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Sample records for iv washington rocky

  1. Integrated Hatchery Operations Team: Operations Plans for Anadromous Fish Production Facilities in the Columbia River Basin, Volume IV of IV; Washington: Rocky Reach Hatchery Addendum, 1992 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Peck, Larry

    1993-08-01

    Rocky Reach Hatchery is located along the Columbia Paver, just downstream from Rocky Reach Dam. Site elevation is 800 feet above sea level. The Turtle Rock Island facility, located 2 miles upstream, is operated as a satellite facility (shared with the Washington Department of Wildlife). The facility is staffed with 2.75 FTE`S. The hatchery was originally designed as a mile-long spawning channel at Turtle Rock Island. Rearing units consist of eight vinyl raceways at Rocky Reach and four rearing ponds at Turtle Rock. Water rights are held by Chelan County PUD and total 3,613 gpm from the Columbia River. Water available for use in the Turtle Rock rearing ponds averages 12,000 gpm from the Columbia River. Rocky Reach Hatchery and the Turtle Rock satellite facility are owned by Chelan County PUD. They are operated as mitigation facilities for the fishery impacts caused by the construction and operation of Rocky Reach Dam. Rocky Reach Hatchery is used for incubation and early rearing of upriver bright (URB) fall chinook. Fingerlings are later transferred to the Turtle Rock facility for final rearing and release.

  2. Relational Database for the Geology of the Northern Rocky Mountains - Idaho, Montana, and Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Causey, J. Douglas; Zientek, Michael L.; Bookstrom, Arthur A.; Frost, Thomas P.; Evans, Karl V.; Wilson, Anna B.; Van Gosen, Bradley S.; Boleneus, David E.; Pitts, Rebecca A.

    2008-01-01

    A relational database was created to prepare and organize geologic map-unit and lithologic descriptions for input into a spatial database for the geology of the northern Rocky Mountains, a compilation of forty-three geologic maps for parts of Idaho, Montana, and Washington in U.S. Geological Survey Open File Report 2005-1235. Not all of the information was transferred to and incorporated in the spatial database due to physical file limitations. This report releases that part of the relational database that was completed for that earlier product. In addition to descriptive geologic information for the northern Rocky Mountains region, the relational database contains a substantial bibliography of geologic literature for the area. The relational database nrgeo.mdb (linked below) is available in Microsoft Access version 2000, a proprietary database program. The relational database contains data tables and other tables used to define terms, relationships between the data tables, and hierarchical relationships in the data; forms used to enter data; and queries used to extract data.

  3. Water quality in the Northern Rockies Intermontane basins, Idaho, Montana, and Washington, 1999-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Gregory M.; Caldwell, Rodney R.; Maret, Terry R.; Bowers, Craig L.; Dutton, DeAnn M.; Becksmith, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    This report contains the major findings of a 1999–2001 assessment of water quality in the Northern Rockies Intermontane Basins. It is one of a series of reports by the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program that present major findings in 51 major river basins and aquifer systems across the Nation. In these reports, water quality is discussed in terms of local, State, and regional issues. Conditions in a particular basin or aquifer system are compared to conditions found elsewhere and to selected national benchmarks, such as those for drinking-water quality and the protection of aquatic organisms. This report is intended for individuals working with water-resource issues in Federal, State, or local agencies, universities, public interest groups, or in the private sector. The information will be useful in addressing a number of current issues, such as the effects of agricultural and urban land use on water quality, human health, drinking water, source-water protection, hypoxia and excessive growth of algae and plants, pesticide registration, and monitoring and sampling strategies. This report is also for individuals who wish to know more about the quality of streams and ground water in areas near where they live, and how that water quality compares to the quality of water in other areas across the Nation. The water-quality conditions in the Northern Rockies Intermontane Basins summarized in this report are discussed in detail in other reports that can be accessed from (http://id.water.usgs.gov/nrok/index.html). Detailed technical information, data and analyses, collection and analytical methodology, models, graphs, and maps that support the findings presented in this report in addition to reports in this series from other basins can be accessed from the national NAWQA Web site (http://water.usgs.gov/nawqa).

  4. Rectified images of selected geologic maps in the Northern Rockies Area, Idaho, Montana, Washington, and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larsen, Jeremy C.; Assmus, Kenneth C.; Causey, J. Douglas; Zientek, Michael L.

    2004-01-01

    Selected geologic maps covering parts of the Northern Rocky Mountains and adjacent areas were converted to raster images and georeferenced (rectified) for use in a geographic information system (GIS). These rectified images were created for the purpose of visually comparing published geologic maps with other geospatial information. However, they cannot be queried or used for spatial analysis thus limiting their use in a GIS. The 42 georeferenced images included in this report range in scale from 1:250,000 to 1:100,000.Tagged Image Format (TIFF) images of the maps were generated by scanning an original paper map or converting previously published Portable Document Format (PDF) images or Encapsulated Post-Script (EPS) files. To reduce file size and minimize image overlap, the TIFF images were cropped, and then rectified using ArcMap? 8 and converted to MrSID? images. Information in the explanation and cross sections can be viewed in un-rectified images of the original publications that are included with this report. In addition, the text in the map unit description along with the unit name, map label, and a citation are organized in a searchable PDF file.

  5. The determination of PCBs in Rocky Flats Type IV waste sludge by gas chromatography/electron capture detection. Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Parish, K.J.; Applegate, D.V.; Postlethwait, P.D.; Boparai, A.S.; Reedy, G.T.

    1994-12-01

    Before disposal, radioactive sludge (Type IV) from Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) must be evaluated for polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) content. The Type IV sludge consists of organic solvents, degreasers, cutting oils, and transuranic (TRU) waste mixed with calcium silicate (MicroCel E{reg_sign} and Oil Dri{reg_sign} to form a grease or paste-like material. For laboratory testing, a nonradioactive simulated Type 17V RFP sludge was prepared at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E). This sludge has a composition similar to that expected from field samples. In an earlier effort, a simplified method was developed for extraction, cleanup of extract, and determination of PCBs in samples of simulated sludge spiked with Aroclors 1254 and 1260. The simplified method has now been used to determine the presence and quantities of other Aroclors in the simulated sludge, namely, Aroclors 10 1 6, 1221, 1232, 1242, and 1248. The accuracy and precision of the data for these Aroclors were found to be similar to the data for sludges spiked with Aroclors 1254 and 1260. Since actual sludges may vary in composition, the method was also verified by analyzing another source of Type IV simulated sludge, prepared by Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W).

  6. Conceptual Model of Hydrologic and Thermal Conditions of the Eastbank Aquifer System near Rocky Reach Dam, Douglas County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Heeswijk, Marijke; Cox, Stephen E.; Huffman, Raegan L.; Curran, Christopher A.

    2008-01-01

    The Lower and Combined Aquifers of the Eastbank Aquifer system, located in a river-terrace deposit along the Columbia River near Rocky Reach Dam, Washington, are primarily recharged by the Columbia River and provide water to the Eastbank Hatchery and the regional water system servicing the cities of Wenatchee, East Wenatchee, and parts of unincorporated Chelan and Douglas Counties. In 2006, mean annual pumpage from the aquifers by the hatchery and regional water system was about 43 and 16 cubic feet per second, respectively. Reportedly, temperatures of ground water pumped by the hatchery have been increasing, thereby making water potentially too warm for salmonid fish production. An evaluation of hourly ground-water and river temperatures from January 1991 through August 2007 indicates increasing interannual trends in temperatures in most of the Lower and Combined Aquifers from 1999 through 2006 that correspond to increasing trends in the annual mean and annual maximum river temperatures during the same period of 0.07 and 0.17?C per year, respectively. There were no trends in the annual minimum river temperatures from 1999 through 2006, and there were no trends in the annual minimum, mean, and maximum river temperatures from 1991 through 1998 and from 1991 through 2007. Increases in river temperatures from 1999 through 2006 are within the natural variability of the river temperatures. Most of the Lower and Combined Aquifers reached thermal equilibrium?defined by constant time lags between changes in river temperatures and subsequent changes in ground-water temperatures?during 1991?98. The only exceptions are the Combined Aquifer north of the well field of the regional water system, which had not reached thermal equilibrium by 2006, and the Lower Aquifer west of the well fields of the hatchery and the regional water system, which reached thermal equilibrium prior to 1991. Because most of the Lower and Combined Aquifers were in thermal equilibrium from 1999 through

  7. Method development and survey of Sudan I–IV in palm oil and chilli spices in the Washington, DC, area

    PubMed Central

    Genualdi, Susie; MacMahon, Shaun; Robbins, Katherine; Farris, Samantha; Shyong, Nicole; DeJager, Lowri

    2016-01-01

    Sudan I, II, III and IV dyes are banned for use as food colorants in the United States and European Union because they are toxic and carcinogenic. These dyes have been illegally used as food additives in products such as chilli spices and palm oil to enhance their red colour. From 2003 to 2005, the European Union made a series of decisions requiring chilli spices and palm oil imported to the European Union to contain analytical reports declaring them free of Sudan I–IV. In order for the USFDA to investigate the adulteration of palm oil and chilli spices with unapproved colour additives in the United States, a method was developed for the extraction and analysis of Sudan dyes in palm oil, and previous methods were validated for Sudan dyes in chilli spices. Both LC-DAD and LC-MS/MS methods were examined for their limitations and effectiveness in identifying adulterated samples. Method validation was performed for both chilli spices and palm oil by spiking samples known to be free of Sudan dyes at concentrations close to the limit of detection. Reproducibility, matrix effects, and selectivity of the method were also investigated. Additionally, for the first time a survey of palm oil and chilli spices was performed in the United States, specifically in the Washington, DC, area. Illegal dyes, primarily Sudan IV, were detected in palm oil at concentrations from 150 to 24 000 ng ml−1. Low concentrations (< 21 μg kg−1) of Sudan dyes were found in 11 out of 57 spices and are most likely a result of cross-contamination during preparation and storage and not intentional adulteration. PMID:26824489

  8. Method development and survey of Sudan I-IV in palm oil and chilli spices in the Washington, DC, area.

    PubMed

    Genualdi, Susie; MacMahon, Shaun; Robbins, Katherine; Farris, Samantha; Shyong, Nicole; DeJager, Lowri

    2016-01-01

    Sudan I, II, III and IV dyes are banned for use as food colorants in the United States and European Union because they are toxic and carcinogenic. These dyes have been illegally used as food additives in products such as chilli spices and palm oil to enhance their red colour. From 2003 to 2005, the European Union made a series of decisions requiring chilli spices and palm oil imported to the European Union to contain analytical reports declaring them free of Sudan I-IV. In order for the USFDA to investigate the adulteration of palm oil and chilli spices with unapproved colour additives in the United States, a method was developed for the extraction and analysis of Sudan dyes in palm oil, and previous methods were validated for Sudan dyes in chilli spices. Both LC-DAD and LC-MS/MS methods were examined for their limitations and effectiveness in identifying adulterated samples. Method validation was performed for both chilli spices and palm oil by spiking samples known to be free of Sudan dyes at concentrations close to the limit of detection. Reproducibility, matrix effects, and selectivity of the method were also investigated. Additionally, for the first time a survey of palm oil and chilli spices was performed in the United States, specifically in the Washington, DC, area. Illegal dyes, primarily Sudan IV, were detected in palm oil at concentrations from 150 to 24 000 ng ml(-1). Low concentrations (< 21 µg kg(-1)) of Sudan dyes were found in 11 out of 57 spices and are most likely a result of cross-contamination during preparation and storage and not intentional adulteration.

  9. Rocky Mountain spotted fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000654.htm Rocky Mountain spotted fever To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a disease caused by a type of ...

  10. Historians' Rocky Job Market

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grafton, Anthony; Townsend, Robert B.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss how the historians' job market is perennially rocky. The history profession had its "golden age" in the 1950s and early 1960s when a generation born in the demographic trench of the Depression entered the market just as the first of the baby boomers began to swell college enrollments. But that moment was…

  11. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Jennan

    2017-01-01

    The tick-borne disease Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) can have deadly outcomes unless treated appropriately, yet nonspecific flu-like symptoms complicate diagnosis. Occupational health nurses must have a high index of suspicion with symptomatic workers and recognize that recent recreational or occupational activities with potential tick exposure may suggest RMSF.

  12. Summary of surface-water-quality data collected for the Northern Rockies Intermontane Basins National Water-Quality Assessment Program in the Clark Fork-Pend Oreille and Spokane River basins, Montana, Idaho, and Washington, water years 1999-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beckwith, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Water-quality samples were collected at 10 sites in the Clark Fork-Pend Oreille and Spokane River Basins in water years 1999 – 2001 as part of the Northern Rockies Intermontane Basins (NROK) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. Sampling sites were located in varied environments ranging from small streams and rivers in forested, mountainous headwater areas to large rivers draining diverse landscapes. Two sampling sites were located immediately downstream from the large lakes; five sites were located downstream from large-scale historical mining and oreprocessing areas, which are now the two largest “Superfund” (environmental remediation) sites in the Nation. Samples were collected during a wide range of streamflow conditions, more frequently during increasing and high streamflow and less frequently during receding and base-flow conditions. Sample analyses emphasized major ions, nutrients, and selected trace elements. Streamflow during the study ranged from more than 130 percent of the long-term average in 1999 at some sites to 40 percent of the long-term average in 2001. River and stream water in the study area exhibited small values for specific conductance, hardness, alkalinity, and dissolved solids. Dissolved oxygen concentrations in almost all samples were near saturation. Median total nitrogen and total phosphorus concentrations in samples from most sites were smaller than median concentrations reported for many national programs and other NAWQA Program study areas. The only exceptions were two sites downstream from large wastewater-treatment facilities, where median concentrations of total nitrogen exceeded the national median. Maximum concentrations of total phosphorus in samples from six sites exceeded the 0.1 milligram per liter threshold recommended for limiting nuisance aquatic growth. Concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, and zinc were largest in samples from sites downstream from historical mining and ore

  13. Rocky Reach: Gaining new equipment, skills for a new century

    SciTech Connect

    McKee, C.A.; Christman, W.G.; Showalter, A.W.

    1997-04-01

    A summary is provided of modifications being made to the 1,287-MW Rocky Reach hydroelectric project on the Columbia River in Washington. Project modifications discussed include powerhouse rehabilitation and new fisheries projects. Replacement and retrofitting on all turbines is being performed to lower mortality rates of juvenile fishes migrating downstream. An electrical system overhaul is also described; performance testing indicates a 3.15 percent efficiency increase.

  14. Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Lacz, N L; Schwartz, R A; Kapila, R

    2006-04-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is an unusual but important dermatological condition to identify without hesitation. The classic triad of headache, fever, and a rash that begins on the extremities and travels proximally to involve the trunk is found in a majority of patients. The cutaneous centripetal pattern is a result of cell to cell migration by the causative organism Rickettsia rickettsii. Such individuals should receive prompt antimicrobial therapy and supportive care to avoid serious and potentially fatal complications.

  15. Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Kamper, C A; Chessman, K H; Phelps, S J

    1988-02-01

    The epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, and treatment of Rocky Mountain spotted fever are reviewed. Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a severe infection caused by Rickettsia rickettsii transmitted to man by various species of ticks. High-incidence areas exist in the southeast and south central United States. Only 60-70% of patients with the disease report a history of tick bite or exposure to tick-infested areas. The disease is initially characterized by fever, headache, gastrointestinal complaints, myalgia, and a generalized rash. In several days generalized vasculitis may lead to periorbital edema and nonpitting edema of the face and extremities. Central nervous system involvement is common. Because signs and symptoms associated with the disease are nonspecific, the diagnosis is often delayed or missed. Traditionally diagnostic confirmation relied on serologic testing, but an indirect fluorescent antibody assay will soon be commercially available. Rocky Mountain spotted fever is usually treated with the rickettsiostatic agents chloramphenicol or tetracycline, but few comparative data on these agents in patients with the disease are available. For patients who cannot tolerate oral medications, intravenous chloramphenicol sodium succinate is the preferred treatment; chloramphenicol is also the drug of choice for children less than eight years of age. Otherwise, oral tetracycline hydrochloride is the drug of choice. Antibiotic therapy should be continued for 7-10 days or until the patient is afebrile for two to five days. All cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever must be reported to the Centers for Disease Control. The best ways to decrease the morbidity and mortality of the disease are to increase awareness of its signs and symptoms and to prevent exposure to ticks.

  16. [Rocky Mountain spotted fever].

    PubMed

    Reinauer, K M; Jaschonek, K; Kusch, G; Heizmann, W R; Döller, P C; Jenss, H

    1990-01-12

    After returning from a holiday in the USA a 24-year-old man fell ill with diarrhoea, high fever and marked rash including the palms of the hands and soles of the feet. When a history of a tick bite in the USA was elicited, a rickettsial infection was suspected. Treatment with doxycycline, 100 mg twice daily, was instituted finally and the fever slowly resolved. The patient became completely well again within four weeks. Serological tests confirmed the diagnosis of Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

  17. Workforce: Washington

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    In Washington, the demand for well-educated employees will only increase over the next several years. In the decade leading up to 2012, healthcare occupations will see growth of 20 percent. Teachers will be in demand: nearly 9,000 new elementary and middle-school educators will need to be hired. Computer fields will undergo growth of 24 percent,…

  18. Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Dantas-Torres, Filipe

    2007-11-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a life-threatening disease caused by Rickettsia rickettsii, an obligately intracellular bacterium that is spread to human beings by ticks. More than a century after its first clinical description, this disease is still among the most virulent human infections identified, being potentially fatal even in previously healthy young people. The diagnosis of RMSF is based on the patient's history and a physical examination, and often presents a dilemma for clinicians because of the non-specific presentation of the disease in its early course. Early empirical treatment is essential to prevent severe complications or a fatal outcome, and treatment should be initiated even in unconfirmed cases. Because there is no vaccine available against RMSF, avoidance of tick-infested areas is still the best way to prevent the infection.

  19. Rocky Mountain Arsenal NPDES Permit

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Under NPDES permit CO-0035009, the U.S. Department of Interior's Fish and Wildlife Service is authorized to discharge from the Rocky Mountain Arsenal recycled water pipeline to Lower Derby Lake in Adams County, Colo.

  20. Washington, DC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Citizens of the United States vote today (November 7, 2000) to determine who will be the next president and vice president of the country, as well as who will fill a number of congressional and senate seats that are up for election. This image of the U.S. capital city-Washington, D.C.-was acquired on June 1 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), a Japanese sensor flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The scene encompasses an area 14 km wide by 13.7 km tall, and was made using a combination of ASTER's visible and near-infrared channels. In this image, vegetation appears red, buildings and paved areas appear light blue, and the waters of the Anacostia and Potomac Rivers are dark grey. ASTER's 15-meter spatial resolution allows us to see individual buildings, including the White House, the Jefferson Memorial, and the Washington Monument with its shadow. Image courtesy NASA/GSFC/MITI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team

  1. Rocky Martian Plain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The rocky Martian plain surrounding Viking 2 is seen in high resolution in this 85-degree panorama sweeping from north at the left to east at right during the Martian afternoon on September 5. Large blocks litter the surface. Some are porous, sponge-like rocks like the one at the left edge (size estimate: 1 1/2 to 2 feet); others are dense and fine-grained, such as the very bright rounded block (1 to 1 1/2 feet across) toward lower right. Pebbled surface between the rocks is covered in places by small drifts of very fine material similar to drifts seen at the Viking 1 landing site some 4600 miles to the southwest. The fine-grained material is banked up behind some rocks, but wind tails seen by Viking 1 are not well-developed here. On the right horizon, flat-topped ridges or hills are illuminated by the afternoon sun. Slope of the horizon is due to the 8-degree tilt of the spacecraft.

  2. Drought in the Rockies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image shows the difference between the amount of vegetation in July 2000 and the average July vegetation for North America. Of particular interest are the dry conditions in the western United States. This spring and summer the Rocky Mountains have been relatively dry, and the brown regions stretching from the Canadian to the Mexican border, indicate the effect on the regions' forests. Western Montana and eastern Idaho are particularly parched, and appear darker brown. The dry conditions have contributed to this year's devastating fire season, during which millions of acres have burned in the west. Scientists find that during the growing season, land plants can be used to measure drought. Healthy, thriving plants reflect and absorb visible and near-infrared light differently than plants under stress. These variations in reflectance and absorption can be measured by satellites to produce maps of healthy and stressed vegetation. This image shows Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) anomaly, which indicates where vegetation growth was above average (green pixels), below average (brown pixels), or normal (white pixels). For more images and information about measuring vegetation and drought from space visit: Drought and Vegetation Monitoring. Image courtesy NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Biospheric Sciences Branch, based on data from NOAA.

  3. Rocky road in the Rockies: Challenges to biodiversity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tomback, Diana F.; Kendall, Katherine C.

