Science.gov

Sample records for iv large time

  1. Time in Physics IV: Aristotle's reductionistic vision in four movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roark, Anthony Phillip

    Aristotle's definition of time in Physics IV.11 as ``a number of motion with respect to the before and after'' is often claimed to be viciously circular, since it is thought that `before' and `after' are terms that cannot be explicated independently of temporal concepts. My project in this dissertation is to defend Aristotle's theory against this charge of circularity and, further, to argue that it succeeds where some modern theories of time fail. The centerpiece of my interpretation is an explication of theoretical entities that Aristotle calls `the before and after in motion', entities that I have dubbed `kinetic positions'. Kinetic positions are instantaneous happenings within a movement that can be specified as functions of a moving object's actual spatial location and the telos, or end, of the movement. On Aristotle's view, time is an aspect of motion, and kinetic positions are the lower-level metaphysical counterparts of instants. It is in this sense that Aristotle's account is reductionistic: time derives its existence and structure from that of motion, and motion derives its existence and structure from that of spatial magnitudes. The success of my project requires that I: (i)establish that Aristotle's kinetic theory can be explicated independently of temporal concepts; (ii)explain how the asymmetrically-ordered kinetic continuum derives from the symmetrically-ordered spatial continuum; (iii)show that my interpretation of kinetic positions is consistent with Aristotle's claim in Physics VI that motion in an instant is impossible; (iv)explain the significance of Aristotle's placement of time within the genus number; (v)justify Aristotle's claim in IV.14 that time would not exist if there were no perceptive souls; (vi)how that Aristotle's account integrates temporal passage, the ``flow'' of time, in such a way as to be immune from devastating arguments, devised by McTaggart and others, against its possibility. I conclude that Aristotle ultimately conceives

  2. Large numbers hypothesis. IV - The cosmological constant and quantum physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    In standard physics quantum field theory is based on a flat vacuum space-time. This quantum field theory predicts a nonzero cosmological constant. Hence the gravitational field equations do not admit a flat vacuum space-time. This dilemma is resolved using the units covariant gravitational field equations. This paper shows that the field equations admit a flat vacuum space-time with nonzero cosmological constant if and only if the canonical LNH is valid. This allows an interpretation of the LNH phenomena in terms of a time-dependent vacuum state. If this is correct then the cosmological constant must be positive.

  3. STT Doubles with Large DM - Part IV: Ophiuchus and Hercules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Wilfried; Nanson, John

    2016-04-01

    The results of visual double star observing sessions suggested a pattern for STT doubles with large DM of being harder to resolve than would be expected based on the WDS catalog data. It was felt this might be a problem with expectations on one hand, and on the other might be an indication of a need for new precise measurements, so we decided to take a closer look at a selected sample of STT doubles and do some research. We found that like in the other constellations covered so far (Gem, Leo, UMa, etc.) at least several of the selected objects in Ophiuchus and Hercules show parameters quite different from the current WDS data.

  4. Anterior panhypopituitarism in diffuse large B-cell stage IV lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Valeros, Katherine A; Khoo, Eric

    2014-08-01

    The most common presentation of metastases to the pituitary gland in systemic lymphoma is diabetes insipidus resulting from infiltration of the infundibulum/posterior lobe. We describe a 69-year-old man with diffuse large B-cell stage IV lymphoma who presented with anterior pituitary hypofunction, without features of posterior pituitary involvement. He presented with a few months of postural dizziness and hypotension, weight loss, fever, strabismus of right eye and a superficial abdominal wall mass. At this time he had no history of malignancy. Biochemically he had hypovolemic hyponatremia, secondary hypothyroidism and adrenal insufficiency. Further hormonal work-up revealed panhypopituitarism but no diabetes insipidus. Imaging of the brain, thorax and abdomen demonstrated diffuse intracranial pachymeningeal thickening and enhancement, multiple lymphadenopathies, a bulky right adrenal gland and a large left suprarenal mass, which were indicative of an infiltrative disease. Imaging of the pituitary showed heterogeneous enhancement of the anterior lobe with an unremarkable pituitary stalk and posterior lobe. Biopsy of the superficial abdominal wall mass revealed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma confirmed by bone marrow aspiration biopsy. Positron emission tomography (PET) scan confirmed diffuse systemic disease involving the right orbital apex, bilateral adrenal glands, bone and bone marrow, retroperitoneum and subcutaneous tissues; however, the pituitary gland, infundibulum and hypothalamus did not show any lesions on the PET scan. The patient was commenced on two cycles of chemotherapy but unfortunately died, thus recovery of pituitary function was not tested. Pure anterior pituitary hypofunction can uncommonly present in individuals with metastases to the pituitary gland, in contrast to the more common posterior pituitary/infundibulum involvement.

  5. Rates of DSM-IV Psychiatric Disorders Among Adolescents in a Large Metropolitan Area

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Robert E.; Roberts, Catherine Ramsay; Xing, Yun

    2009-01-01

    We present prevalence data for adolescents in a large metropolitan area in the U.S. and the association of DSM-IV diagnoses to functional impairment and selected demographic correlates. We sampled 4,175 youths aged 11–17 years from households enrolled in large health maintenance organizations. Data were collected using questionnaires and the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children, Version IV (DISC-IV). Impairment was measured using the Child Global Assessment Scale and diagnostic specific impairment in the DISC-IV. 17.1% of the sample met DSM-IV criteria for one or more disorders in the past year; 11% when only DISC impairment was considered and 5.3% only using the CGAS. The most prevalent disorders were anxiety (6.9%), disruptive (6.5%), and substance use (5.3%) disorders. The most prevalent specific disorders were agoraphobia, conduct and marijuana abuse/dependence, then alcohol use and oppositional defiant disorder. Younger youths and females had lower odds for any disorder, as did youths from two parent homes. There was increased odds associated with lower family income. Females had greater odds of mood and anxiety disorders, males of disruptive and substance use disorders. There were greater odds of mood and disruptive disorders for older youths. Prevalences were highly comparable to recent studies using similar methods in diverse non-metropolitan populations. We found associations with age, gender, and to a lesser extent, socioeconomic status reported in previous studies. The inclusion of both diagnosis-specific impairment and global impairment reduced prevalence rates significantly. Our results suggest commonality of prevalences and associated factors in diverse study settings, including urban and rural areas. PMID:17107689

  6. Titanium(IV) in the organic-structure-directing-agent-free synthesis of hydrophobic and large-pore molecular sieves as redox catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingui; Yokoi, Toshiyuki; Kondo, Junko N; Tatsumi, Takashi; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-08-10

    Titanium(IV) incorporated into the framework of molecular sieves can be used as a highly active and sustainable catalyst for the oxidation of industrially important organic molecules. Unfortunately, the current process for the incorporation of titanium(IV) requires a large amount of expensive organic molecules used as organic-structure-directing agents (OSDAs), and this significantly increases the production costs and causes environmental problems owing to the removal of OSDAs by pyrolysis. Herein, an OSDA-free process was developed to incorporate titanium(IV) into BEA-type molecular sieves for the first time. More importantly, the hydrophobic environment and the robust, 3 D, and large pore structure of the titanium(IV)-incorporated molecular sieves fabricated from the OSDA-free process created a catalyst that was extremely active and selective for the epoxidation of bulky cyclooctene in comparison to Ti-incorporated BEA-type molecular sieves synthesized with OSDAs and commercial titanosilicate TS-1.

  7. Large-scale vertical motion calculations in the AVE IV Experiment. [of atmospheric wind velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, G. S.

    1976-01-01

    Using 3- and 6-h consecutive rawinsonde and surface data from NASA's AVE IV Experiment, synoptic-scale vertical motion calculations are made using an adiabatic technique and three variations of the kinematic technique. Both subjective and objective comparisons in space and time between the sign and magnitude of the computed vertical velocities and precipitation intensities are made. These comparisons are conducted to determine which method would consistently produce realistic magnitudes, patterns, and vertical profiles of vertical velocity essential to the diagnostic study of the relationship between severe convective storms and their environment in AVE IV. The kinematic method, adjusted to the adiabatic value at 100 mb, proved to produce the best overall vertical velocities.

  8. Oblimersen Sodium and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-10-11

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma

  9. Collagen IV-Modified Scaffolds Improve Islet Survival and Function and Reduce Time to Euglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Woon Teck; Salvay, David M.; Silliman, Michael A.; Zhang, Xiaomin; Bannon, Zachary G.; Kaufman, Dixon B.; Lowe, William L.

    2013-01-01

    Islet transplantation on extracellular matrix (ECM) protein-modified biodegradable microporous poly(lactide-co-glycolide) scaffolds is a potential curative treatment for type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Collagen IV-modified scaffolds, relative to control scaffolds, significantly decreased the time required to restore euglycemia from 17 to 3 days. We investigated the processes by which collagen IV-modified scaffolds enhanced islet function and mediated early restoration of euglycemia post-transplantation. We characterized the effect of collagen IV-modified scaffolds on islet survival, metabolism, and insulin secretion in vitro and early- and intermediate-term islet mass and vascular density post-transplantation and correlated these with early restoration of euglycemia in a syngeneic mouse model. Control scaffolds maintained native islet morphologies and architectures as well as collagen IV-modified scaffolds in vivo. The islet size and vascular density increased, while β-cell proliferation decreased from day 16 to 113 post-transplantation. Collagen IV-modified scaffolds promoted islet cell viability and decreased early-stage apoptosis in islet cells in vitro—phenomena that coincided with enhanced islet metabolic function and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. These findings suggest that collagen IV-modified scaffolds promote the early restoration of euglycemia post-transplantation by enhancing islet metabolism and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. These studies of ECM proteins, in particular collagen IV, and islet function provide key insights for the engineering of a microenvironment that would serve as a platform for enhancing islet transplantation as a viable clinical therapy for T1DM. PMID:23713524

  10. Timing signatures of large scale solar eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Hock-Mysliwiec, Rachel; Henry, Timothy; Kirk, Michael S.

    2016-05-01

    We examine the timing signatures of large solar eruptions resulting in flares, CMEs and Solar Energetic Particle events. We probe solar active regions from the chromosphere through the corona, using data from space and ground-based observations, including ISOON, SDO, GONG, and GOES. Our studies include a number of flares and CMEs of mostly the M- and X-strengths as categorized by GOES. We find that the chromospheric signatures of these large eruptions occur 5-30 minutes in advance of coronal high temperature signatures. These timing measurements are then used as inputs to models and reconstruct the eruptive nature of these systems, and explore their utility in forecasts.

  11. Real time interrupt handling using FORTRAN IV plus under RSX-11M

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, D.E.

    1981-01-01

    A real-time data acquisition application for a linear accelerator is described. The important programming features of this application are use of connect to interrupt, a shared library, map to I/O page, and a shared data area. How you can provide rapid interrupt handling using these tools from FORTRAN IV PLUS is explained.

  12. Large-scale environment of z ˜ 5.7 C IV absorption systems -II. Spectroscopy of Lyman α emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, C. Gonzalo; Ryan-Weber, Emma V.; Cooke, Jeff; Koyama, Yusei; Ouchi, Masami

    2015-04-01

    The flow of baryons to and from a galaxy, which is fundamental for galaxy formation and evolution, can be studied with galaxy-metal absorption system pairs. Our search for galaxies around C IV absorption systems at z ˜ 5.7 showed an excess of photometric Lyman α emitter (LAE) candidates in the fields J1030+0524 and J1137+3549. Here, we present spectroscopic follow-up of 33 LAEs in both fields. In the first field, three out of the five LAEs within 10h-1 projected comoving Mpc from the C IV system are within ±500 km s-1 from the absorption at z_{C IV}=5.7242± 0.0001. The closest candidate (LAE 103027+052419) is robustly confirmed at 212.8^{+14}_{-0.4}h^{-1} physical kpc from the C IV system. In the second field, the LAE sample is selected at a lower redshift (Δz ˜ 0.04) than the C IV absorption system as a result of the filter transmission and, thus, do not trace its environment. The observed properties of LAE 103027+052419 indicate that it is near the high-mass end of the LAE distribution, probably having a large H I column density and large-scale outflows. Therefore, our results suggest that the C IV system is likely produced by a star-forming galaxy which has been injecting metals into the intergalactic medium since z > 6. Thus, the C IV system is either produced by LAE 103027+052419, implying that outflows can enrich larger volumes at z > 6 than at z ˜ 3.5, or an undetected dwarf galaxy. In either case, C IV systems like this one trace the ionized intergalactic medium at the end of cosmic hydrogen reionization and may trace the sources of the ionizing flux density.

  13. Timing Characteristics of Large Area Picosecond Photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Bernhard W.; Elagin, Andrey L.; Frisch, H.; Obaid, Razib; Oberla, E; Vostrikov, Alexander; Wagner, Robert G.; Wang, Jingbo; Wetstein, Matthew J.; Northrop, R

    2015-09-21

    The LAPPD Collaboration was formed to develop ultralast large-area imaging photodetectors based on new methods for fabricating microchannel plates (MCPs). In this paper we characterize the time response using a pulsed, sub picosecond laser. We observe single photoelectron time resolutions of a 20 cm x 20 cm MCP consistently below 70 ps, spatial resolutions of roughly 500 pm, and median gains higher than 10(7). The RMS measured at one particular point on an LAPPD detector is 58 ps, with in of 47 ps. The differential time resolution between the signal reaching the two ends of the delay line anode is measured to be 5.1 ps for large signals, with an asymptotic limit falling below 2 ps as noise-over-signal approaches zero.

  14. Timing characteristics of Large Area Picosecond Photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, B. W.; Elagin, A.; Frisch, H. J.; Obaid, R.; Oberla, E.; Vostrikov, A.; Wagner, R. G.; Wang, J.; Wetstein, M.

    2015-09-01

    The LAPPD Collaboration was formed to develop ultrafast large-area imaging photodetectors based on new methods for fabricating microchannel plates (MCPs). In this paper we characterize the time response using a pulsed, sub-picosecond laser. We observe single-photoelectron time resolutions of a 20 cm × 20 cm MCP consistently below 70 ps, spatial resolutions of roughly 500 μm, and median gains higher than 107. The RMS measured at one particular point on an LAPPD detector is 58 ps, with ± 1σ of 47 ps. The differential time resolution between the signal reaching the two ends of the delay line anode is measured to be 5.1 ps for large signals, with an asymptotic limit falling below 2 ps as noise-over-signal approaches zero.

  15. Vorinostat, Rituximab, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-08

    Stage II Contiguous Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma

  16. Real-Time Series Resistance Monitoring in PV Systems Without the Need for IV Curves

    SciTech Connect

    Deceglie, Michael G.; Silverman, Timothy J.; Marion, Bill; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    2015-06-14

    We apply the physical principles of a familiar method, suns-Voc, to a new application: the real-time detection of series resistance changes in modules and systems operating outside. The real-time series resistance (RTSR) method that we describe avoids the need for collecting IV curves or constructing full series-resistance-free IV curves. RTSR is most readily deployable at the module level on micro-inverters or module-integrated electronics, but it can also be extended to full strings. Automated detection of series resistance increases can provide early warnings of some of the most common reliability issues, which also pose fire risks, including broken ribbons, broken solder bonds, and contact problems in the junction or combiner box. We describe the method in detail and describe a sample application to data collected from modules operating in the field.

  17. Titanium(IV) in the organic-structure-directing-agent-free synthesis of hydrophobic and large-pore molecular sieves as redox catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingui; Yokoi, Toshiyuki; Kondo, Junko N; Tatsumi, Takashi; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-08-10

    Titanium(IV) incorporated into the framework of molecular sieves can be used as a highly active and sustainable catalyst for the oxidation of industrially important organic molecules. Unfortunately, the current process for the incorporation of titanium(IV) requires a large amount of expensive organic molecules used as organic-structure-directing agents (OSDAs), and this significantly increases the production costs and causes environmental problems owing to the removal of OSDAs by pyrolysis. Herein, an OSDA-free process was developed to incorporate titanium(IV) into BEA-type molecular sieves for the first time. More importantly, the hydrophobic environment and the robust, 3 D, and large pore structure of the titanium(IV)-incorporated molecular sieves fabricated from the OSDA-free process created a catalyst that was extremely active and selective for the epoxidation of bulky cyclooctene in comparison to Ti-incorporated BEA-type molecular sieves synthesized with OSDAs and commercial titanosilicate TS-1. PMID:26073555

  18. Rapid detection of lineage IV peste des petits ruminants virus by real-time RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Wu, Xiaodong; Liu, Fuxiao; Wang, Zhiliang; Liu, Chunju; Wang, Qinghua; Bao, Jingyue

    2016-09-01

    Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) is the cause agent of peste des petitis ruminants (PPR). A novel lineage IV PPRV has reemerged in China in 2013 and 2014. Mass vaccination was implemented in most provinces in China. In order to detect lineage IV PPRV in clinical samples and to distinguish rapidly it from the other lineages PPRVs, a real-time RT-PCR assay was developed. This assay showed high sensitivity, specificity and efficiency in differentiating the lineage IV PPRV from others. The performance of this assay was evaluated by positive clinical samples of lineage IV viruses. This new real-time RT-PCR assay will facilitate epidemiological investigations and rapid differentiatial diagnosis in areas where lineage IV viruses are circulating. PMID:27260657

  19. High lying configurations in the spectrum of three times ionized indium (In IV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabtsev, A. N.; Kononov, E. Ya.

    2016-01-01

    Using the high resolution vacuum normal and grazing incidence spectrographs the spectrum of three times ionized indium has been studied in the wavelength region 250-700 Å. Previously unknown transitions 4d95s-4d85s5p and 4d95p-4d98s were investigated resulting in the identification of 146 spectral lines and location of 55 levels of the 4d85s5p configuration and all four levels of the 4d98s configuration. The number of identified lines involving the 4d97s, 4d96p, 4d97p, 4d96d, 4d94f and 4d95f configurations was significantly increased. Previously found levels of these configurations were confirmed except two 4d96d levels which were corrected. Overall 210 new lines were identified in In IV.

  20. Nonparametric, nonnegative deconvolution of large time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirpka, O. A.

    2006-12-01

    There is a long tradition of characterizing hydrologic systems by linear models, in which the response of the system to a time-varying stimulus is computed by convolution of a system-specific transfer function with the input signal. Despite its limitations, the transfer-function concept has been shown valuable for many situations such as the precipitation/run-off relationships of catchments and solute transport in agricultural soils and aquifers. A practical difficulty lies in the identification of the transfer function. A common approach is to fit a parametric function, enforcing a particular shape of the transfer function, which may be in contradiction to the real behavior (e.g., multimodal transfer functions, long tails, etc.). In our nonparametric deconvolution, the transfer function is assumed an auto-correlated random time function, which is conditioned on the data by a Bayesian approach. Nonnegativity, which is a vital constraint for solute-transport applications, is enforced by the method of Lagrange multipliers. This makes the inverse problem nonlinear. In nonparametric deconvolution, identifying the auto-correlation parameters is crucial. Enforcing too much smoothness prohibits the identification of important features, whereas insufficient smoothing leads to physically meaningless transfer functions, mapping noise components in the two data series onto each other. We identify optimal smoothness parameters by the expectation-maximization method, which requires the repeated generation of many conditional realizations. The overall approach, however, is still significantly faster than Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo methods presented recently. We apply our approach to electric-conductivity time series measured in a river and monitoring wells in the adjacent aquifer. The data cover 1.5 years with a temporal resolution of 1h. The identified transfer functions have lengths of up to 60 days, making up 1440 parameters. We believe that nonparametric deconvolution is an

  1. Profiling the metabolism of astragaloside IV by ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xu-Dong; Wei, Ming-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Astragaloside IV is a compound isolated from the Traditional Chinese Medicine Astragalus membranaceus, that has been reported to have bioactivities against cardiovascular disease and kidney disease. There is limited information on the metabolism of astragaloside IV, which impedes comprehension of its biological actions and pharmacology. In the present study, an ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS/MS)-based approach was developed to profile the metabolites of astragaloside IV in rat plasma, bile, urine and feces samples. Twenty-two major metabolites were detected. The major components found in plasma, bile, urine and feces included the parent chemical and phases I and II metabolites. The major metabolic reactions of astragaloside IV were hydrolysis, glucuronidation, sulfation and dehydrogenation. These results will help to improve understanding the metabolism and reveal the biotransformation profiling of astragaloside IV in vivo. The metabolic information obtained from our study will guide studies into the pharmacological activity and clinical safety of astragaloside IV. PMID:25407723

  2. Topology of large-scale structure. IV - Topology in two dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melott, Adrian L.; Cohen, Alexander P.; Hamilton, Andrew J. S.; Gott, J. Richard, III; Weinberg, David H.

    1989-01-01

    In a recent series of papers, an algorithm was developed for quantitatively measuring the topology of the large-scale structure of the universe and this algorithm was applied to numerical models and to three-dimensional observational data sets. In this paper, it is shown that topological information can be derived from a two-dimensional cross section of a density field, and analytic expressions are given for a Gaussian random field. The application of a two-dimensional numerical algorithm for measuring topology to cross sections of three-dimensional models is demonstrated.

  3. Reionization on large scales. IV. Predictions for the 21 cm signal incorporating the light cone effect

    SciTech Connect

    La Plante, P.; Battaglia, N.; Natarajan, A.; Peterson, J. B.; Trac, H.; Cen, R.; Loeb, A.

    2014-07-01

    We present predictions for the 21 cm brightness temperature power spectrum during the Epoch of Reionization (EoR). We discuss the implications of the 'light cone' effect, which incorporates evolution of the neutral hydrogen fraction and 21 cm brightness temperature along the line of sight. Using a novel method calibrated against radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, we model the neutral hydrogen density field and 21 cm signal in large volumes (L = 2 Gpc h {sup –1}). The inclusion of the light cone effect leads to a relative decrease of about 50% in the 21 cm power spectrum on all scales. We also find that the effect is more prominent at the midpoint of reionization and later. The light cone effect can also introduce an anisotropy along the line of sight. By decomposing the 3D power spectrum into components perpendicular to and along the line of sight, we find that in our fiducial reionization model, there is no significant anisotropy. However, parallel modes can contribute up to 40% more power for shorter reionization scenarios. The scales on which the light cone effect is relevant are comparable to scales where one measures the baryon acoustic oscillation. We argue that due to its large comoving scale and introduction of anisotropy, the light cone effect is important when considering redshift space distortions and future application to the Alcock-Paczyński test for the determination of cosmological parameters.

  4. The Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey: Spectroscopic Variability Investigations Within SDSS-IV/eBOSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Paul J.; Anderson, Scott F.; Morganson, Eric; Eracleous, Michael; Shen, Yue; Brandt, W. Niel; Ruan, John J.; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Badenes, Carles; West, Andrew A.; Ju, Wenhua; Greene, Jenny E.; Tdss, Panstarrs-1, Sdss-Iv

    2015-01-01

    The Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS) is an SDSS-IV subproject that began summer 2014 and will continue for 4-6 years. Besides its main program to obtain initial characterization spectra of about 220,000 optical variables selected from PanSTARRS-1, the TDSS includes 9 separate smaller programs to study spectroscopic variability. We describe each of these Few-Epoch Spectroscopy (FES) programs, which target objects with existing SDSS spectroscopy amongst classes of quasars and stars of particular astrophysical interest. These include, in approximate order of decreasing sample size: Broad Absorption Line Quasars (BALQSOs), the most photometrically variable ("HyperVariable") quasars, high S/N normal broad line quasars, quasars with double-peaked or very asymmetric broad emission line profiles, Hypervariable stars, active ultracool (late-M and L-type) dwarf stars with Halpha emission, dwarf carbon stars, white dwarf/M dwarf spectroscopic binaries with Halpha emission, and binary supermassive black hole candidates from MgII broad line velocity shift analysis. We summarize herein the unique and diverse astrophysical investigations facilitated by these TDSS FES programs.

  5. The dynamics and control of large flexible space structures-IV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bainum, P. M.; Kumar, V. K.; Krishna, R.; Reddy, A. S. S. R.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of solar radiation pressure as the main environmental disturbance torque were incorporated into the model of the rigid orbiting shallow shell and computer simulation results indicate that within the linear range the rigid modal amplitudes are excited in proportion to the area to mass ratio. The effect of higher order terms in the gravity-gradient torque expressions previously neglected was evaluated and found to be negligible for the size structures under consideration. A graph theory approach was employed for calculating the eigenvalues of a large flexible system by reducing the system (stiffness) matrix to lower ordered submatrices. The related reachability matrix and term rank concepts are used to verify controllability and can be more effective than the alternate numerical rank tests. Control laws were developed for the shape and orientation control of the orbiting flexible shallow shell and numerical results presented.

  6. THE GOULD'S BELT VERY LARGE ARRAY SURVEY. IV. THE TAURUS-AURIGA COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Dzib, Sergio A.; Loinard, Laurent; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Ortiz-León, Gisela N.; Pech, Gerardo; Rivera, Juana L.; Mioduszewski, Amy J.; Kounkel, Marina A.; Hartmann, Lee; Torres, Rosa M.; Boden, Andrew F.; Evans II, Neal J.; Briceño, Cesar; Tobin, John

    2015-03-10

    We present a multi-epoch radio study of the Taurus-Auriga star-forming complex made with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array at frequencies of 4.5 GHz and 7.5 GHz. We detect a total of 610 sources, 59 of which are related to young stellar objects (YSOs) and 18 to field stars. The properties of 56% of the young stars are compatible with non-thermal radio emission. We also show that the radio emission of more evolved YSOs tends to be more non-thermal in origin and, in general, that their radio properties are compatible with those found in other star-forming regions. By comparing our results with previously reported X-ray observations, we notice that YSOs in Taurus-Auriga follow a Güdel-Benz relation with κ = 0.03, as we previously suggested for other regions of star formation. In general, YSOs in Taurus-Auriga and in all the previous studied regions seem to follow this relation with a dispersion of ∼1 dex. Finally, we propose that most of the remaining sources are related with extragalactic objects but provide a list of 46 unidentified radio sources whose radio properties are compatible with a YSO nature.

  7. RAGBEEF: a FORTRAN IV implementation of a time-dependent model for radionuclide contamination of beef

    SciTech Connect

    Pleasant, J C; McDowell-Boyer, L M; Killough, G G

    1982-06-01

    RAGBEEF is a FORTRAN IV program that calculates radionuclide concentrations in beef as a result of ingestion of contaminated feeds, pasture, and pasture soil by beef cattle. The model implemented by RAGBEEF is dynamic in nature, allowing the user to consider age- and season-dependent aspects of beef cattle management in estimating concentrations in beef. It serves as an auxiliary code to RAGTIME, previously documented by the authors, which calculates radionuclide concentrations in agricultural crops in a dynamic manner, but evaluates concentrations in beef for steady-state conditions only. The time-dependent concentrations in feeds, pasture, and pasture soil generated by RAGTIME are used as input to the RAGBEEF code. RAGBEEF, as presently implemented, calculates radionuclide concentrations in the muscle of age-based cohorts in a beef cattle herd. Concentrations in the milk of lactating cows are also calculated, but are assumed age-dependent as in RAGTIME. Radionuclide concentrations in beef and milk are described in RAGBEEF by a system of ordinary linear differential equations in which the transfer rate of radioactivity between compartments is proportional to the inventory of radioactivity in the source compartment. This system is solved by use of the GEAR package for solution of systems of ordinary differential equations. The accuracy of this solution is monitored at various check points by comparison with explicit solutions of Bateman-type equations. This report describes the age- and season-dependent considerations making up the RAGBEEF model, as well as presenting the equations which describe the model and a documentation of the associated computer code. Listings of the RAGBEEF and updated RAGTIME codes are provided in appendices, as are the results of a sample run of RAGBEEF and a description of recent modifications to RAGTIME.

  8. Serotype IV Streptococcus agalactiae ST-452 has arisen from large genomic recombination events between CC23 and the hypervirulent CC17 lineages

    PubMed Central

    Campisi, Edmondo; Rinaudo, C. Daniela; Donati, Claudio; Barucco, Mara; Torricelli, Giulia; Edwards, Morven S.; Baker, Carol J.; Margarit, Imma; Rosini, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) causes life-threatening infections in newborns and adults with chronic medical conditions. Serotype IV strains are emerging both among carriers and as cause of invasive disease and recent studies revealed two main Sequence Types (STs), ST-452 and ST-459 assigned to Clonal Complexes CC23 and CC1, respectively. Whole genome sequencing of 70 type IV GBS and subsequent phylogenetic analysis elucidated the localization of type IV isolates in a SNP-based phylogenetic tree and suggested that ST-452 could have originated through genetic recombination. SNPs density analysis of the core genome confirmed that the founder strain of this lineage originated from a single large horizontal gene transfer event between CC23 and the hypervirulent CC17. Indeed, ST-452 genomes are composed by two parts that are nearly identical to corresponding regions in ST-24 (CC23) and ST-291 (CC17). Chromosome mapping of the major GBS virulence factors showed that ST-452 strains have an intermediate yet unique profile among CC23 and CC17 strains. We described unreported large recombination events, involving the cps IV operon and resulting in the expansion of serotype IV to CC23. This work sheds further light on the evolution of GBS providing new insights on the recent emergence of serotype IV. PMID:27411639

  9. Serotype IV Streptococcus agalactiae ST-452 has arisen from large genomic recombination events between CC23 and the hypervirulent CC17 lineages.

    PubMed

    Campisi, Edmondo; Rinaudo, C Daniela; Donati, Claudio; Barucco, Mara; Torricelli, Giulia; Edwards, Morven S; Baker, Carol J; Margarit, Imma; Rosini, Roberto

    2016-07-14

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) causes life-threatening infections in newborns and adults with chronic medical conditions. Serotype IV strains are emerging both among carriers and as cause of invasive disease and recent studies revealed two main Sequence Types (STs), ST-452 and ST-459 assigned to Clonal Complexes CC23 and CC1, respectively. Whole genome sequencing of 70 type IV GBS and subsequent phylogenetic analysis elucidated the localization of type IV isolates in a SNP-based phylogenetic tree and suggested that ST-452 could have originated through genetic recombination. SNPs density analysis of the core genome confirmed that the founder strain of this lineage originated from a single large horizontal gene transfer event between CC23 and the hypervirulent CC17. Indeed, ST-452 genomes are composed by two parts that are nearly identical to corresponding regions in ST-24 (CC23) and ST-291 (CC17). Chromosome mapping of the major GBS virulence factors showed that ST-452 strains have an intermediate yet unique profile among CC23 and CC17 strains. We described unreported large recombination events, involving the cps IV operon and resulting in the expansion of serotype IV to CC23. This work sheds further light on the evolution of GBS providing new insights on the recent emergence of serotype IV.

  10. Serotype IV Streptococcus agalactiae ST-452 has arisen from large genomic recombination events between CC23 and the hypervirulent CC17 lineages.

    PubMed

    Campisi, Edmondo; Rinaudo, C Daniela; Donati, Claudio; Barucco, Mara; Torricelli, Giulia; Edwards, Morven S; Baker, Carol J; Margarit, Imma; Rosini, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) causes life-threatening infections in newborns and adults with chronic medical conditions. Serotype IV strains are emerging both among carriers and as cause of invasive disease and recent studies revealed two main Sequence Types (STs), ST-452 and ST-459 assigned to Clonal Complexes CC23 and CC1, respectively. Whole genome sequencing of 70 type IV GBS and subsequent phylogenetic analysis elucidated the localization of type IV isolates in a SNP-based phylogenetic tree and suggested that ST-452 could have originated through genetic recombination. SNPs density analysis of the core genome confirmed that the founder strain of this lineage originated from a single large horizontal gene transfer event between CC23 and the hypervirulent CC17. Indeed, ST-452 genomes are composed by two parts that are nearly identical to corresponding regions in ST-24 (CC23) and ST-291 (CC17). Chromosome mapping of the major GBS virulence factors showed that ST-452 strains have an intermediate yet unique profile among CC23 and CC17 strains. We described unreported large recombination events, involving the cps IV operon and resulting in the expansion of serotype IV to CC23. This work sheds further light on the evolution of GBS providing new insights on the recent emergence of serotype IV. PMID:27411639

  11. Quantum Coherence Times Enhancement in Vanadium(IV)-based Potential Molecular Qubits: the Key Role of the Vanadyl Moiety.

    PubMed

    Atzori, Matteo; Morra, Elena; Tesi, Lorenzo; Albino, Andrea; Chiesa, Mario; Sorace, Lorenzo; Sessoli, Roberta

    2016-09-01

    In the search for long-lived quantum coherence in spin systems, vanadium(IV) complexes have shown record phase memory times among molecular systems. When nuclear spin-free ligands are employed, vanadium(IV) complexes can show at low temperature sufficiently long quantum coherence times, Tm, to perform quantum operations, but their use in real devices operating at room temperature is still hampered by the rapid decrease of T1 caused by the efficient spin-phonon coupling. In this work we have investigated the effect of different coordination environments on the magnetization dynamics and the quantum coherence of two vanadium(IV)-based potential molecular spin qubits in the solid state by introducing a unique structural difference, i.e., an oxovanadium(IV) in a square pyramidal versus a vanadium(IV) in an octahedral environment featuring the same coordinating ligand, namely, the 1,3-dithiole-2-thione-4,5-dithiolate. This investigation, performed by a combined approach of alternate current (ac) susceptibility measurements and continuous wave (CW) and pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies revealed that the effectiveness of the vanadyl moiety in enhancing quantum coherence up to room temperature is related to a less effective mechanism of spin-lattice relaxation that can be quantitatively evaluated by the exponent n (ca. 3) of the temperature dependence of the relaxation rate. A more rapid collapse is observed for the non-oxo counterpart (n = 4) hampering the observation of quantum coherence at room temperature. Record coherence time at room temperature (1.04 μs) and Rabi oscillations are also observed for the vanadyl derivative in a very high concentrated material (5 ± 1%) as a result of the additional benefit provided by the use of a nuclear spin-free ligand. PMID:27517709

  12. Quantum Coherence Times Enhancement in Vanadium(IV)-based Potential Molecular Qubits: the Key Role of the Vanadyl Moiety.

    PubMed

    Atzori, Matteo; Morra, Elena; Tesi, Lorenzo; Albino, Andrea; Chiesa, Mario; Sorace, Lorenzo; Sessoli, Roberta

    2016-09-01

    In the search for long-lived quantum coherence in spin systems, vanadium(IV) complexes have shown record phase memory times among molecular systems. When nuclear spin-free ligands are employed, vanadium(IV) complexes can show at low temperature sufficiently long quantum coherence times, Tm, to perform quantum operations, but their use in real devices operating at room temperature is still hampered by the rapid decrease of T1 caused by the efficient spin-phonon coupling. In this work we have investigated the effect of different coordination environments on the magnetization dynamics and the quantum coherence of two vanadium(IV)-based potential molecular spin qubits in the solid state by introducing a unique structural difference, i.e., an oxovanadium(IV) in a square pyramidal versus a vanadium(IV) in an octahedral environment featuring the same coordinating ligand, namely, the 1,3-dithiole-2-thione-4,5-dithiolate. This investigation, performed by a combined approach of alternate current (ac) susceptibility measurements and continuous wave (CW) and pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies revealed that the effectiveness of the vanadyl moiety in enhancing quantum coherence up to room temperature is related to a less effective mechanism of spin-lattice relaxation that can be quantitatively evaluated by the exponent n (ca. 3) of the temperature dependence of the relaxation rate. A more rapid collapse is observed for the non-oxo counterpart (n = 4) hampering the observation of quantum coherence at room temperature. Record coherence time at room temperature (1.04 μs) and Rabi oscillations are also observed for the vanadyl derivative in a very high concentrated material (5 ± 1%) as a result of the additional benefit provided by the use of a nuclear spin-free ligand.

  13. Real-Time Series Resistance Monitoring in PV Systems Without the Need for I-V Curves

    SciTech Connect

    Deceglie, Michael G.; Silverman, Timothy J.; Marion, Bill; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    2015-10-01

    We apply the physical principles of a familiar method, suns-Voc, to a new application: the real-time detection of series resistance changes in modules and systems operating outside. The real-time series resistance (RTSR) method that we describe avoids the need for collecting I-V curves or constructing full series resistance-free I-V curves. RTSR is most readily deployable at the module level on microinverters or module-integrated electronics, but it can also be extended to full strings. We found that automated detection of series resistance increases can provide early warnings of some of the most common reliability issues, which also pose fire risks, including broken ribbons, broken solder bonds, and contact problems in the junction or combiner box. We also describe the method in detail and describe a sample application to data collected from modules operating in the field.

  14. Predictors of Local Recurrence After Rituximab-Based Chemotherapy Alone in Stage III and IV Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma: Guiding Decisions for Consolidative Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jegadeesh, Naresh; Rajpara, Raj; Esiashvili, Natia; Shi, Zheng; Liu, Yuan; Okwan-Duodu, Derrick; Flowers, Christopher R.; Khan, Mohammad K.

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: The role of consolidative radiation therapy (RT) for stage III and IV diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) in the era of rituximab is not well defined. There is evidence that some patients with bulky disease may benefit, but patient selection criteria are not well established. We sought to identify a subset of patients who experienced a high local failure rate after receiving rituximab-based chemotherapy alone and hence may benefit from the addition of consolidative RT. Methods and Materials: Two hundred eleven patients with stage III and IV DLBCL treated between August 1999 and January 2012 were reviewed. Of these, 89 had a complete response to systemic therapy including rituximab and received no initial RT. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression were performed, with local recurrence (LR) as the primary outcome. Results: The median follow-up time was 43.9 months. Fifty percent of patients experienced LR at 5 years. In multivariate analysis, tumor ≥5 cm and stage III disease were associated with increased risk of LR. The 5-year LR-free survival was 47.4% for patients with ≥5-cm lesions versus 74.7% for patients with <5-cm lesions (P=.01). In patients with <5-cm tumors, the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) was ≥15 in all patients with LR. The 5-year LR-free survival was 100% in SUV<15 versus 68.8% in SUV≥15 (P=.10). Conclusions: Advanced-stage DLBCL patients with stage III disease or with disease ≥5 cm appear to be at an increased risk for LR. Patients with <5-cm disease and SUVmax ≥15 may be at higher risk for LR. These patients may benefit from consolidative RT after chemoimmunotherapy.

  15. Ovarian Cancer Stage IV

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage IV Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1200x1335 View Download Large: 2400x2670 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage IV Description: Drawing of stage IV shows ...

  16. Power-law time distribution of large earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Mega, Mirko S; Allegrini, Paolo; Grigolini, Paolo; Latora, Vito; Palatella, Luigi; Rapisarda, Andrea; Vinciguerra, Sergio

    2003-05-01

    We study the statistical properties of time distribution of seismicity in California by means of a new method of analysis, the diffusion entropy. We find that the distribution of time intervals between a large earthquake (the main shock of a given seismic sequence) and the next one does not obey Poisson statistics, as assumed by the current models. We prove that this distribution is an inverse power law with an exponent mu=2.06+/-0.01. We propose the long-range model, reproducing the main properties of the diffusion entropy and describing the seismic triggering mechanisms induced by large earthquakes.

  17. Large Time Asymptotics for the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Nakao; Naumkin, Pavel I.

    2014-08-01

    We study the large time asymptotic behavior of solutions to the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equations ut + u_{xxx} + σ partialx^{-1}u_{yy} = -partialxu2, quad quad (x, y) in {R}2, t in {R},\\ u(0, x, y) = u0( x, y), quad quad qquad qquad (x, y) in {R}2, where σ = ±1 and {partialx^{-1} = int_{-infty}xdx^' } . We prove that the large time asymptotics of the derivative u x of the solution has a quasilinear character.

  18. Real-time simulation of large-scale floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q.; Qin, Y.; Li, G. D.; Liu, Z.; Cheng, D. J.; Zhao, Y. H.

    2016-08-01

    According to the complex real-time water situation, the real-time simulation of large-scale floods is very important for flood prevention practice. Model robustness and running efficiency are two critical factors in successful real-time flood simulation. This paper proposed a robust, two-dimensional, shallow water model based on the unstructured Godunov- type finite volume method. A robust wet/dry front method is used to enhance the numerical stability. An adaptive method is proposed to improve the running efficiency. The proposed model is used for large-scale flood simulation on real topography. Results compared to those of MIKE21 show the strong performance of the proposed model.

  19. Time simulation of flutter with large stiffness changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpel, Mordechay; Wieseman, Carol D.

    1992-01-01

    Time simulation of flutter, involving large local structural changes, is formulated with a state-space model that is based on a relatively small number of generalized coordinates. Free-free vibration modes are first calculated for a nominal finite-element model with relatively large fictitious masses located at the area of structural changes. A low-frequency subset of these modes is then transformed into a set of structural modal coordinates with which the entire simulation is performed. These generalized coordinates and the associated oscillatory aerodynamic force coefficient matrices are used to construct an efficient time-domain, state-space model for a basic aeroelastic case. The time simulation can then be performed by simply changing the mass, stiffness, and damping coupling terms when structural changes occur. It is shown that the size of the aeroelastic model required for time simulation with large structural changes at a few apriori known locations is similar to that required for direct analysis of a single structural case. The method is applied to the simulation of an aeroelastic wind-tunnel model. The diverging oscillations are followed by the activation of a tip-ballast decoupling mechanism that stabilizes the system but may cause significant transient overshoots.

  20. Exploring large scale time-series data using nested timelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zaixian; Ward, Matthew O.; Rundensteiner, Elke A.

    2013-01-01

    When data analysts study time-series data, an important task is to discover how data patterns change over time. If the dataset is very large, this task becomes challenging. Researchers have developed many visualization techniques to help address this problem. However, little work has been done regarding the changes of multivariate patterns, such as linear trends and clusters, on time-series data. In this paper, we describe a set of history views to fill this gap. This technique works under two modes: merge and non-merge. For the merge mode, merge algorithms were applied to selected time windows to generate a change-based hierarchy. Contiguous time windows having similar patterns are merged first. Users can choose different levels of merging with the tradeoff between more details in the data and less visual clutter in the visualizations. In the non-merge mode, the framework can use natural hierarchical time units or one defined by domain experts to represent timelines. This can help users navigate across long time periods. Gridbased views were designed to provide a compact overview for the history data. In addition, MDS pattern starfields and distance maps were developed to enable users to quickly investigate the degree of pattern similarity among different time periods. The usability evaluation demonstrated that most participants could understand the concepts of the history views correctly and finished assigned tasks with a high accuracy and relatively fast response time.

  1. Period04: Statistical analysis of large astronomical time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Patrick; Breger, Michel

    2014-07-01

    Period04 statistically analyzes large astronomical time series containing gaps. It calculates formal uncertainties, can extract the individual frequencies from the multiperiodic content of time series, and provides a flexible interface to perform multiple-frequency fits with a combination of least-squares fitting and the discrete Fourier transform algorithm. Period04, written in Java/C++, supports the SAMP communication protocol to provide interoperability with other applications of the Virtual Observatory. It is a reworked and extended version of Period98 (Sperl 1998) and PERIOD/PERDET (Breger 1990).

  2. FTSPlot: fast time series visualization for large datasets.

    PubMed

    Riss, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of electrophysiological recordings often involves visual inspection of time series data to locate specific experiment epochs, mask artifacts, and verify the results of signal processing steps, such as filtering or spike detection. Long-term experiments with continuous data acquisition generate large amounts of data. Rapid browsing through these massive datasets poses a challenge to conventional data plotting software because the plotting time increases proportionately to the increase in the volume of data. This paper presents FTSPlot, which is a visualization concept for large-scale time series datasets using techniques from the field of high performance computer graphics, such as hierarchic level of detail and out-of-core data handling. In a preprocessing step, time series data, event, and interval annotations are converted into an optimized data format, which then permits fast, interactive visualization. The preprocessing step has a computational complexity of O(n x log(N)); the visualization itself can be done with a complexity of O(1) and is therefore independent of the amount of data. A demonstration prototype has been implemented and benchmarks show that the technology is capable of displaying large amounts of time series data, event, and interval annotations lag-free with < 20 ms ms. The current 64-bit implementation theoretically supports datasets with up to 2(64) bytes, on the x86_64 architecture currently up to 2(48) bytes are supported, and benchmarks have been conducted with 2(40) bytes/1 TiB or 1.3 x 10(11) double precision samples. The presented software is freely available and can be included as a Qt GUI component in future software projects, providing a standard visualization method for long-term electrophysiological experiments.

  3. FTSPlot: Fast Time Series Visualization for Large Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Riss, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of electrophysiological recordings often involves visual inspection of time series data to locate specific experiment epochs, mask artifacts, and verify the results of signal processing steps, such as filtering or spike detection. Long-term experiments with continuous data acquisition generate large amounts of data. Rapid browsing through these massive datasets poses a challenge to conventional data plotting software because the plotting time increases proportionately to the increase in the volume of data. This paper presents FTSPlot, which is a visualization concept for large-scale time series datasets using techniques from the field of high performance computer graphics, such as hierarchic level of detail and out-of-core data handling. In a preprocessing step, time series data, event, and interval annotations are converted into an optimized data format, which then permits fast, interactive visualization. The preprocessing step has a computational complexity of ; the visualization itself can be done with a complexity of and is therefore independent of the amount of data. A demonstration prototype has been implemented and benchmarks show that the technology is capable of displaying large amounts of time series data, event, and interval annotations lag-free with ms. The current 64-bit implementation theoretically supports datasets with up to bytes, on the x86_64 architecture currently up to bytes are supported, and benchmarks have been conducted with bytes/1 TiB or double precision samples. The presented software is freely available and can be included as a Qt GUI component in future software projects, providing a standard visualization method for long-term electrophysiological experiments. PMID:24732865

  4. Galactic cannibalism. IV. The evidence-correlations between dynamical time scales and Bautz-Morgan type

    SciTech Connect

    McGlynn, T.A.; Ostriker, J.P.

    1980-11-01

    If the luminosity of supergiant cD galaxies in particular, and the Bautz-Morgan sequence of galaxy types in general, is produced by dynamical evolutionary processes, then one expects to find a correlation between dynamical times and ..delta..M/sub 12/, the magnitude difference between first and second brightest cluster members.

  5. How To Dance through Time. Volume IV: The Elegance of Baroque Social Dance. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teten, Carol

    This 45-minute VHS videotape is the fourth in a series of "How To Dance Through Time" videos. It shows how to dance the most influential social dances of the French Baroque Court. The ceremonious Minuet is the most famous of the 18th century dance invention. The Allemande is the pivotal bridge linking to the 19th century. The Contredance has…

  6. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: IV. Confirmation of 4 Multiple Planet Systems by Simple Physical Models

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Ford, Eric B.; Steffen, Jason H.; Rowe, Jason F.; Carter, Joshua A.; Moorhead, Althea V.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Steve; Buchhave, Lars A.; Christiansen, Jessie L.; /SETI Inst., Mtn. View /NASA, Ames /Caltech

    2012-01-01

    Eighty planetary systems of two or more planets are known to orbit stars other than the Sun. For most, the data can be sufficiently explained by non-interacting Keplerian orbits, so the dynamical interactions of these systems have not been observed. Here we present 4 sets of lightcurves from the Kepler spacecraft, which each show multiple planets transiting the same star. Departure of the timing of these transits from strict periodicity indicates the planets are perturbing each other: the observed timing variations match the forcing frequency of the other planet. This confirms that these objects are in the same system. Next we limit their masses to the planetary regime by requiring the system remain stable for astronomical timescales. Finally, we report dynamical fits to the transit times, yielding possible values for the planets masses and eccentricities. As the timespan of timing data increases, dynamical fits may allow detailed constraints on the systems architectures, even in cases for which high-precision Doppler follow-up is impractical.

  7. Studies in astronomical time series analysis. IV - Modeling chaotic and random processes with linear filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scargle, Jeffrey D.

    1990-01-01

    While chaos arises only in nonlinear systems, standard linear time series models are nevertheless useful for analyzing data from chaotic processes. This paper introduces such a model, the chaotic moving average. This time-domain model is based on the theorem that any chaotic process can be represented as the convolution of a linear filter with an uncorrelated process called the chaotic innovation. A technique, minimum phase-volume deconvolution, is introduced to estimate the filter and innovation. The algorithm measures the quality of a model using the volume covered by the phase-portrait of the innovation process. Experiments on synthetic data demonstrate that the algorithm accurately recovers the parameters of simple chaotic processes. Though tailored for chaos, the algorithm can detect both chaos and randomness, distinguish them from each other, and separate them if both are present. It can also recover nonminimum-delay pulse shapes in non-Gaussian processes, both random and chaotic.

  8. Time-Domain Filtering for Spatial Large-Eddy Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruett, C. David

    1997-01-01

    An approach to large-eddy simulation (LES) is developed whose subgrid-scale model incorporates filtering in the time domain, in contrast to conventional approaches, which exploit spatial filtering. The method is demonstrated in the simulation of a heated, compressible, axisymmetric jet, and results are compared with those obtained from fully resolved direct numerical simulation. The present approach was, in fact, motivated by the jet-flow problem and the desire to manipulate the flow by localized (point) sources for the purposes of noise suppression. Time-domain filtering appears to be more consistent with the modeling of point sources; moreover, time-domain filtering may resolve some fundamental inconsistencies associated with conventional space-filtered LES approaches.

  9. Large holographic displays for real-time applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwerdtner, A.; Häussler, R.; Leister, N.

    2008-02-01

    Holography is generally accepted as the ultimate approach to display three-dimensional scenes or objects. Principally, the reconstruction of an object from a perfect hologram would appear indistinguishable from viewing the corresponding real-world object. Up to now two main obstacles have prevented large-screen Computer-Generated Holograms (CGH) from achieving a satisfactory laboratory prototype not to mention a marketable one. The reason is a small cell pitch CGH resulting in a huge number of hologram cells and a very high computational load for encoding the CGH. These seemingly inevitable technological hurdles for a long time have not been cleared limiting the use of holography to special applications, such as optical filtering, interference, beam forming, digital holography for capturing the 3-D shape of objects, and others. SeeReal Technologies has developed a new approach for real-time capable CGH using the socalled Tracked Viewing Windows technology to overcome these problems. The paper will show that today's state of the art reconfigurable Spatial Light Modulators (SLM), especially today's feasible LCD panels are suited for reconstructing large 3-D scenes which can be observed from large viewing angles. For this to achieve the original holographic concept of containing information from the entire scene in each part of the CGH has been abandoned. This substantially reduces the hologram resolution and thus the computational load by several orders of magnitude making thus real-time computation possible. A monochrome real-time prototype measuring 20 inches has been built and demonstrated at last year's SID conference and exhibition 2007 and at several other events.

  10. NIHAO - IV: core creation and destruction in dark matter density profiles across cosmic time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tollet, Edouard; Macciò, Andrea V.; Dutton, Aaron A.; Stinson, Greg S.; Wang, Liang; Penzo, Camilla; Gutcke, Thales A.; Buck, Tobias; Kang, Xi; Brook, Chris; Di Cintio, Arianna; Keller, Ben W.; Wadsley, James

    2016-03-01

    We use the NIHAO (Numerical Investigation of Hundred Astrophysical Objects) cosmological simulations to investigate the effects of baryonic physics on the time evolution of dark matter central density profiles. The sample is made of ≈70 independent high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy formation and covers a wide mass range: 1010 ≲ Mhalo/M⊙ ≲ 1012, i.e. from dwarfs to L⋆. We confirm previous results on the dependence of the inner dark matter density slope, α, on the ratio between stellar-to-halo mass, Mstar/Mhalo. We show that this relation holds approximately at all redshifts (with an intrinsic scatter of ˜0.18 in α measured between 1 and 2 per cent of the virial radius). This implies that in practically all haloes the shape of their inner density profile changes quite substantially over cosmic time, as they grow in stellar and total mass. Thus, depending on their final Mstar/Mhalo ratio, haloes can either form and keep a substantial density core (Rcore ˜ 1 kpc), or form and then destroy the core and recontract the halo, going back to a cuspy profile, which is even steeper than cold-dark-matter predictions for massive galaxies (1012 M⊙). We show that results from the NIHAO suite are in good agreement with recent observational measurements of α in dwarf galaxies. Overall our results suggest that the notion of a universal density profile for dark matter haloes is no longer valid in the presence of galaxy formation.

  11. Real-time distributed map building in large environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julier, Simon J.; Uhlmann, Jeffrey K.

    2000-10-01

    Many of the future missions for mobile robots demand multi- robot systems which are capable of operating in large environments for long periods of time. One of the most critical capabilities is the ability to localize- a mobile robot must be able to estimate its own position and to consistently transmit this information to other robots and control sites. Although state-of-the-art GPS is capable of yielding unmatched performance over large areas, it is not applicable in many environments (such as within city streets, under water, indoors, beneath foliage or extra- terrestrial robotic missions) where mobile robots are likely to become commonplace. A widely researched alternative is Simultaneous Localization and Map Building (SLAM): the vehicle constructs a map and, concurrently, estimates its own position. However, most approaches are non-scalable (the storage and computational costs vary quadratically and cubically with the number of beacons in the map) and can only be used with multiple robotic vehicles with a great degree of difficulty. In this paper, we describe the development of a scalable, multiple-vehicle SLAM system. This system, based on the Covariance Intersection algorithm, is scalable- its storage and computational costs are linearly proportional to the number of beacons in the map. Furthermore, it is scalable to multiple robots- each has complete freedom to exchange partial or full map information with any other robot at any other time step. We demonstrate the real-time performance of this system in a scenario of 15,000 beacons.

  12. Large area spark counter with fine time and position resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, A.; Fujiwara, N.; Pestov, Yu.N.; Sugahara, R.

    1984-03-01

    The key properties of spark counters include their capability of precision timing (at the sub 100 ps level) and of measuring the position of the charged particle to high accuracy. At SLAC we have undertaken a program to develop these devices for use in high energy physics experiments involving large detectors. A spark counter of size 1.2 m x 0.1 m has been constructed and has been operating continuously in our test setup for several months. Some details of its construction and its properties as a particle detector are reported. 14 references. (WHK)

  13. Overview of real-time computer systems technical analysis of the Modcomp implementation of a proprietary system MAX IV'' and real-time UNIX system REAL/IX''

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, J.

    1990-10-01

    There many applications throughout industry and government requiring real-time computing. Any application that monitors and/or controls a process would fit into this category. Some examples are: Nuclear power plants, Steel mills, Space program, etc. General Atomics uses eight real-time computer systems for control and high speed data acquisition required to run the nuclear fusion experiments. Real-Time computing can be defined as the ability to respond to asynchronous external events in a predictable (preferably fast) time frame. Real-Time computer systems are similar to other computers in many ways and may by used for general computing requirements such as Time-Sharing. However special hardware, operating systems and software had to be developed to meet the requirement for real-time computing. Traditionally, real-time computing has been a realm of proprietary operating systems with real-time applications written in FORTRAN and assembly language. In the past, these systems adequately served the needs of the real-time world. Many of these systems that were developed 15 years ago are still being used today. However the real-time world is now changing, demanding new systems to be developed. This paper gives a description of general real-time computer systems and how they differ from other systems. However, the main purpose of this paper is to give a detailed technical description of the hardware and operating systems of an existing proprietary system and a real-time UNIX system. The two real-time computer systems described in detail are Modcomp Classic III/95 with the MAX IV operating system and Modcomp TRI-D 9750 with the REAL/IX.2 operating system.

  14. Real-time radiography of Titan IV Solid Rocket Motor Upgrade (SRMU) static firing test QM-2

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, K.W.; Curnow, G.M.; Perkins, D.E.; Schneberk, D.J.; Costerus, B.W.; La Chapell, M.J.; Turner, D.E.; Wallace, P.W.

    1994-03-08

    Real-time radiography was successfully applied to the Titan-IV Solid Rocket Motor Upgrade (SRMU) static firing test QM-2 conducted February 22, 1993 at Phillips Laboratory, Edwards AFB, CA. The real-time video data obtained in this test gave the first incontrovertible evidence that the molten slag pool is low (less than 5 to 6 inches in depth referenced to the bottom of the aft dome cavity) before T + 55 seconds, builds fairly linearly from this point in time reaching a quasi-equilibrium depth of 16 to 17 inches at about T + 97 seconds, which is well below the top of the vectored nozzle, and maintains that level until T + 125 near the end motor burn. From T + 125 seconds to motor burn-out at T + 140 seconds the slag pool builds to a maximum depth of about 20 to 21 inches, still well below the top of the nozzle. The molten slag pool was observed to interact with motions of the vectored nozzle, and exhibit slosh and wave mode oscillations. A few slag ejection events were also observed.

  15. Irregular Morphing for Real-Time Rendering of Large Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalem, Sid'Ali; Kourgli, Assia

    2016-06-01

    The following paper proposes an alternative approach to the real-time adaptive triangulation problem. A new region-based multi-resolution approach for terrain rendering is described which improves on-the-fly the distribution of the density of triangles inside the tile after selecting appropriate Level-Of-Detail by an adaptive sampling. This proposed approach organizes the heightmap into a QuadTree of tiles that are processed independently. This technique combines the benefits of both Triangular Irregular Network approach and region-based multi-resolution approach by improving the distribution of the density of triangles inside the tile. Our technique morphs the initial regular grid of the tile to deformed grid in order to minimize approximation error. The proposed technique strives to combine large tile size and real-time processing while guaranteeing an upper bound on the screen space error. Thus, this approach adapts terrain rendering process to local surface characteristics and enables on-the-fly handling of large amount of terrain data. Morphing is based-on the multi-resolution wavelet analysis. The use of the D2WT multi-resolution analysis of the terrain height-map speeds up processing and permits to satisfy an interactive terrain rendering. Tests and experiments demonstrate that Haar B-Spline wavelet, well known for its properties of localization and its compact support, is suitable for fast and accurate redistribution. Such technique could be exploited in client-server architecture for supporting interactive high-quality remote visualization of very large terrain.

  16. Teleoperation with large time delay using a prevision system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamasco, Massimo; De Paolis, Lucio; Ciancio, Stefano; Pinna, Sebastiano

    1997-12-01

    In teleoperation technology various techniques have been proposed in order to alleviate the effects of time delayed communication and to avoid the instability of the system. This paper describes a different approach to robotic teleoperation with large-time delay and a teleoperation system, based on teleprogramming paradigm, has been developed with the intent to improve the slave autonomy and to decrease the amount of information exchanged between master and slave system. The goal concept, specific of AI, has been used. In order to minimize the total task completion time has been introduced a prevision system, called Merlino, able to know in advance the slave's choices taking into account both the operator's actions and the information about the remote environment. The prevision system allows, in case of environment changes, to understand if the slave can solve the goal. Otherwise, Merlino is able to signal a 'fail situation.' Some experiments have been carried out by means of an advanced human-machine interface with force feedback, designed at PERCRO Laboratory of Scuola Superiore S. Anna, which gives a better sensation of presence in the remote environment.

  17. Large area spark counters with fine time and position resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, A.; Atwood, W.B.; Fujiwara, N.; Pestov, Yu.N.; Sugahara, R.

    1983-10-01

    Spark counters trace their history back over three decades but have been used in only a limited number of experiments. The key properties of these devices include their capability of precision timing (at the sub 100 ps level) and of measuring the position of the charged particle to high accuracy. At SLAC we have undertaken a program to develop these devices for use in high energy physics experiments involving large detectors. A spark counter of size 1.2 m x 0.1 m has been constructed and has been operating continuously in our test setup for several months. In this talk I will discuss some details of its construction and its properties as a particle detector. 14 references.

  18. Large-scale structure of time evolving citation networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leicht, E. A.; Clarkson, G.; Shedden, K.; Newman, M. E. J.

    2007-09-01

    In this paper we examine a number of methods for probing and understanding the large-scale structure of networks that evolve over time. We focus in particular on citation networks, networks of references between documents such as papers, patents, or court cases. We describe three different methods of analysis, one based on an expectation-maximization algorithm, one based on modularity optimization, and one based on eigenvector centrality. Using the network of citations between opinions of the United States Supreme Court as an example, we demonstrate how each of these methods can reveal significant structural divisions in the network and how, ultimately, the combination of all three can help us develop a coherent overall picture of the network's shape.

  19. Parallel Rendering of Large Time-Varying Volume Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbutt, Alexander E.

    2005-01-01

    Interactive visualization of large time-varying 3D volume datasets has been and still is a great challenge to the modem computational world. It stretches the limits of the memory capacity, the disk space, the network bandwidth and the CPU speed of a conventional computer. In this SURF project, we propose to develop a parallel volume rendering program on SGI's Prism, a cluster computer equipped with state-of-the-art graphic hardware. The proposed program combines both parallel computing and hardware rendering in order to achieve an interactive rendering rate. We use 3D texture mapping and a hardware shader to implement 3D volume rendering on each workstation. We use SGI's VisServer to enable remote rendering using Prism's graphic hardware. And last, we will integrate this new program with ParVox, a parallel distributed visualization system developed at JPL. At the end of the project, we Will demonstrate remote interactive visualization using this new hardware volume renderer on JPL's Prism System using a time-varying dataset from selected JPL applications.

  20. Large time behavior of solutions for hyperbolic balance laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hongjun

    2016-11-01

    We study the existence and the large time behavior of global solutions to the initial value problem for hyperbolic balance laws in n space dimensions with n ≥ 3 admitting an entropy and satisfying the stable condition. We first construct global existence of the solutions to such a system around a steady state if the initial energy is small enough. Then we show that k-order derivatives of these solutions approach a constant state in the Lp-norm at a rate O (t -1/2 (k + ρ +n/2 - n/p)) with p ∈ [ 2 , ∞ ] and ρ ∈ [ 0 ,n/2 ] provided that initially ‖z0 ‖ B˙2, ∞ - ρ < ∞, where B˙2, ∞ - ρ is a homogeneous Besov space. These decay results do not impose an additional smallness assumption on Lp norm of the initial data and we thus improve the results in [3,19]. We also show faster decay results in the sense that if ‖ Pz0 ‖ B˙2, ∞ - ρ +‖ (I - P)z0 ‖ B˙2, ∞ - ρ + 1 < ∞ with ρ ∈ (n/2 ,n + 2/2 ], k-order derivatives of the solutions approach a constant state in the Lp-norm at a rate O (t -1/2 (k + ρ + 1 +n/2 - n/p )).

  1. Thermodynamics and kinetics of large-time-step molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rao, Francesco; Spichty, Martin

    2012-02-15

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provide essential information about the thermodynamics and kinetics of proteins. Technological advances in both hardware and algorithms have seen this method accessing timescales that used to be unreachable only few years ago. The quest to simulate slow, biologically relevant macromolecular conformational changes, is still open. Here, we present an approximate approach to increase the speed of MD simulations by a factor of ∼4.5. This is achieved by using a large integration time step of 7 fs, in combination with frozen covalent bonds and look-up tables for nonbonded interactions of the solvent. Extensive atomistic MD simulations for a flexible peptide in water show that the approach reproduces the peptide's equilibrium conformational changes, preserving the essential properties of both thermodynamics and kinetics. Comparison of this approximate method with state-of-the-art implicit solvation simulations indicates that the former provides a better description of the underlying free-energy surface. Finally, simulations of a 33-residue peptide show that these fast MD settings are readily applicable to investigate biologically relevant systems.

  2. Potential Prognostic Impact of Baseline CEA Level and Surgery of Primary Tumor Among Patients with Synchronous Stage IV Colorectal Cancer: A Large Population Based Study.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Shaheenah; Sirohi, Bhawna; Shrikhande, Shailesh V; Toh, Han-Chong; Eng, Cathy

    2015-09-01

    Prognostic role of surgical resection of the primary tumor and baseline CEA among patients with synchronous stage IV colorectal cancer (CRC) remains an area of debate. The objective of this study was to determine the prognostic value of baseline CEA and surgical resection of the primary among patients with synchronous stage IV CRC in the era of modern chemotherapy and biologic therapy. The Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Registry was searched to identify patients with synchronous stage IV CRC diagnosed between 2004 and 2009. Colorectal-cancer-specific survival (CCS) was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier product limit method. Cox models were fitted to assess the multivariable relationship of various patient and tumor characteristics and CCS. Three hundred thirty-three thousand, three hundred ninety nine patients were identified in the SEER registry. Median CCS among patients with their primary tumor removed was 21 M vs. 7 M (primary intact) respectively (p < 0.001). Median CCS among patients who had an elevated vs. non-elevated baseline CEA level was 14 M vs. 24 M respectively (p < 0.0001). By multivariable analysis, patients with an elevated baseline CEA had a 56 % increased risk of death from CRC compared to those with a non-elevated CEA level (HR = 1.56, 95%CI 1.47-1.65, p < 0.0001). Similarly patients who underwent surgical resection of the primary tumor had a 33 % decreased risk of death from CRC compared to those who did not (HR = 0.61, 95%CI 0.54-0.69, p < 0.0001). In our review of this large population SEER based study, an elevated baseline CEA level and surgical resection of the primary tumor among patients with synchronous stage IV CRC appeared to impact survival outcomes. Prospective validation of these results in a surgically unresectable patient population will be required.

  3. Large Time Projection Chambers for Rare Event Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, M

    2009-11-03

    The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) concept [add ref to TPC section] has been applied to many projects outside of particle physics and the accelerator based experiments where it was initially developed. TPCs in non-accelerator particle physics experiments are principally focused on rare event detection (e.g. neutrino and darkmater experiments) and the physics of these experiments can place dramatically different constraints on the TPC design (only extensions to the traditional TPCs are discussed here). The drift gas, or liquid, is usually the target or matter under observation and due to very low signal rates a TPC with the largest active mass is desired. The large mass complicates particle tracking of short and sometimes very low energy particles. Other special design issues include, efficient light collection, background rejection, internal triggering and optimal energy resolution. Backgrounds from gamma-rays and neutrons are significant design issues in the construction of these TPCs. They are generally placed deep underground to shield from cosmogenic particles and surrounded with shielding to reduce radiation from the local surroundings. The construction materials have to be carefully screened for radiopurity as they are in close contact with the active mass and can be a signification source of background events. The TPC excels in reducing this internal background because the mass inside the fieldcage forms one monolithic volume from which fiducial cuts can be made ex post facto to isolate quiet drift mass, and can be circulated and purified to a very high level. Self shielding in these large mass systems can be significant and the effect improves with density. The liquid phase TPC can obtain a high density at low pressure which results in very good self-shielding and compact installation with a lightweight containment. The down sides are the need for cryogenics, slower charge drift, tracks shorter than the typical electron diffusion, lower energy resolution (e

  4. VAC Therapy in Large Infected Sacral Pressure Ulcer Grade IV-Can Be an Alternative to Flap Reconstruction?

    PubMed

    Batra, R K; Aseeja, Veena

    2014-04-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy is a new entrant in wound care after growth factors and alginate or hydrocolloid dressing, in the treatment of pressure ulcers. We have been using this technique for diabetic foot ulcers. A young nondiabetic man presented with a large sacral bed sore after high doses of ionotropes in an intensive care unit for treating severe hypotension. His wound was debrided, and instead of flap surgery in such infected wound, he was treated with VAC therapy. The complete wound healing was achieved in 6 weeks and at half the cost of flap surgery. Moreover, the chances of flap failure and its related complications were eliminated.

  5. A new class of large band gap quantum spin hall insulators: 2D fluorinated group-IV binary compounds.

    PubMed

    Padilha, J E; Pontes, R B; Schmidt, T M; Miwa, R H; Fazzio, A

    2016-05-23

    We predict a new class of large band gap quantum spin Hall insulators, the fluorinated PbX (X = C, Si, Ge and Sn) compounds, that are mechanically stable two-dimensional materials. Based on first principles calculations we find that, while the PbX systems are not topological insulators, all fluorinated PbX (PbXF2) compounds are 2D topological insulators. The quantum spin Hall insulating phase was confirmed by the explicitly calculation of the Z2 invariant. In addition we performed a thorough investigation of the role played by the (i) fluorine saturation, (ii) crystal field, and (iii) spin-orbital coupling in PbXF2. By considering nanoribbon structures, we verify the appearance of a pair of topologically protected Dirac-like edge states connecting the conduction and valence bands. The insulating phase which is a result of the spin orbit interaction, reveals that this new class of two dimensional materials present exceptional nontrivial band gaps, reaching values up to 0.99 eV at the Γ point, and an indirect band gap of 0.77 eV. The topological phase is arisen without any external field, making this system promising for nanoscale applications, using topological properties.

  6. A new class of large band gap quantum spin hall insulators: 2D fluorinated group-IV binary compounds

    PubMed Central

    Padilha, J. E.; Pontes, R. B.; Schmidt, T. M.; Miwa, R. H.; Fazzio, A.

    2016-01-01

    We predict a new class of large band gap quantum spin Hall insulators, the fluorinated PbX (X = C, Si, Ge and Sn) compounds, that are mechanically stable two-dimensional materials. Based on first principles calculations we find that, while the PbX systems are not topological insulators, all fluorinated PbX (PbXF2) compounds are 2D topological insulators. The quantum spin Hall insulating phase was confirmed by the explicitly calculation of the Z2 invariant. In addition we performed a thorough investigation of the role played by the (i) fluorine saturation, (ii) crystal field, and (iii) spin-orbital coupling in PbXF2. By considering nanoribbon structures, we verify the appearance of a pair of topologically protected Dirac-like edge states connecting the conduction and valence bands. The insulating phase which is a result of the spin orbit interaction, reveals that this new class of two dimensional materials present exceptional nontrivial band gaps, reaching values up to 0.99 eV at the Γ point, and an indirect band gap of 0.77 eV. The topological phase is arisen without any external field, making this system promising for nanoscale applications, using topological properties. PMID:27212604

  7. Peptide inhibitors of peptidyltransferase alter the conformation of domains IV and V of large subunit rRNA: a model for nascent peptide control of translation.

    PubMed Central

    Harrod, R; Lovett, P S

    1995-01-01

    Peptides of 5 and 8 residues encoded by the leaders of attenuation regulated chloramphenicol-resistance genes inhibit the peptidyltransferase of microorganisms from the three kingdoms. Therefore, the ribosomal target for the peptides is likely to be a conserved structure and/or sequence. The inhibitor peptides "footprint" to nucleotides of domain V in large subunit rRNA when peptide-ribosome complexes are probed with dimethyl sulfate. Accordingly, rRNA was examined as a candidate for the site of peptide binding. Inhibitor peptides MVKTD and MSTSKNAD were mixed with rRNA phenol-extracted from Escherichia coli ribosomes. The conformation of the RNA was then probed by limited digestion with nucleases that cleave at single-stranded (T1 endonuclease) and double-stranded (V1 endonuclease) sites. Both peptides selectively altered the susceptibility of domains IV and V of 23S rRNA to digestion by T1 endonuclease. Peptide effects on cleavage by V1 nuclease were observed only in domain V. The T1 nuclease susceptibility of domain V of in vitro-transcribed 23S rRNA was also altered by the peptides, demonstrating that peptide binding to the rRNA is independent of ribosomal protein. We propose the peptides MVKTD and MSTSKNAD perturb peptidyltransferase center catalytic activities by altering the conformation of domains IV and V of 23S rRNA. These findings provide a general mechanism through which nascent peptides may cis-regulate the catalytic activities of translating ribosomes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:7567991

  8. Division Iv: Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbally, Christopher; D'Antona, Francesca; Spite, Monique; Asplund, Martin; Charbonnel, Corinne; Docobo, Jose Angel; Gray, Richard O.; Piskunov, Nikolai E.

    2012-04-01

    This Division IV was started on a trial basis at the General Assembly in The Hague 1994 and was formally accepted at the Kyoto General Assembly in 1997. Its broad coverage of ``Stars'' is reflected in its relatively large number of Commissions and so of members (1266 in late 2011). Its kindred Division V, ``Variable Stars'', has the same history of its beginning. The thinking at the time was to achieve some kind of balance between the number of members in each of the 12 Divisions. Amid the current discussion of reorganizing the number of Divisions into a more compact form it seems advisable to make this numerical balance less of an issue than the rationalization of the scientific coverage of each Division, so providing more effective interaction within a particular field of astronomy. After all, every star is variable to a certain degree and such variability is becoming an ever more powerful tool to understand the characteristics of every kind of normal and peculiar star. So we may expect, after hearing the reactions of members, that in the restructuring a single Division will result from the current Divisions IV and V.

