hybridization analysis revealed a striking tissue distribution for type XVIII collagen mRNAs, as the clones hybridized strongly with mRNAs of 4.3 and 5.3 kilobases that were present only in lung and liver of the eight mouse tissues studied. Images PMID:8183894

  15. Mass transfer of large molecules through collagen and collagen-silica hybrid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jofre-Lora, Pedro

    Diabetes is a growing concern in the United States and around the world that must be addressed through new treatment options. Current standard treatment options of diabetes are limiting and have tremendous impacts on patient's lives. Emerging therapies, such as the implantation of encapsulated islets, are promising treatment options, but have not yet materialized due to unsolved problems with material properties. Hybrid silica-collagen membranes address some of these unsolved problems and are a promising material for cell encapsulation. However, the mass transfer properties of large molecules, such as insulin, TNF-alpha, IL1beta, and other important proteins in the etiology of diabetes, through these hybrid membranes are poorly characterized. In order to begin characterizing these properties, a device was constructed to accurately and efficiently measure the mass transfer of other similar large molecules, fluorescein isothiocyanate dextrans (FITC-dextran), through collagen-silica hybrid membranes. The device was used to measure diffusion coefficients of 4, 20, 40, and 150 kDa FITC-dextrans through non-silicified and silicified samples of 200 and 1000 Pa porcine skin collagen. Diffusion coefficients were found to be in the 10-7-10-6 cm2s -1 range, which is in agreement with previously published data for similar molecules through similar hydrogels. The effects of collagen stiffness, FITC-dextran molecular weight, and silicification treatment on diffusion were investigated. It was found that collagen stiffness and FITC-dextran molecular weight had a negative correlation with diffusion, whereas silicification treatment had no global impact on diffusion. The device created, and the results of this preliminary investigation, can be used to develop collagen-silica hybrid membranes as an alternative material for cell encapsulation in a forward-design manner.

  16. ISOCT study of collagen crosslinking of collagen in cancer models (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spicer, Graham; Young, Scott T.; Yi, Ji; Shea, Lonnie D.; Backman, Vadim

    2016-03-01

    The role of extracellular matrix modification and signaling in cancer progression is an increasingly recognized avenue for the progression of the disease. Previous study of field effect carcinogenesis with Inverse Spectroscopic Optical Coherence Tomography (ISOCT) has revealed pronounced changes in the nanoscale-sensitive mass fractal dimension D measured from field effect tissue when compared to healthy tissue. However, the origin of this difference in tissue ultrastructure in field effect carcinogenesis has remained poorly understood. Here, we present findings supporting the idea that enzymatic crosslinking of the extracellular matrix is an effect that presents at the earliest stages of carcinogenesis. We use a model of collagen gel with crosslinking induced by lysyl oxidase (LOXL4) to recapitulate the difference in D previously reported from healthy and cancerous tissue biopsies. Furthermore, STORM imaging of this collagen gel model verifies the morphologic effects of enzymatic crosslinking at length scales as small as 40 nm, close to the previously reported lower length scale sensitivity threshold of 35 nm for ISOCT. Analysis of the autocorrelation function from STORM images of collagen gels and subsequent fitting to the Whittle-Matérn correlation function shows a similar effect of LOXL4 on D from collagen measured with ISOCT and STORM. We extend this to mass spectrometric study of tissue to directly measure concentrations of collagen crosslink residues. The validation of ISOCT as a viable tool for non-invasive rapid quantification of collagen ultrastructure lends it to study other physiological phenomena involving ECM restructuring such as atherosclerotic plaque screening or cervical ripening during pregnancy.

  17. Facile Routes to Th(IV), U(IV), and Np(IV) Phosphites and Phosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Eric M.; Wang, Shuao; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2011-08-05

    Three actinide(IV) phosphites and a NpIV phosphate, AnIV(HPO₃)₂(H₂O)₂ (An = Th, U, Np) and Cs[Np(H1.5PO₄)(PO₄)]₂, respectively, were synthesized using mild hydrothermal conditions. The first three phases are isotypic and were obtained using similar reaction conditions. Cs[Np(H1.5PO₄)(PO₄)]₂ was synthesized using an analogous method to that of Np(HPO₃)₂(H₂O)₂. However, this fourth phase is quite different in comparison to the other phases in both composition and structure. The structure of Cs[Np(H1.5PO₄)(PO₄)]₂ is constructed from double layers of neptunium(IV) phosphate with caesium cations in the interlayer region. In contrast, An(HPO₃)₂(H₂O)₂ (An = Th, U, Np) form dense 3D networks. The actinide contraction is detected in variety of metrics obtained from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. Changes in the oxidation state of the neptunium starting materials yield different products.