    2002-01-01

    To people worldwide, the Rocky Mountains of the United States and Canada represent a last bastion of nature in its purest and rawest form-unspoiled forests teeming with elk and deer stalked by mountain lions and grizzly bears; bald eagles nesting near lakes and rivers; fat, feisty native trout in rushing mountain streams; and dazzling arrays of wildflowers in lush meadows. In fact, the total biodiversity of the Rocky Mountains is considerable, with relatively high diversity in birds, mammals, butterflies, reptiles, and conifers (Ricketts et al. 1999) and with geographic variation in the flora and fauna of alpine, forest, foothill, and adjacent shortgrass prairie and shrub communities over more than 20 degrees of latitude and more than 10' of longitude. Although the biodiversity of most North American regions has declined because of anthropogenic influences, the perception remains that the biodiversity of the Rocky Mountains is intact. This view exists in part because the Rocky Mountains are remote from urban centers, in part because so much of the land comprises protected areas such as national parks and wilderness areas, and in part because of wishful thinking-that nothing bad could happen to the biodiversity that is so much a part of the history, national self-image, legends, nature films, and movies of the United States and Canada. Despite modern technology and the homogenization and globalization of their cities and towns, at heart North Americans still regard their land as the New World, with pristine nature and untamed landscapes epitomized by the Rockies. The reality is that the biodiversity of the Rocky Mountains has not been free of anthropogenic influences since the West was settled in the 1800s, and in fact it was altered by Native Americans for centuries prior to settlement. A number of escalating problems and consequences of management choices are currently changing Rocky Mountain ecological communities at a dizzying pace. In Order to maintain some

  4. The Rocky Planet Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Debra

    In direct support of the NASA Origins program, we propose the Rocky Planet Survey, a high cadence exoplanet search of sixty late G and K dwarf stars using the CHIRON spectrometer, which we built and commissioned at CTIO. CHIRON operates in two high- resolution modes (R=90,000 and R=120,000) and has a demonstrated precision of better than 1 m s-1. We are contributing 200 nights of telescope time for the next three years, for the excellent phase coverage needed to carry out this work. We have developed simulation software to optimize scheduling of observations to suppress aliases and quickly extract dynamical signals. Our science objectives are to (1) provide a statistical assessment of planet occurrence as a function of decreasing mass in the range of parameter space 3 < Msini < 30 MEARTH for orbital periods up to 50 days, (2) to determine the fraction of low mass planets in multi-planet architectures, and (3) detect planets with Msini < 3 MEARTH in orbital periods shorter than ~20 days. In addition to the science objectives, we intend to push the frontiers of extreme precision Doppler measurements to keep the U.S. competitive with the next generation of European Doppler spectroscopy (ESPRESSO on the VLT). Our team has significant expertise in optical design, fiber coupling, raw extraction, barycentric velocity corrections, and Doppler analysis. The proposed work includes a new optimal extraction algorithm, with the optical designers and software engineers working together on the 2-D PSF description needed for a proper row-by-row extraction and calibration. We will also develop and test upgrades to the barycentric correction code and improvements in the Doppler code that take advantage of stability in the dispersion solution, afforded by a new vacuum-enclosed grating upgrade (scheduled for November 2011). We will test use of emission wavelength calibrations to extend the iodine (absorption) wavelength calibration that we currently use to prepare for eventual use of

  5. Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Marylin; Orejuela, Leonora; Fuya, Patricia; Carrillo, Pilar; Hernandez, Jorge; Parra, Edgar; Keng, Colette; Small, Melissa; Olano, Juan P; Bouyer, Donald; Castaneda, Elizabeth; Walker, David; Valbuena, Gustavo

    2007-07-01

    We investigated 2 fatal cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever that occurred in 2003 and 2004 near the same locality in Colombia where the disease was first reported in the 1930s. A retrospective serosurvey of febrile patients showed that > 21% of the serum samples had antibodies aaainst spotted fever group rickettsiae.

  6. Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Panama.

    PubMed

    Estripeaut, Dora; Aramburú, María Gabriela; Sáez-Llorens, Xavier; Thompson, Herbert A; Dasch, Gregory A; Paddock, Christopher D; Zaki, Sherif; Eremeeva, Marina E

    2007-11-01

    We describe a fatal pediatric case of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Panama, the first, to our knowledge, since the 1950s. Diagnosis was established by immunohistochemistry, PCR, and isolation of Rickettsia rickettsii from postmortem tissues. Molecular typing demonstrated strong relatedness of the isolate to strains of R. rickettsii from Central and South America.

  7. Southwest Washington, Urban Renewal Area, Bounded by Independence Avenue, Washington ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Southwest Washington, Urban Renewal Area, Bounded by Independence Avenue, Washington Avenue, South Capitol Street, Canal Street, P Street, Maine Avenue & Washington Channel, Fourteenth Street, D Street, & Twelfth Street, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  8. Managing Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Minniear, Timothy D; Buckingham, Steven C

    2009-11-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is caused by the tick-borne bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii. Symptoms range from moderate illness to severe illness, including cardiovascular compromise, coma and death. The disease is prevalent in most of the USA, especially during warmer months. The trademark presentation is fever and rash with a history of tick bite, although tick exposure is unappreciated in over a third of cases. Other signature symptoms include headache and abdominal pain. The antibiotic therapy of choice for R. rickettsii infection is doxycycline. Preventive measures for Rocky Mountain spotted fever and other tick-borne diseases include: wearing long-sleeved, light colored clothing; checking for tick attachment and removing attached ticks promptly; applying topical insect repellent; and treating clothing with permethrin.

  9. 27 CFR 9.43 - Rocky Knob.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ....S.G.S. maps. The maps are entitled: “Willis Quadrangle Virginia” 7.5 minute series and “Woolwine Quadrangle Virginia” 7.5 minute series. (c) Boundaries. The Rocky Knob viticultural area is located in Floyd... Route No. 726 at the southern boundary of the Rocky Knob Recreation Area. (5) Then follow the...

  10. 27 CFR 9.43 - Rocky Knob.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rocky Knob. 9.43 Section 9.43 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.43 Rocky Knob....

  11. 27 CFR 9.43 - Rocky Knob.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rocky Knob. 9.43 Section 9.43 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.43 Rocky Knob....

  12. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in children.

    PubMed

    Woods, Charles R

    2013-04-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is typically undifferentiated from many other infections in the first few days of illness. Treatment should not be delayed pending confirmation of infection when Rocky Mountain spotted fever is suspected. Doxycycline is the drug of choice even for infants and children less than 8 years old.

  13. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever: Statistics and Epidemiology

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment Statistics and Epidemiology ...

  14. Closing Rocky Flats by 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Tuor, N. R.; Schubert, A. L.

    2002-02-26

    Safely accelerating the closure of Rocky Flats to 2006 is a goal shared by many: the State of Colorado, the communities surrounding the site, the U.S. Congress, the Department of Energy, Kaiser-Hill and its team of subcontractors, the site's employees, and taxpayers across the country. On June 30, 2000, Kaiser-Hill (KH) submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE), KH's plan to achieve closure of Rocky Flats by December 15, 2006, for a remaining cost of $3.96 billion (February 1, 2000, to December 15, 2006). The Closure Project Baseline (CPB) is the detailed project plan for accomplishing this ambitious closure goal. This paper will provide a status report on the progress being made toward the closure goal. This paper will: provide a summary of the closure contract completion criteria; give the current cost and schedule variance of the project and the status of key activities; detail important accomplishments of the past year; and discuss the challenges ahead.

  15. Rockies

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... orbit 7447) include portions of southern Wyoming, central Colorado, and western Nebraska. The top view is from the instrument's ... 422 kilometers x 213 kilometers. The South Platte River enters just to the right of center at the top of the images. It winds its ...

  16. Welding IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding IV, a competency-based course in advanced arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with proficiency in: (1) single vee groove welding using code specifications established by the American Welding Society…

  17. Contributions to the geology of Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, G.O.; Willis, Bailey

    1903-01-01

    Central Washington includes a part of two great topographic provinces; the great plain of the Columbia and the Cascade Range. The former, in its position and general desert-like character, suggests at once a resemblance to the Great Basin of Utah and Nevada; and the vastness of the desert plain is emphasized by the snowy peaks of the Cascades along its western border. These provinces are not to be regarded as unconnected in their geologic history, however great the contrast in their general features. The intermediate zone between the great plain on the east and the mountain range on the west is a strategic point for the investigation of the geologic structure and history and the interpretation of the present topography of both provinces. On the extensive basalt-covered plain monotony wearies the traveler, while on the rocky peaks of the Cascades the complexity taxes the powers of the observer. 

  18. Fatal Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Hattwick, M A; Retailliau, H; O'Brien, R J; Slutzker, M; Fontaine, R E; Hanson, B

    1978-09-29

    Forty-four fatal cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) occurring in 1974 were compared with 50 nonfatal cases of similar age, sex, date of onset, and place of occurrence. Diagnosis and initiation of treatment in fatal cases were substantially delayed compared with nonfatal cases. Several reasons for this delay were identified: (1) the rash appeared later in the course of illness in the fatal cases, often not until the patient was terminal, (2) a history of tick bite was less often obtained during life or obtained late in the clinical course in fatal cases, and (3) initial nonspecific symptoms or unexpected symptoms led to an initial diagnosis of more common diseases. Only two fatal cases were treated with either tetracycline or chloramphenicol before the sixth day of illness. Presumptive diagnosis of RMSF and initiation of tetracycline therapy before onset of rash may be necessary to reduce mortality.

  19. Booker T. Washington Rediscovered

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bieze, Michael Scott, Ed.; Gasman, Marybeth, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Booker T. Washington, a founding father of African American education in the United States, has long been studied, revered, and reviled by scholars and students. Born into slavery, freed and raised in the Reconstruction South, and active in educational reform through the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Washington sought to use…

  20. Model Atmospheres and Transit Spectra for Hot Rocky Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupu, Roxana

    We propose to build a versatile set of self-consistent atmospheric models for hot rocky exoplanets and use them to predict their transit and eclipse spectra. Hot rocky exoplanets will form the majority of small planets in close-in orbits to be discovered by the TESS and Kepler K2 missions, and offer the best opportunity for characterization with current and future instruments. We will use fully non-grey radiative-convective atmospheric structure codes with cloud formation and vertical mixing, combined with a self-consistent treatment of gas chemistry above the magma ocean. Being in equilibrium with the surface, the vaporized rock material can be a good tracer of the bulk composition of the planet. We will derive the atmospheric structure and escape rates considering both volatile-free and volatile bearing compositions, which reflect the diversity of hot rocky planet atmospheres. Our models will inform follow- up observations with JWST and ground-based instruments, aid the interpretation of transit and eclipse spectra, and provide a better understanding of volatile loss in these atmospheres. Such results will help refine our picture of rocky planet formation and evolution. Planets in ultra-short period (USP) orbits are a special class of hot rocky exoplanets. As shown by Kepler, these planets are generally smaller than 2 Earth radii, suggesting that they are likely to be rocky and could have lost their volatiles through photo-evaporation. Being close to their host stars, these planets are ultra-hot, with estimated temperatures of 1000-3000 K. A number of USP planets have been already discovered (e.g. Kepler-78 b, CoRoT-7 b, Kepler-10 b), and this number is expected to grow by confirming additional planet candidates. The characterization of planets on ultra-short orbits is advantageous due to the larger number of observable transits, and the larger transit signal in the case of an evaporating atmosphere. Much advance has been made in understanding and characterizing

  1. IVS Organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    International VLBI Service (IVS) is an international collaboration of organizations which operate or support Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) components. The goals are: To provide a service to support geodetic, geophysical and astrometric research and operational activities. To promote research and development activities in all aspects of the geodetic and astrometric VLBI technique. To interact with the community of users of VLBI products and to integrate VLBI into a global Earth observing system.

  2. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety for the Whole Family Evaluate Your Child's Lyme Disease Risk Lyme Disease Lyme Disease Hey! A Tick Bit Me! Bug Bites and Stings Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Lyme Disease Contact Us Print Resources Send to a friend ...

  3. Kepler Discovers Its First Rocky Planet

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Kepler mission confirmed the discovery of its first rocky planet, named Kepler-10b. Measuring 1.4 times the size of Earth, it is the smallest planet ever discovered outside our solar system....

  4. Northern Rockies Ecoregion: Chapter 7 in Status and trends of land change in the Western United States--1973 to 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Janis L.

    2012-01-01

    The Northern Rockies Ecoregion (Omernik, 1987; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1997) covers approximately 162,746 km2 (63,200 mi2), primarily in Idaho but also including areas in western Montana and northeastern Washington (fig. 1). Canada forms the northern border of the ecoregion. To the west it is bordered by the Columbia Plateau and Blue Mountains Ecoregions, to the south by the Snake River Basin Ecoregion, and to the east by the Canadian Rockies, Middle Rockies, Northwestern Great Plains, and Northwestern Glaciated Plains Ecoregions; also to the east, the Northern Rockies Ecoregion interfingers with the Montana Valley and Foothill Prairies Ecoregion, each enclosing some isolated areas of the other (fig. 1). The ecoregion is composed of a series of high, rugged mountain ranges, mostly oriented northwest-southeast, with intermontane valleys between them (fig. 2). The entire ecoregion was glaciated during the Pleistocene (1,800,000 to 11,400 years ago), and today numerous large lakes occupy basins formed by glacial action (Omernik, 1987; Habeck and Mutch, 1973). Streams draining these mountain ranges provide a water source for many western cities and towns (fig. 3). The Continental Divide, located at the highest elevations along the northern Rocky Mountains, separates rivers that flow westward into the Columbia River watershed from those that flow eastward into the Missouri River watershed.

  5. Rocky Flats beryllium health surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Stange, A.W.; Furman, F.J.; Hilmas, D.E.

    1996-10-01

    The Rocky Flats Beryllium Health Surveillance Program (BHSP), initiated in June 1991, was designed to provide medical surveillance for current and former employees exposed to beryllium. The BHSP identifies individuals who have developed beryllium sensitivity using the beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT). A detailed medical evaluation to determine the prevalence of chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is offered to individuals identified as beryllium sensitized or to those who have chest X-ray changes suggestive of CBD. The BHSP has identified 27 cases of CBD and another 74 cases of beryllium sensitization out of 4268 individuals tested. The distribution of BeLPT values for normal, sensitized, and CBD-identified individuals is described. Based on the information collected during the first 3 1/3 years of the BHSP, the BeLPT is the most effective means for the early identification of beryllium-sensitized individuals and to identify individuals who may have CBD. The need for BeLPT retesting is demonstrated through the identification of beryllium sensitization in individuals who previously tested normal. Posterior/anterior chest X-rays were not effective in the identification of CBD. 12 refs., 8 tabs.

  6. Geothermal Technologies Program: Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2005-02-01

    This fact sheets provides a summary of geothermal potential, issues, and current development in Washington State. This fact sheet was developed as part of DOE's GeoPowering the West initiative, part of the Geothermal Technologies Program.

  7. Polarimetry for rocky exoplanet characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stam, Daphne; Karalidi, Theodora

    2013-04-01

    Since the first discovery of a planet around a solar-type star by Mayor & Queloz in 1995, several hundreds of exoplanets have been detected. Indeed, it appears that practically all Sun-like stars have planets. Inevitable, Earth-sized, rocky planets that orbit in their star's habitable zone, where temperatures could be just right to allow liquid water on a planet's surface, will be found. Liquid water is generally considered to be essential for the existence of life. Whether liquid water actually exists on a planet depends strongly on the atmosphere's thickness and characteristics, such as the surface pressure and composition. Famous examples in the Solar System are Venus and the Earth, with similar sizes, inner compositions and orbital radii, but wildly different surface conditions. The characterization of the atmospheres and/or surfaces of exoplanets will allow a comparison with Solar System planets and it will open up a treasure trove of knowledge about the formation and evolution of planetary atmospheres and surfaces, thanks to the vast range of orbital distances, planet sizes and ages that can be studied. Characterization will also allow studying conditions for life and ultimately the existence of life around other stars. Information about the upper atmospheres of close-in, hot, giant exoplanets, can be derived from measurements of the combined flux of the star and the planet, in particular when the planet is transiting its star. This method has also provided traces of an atmosphere around a large solid planet orbiting red dwarf star GJ1214. Detection and characterization of the atmospheres and/or surfaces of small, solid, Earth-like exoplanets in the habitable zones of Sun-like stars, is virtually impossible with transit observations. For these exiting planets, polarimetry appears to be a strong tool. Polarimetry helps the detection of exoplanets, because direct starlight is usually unpolarized, while starlight that has been reflected by a planet is usually

  8. The fifth International Geological Congress, Washington, 1891

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, C.M.

    2006-01-01

    The 5th International Geological Congress (IGC), the initial meeting in North America, was the first of the three IGCs that have been held in the United States of America (USA). Of the 538 registrants alive when the 5th IGC convened in Washington, 251 persons, representing fifteen countries, actually attended the meeting. These participants included 173 people from the USA, of whom forty-two represented the US Geological Survey (USGS). Fourteen of the US State geological surveys sent representatives to Washington. Eight participants came from other countries in the Western Hemisphere - Canada (3), Chile (1), Mexico (3), and Peru (1). The sixty-six European geologists and naturalists at the 5th IGC represented Austro-Hungary (3), Belgium (3), Britain (12), France (7), Germany (23), Norway (1), Romania (3), Russia (8), Sweden (4), and Switzerland (2). The USGS and the Columbian College (now the George Washington University) acted as the principal hosts. The American Association for the Advancement of Science and then the Geological Society of America (GSA) met in the Capital immediately before the Congress convened (26 August-1 September 1891). The 5th IGC's formal discussions treated the genetic classification of Pleistocene rocks, the chronological correlation of clastic rocks, and the international standardization of colors, symbols, and names used on geologic maps. The third of those topics continued key debates at the 1st through 4th IGCs. The GSA, the Korean Embassy, the Smithsonian Institution's US National Museum, the USGS, and one of the two Secretaries-General hosted evening receptions. Field excursions examined Paleozoic exposures in New York (18-25 August), Cretaceous-Pleistocene localities along the Potomac River south of Washington (30 August), and classic Precambrian-Pleistocene sequences and structures in the Great Plains, Yellowstone, Rocky Mountains, and Great Basin (2-26 September), with optional trips to the Grand Canyon (19-28 September) and Lake

  9. Folding above faults, Rocky Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, D.A. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Asymmetric folds formed above basement faults can be observed throughout the Rocky Mountains. Several previous interpretations of the folding process made the implicit assumption that one or both fold hinges migrated or rolled'' through the steep forelimb of the fold as the structure evolved (rolling hinge model). Results of mapping in the Bighorn and Seminoe Mountains, WY, and Sangre de Cristo Range, CO, do not support this hypothesis. An alternative interpretation is presented in which fold hinges remained fixed in position during folding (fixed hinge model). Mapped folds share common characteristics: (1) axial traces of the folds intersect faults at or near the basement/cover interface, and diverge from faults upsection; (2) fold hinges are narrow and interlimb angles cluster around 80--100[degree] regardless of fold location; (3) fold shape is typically angular, despite published cross sections that show concentric folds; and, (4) beds within the folds show thickening and/or thinning, most commonly adjacent to fold hinges. The rolling hinge model requires that rocks in the fold forelimbs bend through narrow fold hinges as deformation progressed. Examination of massive, competent rock units such as the Ord. Bighorn Dolomite, Miss. Madison Limestone, and, Penn. Tensleep Sandstone reveals no evidence of the extensive internal deformation that would be expected if hinges rolled through rocks of the forelimb. The hinges of some folds (e.g. Golf Creek anticline, Bighorn Mountains) are offset by secondary faults, effectively preventing the passage of rocks from backlimb to forelimb. The fixed hinge model proposes that the fold hinges were defined early in fold evolution, and beds were progressively rotated and steepened as the structure grew.

  10. Mars rover mechanisms designed for Rocky 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivellini, Tommaso P.

    1993-01-01

    A Mars rover prototype vehicle named Rocky 4 was designed and built at JPL during the fall of 1991 and spring 1992. This vehicle is the fourth in a series of rovers designed to test vehicle mobility and navigation software. Rocky 4 was the first attempt to design a vehicle with 'flight like' mass and functionality. It was consequently necessary to develop highly efficient mechanisms and structures to meet the vehicles very tight mass limit of 3 Kg for the entire mobility system (7 Kg for the full system). This paper will discuss the key mechanisms developed for the rover's innovative drive and suspension system. These are the wheel drive and strut assembly, the rocker-bogie suspension mechanism and the differential pivot. The end-to-end design, analysis, fabrication and testing of these components will also be discussed as will their performance during field testing. The lessons learned from Rocky 4 are already proving invaluable for the design of Rocky 6. Rocky 6 is currently being designed to fly on NASA's MESUR mission to Mars scheduled to launch in 1996.

  11. Study of the rocky Intertidal communities of central and northern California: Years 3 and 4. Volume 1 of 5

    SciTech Connect

    Hardin, D.

    1990-08-01

    The study objectives are to describe seasonal and successional variation in rocky Intertidal community structure; determine the response of rocky Intertidal communities to natural and human-induced disturbances and correlate these responses with successional, seasonal, and latitudinal variation; and correlate life history information and oil toxicity data with data from this and other relevant studies. The Year III and IV report is for the third (1987) and fourth (1988) years of a five-year field experimental study investigating two biological assemblages, the Mytilus assemblage and the Endocladia/Mastocarpus papillatus assemblage, that are being studied at six sites along the California coast. Experimental treatments include clearing three plots in spring 1985 and three plots in fall 1985. Data from the program will be correlated with oil toxicity data and other studies to provide indications of the long term effects of an oil spill on rocky Intertidal communities. The report is volume 1 of a 5 volume set.

  12. Study of the rocky Intertidal communities of central and northern California: Years 3 and 4. Volume 5 of 5

    SciTech Connect

    Hardin, D.

    1990-08-01

    The study objectives are to describe seasonal and successional variation in rocky Intertidal community structure; determine the response of rocky Intertidal communities to natural and human-induced disturbances and correlate these responses with successional, seasonal, and latitudinal variation; and correlate life history information and oil toxicity data with data from this and other relevant studies. The Year III and IV report is for the third (1987) and fourth (1988) years of a five-year field experimental study investigating two biological assemblages, the Mytilus assemblage and the Endocladia/Mastocarpus papillatus assemblage, that are being studied at six sites along the California coast. Experimental treatments include clearing three plots in spring 1985 and three plots in fall 1985. Data from the program will be correlated with oil toxicity data and other studies to provide indications of the long term effects of an oil spill on rocky Intertidal communities. The report is volume 5 of a 5 volume set.

  13. Study of the rocky Intertidal communities of central and northern California: Years 3 and 4. Volume 3 of 5

    SciTech Connect

    Hardin, D.

    1990-08-01

    The study objectives are to describe seasonal and successional variation in rocky Intertidal community structure; determine the response of rocky Intertidal communities to natural and human-induced disturbances and correlate these responses with successional, seasonal, and latitudinal variation; and correlate life history information and oil toxicity data with data from this and other relevant studies. The Year III and IV report is for the third (1987) and fourth (1988) years of a five-year field experimental study investigating two biological assemblages, the Mytilus assemblage and the Endocladia/Mastocarpus papillatus assemblage, that are being studied at six sites along the California coast. Experimental treatments include clearing three plots in spring 1985 and three plots in fall 1985. Data from the program will be correlated with oil toxicity data and other studies to provide indications of the long term effects of an oil spill on rocky Intertidal communities. The report is volume 3 of a 5 volume set.

  14. Study of the rocky Intertidal communities of central and northern California: Years 3 and 4. Volume 2 of 5

    SciTech Connect

    Hardin, D.