  9. The PLATO IV Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stifle, Jack

    The PLATO IV computer-based instructional system consists of a large scale centrally located CDC 6400 computer and a large number of remote student terminals. This is a brief and general description of the proposed input/output hardware necessary to interface the student terminals with the computer's central processing unit (CPU) using available…

  10. Asteroids IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Patrick; DeMeo, Francesca E.; Bottke, William F.

    . Asteroids, like planets, are driven by a great variety of both dynamical and physical mechanisms. In fact, images sent back by space missions show a collection of small worlds whose characteristics seem designed to overthrow our preconceived notions. Given their wide range of sizes and surface compositions, it is clear that many formed in very different places and at different times within the solar nebula. These characteristics make them an exciting challenge for researchers who crave complex problems. The return of samples from these bodies may ultimately be needed to provide us with solutions. In the book Asteroids IV, the editors and authors have taken major strides in the long journey toward a much deeper understanding of our fascinating planetary ancestors. This book reviews major advances in 43 chapters that have been written and reviewed by a team of more than 200 international authorities in asteroids. It is aimed to be as comprehensive as possible while also remaining accessible to students and researchers who are interested in learning about these small but nonetheless important worlds. We hope this volume will serve as a leading reference on the topic of asteroids for the decade to come. We are deeply indebted to the many authors and referees for their tremendous efforts in helping us create Asteroids IV. We also thank the members of the Asteroids IV scientific organizing committee for helping us shape the structure and content of the book. The conference associated with the book, "Asteroids Comets Meteors 2014" held June 30-July 4, 2014, in Helsinki, Finland, did an outstanding job of demonstrating how much progress we have made in the field over the last decade. We are extremely grateful to our host Karri Muinonnen and his team. The editors are also grateful to the Asteroids IV production staff, namely Renée Dotson and her colleagues at the Lunar and Planetary Institute, for their efforts, their invaluable assistance, and their enthusiasm; they made life as

  11. Asteroids IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Patrick; DeMeo, Francesca E.; Bottke, William F.

    . Asteroids, like planets, are driven by a great variety of both dynamical and physical mechanisms. In fact, images sent back by space missions show a collection of small worlds whose characteristics seem designed to overthrow our preconceived notions. Given their wide range of sizes and surface compositions, it is clear that many formed in very different places and at different times within the solar nebula. These characteristics make them an exciting challenge for researchers who crave complex problems. The return of samples from these bodies may ultimately be needed to provide us with solutions. In the book Asteroids IV, the editors and authors have taken major strides in the long journey toward a much deeper understanding of our fascinating planetary ancestors. This book reviews major advances in 43 chapters that have been written and reviewed by a team of more than 200 international authorities in asteroids. It is aimed to be as comprehensive as possible while also remaining accessible to students and researchers who are interested in learning about these small but nonetheless important worlds. We hope this volume will serve as a leading reference on the topic of asteroids for the decade to come. We are deeply indebted to the many authors and referees for their tremendous efforts in helping us create Asteroids IV. We also thank the members of the Asteroids IV scientific organizing committee for helping us shape the structure and content of the book. The conference associated with the book, "Asteroids Comets Meteors 2014" held June 30-July 4, 2014, in Helsinki, Finland, did an outstanding job of demonstrating how much progress we have made in the field over the last decade. We are extremely grateful to our host Karri Muinonnen and his team. The editors are also grateful to the Asteroids IV production staff, namely Renée Dotson and her colleagues at the Lunar and Planetary Institute, for their efforts, their invaluable assistance, and their enthusiasm; they made life as

  12. Research on the timing sequence control in large laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaolu; Wang, Lingfang; Wang, Chao; Tang, Ling; Chen, Ji; Zhang, Xin

    2015-11-01

    The timing sequence, between different pulses in SG-III laser facility, is controlled with three arbitrary waveform generators. The external clock and trigger are used to inhibit the timing jitter, which is provided by the synchronization system. Close-loop monitoring is used to make sure that the temporal phase can be recovered after reboot of the arbitrary waveform generator. The verification experiment shows that the three arbitrary waveform generators can work synchronously , which ensures the synchronization error control of the SG-III laser facility.

  13. Large-memory real-time multichannel multiplexed pattern recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, D. A.; Liu, H. K.

    1984-01-01

    The principle and experimental design of a real-time multichannel multiplexed optical pattern recognition system via use of a 25-focus dichromated gelatin holographic lens (hololens) are described. Each of the 25 foci of the hololens may have a storage and matched filtering capability approaching that of a single-lens correlator. If the space-bandwidth product of an input image is limited, as is true in most practical cases, the 25-focus hololens system has 25 times the capability of a single lens. Experimental results have shown that the interfilter noise is not serious. The system has already demonstrated the storage and recognition of over 70 matched filters - which is a larger capacity than any optical pattern recognition system reported to date.

  14. Large-time evolution of an electron in photon bath

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakov, Kirill A.; Nikitin, Vladimir V.

    2012-12-15

    The problem of infrared divergence of the effective electromagnetic field produced by elementary charges is revisited using the model of an electron freely evolving in a photon bath. It is shown that for any finite travel time, the effective field of the electron is infrared-finite, and that at each order of perturbation theory the radiative contributions grow unboundedly with time. Using the Schwinger-Keldysh formalism, factorization of divergent contributions in multi-loop diagrams is proved, and summation of the resulting infinite series is performed. It is found that despite the unbounded growth of individual contributions to the effective field, their sum is bounded, tending to zero in the limit of infinite travel time. It is concluded that the physical meaning of infrared singularity in the effective field is the existence of a peculiar irreversible spreading of electric charges, caused by their interaction with the electromagnetic field. This spreading originates from the quantum electromagnetic fluctuations, rather than the electron-photon scattering, and exists in vacuum as well as at finite temperatures. It shows itself in a damping of the off-diagonal elements of the momentum-space density matrix of electron, but does not affect its momentum probability distribution. This effect is discussed in terms of thermalization of the electron state, and the asymptotic growth of its quantum entropy is determined. Relationship of the obtained results to the Bloch-Nordsieck theorem is established and considered from the standpoint of measurability of the electromagnetic field. The effect of irreversible spreading on the electron diffraction in the classic two-slit experiment is determined, and is shown to be detectable in principle by modern devices already at room temperature. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Infrared finiteness of the effective electromagnetic field of a free electron is proved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantum radiative effects

  15. Times to extinction for small populations of large birds.

    PubMed Central

    Pimm, S L; Diamond, J; Reed, T M; Russell, G J; Verner, J

    1993-01-01

    A major practical problem in conservation biology is to predict the survival times-"lifetimes"-for small populations under alternative proposed management regimes. Examples in the United States include the 'Alala (Hawaiian Crow; Corvus hawaiiensis) and Northern Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis caurina). To guide such decisions, we analyze counts of all crow, owl, and hawk species in the most complete available data set: counts of bird breeding pairs on 14 European islands censused for 29-66 consecutive years. The data set yielded 129 records for analysis. We define the population ceiling as the highest number of breeding pairs observed from colonization to extinction, within a consecutive series of counts for a given species on a given island. The resulting distributions of population lifetimes as a function of population size prove to be highly skewed: most small populations disappear quickly, but a few last for a long time. Median (i.e., 50th percentile) lifetimes are calculated as only 1-5 yr for hawk, owl, and crow populations with ceilings of one or two breeding pairs. As expected if demographic accidents are the main cause of extinction for small populations, lifetimes rise by a factor of 3-4 for each additional pair up to three pairs. They rise more slowly thereafter. These observations suggest that lifetimes of the 'Alala (now reduced to about three pairs in the wild), and of populations of Northern Spotted Owl in the smallest forest fragments, will be short unless active management is implemented. PMID:11607439

  16. Times to extinction for small populations of large birds.

    PubMed

    Pimm, S L; Diamond, J; Reed, T M; Russell, G J; Verner, J

    1993-11-15

    A major practical problem in conservation biology is to predict the survival times-"lifetimes"-for small populations under alternative proposed management regimes. Examples in the United States include the 'Alala (Hawaiian Crow; Corvus hawaiiensis) and Northern Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis caurina). To guide such decisions, we analyze counts of all crow, owl, and hawk species in the most complete available data set: counts of bird breeding pairs on 14 European islands censused for 29-66 consecutive years. The data set yielded 129 records for analysis. We define the population ceiling as the highest number of breeding pairs observed from colonization to extinction, within a consecutive series of counts for a given species on a given island. The resulting distributions of population lifetimes as a function of population size prove to be highly skewed: most small populations disappear quickly, but a few last for a long time. Median (i.e., 50th percentile) lifetimes are calculated as only 1-5 yr for hawk, owl, and crow populations with ceilings of one or two breeding pairs. As expected if demographic accidents are the main cause of extinction for small populations, lifetimes rise by a factor of 3-4 for each additional pair up to three pairs. They rise more slowly thereafter. These observations suggest that lifetimes of the 'Alala (now reduced to about three pairs in the wild), and of populations of Northern Spotted Owl in the smallest forest fragments, will be short unless active management is implemented. PMID:11607439

  17. Large blue isocurvature spectral index signals time-dependent mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Daniel J. H.

    2016-08-01

    We show that if a spectator linear isocurvature dark matter field degree of freedom has a constant mass through its entire evolution history, the maximum measurable isocurvature spectral index that is consistent with the current tensor-to-scalar ratio bound of about r ≲0.1 is about nI≲2.4 , even if experiments can be sensitive to a 10-6 contamination of the predominantly adiabatic power spectrum with an isocurvature power spectrum at the shortest observable length scales. Hence, any foreseeable future measurement of a blue isocurvature spectral index larger than ˜2.4 may provide nontrivial evidence for dynamical degrees of freedom with time-dependent masses during inflation. The bound is not sensitive to the details of the reheating scenario and can be made mildly smaller if r is better constrained in the future.

  18. Time-dependent recovery of passive neutrophils after large deformation.

    PubMed Central

    Tran-Son-Tay, R; Needham, D; Yeung, A; Hochmuth, R M

    1991-01-01

    Experiments are performed in which a passive human neutrophil is deformed into an elongated "sausage" shape by aspirating it into a small glass pipette. When expelled from the pipette the neutrophil recovers its natural spherical shape in approximately 1 minute. This recovery process is analyzed according to a Newtonian, liquid-drop model in which a variational method is used to simultaneously solve the hydrodynamic equations for low Reynolds-number flow and the equations for membrane equilibrium with a constant membrane tension. The theoretical model gives a good fit to the experimental data for a ratio of membrane cortical tension to cytoplasmic viscosity of approximately 1.7 x 10(-5) cm/s (0.17 micron/s). However, when the cell is held in the pipette for only a short time period of 5 s or less, and then expelled, the cell undergoes an initial, rapid elastic rebound suggesting that the cell behaves in this instance as a Maxwell viscoelastic liquid rather than a Newtonian liquid with constant cortical tension. PMID:1742456

  19. Welding IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding IV, a competency-based course in advanced arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with proficiency in: (1) single vee groove welding using code specifications established by the American Welding Society…

  20. The German Environmental Survey for Children (GerES IV): reference values and distributions for time-location patterns of German children.

    PubMed

    Conrad, André; Seiwert, Margarete; Hünken, Andreas; Quarcoo, David; Schlaud, Martin; Groneberg, David

    2013-01-01

    Children's time-location patterns are important determinants of environmental exposure and other health-relevant factors. Building on data of the German Environmental Survey for Children (GerES IV), our study aimed at deriving reference values and distributions for time-location patterns of 3-14-year-old German children. We also investigated if GerES IV data are appropriate for evaluating associations with children's health determinants by linking them to data of the National Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents (KiGGS). Parents reported on the time their children usually spend at home, in other indoor environments, and outdoors. This information was characterized by statistical parameters, which were also calculated for different strata concerning socio-demography and the residential environment. Consequently, group differences were evaluated by t-tests and univariate ANOVA. Reference distributions were fitted to the time-location data by a Maximum Likelihood approach to make them also useable in probabilistic exposure modeling. Finally, associations between data on the children's physical activity as well as body weight and their outdoor time were investigated by bivariate correlation analysis and cross tabulation. On daily average, German children spend 15 h and 31 min at home, 4 h and 46 min in other indoor environments, and 3 h and 43 min outdoors. Time spent at home and outdoors decreases with age while time spent in other indoor environments increases. Differences in time-location patterns were also observed for the socio-economic status (SES) and immigration status. E.g., children with a high SES spend 24 min less outdoors than low SES children. Immigrants spend on daily average 20 min more at home and 15 min less outdoors than non-immigrant children. Outdoor time was associated with parameters of the residential environment like the building development. Children living in 1- or 2-family houses spend more time outdoors than

  1. The German Environmental Survey for Children (GerES IV): reference values and distributions for time-location patterns of German children.

    PubMed

    Conrad, André; Seiwert, Margarete; Hünken, Andreas; Quarcoo, David; Schlaud, Martin; Groneberg, David

    2013-01-01

    Children's time-location patterns are important determinants of environmental exposure and other health-relevant factors. Building on data of the German Environmental Survey for Children (GerES IV), our study aimed at deriving reference values and distributions for time-location patterns of 3-14-year-old German children. We also investigated if GerES IV data are appropriate for evaluating associations with children's health determinants by linking them to data of the National Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents (KiGGS). Parents reported on the time their children usually spend at home, in other indoor environments, and outdoors. This information was characterized by statistical parameters, which were also calculated for different strata concerning socio-demography and the residential environment. Consequently, group differences were evaluated by t-tests and univariate ANOVA. Reference distributions were fitted to the time-location data by a Maximum Likelihood approach to make them also useable in probabilistic exposure modeling. Finally, associations between data on the children's physical activity as well as body weight and their outdoor time were investigated by bivariate correlation analysis and cross tabulation. On daily average, German children spend 15 h and 31 min at home, 4 h and 46 min in other indoor environments, and 3 h and 43 min outdoors. Time spent at home and outdoors decreases with age while time spent in other indoor environments increases. Differences in time-location patterns were also observed for the socio-economic status (SES) and immigration status. E.g., children with a high SES spend 24 min less outdoors than low SES children. Immigrants spend on daily average 20 min more at home and 15 min less outdoors than non-immigrant children. Outdoor time was associated with parameters of the residential environment like the building development. Children living in 1- or 2-family houses spend more time outdoors than

  2. Association between i.v. thrombolysis volume and door-to-needle times in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Groot, Adrien E; van Schaik, Ivo N; Visser, Marieke C; Nederkoorn, Paul J; Limburg, Martien; Aramideh, Majid; de Beer, Frank; Zwetsloot, Caspar P; Halkes, Patricia; de Kruijk, Jelle; Kruyt, Nyika D; van der Meulen, Willem; Spaander, Fianne; van der Ree, Taco; Kwa, Vincent I H; Van den Berg-Vos, Renske M; Roos, Yvo B; Coutinho, Jonathan M

    2016-04-01

    Centralization of intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) for acute ischemic stroke in high-volume centers is believed to improve the door-to-needle times (DNT), but limited data support this assumption. We examined the association between DNT and IVT volume in a large Dutch province. We identified consecutive patients treated with IVT between January 2009 and 2013. Based on annualized IVT volume, hospitals were categorized as low-volume (≤ 24), medium-volume (25-49) or high-volume (≥ 50). In logistic regression analysis, low-volume hospitals were used as reference category. Of 17,332 stroke patients from 11 participating hospitals, 1962 received IVT (11.3 %). We excluded 140 patients because of unknown DNT (n = 86) or in-hospital stroke (n = 54). There were two low-volume (total 101 patients), five medium-volume (747 patients) and four high-volume hospitals (974 patients). Median DNT was shorter in high-volume hospitals (30 min) than in medium-volume (42 min, p < 0.001) and low-volume hospitals (38 min, p < 0.001). Patients admitted to high-volume hospitals had a higher chance of DNT < 30 min (adjusted OR 3.13, 95 % CI 1.70-5.75), lower risk of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (adjusted OR 0.39, 95 % CI 0.16-0.92), and a lower mortality risk (adjusted OR 0.45, 95 % CI 0.21-1.01), compared to low-volume centers. There was no difference in DNT between low- and medium-volume hospitals. Onset-to-needle times (ONT) did not differ between the groups. Hospitals in this Dutch province generally achieved short DNTs. Despite this overall good performance, higher IVT volumes were associated with shorter DNTs and lower complication risks. The ONT was not associated with IVT volume. PMID:26946499

  3. IVS Organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    International VLBI Service (IVS) is an international collaboration of organizations which operate or support Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) components. The goals are: To provide a service to support geodetic, geophysical and astrometric research and operational activities. To promote research and development activities in all aspects of the geodetic and astrometric VLBI technique. To interact with the community of users of VLBI products and to integrate VLBI into a global Earth observing system.

  4. Metal binding properties of fluorescent analogues of trichogin GA IV: a conformational study by time-resolved spectroscopy and molecular mechanics investigations.

    PubMed

    Venanzi, Mariano; Bocchinfuso, Gianfranco; Gatto, Emanuela; Palleschi, Antonio; Stella, Lorenzo; Formaggio, Fernando; Toniolo, Claudio

    2009-01-01

    The metal ion binding properties of two fluorescent analogues of trichogin GA IV, which is a natural undecapeptide showing significant antimicrobial activity, were studied by circular dichroism, time-resolved optical spectroscopy, and molecular mechanics calculations. Binding of Ca(II) and Gd(III) to the peptides investigated was shown to promote a structural transition from highly helical conformations to folded structures characterized by formation of a loop that embedded the metal ion. Time-resolved spectroscopy revealed that peptide dynamics is also remarkably affected by ion binding: peptide-backbone motions slowed down to the microsecond time scale. Finally, molecular mechanics calculations emphasized the role of the central Gly5-Gly6 motif, which allowed for the twisting of the peptide segment that gave rise to the formation of the binding cavity.

  5. Use of a large time-compensated scintillation detector in neutron time-of-flight measurements

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Charles D.

    1979-01-01

    A scintillator for neutron time-of-flight measurements is positioned at a desired angle with respect to the neutron beam, and as a function of the energy thereof, such that the sum of the transit times of the neutrons and photons in the scintillator are substantially independent of the points of scintillations within the scintillator. Extrapolated zero timing is employed rather than the usual constant fraction timing. As a result, a substantially larger scintillator can be employed that substantially increases the data rate and shortens the experiment time.

  6. The Effect of Radiation Timing on Patients With High-Risk Features of Parameningeal Rhabdomyosarcoma: An Analysis of IRS-IV and D9803

    SciTech Connect

    Spalding, Aaron C.; Hawkins, Douglas S.; Anderson, James R.; Lyden, Elizabeth; Laurie, Fran; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Arndt, Carola A.S.; Michalski, Jeff M.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy remains an essential treatment for patients with parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma (PMRMS), and early radiation therapy may improve local control for patients with intracranial extension (ICE). Methods and Materials: To address the role of radiation therapy timing in PMRMS in the current era, we reviewed the outcome from 2 recent clinical trials for intermediate-risk RMS: Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study (IRS)-IV and Children's Oncology Group (COG) D9803. The PMRMS patients on IRS-IV with any high-risk features (cranial nerve palsy [CNP], cranial base bony erosion [CBBE], or ICE) were treated immediately at day 0, and PMRMS patients without any of these 3 features received week 6-9 radiation therapy. The D9803 PMRMS patients with ICE received day 0 X-Ray Therapy (XRT) as well; however, those with either CNP or CBBE had XRT at week 12. Results: Compared with the 198 PMRMS patients from IRS-IV, the 192 PMRMS patients from D9803 had no difference (P<.05) in 5-year local failure (19% vs 19%), failure-free-survival (70% vs 67%), or overall survival (75% vs 73%) in aggregate. The 5-year local failure rates by subset did not differ when patients were classified as having no risk features (None, 15% vs 19%, P=.25), cranial nerve palsy/cranial base of skull erosion (CNP/CBBE, 15% vs 28%, P=.22), or intracranial extension (ICE, 21% vs 15%, P=.27). The D9083 patients were more likely to have received initial staging by magnetic resonance imaging (71% vs 53%). Conclusions: These data support that a delay in radiation therapy for high-risk PMRMS features of CNP/CBBE does not compromise clinical outcomes.

  7. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillaris, A.; Bouratzis, C.; Nindos, A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts that extend to hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprises 48 interplanetary type IV bursts observed with the Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation (WAVES) instrument onboard Wind in the 13.825 MHz - 20 kHz frequency range. The dynamic spectra of the Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), the Nançay Decametric Array (DAM), the Appareil de Routine pour le Traitement et l' Enregistrement Magnetique de l' Information Spectral (ARTEMIS-IV), the Culgoora, Hiraso, and the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN) Radio Spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona. These were supplemented with soft X-ray (SXR) flux-measurements from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and coronal mass ejections (CME) data from the Large Angle and Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Positional information of the coronal bursts was obtained by the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs, and SXR flares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact, their duration was on average 106 minutes. This type of events was, mostly, associated with M- and X-class flares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs, 32 of these events had CMEs faster than 1000 km s^{-1}. Furthermore, in 43 compact events the CME was possibly subjected to reduced aerodynamic drag as it was propagating in the wake of a previous CME. A minority (three) of long-lived type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts was detected, with durations from 960 minutes to 115 hours. These events are referred to as extended or long duration and appear to replenish their energetic electron content, possibly from electrons escaping from the corresponding coronal

  8. Kepler eclipsing binary stars. IV. Precise eclipse times for close binaries and identification of candidate three-body systems

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, Kyle E.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Prša, Andrej; Orosz, Jerome A.; Welsh, William F.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.

    2014-02-01

    We present a catalog of precise eclipse times and analysis of third-body signals among 1279 close binaries in the latest Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog. For these short-period binaries, Kepler's 30 minute exposure time causes significant smearing of light curves. In addition, common astrophysical phenomena such as chromospheric activity, as well as imperfections in the light curve detrending process, can create systematic artifacts that may produce fictitious signals in the eclipse timings. We present a method to measure precise eclipse times in the presence of distorted light curves, such as in contact and near-contact binaries which exhibit continuously changing light levels in and out of eclipse. We identify 236 systems for which we find a timing variation signal compatible with the presence of a third body. These are modeled for the light travel time effect and the basic properties of the third body are derived. This study complements J. A. Orosz et al. (in preparation), which focuses on eclipse timing variations of longer period binaries with flat out-of-eclipse regions. Together, these two papers provide comprehensive eclipse timings for all binaries in the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog, as an ongoing resource freely accessible online to the community.

  9. A Nationwide Survey on the Daily Screen Time of Iranian Children and Adolescents: The CASPIAN - IV Study

    PubMed Central

    Jari, Mohsen; Qorbani, Mostafa; Motlagh, Mohammad Esmaeil; Heshmat, Ramin; Ardalan, Gelayol; Kelishadi, Roya

    2014-01-01

    Background: Leisure time activity is an important life-style habit. This study aims to determine the screen time of a nationally representative sample of Iranian children and adolescents. Methods: This nationwide cross-sectional study was conducted as part of the fourth survey of a surveillance system. The participants consisted of 14880 students, with aged range from 6 to 18 years, living in 30 provinces in Iran. Screen time, i.e. the time spent on watching television (TV)/video and computer games during leisure time, was assessed by using the questionnaire of the Globasl Student Health Survey of the World Health Organization. Results: The study participants were 13486 school students (participation rate of 90.6%) with a mean age of 12. 47 (3.36) years. Overall, 75.6% of students were from urban and 24.4% from rural areas and 50.8% were boys respectively. Overall, 33.4% and 53% of students watched TV/video more than 2 h a day in their leisure time during school days and holidays, respectively. Likewise, 6.3% and 10.9% of students used computer more than 2 h a day in their leisure time during the school days and holidays, respectively. Overall, 47.1% of urban students and 24.2% of rural students used personal computer in their leisure time during the school days. The corresponding figures were 50.8% and 27.2% in weekends and holidays, respectively. Conclusions: The time spent on screen activities is long in a considerably high number of Iranian children and adolescents. It should be reduced by increasing the public awareness and by providing facilities for regular daily physic activity for students’ leisure times. PMID:24627751

  10. Treatment of melasma with low fluence, large spot size, 1064-nm Q-switched neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser for the treatment of melasma in Fitzpatrick skin types II-IV.

    PubMed

    Brown, Alia S; Hussain, Mussarat; Goldberg, David J

    2011-12-01

    Melasma is a common condition affecting over six million American women. Treatment of dermal or combined melasma is difficult and does not respond well to conventional topical therapies. Various light sources have been used recently in the treatment of melasma including fractionated ablative and non-ablative lasers as well as intense pulse light. We report the use of low fluence, large spot size Q-switched, Nd:Yag laser for the treatment of melasma in skin types II-IV.

  11. Bibliographic Automation of Large Library Operations Using a Time-Sharing System: Phase I. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, A. H.; And Others

    The first phase of an ongoing library automation project at Stanford University is described. Project BALLOTS (Bibliographic Automation of Large Library Operations Using a Time-Sharing System) seeks to automate the acquisition and cataloging functions of a large library using an on-line time-sharing computer. The main objectives are to control…

  12. Resolution of Large Azygos Vein Aneurysm Following Stent-Graft Shunt Placement in a Patient with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type IV

    SciTech Connect

    D'Souza, Estelle S.; Williams, David M.; Deeb, G.M.; Cwikiel, Wojciech

    2006-10-15

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type IV is a rare connective tissue disorder associated with thin-walled, friable arteries and veins predisposing patients to aneurysm formation, dissection, fistula formation, and vessel rupture. Azygos vein aneurysm is an extremely rare condition which has not been reported in association with EDS in the literature. We present a patient with EDS type IV and interrupted inferior vena cava (IVC) with azygos continuation who developed an azygos vein aneurysm. In order to decrease flow through the azygos vein and reduce the risk of aneurysm rupture, a stent-graft shunt was created from the right hepatic vein to the azygos vein via a transhepatic, retroperitoneal route. At 6 month follow-up the shunt was open and the azygos vein aneurysm had resolved.

  13. Intelligent Information Retrieval: Part IV. Testing the Timing of Two Information Retrieval Devices in a Naturalistic Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Charles

    2001-01-01

    Reports the results of two studies of undergraduates that tested an uncertainty expansion information retrieval device and an uncertainty reduction device in naturalistic settings, designed to be given at different stages of Kuhlthau's information search process. Concludes that the timing of the device interventions is crucial to their potential…

  14. AN EXPERIMENT IN BASIC AIRBORNE ELECTRONICS TRAINING, PART IV-- EFFECT OF REDUCTION IN TRAINING TIME ON FLEET PERFORMANCE. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BALDWIN, ROBERT O.; AND OTHERS

    THREE PRECEDING REPORTS PRESENTED THE EFFECTS OF SHORTENING TRAINING TIME IN AVIONICS FUNDAMENTALS AND AVIATION ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN (RADAR) TRAINING UPON THE FINAL COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION IN THESE COURSES AND UPON PERFORMANCE IN A SUBSEQUENT EQUIPMENT COURSE. THIS REPORT COMPARES THE ON THE JOB PERFORMANCE OF GRADUATES FROM FOUR GROUPS…

  15. TRANSIT TIMING OBSERVATIONS FROM KEPLER. IV. CONFIRMATION OF FOUR MULTIPLE-PLANET SYSTEMS BY SIMPLE PHYSICAL MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Ford, Eric B.; Moorhead, Althea V.; Steffen, Jason H.; Rowe, Jason F.; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Carter, Joshua A.; Fressin, Francois; Geary, John; Batalha, Natalie M.; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Steve; Haas, Michael R.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Ciardi, David R.; Fanelli, Michael N.; Hall, Jennifer R. [Orbital Sciences Corporation and others

    2012-05-10

    Eighty planetary systems of two or more planets are known to orbit stars other than the Sun. For most, the data can be sufficiently explained by non-interacting Keplerian orbits, so the dynamical interactions of these systems have not been observed. Here we present four sets of light curves from the Kepler spacecraft, each which of shows multiple planets transiting the same star. Departure of the timing of these transits from strict periodicity indicates that the planets are perturbing each other: the observed timing variations match the forcing frequency of the other planet. This confirms that these objects are in the same system. Next we limit their masses to the planetary regime by requiring the system remain stable for astronomical timescales. Finally, we report dynamical fits to the transit times, yielding possible values for the planets' masses and eccentricities. As the timespan of timing data increases, dynamical fits may allow detailed constraints on the systems' architectures, even in cases for which high-precision Doppler follow-up is impractical.

  16. Binaural detection with narrowband and wideband reproducible noise maskers. IV. Models using interaural time, level, and envelope differences

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Junwen; Carney, Laurel H.

    2014-01-01

    The addition of out-of-phase tones to in-phase noises results in dynamic interaural level difference (ILD) and interaural time difference (ITD) cues for the dichotic tone-in-noise detection task. Several models have been used to predict listeners' detection performance based on ILD, ITD, or different combinations of the two cues. The models can be tested using detection performance from an ensemble of reproducible-noise maskers. Previous models cannot predict listeners' detection performance for reproducible-noise maskers without fitting the data. Here, two models were tested for narrowband and wideband reproducible-noise experiments. One model was a linear combination of ILD and ITD that included the generally ignored correlation between the two cues. The other model was based on a newly proposed cue, the slope of the interaural envelope difference (SIED). Predictions from both models explained a significant portion of listeners' performance for detection of a 500-Hz tone in wideband noise. Predictions based on the SIED approached the predictable variance in the wideband condition. The SIED represented a nonlinear combination of ILD and ITD, with the latter cue dominating. Listeners did not use a common strategy (cue) to detect tones in the narrowband condition and may use different single frequencies or different combinations of frequency channels. PMID:25234891

  17. Axially symmetric two-body problem in general relativity. IV. Boundary conditions, time scales, and the quadrupole formula

    SciTech Connect

    Cooperstock, F.I.

    1982-06-15

    The analysis of the field equations and the conservation laws is extended into the skin boundary region which maintains the initially static configuration of the two fluid spheres. Although this leads to a correction of the gravitational-radiation energy-loss rate from a dependence of Eapprox...cap alpha../sup -4/rho/sub 0/ /sup -4/ to ..cap alpha../sup -6/rho/sub 0/ /sup -2/, the importance of the nonlinear structure-dependent terms remain and the essential conclusion, that the quadrupole formula does not apply to this problem, is unaltered. The hydrodynamic, stress-breaking, and free-fall time scales are considered. It is shown that insofar as the quadrupole-formula comparison for free-fall is concerned, only the contribution from bulk motion of the fluid spheres need be considered since tidal quadrupole deformation contributes negligibly to the quadrupole formula. With reference to our problem, it is shown that a recent derivation of the quadrupole formula for free-fall is incorrect and it is suggested that certain other derivations may be applicable only to the radiation damping of a single body.

  18. Radiation-induced changes in collagen isotypes I, III, and IV in the lung of LAF1 mouse: effects of time, dose, and WR-2721

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G.G.; Kenning, J.M.; Dawson, D.T.

    1988-09-01

    Alterations in the amount and distribution of pulmonary connective tissue are commonly observed subsequent to thoracic radiotherapy. The extent to which these changes are important in the expression of radiation damage and its repair remains unclear. We have quantitated changes in the parenchymal levels of collagen types I, III, and IV in the lungs of LAF1 mice at intervals to 1 year, following doses of 0-14 Gy, 300 kV X rays, or 0-18 Gy in the presence of the radioprotective compound, WR-2721. The method of quantitation, which involves video image analysis of fluorescent antibody stained, cryostat tissue sections, provides both quantitative and morphological information for the three collagen isotypes. Type I collagen peaked in tissue content at 15 and 30 weeks postirradiation (p.i.), with transient return to control values 20-25 weeks p.i. Type III collagen peaked at 15 and 25 weeks p.i. and declined in tissue content at 20 and 30 weeks. Type IV peaked 15-20 weeks following irradiation, returned to control levels at 25 weeks, and reached a plateau above control values after 30 weeks. Fluctuations in collagen levels in the parenchyma were dose dependent but were not simultaneous, indicating a radiation response characterized by alpha-chain-specific regulation of collagen biosynthesis and breakdown. In general, WR-2721, which enhanced postirradiation survival (DMF, 1.3), reduced the magnitude and altered the timing of collagen fluctuations; again, the effects were type specific. The results clearly demonstrate that the postirradiation response of the connective tissue is dose dependent, is specific to each macromolecule, and involves both deposition and removal of extracellular matrix. These processes are independently influenced by the presence during irradiation of WR-2721.

  19. Spitzer Survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud, Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (sage). IV. Dust Properties in the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Reach, William T.; Paradis, Deborah; Meixner, Margaret; Paladini, Roberta; Kawamura, Akiko; Onishi, Toshikazu; Vijh, Uma; Gordon, Karl; Indebetouw, Remy; Hora, Joseph L.; Whitney, Barbara; Blum, Robert; Meade, Marilyn; Babler, Brian; Churchwell, Ed B.; Engelbracht, Charles W.; For, Bi-Qing; Misselt, Karl; Leitherer, Claus; Cohen, Martin; Boulanger, François; Frogel, Jay A.; Fukui, Yasuo; Gallagher, Jay; Gorjian, Varoujan; Harris, Jason; Kelly, Douglas; Latter, William B.; Madden, Suzanne; Markwick-Kemper, Ciska; Mizuno, Akira; Mizuno, Norikazu; Mould, Jeremy; Nota, Antonella; Oey, M. S.; Olsen, Knut; Panagia, Nino; Perez-Gonzalez, Pablo; Shibai, Hiroshi; Sato, Shuji; Smith, Linda; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Ueta, Toshiya; Van Dyk, Schuyler; Volk, Kevin; Werner, Michael; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2008-09-01

    mass increase of sime13% of the total dust mass in selected regions. The most likely explanation is that the 70 μm excess is due to the production of large very small grains (VSG) through erosion of larger grains in the diffuse medium. This FIR excess could be due to intrinsic variations of the dust/gas ratio, which would then vary from 4.6 to 2.3 times lower than the MW values across the LMC, but X CO values derived from the IR emission would then be about three times lower than those derived from the Virial analysis of the CO data. We also investigate the possibility that the FIR excess is associated with an additional gas component undetected in the available gas tracers. Assuming a constant dust abundance in all ISM phases, the additional gas component would have twice the known H I mass. We show that it is plausible that the FIR excess is due to cold atomic gas that is optically thick in the 21 cm line, while the contribution by a pure H2 phase with no CO emission remains a possible explanation.

  20. Exploration of PBPK Model-Calculation of Drug Time Course in Tissue Using IV Bolus Drug Plasma Concentration-Time Profile and the Physiological Parameters of the Organ.

    PubMed

    Berezhkovskiy, Leonid M

    2016-08-01

    An uncommon innovative consideration of the well-stirred linear physiologically based pharmacokinetic model and the drug plasma concentration-time profile, which is measured in routine intravenous bolus pharmacokinetic study, was applied for the calculation of the drug time course in human tissues. This cannot be obtained in the in vivo pharmacokinetic study. The physiological parameters of the organ such as organ tissue volume, organ blood flow rate, and its vascular volume were used in the calculation. The considered method was applied to calculate the time course of midazolam, alprazolam, quinidine, and diclofenac in human organs or tissues. The suggested method might be applied for the prediction of drug concentration-time profile in tissues and consequently the drug concentration level in the targeted tissue, as well as the possible undesirable toxic levels in other tissues. PMID:27290628

  1. Improved time response for large area microchannel plate photomultiplier tubes in fusion diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Milnes, J. S. Conneely, T. M.; Howorth, J.; Horsfield, C. J.

    2014-11-15

    Fusion diagnostics that utilise high speed scintillators often need to capture a large area of light with a high degree of time accuracy. Microchannel plate (MCP) photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) are recognised as the leading device for capturing fast optical signals. However, when manufactured in their traditional proximity focused construction, the time response performance is reduced as the active area increases. This is due to two main factors: the capacitance of a large anode and the difficulty of obtaining small pore MCPs with a large area. Collaboration between Photek and AWE has produced prototype devices that combine the excellent time response of small area MCP-PMTs with a large active area by replacing the traditional proximity-gap front section with an electro-optically focused photocathode to MCP. We present results from both single and double MCP devices with a 40 mm diameter active area and show simulations for the 100 mm device being built this year.

  2. Calculation of neutron die-away times in a large-vehicle portal monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Lillie, R.A.; Santoro, R.T.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.

    1981-02-01

    In this paper, Monte Carlo methods are employed to investigate the adequacy of using neutron die-away time measurements to detect the movement of various amounts of shielding materials through a large tunnel detection system. Neutron die-away times are calculated and compared for an empty tunnel and for a tunnel containing a tractor trailer with five different local configurations. 5 refs.

  3. Large-time behavior for the Vlasov/compressible Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Young-Pil

    2016-07-01

    We establish the large-time behavior for the coupled kinetic-fluid equations. More precisely, we consider the Vlasov equation coupled to the compressible isentropic Navier-Stokes equations through a drag forcing term. For this system, the large-time behavior shows the exponential alignment between particles and fluid velocities as time evolves. This improves the previous result by Bae et al. [Discrete Contin. Dyn. Syst. 34, 4419-4458 (2014)] in which they considered the Vlasov/Navier-Stokes equations with nonlocal velocity alignment forces for particles. Employing a new Lyapunov functional measuring the fluctuations of momentum and mass from the averaged quantities, we refine assumptions for the large-time behavior of the solutions to that system.

  4. ECLIPSE TIMINGS OF THE TRANSIENT LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY EXO 0748-676. IV. THE ROSSI X-RAY TIMING EXPLORER ECLIPSES

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, Michael T.; Ray, Paul S.; Wood, Kent S.; Hertz, Paul L. E-mail: Paul.Ray@nrl.navy.mil E-mail: Paul.Hertz@nasa.gov

    2009-07-01

    We report our complete database of X-ray eclipse timings of the low-mass X-ray binary EXO 0748-676 observed by the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) satellite. As of this writing we have accumulated 443 full X-ray eclipses, 392 of which have been observed with the Proportional Counter Array on RXTE. These include both observations where an eclipse was specifically targeted and those eclipses found in the RXTE data archive. Eclipse cycle count has been maintained since the discovery of the EXO 0748-676 system in 1985 February. We describe our observing and analysis techniques for each eclipse and describe improvements we have made since the last compilation by Wolff et al. The principal result of this paper is the database containing the timing results from a seven-parameter fit to the X-ray light curve for each observed eclipse along with the associated errors in the fitted parameters. Based on the standard O - C analysis, EXO 0748-676 has undergone four distinct orbital period epochs since its discovery. In addition, EXO 0748-676 shows small-scale events in the O - C curve that are likely due to short-lived changes in the secondary star.

  5. Effects of Eddy Viscosity on Time Correlations in Large Eddy Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Guowei; Rubinstein, R.; Wang, Lian-Ping; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Subgrid-scale (SGS) models for large. eddy simulation (LES) have generally been evaluated by their ability to predict single-time statistics of turbulent flows such as kinetic energy and Reynolds stresses. Recent application- of large eddy simulation to the evaluation of sound sources in turbulent flows, a problem in which time, correlations determine the frequency distribution of acoustic radiation, suggest that subgrid models should also be evaluated by their ability to predict time correlations in turbulent flows. This paper compares the two-point, two-time Eulerian velocity correlation evaluated from direct numerical simulation (DNS) with that evaluated from LES, using a spectral eddy viscosity, for isotropic homogeneous turbulence. It is found that the LES fields are too coherent, in the sense that their time correlations decay more slowly than the corresponding time. correlations in the DNS fields. This observation is confirmed by theoretical estimates of time correlations using the Taylor expansion technique. Tile reason for the slower decay is that the eddy viscosity does not include the random backscatter, which decorrelates fluid motion at large scales. An effective eddy viscosity associated with time correlations is formulated, to which the eddy viscosity associated with energy transfer is a leading order approximation.

  6. Nanoparticle delivery of sterically hindered platinum(IV) prodrugs shows 100 times higher potency than that of cisplatin upon light activation.

    PubMed

    Song, Haiqin; Kang, Xiang; Sun, Jing; Jing, Xiabin; Wang, Zehua; Yan, Lesan; Qi, Ruogu; Zheng, Minhua

    2016-02-01

    The introduction of a sterically hindered pyridine ligand to a photosensitive platinum(iv) drug for drug delivery resulted in a >100 fold increase in effectiveness compared to the gold standard, cisplatin. PMID:26727577

  7. A robust and high-performance queue management controller for large round trip time networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshnevisan, Ladan; Salmasi, Farzad R.

    2016-05-01

    Congestion management for transmission control protocol is of utmost importance to prevent packet loss within a network. This necessitates strategies for active queue management. The most applied active queue management strategies have their inherent disadvantages which lead to suboptimal performance and even instability in the case of large round trip time and/or external disturbance. This paper presents an internal model control robust queue management scheme with two degrees of freedom in order to restrict the undesired effects of large and small round trip time and parameter variations in the queue management. Conventional approaches such as proportional integral and random early detection procedures lead to unstable behaviour due to large delay. Moreover, internal model control-Smith scheme suffers from large oscillations due to the large round trip time. On the other hand, other schemes such as internal model control-proportional integral and derivative show excessive sluggish performance for small round trip time values. To overcome these shortcomings, we introduce a system entailing two individual controllers for queue management and disturbance rejection, simultaneously. Simulation results based on Matlab/Simulink and also Network Simulator 2 (NS2) demonstrate the effectiveness of the procedure and verify the analytical approach.

  8. The Space-Time Conservative Schemes for Large-Scale, Time-Accurate Flow Simulations with Tetrahedral Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatachari, Balaji Shankar; Streett, Craig L.; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Friedlander, David J.; Wang, Xiao-Yen; Chang, Sin-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Despite decades of development of unstructured mesh methods, high-fidelity time-accurate simulations are still predominantly carried out on structured, or unstructured hexahedral meshes by using high-order finite-difference, weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO), or hybrid schemes formed by their combinations. In this work, the space-time conservation element solution element (CESE) method is used to simulate several flow problems including supersonic jet/shock interaction and its impact on launch vehicle acoustics, and direct numerical simulations of turbulent flows using tetrahedral meshes. This paper provides a status report for the continuing development of the space-time conservation element solution element (CESE) numerical and software framework under the Revolutionary Computational Aerosciences (RCA) project. Solution accuracy and large-scale parallel performance of the numerical framework is assessed with the goal of providing a viable paradigm for future high-fidelity flow physics simulations.

  9. An Efficient Format for Nearly Constant-Time Access to Arbitrary Time Intervals in Large Trace Files

    DOE PAGES

    Chan, Anthony; Gropp, William; Lusk, Ewing

    2008-01-01

    A powerful method to aid in understanding the performance of parallel applications uses log or trace files containing time-stamped events and states (pairs of events). These trace files can be very large, often hundreds or even thousands of megabytes. Because of the cost of accessing and displaying such files, other methods are often used that reduce the size of the tracefiles at the cost of sacrificing detail or other information. This paper describes a hierarchical trace file format that provides for display of an arbitrary time window in a time independent of the total size of the file andmore » roughly proportional to the number of events within the time window. This format eliminates the need to sacrifice data to achieve a smaller trace file size (since storage is inexpensive, it is necessary only to make efficient use of bandwidth to that storage). The format can be used to organize a trace file or to create a separate file of annotations that may be used with conventional trace files. We present an analysis of the time to access all of the events relevant to an interval of time and we describe experiments demonstrating the performance of this file format.« less

  10. A Stochastic, Resonance-Free Multiple Time-Step Algorithm for Polarizable Models That Permits Very Large Time Steps.

    PubMed

    Margul, Daniel T; Tuckerman, Mark E

    2016-05-10

    the polarizable AMOEBA water model. As was seen with fixed-charge models, we are able to obtain large time steps exceeding 100 fs, allowing calculations to be performed 10 to 20 times faster than standard thermostated molecular dynamics. PMID:27054809

  11. Calculation of neutron die-away times in a large-vehicle portal monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Lillie, R.A.; Santoro, R.T.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Monte Carlo methods have been used to calculate neutron die-away times in a large-vehicle portal monitor. These calculations were performed to investigate the adequacy of using neutron die-away time measurements to detect the clandestine movement of shielded nuclear materials. The geometry consisted of a large tunnel lined with He/sup 3/ proportional counters. The time behavior of the (n,p) capture reaction in these counters was calculated when the tunnel contained a number of different tractor-trailer load configurations. Neutron die-away times obtained from weighted least squares fits to these data were compared. The change in neutron die-away time due to the replacement of cargo in a fully loaded truck with a spherical shell containing 240 kg of borated polyethylene was calculated to be less than 3%. This result together with the overall behavior of neutron die-away time versus mass inside the tunnel strongly suggested that measurements of this type will not provide a reliable means of detecting shielded nuclear materials in a large vehicle. 5 figures, 4 tables.

  12. Free-decay time-domain modal identification for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyoung M.; Vanhorn, David A.; Doiron, Harold H.

    1992-01-01

    Concept definition studies for the Modal Identification Experiment (MIE), a proposed space flight experiment for the Space Station Freedom (SSF), have demonstrated advantages and compatibility of free-decay time-domain modal identification techniques with the on-orbit operational constraints of large space structures. Since practical experience with modal identification using actual free-decay responses of large space structures is very limited, several numerical and test data reduction studies were conducted. Major issues and solutions were addressed, including closely-spaced modes, wide frequency range of interest, data acquisition errors, sampling delay, excitation limitations, nonlinearities, and unknown disturbances during free-decay data acquisition. The data processing strategies developed in these studies were applied to numerical simulations of the MIE, test data from a deployable truss, and launch vehicle flight data. Results of these studies indicate free-decay time-domain modal identification methods can provide accurate modal parameters necessary to characterize the structural dynamics of large space structures.

  13. Efficiency and large deviations in time-asymmetric stochastic heat engines

    SciTech Connect

    Gingrich, Todd R.; Rotskoff, Grant M.; Vaikuntanathan, Suriyanarayanan; Geissler, Phillip L.

    2014-10-24

    In a stochastic heat engine driven by a cyclic non-equilibrium protocol, fluctuations in work and heat give rise to a fluctuating efficiency. Using computer simulations and tools from large deviation theory, we have examined these fluctuations in detail for a model two-state engine. We find in general that the form of efficiency probability distributions is similar to those described by Verley et al (2014 Nat. Commun. 5 4721), in particular featuring a local minimum in the long-time limit. In contrast to the time-symmetric engine protocols studied previously, however, this minimum need not occur at the value characteristic of a reversible Carnot engine. Furthermore, while the local minimum may reside at the global minimum of a large deviation rate function, it does not generally correspond to the least likely efficiency measured over finite time. Lastly, we introduce a general approximation for the finite-time efficiency distribution, $P(\\eta )$, based on large deviation statistics of work and heat, that remains very accurate even when $P(\\eta )$ deviates significantly from its large deviation form.

  14. Efficiency and large deviations in time-asymmetric stochastic heat engines

    DOE PAGES

    Gingrich, Todd R.; Rotskoff, Grant M.; Vaikuntanathan, Suriyanarayanan; Geissler, Phillip L.

    2014-10-24

    In a stochastic heat engine driven by a cyclic non-equilibrium protocol, fluctuations in work and heat give rise to a fluctuating efficiency. Using computer simulations and tools from large deviation theory, we have examined these fluctuations in detail for a model two-state engine. We find in general that the form of efficiency probability distributions is similar to those described by Verley et al (2014 Nat. Commun. 5 4721), in particular featuring a local minimum in the long-time limit. In contrast to the time-symmetric engine protocols studied previously, however, this minimum need not occur at the value characteristic of a reversible Carnot engine. Furthermore, while the local minimum may reside at the global minimum of a large deviation rate function, it does not generally correspond to the least likely efficiency measured over finite time. Lastly, we introduce a general approximation for the finite-time efficiency distribution,more » $$P(\\eta )$$, based on large deviation statistics of work and heat, that remains very accurate even when $$P(\\eta )$$ deviates significantly from its large deviation form.« less

  15. Asymptotic behavior of dispersive waves in a spiral structure at large times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, V. V.

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the sine-Gordon integrable model for spiral magnetic structures, we investigate the behavior at large times of a weakly nonlinear dispersive wave field generated by a spatially local initial excitation of the structure. The method used is based on a direct asymptotic analysis of the corresponding matrix of the Riemann problem on the torus.

  16. Precursory measure of interoccurrence time associated with large earthquakes in the Burridge-Knopoff model

    SciTech Connect

    Hasumi, Tomohiro

    2008-11-13

    We studied the statistical properties of interoccurrence time i.e., time intervals between successive earthquakes in the two-dimensional (2D) Burridge-Knopoff (BK) model, and have found that these statistics can be classified into three types: the subcritical state, the critical state, and the supercritical state. The survivor function of interoccurrence time is well fitted by the Zipf-Mandelbrot type power law in the subcritical regime. However, the fitting accuracy of this distribution tends to be worse as the system changes from the subcritical state to the supercritical state. Because the critical phase of a fault system in nature changes from the subcritical state to the supercritical state prior to a forthcoming large earthquake, we suggest that the fitting accuracy of the survivor distribution can be another precursory measure associated with large earthquakes.

  17. Memory effects in the statistics of interoccurrence times between large returns in financial records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogachev, Mikhail I.; Bunde, Armin

    2008-09-01

    We study the statistics of the interoccurrence times between events above some threshold Q in two kinds of multifractal data sets (multiplicative random cascades and multifractal random walks) with vanishing linear correlations. We show that in both data sets the relevant quantities (probability density functions and the autocorrelation function of the interoccurrence times, as well as the conditional return period) are governed by power laws with exponents that depend explicitly on the considered threshold. By studying a large number of representative financial records (market indices, stock prices, exchange rates, and commodities), we show explicitly that the interoccurrence times between large daily returns follow the same behavior, in a nearly quantitative manner. We conclude that this kind of behavior is a general consequence of the nonlinear memory inherent in the multifractal data sets.

  18. Probabilistic model of waiting times between large failures in sheared media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkman, Braden A. W.; LeBlanc, Michael P.; Uhl, Jonathan T.; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Dahmen, Karin A.

    2016-01-01

    Using a probabilistic approximation of a mean-field mechanistic model of sheared systems, we analytically calculate the statistical properties of large failures under slow shear loading. For general shear F (t ) , the distribution of waiting times between large system-spanning failures is a generalized exponential distribution, ρT(t ) =λ ( F (t ) ) P ( F (t ) ) exp[-∫0td τ λ ( F (τ ) ) P ( F (τ ) ) ] , where λ ( F (t )) is the rate of small event occurrences at stress F (t ) and P ( F (t )) is the probability that a small event triggers a large failure. We study the behavior of this distribution as a function of fault properties, such as heterogeneity or shear rate. Because the probabilistic model accommodates any stress loading F (t ) , it is particularly useful for modeling experiments designed to understand how different forms of shear loading or stress perturbations impact the waiting-time statistics of large failures. As examples, we study how periodic perturbations or fluctuations on top of a linear shear stress increase impact the waiting-time distribution.

  19. Probabilistic model of waiting times between large failures in sheared media.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, Braden A W; LeBlanc, Michael P; Uhl, Jonathan T; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Dahmen, Karin A

    2016-01-01

    Using a probabilistic approximation of a mean-field mechanistic model of sheared systems, we analytically calculate the statistical properties of large failures under slow shear loading. For general shear F(t), the distribution of waiting times between large system-spanning failures is a generalized exponential distribution, ρ_{T}(t)=λ(F(t))P(F(t))exp[-∫_{0}^{t}dτλ(F(τ))P(F(τ))], where λ(F(t)) is the rate of small event occurrences at stress F(t) and P(F(t)) is the probability that a small event triggers a large failure. We study the behavior of this distribution as a function of fault properties, such as heterogeneity or shear rate. Because the probabilistic model accommodates any stress loading F(t), it is particularly useful for modeling experiments designed to understand how different forms of shear loading or stress perturbations impact the waiting-time statistics of large failures. As examples, we study how periodic perturbations or fluctuations on top of a linear shear stress increase impact the waiting-time distribution.

  20. Design verification of large time constant thermal shields for optical reference cavities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Wu, W; Shi, X H; Zeng, X Y; Deng, K; Lu, Z H

    2016-02-01

    In order to achieve high frequency stability in ultra-stable lasers, the Fabry-Pérot reference cavities shall be put inside vacuum chambers with large thermal time constants to reduce the sensitivity to external temperature fluctuations. Currently, the determination of thermal time constants of vacuum chambers is based either on theoretical calculation or time-consuming experiments. The first method can only apply to simple system, while the second method will take a lot of time to try out different designs. To overcome these limitations, we present thermal time constant simulation using finite element analysis (FEA) based on complete vacuum chamber models and verify the results with measured time constants. We measure the thermal time constants using ultrastable laser systems and a frequency comb. The thermal expansion coefficients of optical reference cavities are precisely measured to reduce the measurement error of time constants. The simulation results and the experimental results agree very well. With this knowledge, we simulate several simplified design models using FEA to obtain larger vacuum thermal time constants at room temperature, taking into account vacuum pressure, shielding layers, and support structure. We adopt the Taguchi method for shielding layer optimization and demonstrate that layer material and layer number dominate the contributions to the thermal time constant, compared with layer thickness and layer spacing. PMID:26931831

  1. The large discretization step method for time-dependent partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haras, Zigo; Taasan, Shlomo

    1995-01-01

    A new method for the acceleration of linear and nonlinear time dependent calculations is presented. It is based on the Large Discretization Step (LDS) approximation, defined in this work, which employs an extended system of low accuracy schemes to approximate a high accuracy discrete approximation to a time dependent differential operator. Error bounds on such approximations are derived. These approximations are efficiently implemented in the LDS methods for linear and nonlinear hyperbolic equations, presented here. In these algorithms the high and low accuracy schemes are interpreted as the same discretization of a time dependent operator on fine and coarse grids, respectively. Thus, a system of correction terms and corresponding equations are derived and solved on the coarse grid to yield the fine grid accuracy. These terms are initialized by visiting the fine grid once in many coarse grid time steps. The resulting methods are very general, simple to implement and may be used to accelerate many existing time marching schemes.

  2. Molecular Genetics of Growth and Development in Populus. IV. Mapping Qtls with Large Effects on Growth, Form, and Phenology Traits in a Forest Tree

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw-Jr, H. D.; Stettler, R. F.

    1995-01-01

    We have mapped quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for commercially important traits (stem growth and form) and an adaptive trait (spring leaf flush) in a Populus F(2) generation derived from a cross between interspecific F(1) hybrids (P. trichocarpa X P. deltoides). Phenotypic data were collected over a 2-year period from a replicated clonal trial containing ramets of the parental, F(1), and F(2) trees. Contrary to the assumptions of simple polygenic models of quantitative trait inheritance, 1-5 QTLs of large effect are responsible for a large portion of the genetic variance in each of the traits measured. For example, 44.7% of the genetic variance in stem volume after 2 years of growth is controlled by just two QTLs. QTLs governing stem basal area were found clustered with QTLs for sylleptic branch leaf area, sharing similar chromosomal position and mode of action and suggesting a pleiotropic effect of QTLs ultimately responsible for stem diameter growth. PMID:7713445

  3. A sputnik IV saga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Charles A.

    2009-12-01

    The Sputnik IV launch occurred on May 15, 1960. On May 19, an attempt to deorbit a 'space cabin' failed and the cabin went into a higher orbit. The orbit of the cabin was monitored and Moonwatch volunteer satellite tracking teams were alerted to watch for the vehicle demise. On September 5, 1962, several team members from Milwaukee, Wisconsin made observations starting at 4:49 a.m. of a fireball following the predicted orbit of Sputnik IV. Requests went out to report any objects found under the fireball path. An early morning police patrol in Manitowoc had noticed a metal object on a street and had moved it to the curb. Later the officers recovered the object and had it dropped off at the Milwaukee Journal. The Moonwarch team got the object and reported the situation to Moonwatch Headquarters at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. A team member flew to Cambridge with the object. It was a solid, 9.49 kg piece of steel with a slag-like layer attached to it. Subsequent analyses showed that it contained radioactive nuclei produced by cosmic ray exposure in space. The scientists at the Observatory quickly recognized that measurements of its induced radioactivity could serve as a calibration for similar measurements of recently fallen nickel-iron meteorites. Concurrently, the Observatory directorate informed government agencies that a fragment from Sputnik IV had been recovered. Coincidently, a debate in the UN Committee on Peaceful Uses of Outer Space involved the issue of liability for damage caused by falling satellite fragments. On September 12, the Observatory delivered the bulk of the fragment to the US Delegation to the UN. Two days later, the fragment was used by US Ambassador Francis Plimpton as an exhibit that the time had come to agree on liability for damage from satellite debris. He offered the Sputnik IV fragment to USSR Ambassador P.D. Morozov, who refused the offer. On October 23, Drs. Alla Massevitch and E.K. Federov of the USSR visited the

  4. Subsurface Supergranular Vertical Flows as Measured Using Large Distance Separations in Time-Distance Helioseismology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, Thomas L., Jr.; Hanasoge, S. M.

    2012-01-01

    As large-distance rays (say, 10 - 24deg) approach the solar surface approximately vertically, travel times measured from surface pairs for these large separations are mostly sensitive to vertical flows, at least for shallow flows within a few Mm of the solar surface. All previous analyses of supergranulation have used smaller separations and have been hampered by the difficulty of separating the horizontal and vertical flow components. We find that the large-separation travel times associated with supergranulation cannot be studied using the standard phase-speed filters of time-distance helioseismology. These filters, whose use is based upon a refractive model of the perturbations, reduce the resultant travel time signal by at least an order of magnitude at some distances. More effective filters are derived. Modeling suggests that the center-annulus travel-time difference [outward-going time minus inward-going time] in the separation range delta= 10 - 24deg is insensitive to the horizontally diverging flow from the centers of the supergranules and should lead to a constant signal from the vertical flow. Our measurement of this quantity, 5.1+/-0.1 seconds, is constant over the distance range. This magnitude of the signal cannot be caused by the level of upflow at cell centers seen at the photosphere of 10 ms(exp-1) extended in depth. It requires the vertical flow to increase with depth. A simple Gaussian model of the increase with depth implies a peak upward flow of 240 ms(exp-1) at a depth of 2.3 Mm and a peak horizontal flow of 700 ms(exp-1) at a depth of 1.6 Mm.

  5. Displacement in the parameter space versus spurious solution of discretization with large time step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, Eduardo; Letellier, Christophe

    2004-01-01

    In order to investigate a possible correspondence between differential and difference equations, it is important to possess discretization of ordinary differential equations. It is well known that when differential equations are discretized, the solution thus obtained depends on the time step used. In the majority of cases, such a solution is considered spurious when it does not resemble the expected solution of the differential equation. This often happens when the time step taken into consideration is too large. In this work, we show that, even for quite large time steps, some solutions which do not correspond to the expected ones are still topologically equivalent to solutions of the original continuous system if a displacement in the parameter space is considered. To reduce such a displacement, a judicious choice of the discretization scheme should be made. To this end, a recent discretization scheme, based on the Lie expansion of the original differential equations, proposed by Monaco and Normand-Cyrot will be analysed. Such a scheme will be shown to be sufficient for providing an adequate discretization for quite large time steps compared to the pseudo-period of the underlying dynamics.

  6. Observation of quantum particles on a large space-time scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landau, L. J.

    1994-10-01

    A quantum particle observed on a sufficiently large space-time scale can be described by means of classical particle trajectories. The joint distribution for large-scale multiple-time position and momentum measurements on a nonrelativistic quantum particle moving freely in R v is given by straight-line trajectories with probabilities determined by the initial momentum-space wavefunction. For large-scale toroidal and rectangular regions the trajectories are geodesics. In a uniform gravitational field the trajectories are parabolas. A quantum counting process on free particles is also considered and shown to converge in the large-space-time limit to a classical counting process for particles with straight-line trajectories. If the quantum particle interacts weakly with its environment, the classical particle trajectories may undergo random jumps. In the random potential model considered here, the quantum particle evolves according to a reversible unitary one-parameter group describing elastic scattering off static randomly distributed impurities (a quantum Lorentz gas). In the large-space-time weak-coupling limit a classical stochastic process is obtained with probability one and describes a classical particle moving with constant speed in straight lines between random jumps in direction. The process depends only on the ensemble value of the covariance of the random field and not on the sample field. The probability density in phase space associated with the classical stochastic process satisfies the linear Boltzmann equation for the classical Lorentz gas, which, in the limit h→0, goes over to the linear Landau equation. Our study of the quantum Lorentz gas is based on a perturbative expansion and, as in other studies of this system, the series can be controlled only for small values of the rescaled time and for Gaussian random fields. The discussion of classical particle trajectories for nonrelativistic particles on a macroscopic spacetime scale applies also to

  7. Large-Strain Time-Temperature Equivalence and Adiabatic Heating of Polyethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Furmanski, Jevan; Brown, Eric; Cady, Carl M.

    2012-06-06

    Time-temperature equivalence is a well-known phenomenon in time-dependent material response, where rapid events at a moderate temperature are indistinguishable from some occurring at modest rates but elevated temperatures. However, there is as-yet little elucidation of how well this equivalence holds for substantial plastic strains. In this work, we demonstrate time-temperature equivalence over a large range in a previously studied high-density polyethylene formulation (HDPE). At strain-rates exceeding 0.1/s, adiabatic heating confounds the comparison of nominally isothermal material response, apparently violating time-temperature equivalence. Strain-rate jumps can be employed to access the instantaneous true strain rate without heating. Adiabatic heating effects were isolated by comparing a locus of isothermal instantaneous flow stress measurements from strain-rate jumps up to 1/s with the predicted equivalent states at 0.01/s and 0.001/s in compression. Excellent agreement between the isothermal jump condition locus and the quasi-static tests was observed up to 50% strain, yielding one effective isothermal plastic response for each material for a given time-temperature equivalent state. These results imply that time-temperature equivalence can be effectively used to predict the deformation response of polymers during extreme mechanical events (large strain and high strain-rate) from measurements taken at reduced temperatures and nominal strain-rates in the laboratory.

  8. Linearly chirped microwave waveform generation with large time-bandwidth product by optically injected semiconductor laser.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Pei; Zhang, Fangzheng; Guo, Qingshui; Pan, Shilong

    2016-08-01

    A scheme for photonic generation of linearly chirped microwave waveforms (LCMWs) with a large time-bandwidth product (TBWP) is proposed and demonstrated based on an optically injected semiconductor laser. In the proposed system, the optically injected semiconductor laser is operated in period-one (P1) oscillation state. After optical-to-electrical conversion, a microwave signal can be generated with its frequency determined by the injection strength. By properly controlling the injection strength, an LCMW with a large TBWP can be generated. The proposed system has a simple and compact structure. Besides, the center frequency, bandwidth, as well as the temporal duration of the generated LCMWs can be easily adjusted. An experiment is carried out. LCMWs with TBWPs as large as 1.2x105 (bandwidth 12 GHz; temporal duration 10 μs) are successfully generated. The flexibility for tuning the center frequency, bandwidth and temporal duration is also demonstrated. PMID:27505809

  9. Asymptotic behavior of solutions of the Korteweg-de Vries equation for large times

    SciTech Connect

    Buslaev, V.S.; Sukhanov, V.V.

    1986-09-10

    For the KdV equation a complete asymptotic expansion of the dispersive tail for large times is described, and generalized wave operators are introduced. The asymptotics for large times of the spectral Schroedinger equation with a potential of the type of a solution of the KdV equation is studied. It is shown that the KdV equation is connected in a specific manner with the structure of the asymptotics of solutions of the spectral equation. As a corollary, known explicit formulas for the leading terms of the asymptotics of solutions of the KdV equation in terms of spectral data corresponding to the initial conditions are obtained. A plan for justifying the results listed is outlined.

  10. Associations between motor timing, music practice, and intelligence studied in a large sample of twins.

    PubMed

    Ullén, Fredrik; Mosing, Miriam A; Madison, Guy

    2015-03-01

    Music performance depends critically on precise processing of time. A common model behavior in studies of motor timing is isochronous serial interval production (ISIP), that is, hand/finger movements with a regular beat. ISIP accuracy is related to both music practice and intelligence. Here we present a study of these associations in a large twin cohort, demonstrating that the effects of music practice and intelligence on motor timing are additive, with no significant multiplicative (interaction) effect. Furthermore, the association between music practice and motor timing was analyzed with the use of a co-twin control design using intrapair differences. These analyses revealed that the phenotypic association disappeared when all genetic and common environmental factors were controlled. This suggests that the observed association may not reflect a causal effect of music practice on ISIP performance but rather reflect common influences (e.g., genetic effects) on both outcomes. The relevance of these findings for models of practice and expert performance is discussed.

  11. Large deviations for the height in 1D Kardar-Parisi-Zhang growth at late times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Doussal, Pierre; Majumdar, Satya N.; Schehr, Grégory

    2016-03-01

    We study the atypically large deviations of the height H∼O}(t) at the origin at late times in (1 + 1)-dimensional growth models belonging to the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) universality class. We present exact results for the rate functions for the discrete single-step growth model, as well as for the continuum KPZ equation in a droplet geometry. Based on our exact calculation of the rate functions we argue that models in the KPZ class undergo a third-order phase transition from a strong-coupling to a weak-coupling phase, at late times.

  12. Organizing the Extremely Large LSST Database forReal-Time Astronomical Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Becla, Jacek; Lim, Kian-Tat; Monkewitz, Serge; Nieto-Santisteban, Maria; Thakar, Ani; /Johns Hopkins U.

    2007-11-07

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will catalog billions of astronomical objects and trillions of sources, all of which will be stored and managed by a database management system. One of the main challenges is real-time alert generation. To generate alerts, up to 100K new difference detections have to be cross-correlated with the huge historical catalogs, and then further processed to prune false alerts. This paper explains the challenges, the implementation of the LSST Association Pipeline and the database organization strategies we are planning to use to meet the real-time requirements, including data partitioning, parallelization, and pre-loading.

  13. Numerical methods for large-scale, time-dependent partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turkel, E.

    1979-01-01

    A survey of numerical methods for time dependent partial differential equations is presented. The emphasis is on practical applications to large scale problems. A discussion of new developments in high order methods and moving grids is given. The importance of boundary conditions is stressed for both internal and external flows. A description of implicit methods is presented including generalizations to multidimensions. Shocks, aerodynamics, meteorology, plasma physics and combustion applications are also briefly described.

  14. Time-sliced perturbation theory for large scale structure I: general formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blas, Diego; Garny, Mathias; Ivanov, Mikhail M.; Sibiryakov, Sergey

    2016-07-01

    We present a new analytic approach to describe large scale structure formation in the mildly non-linear regime. The central object of the method is the time-dependent probability distribution function generating correlators of the cosmological observables at a given moment of time. Expanding the distribution function around the Gaussian weight we formulate a perturbative technique to calculate non-linear corrections to cosmological correlators, similar to the diagrammatic expansion in a three-dimensional Euclidean quantum field theory, with time playing the role of an external parameter. For the physically relevant case of cold dark matter in an Einstein-de Sitter universe, the time evolution of the distribution function can be found exactly and is encapsulated by a time-dependent coupling constant controlling the perturbative expansion. We show that all building blocks of the expansion are free from spurious infrared enhanced contributions that plague the standard cosmological perturbation theory. This paves the way towards the systematic resummation of infrared effects in large scale structure formation. We also argue that the approach proposed here provides a natural framework to account for the influence of short-scale dynamics on larger scales along the lines of effective field theory.

  15. Interrelations between the perception of time and space in large-scale environments.

    PubMed

    Riemer, Martin; Hölzl, Rupert; Kleinböhl, Dieter

    2014-04-01

    Interactions between perceived temporal and spatial properties of external stimuli (e.g. duration and size) suggest common neural mechanisms underlying the perception of time and space. This conclusion, however, lacks support from studies in large-scale environments, showing that judgements on travelled distances and associated travel times are independent from each other. Here, we used a different approach to test whether the perception of travelled distances is influenced by the perception of time. Unlike previous studies, in which temporal and spatial judgements were related to the same experience of walking, we assessed time and distance perception in analogous, but separate versions of estimation and production tasks. In estimation tasks, participants estimated the duration of a presented sound (time) or the length of a travelled distance (space), and in production tasks, participants terminated a sound after a numerically specified duration (time) or covered a numerically specified distance (space). The results show systematic overestimation of time and underestimation of travelled distance, and the latter reflecting previously reported misperceptions of visual distance. Time and distance judgements were related within individuals for production, but not for estimation tasks. These results suggest that temporal information might constitute a probabilistic cue for path integration.

  16. Incipient multiple fault diagnosis in real time with applications to large-scale systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.Y.; Bien, Z.; Park, J.H.; Seon, P.H. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1994-08-01

    By using a modified signed directed graph (SDG) together with the distributed artificial neutral networks and a knowledge-based system, a method of incipient multi-fault diagnosis is presented for large-scale physical systems with complex pipes and instrumentations such as valves, actuators, sensors, and controllers. The proposed method is designed so as to (1) make a real-time incipient fault diagnosis possible for large-scale systems, (2) perform the fault diagnosis not only in the steady-state case but also in the transient case as well by using a concept of fault propagation time, which is newly adopted in the SDG model, (3) provide with highly reliable diagnosis results and explanation capability of faults diagnosed as in an expert system, and (4) diagnose the pipe damage such as leaking, break, or throttling. This method is applied for diagnosis of a pressurizer in the Kori Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) unit 2 in Korea under a transient condition, and its result is reported to show satisfactory performance of the method for the incipient multi-fault diagnosis of such a large-scale system in a real-time manner.

  17. Access Time of Emergency Vehicles Under the Condition of Street Blockages after a Large Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirokawa, N.; Osaragi, T.

    2016-09-01

    The previous studies have been carried out on accessibility in daily life. However it is an important issue to improve the accessibility of emergency vehicles after a large earthquake. In this paper, we analyzed the accessibility of firefighters by using a microscopic simulation model immediately after a large earthquake. More specifically, we constructed the simulation model, which describes the property damage, such as collapsed buildings, street blockages, outbreaks of fires, and fire spreading, and the movement of firefighters from fire stations to the locations of fires in a large-scale earthquake. Using this model, we analyzed the influence of the street-blockage on the access time of firefighters. In case streets are blocked according to property damage simulation, the result showed the average access time is more than 10 minutes in the outskirts of the 23 wards of Tokyo, and there are some firefighters arrive over 20 minutes at most. Additionally, we focused on the alternative routes and proposed that volunteers collect information on street blockages to improve the accessibility of firefighters. Finally we demonstrated that access time of firefighters can be reduced to the same level as the case no streets were blocked if 0.3% of residents collected information in 10 minutes.

  18. Sorption of selenium(IV) and selenium(VI) to mackinawite (FeS): effect of contact time, extent of removal, sorption envelopes.

    PubMed

    Han, Dong Suk; Batchelor, Bill; Abdel-Wahab, Ahmed

    2011-02-15

    Higher concentrations (127, 253 μM) of Se(IV) at pH 8 were completely removed by 0.5 g/L FeS within 120 min. Removal of Se(VI) by FeS at pH 8 was less extensive than removal of Se(IV). Only 10% of the Se(VI) was removed by 1 g/L FeS within 1h. Removal patterns for Se by FeS depend on pH. Removal patterns of Se at pH 7 and pH 8 were best described by BET models for Se(IV) and Freundlich models for Se(VI), while removal patterns of both at pH 9 and 10 were best described by Langmuir models. Sulfate at 1 and 10 mM had negligible effect on removal of Se(IV) by FeS, while sulfate had little effect on removal of Se(VI) by FeS, but there was some indication that sulfate promoted removal of Se(VI) at intermediate concentrations. The test for the effect of pH on sorption of Se(IV) by FeS showed nearly complete removal at all but the high initial pH. When pH was raised back to initial value, greater removals were observed than initially. Mixtures of Se(VI) and FeS showed moderate removal at low pH, a minimum removal near pH 6 and nearly complete removal at high pH. Very high stability was observed with negligible release as pH decreased.

  19. Subsurface Supergranular Vertical Flows as Measured Using Large Distance Separations in Time-Distance Helioseismology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Hanasoge, S. M.