  18. Collagenous colitis and collagenous gastritis in a 9 year old girl: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Camarero Salces, C; Enes Romero, P; Redondo, C; Rizo Pascual, J M; Roy Ariño, G

    2011-09-01

    Collagenous gastritis is a rare disease in the general population and collagenous colitis has seldom been reported in children. We report a girl with both diseases and review the literature on this association afetr a systematic search of Pubmed, Medline and Embase databases.. The girl, diagnosed of collagenous colitis at the age of 2 years, started with abdominal pain and anaemia at the age of 9 years and was diagnosed of collagenous gastritis in the gastric biopsies. After review of the literature, we found 66 reported cases (33 children, 33 adults, 68% females), 56 patients with collagenous gastritis and 16 children with collagenous colitis. Both disorders coexisted in 20 patients. The main presenting symptoms are abdominal pain and anaemia in patients with collagenous gastritis and diarrhoea and weight loss in patients with both disorders. Hypoalbuminemia was found in 9 patients with both diseases and protein losing enteropathy was demonstrated in 3 cases. Deposits of collagen in the duodenum were observed in 13 of 19 patients with both diseases. Seventeen of 66 patients had associated autoimmune disorders, particularly in patients with both diseases (35%). These conditions have a chronic course but gastric or colonic malignancies have not been communicated to date. In conclusion, collagenous gastritis and collagenous colitis mainly affects women and can occur at any age. Their association is exceptional. These disorders, although rare, should be considered in patients with anaemia and epigastric pain, watery diarrhoea or protein losing enteropathy. PMID:22103057

  19. Chemical and histochemical studies of human alveolar collagen fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, W.

    1977-01-01

    Light and electron microscopic studies have established that the normal human alveolar argyrophilic (reticulum) fiber is collagen fiber. The silver impregnation method is highly sensitive and specific for histologic demonstration of the elaborate collagen fiber network of alveolar septa. The argyrophilic alveolar collagen fiber does not stain with the periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) or periodic acid-thiocarbohydrazide-osmium tetroxide (PTO) reaction. The materials positive for the PAS and PTO reactions in alveolar septa are epithelial and endothelial basal laminas, which are nonargyrophilic. Chemically, lung collagen fibers are composed of Type I and Type III collagens, which differ in amino acid composition, chain composition, and carbohydrate content. The chemical heterogeneity of lung collagen may have important biologic implications in the maintenance of normal structure and in the repair of lung injury. Images Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:64120

  20. Immunogold labelling of human von Willebrand factor adsorbed to collagen.

    PubMed

    Furlan, M; Robles, R; Lämmle, B; Zimmermann, J; Hunziker, E

    1991-06-01

    von Willebrand factor (vWF) mediates adhesion of platelets to the exposed subendothelium at sites of vascular injury. This function is expressed through binding of vWF to both collagen and receptors on the platelet membrane. We have developed a new method using immunogold staining and electron microscopy, permitting visualization of human vWF adsorbed to collagen fibrils. The electron micrographs revealed strings of gold beads reflecting the polymeric structure of vWF. Our data showed dramatic differences in the binding of vWF to collagens of different sources: high binding density was observed using a collagen preparation isolated from aortic tissue whereas colloidal gold was virtually absent from tendon collagen. Using the immunogold labelling method we demonstrated that high shear rate enhanced vWF binding to aortic collagen.

  1. Gap Dependent Rheology in Type I Collagen Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arevalo, Richard; Urbach, Jeffrey; Blair, Daniel

    2010-03-01

    Branched type I collagen fiber networks provide extracellular support in mammalian tissues. The intricate network structure can succumb to partial or complete tearing under sufficient applied strain. Under small shear strains, in vitro collagen gels exhibit strain-stiffening while maintaining overall network integrity. Higher shear strains lead to network failure through discrete yielding events. We perform rheology and confocal-rheology experiments to fully elucidate the strain-stiffening and yielding behavior in these highly nonlinear materials. We apply continuous shear strains to collagen gels confined within the rheometer at fixed gaps. We observe that sheared collagen in the strain-stiffening and yielding regime has an apparent modulus that is strongly dependent on the collagen thickness. Moreover, we demonstrate that network yielding is universally controlled by the ratio of the collagen thickness to the mesh size. These results have broad implications for the interpretation of rheological data of extracellular matrix proteins and for the design of biomimetic scaffolds.