    1990-08-01

    The study objectives are to describe seasonal and successional variation in rocky Intertidal community structure; determine the response of rocky Intertidal communities to natural and human-induced disturbances and correlate these responses with successional, seasonal, and latitudinal variation; and correlate life history information and oil toxicity data with data from this and other relevant studies. The Year III and IV report is for the third (1987) and fourth (1988) years of a five-year field experimental study investigating two biological assemblages, the Mytilus assemblage and the Endocladia/Mastocarpus papillatus assemblage, that are being studied at six sites along the California coast. Experimental treatments include clearing three plots in spring 1985 and three plots in fall 1985. Data from the program will be correlated with oil toxicity data and other studies to provide indications of the long term effects of an oil spill on rocky Intertidal communities. The report is volume 2 of a 5 volume set.

  15. Study of the rocky Intertidal communities of central and northern California: Years 3 and 4. Volume 4 of 5

    SciTech Connect

    Hardin, D.

    1990-08-01

    The study objectives are to describe seasonal and successional variation in rocky Intertidal community structure; determine the response of rocky Intertidal communities to natural and human-induced disturbances and correlate these responses with successional, seasonal, and latitudinal variation; and correlate life history information and oil toxicity data with data from this and other relevant studies. The Year III and IV report is for the third (1987) and fourth (1988) years of a five-year field experimental study investigating two biological assemblages, the Mytilus assemblage and the Endocladia/Mastocarpus papillatus assemblage, that are being studied at six sites along the California coast. Experimental treatments include clearing three plots in spring 1985 and three plots in fall 1985. Data from the program will be correlated with oil toxicity data and other studies to provide indications of the long term effects of an oil spill on rocky Intertidal communities. The report is volume 4 of a 5 volume set.

  16. A case of Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Rubel, Barry S

    2007-01-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a serious, generalized infection that is spread to humans through the bite of infected ticks. It can be lethal but it is curable. The disease gets its name from the Rocky Mountain region where it was first identified in 1896. The fever is caused by the bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii and is maintained in nature in a complex life cycle involving ticks and mammals. Humans are considered to be accidental hosts and are not involved in the natural transmission cycle of this pathogen. The author examined a 47-year-old woman during a periodic recall appointment. The patient had no dental problems other than the need for routine prophylaxis but mentioned a recent problem with swelling of her extremities with an accompanying rash and general malaise and soreness in her neck region. Tests were conducted and a diagnosis of Rocky Mountain spotted fever was made.

  17. Asteroids IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Patrick; DeMeo, Francesca E.; Bottke, William F.

    . Asteroids, like planets, are driven by a great variety of both dynamical and physical mechanisms. In fact, images sent back by space missions show a collection of small worlds whose characteristics seem designed to overthrow our preconceived notions. Given their wide range of sizes and surface compositions, it is clear that many formed in very different places and at different times within the solar nebula. These characteristics make them an exciting challenge for researchers who crave complex problems. The return of samples from these bodies may ultimately be needed to provide us with solutions. In the book Asteroids IV, the editors and authors have taken major strides in the long journey toward a much deeper understanding of our fascinating planetary ancestors. This book reviews major advances in 43 chapters that have been written and reviewed by a team of more than 200 international authorities in asteroids. It is aimed to be as comprehensive as possible while also remaining accessible to students and researchers who are interested in learning about these small but nonetheless important worlds. We hope this volume will serve as a leading reference on the topic of asteroids for the decade to come. We are deeply indebted to the many authors and referees for their tremendous efforts in helping us create Asteroids IV. We also thank the members of the Asteroids IV scientific organizing committee for helping us shape the structure and content of the book. The conference associated with the book, "Asteroids Comets Meteors 2014" held June 30-July 4, 2014, in Helsinki, Finland, did an outstanding job of demonstrating how much progress we have made in the field over the last decade. We are extremely grateful to our host Karri Muinonnen and his team. The editors are also grateful to the Asteroids IV production staff, namely Renée Dotson and her colleagues at the Lunar and Planetary Institute, for their efforts, their invaluable assistance, and their enthusiasm; they made life as

  18. Consequences of early snowmelt in Rocky Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-01-01

    Snow melted significantly earlier in the Rocky Mountains in 2012 than in previous years, with serious consequences for plants and animals, scientists reported at the AGU Fall Meeting. David Inouye of the University of Maryland, College Park, and the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory said that "the timing of winter's end is changing." He has been observing snowmelt dates and flowering of plants at a site at 2900 meters altitude. This year's snowmelt occurred 23 April, whereas the previous year, snow melted 19 June, he reported.

  19. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever in Argentina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We describe the first molecular confirmation of Rickettsia rickettsii, the cause of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), from a tick vector, Amblyomma cajennense, and from a cluster of fatal spotted fever cases in Argentina. Questing A. cajennense ticks were collected at or near sites of presumed or...

  20. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Argentina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cases of epidemic typhus have been documented in Argentina since 1919; however, no confirmed reports of spotted fever rickettsiosis were described in this country until 1999. We describe the first molecular confirmation of Rickettsia rickettsii, the etiologic agent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (R...

  1. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in dogs, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Labruna, Marcelo B; Kamakura, Orson; Moraes-Filho, Jonas; Horta, Mauricio C; Pacheco, Richard C

    2009-03-01

    Clinical illness caused by Rickettsia rickettsii in dogs has been reported solely in the United States. We report 2 natural clinical cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in dogs in Brazil. Each case was confirmed by seroconversion and molecular analysis and resolved after doxycycline therapy.

  2. Late glacial aridity in southern Rocky Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, O.K.; Pitblado, B.L.

    1995-09-01

    While the slopes of the present-day Colorado Rocky Mountains are characterized by large stands of subalpine and montane conifers, the Rockies of the late glacial looked dramatically different. Specifically, pollen records suggest that during the late glacial, Artemisia and Gramineae predominated throughout the mountains of Colorado. At some point between 11,000 and 10,000 B.P., however, both Artemisia and grasses underwent a dramatic decline, which can be identified in virtually every pollen diagram produced for Colorado mountain sites, including Como Lake (Sangre de Cristo Mountains), Copley Lake and Splains; Gulch (near Crested Butte), Molas Lake (San Juan Mountains), and Redrock Lake (Boulder County). Moreover, the same pattern seems to hold for pollen spectra derived for areas adjacent to Colorado, including at sites in the Chuska Mountains of New Mexico and in eastern Wyoming. The implications of this consistent finding are compelling. The closest modem analogues to the Artemisia- and Gramineae-dominated late-glacial Colorado Rockies are found in the relatively arid northern Great Basin, which suggests that annual precipitation was much lower in the late-glacial southern Rocky Mountains than it was throughout the Holocene.

  3. Field Trip to a Rocky Shore.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maine Univ., Orono. Cooperative Extension Service.

    Field trip activities designed for use on Maine's coast are provided, with brief definitions of the major physical zones to be found in this area. An introduction to the study of zonation of plants and animals living on the rocky shore is presented along with a list of the materials needed and the procedures to be followed when making a study of…

  4. Geology highlights for Ride the Rockies 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slate, J.L.; Hess, Amber; Van Sistine, D.R.

    2010-01-01

    The author provides a brief description of the geology along the route for each day of the ride, from June 13 through June 19, 2010. Ride the Rockies begins in Grand Junction, with stops in Delta, Ouray, Durango, Pagosa Springs, Alamosa, and ends in Salida, Colorado. A small, generalized geologic map also is shown.

  5. Geology Highlights for Ride the Rockies 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slate, Janet

    2009-01-01

    The author provides a brief description of the geology along the route for each day of the ride, from June 14 through June 19, 2009. Ride the Rockies begins and ends in Glenwood Springs, with stops in Hotchkiss, Gunnison, Salida, Leadville, Aspen, and back to Glenwood Springs, Colorado. A small, generalized geologic map also is shown.

  6. Geology highlights, Ride the Rockies 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slate, Janet L.

    2011-01-01

    The author provides a brief description of the geology along the route for each day of the ride, from June 12 through June 17, 2011. Ride the Rockies begins in Crested Butte, Colorado, with stops in Buena Vista, Edwards, Steamboat Springs, Granby, and Georgetown. A small, generalized geologic map also is shown.

  7. Transportation Fuels Markets, Midwest and Rocky Mountain

    EIA Publications

    2017-01-01

    A new study commissioned by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), finds that changes in North American energy markets over the past decade have strengthened the supply of transportation fuels including motor gasoline, distillates, and jet fuel in the Midwest and Rocky Mountain regions.

  8. Washington's Bold Reformer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schachter, Ron

    2008-01-01

    For more than a year, the debate, press coverage, and buzz in Washington, D.C., have swirled over whether someone so different--and so relatively inexperienced--can deliver sweeping change. And presidential hopeful Barack Obama hasn't been the only one receiving that kind of unrelenting scrutiny. This article describes Michelle Rhee who became…

  9. Indians of Washington State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Office of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Olympia.

    Maps, photographs, and illustrations are included in this introductory history of Indians in Washington state. The tribal groups of the area are classified by geographic and cultural region as Coastal, Puget Sound, and Plateau tribes, and the majority of the resource booklet provides information about the history and culture of each group.…

  10. Washington: Hanford Nuclear Reservation

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... River branches off to the right. According to Idaho's National Interagency Fire Center, the US has been experiencing the worst fire ... NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Terra spacecraft is managed ...

  11. Working in Washington.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silberman, Harry F.

    1980-01-01

    The natural conflict in a governmental system of checks and balances has a ripple effect, beginning with the low morale in Washington offices and ending with the recipients of program funds. A new Department of Education will not alter the problem. (Author/IRT)

  12. Libby South Fire, Washington

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On July 9, 2001, a fire burned about 15 miles south of Twisp, Washington, that officials believe was caused by human error. NASA's Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer on the Terra satellite observed the fire, indicated with a red dot in this image, on July 10, after the fire had already consumed about 1,240 acres. On July 10, another fire-called the Thirty Mile Fire-trapped 21 firefighters and 2 civilians in a narrow canyon in the Chewuch River Valley, north of Winthrop, WA. (That fire did not erupt until later in the day after this image was acquired and is therefore not visible.) Tragically, four firefighters were killed and six people were injured, including the two civilians. Rolling debris, rugged and steep terrain, and limited access are impeding efforts to contain the now 8,200-acre fire, which according to current fire incident reports, is completely uncontained. Nearly all the areas in the full-size image, including Washington (center), Idaho (right), Oregon (bottom) are in a state of severe drought, which means the region could be in for another devastating fire season. Another fire is visible in Idaho in the full-size image just east of where Idaho borders with Washington and Oregon. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team

  13. Rocky Mountain spotted fever: a clinician's dilemma.

    PubMed

    Masters, Edwin J; Olson, Gary S; Weiner, Scott J; Paddock, Christopher D

    2003-04-14

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is still the most lethal tick-vectored illness in the United States. We examine the dilemmas facing the clinician who is evaluating the patient with possible Rocky Mountain spotted fever, with particular attention to the following 8 pitfalls in diagnosis and treatment: (1) waiting for a petechial rash to develop before diagnosis; (2) misdiagnosing as gastroenteritis; (3) discounting a diagnosis when there is no history of a tick bite; (4) using an inappropriate geographic exclusion; (5) using an inappropriate seasonal exclusion; (6) failing to treat on clinical suspicion; (7) failing to elicit an appropriate history; and (8) failing to treat with doxycycline. Early diagnosis and proper treatment save lives.

  14. Microwave solidification development for Rocky Flats waste

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, D.; Erle, R.; Eschen, V.

    1994-04-01

    The Microwave Engineering Team at the Rocky Flats Plant has developed a production-scale system for the treatment of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes using microwave energy. The system produces a vitreous final form which meets the acceptance criteria for shipment and disposal. The technology also has potential for application on various other waste streams from the public and private sectors. Technology transfer opportunities are being identified and pursued for commercialization of the microwave solidification technology.

  15. Status Update: Closing Rocky Flats by 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Tuor, N.; Schubert, A.

    2003-02-25

    Safely closing Rocky Flats by December 2006 is a goal shared by many: the State of Colorado, the communities surrounding the site, the U.S. Congress, the Department of Energy (DOE), Kaiser-Hill and its team of subcontractors, the site's employees and taxpayers across the country. This paper will: provide a status of the Closure Project to date; describe important accomplishments of the past year; describe some of the closure-enhancing technologies enabling acceleration; and discuss the remaining challenges ahead.

  16. THERMODYNAMIC LIMITS ON MAGNETODYNAMOS IN ROCKY EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Gaidos, Eric; Conrad, Clinton P.; Manga, Michael; Hernlund, John

    2010-08-01

    To ascertain whether magnetic dynamos operate in rocky exoplanets more massive or hotter than the Earth, we developed a parametric model of a differentiated rocky planet and its thermal evolution. Our model reproduces the established properties of Earth's interior and magnetic field at the present time. When applied to Venus, assuming that planet lacks plate tectonics and has a dehydrated mantle with an elevated viscosity, the model shows that the dynamo shuts down or never operated. Our model predicts that at a fixed planet mass, dynamo history is sensitive to core size, but not to the initial inventory of long-lived, heat-producing radionuclides. It predicts that rocky planets larger than 2.5 Earth masses will not develop inner cores because the temperature-pressure slope of the iron solidus becomes flatter than that of the core adiabat. Instead, iron 'snow' will condense near or at the top of these cores, and the net transfer of latent heat upward will suppress convection and a dynamo. More massive planets can have anemic dynamos due to core cooling, but only if they have mobile lids (plate tectonics). The lifetime of these dynamos is shorter with increasing planet mass but longer with higher surface temperature. Massive Venus-like planets with stagnant lids and more viscous mantles will lack dynamos altogether. We identify two alternative sources of magnetic fields on rocky planets: eddy currents induced in the hot or molten upper layers of planets on very short-period orbits, and dynamos in the ionic conducting layers of 'ocean' planets with {approx}10% mass in an upper mantle of water (ice).

  17. Rocky Mountain futures: An ecological perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baron, Jill S.

    2002-01-01

    The United Nations has proclaimed 2002 as the International Year of Mountains to increase international awareness of the global importance of mountain ecosystems. The case-based multidisciplinary approach of this book constitutes an important new model for understanding the implications of land-use practices and economic activity on mountains, and will serve a vital role in improving decisionmaking both in the Rocky Mountains and in other parts of the world that face similar challenges.

  18. Thermodynamic Limits on Magnetodynamos in Rocky Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidos, Eric; Conrad, Clinton P.; Manga, Michael; Hernlund, John

    2010-08-01

    To ascertain whether magnetic dynamos operate in rocky exoplanets more massive or hotter than the Earth, we developed a parametric model of a differentiated rocky planet and its thermal evolution. Our model reproduces the established properties of Earth's interior and magnetic field at the present time. When applied to Venus, assuming that planet lacks plate tectonics and has a dehydrated mantle with an elevated viscosity, the model shows that the dynamo shuts down or never operated. Our model predicts that at a fixed planet mass, dynamo history is sensitive to core size, but not to the initial inventory of long-lived, heat-producing radionuclides. It predicts that rocky planets larger than 2.5 Earth masses will not develop inner cores because the temperature-pressure slope of the iron solidus becomes flatter than that of the core adiabat. Instead, iron "snow" will condense near or at the top of these cores, and the net transfer of latent heat upward will suppress convection and a dynamo. More massive planets can have anemic dynamos due to core cooling, but only if they have mobile lids (plate tectonics). The lifetime of these dynamos is shorter with increasing planet mass but longer with higher surface temperature. Massive Venus-like planets with stagnant lids and more viscous mantles will lack dynamos altogether. We identify two alternative sources of magnetic fields on rocky planets: eddy currents induced in the hot or molten upper layers of planets on very short-period orbits, and dynamos in the ionic conducting layers of "ocean" planets with ~10% mass in an upper mantle of water (ice).

  19. Strain monitoring averts line failure in Rockies

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.; Bukovansky, M.

    1987-08-10

    The case history of a landslide in the U.S. Rocky Mountains shows that the potential for pipeline monitoring in geologically sensitive areas, those subject to landslides and subsidence, for example. A properly installed monitoring system monitored by the pipeline operator, Western Gas Supply Co. (West Gas), Denver, provided an early warning of increasing line strains. The problem was complicated by rugged topography which is described here. Stability analysis was the key technique utilized in the process.

  20. Atmospheric deposition maps for the Rocky Mountains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nanus, L.; Campbell, D.H.; Ingersoll, G.P.; Clow, D.W.; Mast, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    Variability in atmospheric deposition across the Rocky Mountains is influenced by elevation, slope, aspect, and precipitation amount and by regional and local sources of air pollution. To improve estimates of deposition in mountainous regions, maps of average annual atmospheric deposition loadings of nitrate, sulfate, and acidity were developed for the Rocky Mountains by using spatial statistics. A parameter-elevation regressions on independent slopes model (PRISM) was incorporated to account for variations in precipitation amount over mountainous regions. Chemical data were obtained from the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network and from annual snowpack surveys conducted by the US Geological Survey and National Park Service, in cooperation with other Federal, State and local agencies. Surface concentration maps were created by ordinary kriging in a geographic information system, using a local trend and mathematical model to estimate the spatial variance. Atmospheric-deposition maps were constructed at 1-km resolution by multiplying surface concentrations from the kriged grid and estimates of precipitation amount from the PRISM model. Maps indicate an increasing spatial trend in concentration and deposition of the modeled constituents, particularly nitrate and sulfate, from north to south throughout the Rocky Mountains and identify hot-spots of atmospheric deposition that result from combined local and regional sources of air pollution. Highest nitrate (2.5-3.0kg/ha N) and sulfate (10.0-12.0kg/ha SO4) deposition is found in northern Colorado.

  1. Technical Safety Appraisal of the Rocky Flats Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Blake P.

    1989-01-01

    This report provides the results of a Technical Safety Appraisal (TSA) of the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) conducted November 14 to 18 and November 28 to December 9, 1988. This appraisal covered the effectiveness and improvements in the RFP safety program across the site, evaluating progress to date against standards of accepted practice. The appraisal included coverage of the timeliness and effectiveness of actions taken in response to the recommendations/concerns in three previous Technical Safety Appraisals (TSAs) of RFP Bldg. 707 conducted in July 1986, Bldgs. 771/774 conducted in October/November 1986, and Bldgs. 776/777 conducted in January/February 1988. Results of this appraisal are given in Section IV for each of 14 technical safety areas at RFP. These results include a discussion, conclusions and any new safety concerns for each technical safety area. Appendix A contains a description of the system for categorizing concerns, and the concerns are tabulated in Appendix B. Appendix C reports on the evaluation of the contractor's actions and the current status of each of the 230 recommendations and concerns contained in the three previous TSA reports.

  2. Symposium 9: Rocky Mountain futures: preserving, utilizing, and sustaining Rocky Mountain ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baron, Jill S.; Seastedt, Timothy; Fagre, Daniel B.; Hicke, Jeffrey A.; Tomback, Diana; Garcia, Elizabeth; Bowen, Zachary H.; Logan, Jesse A.

    2013-01-01

    In 2002 we published Rocky Mountain Futures, an Ecological Perspective (Island Press) to examine the cumulative ecological effects of human activity in the Rocky Mountains. We concluded that multiple local activities concerning land use, hydrologic manipulation, and resource extraction have altered ecosystems, although there were examples where the “tyranny of small decisions” worked in a positive way toward more sustainable coupled human/environment interactions. Superimposed on local change was climate change, atmospheric deposition of nitrogen and other pollutants, regional population growth, and some national management policies such as fire suppression.

  3. Washington v. Glucksberg.

    PubMed

    1997-06-26

    The U.S. Supreme Court upheld Washington's ban against assisted suicide "as applied to competent, terminally ill adults who wish to hasten their deaths by obtaining medication prescribed by their doctors." The Court refused to expand the liberty interest under the Due Process Clause of the U.S. constitution to include a right to commit suicide under it, a right to assisted suicide. The state has prevailing interests in the preservation of human life, the prevention of suicide, the integrity of the medical profession, the protection of vulnerable groups, and avoidance of a slippery slope into euthanasia.

  4. MOUNT WASHINGTON WILDERNESS, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Edward M.; Causey, J. Douglas

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey, Mount Washington Wilderness, Oregon has little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral or fossil fuel resources. Abundant cinder resources occur in the wilderness, but other large volume cinder deposits are available outside the wilderness and closer to markets. Analysis of the geothermal potential of the High Cascades province cannot be made without data on the subsurface thermal and hydrologic regimes which can only be provided by deep drill holes. Several deep holes could be drilled in areas outside the wildernesses of the High Cascades, from which extrapolations of the geothermal potential of the wildernesses could be made.

  5. 76 FR 9350 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Delisting From Rocky Mountain Patient Safety Organization

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-17

    ... Delisting From Rocky Mountain Patient Safety Organization AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice of Delisting. SUMMARY: Rocky Mountain Patient Safety Organization: AHRQ has accepted a notification of voluntary relinquishment from Rocky Mountain Patient Safety Organization,...

  6. Modeling rocky coastline evolution and equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limber, P. W.; Murray, A. B.

    2010-12-01

    Many of the world’s rocky coastlines exhibit planform roughness in the form of alternating headlands and embayments. Along cliffed coasts, it is often assumed that headlands consist of rock that is more resistant to wave attack than in neighboring bays, because of either structural or lithologic variations. Bays would then retreat landward faster than headlands, creating the undulating planform profiles characteristic of a rocky coastal landscape. While the interplay between alongshore rock strength and nearshore wave energy is, in some circumstances, a fundamental control on coastline shape, beach sediment is also important. Laboratory experiments and field observations have shown that beach sediment, in small volumes, can act as an abrasive tool to encourage sea cliff retreat. In large volumes, though, sediment discourages wave attack on the cliff face, acting as a protective barrier. This nonlinearity suggests a means for headland persistence, even without alongshore variations in rock strength: bare-rock headlands could retreat more slowly than, or at the same rate as, neighboring sediment-filled embayments because of alongshore variations in the availability of beach sediment. Accordingly, nearshore sediment dynamics (i.e. sediment production from sea cliff retreat and alongshore sediment transport) could promote the development of autogenic planform geometry. To explore these ideas, we present numerical and analytical modeling of large-scale (> one kilometer) and long-term (millennial-scale) planform rocky coastline evolution, in which sediment is supplied by both sea cliff erosion and coastal rivers and is distributed by alongshore sediment transport. We also compare model predictions with real landscapes. Previously, our modeling exercises focused on a basic rocky coastline configuration where lithologically-homogeneous sea cliffs supplied all beach sediment and maintained a constant alongshore height. Results showed that 1) an equilibrium alongshore

  7. Intelligent Virtual Station (IVS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Intelligent Virtual Station (IVS) is enabling the integration of design, training, and operations capabilities into an intelligent virtual station for the International Space Station (ISS). A viewgraph of the IVS Remote Server is presented.