    2012-01-01

    As large-distance rays (say, 10-24 deg) approach the solar surface approximately vertically, travel times measured from surface pairs for these large separations are mostly sensitive to vertical flows, at least for shallow flows within a few Mm of the solar surface. All previous analyses of supergranulation have used smaller separations and have been hampered by the difficulty of separating the horizontal and vertical flow components. We find that the large separation travel times associated with upergranulation cannot be studied using the standard phase-speed filters of time-distance helioseismology. These filters, whose use is based upon a refractive model of the perturbations,reduce the resultant travel time signal by at least an order of magnitude at some distances. More effective filters are derived. Modeling suggests that the center-annulus travel time difference in the separation range 10-24 deg is insensitive to the horizontally diverging flow from the centers of the supergranules and should lead to a constant signal from the vertical flow. Our measurement of this quantity for the average supergranule, 5.1 s, is constant over the distance range. This magnitude of signal cannot be caused by the level of upflow at cell centers seen at the photosphere of 10 m/s extended in depth. It requires the vertical flow to increase with depth. A simple Gaussian model of the increase with depth implies a peak upward flow of 240 m/s at a depth of 2.3 Mm and a peak horizontal flow of 700 m/s at a depth of 1.6 Mm.

  20. Intelligent Virtual Station (IVS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Intelligent Virtual Station (IVS) is enabling the integration of design, training, and operations capabilities into an intelligent virtual station for the International Space Station (ISS). A viewgraph of the IVS Remote Server is presented.

  1. TIMESERIESSTREAMING.VI: LabVIEW program for reliable data streaming of large analog time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czerwinski, Fabian; Oddershede, Lene B.

    2011-02-01

    With modern data acquisition devices that work fast and very precise, scientists often face the task of dealing with huge amounts of data. These need to be rapidly processed and stored onto a hard disk. We present a LabVIEW program which reliably streams analog time series of MHz sampling. Its run time has virtually no limitation. We explicitly show how to use the program to extract time series from two experiments: For a photodiode detection system that tracks the position of an optically trapped particle and for a measurement of ionic current through a glass capillary. The program is easy to use and versatile as the input can be any type of analog signal. Also, the data streaming software is simple, highly reliable, and can be easily customized to include, e.g., real-time power spectral analysis and Allan variance noise quantification. Program summaryProgram title: TimeSeriesStreaming.VI Catalogue identifier: AEHT_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEHT_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 250 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 63 259 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: LabVIEW ( http://www.ni.com/labview/) Computer: Any machine running LabVIEW 8.6 or higher Operating system: Windows XP and Windows 7 RAM: 60-360 Mbyte Classification: 3 Nature of problem: For numerous scientific and engineering applications, it is highly desirable to have an efficient, reliable, and flexible program to perform data streaming of time series sampled with high frequencies and possibly for long time intervals. This type of data acquisition often produces very large amounts of data not easily streamed onto a computer hard disk using standard methods. Solution method: This LabVIEW program is developed to directly

  2. Physics of the environment: possible Sumatra Tsunami warning times for large animals in Sri Lanka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, David G.; Scheifele, Peter M.; Vonwinkle, William A.

    2005-04-01

    There has previously been significant anecdotal evidence that animals can anticipate or sense seismic events. It is known that large animals, specifically elephants, sense and utilize low frequency sound. The object of this paper is to estimate the possible warning times that large animals in Sri Lanka could have had of the Sumatra Tsunami, assuming they could sense low frequency wave transmission from the initial earthquake arriving by either atmospheric, ocean, or bottom paths. The atmospheric path appears to be the least efficient due to relatively high attenuation and poor coupling to the source. It would also give the shortest warning time: approximately 30 minutes. The ocean path via the deep sound channel, which has been shown by a previous Bermuda experiment to be an efficient means of coupling seismic energy to an island, would give a warning time of more than 1.5 hours. The bottom path(s), which gave strong received signals at a Sri Lanka seismic station, would give a warning time of about 2 hours. These estimates should provide a context for animal behavior reports.

  3. Visible-light-induced electron transport from small to large nanoparticles in bimodal gold nanoparticle-loaded titanium(IV) oxide.

    PubMed

    Naya, Shin-Ichi; Niwa, Tadahiro; Kume, Takahiro; Tada, Hiroaki

    2014-07-01

    A key to realizing the sustainable society is to develop highly active photocatalysts for selective organic synthesis effectively using sunlight as the energy source. Recently, metal-oxide-supported gold nanoparticles (NPs) have emerged as a new type of visible-light photocatalysts driven by the excitation of localized surface plasmon resonance of Au NPs. Here we show that visible-light irradiation (λ>430 nm) of TiO2 -supported Au NPs with a bimodal size distribution (BM-Au/TiO2 ) gives rise to the long-range (>40 nm) electron transport from about 14 small (ca. 2 nm) Au NPs to one large (ca. 9 nm) Au NP through the conduction band of TiO2 . As a result of the enhancement of charge separation, BM-Au/TiO2 exhibits a high level of visible-light activity for the one-step synthesis of azobenzenes from nitrobenzenes at 25 °C with a yield greater than 95 % and a selectivity greater than 99 %, whereas unimodal Au/TiO2 (UM-Au/TiO2 ) is photocatalytically inactive. PMID:24863051

  4. Time and Amplitude Characteristics of Large Scintillation Detectors with SiPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplin, V. A.; Makliaev, E. F.; Melikyan, Yu. A.; Naumov, P. P.; Naumov, P. Yu.; Runtso, M. F.

    A large plastic scintillation detector system with silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) readout has been developed as a prototype for future astroparticle experiments' detectors. A set of SiPM connected in parallel was used in order to enlarge the light collection effective area and thus enhance the detector's amplitude and timing performance. Here we report on the values of time resolution and scintillation detection efficiency of such a system for different types of SiPM as a function of the distance between the scintillation strip edge with photomultipliers attached to it, and the penetrating particle. Results of a special simulation study of the system's amplitude and timing performance as a function of the SiPM radiation aging are also presented.

  5. Some Uniform Estimates and Large-Time Behavior of Solutions to One-Dimensional Compressible Navier-Stokes System in Unbounded Domains with Large Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Liang, Zhilei

    2016-06-01

    We study the large-time behavior of solutions to the initial and initial boundary value problems with large initial data for the compressible Navier-Stokes system describing the one-dimensional motion of a viscous heat-conducting perfect polytropic gas in unbounded domains. The temperature is proved to be bounded from below and above, independent of both time and space. Moreover, it is shown that the global solution is asymptotically stable as time tends to infinity. Note that the initial data can be arbitrarily large. This result is proved by using elementary energy methods.

  6. Large Observatory For X-ray Timing (LOFT-P): A Probe-Class Mission Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Ray, Paul S.; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Feroci, Marco

    2016-04-01

    LOFT-P is a mission concept for a NASA Astrophysics Probe-Class (<$1B) X-ray timing mission, based on the LOFT M-class concept originally proposed to ESA’s M3 and M4 calls. LOFT-P requires very large collecting area, high time resolution, good spectral resolution,broadband spectral coverage (2-30 keV), highly flexible scheduling, and an ability to detect and respond promptly to time-critical targets of opportunity. It addresses science questions such as: What is the equation of state of ultra dense matter? What are the effects of strong gravity on matter spiraling into black holes? It would be optimized for sub-millisecond timing of bright Galactic X-ray sources including X-ray bursters, black hole binaries, and magnetars to study phenomena at the natural timescales of neutron star surfaces and black hole event horizons and to measure mass and spin of black holes. These measurements are synergistic to imaging and high-resolution spectroscopy instruments, addressing much smaller distance scales than are possible without very long baseline X-ray interferometry, and using complementary techniques to address the geometry and dynamics of emission regions. LOFT-P would have an effective area of >6 m2, >10x that of the highly successful Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). A sky monitor (~2-50 keV) acts as a trigger for pointed observations, providing high duty cycle, high time resolution monitoring of the X-ray sky with ~20 times the sensitivity of the RXTE All-Sky Monitor, enabling multi-wavelength and multi-messenger studies. A probe-class mission concept would employ lightweight collimator technology and large-area solid-state detectors, segmented into pixels or strips, technologies which have been recently greatly advanced during the ESA M-3 Phase A study of LOFT. Given the large community interested in LOFT (>800 supporters), the scientific productivity of this mission is expected to be very high, similar to or greater than RXTE (~2000 refereed publications.) In

  7. GLOBULAR CLUSTER ABUNDANCES FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION, INTEGRATED-LIGHT SPECTROSCOPY. IV. THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD: {alpha}, Fe-PEAK, LIGHT, AND HEAVY ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A.; McWilliam, Andrew E-mail: rab@ucolick.org E-mail: andy@ociw.edu

    2012-02-10

    We present detailed chemical abundances in eight clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We measure abundances of 22 elements for clusters spanning a range in age of 0.05-12 Gyr, providing a comprehensive picture of the chemical enrichment and star formation history of the LMC. The abundances were obtained from individual absorption lines using a new method for analysis of high-resolution (R {approx} 25,000), integrated-light (IL) spectra of star clusters. This method was developed and presented in Papers I, II, and III of this series. In this paper, we develop an additional IL {chi}{sup 2}-minimization spectral synthesis technique to facilitate measurement of weak ({approx}15 mA) spectral lines and abundances in low signal-to-noise ratio data (S/N {approx} 30). Additionally, we supplement the IL abundance measurements with detailed abundances that we measure for individual stars in the youngest clusters (age < 2 Gyr) in our sample. In both the IL and stellar abundances we find evolution of [{alpha}/Fe] with [Fe/H] and age. Fe-peak abundance ratios are similar to those in the Milky Way (MW), with the exception of [Cu/Fe] and [Mn/Fe], which are sub-solar at high metallicities. The heavy elements Ba, La, Nd, Sm, and Eu are significantly enhanced in the youngest clusters. Also, the heavy to light s-process ratio is elevated relative to the MW ([Ba/Y] >+0.5) and increases with decreasing age, indicating a strong contribution of low-metallicity asymptotic giant branch star ejecta to the interstellar medium throughout the later history of the LMC. We also find a correlation of IL Na and Al abundances with cluster mass in the sense that more massive, older clusters are enriched in the light elements Na and Al with respect to Fe, which implies that these clusters harbor star-to-star abundance variations as is common in the MW. Lower mass, intermediate-age, and young clusters have Na and Al abundances that are lower and more consistent with LMC field stars. Our

  8. Very Large Inflammatory Odontogenic Cyst with Origin on a Single Long Time Traumatized Lower Incisor

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Filipe; Andre, Saudade; Moreira, Andre; Carames, Joao

    2015-01-01

    One of the consequences of traumatic injuries is the chance of aseptic pulp necrosis to occur which in time may became infected and give origin to periapical pathosis. Although the apical granulomas and cysts are a common condition, there appearance as an extremely large radiolucent image is a rare finding. Differential diagnosis with other radiographic-like pathologies, such as keratocystic odontogenic tumour or unicystic ameloblastoma, is mandatory. The purpose of this paper is to report a very large radicular cyst caused by a single mandibular incisor traumatized long back, in a 60-year-old male. Medical and clinical histories were obtained, radiographic and cone beam CT examinations performed and an initial incisional biopsy was done. The final decision was to perform a surgical enucleation of a lesion, 51.4 mm in length. The enucleated tissue biopsy analysis was able to render the diagnosis as an inflammatory odontogenic cyst. A 2 year follow-up showed complete bone recovery. PMID:26393219

  9. Timing of Formal Phase Safety Reviews for Large-Scale Integrated Hazard Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massie, Michael J.; Morris, A. Terry

    2010-01-01

    Integrated hazard analysis (IHA) is a process used to identify and control unacceptable risk. As such, it does not occur in a vacuum. IHA approaches must be tailored to fit the system being analyzed. Physical, resource, organizational and temporal constraints on large-scale integrated systems impose additional direct or derived requirements on the IHA. The timing and interaction between engineering and safety organizations can provide either benefits or hindrances to the overall end product. The traditional approach for formal phase safety review timing and content, which generally works well for small- to moderate-scale systems, does not work well for very large-scale integrated systems. This paper proposes a modified approach to timing and content of formal phase safety reviews for IHA. Details of the tailoring process for IHA will describe how to avoid temporary disconnects in major milestone reviews and how to maintain a cohesive end-to-end integration story particularly for systems where the integrator inherently has little to no insight into lower level systems. The proposal has the advantage of allowing the hazard analysis development process to occur as technical data normally matures.

  10. Surgical research IV.

    PubMed

    Toledo-Pereyra, Luis H

    2010-08-01

    Harvey W. Cushing (1869-1939) is the only surgeon represented in Surgical Research IV and one of the most accomplished American contributors to surgical research in general and to neurological and endocrine surgery research in particular. Other surgical research leaders of the 19th and 20th centuries who preceded Harvey Cushing have been introduced before. First, we highlighted the "importance of medical and surgical research" as the basic elements in the advancement of medicine and surgery could be considered as Surgical Research I. Second, in Surgical Research II, we presented William Beaumont, Samuel Gross, and William Halsted as the most important participants of the first wave of American surgical researchers. Next, in Surgical Research III, we considered surgeon researchers who moved ahead in the field of surgery with their research initiatives at the time, including John B. Murphy, the Mayo Brothers William J. and Charles H. Mayo, and George W. Crile. With Harvey Cushing, we enter an era of surgical research associated with neurosurgery and endocrine surgery as part of Surgical Research IV. PMID:20690841

  11. Large time-step stability of explicit one-dimensional advection schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, B. P.

    1993-01-01

    There is a wide-spread belief that most explicit one-dimensional advection schemes need to satisfy the so-called 'CFL condition' - that the Courant number, c = udelta(t)/delta(x), must be less than or equal to one, for stability in the von Neumann sense. This puts severe limitations on the time-step in high-speed, fine-grid calculations and is an impetus for the development of implicit schemes, which often require less restrictive time-step conditions for stability, but are more expensive per time-step. However, it turns out that, at least in one dimension, if explicit schemes are formulated in a consistent flux-based conservative finite-volume form, von Neumann stability analysis does not place any restriction on the allowable Courant number. Any explicit scheme that is stable for c is less than 1, with a complex amplitude ratio, G(c), can be easily extended to arbitrarily large c. The complex amplitude ratio is then given by exp(- (Iota)(Nu)(Theta)) G(delta(c)), where N is the integer part of c, and delta(c) = c - N (less than 1); this is clearly stable. The CFL condition is, in fact, not a stability condition at all, but, rather, a 'range restriction' on the 'pieces' in a piece-wise polynomial interpolation. When a global view is taken of the interpolation, the need for a CFL condition evaporates. A number of well-known explicit advection schemes are considered and thus extended to large delta(t). The analysis also includes a simple interpretation of (large delta(t)) total-variation-diminishing (TVD) constraints.

  12. Event processing time prediction at the CMS experiment of the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cury, Samir; Gutsche, Oliver; Kcira, Dorian

    2014-06-01

    The physics event reconstruction is one of the biggest challenges for the computing of the LHC experiments. Among the different tasks that computing systems of the CMS experiment performs, the reconstruction takes most of the available CPU resources. The reconstruction time of single collisions varies according to event complexity. Measurements were done in order to determine this correlation quantitatively, creating means to predict it based on the data-taking conditions of the input samples. Currently the data processing system splits tasks in groups with the same number of collisions and does not account for variations in the processing time. These variations can be large and can lead to a considerable increase in the time it takes for CMS workflows to finish. The goal of this study was to use estimates on processing time to more efficiently split the workflow into jobs. By considering the CPU time needed for each job the spread of the job-length distribution in a workflow is reduced.

  13. Large time behavior in a nonlinear age-dependent population dynamics problem with spatial diffusion.

    PubMed

    Langlais, M

    1988-01-01

    In this work we analyze the large time behavior in a nonlinear model of population dynamics with age-dependence and spatial diffusion. We show that when t----+ infinity either the solution of our problem goes to 0 or it stabilizes to a nontrivial stationary solution. We give two typical examples where the stationary solutions can be evaluated upon solving very simple partial differential equations. As a by-product of the extinction case we find a necessary condition for a nontrivial periodic solution to exist. Numerical computations not described below show a rapid stabilization.

  14. Space-Time Controls on Carbon Sequestration Over Large-Scale Amazon Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Cooper, Harry J.; Gu, Jiujing; Grose, Andrew; Norman, John; daRocha, Humberto R.; Starr, David O. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A major research focus of the LBA Ecology Program is an assessment of the carbon budget and the carbon sequestering capacity of the large scale forest-pasture system that dominates the Amazonia landscape, and its time-space heterogeneity manifest in carbon fluxes across the large scale Amazon basin ecosystem. Quantification of these processes requires a combination of in situ measurements, remotely sensed measurements from space, and a realistically forced hydrometeorological model coupled to a carbon assimilation model, capable of simulating details within the surface energy and water budgets along with the principle modes of photosynthesis and respiration. Here we describe the results of an investigation concerning the space-time controls of carbon sources and sinks distributed over the large scale Amazon basin. The results are derived from a carbon-water-energy budget retrieval system for the large scale Amazon basin, which uses a coupled carbon assimilation-hydrometeorological model as an integrating system, forced by both in situ meteorological measurements and remotely sensed radiation fluxes and precipitation retrieval retrieved from a combination of GOES, SSM/I, TOMS, and TRMM satellite measurements. Brief discussion concerning validation of (a) retrieved surface radiation fluxes and precipitation based on 30-min averaged surface measurements taken at Ji-Parana in Rondonia and Manaus in Amazonas, and (b) modeled carbon fluxes based on tower CO2 flux measurements taken at Reserva Jaru, Manaus and Fazenda Nossa Senhora. The space-time controls on carbon sequestration are partitioned into sets of factors classified by: (1) above canopy meteorology, (2) incoming surface radiation, (3) precipitation interception, and (4) indigenous stomatal processes varied over the different land covers of pristine rainforest, partially, and fully logged rainforests, and pasture lands. These are the principle meteorological, thermodynamical, hydrological, and biophysical

  15. A large-area time-of-flight system for a colliding beam machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basile, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Cifarelli, L.; D'Ali, G.; Di Cesare, P.; Giusti, P.; Massam, T.; Palmonari, F.; Sartorelli, G.; Valenti, G.; Contin, A.; Favale, L.; Zichichi, A.; Esposito, B.

    1981-02-01

    We describe the performance of a large solid-angle (2 sr) time-of-flight system used in conjunction with the Split Field Magnet spectrometer of the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR). The system consists of a hodoscope of 67 scintillator counters, at a distance of about 5 m from the beam intersection. The ISR being a coasting beam machine, contrary to the tightly bunched e +e - machines, the event time is unknown and therefore a special analysis procedure for particle identification is required. We illustrate a powerful statistical method which allows the identification, with more than 90% efficiency, of pions up to about 1 GeV/c, kaons up to about 1.4 GeV/c, and protons up to about 2 GeV/c.

  16. The sub 60 ps timing resolution using large area silicon avalanche diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauger, A.; Hirsch, A.; Porile, N.; Scharenberg, R.; Stringfellow, B. C.; Tincknell, M.; Rai, G.

    1992-10-01

    The new generation of planned experiments in high energy and nuclear physics requires high pixel density time-of-flight detection systems which mark the occurrence of an event with sub-100 ps accuracy. Conventional fast phototubes and scintillators do not easily lend themselves to large scale mechanical and electrical integration and generally prove to be very expensive. As an alternative technology, we report on the development and optimization of Silicon Avalanche Diodes (AVD's). The project is in part strongly motivated by the STAR experiment planned for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) facility at BNL. The time-of-flight component of STAR is expected to operate in a 0.5T magnetic field and is highly segmented.

  17. Simulation of Vibrational Spectra of Large Molecules by Arbitrary Time Propagation.

    PubMed

    Kubelka, Jan; Bouř, Petr

    2009-01-13

    Modern ab initio and multiscale methods enable the simulation of vibrational properties of very large molecules. Within the harmonic approximation, the traditional generation of the spectra based on the force field diagonalization can become inefficient due to the excessive demands on computer time and memory. The present study proposes to avoid completely the matrix diagonalization with a direct generation of the spectral shapes. For infrared absorption (IR) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) electric and magnetic dipole moments are propagated in a fictitious time and spectral intensities are obtained by Fourier transformation. The algorithm scales quasi-linearly, and for model polypeptide molecules the method was found numerically stable and faithfully reproduced exact transition frequencies and relative intensities.

  18. Virtual Testing of Large Composite Structures: A Multiple Length/Time-Scale Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gigliotti, Luigi; Pinho, Silvestre T.

    2015-12-01

    This paper illustrates a multiple length/time-scale framework for the virtual testing of large composite structures. Such framework hinges upon a Mesh Superposition Technique (MST) for the coupling between areas of the structure modelled at different length-scales and upon an efficient solid-to-shell numerical homogenization which exploits the internal symmetries of Unit Cells (UCs). Using this framework, it is possible to minimize the areas of the structure modelled at the lowest- (and computationally demanding) scales and the computational cost required to calculate the homogenised to be used in the higher-scales subdomains of multiscale FE models, as well as to simulate the mechanical response of different parts of the structure using different solvers, depending on where they are expected to provide the most computationally efficient solution. The relevance and key-aspects of the multiple length/time-scale framework are demonstrated through the analysis of a real-sized aeronautical composite component.

  19. Real-time target tracking simulations in large disparate sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hong; Rushing, John; Graves, Sara; Criswell, Evans; Tanner, Steve

    2007-04-01

    Real-time target tracking in large disparate sensor networks has been simulated with a parallelized search based data fusion algorithm using a simulated annealing approach. The networks are composed of large numbers of low fidelity binary and bearing-only sensors, and small numbers of high fidelity position sensors over a large region. The primitive sensors provide limited information, not sufficient to locate targets; the position sensors can report both range and direction of the targets. Target positions are determined through fusing information from all types of sensors. A score function, which takes into account the fidelity of sensors of different types, is defined and used as the evaluation function for the optimization search. The fusion algorithm is parallelized using spatial decomposition so that the fusion process can finish before the arrival of the next set of sensor data. A series of target tracking simulations are performed on a Linux cluster with communication between nodes facilitated by the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The probability of detection (POD), false alarm rate (FAR), and average deviation (AVD) are used to evaluate the network performance. The input target information used for all the simulations is a set of target track data created from a theater level air combat simulation.

  20. Asymptotics for Large Time of Global Solutions to the Generalized Kadomtsev-Petviashvili Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Nakao; Naumkin, Pavel I.; Saut, Jean-Claude

    We study the large time asymptotic behavior of solutions to the generalized Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) equations where σ= 1 or σ=- 1. When ρ= 2 and σ=- 1, (KP) is known as the KPI equation, while ρ= 2, σ=+ 1 corresponds to the KPII equation. The KP equation models the propagation along the x-axis of nonlinear dispersive long waves on the surface of a fluid, when the variation along the y-axis proceeds slowly [10]. The case ρ= 3, σ=- 1 has been found in the modeling of sound waves in antiferromagnetics [15]. We prove that if ρ>= 3 is an integer and the initial data are sufficiently small, then the solution u of (KP) satisfies the following estimates: for all t∈R, where κ= 1 if ρ= 3 and κ= 0 if ρ>= 4. We also find the large time asymptotics for the solution.

  1. On large time step TVD scheme for hyperbolic conservation laws and its efficiency evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, ZhanSen; Lee, Chun-Hian

    2012-08-01

    A large time step (LTS) TVD scheme originally proposed by Harten is modified and further developed in the present paper and applied to Euler equations in multidimensional problems. By firstly revealing the drawbacks of Harten's original LTS TVD scheme, and reasoning the occurrence of the spurious oscillations, a modified formulation of its characteristic transformation is proposed and a high resolution, strongly robust LTS TVD scheme is formulated. The modified scheme is proven to be capable of taking larger number of time steps than the original one. Following the modified strategy, the LTS TVD schemes for Yee's upwind TVD scheme and Yee-Roe-Davis's symmetric TVD scheme are constructed. The family of the LTS schemes is then extended to multidimensional by time splitting procedure, and the associated boundary condition treatment suitable for the LTS scheme is also imposed. The numerical experiments on Sod's shock tube problem, inviscid flows over NACA0012 airfoil and ONERA M6 wing are performed to validate the developed schemes. Computational efficiencies for the respective schemes under different CFL numbers are also evaluated and compared. The results reveal that the improvement is sizable as compared to the respective single time step schemes, especially for the CFL number ranging from 1.0 to 4.0.

  2. Time-dependent simulations of large-scale quantum mechanical processes

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L. A.

    2002-01-01

    Time dependent linear and nonlinear equations govern the evolution of an extensive set of physical systems and processes describing, to enumerate just a few, Bose-Einstein condensates; soliton propagation in optical and photonic band-gap fibers; quantum control of atomic and molecular collisions and reactions; highly-compressed liquids; and dense and ultracold plasmas. While the media vary substantially, the basic computational procedures have many common features. We focus on the nonlinear Schrodinger equation and discuss two powerful approaches to its propagation: the Arnoldi/Lanczos(AL)l and Real Space Product Formula(RSPF)2. Both provide efficient systematic approximations to the short-time exponential propagator that moves the solution between time steps. We implement the former in a discrete variable representation (DVR)3 both in spatial grid and finite element forms and the latter in a spatial mesh with a finite difference representation of the kinetic energy operator. Both approaches require O(N) operations to propagate the wavefunction between time steps and handle multidimensional systems. We shall also draw connections with Liouville formulations used in quantum molecular dynamics simulations of large collections of atoms and molecules. After briefly outlining these formulations, we shall discuss some of the varied applications.

  3. Mechanical properties of bulk polydimethylsiloxane for microfluidics over a large range of frequencies and aging times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placet, V.; Delobelle, P.

    2015-03-01

    The dynamic mechanical characterization of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) over a large range of frequencies (10-2 < f < 105 Hz) and long aging times at room temperature (4 h < tv < ~60 000 h) has been presented. Three samples with different curing conditions have been studied and three different techniques, dynamic mechanical analysis at different temperatures, nano-indentation and scanning micro-deformation microscopy, have been used. Although the three techniques work at different scales and at different frequencies all the results match the same master curve. As expected, the storage and the loss moduli greatly increase with the frequency. Moreover, these moduli moderately increase with the aging time tv depending on the curing temperature. A simple model which takes the frequency and the aging time into account, and which is based on the Havriliak-Negami model, has been presented and identified. Hence, values of the relaxed and instantaneous moduli at tv = 0 and tv = ∞ are proposed. Only the relaxed moduli depend on the curing conditions and moreover it has been shown that the tangent of the phase lag is independent of the aging time and thus of the curing process.

  4. Size Estimation and Time Evolution of Large Size Rare Gas Clusters by Rayleigh Scattering Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bing-Chen; Zhu, Pin-Pin; Li, Zhao-Hui; Ni, Guo-Quan; Xu, Zhi-Zhan

    2002-05-01

    Large rare gas clusters Arn, Krn and Xen were produced at room temperature in the process of supersonic adiabatic expansion. The cluster size is examined by a Rayleigh scattering experiment. Power variations of the average cluster size 0256-307X/19/5/316/art16 with the gas backing pressure P0 give size scaling as 0256-307X/19/5/316/art16 ∝P02.0, resulting in the largest cluster sizes which are estimated in the present work to be about 1.5×104, 2.6×104 and 4.0×104 atoms (the corresponding diameters of the cluster spheres are about 9, 13 and 17 nm) for Ar, Kr and Xe, respectively. A time resolving Rayleigh scattering experiment was conducted to investigate the time evolution of cluster formation and decay processes. A surprising two-plateau structure of the time evolution characteristic of cluster formation and decay processes of Kr and Xe clusters was revealed as compared with a ``normal'' single structure for the case of Ar gas. In the second plateau, the intensity of the scattered light is enhanced greatly, by even as much as 62 times, over that in the first plateau, indicating a significant increase in cluster size. This finding supports the importance of nuclei in the gas condensation process and may be helpful for further insight into the phenomenon of clustering.

  5. Deformation microstructures and timing of a large submarine landslide drilled offshore Martinique (IODP Exp. 340)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyard, H.; Le Friant, A.; Brunet, M.; Boudon, G.; Emmanuel, L.; Caron, B.; Villemant, B.; Feuillet, N.

    2015-12-01

    Flank-instabilities constitute a recurrent process in the long-term evolution of many volcanoes. A very large submarine landslide deposit (~2100 km2, ~300 km3) drilled southwest Martinique island during the IODP Exp. 340 in 2012 is likely associated with one (or more) major volcanic flank collapse of Mount Pelée during the Late Pleistocene. A recent study revealed that this D1/D2 deposit is emergent in its central part, frontally confined, and mainly comprises remobilized seafloor sediments rather than debris avalanche material from the volcanic edifice (Brunet et al., subm). Here, we investigate the sedimentary microstructures and timing of deformation from the central (Hole 1400B, ~37 km from the coastline) and distal (Hole 1399A, ~70 km from the coastline) units of the D1/D2 deposit, in order to better understand the emplacement dynamics of such potentially tsunamigenic submarine landslides. High resolution CT-Scan analyses were continuously performed on more than 300 m of sediment cores, in order to characterize and distinguish the internal architecture and the complex deformation features of the sediments at each drilling site. The establishment of the stratigraphy, based on δ18O measurements and AMS 14C dating, is still in progress and may confirm the possible link between the submarine landslide deposits and the flank collapse scars observed on the subaerial part of Martinique. These new insights into the timing and emplacement processes of this large submarine landslide will have important implications for tsunami hazards. ReferenceBrunet, M., Le Friant, A., Boudon, G., Lafuerza, S., Talling, P., Hornbach, M., Lebas, E., Guyard, H., and IODP Expedition 340 science party, submitted. Composition, geometry and emplacement dynamics of a large volcanic island landslide offshore Martinique: from volcano flank-collapse to seafloor sediment failure? Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems.

  6. Parallel computation of unsteady, three-dimensional, chemically reacting, nonequilibrium flow using a time-split finite-volume method on the Illiac IV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, W. A.

    1977-01-01

    A description is presented of the split finite-volume method which is a viable numerical procedure for performing with the aid of a modern special purpose vector computer numerical simulation studies of complicated flow fields, including chemical reactions, about geometrically complex bodies. Such numerical studies are needed for the development of atmospheric entry vehicles such as the space shuttle. The equations which are approximated are quite general and can be used in studies of combustion, pollution, and other chemically reacting flow phenomena, where convective transport effects dominate the influence of radiative, viscous, and other transport mechanisms. The shock perturbed flow about a shuttle orbiter flying at a large angle of attack during atmospheric entry is illustrated. The method uses a time splitting of the convection differencing operator to achieve efficient data management.

  7. Backward-in-time methods to simulate large-scale transport and mixing in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prants, S. V.

    2015-06-01

    In oceanography and meteorology, it is important to know not only where water or air masses are headed for, but also where they came from as well. For example, it is important to find unknown sources of oil spills in the ocean and of dangerous substance plumes in the atmosphere. It is impossible with the help of conventional ocean and atmospheric numerical circulation models to extrapolate backward from the observed plumes to find the source because those models cannot be reversed in time. We review here recently elaborated backward-in-time numerical methods to identify and study mesoscale eddies in the ocean and to compute where those waters came from to a given area. The area under study is populated with a large number of artificial tracers that are advected backward in time in a given velocity field that is supposed to be known analytically or numerically, or from satellite and radar measurements. After integrating advection equations, one gets positions of each tracer on a fixed day in the past and can identify from known destinations a particle positions at earlier times. The results provided show that the method is efficient, for example, in estimating probabilities to find increased concentrations of radionuclides and other pollutants in oceanic mesoscale eddies. The backward-in-time methods are illustrated in this paper with a few examples. Backward-in-time Lagrangian maps are applied to identify eddies in satellite-derived and numerically generated velocity fields and to document the pathways by which they exchange water with their surroundings. Backward-in-time trapping maps are used to identify mesoscale eddies in the altimetric velocity field with a risk to be contaminated by Fukushima-derived radionuclides. The results of simulations are compared with in situ mesurement of caesium concentration in sea water samples collected in a recent research vessel cruise in the area to the east of Japan. Backward-in-time latitudinal maps and the corresponding

  8. Variations of characteristic time scales in rotating stratified turbulence using a large parametric numerical study.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, D; Marino, R; Herbert, C; Pouquet, A

    2016-01-01

    We study rotating stratified turbulence (RST) making use of numerical data stemming from a large parametric study varying the Reynolds, Froude and Rossby numbers, Re, Fr and Ro in a broad range of values. The computations are performed using periodic boundary conditions on grids of 1024(3) points, with no modeling of the small scales, no forcing and with large-scale random initial conditions for the velocity field only, and there are altogether 65 runs analyzed in this paper. The buoyancy Reynolds number defined as R(B) = ReFr2 varies from negligible values to ≈ 10(5), approaching atmospheric or oceanic regimes. This preliminary analysis deals with the variation of characteristic time scales of RST with dimensionless parameters, focusing on the role played by the partition of energy between the kinetic and potential modes, as a key ingredient for modeling the dynamics of such flows. We find that neither rotation nor the ratio of the Brunt-Väisälä frequency to the inertial frequency seem to play a major role in the absence of forcing in the global dynamics of the small-scale kinetic and potential modes. Specifically, in these computations, mostly in regimes of wave turbulence, characteristic times based on the ratio of energy to dissipation of the velocity and temperature fluctuations, T(V) and T(P), vary substantially with parameters. Their ratio γ=T(V)/T(P) follows roughly a bell-shaped curve in terms of Richardson number Ri. It reaches a plateau - on which time scales become comparable, γ≈0.6 - when the turbulence has significantly strengthened, leading to numerous destabilization events together with a tendency towards an isotropization of the flow.

  9. Large field of view real-time three-dimensional imaging for ports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Meijing; Wu, Weilong; Gu, Haihua; Bi, Weihong

    2011-06-01

    With the acceleration of globalization and regionalization of the world economy, port is playing an increasingly important role for that it is an international transportation hub port interface and the support of the international trade platform. How to effectively reduce labor costs, improve the working environment, stable productivity, reduce the production cuts caused by human intervention and improve the management of real-time monitoring of all the major ports has become a common issue faced. In order to achieve the automatically stacking and reclaiming process of Stacker-Reclaimer in the bulk material yard, the source of its control is expected to identify the stockpile in the bulk yard, including length, width, height, the starting address, destination address, as well as Three-dimensional shape of the stockpile, since in the operation process, stockpile changes the shape dynamically. As a result, the real-time three-dimensional shape and coordinate of piles should be achieved. Based on the existing Stacker-Reclaimer in Qinhuangdao Port coal, we study the large field of view real-time three-dimensional laser scanning imaging theory and technology. The overall system design to achieving the three-dimensional laser scanning image is presented. The working principle of the three-dimensional laser scanning imaging system is analysised. Moreover, the parameter designation, the technical parameters and the composition of the whole system are all given. The research of the thesis is also used for other large-scale three-dimensional modeling of piles and the volume computing. In a world, the method has wide application prospect.

  10. Variations of characteristic time scales in rotating stratified turbulence using a large parametric numerical study.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, D; Marino, R; Herbert, C; Pouquet, A

    2016-01-01

    We study rotating stratified turbulence (RST) making use of numerical data stemming from a large parametric study varying the Reynolds, Froude and Rossby numbers, Re, Fr and Ro in a broad range of values. The computations are performed using periodic boundary conditions on grids of 1024(3) points, with no modeling of the small scales, no forcing and with large-scale random initial conditions for the velocity field only, and there are altogether 65 runs analyzed in this paper. The buoyancy Reynolds number defined as R(B) = ReFr2 varies from negligible values to ≈ 10(5), approaching atmospheric or oceanic regimes. This preliminary analysis deals with the variation of characteristic time scales of RST with dimensionless parameters, focusing on the role played by the partition of energy between the kinetic and potential modes, as a key ingredient for modeling the dynamics of such flows. We find that neither rotation nor the ratio of the Brunt-Väisälä frequency to the inertial frequency seem to play a major role in the absence of forcing in the global dynamics of the small-scale kinetic and potential modes. Specifically, in these computations, mostly in regimes of wave turbulence, characteristic times based on the ratio of energy to dissipation of the velocity and temperature fluctuations, T(V) and T(P), vary substantially with parameters. Their ratio γ=T(V)/T(P) follows roughly a bell-shaped curve in terms of Richardson number Ri. It reaches a plateau - on which time scales become comparable, γ≈0.6 - when the turbulence has significantly strengthened, leading to numerous destabilization events together with a tendency towards an isotropization of the flow. PMID:26830757

  11. Real-time data assimilation for large-scale systems: The spectral Kalman filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorbanidehno, Hojat; Kokkinaki, Amalia; Li, Judith Yue; Darve, Eric; Kitanidis, Peter K.

    2015-12-01

    The Kalman Filter (KF) is a data assimilation method that has been widely used for estimating spatially varying unknown states evolving in time. Recently, KF methods have shown potential for tracking CO2 plumes injected in deep geologic formations. Such real-time estimation would serve as an early warning system for leakage incidents. However, for the large number of unknowns of such large systems, KF methods are impractical, because updating the huge state covariance matrix is computationally expensive. Low rank approximation methods have been devised to overcome this problem; these methods assume a low rank of the covariance matrix, which they approximate by smaller matrices. The approximation error is small for smooth functions, but may be larger for more complex physical problems, potentially leading to filter divergence and inaccurate state estimates. We present the Spectral Kalman Filter (SpecKF), a new algorithm that utilizes the exact covariance matrix. Thus it avoids the approximation error and does so in a computationally efficient way, which is specially important for systems with large numbers of unknowns. The computational speed-up of the SpecKF is achieved by updating cross-covariance matrices instead of the larger covariance matrices. The benefit can be considerable, especially in large systems, because the computational complexity of the SpecKF scales with the number of measurements, as opposed to the effective rank of the covariance matrix in low-rank KFs or the number of ensemble members in ensemble methods. We investigate the accuracy and performance of the SpecKF for a diffusion problem with random perturbations, and for a more complex case of CO2 injection in a homogeneous two-dimensional domain. Our results show that the SpecKF reduces greatly the computational cost compared to the original KF algorithm, and that it can provide higher accuracy than the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) with the same or even smaller computational cost. Finally, we

  12. Quadratic Time-Frequency Analysis of Hydroacoustic Signals as Applied to Acoustic Emissions of Large Whales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bras, Ronan; Victor, Sucic; Damir, Malnar; Götz, Bokelmann

    2014-05-01

    In order to enrich the set of attributes in setting up a large database of whale signals, as envisioned in the Baleakanta project, we investigate methods of time-frequency analysis. The purpose of establishing the database is to increase and refine knowledge of the emitted signal and of its propagation characteristics, leading to a better understanding of the animal migrations in a non-invasive manner and to characterize acoustic propagation in oceanic media. The higher resolution for signal extraction and a better separation from other signals and noise will be used for various purposes, including improved signal detection and individual animal identification. The quadratic class of time-frequency distributions (TFDs) is the most popular set of time-frequency tools for analysis and processing of non-stationary signals. Two best known and most studied members of this class are the spectrogram and the Wigner-Ville distribution. However, to be used efficiently, i.e. to have highly concentrated signal components while significantly suppressing interference and noise simultaneously, TFDs need to be optimized first. The optimization method used in this paper is based on the Cross-Wigner-Ville distribution, and unlike similar approaches it does not require prior information on the analysed signal. The method is applied to whale signals, which, just like the majority of other real-life signals, can generally be classified as multicomponent non-stationary signals, and hence time-frequency techniques are a natural choice for their representation, analysis, and processing. We present processed data from a set containing hundreds of individual calls. The TFD optimization method results into a high resolution time-frequency representation of the signals. It allows for a simple extraction of signal components from the TFD's dominant ridges. The local peaks of those ridges can then be used for the signal components instantaneous frequency estimation, which in turn can be used as

  13. Real-time modulated nanoparticle separation with an ultra-large dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Zeming, Kerwin Kwek; Thakor, Nitish V; Zhang, Yong; Chen, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles exhibit size-dependent properties which make size-selective purification of proteins, DNA or synthetic nanoparticles essential for bio-analytics, clinical medicine, nano-plasmonics and nano-material sciences. Current purification methods of centrifugation, column chromatography and continuous-flow techniques suffer from particle aggregation, multi-stage process, complex setups and necessary nanofabrication. These increase process costs and time, reduce efficiency and limit dynamic range. Here, we achieve an unprecedented real-time nanoparticle separation (51-1500 nm) using a large-pore (2 μm) deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) device. No external force fields or nanofabrication are required. Instead, we investigated innate long-range electrostatic influences on nanoparticles within a fluid medium at different NaCl ionic concentrations. In this study we account for the electrostatic forces beyond Debye length and showed that they cannot be assumed as negligible especially for precise nanoparticle separation methods such as DLD. Our findings have enabled us to develop a model to simultaneously quantify and modulate the electrostatic force interactions between nanoparticle and micropore. By simply controlling buffer solutions, we achieve dynamic nanoparticle size separation on a single device with a rapid response time (<20 s) and an enlarged dynamic range (>1200%), outperforming standard benchtop centrifuge systems. This novel method and model combines device simplicity, isolation precision and dynamic flexibility, opening opportunities for high-throughput applications in nano-separation for industrial and biological applications. PMID:26575003

  14. Timing of occurrence of large submarine landslides on the Atlantic Ocean margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    Submarine landslides are distributed unevenly both in space and time. Spatially, they occur most commonly in fjords, active river deltas, submarine canyon-fan systems, the open continental slope and on the flanks of oceanic volcanic islands. Temporally, they are influenced by the size, location, and sedimentology of migrating depocenters, changes in seafloor pressures and temperatures, variations in seismicity and volcanic activity, and changes in groundwater flow conditions. The dominant factor influencing the timing of submarine landslide occurrence is glaciation. A review of known ages of submarine landslides along the margins of the Atlantic Ocean, augmented by a few ages from other submarine locations shows a relatively even distribution of large landslides with time from the last glacial maximum until about five thousand years after the end of glaciation. During the past 5000??yr, the frequency of occurrence is less by a factor of 1.7 to 3.5 than during or shortly after the last glacial/deglaciation period. Such an association likely exists because of the formation of thick deposits of sediment on the upper continental slope during glacial periods and increased seismicity caused by isostatic readjustment during and following deglaciation. Hydrate dissociation may play a role, as suggested previously in the literature, but the connection is unclear.

  15. Energy levels and lifetimes of Nd IV, Pm IV, Sm IV, and Eu IV

    SciTech Connect

    Dzuba, V. A.; Safronova, U. I.; Johnson, W. R.

    2003-09-01

    To address the shortage of experimental data for electron spectra of triply ionized rare-earth elements we have calculated energy levels and lifetimes of 4f{sup n+1} and 4f{sup n}5d configurations of Nd IV (n=2), Pm IV (n=3), Sm IV (n=4), and Eu IV (n=5) using Hartree-Fock and configuration-interaction methods. To control the accuracy of our calculations we also performed similar calculations for Pr III, Nd III, and Sm III, for which experimental data are available. The results are important, in particular, for physics of magnetic garnets.

  16. Detrending Algorithms in Large Time Series: Application to TFRM-PSES Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Ser, D.; Fors, O.; Núñez, J.; Voss, H.; Rosich, A.; Kouprianov, V.

    2015-07-01

    Certain instrumental effects and data reduction anomalies introduce systematic errors in photometric time series. Detrending algorithms such as the Trend Filtering Algorithm (TFA; Kovács et al. 2004) have played a key role in minimizing the effects caused by these systematics. Here we present the results obtained after applying the TFA, Savitzky & Golay (1964) detrending algorithms, and the Box Least Square phase-folding algorithm (Kovács et al. 2002) to the TFRM-PSES data (Fors et al. 2013). Tests performed on these data show that by applying these two filtering methods together the photometric RMS is on average improved by a factor of 3-4, with better efficiency towards brighter magnitudes, while applying TFA alone yields an improvement of a factor 1-2. As a result of this improvement, we are able to detect and analyze a large number of stars per TFRM-PSES field which present some kind of variability. Also, after porting these algorithms to Python and parallelizing them, we have improved, even for large data samples, the computational performance of the overall detrending+BLS algorithm by a factor of ˜10 with respect to Kovács et al. (2004).

  17. Solar large-scale flows obtained from the HMI time-distance data-analysis pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Junwei

    2016-10-01

    Using the subsurface flow maps obtained from the HMI time-distance data-analysis pipeline, I examine the temporal evolution of torsional oscillation, meridional flow, and long-living large-scale structures in high-latitude areas. During the 5.5-year analysis period, both the torsional oscillation and meridional flow show strong hemispheric asymmetry while persisting the converging-flow patterns toward the activity belts. Meanwhile, for both hemispheres in the mid-latitude zone, the meridional-flow speed shows an anti-correlation with the magnetic flux being transported toward the pole, slowing down (speeding up) when following-polarity (leading-polarity) magnetic flux is transported. In the latitudinal band studied, the meridional-flow speed and magnetic field remained relatively unchanged from 2012 through 2015 in the northern hemisphere, but varied substantially during the same period in the southern hemisphere. Long-living large-scale structures, characterized by their low zonal speed, are observed in high-latitude areas, but the nature and cause of these structures are unknown.

  18. A New Paradigm for Supergranulation Derived from Large-Distance Time-Distance Helioseismology: Pancakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, Thomas L.; Hanasoge, Shravan M.

    2012-01-01

    With large separations (10-24 deg heliocentric), it has proven possible to cleanly separate the horizontal and vertical components of supergranular flow with time-distance helioseismology. These measurements require very broad filters in the k-$\\omega$ power spectrum as apparently supergranulation scatters waves over a large area of the power spectrum. By picking locations of supergranulation as peaks in the horizontal divergence signal derived from f-mode waves, it is possible to simultaneously obtain average properties of supergranules and a high signal/noise ratio by averaging over many cells. By comparing ray-theory forward modeling with HMI measurements, an average supergranule model with a peak upflow of 240 m/s at cell center at a depth of 2.3 Mm and a peak horizontal outflow of 700 m/s at a depth of 1.6 Mm. This upflow is a factor of 20 larger than the measured photospheric upflow. These results may not be consistent with earlier measurements using much shorter separations (<5 deg heliocentric). With a 30 Mm horizontal extent and a few Mm in depth, the cells might be characterized as thick pancakes.

  19. Spatial, temporal, and hybrid decompositions for large-scale vehicle routing with time windows

    SciTech Connect

    Bent, Russell W

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the use of decomposition techniques to quickly find high-quality solutions to large-scale vehicle routing problems with time windows. It considers an adaptive decomposition scheme which iteratively decouples a routing problem based on the current solution. Earlier work considered vehicle-based decompositions that partitions the vehicles across the subproblems. The subproblems can then be optimized independently and merged easily. This paper argues that vehicle-based decompositions, although very effective on various problem classes also have limitations. In particular, they do not accommodate temporal decompositions and may produce spatial decompositions that are not focused enough. This paper then proposes customer-based decompositions which generalize vehicle-based decouplings and allows for focused spatial and temporal decompositions. Experimental results on class R2 of the extended Solomon benchmarks demonstrates the benefits of the customer-based adaptive decomposition scheme and its spatial, temporal, and hybrid instantiations. In particular, they show that customer-based decompositions bring significant benefits over large neighborhood search in contrast to vehicle-based decompositions.

  20. Geographic variation in marine invasions among large estuaries: effects of ships and time.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Gregory M; Fofonoff, Paul W; Ashton, Gail; Minton, Mark S; Miller, A Whitman

    2013-03-01

    Coastal regions exhibit strong geographic patterns of nonnative species richness. Most invasions in marine ecosystems are known from bays and estuaries, where ship-mediated transfers (on hulls or in ballasted materials) have been a dominant vector of species introductions. Conspicuous spatial differences in nonnative species richness exist among bays, but the quantitative relationship between invasion magnitude and shipping activity across sites is largely unexplored. Using data on marine invasions (for invertebrates and algae) and commercial shipping across 16 large bays in the United States, we estimated (1) geographic variation in nonnative species richness attributed to ships, controlling for effects of salinity and other vectors, (2) changes through time in geographic variation of these ship-mediated invasions, and (3) effects of commercial ship traffic and ballast water discharge magnitude on nonnative species richness. For all nonnative species together (regardless of vector, salinity, or time period), species richness differed among U.S. coasts, being significantly greater for Pacific Coast bays than Atlantic or Gulf Coast bays. This difference also existed when considering only species attributed to shipping (or ballast water), controlling for time and salinity. Variation in nonnative species richness among Pacific Coast bays was strongly affected by these same criteria. San Francisco Bay, California, had over 200 documented nonnative species, more than twice that reported for other bays, but many species were associated with other (non-shipping) vectors or the extensive low-salinity habitats (unavailable in some bays). When considering only ship- or ballast-mediated introductions in high-salinity waters, the rate of newly detected invasions in San Francisco Bay has converged increasingly through time on that for other Pacific Coast bays, appearing no different since 1982. Considering all 16 bays together, there was no relationship between either (1

  1. Linear noise approximation is valid over limited times for any chemical system that is sufficiently large.

    PubMed

    Wallace, E W J; Gillespie, D T; Sanft, K R; Petzold, L R

    2012-08-01

    The linear noise approximation (LNA) is a way of approximating the stochastic time evolution of a well-stirred chemically reacting system. It can be obtained either as the lowest order correction to the deterministic chemical reaction rate equation (RRE) in van Kampen's system-size expansion of the chemical master equation (CME), or by linearising the two-term-truncated chemical Kramers-Moyal equation. However, neither of those derivations sheds much light on the validity of the LNA. The problematic character of the system-size expansion of the CME for some chemical systems, the arbitrariness of truncating the chemical Kramers-Moyal equation at two terms, and the sometimes poor agreement of the LNA with the solution of the CME, have all raised concerns about the validity and usefulness of the LNA. Here, the authors argue that these concerns can be resolved by viewing the LNA as an approximation of the chemical Langevin equation (CLE). This view is already implicit in Gardiner's derivation of the LNA from the truncated Kramers-Moyal equation, as that equation is mathematically equivalent to the CLE. However, the CLE can be more convincingly derived in a way that does not involve either the truncated Kramers-Moyal equation or the system-size expansion. This derivation shows that the CLE will be valid, at least for a limited span of time, for any system that is sufficiently close to the thermodynamic (large-system) limit. The relatively easy derivation of the LNA from the CLE shows that the LNA shares the CLE's conditions of validity, and it also suggests that what the LNA really gives us is a description of the initial departure of the CLE from the RRE as we back away from the thermodynamic limit to a large but finite system. The authors show that this approach to the LNA simplifies its derivation, clarifies its limitations, and affords an easier path to its solution.

  2. Quasi-real-time Adaptive Optics Simulations on GPUs for the Next Generation Extremely Large Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratadour, D.

    2012-09-01

    Final design studies for the first generation of Adaptive Optics (AO) systems for the E-ELT (European Extremely Large Telescope) should begin in 2012, the first step of which will involve realistic end-to-end numerical simulations of the instruments and their environment. In this paper we present the first performance analysis of our simulation code, showing its ability to provide Shack-Hartmann (SH) images and measurements at the kHz scale for VLT-sized AO system and in quasi-real-time (up to 100 iterations per second) for ELT-sized on a single top-end GPU. The simulation code includes multiple layers atmospheric turbulence generation, ray tracing through these layers, image formation at the focal plane of every sub-aperture of a SH sensor using either natural or laser guide stars and centroiding on these images using various algorithms. Turbulence is generated on-the-fly giving the ability to simulate hours of observations without the need of loading extremely large phase screens in the global memory. Because of its performance this code additionally provides the unique ability to test real-time controllers for future AO systems under nominal conditions. This open source project is distributed under a GPL license and can be used to simulate a wide range of AO systems from classical AO on a medium size telescope to multi-conjugate AO on an ELT. Simulation parameters (number of turbulent layers, turbulence strength, number and position of targets, etc.) can be modified dynamically thanks to the modular underlying implementation using the Standard Template Library. While a simulation run is fully scriptable, a Graphical User Interface is also provided for easier fine tuning of the system parameters and easier access to sophisticated system designs.

  3. Large-scale time series microscopy of neovessel growth during angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Utzinger, Urs; Baggett, Brenda; Weiss, Jeffrey A; Hoying, James B; Edgar, Lowell T

    2015-07-01

    During angiogenesis, growing neovessels must effectively navigate through the tissue space as they elongate and subsequently integrate into a microvascular network. While time series microscopy has provided insight into the cell activities within single growing neovessel sprouts, less is known concerning neovascular dynamics within a large angiogenic tissue bed. Here, we developed a time-lapse imaging technique that allowed visualization and quantification of sprouting neovessels as they form and grow away from adult parent microvessels in three dimensions over cubic millimeters of matrix volume during the course of up to 5 days on the microscope. Using a new image acquisition procedure and novel morphometric analysis tools, we quantified the elongation dynamics of growing neovessels and found an episodic growth pattern accompanied by fluctuations in neovessel diameter. Average elongation rate was 5 μm/h for individual vessels, but we also observed considerable dynamic variability in growth character including retraction and complete regression of entire neovessels. We observed neovessel-to-neovessel directed growth over tens to hundreds of microns preceding tip-to-tip inosculation. As we have previously described via static 3D imaging at discrete time points, we identified different collagen fibril structures associated with the growing neovessel tip and stalk, and observed the coordinated alignment of growing neovessels in a deforming matrix. Overall analysis of the entire image volumes demonstrated that although individual neovessels exhibited episodic growth and regression, there was a monotonic increase in parameters associated with the entire vascular bed such as total network length and number of branch points. This new time-lapse imaging approach corroborated morphometric changes in individual neovessels described by us and others, as well as captured dynamic neovessel behaviors unique to days-long angiogenesis within the forming neovascular network. PMID

  4. The biotic effects of large bolide impacts: size versus time and place

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walkden, Gordon; Parker, Julian

    2008-10-01

    In estimating the biotic effects of large terrestrial impacts we are reliant upon apparent crater diameter as a proxy for impact magnitude. This underlies the ‘kill-curve’ approach which graphs crater diameter directly against likely percentage losses of taxa. However, crater diameter is a complex product of syn- and post-impact processes that can be site-dependent. Furthermore, location (global positioning) and timing (moment in geological history) also strongly influence biotic effects. We examine four of our largest and best-documented Phanerozoic impacts to explore this more holistic size time place relationship. Only the c. 180 km end-Cretaceous Chicxulub crater (Mexico) links to any substantial immediate extinction and some of the worst effects stem from where it struck the planet (a continental margin carbonate platform site) and when (a time of high regional and global biodiversity). Both the c. 100 km late Triassic Manicouagan crater in NE Canada (arid continental interior, low regional and world biodiversity) and the c. 35 Ma 100 km Popigai crater, Siberia (continental arctic desert) provide much less damaging scenarios. However the c. 90 km Chesapeake Bay crater, Eastern USA (also c. 35 Ma) marks a far more sensitive (Chicxulub-like) site but it also proved relatively benign. Here the rheologically varied shallow marine target site produced an anomalously broad crater, and the scale of the impact has evidently been overestimated. We offer a new approach to the graphical prediction of biotic risk in which both crater diameter and a generalised time/place factor we term ‘vulnerability’ are variables.

  5. Large Area Flat Panel Imaging Detectors for Astronomy and Night Time Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, O.; McPhate, J.; Frisch, H.; Elam, J.; Mane, A.; Wagner, R.; Varner, G.

    2013-09-01

    Sealed tube photo-sensing detectors for optical/IR detection have applications in astronomy, nighttime remote reconnaissance, and airborne/space situational awareness. The potential development of large area photon counting, imaging, timing detectors has significance for these applications and a number of other areas (High energy particle detection (RICH), biological single-molecule fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, neutron imaging, time of flight mass spectroscopy, diffraction imaging). We will present details of progress towards the development of a 20 cm sealed tube optical detector with nanoengineered microchannel plates for photon counting, imaging and sub-ns event time stamping. In the operational scheme of the photodetector incoming light passes through an entrance window and interacts with a semitransparent photocathode on the inside of the window. The photoelectrons emitted are accelerated across a proximity gap and are detected by an MCP pair. The pair of novel borosilicate substrate MCPs are functionalized by atomic layer deposition (ALD), and amplify the signal and the resulting electron cloud is detected by a conductive strip line anode for determination of the event positions and the time of arrival. The physical package is ~ 25 x 25 cm but only 1.5 cm thick. Development of such a device in a square 20 cm format presents challenges: hermetic sealing to a large entrance window, a 20 cm semitransparent photocathode with good efficiency and uniformity, 20 cm MCPs with reasonable cost and performance, robust construction to preserve high vacuum and withstand an atmosphere pressure differential. We will discuss the schemes developed to address these issues and present the results for the first test devices. The novel microchannel plates employing borosilicate micro-capillary arrays provide many performance characteristics typical of conventional MCPs, but have been made in sizes up to 20 cm, have low intrinsic background (0.08 events cm2 s-1) and

  6. Phase IV of Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Suvarna, Viraj

    2010-04-01

    Not all Phase IV studies are post-marketing surveillance (PMS) studies but every PMS study is a phase IV study. Phase IV is also an important phase of drug development. In particular, the real world effectiveness of a drug as evaluated in an observational, non-interventional trial in a naturalistic setting which complements the efficacy data that emanates from a pre-marketing randomized controlled trial (RCT). No matter how many patients are studied pre-marketing in a controlled environment, the true safety profile of a drug is characterized only by continuing safety surveillance through a spontaneous adverse event monitoring system and a post-marketing surveillance/non-interventional study. Prevalent practice patterns can generate leads that could result in further evaluation of a new indication via the RCT route or even a signal that may necessitate regulatory action (change in labeling, risk management/minimization action plan). Disease registries are another option as are the large simple hybrid trials. Surveillance of spontaneously reported adverse events continues as long as a product is marketed. And so Phase IV in that sense never ends.

  7. Real-World-Time Simulation of Memory Consolidation in a Large-Scale Cerebellar Model

    PubMed Central

    Gosui, Masato; Yamazaki, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    We report development of a large-scale spiking network model of the cerebellum composed of more than 1 million neurons. The model is implemented on graphics processing units (GPUs), which are dedicated hardware for parallel computing. Using 4 GPUs simultaneously, we achieve realtime simulation, in which computer simulation of cerebellar activity for 1 s completes within 1 s in the real-world time, with temporal resolution of 1 ms. This allows us to carry out a very long-term computer simulation of cerebellar activity in a practical time with millisecond temporal resolution. Using the model, we carry out computer simulation of long-term gain adaptation of optokinetic response (OKR) eye movements for 5 days aimed to study the neural mechanisms of posttraining memory consolidation. The simulation results are consistent with animal experiments and our theory of posttraining memory consolidation. These results suggest that realtime computing provides a useful means to study a very slow neural process such as memory consolidation in the brain. PMID:26973472

  8. Real-World-Time Simulation of Memory Consolidation in a Large-Scale Cerebellar Model.

    PubMed

    Gosui, Masato; Yamazaki, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    We report development of a large-scale spiking network model of the cerebellum composed of more than 1 million neurons. The model is implemented on graphics processing units (GPUs), which are dedicated hardware for parallel computing. Using 4 GPUs simultaneously, we achieve realtime simulation, in which computer simulation of cerebellar activity for 1 s completes within 1 s in the real-world time, with temporal resolution of 1 ms. This allows us to carry out a very long-term computer simulation of cerebellar activity in a practical time with millisecond temporal resolution. Using the model, we carry out computer simulation of long-term gain adaptation of optokinetic response (OKR) eye movements for 5 days aimed to study the neural mechanisms of posttraining memory consolidation. The simulation results are consistent with animal experiments and our theory of posttraining memory consolidation. These results suggest that realtime computing provides a useful means to study a very slow neural process such as memory consolidation in the brain.

  9. Real-Time Control of a System of Large Hydropower Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, Dennis; Velasco, Horacio L.

    1990-04-01

    This paper describes a real-time optimal control approach for operating a system of large hydropower reservoirs. The operating objective is to track specified power output targets, subject to a variety of physical constraints. The constraints describe the hydrologie behavior of the tributary watershed and the dynamics of the reservoir system. The decision variables are monthly average releases from each of the system reservoirs. These releases are derived in real time, as functions of available measurements of reservoir storage and tributary inflow. Inflow and measurement uncertainty are explicitly included in the state and measurement equations. The stochastic operations problem is first formulated in general terms and then simplified to allow the use of classical linear-quadratic stochastic control concepts. The solution to the simplified control problem is implemented by combining a linear deterministic control law with a linear estimation algorithm. The resulting stochastic controller is applied to a two-reservoir system in the Caroni River basin of Venezuela. Preliminary tests indicate that the controller performs well in this application, even when some of its underlying assumptions are violated.

  10. Real-time control of a system of large hydropower reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, D.; Velasco, H.L. )

    1990-04-01

    This paper describes a real-time optimal control approach for operating a system of large hydropower reservoirs. The operating objective is to track specified power output targets, subject to a variety of physical constraints. The constraints describe the hydrologic behavior of the tributary watershed and the dynamics of the reservoir system. The decision variables are monthly average releases from each of the system reservoirs. These releases are derived in real time, as functions of available measurements of reservoir storage and tributary inflow. Inflow and measurement uncertainty are explicitly included in the state and measurement equations. The stochastic operations problem is first formulated in general terms and then simplified to allow the use of classical linear-quadratic stochastic control concepts. The solution to the simplified control problem is implemented by combining a linear deterministic control law with a linear estimation algorithm. The resulting stochastic controller is applied to a two-reservoir system in the Caroni River basin of Venezuela. Preliminary tests indicate that the controller performs well in this application, even when some of its underlying assumptions are violated.

  11. Real-World-Time Simulation of Memory Consolidation in a Large-Scale Cerebellar Model.

    PubMed

    Gosui, Masato; Yamazaki, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    We report development of a large-scale spiking network model of the cerebellum composed of more than 1 million neurons. The model is implemented on graphics processing units (GPUs), which are dedicated hardware for parallel computing. Using 4 GPUs simultaneously, we achieve realtime simulation, in which computer simulation of cerebellar activity for 1 s completes within 1 s in the real-world time, with temporal resolution of 1 ms. This allows us to carry out a very long-term computer simulation of cerebellar activity in a practical time with millisecond temporal resolution. Using the model, we carry out computer simulation of long-term gain adaptation of optokinetic response (OKR) eye movements for 5 days aimed to study the neural mechanisms of posttraining memory consolidation. The simulation results are consistent with animal experiments and our theory of posttraining memory consolidation. These results suggest that realtime computing provides a useful means to study a very slow neural process such as memory consolidation in the brain. PMID:26973472

  12. Global Static Indexing for Real-Time Exploration of Very Large Regular Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Pascucci, V; Frank, R

    2001-07-23

    In this paper we introduce a new indexing scheme for progressive traversal and visualization of large regular grids. We demonstrate the potential of our approach by providing a tool that displays at interactive rates planar slices of scalar field data with very modest computing resources. We obtain unprecedented results both in terms of absolute performance and, more importantly, in terms of scalability. On a laptop computer we provide real time interaction with a 2048{sup 3} grid (8 Giga-nodes) using only 20MB of memory. On an SGI Onyx we slice interactively an 8192{sup 3} grid (1/2 tera-nodes) using only 60MB of memory. The scheme relies simply on the determination of an appropriate reordering of the rectilinear grid data and a progressive construction of the output slice. The reordering minimizes the amount of I/O performed during the out-of-core computation. The progressive and asynchronous computation of the output provides flexible quality/speed tradeoffs and a time-critical and interruptible user interface.

  13. Determinants and Time Trends for Ischaemic and Haemorrhagic Stroke in a Large Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yutao; Wang, Hao; Tao, Tao; Tian, Yingchun; Wang, Yutang; Chen, Yundai; Lip, Gregory Y. H.

    2016-01-01

    Background The clinical epidemiology of stroke has been widely investigated in Caucasian populations, but the changes over time in the proportion of ischaemic to haemorrhagic strokes is less clear, especially in the Chinese population. Aims Our objective was to study the determinants and time trends for ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke, in relation to age, in a large Chinese population cohort. Methods Using a medical insurance database in the southwest of China from 2001 to 2012, time trends in age-adjusted ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke incidence and the contributing risk factors associated with age were investigated. Results Among 425,901 individuals without prior stroke (52.4% male, median age 54), the rate of ischaemic stroke (per 1000 patient-years) decreased between 2002–2007, then remained broadly similar between 2008–2012. The rate of haemorrhagic stroke showed a similar trend, being approximately 1.3–1.9 from 2008–2012. Compared to patients age<65, ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke incidences (rate, 95% confidential interval, CI) were higher in the elderly population (age <65 versus age ≥65: ischaemic: 3.64, 3.33–4.00, vs 14.33, 14.01–14.60; haemorrhagic: 1.09, 1.00–1.10 vs 2.52,2.40–2.70, respectively, both p<0.001). There were no significant differences in haemorrhagic stroke rates between the elderly and the very elderly population. Ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke shared similar risk factors (age, hypertension, coronary artery disease (CAD), vascular disease, and diabetes mellitus) (all p<0.05). In subjects age<75 years, CAD (7.17, 4.14–12.37) and diabetes mellitus (3.27, 2.42–4.42) contributed most to the developing of haemorrhagic stroke (all p<0.001). Amongst the very elderly, vascular disease (2.24, 1.49–3.37) was an additional major risk factor for haemorrhagic stroke, together with CAD and diabetes mellitus (all p<0.001). Conclusion In this large Chinese cohort, there was an increased risk of ischaemic stroke compared

  14. Supermassive Black Holes with High Accretion Rates in Active Galactic Nuclei. IV. Hβ Time Lags and Implications for Super-Eddington Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Pu; Hu, Chen; Lu, Kai-Xing; Huang, Ying-Ke; Cheng, Cheng; Qiu, Jie; Li, Yan-Rong; Zhang, Yang-Wei; Fan, Xu-Liang; Bai, Jin-Ming; Bian, Wei-Hao; Yuan, Ye-Fei; Kaspi, Shai; Ho, Luis C.; Netzer, Hagai; Wang, Jian-Min; SEAMBH Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    We have completed two years of photometric and spectroscopic monitoring of a large number of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with very high accretion rates. In this paper, we report on the result of the second phase of the campaign, during 2013-2014, and the measurements of five new Hβ time lags out of eight monitored AGNs. All five objects were identified as super-Eddington accreting massive black holes (SEAMBHs). The highest measured accretion rates for the objects in this campaign are \\mathscr{\\dot{M}} {\\mkern 1mu} ≳ 200, where \\mathscr{\\dot{M}} {\\mkern 1mu} ={{\\dot{M}}\\bullet }/{{L}Edd}{{c}-2}, {{\\dot{M}}\\bullet } is the mass accretion rates, {{L}Edd} is the Eddington luminosity and c is the speed of light. We find that the Hβ time lags in SEAMBHs are significantly shorter than those measured in sub-Eddington AGNs, and the deviations increase with increasing accretion rates. Thus, the relationship between broad-line region size ({{R}_{Hβ }}) and optical luminosity at 5100 Å, {{R}_{Hβ }}-{{L}5100}, requires accretion rate as an additional parameter. We propose that much of the effect may be due to the strong anisotropy of the emitted slim-disk radiation. Scaling {{R}_{Hβ }} by the gravitational radius of the black hole (BH), we define a new radius-mass parameter (Y) and show that it saturates at a critical accretion rate of \\mathscr{\\dot{M}} {\\mkern 1mu} {{}c}=6˜ 30, indicating a transition from thin to slim accretion disk and a saturated luminosity of the slim disks. The parameter Y is a very useful probe for understanding the various types of accretion onto massive BHs. We briefly comment on implications to the general population of super-Eddington AGNs in the universe and applications to cosmology.

  15. Determination of paleoseismic activity over a large time-scale: Fault scarp dating with 36Cl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozafari Amiri, Nasim; Tikhomirov, Dmitry; Sümer, Ökmen; Özkaymak, Çaǧlar; Uzel, Bora; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Vockenhuber, Christof; Sözbilir, Hasan; Akçar, Naki

    2016-04-01

    Bedrock fault scarps are the most direct evidence of past earthquakes to reconstruct seismic activity in a large time-scale using cosmogenic 36Cl dating if built in carbonates. For this method, a surface along the fault scarp with a minimum amount of erosion is required to be chosen as an ideal target point. The section of the fault selected for sampling should cover at least two meters of the fault surface from the lower part of the scarp, where intersects with colluvium wedge. Ideally, sampling should be performed on a continuous strip along the direction of the fault slip direction. First, samples of 10 cm high and 15 cm wide are marked on the fault surface. Then, they are collected using cutters, hammer and chisel in a thickness of 3 cm. The main geometrical factors of scarp dip, scarp height, top surface dip and colluvium dip are also measured. Topographic shielding in the sampling spot is important to be estimated as well. Moreover, density of the fault scarp and colluvium are calculated. The physical and chemical preparations are carried in laboratory for AMS and chemical analysis of the samples. A Matlab® code is used for modelling of seismically active periods based on increasing production rate of 36Cl following each rupture, when a buried section of a fault is exposed. Therefore, by measuring the amount of cosmogenic 36Cl versus height, the timing of major ruptures and their offsets are determined. In our study, Manastır, Mugırtepe and Rahmiye faults in Gediz graben, Priene-Sazlı, Kalafat and Yavansu faults in Büyük Menderes graben and Ören fault in Gökava half-graben have been examined in the seismically active region of Western Turkey. Our results reconstruct at least five periods of high seismic activity during the Holocene time, three of which reveal seismic ruptures beyond the historical pre-existing data.

  16. Using PLATO IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meller, David V.

    This beginning reference manual describes PLATO IV hardware for prospective users and provides an introduction to PLATO for new authors. The PLATO terminal is described in detail in Chapter 1. Chapter 2 provides a block diagram of the PLATO IV system. Procedures for getting on line are described in Chapter 3, and Chapter 4 provides references to…

  17. Likelihood of Null Effects of Large NHLBI Clinical Trials Has Increased over Time

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Robert M.; Irvin, Veronica L.