  2. Alternating potentials assisted electrochemical deposition of mineralized collagen coatings.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Junjun; Lin, Jun; Li, Juan; Weng, Wenjian; Cheng, Kui; Wang, Huiming

    2015-12-01

    Mineralized collagen coatings were synthesized by electrochemical deposition with alternating negative and positive potentials. The obtained coatings demonstrated a multi-layer structure alternating consisting of weakly and highly mineralized collagen layers and the proportion of each layer could be controlled by adjusting the deposition time. The coatings deposited using alternating potentials assisted electrochemical deposition (AP-ECD) showed significantly enhanced osteoblasts proliferation, and rhBMP-2 loading capability compared to those of the coatings deposited using constant potential electrochemical deposition (CP-ECD). The enhanced cytocompatibility and rhBMP-2 loading capability of the coatings might be attributed to their high proportion of weakly mineralized collagen layer. Furthermore, the deposition mechanism for alternating potentials is proposed as that positive potential induces deposition of negatively charged collagen fibrils to form a weakly mineralized collagen layer. Our results suggest that the present deposition method could be a promising approach to engineer mineralized collagen coating with better biological performances.

  3. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: increased solubility of skin collagen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ono, S.; Yamauchi, M.

    1992-01-01

    We studied the solubility of skin collagen from six patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and six controls. The amount of collagen extracted with neutral salt solution was significantly greater in patients with ALS than in controls. In addition, there was a statistically significant increase in the proportion of collagen extracted from ALS patients with increased duration of illness. The collagen solubilized by pepsin and cyanogen bromide treatments was significantly higher in ALS patients than in controls, and its proportion was positively and significantly associated with duration of illness in ALS patients. These results indicate that the metabolism of skin collagen may be affected in the disease process of ALS, causing an increase in immature soluble collagen in the tissue, which is the opposite to that which occurs in the normal aging process.

  4. Nanorod mediated collagen scaffolds as extra cellular matrix mimics.

    PubMed

    Vedhanayagam, Mohan; Mohan, Ranganathan; Nair, Balachandran Unni; Sreeram, Kalarical Janardhanan

    2015-12-01

    Creating collagen scaffolds that mimic extracellular matrices without using toxic exogenous materials remains a big challenge. A new strategy to create scaffolds through end-to-end crosslinking through functionalized nanorods leading to well-designed architecture is presented here. Self-assembled scaffolds with a denaturation temperature of 110 °C, porosity of 70%, pore size of 0.32 μm and Young's modulus of 231 MPa were developed largely driven by imine bonding between 3-mercapto-1-propanal (MPA) functionalized ZnO nanorods and collagen. The mechanical properties obtained were much higher than that of native collagen, collagen-MPA, collagen-3-mercapto-1-propanol (3MPOH) or collagen- 3-MPOH-ZnO, clearly bringing out the relevance of nanorod mediated assembly of fibrous networks. This new strategy has led to scaffolds with mechanical properties much higher than earlier reports and can provide support for cell growth and facilitation of cell attachment. PMID:26586667

  5. Collagenous gastritis associated with lymphocytic gastritis and celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Stancu, M; De Petris, G; Palumbo, T P; Lev, R

    2001-12-01

    Collagenous gastritis is a rare disorder, with only 8 cases reported in the literature, 2 in children and 6 in adults. We report an additional case of collagenous gastritis in a 42-year-old man with celiac disease. A thickened (>10 microm) subepithelial collagen band with entrapped capillaries, fibroblasts, and inflammatory cells was seen in the stomach, associated with lymphocytic gastritis. The duodenal mucosa showed severe villous atrophy but no subepithelial collagen deposition. No evidence of lymphocytic or collagenous colitis was found in the colon. The patient became symptom-free on a gluten exclusion diet and showed partial improvement of histopathologic findings after 3 months. Collagenous gastritis is a rare disease, but a wider recognition of its histopathologic features and clinical associations may bring more cases to light and provide additional clues in determining its etiology and pathogenesis. PMID:11735694