  8. What's new in Rocky Mountain spotted fever?

    PubMed

    Chen, Luke F; Sexton, Daniel J

    2008-09-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) remains an important illness despite an effective therapy because it is difficult to diagnose and is capable of producing a fatal outcome. The pathogenesis of RMSF remains, in large part, an enigma. However, recent research has helped shed light on this mystery. Importantly, the diagnosis of RMSF must be considered in all febrile patients who have known or possible exposure to ticks, especially if they live in or have traveled to endemic regions during warmer months. Decisions about giving empiric therapy to such patients are difficult and require skill and careful judgement.

  9. Pumped storage job is a rocky challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Setzer, S.W.

    1994-03-07

    Georgia mountain lives up to its rugged name as excavators fight some unexpected ground conditions. When settlers pushed into the remote valleys of far northwestern Georgia, they had no idea just how apt the name given one odd geologic formation would become to a new generation of pioneers. Rocky Mountain`s 700 ft of diagonally upthrusting limestone, shale and sandstone layers have become the main antagonists in a decade-long struggle to place an 848-Mw pumped storage power project in and around the mountain.

  10. Early Learning in Washington State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, 2011

    2011-01-01

    About 80,000 children enter kindergarten in Washington each year, and many lack basic language and behavioral skills--such as knowing letters and colors, following directions, getting along with others, and exhibiting impulse-control. In 2006, based on the recommendation of the Washington Learns Commission, Governor Christine Gregoire created the…

  11. Ovarian Cancer Stage IV

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage IV Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1200x1335 View Download Large: 2400x2670 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage IV Description: Drawing of stage IV shows ...

  12. 29. AERIAL VIEW OF THE ROCKY FLATS PLANT LOOKING SOUTH. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. AERIAL VIEW OF THE ROCKY FLATS PLANT LOOKING SOUTH. IN 1983, THE PERIMETER SECURITY ZONE SURROUNDING THE PLUTONIUM OPERATIONS WAS COMPLETED. IT CONSISTED OF A DOUBLE PERIMETER FENCE, CLOSED CIRCUIT TELEVISIONS, ALARMS, AND AN UNINTERRUPTED POWER SUPPLY (7/29/83). - Rocky Flats Plant, Bounded by Indiana Street & Routes 93, 128 & 72, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  13. 36 CFR 7.7 - Rocky Mountain National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rocky Mountain National Park. 7.7 Section 7.7 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.7 Rocky Mountain National Park....

  14. 36 CFR 7.7 - Rocky Mountain National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Rocky Mountain National Park. 7.7 Section 7.7 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.7 Rocky Mountain National Park....

  15. 74. Rocky Knob Recreation area contact station. In the foreground ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    74. Rocky Knob Recreation area contact station. In the foreground is one of the Rocky Fins which is representative of the area. In the background is the contact station which opened as a gas station in September 1949. Facing northeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  16. 12. VIEW OF THE ROCKY FLATS PLANT LOOKING WEST. AFTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW OF THE ROCKY FLATS PLANT LOOKING WEST. AFTER 38 YEARS, WEAPONS PRODUCTION CEASED IN 1989. IN 1992, THE PLANT MISSION CHANGED FROM WEAPONS PRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL CLEAN UP AND RESTORATION. BY 1995, THE SITE HAD BEGUN TO BE DISMANTLED (6/27/95). - Rocky Flats Plant, Bounded by Indiana Street & Routes 93, 128 & 72, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  17. 36 CFR 7.7 - Rocky Mountain National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rocky Mountain National Park. 7.7 Section 7.7 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.7 Rocky Mountain National Park....

  18. 36 CFR 7.7 - Rocky Mountain National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rocky Mountain National Park. 7.7 Section 7.7 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.7 Rocky Mountain National Park....

  19. 36 CFR 7.7 - Rocky Mountain National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rocky Mountain National Park. 7.7 Section 7.7 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.7 Rocky Mountain National Park....

  20. Risk, media, and stigma at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, J.; Peters, E.; Mertz, C.K.; Slovic, P.

    1998-12-01

    Public responses to nuclear technologies are often strongly negative. Events, such as accidents or evidence of unsafe conditions at nuclear facilities, receive extensive and dramatic coverage by the news media. These news stories affect public perceptions of nuclear risks and the geographic areas near nuclear facilities. One result of these perceptions, avoidance behavior, is a form of technological stigma that leads to losses in property values near nuclear facilities. The social amplification of risk is a conceptual framework that attempts to explain how stigma is created through media transmission of information about hazardous places and public perceptions and decisions. This paper examines stigma associated with the US Department of energy`s Rocky Flats facility, a major production plant in the nation`s nuclear weapons complex, located near Denver, Colorado. This study, based upon newspaper analyses and a survey of Denver area residents, finds that the social amplification theory provides a reasonable framework for understanding the events and public responses that took place in regard to Rocky Flats during a 6-year period, beginning with an FBI raid of the facility in 1989.

  1. Rocky River Watershed Based Curriculum Guide Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Phillip Howard

    Environmental education has the ability to increase cognitive ability, have a positive impact on group work skills, attitudes and self-efficacy, and increase student performance. Due to Federal "No Child Left Behind Act" legislation, increased standardized testing has resulted in the disenfranchisement of students from formal learning. The purpose of this project was to develop a curriculum guide based on the Rocky River watershed so teachers could use the Rocky River watershed as a means to satisfy the objectives of the NC Standard Course of Study and at the same time increase student environmental awareness, classroom engagement, sense of place and scores on the NC Earth/Environmental Final Exams. The project was developed to correlate with the newly revised North Carolina Standard Course of Study for Earth/Environmental Science. The curriculum guide was developed by utilizing the best practices suggested by scientific literature, the NC Standard Course of Study for Earth/Environmental Science, the North American Association for Environmental Education and the National Education Association.

  2. Quantifying the Effects of Temperature on Rocky Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Sabrina; Rogers, Leslie

    2017-01-01

    Rocky planets can be very diverse in structure and composition compared to the Earth. Their temperature profiles could also differ greatly from Earth’s depending on their mass and distance from their host stars. Interior structure models of rocky exoplanets have not yet studied the full range of possible temperature profiles. We develop a simulation, PyPlanet, for a rocky planet with an arbitrary number of layers and equations of state. We apply this model to explore many possible temperature profiles and quantify the thermal effects on the mass-radius relations of rocky planets.This detailed modeling will be crucial for making robust inferences about rocky planet structure and composition from transit and radial velocity observations.

  3. USGS Water Data for Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been investigating the water resources of Washington State since the latter part of the 19th century. During this time, demand for water has evolved from primarily domestic and stock needs to the current complex requirements for public-water supplies, irrigation, power generation, navigation, ecological needs, and numerous other uses. Water-resource data collected by the USGS in Washington have been, or soon will be, published by the USGS Washington Water Science Center (WAWSC) in numerous data and interpretive reports. Most of these reports are available online at the WAWSC web page http://wa.water.usgs.gov/pubs/

  4. Terrestrial ecosystem biomonitoring at Rocky Mountain Arsenal

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, R.; Matiatos, D.; Seery, D.; Hetrick, M.; Griess, J.; Henry, C.; Vaughn, S.; Miesner, J.

    1994-12-31

    In 1987 the Fish and Wildlife Service became actively involved in wildlife population monitoring at the Arsenal because of the discovery of a bald eagle roost on the site. Since that time the Service has conducted or funded a variety of investigations to inventory the wildlife species present at the Arsenal and determine their population status. As time progressed and as a result of the passage of the Rocky Mountain Arsenal Refuge legislation in 1992, the Service developed a biomonitoring strategy to determine the current effects of contaminants on terrestrial wildlife resources at the Arsenal and evaluate the efficacy of remediation to ensure the protection and restoration of wildlife resources at the future refuge. This poster will present an overview of the species being studied, measurement and assessment endpoints, strategies, and methods being used by the Service to assess wildlife health as it relates to contaminant exposure.

  5. Rocky Mountain Basins Produced Water Database

    DOE Data Explorer

    Historical records for produced water data were collected from multiple sources, including Amoco, British Petroleum, Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, United States Geological Survey (USGS), Wyoming Oil and Gas Commission (WOGC), Denver Earth Resources Library (DERL), Bill Barrett Corporation, Stone Energy, and other operators. In addition, 86 new samples were collected during the summers of 2003 and 2004 from the following areas: Waltman-Cave Gulch, Pinedale, Tablerock and Wild Rose. Samples were tested for standard seven component "Stiff analyses", and strontium and oxygen isotopes. 16,035 analyses were winnowed to 8028 unique records for 3276 wells after a data screening process was completed. [Copied from the Readme document in the zipped file available at http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/database.html] Save the Zipped file to your PC. When opened, it will contain four versions of the database: ACCESS, EXCEL, DBF, and CSV formats. The information consists of detailed water analyses from basins in the Rocky Mountain region.

  6. Ecosystem trends in the Colorado Rockies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stohlgren, T. J.; Baron, J. S.; Kittel, T. G. F.; Binkley, D.

    1995-01-01

    Biological conservation is increasingly moving toward an ecosystem and landscape approach, recognizing the prohibitive cost and difficulty of a species-by-species approach (LaRoe 1993). Also, statewide (e.g., Gap Analysis Program) and national surveys (e.g., Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program or EMAP) are conducted at a scale and level of resolution that do not meet the needs of most small land-management units that require detailed information at the ecosystem and landscape scale (Stohlgren 1994). The Colorado Rockies are an ideal outdoor laboratory for ecosystem science and management. The escalating environmental threats described in this article compelled us to design a landscape-scale assessment of the status and trends of biotic resources.

  7. Kepler-454b: Rocky or Not?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    Small exoplanets tend to fall into two categories: the smallest ones are predominantly rocky, like Earth, and the larger ones have a lower-density, more gaseous composition, similar to Neptune. The planet Kepler-454b was initially estimated to fall between these two groups in radius. So what is its composition?Small-Planet DichotomyThough Kepler has detected thousands of planet candidates with radii between 1 and 2.7 Earth radii, we have only obtained precise mass measurements for 12 of these planets.Mass-radius diagram (click for a closer look!) for planets with radius 2.7 Earth radii and well-measured masses. The six smallest planets (and Venus and Earth) fall along a single mass-radius curve of Earth-like composition. The six larger planets (including Kepler-454b) have lower-density compositions. [Gettel et al. 2016]These measurements, however, show an interesting dichotomy: planets with radii less than 1.6 Earth radii have rocky, Earth-like compositions, following a single relation between their mass and radius. Planets between 2 and 2.7 Earth radii, however, have lower densities and dont follow a single mass-radius relation. Their low densities suggest they contain a significant fraction of volatiles, likely in the form of a thick gas envelope of water, hydrogen, and/or helium.The planet Kepler-454b, discovered transiting a Sun-like star, was initially estimated to have a radius of 1.86 Earth radii placing it in between these two categories. A team of astronomers led by Sara Gettel (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) have since followed up on the initial Kepler detection, hoping to determine the planets composition.Low-Density OutcomeGettel and collaborators obtained 63 observations of the host stars radial velocity with the HARPS-N spectrograph on the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, and another 36 observations with the HIRES spectrograph at Keck Observatory. These observations allowed them to do several things:Obtain a more accurate radius estimate

  8. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Paddock, Christopher D; Fernandez, Susana; Echenique, Gustavo A; Sumner, John W; Reeves, Will K; Zaki, Sherif R; Remondegui, Carlos E

    2008-04-01

    We describe the first molecular confirmation of Rickettsia rickettsii, the cause of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), from a tick vector, Amblyomma cajennense, and from a cluster of fatal spotted fever cases in Argentina. Questing A. cajennense ticks were collected at or near sites of presumed or confirmed cases of spotted fever rickettsiosis in Jujuy Province and evaluated by polymerase chain reaction assays for spotted fever group rickettsiae. DNA of R. rickettsii was amplified from a pool of A. cajennense ticks and from tissues of one of four patients who died during 2003-2004 after illnesses characterized by high fever, severe headache, myalgias, and petechial rash. The diagnosis of spotted fever rickettsiosis was confirmed in the other patients by indirect immunofluorescence antibody and immunohistochemical staining techniques. These findings show the existence of RMSF in Argentina and emphasize the need for clinicians throughout the Americas to consider RMSF in patients with febrile rash illnesses.

  9. Utility of microfossils in Rocky Mountain exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Wornardt, W.W. Jr.

    1983-08-01

    Prior to 1960, exploration geologists in the Rocky Mountain area primarily used lithology, E-logs, geophysics, and a few microfossil groups (fusulinids, invertebrates) for stratigraphic correlations. From 1960 to about 1968, these exploration geologists added several additional groups of microfossils (spores, pollen, and foraminifers) to their tools for correlation. During the past 15 yrs, there has been an explosion in the scientific study of microfossils ranging in age from Cambrian to Holocene. Currently, oil finders are integrating the age-dates and paleoenvironmental information obtained from analyzing 20 different groups of microfossils with the stratigraphy, sedimentology, structure, and geophysical data to create a synergistic exploration program. The addition of micropaleontology and paleoenvironmental data into an exploration program has helped managers make better management decisions, save millions of dollars for the company, and find economical pools of hydrocarbons.

  10. Union Proposals for Washington Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simons, William H.

    1970-01-01

    President of the Washington, D.C. Teachers' Union presents the Union's recommendations for short range solutions to their extensive educational problems in testimony before the Senate Public Health, Education, Welfare, and Safety Committee on the District of Columbia. (DM)

  11. Greening America's Capitals - Washington, DC

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Greening America's Capitals report describes design options for the Anacostia Metro station in Washington, DC, that could help people feel safer and more comfortable walking to and from the station.

  12. Landscape Morphology of the Canadian Rocky Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinlan, K. T.; Barnes, J. B.; Pavelsky, T.

    2013-12-01

    Glaciers and rivers can significantly modify the shape of mountain landscapes. Following deformation and glaciation, bedrock river form and incision patterns are primarily controlled by variations in geologic structure, the glacial preconditioning of the landscape, and climate. However, the extent to which these factors integrate to affect Holocene patterns and rates of fluvial processes is poorly understood. Fluvial processes dominate the morphology of the Canadian Rocky Mountains today, though the inherited imprint of glaciers remains substantial. This study of fluvial geomorphology in the Athabasca River watershed in Jasper National Park, Alberta, addresses two primary ideas: (1) the fluvial response to deglaciation in alpine environments, and (2) the role of thrust belt geology affecting differential erosion in shaping post-orogenic topography. We use the 0.75 arc-second GeoBase Digital Elevation Model (~18m resolution) to analyze patterns of river concavity (θ) and normalized steepness index (ksn), estimate rock erodibility with field-based proxy measurements, and determine basin-averaged erosion rates using existing river gauge data. We find that bedrock geology and glacial preconditioning exhibit different yet recognizable morphological signatures and that they appear to be related to basin erosion rate. The principal differences we observe include the shape and scale of knickzones, magnitude of channel steepness values, channel concavity patterns, and relationship to bedrock geology. We find that lithologically controlled channel steepness patterns are contained to local spatial scales (<500m) and feature sharp increases in channel steepness at or near contacts between lithologies with differences in measured erodibility. By contrast, glacially controlled steepness patterns are expansive in spatial extent (1-10km), are insensitive to bedrock geology, and have higher overall channel steepness values than areas of lithologically controlled channel steepness

  13. Washington: A DC Circuit Tour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, Paul

    2010-12-01

    I explore the history of physics in Washington, D.C., and its environs through a tour of notable sites and personalities. Highlights include visits to the Smithsonian and Carnegie Institutions, stops at the Einstein Memorial, George Washington University, the University of Maryland, and the American Center for Physics, and biographical sketches of physicists Joseph Henry, George Gamow, Edward Teller, and others who worked in the District of Columbia.

  14. Energy levels and lifetimes of Nd IV, Pm IV, Sm IV, and Eu IV

    SciTech Connect

    Dzuba, V. A.; Safronova, U. I.; Johnson, W. R.

    2003-09-01

    To address the shortage of experimental data for electron spectra of triply ionized rare-earth elements we have calculated energy levels and lifetimes of 4f{sup n+1} and 4f{sup n}5d configurations of Nd IV (n=2), Pm IV (n=3), Sm IV (n=4), and Eu IV (n=5) using Hartree-Fock and configuration-interaction methods. To control the accuracy of our calculations we also performed similar calculations for Pr III, Nd III, and Sm III, for which experimental data are available. The results are important, in particular, for physics of magnetic garnets.

  15. 21. AERIAL VIEW OF THE ROCKY FLATS PLANT LOOKING NORTHWEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. AERIAL VIEW OF THE ROCKY FLATS PLANT LOOKING NORTHWEST. BY THE LATE 1960S, THE SITE HAD UNDERGONE TWO MAJOR EXPANSIONS. THE FIRST EXPANSION IN 1956-57, WHEN THE TRIGGER DESIGN CHANGED AND NECESSITATED THE ADDITION OF SEVEN NEW BUILDINGS. THE SECOND LARGE EXPANSION TOOK PLACE FROM 1964-65, WHEN ROCKY FLATS BECAME THE SOLE PRODUCER OF TRIGGERS. DURING THIS EXPANSION, ELEVEN BUILDINGS WERE ADDED, PRIMARILY IN RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT LABORATORIES, GUARD HOUSES, AND WASTE WATER TREATMENT (7/1/69). - Rocky Flats Plant, Bounded by Indiana Street & Routes 93, 128 & 72, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  16. Rocky core solubility in Jupiter and giant exoplanets.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Hugh F; Militzer, Burkhard

    2012-03-16

    Gas giants are believed to form by the accretion of hydrogen-helium gas around an initial protocore of rock and ice. The question of whether the rocky parts of the core dissolve into the fluid H-He layers following formation has significant implications for planetary structure and evolution. Here we use ab initio calculations to study rock solubility in fluid hydrogen, choosing MgO as a representative example of planetary rocky materials, and find MgO to be highly soluble in H for temperatures in excess of approximately 10,000 K, implying the potential for significant redistribution of rocky core material in Jupiter and larger exoplanets.

  17. 3. FIRSTFLOOR LABORATORY. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. Rocky Mountain Arsenal, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. FIRST-FLOOR LABORATORY. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Administration-Laboratory- Change House-Bomb Rail, 420 feet South of December Seventh Avenue; 530 feet West of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  18. How is Pluto Classified as a Rocky World?

    NASA Video Gallery

    When it comes to Pluto, classification is tricky, but it’s unquestioningly a rocky body. This is Pluto in a Minute. The bodies in our solar system fall more or less into set categories like gas g...

  19. 26. AERIAL VIEW OF THE ROCKY FLATS PLANT LOOKING NORTHEAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. AERIAL VIEW OF THE ROCKY FLATS PLANT LOOKING NORTHEAST. IN 1951, A GOOD FRIDAY ISSUE OF THE DENVER POST ANNOUNCED THE ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION'S PLANS TO BUILD THE ROCKY FLATS PLANT. UNDER THE HEADLINE 'THERE'S GOOD NEWS TODAY.' POLITICAL LEADERS EXPRESSED GREAT PRIDE IN THE CHOICE OF THE DENVER-BOULDER AREA AS THE SITE FOR AN ATOMIC PLANT AS QUOTED IN THE ROCKY MOUNTAIN NEWS: 'WE ARE PROUD THAT THE AREA HAS BEEN CHOSEN FOR ANOTHER IMPORTANT CONTRIBUTION TO THE NATION'S STRENGTH AND FUTURE SECURITY.' BY THE MID 1970S, PUBLIC OPINION OF THE SITE HAD CHANGED (5/4/78). - Rocky Flats Plant, Bounded by Indiana Street & Routes 93, 128 & 72, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  20. 7. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 514. VIEW TO WEST. Rocky ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 514. VIEW TO WEST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Lewisite Reactor & Distilled Mustard Distillation Building, 420 feet South of December Seventh Avenue; 1070 feet East of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  1. 8. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 514. VIEW TO EAST. Rocky ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 514. VIEW TO EAST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Lewisite Reactor & Distilled Mustard Distillation Building, 420 feet South of December Seventh Avenue; 1070 feet East of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  2. 9. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 514. VIEW TO WEST. Rocky ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 514. VIEW TO WEST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Lewisite Reactor & Distilled Mustard Distillation Building, 420 feet South of December Seventh Avenue; 1070 feet East of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  3. 48. VIEW OF SKYLINE DRIVE FROM THE ROCKY PEAK OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. VIEW OF SKYLINE DRIVE FROM THE ROCKY PEAK OF STONY MAN MOUNTAIN (EL. 4,011). LOOKING NORTHEAST. STONY MAN OVERLOOK VISIBLE IN THE DISTANCE. - Skyline Drive, From Front Royal, VA to Rockfish Gap, VA , Luray, Page County, VA

  4. Why sulfonamides are contraindicated in Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Ren, Vicky; Hsu, Sylvia

    2014-02-18

    Sulfonamide antibiotics are not effective for the treatment of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF). Patients suspected of having RMSF based on history and physical exam should be treated with doxycycline and not a sulfonamide to avoid increased morbidity and mortality.