    2015-01-01

    Background We explore whether the number of null results in large National Heart Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) funded trials has increased over time. Methods We identified all large NHLBI supported RCTs between 1970 and 2012 evaluating drugs or dietary supplements for the treatment or prevention of cardiovascular disease. Trials were included if direct costs >$500,000/year, participants were adult humans, and the primary outcome was cardiovascular risk, disease or death. The 55 trials meeting these criteria were coded for whether they were published prior to or after the year 2000, whether they registered in clinicaltrials.gov prior to publication, used active or placebo comparator, and whether or not the trial had industry co-sponsorship. We tabulated whether the study reported a positive, negative, or null result on the primary outcome variable and for total mortality. Results 17 of 30 studies (57%) published prior to 2000 showed a significant benefit of intervention on the primary outcome in comparison to only 2 among the 25 (8%) trials published after 2000 (χ2=12.2,df= 1, p=0.0005). There has been no change in the proportion of trials that compared treatment to placebo versus active comparator. Industry co-sponsorship was unrelated to the probability of reporting a significant benefit. Pre-registration in clinical trials.gov was strongly associated with the trend toward null findings. Conclusions The number NHLBI trials reporting positive results declined after the year 2000. Prospective declaration of outcomes in RCTs, and the adoption of transparent reporting standards, as required by clinicaltrials.gov, may have contributed to the trend toward null findings. PMID:26244868

  18. Large-deviation joint statistics of the finite-time Lyapunov spectrum in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Perry L.; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-08-01

    One of the hallmarks of turbulent flows is the chaotic behavior of fluid particle paths with exponentially growing separation among them while their distance does not exceed the viscous range. The maximal (positive) Lyapunov exponent represents the average strength of the exponential growth rate, while fluctuations in the rate of growth are characterized by the finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLEs). In the last decade or so, the notion of Lagrangian coherent structures (which are often computed using FTLEs) has gained attention as a tool for visualizing coherent trajectory patterns in a flow and distinguishing regions of the flow with different mixing properties. A quantitative statistical characterization of FTLEs can be accomplished using the statistical theory of large deviations, based on the so-called Cramér function. To obtain the Cramér function from data, we use both the method based on measuring moments and measuring histograms and introduce a finite-size correction to the histogram-based method. We generalize the existing univariate formalism to the joint distributions of the two FTLEs needed to fully specify the Lyapunov spectrum in 3D flows. The joint Cramér function of turbulence is measured from two direct numerical simulation datasets of isotropic turbulence. Results are compared with joint statistics of FTLEs computed using only the symmetric part of the velocity gradient tensor, as well as with joint statistics of instantaneous strain-rate eigenvalues. When using only the strain contribution of the velocity gradient, the maximal FTLE nearly doubles in magnitude, highlighting the role of rotation in de-correlating the fluid deformations along particle paths. We also extend the large-deviation theory to study the statistics of the ratio of FTLEs. The most likely ratio of the FTLEs λ1 : λ2 : λ3 is shown to be about 4:1:-5, compared to about 8:3:-11 when using only the strain-rate tensor for calculating fluid volume deformations. The results

  19. Large-deviation joint statistics of the finite-time Lyapunov spectrum in isotropic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Perry L. Meneveau, Charles

    2015-08-15

    One of the hallmarks of turbulent flows is the chaotic behavior of fluid particle paths with exponentially growing separation among them while their distance does not exceed the viscous range. The maximal (positive) Lyapunov exponent represents the average strength of the exponential growth rate, while fluctuations in the rate of growth are characterized by the finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLEs). In the last decade or so, the notion of Lagrangian coherent structures (which are often computed using FTLEs) has gained attention as a tool for visualizing coherent trajectory patterns in a flow and distinguishing regions of the flow with different mixing properties. A quantitative statistical characterization of FTLEs can be accomplished using the statistical theory of large deviations, based on the so-called Cramér function. To obtain the Cramér function from data, we use both the method based on measuring moments and measuring histograms and introduce a finite-size correction to the histogram-based method. We generalize the existing univariate formalism to the joint distributions of the two FTLEs needed to fully specify the Lyapunov spectrum in 3D flows. The joint Cramér function of turbulence is measured from two direct numerical simulation datasets of isotropic turbulence. Results are compared with joint statistics of FTLEs computed using only the symmetric part of the velocity gradient tensor, as well as with joint statistics of instantaneous strain-rate eigenvalues. When using only the strain contribution of the velocity gradient, the maximal FTLE nearly doubles in magnitude, highlighting the role of rotation in de-correlating the fluid deformations along particle paths. We also extend the large-deviation theory to study the statistics of the ratio of FTLEs. The most likely ratio of the FTLEs λ{sub 1} : λ{sub 2} : λ{sub 3} is shown to be about 4:1:−5, compared to about 8:3:−11 when using only the strain-rate tensor for calculating fluid volume

  20. Multifrequency time-harmonic elastography for the measurement of liver viscoelasticity in large tissue windows.

    PubMed

    Tzschätzsch, Heiko; Ipek-Ugay, Selcan; Trong, Manh Nguyen; Guo, Jing; Eggers, Jonathan; Gentz, Enno; Fischer, Thomas; Schultz, Michael; Braun, Jürgen; Sack, Ingolf

    2015-03-01

    Elastography of the liver for the non-invasive diagnosis of hepatic fibrosis is an established method. However, investigations of obese patients or patients with ascites are often limited by small and superficial elastographic windows. Therefore, multifrequency time-harmonic elastography (THE) based on time-resolved A-line ultrasound has recently been developed for measuring liver viscoelasticity in wide soft tissue windows and at greater depths. In this study, THE was integrated into a clinical B-mode scanner connected to a dedicated actuator bed driven by superimposed vibrations of 30- to 60-Hz frequencies. The resulting shear waves in the liver were captured along multiple profiles 7 to 14 cm in width and automatically processed for reconstruction of mean efficient shear wave speed and shear wave dispersion slope. This new modality was tested in healthy volunteers and 22 patients with clinically proven cirrhosis. Patients could be separated from controls by higher shear wave speeds (3.11 ± 0.64 m/s, 2.14-4.81 m/s, vs. 1.74 ± 0.10 m/s, 1.60-1.91 m/s) without significant degradation of data by high body mass index or ascites. Furthermore, the wave speed dispersion slope was significantly (p = 0.0025) lower in controls (5.2 ± 1.8 m/s/kHz) than in patients (39.1 ± 32.2 m/s/kHz). In conclusion, THE is useful for the diagnosis of cirrhosis in large tissue windows.

  1. Haemoglobin decreases in NSAID users over time: an analysis of two large outcome trials

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, J L; Chan, F K L; Lanas, A; Wilcox, C M; Peura, D; Sands, G H; Berger, M F; Nguyen, H; Scheiman, J M

    2011-01-01

    Background Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been associated with clinically significant decreases in haemoglobin dependent and independent of acute bleeding events. Aim To evaluate the incidence and time to a clinically meaningful decrease in haemoglobin in two double-blind, prospective randomised clinical trials comparing NSAIDs in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods In CLASS, patients with OA/RA who were aged ≥18 years and required continuous NSAID treatment were included; patients who were Helicobacter pylori positive and/or using aspirin were not excluded. In contrast, in the CONDOR trial, comparing celecoxib alone to diclofenac sustained release (plus omeprazole), patients were aged ≥60 years or ≥18 years with a history of gastroduodenal ulcer and were H. pylori negative; aspirin or other anti-platelet users were excluded. To make a parallel post hoc analysis we limited our study to 6 months and the populations to only the non-aspirin users in CLASS and those patients receiving either celecoxib or diclofenac. A decrease in haemoglobin of ≥2 g/dL defined the primary end point. Results At 6 months, in the CLASS and CONDOR trials, 1.9% and 2.0% of patients treated with celecoxib and 3.3% and 5.7% of patients treated with diclofenac developed a ≥2 g/dL decrease in haemoglobin, respectively, [CLASS: odds ratio (OR) 1.80 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.22–2.65) and CONDOR: OR 2.93 (95% CI, 2.06–4.15), respectively]. Conclusion In these two large, independent trials, clinically-meaningful decreases in haemoglobin ≥2 g/dL occurred in a relatively similar fashion over time despite differences in trial designs. PMID:21810115

  2. Precipitation-snowmelt timing and snowmelt augmentation of large peak flow events, western Cascades, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, Keith; Jones, Julia A.

    2015-09-01

    This study tested multiple hydrologic mechanisms to explain snowpack dynamics in extreme rain-on-snow floods, which occur widely in the temperate and polar regions. We examined 26, 10 day large storm events over the period 1992-2012 in the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest in western Oregon, using statistical analyses (regression, ANOVA, and wavelet coherence) of hourly snowmelt lysimeter, air and dewpoint temperature, wind speed, precipitation, and discharge data. All events involved snowpack outflow, but only seven events had continuous net snowpack outflow, including three of the five top-ranked peak discharge events. Peak discharge was not related to precipitation rate, but it was related to the 10 day sum of precipitation and net snowpack outflow, indicating an increased flood response to continuously melting snowpacks. The two largest peak discharge events in the study had significant wavelet coherence at multiple time scales over several days; a distribution of phase differences between precipitation and net snowpack outflow at the 12-32 h time scale with a sharp peak at π/2 radians; and strongly correlated snowpack outflow among lysimeters representing 42% of basin area. The recipe for an extreme rain-on-snow event includes persistent, slow melt within the snowpack, which appears to produce a near-saturated zone within the snowpack throughout the landscape, such that the snowpack may transmit pressure waves of precipitation directly to streams, and this process is synchronized across the landscape. Further work is needed to understand the internal dynamics of a melting snowpack throughout a snow-covered landscape and its contribution to extreme rain-on-snow floods.

  3. Distribution and residence times of large woody debris along South River, Shenandoah Valley, Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, J.; Pizzuto, J.

    2006-12-01

    Numerous studies on large woody debris (LWD) have focused on forested mountain streams located in the Pacific Northwest. Wood in these streams typically form log jams that have a profound impact on stream morphology, promoting channel stability and forcing pools. However, studies are sparse on larger rivers where LWD occurs primarily as individual pieces. Even less is known about the residence times of LWD in these settings. This study focuses on the use of dendrochronology to determine the rates of LWD recruitment and LWD residence times. Located in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia, the South River is a fourth order stream with a drainage area of over 600 km2 at its confluence with the South Fork Shenandoah River. The riparian zone is dominated by agriculture. Agricultural land use creates a distribution of LWD unlike that of forested streams, consisting primarily of isolated pieces and small jams versus larger jams. Four species of trees are dominant at South River: sycamore (Platanus occidentalis), silver maple (Acer saccharinum), boxelder (Acer negundo) and black walnut (Juglans nigra). Average diameters of LWD are 32 cm with lengths averaging 6-7 m. At the South River, LWD has no influence on channel morphology, but wood traps fine-grained sediment (storing 16% of the river's annual load) and associated contaminants making it the most significant mechanism for storing clay and silt within the channel perimeter. Sixty to seventy-five percent of LWD occurs in pools, while 10-20% occurs in riffles. Most of the wood falls from adjacent banks by both natural processes and agricultural practices. Preliminary dating results indicate that LWD reside in the channel a minimum of 15 years.

  4. Storm-time Large-Scale Birkeland Currents: Salient Dynamics in Grand Challenge Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korth, H.; Anderson, B. J.; Waters, C. L.; Barnes, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) provides continuous global observations of Birkeland currents on a 10 minute cadence. During geomagnetic storms, currents intensify to over 15 MA, are dynamic both in intensity and distribution, and exhibit features not discernible in statistical analyses. For all of the subject grand challenge storms, AMPERE data reveal a number of novel phenomena illustrating the profound dynamics of the storm-time system. Storm-time onsets associated with shock arrivals are often very prompt and lead to dramatic surges in total current from 1 MA to over 5 MA in less than 20 minutes. The current surges occur predominantly on the dayside at high latitudes prior to any ring current or auroral expansions, indicating that neutral density upwelling is often driven independently of ring current or auroral zone intensifications. Rapid reconfigurations of the currents with IMF BY reversals within the sheath structures of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are also common. This implies that convection of ionospheric density patches over the polar cap may be quite complex, particularly during the early phase of geomagnetic storms related to the CME sheath passage. The 3 September 2012 storm exhibited intense driving with classic quasi-stable Region 1 and 2 currents spanning 55 to 70 degrees magnetic latitude for over 10 hours at the beginning of the day, corresponding to stable southward IMF prior to shock arrival at noon on that day. The shock arrival and IMF southward intensification led to further expansion of the currents below 50 degrees magnetic latitude and to episodic surges in currents on the nightside, which is unique to storms. The resulting current structure showed multiple large-scale alternations in downward-upward-downward-upward direction that often occurs during intense, sustained driving during strong storms.

  5. Large modal survey testing using the Ibrahim time domain /ITD/ identification technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, S. R.; Pappa, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    The ability of the ITD identification algorithm in identifying a complete set of structural modal parameters using a large number of free-response time histories simultaneously in one analysis, assuming a math model with a high number of degrees-of-freedom, has been studied. Identification results using simulated free responses of a uniform rectangular plate, with 225 measurement stations, and experimental responses from a ground vibration test of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Space Shuttle payload, with 142 measurement stations, are presented. As many as 300 degrees-of-freedom were allowed in analyzing these data. In general, the use of a significantly oversized math model in the identification process was found to maintain or increase identification accuracy and to identify modes of low response level that are not identified with smaller math model sizes. The concept of a Mode Shape Correlation Constant is introduced for use when more than one identification analysis of the same structure are conducted. This constant quantifies the degree of correlation between any two sets of complex mode shapes identified using different excitation conditions, different user-selectable algorithm constants, or overlapping sets of measurements.

  6. A timing constraint on the (total) mass of the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peñarrubia, Jorge; Gómez, Facundo A.; Besla, Gurtina; Erkal, Denis; Ma, Yin-Zhe

    2016-02-01

    This paper explores the effect of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) on the mass estimates obtained from the timing argument. We show that accounting for the presence of the LMC systematically lowers the Local Group mass (MLG) derived from the relative motion of the Milky Way-Andromeda pair. Motivated by this result, we apply a Bayesian technique devised by Peñarrubia et al. to simultaneously fit (i) distances and velocities of galaxies within 3 Mpc and (ii) the relative motion between the Milky Way and Andromeda derived from HST observations, with the LMC mass (MLMC) as a free parameter. Our analysis returns a Local Group mass M_LG=2.64^{+0.42}_{-0.38}× 10^{12} M_{⊙} at a 68 per cent confidence level. The masses of the Milky Way, M_MW=1.04_{-0.23}^{+0.26}× 10^{12} M_{⊙}, and Andromeda, M_{M31}=1.33_{-0.33}^{+0.39}× 10^{12} M_{⊙}, are consistent with previous estimates that neglect the impact of the LMC on the observed Hubble flow. We find a (total) LMC mass M_LMC=0.25_{-0.08}^{+0.09}× 10^{12} M_{⊙}, which is indicative of an extended dark matter halo and supports the scenario where this galaxy is just past its first pericentric approach. Consequently, these results suggest that the LMC may induce significant perturbations on the Galactic potential.

  7. Time sequence of energetic particle spectra in quasiparallel shocks in large simulation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, Tooru

    2011-02-15

    We have performed collisionless shock simulations using a one-dimensional hybrid particle-in-cell method to investigate the energy spectra of the differential intensity around the quasiparallel shocks. The system size is sufficiently large (200 000 ion inertia length) in order to eliminate the unphysical effect caused by the upstream boundary. The obtained spectrum of the differential intensity have the shape of the power-law with exponentially falling off in higher energy as predicted in previous simulations, however, the power-law indices and e-folding energy do not depend on the shock parameters, the shock Mach number M{sub A} (7.1-11.7) and the shock angle {theta}{sub BN} (10 deg. - 40 deg.). The power-law index is {approx}1.0. This number is close to the prediction by the standard diffusive shock acceleration theory. However, the reason for the agreements between the values is not clear because an additional acceleration process is also observed in the present runs; this process was reported in [Sugiyama and Terasawa, Adv. Space Res. 24, 73 (1999)] and [Sugiyama et al., J. Geophys. Res. 106, 21657 (2001)]. The e-folding energy linearly increases in time for all runs. One of the reasons for these independent profiles on shock parameters is that the pitch angle distribution in the upstream region shows similar profiles in each run.

  8. "Tools For Analysis and Visualization of Large Time- Varying CFD Data Sets"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelms, Jane; vanGelder, Allen

    1999-01-01

    During the four years of this grant (including the one year extension), we have explored many aspects of the visualization of large CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) datasets. These have included new direct volume rendering approaches, hierarchical methods, volume decimation, error metrics, parallelization, hardware texture mapping, and methods for analyzing and comparing images. First, we implemented an extremely general direct volume rendering approach that can be used to render rectilinear, curvilinear, or tetrahedral grids, including overlapping multiple zone grids, and time-varying grids. Next, we developed techniques for associating the sample data with a k-d tree, a simple hierarchial data model to approximate samples in the regions covered by each node of the tree, and an error metric for the accuracy of the model. We also explored a new method for determining the accuracy of approximate models based on the light field method described at ACM SIGGRAPH (Association for Computing Machinery Special Interest Group on Computer Graphics) '96. In our initial implementation, we automatically image the volume from 32 approximately evenly distributed positions on the surface of an enclosing tessellated sphere. We then calculate differences between these images under different conditions of volume approximation or decimation.

  9. Identification of genetic variants associated with maize flowering time using an extremely large multi-genetic background population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flowering time is one of the major adaptive traits in domestication of maize and an important selection criterion in breeding. To detect more maize flowering time variants we evaluated flowering time traits using an extremely large multi- genetic background population that contained more than 8000 l...

  10. On the problem of earthquake correlation in space and time over large distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgoulas, G.; Konstantaras, A.; Maravelakis, E.; Katsifarakis, E.; Stylios, C. D.

    2012-04-01

    A quick examination of geographical maps with the epicenters of earthquakes marked on them reveals a strong tendency of these points to form compact clusters of irregular shapes and various sizes often traversing with other clusters. According to [Saleur et al. 1996] "earthquakes are correlated in space and time over large distances". This implies that seismic sequences are not formatted randomly but they follow a spatial pattern with consequent triggering of events. Seismic cluster formation is believed to be due to underlying geological natural hazards, which: a) act as the energy storage elements of the phenomenon, and b) tend to form a complex network of numerous interacting faults [Vallianatos and Tzanis, 1998]. Therefore it is imperative to "isolate" meaningful structures (clusters) in order to mine information regarding the underlying mechanism and at a second stage to test the causality effect implied by what is known as the Domino theory [Burgman, 2009]. Ongoing work by Konstantaras et al. 2011 and Katsifarakis et al. 2011 on clustering seismic sequences in the area of the Southern Hellenic Arc and progressively throughout the Greek vicinity and the entire Mediterranean region based on an explicit segmentation of the data based both on their temporal and spatial stamp, following modelling assumptions proposed by Dobrovolsky et al. 1989 and Drakatos et al. 2001, managed to identify geologically validated seismic clusters. These results suggest that that the time component should be included as a dimension during the clustering process as seismic cluster formation is dynamic and the emerging clusters propagate in time. Another issue that has not been investigated yet explicitly is the role of the magnitude of each seismic event. In other words the major seismic event should be treated differently compared to pre or post seismic sequences. Moreover the sometimes irregular and elongated shapes that appear on geophysical maps means that clustering algorithms

  11. Comparing two fish sampling standards over time: largely congruent results but with caveats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yule, Daniel L.; Evrard, Lori M.; Cachera, Sébastien; Colon, Michel; Guillard, Jean

    2013-01-01

    1. We sampled Lake Bourget (surface area = 44 km2) using CEN standard gillnet and provisional standard acoustic survey methods over 3 years (2005, 2010 and 2011) as the fish community responded to re-oligotrophication. A total of 16 species were caught in benthic gillnets and three species in pelagic gillnets. 2. Lake Bourget results were consistent with a recent study (Emmrich et al., Freshwater Biology, 57, 2012, 2436) showing strong correspondence between average biomass-per-unit-effort (BPUE) in standard benthic gillnets and average acoustic volume backscattering when smaller lakes (0.25–5.45 km2) were treated as sample units. 3. The BPUE of whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus), perch (Perca fluviatilis) and roach (Rutilus rutilus) measured by benthic gillnets all declined significantly with increasing bathymetric depth; 93% of nets set at depths >50 m caught zero fish. 4. Pelagic gillnetting indicated that small (20 m) increased significantly after 2005. 5. Both surveys showed whitefish biomass increased significantly during the study, but whitefish ≥25 cm were poorly represented in benthic gillnet catches. Contrary to the acoustic findings, the BPUE of perch and roach in benthic gillnets did not vary significantly over time. This metric is insensitive to changes in size structure in that a high catch of small fish and a low catch of large fish in different years can provide similar average BPUE estimates. 6. We examined correlations between BPUE in benthic gillnets and acoustic methods at fine spatial scales by averaging acoustic backscattering measurements encompassed by buffers of varying size (250–2000 m) around individual gillnets and by averaging samples collected from lake quadrants. Correlations at fines scales were generally poor, and only in 1 year was the quadrant correlation significant. The lack of correlation can be explained, in part, by the two gears sampling different components of the fish community. Conversely, in pelagic habitat, where the

  12. How the timing of weather events influences early development in a large mammal.

    PubMed

    Hendrichsen, D K; Tyler, N J C

    2014-07-01

    Capturing components of the weather that drive environment-animal interactions is a perennial problem in ecology. Identifying biologically significant elements of weather conditions in sensible statistics suitable for analysis of life history variation and population dynamics is central. Meteorological variables such as temperature, precipitation, and wind modulate rates of heat loss in animals, but analysis of their effects on endothermic species is complicated by the fact that their influence on energy balance is not invariably linear, even across the thermoneutral range. Rather, the thermal load imposed by a given set of weather conditions is a function of organisms' metabolic requirement, which, crucially, may vary spontaneously both seasonally and across different life phases. We propose that the endogenous component of variation in metabolic demand introduces a temporal dimension and that, as a consequence, the specific effect of meteorological variables on energy balance and attendant life history parameters is a function of the timing of weather events with respect to the organism's metabolic rhythm(s). To test this, we examined how a spontaneous increase in metabolic demand influenced the effect of weather on early development in a large mammal. Specifically, we examined interaction between the exponential rise in the energy requirements of pregnancy and depth of snow, which restricts dams' access to forage, on the body mass of reindeer calves (Rangifer tarandus) at weaning. As expected, we detected a significant temporal component: the specific negative effect of snow on weaning mass was not constant, but increased across pregnancy. The life history response was therefore better predicted by interaction between the magnitude and the timing of weather events than by their magnitude alone. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the influence of an endogenous metabolic dynamic on the impact of weather on a life history trait in a free

  13. How the timing of weather events influences early development in a large mammal.

    PubMed

    Hendrichsen, D K; Tyler, N J C

    2014-07-01

    Capturing components of the weather that drive environment-animal interactions is a perennial problem in ecology. Identifying biologically significant elements of weather conditions in sensible statistics suitable for analysis of life history variation and population dynamics is central. Meteorological variables such as temperature, precipitation, and wind modulate rates of heat loss in animals, but analysis of their effects on endothermic species is complicated by the fact that their influence on energy balance is not invariably linear, even across the thermoneutral range. Rather, the thermal load imposed by a given set of weather conditions is a function of organisms' metabolic requirement, which, crucially, may vary spontaneously both seasonally and across different life phases. We propose that the endogenous component of variation in metabolic demand introduces a temporal dimension and that, as a consequence, the specific effect of meteorological variables on energy balance and attendant life history parameters is a function of the timing of weather events with respect to the organism's metabolic rhythm(s). To test this, we examined how a spontaneous increase in metabolic demand influenced the effect of weather on early development in a large mammal. Specifically, we examined interaction between the exponential rise in the energy requirements of pregnancy and depth of snow, which restricts dams' access to forage, on the body mass of reindeer calves (Rangifer tarandus) at weaning. As expected, we detected a significant temporal component: the specific negative effect of snow on weaning mass was not constant, but increased across pregnancy. The life history response was therefore better predicted by interaction between the magnitude and the timing of weather events than by their magnitude alone. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the influence of an endogenous metabolic dynamic on the impact of weather on a life history trait in a free

  14. Tools for Analysis and Visualization of Large Time-Varying CFD Data Sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelms, Jane; VanGelder, Allen

    1997-01-01

    In the second year, we continued to built upon and improve our scanline-based direct volume renderer that we developed in the first year of this grant. This extremely general rendering approach can handle regular or irregular grids, including overlapping multiple grids, and polygon mesh surfaces. It runs in parallel on multi-processors. It can also be used in conjunction with a k-d tree hierarchy, where approximate models and error terms are stored in the nodes of the tree, and approximate fast renderings can be created. We have extended our software to handle time-varying data where the data changes but the grid does not. We are now working on extending it to handle more general time-varying data. We have also developed a new extension of our direct volume renderer that uses automatic decimation of the 3D grid, as opposed to an explicit hierarchy. We explored this alternative approach as being more appropriate for very large data sets, where the extra expense of a tree may be unacceptable. We also describe a new approach to direct volume rendering using hardware 3D textures and incorporates lighting effects. Volume rendering using hardware 3D textures is extremely fast, and machines capable of using this technique are becoming more moderately priced. While this technique, at present, is limited to use with regular grids, we are pursuing possible algorithms extending the approach to more general grid types. We have also begun to explore a new method for determining the accuracy of approximate models based on the light field method described at ACM SIGGRAPH '96. In our initial implementation, we automatically image the volume from 32 equi-distant positions on the surface of an enclosing tessellated sphere. We then calculate differences between these images under different conditions of volume approximation or decimation. We are studying whether this will give a quantitative measure of the effects of approximation. We have created new tools for exploring the

  15. Across space and time: social responses to large-scale biophysical systems.

    PubMed

    MacMynowski, Dena P

    2007-06-01

    The conceptual rubric of ecosystem management has been widely discussed and deliberated in conservation biology, environmental policy, and land/resource management. In this paper, I argue that two critical aspects of the ecosystem management concept require greater attention in policy and practice. First, although emphasis has been placed on the "space" of systems, the "time" -- or rates of change -- associated with biophysical and social systems has received much less consideration. Second, discussions of ecosystem management have often neglected the temporal disconnects between changes in biophysical systems and the response of social systems to management issues and challenges. The empirical basis of these points is a case study of the "Crown of the Continent Ecosystem," an international transboundary area of the Rocky Mountains that surrounds Glacier National Park (USA) and Waterton Lakes National Park (Canada). This project assessed the experiences and perspectives of 1) middle- and upper-level government managers responsible for interjurisdictional cooperation, and 2) environmental nongovernment organizations with an international focus. I identify and describe 10 key challenges to increasing the extent and intensity of transboundary cooperation in land/resource management policy and practice. These issues are discussed in terms of their political, institutional, cultural, information-based, and perceptual elements. Analytic techniques include a combination of environmental history, semistructured interviews with 48 actors, and text analysis in a systematic qualitative framework. The central conclusion of this work is that the rates of response of human social systems must be better integrated with the rates of ecological change. This challenge is equal to or greater than the well-recognized need to adapt the spatial scale of human institutions to large-scale ecosystem processes and transboundary wildlife. PMID:17415612

  16. The Potential of Time Series Based Earth Observation for the Monitoring of Large River Deltas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuenzer, C.; Leinenkugel, P.; Huth, J.; Ottinger, M.; Renaud, F.; Foufoula-Georgiou, E.; Vo Khac, T.; Trinh Thi, L.; Dech, S.; Koch, P.; Le Tissier, M.

    2015-12-01

    Although river deltas only contribute 5% to the overall land surface, nearly six hundred million people live in these complex social-ecological environments, which combine a variety of appealing locational advantages. In many countries deltas provide the major national contribution to agricultural and industrial production. At the same time these already very dynamic environments are exposed to a variety of threats, including the disturbance and replacement of valuable ecosystems, increasing water, soil, and air pollution, human induced land subsidence, sea level rise, as well upstream developments impacting water and sediment supplies. A constant monitoring of delta systems is thus of utmost relevance for understanding past and current land surface change and anticipating possible future developments. We present the potential of Earth Observation based analyses and derived novel information products that can play a key role in this context. Along with the current trend of opening up numerous satellite data archives go increasing capabilities to explore big data. Whereas in past decades remote sensing data were analysed based on the spectral-reflectance-defined 'finger print' of individual surfaces, we mainly exploit the 'temporal fingerprints' of our land surface in novel pathways of data analyses at differing spatial-, and temporally-dense scales. Following our results on an Earth Observation based characterization of large deltas globally, we present in depth results from the Mekong Delta in Vietnam, the Yellow River Delta in China, the Niger Delta in Nigeria, as well as additional deltas, focussing on the assessment of river delta flood and inundation dynamics, river delta coastline dynamics, delta morphology dynamics including the quantification of erosion and accretion processes, river delta land use change and trends, as well as the monitoring of compliance to environmental regulations.

  17. IV treatment at home

    MedlinePlus

    ... home; PICC line - home; Infusion therapy - home; Home health care - IV treatment ... Often, home health care nurses will come to your home to give you the medicine. Sometimes, a family member, a friend, or ...

  18. Underutilization of IV nitrates in the treatment of acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Mohapradeep; Hawkey, Sean; Baig, Fatima; Choy, Anna Maria; Lang, Chim C

    2015-08-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is a growing public health concern with high inhospital mortality and costs. Clinical practice guidelines, underpinned by positive randomized controlled trials, recommend the early use of intravenous (IV) nitrates in the treatment of AHF. However, the "real-world" usage of IV nitrates has not been clearly defined. The objective of this study was to examine the use of IV nitrates in the treatment of AHF as recommended by clinical practice guidelines. A case-record analysis was conducted of all admissions with AHF at a large teaching hospital. Of the 81 AHF patients (mean age 77 ± 11, mean SBP 130 ± 27 mmHg) enrolled for this analysis, only 5 (6%) received IV nitrates at the time of AHF admission. Forty (49%, mean age 77 ± 11, mean SBP 131 ± 27 mmHg) of these 81 patients met the guideline criteria for suitability for IV nitrates and only 5 (12%) of these received them during this admission. Patients who received IV nitrates were more likely to have higher blood pressure and all had myocardial ischemia as a precipitant. Seventy-five (93%) of the total population received loop diuretics on admission. Overall, this study shows that loop diuretics remain the first-line therapy in AHF with little use of IV nitrates, despite recommendations from clinical practice guidelines.

  19. GCF Mark IV development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mortensen, L. O.

    1982-01-01

    The Mark IV ground communication facility (GCF) as it is implemented to support the network consolidation program is reviewed. Changes in the GCF are made in the area of increased capacity. Common carrier circuits are the medium for data transfer. The message multiplexing in the Mark IV era differs from the Mark III era, in that all multiplexing is done in a GCF computer under GCF software control, which is similar to the multiplexing currently done in the high speed data subsystem.

  20. Note: A large open ratio, time, and position sensitive detector for time of flight measurements in UHV

    SciTech Connect

    Lupone, S.; Damoy, S.; Husseen, A.; Briand, N.; Debiossac, M.; Tall, S.; Roncin, P.

    2015-12-15

    We report on the construction of an UHV compatible 40 mm active diameter detector based on micro channel plates and assembled directly on the feed-throughs of a DN63CF flange. It is based on the charge division technique and uses a standard 2 inch Si wafer as a collector. The front end electronic is placed directly on the air side of the flange allowing excellent immunity to noise and a very good timing signal with reduced ringing. The important aberrations are corrected empirically providing an absolute positioning accuracy of 500 μm while a 150 μm resolution is measured in the center.

  1. Visual analytics techniques for large multi-attribute time series data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Ming C.; Dayal, Umeshwar; Keim, Daniel A.

    2008-01-01

    Time series data commonly occur when variables are monitored over time. Many real-world applications involve the comparison of long time series across multiple variables (multi-attributes). Often business people want to compare this year's monthly sales with last year's sales to make decisions. Data warehouse administrators (DBAs) want to know their daily data loading job performance. DBAs need to detect the outliers early enough to act upon them. In this paper, two new visual analytic techniques are introduced: The color cell-based Visual Time Series Line Charts and Maps highlight significant changes over time in a long time series data and the new Visual Content Query facilitates finding the contents and histories of interesting patterns and anomalies, which leads to root cause identification. We have applied both methods to two real-world applications to mine enterprise data warehouse and customer credit card fraud data to illustrate the wide applicability and usefulness of these techniques.

  2. Synthesis procedure for linear time-varying feedback systems with large parameter ignorance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, T. E., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The development of synthesis procedures for linear time-varying feedback systems is considered. It is assumed that the plant can be described by linear differential equations with time-varying coefficients; however, ignorance is associated with the plant in that only the range of the time-variations are known instead of exact functional relationships. As a result of this plant ignorance the use of time-varying compensation is ineffective so that only time-invariant compensation is employed. In addition, there is a noise source at the plant output which feeds noise through the feedback elements to the plant input. Because of this noise source the gain of the feedback elements must be as small as possible. No attempt is made to develop a stability criterion for time-varying systems in this work.

  3. The Evolution of Quasar C IV and Si IV Broad Absorption Lines over Multi-year Timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Robert R.; Brandt, W. N.; Gallagher, S. C.; Hewett, Paul C.; Schneider, Donald P.

    2010-04-01

    We investigate the variability of C IV λ1549 broad absorption line (BAL) troughs over rest-frame timescales of up to ≈7 yr in 14 quasars at redshifts z >~ 2.1. For nine sources at sufficiently high redshift, we also compare the C IV and Si IV λ1400 absorption variation. We compare shorter and longer term variability using spectra from up to four different epochs per source and find complex patterns of variation in the sample overall. The scatter in the change of absorption equivalent width (EW), ΔEW, increases with the time between observations. BALs do not, in general, strengthen or weaken monotonically, and variation observed over shorter (lsimmonths) timescales is not predictive of multi-year variation. We find no evidence for asymmetry in the distribution of ΔEW that would indicate that BALs form and decay on different timescales, and we constrain the typical BAL lifetime to be gsim30 yr. The BAL absorption for one source, LBQS 0022+0150, has weakened and may now be classified as a mini-BAL. Another source, 1235+1453, shows evidence of variable, blue continuum emission that is relatively unabsorbed by the BAL outflow. C IV and Si IV BAL shape changes are related in at least some sources. Given their high velocities, BAL outflows apparently traverse large spatial regions and may interact with parsec-scale structures such as an obscuring torus. Assuming BAL outflows are launched from a rotating accretion disk, notable azimuthal symmetry is required in the outflow to explain the relatively small changes observed in velocity structure over times up to 7 yr.

  4. Relationship between leisure time screen activity and aggressive and violent behaviour in Iranian children and adolescents: the CASPIAN-IV Study.

    PubMed

    Kelishadi, Roya; Qorbani, Mostafa; Motlagh, Mohammad Esmaeil; Heshmat, Ramin; Ardalan, Gelayol; Jari, Mohsen

    2014-08-21

    Background: This study aimed to assess the relationship between leisure time spent watching television (TV) and at a computer and aggressive and violent behaviour in children and adolescents. Methods: In this nationwide study, 14,880 school students, aged 6-18 years, were selected by cluster and stratified multi-stage sampling method from 30 provinces in Iran. The World Health Organization Global School-based Health Survey questionnaire (WHO-GSHS) was used. Results: Overall, 13,486 children and adolescents (50·8% boys, 75·6% urban residents) completed the study (participation rate 90·6%). The risk of physical fighting and quarrels increased by 29% (OR 1·29, 95% CI 1·19-1·40) with watching TV for >2 hr/day, by 38% (OR 1·38, 95% CI 1·21-1·57) with leisure time computer work of >2 hr/day, and by 42% (OR 1·42, 95% CI 1·28-1·58) with the total screen time of >2 hr/day. Watching TV or leisure time spent on a computer or total screen time of >2 hr/day increased the risk of bullying by 30% (OR 1·30, 95% CI 1·18-1·43), 57% (1·57, 95% CI 1·34-1·85) and 62% (OR 1·62, 95% CI 1·43-1·83). Spending >2 hr/day watching TV and total screen time increased the risk of being bullied by 12% (OR 1·12, 95% CI 1·02-1·22) and 15% (OR 1·15, 95% CI 1·02-1·28), respectively. This relationship was not statistically significant for leisure time spent on a computer (OR 1·10, 95% CI 0·9-1·27). Conclusions: Prolonged leisure time spent on screen activities is associated with violent and aggressive behaviour in children and adolescents. In addition to the duration of screen time, the association is likely to be explained also by the media content. PMID:25146837

  5. Relationship between leisure time screen activity and aggressive and violent behaviour in Iranian children and adolescents: the CASPIAN-IV Study.

    PubMed

    Kelishadi, Roya; Qorbani, Mostafa; Motlagh, Mohammad Esmaeil; Heshmat, Ramin; Ardalan, Gelayol; Jari, Mohsen

    2014-08-21

    Background: This study aimed to assess the relationship between leisure time spent watching television (TV) and at a computer and aggressive and violent behaviour in children and adolescents. Methods: In this nationwide study, 14,880 school students, aged 6-18 years, were selected by cluster and stratified multi-stage sampling method from 30 provinces in Iran. The World Health Organization Global School-based Health Survey questionnaire (WHO-GSHS) was used. Results: Overall, 13,486 children and adolescents (50·8% boys, 75·6% urban residents) completed the study (participation rate 90·6%). The risk of physical fighting and quarrels increased by 29% (OR 1·29, 95% CI 1·19-1·40) with watching TV for >2 hr/day, by 38% (OR 1·38, 95% CI 1·21-1·57) with leisure time computer work of >2 hr/day, and by 42% (OR 1·42, 95% CI 1·28-1·58) with the total screen time of >2 hr/day. Watching TV or leisure time spent on a computer or total screen time of >2 hr/day increased the risk of bullying by 30% (OR 1·30, 95% CI 1·18-1·43), 57% (1·57, 95% CI 1·34-1·85) and 62% (OR 1·62, 95% CI 1·43-1·83). Spending >2 hr/day watching TV and total screen time increased the risk of being bullied by 12% (OR 1·12, 95% CI 1·02-1·22) and 15% (OR 1·15, 95% CI 1·02-1·28), respectively. This relationship was not statistically significant for leisure time spent on a computer (OR 1·10, 95% CI 0·9-1·27). Conclusions: Prolonged leisure time spent on screen activities is associated with violent and aggressive behaviour in children and adolescents. In addition to the duration of screen time, the association is likely to be explained also by the media content.

  6. Real-Time Large Scale 3d Reconstruction by Fusing Kinect and Imu Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huai, J.; Zhang, Y.; Yilmaz, A.

    2015-08-01

    Kinect-style RGB-D cameras have been used to build large scale dense 3D maps for indoor environments. These maps can serve many purposes such as robot navigation, and augmented reality. However, to generate dense 3D maps of large scale environments is still very challenging. In this paper, we present a mapping system for 3D reconstruction that fuses measurements from a Kinect and an inertial measurement unit (IMU) to estimate motion. Our major achievements include: (i) Large scale consistent 3D reconstruction is realized by volume shifting and loop closure; (ii) The coarse-to-fine iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm, the SIFT odometry, and IMU odometry are combined to robustly and precisely estimate pose. In particular, ICP runs routinely to track the Kinect motion. If ICP fails in planar areas, the SIFT odometry provides incremental motion estimate. If both ICP and the SIFT odometry fail, e.g., upon abrupt motion or inadequate features, the incremental motion is estimated by the IMU. Additionally, the IMU also observes the roll and pitch angles which can reduce long-term drift of the sensor assembly. In experiments on a consumer laptop, our system estimates motion at 8Hz on average while integrating color images to the local map and saving volumes of meshes concurrently. Moreover, it is immune to tracking failures, and has smaller drift than the state-of-the-art systems in large scale reconstruction.

  7. Hard X-ray time profiles and acceleration processes in large solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, T.; Ramaty, R.

    1979-01-01

    The hard X-ray time profiles of the (1972) August 4 and 7 flares are investigated, taking into account a comparison of the time profiles of different energy channels. It is shown that for these flares the temporal features of the intensity profiles of higher energy channels are delayed with respect to those of channel 1. The delay time gradually increases to approximately 5 sec as the channel number increases from 1 to 5, and it jumps to approximately 15 sec for channels 6 and 7. A description is presented of a model in which the delay and other characteristics of the observed time profiles in channels 1-5 are self-consistently explained by the increase of the electron energy loss time with electron energy.

  8. S0819: Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Bevacizumab and/or Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Stage IV or Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Recurrent Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Lung Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IV Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IV Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma

  9. Decentralised robust stabilisation of uncertain large-scale interconnected time-delay systems with unknown upper bounds of uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hansheng

    2016-09-01

    The problem of decentralised robust stabilisation is considered for a class of uncertain large-scale time-delay interconnected dynamical systems. In the paper, the upper bounds of delayed state perturbations, uncertainties, interconnection terms, and external disturbances are assumed to be completely unknown, and the delays are assumed to be any non-negative constants. For such a class of uncertain large-scale time-delay interconnected systems, a new method is presented whereby a class of adaptation-free decentralised local robust state feedback controllers can be constructed. In addition, it is also shown that the solutions of uncertain large-scale time-delay interconnected systems can be guaranteed to be uniformly ultimately bounded. Finally, as an application to the practical mechanical systems, some simulations of a numerical example are provided to demonstrate the validity of the theoretical results.

  10. Design for the correction system of the real time nonuniformity of large area-array CCD image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Li, Chunmei; Lei, Ning

    2012-10-01

    With the robust thriving of aviation cameras and remote sensing technology, the linear-array CCD (charge-coupled device) and area CCD have developed toward large area CCD, which has a broad coverage and avoids the difficulty in jointing small area CCDs in addition to improving time resolution. However, due to the high amount of pixels and channels of large area CCD, photo-response non-uniformity (PRNU) is severe. In this paper, a real time non-uniformity correction system is introduced for a sort of large area full frame transfer CCD. First, the correction algorithm is elaborated according to CCD's working principle. Secondly, due to the high number of pixels and correction coefficient, ordinary chip memory cannot meet the requirement. The combination of external flash memory and DDR described in the paper satisfies large capacity memory and rapid real time correction. The methods and measurement steps for obtaining correction factors are provided simultaneously. At the end, an imaging test is made. The non-uniformity of the image is reduced to 0.38 % from the pre-correction 2.96 %, achieving an obvious reduction of non-uniformity. The result shows that the real time non-uniformity correction system can meet the demands of large area-array CCD.

  11. Implications of cosmic strings with time-varying tension on the CMB and large scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, Kazuhide; Takahashi, Tomo; Yamaguchi, Masahide

    2006-09-15

    We investigate cosmological evolution and implications of cosmic strings with time-dependent tension. We derive basic equations of time development of the correlation length and the velocity of such strings, based on the one-scale model. Then, we find that, in the case where the tension depends on some power of the cosmic time, cosmic strings with time-dependent tension goes into the scaling solution if the power is lower than a critical value. We also discuss cosmic microwave background anisotropy and matter power spectra produced by these strings. The constraints on their tensions from the Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe (WMAP) 3 yr data and Sloan digital sky survey (SDSS) data are also given.

  12. An accurate treatment of diffuse reflection boundary conditions for a stochastic particle Fokker-Planck algorithm with large time steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Önskog, Thomas; Zhang, Jun

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present a stochastic particle algorithm for the simulation of flows of wall-confined gases with diffuse reflection boundary conditions. Based on the theoretical observation that the change in location of the particles consists of a deterministic part and a Wiener process if the time scale is much larger than the relaxation time, a new estimate for the first hitting time at the boundary is obtained. This estimate facilitates the construction of an algorithm with large time steps for wall-confined flows. Numerical simulations verify that the proposed algorithm reproduces the correct boundary behaviour.

  13. Radiation of de-excited electrons at large times in a strong electromagnetic plane wave

    SciTech Connect

    Kazinski, P.O.

    2013-12-15

    The late time asymptotics of the physical solutions to the Lorentz–Dirac equation in the electromagnetic external fields of simple configurations–the constant homogeneous field, the linearly polarized plane wave (in particular, the constant uniform crossed field), and the circularly polarized plane wave–are found. The solutions to the Landau–Lifshitz equation for the external electromagnetic fields admitting a two-parametric symmetry group, which include as a particular case the above mentioned field configurations, are obtained. Some general properties of the total radiation power of a charged particle are established. In particular, for a circularly polarized wave and constant uniform crossed fields, the total radiation power in the asymptotic regime is independent of the charge and the external field strength, when expressed in terms of the proper-time, and equals a half the rest energy of a charged particle divided by its proper-time. The spectral densities of the radiation power formed on the late time asymptotics are derived for a charged particle moving in the external electromagnetic fields of the simple configurations pointed above. This provides a simple method to verify experimentally that the charged particle has reached the asymptotic regime. -- Highlights: •Late time asymptotics of the solutions to the Lorentz–Dirac equation are studied. •General properties of the total radiation power of electrons are established. •The total radiation power equals a half the rest energy divided by the proper-time. •Spectral densities of radiation formed on the late time asymptotics are derived. •Possible experimental verification of the results is proposed.

  14. Monte Carlo Study of Feasibility of Passive Time-Coincidence Measurements for Monitoring Large Fissile Storage Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Bevins, James E; Hayward, Jason P; Mihalczo, John T

    2009-01-01

    Monitoring the amount of HEU in large (metric tons) storage arrays with passive time coincidence distribution measurements is complicated by a variety of effects. These include: (1) time correlated background from HEU outside the particular localized section of the storage array being monitored, (2) cosmic radiation induced fission of nearby array materials, and (3) how large a portion of the array can be monitored with a set of detectors at a particular location in the array. Such a large storage array is typically rows of 2 wide and 3 high birdcages (metal structures that maintain safe nuclear criticality spacing between stored HEU castings) separated by 2 foot wide aisles between rows. This evaluation investigates how large an array of birdcages can be monitored by two 4x4 arrays of proton recoil scintillators. Monte Carlo simulations provided the time distribution of coincidences, multiplets (number of times n detection events occur in a time interval), and Feynman variance as a function of the length of the array. These calculations were performed for hypothetical arrays of 18 kg HEU standard Y-12 storage castings spaced 20 in apart. These types of arrays are used because the spacing between HEU castings are loosely coupled in that the castings at the ends of the arrays only interact with adjacent castings; this makes monitoring of the entire array difficult with detectors at a particular location in the array.

  15. Time-Reversal Imaging of seismic sources and application to recent large Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagner, J.; Larmat, C.; Fink, M.; Capdeville, Y.; Tourin, A.

    2006-12-01

    The occurrence of the disastrous Sumatra-Andaman earthquake on dec. 26, 2004 makes it necessary to develop innovative techniques for studying the complex spatio-temporal characteristics of rupture. The concept of time-reversal (hereafter referred to as TR) was previously successfully applied for acoustic waves in many fields such as medical imaging, underwater acoustics and non destructive testing. The increasing power of computers and numerical methods (such as spectral element methods) enables one to simulate more and more accurately the propagation of seismic waves in heterogeneous media and to develop new applications, in particular time reversal in the three-dimensional Earth. We present here the first applications at the global scale of TR with associated reverse movies of seismic waves propagation by sending back time--reversed seismograms. We show that seismic wave energy is refocused at the right location and the right time of the earthquake. When TR is applied to the Sumatra-- Andaman earthquake (26 dec. 2004), the migration of the rupture from the south towards the north is retrieved. All corresponding movies can be downloaded at the following webpage: http://www.gps.caltech.edu/~carene Other applications to recent smaller earthquakes will be also shown. Therefore, the technique of TR is potentially interesting for automatically locating earthquakes in space and time and for constraining the spatio-temporal history of complex earthquakes .

  16. A versatile fluorescence lifetime imaging system for scanning large areas with high time and spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardo, César; Belsley, Michael; de Matos Gomes, Etelvina; Gonçalves, Hugo; Isakov, Dmitry; Liebold, Falk; Pereira, Eduardo; Pires, Vladimiro; Samantilleke, Anura; Vasilevskiy, Mikhail; Schellenberg, Peter

    2014-08-01

    We present a flexible fluorescence lifetime imaging device which can be employed to scan large sample areas with a spatial resolution adjustable from many micrometers down to sub-micrometers and a temporal resolution of 20 picoseconds. Several different applications of the system will be presented including protein microarrays analysis, the scanning of historical samples, evaluation of solar cell surfaces and nanocrystalline organic crystals embedded in electrospun polymeric nanofibers. Energy transfer processes within semiconductor quantum dot superstructures as well as between dye probes and graphene layers were also investigated.

  17. Environmental Detection of Genogroup I, II, and IV Noroviruses by Using a Generic Real-Time Reverse Transcription-PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Takayuki; Parnaudeau, Sylvain; Grodzki, Marco; Okabe, Satoshi; Atmar, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Norovirus is the most common agent implicated in food-borne outbreaks and is frequently detected in environmental samples. These viruses are highly diverse, and three genogroups (genogroup I [GI], GII, and GIV) infect humans. Being noncultivable viruses, real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) is the only sensitive method available for their detection in food or environmental samples. Selection of consensus sequences for the design of sensitive assays has been challenging due to sequence diversity and has led to the development of specific real-time RT-PCR assays for each genogroup. Thus, sample screening can require several replicates for amplification of each genogroup (without considering positive and negative controls or standard curves). This study reports the development of a generic assay that detects all three human norovirus genogroups on a qualitative basis using a one-step real-time RT-PCR assay. The generic assay achieved good specificity and sensitivity for all three genogroups, detected separately or in combination. At variance with multiplex assays, the choice of the same fluorescent dye for all three probes specific to each genogroup allows the levels of fluorescence to be added and may increase assay sensitivity when multiple strains from different genogroups are present. When it was applied to sewage sample extracts, this generic assay successfully detected norovirus in all samples found to be positive by the genogroup-specific RT-PCRs. The generic assay also identified all norovirus-positive samples among 157 archived nucleic acid shellfish extracts, including samples contaminated by all three genogroups. PMID:23956397

  18. PLATO IV Accountancy Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pondy, Dorothy, Comp.

    The catalog was compiled to assist instructors in planning community college and university curricula using the 48 computer-assisted accountancy lessons available on PLATO IV (Programmed Logic for Automatic Teaching Operation) for first semester accounting courses. It contains information on lesson access, lists of acceptable abbreviations for…

  19. IVS Technology Coordinator Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Alan

    2013-01-01

    This report of the Technology Coordinator includes the following: 1) continued work to implement the new VLBI2010 system, 2) the 1st International VLBI Technology Workshop, 3) a VLBI Digital- Backend Intercomparison Workshop, 4) DiFX software correlator development for geodetic VLBI, 5) a review of progress towards global VLBI standards, and 6) a welcome to new IVS Technology Coordinator Bill Petrachenko.

  20. Experimental determination of quantum-well lifetime effect on large-signal resonant tunneling diode switching time

    SciTech Connect

    Growden, Tyler A.; Berger, Paul R.; Brown, E. R.; Zhang, Weidong; Droopad, Ravi

    2015-10-12

    An experimental determination is presented of the effect the quantum-well lifetime has on a large-signal resonant tunneling diode (RTD) switching time. Traditional vertical In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As/AlAs RTDs were grown, fabricated, and characterized. The switching time was measured with a high-speed oscilloscope and found to be close to the sum of the calculated RC-limited 10%–90% switching time and the quantum-well quasibound-state lifetime. This method displays experimental evidence that the two intrinsic resonant-tunneling characteristic times act independently, and that the quasibound-state lifetime then serves as a quantum-limit on the large-signal speed of RTDs.

  1. Experimental determination of quantum-well lifetime effect on large-signal resonant tunneling diode switching time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Growden, Tyler A.; Brown, E. R.; Zhang, Weidong; Droopad, Ravi; Berger, Paul R.

    2015-10-01

    An experimental determination is presented of the effect the quantum-well lifetime has on a large-signal resonant tunneling diode (RTD) switching time. Traditional vertical In0.53Ga0.47As/AlAs RTDs were grown, fabricated, and characterized. The switching time was measured with a high-speed oscilloscope and found to be close to the sum of the calculated RC-limited 10%-90% switching time and the quantum-well quasibound-state lifetime. This method displays experimental evidence that the two intrinsic resonant-tunneling characteristic times act independently, and that the quasibound-state lifetime then serves as a quantum-limit on the large-signal speed of RTDs.

  2. Emergence of network structure due to spike-timing-dependent plasticity in recurrent neuronal networks IV: structuring synaptic pathways among recurrent connections.

    PubMed

    Gilson, Matthieu; Burkitt, Anthony N; Grayden, David B; Thomas, Doreen A; van Hemmen, J Leo

    2009-12-01

    In neuronal networks, the changes of synaptic strength (or weight) performed by spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) are hypothesized to give rise to functional network structure. This article investigates how this phenomenon occurs for the excitatory recurrent connections of a network with fixed input weights that is stimulated by external spike trains. We develop a theoretical framework based on the Poisson neuron model to analyze the interplay between the neuronal activity (firing rates and the spike-time correlations) and the learning dynamics, when the network is stimulated by correlated pools of homogeneous Poisson spike trains. STDP can lead to both a stabilization of all the neuron firing rates (homeostatic equilibrium) and a robust weight specialization. The pattern of specialization for the recurrent weights is determined by a relationship between the input firing-rate and correlation structures, the network topology, the STDP parameters and the synaptic response properties. We find conditions for feed-forward pathways or areas with strengthened self-feedback to emerge in an initially homogeneous recurrent network. PMID:19937070

  3. On the Large Time Behavior of the Solutions of a Nonlocal Ordinary Differential Equation with Mass Conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilhorst, Danielle; Matano, Hiroshi; Nguyen, Thanh Nam; Weber, Hendrik

    2016-09-01

    We consider an initial value problem for a nonlocal differential equation with a bistable nonlinearity in several space dimensions. The equation is an ordinary differential equation with respect to the time variable t, while the nonlocal term is expressed in terms of spatial integration. We discuss the large time behavior of solutions and prove, among other things, the convergence to steady-states. The proof that the solution orbits are relatively compact is based upon the rearrangement theory.

  4. An extensive spectroscopic time series of three Wolf-Rayet stars - I. The lifetime of large-scale structures in the wind of WR 134

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldoretta, E. J.; St-Louis, N.; Richardson, N. D.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Eversberg, T.; Hill, G. M.; Shenar, T.; Artigau, É.; Gauza, B.; Knapen, J. H.; Kubát, J.; Kubátová, B.; Maltais-Tariant, R.; Muñoz, M.; Pablo, H.; Ramiaramanantsoa, T.; Richard-Laferrière, A.; Sablowski, D. P.; Simón-Díaz, S.; St-Jean, L.; Bolduan, F.; Dias, F. M.; Dubreuil, P.; Fuchs, D.; Garrel, T.; Grutzeck, G.; Hunger, T.; Küsters, D.; Langenbrink, M.; Leadbeater, R.; Li, D.; Lopez, A.; Mauclaire, B.; Moldenhawer, T.; Potter, M.; dos Santos, E. M.; Schanne, L.; Schmidt, J.; Sieske, H.; Strachan, J.; Stinner, E.; Stinner, P.; Stober, B.; Strandbaek, K.; Syder, T.; Verilhac, D.; Waldschläger, U.; Weiss, D.; Wendt, A.

    2016-08-01

    During the summer of 2013, a 4-month spectroscopic campaign took place to observe the variabilities in three Wolf-Rayet stars. The spectroscopic data have been analysed for WR 134 (WN6b), to better understand its behaviour and long-term periodicity, which we interpret as arising from corotating interaction regions (CIRs) in the wind. By analysing the variability of the He II λ5411 emission line, the previously identified period was refined to P = 2.255 ± 0.008 (s.d.) d. The coherency time of the variability, which we associate with the lifetime of the CIRs in the wind, was deduced to be 40 ± 6 d, or ˜18 cycles, by cross-correlating the variability patterns as a function of time. When comparing the phased observational grey-scale difference images with theoretical grey-scales previously calculated from models including CIRs in an optically thin stellar wind, we find that two CIRs were likely present. A separation in longitude of Δφ ≃ 90° was determined between the two CIRs and we suggest that the different maximum velocities that they reach indicate that they emerge from different latitudes. We have also been able to detect observational signatures of the CIRs in other spectral lines (C IV λλ5802,5812 and He I λ5876). Furthermore, a DAC was found to be present simultaneously with the CIR signatures detected in the He I λ5876 emission line which is consistent with the proposed geometry of the large-scale structures in the wind. Small-scale structures also show a presence in the wind, simultaneously with the larger scale structures, showing that they do in fact co-exist.

  5. A Distributed Processing Approach to Payroll Time Reporting for a Large School District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Raoul J.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a system for payroll reporting from geographically disparate locations in which data is entered, edited, and verified locally on minicomputers and then uploaded to a central computer for the standard payroll process. Communications and hardware, time-reporting software, data input techniques, system implementation, and its advantages are…

  6. Radiation of de-excited electrons at large times in a strong electromagnetic plane wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazinski, P. O.

    2013-12-01

    The late time asymptotics of the physical solutions to the Lorentz-Dirac equation in the electromagnetic external fields of simple configurations-the constant homogeneous field, the linearly polarized plane wave (in particular, the constant uniform crossed field), and the circularly polarized plane wave-are found. The solutions to the Landau-Lifshitz equation for the external electromagnetic fields admitting a two-parametric symmetry group, which include as a particular case the above mentioned field configurations, are obtained. Some general properties of the total radiation power of a charged particle are established. In particular, for a circularly polarized wave and constant uniform crossed fields, the total radiation power in the asymptotic regime is independent of the charge and the external field strength, when expressed in terms of the proper-time, and equals a half the rest energy of a charged particle divided by its proper-time. The spectral densities of the radiation power formed on the late time asymptotics are derived for a charged particle moving in the external electromagnetic fields of the simple configurations pointed above. This provides a simple method to verify experimentally that the charged particle has reached the asymptotic regime.

  7. Imaginary time propagation code for large-scale two-dimensional eigenvalue problems in magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luukko, P. J. J.; Räsänen, E.

    2013-03-01

    We present a code for solving the single-particle, time-independent Schrödinger equation in two dimensions. Our program utilizes the imaginary time propagation (ITP) algorithm, and it includes the most recent developments in the ITP method: the arbitrary order operator factorization and the exact inclusion of a (possibly very strong) magnetic field. Our program is able to solve thousands of eigenstates of a two-dimensional quantum system in reasonable time with commonly available hardware. The main motivation behind our work is to allow the study of highly excited states and energy spectra of two-dimensional quantum dots and billiard systems with a single versatile code, e.g., in quantum chaos research. In our implementation we emphasize a modern and easily extensible design, simple and user-friendly interfaces, and an open-source development philosophy. Catalogue identifier: AENR_v1_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AENR_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 11310 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 97720 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ and Python. Computer: Tested on x86 and x86-64 architectures. Operating system: Tested under Linux with the g++ compiler. Any POSIX-compliant OS with a C++ compiler and the required external routines should suffice. Has the code been vectorised or parallelized?: Yes, with OpenMP. RAM: 1 MB or more, depending on system size. Classification: 7.3. External routines: FFTW3 (http://www.fftw.org), CBLAS (http://netlib.org/blas), LAPACK (http://www.netlib.org/lapack), HDF5 (http://www.hdfgroup.org/HDF5), OpenMP (http://openmp.org), TCLAP (http://tclap.sourceforge.net), Python (http://python.org), Google Test (http://code.google.com/p/googletest/) Nature of problem: Numerical calculation

  8. Dust in Jupiter's magnetosphere. I - Physical processes. II - Origin of the ring. III - Time variations. IV - Effect on magnetospheric electrons and ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morfill, G. E.; Gruen, E.; Johnson, T. V.

    1980-01-01

    The physical processes acting on charged microscopic dust grains in the Jovian atmosphere involve electromagnetic forces which dominate dust particle dynamics and diffusion across field lines resulting from random charge fluctuations of the dust grains. A model of the Jovian ring hypothesizes that the 'visible' ring particles are produced by erosive collisions between an assumed population of kilometer-sized parent bodies and submicron-sized magnetospheric dust particles. Fluctuations in the ring topology and intensity are determined over various time scales, showing that the ring is a quasipermanent and quasistable characteristic of the Jovian system. Finally, the interaction of the Jovian energetic belt electrons and the Jovian plasma with an ambient dust population is examined; the distribution of dust ejected from Io in the inner magnetosphere and losses of magnetospheric ions and electrons due to direct collisions with charged dust particles are calculated.

  9. Examining the Content of Head Start Teachers' Literacy Instruction within Two Activity Contexts during Large-Group Circle Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Chenyi; Diamond, Karen E.; Powell, Douglas R.

    2015-01-01

    Large-group circle time is an important component of many preschool classrooms' daily schedules. This study scrutinized the teaching content of Head Start teachers' literacy instruction (i.e., the types of literacy concept embedded within the instruction, lexical characteristics of teachers' talk, and elaborations on literacy knowledge) in two…

  10. Does Time Spent Online Have an Influence on Student Performance? Evidence for a Large Business Studies Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korkofingas, Con; Macri, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines, using regression modelling, whether a statistically significant relationship exists between the time spent by a student using the course website and the student's assessment performance for a large third year university business forecasting course. We utilise the online tracking system in Blackboard, a web-based software…

  11. EMCS and time-series energy data analysis in a large government office building

    SciTech Connect

    Piette, Mary Ann; Kinney, Satkartar; Friedman, Hannah

    2001-04-01

    Energy Management Control System (EMCS) data are an underutilized source of information on the performance of commercial buildings. Newer EMCS's have the ability and storage capacity to trend large amounts of data and perform preliminary analyses; however, these features often receive little or no use, as operators are generally not trained in data management, visualization, and analysis. Whole-building hourly electric-utility data are another readily available and underutilized source of information. This paper outlines the use of EMCS and utility data to evaluate the performance of the Ronald V. Dellums Federal Building in Oakland, California, a large office building operated by the Federal General Services Administration (GSA). The project began as an exploratory effort at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to examine the procedures operators were using to obtain information and operate their buildings. Trending capabilities were available, but in limited use by the operators. LBNL worked with the building operators to use EMCS to trend one-minute data for over one-hundred points. Hourly electricity-use data were also used to understand usage patterns and peak demand. The paper describes LBNL's key findings in the following areas: Characterization of cooling plant operations; Characterization of economizer performance; Analysis of annual energy use and peak demand operations; Techniques, strengths, and shortcomings of EMCS data analysis; Future plans at the building for web-based remote monitoring and diagnostics. These findings have helped GSA develop strategies for peak demand reduction in this and other GSA buildings. Such activities are of great interest in California and elsewhere, where electricity reliability and demand are currently problematic. Overall, though the building's energy use is fairly low, significant energy savings are available by improving the existing EMCS control strategies.

  12. A Phase Locked High Speed Real-Time Interferometry System for Large Amplitude Unsteady Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandrasekhara, M. S.; Squires, D. D.; Wilder, M. C.; Carr, L. W.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A high speed phase locked interferometry system has been designed and developed for real-time measurements of the dynamic stall flow over a pitching airfoil. Point diffraction interferograms of incipient flow separation over a sinusoidally oscillating airfoil have been obtained at rates of up to 20 KHz and for free stream Mach numbers of 0.3 and 0.45. The images were recorded on ASA 125 and ASA 400 film using a drum camera. Special electronic timing and synchronizing circuits were developed to trigger the laser light source from the camera, and to initiate acquisition of the interferogram sequence from any desired phase angle of oscillation. The airfoil instantaneous angle of attack data provided by an optical encoder was recorded via a FIFO and in EPROM into a microcomputer. The interferograms have been analyzed using software developed in-house to get quantitative flow density and pressure distributions.

  13. Explicit large time-step schemes for the shallow water equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turkel, E.; Zwas, G.

    1979-01-01

    Modifications to explicit finite difference schemes for solving the shallow water equations for meteorological applications by increasing the time step for the fast gravity waves are analyzed. Terms associated with the gravity waves in the shallow water equations are treated on a coarser grid than those associated with the slow Rossby waves, which contain much more of the available energy and must be treated with higher accuracy, enabling a several-fold increase in time step without degrading the accuracy of the solution. The method is presented in Cartesian and spherical coordinates for a rotating earth, using generalized leapfrog, frozen coefficient, and Fourier filtering finite difference schemes. Computational results verify the numerical stability of the approach.

  14. Unification of Small and Large Time Scales for Biological Evolution: Deviations from Power Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Debashish; Stauffer, Dietrich; Kunwar, Ambarish

    2003-02-01

    We develop a unified model that describes both “micro” and “macro” evolutions within a single theoretical framework. The ecosystem is described as a dynamic network; the population dynamics at each node of this network describes the “microevolution” over ecological time scales (i.e., birth, ageing, and natural death of individual organisms), while the appearance of new nodes, the slow changes of the links, and the disappearance of existing nodes accounts for the “macroevolution” over geological time scales (i.e., the origination, evolution, and extinction of species). In contrast to several earlier claims in the literature, we observe strong deviations from power law in the regime of long lifetimes.

  15. A new approach for the simulation of ESR lineshapes over a large range of correlation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eviatar, H.; van Faassen, E.; Levine, Y. K.

    1992-07-01

    A new approach for the simulation of ESR lineshapes over a range of correlation times extending from the Redfield limit to the rigid limit is described. The use of a separable operator for the dynamics of a spin label in a uniaxial liquid crystal ("Kangaroo dynamics") allows an algebraic solution of the stochastic Liouville equation. This procedure avoids the numerical instability resulting from clustering of eigenvalues inherent in the conventional solution using an eigenfunction expansion.

  16. Existence and large time behavior for a stochastic model of modified magnetohydrodynamic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razafimandimby, Paul André; Sango, Mamadou

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we study a system of nonlinear stochastic partial differential equations describing the motion of turbulent non-Newtonian media in the presence of fluctuating magnetic field. The system is basically obtained by a coupling of the dynamical equations of a non-Newtonian fluids having p-structure and the Maxwell equations. We mainly show the existence of weak martingale solutions and their exponential decay when time goes to infinity.

  17. Discovery of a large time scale cyclic evolution of radio pulsars rotational frequency.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskin, G.; Biryukov, A.; Karpov, S.

    2006-08-01

    The recent massive measurements of pulsar frequency second derivatives have shown that they are 100-1000 times larger than expected for standard pulsar slowdown low. Moreover, the second derivatives as well as braking indices are even negative for about half of pulsars. We explain these paradoxical results on the basis of the statistical analysis of the rotational parameters (frequency, its first and second derivatives) of the subset of 295 pulsars taken mostly from the ATNF database. We have found strong correlation of second and first frequency derivatives either for positive (correlation coefficient r~0.9) and negative (r~0.85) values of second derivative, and of the frequency and and its first derivative (r~0.7). We interpret these dependencies as evolutionary ones due to the first frequency derivative being nearly proportional to the characteristic age. The derived statistical relations as well as "anomalous" values of the second frequency derivative are well explained in the framework of the simple model of cyclic evolution of the rotational frequency of the pulsars. It combines the secular change of the rotational parameters according to the power law with braking index n~5 and harmonic oscillations of 100--1000 years period with an amplitude from 10^-3 Hz for young pulsars to 10^-10 Hz for elder ones. The physical nature of these cyclic variations of the rotational frequency may be similar to the well-known red timing noise, however, with much larger characteristic time scale.

  18. Agent-based Large-Scale Emergency Evacuation Using Real-Time Open Government Data

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei; Liu, Cheng; Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2014-01-01

    The open government initiatives have provided tremendous data resources for the transportation system and emergency services in urban areas. This paper proposes a traffic simulation framework using high temporal resolution demographic data and real time open government data for evacuation planning and operation. A comparison study using real-world data in Seattle, Washington is conducted to evaluate the framework accuracy and evacuation efficiency. The successful simulations of selected area prove the concept to take advantage open government data, open source data, and high resolution demographic data in emergency management domain. There are two aspects of parameters considered in this study: user equilibrium (UE) conditions of traffic assignment model (simple Non-UE vs. iterative UE) and data temporal resolution (Daytime vs. Nighttime). Evacuation arrival rate, average travel time, and computation time are adopted as Measure of Effectiveness (MOE) for evacuation performance analysis. The temporal resolution of demographic data has significant impacts on urban transportation dynamics during evacuation scenarios. Better evacuation performance estimation can be approached by integrating both Non-UE and UE scenarios. The new framework shows flexibility in implementing different evacuation strategies and accuracy in evacuation performance. The use of this framework can be explored to day-to-day traffic assignment to support daily traffic operations.

  19. The SDSS-IV in 2014: A Demographic Snapshot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundgren, Britt; Kinemuchi, Karen; Zasowski, Gail; Lucatello, Sara; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Tremonti, Christy A.; Myers, Adam D.; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Gillespie, Bruce; Ho, Shirley; Gallagher, John S.

    2015-08-01

    Many astronomers now participate in large international scientific collaborations, and it is important to examine whether these structures foster a healthy scientific climate that is inclusive and diverse. The Committee on the Participation of Women in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (CPWS) was formed to evaluate the demographics and gender climate within SDSS-IV, one of the largest and most geographically distributed astronomical collaborations. In 2014 April, the CPWS administered a voluntary demographic survey to establish a baseline for the incipient SDSS-IV, which began observations in 2014 July. We received responses from 250 participants (46% of the active membership). Half of the survey respondents were located in the United States or Canada and 30% were based in Europe. Approximately 65% were faculty or research scientists and 31% were postdocs or graduate students. Eleven percent of survey respondents considered themselves to be an ethnic minority at their current institution. Twenty-five percent of the SDSS-IV collaboration members are women, a fraction that is consistent with the U.S. astronomical community, but substantially higher than the fraction of women in the International Astronomical Union (16%). Approximately equal fractions of men and women report holding positions of leadership in the collaboration. When binned by academic age and career level, men and women also assume leadership roles at approximately equal rates, in a way that increases steadily for both genders with increasing seniority. In this sense, SDSS-IV has been successful in recruiting leaders that are representative of the collaboration. That said, it is clear that more progress needs to be made toward achieving gender balance and increasing diversity in the field of astronomy, and there is still room for improvement in the membership and leadership of SDSS-IV. For example, at the highest level of SDSS-IV leadership, women disproportionately assume roles related to education and

  20. Wide dynamic range neutron flux monitor having fast time response for the Large Helical Device.

    PubMed

    Isobe, M; Ogawa, K; Miyake, H; Hayashi, H; Kobuchi, T; Nakano, Y; Watanabe, K; Uritani, A; Misawa, T; Nishitani, T; Tomitaka, M; Kumagai, T; Mashiyama, Y; Ito, D; Kono, S; Yamauchi, M; Takeiri, Y

    2014-11-01

    A fast time response, wide dynamic range neutron flux monitor has been developed toward the LHD deuterium operation by using leading-edge signal processing technologies providing maximum counting rate up to ∼5 × 10(9) counts/s. Because a maximum total neutron emission rate over 1 × 10(16) n/s is predicted in neutral beam-heated LHD plasmas, fast response and wide dynamic range capabilities of the system are essential. Preliminary tests have demonstrated successful performance as a wide dynamic range monitor along the design.

  1. Wide dynamic range neutron flux monitor having fast time response for the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Isobe, M. Takeiri, Y.; Ogawa, K.; Miyake, H.; Hayashi, H.; Kobuchi, T.; Nakano, Y.; Watanabe, K.; Uritani, A.; Misawa, T.; Nishitani, T.; Tomitaka, M.; Kumagai, T.; Mashiyama, Y.; Ito, D.; Kono, S.; Yamauchi, M.

    2014-11-15

    A fast time response, wide dynamic range neutron flux monitor has been developed toward the LHD deuterium operation by using leading-edge signal processing technologies providing maximum counting rate up to ∼5 × 10{sup 9} counts/s. Because a maximum total neutron emission rate over 1 × 10{sup 16} n/s is predicted in neutral beam-heated LHD plasmas, fast response and wide dynamic range capabilities of the system are essential. Preliminary tests have demonstrated successful performance as a wide dynamic range monitor along the design.

  2. Wide dynamic range neutron flux monitor having fast time response for the Large Helical Devicea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, M.; Ogawa, K.; Miyake, H.; Hayashi, H.; Kobuchi, T.; Nakano, Y.; Watanabe, K.; Uritani, A.; Misawa, T.; Nishitani, T.; Tomitaka, M.; Kumagai, T.; Mashiyama, Y.; Ito, D.; Kono, S.; Yamauchi, M.; Takeiri, Y.

    2014-11-01

    A fast time response, wide dynamic range neutron flux monitor has been developed toward the LHD deuterium operation by using leading-edge signal processing technologies providing maximum counting rate up to ˜5 × 109 counts/s. Because a maximum total neutron emission rate over 1 × 1016 n/s is predicted in neutral beam-heated LHD plasmas, fast response and wide dynamic range capabilities of the system are essential. Preliminary tests have demonstrated successful performance as a wide dynamic range monitor along the design.

  3. Screening for lung cancer: time for large-scale screening by chest computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Shlomi, Dekel; Ben-Avi, Ronny; Balmor, Gingy Ronen; Onn, Amir; Peled, Nir

    2014-07-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Age and smoking are the primary risk factors for lung cancer. Treatment based on surgical removal in the early stages of the disease results in better survival. Screening programmes for early detection that used chest radiography and sputum cytology failed to attain reduction of lung cancer mortality. Screening by low-dose computed tomography (CT) demonstrated high rates of early-stage lung cancer detection in a high-risk population. Nevertheless, no mortality advantage was manifested in small randomised control trials. A large randomised control trial in the U.S.A., the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), showed a significant relative reduction of 20% in lung cancer mortality and 6.7% reduction in total mortality, yet no reduction was evidenced in the late-stage prevalence. Screening for lung cancer by low-dose CT reveals a high level of false-positive lesions, which necessitates further noninvasive and invasive evaluations. Based primarily on the NLST eligible criteria, new guidelines have recently been developed by major relevant organisations. The overall recommendation coming out of this collective work calls for lung cancer screening by low-dose CT to be performed in medical centres manned by specialised multidisciplinary teams, as well as for a mandatory, pre-screening, comprehensive discussion with the patient about the risks and advantages involved in the process. Lung cancer screening is on the threshold of a new era, with ever more questions still left open to challenge future studies.

  4. Large eddy simulations of time-dependent and buoyancy-driven channel flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabot, William H.