  6. Type IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome: A Surgical Emergency? A Case of Massive Retroperitoneal Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Chun, Stephen G; Pedro, Patrick; Yu, Mihae; Takanishi, Danny M

    2011-01-01

    Retroperitoneal hemorrhagic bleeding is a known manifestation of Type-IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome that is caused by loss-of-function mutations of the pro-alpha-1 chains of type III pro-collagen (COL3A1) resulting in vascular fragility. A number of previous reports describe futile surgical intervention for retroperitoneal bleeding in Type-IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome with high post-operative mortality, although the rarity of retroperitoneal bleeding associated with Type-IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome precludes an evidence-based approach to clinical management. We report a 23-year-old male with history of Type-IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome who presented with severe abdominal pain and tachycardia following an episode of vomiting. Further work-up of his abdominal pain revealed massive retroperitoneal bleeding by CT-scan of the abdomen. Given numerous cases of catastrophic injury caused by surgical intervention in Type-IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, the patient was treated non-operatively, and the patient made a full recovery. This case suggests that even in cases of large retroperitoneal hemorrhages associated with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, it may not truly represent a surgical emergency. PMID:21966332

  7. Type IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome: A Surgical Emergency? A Case of Massive Retroperitoneal Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Chun, Stephen G; Pedro, Patrick; Yu, Mihae; Takanishi, Danny M

    2011-01-01

    Retroperitoneal hemorrhagic bleeding is a known manifestation of Type-IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome that is caused by loss-of-function mutations of the pro-alpha-1 chains of type III pro-collagen (COL3A1) resulting in vascular fragility. A number of previous reports describe futile surgical intervention for retroperitoneal bleeding in Type-IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome with high post-operative mortality, although the rarity of retroperitoneal bleeding associated with Type-IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome precludes an evidence-based approach to clinical management. We report a 23-year-old male with history of Type-IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome who presented with severe abdominal pain and tachycardia following an episode of vomiting. Further work-up of his abdominal pain revealed massive retroperitoneal bleeding by CT-scan of the abdomen. Given numerous cases of catastrophic injury caused by surgical intervention in Type-IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, the patient was treated non-operatively, and the patient made a full recovery. This case suggests that even in cases of large retroperitoneal hemorrhages associated with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, it may not truly represent a surgical emergency.

  8. A new COL3A1 mutation in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV.

    PubMed

    Eder, Johanna; Laccone, Franco; Rohrbach, Marianne; Giunta, Cecilia; Aumayr, Klaus; Reichel, Christofer; Trautinger, Franz

    2013-03-01

    The vascular type of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV, EDS IV; OMIM #130050) is a rare connective tissue disorder with autosomal dominant transmission caused by mutations in the COL3A1 gene resulting in increased fragility of connective tissue with arterial, intestinal, and uterine ruptures and premature death. We present a 28-year-old female who in addition to typical EDS IV symptoms had severe peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) and subtotal stenosis of the abdominal aorta. COL3A1 sequencing resulted in detection of an as yet undescribed mutation in exon 36 at position 2465 leading to a nucleotide replacement (c.2465G>C; p.G822A). Ultrastructural analysis of a skin biopsy revealed abnormal morphology and distribution of dermal collagen fibres. We conclude that PAOD is a possible manifestation of EDS IV and that further research is required to define its true prevalence among patients with EDS IV and its molecular pathology including genotype-phenotype correlation.

  9. Endovascular repair of direct carotid-cavernous fistula in Ehlers-Danlos type IV.

    PubMed

    Linfante, Italo; Lin, Eugene; Knott, Eric; Katzen, Barry; Dabus, Guilherme

    2014-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type IV is a collagen vascular disease with an autosomal dominant inheritance caused by COL3A1 mutation. Patients with EDS type IV can present with organ rupture, spontaneous arterial dissections and ruptured aneurysms. Because of their propensity to form arterial dissections, aneurysms and rupture, they can develop carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) after minor trauma or spontaneously. In EDS, it has been reported that even conventional catheter diagnostic angiography may result in large artery dissections and vessel rupture. In addition, the treatment of CCF in EDS type IV can result in up to 59% mortality after initial treatment, of which 23% is attributed to direct complications of treatment. We present the case of a patient with EDS type IV who previously had spontaneous dissection and multiple pseudoaneurysms of both the iliac and femoral arteries and the distal abdominal aorta. Several years later the patient developed a direct type A CCF which was successfully treated with endovascular embolization using a transvenous approach with detachable coils. The literature pertaining to CCF in EDS type IV and its treatment is reviewed. PMID:24385391