  5. 1. SUBMERGED QUENCH INCINERATOR. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. Rocky Mountain ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. SUBMERGED QUENCH INCINERATOR. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Submerged Quench Incinerator, 3940 feet South of Ninth Avenue; 930 feet West of Road NS-4, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  6. 2. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 1602. VIEW TO WEST. Rocky ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 1602. VIEW TO WEST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Ammunition Demolition Building-Paint Storage, 40 feet North of Road EW-2; 2900 feet East of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  7. 18. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 1606. VIEW TO SOUTH. Rocky ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 1606. VIEW TO SOUTH. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Cluster Bomb Assembly-Filling-Storage Building, 3500 feet South of Ninth Avenue; 2870 feet East of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  8. 7. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 1601. VIEW TO SOUTH. Rocky ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 1601. VIEW TO SOUTH. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Cluster Bomb Assembly-Filling-Storage Building, 3500 feet South of Ninth Avenue; 2870 feet East of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  9. 10. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 1606. VIEW TO SOUTH. Rocky ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 1606. VIEW TO SOUTH. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Cluster Bomb Assembly-Filling-Storage Building, 3500 feet South of Ninth Avenue; 2870 feet East of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  10. 9. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 1601. VIEW TO SOUTH. Rocky ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 1601. VIEW TO SOUTH. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Cluster Bomb Assembly-Filling-Storage Building, 3500 feet South of Ninth Avenue; 2870 feet East of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  11. 22. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 1606. VIEW TO NORTH. Rocky ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 1606. VIEW TO NORTH. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Cluster Bomb Assembly-Filling-Storage Building, 3500 feet South of Ninth Avenue; 2870 feet East of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  12. 6. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 1601. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. Rocky ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 1601. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Cluster Bomb Assembly-Filling-Storage Building, 3500 feet South of Ninth Avenue; 2870 feet East of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  13. 19. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 1606. VIEW TO SOUTH. Rocky ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 1606. VIEW TO SOUTH. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Cluster Bomb Assembly-Filling-Storage Building, 3500 feet South of Ninth Avenue; 2870 feet East of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  14. 13. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 1606. VIEW TO WEST. Rocky ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 1606. VIEW TO WEST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Cluster Bomb Assembly-Filling-Storage Building, 3500 feet South of Ninth Avenue; 2870 feet East of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  15. 11. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 1606. VIEW TO WEST. Rocky ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 1606. VIEW TO WEST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Cluster Bomb Assembly-Filling-Storage Building, 3500 feet South of Ninth Avenue; 2870 feet East of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  16. 23. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 1607. VIEW TO NORTH. Rocky ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 1607. VIEW TO NORTH. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Cluster Bomb Assembly-Filling-Storage Building, 3500 feet South of Ninth Avenue; 2870 feet East of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  17. 8. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 1601. VIEW TO NORTH. Rocky ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 1601. VIEW TO NORTH. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Cluster Bomb Assembly-Filling-Storage Building, 3500 feet South of Ninth Avenue; 2870 feet East of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  18. 20. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 1606. VIEW TO SOUTH. Rocky ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 1606. VIEW TO SOUTH. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Cluster Bomb Assembly-Filling-Storage Building, 3500 feet South of Ninth Avenue; 2870 feet East of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  19. 1. BUILDING 411A. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. Rocky Mountain Arsenal, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. BUILDING 411A. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Sulfur Monochloride & Dichloride Manufacturing, 1003 feet South of December Seventh Avenue; 412 feet East of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  20. The oldest known Rocky Mountain bristlecone pines (Pinus aristata Engelm.)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brunstein, F.C.; Yamaguchi, D.K.

    1992-01-01

    The authors have found 12 living Rocky Mountain bristlecone pines >1600 yr old, including four that are >2100 yr old, on Black Mountain, near South Park, and on Almagre Mountain, in the S Front Range, Colorado. A core from the oldest of these trees has an inner-ring date of 442 BC. This tree is therefore at least 2435 yr old and exceeds the age of the oldest previously reported Rocky Mountain bristlecone pine by 846 yr. -from Authors

  1. 25. AERIAL VIEW OF THE ROCKY FLATS PLANT LOOKING WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. AERIAL VIEW OF THE ROCKY FLATS PLANT LOOKING WEST - NORTHWEST IN 1974. IN 1972, 4,600 ACRES WERE PURCHASED AROUND THE SITE TO BETTER PROTECT THE BORDERS FROM TERRORISM AND INFILTRATION BY PROTESTORS. ANTI-NUCLEAR DEMONSTRATION BEGAN SHORTLY AFTER THE 1969 FIRE IN BUILDING 776/777, AND CONTINUED UNTIL PRODUCTION CEASED AT THE PLANT IN 1989 (10/7/74). - Rocky Flats Plant, Bounded by Indiana Street & Routes 93, 128 & 72, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  2. 20. AERIAL VIEW OF THE ROCKY FLATS PLANT LOOKING NORTHEAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. AERIAL VIEW OF THE ROCKY FLATS PLANT LOOKING NORTHEAST. THE PLANT WAS COMPOSED OF FOUR WIDELY SEPARATED AREAS, EACH ONE PERFORMING A DIFFERENT TYPE OF WORK. PLANT A (44), SOUTHWEST, FABRICATED PARTS FROM DEPLETED URANIUM, PLANT B (81), SOUTH, WAS ENRICHED URANIUM OPERATIONS, PLANT C (71), NORTH, PLUTONIUM OPERATIONS, AND PLANT D (91), EAST, WAS FINAL ASSEMBLY, SHIPPING AND RECEIVING (2/6/66). - Rocky Flats Plant, Bounded by Indiana Street & Routes 93, 128 & 72, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  3. Kepler's First Rocky Planet: Kepler-10b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalha, Natalie M.; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Ciardi, David; Dunham, Edward W.; Fressin, Francois; Gautier, Thomas N., III; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Haas, Michael R.; Howell, Steve B.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Kjeldsen, Hans; Koch, David G.; Latham, David W.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Rowe, Jason F.; Sasselov, Dimitar D.; Seager, Sara; Steffen, Jason H.; Torres, Guillermo; Basri, Gibor S.; Brown, Timothy M.; Charbonneau, David; Christiansen, Jessie; Clarke, Bruce; Cochran, William D.; Dupree, Andrea; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Fischer, Debra; Ford, Eric B.; Fortney, Jonathan; Girouard, Forrest R.; Holman, Matthew J.; Johnson, John; Isaacson, Howard; Klaus, Todd C.; Machalek, Pavel; Moorehead, Althea V.; Morehead, Robert C.; Ragozzine, Darin; Tenenbaum, Peter; Twicken, Joseph; Quinn, Samuel; VanCleve, Jeffrey; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.; Welsh, William F.; Devore, Edna; Gould, Alan

    2011-03-01

    NASA's Kepler Mission uses transit photometry to determine the frequency of Earth-size planets in or near the habitable zone of Sun-like stars. The mission reached a milestone toward meeting that goal: the discovery of its first rocky planet, Kepler-10b. Two distinct sets of transit events were detected: (1) a 152 ± 4 ppm dimming lasting 1.811 ± 0.024 hr with ephemeris T [BJD] =2454964.57375+0.00060 -0.00082 + N*0.837495+0.000004 -0.000005 days and (2) a 376 ± 9 ppm dimming lasting 6.86 ± 0.07 hr with ephemeris T [BJD] =2454971.6761+0.0020 -0.0023 + N*45.29485+0.00065 -0.00076 days. Statistical tests on the photometric and pixel flux time series established the viability of the planet candidates triggering ground-based follow-up observations. Forty precision Doppler measurements were used to confirm that the short-period transit event is due to a planetary companion. The parent star is bright enough for asteroseismic analysis. Photometry was collected at 1 minute cadence for >4 months from which we detected 19 distinct pulsation frequencies. Modeling the frequencies resulted in precise knowledge of the fundamental stellar properties. Kepler-10 is a relatively old (11.9 ± 4.5 Gyr) but otherwise Sun-like main-sequence star with T eff = 5627 ± 44 K, M sstarf = 0.895 ± 0.060 M sun, and R sstarf = 1.056 ± 0.021 R sun. Physical models simultaneously fit to the transit light curves and the precision Doppler measurements yielded tight constraints on the properties of Kepler-10b that speak to its rocky composition: M P = 4.56+1.17 -1.29 M ⊕, R P = 1.416+0.033 -0.036 R ⊕, and ρP = 8.8+2.1 -2.9 g cm-3. Kepler-10b is the smallest transiting exoplanet discovered to date. Based in part on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology.

  4. ROTC Validation Study of LEADER MATCH IV, Programmed Instruction in Leadership for the US Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-05-01

    00/ SARI TECHNICAL REPORT TR-78-TH2 utm ROTC Validation Study of LEADER MATCH IV, Programmed Instruction in Leadership for the US Army by ,EVEL Fred ...E. Fiedler and Linda Mahar University of Washington S Seattle, Washington 98105 and -I. Robert M. Carroll . Army Research Institute •,et q•\\•’~e009ŕ...Sciences as ARI Technical Report TR-77-TH3, "LEADER MATCH IV, Programmed Instruction in Leadership for the U.S. Army," by F. E. Fiedler , L. Mahar, and M

  5. Elemental compositions of two extrasolar rocky planetesimals

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, S.; Jura, M.; Klein, B.; Zuckerman, B.; Koester, D. E-mail: jura@astro.ucla.edu E-mail: ben@astro.ucla.edu

    2014-03-10

    We report Keck/HIRES and Hubble Space Telescope/COS spectroscopic studies of extrasolar rocky planetesimals accreted onto two hydrogen atmosphere white dwarfs, G29-38 and GD 133. In G29-38, eight elements are detected, including C, O, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, and Fe while in GD 133, O, Si, Ca, and marginally Mg are seen. These two extrasolar planetesimals show a pattern of refractory enhancement and volatile depletion. For G29-38, the observed composition can be best interpreted as a blend of a chondritic object with some refractory-rich material, a result from post-nebular processing. Water is very depleted in the parent body accreted onto G29-38, based on the derived oxygen abundance. The inferred total mass accretion rate in GD 133 is the lowest of all known dusty white dwarfs, possibly due to non-steady state accretion. We continue to find that a variety of extrasolar planetesimals all resemble to zeroth order the elemental composition of bulk Earth.

  6. Planned Parenthood of Rocky Mountains v. Owens.

    PubMed

    2002-01-01

    Court Decision: 287 Federal Reporter, 3d Series 910; 2002 Apr 17 (date of decision). The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit agreed with a lower court that Colorado's Parental Notification Act (PNA) was unconstitutional because it failed to provide an exception for a minor's health. Planned Parenthood of the Rocky Mountain Services brought an action challenging the constitutionality of the PNA which required parental notice and a waiting period before a minor could obtain an abortion. The PNA granted an exception in cases where a physician reports that the minor is a victim of child abuse or neglect at the hands of the persons entitled to notice and where an immediate abortion is necessary to prevent the minor's imminent death. The Tenth Circuit held that state abortion regulations must provide an exception to protect maternal health. Noting that medical complications could result in significant harm to the the health of a pregnant woman without constituting a threat of imminent death, the court held that the PNA infringed on the ability of any pregnant woman to protect her health because it failed to provide adequate exceptions to parental notice in cases where maternal health was at risk. The court rejected the defendant's argument that Colorado's Children's Code could be read as superseding the PNA and providing a maternal health exception, and held that the PNA superseded other Colorado law.

  7. The Critical Mass Laboratory at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect

    Rothe, Robert E

    2003-10-15

    The Critical Mass Laboratory (CML) at Rocky Flats northwest of Denver, Colorado, was built in 1964 and commissioned to conduct nuclear experiments on January 28, 1965. It was built to attain more accurate and precise experimental data to ensure nuclear criticality safety at the plant than were previously possible. Prior to its construction, safety data were obtained from long extrapolations of subcritical data (called in situ experiments), calculated parameters from reactor engineering 'models', and a few other imprecise methods. About 1700 critical and critical-approach experiments involving several chemical forms of enriched uranium and plutonium were performed between then and 1988. These experiments included single units and arrays of fissile materials, reflected and 'bare' systems, and configurations with various degrees of moderation, as well as some containing strong neutron absorbers. In 1989, a raid by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) caused the plant as a whole to focus on 'resumption' instead of further criticality safety experiments. Though either not recognized or not admitted for a few years, that FBI raid did sound the death knell for the CML. The plant's optimistic goal of resumption evolved to one of deactivation, decommissioning, and plantwide demolition during the 1990s. The once-proud CML facility was finally demolished in April of 2002.

  8. Rocky Mountain spotted fever: a seasonal alert.

    PubMed

    Walker, D H

    1995-05-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever occurs during seasonal tick activity. A history of exposure to tick-containing habitats within the 3- to 12-day incubation period is a key epidemiological factor. The signs of fever, headache, myalgia, nausea, vomiting, and anorexia at onset of infection are difficult to distinguish from those of self-limited viral infections. Rash usually appears later and, if present, progresses through a sequence of stages and distribution that are never pathognomonic. The effects of disseminated Rickettsia rickettsii infection of endothelial cells include increased vascular permeability, edema, hypovolemia, hypotension, prerenal azotemia, and, in life-threatening cases, pulmonary edema, shock, acute tubular necrosis, and meningoencephalitis. In severe cases, fluid management is a challenge. The clinical diagnosis, which is difficult, is rarely assisted by laboratory findings because antibodies are usually detected only in convalescence, and immunohistologic methods for detection of rickettsiae are unavailable in most clinics. Doxycycline is the treatment of choice except for pregnant or allergic patients, who are treated with chloramphenicol.

  9. Exploring groundwater processes in Rocky Mountain headwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janzen, D.; Ireson, A. M.; Yassin, F. A.

    2014-12-01

    More than one-sixth of the Earth's human population relies on freshwater originating in mountain headwaters, which is understood to be generated largely from snowpacks that melt throughout the spring and summer. Annual hydrographs in these regions are characterized by large peaks occurring in the spring, followed by slow recession towards winter baseflow conditions. However, atmospheric warming trends are found to coincide with earlier periods of snowmelt, leading to increased flows in spring and decreased flows in summer. This decreased ability of our 'water towers' to store snow late into the summer suggests that other mechanisms of storage and release may become more important in sustaining baseflows. In particular, subsurface processes leading to late summer and winter flow will become increasingly important earlier on, but are as yet poorly understood. By utilising historical data to inform a better understanding of late-season subsurface processes, we will be better prepared to predict how these mountains will temporarily store and release groundwater in a warmer climate. Here, we analyse long-term data sets from a small (Marmot Creek, Alberta ~10 km2) and a large (Bow River at Banff, Alberta ~1000 km2) basinwithin the Canadian Rocky Mountains, comparing observations with model outputs, to investigate late-season hydrological responses, and particularly the role of groundwater as a temporary storage mechanism.

  10. The Rocky World of Young Planetary Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Panel A of Inset Panel B of Inset Panel C of Inset

    This artist's concept illustrates how planetary systems arise out of massive collisions between rocky bodies. New findings from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope show that these catastrophes continue to occur around stars even after they have developed full-sized planets, when they are as old as one hundred million years. For reference, our own Sun, at 4.5 billion years old, is far past this late stage of planet formation.

    In this image, a young star is shown circled by full-sized planets, and rings of dust beyond. These rings, also called 'debris discs,' arise when embryonic planets smash into each other. One of these collisions is illustrated in the inset of Figure 1.

    Spitzer was able to see the dust generated by these collisions with its powerful infrared vision.

  11. Effective discharge in Rocky Mountain headwater streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunte, Kristin; Abt, Steven R.; Swingle, Kurt W.; Cenderelli, Dan A.

    2014-11-01

    Whereas effective discharge (Qeff) in mountain streams is commonly associated with a moderate flow such as bankfull discharge (Qbf), this study found that the maximum discharge (Qmax), and not bankfull discharge, is the channel forming or effective flow for gravel transport in plane-bed streams where partial bed mobility causes steep gravel transport rating curves. Qeff may approach bankfull flow in some step-pool channels where gravel moves over a static cobble/boulder bed. Our conclusions are based on magnitude-frequency analyses conducted at 41 gauged Rocky Mountain headwater streams. Because these gauged streams lacked gravel transport data, as is typical, comparable streams with measured transport rates were used to develop scaling relations for rating curve exponents with stream and watershed characteristics. Those scaling relations were then used to estimate the steepness of gravel rating curves at the 41 gauged but unsampled sites. The measured flow frequency distributions were characterized by two fitted power functions. The steepness of the flow frequency distributions and the estimated steepness of gravel transport relations were combined in magnitude-frequency analyses to compute Qeff.

  12. The 1983 Temperature Gradient and Heat Flow Drilling Project for the State of Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Korosec, Michael A.

    1983-11-01

    During the Summer of 1983, the Washington Division of Geology and Earth Resources carried out a three-hole drilling program to collect temperature gradient and heat flow information near potential geothermal resource target areas. The project was part of the state-coupled US Department of Energy Geothermal Program. Richardson Well Drilling of Tacoma, Washington was subcontracted through the State to perform the work. The general locations of the project areas are shown in figure 1. The first hole, DNR 83-1, was located within the Green River valley northwest of Mount St. Helens. This site is near the Green River Soda Springs and along the projection of the Mount St. Helens--Elk Lake seismic zone. The other two holes were drilled near Mount Baker. Hole DNR 83-3 was sited about 1/4 km west of the Baker Hot Springs, 10.5 km east of Mount Baker, while hole DNR 83-5 was located along Rocky Creek in the Sulphur Creek Valley. The Rocky Creek hole is about 10 km south-southwest of the peak. Two other holes, DNR 83-2 and DNR 83-4, were located on the north side of the Sulphur Creek Valley. Both holes were abandoned at early stages of drilling because of deep overburden and severe caving problems. The sites were apparently located atop old landslide deposits.

  13. IV treatment at home

    MedlinePlus

    ... venous catheter - home; Port - home; PICC line - home; Infusion therapy - home; Home health care - IV treatment ... is given quickly, all at once. A slow infusion, which means the medicine is given slowly over ...

  14. GCF Mark IV development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mortensen, L. O.

    1982-01-01

    The Mark IV ground communication facility (GCF) as it is implemented to support the network consolidation program is reviewed. Changes in the GCF are made in the area of increased capacity. Common carrier circuits are the medium for data transfer. The message multiplexing in the Mark IV era differs from the Mark III era, in that all multiplexing is done in a GCF computer under GCF software control, which is similar to the multiplexing currently done in the high speed data subsystem.

  15. Rocky desertification in Southwest China: Impacts, causes, and restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhongcheng; Lian, Yanqing; Qin, Xiaoqun

    2014-05-01

    Rocky desertification, which is relatively less well known than desertification, refers to the processes and human activities that transform a karst area covered by vegetation and soil into a rocky landscape. It has occurred in various countries and regions, including the European Mediterranean and Dinaric Karst regions of the Balkan Peninsula, Southwest China on a large scale, and alarmingly, even in tropical rainforests such as Haiti and Barbados, and has had tremendous negative impacts to the environment and social and economic conditions at local and regional scales. The goal of this paper is to provide a thorough review of the impacts, causes, and restoration measures of rocky desertification based on decades of studies in the southwest karst area of China and reviews of studies in Europe and other parts of the world. The low soil formation rate and high permeability of carbonate rocks create a fragile and vulnerable environment that is susceptible to deforestation and soil erosion. Other natural processes related to hydrology and ecology could exacerbate rocky desertification. However, disturbances from a wide variety of human activities are ultimately responsible for rocky desertification wherever it has occurred. This review shows that reforestation can be successful in Southwest China and even in the Dinaric Karst region when the land, people, water, and other resources are managed cohesively. However, new challenges may arise as more frequent droughts and extreme floods induced by global climate change and variability may slow the recovery process or even expand rocky desertification. This review is intended to bring attention to this challenging issue and provide information needed to advance research and engineering practices to combat rocky desertification and to aid in sustainable development.

  16. Libraries in Washington: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/washington.html Libraries in Washington To use the sharing features on ... enable JavaScript. Bellevue Overlake Hospital Medical Center Medical Library 1035 116th Avenue NE Bellevue, WA 98004 425- ...

  17. Washington State's Student Achievement Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettitt, Maureen; Prince, David

    2010-01-01

    This article describes Washington State's Student Achievement Initiative, an accountability system implemented in 2005-06 that measures students' gains in college readiness, college credits earned, and degree or certificate completion. The goal of the initiative is to increase educational attainment by focusing on the critical momentum points…

  18. Washington State 1995 Data Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Office of Financial Management, Olympia.

    This document is intended to present, in tables and graphs, a diversity of information on Washington State, its people, economy, and government. The information was obtained from state and federal agencies and from private businesses. The data are organized into 11 major chapters which cover the following topics (sample subtopics in parentheses):…

  19. Washington Education Association Directory, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Advancement and Support of Education, Washington, DC.

    This directory presents profiles of 73 higher education associations located in the Washington, DC (and northern Virginia) area. Preliminary information includes an alphabetical list of the associations by full name and an alphabetical list by organizational acronym. Each profile includes the organization's address, telephone numbers, e-mail and…

  20. The 1963 March on Washington.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Natalie; Schamel, Wynell; Potter, Lee Ann

    2001-01-01

    Provides historical information on the "March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom" and the role of A. Philip Randolph who originally conceived the idea for the March. Features a letter from A. Philip Randolph to President John F. Kennedy. Includes a list of teaching activities. (CMK)

  1. Teaching the March on Washington

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, William P.; Euchner, Charles; Hill, Norman; Hill, Velma Murphy

    2013-01-01

    One of the most historical events in American history, the non-violent protest "March on Washington," August 28, 1963, is detailed in an article of remembrance by William P. Jones. His article is crowned by highlights from the "I Have a Dream" speech by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., but also highlights the lessor known role…

  2. Washington Promise Scholarship Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Higher Education Coordinating Board, Olympia.

    The Washington Promise Scholarship program was established to encourage excellent academic performance and to reward low- and middle-income students who demonstrate meritorious achievement in high school by providing them a 2-year scholarship. An evaluation was conducted to study the program and its impact on college attendance and student…

  3. Antidote: Civic Responsibility. Washington Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phi Alpha Delta Law Fraternity International, Washington, DC.