    1993-01-01

    The primary goal of this work has been to assess the performance of the dynamic SGS model in the large eddy simulation (LES) of channel flows in a variety of situations, viz., in temporal development of channel flow turned by a transverse pressure gradient and especially in buoyancy-driven turbulent flows such as Rayleigh-Benard and internally heated channel convection. For buoyancy-driven flows, there are additional buoyant terms that are possible in the base models, and one objective has been to determine if the dynamic SGS model results are sensitive to such terms. The ultimate goal is to determine the minimal base model needed in the dynamic SGS model to provide accurate results in flows with more complicated physical features. In addition, a program of direct numerical simulation (DNS) of fully compressible channel convection has been undertaken to determine stratification and compressibility effects. These simulations are intended to provide a comparative base for performing the LES of compressible (or highly stratified, pseudo-compressible) convection at high Reynolds number in the future.

  5. Real time in-line monitoring of large scale Bacillus fermentations with near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Alves-Rausch, José; Bienert, Roland; Grimm, Christian; Bergmaier, Dirk

    2014-11-10

    NIR spectroscopy was used to monitor Bacillus fermentations in 50 m(3) reactors under harsh industrial conditions. The BioPAT(®) Spectro NIR sensor was attached directly to the bioreactor and provided fast, sensitive, non-destructive and robust measurements without interfering with the microorganism metabolism. Multivariate data analysis techniques related the spectra collected in real time during the fermentation with reference analyte concentrations. Analyte concentrations of future batches can be determined in real time with these models. The SugarSUM parameter was modeled with a SEP of 1.33 g/L in a range of 0-35 g/L. The models for AnalyteSUM (SEP = 0.81 g/L in 0.5-43 g/L range), OD(600) (SEP = 2.88 OD in 3.5-50 OD range), dry mass (SEP = 0.09 in 0.4-1.7% range) and Acetoin (SEP = 0.94 g/L in 0-11 g/L range) also show a great prediction performance in the complex media matrix. Sophisticated process control strategies such as a feeding control of the sugar source can be implemented in the future, potentially increasing spore yield due to a reduction of carbon overflow mechanisms. Media classification with PCA identified media formulation errors. Batch evolution models, built with spectra data only, monitored the evolution of new batches by comparing it with a "golden batch" trajectory.

  6. Planar quantum quenches: computation of exact time-dependent correlation functions at large N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortés Cubero, Axel

    2016-08-01

    We study a quantum quench of an integrable quantum field theory in the planar infinite-N limit. Unlike isovector-valued O(N) models, matrix-valued field theories in the infinite-N limit are not solvable by the Hartre-Fock approximation, and are nontrivial interacting theories. We study quenches with initial states that are color-charge neutral, correspond to integrability-preserving boundary conditions, and that lead to nontrivial correlation functions of operators. We compute exactly at infinite N, the time-dependent one- and two-point correlation functions of the energy-momentum tensor and renormalized field operator after this quench using known exact form factors. This computation can be done fully analytically, due the simplicity of the initial state and the form factors in the planar limit. We also show that this type of quench preserves factorizability at all times, allows for particle transmission from the pre-quench state, while still having nontrivial interacting post-quench dynamics.

  7. A reference web architecture and patterns for real-time visual analytics on large streaming data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandogan, Eser; Soroker, Danny; Rohall, Steven; Bak, Peter; van Ham, Frank; Lu, Jie; Ship, Harold-Jeffrey; Wang, Chun-Fu; Lai, Jennifer

    2013-12-01

    Monitoring and analysis of streaming data, such as social media, sensors, and news feeds, has become increasingly important for business and government. The volume and velocity of incoming data are key challenges. To effectively support monitoring and analysis, statistical and visual analytics techniques need to be seamlessly integrated; analytic techniques for a variety of data types (e.g., text, numerical) and scope (e.g., incremental, rolling-window, global) must be properly accommodated; interaction, collaboration, and coordination among several visualizations must be supported in an efficient manner; and the system should support the use of different analytics techniques in a pluggable manner. Especially in web-based environments, these requirements pose restrictions on the basic visual analytics architecture for streaming data. In this paper we report on our experience of building a reference web architecture for real-time visual analytics of streaming data, identify and discuss architectural patterns that address these challenges, and report on applying the reference architecture for real-time Twitter monitoring and analysis.

  8. Operational flood control of a low-lying delta system using large time step Model Predictive Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xin; van Overloop, Peter-Jules; Negenborn, Rudy R.; van de Giesen, Nick

    2015-01-01

    The safety of low-lying deltas is threatened not only by riverine flooding but by storm-induced coastal flooding as well. For the purpose of flood control, these deltas are mostly protected in a man-made environment, where dikes, dams and other adjustable infrastructures, such as gates, barriers and pumps are widely constructed. Instead of always reinforcing and heightening these structures, it is worth considering making the most of the existing infrastructure to reduce the damage and manage the delta in an operational and overall way. In this study, an advanced real-time control approach, Model Predictive Control, is proposed to operate these structures in the Dutch delta system (the Rhine-Meuse delta). The application covers non-linearity in the dynamic behavior of the water system and the structures. To deal with the non-linearity, a linearization scheme is applied which directly uses the gate height instead of the structure flow as the control variable. Given the fact that MPC needs to compute control actions in real-time, we address issues regarding computational time. A new large time step scheme is proposed in order to save computation time, in which different control variables can have different control time steps. Simulation experiments demonstrate that Model Predictive Control with the large time step setting is able to control a delta system better and much more efficiently than the conventional operational schemes.

  9. Across Space and Time: Social Responses to Large-Scale Biophysical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macmynowski, Dena P.

    2007-06-01

    The conceptual rubric of ecosystem management has been widely discussed and deliberated in conservation biology, environmental policy, and land/resource management. In this paper, I argue that two critical aspects of the ecosystem management concept require greater attention in policy and practice. First, although emphasis has been placed on the “space” of systems, the “time”—or rates of change—associated with biophysical and social systems has received much less consideration. Second, discussions of ecosystem management have often neglected the temporal disconnects between changes in biophysical systems and the response of social systems to management issues and challenges. The empirical basis of these points is a case study of the “Crown of the Continent Ecosystem,” an international transboundary area of the Rocky Mountains that surrounds Glacier National Park (USA) and Waterton Lakes National Park (Canada). This project assessed the experiences and perspectives of 1) middle- and upper-level government managers responsible for interjurisdictional cooperation, and 2) environmental nongovernment organizations with an international focus. I identify and describe 10 key challenges to increasing the extent and intensity of transboundary cooperation in land/resource management policy and practice. These issues are discussed in terms of their political, institutional, cultural, information-based, and perceptual elements. Analytic techniques include a combination of environmental history, semistructured interviews with 48 actors, and text analysis in a systematic qualitative framework. The central conclusion of this work is that the rates of response of human social systems must be better integrated with the rates of ecological change. This challenge is equal to or greater than the well-recognized need to adapt the spatial scale of human institutions to large-scale ecosystem processes and transboundary wildlife.

  10. Verdict: Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory "Not Guilty" of Large Errors for Cyanines.

    PubMed

    Jacquemin, Denis; Zhao, Yan; Valero, Rosendo; Adamo, Carlo; Ciofini, Ilaria; Truhlar, Donald G

    2012-04-10

    We assess the accuracy of eight Minnesota density functionals (M05 through M08-SO) and two others (PBE and PBE0) for the prediction of electronic excitation energies of a family of four cyanine dyes. We find that time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) with the five most recent of these functionals (from M06-HF through M08-SO) is able to predict excitation energies for cyanine dyes within 0.10-0.36 eV accuracy with respect to the most accurate available Quantum Monte Carlo calculations, providing a comparable accuracy to the latest generation of CASPT2 calculations, which have errors of 0.16-0.34 eV. Therefore previous conclusions that TDDFT cannot treat cyanine dyes reasonably accurately must be revised.

  11. Dipole switching in large molecules described by explicitly time-dependent configuration interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Pascal; Klamroth, Tillmann

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, we report laser-driven charge transfer simulations for Li-(Ph)n-CN (n=1,2,3) using the time-dependent configuration interaction single approach. These molecules serve as systematically extendable model systems, in order to investigate the selectivity, and thus controllability, of an ultrashort laser-induced electronic excitation as a function of the molecular size. For example, such control would be needed if a small electronic molecular switch is connected to a larger molecular device. We demonstrate that for larger molecules, the selectivity of the electronic transition is considerably reduced even for rather long pulses due to dynamic polarizations of the molecules. We also show that these dynamic polarizations might be substantially underestimated in few state models.

  12. Global Existence and Large Time Behavior of Strong Solutions to the 2-D Compressible Nematic Liquid Crystal Flows with Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Teng

    2016-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the strong solutions to the Cauchy problem of a simplified Ericksen-Leslie system of compressible nematic liquid crystals in two or three dimensions with vacuum as far field density. For strong solutions, some a priori decay rate (in large time) for the pressure, the spatial gradient of velocity field and the second spatial gradient of liquid crystal director field are obtained provided that the initial total energy is suitably small. Furthermore, with the help of the key decay rates, we establish the global existence and uniqueness of strong solutions (which may be of possibly large oscillations) in two spatial dimensions.

  13. Enhanced Design Alternative IV

    SciTech Connect

    N. E. Kramer

    1999-05-18

    This report evaluates Enhanced Design Alternative (EDA) IV as part of the second phase of the License Application Design Selection (LADS) effort. The EDA IV concept was compared to the VA reference design using criteria from the ''Design Input Request for LADS Phase II EDA Evaluations'' (CRWMS M&O 1999b) and (CRWMS M&O 1999f). Briefly, the EDA IV concept arranges the waste packages close together in an emplacement configuration known as ''line load''. Continuous pre-closure ventilation keeps the waste packages from exceeding the 350 C cladding and 200 C (4.3.13) drift wall temperature limits. This EDA concept keeps relatively high, uniform emplacement drift temperatures (post-closure) to drive water away from the repository and thus dry out the pillars between emplacement drifts. The waste package is shielded to permit human access to emplacement drifts and includes an integral filler inside the package to reduce the amount of water that can contact the waste form. Closure of the repository is desired 50 years after first waste is emplaced. Both backfill and a drip shields will be emplaced at closure to improve post-closure performance.

  14. The sequence and timing of large late Pleistocene floods from glacial Lake Missoula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Michelle A.; Lian, Olav B.; Clague, John J.

    2012-01-01

    Glacial Lake Missoula formed when the Purcell Trench lobe of the Cordilleran ice sheet dammed Clark Fork River in Montana during the Fraser Glaciation (marine oxygen isotope stage 2). Over a period of several thousand years, the lake repeatedly filled and drained through its ice dam, and floodwaters coursed across the landscape in eastern Washington. In this paper, we describe the stratigraphy and sedimentology of a significant new section of fine-grained glacial Lake Missoula sediment and compare this section to a similar, previously described sequence of sediments at Ninemile Creek, 26 km to the northwest. The new exposure, which we informally term the rail line section, is located near Missoula, Montana, and exposes 29 units, each of which consists of many silt and clay couplets that we interpret to be varves. The deposits are similar to other fine-grained sediments attributed to glacial Lake Missoula. Similar varved sediments overlie gravelly flood deposits elsewhere in the glacial Lake Missoula basin. Each of the 29 units represents a period when the lake was deepening, and all units show evidence for substantial draining of glacial Lake Missoula that repeatedly exposed the lake floor. The evidence includes erosion and deformation of glaciolacustrine sediment that we interpret happened during draining of the lake, desiccation cracks that formed during exposure of the lake bottom, and fluvial sand deposited as the lake began to refill. The floods date to between approximately 21.4 and 13.4 cal ka ago based on regional chronological data. The total number of varves at the rail line and Ninemile sites are, respectively, 732 and 583. Depending on lake refilling times, each exposure probably records 1350-1500 years of time. We present three new optical ages from the rail line and Ninemile sites that further limit the age of the floods. These ages, in calendar years, are 15.1 ± 0.6 ka at the base of the Ninemile exposure, and 14.8 ± 0.7 and 12.6 ± 0.6 ka midway

  15. Caterpillars selected for large body size and short development time are more susceptible to oxygen-related stress.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jon F; Cease, Arianne J; Vandenbrooks, John M; Albert, Todd; Davidowitz, Goggy

    2013-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that higher growth rates may be associated with reduced capacities for stress tolerance and increased accumulated damage due to reactive oxygen species. We tested the response of Manduca sexta (Sphingidae) lines selected for large or small body size and short development time to hypoxia (10 kPa) and hyperoxia (25, 33, and 40 kPa); both hypoxia and hyperoxia reduce reproduction and oxygen levels over 33 kPa have been shown to increase oxidative damage in insects. Under normoxic (21 kPa) conditions, individuals from the large-selected (big-fast) line were larger and had faster growth rates, slightly longer developmental times, and reduced survival rates compared to individuals from a line selected for small size (small-fast) or an unselected control line. Individuals from the big-fast line exhibited greater negative responses to hyperoxia with greater reductions in juvenile and adult mass, growth rate, and survival than the other two lines. Hypoxia generally negatively affected survival and growth/size, but the lines responded similarly. These results are mostly consistent with the hypothesis that simultaneous acquisition of large body sizes and short development times leads to reduced capacities for coping with stressful conditions including oxidative damage. This result is of particular importance in that natural selection tends to decrease development time and increase body size.

  16. Caterpillars selected for large body size and short development time are more susceptible to oxygen-related stress

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Jon F; Cease, Arianne J; VandenBrooks, John M; Albert, Todd; Davidowitz, Goggy

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that higher growth rates may be associated with reduced capacities for stress tolerance and increased accumulated damage due to reactive oxygen species. We tested the response of Manduca sexta (Sphingidae) lines selected for large or small body size and short development time to hypoxia (10 kPa) and hyperoxia (25, 33, and 40 kPa); both hypoxia and hyperoxia reduce reproduction and oxygen levels over 33 kPa have been shown to increase oxidative damage in insects. Under normoxic (21 kPa) conditions, individuals from the large-selected (big-fast) line were larger and had faster growth rates, slightly longer developmental times, and reduced survival rates compared to individuals from a line selected for small size (small-fast) or an unselected control line. Individuals from the big-fast line exhibited greater negative responses to hyperoxia with greater reductions in juvenile and adult mass, growth rate, and survival than the other two lines. Hypoxia generally negatively affected survival and growth/size, but the lines responded similarly. These results are mostly consistent with the hypothesis that simultaneous acquisition of large body sizes and short development times leads to reduced capacities for coping with stressful conditions including oxidative damage. This result is of particular importance in that natural selection tends to decrease development time and increase body size. PMID:23762517

  17. Real-time target detection technology of large view-field infrared image based on multicore DSP parallel processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Gang; Liu, Songlin; Wang, Weihua; Chen, Zengping

    2013-10-01

    In order to implement real-time detection of hedgehopping target in large view-field infrared (LVIR) image, the paper proposes a fast algorithm flow to extract the target region of interest (ROI). The ground building region was rejected quickly and target ROI was segmented roughly through the background classification. Then the background image containing target ROI was matched with previous frame based on a mean removal normalized product correlation (MRNPC) similarity measure function. Finally, the target motion area was extracted by inter-frame difference in time domain. According to the proposed algorithm flow, this paper designs the high-speed real-time signal processing hardware platform based on FPGA + DSP, and also presents a new parallel processing strategy that called function-level and task-level, which could parallel process LVIR image by multi-core and multi-task. Experimental results show that the algorithm can extract low altitude aero target with complex background in large view effectively, and the new design hardware platform could implement real time processing of the IR image with 50000x288 pixels per second in large view-field infrared search system (LVIRSS).

  18. Energy beyond food: foraging theory informs time spent in thermals by a large soaring bird.

    PubMed

    Shepard, Emily L C; Lambertucci, Sergio A; Vallmitjana, Diego; Wilson, Rory P

    2011-01-01

    Current understanding of how animals search for and exploit food resources is based on microeconomic models. Although widely used to examine feeding, such constructs should inform other energy-harvesting situations where theoretical assumptions are met. In fact, some animals extract non-food forms of energy from the environment, such as birds that soar in updraughts. This study examined whether the gains in potential energy (altitude) followed efficiency-maximising predictions in the world's heaviest soaring bird, the Andean condor (Vultur gryphus). Animal-attached technology was used to record condor flight paths in three-dimensions. Tracks showed that time spent in patchy thermals was broadly consistent with a strategy to maximise the rate of potential energy gain. However, the rate of climb just prior to leaving a thermal increased with thermal strength and exit altitude. This suggests higher rates of energetic gain may not be advantageous where the resulting gain in altitude would lead to a reduction in the ability to search the ground for food. Consequently, soaring behaviour appeared to be modulated by the need to reconcile differing potential energy and food energy distributions. We suggest that foraging constructs may provide insight into the exploitation of non-food energy forms, and that non-food energy distributions may be more important in informing patterns of movement and residency over a range of scales than previously considered.

  19. Energy Beyond Food: Foraging Theory Informs Time Spent in Thermals by a Large Soaring Bird

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Emily L. C.; Lambertucci, Sergio A.; Wilson, Rory P.

    2011-01-01

    Current understanding of how animals search for and exploit food resources is based on microeconomic models. Although widely used to examine feeding, such constructs should inform other energy-harvesting situations where theoretical assumptions are met. In fact, some animals extract non-food forms of energy from the environment, such as birds that soar in updraughts. This study examined whether the gains in potential energy (altitude) followed efficiency-maximising predictions in the world's heaviest soaring bird, the Andean condor (Vultur gryphus). Animal-attached technology was used to record condor flight paths in three-dimensions. Tracks showed that time spent in patchy thermals was broadly consistent with a strategy to maximise the rate of potential energy gain. However, the rate of climb just prior to leaving a thermal increased with thermal strength and exit altitude. This suggests higher rates of energetic gain may not be advantageous where the resulting gain in altitude would lead to a reduction in the ability to search the ground for food. Consequently, soaring behaviour appeared to be modulated by the need to reconcile differing potential energy and food energy distributions. We suggest that foraging constructs may provide insight into the exploitation of non-food energy forms, and that non-food energy distributions may be more important in informing patterns of movement and residency over a range of scales than previously considered. PMID:22087301

  20. A new time dependent density functional algorithm for large systems and plasmons in metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Baseggio, Oscar; Fronzoni, Giovanna; Stener, Mauro

    2015-07-14

    A new algorithm to solve the Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) equations in the space of the density fitting auxiliary basis set has been developed and implemented. The method extracts the spectrum from the imaginary part of the polarizability at any given photon energy, avoiding the bottleneck of Davidson diagonalization. The original idea which made the present scheme very efficient consists in the simplification of the double sum over occupied-virtual pairs in the definition of the dielectric susceptibility, allowing an easy calculation of such matrix as a linear combination of constant matrices with photon energy dependent coefficients. The method has been applied to very different systems in nature and size (from H{sub 2} to [Au{sub 147}]{sup −}). In all cases, the maximum deviations found for the excitation energies with respect to the Amsterdam density functional code are below 0.2 eV. The new algorithm has the merit not only to calculate the spectrum at whichever photon energy but also to allow a deep analysis of the results, in terms of transition contribution maps, Jacob plasmon scaling factor, and induced density analysis, which have been all implemented.

  1. Achieving compliance with the European Working Time Directive in a large teaching hospital: a strategic approach.

    PubMed

    Jones, Gareth J; Vanderpump, Mark P J; Easton, Mark; Baker, Daryll M; Ball, Carol; Leenane, Michael; O'Brien, Heather; Turner, Nigel; Else, Martin; Reid, Wendy M N; Johnson, Margaret

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the strategy which achieved European Working Time Directive (EWTD) compliance at the Royal Free Hampstead NHS Trust in medicine and surgery. Compliance with EWTD regulations was assessed by diary card exercise, clinical care assessed through critical incident reports, electronic handover documents and nursing reports, training opportunities assessed by unit training directors, cost controls assessed by finance department analysis, and workload assessed by staff attendance on wards, in casualty and in theatres. There was a change in focus of care to a consultant-led, specialist registrar- (SpR-)driven service extending into evenings and on weekends, coupled with a move to a multi-skilled team for night cover, and to a move from traditional on-call shifts to a full shift system across both medicine and surgery. Compliance with the EWTD was achieved whilst maintaining good standards of clinical care, ensuring training opportunities for doctors in training, controlling payroll costs, removing the need for locums, and reducing workload for both junior doctors and consultants. PMID:15536871

  2. Energy beyond food: foraging theory informs time spent in thermals by a large soaring bird.

    PubMed

    Shepard, Emily L C; Lambertucci, Sergio A; Vallmitjana, Diego; Wilson, Rory P

    2011-01-01

    Current understanding of how animals search for and exploit food resources is based on microeconomic models. Although widely used to examine feeding, such constructs should inform other energy-harvesting situations where theoretical assumptions are met. In fact, some animals extract non-food forms of energy from the environment, such as birds that soar in updraughts. This study examined whether the gains in potential energy (altitude) followed efficiency-maximising predictions in the world's heaviest soaring bird, the Andean condor (Vultur gryphus). Animal-attached technology was used to record condor flight paths in three-dimensions. Tracks showed that time spent in patchy thermals was broadly consistent with a strategy to maximise the rate of potential energy gain. However, the rate of climb just prior to leaving a thermal increased with thermal strength and exit altitude. This suggests higher rates of energetic gain may not be advantageous where the resulting gain in altitude would lead to a reduction in the ability to search the ground for food. Consequently, soaring behaviour appeared to be modulated by the need to reconcile differing potential energy and food energy distributions. We suggest that foraging constructs may provide insight into the exploitation of non-food energy forms, and that non-food energy distributions may be more important in informing patterns of movement and residency over a range of scales than previously considered. PMID:22087301

  3. Robust Requirements Tracing via Internet Search Technology: Improving an IV and V Technique. Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Jane; Dekhtyar, Alex

    2004-01-01

    There are three major objectives to this phase of the work. (1) Improvement of Information Retrieval (IR) methods for Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) requirements tracing. Information Retrieval methods are typically developed for very large (order of millions - tens of millions and more documents) document collections and therefore, most successfully used methods somewhat sacrifice precision and recall in order to achieve efficiency. At the same time typical IR systems treat all user queries as independent of each other and assume that relevance of documents to queries is subjective for each user. The IV&V requirements tracing problem has a much smaller data set to operate on, even for large software development projects; the set of queries is predetermined by the high-level specification document and individual requirements considered as query input to IR methods are not necessarily independent from each other. Namely, knowledge about the links for one requirement may be helpful in determining the links of another requirement. Finally, while the final decision on the exact form of the traceability matrix still belongs to the IV&V analyst, his/her decisions are much less arbitrary than those of an Internet search engine user. All this suggests that the information available to us in the framework of the IV&V tracing problem can be successfully leveraged to enhance standard IR techniques, which in turn would lead to increased recall and precision. We developed several new methods during Phase II; (2) IV&V requirements tracing IR toolkit. Based on the methods developed in Phase I and their improvements developed in Phase II, we built a toolkit of IR methods for IV&V requirements tracing. The toolkit has been integrated, at the data level, with SAIC's SuperTracePlus (STP) tool; (3) Toolkit testing. We tested the methods included in the IV&V requirements tracing IR toolkit on a number of projects.

  4. Potential of the Large Observatory for X-ray Timing telescope for the search for dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neronov, A.; Boyarsky, A.; Iakubovskyi, D.; Ruchayskiy, O.

    2014-12-01

    Large observatory for x-ray timing (LOFT) is a concept of a next-generation x-ray telescope considered in the context of the "Cosmic Vision" program of the European Space Agency. The Large Area Detector on board of LOFT will be a collimator-type telescope with an unprecedentedly large collecting area of about 1 05 cm2 in the energy band between 2 and 100 keV. We demonstrate that LOFT will be a powerful dark matter detector, suitable for the search of the x-ray line emission expected from decays of light dark matter particles in galactic halos. We show that LOFT will have sensitivity for dark matter line search more than an order of magnitude higher than that of all existing x-ray telescopes. In this way, LOFT will be able to provide a new insight into the fundamental problem of the nature of dark matter.

  5. Stage IV-S neuroblastoma. Results with definitive therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, S.H.; Thomas, P.R.; Perez, C.A.; Vietti, T.J.

    1984-05-15

    The results of management of 14 patients with Stage IV-S neuroblastoma are reported. The treatment policy, although not consistent over this time span, in general used a combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy or infrequently one modality alone. Twelve of 14 (86%) survived more than 6 years. One patient, with a solitary mediastinal primary tumor, died of rapidly progressive disease at three months. The other death occurred in a 4.5-year-old presenting with hepatomegaly at diagnosis followed by skeletal dissemination 2.5 years later. Thirteen of the patients were younger than 1 year of age. Of the 11 patients that received radiotherapy, 4 experienced mild asymptomatic scoliosis or kyphoscoliosis at 3 to 12 years after initial therapy. A review of the literature indicates that spontaneous regression in this tumor is very frequent; therefore, it is recommended that for the common presentation of massive hepatomegaly in an infant, close observation is warranted, unless life threatening complications occur. However, initial therapeutic intervention may be indicated in those patients with life threatening presentations. This data did not substantiate the necessity for complete surgical excision of the primary tumor, as has been suggested by others.

  6. Using SDO-EVE Satellite Data to Model for the First Time how Large Solar Flares Influence the Earths Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Joseph; Sojka, Jan; Schunk, Robert; David, Michael; Woods, Tom; Eparvier, Frank

    2012-10-01

    The earth's ionosphere is very important in our everyday life. During large solar flares the ionosphere expands to the point of disrupting communications from GPS, military, and commercial communications satellites, and even radio blackouts can occur. The EVE instrument on the SDO satellite has given unprecedented spectral resolution for the Extreme Ultraviolet(EUV) spectrum with a time cadence of 10 seconds. This has made it possible to analyze flare spectra as never before. Using the Time Dependent Ionospheric Model (TDIM) we have input this new spectral data for large solar flares and analyzed the effect on the ionosphere. We take as a test case the X1.6 flare on March 9, 2011. Even this minor X-class provides insight into how the ionospheric layers respond differently to solar flares.

  7. Increasing streamflow forecast lead time for snowmelt-driven catchment based on large-scale climate patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalra, Ajay; Ahmad, Sajjad; Nayak, Anurag

    2013-03-01

    This study focuses on improving the spring-summer streamflow forecast lead time using large scale climate patterns. An artificial intelligence type data-driven model, Support Vector Machine (SVM), was developed incorporating oceanic-atmospheric oscillations to increase the forecast lead time. The application of SVM model is tested on three unimpaired gages in the North Platte River Basin. Seasonal averages of oceanic-atmospheric indices for the period of 1940-2007 are used to generate spring-summer streamflow volumes with 3-, 6- and 9-month lead times. The results reveal a strong association between coupled indices compared to their individual effects. The best streamflow estimates are obtained at 6-month compared to 3-month and 9-month lead times. The proposed modeling technique is expected to provide useful information to water managers and help in better managing the water resources and the operation of water systems.

  8. Identification of genetic variants associated with maize flowering time using an extremely large multi-genetic background population.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong-Xiang; Li, Chunhui; Bradbury, Peter J; Liu, Xiaolei; Lu, Fei; Romay, Cinta M; Glaubitz, Jeffrey C; Wu, Xun; Peng, Bo; Shi, Yunsu; Song, Yanchun; Zhang, Dengfeng; Buckler, Edward S; Zhang, Zhiwu; Li, Yu; Wang, Tianyu

    2016-06-01

    Flowering time is one of the major adaptive traits in domestication of maize and an important selection criterion in breeding. To detect more maize flowering time variants we evaluated flowering time traits using an extremely large multi- genetic background population that contained more than 8000 lines under multiple Sino-United States environments. The population included two nested association mapping (NAM) panels and a natural association panel. Nearly 1 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were used in the analyses. Through the parallel linkage analysis of the two NAM panels, both common and unique flowering time regions were detected. Genome wide, a total of 90 flowering time regions were identified. One-third of these regions were connected to traits associated with the environmental sensitivity of maize flowering time. The genome-wide association study of the three panels identified nearly 1000 flowering time-associated SNPs, mainly distributed around 220 candidate genes (within a distance of 1 Mb). Interestingly, two types of regions were significantly enriched for these associated SNPs - one was the candidate gene regions and the other was the approximately 5 kb regions away from the candidate genes. Moreover, the associated SNPs exhibited high accuracy for predicting flowering time. PMID:27012534

  9. PMD IVS Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tornatore, Vincenza

    2013-01-01

    The main activities carried out at the PMD (Politecnico di Milano DIIAR) IVS Analysis Center during 2012 are briefly higlighted, and future plans for 2013 are sketched out. We principally continued to process European VLBI sessions using different approaches to evaluate possible differences due to various processing choices. Then VLBI solutions were also compared to the GPS ones as well as the ones calculated at co-located sites. Concerning the observational aspect, several tests were performed to identify the most suitable method to achieve the highest possible accuracy in the determination of GNSS (GLOBAL NAVIGATION SATELLITE SYSTEM) satellite positions using the VLBI technique.

  10. Parallel Configuration For Fast Superconducting Strip Line Detectors With Very Large Area In Time Of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Casaburi, A.; Zen, N.; Suzuki, K.; Ohkubo, M.; Ejrnaes, M.; Cristiano, R.; Pagano, S.

    2009-12-16

    We realized a very fast and large Superconducting Strip Line Detector based on a parallel configuration of nanowires. The detector with size 200x200 {mu}m{sup 2} recorded a sub-nanosecond pulse width of 700 ps in FWHM (400 ps rise time and 530 ps relaxation time) for lysozyme monomers/multimers molecules accelerated at 175 keV in a Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer. This record is the best in the class of superconducting detectors and comparable with the fastest NbN superconducting single photon detector of 10x10 {mu}m{sup 2}. We succeeded in acquiring mass spectra as the first step for a scale-up to {approx}mm pixel size for high throughput MS analysis, while keeping a fast response.

  11. Application of Time Series Insar Technique for Deformation Monitoring of Large-Scale Landslides in Mountainous Areas of Western China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, T.; Lu, P.; Liu, C.; Wan, H.

    2016-06-01

    Western China is very susceptible to landslide hazards. As a result, landslide detection and early warning are of great importance. This work employs the SBAS (Small Baseline Subset) InSAR Technique for detection and monitoring of large-scale landslides that occurred in Li County, Sichuan Province, Western China. The time series INSAR is performed using descending scenes acquired from TerraSAR-X StripMap mode since 2014 to get the spatial distribution of surface displacements of this giant landslide. The time series results identify the distinct deformation zone on the landslide body with a rate of up to 150mm/yr. The deformation acquired by SBAS technique is validated by inclinometers from diverse boreholes of in-situ monitoring. The integration of InSAR time series displacements and ground-based monitoring data helps to provide reliable data support for the forecasting and monitoring of largescale landslide.

  12. Large time zero temperature dynamics of the spherical p  =  2-spin glass model of finite size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fyodorov, Yan V.; Perret, Anthony; Schehr, Grégory

    2015-11-01

    We revisit the long time dynamics of the spherical fully connected $p = 2$-spin glass model when the number of spins $N$ is large but {\\it finite}. At $T=0$ where the system is in a (trivial) spin-glass phase, and on long time scale $t \\gtrsim {\\cal O}{(N^{2/3})}$ we show that the behavior of physical observables, like the energy, correlation and response functions, is controlled by the density of near-extreme eigenvalues at the edge of the spectrum of the coupling matrix $J$, and are thus non self-averaging. We show that the late time decay of these observables, once averaged over the disorder, is controlled by new universal exponents which we compute exactly.

  13. Large-scale time-lapse microscopy of Oct4 expression in human embryonic stem cell colonies.

    PubMed

    Bhadriraju, Kiran; Halter, Michael; Amelot, Julien; Bajcsy, Peter; Chalfoun, Joe; Vandecreme, Antoine; Mallon, Barbara S; Park, Kye-Yoon; Sista, Subhash; Elliott, John T; Plant, Anne L

    2016-07-01

    Identification and quantification of the characteristics of stem cell preparations is critical for understanding stem cell biology and for the development and manufacturing of stem cell based therapies. We have developed image analysis and visualization software that allows effective use of time-lapse microscopy to provide spatial and dynamic information from large numbers of human embryonic stem cell colonies. To achieve statistically relevant sampling, we examined >680 colonies from 3 different preparations of cells over 5days each, generating a total experimental dataset of 0.9 terabyte (TB). The 0.5 Giga-pixel images at each time point were represented by multi-resolution pyramids and visualized using the Deep Zoom Javascript library extended to support viewing Giga-pixel images over time and extracting data on individual colonies. We present a methodology that enables quantification of variations in nominally-identical preparations and between colonies, correlation of colony characteristics with Oct4 expression, and identification of rare events.

  14. Precisions Measurement for the Grasp of Welding Deformation amount of Time Series for Large-Scale Industrial Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, R.; Hamada, K.; Hirata, N.; Tamura, R.; Nishi, N.

    2015-05-01

    As well as the BIM of quality management in the construction industry, demand for quality management of the manufacturing process of the member is higher in shipbuilding field. The time series of three-dimensional deformation of the each process, and are accurately be grasped strongly demanded. In this study, we focused on the shipbuilding field, will be examined three-dimensional measurement method. The shipyard, since a large equipment and components are intricately arranged in a limited space, the installation of the measuring equipment and the target is limited. There is also the element to be measured is moved in each process, the establishment of the reference point for time series comparison is necessary to devise. In this paper will be discussed method for measuring the welding deformation in time series by using a total station. In particular, by using a plurality of measurement data obtained from this approach and evaluated the amount of deformation of each process.

  15. Comparison of Fault Detection Algorithms for Real-time Diagnosis in Large-Scale System. Appendix E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirubarajan, Thiagalingam; Malepati, Venkat; Deb, Somnath; Ying, Jie

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we present a review of different real-time capable algorithms to detect and isolate component failures in large-scale systems in the presence of inaccurate test results. A sequence of imperfect test results (as a row vector of I's and O's) are available to the algorithms. In this case, the problem is to recover the uncorrupted test result vector and match it to one of the rows in the test dictionary, which in turn will isolate the faults. In order to recover the uncorrupted test result vector, one needs the accuracy of each test. That is, its detection and false alarm probabilities are required. In this problem, their true values are not known and, therefore, have to be estimated online. Other major aspects in this problem are the large-scale nature and the real-time capability requirement. Test dictionaries of sizes up to 1000 x 1000 are to be handled. That is, results from 1000 tests measuring the state of 1000 components are available. However, at any time, only 10-20% of the test results are available. Then, the objective becomes the real-time fault diagnosis using incomplete and inaccurate test results with online estimation of test accuracies. It should also be noted that the test accuracies can vary with time --- one needs a mechanism to update them after processing each test result vector. Using Qualtech's TEAMS-RT (system simulation and real-time diagnosis tool), we test the performances of 1) TEAMSAT's built-in diagnosis algorithm, 2) Hamming distance based diagnosis, 3) Maximum Likelihood based diagnosis, and 4) HidderMarkov Model based diagnosis.

  16. Efficient multiple time step method for use with Ewald and particle mesh Ewald for large biomolecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ruhong; Harder, Edward; Xu, Huafeng; Berne, B. J.

    2001-08-01

    The particle-particle particle-mesh (P3M) method for calculating long-range electrostatic forces in molecular simulations is modified and combined with the reversible reference system propagator algorithm (RESPA) for treating the multiple time scale problems in the molecular dynamics of complex systems with multiple time scales and long-range forces. The resulting particle-particle particle-mesh Ewald RESPA (P3ME/RESPA) method provides a fast and accurate representation of the long-range electrostatic interactions for biomolecular systems such as protein solutions. The method presented here uses a different breakup of the electrostatic forces than was used by other authors when they combined the Particle Mesh Ewald method with RESPA. The usual breakup is inefficient because it treats the reciprocal space forces in an outer loop even though they contain a part that changes rapidly in time. This does not allow use of a large time step for the outer loop. Here, we capture the short-range contributions in the reciprocal space forces and include them in the inner loop, thereby allowing for larger outer loop time steps and thus for a much more efficient RESPA implementation. The new approach has been applied to both regular Ewald and P3ME. The timings of Ewald/RESPA and P3ME/RESPA are compared in detail with the previous approach for protein water solutions as a function of number of atoms in the system, and significant speedups are reported.

  17. 78 FR 2390 - CSOLAR IV South, LLC, Wistaria Ranch Solar, LLC, CSOLAR IV West, LLC, CSOLAR IV North, LLC v...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-11

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission CSOLAR IV South, LLC, Wistaria Ranch Solar, LLC, CSOLAR IV West, LLC, CSOLAR IV North, LLC v. California Independent System Operator Corporation; Notice of Complaint Take notice... IV South, LLC, Wistaria Ranch Solar, LLC, CSOLAR IV West, LLC and CSOLAR IV North, LLC...

  18. 3-D imaging of large scale buried structure by 1-D inversion of very early time electromagnetic (VETEM) data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aydmer, A.A.; Chew, W.C.; Cui, T.J.; Wright, D.L.; Smith, D.V.; Abraham, J.D.

    2001-01-01

    A simple and efficient method for large scale three-dimensional (3-D) subsurface imaging of inhomogeneous background is presented. One-dimensional (1-D) multifrequency distorted Born iterative method (DBIM) is employed in the inversion. Simulation results utilizing synthetic scattering data are given. Calibration of the very early time electromagnetic (VETEM) experimental waveforms is detailed along with major problems encountered in practice and their solutions. This discussion is followed by the results of a large scale application of the method to the experimental data provided by the VETEM system of the U.S. Geological Survey. The method is shown to have a computational complexity that is promising for on-site inversion.

  19. Cell line differences in replication timing of human glutamate receptor genes and other large genes associated with neural disease

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yoshihisa; Shibata, Kiyoshi; Maekawa, Masato

    2014-01-01

    There is considerable current interest in the function of epigenetic mechanisms in neuroplasticity with regard to learning and memory formation and to a range of neural diseases. Previously, we described replication timing on human chromosome 21q in the THP-1 human cell line (2n = 46, XY) and showed that several genes associated with neural diseases, such as the neuronal glutamate receptor subunit GluR-5 (GRIK1) and amyloid precursor protein (APP), were located in regions where replication timing transitioned from early to late S phase. Here, we compared replication timing of all known human glutamate receptor genes (26 genes in total) and APP in 6 different human cell lines including human neuron-related cell lines. Replication timings were obtained by integrating our previously reported data with new data generated here and information from the online database ReplicationDomain. We found that many of the glutamate receptor genes were clearly located in replication timing transition zones in neural precursor cells, but this relationship was less clear in embryonic stem cells before neural differentiation; in the latter, the genes were often located in later replication timing zones that displayed DNA hypermethylation. Analysis of selected large glutamate receptor genes (>200 kb), and of APP, showed that their precise replication timing patterns differed among the cell lines. We propose that the transition zones of DNA replication timing are altered by epigenetic mechanisms, and that these changes may affect the neuroplasticity that is important to memory and learning, and may also have a role in the development of neural diseases. PMID:25437050

  20. Seafloor earthquake measurement system, SEMS IV

    SciTech Connect

    Platzbecker, M.R.; Ehasz, J.P.; Franco, R.J.

    1997-07-01

    Staff of the Telemetry Technology Development Department (2664) have, in support of the U.S. Interior Department Mineral Management Services (MMS), developed and deployed the Seafloor Earthquake Measurement System IV (SEMS IV). The result of this development project is a series of three fully operational seafloor seismic monitor systems located at offshore platforms: Eureka, Grace, and Irene. The instrument probes are embedded from three to seven feet into the seafloor and hardwired to seismic data recorders installed top side at the offshore platforms. The probes and underwater cables were designed to survive the seafloor environment with an operation life of five years. The units have been operational for two years and have produced recordings of several minor earthquakes in that time. Sandia Labs will transfer operation of SEMS IV to MMS contractors in the coming months. 29 figs., 25 tabs.

  1. Fast analysis of wide-band scattering from electrically large targets with time-domain parabolic equation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zi; Chen, Ru-Shan

    2016-03-01

    An efficient three-dimensional time domain parabolic equation (TDPE) method is proposed to fast analyze the narrow-angle wideband EM scattering properties of electrically large targets. The finite difference (FD) of Crank-Nicolson (CN) scheme is used as the traditional tool to solve the time-domain parabolic equation. However, a huge computational resource is required when the meshes become dense. Therefore, the alternating direction implicit (ADI) scheme is introduced to discretize the time-domain parabolic equation. In this way, the reduced transient scattered fields can be calculated line by line in each transverse plane for any time step with unconditional stability. As a result, less computational resources are required for the proposed ADI-based TDPE method when compared with both the traditional CN-based TDPE method and the finite-different time-domain (FDTD) method. By employing the rotating TDPE method, the complete bistatic RCS can be obtained with encouraging accuracy for any observed angle. Numerical examples are given to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method.

  2. The effects of season, daylight saving and time of sunrise on serum cortisol in a large population.

    PubMed

    Hadlow, Narelle C; Brown, Suzanne; Wardrop, Robert; Henley, David

    2014-03-01

    Cortisol is critical for maintenance of health and homeostasis and factors affecting cortisol levels are of clinical importance. There is conflicting information about the effects of season on morning cortisol and little information on the effects of sunlight on population cortisol assessment. The aim of this study was to assess whether changes in median serum cortisol occurred in a population in conjunction with changing seasons, daylight saving time (DST) or time of sunrise. We analysed serum cortisol results (n = 27,569) from a single large laboratory over a 13-year period. Subjects with confounding medications or medical conditions were excluded and data analysed in 15-minute intervals. We assessed the influence of traditional seasons, seasons determined by equinox/solstice, DST and time of sunrise on median cortisol. The median time of cortisol collection did not vary significantly between seasons. Using traditional seasons, median cortisol was lowest in summer (386 nmol/L) and spring (384 nmol/L) with higher cortisol in autumn (406 nmol/L) and winter (414 nmol/L). Median cortisol was lowest in the summer solstice quarter with significant comparative increases in the spring equinox quarter (3.1%), the autumn equinox quarter (4.5%) and the winter solstice quarter (8.6%). When cortisol was modelled against time, with adjustment for actual sunrise time on day of collection, for each hour delay in sunrise there was a 4.8% increase in median cortisol (95% CI: 3.9-5.7%). In modelling to explain the variation in cortisol over the morning, sunrise time was better than season in explaining seasonal effects. A subtle cyclic pattern in median cortisol also occurred throughout the months of the year. A 3-year trial of DST allowed comparison of cortisol in DST and non DST periods, when clock time differed by one hour. There was modest evidence of a difference in acrophase between DST and non DST cortisol (p = 0.038), with DST peak cortisol estimated to

  3. The control and estimation of large space structures. [for optimal shape variation with respect to space and time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, C.

    1980-01-01

    A shape control or estimation problem for a large space structure can be modeled by a partial differential equation which represents changes in shape with respect to space and time, together with spatially discrete forcing functions or observations which represent the placement of actuators or sensors at discrete points along the structure. The use of Green's functions to convert boundary value problems into integral equations provides a convenient treatment of this mixture of continuous and discrete mathematics. Control and estimation algorithms are developed for the one-dimensional static beam to illustrate this technique.

  4. NAVIS-An UGV indoor positioning system using laser scan matching for large-area real-time applications.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jian; Chen, Yuwei; Jaakkola, Anttoni; Liu, Jinbing; Hyyppä, Juha; Hyyppä, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    Laser scan matching with grid-based maps is a promising tool for real-time indoor positioning of mobile Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGVs). While there are critical implementation problems, such as the ability to estimate the position by sensing the unknown indoor environment with sufficient accuracy and low enough latency for stable vehicle control, further development work is necessary. Unfortunately, most of the existing methods employ heuristics for quick positioning in which numerous accumulated errors easily lead to loss of positioning accuracy. This severely restricts its applications in large areas and over lengthy periods of time. This paper introduces an efficient real-time mobile UGV indoor positioning system for large-area applications using laser scan matching with an improved probabilistically-motivated Maximum Likelihood Estimation (IMLE) algorithm, which is based on a multi-resolution patch-divided grid likelihood map. Compared with traditional methods, the improvements embodied in IMLE include: (a) Iterative Closed Point (ICP) preprocessing, which adaptively decreases the search scope; (b) a totally brute search matching method on multi-resolution map layers, based on the likelihood value between current laser scan and the grid map within refined search scope, adopted to obtain the global optimum position at each scan matching; and (c) a patch-divided likelihood map supporting a large indoor area. A UGV platform called NAVIS was designed, manufactured, and tested based on a low-cost robot integrating a LiDAR and an odometer sensor to verify the IMLE algorithm. A series of experiments based on simulated data and field tests with NAVIS proved that the proposed IMEL algorithm is a better way to perform local scan matching that can offer a quick and stable positioning solution with high accuracy so it can be part of a large area localization/mapping, application. The NAVIS platform can reach an updating rate of 12 Hz in a feature-rich environment and 2 Hz

  5. NAVIS-An UGV Indoor Positioning System Using Laser Scan Matching for Large-Area Real-Time Applications

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jian.; Chen, Yuwei.; Jaakkola, Anttoni.; Liu, Jinbing.; Hyyppä, Juha.; Hyyppä, Hannu.

    2014-01-01

    Laser scan matching with grid-based maps is a promising tool for real-time indoor positioning of mobile Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGVs). While there are critical implementation problems, such as the ability to estimate the position by sensing the unknown indoor environment with sufficient accuracy and low enough latency for stable vehicle control, further development work is necessary. Unfortunately, most of the existing methods employ heuristics for quick positioning in which numerous accumulated errors easily lead to loss of positioning accuracy. This severely restricts its applications in large areas and over lengthy periods of time. This paper introduces an efficient real-time mobile UGV indoor positioning system for large-area applications using laser scan matching with an improved probabilistically-motivated Maximum Likelihood Estimation (IMLE) algorithm, which is based on a multi-resolution patch-divided grid likelihood map. Compared with traditional methods, the improvements embodied in IMLE include: (a) Iterative Closed Point (ICP) preprocessing, which adaptively decreases the search scope; (b) a totally brute search matching method on multi-resolution map layers, based on the likelihood value between current laser scan and the grid map within refined search scope, adopted to obtain the global optimum position at each scan matching; and (c) a patch-divided likelihood map supporting a large indoor area. A UGV platform called NAVIS was designed, manufactured, and tested based on a low-cost robot integrating a LiDAR and an odometer sensor to verify the IMLE algorithm. A series of experiments based on simulated data and field tests with NAVIS proved that the proposed IMEL algorithm is a better way to perform local scan matching that can offer a quick and stable positioning solution with high accuracy so it can be part of a large area localization/mapping, application. The NAVIS platform can reach an updating rate of 12 Hz in a feature-rich environment and 2 Hz

  6. NAVIS-An UGV indoor positioning system using laser scan matching for large-area real-time applications.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jian; Chen, Yuwei; Jaakkola, Anttoni; Liu, Jinbing; Hyyppä, Juha; Hyyppä, Hannu

    2014-07-04

    Laser scan matching with grid-based maps is a promising tool for real-time indoor positioning of mobile Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGVs). While there are critical implementation problems, such as the ability to estimate the position by sensing the unknown indoor environment with sufficient accuracy and low enough latency for stable vehicle control, further development work is necessary. Unfortunately, most of the existing methods employ heuristics for quick positioning in which numerous accumulated errors easily lead to loss of positioning accuracy. This severely restricts its applications in large areas and over lengthy periods of time. This paper introduces an efficient real-time mobile UGV indoor positioning system for large-area applications using laser scan matching with an improved probabilistically-motivated Maximum Likelihood Estimation (IMLE) algorithm, which is based on a multi-resolution patch-divided grid likelihood map. Compared with traditional methods, the improvements embodied in IMLE include: (a) Iterative Closed Point (ICP) preprocessing, which adaptively decreases the search scope; (b) a totally brute search matching method on multi-resolution map layers, based on the likelihood value between current laser scan and the grid map within refined search scope, adopted to obtain the global optimum position at each scan matching; and (c) a patch-divided likelihood map supporting a large indoor area. A UGV platform called NAVIS was designed, manufactured, and tested based on a low-cost robot integrating a LiDAR and an odometer sensor to verify the IMLE algorithm. A series of experiments based on simulated data and field tests with NAVIS proved that the proposed IMEL algorithm is a better way to perform local scan matching that can offer a quick and stable positioning solution with high accuracy so it can be part of a large area localization/mapping, application. The NAVIS platform can reach an updating rate of 12 Hz in a feature-rich environment and 2 Hz

  7. Introduction of bifunctional groups into mesoporous silica for enhancing uptake of thorium(IV) from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Li-Yong; Bai, Zhi-Qiang; Zhao, Ran; Liu, Ya-Lan; Li, Zi-Jie; Chu, Sheng-Qi; Zheng, Li-Rong; Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Yu-Liang; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Shi, Wei-Qun

    2014-04-01

    The potential industrial application of thorium (Th), as well as the environmental and human healthy problems caused by thorium, promotes the development of reliable methods for the separation and removal of Th(IV) from environmental and geological samples. Herein, the phosphonate-amino bifunctionalized mesoporous silica (PAMS) was fabricated by a one-step self-assembly approach for enhancing Th(IV) uptake from aqueous solution. The synthesized sorbent was found to possess ordered mesoporous structures with uniform pore diameter and large surface area, characterized by SEM, XRD, and N2 sorption/desorption measurements. The enhancement of Th(IV) uptake by PAMS was achieved by coupling of an access mechanism to a complexation mechanism, and the sorption can be optimized by adjusting the coverage of the functional groups in the PAMS sorbent. The systemic study on Th(IV) sorption/desorption by using one coverage of PAMS (PAMS12) shows that the Th(IV) sorption by PAMS is fast with equilibrium time of less than 1 h, and the sorption capacity is more than 160 mg/g at a relatively low pH. The sorption isotherm has been successfully modeled by the Langmuir isotherm and D-R isotherm, which reveals a monolayer homogeneous chemisorption of Th(IV) in PAMS. The Th(IV) sorption by PAMS is pH dependent but ionic strength independent. In addition, the sorbed Th(IV) can be completely desorbed using 0.2 mol/L or more concentrated nitric acid solution. The sorption test performed in the solution containing a range of competing metal ions suggests that the PAMS sorbent has a desirable selectivity for Th(IV) ions.

  8. Motions of charged particles in the Magnetosphere under the influence of a time-varying large scale convection electric field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. H.; Bewtra, N. K.; Hoffman, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    The motions of charged particles under the influence of the geomagnetic and electric fields were quite complex in the region of the inner magnetosphere. The Volland-Stern type large scale convection electric field was used successfully to predict both the plasmapause location and particle enhancements determined from Explorer 45 measurements. A time dependence in this electric field was introduced based on the variation in Kp for actual magnetic storm conditions. The particle trajectories were computed as they change in this time-varying electric field. Several storm fronts of particles of different magnetic moments were allowed to be injected into the inner magnetosphere from L = 10 in the equatorial plane. The motions of these fronts are presented in a movie format.

  9. CHANG-ES. IV. RADIO CONTINUUM EMISSION OF 35 EDGE-ON GALAXIES OBSERVED WITH THE KARL G. JANSKY VERY LARGE ARRAY IN D CONFIGURATION—DATA RELEASE 1

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegert, Theresa; Irwin, Judith; MacGregor, Stephen E-mail: irwin@astro.queensu.ca; and others

    2015-09-15

    We present the first part of the observations made for the Continuum Halos in Nearby Galaxies, an EVLA Survey (CHANG-ES) project. The aim of the CHANG-ES project is to study and characterize the nature of radio halos, their prevalence as well as their magnetic fields, and the cosmic rays illuminating these fields. This paper reports observations with the compact D configuration of the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) for the sample of 35 nearby edge-on galaxies of CHANG-ES. With the new wide bandwidth capabilities of the VLA, an unprecedented sensitivity was achieved for all polarization products. The beam resolution is an average of 9.″6 and 36″ with noise levels reaching approximately 6 and 30 μJy beam{sup −1} for C- and L-bands, respectively (robust weighting). We present intensity maps in these two frequency bands (C and L), with different weightings, as well as spectral index maps, polarization maps, and new measurements of star formation rates (SFRs). The data products described herein are available to the public in the CHANG-ES data release available at http://www.queensu.ca/changes. We also present evidence of a trend among galaxies with larger halos having higher SFR surface density, and we show, for the first time, a radio continuum image of the median galaxy, taking advantage of the collective signal-to-noise ratio of 30 of our galaxies. This image shows clearly that a “typical” spiral galaxy is surrounded by a halo of magnetic fields and cosmic rays.

  10. High-energy radiation from thunderstorms and lightning with the Large Observatory for x-ray Timing (LOFT) mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marisaldi, Martino; Smith, David M.; Brandt, Søren; Briggs, Michael S.; Budz-Jørgensen, Carl; Campana, Riccardo; Carlson, Brant E.; Celestin, Sebastien; Connaughton, Valerie; Cummer, Steven A.; Dwyer, Joseph R.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Fullekrug, Martin; Fuschino, Fabio; Gjesteland, Thomas; Neubert, Torsten; Østgaard, Nikolai; Tavani, Marco

    2015-04-01

    We explore the possible contributions of the Large Observatory for X-ray Timing (LOFT) mission to the study of high-energy radiation from thunderstorms and lightning. LOFT is a mission dedicated to X-ray timing studies of astrophysical sources, characterised by a very large effective area of about 8.5 square meters at 8 keV. Although the main scientific target of the mission is the fundamental physics of matter under extreme conditions, the peculiar instrument concept allows significant contributions to a wide range of other science topics, including the cross-disciplinary field of high-energy atmospheric physics, at the crossroad between geophysics, space physics and astrophysics. In this field we foresee the following major contributions: detect ˜ 700 Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) per year, probing the TGF intensity distribution at low fluence values and providing an unbiased sample of bright events thanks to the intrinsic robustness against dead-time and pile-up; provide the largest TGF detection rate surface density above the equator, allowing for correlation studies with lightning activity on short time scales and small regional scales, to probe the TGF / lightning relationship; lower by a factor ˜ 5 the minimum detectable fluence for Terrestrial Electron Beams (TEBs), an additional tool to probe TGF production mechanism and the lower edge of TGF intensity distribution; open up a discovery space for the detection of high-altitude electron beams and weak X-ray emissions associated to Transient Luminous Events (TLEs). LOFT has been studied as a candidate ESA M3 mission during an extensive assessment phase. The high level of readiness and maturity of the mission, as well as the clean and solid assessment of its unique science case, make LOFT a competitive mission with a compelling science case. For this reason, its development has been continued, aiming at new launch opportunities.

  11. Development of a time-stepping sediment budget model for assessing land use impacts in large river basins.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, S N; Dougall, C; Kinsey-Henderson, A E; Searle, R D; Ellis, R J; Bartley, R

    2014-01-15

    The use of river basin modelling to guide mitigation of non-point source pollution of wetlands, estuaries and coastal waters has become widespread. To assess and simulate the impacts of alternate land use or climate scenarios on river washload requires modelling techniques that represent sediment sources and transport at the time scales of system response. Building on the mean-annual SedNet model, we propose a new D-SedNet model which constructs daily budgets of fine sediment sources, transport and deposition for each link in a river network. Erosion rates (hillslope, gully and streambank erosion) and fine sediment sinks (floodplains and reservoirs) are disaggregated from mean annual rates based on daily rainfall and runoff. The model is evaluated in the Burdekin basin in tropical Australia, where policy targets have been set for reducing sediment and nutrient loads to the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) lagoon from grazing and cropping land. D-SedNet predicted annual loads with similar performance to that of a sediment rating curve calibrated to monitored suspended sediment concentrations. Relative to a 22-year reference load time series at the basin outlet derived from a dynamic general additive model based on monitoring data, D-SedNet had a median absolute error of 68% compared with 112% for the rating curve. RMS error was slightly higher for D-SedNet than for the rating curve due to large relative errors on small loads in several drought years. This accuracy is similar to existing agricultural system models used in arable or humid environments. Predicted river loads were sensitive to ground vegetation cover. We conclude that the river network sediment budget model provides some capacity for predicting load time-series independent of monitoring data in ungauged basins, and for evaluating the impact of land management on river sediment load time-series, which is challenging across large regions in data-poor environments. PMID:23968738

  12. Development of a time-stepping sediment budget model for assessing land use impacts in large river basins.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, S N; Dougall, C; Kinsey-Henderson, A E; Searle, R D; Ellis, R J; Bartley, R

    2014-01-15

    The use of river basin modelling to guide mitigation of non-point source pollution of wetlands, estuaries and coastal waters has become widespread. To assess and simulate the impacts of alternate land use or climate scenarios on river washload requires modelling techniques that represent sediment sources and transport at the time scales of system response. Building on the mean-annual SedNet model, we propose a new D-SedNet model which constructs daily budgets of fine sediment sources, transport and deposition for each link in a river network. Erosion rates (hillslope, gully and streambank erosion) and fine sediment sinks (floodplains and reservoirs) are disaggregated from mean annual rates based on daily rainfall and runoff. The model is evaluated in the Burdekin basin in tropical Australia, where policy targets have been set for reducing sediment and nutrient loads to the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) lagoon from grazing and cropping land. D-SedNet predicted annual loads with similar performance to that of a sediment rating curve calibrated to monitored suspended sediment concentrations. Relative to a 22-year reference load time series at the basin outlet derived from a dynamic general additive model based on monitoring data, D-SedNet had a median absolute error of 68% compared with 112% for the rating curve. RMS error was slightly higher for D-SedNet than for the rating curve due to large relative errors on small loads in several drought years. This accuracy is similar to existing agricultural system models used in arable or humid environments. Predicted river loads were sensitive to ground vegetation cover. We conclude that the river network sediment budget model provides some capacity for predicting load time-series independent of monitoring data in ungauged basins, and for evaluating the impact of land management on river sediment load time-series, which is challenging across large regions in data-poor environments.

  13. dBASE IV basics

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, P.

    1994-09-01

    This is a user`s manual for dBASE IV. dBASE IV is a popular software application that can be used on your personal computer to help organize and maintain your database files. It is actually a set of tools with which you can create, organize, select and manipulate data in a simple yet effective manner. dBASE IV offers three methods of working with the product: (1) control center: (2) command line; and (3) programming.

  14. Photophysics of Soret-Excited Tetrapyrroles in Solution. IV. Radiationless Decay and Triplet-Triplet Annihilation Investigated Using Tetraphenylporphinato Sn(IV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Manisankar; Danger, Brook R.; Steer, Ronald P.

    2009-09-01

    The S2 population decay rates and triplet-triplet annihilation efficiencies of Sn(IV)Cl2TPP have been measured in fluid solutions using its weak S2-S0 fluorescence as a metric. A detailed description of the excited-state photophysics of Sn(IV)Cl2TPP has allowed comparisons to be made between this rigid, D4h axially coordinated molecule and axially uncoordinated tetrapyrroles of greater flexibility and lower symmetry. S2-S1 internal conversion is the major S2 population decay path for Sn(IV)Cl2TPP as it is for the S2 states of all other d0 and d10 metalated tetrapyrroles. The S2 state of Sn(IV)Cl2TPP exhibits S2-S1 relaxation rates that follow the energy gap law of radiationless transition theory and are only slightly faster than those exhibited by MgTPP and the weak coupling limit. Differences in S2-S1 radiationless decay rates among the series MTPP (M = Mg, Zn, Cd, SnCl2) cannot be traced to differences in the displacements of the S2 and S1 potential surfaces. Instead, the most likely source of the large differences in S2-S1 radiationless decay rates between CdTPP and Sn(IV)Cl2TPP is the lower symmetry of the former (near C4v), which permits a much larger number of vibrations to participate in S2-S1 vibronic coupling. Triplet-triplet annihilation of the type 2T1 → S2 + S0 has been observed in Sn(IV)Cl2TPP for the first time, but is of substantially lower efficiency than seen in ZnTPP in noncoordinating solvents because of its shorter triplet lifetime and the shielding effects of its axial Cl ligands, which tend to block the short-range interaction needed for Dexter energy transfer.

  15. Analgesia after Epidural Dexamethasone is Further Enhanced by IV Dipyrone, but Not IV Parecoxibe Following Minor Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Righeti, Claudia CF; Kitayama, Antonio T

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidural administration of dexamethasone has been suggested for pain control after minor orthopedic surgery. This study was conducted to assess its efficacy after such surgery, combined or not to IV dipyrone, IV parecoxibe or their combination. Methods 91 patients were randomly assigned to seven groups. Patients were submitted to spinal bupivacaine anesthesia combined to epidural administration of either 10 ml saline or 10 mg dexamethasone diluted to 10-ml volume. Patients also received 10 ml IV saline or 1 gr dipyrone and/or 40 mg parecoxibe diluted to 10 ml with saline. Control group (CG) received epidural and IV saline. Dexamethasone group (DexG) received epidural dexamethasone and IV saline. Dipyrone group (DipG) received epidural saline and IV dipyrone. Dex-Dip G received epidural dexamethasone and IV dipyrone. Parecoxibe group (ParG) received epidural saline and IV parecoxibe. Dex-ParG received epidural dexamethasone and IV parecoxibe. Finally, Dex-Dip-ParG received epidural dexamethasone and IV dipyrone plus IV parecoxibe. Results The CG expressed 4h of analgesia and sooner requested pain killer. DexG was similar to DipG or ParG or Dex-ParG (7-hours), and they requested less ketoprofen compared to the CG (P < 0.05). However, the Dex-DipG and the Dex-Dip-ParG resulted in longer time to demand pain killer (17-hours) and less ketoprofen consumption in 24-hours (P < 0.002). Adverse effects were similar among groups. Conclusions The analgesia secondary to epidural dexamethasone was enhanced by IV dipyrone, while no effects were observed by the addition of IV parecoxibe. PMID:25317284

  16. Stabilization of large drainage basins over geological time scales: Cenozoic West Africa, hot spot swell growth, and the Niger River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chardon, Dominique; Grimaud, Jean-Louis; Rouby, Delphine; Beauvais, Anicet; Christophoul, Frédéric

    2016-03-01

    Reconstructing the evolving geometry of large river catchments over geological time scales is crucial to constraining yields to sedimentary basins. In the case of Africa, it should further help deciphering the response of large cratonic sediment routing systems to Cenozoic growth of the basin-and-swell topography of the continent. Mapping of dated and regionally correlated lateritic paleolandscape remnants complemented by onshore sedimentological archives allows the reconstruction of two physiographic configurations of West Africa in the Paleogene. Those reconstructions show that the geometry of the drainage is stabilized by the late early Oligocene (29 Ma) and probably by the end of the Eocene (34 Ma), allowing to effectively link the inland morphoclimatic record to offshore sedimentation since that time, particularly in the case of the Niger catchment—delta system. Mid-Eocene paleogeography reveals the antiquity of the Senegambia catchment back to at least 45 Ma and suggests that a marginal upwarp forming a continental divide preexisted early Oligocene connection of the Niger and Volta catchments to the Equatorial Atlantic Ocean. Such a drainage rearrangement was primarily enhanced by the topographic growth of the Hoggar hot spot swell and caused a stratigraphic turnover along the Equatorial margin of West Africa.

  17. Linear time reduction of large kinetic mechanisms with directed relation graph: n-Heptane and iso-octane

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Tianfeng; Law, Chung K.

    2006-01-01

    The algorithm of directed relation graph recently developed for skeletal mechanism reduction was extended to overall linear time operation, thereby greatly facilitating the computational effort in mechanism reduction, particularly for those involving large mechanisms. Together with a two-stage reduction strategy and using the kinetic responses of autoignition and perfectly stirred reactor (PSR) with extensive parametric variations as the criteria in eliminating unimportant species, a detailed 561-species n-heptane mechanism and a detailed 857-species iso-octane mechanism were successfully reduced to skeletal mechanisms consisting of 188 and 233 species, respectively. These skeletal mechanisms were demonstrated to mimic well the performance of the detailed mechanisms, not only for the autoignition and PSR systems based on which the reduced mechanisms were developed but also for the independent system of jet-stirred reactor. It was further observed that the accuracy of calculated species concentrations was equivalently bounded by the user-specified error threshold value and that the reduction time for a single reaction state is only about 50 ms for the large iso-octane mechanism.

  18. Induced core formation time in subcritical magnetic clouds by large-scale trans-Alfvénic flows

    SciTech Connect

    Kudoh, Takahiro; Basu, Shantanu E-mail: basu@uwo.ca

    2014-10-20

    We clarify the mechanism of accelerated core formation by large-scale nonlinear flows in subcritical magnetic clouds by finding a semi-analytical formula for the core formation time and describing the physical processes that lead to them. Recent numerical simulations show that nonlinear flows induce rapid ambipolar diffusion that leads to localized supercritical regions that can collapse. Here, we employ non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations including ambipolar diffusion for gravitationally stratified sheets threaded by vertical magnetic fields. One of the horizontal dimensions is eliminated, resulting in a simpler two-dimensional simulation that can clarify the basic process of accelerated core formation. A parameter study of simulations shows that the core formation time is inversely proportional to the square of the flow speed when the flow speed is greater than the Alfvén speed. We find a semi-analytical formula that explains this numerical result. The formula also predicts that the core formation time is about three times shorter than that with no turbulence, when the turbulent speed is comparable to the Alfvén speed.

  19. IVS contribution to ITRF2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Sabine; Thaller, Daniela; Roggenbuck, Ole; Lösler, Michael; Messerschmitt, Linda

    2016-07-01

    Every few years the International Terrestrial Reference System (ITRS) Center of the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS) decides to generate a new version of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). For the upcoming ITRF2014 the official contribution of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS) comprises 5796 combined sessions in SINEX file format from 1979.6 to 2015.0 containing 158 stations, overall. Nine AC contributions were included in the combination process, using five different software packages. Station coordinate time series of the combined solution show an overall repeatability of 3.3 mm for the north, 4.3 mm for the east and 7.5 mm for the height component over all stations. The minimum repeatabilities are 1.5 mm for north, 2.1 mm for east and 2.9 mm for height. One of the important differences between the IVS contribution to the ITRF2014 and the routine IVS combination is the omission of the correction for non-tidal atmospheric pressure loading (NTAL). Comparisons between the amplitudes of the annual signals derived by the VLBI observations and the annual signals from an NTAL model show that for some stations, NTAL has a high impact on station height variation. For other stations, the effect of NTAL is low. Occasionally other loading effects have a higher influence (e.g. continental water storage loading). External comparisons of the scale parameter between the VTRF2014 (a TRF based on combined VLBI solutions), DTRF2008 (DGFI-TUM realization of ITRS) and ITRF2008 revealed a significant difference in the scale. A scale difference of 0.11 ppb (i.e. 0.7 mm on the Earth's surface) has been detected between the VTRF2014 and the DTRF2008, and a scale difference of 0.44 ppb (i.e. 2.8 mm on the Earth's surface) between the VTRF2014 and ITRF2008. Internal comparisons between the EOP of the combined solution and the individual solutions from the AC contributions show a WRMS in X- and Y-Pole between

  20. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdnack, James A.; Zhou, Xiaobin; Larrabee, Glenn J.; Millis, Scott R.; Salthouse, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-fourth edition (WAIS-IV) and the Wechsler Memory Scale-fourth edition (WMS-IV) were co-developed to be used individually or as a combined battery of tests. The independent factor structure of each of the tests has been identified; however, the combined factor structure has yet to be determined. Confirmatory…

  1. Improving IV-A/IV-D Interface. Trainer Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. for Child Support Enforcement, Chevy Chase, MD.

    Effective interface between the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (IV-A) and the Child Support Enforcement (IV-D) programs is a key factor in assisting families in becoming self-sufficient, reducing welfare expenditures, and enforcing parental responsibility to support their children. Consequently, overcoming the procedural, technological,…

  2. Improving IV-A/IV-D Interface. Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. for Child Support Enforcement, Chevy Chase, MD.

    Effective interface between the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (IV-A) and the Child Support Enforcement (IV-D) programs is a key factor in assisting families in becoming self-sufficient, reducing welfare expenditures, and enforcing parental responsibility to support their children. Consequently, overcoming the procedural, technological,…

  3. Time-domain solution for transient dynamic response of a large-diameter thin-walled pipe pile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xuanming; Liu, Hanlong; Chu, Jian; Cheng, Ke

    2015-06-01

    The propagation of stress waves in a large-diameter pipe pile for low strain dynamic testing cannot be explained properly by traditional 1D wave theories. A new computational model is established to obtain a wave equation that can describe the dynamic response of a large-diameter thin-walled pipe pile to a transient point load during a low strain integrity test. An analytical solution in the time domain is deduced using the separation of variables and variation of constant methods. The validity of this new solution is verified by an existing analytical solution under free boundary conditions. The results of this time domain solution are also compared with the results of a frequency domain solution and field test data. The comparisons indicate that the new solution agrees well with the results of previous solutions. Parametric studies using the new solution with reference to a case study are also carried out. The results show that the mode number affects the accuracy of the dynamic response. A mode number greater than 10 is required to enable the calculated dynamic responses to be independent of the mode number. The dynamic response is also greatly affected by soil properties. The larger the side resistance, the smaller the displacement response and the smaller the reflected velocity wave crest. The displacement increases as the stress waves propagate along the pile when the pile shaft is free. The incident waves of displacement and velocity responses of the pile are not the same among different points in the circumferential direction on the pile top. However, the arrival time and peak value of the pile tip reflected waves are almost the same among different points on the pile top.

  4. Investigation on F layer height rise and equatorial spread F onset time: Signature of standing large-scale wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Lalit Mohan; Balwada, S.; Pant, T. K.; Sumod, S. G.

    2015-04-01

    Equatorial spread F observations have been categorized into three categories based on ionograms recorded over Sriharikota. First category comprised cases where the onset of equatorial spread F (ESF) was concurrent with the peak h'F time. Second and third categories comprised cases where the onset of ESF happened with a delay of 30 min and more than 30 min, respectively, with reference to the peak h'F time. Average peak h'F in the first category was more than 35 km higher than that in the second and third categories. Also, the peak vertical (upward) plasma drift was higher in the first category. Assuming the genesis of F region irregularity to have happened at or before the time of F layer attaining the peak height, late onset of ESF indicates the genesis of irregularities to have happened westward of Sriharikota. The fact that the peak h'F values were remarkably different in the three categories indicates a zonal variation of eastward electric field and postsunset height rise of F layer. The relative magnitude of the F layer height rise in the three different categories over Sriharikota has also been found to be significantly different than that over Thumba, an equatorial (magnetic) station located ~360 km westward of Sriharikota longitude. This scenario points toward the existence of a large-scale zonal standing wave in the F layer and its important role in F region instability process. Results presented in the manuscript have been discussed in the light of current understanding on the large-scale wave structure.

  5. MOBBED: a computational data infrastructure for handling large collections of event-rich time series datasets in MATLAB.

    PubMed

    Cockfield, Jeremy; Su, Kyungmin; Robbins, Kay A

    2013-01-01

    Experiments to monitor human brain activity during active behavior record a variety of modalities (e.g., EEG, eye tracking, motion capture, respiration monitoring) and capture a complex environmental context leading to large, event-rich time series datasets. The considerable variability of responses within and among subjects in more realistic behavioral scenarios requires experiments to assess many more subjects over longer periods of time. This explosion of data requires better computational infrastructure to more systematically explore and process these collections. MOBBED is a lightweight, easy-to-use, extensible toolkit that allows users to incorporate a computational database into their normal MATLAB workflow. Although capable of storing quite general types of annotated data, MOBBED is particularly oriented to multichannel time series such as EEG that have event streams overlaid with sensor data. MOBBED directly supports access to individual events, data frames, and time-stamped feature vectors, allowing users to ask questions such as what types of events or features co-occur under various experimental conditions. A database provides several advantages not available to users who process one dataset at a time from the local file system. In addition to archiving primary data in a central place to save space and avoid inconsistencies, such a database allows users to manage, search, and retrieve events across multiple datasets without reading the entire dataset. The database also provides infrastructure for handling more complex event patterns that include environmental and contextual conditions. The database can also be used as a cache for expensive intermediate results that are reused in such activities as cross-validation of machine learning algorithms. MOBBED is implemented over PostgreSQL, a widely used open source database, and is freely available under the GNU general public license at http://visual.cs.utsa.edu/mobbed. Source and issue reports for MOBBED

  6. MOBBED: a computational data infrastructure for handling large collections of event-rich time series datasets in MATLAB

    PubMed Central

    Cockfield, Jeremy; Su, Kyungmin; Robbins, Kay A.