  10. Endovascular repair of direct carotid-cavernous fistula in Ehlers-Danlos type IV.

    PubMed

    Linfante, Italo; Lin, Eugene; Knott, Eric; Katzen, Barry; Dabus, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type IV is a collagen vascular disease with an autosomal dominant inheritance caused by COL3A1 mutation. Patients with EDS type IV can present with organ rupture, spontaneous arterial dissections and ruptured aneurysms. Because of their propensity to form arterial dissections, aneurysms and rupture, they can develop carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) after minor trauma or spontaneously. In EDS, it has been reported that even conventional catheter diagnostic angiography may result in large artery dissections and vessel rupture. In addition, the treatment of CCF in EDS type IV can result in up to 59% mortality after initial treatment, of which 23% is attributed to direct complications of treatment. We present the case of a patient with EDS type IV who previously had spontaneous dissection and multiple pseudoaneurysms of both the iliac and femoral arteries and the distal abdominal aorta. Several years later the patient developed a direct type A CCF which was successfully treated with endovascular embolization using a transvenous approach with detachable coils. The literature pertaining to CCF in EDS type IV and its treatment is reviewed. PMID:24401479

  11. Raman study of the shockwave effect on collagens.

    PubMed

    Cárcamo, José J; Aliaga, Alvaro E; Clavijo, R Ernesto; Brañes, Manuel R; Campos-Vallette, Marcelo M

    2012-02-01

    The Raman spectra (1800-200 cm(-1)) of isolated dried collagen types I and III were recorded at different times after shockwave (SW) application in aqueous media. SWs were applied in a single session. One week after the SW application the vibrational data analysis indicates changes in the conformation of the collagens; orientational changes are also inferred. During the next three weeks collagens tended to recover the conformation and orientation existing before SW application.

  12. [The use of collagen in the cicatrization of wounds].

    PubMed

    Torra i Bou, J E; Casaroli-Marano, R P; Martínez Cuervo, F; Reina, M; Soldevilla Agreda, J J; Vilaró, S

    2000-10-01

    The authors review the use of collagen in the cicatrization of wounds, analyzing what this process consists of and what its regeneration and reparation phases are. The authors also summarize some fundamental biological aspects collagen has, their functions in hemostasia and in cicatrization; they develop the use of heterologous collagen in the cicatrization process. Expressive illustrations and a selection of bibliographical references accompany this article.

  13. Fibrous long-spacing collagen in bacillary angiomatosis.

    PubMed

    Borczuk, A C; Niedt, G; Sablay, L B; Kress, Y; Mannion, C M; Factor, S M; Tanaka, K E

    1998-01-01

    Fibrous long-spacing (FLS) collagen is a distinct ultrastructural form of collagen present in normal tissue, various tumors, and tissues degraded by bacterial collagenases in vivo and in vitro. An association between FLS collagen and bacillary angiomatosis has not been previously described. Six cases of bacillary angiomatosis, including one autopsy case with disseminated disease, were examined ultrastructurally. In addition, Kaposi sarcoma (3), pyogenic granuloma (3), capillary hemangioma (3), and cavernous hemangioma (2) were examined for comparison. A vascular proliferation in a lymph node from a patient with AIDS (1) and a case of pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis (1), also in an AIDS patient, were studied. Abundant FLS collagen was identified in 4 of 6 cases of bacillary angiomatosis, in close association with the organisms. FLS collagen was not seen beyond the immediate vicinity of the organisms. The FLS collagen in bacillary angiomatosis was seen in skin biopsies and in lung and skeletal muscle in the autopsy case; in the latter case, as well as in the two AIDS-associated, nonbacillary angiomatosis, non-Kaposi sarcoma vascular proliferations, there was a striking distribution of FLS collagen around small blood vessels. Occasional FLS collagen was observed in all three pyogenic granuloma. When present in pyogenic granuloma, FLS collagen was intermixed with subendothelial collagen. Abundant FLS collagen was identified in close association with the organisms of bacillary angiomatosis in four cases; this morphologic alteration was seen in skin as well as lung and skeletal muscle. An association between FLS collagen and endothelial cells in normal tissue (Descemet's membrane) and in certain vascular proliferations appears to exist.