    Designed for middle school through high school students, this unit contains eight lesson plans that focus on Washington state law. The state lessons correspond to lessons in the volume, "Antidote: Civic Responsibility. Drug Avoidance Lessons for Middle School & High School Students." Developed to be presented by educators, law…

  4. Cutaneous histopathology of Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Kao, G F; Evancho, C D; Ioffe, O; Lowitt, M H; Dumler, J S

    1997-11-01

    The dermatologic diagnosis of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is often presumptive; the clinical presentation includes skin rash and febrile illness with or without a clear history of tick bite. The characteristic cutaneous manifestations include a generalized skin eruption with purpuric, blanching or non-blanching macules and papules usually involving the extremities. Although skin biopsies are often performed to confirm the diagnosis, the spectrum of cutaneous histopathology in RMSF has not been well described. We studied a series of 26 cases of RMSF, of which 10 were surgical specimens and 16 were autopsies. The microscopic changes were correlated with the duration of illness. The main histopathologic feature was lymphohistiocytic capillaritis and venulitis with extravasation of erythrocytes, edema, predominantly perivascular and some interstitial infiltrate. Leukocytoclastic vasculitis (LCV) with neutrophilic infiltrate and nuclear dust was seen in 11 of 15 (73%) specimens from involved skin. These lesions with LCV also showed notable epidermal change including basal layer vacuolar degeneration with mild dermoepidermal interface lymphocytic exocytosis. Six lesions with LCV displayed focal fibrin thrombi and capillary wall necrosis. Apoptotic keratinocytes were noted in 3 lesions with LCV. Subepidermal blister was observed in the skin lesion of an autopsied patient with LCV changes. Another lesion of a fatal case with LCV also contained features of acute neutrophilic eccrine hidradenitis. Focal small nerve twig inflammation was noted in a third autopsy case with LCV. Plasma cells were seen in 6 of 34 specimens (18%); and eosinophils were observed in 3 (9%). The subcutaneous fat contained a mild perivascular inflammation and one case revealed focal lobular neutrophilic inflammation. Immunohistologic (IH) staining using polyclonal rabbit anti-Rickettsia rickettsii demonstrated positive staining of the organisms in the affected endothelial cells in all 12 cases

  5. Weighing Rocky Exoplanets with Improved Radial Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuesong Wang, Sharon; Wright, Jason; California Planet Survey Consortium

    2016-01-01

    The synergy between Kepler and the ground-based radial velocity (RV) surveys have made numerous discoveries of small and rocky exoplanets, opening the age of Earth analogs. However, most (29/33) of the RV-detected exoplanets that are smaller than 3 Earth radii do not have their masses constrained to better than 20% - limited by the current RV precision (1-2 m/s). Our work improves the RV precision of the Keck telescope, which is responsible for most of the mass measurements for small Kepler exoplanets. We have discovered and verified, for the first time, two of the dominant terms in Keck's RV systematic error budget: modeling errors (mostly in deconvolution) and telluric contamination. These two terms contribute 1 m/s and 0.6 m/s, respectively, to the RV error budget (RMS in quadrature), and they create spurious signals at periods of one sidereal year and its harmonics with amplitudes of 0.2-1 m/s. Left untreated, these errors can mimic the signals of Earth-like or Super-Earth planets in the Habitable Zone. Removing these errors will bring better precision to ten-year worth of Keck data and better constraints on the masses and compositions of small Kepler planets. As more precise RV instruments coming online, we need advanced data analysis tools to overcome issues like these in order to detect the Earth twin (RV amplitude 8 cm/s). We are developing a new, open-source RV data analysis tool in Python, which uses Bayesian MCMC and Gaussian processes, to fully exploit the hardware improvements brought by new instruments like MINERVA and NASA's WIYN/EPDS.

  6. VIEW OF THE REAR OF WATERSIDE MALL Southwest Washington, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF THE REAR OF WATERSIDE MALL - Southwest Washington, Urban Renewal Area, Bounded by Independence Avenue, Washington Avenue, South Capitol Street, Canal Street, P Street, Maine Avenue & Washington Channel, Fourteenth Street, D Street, & Twelfth Street, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  7. CLOSE VIEW ALONG WATERFRONT TO SHOW BULKHEAD Southwest Washington, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CLOSE VIEW ALONG WATERFRONT TO SHOW BULKHEAD - Southwest Washington, Urban Renewal Area, Bounded by Independence Avenue, Washington Avenue, South Capitol Street, Canal Street, P Street, Maine Avenue & Washington Channel, Fourteenth Street, D Street, & Twelfth Street, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  8. INTERIOR VIEW, WATERSIDE MALL Southwest Washington, Urban Renewal Area, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW, WATERSIDE MALL - Southwest Washington, Urban Renewal Area, Bounded by Independence Avenue, Washington Avenue, South Capitol Street, Canal Street, P Street, Maine Avenue & Washington Channel, Fourteenth Street, D Street, & Twelfth Street, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  9. 76 FR 21928 - Washington State University; Facility Operating License No. R-76; Washington State University...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-19

    ... COMMISSION Washington State University; Facility Operating License No. R-76; Washington State University... of a renewed Facility Operating License No. R- 76, to be held by Washington State University (WSU or the licensee), which would authorize continued operation of the Washington State University...

  10. 75 FR 20776 - Security Zone; Potomac River, Washington Channel, Washington, DC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-21

    ..., Washington, DC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is... Building Ground Floor, Room W12-140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE., Washington, DC 20590, between 9 a.m. and... (NPRM) entitled ``Security Zone; Potomac River, Washington Channel, Washington, DC'' in the...

  11. Washington Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, T. J.; Schelling, J.

    2012-12-01

    Washington State has participated in the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP) since its inception in 1995. We have participated in the tsunami inundation hazard mapping, evacuation planning, education, and outreach efforts that generally characterize the NTHMP efforts. We have also investigated hazards of significant interest to the Pacific Northwest. The hazard from locally generated earthquakes on the Cascadia subduction zone, which threatens tsunami inundation in less than hour following a magnitude 9 earthquake, creates special problems for low-lying accretionary shoreforms in Washington, such as the spits of Long Beach and Ocean Shores, where high ground is not accessible within the limited time available for evacuation. To ameliorate this problem, we convened a panel of the Applied Technology Council to develop guidelines for construction of facilities for vertical evacuation from tsunamis, published as FEMA 646, now incorporated in the International Building Code as Appendix M. We followed this with a program called Project Safe Haven (http://www.facebook.com/ProjectSafeHaven) to site such facilities along the Washington coast in appropriate locations and appropriate designs to blend with the local communities, as chosen by the citizens. This has now been completed for the entire outer coast of Washington. In conjunction with this effort, we have evaluated the potential for earthquake-induced ground failures in and near tsunami hazard zones to help develop cost estimates for these structures and to establish appropriate tsunami evacuation routes and evacuation assembly areas that are likely to to be available after a major subduction zone earthquake. We intend to continue these geotechnical evaluations for all tsunami hazard zones in Washington.

  12. The oldest know Rocky Mountain bristlecone pines (Pinus aristata Engelm. )

    SciTech Connect

    Brunstein, F.C. ); Yamaguchi, D.K. )

    1992-08-01

    We have found 12 living Rocky Mountain bristlecone pines (Pinus aristata) more than 1600 yr old, including four that are more than 2 1 00 yr old, on Black Mountain, near South Park, and on Almagre Mountain, in the southern Front Range, Colorado. A core from the oldest of these trees has an inner-ring date of 442 B.C. This tree is therefore at least 2435 yr old and exceeds the age of the oldest previously reported Rocky Mountain bristlecone pine by 846 yr, The ages of these trees show that Rocky Mountain bristlecone pines, under arid environmental conditions, achieve much older ages than have been previously reported. The ages also show that previously inferred trends in bristlecone pine ages, where maximum ages in the eastern range of Rocky Mountain bristlecone pines are much less than maximum ages in the western range of Great Basin bristlecone pines (Pinus longaea), are less strong than previously supposed. Ancient Rocky Mountain bristlecone pines, such as those found in this study, have the potential to expand our knowledge of late Holocene climatic conditions in western North America.

  13. 49 CFR 372.219 - Washington, DC

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Washington, DC 372.219 Section 372.219... ZONES, AND TERMINAL AREAS Commercial Zones § 372.219 Washington, DC The zone adjacent to, and... points within a line drawn 15 miles beyond the municipal limits of Washington, DC (c) All points...

  14. 49 CFR 372.219 - Washington, DC

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Washington, DC 372.219 Section 372.219... ZONES, AND TERMINAL AREAS Commercial Zones § 372.219 Washington, DC The zone adjacent to, and... points within a line drawn 15 miles beyond the municipal limits of Washington, DC (c) All points...

  15. 49 CFR 372.219 - Washington, DC

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Washington, DC 372.219 Section 372.219... ZONES, AND TERMINAL AREAS Commercial Zones § 372.219 Washington, DC The zone adjacent to, and... points within a line drawn 15 miles beyond the municipal limits of Washington, DC (c) All points...

  16. 49 CFR 372.219 - Washington, DC

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Washington, DC 372.219 Section 372.219... ZONES, AND TERMINAL AREAS Commercial Zones § 372.219 Washington, DC The zone adjacent to, and... points within a line drawn 15 miles beyond the municipal limits of Washington, DC (c) All points...

  17. 49 CFR 372.219 - Washington, DC

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Washington, DC 372.219 Section 372.219... ZONES, AND TERMINAL AREAS Commercial Zones § 372.219 Washington, DC The zone adjacent to, and... points within a line drawn 15 miles beyond the municipal limits of Washington, DC (c) All points...

  18. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillaris, A.; Bouratzis, C.; Nindos, A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts that extend to hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprises 48 interplanetary type IV bursts observed with the Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation (WAVES) instrument onboard Wind in the 13.825 MHz - 20 kHz frequency range. The dynamic spectra of the Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), the Nançay Decametric Array (DAM), the Appareil de Routine pour le Traitement et l' Enregistrement Magnetique de l' Information Spectral (ARTEMIS-IV), the Culgoora, Hiraso, and the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN) Radio Spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona. These were supplemented with soft X-ray (SXR) flux-measurements from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and coronal mass ejections (CME) data from the Large Angle and Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Positional information of the coronal bursts was obtained by the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs, and SXR flares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact, their duration was on average 106 minutes. This type of events was, mostly, associated with M- and X-class flares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs, 32 of these events had CMEs faster than 1000 km s^{-1}. Furthermore, in 43 compact events the CME was possibly subjected to reduced aerodynamic drag as it was propagating in the wake of a previous CME. A minority (three) of long-lived type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts was detected, with durations from 960 minutes to 115 hours. These events are referred to as extended or long duration and appear to replenish their energetic electron content, possibly from electrons escaping from the corresponding coronal

  19. Lake Washington Ship Canal, Seattle, Washington. Master Plan (DM 9)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-01

    published two plants of the purslane family: Talbnum okanoganense from the Okanogan Highlands of north-central Washington; and Caytwnia nia/Ls from the...paramount concern. Some of the fish passage concerns identified in the past include delay caused by varying salinities and attraction flows, loss of...fish ladder flow in the diffuser supply wells, adult fish fallback, and impacts to juvenile fish due to abrupt pressure and salinity changes. Ensuring

  20. Inversion Breakup in Small Rocky Mountain and Alpine Basins

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, Charles D.; Pospichal, Bernhard; Eisenbach, Stefan; Weihs, P.; Clements, Craig B.; Steinacker, Reinhold; Mursch-Radlgruber, Erich; Dorninger, Manfred

    2004-08-01

    Comparisons are made between the post-sunrise breakup of temperature inversions in two similar closed basins in quite different climate settings, one in the eastern Alps and one in the Rocky Mountains. The small, high-altitude, limestone sinkholes have both experienced extreme temperature minima below -50°C. On undisturbed clear nights, temperature inversions reach to 120 m heights in both sinkholes, but are much stronger in the drier Rocky Mountain basin (24K versus 13K). Inversion destruction takes place 2.6 to 3 hours after sunrise and is accomplished primarily by subsidence warming associated with the removal of air from the base of the inversion by the upslope flows that develop over the sidewalls. Differences in inversion strengths and post-sunrise heating rates are caused by differences in the surface energy budget, with drier soil and a higher sensible heat flux in the Rocky Mountain sinkhole.

  1. 13. AERIAL VIEW OF THE ROCKY FLATS PLANT FROM DIRECTLY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. AERIAL VIEW OF THE ROCKY FLATS PLANT FROM DIRECTLY OVERHEAD IN 1954. IN 1950, DOW CHEMICAL COMPANY WAS CHOSEN BY THE ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION TO ESTABLISH THE ROCKY FLATS PLANT AS AN ATOMIC BOMB TRIGGER FABRICATION FACILITY. THE CRITERIA FOR SITING SUCH A PLANT INCLUDED A LOCATION WEST OF THE MISSISSIPPI, NORTH OF TEXAS, SOUTH OF THE NORTHERN BORDER OF COLORADO, AND EAST OF UTAH; A DRY MODERATE CLIMATE; A SUPPORTING POPULATION OF AT LEAST 25,000 PEOPLE; AND ACCESSIBILITY FROM LOS ALAMOS, NM, CHICAGO, IL, AND ST. LOUIS, MO. TWENTY-ONE AREAS IN THE UNITED STATES WERE SUGGESTED; SEVEN LOCATIONS WERE SCREENED IN THE DENVER AREA. THIS FOUR-SQUARE MILE AREA WAS SELECTED AND CONSTRUCTION BEGAN IN 1951 (8/31/54). - Rocky Flats Plant, Bounded by Indiana Street & Routes 93, 128 & 72, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  2. Rocky Planetesimal Formation via Fluffy Aggregates of Nanograins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, Sota; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2016-12-01

    Several pieces of evidence suggest that silicate grains in primitive meteorites are not interstellar grains but condensates formed in the early solar system. Moreover, the size distribution of matrix grains in chondrites implies that these condensates might be formed as nanometer-sized grains. Therefore, we propose a novel scenario for rocky planetesimal formation in which nanometer-sized silicate grains are produced by evaporation and recondensation events in early solar nebula, and rocky planetesimals are formed via aggregation of these nanograins. We reveal that silicate nanograins can grow into rocky planetesimals via direct aggregation without catastrophic fragmentation and serious radial drift, and our results provide a suitable condition for protoplanet formation in our solar system.

  3. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Mexico: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Hernández, Gerardo; Roldán, Jesús Felipe González; Milan, Néstor Saúl Hernández; Lash, R Ryan; Behravesh, Casey Barton; Paddock, Christopher D

    2017-03-29

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever, a tick-borne zoonosis caused by Rickettsia rickettsii, is among the most lethal of all infectious diseases in the Americas. In Mexico, the disease was first described during the early 1940s by scientists who carefully documented specific environmental determinants responsible for devastating outbreaks in several communities in the states of Sinaloa, Sonora, Durango, and Coahuila. These investigators also described the pivotal roles of domesticated dogs and Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (brown dog ticks) as drivers of epidemic levels of Rocky Mountain spotted fever. After several decades of quiescence, the disease re-emerged in Sonora and Baja California during the early 21st century, driven by the same environmental circumstances that perpetuated outbreaks in Mexico during the 1940s. This Review explores the history of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Mexico, current epidemiology, and the multiple clinical, economic, and social challenges that must be considered in the control and prevention of this life-threatening illness.

  4. Conference Report: Masters Forum IV, February 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, Todd

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the APPL Masters Forum is to bring together some of the best project managers at NASA, as well as those in industry and other government agencies, for 2 1/2 days of knowledge sharing. The project managers come eager to reflect on their project experiences, to learn new things from one another--and to unlearn a few things, too. This was the fourth Masters Forum, and the first one held outside Washington, DC. Fifty participants from across the country came to Dallas at the American Airlines Conference Center, a wonderful facility that was conveniently located by the airport and yet still seemed isolated from the rest of the world. Masters Forum IV was also the first one held during the winter. Previous Masters Forums have been during the summer. Hot, sticky Washington, D.C. in the summer may sound unpleasant, but frankly the popularity of earlier Forums is what led to this annual event becoming a semiannual one.

  5. An exhumed Late Paleozoic canyon in the rocky mountains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soreghan, G.S.; Sweet, D.E.; Marra, K.R.; Eble, C.F.; Soreghan, M.J.; Elmore, R.D.; Kaplan, S.A.; Blum, M.D.

    2007-01-01

    Landscapes are thought to be youthful, particularly those of active orogenic belts. Unaweep Canyon in the Colorado Rocky Mountains, a large gorge drained by two opposite-flowing creeks, is an exception. Its origin has long been enigmatic, but new data indicate that it is an exhumed late Paleozoic landform. Its survival within a region of profound late Paleozoic orogenesis demands a reassessment of tectonic models for the Ancestral Rocky Mountains, and its form and genesis have significant implications for understanding late Paleozoic equatorial climate. This discovery highlights the utility of paleogeomorphology as a tectonic and climatic indicator. ?? 2007 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

  6. Transforming the Rockies: Human forces, settlement patterns, and ecosystem effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Travis, William R.; Theobald, David M.; Fagre, Daniel B.

    2002-01-01

    The current ecological condition of the Rocky Mountains can be viewed from two somewhat opposing perspectives. The first is that human occupation has had relatively little effect on the Rockies: large natural, if not pristine, areas remain, and the region's open spaces provide wildlife habitat, majestic scenery, and a sense of wildness. Unlike the situation in, say, the Swiss Alps, where even high-elevation meadows have been mown and grazed intensively for as long as 500 years and many large mammals have been extirpated, most elements of Rocky Mountain landscapes and biota are reasonably unaltered. Even the presumption that Native Americans changed regional landscapes with deliberately set fires has been challenged by Baker and Ehle (2001) and others who think that most fires were lightning-caused or accidental ignitions. The second view is that humans have dramatically transformed the Rockies, at least since Euro-American settlement in the mid- to late 1800s. The slaughter of vast buffalo herds, the clearing of timber for railroad ties, and even the removal of whole hillsides in hydraulic placer mining represented substantial transformation. Ranch, resort, and residential development marks the latest incarnation of this transformation. Numerous, complex layers of land use have left landscape legacies, some of which may be unrecognized or underappreciated in modern assessments (Wohl 2001). Here we consider both perspectives because we are impressed with both the many effects of human use of the Rockies and the region's remaining wild landscapes. Ironically, much of the recent population growth and development in the Rockies is driven by the region's wild landscapes, which make the present widespread transformation seem all the more significant. It is, of course, the rapid clip of current human transformation—high population growth rates, pervasive rural residential development, and landscape fragmentation (Baron, Theobald, and Fagre 2000)—that worries

  7. Coal-bed gas resources of the Rocky Mountain region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schenk, C.J.; Nuccio, V.F.; Flores, R.M.; Johnson, R.C.; Roberts, S.B.; Collett, T.S.

    2001-01-01

    The Rocky Mountain region contains several sedimentary provinces with extensive coal deposits and significant accumulations of coal-bed gas. This summary includes coal-bed gas resources in the Powder River Basin (Wyoming and Montana), Wind River Basin (Wyoming), Southwest Wyoming (Greater Green River Basin of Wyoming, Colorado, and Utah), Uinta-Piceance Basin (Colorado and Utah), Raton Basin (Colorado and New Mexico), and San Juan Basin (Colorado and New Mexico). Other provinces in the Rocky Mountain region may contain significant coal-bed gas resources, but these resource estimates are not available at this time.

  8. Common and Unique Factors Associated with DSM-IV-TR Internalizing Disorders in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higa-McMillan, Charmaine K.; Smith, Rita L.; Chorpita, Bruce F.; Hayashi, Kentaro

    2008-01-01

    With the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (American Psychiatric Association. "Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders DSM-IV Fourth Edition-Text Revision". Author, Washington, DC. 2000) ahead, decisions will be made about the future of taxonomic conceptualizations. This study examined the…

  9. Tsunami Preparedness in Washington (video)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loeffler, Kurt; Gesell, Justine

    2010-01-01

    Tsunamis are a constant threat to the coasts of our world. Although tsunamis are infrequent along the West coast of the United States, it is possible and necessary to prepare for potential tsunami hazards to minimize loss of life and property. Community awareness programs are important, as they strive to create an informed society by providing education and training. This video about tsunami preparedness in Washington distinguishes between a local tsunami and a distant event and focus on the specific needs of this region. It offers guidelines for correct tsunami response and community preparedness from local emergency managers, first-responders, and leading experts on tsunami hazards and warnings, who have been working on ways of making the tsunami affected regions safer for the people and communities on a long-term basis. This video was produced by the US Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with Washington Emergency Management Division (EMD) and with funding by the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program.

  10. Father Secchi Goes to Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, M. F.

    1994-12-01

    In 1848 a small group of Jesuit refugees arrived at Georgetown College near Washington, D.C. Among them was a young priest, Angelo Secchi, who had finished theology studies in Rome, but had not been able to complete his final examinations. This done successfully, Secchi turned to astronomy and the new facilities of the Georgetown College Observatory, directed by its founder, Fr. James Curley. During his two years in Washington, Secchi studied physics, wrote an article on Electrical Rheometry for the Smithsonian Institution, and formed a friendship with Matthew Fontaine Maury of the U.S. Navy, who headed the Chart Service and in 1844 was named superintendent of the National Observatory. This was later named the U.S. Naval Observatory. Secchi's friendships formed during the Washington visit proved most helpful for relations between European astronomers and U.S. colleagues. Secchi, after his return to Rome constructed the Observatory of the Collegio Romano atop the baroque Church of St. Ignatius in Rome and began his work in spectral classification of stars.

  11. PLATO IV Accountancy Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pondy, Dorothy, Comp.

    The catalog was compiled to assist instructors in planning community college and university curricula using the 48 computer-assisted accountancy lessons available on PLATO IV (Programmed Logic for Automatic Teaching Operation) for first semester accounting courses. It contains information on lesson access, lists of acceptable abbreviations for…

  12. IVS Technology Coordinator Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Alan

    2013-01-01

    This report of the Technology Coordinator includes the following: 1) continued work to implement the new VLBI2010 system, 2) the 1st International VLBI Technology Workshop, 3) a VLBI Digital- Backend Intercomparison Workshop, 4) DiFX software correlator development for geodetic VLBI, 5) a review of progress towards global VLBI standards, and 6) a welcome to new IVS Technology Coordinator Bill Petrachenko.

  13. The PLATO IV Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stifle, Jack

    The PLATO IV computer-based instructional system consists of a large scale centrally located CDC 6400 computer and a large number of remote student terminals. This is a brief and general description of the proposed input/output hardware necessary to interface the student terminals with the computer's central processing unit (CPU) using available…

  14. Little Jiffy, Mark IV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Henry F.; Rice, John

    1974-01-01

    In this paper three changes and one new development for the method of exploratory factor analysis (a second generation Little Jiffy) developed by Kaiser are described. Following this short description a step-by-step computer algorithm of the revised method, dubbed Little Jiffy, Mark IV is presented. (MP)

  15. Adsorption study for uranium in Rocky Flats groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Laul, J.C.; Rupert, M.C.; Harris, M.J.; Duran, A.