    2013-01-01

    Experiments to monitor human brain activity during active behavior record a variety of modalities (e.g., EEG, eye tracking, motion capture, respiration monitoring) and capture a complex environmental context leading to large, event-rich time series datasets. The considerable variability of responses within and among subjects in more realistic behavioral scenarios requires experiments to assess many more subjects over longer periods of time. This explosion of data requires better computational infrastructure to more systematically explore and process these collections. MOBBED is a lightweight, easy-to-use, extensible toolkit that allows users to incorporate a computational database into their normal MATLAB workflow. Although capable of storing quite general types of annotated data, MOBBED is particularly oriented to multichannel time series such as EEG that have event streams overlaid with sensor data. MOBBED directly supports access to individual events, data frames, and time-stamped feature vectors, allowing users to ask questions such as what types of events or features co-occur under various experimental conditions. A database provides several advantages not available to users who process one dataset at a time from the local file system. In addition to archiving primary data in a central place to save space and avoid inconsistencies, such a database allows users to manage, search, and retrieve events across multiple datasets without reading the entire dataset. The database also provides infrastructure for handling more complex event patterns that include environmental and contextual conditions. The database can also be used as a cache for expensive intermediate results that are reused in such activities as cross-validation of machine learning algorithms. MOBBED is implemented over PostgreSQL, a widely used open source database, and is freely available under the GNU general public license at http://visual.cs.utsa.edu/mobbed. Source and issue reports for MOBBED

  7. Locating single-point sources from arrival times containing large picking errors (LPEs): the virtual field optimization method (VFOM)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xi-Bing; Wang, Ze-Wei; Dong, Long-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Microseismic monitoring systems using local location techniques tend to be timely, automatic and stable. One basic requirement of these systems is the automatic picking of arrival times. However, arrival times generated by automated techniques always contain large picking errors (LPEs), which may make the location solution unreliable and cause the integrated system to be unstable. To overcome the LPE issue, we propose the virtual field optimization method (VFOM) for locating single-point sources. In contrast to existing approaches, the VFOM optimizes a continuous and virtually established objective function to search the space for the common intersection of the hyperboloids, which is determined by sensor pairs other than the least residual between the model-calculated and measured arrivals. The results of numerical examples and in-site blasts show that the VFOM can obtain more precise and stable solutions than traditional methods when the input data contain LPEs. Furthermore, we discuss the impact of LPEs on objective functions to determine the LPE-tolerant mechanism, velocity sensitivity and stopping criteria of the VFOM. The proposed method is also capable of locating acoustic sources using passive techniques such as passive sonar detection and acoustic emission. PMID:26754955

  8. Large-scale time-lapse microscopy of Oct4 expression in human embryonic stem cell colonies.

    PubMed

    Bhadriraju, Kiran; Halter, Michael; Amelot, Julien; Bajcsy, Peter; Chalfoun, Joe; Vandecreme, Antoine; Mallon, Barbara S; Park, Kye-Yoon; Sista, Subhash; Elliott, John T; Plant, Anne L

    2016-07-01

    Identification and quantification of the characteristics of stem cell preparations is critical for understanding stem cell biology and for the development and manufacturing of stem cell based therapies. We have developed image analysis and visualization software that allows effective use of time-lapse microscopy to provide spatial and dynamic information from large numbers of human embryonic stem cell colonies. To achieve statistically relevant sampling, we examined >680 colonies from 3 different preparations of cells over 5days each, generating a total experimental dataset of 0.9 terabyte (TB). The 0.5 Giga-pixel images at each time point were represented by multi-resolution pyramids and visualized using the Deep Zoom Javascript library extended to support viewing Giga-pixel images over time and extracting data on individual colonies. We present a methodology that enables quantification of variations in nominally-identical preparations and between colonies, correlation of colony characteristics with Oct4 expression, and identification of rare events. PMID:27286574

  9. Locating single-point sources from arrival times containing large picking errors (LPEs): the virtual field optimization method (VFOM).

    PubMed

    Li, Xi-Bing; Wang, Ze-Wei; Dong, Long-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Microseismic monitoring systems using local location techniques tend to be timely, automatic and stable. One basic requirement of these systems is the automatic picking of arrival times. However, arrival times generated by automated techniques always contain large picking errors (LPEs), which may make the location solution unreliable and cause the integrated system to be unstable. To overcome the LPE issue, we propose the virtual field optimization method (VFOM) for locating single-point sources. In contrast to existing approaches, the VFOM optimizes a continuous and virtually established objective function to search the space for the common intersection of the hyperboloids, which is determined by sensor pairs other than the least residual between the model-calculated and measured arrivals. The results of numerical examples and in-site blasts show that the VFOM can obtain more precise and stable solutions than traditional methods when the input data contain LPEs. Furthermore, we discuss the impact of LPEs on objective functions to determine the LPE-tolerant mechanism, velocity sensitivity and stopping criteria of the VFOM. The proposed method is also capable of locating acoustic sources using passive techniques such as passive sonar detection and acoustic emission. PMID:26754955

  10. Motions of charged particles in the magnetosphere under the influence of a time-varying large scale convection electric field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. H.; Hoffman, R. A.; Bewtra, N. K.

    1979-01-01

    The motions of charged particles under the influence of the geomagnetic and electric fields are quite complex in the region of the inner magnetosphere. The Volland-Stern type large-scale convection electric field with gamma = 2 has been used successfully to predict both the plasmapause location and particle enhancements determined from Explorer 45 (S3-A) measurements. Recently introduced into the trajectory calculations of Ejiri et al. (1978) is a time dependence in this electric field based on the variation in Kp for actual magnetic storm conditions. The particle trajectories are computed as they change in this time-varying electric field. Several storm fronts of particles of different magnetic moments are allowed to be injected into the inner magnetosphere from L = 10 in the equatorial plane. The motions of these fronts are presented in a movie format. The local time of injection, the particle magnetic moments and the subsequent temporal history of the magnetospheric electric field play important roles in determining whether the injected particles are trapped within the ring current region or whether they are convected to regions outside the inner magnetosphere.

  11. Locating single-point sources from arrival times containing large picking errors (LPEs): the virtual field optimization method (VFOM).

    PubMed

    Li, Xi-Bing; Wang, Ze-Wei; Dong, Long-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Microseismic monitoring systems using local location techniques tend to be timely, automatic and stable. One basic requirement of these systems is the automatic picking of arrival times. However, arrival times generated by automated techniques always contain large picking errors (LPEs), which may make the location solution unreliable and cause the integrated system to be unstable. To overcome the LPE issue, we propose the virtual field optimization method (VFOM) for locating single-point sources. In contrast to existing approaches, the VFOM optimizes a continuous and virtually established objective function to search the space for the common intersection of the hyperboloids, which is determined by sensor pairs other than the least residual between the model-calculated and measured arrivals. The results of numerical examples and in-site blasts show that the VFOM can obtain more precise and stable solutions than traditional methods when the input data contain LPEs. Furthermore, we discuss the impact of LPEs on objective functions to determine the LPE-tolerant mechanism, velocity sensitivity and stopping criteria of the VFOM. The proposed method is also capable of locating acoustic sources using passive techniques such as passive sonar detection and acoustic emission.

  12. Locating single-point sources from arrival times containing large picking errors (LPEs): the virtual field optimization method (VFOM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xi-Bing; Wang, Ze-Wei; Dong, Long-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Microseismic monitoring systems using local location techniques tend to be timely, automatic and stable. One basic requirement of these systems is the automatic picking of arrival times. However, arrival times generated by automated techniques always contain large picking errors (LPEs), which may make the location solution unreliable and cause the integrated system to be unstable. To overcome the LPE issue, we propose the virtual field optimization method (VFOM) for locating single-point sources. In contrast to existing approaches, the VFOM optimizes a continuous and virtually established objective function to search the space for the common intersection of the hyperboloids, which is determined by sensor pairs other than the least residual between the model-calculated and measured arrivals. The results of numerical examples and in-site blasts show that the VFOM can obtain more precise and stable solutions than traditional methods when the input data contain LPEs. Furthermore, we discuss the impact of LPEs on objective functions to determine the LPE-tolerant mechanism, velocity sensitivity and stopping criteria of the VFOM. The proposed method is also capable of locating acoustic sources using passive techniques such as passive sonar detection and acoustic emission.

  13. Real-Time Three-Dimensional Cell Segmentation in Large-Scale Microscopy Data of Developing Embryos.

    PubMed

    Stegmaier, Johannes; Amat, Fernando; Lemon, William C; McDole, Katie; Wan, Yinan; Teodoro, George; Mikut, Ralf; Keller, Philipp J

    2016-01-25

    We present the Real-time Accurate Cell-shape Extractor (RACE), a high-throughput image analysis framework for automated three-dimensional cell segmentation in large-scale images. RACE is 55-330 times faster and 2-5 times more accurate than state-of-the-art methods. We demonstrate the generality of RACE by extracting cell-shape information from entire Drosophila, zebrafish, and mouse embryos imaged with confocal and light-sheet microscopes. Using RACE, we automatically reconstructed cellular-resolution tissue anisotropy maps across developing Drosophila embryos and quantified differences in cell-shape dynamics in wild-type and mutant embryos. We furthermore integrated RACE with our framework for automated cell lineaging and performed joint segmentation and cell tracking in entire Drosophila embryos. RACE processed these terabyte-sized datasets on a single computer within 1.4 days. RACE is easy to use, as it requires adjustment of only three parameters, takes full advantage of state-of-the-art multi-core processors and graphics cards, and is available as open-source software for Windows, Linux, and Mac OS. PMID:26812020

  14. NATIONAL COASTAL CONDITION REPORT IV

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Coastal Condition Report IV (NCCR IV) is the fourth in a series of environmental assessments of U.S. coastal waters and the Great Lakes. The report includes assessments of all the nation’s estuaries in the contiguous 48 states and Puerto Rico, south-eastern Alaska, ...

  15. An integrated, indicator framework for assessing large-scale variations and change in seasonal timing and phenology (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancourt, J. L.; Weltzin, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    As part of an effort to develop an Indicator System for the National Climate Assessment (NCA), the Seasonality and Phenology Indicators Technical Team (SPITT) proposed an integrated, continental-scale framework for understanding and tracking seasonal timing in physical and biological systems. The framework shares several metrics with the EPA's National Climate Change Indicators. The SPITT framework includes a comprehensive suite of national indicators to track conditions, anticipate vulnerabilities, and facilitate intervention or adaptation to the extent possible. Observed, modeled, and forecasted seasonal timing metrics can inform a wide spectrum of decisions on federal, state, and private lands in the U.S., and will be pivotal for international efforts to mitigation and adaptation. Humans use calendars both to understand the natural world and to plan their lives. Although the seasons are familiar concepts, we lack a comprehensive understanding of how variability arises in the timing of seasonal transitions in the atmosphere, and how variability and change translate and propagate through hydrological, ecological and human systems. For example, the contributions of greenhouse warming and natural variability to secular trends in seasonal timing are difficult to disentangle, including earlier spring transitions from winter (strong westerlies) to summer (weak easterlies) patterns of atmospheric circulation; shifts in annual phasing of daily temperature means and extremes; advanced timing of snow and ice melt and soil thaw at higher latitudes and elevations; and earlier start and longer duration of the growing and fire seasons. The SPITT framework aims to relate spatiotemporal variability in surface climate to (1) large-scale modes of natural climate variability and greenhouse gas-driven climatic change, and (2) spatiotemporal variability in hydrological, ecological and human responses and impacts. The hierarchical framework relies on ground and satellite observations

  16. Innovative real-time and non-destructive method of beam profile measurement under large beam current irradiation for BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, M.; Kamada, S.; Suda, M.; Fujii, R.; Nakamura, M.; Hoshi, M.; Sato, H.; Endo, S.; Hamano, T.; Arai, S.; Higashimata, A.

    2012-10-01

    We developed a real-time and non-destructive method of beam profile measurement on a target under large beam current irradiation, and without any complex radiation detectors or electrical circuits. We measured the beam profiles on a target by observing the target temperature using an infrared-radiation thermometer camera. The target temperatures were increased and decreased quickly by starting and stopping the beam irradiation within 1 s in response speed. Our method could trace beam movements rapidly. The beam size and position were calibrated by measuring O-ring heat on the target. Our method has the potential to measure beam profiles at beam current over 1 mA for proton and deuteron with the energy around 3 MeV and allows accelerator operators to adjust the beam location during beam irradiation experiments without decreasing the beam current.

  17. Third-order-accurate numerical methods for efficient, large time-step solutions of mixed linear and nonlinear problems

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, J.W.

    1995-02-01

    There is an increasing need for more accurate numerical methods for large-scale nonlinear magneto-fluid turbulence calculations. These methods should not only increase the current state of the art in terms of accuracy, but should also continue to optimize other desired properties such as simplicity, minimized computation, minimized memory requirements, and robust stability. This includes the ability to stably solve stiff problems with long time-steps. This work discusses a general methodology for deriving higher-order numerical methods. It also discusses how the selection of various choices can affect the desired properties. The explicit discussion focuses on third-order Runge-Kutta methods, including general solutions and five examples. The study investigates the linear numerical analysis of these methods, including their accuracy, general stability, and stiff stability. Additional appendices discuss linear multistep methods, discuss directions for further work, and exhibit numerical analysis results for some other commonly used lower-order methods.

  18. Time-domain algorithm for single-photon laser-Doppler flowmetry at large interoptode spacing in human bone.

    PubMed

    Binzoni, Tiziano; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Sanguinetti, Bruno

    2014-10-20

    A new laser-Doppler flowmeter at large interoptode spacing, based on single-photon counting (single-photon laser-Doppler flowmetry [SP-LDF]) and allowing assessment of blood flow deep in bone tissue, is proposed and implemented. To exploit the advantages of the new SP-LDF hardware, a dedicated simple and efficient time-domain algorithm has been developed. The new algorithm is based on the zero-order moment of the power density spectrum of the ad hoc prefiltered photoelectric current. The SP-LDF has been validated by Monte Carlo simulations, as well as by experimental measurements on a bone tissue phantom for optical flowmeters and on human. PMID:25402789

  19. Space-time block code based MIMO encoding for large core step index plastic optical fiber transmission systems.

    PubMed

    Raptis, Nikos; Grivas, Evangelos; Pikasis, Evangelos; Syvridis, Dimitris

    2011-05-23

    The performance of Space-Time Block Codes combined with Discrete MultiTone modulation applied in a Large Core Step-Index POF link is examined theoretically. A comparative study is performed considering several schemes that employ multiple transmitters/receivers and a fiber span of 100 m. The performance enhancement of the higher diversity order configurations is revealed by application of a Margin Adaptive Bit Loading technique that employs Chow's algorithm. Simulations results of the above schemes, in terms of Bit Error Rate as a function of the received Signal to Noise Ratio, are provided. An improvement of more than 6 dB for the required electrical SNR is observed for a 3 × 1 configuration, in order to achieve a 10(-3) BER value, as compared to a conventional Single Input Single output scheme.

  20. Large-strain optical fiber sensing and real-time FEM updating of steel structures under the high temperature effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ying; Fang, Xia; Bevans, Wesley James; Zhou, Zhi; Xiao, Hai; Chen, Genda

    2013-01-01

    Steel buildings are subjected to fire hazards during or immediately after a major earthquake. Under combined gravity and thermal loads, they have non-uniformly distributed stiffness and strength, and thus collapse progressively with large deformation. In this study, large-strain optical fiber sensors for high temperature applications and a temperature-dependent finite element model updating method are proposed for accurate prediction of structural behavior in real time. The optical fiber sensors can measure strains up to 10% at approximately 700 °C. Their measurements are in good agreement with those from strain gauges up to 0.5%. In comparison with the experimental results, the proposed model updating method can reduce the predicted strain errors from over 75% to below 20% at 800 °C. The minimum number of sensors in a fire zone that can properly characterize the vertical temperature distribution of heated air due to the gravity effect should be included in the proposed model updating scheme to achieve a predetermined simulation accuracy.

  1. Large scale pesticide multiresidue methods in food combining liquid chromatography--time-of-flight mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    García-Reyes, Juan F; Hernando, M Dolores; Ferrer, Carmen; Molina-Díaz, Antonio; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo R

    2007-10-01

    Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-TOFMS) are powerful and complementary techniques that can independently cover the majority of the challenges related with pesticide residue food control. The sequential combination of both systems benefits from their complementary advantages and assists to increase the performance and to simplify routine large scale pesticide multiresidue methods. The proposed approach consists of three stages: (1) automated pesticide screening by LC-TOFMS; (2) identification by LC-TOFMS accurate mass measurements; and (3) confirmation and quantitation by LC-MS/MS. We have developed a fast comprehensive (identification/confirmation + quantitation) automated screening method for 100 target pesticides in crops. In the first stage, a set of data including m/z accurate mass windows (within 20 mDa width) and retention time is obtained (using a standard solution containing all the targeted pesticides) in order to build the automated screening procedure, which is created automatically by assigning retention time and the m/z mass window for each target pesticide. Samples are then analyzed, and the method enables the screening and preliminary identification of the species first by retention time and m/z mass window, followed by subsequent identification (only if positive results) by LC-TOFMS accurate mass measurements. After that, final confirmation of the positive findings using two MRM transitions and accurate quantitation is performed by LC-MS/MS using a hybrid triple quadrupole linear ion trap (QqLIT) mass spectrometer. In addition, the use of this QqLIT instrument also offers additional advantageous scanning modes (enhanced product ion and MS3 modes) for confirmatory purposes in compounds with poor fragmentation. Examples of applications to real samples show the potential of the proposed approach, including the detection of nonselected "a priori" compounds as a

  2. Apolipoprotein A-IV: a protein intimately involved in metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Kohan, Alison B.; Lo, Chun-Min; Liu, Min; Howles, Philip; Tso, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of the physiological roles of apoA-IV in metabolism, and to underscore the potential for apoA-IV to be a focus for new therapies aimed at the treatment of diabetes and obesity-related disorders. ApoA-IV is primarily synthesized by the small intestine, attached to chylomicrons by enterocytes, and secreted into intestinal lymph during fat absorption. In circulation, apoA-IV is associated with HDL and chylomicron remnants, but a large portion is lipoprotein free. Due to its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties, and because it can mediate reverse-cholesterol transport, proposed functions of circulating apoA-IV have been related to protection from cardiovascular disease. This review, however, focuses primarily on several properties of apoA-IV that impact other metabolic functions related to food intake, obesity, and diabetes. In addition to participating in triglyceride absorption, apoA-IV can act as an acute satiation factor through both peripheral and central routes of action. It also modulates glucose homeostasis through incretin-like effects on insulin secretion, and by moderating hepatic glucose production. While apoA-IV receptors remain to be conclusively identified, the latter modes of action suggest that this protein holds therapeutic promise for treating metabolic disease. PMID:25640749

  3. Time resolved in situ X-ray diffraction study of crystallisation processes of large pore nanoporous aluminophosphate materials.

    PubMed

    Simmance, Kerry; van Beek, Wouter; Sankar, Gopinathan

    2015-01-01

    Time resolved high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction was utilized to obtain detailed changes in the crystal structure parameters during the hydrothermal crystallization process of the nanoporous aluminophosphate AlPO-5 (AFI) structure. This in situ study offered not only the influence of metal ions on the onset of crystallization and estimation of the activation energy of the process, but also allowed us to determine in detail the changes in lattice parameters during this process. More importantly the time-resolved study clearly showed the lattice expansion in the divalent metal ions substituted system right from the on-set of crystallization process, compared to the one without any dopant ions, which suggest that an amorphous or poorly crystalline network is formed prior to crystallization that contains the large divalent ions (compared to Al(iii), the substituting element), which is in agreement with the combined XAS/XRD study reported earlier. A mechanism based on this and the earlier study is suggested. PMID:25683746

  4. Time evolution of negative ion profile in a large cesiated negative ion source applicable to fusion reactors.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, M; Hanada, M; Kojima, A; Kashiwagi, M; Umeda, N; Hiratsuka, J; Ichikawa, M; Watanabe, K; R Grisham, L; Tsumori, K; Kisaki, M

    2016-02-01

    To understand the physics of the cesium (Cs) recycling in the large Cs-seeded negative ion sources relevant to ITER and JT-60SA with ion extraction area of 45-60 cm × 110-120 cm, the time evolution of the negative ion profile was precisely measured in JT-60SA where the ion extraction area is longitudinally segmented into 5. The Cs was seeded from the oven at 180 °C to the ion source. After 1 g of Cs input, surface production of the negative ions appeared only in the central segment where a Cs nozzle was located. Up to 2 g of Cs, the negative ion profile was longitudinally expanded over full ion extraction area. The measured time evolution of the negative ion profile has the similar tendency of distribution of the Cs atoms that is calculated. From the results, it is suggested that Cs atom distribution is correlated with the formation of the negative ion profile. PMID:26932026

  5. ASIC-based architecture for the real-time computation of 2D convolution with large kernel size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Rui; Zhong, Sheng; Yan, Luxin

    2015-12-01

    Bidimensional convolution is a low-level processing algorithm of interest in many areas, but its high computational cost constrains the size of the kernels, especially in real-time embedded systems. This paper presents a hardware architecture for the ASIC-based implementation of 2-D convolution with medium-large kernels. Aiming to improve the efficiency of storage resources on-chip, reducing off-chip bandwidth of these two issues, proposed construction of a data cache reuse. Multi-block SPRAM to cross cached images and the on-chip ping-pong operation takes full advantage of the data convolution calculation reuse, design a new ASIC data scheduling scheme and overall architecture. Experimental results show that the structure can achieve 40× 32 size of template real-time convolution operations, and improve the utilization of on-chip memory bandwidth and on-chip memory resources, the experimental results show that the structure satisfies the conditions to maximize data throughput output , reducing the need for off-chip memory bandwidth.

  6. Distribution and timing of distant metastasis after local therapy in large cohort of patients with esophageal and esophagogastric junction cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shiozaki, Hironori; Sudo, Kazuki; Xiao, Lianchun; Wadhwa, Roopma; Elimova, Elena; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Skinner, Heath D.; Lee, Jeffrey H.; Weston, Brian; Bhutani, Manoop S.; Blum, Mariela A.; Maru, Dipen M.; Ajani, Jaffer A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with localized esophageal and esophagogastric junction cancer (EAC) receive chemoradiation then surgery (trimodality; TMT) or definitive chemoradiation (bimodality; BMT). Since distant metastases (DMs) are common but the details of the DM distribution and timing in a large cohort have not been described. Methods 629 patients with localized EAC who had TMT or BMT were analyzed. Standard statistical methods were used to define the endpoints. Results The median follow-up time was 37.2 months (interquartile range: 17.8–65.0). Among 356 TMT patients, 33% (119) developed DM as their first relapse and among 273 patients with BMT, 40% (109) developed DM. 91% (TMT) and 96% (BMT) of DMs were diagnosed within 2 years of local therapy. The most common sites of DMs were: lung, distant nodes, liver, peritoneal cavity, bone, brain, and pleura in the order of frequency. The median overall survival of TMT patients with DM was 10.2 months (95% CI: 7.8–12.7) and that for BMT patients with DM was 7.8 months (95% CI: 5.7–9.9). Conclusions Following TMT or BMT, ≥33% of patients developed DMs and most DM occurred within 2 years (>90%) of local therapy. A clinical model that highly associates with high-risk for DM in TMT-eligible patients, prior to surgery, is desirable. PMID:24925190

  7. Large Observatory for X-ray Timing (LOFT-P): A Probe-Class Mission Concept Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Ray, P. S.; Chakrabarty, D.; Feroci, M.; Jenke, Peter; Griffith, C.; Zane, S.; Winter, B.; Brandt, S.; Hernamdez, M.; Hickman, R.; Hopkins, R.; Garcia, J.; Chapman, J.; Schnell, A.; Becker, C.; Dominguez, A.; Ingram, L.; Gangl, B.; Carson, B.

    2016-01-01

    LOFT-P is a mission concept for a NASA Astrophysics Probe-Class (less than $1B) X-ray timing mission, based on the LOFT M-class concept originally proposed to ESA's M3 and M4 calls. LOFT-P requires very large collecting area, high time resolution, good spectral resolution, broadband spectral coverage (2-30 keV), highly flexible scheduling, and an ability to detect and respond promptly to time-critical targets of opportunity. Many of LOFTP's targets are bright, rapidly varying sources, so these measurements are synergistic to imaging and high-resolution spectroscopy instruments, addressing much smaller distance scales than are possible without very long baseline X-ray interferometry, and using complementary techniques to address the geometry and dynamics of emission regions. LOFT-P was presented as an example mission to the head of NASA's Astrophysics Division, to demonstrate the strong community support for creation of a probe-class, for missions costing between $500M and $1B. We submitted a white paper4 in response to NASA PhysPAG's call for white papers: Probe-class Mission Concepts, describing LOFT-P science and a simple extrapolation from the ESA study costs. The next step for probe-class missions will be input into the NASA Astrophysics Decadal Survey to encourage the creation of a probe-class opportunity. We report on a 2016 study by MSFC's Advanced Concepts Office of LOFT-P, a US-led probe-class LOFT concept.

  8. Large-Scale Uncertainty and Error Analysis for Time-dependent Fluid/Structure Interactions in Wind Turbine Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, Juan J.; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2013-08-25

    The following is the final report covering the entire period of this aforementioned grant, June 1, 2011 - May 31, 2013 for the portion of the effort corresponding to Stanford University (SU). SU has partnered with Sandia National Laboratories (PI: Mike S. Eldred) and Purdue University (PI: Dongbin Xiu) to complete this research project and this final report includes those contributions made by the members of the team at Stanford. Dr. Eldred is continuing his contributions to this project under a no-cost extension and his contributions to the overall effort will be detailed at a later time (once his effort has concluded) on a separate project submitted by Sandia National Laboratories. At Stanford, the team is made up of Profs. Alonso, Iaccarino, and Duraisamy, post-doctoral researcher Vinod Lakshminarayan, and graduate student Santiago Padron. At Sandia National Laboratories, the team includes Michael Eldred, Matt Barone, John Jakeman, and Stefan Domino, and at Purdue University, we have Prof. Dongbin Xiu as our main collaborator. The overall objective of this project was to develop a novel, comprehensive methodology for uncertainty quantification by combining stochastic expansions (nonintrusive polynomial chaos and stochastic collocation), the adjoint approach, and fusion with experimental data to account for aleatory and epistemic uncertainties from random variable, random field, and model form sources. The expected outcomes of this activity were detailed in the proposal and are repeated here to set the stage for the results that we have generated during the time period of execution of this project: 1. The rigorous determination of an error budget comprising numerical errors in physical space and statistical errors in stochastic space and its use for optimal allocation of resources; 2. A considerable increase in efficiency when performing uncertainty quantification with a large number of uncertain variables in complex non-linear multi-physics problems; 3. A

  9. Development of Methodologies for IV and V of Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Brian; Darrah, Marjorie

    2003-01-01

    Non-deterministic systems often rely upon neural network (NN) technology to "lean" to manage flight systems under controlled conditions using carefully chosen training sets. How can these adaptive systems be certified to ensure that they will become increasingly efficient and behave appropriately in real-time situations? The bulk of Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) research of non-deterministic software control systems such as Adaptive Flight Controllers (AFC's) addresses NNs in well-behaved and constrained environments such as simulations and strict process control. However, neither substantive research, nor effective IV&V techniques have been found to address AFC's learning in real-time and adapting to live flight conditions. Adaptive flight control systems offer good extensibility into commercial aviation as well as military aviation and transportation. Consequently, this area of IV&V represents an area of growing interest and urgency. ISR proposes to further the current body of knowledge to meet two objectives: Research the current IV&V methods and assess where these methods may be applied toward a methodology for the V&V of Neural Network; and identify effective methods for IV&V of NNs that learn in real-time, including developing a prototype test bed for IV&V of AFC's. Currently. no practical method exists. lSR will meet these objectives through the tasks identified and described below. First, ISR will conduct a literature review of current IV&V technology. TO do this, ISR will collect the existing body of research on IV&V of non-deterministic systems and neural network. ISR will also develop the framework for disseminating this information through specialized training. This effort will focus on developing NASA's capability to conduct IV&V of neural network systems and to provide training to meet the increasing need for IV&V expertise in such systems.

  10. Large geodetic time series constraining the spatial distribution and the time evolution of the velocity field at the western tip of the Aden Ridge in Afar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doubre, C.; Deprez, A.; Masson, F.; Socquet, A.; Ulrich, P.; Ibrahim Ahmed, S.; de Chabalier, J. B.; Ahmadine Omar, A.; Vigny, C.; Ruegg, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    We present the results of the last GPS campaign conducted over the Djiboutian part of Eastern Afar. A large and dense geodetic network has been measured regularly since the 90's, and allows an accurate determination of the velocity field associated with the western tip of the Arabia-Somalia divergent plate boundary. Within the Tadjoura Gulf, the Aden ridge consists of a series of 3 en échelon, submerged spreading segments, except for the Asal segment, which is partly above water. The repetition of 6 to 7 measurements together with 6 permanent continuous GNSS stations allow an opportunity to study the spatial distribution of the active extension in relation to these 3 segments, but also to study time variations of the displacements, which are greatly expected to be transitory because of the occurrence of dyking events, small to intermediate seismic events, and volcanic activity. The divergent motion of the two margins of the Gulf occurs at ~15 mm/yr, which is consistent with the long-term estimates of the Arabia-Somalia motion. Across the Asal segment, this value confirms that the effect of the dyking event in 1978 has ended. The velocity gradients show that the deformation is distributed from the southern to the northern rift shoulder. As revealed by the InSAR data however, the along-axis variations of the deformation pattern, i.e. clear superficial active faults in the SE part of the rift and deep opening in the NW part, suggests the remaining influence of the previous dyke intrusions within the segment inner floor. The time series show that the velocity field was more heterogeneous before 2003, when the micro-seismic activity was significant, particularly around the volcanic center. The striking feature of the time evolution of the velocity field consists in the transition from an extension mainly localized across the Asal segment before 2003 to an extension more distributed, implying the influence of the southern Quaternary structures forming the Gaggade and

  11. Aqueous complexation of thorium(IV), uranium(IV), neptunium(IV), plutonium(III/IV), and cerium(III/IV) with DTPA.

    PubMed

    Brown, M Alex; Paulenova, Alena; Gelis, Artem V

    2012-07-16

    Aqueous complexation of Th(IV), U(IV), Np(IV), Pu(III/IV), and Ce(III/IV) with DTPA was studied by potentiometry, absorption spectrophotometry, and cyclic voltammetry at 1 M ionic strength and 25 °C. The stability constants for the 1:1 complex of each trivalent and tetravalent metal were calculated. From the potentiometric data, we report stability constant values for Ce(III)DTPA, Ce(III)HDTPA, and Th(IV)DTPA of log β(101) = 20.01 ± 0.02, log β(111) = 22.0 ± 0.2, and log β(101) = 29.6 ± 1, respectively. From the absorption spectrophotometry data, we report stability constant values for U(IV)DTPA, Np(IV)DTPA, and Pu(IV)DTPA of log β(101) = 31.8 ± 0.1, 32.3 ± 0.1, and 33.67 ± 0.02, respectively. From the cyclic voltammetry data, we report stability constant values for Ce(IV) and Pu(III) of log β(101) = 34.04 ± 0.04 and 20.58 ± 0.04, respectively. The values obtained in this work are compared and discussed with respect to the ionic radius of each cationic metal.

  12. When David Beats Goliath: The Advantage of Large Size in Interspecific Aggressive Contests Declines over Evolutionary Time

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Paul R.; Ghalambor, Cameron K.

    2014-01-01

    Body size has long been recognized to play a key role in shaping species interactions. For example, while small species thrive in a diversity of environments, they typically lose aggressive contests for resources with larger species. However, numerous examples exist of smaller species dominating larger species during aggressive interactions, suggesting that the evolution of traits can allow species to overcome the competitive disadvantage of small size. If these traits accumulate as lineages diverge, then the advantage of large size in interspecific aggressive interactions should decline with increased evolutionary distance. We tested this hypothesis using data on the outcomes of 23,362 aggressive interactions among 246 bird species pairs involving vultures at carcasses, hummingbirds at nectar sources, and antbirds and woodcreepers at army ant swarms. We found the advantage of large size declined as species became more evolutionarily divergent, and smaller species were more likely to dominate aggressive contests when interacting with more distantly-related species. These results appear to be caused by both the evolution of traits in smaller species that enhanced their abilities in aggressive contests, and the evolution of traits in larger species that were adaptive for other functions, but compromised their abilities to compete aggressively. Specific traits that may provide advantages to small species in aggressive interactions included well-developed leg musculature and talons, enhanced flight acceleration and maneuverability, novel fighting behaviors, and traits associated with aggression, such as testosterone and muscle development. Traits that may have hindered larger species in aggressive interactions included the evolution of morphologies for tree trunk foraging that compromised performance in aggressive contests away from trunks, and the evolution of migration. Overall, our results suggest that fundamental trade-offs, such as those associated with body size

  13. When David beats Goliath: the advantage of large size in interspecific aggressive contests declines over evolutionary time.

    PubMed

    Martin, Paul R; Ghalambor, Cameron K

    2014-01-01

    Body size has long been recognized to play a key role in shaping species interactions. For example, while small species thrive in a diversity of environments, they typically lose aggressive contests for resources with larger species. However, numerous examples exist of smaller species dominating larger species during aggressive interactions, suggesting that the evolution of traits can allow species to overcome the competitive disadvantage of small size. If these traits accumulate as lineages diverge, then the advantage of large size in interspecific aggressive interactions should decline with increased evolutionary distance. We tested this hypothesis using data on the outcomes of 23,362 aggressive interactions among 246 bird species pairs involving vultures at carcasses, hummingbirds at nectar sources, and antbirds and woodcreepers at army ant swarms. We found the advantage of large size declined as species became more evolutionarily divergent, and smaller species were more likely to dominate aggressive contests when interacting with more distantly-related species. These results appear to be caused by both the evolution of traits in smaller species that enhanced their abilities in aggressive contests, and the evolution of traits in larger species that were adaptive for other functions, but compromised their abilities to compete aggressively. Specific traits that may provide advantages to small species in aggressive interactions included well-developed leg musculature and talons, enhanced flight acceleration and maneuverability, novel fighting behaviors, and traits associated with aggression, such as testosterone and muscle development. Traits that may have hindered larger species in aggressive interactions included the evolution of morphologies for tree trunk foraging that compromised performance in aggressive contests away from trunks, and the evolution of migration. Overall, our results suggest that fundamental trade-offs, such as those associated with body size

  14. When David beats Goliath: the advantage of large size in interspecific aggressive contests declines over evolutionary time.

    PubMed

    Martin, Paul R; Ghalambor, Cameron K

    2014-01-01

    Body size has long been recognized to play a key role in shaping species interactions. For example, while small species thrive in a diversity of environments, they typically lose aggressive contests for resources with larger species. However, numerous examples exist of smaller species dominating larger species during aggressive interactions, suggesting that the evolution of traits can allow species to overcome the competitive disadvantage of small size. If these traits accumulate as lineages diverge, then the advantage of large size in interspecific aggressive interactions should decline with increased evolutionary distance. We tested this hypothesis using data on the outcomes of 23,362 aggressive interactions among 246 bird species pairs involving vultures at carcasses, hummingbirds at nectar sources, and antbirds and woodcreepers at army ant swarms. We found the advantage of large size declined as species became more evolutionarily divergent, and smaller species were more likely to dominate aggressive contests when interacting with more distantly-related species. These results appear to be caused by both the evolution of traits in smaller species that enhanced their abilities in aggressive contests, and the evolution of traits in larger species that were adaptive for other functions, but compromised their abilities to compete aggressively. Specific traits that may provide advantages to small species in aggressive interactions included well-developed leg musculature and talons, enhanced flight acceleration and maneuverability, novel fighting behaviors, and traits associated with aggression, such as testosterone and muscle development. Traits that may have hindered larger species in aggressive interactions included the evolution of morphologies for tree trunk foraging that compromised performance in aggressive contests away from trunks, and the evolution of migration. Overall, our results suggest that fundamental trade-offs, such as those associated with body size

  15. An Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology for Generation IV Nuclear Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy J. Leahy

    2010-06-01

    The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) Risk and Safety Working Group (RSWG) was created to develop an effective approach for the safety of Generation IV advanced nuclear energy systems. Early work of the RSWG focused on defining a safety philosophy founded on lessons learned from current and prior generations of nuclear technologies, and on identifying technology characteristics that may help achieve Generation IV safety goals. More recent RSWG work has focused on the definition of an integrated safety assessment methodology for evaluating the safety of Generation IV systems. The methodology, tentatively called ISAM, is an integrated “toolkit” consisting of analytical techniques that are available and matched to appropriate stages of Generation IV system concept development. The integrated methodology is intended to yield safety-related insights that help actively drive the evolving design throughout the technology development cycle, potentially resulting in enhanced safety, reduced costs, and shortened development time.

  16. Breaking Computational Barriers: Real-time Analysis and Optimization with Large-scale Nonlinear Models via Model Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Carlberg, Kevin Thomas; Drohmann, Martin; Tuminaro, Raymond S.; Boggs, Paul T.; Ray, Jaideep; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf

    2014-10-01

    Model reduction for dynamical systems is a promising approach for reducing the computational cost of large-scale physics-based simulations to enable high-fidelity models to be used in many- query (e.g., Bayesian inference) and near-real-time (e.g., fast-turnaround simulation) contexts. While model reduction works well for specialized problems such as linear time-invariant systems, it is much more difficult to obtain accurate, stable, and efficient reduced-order models (ROMs) for systems with general nonlinearities. This report describes several advances that enable nonlinear reduced-order models (ROMs) to be deployed in a variety of time-critical settings. First, we present an error bound for the Gauss-Newton with Approximated Tensors (GNAT) nonlinear model reduction technique. This bound allows the state-space error for the GNAT method to be quantified when applied with the backward Euler time-integration scheme. Second, we present a methodology for preserving classical Lagrangian structure in nonlinear model reduction. This technique guarantees that important properties--such as energy conservation and symplectic time-evolution maps--are preserved when performing model reduction for models described by a Lagrangian formalism (e.g., molecular dynamics, structural dynamics). Third, we present a novel technique for decreasing the temporal complexity --defined as the number of Newton-like iterations performed over the course of the simulation--by exploiting time-domain data. Fourth, we describe a novel method for refining projection-based reduced-order models a posteriori using a goal-oriented framework similar to mesh-adaptive h -refinement in finite elements. The technique allows the ROM to generate arbitrarily accurate solutions, thereby providing the ROM with a 'failsafe' mechanism in the event of insufficient training data. Finally, we present the reduced-order model error surrogate (ROMES) method for statistically quantifying reduced- order-model errors. This

  17. Genome Sequencing and Analysis Conference IV

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    J. Craig Venter and C. Thomas Caskey co-chaired Genome Sequencing and Analysis Conference IV held at Hilton Head, South Carolina from September 26--30, 1992. Venter opened the conference by noting that approximately 400 researchers from 16 nations were present four times as many participants as at Genome Sequencing Conference I in 1989. Venter also introduced the Data Fair, a new component of the conference allowing exchange and on-site computer analysis of unpublished sequence data.

  18. Vehicular emissions and fuel consumption estimation in passer IV. Research report

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhary, N.A.

    1995-04-01

    Gasoline consumed by vehicles traveling within urban signalized networks constitutes a large portion of the total fuel usage in the United States. In addition, pollutants emitted by these vehicles degrade urban air quality. It is well known that the optimal coordination of traffic signals on urban signalized arterials improves traffic flow and reduces gasoline consumption and vehicular emissions. The research performed in this project incorporated fuel consumption and emissions estimation procedures into PASSER IV, a program for optimizing bandwidth-based signal timings in traffic networks. The enhanced PASSER IV software will allow Traffic Engineers to better assess the impacts of alternate signal timing plans on fuel consumption and emissions of vehicles traveling in a signalized network.

  19. Sequence and relative timing of large lakes in Gale crater (Mars) after the formation of Mount Sharp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palucis, Marisa C.; Dietrich, William E.; Williams, Rebecca M. E.; Hayes, Alexander G.; Parker, Tim; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Mangold, Nicolas; Lewis, Kevin; Newsom, Horton

    2016-03-01

    The quantification of lake levels in Gale crater is important to define the hydrologic and climatic history experienced by the sedimentary deposits found by Curiosity. We propose that there were at least three major lake stands within Gale, each persisted >1000 years, and all occurred after Mount Sharp reached close to its current topographic form. Deltaic deposits off the southern rim of Gale, derived from incision of Farah Vallis, and corresponding deposits off the southern flank of Mount Sharp define the highest lake level, which had a mean depth of 700 m. Canyons similar in form to Farah Vallis enter into craters and/or the crustal dichotomy near Gale from the south, suggesting that the highest lake was supplied by a large-scale flow system. The next lake level, established after a period of drying and rewetting, is defined by four deltaic features, three sourced from Mount Sharp and one from the western rim of Gale, as well as the termination of gullies around the northern rim of Gale. This second lake level had a mean depth of 300 m. The presence of the gullies suggests more locally sourced water. Lake levels then rose another 100 m, as evidenced by two deltaic deposits derived from the rim of Gale and the termination of a second set of gullies. Post-lake, reduced hydrologic activity continued, evidenced by a time of fan building (including Peace Vallis). The sequence of events suggests an episodic shift through time from relatively wet regional conditions to a drier environment with local runoff.

  20. Long Time, Large Scale Limit of the Wigner Transform for a System of Linear Oscillators in One Dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komorowski, Tomasz; Stȩpień, Łukasz

    2012-07-01

    We consider the long time, large scale behavior of the Wigner transform W ɛ ( t, x, k) of the wave function corresponding to a discrete wave equation on a 1-d integer lattice, with a weak multiplicative noise. This model has been introduced in Basile et al. in Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 (2006) to describe a system of interacting linear oscillators with a weak noise that conserves locally the kinetic energy and the momentum. The kinetic limit for the Wigner transform has been shown in Basile et al. in Arch. Rat. Mech. 195(1):171-203 (2009). In the present paper we prove that in the unpinned case there exists γ 0>0 such that for any γ∈(0, γ 0] the weak limit of W ɛ ( t/ ɛ 3/2 γ , x/ ɛ γ , k), as ɛ≪1, satisfies a one dimensional fractional heat equation partialt W(t,x)=-hat{c}(-partialx2)^{3/4}W(t,x) with hat{c}>0. In the pinned case an analogous result can be claimed for W ɛ ( t/ ɛ 2 γ , x/ ɛ γ , k) but the limit satisfies then the usual heat equation.

  1. Onset time and strength of oceanic deep convection diagnosed from an ocean large-eddy simulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Denbo, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    Deep convection has an important role in the large-scale thermohaline circulation, which in turn plays a central part in determining global climate. Manabe and Stouffer`s climate simulations have shown that the thermal and dynamic structure of the oceans have pronounced changes in model climates with increased CO{sub 2}. In their simulations, the addition of low-salinity surface water at high latitudes prevents the ventilation of the deep ocean, thus reducing or in some cases nearly extinguishing the thermohaline circulation. Siegenthaler and Sarmiento remarked that whereas the ocean is the largest of the rapidly exchanging global carbon reservoirs and a major sink for anthropogenic carbon, this uptake capacity become available only when the whole ocean is chemically equilibrated with the new atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration. The dynamics of the oceanic uptake of CO{sub 2} is therefore strongly determined by the rate of downward transport of CO{sub 2}-laden water from surface to depth. The importance of deep convection in moderating the uptake of CO{sub 2} by the ocean and its role in the meridional circulation, which affects climate by transporting heat from the tropics to the polar regions, motivates this research. The experiments described here were designed to study the sensitivity of the onset time and strength of deep convection to changes in the heat flux, latent heat flux, and perturbations of the surface mixed-layer temperature and salinity.

  2. Health Habits of Employees in a Large Medical Center: Time Trends and Impact of a Worksite Wellness Facility

    PubMed Central

    Abu Dabrh, Abd Moain; Gorty, Archana; Jenkins, Sarah M.; Murad, Mohammad Hassan; Hensrud, Donald D.

    2016-01-01

    Worksite health interventions are not novel but their effect remains subject of debate. We examined employer-based wellness program to determine health habits trends, and compare prevalence estimates to national data. We conducted serial surveys (1996 and 2007–10) to employees of a large medical center that included questions measuring outcomes, including obesity, regular exercise, cardiovascular activity, and smoking status. Logistic regression models were estimated to compare data by membership across years, considering p-values ≤ 0.01 as statistically significant. 3,206 employees responded (Response rates 59–68%). Obesity prevalence increased over time in members and nonmembers of the wellness facility, consistent with national trends. Members had a lower prevalence of cigarette smoking compared to nonmembers (overall year-adjusted odds ratio 0.66, P < 0.001). Further, employees had a lower prevalence of cigarette smoking (9.7 vs. 17.3% in 2010, P < 0.001) compared with national data. Wellness facility membership was associated with increased regular exercise and cardiovascular exercise (P < 0.001) compared to nonmembers. In summary, working in a medical center was associated with a decreased prevalence of cigarette smoking, but not with lower prevalence of obesity. Worksite wellness facility membership was associated with increased exercise and decreased cigarette smoking. Employer-based interventions may be effective in improving some health behaviors. PMID:26864205

  3. Large-Scale Chromatin Structure-Function Relationships during the Cell Cycle and Development: Insights from Replication Timing.

    PubMed

    Dileep, Vishnu; Rivera-Mulia, Juan Carlos; Sima, Jiao; Gilbert, David M

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome architecture has received a lot of attention since the recent development of genome-scale methods to measure chromatin interactions (Hi-C), enabling the first sequence-based models of chromosome tertiary structure. A view has emerged of chromosomes as a string of structural units (topologically associating domains; TADs) whose boundaries persist through the cell cycle and development. TADs with similar chromatin states tend to aggregate, forming spatially segregated chromatin compartments. However, high-resolution Hi-C has revealed substructure within TADs (subTADs) that poses a challenge for models that attribute significance to structural units at any given scale. More than 20 years ago, the DNA replication field independently identified stable structural (and functional) units of chromosomes (replication foci) as well as spatially segregated chromatin compartments (early and late foci), but lacked the means to link these units to genomic map units. Genome-wide studies of replication timing (RT) have now merged these two disciplines by identifying individual units of replication regulation (replication domains; RDs) that correspond to TADs and are arranged in 3D to form spatiotemporally segregated subnuclear compartments. Furthermore, classifying RDs/TADs by their constitutive versus developmentally regulated RT has revealed distinct classes of chromatin organization, providing unexpected insight into the relationship between large-scale chromosome structure and function. PMID:26590169

  4. Scaling behavior of the earthquake intertime distribution: influence of large shocks and time scales in the Omori law.

    PubMed

    Lippiello, Eugenio; Corral, Alvaro; Bottiglieri, Milena; Godano, Cataldo; de Arcangelis, Lucilla

    2012-12-01

    We present a study of the earthquake intertime distribution D(Δt) for a California catalog in temporal periods of short duration T. We compare experimental results with theoretical predictions and analytical approximate solutions. For the majority of intervals, rescaling intertimes by the average rate leads to collapse of the distributions D(Δt) on a universal curve, whose functional form is well fitted by a Gamma distribution. The remaining intervals, exhibiting a more complex D(Δt), are all characterized by the presence of large shocks. These results can be understood in terms of the relevance of the ratio between the characteristic time c in the Omori law and T: Intervals with Gamma-like behavior are indeed characterized by a vanishing c/T. The above features are also investigated by means of numerical simulations of the Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) model. This study shows that collapse of D(Δt) is also observed in numerical catalogs; however, the fit with a Gamma distribution is possible only assuming that c depends on the main-shock magnitude m. This result confirms that the dependence of c on m, previously observed for m>6 main shocks, extends also to small m>2.

  5. [A large amount of distilled water ineffective for prevention of bladder cancer cell implantation at the time of transurethral resection].

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yasuyuki; Fujii, Yasuhisa; Hyochi, Nobuhiko; Masuda, Hitoshi; Kawakami, Satoru; Kobayashi, Tsuyoshi; Kageyama, Yukio; Kihara, Kazunori

    2006-03-01

    A previous study indicated that distilled water could prevent bladder tumor cell implantation in an in vitro assay. We investigated whether a large amount of distilled water irrigation prevented recurrence of superficial bladder cancer in the clinical setting and then we estimated whether cancer cell implantation at the time of transurethral resection is a major mechanism of recurrence. Between May 2000 and January 2002, 22 patients with primary, superficial bladder carcinoma who underwent transurethral resection of bladder tumors (TURBT) were enrolled in this study. The patients underwent bladder washout with 1,000 ml distilled water immediately after TURBT, and then intravesical irrigation with 3,000 ml water for three hours. Control patients were randomly chosen from those who previously underwent TURBT in our hospital and had similar prognostic factors. The 1- and 2-year recurrence-free rates in the patients undergoing distilled water irrigation were both 45% and those in the control patients were 65% and 45%, respectively. There were no significant differences between the two groups. This result indicates that distilled water was ineffective in preventing recurrence of superficial bladder tumor. PMID:16617868

  6. The soft, fluctuating UVB at z ˜ 6 as traced by C IV, Si IV, and C II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlator, Kristian; Oppenheimer, B. D.; Davé, Romeel; Zackrisson, E.; Thompson, Robert; Huang, Shuiyao

    2016-07-01

    The sources that drove cosmological reionization left clues regarding their identity in the slope and inhomogeneity of the ultraviolet ionizing background (UVB): bright quasars (QSOs) generate a hard UVB with predominantly large-scale fluctuations while Population II stars generate a softer one with smaller scale fluctuations. Metal absorbers probe the UVB's slope because different ions are sensitive to different energies. Likewise, they probe spatial fluctuations because they originate in regions where a galaxy-driven UVB is harder and more intense. We take a first step towards studying the reionization-epoch UVB's slope and inhomogeneity by comparing observations of 12 metal absorbers at z ˜ 6 versus predictions from a cosmological hydrodynamic simulation using three different UVBs: a soft, spatially inhomogeneous `galaxies+QSOs' UVB; a homogeneous `galaxies+QSOs' UVB, and a `QSOs-only' model. All UVBs reproduce the observed column density distributions of C II, Si IV, and C IV reasonably well although high-column, high-ionization absorbers are underproduced, reflecting numerical limitations. With upper limits treated as detections, only a soft, fluctuating UVB reproduces both the observed Si IV/C IV and C II/C IV distributions. The QSOs-only UVB overpredicts both C IV/C II and C IV/Si IV, indicating that it is too hard. The Haardt & Madau (2012) UVB underpredicts C IV/Si IV, suggesting that it lacks amplifications near galaxies. Hence current observations prefer a soft, fluctuating UVB as expected from a predominantly Population II background although they cannot rule out a harder one. Future observations probing a factor of 2 deeper in metal column density will distinguish between the soft, fluctuating and QSOs-only UVBs.

  7. The Plate Boundary Observatory Cascadia Network: Development and Installation of a Large Scale Real-time GPS Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, K. E.; Blume, F.; Berglund, H. T.; Feaux, K.; Gallaher, W. W.; Hodgkinson, K. M.; Mattioli, G. S.; Mencin, D.

    2014-12-01

    The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), through a NSF-ARRA supplement, has enhanced the geophysical infrastructure in in the Pacific Northwest by upgrading a total of 282 Plate Boundary Observatory GPS stations to allow the collection and distribution of high-rate (1 Hz), low-latency (<1 s) data streams (RT-GPS). These upgraded stations supplemented the original 100 RT-GPS stations in the PBO GPS network. The addition of the new RT-GPS sites in Cascadia should spur new volcano and earthquake research opportunities in an area of great scientific interest and high geophysical hazard. Streaming RT-GPS data will enable researchers to detect and investigate strong ground motion during large geophysical events, including a possible plate-interface earthquake, which has implications for earthquake hazard mitigation. A Mw 6.9 earthquake occurred on March 10, 2014, off the coast of northern California. As a response, UNAVCO downloaded high-rate GPS data from Plate Boundary Observatory stations within 500 km of the epicenter of the event, providing a good test of network performance.In addition to the 282 stations upgraded to real-time, 22 new meteorological instruments were added to existing PBO stations. Extensive testing of BGAN satellite communications systems has been conducted to support the Cascadia RT-GPS upgrades and the installation of three BGAN satellite fail over systems along the Cascadia margin will allow for the continuation of data flow in the event of a loss of primary communications during in a large geophysical event or other interruptions in commercial cellular networks. In summary, with these additional upgrades in the Cascadia region, the PBO RT-GPS network will increase to 420 stations. Upgrades to the UNAVCO data infrastructure included evaluation and purchase of the Trimble Pivot Platform, servers, and additional hardware for archiving the high rate data, as well as testing and implementation of GLONASS and Trimble RTX positioning on the

  8. Synthesis and characterization of thorium(IV) and uranium(IV) corrole complexes.

    PubMed

    Ward, Ashleigh L; Buckley, Heather L; Lukens, Wayne W; Arnold, John

    2013-09-18

    The first examples of actinide complexes incorporating corrole ligands are presented. Thorium(IV) and uranium(IV) macrocycles of Mes2(p-OMePh)corrole were synthesized via salt metathesis with the corresponding lithium corrole in remarkably high yields (93% and 83%, respectively). Characterization by single-crystal X-ray diffraction revealed both complexes to be dimeric, having two metal centers bridged via bis(μ-chlorido) linkages. In each case, the corrole ring showed a large distortion from planarity, with the Th(IV) and U(IV) ions residing unusually far (1.403 and 1.330 Å, respectively) from the N4 plane of the ligand. (1)H NMR spectroscopy of both the Th and U dimers revealed dynamic solution behavior. In the case of the diamagnetic thorium corrole, variable-temperature, DOSY (diffusion-ordered) and EXSY (exhange) (1)H NMR spectroscopy was employed and supported that this behavior was due to an intrinsic pseudorotational mode of the corrole ring about the M-M axis. Additionally, the electronic structure of the actinide corroles was assessed using UV-vis spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility. This novel class of macrocyclic complexes provides a rich platform in an underdeveloped area for the study of nonaqueous actinide bonding and reactivity.

  9. Methoxyamine, Pemetrexed Disodium, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IIIA-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-05

    Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Brain; Stage IIIA Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IV Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  10. 26 CFR 301.6166-1 - Extension of time for payment of estate tax where estate consists largely of interest in closely...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Extension of time for payment of estate tax where estate consists largely of interest in closely held business. 301.6166-1 Section 301.6166-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Time and...

  11. Confirmatory factor analysis of the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV.

    PubMed

    Holdnack, James A; Xiaobin Zhou; Larrabee, Glenn J; Millis, Scott R; Salthouse, Timothy A

    2011-06-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-fourth edition (WAIS-IV) and the Wechsler Memory Scale-fourth edition (WMS-IV) were co-developed to be used individually or as a combined battery of tests. The independent factor structure of each of the tests has been identified; however, the combined factor structure has yet to be determined. Confirmatory factor analysis was applied to the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV Adult battery (i.e., age 16-69 years) co-norming sample (n = 900) to test 13 measurement models. The results indicated that two models fit the data equally well. One model is a seven-factor solution without a hierarchical general ability factor: Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning, Processing Speed, Auditory Working Memory, Visual Working Memory, Auditory Memory, and Visual Memory. The second model is a five-factor model composed of Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning, Processing Speed, Working Memory, and Memory with a hierarchical general ability factor. Interpretative implications for each model are discussed.

  12. The IVS data input to ITRF2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nothnagel, Axel; Alef, Walter; Amagai, Jun; Andersen, Per Helge; Andreeva, Tatiana; Artz, Thomas; Bachmann, Sabine; Barache, Christophe; Baudry, Alain; Bauernfeind, Erhard; Baver, Karen; Beaudoin, Christopher; Behrend, Dirk; Bellanger, Antoine; Berdnikov, Anton; Bergman, Per; Bernhart, Simone; Bertarini, Alessandra; Bianco, Giuseppe; Bielmaier, Ewald; Boboltz, David; Böhm, Johannes; Böhm, Sigrid; Boer, Armin; Bolotin, Sergei; Bougeard, Mireille; Bourda, Geraldine; Buttaccio, Salvo; Cannizzaro, Letizia; Cappallo, Roger; Carlson, Brent; Carter, Merri Sue; Charlot, Patrick; Chen, Chenyu; Chen, Maozheng; Cho, Jungho; Clark, Thomas; Collioud, Arnaud; Colomer, Francisco; Colucci, Giuseppe; Combrinck, Ludwig; Conway, John; Corey, Brian; Curtis, Ronald; Dassing, Reiner; Davis, Maria; de-Vicente, Pablo; De Witt, Aletha; Diakov, Alexey; Dickey, John; Diegel, Irv; Doi, Koichiro; Drewes, Hermann; Dube, Maurice; Elgered, Gunnar; Engelhardt, Gerald; Evangelista, Mark; Fan, Qingyuan; Fedotov, Leonid; Fey, Alan; Figueroa, Ricardo; Fukuzaki, Yoshihiro; Gambis, Daniel; Garcia-Espada, Susana; Gaume, Ralph; Gaylard, Michael; Geiger, Nicole; Gipson, John; Gomez, Frank; Gomez-Gonzalez, Jesus; Gordon, David; Govind, Ramesh; Gubanov, Vadim; Gulyaev, Sergei; Haas, Ruediger; Hall, David; Halsig, Sebastian; Hammargren, Roger; Hase, Hayo; Heinkelmann, Robert; Helldner, Leif; Herrera, Cristian; Himwich, Ed; Hobiger, Thomas; Holst, Christoph; Hong, Xiaoyu; Honma, Mareki; Huang, Xinyong; Hugentobler, Urs; Ichikawa, Ryuichi; Iddink, Andreas; Ihde, Johannes; Ilijin, Gennadiy; Ipatov, Alexander; Ipatova, Irina; Ishihara, Misao; Ivanov, D. V.; Jacobs, Chris; Jike, Takaaki; Johansson, Karl-Ake; Johnson, Heidi; Johnston, Kenneth; Ju, Hyunhee; Karasawa, Masao; Kaufmann, Pierre; Kawabata, Ryoji; Kawaguchi, Noriyuki; Kawai, Eiji; Kaydanovsky, Michael; Kharinov, Mikhail; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Kokado, Kensuke; Kondo, Tetsuro; Korkin, Edward; Koyama, Yasuhiro; Krasna, Hana; Kronschnabl, Gerhard; Kurdubov, Sergey; Kurihara, Shinobu; Kuroda, Jiro; Kwak, Younghee; La Porta, Laura; Labelle, Ruth; Lamb, Doug; Lambert, Sébastien; Langkaas, Line; Lanotte, Roberto; Lavrov, Alexey; Le Bail, Karine; Leek, Judith; Li, Bing; Li, Huihua; Li, Jinling; Liang, Shiguang; Lindqvist, Michael; Liu, Xiang; Loesler, Michael; Long, Jim; Lonsdale, Colin; Lovell, Jim; Lowe, Stephen; Lucena, Antonio; Luzum, Brian; Ma, Chopo; Ma, Jun; Maccaferri, Giuseppe; Machida, Morito; MacMillan, Dan; Madzak, Matthias; Malkin, Zinovy; Manabe, Seiji; Mantovani, Franco; Mardyshkin, Vyacheslav; Marshalov, Dmitry; Mathiassen, Geir; Matsuzaka, Shigeru; McCarthy, Dennis; Melnikov, Alexey; Michailov, Andrey; Miller, Natalia; Mitchell, Donald; Mora-Diaz, Julian Andres; Mueskens, Arno; Mukai, Yasuko; Nanni, Mauro; Natusch, Tim; Negusini, Monia; Neidhardt, Alexander; Nickola, Marisa; Nicolson, George; Niell, Arthur; Nikitin, Pavel; Nilsson, Tobias; Ning, Tong; Nishikawa, Takashi; Noll, Carey; Nozawa, Kentarou; Ogaja, Clement; Oh, Hongjong; Olofsson, Hans; Opseth, Per Erik; Orfei, Sandro; Pacione, Rosa; Pazamickas, Katherine; Petrachenko, William; Pettersson, Lars; Pino, Pedro; Plank, Lucia; Ploetz, Christian; Poirier, Michael; Poutanen, Markku; Qian, Zhihan; Quick, Jonathan; Rahimov, Ismail; Redmond, Jay; Reid, Brett; Reynolds, John; Richter, Bernd; Rioja, Maria; Romero-Wolf, Andres; Ruszczyk, Chester; Salnikov, Alexander; Sarti, Pierguido; Schatz, Raimund; Scherneck, Hans-Georg; Schiavone, Francesco; Schreiber, Ulrich; Schuh, Harald; Schwarz, Walter; Sciarretta, Cecilia; Searle, Anthony; Sekido, Mamoru; Seitz, Manuela; Shao, Minghui; Shibuya, Kazuo; Shu, Fengchun; Sieber, Moritz; Skjaeveland, Asmund; Skurikhina, Elena; Smolentsev, Sergey; Smythe, Dan; Sousa, Don; Sovers, Ojars; Stanford, Laura; Stanghellini, Carlo; Steppe, Alan; Strand, Rich; Sun, Jing; Surkis, Igor; Takashima, Kazuhiro; Takefuji, Kazuhiro; Takiguchi, Hiroshi; Tamura, Yoshiaki; Tanabe, Tadashi; Tanir, Emine; Tao, An; Tateyama, Claudio; Teke, Kamil; Thomas, Cynthia; Thorandt, Volkmar; Thornton, Bruce; Tierno Ros, Claudia; Titov, Oleg; Titus, Mike; Tomasi, Paolo; Tornatore, Vincenza; Trigilio, Corrado; Trofimov, Dmitriy; Tsutsumi, Masanori; Tuccari, Gino; Tzioumis, Tasso; Ujihara, Hideki; Ullrich, Dieter; Uunila, Minttu; Venturi, Tiziana; Vespe, Francesco; Vityazev, Veniamin; Volvach, Alexandr; Vytnov, Alexander; Wang, Guangli; Wang, Jinqing; Wang, Lingling; Wang, Na; Wang, Shiqiang; Wei, Wenren; Weston, Stuart; Whitney, Alan; Wojdziak, Reiner; Yatskiv, Yaroslav; Yang, Wenjun; Ye, Shuhua; Yi, Sangoh; Yusup, Aili; Zapata, Octavio; Zeitlhoefler, Reinhard; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Ming; Zhang, Xiuzhong; Zhao, Rongbing; Zheng, Weimin; Zhou, Ruixian; Zubko, Nataliya

    2015-01-01

    Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) is a primary space-geodetic technique for determining precise coordinates on the Earth, for monitoring the variable Earth rotation and orientation with highest precision, and for deriving many other parameters of the Earth system. The International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS, http://ivscc.gsfc.nasa.gov/) is a service of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) and the International Astronomical Union (IAU). The datasets published here are the results of individual Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) sessions in the form of normal equations in SINEX 2.0 format (http://www.iers.org/IERS/EN/Organization/AnalysisCoordinator/SinexFormat/sinex.html, the SINEX 2.0 description is attached as pdf) provided by IVS as the input for the next release of the International Terrestrial Reference System (ITRF): ITRF2014. This is a new version of the ITRF2008 release (Bockmann et al., 2009). For each session/ file, the normal equation systems contain elements for the coordinate components of all stations having participated in the respective session as well as for the Earth orientation parameters (x-pole, y-pole, UT1 and its time derivatives plus offset to the IAU2006 precession-nutation components dX, dY (https://www.iau.org/static/resolutions/IAU2006_Resol1.pdf). The terrestrial part is free of datum. The data sets are the result of a weighted combination of the input of several IVS Analysis Centers. The IVS contribution for ITRF2014 is described in Bachmann et al (2015), Schuh and Behrend (2012) provide a general overview on the VLBI method, details on the internal data handling can be found at Behrend (2013).

  13. BJN Awards 2016: IV therapy.

    PubMed

    Rickard, Claire

    2016-07-28

    Claire Rickard Professor of Nursing, National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Centre of Research Excellence in Nursing, Griffith University, was awarded second place in the BJN Awards 2016 for IV Therapy Nurse of the Year. Here she talks about the she has done to be recognised in this field. PMID:27467655

  14. The PLATO IV Communications System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherwood, Bruce Arne; Stifle, Jack

    The PLATO IV computer-based educational system contains its own communications hardware and software for operating plasma-panel graphics terminals. Key echoing is performed by the central processing unit: every key pressed at a terminal passes through the entire system before anything appears on the terminal's screen. Each terminal is guaranteed…

  15. The PLATO IV Student Terminal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stifle, Jack

    This report describes the remote computer terminal designed for student use in the PLATO IV computer-assisted instruction system. The terminal features a plasma display panel, self-contained character and line generators, and the ability to communicate over voice grade telephone circuits. Operating modes and control characters are described in…

  16. Reconstruction for Type IV Radial Polydactyly.

    PubMed

    Wall, Lindley B; Goldfarb, Charles A

    2015-09-01

    Type IV radial polydactyly represents a thumb with an extra proximal and distal phalanx. Assessment of the thumb for surgical reconstruction includes observing thumb function, evaluating thumb size and stability, and assessing the first web space. Reconstruction includes excision of the smaller thumb, typically the radial thumb, and re-creating thumb stability and alignment by addressing tendon insertion and joint orientation. Although surgical results are satisfying and complications are uncommon, additional surgical intervention may be required over time owing to thumb malalignment or instability.

  17. Application of time-independent cumulant expansion to calculation of Franck-Condon profiles for large molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Huh, Joonsuk; Berger, Robert

    2011-01-01

    In this contribution, advantages and disadvantages of the time-independent and time-dependent approaches for Franck-Condon profile calculations are discussed within the displaced-distorted-rotated harmonic oscillator approximation. Particular strengths and prospects of a previously developed time-independent cumulant expansion in the calculation of a Franck-Condon profile for UV/Vis absorption spectra are demonstrated for the specific case of the S0(1Ag) --> S1(1B3u) transition of terrylene at various temperatures. PMID:22457957

  18. Analytical framework for screening long-time and large-scale soil moisture variability and its comparison with GRACE satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verrot, Lucile; Destouni, Georgia

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture is a central component of the hydrologic cycle and its spatiotemporal variability offers a great challenge in assessing large-scale hydrological processes. As this variability depends greatly on prevailing hydro-climate, along with soil texture and its primarily spatial heterogeneity, soil moisture may be relatively easily constrained by large-scale water balance consideration in time and knowledge of soil property distribution in space. We have developed a relatively simple soil moisture model that relies on explicit account of spatial soil hydraulics parameters and catchment-wise organized hydro-climatic data and their variation in time. The current state of field techniques does not allow the retrieval of large-scale soil moisture data for direct comparison with model results. However, the recent GRACE satellite data provides for the first time large-scale directly comparative of large-scale water storage variability. This study compares the developed soil moisture model's ability to reproduce main variability dynamics in long-term data series of unsaturated water content and groundwater table position at the catchment scale with GRACE data, for a set of large tropical catchments.

  19. Extended temperature-accelerated dynamics: Enabling long-time full-scale modeling of large rare-event systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bochenkov, Vladimir; Suetin, Nikolay; Shankar, Sadasivan

    2014-09-07

    A new method, the Extended Temperature-Accelerated Dynamics (XTAD), is introduced for modeling long-timescale evolution of large rare-event systems. The method is based on the Temperature-Accelerated Dynamics approach [M. Sørensen and A. Voter, J. Chem. Phys. 112, 9599 (2000)], but uses full-scale parallel molecular dynamics simulations to probe a potential energy surface of an entire system, combined with the adaptive on-the-fly system decomposition for analyzing the energetics of rare events. The method removes limitations on a feasible system size and enables to handle simultaneous diffusion events, including both large-scale concerted and local transitions. Due to the intrinsically parallel algorithm, XTAD not only allows studies of various diffusion mechanisms in solid state physics, but also opens the avenue for atomistic simulations of a range of technologically relevant processes in material science, such as thin film growth on nano- and microstructured surfaces.

  20. Time?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoroso, Richard L.

    2013-09-01

    The concept of time in the `clockwork' Newtonian world was irrelevant; and has generally been ignored until recently by several generations of physicists since the implementation of quantum mechanics. We will set aside the utility of time as a property relating to physical calculations of events relating to a metrics line element or as an aspect of the transformation of a particles motion/interaction in a coordinate system or in relation to thermodynamics etc., i.e. we will discard all the usual uses of time as a concept used to circularly define physical parameters in terms of other physical parameters; concentrating instead on time as an aspect of the fundamental cosmic topology of our virtual reality especially as it inseparably relates to the nature and role of the observer in natural science.

  1. Memory functioning in individuals with traumatic brain injury: an examination of the Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition (WMS-IV).

    PubMed

    Carlozzi, Noelle E; Grech, Julie; Tulsky, David S

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the construct validity of the Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition (WMS-IV) in individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI). One hundred individuals with TBI (n = 35 complicated mild/moderate TBI; n = 65 severe TBI) and 100 matched controls from the WMS-IV normative dataset completed the WMS-IV. Multivariate analyses indicated that severe TBI participants had poorer performance than matched controls on all index scores and subtests. Individuals with complicated mild/moderate TBI performed more poorly than controls on all index scores, as well as on tests of visual memory (Designs I and II; Visual Reproduction I and II) and visual working memory (Spatial Addition; Symbol Span), but not on auditory verbal memory tests (Logical Memory I and II; Verbal Paired Associates I and II). After controlling for time since injury, severe TBI participants had significantly lower scores than the complicated mild/moderate TBI on 4 of the 5 WMS-IV index scores (Auditory Memory, Visual Memory, Immediate Memory, Delayed Memory) and 4 of the 10 WMS-IV subtests (Designs I and II, Verbal Pairs II, Logical Memory II). Effect sizes for index and subtest scores were generally moderate for the complicated mild/moderate group and moderate-to-large for the severe TBI group. Findings provide support for the construct validity of the WMS-IV in individuals with TBI.

  2. DNA gyrase, topoisomerase IV, and the 4-quinolones.

    PubMed Central

    Drlica, K; Zhao, X

    1997-01-01

    For many years, DNA gyrase was thought to be responsible both for unlinking replicated daughter chromosomes and for controlling negative superhelical tension in bacterial DNA. However, in 1990 a homolog of gyrase, topoisomerase IV, that had a potent decatenating activity was discovered. It is now clear that topoisomerase IV, rather than gyrase, is responsible for decatenation of interlinked chromosomes. Moreover, topoisomerase IV is a target of the 4-quinolones, antibacterial agents that had previously been thought to target only gyrase. The key event in quinolone action is reversible trapping of gyrase-DNA and topoisomerase IV-DNA complexes. Complex formation with gyrase is followed by a rapid, reversible inhibition of DNA synthesis, cessation of growth, and induction of the SOS response. At higher drug concentrations, cell death occurs as double-strand DNA breaks are released from trapped gyrase and/or topoisomerase IV complexes. Repair of quinolone-induced DNA damage occurs largely via recombination pathways. In many gram-negative bacteria, resistance to moderate levels of quinolone arises from mutation of the gyrase A protein and resistance to high levels of quinolone arises from mutation of a second gyrase and/or topoisomerase IV site. For some gram-positive bacteria, the situation is reversed: primary resistance occurs through changes in topoisomerase IV while gyrase changes give additional resistance. Gyrase is also trapped on DNA by lethal gene products of certain large, low-copy-number plasmids. Thus, quinolone-topoisomerase biology is providing a model for understanding aspects of host-parasite interactions and providing ways to investigate manipulation of the bacterial chromosome by topoisomerases. PMID:9293187

  3. Facile Routes to Th(IV), U(IV), and Np(IV) Phosphites and Phosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Eric M.; Wang, Shuao; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2011-08-05

    Three actinide(IV) phosphites and a NpIV phosphate, AnIV(HPO₃)₂(H₂O)₂ (An = Th, U, Np) and Cs[Np(H1.5PO₄)(PO₄)]₂, respectively, were synthesized using mild hydrothermal conditions. The first three phases are isotypic and were obtained using similar reaction conditions. Cs[Np(H1.5PO₄)(PO₄)]₂ was synthesized using an analogous method to that of Np(HPO₃)₂(H₂O)₂. However, this fourth phase is quite different in comparison to the other phases in both composition and structure. The structure of Cs[Np(H1.5PO₄)(PO₄)]₂ is constructed from double layers of neptunium(IV) phosphate with caesium cations in the interlayer region. In contrast, An(HPO₃)₂(H₂O)₂ (An = Th, U, Np) form dense 3D networks. The actinide contraction is detected in variety of metrics obtained from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. Changes in the oxidation state of the neptunium starting materials yield different products.