  14. Collagenous gastritis: a morphologic and immunohistochemical study of 40 patients.

    PubMed

    Arnason, Thomas; Brown, Ian S; Goldsmith, Jeffrey D; Anderson, William; O'Brien, Blake H; Wilson, Claire; Winter, Harland; Lauwers, Gregory Y

    2015-04-01

    Collagenous gastritis is a rare condition defined histologically by a superficial subepithelial collagen layer. This study further characterizes the morphologic spectrum of collagenous gastritis by evaluating a multi-institutional series of 40 patients (26 female and 14 male). The median age at onset was 16 years (range 3-89 years), including 24 patients (60%) under age 18. Twelve patients (30%) had associated celiac disease, collagenous sprue, or collagenous colitis. Hematoxylin and eosin slides were reviewed in biopsies from all patients and tenascin, gastrin, eotaxin, and IgG4/IgG immunohistochemical stains were applied to a subset. The distribution of subepithelial collagen favored the body/fundus in pediatric patients and the antrum in adults. There were increased surface intraepithelial lymphocytes (>25 lymphocytes/100 epithelial cells) in five patients. Three of these patients had associated celiac and/or collagenous sprue/colitis, while the remaining two had increased duodenal lymphocytosis without specific etiology. An eosinophil-rich pattern (>30 eosinophils/high power field) was seen in 21/40 (52%) patients. Seven patients' biopsies demonstrated atrophy of the gastric corpus mucosa. Tenascin immunohistochemistry highlighted the subepithelial collagen in all 21 specimens evaluated and was a more sensitive method of collagen detection in biopsies from two patients with subtle subepithelial collagen. No increased eotaxin expression was identified in 16 specimens evaluated. One of the twenty-three biopsies tested had increased IgG4-positive cells (100/high power field) with an IgG4/IgG ratio of 55%. In summary, collagenous gastritis presents three distinct histologic patterns including a lymphocytic gastritis-like pattern, an eosinophil-rich pattern, and an atrophic pattern. Eotaxin and IgG4 were not elevated enough to implicate these pathways in the pathogenesis. Tenascin immunohistochemistry can be used as a sensitive method of collagen detection. PMID

  15. Collagenous gastritis: an unusual association with profound weight loss.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hanlin L; Shah, Amit G; Yerian, Lisa M; Cohen, Russell D; Hart, John

    2004-02-01

    Collagenous gastritis is a distinctive disorder characterized by thickening of the subepithelial collagen layer in the gastric mucosa. Although this entity was recognized in 1989, its etiology, pathogenesis, and clinicopathologic features remain poorly understood because of its rarity. An unusual case of collagenous gastritis was observed in a 37-year-old man who presented with profound weight loss, a feature that has not previously been emphasized. PMID:14736276

  16. The Role of Collagen Organization on the Properties of Bone.

    PubMed

    Garnero, Patrick

    2015-09-01

    Bone is a complex tissue constituted by a collagen matrix filled in with crystal of hydroxyapatite (HAP). Bone mechanical properties are influenced by the collagen matrix which is organized into hierarchical structures from the individual type I collagen heterotrimer flanked by linear telopeptides at each end to the collagen fibrils that are interconnected by enzymatic and non-enzymatic cross-links. Although most studies focused on the role of collagen cross-links in bone strength, other organizational features may also play a role. At the molecular level it has been shown that homotrimer of type I collagen found in bone tissue of some patients with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is characterized by decreased mechanical competence compared to the regular heterotrimer. The state of C-telopeptide isomerization-which can be estimated by the measurement in body fluids of the native and isomerized isoforms-has also been shown to be associated with bone strength, particularly the post-yield properties independent of bone size and bone mineral density. Other higher hierarchical features of collagen organization have shown to be associated with changes in bone mechanical behavior in ex vivo models and may also be relevant to explain bone fragility in diseases characterized by collagen abnormalities e.g., OI and Paget's disease. These include the orientation of collagen fibrils in a regular longitudinal direction, the D-spacing period between collagen fibrils and the collagen-HAP interfacial bonding. Preliminary data indicate that some of these organizational features can change during treatment with bisphosphonate, raloxifene, and PTH suggesting that they may contribute to their anti-fracture efficacy. It remains however to be d