    1995-01-01

    Six adsorbents were studied to determine their effectiveness in removing uranium in Rocky Flats groundwater. The bench column and batch (Kd) tests showed that uranium can be removed (>99.9%) by four adsorbents. Bone Charcoal (R1O22); F-1 Alumina (granular activated alumina); BIOFIX (immobilized biological agent); SOPBPLUS (mixed metal oxide); Filtrasorb 300 (granular activated carbon); and Zeolite (clinoptilolite).

  16. Wolf-livestock interactions in the northern Rocky Mountains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since reintroduction in 1995, gray wolf populations in the northern Rocky Mountains have increased dramatically. Although rough tallies of livestock death/injury losses resulting from wolf predation are made each year, we know almost nothing about the indirect effects of wolf-livestock interactions...

  17. 77. Rocky Knob Recreation area. View of the valley from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    77. Rocky Knob Recreation area. View of the valley from Belcher's Curve. Notice that the scenic easement allows A the boundary of the parkway to disappear creating a park that appears bigger than it is. View to west-southwest. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  18. 76. Rocky Knob Recreation area, Belcher's Curve. View of a ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    76. Rocky Knob Recreation area, Belcher's Curve. View of a parkway scenic easement. These have helped preserve the rural character of the landscape through which the parkway passes. Facing east-southeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  19. Teacher Contract Non-Renewal: Midwest, Rocky Mountains, and Southeast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nixon, Andy; Dam, Margaret; Packard, Abbot L.

    2012-01-01

    This quantitative study investigated reasons that school principals recommend non-renewal of probationary teachers' contracts. Principal survey results from three regions of the US (Midwest, Rocky Mountains, & Southeast) were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U statistical procedures, while significance was tested applying a…

  20. The Conifers of the Northern Rockies. Bulletin, 1917, No. 53

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood, J. F.

    1918-01-01

    The purpose of this bulletin is to enable persons not technically trained in botany to identify the coniferous species of the northern Rocky Mountain region lying within the United States. Forest trees of all kinds have interest for all people. Familiar and affection knowledge of them has culture value of a very fine kind. For the people of some…

  1. Computing Risk to West Coast Intertidal Rocky Habitat due to ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Compared to marshes, little information is available on the potential for rocky intertidal habitats to migrate upward in response to sea level rise (SLR). To address this gap, we utilized topobathy LiDAR digital elevation models (DEMs) downloaded from NOAA’s Digital Coast GIS data repository to estimate percent change in the area of rocky intertidal habitat in 10 cm increments with eustatic sea level rise. The analysis was conducted at the scale of the four Marine Ecoregions of the World (MEOW) ecoregions located along the continental west coast of the United States (CONUS). Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) map data were used to identify rocky shoreline. Such stretches of shoreline were extracted for each of the four ecoregions and buffered by 100 m to include the intertidal and evaluate the potential area for upland habitat migration. All available LiDAR topobathy DEMs from Digital Coast were extracted using the resulting polygons and two rasters were synthesized from the results, a 10 cm increment zone raster and a non-planimetric surface area raster for zonal summation. Current rocky intertidal non-planimetric surface areas for each ecoregion were computed between Mean Higher High Water (MHHW) and Mean Lower Low Water (MLLW) levels established from published datum sheets for tidal stations central to each MEOW ecoregion. Percent change in non-planimetric surface area for the same relative ranges were calculated in 10 cm incremental steps of eustatic S

  2. Natural Gas in the Rocky Mountains: Developing Infrastructure

    EIA Publications

    2007-01-01

    This Supplement to the Energy Information Administration's Short-Term Energy Outlook analyzes current natural gas production, pipeline and storage infrastructure in the Rocky Mountains, as well as prospective pipeline projects in these states. The influence of these factors on regional prices and price volatility is examined.

  3. 18. Rocky Mountain Viaduct. This view shows the stone faced ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Rocky Mountain Viaduct. This view shows the stone faced arched piers. It is the only structure on the parkway with this feature. View is facing east. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  4. 251. Rocky Knob Recreation Area contact station. In the foreground ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    251. Rocky Knob Recreation Area contact station. In the foreground S one of the rock fins which is representative of the area. In the background is the contact station which opened as a gas station in September 1949. Facing northwest. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  5. Rocky Flats Plant Site Environmental Report for 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Cirrincione, D.A.; Erdmann, N.L.

    1992-12-31

    The Rocky Rats Plant Site Environmental Report provides summary information on the plant`s environmental monitoring programs and the results recorded during 1992. The report contains a compliance summary, results of environmental monitoring and other related programs, a review of environmental remediation activities, information on external gamma radiation dose monitoring, and radiation dose estimates for the surrounding population.

  6. Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement implementation successes and challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, D.C.

    1997-02-01

    On July 19, 1996 the US Department of Energy (DOE), State of Colorado (CDPHE), and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) entered into an agreement called the Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement (RFCA) for the cleanup and closure of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS or Rocky Flats). Major elements of the agreement include: an Integrated Site-Wide Baseline; up to twelve significant enforceable milestones per year; agreed upon soil and water action levels and standards for cleanup; open space as the likely foreseeable land use; the plutonium and TRU waste removed by 2015; streamlined regulatory process; agreement with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) to coordinate activities; and a risk reduction focus. Successful implementation of RFCA requires a substantial effort by the parties to change their way of thinking about RFETS and meet the deliverables and commitments. Substantial progress toward Site closure through the implementation of RFCA has been accomplished in the short time since the signing, yet much remains to be done. Much can be learned from the Rocky Flats experience by other facilities in similar situations.

  7. This Glorious Mud Pile (Rocky River Valley). Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabbage, Mary Ellen

    This student text focuses on the social and geological history of a river basin. In addition to background information, the text includes student worksheets for 12 field trip stops in Ohio's Rocky River Valley. Material is designed to support a full-day field trip during which students work in small groups. Also included are a geological…

  8. "Rocky Mountain Talent Search" at the University of Denver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigby, Kristin

    2005-01-01

    The "Rocky Mountain Talent Search" (RMTS) at the University of Denver was developed based on the talent search model developed by Dr Julian Stanley of Johns Hopkins University. This article summarizes the establishment of RMTS and outlines its contemporary programs. Guided by the philosophy that gifted students have unique needs, require academic…

  9. 245. Rocky Mountain Viaduct. This steel girder viaduct was built ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    245. Rocky Mountain Viaduct. This steel girder viaduct was built in 1942. All of the reinforced concrete was faced with a rusticated stone. It is the only structure on the parkway with stone faced arched piers. The view is facing east. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  10. 17. Rocky Mountain viaduct. This steel girder viaduct was built ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Rocky Mountain viaduct. This steel girder viaduct was built in 1942. All of the reinforced concrete was faced with a rustic stone facade. View is to east. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  11. Observations of captive Rocky Mountain mule deer behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Halford, D.K.; Arthur, W.J. III; Alldredge, A.W.

    1987-01-31

    Observations were made near Fort Collins, Colorado on the behavior of a captive herd of Rocky Mountain mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus hemionus). Comparisons in general behavior patterns were made between captive and wild deer. Similar behavior was exhibited by captive and wild deer. Captive deer (as well as other species) may be useful for study of certain behavioral aspects of their wild counterparts.

  12. 7. Photographic copy of photograph (Source: National Archives, Rocky Mountain ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photographic copy of photograph (Source: National Archives, Rocky Mountain Region, Denver, Salt River Project History, Final History to 1916. p. 506) Interior view of transformer house. No date. CA. 1916. - Theodore Roosevelt Dam, Transformer House, Salt River, Tortilla Flat, Maricopa County, AZ

  13. 7. Photographic copy of photograph (Source: National Archives, Rocky Mountain ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photographic copy of photograph (Source: National Archives, Rocky Mountain Region, Denver, Salt River Project History, Final History to 1916. p. 504) Inside Roosevelt power plant showing size of valve. CA. 1916. - Theodore Roosevelt Dam, Power Plant, Salt River, Tortilla Flat, Maricopa County, AZ

  14. Operation Minerva Rocky View: Mentoring Young Girls in Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makosz, Jean; And Others

    Operation Minerva is a science conference which originated in Calgary (Alberta, Canada) to provide young girls with positive experiences in math, the sciences, and technology. The program was adopted by a group of Rocky View teachers and parents who revised the program to meet the needs of their rural students. The program involved 40 eighth grade…

  15. Rapid Oligocene Exhumation of the Western Canadian Rocky Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szameitat, A.; Parrish, R. R.; Stuart, F. M.; Carter, A.; Fishwick, S.

    2014-12-01

    As part of the North American Cordillera the Rocky Mountains of Canada impact the deflection of weather systems and the jet stream and form a distinct barrier to Pacific moisture reaching the continental interior. The extent to which this climatic pattern extended into the past is at present uncertain, so improving our understanding of the elevation history of the Rockies is critical to determining the controls on climate change within the Northern Hemisphere. We have undertaken a comprehensive apatite (U-Th-Sm)/He and fission track study of the southeastern Canadian Cordillera, i.e. the southern Canadian Rocky Mountains, in order to provide insight into the mid to late Cenozoic uplift and exhumation history of this region. Thermal history and exhumation models of widespread low elevation samples in combination with 6 vertical profiles covering elevations from 500 up to 3100 m a.s.l. show at least 1500 m of rapid exhumation west of the Rocky Mountain Trench (RMT) during the Oligocene (Figure 1). In contrast, the ranges east of the RMT low elevation samples provide Eocene ages throughout. The data show a very different history of recent uplift of the Canadian Rockies compared to what is currently known from published work, which mostly infer that the eastern Canadian Cordillera has not experienced significant uplift since the Eocene. We propose that the most likely cause of this rock uplift was upwelling of asthenosphere around the eastward subducting Farallon Plate. This also led to the eruption of the nearby mainly Miocene Chilcotin Group flood basalts and could have caused underplating of the thin lithosphere west of the RMT, adding to the buoyancy of the plate and lifting the range. Because the Trench marks the edge of the normal thickness craton which was underthrust beneath the Rocky Mountains during the initial upper Cretaceous orogeny, the eastern Rockies have a normal lithosperic thickness. This would impede recent uplift and provides an explanation for the

  16. A Regional Atmospheric Continuous CO2 Network In The Rocky Mountains (Rocky RACCOON)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, B.; de Wekker, S.; Watt, A.; Schimel, D.

    2005-12-01

    We have established a continuous CO2 observing network in the Rocky Mountains, building on technological and modeling advances made during the Carbon in the Mountains Experiment (CME), to improve our understanding of regional carbon fluxes and to fill key gaps in the North American Carbon Program (NACP). We will present a description of the Rocky RACCOON network and early results from the first three sites. There are strong scientific and societal motivations for determining CO2 exchanges on regional scales. NACP aims to address these concerns through a dramatic expansion in observations and modeling capabilities over North America. Mountain forests in particular represent a significant potential net CO2 sink in the U.S. and are highly sensitive to land-use practices and climate change. However, plans for new continuous CO2 observing sites have omitted the mountain west. This resulted from expensive instrumentation in the face of limited resources, and a perception that current atmospheric transport models are not sophisticated enough to interpret CO2 measurements made in complex terrain. Through our efforts in CME, we have a new autonomous, inexpensive, and robust CO2 analysis system and are developing mountain CO2 modeling tools that will help us to overcome these obstacles. Preliminary observational and modeling results give us confidence that continuous CO2 observations from mountain top observatories will provide useful constraints on regional carbon cycling and will be valuable in the continental inverse modeling efforts planned for NACP. We began at three Colorado sites in August 2005 and hope to add three to six sites in other western states in subsequent years, utilizing existing observatories to the maximum extent possible. The first three sites are at Niwot Ridge, allowing us to have an ongoing intercomparison with flask measurements made by NOAA CMDL; at Storm Peak Laboratory near Steamboat Springs, allowing us to investigate comparisons between these

  17. The challenge and future of rocky desertification control in Karst areas in Southwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. Y.; Dai, M. H.; Wang, L. C.; Zeng, C. F.; Su, W. C.

    2015-11-01

    Karst rocky desertification occurs after vegetation deteriorates as a result of intensive land use, which leads to severe water loss and soil erosion and exposes basement rocks, creating a rocky landscape. The karst rocky desertification is found in humid areas in Southwest China, the region most seriously affected by rocky desertification in the world. In order to promote ecological restoration and help peasants out of poverty, the Chinese government carried out the first phase of a rocky desertification control project from 2006 to 2015, which initially contained the expansion of rocky desertification. Currently, the Chinese government is prepared to implement the second phase of the rocky desertification control project, and therefore it is essential to summarize the lessons learned over the last ten years of the first phase. In this paper, we analyze the driving social and economic factors behind rocky desertification, summarize the scientific research on rocky desertification in the region, and finally identify the main problems facing rocky desertification control. In addition, we put forward several policy suggestions that take into account the perspective of local peasants, the scientific research, and China's economic development and urbanization process. These suggestions include: promoting the non-agriculturalization of household livelihoods, improving ecological compensation, strengthening the evaluation of rocky desertification control and dynamic monitoring, and strengthening research on key ecological function recovery technologies and supporting technologies.

  18. The challenge and future of rocky desertification control in karst areas in southwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. Y.; Dai, M. H.; Wang, L. C.; Zeng, C. F.; Su, W. C.

    2016-01-01

    Karst rocky desertification occurs after vegetation deteriorates as a result of intensive land use, which leads to severe water loss and soil erosion and exposes basement rocks, creating a rocky landscape. Karst rocky desertification is found in humid areas in southwest China, the region most seriously affected by rocky desertification in the world. In order to promote ecological restoration and help peasants out of poverty, the Chinese government carried out the first phase of a rocky desertification control project from 2006 to 2015, which initially contained the expansion of rocky desertification. Currently, the Chinese government is prepared to implement the second phase of the rocky desertification control project, and therefore it is essential to summarise the lessons learned over the last 10 years of the first phase. In this paper, we analyse the driving social and economic factors behind rocky desertification, summarise the scientific research on rocky desertification in the region, and finally identify the main problems facing rocky desertification control. In addition, we put forward several policy suggestions that take into account the perspective of local peasants, scientific research, and China's economic development and urbanisation process. These suggestions include promoting the non-agriculturalization of household livelihoods, improving ecological compensation, strengthening the evaluation of rocky desertification control and dynamic monitoring, and strengthening research on key ecological function recovery technologies and supporting technologies.

  19. Enhanced Design Alternative IV

    SciTech Connect

    N. E. Kramer

    1999-05-18

    This report evaluates Enhanced Design Alternative (EDA) IV as part of the second phase of the License Application Design Selection (LADS) effort. The EDA IV concept was compared to the VA reference design using criteria from the ''Design Input Request for LADS Phase II EDA Evaluations'' (CRWMS M&O 1999b) and (CRWMS M&O 1999f). Briefly, the EDA IV concept arranges the waste packages close together in an emplacement configuration known as ''line load''. Continuous pre-closure ventilation keeps the waste packages from exceeding the 350 C cladding and 200 C (4.3.13) drift wall temperature limits. This EDA concept keeps relatively high, uniform emplacement drift temperatures (post-closure) to drive water away from the repository and thus dry out the pillars between emplacement drifts. The waste package is shielded to permit human access to emplacement drifts and includes an integral filler inside the package to reduce the amount of water that can contact the waste form. Closure of the repository is desired 50 years after first waste is emplaced. Both backfill and a drip shields will be emplaced at closure to improve post-closure performance.

  20. 76 FR 21425 - Rocky Mountain Railcar and Repair, Inc.-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-Line of Railroad in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-15

    ... Surface Transportation Board Rocky Mountain Railcar and Repair, Inc.--Acquisition and Operation Exemption--Line of Railroad in Tooele County, UT Rocky Mountain Railcar and Repair, Inc. (Rocky Mountain), a... line. \\1\\ Rocky Mountain states that it currently operates a railcar repair facility, but that it...

  1. Booker T. Washington and George Washington Carver: A Tandem of Adult Educators at Tuskegee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Leo

    1984-01-01

    Shows how Booker T. Washington and George Washington Carver espoused adult education principles through their efforts to eradicate illiteracy, teach practical knowledge to Black farmers and poor Blacks, and instill the value of education in Black adults. (SK)

  2. Contributors to Adult Education: Booker T. Washington, George Washington Carver, Alain L. Locke, and Ambrose Caliver.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gyant, LaVerne

    1988-01-01

    Outlines the lives and the contributions to adult education made by the following African American educators: (1) Booker T. Washington; (2) George Washington Carver; (3) Alain L. Locke; and (4) Ambrose Caliver. (BJV)

  3. Bacterial Meningitis in Washington State

    PubMed Central

    Ostroy, Paul R.

    1979-01-01

    During 1977 the state of Washington maintained a surveillance system for reporting cases of bacterial meningitis. Hemophilus influenzae meningitis was the most common etiologic agent causing bacterial meningitis. A high incidence rate for H. influenzae meningitis was found among American Indians less than five years ago. A focus of ampicillin-resistant H. influenzae meningitis was found in Pierce County among military dependents or persons who had family members or relatives working or attending school with Fort Lewis Army Base personnel. Although relationships between the individual cases were not detected, the surveillance system continues to seek some association. PMID:506227

  4. GLACIER PEAK ROADLESS AREA, WASHINGTON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, S.E.; Johnson, F.L.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey outlined areas of mineral-resource potential in the Glacier Peak Roadless Area, Washington. Substantiated resource potential for base and precious metals has been identified in four mining districts included in whole or in part within the boundary of the roadless area. Several million tons of demonstrated base- and precious-metal resources occur in numerous mines in these districts. Probable resource potential for precious metals exists along a belt of fractured and locally mineralized rock extending northeast from Monte Cristo to the northeast edge of the roadless area.

  5. Bacterial meningitis in Washington state.

    PubMed

    Ostroy, P R

    1979-10-01

    During 1977 the state of Washington maintained a surveillance system for reporting cases of bacterial meningitis. Hemophilus influenzae meningitis was the most common etiologic agent causing bacterial meningitis. A high incidence rate for H. influenzae meningitis was found among American Indians less than five years ago. A focus of ampicillin-resistant H. influenzae meningitis was found in Pierce County among military dependents or persons who had family members or relatives working or attending school with Fort Lewis Army Base personnel. Although relationships between the individual cases were not detected, the surveillance system continues to seek some association.

  6. A sputnik IV saga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Charles A.

    2009-12-01

    The Sputnik IV launch occurred on May 15, 1960. On May 19, an attempt to deorbit a 'space cabin' failed and the cabin went into a higher orbit. The orbit of the cabin was monitored and Moonwatch volunteer satellite tracking teams were alerted to watch for the vehicle demise. On September 5, 1962, several team members from Milwaukee, Wisconsin made observations starting at 4:49 a.m. of a fireball following the predicted orbit of Sputnik IV. Requests went out to report any objects found under the fireball path. An early morning police patrol in Manitowoc had noticed a metal object on a street and had moved it to the curb. Later the officers recovered the object and had it dropped off at the Milwaukee Journal. The Moonwarch team got the object and reported the situation to Moonwatch Headquarters at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. A team member flew to Cambridge with the object. It was a solid, 9.49 kg piece of steel with a slag-like layer attached to it. Subsequent analyses showed that it contained radioactive nuclei produced by cosmic ray exposure in space. The scientists at the Observatory quickly recognized that measurements of its induced radioactivity could serve as a calibration for similar measurements of recently fallen nickel-iron meteorites. Concurrently, the Observatory directorate informed government agencies that a fragment from Sputnik IV had been recovered. Coincidently, a debate in the UN Committee on Peaceful Uses of Outer Space involved the issue of liability for damage caused by falling satellite fragments. On September 12, the Observatory delivered the bulk of the fragment to the US Delegation to the UN. Two days later, the fragment was used by US Ambassador Francis Plimpton as an exhibit that the time had come to agree on liability for damage from satellite debris. He offered the Sputnik IV fragment to USSR Ambassador P.D. Morozov, who refused the offer. On October 23, Drs. Alla Massevitch and E.K. Federov of the USSR visited the

  7. Washington: a guide to geothermal energy development

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomquist, R.G.; Basescu, N.; Higbee, C.; Justus, D.; Simpson, S.

    1980-06-01

    Washington's geothermal potential is discussed. The following topics are covered: exploration, drilling, utilization, legal and institutional setting, and economic factors of direct use projects. (MHR)

  8. 30 CFR 947.700 - Washington Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Forest Practices Act, RCW 76.09. (5) Washington Water Code, RCW 90.03. (6) Washington Water Pollution Control Act, RCW 90.48. (7) Washington Minimum Water Flows and Levels Act, RCW 90.22. (8) Washington... notice to that effect in the Federal Register. (1) The Washington Surface Mining Act of 1971,...

  9. 1. WASHINGTON TERMINAL COMPANY: UNION STATION. WASHINGTON, D.C. Sec. 1201, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. WASHINGTON TERMINAL COMPANY: UNION STATION. WASHINGTON, D.C. Sec. 1201, MP 137.00. (See HAER No. DC-1 for documentation on Union Station Power Plant.) - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between Union Station & DC/MD State Line, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  10. Climatic implications of latest Pleistocene and earliest Holocene mammalian sympatries in eastern Washington state, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyman, R. Lee

    2008-11-01

    For more than fifty years it has been known that mammalian faunas of late-Pleistocene age are taxonomically unique and lack modern analogs. It has long been thought that nonanalog mammalian faunas are limited in North America to areas east of the Rocky Mountains and that late-Pleistocene mammalian faunas in the west were modern in taxonomic composition. A late-Pleistocene fauna from Marmes Rockshelter in southeastern Washington State has no modern analog and defines an area of maximum sympatry that indicates significantly cooler summers than are found in the area today. An earliest Holocene fauna from Marmes Rockshelter defines an area of maximum sympatry, including the site area, but contains a single tentatively identified taxon that may indicate slightly cooler than modern summers.

  11. PMD IVS Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tornatore, Vincenza

    2013-01-01

    The main activities carried out at the PMD (Politecnico di Milano DIIAR) IVS Analysis Center during 2012 are briefly higlighted, and future plans for 2013 are sketched out. We principally continued to process European VLBI sessions using different approaches to evaluate possible differences due to various processing choices. Then VLBI solutions were also compared to the GPS ones as well as the ones calculated at co-located sites. Concerning the observational aspect, several tests were performed to identify the most suitable method to achieve the highest possible accuracy in the determination of GNSS (GLOBAL NAVIGATION SATELLITE SYSTEM) satellite positions using the VLBI technique.