  4. VEGF Trap in Treating Patients With Recurrent Stage III or Stage IV Melanoma That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-02

    Ciliary Body and Choroid Melanoma, Medium/Large Size; Extraocular Extension Melanoma; Iris Melanoma; Metastatic Intraocular Melanoma; Recurrent Intraocular Melanoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Stage III Melanoma; Stage IV Melanoma

  5. A coarse grained perturbation theory for the Large Scale Structure, with cosmology and time independence in the UV

    SciTech Connect

    Manzotti, Alessandro; Peloso, Marco; Pietroni, Massimo; Viel, Matteo; Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco E-mail: peloso@physics.umn.edu E-mail: viel@oats.inaf.it

    2014-09-01

    Standard cosmological perturbation theory (SPT) for the Large Scale Structure (LSS) of the Universe fails at small scales (UV) due to strong nonlinearities and to multistreaming effects. In ref. [1] a new framework was proposed in which the large scales (IR) are treated perturbatively while the information on the UV, mainly small scale velocity dispersion, is obtained by nonlinear methods like N-body simulations. Here we develop this approach, showing that it is possible to reproduce the fully nonlinear power spectrum (PS) by combining a simple (and fast) 1-loop computation for the IR scales and the measurement of a single, dominant, correlator from N-body simulations for the UV ones. We measure this correlator for a suite of seven different cosmologies, and we show that its inclusion in our perturbation scheme reproduces the fully non-linear PS with percent level accuracy, for wave numbers up to k∼ 0.4 h Mpc{sup -1} down to 0z=. We then show that, once this correlator has been measured in a given cosmology, there is no need to run a new simulation for a different cosmology in the suite. Indeed, by rescaling this correlator by a proper function computable in SPT, the reconstruction procedure works also for the other cosmologies and for all redshifts, with comparable accuracy. Finally, we clarify the relation of this approach to the Effective Field Theory methods recently proposed in the LSS context.

  6. Zirconium(IV) and Hafnium(IV) Porphyrin and Phthalocyanine Complexes as New Dyes for Solar Cell Devices

    PubMed Central

    Radivojevic, Ivana; Bazzan, Giorgio; Burton-Pye, Benjamin P.; Ithisuphalap, Kemakorn; Saleh, Raihan; Durstock, Michael F.; Francesconi, Lynn C.; Drain, Charles Michael

    2012-01-01

    Metalloporphyrin and metallophthalocyanine dyes ligating Hf(IV) and Zr(IV) ions bind to semiconductor oxide surfaces such as TiO2 via the protruding group IV metal ions. The use of oxophylic metal ions with large ionic radii that protrude from the macrocycle is a unique mode of attaching chromophores to oxide surfaces in the design of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Our previous report on the structure and physical properties of ternary complexes wherein the Hf(IV) and Zr(IV) ions are ligated to both a porphyrinoid and to a defect site on a polyoxometalate (POM) represents a model for this new way of binding dyes to oxide surfaces. The Zr(IV) and Hf(IV) complexes of 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP) with two ligated acetates, (TPP)Hf(OAc)2 and (TPP)Zr(OAc)2, and the corresponding metallophthalocyanine (Pc) diacetate complexes, (Pc)Hf(OAc)2 and (Pc)Zr(OAc)2, were evaluated as novel dyes for the fabrication of dye-sensitized solar cells. Similarly to the ternary complexes with the POM, the oxide surface replaces the acetates to affect binding. In DSSCs the Zr(IV) phthalocyanine dye performs better than the Zr(IV) porphyrin dye, and reaches an overall efficiency of ~ 1.0%. The Hf(IV) dyes are less efficient. The photophysical properties of these complexes in solution suggested energetically favorable injection of electrons into the conduction band of TiO2 semiconductor nanoparticles, as well as a good band gap match with I3−/I− pair in liquid 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium iodide. The combination of blue absorbing TPP with the red absorbing Pc complexes can increase the absorbance of solar light in the device; however, the overall conversion efficiency of DSSCs using TiO2 nanoparticles treated with a mixture of both Zr(IV) complexes is comparable, but not greater than, the single (Pc)Zr. Thus, surface bound (TPP)Zr increases the absorbance in blue region of the spectra, but at the cost of diminished absorbance in the red in this DSSC architecture. PMID

  7. Zirconium((IV)) and Hafnium((IV)) Porphyrin and Phthalocyanine Complexes as New Dyes for Solar Cell Devices.

    PubMed

    Radivojevic, Ivana; Bazzan, Giorgio; Burton-Pye, Benjamin P; Ithisuphalap, Kemakorn; Saleh, Raihan; Durstock, Michael F; Francesconi, Lynn C; Drain, Charles Michael

    2012-08-01

    Metalloporphyrin and metallophthalocyanine dyes ligating Hf(IV) and Zr(IV) ions bind to semiconductor oxide surfaces such as TiO(2) via the protruding group IV metal ions. The use of oxophylic metal ions with large ionic radii that protrude from the macrocycle is a unique mode of attaching chromophores to oxide surfaces in the design of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Our previous report on the structure and physical properties of ternary complexes wherein the Hf(IV) and Zr(IV) ions are ligated to both a porphyrinoid and to a defect site on a polyoxometalate (POM) represents a model for this new way of binding dyes to oxide surfaces. The Zr(IV) and Hf(IV) complexes of 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP) with two ligated acetates, (TPP)Hf(OAc)(2) and (TPP)Zr(OAc)(2), and the corresponding metallophthalocyanine (Pc) diacetate complexes, (Pc)Hf(OAc)(2) and (Pc)Zr(OAc)(2), were evaluated as novel dyes for the fabrication of dye-sensitized solar cells. Similarly to the ternary complexes with the POM, the oxide surface replaces the acetates to affect binding. In DSSCs the Zr(IV) phthalocyanine dye performs better than the Zr(IV) porphyrin dye, and reaches an overall efficiency of ~ 1.0%. The Hf(IV) dyes are less efficient. The photophysical properties of these complexes in solution suggested energetically favorable injection of electrons into the conduction band of TiO(2) semiconductor nanoparticles, as well as a good band gap match with I(3) (-)/I(-) pair in liquid 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium iodide. The combination of blue absorbing TPP with the red absorbing Pc complexes can increase the absorbance of solar light in the device; however, the overall conversion efficiency of DSSCs using TiO(2) nanoparticles treated with a mixture of both Zr(IV) complexes is comparable, but not greater than, the single (Pc)Zr. Thus, surface bound (TPP)Zr increases the absorbance in blue region of the spectra, but at the cost of diminished absorbance in the red in this DSSC

  8. High-performance parallel solver for 3D time-dependent Schrodinger equation for large-scale nanosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainullin, I. K.; Sonkin, M. A.

    2015-03-01

    A parallelized three-dimensional (3D) time-dependent Schrodinger equation (TDSE) solver for one-electron systems is presented in this paper. The TDSE Solver is based on the finite-difference method (FDM) in Cartesian coordinates and uses a simple and explicit leap-frog numerical scheme. The simplicity of the numerical method provides very efficient parallelization and high performance of calculations using Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). For example, calculation of 106 time-steps on the 1000ṡ1000ṡ1000 numerical grid (109 points) takes only 16 hours on 16 Tesla M2090 GPUs. The TDSE Solver demonstrates scalability (parallel efficiency) close to 100% with some limitations on the problem size. The TDSE Solver is validated by calculation of energy eigenstates of the hydrogen atom (13.55 eV) and affinity level of H- ion (0.75 eV). The comparison with other TDSE solvers shows that a GPU-based TDSE Solver is 3 times faster for the problems of the same size and with the same cost of computational resources. The usage of a non-regular Cartesian grid or problem-specific non-Cartesian coordinates increases this benefit up to 10 times. The TDSE Solver was applied to the calculation of the resonant charge transfer (RCT) in nanosystems, including several related physical problems, such as electron capture during H+-H0 collision and electron tunneling between H- ion and thin metallic island film.

  9. Real-time turbulence profiling with a pair of laser guide star Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors for wide-field adaptive optics systems on large to extremely large telescopes.

    PubMed

    Gilles, L; Ellerbroek, B L

    2010-11-01

    Real-time turbulence profiling is necessary to tune tomographic wavefront reconstruction algorithms for wide-field adaptive optics (AO) systems on large to extremely large telescopes, and to perform a variety of image post-processing tasks involving point-spread function reconstruction. This paper describes a computationally efficient and accurate numerical technique inspired by the slope detection and ranging (SLODAR) method to perform this task in real time from properly selected Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor measurements accumulated over a few hundred frames from a pair of laser guide stars, thus eliminating the need for an additional instrument. The algorithm is introduced, followed by a theoretical influence function analysis illustrating its impulse response to high-resolution turbulence profiles. Finally, its performance is assessed in the context of the Thirty Meter Telescope multi-conjugate adaptive optics system via end-to-end wave optics Monte Carlo simulations.

  10. Plant diversity induces a shift of DOC concentration over time - results from long term and large scale experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Markus; Gleixner, Gerd

    2016-04-01

    Plant diversity has been demonstrated as a crucial factor for soil organic carbon (SOC) storage. The horizontal SOC formation in turn is strongly impacted by the relative small but consistent flow of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in soils. In this process, pore water leaches plant material and already stored SOC while simultaneously these leachates are transported downwards. However, there is a big uncertainty about the drivers of DOC flux; in particular about the importance of biological processes. We investigated the impact of plant diversity and other biotic drivers on DOC concentrations and total DOC fluxes (concentration × sampled water amount). In addition, we considered abiotic factors such as weather and soil conditions to assess the relative importance of biotic and abiotic drivers and how their importance changes over time. We used a comprehensive data set, gathered in the frame of the long-term biodiversity experiment "The Jena Experiment". Permanent monitoring started directly after establishment of the field site in 2002 and is still running. This enabled us to trace the impact of plant communities with their increasing establishment over the time on DOC concentration. We found the amount of sampled pore water best explained by rainfall, while it was not related to plant associated variables. Directly after establishing the experimental site, DOC concentrations were highest and then decreasing with time. In the first period of the experiment plant diversity had no or even a slightly negative impact on DOC concentrations. The direction of the plant diversity effect on DOC concentrations changed over time; namely in later phases we observed highest DOC concentrations on plots with high plant diversity. Moreover, DOC concentrations were negatively affected by increased amounts of sampled pore water indicating a dilution effect. Even though this impact was highly significant; its effect size was even less pronounced at later time points. In summary

  11. Revealing the Stellar POPULATION{S} of Andromeda IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Annette

    1996-07-01

    Andromeda IV is an enigmatic object, first identified by van den Bergh {1972}, during his photographic survey for dwarf spheroidal galaxy companions to M31, as either an `old star cloud' in the outer disk of M31, or possibly a background dwarf galaxy. We here propose deep WFPC2 V and I imaging of And IV to V> 27, which will resolve stars down to M_V +3, and determine main sequence turnoffs of < 5 * 10^9yr. The mean color of the red giant branch will provide a mean metallicity estimate, while the width constrains the dispersion in metallicity. The AGB and BHB stars provide further age and metallicity constraints. A reliable distance is necessary to establish the location of And IV in the M31 disk; this will be obtained from the I-band magnitude of the tip of the RGB. Ground-based observations are hampered by the proximity of a relatively bright star and by the combination of faintness and crowding in And IV. The extant ground-based CCD photometry for this object, to V 23 {Jones 1993}, have been interpreted as representing a young population with a narrow range of ages, an `unusually large' open cluster. And IV may be large enough that it could represent the transition stage between a single-age star cluster, and a self-enriched, many-generation stellar system. If indeed in the disk of M31, And IV lies beyond 4 disk scalelengths, a typical `edge' of optical disks. It thus could provide a unique example of a large star cluster in the outer regions of a disk, where there is little on-going or past star formation.

  12. Advanced clinical interpretation of the WAIS-IV and WMS-IV: prevalence of low scores varies by level of intelligence and years of education.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Brian L; Holdnack, James A; Iverson, Grant L

    2011-06-01

    Clinicians can use the base rates of low scores in healthy people to reduce the likelihood of misdiagnosing cognitive impairment. In the present study, base rates were developed for the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) and Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition (WMS-IV) using 900 healthy adults and validated on 28 patients with moderate or severe traumatic brain injuries (TBIs). Results indicated that healthy people obtain some low scores on the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV, with prevalence rates increasing with fewer years of education and lower predicted intelligence. When applying the base rates information to the clinical sample, the TBI patients were 13 times more likely to be identified as having a low cognitive profile compared with the controls. Using the base rates information is a psychometrically advanced method for establishing criteria to determine low cognitive abilities on the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV.

  13. Evidence from a Large Sample on the Effects of Group Size and Decision-Making Time on Performance in a Marketing Simulation Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treen, Emily; Atanasova, Christina; Pitt, Leyland; Johnson, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Marketing instructors using simulation games as a way of inducing some realism into a marketing course are faced with many dilemmas. Two important quandaries are the optimal size of groups and how much of the students' time should ideally be devoted to the game. Using evidence from a very large sample of teams playing a simulation game, the study…

  14. 26 CFR 20.6166A-1 - Extension of time for payment of estate tax where estate consists largely of interest in closely...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Extension of time for payment of estate tax where estate consists largely of interest in closely held business. 20.6166A-1 Section 20.6166A-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER...

  15. Measured Response of Local, Mid-range and Far-range Discontinuities of Large Metal Groundplanes using Time Domain Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, T.; Münter, K.; Battermann, S.; Garbe, H.

    2005-05-01

    This work describes a method to detect and to quantify any local or mid-range discontinuity on extended flat metal planes. Often these planes are used for antenna calibration (open area test site - OATS) or the plane could be the ground of a semi-anechoic chamber used in Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) testing. The measurement uncertainty of antenna calibration or EMC testing depends on the groundplane's quality, which can be accessed using this method. A vector network analyzer with time-domain option is used to determine the complex-valued input scattering parameter S11,F of an aperture antenna in a monostatic setup. S;11,F contains the information desired about the discontinuities and is measured in the frequency domain with high dynamic range. But only after a linear filtering utilizing the Chirp-Z-Transform the obtained time-domain signal S11,T evidence of local and mid-range discontinuities.

  16. Time Dependent Density Functional Theory Calculations of Large Compact PAH Cations: Implications for the Diffuse Interstellar Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisman, Jennifer L.; Lee, Timothy J.; Salama, Farid; Gordon-Head, Martin; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the electronic absorption spectra of several maximally pericondensed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon radical cations with time dependent density functional theory calculations. We find interesting trends in the vertical excitation energies and oscillator strengths for this series containing pyrene through circumcoronene, the largest species containing more than 50 carbon atoms. We discuss the implications of these new results for the size and structure distribution of the diffuse interstellar band carriers.

  17. Wait, are you sad or angry? Large exposure time differences required for the categorization of facial expressions of emotion.

    PubMed

    Du, Shichuan; Martinez, Aleix M

    2013-03-18

    Facial expressions of emotion are essential components of human behavior, yet little is known about the hierarchical organization of their cognitive analysis. We study the minimum exposure time needed to successfully classify the six classical facial expressions of emotion (joy, surprise, sadness, anger, disgust, fear) plus neutral as seen at different image resolutions (240 × 160 to 15 × 10 pixels). Our results suggest a consistent hierarchical analysis of these facial expressions regardless of the resolution of the stimuli. Happiness and surprise can be recognized after very short exposure times (10-20 ms), even at low resolutions. Fear and anger are recognized the slowest (100-250 ms), even in high-resolution images, suggesting a later computation. Sadness and disgust are recognized in between (70-200 ms). The minimum exposure time required for successful classification of each facial expression correlates with the ability of a human subject to identify it correctly at low resolutions. These results suggest a fast, early computation of expressions represented mostly by low spatial frequencies or global configural cues and a later, slower process for those categories requiring a more fine-grained analysis of the image. We also demonstrate that those expressions that are mostly visible in higher-resolution images are not recognized as accurately. We summarize implications for current computational models.

  18. Performance analysis of a large photoactive area CMOS line sensor for fast, time-resolved spectroscopy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poklonskaya, Elena A.; Durini, Daniel; Jung, Melanie; Schrey, Olaf; Driewer, Adrian; Brockherde, Werner; Hosticka, Bedrich; Vogt, Holger

    2014-05-01

    The performance of a fabricated CMOS line sensor based on the lateral drift-field photodiode (LDPD)1 concept is described. A new pixel structure was designed to decrease the charge transfer time across the photoactive area. Synopsys TCAD simulations were performed to design a proper intrinsic lateral drift-field within the pixel. The line sensor was fabricated in the 0.35 μm CMOS technology, and further characterized using a tailored photon-transfer method2 and the EMVA 1288 standard3. The basic parameters such as spectral responsivity, photo-response non-uniformity and dark current were measured at fabricated sensor samples. A special attention was paid to charge transfer time characterization4 and the evaluation of crosstalk between neighboring pixels - two major concerns attained during the development. It is shown that the electro-optical characteristics of the developed line sensor are comparable to those delivered by CCD line sensors available on the market, which are normally superior in performance compared to their CMOS based counterparts, but offering additional features such as the possibility of time gating, non-destructive readout, and charge accumulation over several cycles: approaches used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the sensor output.

  19. Wait, are you sad or angry? Large exposure time differences required for the categorization of facial expressions of emotion

    PubMed Central

    Du, Shichuan; Martinez, Aleix M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Facial expressions of emotion are essential components of human behavior, yet little is known about the hierarchical organization of their cognitive analysis. We study the minimum exposure time needed to successfully classify the six classical facial expressions of emotion (joy, surprise, sadness, anger, disgust, fear) plus neutral as seen at different image resolutions (240 × 160 to 15 × 10 pixels). Our results suggest a consistent hierarchical analysis of these facial expressions regardless of the resolution of the stimuli. Happiness and surprise can be recognized after very short exposure times (10–20 ms), even at low resolutions. Fear and anger are recognized the slowest (100–250 ms), even in high-resolution images, suggesting a later computation. Sadness and disgust are recognized in between (70–200 ms). The minimum exposure time required for successful classification of each facial expression correlates with the ability of a human subject to identify it correctly at low resolutions. These results suggest a fast, early computation of expressions represented mostly by low spatial frequencies or global configural cues and a later, slower process for those categories requiring a more fine-grained analysis of the image. We also demonstrate that those expressions that are mostly visible in higher-resolution images are not recognized as accurately. We summarize implications for current computational models. PMID:23509409

  20. Compact Wireless Microscope for In-Situ Time Course Study of Large Scale Cell Dynamics within an Incubator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Di; Wong, Dennis; Li, Junxiang; Luo, Zhang; Guo, Yiran; Liu, Bifeng; Wu, Qiong; Ho, Chih-Ming; Fei, Peng

    2015-12-01

    Imaging of live cells in a region of interest is essential to life science research. Unlike the traditional way that mounts CO2 incubator onto a bulky microscope for observation, here we propose a wireless microscope (termed w-SCOPE) that is based on the “microscope-in-incubator” concept and can be easily housed into a standard CO2 incubator for prolonged on-site observation of the cells. The w-SCOPE is capable of tunable magnification, remote control and wireless image transmission. At the same time, it is compact, measuring only ~10 cm in each dimension, and cost-effective. With the enhancement of compressive sensing computation, the acquired images can achieve a wide field of view (FOV) of ~113 mm2 as well as a cellular resolution of ~3 μm, which enables various forms of follow-up image-based cell analysis. We performed 12 hours time-lapse study on paclitaxel-treated MCF-7 and HEK293T cell lines using w-SCOPE. The analytic results, such as the calculated viability and therapeutic window, from our device were validated by standard cell detection assays and imaging-based cytometer. In addition to those end-point detection methods, w-SCOPE further uncovered the time course of the cell’s response to the drug treatment over the whole period of drug exposure.

  1. Compact Wireless Microscope for In-Situ Time Course Study of Large Scale Cell Dynamics within an Incubator

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Di; Wong, Dennis; Li, Junxiang; Luo, Zhang; Guo, Yiran; Liu, Bifeng; Wu, Qiong; Ho, Chih-Ming; Fei, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Imaging of live cells in a region of interest is essential to life science research. Unlike the traditional way that mounts CO2 incubator onto a bulky microscope for observation, here we propose a wireless microscope (termed w-SCOPE) that is based on the “microscope-in-incubator” concept and can be easily housed into a standard CO2 incubator for prolonged on-site observation of the cells. The w-SCOPE is capable of tunable magnification, remote control and wireless image transmission. At the same time, it is compact, measuring only ~10 cm in each dimension, and cost-effective. With the enhancement of compressive sensing computation, the acquired images can achieve a wide field of view (FOV) of ~113 mm2 as well as a cellular resolution of ~3 μm, which enables various forms of follow-up image-based cell analysis. We performed 12 hours time-lapse study on paclitaxel-treated MCF-7 and HEK293T cell lines using w-SCOPE. The analytic results, such as the calculated viability and therapeutic window, from our device were validated by standard cell detection assays and imaging-based cytometer. In addition to those end-point detection methods, w-SCOPE further uncovered the time course of the cell’s response to the drug treatment over the whole period of drug exposure. PMID:26681552

  2. IV-VI semiconductor lasers for gas phase biomarker detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, Patrick; Namjou, Khosrow; Roller, Chad; McMillen, Gina; Kamat, Pratyuma

    2007-09-01

    A promising absorption spectroscopy application for mid-IR lasers is exhaled breath analysis where sensitive, selective, and speedy measurement of small gas phase biomarker molecules can be used to diagnose disease and monitor therapies. Many molecules such as nitric oxide, ethane, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, carbonyl sulfide, and carbon disulfide have been connected to diseases or conditions such as asthma, oxidative stress, breast cancer, lung cancer, diabetes, organ transplant rejection, and schizophrenia. Measuring these and other, yet to be discovered, biomarker molecules in exhaled breath with mid-IR lasers offers great potential for improving health care since such tests are non-invasive, real-time, and do not require expensive consumables or chemical reagents. Motivated by these potential benefits, mid-IR laser spectrometers equipped with presently available cryogenically-cooled IV-VI lasers mounted in compact Stirling coolers have been developed for clinical research applications. This paper will begin with a description of the development of mid-IR laser instruments and their use in the largest known exhaled breath clinical study ever performed. It will then shift to a description of recent work on the development of new IV-VI semiconductor quantum well materials and laser fabrication methods that offer the promise of low power consumption (i.e. efficient) continuous wave emission at room temperature. Taken together, the demonstration of compelling clinical applications with large market opportunities and the clear identification of a viable pathway to develop low cost mid-IR laser instrumentation can create a renewed focus for future research and development efforts within the mid-IR materials and devices area.

  3. Biosynthesis of alpha2(IV) and alpha1(IV) chains of collagen IV and interactions with matrix metalloproteinase-9.

    PubMed

    Toth, M; Sado, Y; Ninomiya, Y; Fridman, R

    1999-07-01

    In vitro binding studies with latent matrix metalloproteinase-9 (pro-MMP-9) have revealed the existence of nondisulfide-bonded alpha2(IV) chains on the cell surface capable of forming a high-affinity complex with the enzyme. Here we investigated the biosynthesis and cellular distribution of alpha2(IV) and alpha1(IV) chains in breast epithelial (MCF10A and MDA-MB-231) and fibrosarcoma (HT1080) cells by pulse-chase analysis followed by immunoprecipitation with chain-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb). These studies showed that whereas the alpha1(IV) chain remained in the intracellular compartment, nondisulfide-bonded alpha2(IV) chains were secreted into the media in a stable form. Consistently, only alpha2(IV) was detected on the cell surface by surface biotinylation or indirect immunofluorescence. In agreement with the pulse-chase analysis, media subjected to co-precipitation experiments with pro-MMP-9 or pro-MMP-9-affinity chromatography followed by immunoblotting with chain-specific mAbs resulted in the detection of alpha2(IV). A preferential secretion of nondisulfide-bonded alpha2(IV) chains was also observed in CHO-K1 cells transiently transfected with full-length mouse alpha2(IV) or alpha (IV) cDNAs. However, a complex of mouse alpha1(IV) with pro-MMP-9 was coprecipitated with exogenous enzyme from lysates of CHO-K1 cells transfected with mouse alpha1(IV), suggesting that under overexpression conditions the enzyme can also interact with the alpha1 (IV) chain. Collectively, these studies further demonstrate the interactions of pro-MMP-9 with collagen IV chains and a unique processing and targeting of nondisulfide-bonded alpha2(IV) chains that may play a role in the surface/matrix association of pro-MMP-9.

  4. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia River Basin, Volume IV : Evaluation of the 1998 Predictions of the Run-timing of Wild Migrant Yearling and Subyearling Chinook and Steelhead, and Hatchery Salmon in the Snake River Basin Using Program RealTime.

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, Caitlin

    1997-01-01

    Program RealTime provided tracking and forecasting of the 1998 inseason outmigration via the internet for stocks of wild PIT-tagged spring/summer chinook. These stocks were from eight release sites above Lower Granite dam, including Bear Valley Creek, Catherine Creek, Elk Creek, Lake Creek, Imnaha River, Minam River, South Fork Salmon River, and Secesh River. Forecasts were also provided for a stock of hatchery-reared PIT-tagged summer-run sockeye from Redfish Lake and for the runs-at-large of Snake River wild yearling and subyearling chinook salmon, and steelhead. The 1998 Program RealTime performance was comparable to its performance in previous years for the whole-season evaluations for every stock tracked. Relative to 1997, performance improved for the yearling chinook run-at-large, and for predictions for last-half of the season for every other stock. Performance compared poorly with 1997 predictions for the first half of the runs of PIT-tagged yearling spring/summer chinook stocks and the run-at-large of fall subyearling chinook, and was slightly worse for the first half of the Redfish Lake sockeye run and the steelhead run-at-large. Poor first-half performance was likely due to the unusually large (and in some cases short) outmigrations in 1998. Utilization in 1998 of a different method of adjusting smolt counts at Lower Granite Dam compared to previous years produced slightly better first-half performance than pre-1998 adjustments would have, but slightly worse last-half performance, for all the PIT-tagged stocks, prompting a return to the pre-1998 adjustment formula for the 1999 outmigration. An Army Corp of Engineers (ACOE) experiment during April and May of 1998 involving the installation of two new components to existing structures at Lower Granite Dam did not appear to affect RealTime performance. A comparison of run-timing predictions based on FPC passage indices and Battelle hydroacoustic counts showed the two independent data sources produced very

  5. C IV and C III] reverberation mapping of the luminous quasar PG 1247+267

    SciTech Connect

    Trevese, D.; Saturni, F. G.; Perna, M.; Dadina, M.

    2014-11-10

    So far the masses of about 50 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) have been measured through the reverberation mapping technique (RM). Most measurements have been performed for objects of moderate luminosity and redshift, based on Hβ, which is also used to calibrate the scaling relation that allows single-epoch (SE) mass determination based on AGN luminosity and the width of different emission lines. Due to the complex structure and gas dynamics of the relevant emission region, the SE masses obtained from the C IV(1549 Å) line show a large spread around the mean values. Direct RM measures of C IV exist for only six AGNs of low luminosity and redshift, and only one luminous quasar. Since 2003, we have collected photometric and spectroscopic observations of PG1247+267, the most luminous quasar ever analyzed for RM. We provide light curves for the continuum and for C IV(1549 Å) and C III](1909 Å), and measures of the reverberation time lags based on the SPEAR method. The sizes of the line emission regions assume a ratio of R {sub C} {sub III]}/R {sub C} {sub IV} ∼ 2, similar to the case of Seyfert galaxies, indicating for the first time a similar ionization stratification in a luminous quasar and low-luminosity nuclei. Due to the relatively small size of the broad line region and the relatively narrow line widths, we estimate a small mass and an anomalously high Eddington ratio. We discuss the possibility that either the shape of the emission region or an amplification of the luminosity caused by gravitational lensing may be partly responsible for the result.

  6. The HIV Care Cascade Measured Over Time and by Age, Sex, and Race in a Large National Integrated Care System.

    PubMed

    Horberg, Michael Alan; Hurley, Leo Bartemeier; Klein, Daniel Benjamin; Towner, William James; Kadlecik, Peter; Antoniskis, Diana; Mogyoros, Miguel; Brachman, Philip Sigmund; Remmers, Carol Louise; Gambatese, Rebecca Claire; Blank, Jackie; Ellis, Courtney Georgiana; Silverberg, Michael Jonah

    2015-11-01

    HIV care cascades can evaluate programmatic success over time. However, methodologies for estimating cascade stages vary, and few have evaluated differences by demographic subgroups. We examined cascade performance over time and by age, sex, and race/ethnicity in Kaiser Permanente, providing HIV care in eight US states and Washington, DC. We created cascades for HIV+ members' age ≥13 for 2010-2012. We measured "linkage" (a visit/CD4 within 90 days of being diagnosed for new patients; ≥1 medical visit/year if established); "retention" (≥2 medical visits ≥60 days apart); filled ART (filled ≥3 months of combination ART); and viral suppression (HIV RNA <200 copies/mL last measured in year). The cascades were stratified by calendar year, sex, age, and race/ethnicity. We found men had statistically (p < 0.05) higher percent linkage, filled ART, and viral suppression for 2010 and 2011 but not for 2012. Women had significantly greater retention for all years. Annually, older age was associated (p < 0.05) with retention, filled ART, and viral suppression but not linkage. Latinos had greater (p < 0.05) retention than whites or blacks in all years, with similar retention comparing blacks and whites. Filled ART and viral suppression was increased (p < 0.05) for whites compared with all racial/ethnic groups in all years. Cascade methodology requiring success at upstream stages before measuring success at later stages (i.e., "dependent" methodology) underreported performance by up to 20% compared with evaluating each stage separately ("independent"). Thus, care results improved over time, but significant differences exist by patient demographics. Specifically, retention efforts should be targeted toward younger patients and blacks; women, blacks, and Latinos require greater ART prescribing.

  7. WISC-IV and Clinical Validation of the Four- and Five-Factor Interpretative Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Lawrence G.; Keith, Timothy Z.; Zhu, Jianjun; Chen, Hsinyi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the constructs measured by the WISC-IV and the consistency of measurement across large normative and clinical samples. Competing higher order four- and five-factor models were analyzed using the WISC-IV normative sample and clinical subjects. The four-factor solution is the model published with the test…

  8. Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IIC-IV Melanoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-20

    Ciliary Body and Choroid Melanoma, Medium/Large Size; Ciliary Body and Choroid Melanoma, Small Size; Extraocular Extension Melanoma; Iris Melanoma; Metastatic Intraocular Melanoma; Mucosal Melanoma; Recurrent Intraocular Melanoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Stage IIC Melanoma; Stage IIIA Intraocular Melanoma; Stage IIIA Melanoma; Stage IIIB Intraocular Melanoma; Stage IIIB Melanoma; Stage IIIC Intraocular Melanoma; Stage IIIC Melanoma; Stage IV Intraocular Melanoma; Stage IV Melanoma

  9. Local Recurrence in Women With Stage I Breast Cancer: Declining Rates Over Time in a Large, Population-Based Cohort

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, Joycelin; Truong, Pauline T.; Smith, Sally L.; Lu, Linghong; Lesperance, Mary; Olivotto, Ivo A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether local recurrence (LR) risk has changed over time among women with stage I breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: Subjects were 5974 women aged ≥50 years diagnosis with pT1N0 breast cancer from 1989 to 2006, treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy. Clinicopathologic characteristics, treatment, and LR outcomes were compared among 4 cohorts stratified by year of diagnosis: 1989 to 1993 (n=1077), 1994 to 1998 (n=1633), 1999 to 2002 (n=1622), and 2003 to 2006 (n=1642). Multivariable analysis was performed, with year of diagnosis as a continuous variable. Results: Median follow-up time was 8.6 years. Among patients diagnosed in 1989 to 1993, 1994 to 1998, 1999 to 2002, and 2003 to 2006, the proportions of grade 1 tumors increased (16% vs 29% vs 40% vs 39%, respectively, P<.001). Surgical margin clearance rates increased from 82% to 93% to 95% and 88%, respectively (P<.001). Over time, the proportions of unknown estrogen receptor (ER) status decreased (29% vs 10% vs 1.2% vs 0.5%, respectively, P<.001), whereas ER-positive tumors increased (56% vs 77% vs 86% vs 86%, respectively, P<.001). Hormone therapy use increased (23% vs 23% vs 62% vs 73%, respectively, P<.001), and chemotherapy use increased (2% vs 5% vs 10% vs 13%, respectively, P<.001). The 5-year cumulative incidence rates of LR over the 4 time periods were 2.8% vs 1.7% vs 0.9% vs 0.8%, respectively (Gray's test, P<.001). On competing risk multivariable analysis, year of diagnosis was significantly associated with decreased LR (hazard ratio, 0.92 per year, P=.0003). Relative to grade 1 histology, grades 2, 3, and unknown were associated with increased LR. Hormone therapy use was associated with reduced LR. Conclusion: Significant changes in the multimodality management of stage I breast cancer have occurred over the past 2 decades. More favorable-risk tumors were diagnosed, and margin clearance and systemic therapy use

  10. Large-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances using ionospheric imaging at storm time: A case study on 17 march 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jun; Yao, Yibin; Kong, Jian; Zhang, Liang

    2016-07-01

    A moderate geomagnetic storm occurred on March 17, 2013, during which large-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (LSTIDs) are observed over China by ionosondes and GPS from Crustal Movement Observation Network of China (CMONOC) and the International GNSS Service (IGS). Ionosonde data and computerized ionospheric tomography (CIT) technique are employed to analyze the disturbances in our study. The maximum entropy cross spectral analysis (MECSA) method is used to obtain the propagation parameters of the LSTIDs. Spatio-temporal variations of ionospheric electron density (IED) and total electron content (TEC) during this geomagnetic storm over China are investigated. Disturbance images of IED and TEC are also presented in the paper. The results show two LSTID events at about 12:00 UT and 15:00 UT during the main phase of the storm. Besides, the LSTIDs with a duration of 40 min are detected over China. It is confirmed that the LSTIDs travel from north to south with a horizontal velocity of 400-500 m/s, and moved southwestwards with a horizontal velocity of 250-300 m/s, respectively.

  11. Thermo-mechanical response of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) large volumes exposed to time-dependent environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraldi, M.; Esposito, L.; Perrella, G.; Cutolo, A.

    2014-02-01

    Low thermal conductivity and elevated absorbance of large bulky volumes of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) exposed to moderately aggressive environmental conditions may cooperate to determine critical mechanical conditions, kindling unexpected high thermal stresses values which lead the material to failure. From the engineering point of view, this can be explained as the result of two concomitant phenomena which activate a cascade of events: very sharp thermal gradients engendered by transient thermal processes induced by cyclic environmental conditions, combined with significant bulk heat generation due to the high thermal inertia of massive PMMA volumes, in turn aggravating the steepness of the thermal gradients, may in fact ingenerate severe stress regimes, potentially undermining the structural stability of the material. Moving from these considerations, the present study is aimed to investigate possible rupture of PMMA blocks experiencing heating processes as a consequence of their exposure to outdoor cyclic environmental conditions. The problem is approached by means of both rigorous analytical arguments and the Finite Element based numerical methods, finally exploiting the theoretical outcomes to formulate a hypothesis which might explain the still unclear phenomenon of the sudden breaking of the PMMA structure, named Huge Wine Glass and designed by the world famous Japanese architect Toyo Ito, which occurred in Pescara (Italy) in 2009.

  12. Long implosion time (240 ns) Z-pinch experiments with a large diameter (12 cm) double-shell nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, J. S.; Banister, J. W.; Failor, B. H.; Qi, N.; Song, Y.; Sze, H. M.; Fisher, A.

    2004-05-01

    Recently, an 8 cm diameter double-shell nozzle has produced argon Z pinches with high K-shell yields with implosion time of 210 ns. To produce even longer implosion time Z pinches for facilities such as Decade Quad [D. Price, et al., "Electrical and Mechanical Design of the Decade Quad in PRS Mode," in Proceedings of the 12th IEEE Pulsed Power Conference, Monterey, CA, edited by C. Stallings and H. Kirbie (IEEE, New York, 1999), p. 489] (9 MA short circuit current at 300 ns), a larger nozzle (12 cm outer diameter) was designed and fabricated. During initial testing on Double-EAGLE [P. Sincerny et al., Proceedings of the 5th IEEE Pulsed Power Conference, Arlington, VA, edited by M. F. Rose and P. J. Turchi (IEEE, New York, 1985), p. 151], 9 kJ of argon K-shell radiation in a 6 ns full width at half maximum pulse was produced with a 240 ns implosion. The initial gas distributions produced by various nozzle configurations have been measured and their impact on the final radiative characteristics of the pinch are presented. The addition of a central jet to increase the initial gas density near the axis is observed to enhance the pinch quality, increasing K-shell yield by 17% and power by 40% in the best configuration tested.

  13. Development of a large-area CMOS-based detector for real-time x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Sung Kyn; Park, Sung Kyu; Hwang, Sung Ha; Im, Dong Ak; Kosonen, Jari; Kim, Tae Woo; Yun, Seungman; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2010-04-01

    Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensors (APSs) with high electrical and optical performances are now being attractive for digital radiography (DR) and dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). In this study, we report our prototype CMOS-based detectors capable of real-time imaging. The field-of-view of the detector is 12 × 14.4 cm. The detector employs a CsI:Tl scintillator as an x-ray-to-light converter. The electrical performance of the CMOS APS, such as readout noise and full-well capacity, was evaluated. The x-ray imaging characteristics of the detector were evaluated in terms of characteristic curve, pre-sampling modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, detective quantum efficiency, and image lag. The overall performance of the detector is demonstrated with phantom images obtained for DR and CBCT applications. The detailed development description and measurement results are addressed. With the results, we suggest that the prototype CMOS-based detector has the potential for CBCT and real-time x-ray imaging applications.

  14. Interactions and Localization of Escherichia coli Error-Prone DNA Polymerase IV after DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Mallik, Sarita; Popodi, Ellen M.; Hanson, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Escherichia coli's DNA polymerase IV (Pol IV/DinB), a member of the Y family of error-prone polymerases, is induced during the SOS response to DNA damage and is responsible for translesion bypass and adaptive (stress-induced) mutation. In this study, the localization of Pol IV after DNA damage was followed using fluorescent fusions. After exposure of E. coli to DNA-damaging agents, fluorescently tagged Pol IV localized to the nucleoid as foci. Stepwise photobleaching indicated ∼60% of the foci consisted of three Pol IV molecules, while ∼40% consisted of six Pol IV molecules. Fluorescently tagged Rep, a replication accessory DNA helicase, was recruited to the Pol IV foci after DNA damage, suggesting that the in vitro interaction between Rep and Pol IV reported previously also occurs in vivo. Fluorescently tagged RecA also formed foci after DNA damage, and Pol IV localized to them. To investigate if Pol IV localizes to double-strand breaks (DSBs), an I-SceI endonuclease-mediated DSB was introduced close to a fluorescently labeled LacO array on the chromosome. After DSB induction, Pol IV localized to the DSB site in ∼70% of SOS-induced cells. RecA also formed foci at the DSB sites, and Pol IV localized to the RecA foci. These results suggest that Pol IV interacts with RecA in vivo and is recruited to sites of DSBs to aid in the restoration of DNA replication. IMPORTANCE DNA polymerase IV (Pol IV/DinB) is an error-prone DNA polymerase capable of bypassing DNA lesions and aiding in the restart of stalled replication forks. In this work, we demonstrate in vivo localization of fluorescently tagged Pol IV to the nucleoid after DNA damage and to DNA double-strand breaks. We show colocalization of Pol IV with two proteins: Rep DNA helicase, which participates in replication, and RecA, which catalyzes recombinational repair of stalled replication forks. Time course experiments suggest that Pol IV recruits Rep and that RecA recruits Pol IV. These findings

  15. Time-Dependent Predictors of Loss to Follow-Up in a Large HIV Treatment Cohort in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Meloni, Seema Thakore; Chang, Charlotte; Chaplin, Beth; Rawizza, Holly; Jolayemi, Oluwatoyin; Banigbe, Bolanle; Okonkwo, Prosper; Kanki, Phyllis

    2014-01-01

    Background  Most evaluations of loss to follow-up (LTFU) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) treatment programs focus on baseline predictors, prior to antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation. As risk of LTFU is a continuous issue, the aim of this evaluation was to augment existing information with further examination of time-dependent predictors of loss. Methods  This was a retrospective evaluation of data collected between 2004 and 2012 by the Harvard School of Public Health and the AIDS Prevention Initiative in Nigeria as part of PEPFAR-funded program in Nigeria. We used multivariate modeling methods to examine associations between CD4+ cell counts, viral load, and early adherence patterns with LTFU, defined as no refills collected for at least 2 months since the last scheduled appointment. Results  Of 51 953 patients initiated on ART between 2004 and 2011, 14 626 (28%) were LTFU by 2012. Factors associated with increased risk for LTFU were young age, having nonincome-generating occupations or no education, being unmarried, World Health Organization (WHO) stage, having a detectable viral load, and lower CD4+ cell counts. In a subset analysis, adherence patterns during the first 3 months of ART were associated with risk of LTFU by month 12. Conclusions  In settings with limited resources, early adherence patterns, as well as CD4+ cell counts and unsuppressed viral load, at any time point in treatment are predictive of loss and serve as effective markers for developing targeted interventions to reduce rates of attrition. PMID:25734125

  16. Spectroscopic study of Se(IV) removal from water by reductive precipitation using sulfide.

    PubMed

    Jung, Bahngmi; Safan, Aya; Batchelor, Bill; Abdel-Wahab, Ahmed

    2016-11-01

    This study investigates the removal of selenium (IV) from water by reductive precipitation using sodium sulfide at neutral pH. Also, it examines the application of UV light as an activating method to enhance reductive precipitation. Furthermore, this work evaluates the effects of sulfide dose and solution pH on behavior of Se(IV) reduction. Selenium was effectively removed in sulfide solution at both neutral and acidic pH. UV irradiation did not enhance removal efficiency of Se(IV) at conditions tested, but it affected solids morphology and composition. SEM/EDS and XPS results showed that selenite was reduced to elemental Se or Se-S precipitates (e.g. SenS8-n) in sulfide solution. High resolution S 2p XPS spectra suggested the presence of sulfur-containing anions (e.g. S2O3(2-), HSO3(-), etc.) or elemental S (S(0)), monosulfide (S(2-)), and polysulfides (Sn(2-)), which could be produced from sulfide photolysis or reaction with Se. In addition, large aggregates of irregular shape, which suggest Se-S precipitates or elemental sulfur, were found more prominently at pH 4 than at pH 7, and they were more noticeable in the presence of UV with longer reaction times. In addition, XRD patterns showed that gray elemental Se solids were dominant in experiments without UV, whereas Se-S precipitates (Se3S5) with an orange color were found in those with UV. PMID:27552695

  17. Coordination Chemistry of Homoleptic Actinide(IV)-Thiocyanate Complexes.

    PubMed

    Carter, Tyler J; Wilson, Richard E

    2015-10-26

    The synthesis, X-ray crystal structure, vibrational and optical spectroscopy for the eight-coordinate thiocyanate compounds, [Et4 N]4 [Pu(IV) (NCS)8 ], [Et4 N]4 [Th(IV) (NCS)8 ], and [Et4 N]4 [Ce(III) (NCS)7 (H2 O)] are reported. Thiocyanate was found to rapidly reduce plutonium to Pu(III) in acidic solutions (pH<1) in the presence of NCS(-) . The optical spectrum of [Et4 N][SCN] containing Pu(III) solution was indistinguishable from that of aquated Pu(III) suggesting that inner-sphere complexation with [Et4 N][SCN] does not occur in water. However, upon concentration, the homoleptic thiocyanate complex [Et4 N]4 [Pu(IV) (NCS)8 ] was crystallized when a large excess of [Et4 N][NCS] was present. This compound, along with its U(IV) analogue, maintains inner-sphere thiocyanate coordination in acetonitrile based on the observation of intense ligand-to-metal charge-transfer bands. Spectroscopic and crystallographic data do not support the interaction of the metal orbitals with the ligand π system, but support an enhanced An(IV) -NCS interaction, as the Lewis acidity of the metal ion increases from Th to Pu.

  18. Test Review: Advanced Clinical Solutions for WAIS-IV and WMS-IV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Yiting; Lai, Mark H. C.; Xu, Yining; Zhou, Yuanyuan

    2012-01-01

    The authors review the "Advanced Clinical Solutions for WAIS-IV and WMS-IV". The "Advanced Clinical Solutions (ACS) for the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition" (WAIS-IV; Wechsler, 2008) and the "Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition" (WMS-IV; Wechsler, 2009) was published by Pearson in 2009. It is a clinical tool for extending the…

  19. IV antibiotic therapy in the community: clinically effective and cost effective.

    PubMed

    Barker, Annie; Lyden-Rodgers, Mary

    This article discusses how the introduction of new ways of working has resulted in a more cost-effective service for the delivery of intravenous (IV) antibiotic therapy in a community setting. When community IV therapy was originally initiated in the trust, the system involved two nurses to check calculations and oversee the administration of IV antibiotic therapy. However, as the demand for IV therapy escalated, and with some patients requiring multiple visits, pressures on community nursing teams created challenges relating to capacity and demand. This service improvement project involved two phases. Phase one examined patient safety and the administration of IV antibiotics by one nurse. Phase two reviewed the administration of IV antibiotic via a timed bolus route. Following the analysis, the implementation of these initiatives demonstrated maximisation of resources, a release of nurses' time to care and improvements to the patient experience. PMID:27145545

  20. A large eruption convulsed in prehistoric times an extensive area of Catamarca, Southern Central Andes, NW Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Turiel, Jose-Luis; Ratto, Norma; Perez-Torrado, Francisco-Jose; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Rejas, Marta; Lobo, Agustin

    2016-04-01

    rendered uninhabitable, being dramatic the socio-economic and environmental consequences for generations. However, the resilience was high, as evidenced by the relatively quick reintroduction of cultivated fields. The understanding of these impacts could provide valuable insights to manage volcanic hazards related to large explosive eruptions. Financial support was provided by the QUECA Project (MINECO, CGL2011-23307).

  1. NIHAO project - I. Reproducing the inefficiency of galaxy formation across cosmic time with a large sample of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liang; Dutton, Aaron A.; Stinson, Gregory S.; Macciò, Andrea V.; Penzo, Camilla; Kang, Xi; Keller, Ben W.; Wadsley, James

    2015-11-01

    We introduce project NIHAO (Numerical Investigation of a Hundred Astrophysical Objects), a set of 100 cosmological zoom-in hydrodynamical simulations performed using the GASOLINE code, with an improved implementation of the SPH algorithm. The haloes in our study range from dwarf (M200 ˜ 5 × 109 M⊙) to Milky Way (M200 ˜ 2 × 1012 M⊙) masses, and represent an unbiased sampling of merger histories, concentrations and spin parameters. The particle masses and force softenings are chosen to resolve the mass profile to below 1 per cent of the virial radius at all masses, ensuring that galaxy half-light radii are well resolved. Using the same treatment of star formation and stellar feedback for every object, the simulated galaxies reproduce the observed inefficiency of galaxy formation across cosmic time as expressed through the stellar mass versus halo mass relation, and the star formation rate versus stellar mass relation. We thus conclude that stellar feedback is the chief piece of physics required to limit the efficiency of star formation in galaxies less massive than the Milky Way.

  2. PREPARATION OF OXOPORPHINATOMANGANESE (IV) COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Willner, I.; Otvos, J.; Calvin, M.

    1980-07-01

    Oxo-manganese-tetraphenylporphyrin (O=Mn{sup IV}-TPP) has been prepared by an oxygen-transfer reaction from iodosylbenzene to MnIITPP and characterized by its i.r. and field desorption mass spectra, which are identical to those of the product obtained by direct oxidation of Mn{sup III}(TPP) in an aqueous medium; it transfers oxygen to triphenylphosphine to produce triphenylphosphine oxide, and it is suggested that similar intermediates are important in oxygen activation by cytochrome P-450 as well as in the photosynthetic evolution of oxygen.

  3. Time trends in the treatment and prognosis of resectable pancreatic cancer in a large tertiary referral centre

    PubMed Central

    Barugola, Giuliano; Partelli, Stefano; Crippa, Stefano; Butturini, Giovanni; Salvia, Roberto; Sartori, Nora; Bassi, Claudio; Falconi, Massimo; Pederzoli, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Mortality in pancreatic cancer has remained unchanged over the last 20–30 years. The aim of the present study was to analyse survival trends in a selected population of patients submitted to resection for pancreatic cancer at a single institution. Methods Included were 544 patients who underwent pancreatectomy for pancreatic cancer between 1990 and 2009. Patients were categorized into two subgroups according to the decade in which resection was performed (1990–1999 and 2000–2009). Predictors of survival were analysed using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results Totals of 114 (21%) and 430 (79%) resections were carried out during the periods 1990–1999 and 2000–2009, respectively (P < 0.0001). Hospital length of stay (16 days versus 10 days; P < 0.001) and postoperative mortality (3% versus 1%; P = 0.160) decreased over time. Median disease-specific survival significantly increased from 16 months in the first period to 29 months in the second period (P < 0.001). Following multivariate analysis, poorly differentiated tumour [hazard ratio (HR) 3.1, P < 0.001], lymph node metastases (HR = 1.9, P < 0.001), macroscopically positive margin (R2) resection (HR = 3.2, P < 0.0001), no adjuvant therapy (HR = 1.6, P < 0.001) and resection performed in the period 1990–1999 (HR = 2.18, P < 0.001) were significant independent predictors of a poor outcome. Conclusions Longterm survival after surgery for pancreatic cancer significantly improved over the period under study. Better patient selection and the routine use of adjuvant therapy may account for this improvement. PMID:23490217

  4. Assessing Methods for Mapping 2D Field Concentrations of CO2 Over Large Spatial Areas for Monitoring Time Varying Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaccheo, T. S.; Pernini, T.; Botos, C.; Dobler, J. T.; Blume, N.; Braun, M.; Levine, Z. H.; Pintar, A. L.

    2014-12-01

    This work presents a methodology for constructing 2D estimates of CO2 field concentrations from integrated open path measurements of CO2 concentrations. It provides a description of the methodology, an assessment based on simulated data and results from preliminary field trials. The Greenhouse gas Laser Imaging Tomography Experiment (GreenLITE) system, currently under development by Exelis and AER, consists of a set of laser-based transceivers and a number of retro-reflectors coupled with a cloud-based compute environment to enable real-time monitoring of integrated CO2 path concentrations, and provides 2D maps of estimated concentrations over an extended area of interest. The GreenLITE transceiver-reflector pairs provide laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) measurements of differential absorption due to CO2 along intersecting chords within the field of interest. These differential absorption values for the intersecting chords of horizontal path are not only used to construct estimated values of integrated concentration, but also employed in an optimal estimation technique to derive 2D maps of underlying concentration fields. This optimal estimation technique combines these sparse data with in situ measurements of wind speed/direction and an analytic plume model to provide tomographic-like reconstruction of the field of interest. This work provides an assessment of this reconstruction method and preliminary results from the Fall 2014 testing at the Zero Emissions Research and Technology (ZERT) site in Bozeman, Montana. This work is funded in part under the GreenLITE program developed under a cooperative agreement between Exelis and the National Energy and Technology Laboratory (NETL) under the Department of Energy (DOE), contract # DE-FE0012574. Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. is a major partner in this development.

  5. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography–Guided Positioning of Laryngeal Cancer Patients with Large Interfraction Time Trends in Setup and Nonrigid Anatomy Variations

    SciTech Connect

    Gangsaas, Anne Astreinidou, Eleftheria; Quint, Sandra; Levendag, Peter C.; Heijmen, Ben

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate interfraction setup variations of the primary tumor, elective nodes, and vertebrae in laryngeal cancer patients and to validate protocols for cone beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided correction. Methods and Materials: For 30 patients, CBCT-measured displacements in fractionated treatments were used to investigate population setup errors and to simulate residual setup errors for the no action level (NAL) offline protocol, the extended NAL (eNAL) protocol, and daily CBCT acquisition with online analysis and repositioning. Results: Without corrections, 12 of 26 patients treated with radical radiation therapy would have experienced a gradual change (time trend) in primary tumor setup ≥4 mm in the craniocaudal (CC) direction during the fractionated treatment (11/12 in caudal direction, maximum 11 mm). Due to these trends, correction of primary tumor displacements with NAL resulted in large residual CC errors (required margin 6.7 mm). With the weekly correction vector adjustments in eNAL, the trends could be largely compensated (CC margin 3.5 mm). Correlation between movements of the primary and nodal clinical target volumes (CTVs) in the CC direction was poor (r{sup 2}=0.15). Therefore, even with online setup corrections of the primary CTV, the required CC margin for the nodal CTV was as large as 6.8 mm. Also for the vertebrae, large time trends were observed for some patients. Because of poor CC correlation (r{sup 2}=0.19) between displacements of the primary CTV and the vertebrae, even with daily online repositioning of the vertebrae, the required CC margin around the primary CTV was 6.9 mm. Conclusions: Laryngeal cancer patients showed substantial interfraction setup variations, including large time trends, and poor CC correlation between primary tumor displacements and motion of the nodes and vertebrae (internal tumor motion). These trends and nonrigid anatomy variations have to be considered in the choice of setup verification protocol

  6. A new multichannel time reversal focusing method for circumferential Lamb waves and its applications for defect detection in thick-walled pipe with large-diameter.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zenghua; Xu, Qinglong; Gong, Yu; He, Cunfu; Wu, Bin

    2014-09-01

    This paper proposes a new multichannel time reversal focusing (MTRF) method for circumferential Lamb waves which is based on modified time reversal algorithm and applies this method for detecting different kinds of defects in thick-walled pipe with large-diameter. The principle of time reversal of circumferential Lamb waves in pipe is presented along with the influence from multiple guided wave modes and propagation paths. Experimental study is carried out in a thick-walled and large-diameter pipe with three artificial defects, namely two axial notches on its inner and outer surface respectively, and a corrosion-like defect on its outer surface. By using the proposed MTRF method, the multichannel signals focus at the defects, leading to the amplitude improvement of the defect scattered signal. Besides, another energy focus arises in the direct signal due to the partial compensation of dispersion and multimode of circumferential Lamb waves, alongside the multichannel focusing, during MTRF process. By taking the direct focus as a time base, accurate defect localization is implemented. Secondly, a new phenomenon is exhibited in this paper that defect scattered wave packet appears just before the right boundary of truncation window after time reversal, and to which two feasible explanations are given. Moreover, this phenomenon can be used as the theoretical basis in the determination of defect scattered waves in time reversal response signal. At last, in order to detect defects without prior knowing their exact position, a large-range truncation window is used in the proposed method. As a result, the experimental operation of MTRF method is simplified and defect detection and localization are well accomplished. PMID:24877582

  7. Taming Tin(IV) Polyazides.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Rory; Davis, Martin F; Fazakerley, Mathew; Portius, Peter

    2015-12-14

    The first charge-neutral Lewis base adducts of tin(IV) tetraazide, [Sn(N3)4(bpy)], [Sn(N3)4(phen)] and [Sn(N3)4(py)2], and the salt bis{bis(triphenylphosphine)iminium} hexa(azido)stannate [(PPN)2Sn(N3)6] (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine; phen = 1,10-phenanthroline; py = pyridine; PPN = N(PPh3)2) have been prepared using covalent or ionic azide-transfer reagents and ligand-exchange reactions. The azides were isolated on the 0.3 to 1 g scale and characterized by IR and NMR spectroscopies, microanalytical and thermal methods and their molecular structures determined by single-crystal XRD. All complexes have a distorted octahedral Sn[N]6 coordination geometry and possess greater thermal stability than their Si and Ge homologues. The nitrogen content of the adducts of up to 44% exceed any Sn(IV) compound known hitherto. PMID:26767331

  8. Real-Time 3D Fluoroscopy-Guided Large Core Needle Biopsy of Renal Masses: A Critical Early Evaluation According to the IDEAL Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Kroeze, Stephanie G. C.; Huisman, Merel; Verkooijen, Helena M.; Diest, Paul J. van; Ruud Bosch, J. L. H.; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den

    2012-06-15

    Introduction: Three-dimensional (3D) real-time fluoroscopy cone beam CT is a promising new technique for image-guided biopsy of solid tumors. We evaluated the technical feasibility, diagnostic accuracy, and complications of this technique for guidance of large-core needle biopsy in patients with suspicious renal masses. Methods: Thirteen patients with 13 suspicious renal masses underwent large-core needle biopsy under 3D real-time fluoroscopy cone beam CT guidance. Imaging acquisition and subsequent 3D reconstruction was done by a mobile flat-panel detector (FD) C-arm system to plan the needle path. Large-core needle biopsies were taken by the interventional radiologist. Technical success, accuracy, and safety were evaluated according to the Innovation, Development, Exploration, Assessment, Long-term study (IDEAL) recommendations. Results: Median tumor size was 2.6 (range, 1.0-14.0) cm. In ten (77%) patients, the histological diagnosis corresponded to the imaging findings: five were malignancies, five benign lesions. Technical feasibility was 77% (10/13); in three patients biopsy results were inconclusive. The lesion size of these three patients was <2.5 cm. One patient developed a minor complication. Median follow-up was 16.0 (range, 6.4-19.8) months. Conclusions: 3D real-time fluoroscopy cone beam CT-guided biopsy of renal masses is feasible and safe. However, these first results suggest that diagnostic accuracy may be limited in patients with renal masses <2.5 cm.

  9. The dependence of C IV broad absorption line properties on accompanying Si IV and Al III absorption: relating quasar-wind ionization levels, kinematics, and column densities

    SciTech Connect

    Filiz Ak, N.; Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, D. P.; Trump, J. R.; Hall, P. B.; Anderson, S. F.; Hamann, F.; Myers, Adam D.; Pâris, I.; Petitjean, P.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Shen, Yue; York, Don

    2014-08-20

    We consider how the profile and multi-year variability properties of a large sample of C IV Broad Absorption Line (BAL) troughs change when BALs from Si IV and/or Al III are present at corresponding velocities, indicating that the line of sight intercepts at least some lower ionization gas. We derive a number of observational results for C IV BALs separated according to the presence or absence of accompanying lower ionization transitions, including measurements of composite profile shapes, equivalent width (EW), characteristic velocities, composite variation profiles, and EW variability. We also measure the correlations between EW and fractional-EW variability for C IV, Si IV, and Al III. Our measurements reveal the basic correlated changes between ionization level, kinematics, and column density expected in accretion-disk wind models; e.g., lines of sight including lower ionization material generally show deeper and broader C IV troughs that have smaller minimum velocities and that are less variable. Many C IV BALs with no accompanying Si IV or Al III BALs may have only mild or no saturation.

  10. Rhenium(IV) compounds inducing apoptosis in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Lillo, José; Mastropietro, Teresa F; Lappano, Rosamaria; Madeo, Antonio; Alberto, Marta E; Russo, Nino; Maggiolini, Marcello; De Munno, Giovanni

    2011-05-14

    The anticancer properties of a series of mononuclear Re(IV) compounds of formula ReCl(4)L (where L is bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine; bpym = 2,2'-bipyrimidine; dmbpy = 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine; phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) were investigated for the first time. All compounds displayed potent in vitro antiproliferative activity against selected cancer cells.

  11. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Rituximab in Treating Younger Patients With Stage III-IV Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or B-Cell Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-24

    Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma

  12. Research Level I-V and QE Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, Keith

    2013-08-12

    A summary of key points related to research-level measurements of current-voltage (I-V) and quantum efficiency (QE) for various types of photovoltaic cells include the following: (1) Compare measurements with another trusted laboratory often enough to see the random error; (2) Have a calibration lab calibrate your research cell; (3) Document potential metastabilities and sensitivity to premeasurement conditions; (4) Measure the 1-sun spectral responsivity with a bias light level of 0.37 times the expected 1-sun short-current current; and (5) Be aware of bias rate artifacts in I-V and QE.

  13. Global fuel consumption optimization of an open-time terminal rendezvous and docking with large-eccentricity elliptic-orbit by the method of interval analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hongliang; Xu, Shijie

    2016-11-01

    By defining two open-time impulse points, the optimization of a two-impulse, open-time terminal rendezvous and docking with target spacecraft on large-eccentricity elliptical orbit is proposed in this paper. The purpose of optimization is to minimize the velocity increment for a terminal elliptic-reference-orbit rendezvous and docking. Current methods for solving this type of optimization problem include for example genetic algorithms and gradient based optimization. Unlike these methods, interval methods can guarantee that the globally best solution is found for a given parameterization of the input. The non-linear Tschauner- Hempel(TH) equations of the state transitions for a terminal elliptic target orbit are transformed form time domain to target orbital true anomaly domain. Their homogenous solutions and approximate state transition matrix for the control with a short true anomaly interval can be used to avoid interval integration. The interval branch and bound optimization algorithm is introduced for solving the presented rendezvous and docking optimization problem and optimizing two open-time impulse points and thruster pulse amplitudes, which systematically eliminates parts of the control and open-time input spaces that do not satisfy the path and final time state constraints. Several numerical examples are undertaken to validate the interval optimization algorithm. The results indicate that the sufficiently narrow spaces containing the global optimization solution for the open-time two-impulse terminal rendezvous and docking with target spacecraft on large-eccentricity elliptical orbit can be obtained by the interval algorithm (IA). Combining the gradient-based method, the global optimization solution for the discontinuous nonconvex optimization problem in the specifically remained search space can be found. Interval analysis is shown to be a useful tool and preponderant in the discontinuous nonconvex optimization problem of the terminal rendezvous and

  14. The MAX IV storage ring project.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Pedro F; Leemann, Simon C; Sjöström, Magnus; Andersson, Ake

    2014-09-01

    The MAX IV facility, currently under construction in Lund, Sweden, features two electron storage rings operated at 3 GeV and 1.5 GeV and optimized for the hard X-ray and soft X-ray/VUV spectral ranges, respectively. A 3 GeV linear accelerator serves as a full-energy injector into both rings as well as a driver for a short-pulse facility, in which undulators produce X-ray pulses as short as 100 fs. The 3 GeV ring employs a multibend achromat (MBA) lattice to achieve, in a relatively short circumference of 528 m, a bare lattice emittance of 0.33 nm rad, which reduces to 0.2 nm rad as insertion devices are added. The engineering implementation of the MBA lattice raises several technological problems. The large number of strong magnets per achromat calls for a compact design featuring small-gap combined-function magnets grouped into cells and sharing a common iron yoke. The small apertures lead to a low-conductance vacuum chamber design that relies on the chamber itself as a distributed copper absorber for the heat deposited by synchrotron radiation, while non-evaporable getter (NEG) coating provides for reduced photodesorption yields and distributed pumping. Finally, a low main frequency (100 MHz) is chosen for the RF system yielding long bunches, which are further elongated by passively operated third-harmonic Landau cavities, thus alleviating collective effects, both coherent (e.g. resistive wall instabilities) and incoherent (intrabeam scattering). In this paper, we focus on the MAX IV 3 GeV ring and present the lattice design as well as the engineering solutions to the challenges inherent to such a design. As the first realisation of a light source based on the MBA concept, the MAX IV 3 GeV ring offers an opportunity for validation of concepts that are likely to be essential ingredients of future diffraction-limited light sources. PMID:25177978

  15. The MAX IV storage ring project

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Pedro F.; Leemann, Simon C.; Sjöström, Magnus; Andersson, Åke

    2014-01-01

    The MAX IV facility, currently under construction in Lund, Sweden, features two electron storage rings operated at 3 GeV and 1.5 GeV and optimized for the hard X-ray and soft X-ray/VUV spectral ranges, respectively. A 3 GeV linear accelerator serves as a full-energy injector into both rings as well as a driver for a short-pulse facility, in which undulators produce X-ray pulses as short as 100 fs. The 3 GeV ring employs a multibend achromat (MBA) lattice to achieve, in a relatively short circumference of 528 m, a bare lattice emittance of 0.33 nm rad, which reduces to 0.2 nm rad as insertion devices are added. The engineering implementation of the MBA lattice raises several technological problems. The large number of strong magnets per achromat calls for a compact design featuring small-gap combined-function magnets grouped into cells and sharing a common iron yoke. The small apertures lead to a low-conductance vacuum chamber design that relies on the chamber itself as a distributed copper absorber for the heat deposited by synchrotron radiation, while non-evaporable getter (NEG) coating provides for reduced photodesorption yields and distributed pumping. Finally, a low main frequency (100 MHz) is chosen for the RF system yielding long bunches, which are further elongated by passively operated third-harmonic Landau cavities, thus alleviating collective effects, both coherent (e.g. resistive wall instabilities) and incoherent (intrabeam scattering). In this paper, we focus on the MAX IV 3 GeV ring and present the lattice design as well as the engineering solutions to the challenges inherent to such a design. As the first realisation of a light source based on the MBA concept, the MAX IV 3 GeV ring offers an opportunity for validation of concepts that are likely to be essential ingredients of future diffraction-limited light sources. PMID:25177978

  16. Analysis of cadmium in undissolved anode materials of Mark-IV electro-refiner

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Tae-Sic; Fredrickson, G.L.; Vaden, D.; Westphal, B.

    2013-07-01

    The Mark-IV electro-refiner (Mk-IV ER) is a unit process in the FCF (Fuel Conditioning Facility), which is primarily assigned to treating the used driver fuels. Mk-IV ER contains an electrolyte/molten cadmium system for refining uranium electrochemically. Typically, the anode of the Mk-IV ER consists of the chopped sodium-bonded metallic driver fuels, which have been primarily U-10Zr binary fuels. Chemical analysis of the residual anode materials after electrorefining indicates that a small amount of cadmium is removed from the Mk-IV ER along with the undissolved anode materials. Investigation of chemical analysis data indicates that the amount of cadmium in the undissolved anode materials is strongly correlated with the anode rotation speeds and the residence time of the anode in the Mk-IV ER. Discussions are given to explain the prescribed correlation. (authors)

  17. Chemical nature of implant-derived titanium(IV) ions in synovial fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Silwood, Christopher J.L.; Grootveld, Martin . E-mail: grootvm@lsbu.ac.uk

    2005-05-13

    Previous investigations have indicated a deleterious leakage of Ti(III) and/or Ti(IV) species from Ti-Al-V alloy joint prostheses into adjacent tissue, synovium or synovial fluid (SF) in vivo. In view of the importance of the particular chemical nature of such complexes in determining their biological activity, we have employed high field proton ({sup 1}H) NMR spectroscopy to 'speciate' Ti(IV) in inflammatory SF. Treatment of osteoarthritic SF samples with increasing concentrations of Ti(IV) (0.10-1.03 mM [TiO(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2}]{sup 2-}) gave rise to a specific broadening of the citrate proton resonances, indicating that this bioavailable oxygen-donor ligand plays an important role in complexing implant-derived Ti(IV). {sup 1}H NMR analysis of Ti(IV)-loaded SF samples subsequently treated with a large excess of ascorbate (0.05 M) showed that this added Ti(IV) chelator was only poorly effective in removing this metal ion from Ti(IV)-citrate/Ti(IV)-oxycitrate complexes. The results obtained here provide evidence for complexation of the low-molecular-mass (non-protein-bound) fraction of implant-derived Ti(IV) by citrate in vivo.

  18. Optical and Infrared Interferometry IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, Jayadev K.; Creech-Eakman, Michelle J.; Malbet, Fabien

    2014-08-01

    Optical and IR Interferometry IV at the SPIE 2014 symposium in Montreal had a strong and vibrant program. After initial fears about budget cuts and travel-funding constraints, the Program Committee had to work hard to accommodate as many quality submissions as possible. Innovative, creative and visionary work ensured that the field has progressed well, despite the bleak funding climate felt in the US, Europe and elsewhere. Montreal proved an excellent venue for this, the largest of Interferometry conferences and the only one that brings together practitioners from the world over. Let us summarize a few highlights to convey a glimpse of the excitement that is detailed in the rest of these Proceedings.

  19. The LOFT perspective on neutron star thermonuclear bursts: White paper in support of the mission concept of the large observatory for X-ray timing

    SciTech Connect

    in't Zand, J. J.M.; Malone, Christopher M.; Altamirano, D.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Brown, E. F.; Cavecchi, Y.; Chakrabarty, D.; Chenevez, J.; Cumming, A.; Degenaar, N.; Falanga, M.; Galloway, D. K.; Heger, A.; Jose, J.; Keek, L.; Linares, M.; Mahmoodifar, S.; Mendez, M.; Miller, M. C.; Paerels, F. B. S.; Poutanen, J.; Rozanska, A.; Schatz, H.; Serino, M.; Strohmayer, T. E.; Suleimanov, V. F.; Thielemann, F. -K.; Watts, A. L.; Weinberg, N. N.; Woosley, S. E.; Yu, W.; Zhang, S.; Zingale, M.

    2015-01-14

    The Large Area Detector (LAD) on the Large Observatory For X-ray Timing ( LOFT ), with a 8.5 m 2 photon- collecting area in the 2–30 keV bandpass at CCD-class spectral resolving power (λ/Δλ = 10 – 100), is designed for optimum performance on bright X-ray sources. Thus, it is well-suited to study thermonuclear X-ray bursts from Galactic neutron stars. These bursts will typically yield 2 x 105 photon detections per second in the LAD, which is at least 15 times more than with any other instrument past, current or anticipated. The Wide Field Monitor (WFM) foreseen for LOFT uniquely combines 2–50 keV imaging with large (30%) prompt sky coverage. This will enable the detection of tens of thousands of thermonuclear X-ray bursts during a 3-yr mission, including tens of superbursts. Both numbers are similar or more than the current database gathered in 50 years of X-ray astronomy.

  20. RF beam transmission of x-band PAA system utilizing large-area, polymer-based true-time-delay module developed using imprinting and inkjet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zeyu; Subbaraman, Harish; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Qiaochu; Xu, Xiaochuan; Chen, Xiangning; Zhang, Xingyu; Zou, Yi; Panday, Ashwin; Guo, L. Jay; Chen, Ray T.

    2016-02-01

    Phased-array antenna (PAA) technology plays a significant role in modern day radar and communication networks. Truetime- delay (TTD) enabled beam steering networks provide several advantages over their electronic counterparts, including squint-free beam steering, low RF loss, immunity to electromagnetic interference (EMI), and large bandwidth control of PAAs. Chip-scale and integrated TTD modules promise a miniaturized, light-weight system; however, the modules are still rigid and they require complex packaging solutions. Moreover, the total achievable time delay is still restricted by the wafer size. In this work, we propose a light-weight and large-area, true-time-delay beamforming network that can be fabricated on light-weight and flexible/rigid surfaces utilizing low-cost "printing" techniques. In order to prove the feasibility of the approach, a 2-bit thermo-optic polymer TTD network is developed using a combination of imprinting and ink-jet printing. RF beam steering of a 1×4 X-band PAA up to 60° is demonstrated. The development of such active components on large area, light-weight, and low-cost substrates promises significant improvement in size, weight, and power (SWaP) requirements over the state-of-the-art.

  1. Characterization of mean transit time at large springs in the Upper Colorado River Basin, USA: a tool for assessing groundwater discharge vulnerability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solder, John E.; Stolp, Bernard J.; Heilweil, Victor M.; Susong, David D.

    2016-07-01

    Environmental tracers (noble gases, tritium, industrial gases, stable isotopes, and radio-carbon) and hydrogeology were interpreted to determine groundwater transit-time distribution and calculate mean transit time (MTT) with lumped parameter modeling at 19 large springs distributed throughout the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB), USA. The predictive value of the MTT to evaluate the pattern and timing of groundwater response to hydraulic stress (i.e., vulnerability) is examined by a statistical analysis of MTT, historical spring discharge records, and the Palmer Hydrological Drought Index. MTTs of the springs range from 10 to 15,000 years and 90 % of the cumulative discharge-weighted travel-time distribution falls within the range of 2-10,000 years. Historical variability in discharge was assessed as the ratio of 10-90 % flow-exceedance (R 10/90%) and ranged from 2.8 to 1.1 for select springs with available discharge data. The lag-time (i.e., delay in discharge response to drought conditions) was determined by cross-correlation analysis and ranged from 0.5 to 6 years for the same select springs. Springs with shorter MTTs (<80 years) statistically correlate with larger discharge variations and faster responses to drought, indicating MTT can be used for estimating the relative magnitude and timing of groundwater response. Results indicate that groundwater discharge to streams in the UCRB will likely respond on the order of years to climate variation and increasing groundwater withdrawals.

  2. Sharpen Your Skills: Large Type.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knisely, Phyllis

    1983-01-01

    Three short articles about large type transcribing are provided for braille transcribers and teachers of the visually handicapped. The first article explains section IV-B-2 of the National Braille Association Manual for Large Type Transcribing. The second article presents the results of a survey on the kinds of typewriters, types of…

  3. Evaluation of Thermoelectric Generators by I-V Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Gao; Singh, Tanuj; Garcia-Canadas, Jorge; Ellor, Robert

    2016-03-01

    A recent theoretical study proposes a new way to evaluate thermoelectric devices by measuring two I-V curves—one obtained under a constant temperature difference and the other obtained for a constant thermal input. We report an experimental demonstration of the feasibility of this novel technique. A measurement system was designed and constructed, which enables both types of I-V curves to be obtained automatically. The effective ZT values of a thermoelectric module were determined using this system and compared with those measured by an impedance spectroscopy technique. The results confirm the validity of the proposed technique. In addition, the capability of measuring ZT under a large temperature difference was also investigated. The results show that the ZTs obtained for a large temperature difference are significantly smaller than those for a small temperature difference, providing insights into the design and operation of thermoelectric modules in realistic applications.

  4. Single-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann scheme for advection-diffusion problems with large diffusion-coefficient heterogeneities and high-advection transport.

    PubMed

    Perko, Janez; Patel, Ravi A

    2014-05-01

    The paper presents an approach that extends the flexibility of the standard lattice Boltzmann single relaxation time scheme in terms of spatial variation of dissipative terms (e.g., diffusion coefficient) and stability for high Péclet mass transfer problems. Spatial variability of diffusion coefficient in SRT is typically accommodated through the variation of relaxation time during the collision step. This method is effective but cannot deal with large diffusion coefficient variations, which can span over several orders of magnitude in some natural systems. The approach explores an alternative way of dealing with large diffusion coefficient variations in advection-diffusion transport systems by introducing so-called diffusion velocity. The diffusion velocity is essentially an additional convective term that replaces variations in diffusion coefficients vis-à-vis a chosen reference diffusion coefficient which defines the simulation time step. Special attention is paid to the main idea behind the diffusion velocity formulation and its implementation into the lattice Boltzmann framework. Finally, the performance, stability, and accuracy of the diffusion velocity formulation are discussed via several advection-diffusion transport benchmark examples. These examples demonstrate improved stability and flexibility of the proposed scheme with marginal consequences on the numerical performance.

  5. Statistical searches for microlensing events in large, non-uniformly sampled time-domain surveys: A test using palomar transient factory data

    SciTech Connect

    Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Agüeros, Marcel A.; Fournier, Amanda P.; Street, Rachel; Ofek, Eran O.; Covey, Kevin R.; Levitan, David; Sesar, Branimir; Laher, Russ R.; Surace, Jason

    2014-01-20

    Many photometric time-domain surveys are driven by specific goals, such as searches for supernovae or transiting exoplanets, which set the cadence with which fields are re-imaged. In the case of the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), several sub-surveys are conducted in parallel, leading to non-uniform sampling over its ∼20,000 deg{sup 2} footprint. While the median 7.26 deg{sup 2} PTF field has been imaged ∼40 times in the R band, ∼2300 deg{sup 2} have been observed >100 times. We use PTF data to study the trade off between searching for microlensing events in a survey whose footprint is much larger than that of typical microlensing searches, but with far-from-optimal time sampling. To examine the probability that microlensing events can be recovered in these data, we test statistics used on uniformly sampled data to identify variables and transients. We find that the von Neumann ratio performs best for identifying simulated microlensing events in our data. We develop a selection method using this statistic and apply it to data from fields with >10 R-band observations, 1.1 × 10{sup 9} light curves, uncovering three candidate microlensing events. We lack simultaneous, multi-color photometry to confirm these as microlensing events. However, their number is consistent with predictions for the event rate in the PTF footprint over the survey's three years of operations, as estimated from near-field microlensing models. This work can help constrain all-sky event rate predictions and tests microlensing signal recovery in large data sets, which will be useful to future time-domain surveys, such as that planned with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  6. Modeling 25 years of spatio-temporal surface water and inundation dynamics on large river basin scale using time series of Earth observation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimhuber, Valentin; Tulbure, Mirela G.; Broich, Mark

    2016-06-01

    The usage of time series of Earth observation (EO) data for analyzing and modeling surface water extent (SWE) dynamics across broad geographic regions provides important information for sustainable management and restoration of terrestrial surface water resources, which suffered alarming declines and deterioration globally. The main objective of this research was to model SWE dynamics from a unique, statistically validated Landsat-based time series (1986-2011) continuously through cycles of flooding and drying across a large and heterogeneous river basin, the Murray-Darling Basin (MDB) in Australia. We used dynamic linear regression to model remotely sensed SWE as a function of river flow and spatially explicit time series of soil moisture (SM), evapotranspiration (ET), and rainfall (P). To enable a consistent modeling approach across space, we modeled SWE dynamics separately for hydrologically distinct floodplain, floodplain-lake, and non-floodplain areas within eco-hydrological zones and 10km × 10km grid cells. We applied this spatial modeling framework to three sub-regions of the MDB, for which we quantified independently validated lag times between river gauges and each individual grid cell and identified the local combinations of variables that drive SWE dynamics. Based on these automatically quantified flow lag times and variable combinations, SWE dynamics on 233 (64 %) out of 363 floodplain grid cells were modeled with a coefficient of determination (r2) greater than 0.6. The contribution of P, ET, and SM to the predictive performance of models differed among the three sub-regions, with the highest contributions in the least regulated and most arid sub-region. The spatial modeling framework presented here is suitable for modeling SWE dynamics on finer spatial entities compared to most existing studies and applicable to other large and heterogeneous river basins across

  7. Modeling 25 years of spatio-temporal surface water and inundation dynamics on large river basin scale using time series of earth observation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimhuber, V.; Tulbure, M. G.; Broich, M.

    2015-11-01

    The usage of time series of earth observation (EO) data for analyzing and modeling surface water dynamics (SWD) across broad geographic regions provides important information for sustainable management and restoration of terrestrial surface water resources, which suffered alarming declines and deterioration globally. The main objective of this research was to model SWD from a unique validated Landsat-based time series (1986-2011) continuously through cycles of flooding and drying across a large and heterogeneous river basin, the Murray-Darling Basin (MDB) in Australia. We used dynamic linear regression to model remotely sensed SWD as a function of river flow and spatially explicit time series of soil moisture (SM), evapotranspiration (ET) and rainfall (P). To enable a consistent modeling approach across space, we modeled SWD separately for hydrologically distinct floodplain, floodplain-lake and non-floodplain areas within eco-hydrological zones and 10 km × 10 km grid cells. We applied this spatial modeling framework (SMF) to three sub-regions of the MDB, for which we quantified independently validated lag times between river gauges and each individual grid cell and identified the local combinations of variables that drive SWD. Based on these automatically quantified flow lag times and variable combinations, SWD on 233 (64 %) out of 363 floodplain grid cells were modeled with r2 ≥ 0.6. The contribution of P, ET and SM to the models' predictive performance differed among the three sub-regions, with the highest contributions in the least regulated and most arid sub-region. The SMF presented here is suitable for modeling SWD on finer spatial entities compared to most existing studies and applicable to other large and heterogeneous river basins across the world.

  8. Statistical Searches for Microlensing Events in Large, Non-uniformly Sampled Time-Domain Surveys: A Test Using Palomar Transient Factory Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Agüeros, Marcel A.; Fournier, Amanda P.; Street, Rachel; Ofek, Eran O.; Covey, Kevin R.; Levitan, David; Laher, Russ R.; Sesar, Branimir; Surace, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Many photometric time-domain surveys are driven by specific goals, such as searches for supernovae or transiting exoplanets, which set the cadence with which fields are re-imaged. In the case of the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), several sub-surveys are conducted in parallel, leading to non-uniform sampling over its ~20,000 deg2 footprint. While the median 7.26 deg2 PTF field has been imaged ~40 times in the R band, ~2300 deg2 have been observed >100 times. We use PTF data to study the trade off between searching for microlensing events in a survey whose footprint is much larger than that of typical microlensing searches, but with far-from-optimal time sampling. To examine the probability that microlensing events can be recovered in these data, we test statistics used on uniformly sampled data to identify variables and transients. We find that the von Neumann ratio performs best for identifying simulated microlensing events in our data. We develop a selection method using this statistic and apply it to data from fields with >10 R-band observations, 1.1 × 109 light curves, uncovering three candidate microlensing events. We lack simultaneous, multi-color photometry to confirm these as microlensing events. However, their number is consistent with predictions for the event rate in the PTF footprint over the survey's three years of operations, as estimated from near-field microlensing models. This work can help constrain all-sky event rate predictions and tests microlensing signal recovery in large data sets, which will be useful to future time-domain surveys, such as that planned with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  9. Multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model for incompressible miscible flow with large viscosity ratio and high Péclet number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xuhui; Guo, Zhaoli

    2015-10-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model with a multiple-relaxation-time (MRT) collision operator is proposed for incompressible miscible flow with a large viscosity ratio as well as a high Péclet number in this paper. The equilibria in the present model are motivated by the lattice kinetic scheme previously developed by Inamuro et al. [Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 360, 477 (2002), 10.1098/rsta.2001.0942]. The fluid viscosity and diffusion coefficient depend on both the corresponding relaxation times and additional adjustable parameters in this model. As a result, the corresponding relaxation times can be adjusted in proper ranges to enhance the performance of the model. Numerical validations of the Poiseuille flow and a diffusion-reaction problem demonstrate that the proposed model has second-order accuracy in space. Thereafter, the model is used to simulate flow through a porous medium, and the results show that the proposed model has the advantage to obtain a viscosity-independent permeability, which makes it a robust method for simulating flow in porous media. Finally, a set of simulations are conducted on the viscous miscible displacement between two parallel plates. The results reveal that the present model can be used to simulate, to a high level of accuracy, flows with large viscosity ratios and/or high Péclet numbers. Moreover, the present model is shown to provide superior stability in the limit of high kinematic viscosity. In summary, the numerical results indicate that the present lattice Boltzmann model is an ideal numerical tool for simulating flow with a large viscosity ratio and/or a high Péclet number.

  10. Comparison between method of lines and time domain method in evaluating the large signal responses of Fabry-Perot semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braverman, Ada L.

    1998-07-01

    An extensive comparison between two modeling methods: Method of Lines and Time Domain Method in analyzing the large signal responses of Fabry-Perot semiconductor lasers is presented. The methods are implemented in two numerical codes written in FORTRAN and using DIGITAL ALPHA workstations under VAX/VMS and UNIX operating systems. The comparison shows good agreement between the simulation results under specific conditions. A special accent is placed on the advantages and drawbacks of both methods by taking into account their numerical problems and the computational effort implied by simulations.

  11. Large detector array and real-time processing and elemental image projection of X-ray and proton microprobe fluorescence data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, C. G.; Siddons, D. P.; Moorhead, G.; Kirkham, R.; Dunn, P. A.; Dragone, A.; De Geronimo, G.

    2007-07-01

    A detector concept is described that integrates a large solid-angle detector array developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory and a high speed pipelined parallel processing engine developed at CSIRO for machine vision, with an embedded implementation of the Dynamic Analysis method for fluorescence spectra deconvolution and image projection, to yield a detection system capable of energy-dispersive detection, spectral deconvolution and real-time elemental imaging at ˜10 8 events per second for PIXE elemental imaging using the nuclear microprobe and SXRF elemental imaging using the synchrotron X-ray microprobe.

  12. EnEnvironmental Mobility of Pu(IV) in the Presence of Ethylenediaminetetraacetic Acid: Myth or Reality

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, Dhanpat; Moore, Dean A.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Bolton, Harvey

    2008-07-01

    Ethylenediaminetetracetic acid (EDTA), which was co-disposed with Pu at several U. S. Department of Energy sites, has been reported to enhance the solubility and transport of Pu. It is generally assumed that this enhanced transport of Pu in geologic environments is a result of complexation of Pu(IV) with EDTA. However, the fundamental bases for this assumption have never been fully explored. Whether EDTA can mobilize Pu(IV) in geologic environments is dependent on many factors, chief among them are not only the complexation constants of Pu with EDTA and dominant oxidation state and the nature of Pu solids, but also 1) the complexation constants of environmentally important metal ions (e.g. Fe, Al, Ca, Mg) that compete with Pu for EDTA and 2) EDTA interactions with geomedia (e.g., adsorption, biodegradation) that reduce effective EDTA concentrations available for complexation. Extensive studies over a large range of pH values (1 to 14) and EDTA concentrations (0.0001 to 0.01 M) as a function of time were conducted on the solubility of 2-line ferrihydrite (Fe(OH)3(s)), PuO2(am) in the presence of different concentrations of Ca ions, and mixtures of PuO2(am) and Fe(OH)3(s). The solubility data were interpreted using Pitzer’s ion-interaction approach to determine/validate the solubility product of Fe(OH)3(s), the complexation constants of Pu(IV)-EDTA and Fe(III)-EDTA, and to determine the affect of EDTA in solubilizing Pu(IV) from PuO2(am) in the presence of Fe(III) compounds and aqueous Ca concentrations. Predictions based on these extensive fundamental data show that environmental mobility of Pu as a result of Pu(IV)-EDTA complexation as reported/implied in the literature is a myth rather than the reality.

  13. Nascent transcription affected by RNA polymerase IV in Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Erhard, Karl F; Talbot, Joy-El R B; Deans, Natalie C; McClish, Allison E; Hollick, Jay B

    2015-04-01

    All eukaryotes use three DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RNAPs) to create cellular RNAs from DNA templates. Plants have additional RNAPs related to Pol II, but their evolutionary role(s) remain largely unknown. Zea mays (maize) RNA polymerase D1 (RPD1), the largest subunit of RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV), is required for normal plant development, paramutation, transcriptional repression of certain transposable elements (TEs), and transcriptional regulation of specific alleles. Here, we define the nascent transcriptomes of rpd1 mutant and wild-type (WT) seedlings using global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) to identify the broader targets of RPD1-based regulation. Comparisons of WT and rpd1 mutant GRO-seq profiles indicate that Pol IV globally affects transcription at both transcriptional start sites and immediately downstream of polyadenylation addition sites. We found no evidence of divergent transcription from gene promoters as seen in mammalian GRO-seq profiles. Statistical comparisons identify genes and TEs whose transcription is affected by RPD1. Most examples of significant increases in genic antisense transcription appear to be initiated by 3'-proximal long terminal repeat retrotransposons. These results indicate that maize Pol IV specifies Pol II-based transcriptional regulation for specific regions of the maize genome including genes having developmental significance.

  14. Nascent Transcription Affected by RNA Polymerase IV in Zea mays

    PubMed Central

    Erhard, Karl F.; Talbot, Joy-El R. B.; Deans, Natalie C.; McClish, Allison E.; Hollick, Jay B.

    2015-01-01

    All eukaryotes use three DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RNAPs) to create cellular RNAs from DNA templates. Plants have additional RNAPs related to Pol II, but their evolutionary role(s) remain largely unknown. Zea mays (maize) RNA polymerase D1 (RPD1), the largest subunit of RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV), is required for normal plant development, paramutation, transcriptional repression of certain transposable elements (TEs), and transcriptional regulation of specific alleles. Here, we define the nascent transcriptomes of rpd1 mutant and wild-type (WT) seedlings using global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) to identify the broader targets of RPD1-based regulation. Comparisons of WT and rpd1 mutant GRO-seq profiles indicate that Pol IV globally affects transcription at both transcriptional start sites and immediately downstream of polyadenylation addition sites. We found no evidence of divergent transcription from gene promoters as seen in mammalian GRO-seq profiles. Statistical comparisons identify genes and TEs whose transcription is affected by RPD1. Most examples of significant increases in genic antisense transcription appear to be initiated by 3ʹ-proximal long terminal repeat retrotransposons. These results indicate that maize Pol IV specifies Pol II-based transcriptional regulation for specific regions of the maize genome including genes having developmental significance. PMID:25653306

  15. Imaging human intrasynaptic dopamine release by IV cocaine and amphetamine

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, D.F.; Hong, C.; Yokoi, F.

    1995-05-01

    Intrasynaptic dopamine (DA) release was measured with C-11 Raclopride (RAC) PET in 15 human subjects with two psychostimulant drugs, IV cocaine or IV amphetamine (AMPH). Eleven cocaine users received IV saline then cocaine with high specific activity (SA) tracer RAC by IV bolus. To determine the optimal timing of drug administration, subjects received 48mg cocaine at 0 min.(1 subject), 4 min.(3 subjects) or 10 min.(7 subjects) post injection (mpi). One received 32mg at 4 and 16mg at 10 mpi. In a separate paradigm, the effect of AMPH not only on the binding of Hi SA but also on the receptor density (B{sub max}) using Hi SA and low SA was examined. Four normals received 2 pairs of Hi SA and Low SA RAC PET scans, each pair separated by 1 week to estimate 2 B{sub max}`s, one affected by AMPH. Before the 2nd pair, 0.3mg/kg IV AMPH was given in the times corresponding to the AMPH times for the 1s B{sub max} measurement. All were scanned on a GE 4096WB+PET with 50 frames over 90 min with radial arterial plasma sampling and HPLC metabolite correction. Neuropsychological-endocrine testing was done concurrently. All subjects had a marked psychophysiological response for cocaine or AMPH (less with Low SA RAC). However, evidence of substantial DA release was not consistent with IV cocaine nor correlated with any timing of cocaine vs. RAC, except for an overall trend for RAC reduction with cocaine. The % change in k{sub 3}/k{sub 4} by graphical analysis ranged from +10 to -21%, with similar changes by other methods of quantification, such as k{sub 3}/k{sub 4} constrained to cerebellar K{sub 1}/k{sub 2}, and simple tissue ratios comparisons. IV AMPH showed DA release (19% {plus_minus} 2 (SEM) decrease) in all Hi SA RAC (k{sub 3}/k{sub 4}) by graphical analysis. The calculation of B{sub max} in putamen using Scatchard analysis (baseline B{sub max}29{plus_minus}2) showed 12 to 28% decreases following AMPH.

  16. Longitudinal development of muons in large air showers studies from the arrival time distributions measured at 900m above sea level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kakimoto, F.; Tsuchimoto, I.; Enoki, T.; Suga, K.; Nishi, K.

    1985-01-01

    The arrival time distributions of muons with energies above 1.0GeV and 0.5GeV have been measured in the Akeno air-shower array to study the longitudinal development of muons in air showers with primary energies in the range 10 to the 17th power to 10 to the 18th power ev. The average rise times of muons with energies above 1.0GeV at large core distances are consistent with those expected from very high multiplicity models and, on the contrary, with those expected from the low multiplicity models at small core distances. This implies that the longitudinal development at atmospheric depth smaller than 500 cm square is very fast and that at larger atmospheric depths is rather slow.

  17. Reducing the Time From Diagnosis to Treatment of Patients With Stage II/III Rectal Cancer at a Large Public Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Lori A.; Jacobs, Ryan W.; Millas, Stefanos; Surabhi, Venkateswar; Mok, Henry; Jhaveri, Pavan; Kott, Marylee M.; Jackson, Lymesia; Rieber, Alyssa; Bhadkamkar, Nishin A.

    2016-01-01

    Curative-intent therapy for stage II/III rectal cancer is necessarily complex. Current guidelines by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network recommend preoperative concurrent chemoradiation followed by resection and additional adjuvant chemotherapy. We used standard quality improvement methodology to implement a cost-effective intervention that reduced the time from diagnosis to treatment of patients with stage II/III rectal cancer by approximately 30% in a large public hospital in Houston, Texas. Implementation of the program resulted in a reduction in time from pathologic diagnosis to treatment of 29% overall, from 62 to 44 days. These gains were cost neutral and resulted from improvements in scheduling and coordination of care alone. Our results suggest that: (1) quality improvement methodology can be successfully applied to multidisciplinary cancer care, (2) effective interventions can be cost neutral, and (3) effective strategies can overcome complexities such as having multiple sites of care, high staff turnover, and resource limitations. PMID:26869658

  18. Dimerization of the type IV pilin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain K122-4 results in increased helix stability as measured by time-resolved hydrogen-deuterium exchange

    PubMed Central

    Lento, Cristina; Wilson, Derek J.; Audette, Gerald F.

    2015-01-01

    Truncated pilin monomers from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain K122-4 (ΔK122) have been shown to enter a monomer-dimer equilibrium in solution prior to oligomerization into protein nanotubes. Here, we examine the structural changes occurring between the monomeric and dimeric states of ΔK122 using time-resolved hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. Based on levels of deuterium uptake, the N-terminal α-helix and the loop connecting the second and third strands of the anti-parallel β-sheet contribute significantly to pilin dimerization. Conversely, the antiparallel β-sheet and αβ loop region exhibit increased flexibility, while the receptor binding domain retains a rigid conformation in the equilibrium state. PMID:26798830

  19. European Invasion of North American Pinus strobus at Large and Fine Scales: High Genetic Diversity and Fine-Scale Genetic Clustering over Time in the Adventive Range

    PubMed Central

    Mandák, Bohumil; Hadincová, Věroslava; Mahelka, Václav; Wildová, Radka

    2013-01-01

    Background North American Pinus strobus is a highly invasive tree species in Central Europe. Using ten polymorphic microsatellite loci we compared various aspects of the large-scale genetic diversity of individuals from 30 sites in the native distribution range with those from 30 sites in the European adventive distribution range. To investigate the ascertained pattern of genetic diversity of this intercontinental comparison further, we surveyed fine-scale genetic diversity patterns and changes over time within four highly invasive populations in the adventive range. Results Our data show that at the large scale the genetic diversity found within the relatively small adventive range in Central Europe, surprisingly, equals the diversity found within the sampled area in the native range, which is about thirty times larger. Bayesian assignment grouped individuals into two genetic clusters separating North American native populations from the European, non-native populations, without any strong genetic structure shown over either range. In the case of the fine scale, our comparison of genetic diversity parameters among the localities and age classes yielded no evidence of genetic diversity increase over time. We found that SGS differed across age classes within the populations under study. Old trees in general completely lacked any SGS, which increased over time and reached its maximum in the sapling stage. Conclusions Based on (1) the absence of difference in genetic diversity between the native and adventive ranges, together with the lack of structure in the native range, and (2) the lack of any evidence of any temporal increase in genetic diversity at four highly invasive populations in the adventive range, we conclude that population amalgamation probably first happened in the native range, prior to introduction. In such case, there would have been no need for multiple introductions from previously isolated populations, but only several introductions from

  20. First operation and drift field performance of a large area double phase LAr Electron Multiplier Time Projection Chamber with an immersed Greinacher high-voltage multiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badertscher, A.; Curioni, A.; Degunda, U.; Epprecht, L.; Gendotti, A.; Horikawa, S.; Knecht, L.; Lussi, D.; Marchionni, A.; Natterer, G.; Nguyen, K.; Resnati, F.; Rubbia, A.; Viant, T.

    2012-08-01

    We have operated a liquid-argon large-electron-multiplier time-projection chamber (LAr LEM-TPC) with a large active area of 76 × 40 cm2 and a drift length of 60 cm. This setup represents the largest chamber ever achieved with this novel detector concept. The chamber is equipped with an immersed built-in cryogenic Greinacher multi-stage high-voltage (HV) multiplier, which, when subjected to an external AC HV of ~ 1 kVpp, statically charges up to a voltage a factor of ~ 30 higher inside the LAr vessel, creating a uniform drift field of ~ 0.5 kV/cm over the full drift length. This large LAr LEM-TPC was brought into successful operation in the double-phase (liquid-vapor) operation mode and tested during a period of ~ 1 month, recording impressive three-dimensional images of very high-quality from cosmic particles traversing or interacting in the sensitive volume. The double phase readout and HV systems achieved stable operation in cryogenic conditions demonstrating their good characteristics, which particularly suit applications for next-generation giant-scale LAr-TPCs.

  1. Time evolution of the luminosity of colliding heavy-ion beams in BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, R.; Jowett, J. M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Fischer, W.

    2010-09-01

    We have studied the time evolution of the heavy-ion luminosity and bunch intensities in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, and in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. First, we present measurements from a large number of RHIC stores (from run-7), colliding 100GeV/nucleon Au79+197 beams without stochastic cooling. These are compared with two different calculation methods. The first is a simulation based on multiparticle tracking taking into account collisions, intrabeam scattering, radiation damping, and synchrotron and betatron motion. In the second, faster, method, a system of ordinary differential equations with terms describing the corresponding effects on emittances and bunch populations is solved numerically. Results of the tracking method agree very well with the RHIC data. With the faster method, significant discrepancies are found since the losses of particles diffusing out of the rf bucket due to intrabeam scattering are not modeled accurately enough. Finally, we use both methods to make predictions of the time evolution of the future Pb82+208 beams in the LHC at injection and collision energy. For this machine, the two methods agree well.

  2. Time evolution of the luminosity of colliding heavy-ion beams in BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and CERN Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, R.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Jowett, J.M.; Fischer, W.

    2010-09-07

    We have studied the time evolution of the heavy ion luminosity and bunch intensities in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), at BNL, and in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), at CERN. First, we present measurements from a large number of RHIC stores (from Run 7), colliding 100 GeV/nucleon {sup 197}Au{sup 79}+ beams without stochastic cooling. These are compared with two different calculation methods. The first is a simulation based on multi-particle tracking taking into account collisions, intrabeam scattering, radiation damping, and synchrotron and betatron motion. In the second, faster, method, a system of ordinary differential equations with terms describing the corresponding effects on emittances and bunch populations is solved numerically. Results of the tracking method agree very well with the RHIC data. With the faster method, significant discrepancies are found since the losses of particles diffusing out of the RF bucket due to intrabeam scattering are not modeled accurately enough. Finally, we use both methods to make predictions of the time evolution of the future {sup 208}Pb+{sup 82+} beams in the LHC at injection and collision energy. For this machine, the two methods agree well.

  3. Development of large area diamond detectors for time-of-flight measurements of relativistic heavy ions for the super-FRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirru, F.; Nociforo, C.; Kiš, M.; Ciobanu, M.; Frühauf, J.; Kratz, A.; Kurz, N.; Szczepanczyk, B.; Träger, M.; Visinka, R.

    2016-06-01

    Time-of-flight (ToF) performances of large area diamond detectors based on polycrystalline samples of dimensions 20 mm  ×  20 mm and thickness of 0.3 mm are presented. The devices that feature segmented Cr/Au electrodes in a sandwich configuration were irradiated with a heavy ions 197Au beam of 1 GeV u-1 showing, when mounted with a separation distance of 2 cm, a ToF resolution \\barσ of 37.5 ps averaged on 16 strip pairs. When ToF measurements were performed over a particle path of 30 m, a resolution σ of 45 ps was achieved. The detectors were mounted on high-vacuum compatible printed circuit boards (PCBs) with integrated processing electronics. This is the first time that ToF measurements have been performed using integrated electronics with such a large separation distance between the diamond detectors.

  4. Influence of category-heifers, primiparous and multiparous lactating cows-in a large-scale resynchronization fixed-time artificial insemination program

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Márcio de Oliveira; Morotti, Fábio; da Silva, Camila Bizarro; Júnior, Mario Ribeiro; da Silva, Rubens César Pinto; Baruselli, Pietro Sampaio; Seneda, Marcelo Marcondes

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the influence of category (heifers, primiparous or multiparous cows) on pregnancy rates in a large scale resynchronization ovulation program. Nelore heifers (n = 903), primiparous lactating cows (n = 338) and multiparous lactating cows (n = 1,223) were synchronized using a conventional protocol of estradiol/P4-based fixed-time artificial insemination (FTAI). Thirty days after ultrasonography, females who failed the first FTAI were resynchronized with the same hormonal protocol prior to a second FTAI. The pregnancy status of each cohort was evaluated by ultrasonography 30 days after each FTAI. The average conception rate after the first FTAI and resynchronization was 80.5%. Heifers had a higher conception rate (85%) than primiparous (76%) or multiparous cows (78%; p = 0.0001). The conception rate after the first FTAI was similar among heifers (57%), primiparous cows (51%) and multiparous cows (56%; p = 0.193). After the second FTAI, heifers exhibited a higher conception rate (66%) than primiparous or multiparous cows (51%; p = 0.0001). These results demonstrate the feasibility of resynchronization in large beef herds for providing consistent pregnancy rates in a short period of time. We also demonstrated that ovulation resynchronization 30 days after FTAI is particularly effective for heifers, providing a conception rate of up to 66%. PMID:25797292

  5. IVS Working Group 4: VLBI Data Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gipson, John

    2010-01-01

    In 2007 the IVS Directing Board established IVS Working Group 4 on VLBI Data Structures. This note discusses the current VLBI data format, goals for a new format, the history and formation of the Working Group, and a timeline for the development of a new VLBI data format.

  6. CHLORINE ABSORPTION IN S(IV) SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of measurements of the rate of Chlorine (Cl2) absorption into aqueous sulfite/bisulfite -- S(IV) -- solutions at ambient temperature using a highly characterized stirred-cell reactor. The reactor media were 0 to 10 mM S(IV) with pHs of 3.5-8.5. Experiment...

  7. Stark broadening of B IV spectral lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrijević, Milan S.; Christova, Magdalena; Simić, Zoran; Kovačević, Andjelka; Sahal-Bréchot, Sylvie

    2016-08-01

    Stark broadening parameters for 157 multiplets of helium-like boron (B IV) have been calculated using the impact semiclassical perturbation formalism. Obtained results have been used to investigate the regularities within spectral series. An example of the influence of Stark broadening on B IV lines in DO white dwarfs is given.

  8. Metsahovi Radio Observatory - IVS Network Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uunila, Minttu; Zubko, Nataliya; Poutanen, Markku; Kallunki, Juha; Kallio, Ulla

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, Metsahovi Radio Observatory together with Finnish Geodetic Institute officially became an IVS Network Station. Eight IVS sessions were observed during the year. Two spacecraft tracking and one EVN X-band experiment were also performed. In 2012, the Metsahovi VLBI equipment was upgraded with a Digital Base Band Converter, a Mark 5B+, a FILA10G, and a FlexBuff.

  9. Large-scale time-resolved digital particle image velocimetry (TR-DPIV) for measurement of high subsonic hot coaxial jet exhaust of a gas turbine engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmerman, B. H.; Skeen, A. J.; Bryanston-Cross, P. J.; Graves, M. J.

    2009-07-01

    The development of a highly configurable triple digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) system is described, which is capable of acquiring both continuous, statistically independent measurements at up to 14 Hz and time-resolved PIV data at MHz rates. The system was used at QinetiQ's Noise Test Facility (NTF) as part of the EU-funded CoJeN programme to obtain measurements from high subsonic (Mach <= 0.9), hot (~500 °C), large (1/10th) scale coaxial jet flows at a standoff distance of ~1 m. High-resolution time-averaged velocity and turbulence data were obtained for complete coaxial engine exhaust plumes down to 4 m (20 jet diameters) from the nozzle exit in less than 1 h. In addition, the system allowed volumetric data to be obtained, enabling fast assessment of spatial alignment of nozzle configurations. Furthermore, novel six-frame time-series data-capture is demonstrated up to 330 kHz, used to calculate time-space correlations within the exhaust, allowing for study of spatio-temporal developments in the jet, associated with jet-noise production. The highly automated system provides synchronization triggers for simultaneous acquisition from different measurement systems (e.g. LDA) and is shown to be versatile, rugged, reliable and portable, operating remotely in a hostile environment. Data are presented for three operating conditions and two nozzle geometries, providing a database to be used to validate CFD models of coaxial jet flow.

  10. Decomposing Large Inverse Problems with an Augmented Lagrangian Approach: Application to Joint Inversion of Body-Wave Travel Times and Surface-Wave Dispersion Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, D. T.; Rodi, W. L.

    2015-12-01

    Constructing 3D Earth models through the joint inversion of large geophysical data sets presents numerous theoretical and practical challenges, especially when diverse types of data and model parameters are involved. Among the challenges are the computational complexity associated with large data and model vectors and the need to unify differing model parameterizations, forward modeling methods and regularization schemes within a common inversion framework. The challenges can be addressed in part by decomposing the inverse problem into smaller, simpler inverse problems that can be solved separately, providing one knows how to merge the separate inversion results into an optimal solution of the full problem. We have formulated an approach to the decomposition of large inverse problems based on the augmented Lagrangian technique from optimization theory. As commonly done, we define a solution to the full inverse problem as the Earth model minimizing an objective function motivated, for example, by a Bayesian inference formulation. Our decomposition approach recasts the minimization problem equivalently as the minimization of component objective functions, corresponding to specified data subsets, subject to the constraints that the minimizing models be equal. A standard optimization algorithm solves the resulting constrained minimization problems by alternating between the separate solution of the component problems and the updating of Lagrange multipliers that serve to steer the individual solution models toward a common model solving the full problem. We are applying our inversion method to the reconstruction of the·crust and upper-mantle seismic velocity structure across Eurasia.· Data for the inversion comprise a large set of P and S body-wave travel times·and fundamental and first-higher mode Rayleigh-wave group velocities.

  11. Characterization of mean transit time at large springs in the Upper Colorado River Basin, USA: A tool for assessing groundwater discharge vulnerability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solder, John; Stolp, Bernard J.; Heilweil, Victor M.; Susong, David D.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental tracers (noble gases, tritium, industrial gases, stable isotopes, and radio-carbon) and hydrogeology were interpreted to determine groundwater transit-time distribution and calculate mean transit time (MTT) with lumped parameter modeling at 19 large springs distributed throughout the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB), USA. The predictive value of the MTT to evaluate the pattern and timing of groundwater response to hydraulic stress (i.e., vulnerability) is examined by a statistical analysis of MTT, historical spring discharge records, and the Palmer Hydrological Drought Index. MTTs of the springs range from 10 to 15,000 years and 90 % of the cumulative discharge-weighted travel-time distribution falls within the range of 2−10,000 years. Historical variability in discharge was assessed as the ratio of 10–90 % flow-exceedance (R 10/90%) and ranged from 2.8 to 1.1 for select springs with available discharge data. The lag-time (i.e., delay in discharge response to drought conditions) was determined by cross-correlation analysis and ranged from 0.5 to 6 years for the same select springs. Springs with shorter MTTs (<80 years) statistically correlate with larger discharge variations and faster responses to drought, indicating MTT can be used for estimating the relative magnitude and timing of groundwater response. Results indicate that groundwater discharge to streams in the UCRB will likely respond on the order of years to climate variation and increasing groundwater withdrawals.

  12. The adsorption of plutonium IV and V on goethite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Arthur L.; Murray, James W.; Sibley, Thomas H.

    1985-11-01

    The adsorption of Pu(IV) and Pu(V) on goethite (αFeOOH) from NaNO 3 solution shows distinct differences related to the different hydrolytic character of these two oxidation states. Under similar solution conditions, the adsorption edge of the more strongly hydrolyzable Pu(IV) occurs in the pH range 3 to 5 while that for Pu(V) is at pH 5 to 7. The adsorption edge for Pu(V) shifts with time to lower pH values and this appears to be due to the reduction of Pu(V) to Pu(IV) in the presence of the goethite surface. These results suggest that redox transformations may be an important aspect of Pu adsorption chemistry and the resulting scavenging of Pu from natural waters. Increasing ionic strength (from 0.1 M to 3 M NaCl or NaNO 3 and 0.03 M to 0.3 M Na 2SO 4) did not influence Pu(IV) or Pu(V) adsorption. In the presence of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), Pu(V) reduction to Pu(IV) occurred in solution. Pu(IV) adsorption on goethite decreased by 30% in the presence of 240 ppm natural DOC found in Soap Lake, Washington waters. Increasing concentrations of carbonate ligands decreased Pu(IV) and Pu(V) adsorption on goethite, with an alkalinity of 1000 meq/l totally inhibiting adsorption. The Pu-goethite adsorption system provides the data base for developing a thermodynamic model of Pu interaction with an oxide surface and with dissolved ligands, using the MINEQL computer program. From the model calculations we determined equilibrium constants for the adsorption of Pu(IV) hydrolysis species. The model was then applied to Pu adsorption in carbonate media to see how the presence of CO 3-2 could influence the mobility of Pu. The decrease in adsorption appears to be due to formation of a Pu-CO 3 complex. Model calculations were used to predict what the adsorption curves would look like if Pu-CO 3 complexes formed.

  13. Towards real-time simulation of large space structures: Stabilization of fluid/thermal/structure interactions and implementation on high performance supercomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhat, C.

    1989-01-01

    Within the Center for Space Construction, the SIMSTRUC project's objectives center around the development of simulation tools for the realistic analysis of large space structures. The word 'tools' is the broad sense; it designates mathematical models, finite element/finite difference formulations, computational algorithms, implementations on advanced computer architectures, and visualization capabilities. The results of our activities during the first year within the SIMSTRUC project are reported. On the modeling side, an alternative approach to fluid/thermal/structure interaction analysis that is a departure from the 'loosely coupled' and 'unified' approaches that are being currently practiced are described. The advantages of our approach both in terms of accuracy and computational efficiency were demonstrated. On the computational side, a software architecture for parallel/vector and massively parallel supercomputers that speeds up finite element and finite difference computations by several orders of magnitude is presented. As an example, the simulation of the deployment of a space structure that used to require over six hours of a workstation using a conventional finite element software, now runs on a multiprocessor using a parallel computation strategy in less than three seconds. In order to promote the physical understanding of the simulation behavior, a real-time visualization capability on the Connection Machine, which allows the analyst to watch the graphical animation of the results at the same time these are generated, was also developed. It is believed that by combining efficient analytical formulations with the state-of-the-art high performance computer implementations and superfast visualization capabilities, SIMSTRUC is moving fast towards the real-time simulation of large space structures. The designers as well as the researchers will certainly benefit from this technology.

  14. Defining interactions between DNA-PK and ligase IV/XRCC4

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Hsin-Ling; Yannone, Steven M.; Chen, David J.

    2001-04-10

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is a major pathway for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks in mammalian cells. DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), ligase IV, and XRCC4 are all critical components of the NHEJ repair pathway. DNA-PK is composed of a heterodimeric DNA-binding component, Ku, and a large catalytic subunit, DNA-PKcs. Ligase IV and XRCC4 associate to form a multimeric complex that is also essential for NHEJ. DNA-PK and ligase IV/XRCC4 interact at DNA termini which results in stimulated ligase activity. Here we define interactions between the components of these two essential complexes, DNA-PK and ligase IV/XRCC4. We find that ligase IV/XRCC4 associates with DNA-PK in a DNA-independent manner. The specific protein-protein interactions that mediate the interaction between these two complexes are further identified. Direct physical interactions between ligase IV and Ku as well as between XRCC4 and DNA-PKcs are shown. No direct interactions are observed between ligase IV and DNA-PKcs or between XRCC4 and Ku. Our data defines the specific protein pairs involved in the association of DNA-PK and ligase IV/XRCC4, and suggests a molecular mechanism for coordinating the assembly of the DNA repair complex at DNA breaks.

  15. Brief report: accuracy and response time for the recognition of facial emotions in a large sample of children with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Fink, Elian; de Rosnay, Marc; Wierda, Marlies; Koot, Hans M; Begeer, Sander

    2014-09-01

    The empirical literature has presented inconsistent evidence for deficits in the recognition of basic emotion expressions in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), which may be due to the focus on research with relatively small sample sizes. Additionally, it is proposed that although children with ASD may correctly identify emotion expression they rely on more deliberate, more time-consuming strategies in order to accurately recognize emotion expressions when compared to typically developing children. In the current study, we examine both emotion recognition accuracy and response time in a large sample of children, and explore the moderating influence of verbal ability on these findings. The sample consisted of 86 children with ASD (M age = 10.65) and 114 typically developing children (M age = 10.32) between 7 and 13 years of age. All children completed a pre-test (emotion word-word matching), and test phase consisting of basic emotion recognition, whereby they were required to match a target emotion expression to the correct emotion word; accuracy and response time were recorded. Verbal IQ was controlled for in the analyses. We found no evidence of a systematic deficit in emotion recognition accuracy or response time for children with ASD, controlling for verbal ability. However, when controlling for children's accuracy in word-word matching, children with ASD had significantly lower emotion recognition accuracy when compared to typically developing children. The findings suggest that the social impairments observed in children with ASD are not the result of marked deficits in basic emotion recognition accuracy or longer response times. However, children with ASD may be relying on other perceptual skills (such as advanced word-word matching) to complete emotion recognition tasks at a similar level as typically developing children.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of II-IV-V(2) semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Yuan-Chung

    1998-11-01

    The II-IV-V2 chalcopyrite semiconductors are isostructural and isoelectronic analogues of the III-V semiconductors. Like the III-V materials the compounds have potential applications in nonlinear optics, optoelectronics and solar energy conversion. The naturally abundant elements and high absorption coefficients in many of the II-IV-V2's make these materials more attractive for large scale applications. Our study focused on the investigation of the basic electrical and optical properties of a number of II-IV- V2 materials by photoelectrochemical methods and photoluminescence. A variety of single crystals in II-IV- V2 family such as ZnSiAs2, CdSiAs2, CdSiP2, ZnSiP2, CdGeP2, ZnGeP2, and ZnSnP2 have been synthesized by chemical vapor transport (CVT) and Bridgman growth techniques. Intentional doping with S, Se, Al, Ga and In of the crystals resulted in complex behavior. In some systems compensation with intrinsic acceptors was observed and in other systems the change of doping type and controllable doping levels were observed. The bandgap, doping level, band position, quantum yield and current voltage behavior in various electrolytes for many of the II-IV-V2 semiconductors have been determined using photoelectrochemical methods. Hall effect measurements of doping density have been used to compare with values obtained from Mott-Schottky analysis. Frequency and pH dependence of the Mott-Schottky plots were observed. The minority diffusion length of II-IV-V2 calculated from quantum yield and absorption coefficient data at the onset of photocurrent matches well to the prediction from the Gartner Model. Polarization dependent photoluminescence has been used for the study of interband transitions and optical anisotropy in CdSiAs2 and CdSiP2 crystals. The electrode surfaces of CdSiAs2 crystals treated by wet chemical etchants were investigated and characterized by XPS. 31P solid state MAS NMR studies of the II-IV- P2 compounds gave very sharp 31P resonances and revealed

  17. The BALDER Beamline at the MAX IV Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klementiev, K.; Norén, K.; Carlson, S.; Sigfridsson Clauss, K. G. V.; Persson, I.

    2016-05-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) includes well-established methods to study the local structure around the absorbing element - extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and the effective oxidation number or to quantitatively determine the speciation of an element in a complex matrix - X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES). The increased brilliance and intensities available at the new generation of synchrotron light sources makes it possible to study, in-situ and in-operando, much more dilute systems with relevance for natural systems, as well as the micro-scale variability and dynamics of chemical reactions on the millisecond time-scale. The design of the BALDER beamline at the MAX IV Laboratory 3 GeV ring has focused on a high flux of photons in a wide energy range, 2.4-40 keV, where the K-edge is covered for the elements S to La, and the L 3-edge for all elements heavier than Sb. The overall design of the beamline will allow large flexibility in energy range, beam size and data collection time. The other focus of the beamline design is the possibility to perform multi-technique analyses on samples. Development of sample environment requires focus on implementation of auxiliary methods in such a way that techniques like Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, UV-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and/or mass spectrometry can be performed simultaneously as the XAS study. It will be a flexible system where different instruments can be plugged in and out depending on the needs for the particular investigation. Many research areas will benefit from the properties of the wiggler based light source and the capabilities to perform in-situ and in-operando measurements, for example environmental and geochemical sciences, nuclear chemistry, catalysis, materials sciences, and cultural heritage.

  18. Cost-Effectiveness Comparison of Response Strategies to a Large-Scale Anthrax Attack on the Chicago Metropolitan Area: Impact of Timing and Surge Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Dobrez, Debra; Parada, Jorge P.; Steinberg, Justin M.; Kahn, Adam; Bennett, Charles L.; Schmitt, Brian P.

    2012-01-01

    Rapid public health response to a large-scale anthrax attack would reduce overall morbidity and mortality. However, there is uncertainty about the optimal cost-effective response strategy based on timing of intervention, public health resources, and critical care facilities. We conducted a decision analytic study to compare response strategies to a theoretical large-scale anthrax attack on the Chicago metropolitan area beginning either Day 2 or Day 5 after the attack. These strategies correspond to the policy options set forth by the Anthrax Modeling Working Group for population-wide responses to a large-scale anthrax attack: (1) postattack antibiotic prophylaxis, (2) postattack antibiotic prophylaxis and vaccination, (3) preattack vaccination with postattack antibiotic prophylaxis, and (4) preattack vaccination with postattack antibiotic prophylaxis and vaccination. Outcomes were measured in costs, lives saved, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs). We estimated that postattack antibiotic prophylaxis of all 1,390,000 anthrax-exposed people beginning on Day 2 after attack would result in 205,835 infected victims, 35,049 fulminant victims, and 28,612 deaths. Only 6,437 (18.5%) of the fulminant victims could be saved with the existing critical care facilities in the Chicago metropolitan area. Mortality would increase to 69,136 if the response strategy began on Day 5. Including postattack vaccination with antibiotic prophylaxis of all exposed people reduces mortality and is cost-effective for both Day 2 (ICER=$182/QALY) and Day 5 (ICER=$1,088/QALY) response strategies. Increasing ICU bed availability significantly reduces mortality for all response strategies. We conclude that postattack antibiotic prophylaxis and vaccination of all exposed people is the optimal cost-effective response strategy for a large-scale anthrax attack. Our findings support the US government's plan to provide antibiotic prophylaxis and

  19. Variability, polarimetry, and timing properties of single pulses from PSR J1713+0747 using the Large European Array for Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, K.; Bassa, C. G.; Janssen, G. H.; Karuppusamy, R.; McKee, J.; Kramer, M.; Lee, K. J.; Perrodin, D.; Purver, M.; Sanidas, S.; Smits, R.; Stappers, B. W.; Weltevrede, P.; Zhu, W. W.

    2016-09-01

    Single pulses preserve information about the pulsar radio emission and propagation in the pulsar magnetosphere, and understanding the behaviour of their variability is essential for estimating the fundamental limit on the achievable pulsar timing precision. Here we report the findings of our analysis of single pulses from PSR J1713+0747 with data collected by the Large European Array for Pulsars (LEAP). We present statistical studies of the pulse properties that include distributions of their energy, phase and width. Two modes of systematic sub-pulse drifting have been detected, with a periodicity of 7 and 3 pulse periods. The two modes appear at different ranges of pulse longitude but overlap under the main peak of the integrated profile. No evidence for pulse micro-structure is seen with a time resolution down to 140 ns. In addition, we show that the fractional polarisation of single pulses increases with their pulse peak flux density. By mapping the probability density of linear polarisation position angle with pulse longitude, we reveal the existence of two orthogonal polarisation modes. Finally, we find that the resulting phase jitter of integrated profiles caused by single pulse variability can be described by a Gaussian probability distribution only when at least 100 pulses are used for integration. Pulses of different flux densities and widths contribute approximately equally to the phase jitter, and no improvement on timing precision is achieved by using a sub-set of pulses with a specific range of flux density or width.

  20. A 3D Time-Shared NOESY Experiment Designed to Provide Optimal Resolution for Accurate Assignment of NMR Distance Restraints in Large Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Subrata H; Harden, Bradley J

    2014-01-01

    Structure determination of proteins by solution NMR has become an established method, but challenges increase steeply with the size of proteins. Notably spectral crowding and signal overlap impair the analysis of cross-peaks in NOESY spectra that provide distance restraints for structural models. An optimal spectral resolution can alleviate overlap but requires prohibitively long experimental time with existing methods. Here we present a time-shared 3D experiment optimized for large proteins that provides 15N and 13C dispersed NOESY spectra in a single measurement. NOESY correlations appear in the detected dimension and hence benefit from the highest resolution achievable of all dimensions without increase in experimental time. By design, this experiment is inherently optimal for non-uniform sampling acquisition when compared to current alternatives. Thus, 15N and 13C dispersed NOESY spectra with ultra-high resolution in all dimensions were acquired in parallel within about 4 days instead of 80 days for a 52 kDa monomeric protein at a concentration of 350 μM. PMID:25381567

  1. Improving surgical inpatient ward lists in a large acute hospital: a simple yet effective process to save the time of junior house officers.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Ross; Johnston, Carolyn; Qureshi, Imran

    2014-01-01

    In order for the smooth running of a surgical firm, an effective ward list must be created, updated, and edited each day, often by junior medical personnel. Ward lists are used by various healthcare professionals including consultants, specialist nurses, and pharmacists. Over time ward inpatient lists can become increasingly difficult to use and lacking in vital information. Baseline measurement revealed the extent of the problem with junior house officers spending on average 95 minutes per day maintaining the ward list. After a period of research and learning, a bespoke inpatient list was created containing all of the vital information required. Criteria to fulfil included being straightforward to manipulate, easy to input new patients and aesthetically pleasing. After a trial period with modifications, an improved inpatient ward list was successfully implemented. Post-intervention data collection revealed a reduction of 42 minutes per day on average spent maintaining the list, with a 100% increase in satisfaction, and reduction in problems encountered from daily to weekly. Following this success, the general surgery weekend handover list was improved using the same prototype. This led to a saving of 8 minutes per day on average and increased doctor satisfaction. The process of creating an effective, easy to use, and useful inpatient ward list can lead to large amount of time saved each day for the staff responsible for its management. This time can then be reinvested on clinical duties, or education, to further improve the healthcare service we provide. PMID:26734290

  2. A Study of Transport in the Near-Earth Plasma Sheet During A Substorm Using Time-Dependent Large Scale Kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Alaoui, M.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Raeder, J.; Frank, L. A.; Paterson, W. R.

    1998-01-01

    In this study we investigate the transport of H+ ions that made up the complex ion distribution function observed by the Geotail spacecraft at 0740 UT on November 24, 1996. This ion distribution function, observed by Geotail at approximately 20 R(sub E) downtail, was used to initialize a time-dependent large-scale kinetic (LSK) calculation of the trajectories of 75,000 ions forward in time. Time-dependent magnetic and electric fields were obtained from a global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of the magnetosphere and its interaction with the solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) as observed during the interval of the observation of the distribution function. Our calculations indicate that the particles observed by Geotail were scattered across the equatorial plane by the multiple interactions with the current sheet and then convected sunward. They were energized by the dawn-dusk electric field during their transport from Geotail location and ultimately were lost at the ionospheric boundary or into the magnetopause.

  3. Surprising Coordination Geometry Differences in Ce(IV)- and Pu(IV)-Maltol Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Raymond, Kenneth; Szigethy, Geza; Xu, Jide; Gorden, Anne E.V.; Teat, Simon J.; Shuh, David K.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-02-12

    As part of a study to characterize the detailed coordination behavior of Pu(IV), single crystal X-ray diffraction structures have been determined for Pu(IV) and Ce(IV) complexes with the naturally-occurring ligand maltol (3-hydroxy-2-methyl-pyran-4-one) and its derivative bromomaltol (5-bromo-3-hydroxy-2-methyl-pyran-4-one). Although Ce(IV) is generally accepted as a structural analog for Pu(IV), and the maltol complexes of these two metals are isostructural, the corresponding bromomaltol complexes are strikingly different with respect to ligand orientation about the metal ion: All complexes exhibit trigonal dodecahedral coordination geometry but the Ce(IV)-bromomaltol complex displays an uncommon ligand arrangement not mirrored in the Pu(IV) complex, although the two metal species are generally accepted to be structural analogs.

  4. The Formation of Pb(IV) Oxides in Chlorinated Water

    SciTech Connect

    Lytle, Darren A.; Schock, Michael R.

    2008-06-09

    Recent research has shown that Pb(IV) oxides play a significant geochemical role in drinking water distribution systems. However, most of the guidance for lead control in drinking water is based on the presumption that Pb(II) solids control lead solubility. Therefore, a better understanding of the chemistry of Pb(IV) in water is needed. Long-term lead precipitation experiments were conducted in chlorinated water (1-3 mg/L Cl{sub 2}) at pH 6.5,8, and 10, with and without sulfate. Results showed that two Pb(IV) dioxide polymorphs-plattnerite ({beta}-PbO{sub 2}) and scrutinyite ({alpha}-PbO{sub 2})-formed over time, as long as a high suspension redox potential was maintained with free chlorine. Neither mineral formed spontaneously, and the rate of formation increased with increasing pH. Hydrocerrusite and/or cerrusite initially precipitated out and overtime either disappeared or coexisted with PbO{sub 2}. Water pH dictated mineralogical presence. High pH favored hydrocerrusite and scrutinyite; low pH favored cerrusite and plattnerite. Along with a transformation of Pb(II) to Pb(IV) came a change in particle color from white to a dark shade of red to dark grey (differing with pH) and a decrease in lead solubility. If free chlorine was permitted to dissipate, the aging processes (i.e., mineralogy, color, and solubility) were reversible.

  5. Carfilzomib, Rituximab, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-29

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma

  6. Fatty acid composition, oxidation status and volatile organic compounds in "Colonnata" lard from Large White or Cinta Senese pigs as affected by curing time.

    PubMed

    Serra, A; Buccioni, A; Rodriguez-Estrada, M T; Conte, G; Cappucci, A; Mele, M

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present paper was to evaluate the fatty acid composition, lipolysis, lipid oxidation and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Colonnata lard from Large White (LW) or Cinta Senese (CS) pigs during one-year of curing. CS lard contained higher amounts of unsaturated fatty acids than that from LW, due to the different rearing and feeding systems. Despite higher lipolysis in CS backfat during the curing period, the rate of fatty acid and cholesterol oxidation was higher in LW. The amount of cholesterol oxidation products (COPs) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARs) significantly decreased after 3 months of curing, regardless of the type of lard. VOCs composition of lard was affected by curing time, but not by breed. While volatile fatty acid oxidation products (mainly aldehydes) were present at the beginning of curing, subsequently other volatile compounds (such as sulphur compounds and terpenes) that derived from ingredients used for lard production, increased in the samples.

  7. DSM-5 personality traits and DSM-IV personality disorders.

    PubMed

    Hopwood, Christopher J; Thomas, Katherine M; Markon, Kristian E; Wright, Aidan G C; Krueger, Robert F

    2012-05-01

    Two issues pertinent to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; DSM-5) proposal for personality pathology, the recovery of DSM-IV personality disorders (PDs) by proposed DSM-5 traits and the validity of the proposed DSM-5 hybrid model, which incorporates both personality pathology symptoms and maladaptive traits, were evaluated in a large undergraduate sample (N = 808). Proposed DSM-5 traits as assessed with the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 explained a substantial proportion of variance in DSM-IV PDs as assessed with the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire-4+, and trait indicators of the 6 proposed DSM-5 PDs were mostly specific to those disorders with some exceptions. Regression analyses support the DSM-5 hybrid model in that pathological traits, and an indicator of general personality pathology severity provided incremental information about PDs. Findings are discussed in the context of broader issues around the proposed DSM-5 model of personality disorders.

  8. Biocompatible Green and Red Fluorescent Organic Dots with Remarkably Large Two-Photon Action Cross Sections for Targeted Cellular Imaging and Real-Time Intravital Blood Vascular Visualization.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jiayun; Cai, Xiaolei; Lou, Xiaoding; Feng, Guangxue; Min, Xuehong; Luo, Wenwen; He, Bairong; Goh, Chi Ching; Ng, Lai Guan; Zhou, Jian; Zhao, Zujin; Liu, Bin; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2015-07-15

    Fluorescent organic dots are emerging as promising bioimaging reagents because of their high brightness, good photostability, excellent biocompatibility, and facile surface functionalization. Organic dots with large two-photon absorption (TPA) cross sections are highly desired for two-photon fluorescence microscopy. In this work, we report two biocompatible and photostable organic dots fabricated by encapsulating tetraphenylethene derivatives within DSPE-PEG matrix. The two organic dots show absorption maxima at 425 and 483 nm and emit green and red fluorescence at 560 and 645 nm, with high fluorescence quantum yields of 64% and 22%, respectively. Both organic dots exhibit excellent TPA property in the range of 800-960 nm, affording upon excitation at 820 nm remarkably large TPA cross sections of 1.2×10(6) and 2.5×10(6) GM on the basis of dot concentration. The bare fluorophores and their organic dots are biocompatible and have been used to stain living cells for one- and two-photon fluorescence bioimagings. The cRGD-modified organic dots can selectively target integrin αvβ3 overexpressing breast cancer cells for targeted imaging. The organic dots are also applied for real-time two-photon fluorescence in vivo visualization of the blood vasculature of mouse ear, providing the spatiotemporal information about the whole blood vascular network. These results demonstrate that the present fluorescent organic dots are promising candidates for living cell and tissue imaging.

  9. Population cycles are highly correlated over long time series and large spatial scales in two unrelated species: Greater sage-grouse and cottontail rabbits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fedy, B.C.; Doherty, K.E.

    2011-01-01

    Animal species across multiple taxa demonstrate multi-annual population cycles, which have long been of interest to ecologists. Correlated population cycles between species that do not share a predator-prey relationship are particularly intriguing and challenging to explain. We investigated annual population trends of greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) and cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus sp.) across Wyoming to explore the possibility of correlations between unrelated species, over multiple cycles, very large spatial areas, and relatively southern latitudes in terms of cycling species. We analyzed sage-grouse lek counts and annual hunter harvest indices from 1982 to 2007. We show that greater sage-grouse, currently listed as warranted but precluded under the US Endangered Species Act, and cottontails have highly correlated cycles (r = 0. 77). We explore possible mechanistic hypotheses to explain the synchronous population cycles. Our research highlights the importance of control populations in both adaptive management and impact studies. Furthermore, we demonstrate the functional value of these indices (lek counts and hunter harvest) for tracking broad-scale fluctuations in the species. This level of highly correlated long-term cycling has not previously been documented between two non-related species, over a long time-series, very large spatial scale, and within more southern latitudes. ?? 2010 US Government.

  10. Population cycles are highly correlated over long time series and large spatial scales in two unrelated species: greater sage-grouse and cottontail rabbits.

    PubMed

    Fedy, Bradley C; Doherty, Kevin E

    2011-04-01

    Animal species across multiple taxa demonstrate multi-annual population cycles, which have long been of interest to ecologists. Correlated population cycles between species that do not share a predator-prey relationship are particularly intriguing and challenging to explain. We investigated annual population trends of greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) and cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus sp.) across Wyoming to explore the possibility of correlations between unrelated species, over multiple cycles, very large spatial areas, and relatively southern latitudes in terms of cycling species. We analyzed sage-grouse lek counts and annual hunter harvest indices from 1982 to 2007. We show that greater sage-grouse, currently listed as warranted but precluded under the US Endangered Species Act, and cottontails have highly correlated cycles (r = 0.77). We explore possible mechanistic hypotheses to explain the synchronous population cycles. Our research highlights the importance of control populations in both adaptive management and impact studies. Furthermore, we demonstrate the functional value of these indices (lek counts and hunter harvest) for tracking broad-scale fluctuations in the species. This level of highly correlated long-term cycling has not previously been documented between two non-related species, over a long time-series, very large spatial scale, and within more southern latitudes.

  11. Real-time display with large field of view on fourier domain optical coherence tomography at 1310 nm wavelength for dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Qing; Hou, Jue; Fu, Ling

    2012-06-01

    A Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) system with 1310 nm light was demonstrated to study inflammatory human skin and the skin coated with a moisturizer in vivo. By using a graphics processing unit (GPU), the display rate could reach 20 frames/s with 1000 A-scans contained in one image. The field of view (FOV) of the cross-sectional image is 7 mm in the lateral direction and the penetration depth is ˜1 mm in skin. The result shows that, in inflammatory skin, the epidermis became thicker and had a decreased scattering; furthermore, the region of the severe lesion present an uneven thickness of the epidermis compared with the peripheral area. For the result of a finger tip coated with the moisturizer, the antireflection effect was significant and the stratum corneum became more transparent. In this letter, we demonstrated that real-time display with a large FOV could enable screening of a large tissue area; thereby increasing the dermatologic diagnostic potential of the method by permitting a comparison of the lesion and the normal peripheral region.

  12. Space-time characteristics of wall-pressure and wall shear-stress fluctuations in wall-modeled large eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, George Ilhwan; Moin, Parviz

    2016-06-01

    We report the space-time characteristics of the wall-pressure fluctuations and wall shear-stress fluctuations from wall-modeled large eddy simulation (WMLES) of a turbulent channel flow at Reτ=2000 . Two standard zonal wall models (equilibrium stress model and nonequilibrium model based on unsteady RANS) are employed, and it is shown that they yield similar results in predicting these quantities. The wall-pressure and wall shear-stress fields from WMLES are analyzed in terms of their r.m.s. fluctuations, spectra, two-point correlations, and convection velocities. It is demonstrated that the resolution requirement for predicting the wall-pressure fluctuations is more stringent than that for predicting the velocity. At least δ /Δ x >20 and δ /Δ z >30 are required to marginally resolve the integral length scales of the pressure-producing eddies near the wall. Otherwise, the pressure field is potentially aliased. Spurious high wave number modes dominate in the streamwise direction, and they contaminate the pressure spectra leading to significant overprediction of the second-order pressure statistics. When these conditions are met, the pressure statistics and spectra at low wave number or low frequency agree well with the DNS and experimental data. On the contrary, the wall shear-stress fluctuations, modeled entirely through the RANS-based wall models, are largely underpredicted and relatively insensitive to the grid resolution. The short-time, small-scale near-wall eddies, which are neither resolved nor modeled adequately in the wall models, seem to be important for accurate prediction of the wall shear-stress fluctuations.

  13. Dual time point imaging fluorine-18 flourodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography for evaluation of large loco-regional recurrences of breast cancer treated with electrochemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Matthiessen, Louise Wichmann; Johannesen, Helle Hjorth; Skougaard, Kristin; Gehl, Julie; Hendel, Helle Westergren

    2013-01-01

    Background Electrochemotherapy is a local anticancer treatment very efficient for treatment of small cutaneous metastases. The method is now being investigated for large cutaneous recurrences of breast cancer that are often confluent masses of malignant tumour with various degrees of inflammation. To this end 18-Flourine-Flourodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (FDG-PET/CT) could be a method for response evaluation. However, a standard FDG-PET/CT scan cannot differentiate inflammatory tissue from malignant tissue. Dual point time imaging (DTPI) FDG-PET has the potential of doing so. The purpose of this study was to investigate if DTPI FDG-PET/CT could assess response to electrochemotherapy and to assess the optimal timing of imaging. Patients and methods Within a phase II clinical trial 11 patients with cutaneous recurrences had FDG-PET/CT scans at three time points: 60 min, 120 min and 180 min after FDG injection. The scans were performed before and 3 weeks after electrochemotherapy. Results A significant reduction in maximum standard uptake value at 60 min post injection was seen after treatment. Furthermore a change in the FDG uptake pattern was observed; from increasing uptake in up to 180 min post injection before treatment to stabilization of FDG uptake at 120 min post injection after treatment. The change in FDG uptake pattern over time lead to change of response in three target lesions; two lesions changed from stable metabolic disease to partial metabolic response and one lesion changed from partial metabolic response to stable metabolic disease. To ensure detection of the change in uptake pattern, scanning 60 and 180 min post injection seems optimal. Conclusions The present study shows that FDG-PET/CT 60 and 180 min after tracer injection is a promising tool for response evaluation of cutaneous recurrences of breast cancer treated with electrochemotherapy. PMID:24294180

  14. Analysis of Cadmium in Undissolved Anode Materials of Mark-IV Electrorefiner

    SciTech Connect

    Tae-Sic Yoo; Guy L. Fredrickson; DeeEarl Vaden; Brian R. Westphal

    2013-10-01

    The Mark-IV electrorefiner (Mk-IV ER) contains an electrolyte/molten cadmium system for refining uranium electrochemically. Typically, the anode of the Mk-IV ER consists of the chopped sodium-bonded metallic driver fuels, which have been primarily U-10Zr binary fuels. Chemical analysis of the residual anode materials after electrorefining indicates that a small amount of cadmium is removed from the Mk-IV ER along with the undissolved anode materials. Investigation of chemical analysis data indicates that the amount of cadmium in the undissolved anode materials is strongly correlated with the anode rotation speeds and the residence time of the anode in the Mk-IV ER. Discussions are given to explain the prescribed correlation.

  15. TRISTEN/FRAM IV arctic ambient noise measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, R. J.; Dinapoli, F. R.; Fecher, M. P.; Fisch, N. P.; Potter, D. M.

    1984-03-01

    Multichannel ice camp ambient noise data were recorded by NUSC during the TRISTEN/FRAM IV experiment in the Barents Abyssal Plain, Arctic Ocean during April 1982. Single-hydrophone data were recorded from various elements of both the Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute horizontal array and the Naval Research Laboratory vertical array. This paper characteristics the average ambient noise level and its variance as a function of frequency (to 2500 Hz), depth, and time.

  16. Using a microcomputer to support an I.V. admixture service.

    PubMed

    Sylvan, L; Lenihan, L

    1983-07-01

    Acquisition of a microcomputer and a high-speed printer enabled the authors' pharmacy to automate the production of I.V. additive labels. This automation freed 0.5 FTEs of pharmacy personnel time for other duties. This low-cost microcomputer and printer has proven to be sufficient equipment for the support of an I.V. admixture program with time-saving and cost-saving applications.

  17. Factors influencing response to intravenous lacosamide in emergency situations: LACO-IV study.

    PubMed

    Garcés, Mercedes; Villanueva, Vicente; Mauri, José Angel; Suller, Ana; García, Carolina; López González, Franscisco Javier; Rodríguez Osorio, Xiana; Fernández Pajarín, Gustavo; Piera, Anna; Guillamón, Edelmira; Santafé, Consuelo; Castillo, Ascensión; Giner, Pau; Torres, Nerea; Escalza, Inés; Del Villar, Ana; García de Casasola, Maria Carmen; Bonet, Macarena; Noé, Enrique; Olmedilla, Nuria

    2014-07-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) and acute repetitive seizures (ARSs) frequently result in emergency visits. Wide variations in response are seen with standard antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Oral and intravenous (IV) formulations of lacosamide are approved as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of partial-onset seizures in adults and adolescents. The aim of the retrospective multicenter observational study (LACO-IV) was to analyze data from a large cohort of patients with SE or ARSs of varying severity and etiology, who received IV lacosamide in the emergency setting. Patient clinical data were entered into a database; lacosamide use and efficacy and tolerability variables were analyzed. In SE, IV lacosamide tended to be used mainly in nonconvulsive status epilepticus as second- or third-line treatment. The proportion of patients with no seizures when IV lacosamide was the last drug administered was 76.5% (70.9% SE and 83.7% ARSs). The rate of seizure cessation ≤ 24 h after IV lacosamide administration was 57.1% (49.1% SE and 67.4% ARSs). Of the factors analyzed, a shorter latency from seizure onset to IV lacosamide infusion influenced treatment response significantly. A nonsignificant tendency towards a higher response was seen with lacosamide dose >200mg versus ≤ 200 mg. Analysis of response according to mechanism of action showed no significant differences in response to IV lacosamide in patients receiving prior sodium channel blocker (SCB) or non-SCB AEDs in the overall or SE population; however, in ARSs, a tendency towards a higher response was observed in those receiving non-SCB AEDs. The frequency and nature of adverse events observed were in line with those reported in other studies (somnolence being the most frequent). In the absence of randomized prospective controlled studies of IV lacosamide, our observations suggest that IV lacosamide may be a potential alternative for treatment of SE/ARSs when seizures fail to improve with standard AEDs or when AEDs are

  18. Development and application of single-tube multiplex real-time PCR for lineage classification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis based on large sequence polymorphism in Northeast Thailand.

    PubMed

    Faksri, Kiatichai; Hanchaina, Rattanavinan; Sangka, Arunnee; Namwat, Wises; Lulitanond, Viraphong

    2015-07-01

    An appreciation of the genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is needed for effective planning of strategies in tuberculosis (TB) control. Large sequence polymorphisms (LSPs) are the molecular epidemiological and evolutionary markers for classification of Mtb into East Asian (EA) or Beijing, Indo-Oceanic (IO), Euro-American (EuA) and East African-Indian (EAI) lineages. We aimed to develop a single-tube multiplex real-time PCR assay using melting curve analysis for lineage classification of Mtb based on LSPs. The technique was optimized and tested with well-characterized strains (n = 89). The developed technique was then applied to classify Mtb isolates from TB patients (n = 256) randomly recruited from 19 provinces covering Northeast Thailand in 2013-2014. The technique demonstrated 100% sensitivity and specificity based on well-characterized strains compared to conventional techniques. The detection limit of the technique is 0.05 ng of genomic DNA of Mtb. The 256 Mtb isolates represented IO (n = 178, 70%), Beijing (n = 60, 23%) and EuA (n = 18, 7%) lineages. Significant associations of the Beijing lineage with drug resistance (p < 0.001) and younger average age of TB patients (p < 0.001) compared to other lineages were shown. The single-tube multiplex real-time PCR technique provides a simple, rapid and high performance tool for characterizing Mtb based on LSPs.

  19. Does developmental timing of exposure to child maltreatment predict memory performance in adulthood? Results from a large, population-based sample.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Erin C; Busso, Daniel S; Raffeld, Miriam R; Smoller, Jordan W; Nelson, Charles A; Doyle, Alysa E; Luk, Gigi

    2016-01-01

    Although maltreatment is a known risk factor for multiple adverse outcomes across the lifespan, its effects on cognitive development, especially memory, are poorly understood. Using data from a large, nationally representative sample of young adults (Add Health), we examined the effects of physical and sexual abuse on working and short-term memory in adulthood. We examined the association between exposure to maltreatment as well as its timing of first onset after adjusting for covariates. Of our sample, 16.50% of respondents were exposed to physical abuse and 4.36% to sexual abuse by age 17. An analysis comparing unexposed respondents to those exposed to physical or sexual abuse did not yield any significant differences in adult memory performance. However, two developmental time periods emerged as important for shaping memory following exposure to sexual abuse, but in opposite ways. Relative to non-exposed respondents, those exposed to sexual abuse during early childhood (ages 3-5), had better number recall and those first exposed during adolescence (ages 14-17) had worse number recall. However, other variables, including socioeconomic status, played a larger role (than maltreatment) on working and short-term memory. We conclude that a simple examination of "exposed" versus "unexposed" respondents may obscure potentially important within-group differences that are revealed by examining the effects of age at onset to maltreatment.

  20. Moon-to-Earth: Eavesdropping on the GRAIL Inter-Spacecraft Time-Transfer Link Using a Large Antenna and a Software Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esterhuizen, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    NASA's twin GRAIL [1] spacecraft (Ebb and Flow) arrived at Earth's Moon on New Year's Day, 2012. GRAIL's primary mission is to create a high-resolution map of the Moon's gravitational field by measuring very precisely the change in distance between the two spacecraft [2]. Each spacecraft transmits two signals to the other spacecraft, a PRN code modulated on a 2 GHz carrier (S-band), as well as an unmodulated carrier at roughly 33 GHz (Ka-band). Since it's not feasible to synchronize the two GRAIL spacecraft's clocks via GPS (as was done with GRACE), the S-band signals are used as a time-transfer link to synchronize either Ebb's clock to Flow or vice versa. As an independent measure to determine the clock offset of the GRAIL ultra-stable oscillators to UTC(NIST), an experiment was conducted where our JPL team used a large antenna on Earth to eavesdrop on the inter-spacecraft time-transfer link.