  12. Achieving Small School Success in Washington State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyle, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Of Washington State's 296 school districts, two-thirds have 2,000 or fewer students. These small school districts provide unique learning opportunities for Washington's children, but also present special challenges to achieving the higher standards called for in the state education reform bill and recent federal legislation. This report provides…

  13. 77 FR 15179 - Disaster Declaration for Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-14

    ... Counties: Clallam, Grays Harbor, King, Klickitat, Lewis, Mason, Pierce, Skamania, Snohomish, Thurston... ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 13027 and 13028; Washington Disaster WA-00036] Disaster Declaration for Washington AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ] ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of...

  14. 40 CFR 81.434 - Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Washington. 81.434 Section 81.434 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.434 Washington. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal...

  15. 21 CFR 808.97 - Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EXEMPTIONS FROM FEDERAL PREEMPTION OF STATE AND LOCAL MEDICAL DEVICE REQUIREMENTS Listing of Specific State and Local Exemptions § 808.97 Washington. (a) The following Washington medical device requirement...

  16. 21 CFR 808.97 - Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EXEMPTIONS FROM FEDERAL PREEMPTION OF STATE AND LOCAL MEDICAL DEVICE REQUIREMENTS Listing of Specific State and Local Exemptions § 808.97 Washington. (a) The following Washington medical device requirement...

  17. Frustration at Heart of Washington Rally

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2011-01-01

    Thousands of educators, parent activists, and others are expected to convene in the heat and humidity of Washington next month for a march protesting the current thrust of education policy in the United States, especially the strong emphasis on test-based accountability. Organizers of the Washington say U.S. policymakers are moving in the wrong…

  18. Reshaping the Image of Booker T. Washington

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norrell, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Booker T. Washington, founder of the Tuskegee Institute and the recognized leader of American black people from 1895 until his death in 1915, has been viewed as an accommodationist to segregation, an African-American leader who traded black equality and voting rights for his own influence among white bigots. Washington rose to national fame with a…

  19. 33 CFR 117.1049 - Lake Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Seattle Marine Operator, Station KOH, or through other marine wire or radiotelephone service. (c) The draw... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Washington § 117.1049 Lake Washington. The draw of the Evergreen Point Floating Bridge between Seattle and Bellevue shall operate as follows: (a) The draw...

  20. 21 CFR 808.97 - Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EXEMPTIONS FROM FEDERAL PREEMPTION OF STATE AND LOCAL MEDICAL DEVICE REQUIREMENTS Listing of Specific State and Local Exemptions § 808.97 Washington. (a) The following Washington medical device requirement...

  1. 75 FR 52048 - Washington Disaster #WA-00027

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-24

    ... ADMINISTRATION Washington Disaster WA-00027 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of WASHINGTON dated 08/17/2010. Incident: Lynnview Apartment Complex Fire. Incident Period: 08/09/2010. Effective Date:...

  2. 76 FR 44976 - Washington Disaster # WA-00031

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-27

    ... No: 2011-18896] SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12693 and 12694] Washington Disaster WA-00031 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Washington dated 07/19/2011....

  3. Early Childhood Injury Deaths in Washington State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starzyk, Patricia M.

    This paper discusses data on the deaths of children aged 1-4 years in Washington State. A two-fold approach was used in the analysis. First, Washington State death certificate data for 1979-85 were used to characterize the deaths and identify hazardous situations. Second, death certificates were linked to birth certificates of children born in…

  4. Aerospace Training. Washington's Community and Technical Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Aerospace is an economic powerhouse that generates jobs and fuels our economy. Washington's community and technical colleges produce the world-class employees needed to keep it that way. With about 1,250 aerospace-related firms employing more than 94,000 workers, Washington has the largest concentration of aerospace expertise in the nation. To…

  5. Washington State Survey of Adolescent Health Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Dept. of Social and Health Services, Olympia.

    The 1992 Washington State Survey of Adolescent Health Behaviors (WSSAHB) was created to collect information regarding a variety of adolescent health behaviors among students in the state of Washington. It expands on two previous administrations of a student tobacco, alcohol, and other drug survey and includes questions about medical care, safety,…

  6. Corrections Education. Washington's Community and Technical Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The Washington State Department of Corrections contracts with community colleges to provide basic education and job training at each of the state's 12 adult prisons so upon release, individuals are more likely to get jobs and less likely to return. Washington State community colleges build a bridge for offenders to successfully re-enter…

  7. 12 CFR 4.4 - Washington office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., and is responsible for the direct supervision of certain national banks, including the largest... Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS, AVAILABILITY... EXAMINERS Organization and Functions § 4.4 Washington office. The Washington office of the OCC is the...

  8. Licensed Child Care in Washington State: 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Marna Geyer; Hu, James S.; Mayfield, Jim

    This study was the fifth survey of the Washington State licensed child care market, completed in 1996 by the Washington State Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS). Data were obtained through telephone interviews of approximately 2,700 child care providers. The major findings indicate that between 1994 and 1996, the monthly rate at…

  9. Polymer solidification of mixed wastes at the Rocky Flats Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Faucette, A.M.; Logsdon, B.W.; Lucerna, J.J.; Yudnich, R.J.

    1994-02-01

    The Rocky Flats Plant is pursuing polymer solidification as a viable treatment option for several mixed waste streams that are subject to land disposal restrictions within the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act provisions. Tests completed to date using both surrogate and actual wastes indicate that polyethylene microencapsulation is a viable treatment option for several mixed wastes at the Rocky Flats Plant, including nitrate salts, sludges, and secondary wastes such as ash. Treatability studies conducted on actual salt waste demonstrated that the process is capable of producing waste forms that comply with all applicable regulatory criteria, including the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure. Tests have also been conducted to evaluate the feasibility of macroencapsulating certain debris wastes in polymers. Several methods and plastics have been tested for macroencapsulation, including post-consumer recycle and regrind polyethylene.

  10. Facility overview for commercial application of selected Rocky Flats facilities

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this Facility Overview is to support the Rocky Flats Local Impacts Initiative`s Request for Interest, to solicit interest from commercial corporations for utilizing buildings 865 and 883, and the equipment contained within each building, for a commercial venture. In the following sections, this document describes the Rocky Flats Site, the buildings available for lease, the equipment within these buildings, the site services available to a tenant, the human resources available to support operations in buildings 865 and 883, and the environmental condition of the buildings and property. In addition, a brief description is provided of the work performed to date to explore the potential products that might be manufactured in Buildings 865 and 883, and the markets for these products.

  11. 32. AERIAL VIEW OF THE ROCKY FLATS PLANT LOOKING NORTHWEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. AERIAL VIEW OF THE ROCKY FLATS PLANT LOOKING NORTHWEST. DURING THE 1980S, A NUMBER OF COMPLAINTS CONCERNING SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ERRORS SURFACED, CULMINATING IN THE 1989 RAID ON THE PLANT BY THE FBI FOR ALLEGED ENVIRONMENTAL INFRACTIONS. THAT SAME YEAR, PRODUCTION AT THE PLANT WAS HALTED FOR CORRECTION OF SAFETY DEFICIENCIES. BY 1991, A SERIES OF EVENTS WORLDWIDE REDUCED THE COLD WAR THREAT, AND IN 1992, THE SECRETARY OF ENERGY ANNOUNCED THAT THE MISSION AT THE PLANT WOULD BE CHANGED TO ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION AND WASTE MANAGEMENT, WITH THE GOAL OF CLEANING UP THE PLANT AND SITE (1989). - Rocky Flats Plant, Bounded by Indiana Street & Routes 93, 128 & 72, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  12. Evidence of rocky planetesimals orbiting two Hyades stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farihi, J.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Koester, D.

    2013-07-01

    The Hyades is the nearest open cluster, relatively young and containing numerous A-type stars; its known age, distance, and metallicity make it an ideal site to study planetary systems around 2-3 M⊙ stars at an epoch similar to the late heavy bombardment. Hubble Space Telescope far-ultraviolet spectroscopy strongly suggests ongoing, external metal pollution in two remnant Hyads. For ongoing accretion in both stars, the polluting material has log [n(Si)/n(C)] > 0.2, is more carbon deficient than chondritic meteorites and is thus rocky. These data are consistent with a picture where rocky planetesimals and small planets have formed in the Hyades around two main-sequence A-type stars, whose white dwarf descendants bear the scars. These detections via metal pollution are shown to be equivalent to infrared excesses of LIR/L* ˜ 10-6 in the terrestrial zone of the stars.

  13. Adult Onset Still's Disease and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever.

    PubMed

    Persad, Paul; Patel, Rajendrakumar; Patel, Niki

    2010-01-01

    Adult Still's Disease was first described in 1971 by Bywaters in fourteen adult female patients who presented with symptoms indistinguishable from that of classic childhood Still's Disease (Bywaters, 1971). George Still in 1896 first recognized this triad of quotidian (daily) fevers, evanescent rash, and arthritis in children with what later became known as juvenile inflammatory arthritis (Still, 1990). Adult Onset Still's Disease (AOSD) is an inflammatory condition of unknown etiology characterized by an evanescent rash, quotidian fevers, and arthralgias. Numerous infectious agents have been associated with its presentation. This case is to our knowledge the first presentation of AOSD in the setting of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. Although numerous infectious agents have been suggested, the etiology of this disorder remains elusive. Nevertheless, infection may in fact play a role in triggering the onset of symptoms in those with this disorder. Our case presentation is, to our knowledge, the first case of Adult Onset Still's Disease associated with Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF).

  14. Actinide solution processing at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1039, for radioactive solution removal and processing at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado. The proposal for solution removal and processing is in response to independent safety assessments and an agreement with the State of Colorado to remove mixed residues at Rocky Flats and reduce the risk of future accidents. Monthly public meetings were held during the scoping and preparation of the EA. The scope of the EA included evaluations of alternative methods and locations of solution processing. A comment period from February 20, 1995 through March 21, 1995 was provided to the public and the State of Colorado to offer written comment on the EA. Comments were received from the State of Colorado and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. A response to the agency comments is included in the Final EA.

  15. Division Iv: Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbally, Christopher; D'Antona, Francesca; Spite, Monique; Asplund, Martin; Charbonnel, Corinne; Docobo, Jose Angel; Gray, Richard O.; Piskunov, Nikolai E.

    2012-04-01

    This Division IV was started on a trial basis at the General Assembly in The Hague 1994 and was formally accepted at the Kyoto General Assembly in 1997. Its broad coverage of ``Stars'' is reflected in its relatively large number of Commissions and so of members (1266 in late 2011). Its kindred Division V, ``Variable Stars'', has the same history of its beginning. The thinking at the time was to achieve some kind of balance between the number of members in each of the 12 Divisions. Amid the current discussion of reorganizing the number of Divisions into a more compact form it seems advisable to make this numerical balance less of an issue than the rationalization of the scientific coverage of each Division, so providing more effective interaction within a particular field of astronomy. After all, every star is variable to a certain degree and such variability is becoming an ever more powerful tool to understand the characteristics of every kind of normal and peculiar star. So we may expect, after hearing the reactions of members, that in the restructuring a single Division will result from the current Divisions IV and V.

  16. Rocky Flats Plant Site Environmental Report: 1993 Highlights

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    The Rocky Flats Plant Site Environmental Report provides summary information on the plant`s environmental monitoring programs and the results recorded during 1993. The report contains a compliance summary, results of environmental monitoring and other related programs, a review of environmental remediation activities, information on external gamma radiation dose monitoring, and radiation dose estimates for the surrounding population. This section provides an overview of these topics and summarizes more comprehensive discussions found in the main text of this annual report.

  17. Restoration of genetic connectivity among Northern Rockies wolf populations.

    PubMed

    Hebblewhite, Mark; Musiani, Marco; Mills, L Scott

    2010-10-01

    Probably no conservation genetics issue is currently more controversial than the question of whether grey wolves (Canis lupus) in the Northern Rockies have recovered to genetically effective levels. Following the dispersal-based recolonization of Northwestern Montana from Canada, and reintroductions to Yellowstone and Central Idaho, wolves have vastly exceeded population recovery goals of 300 wolves distributed in at least 10 breeding pairs in each of Wyoming, Idaho and Montana. With >1700 wolves currently, efforts to delist wolves from endangered status have become mired in legal battles over the distinct population segment (DPS) clause of the Endangered Species Act (ESA), and whether subpopulations within the DPS were genetically isolated. An earlier study by vonHoldt et al. (2008) suggested Yellowstone National Park wolves were indeed isolated and was used against delisting in 2008. Since then, wolves were temporarily delisted, and a first controversial hunting season occurred in fall of 2009. Yet, concerns over the genetic recovery of wolves in the Northern Rockies remain, and upcoming District court rulings in the summer of 2010 will probably include consideration of gene flow between subpopulations. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, vonHoldt et al. (2010) conduct the largest analysis of gene flow and population structure of the Northern Rockies wolves to date. Using an impressive sampling design and novel analytic methods, vonHoldt et al. (2010) show substantial levels of gene flow between three identified subpopulations of wolves within the Northern Rockies, clarifying previous analyses and convincingly showing genetic recovery.

  18. Karst rocky desertification information extraction with EO-1 Hyperion data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Yuemin; Wang, Kelin; Zhang, Bing; Jiao, Quanjun; Yu, Yizun

    2008-12-01

    Karst rocky desertification is a special kind of land desertification developed under violent human impacts on the vulnerable eco-geo-environment of karst ecosystem. The process of karst rocky desertification results in simultaneous and complex variations of many interrelated soil, rock and vegetation biogeophysical parameters, rendering it difficult to develop simple and robust remote sensing mapping and monitoring approaches. In this study, we aimed to use Earth Observing 1 (EO-1) Hyperion hyperspectral data to extract the karst rocky desertification information. A spectral unmixing model based on Monte Carlo approach, was employed to quantify the fractional cover of photosynthetic vegetation (PV), non-photosynthetic vegetation (NPV) and bare substrates. The results showed that SWIR (1.9-2.35μm) portions of the spectrum were significantly different in PV, NPV and bare rock spectral properties. It has limitations in using full optical range or only SWIR (1.9-2.35μm) region of Hyperion to decompose image into PV, NPV and bare substrates covers. However, when use the tied-SWIR, the sub-pixel fractional covers of PV, NPV and bare substrates were accurately estimated. Our study indicates that the "tied-spectrum" method effectively accentuate the spectral characteristics of materials, while the spectral unmixing model based on Monte Carlo approach is a useful tool to automatically extract mixed ground objects in karst ecosystem. Karst rocky desertification information can be accurately extracted with EO-1 Hyperion. Imaging spectroscopy can provide a powerful methodology toward understanding the extent and spatial pattern of land degradation in karst ecosystem.

  19. Rocky Mountain Arsenal Offpost Contamination Assessment. Technical Plan A003.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-09

    AND DATES COVERED S..... 11/09/84 .... 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS ROCKY MOUNTAIN ARSENAL OFFPOST CONTAMINATION ASSESSMENT, TECHNICAL PLAN...A003 6. AUTHOR(S) DAAK11 83 D 0007 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER ENVIRONAIENTAL SCIENCE...AND ENGINEERING DENVER, CO 8512*7R04 9. SPONSORING /MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSORING/ MONITORING AGENCY REPORT NUMBER ARMY

  20. Inspection of management of excess personal property at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-17

    Inspection revealed that immediate management attention is needed to properly control, store, and dispose of excess personal property at Rocky Flats. Current system of operation does not allow for efficient, timely, cost effective management; current storage and disposal practices are not consistent with contract requirements or DOE policies and procedures. Other deficiencies are pointed out. Results of inspection are divided into 4 sections: contract changeover issues, moratorium issues, additional excess property issues, and award fee observations. Recommendations are outlined.

  1. Estimating rocky seafloor extent on the Southern California continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cochrane, G.R.; Greene, H. Gary

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution sonar data are necessary to map bottom substrate for habitat studies but are lacking over much of the continental shelf. With such data, areas covered by sediment can be distinguished from bedrock areas with an accuracy of ??90%. Without these data, the extent of sediment as thick as 10 m cannot be resolved, and estimates of the extent of rocky seafloor are exaggerated. A study area north of Anacapa Island in Southern California interpreted as a large rocky area after mapping with low-resolution seismic systems was found to have exposed rocky bottom in only 10% of the area when mapped with high-resolution, side-scan sonar. The area of rock was estimated using video-supervised, sonar-image classification of textural derivatives of the data calculated from gray-level co-occurrence matrices. The classification of soft bottom was found to be ??90% accurate using an independent data set, derived from seafloor sampling records. Two general types of rock exposure are observed-sparse linear outcrops of layered sedimentary rocks and more massive, rounded outcrop areas of volcanic rocks. The percentage of exposed rock in volcanic areas exceeded that in sedimentary rock areas by a factor of 5 in the study area north of Anacapa Island. South of Point Arguello, 80% of the shelf seafloor is underlain by sedimentary rock units. The percentage of area that is exposed, rocky-reef habitat may be greater in other areas of coastal seafloor if the bedrock is predominantly volcanic. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  2. Orchitis in two dogs with Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Ober, Christopher P; Spaulding, Kathy; Breitschwerdt, Edward B; Malarkey, David E; Hegarty, Barbara C

    2004-01-01

    Two dogs with testicular swelling were sonographically diagnosed with orchitis and were subsequently diagnosed with Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF). Use of both gray scale and color Doppler sonography allowed for differentiation of orchitis from neoplasia and torsion. While only experimentally induced RMSF is reported to cause orchitis in dogs, it should be considered in any dog with vascular insult to the testes, especially when other signs of systemic illness are involved.

  3. Rocky Mountain spotted fever acquired in Florida, 1973-83.

    PubMed

    Sacks, J J; Janowski, H T

    1985-12-01

    From 1973 to 1983, 49 Florida residents were reported with confirmed Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), 25 of whom were considered to have had Florida-acquired disease. Although there was no history of tick exposure for six of these 25 persons, all had contact with dogs or outdoor activities during the incubation period. The tick vectors of RMSF are widely distributed throughout Florida. We conclude that RMSF, although rare in Florida, can be acquired in the state.

  4. Erosion of rocky carbonate coastlines: Andros Island, Bahamas

    SciTech Connect

    Donn, T.F.; Boardman, M.R.

    1985-01-01

    Erosion of rocky carbonate coastlines has been monitored at intertidal and supratidal locations on Andros Island, Bahamas. The monitoring method involves periodic direct measurement of over 1000 points on a 0.25 square meter surface of rock. Comparisons are made between initial surface morphology and subsequent surface morphologies in order to measure rates and patterns of erosion. Rates of intertidal erosion vary from 2.5 meters/1000 years to 5.0 meters/1000 years, with an average of 3.1 meters/1000 years. The lack of wave action, combined with an absence of bioeroding organisms such as gastropods, chitons, sponges, worms and barnacles, which exist in the intertidal zone, causes the supratidal rate of erosion to be much lower than the rate of intertidal erosion. Degradation of rocky coastlines results in island retreat as well as the production of a large amount of sediment which is deposited in adjacent lagoons. Much of the sediment produced by bioerosion of these peloidal limestones exists as fecal pellets and sponge chips which are calcite. The erosion of rocky intertidal escarpments creates terraces and notches which lie near low-tide level. The width of the intertidal terraces of Andros Island aids our understanding of the duration of the most recent stillstand of sea level. Terraces and notches at other elevations indicate former stillstands.

  5. Rocky flats closure project - lessons learned in worker stakeholder engagement

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, Laura; Mazur, Robert E.; Edelson, Martin

    2013-07-01

    The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (EPA Superfund site near Denver, Colorado) produced plutonium components for nuclear weapons for the U.S. defense program. The facility shut down in 1989 and clean up began in 1992. To ensure safe remediation of inactive nuclear sites, site owners have begun to consult stakeholders more widely in recent years. The closure of Rocky Flats aimed to set the standard for stakeholder involvement in doing the work safely, complying with regulations/standards, in a cost-effective manner. We have studied, using ethnographic methods, the extent to which workers at Rocky Flats were involved in communication and decision making strategies. Our results point out that workers can have perceptions of the site remediation process that differ from management and even other workers and that a significant number of workers questioned the commitment by management to engage the worker as stakeholder. The most effective remediation efforts should involve careful consideration of the insights and observations of all workers, particularly those who face immediate and high-level health and safety risks. (authors)

  6. Map of mixed prairie grassland vegetation, Rocky Flats, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, S J.V.; Webber, P J; Komarkova, V; Weber, W A

    1980-01-01

    A color vegetation map at the scale of 1:12,000 of the area surrounding the Rocky Flats, Rockwell International Plant near Boulder, Colorado, provides a permanent record of baseline data which can be used to monitor changes in both vegetation and environment and thus to contribute to future land management and land-use policies. Sixteen mapping units based on species composition were identified, and characterized by two 10-m/sup 2/ vegetation stands each. These were grouped into prairie, pasture, and valley side on the basis of their species composition. Both the mapping units and these major groups were later confirmed by agglomerative clustering analysis of the 32 vegetation stands on the basis of species composition. A modified Bray and Curtis ordination was used to determine the environmental factor complexes controlling the distribution of vegetation at Rocky flats. Recommendations are made for future policies of environmental management and predictions of the response to environmental change of the present vegetation at the Rocky Flats site.

  7. [Rocky Mountain spotted fever in an American tourist].

    PubMed

    de Pender, A M G; Bauer, A G C; van Genderen, P J J

    2005-04-02

    In a 28-year-old male American tourist who presented in the hospital with fever, cold shivers, headache, nausea, myalgia and arthralgia, Rocky Mountain spotted fever was suspected, partly because he came from an endemic region (the state of Georgia). The patient was treated with doxycycline, 100 mg b.i.d.; 9 days after the first appearance of the symptoms, the diagnosis was confirmed by the report of a positive antibody titre against Rickettsia rickettsii. The patient did not have exanthema. He was discharged in good general condition after two weeks of treatment. Rocky Mountain spotted fever, caused by the Gram-negative bacterium R. rickettsii, is a serious rickettsiosis. The disease is seen only sporadically in the Netherlands because the ticks in the Netherlands do not carry the bacterium. The travel history is still not a standard component of the anamnesis and is therefore often forgotten. This can lead to under-diagnosis and delayed treatment of diseases that were formerly limited to the continent. The early recognition and treatment of Rocky Mountain spotted fever is important since delayed treatment is associated with a clear increase in both morbidity and mortality.

  8. Predators on rocky shores in the northern Atlantic: Can the results of local experiments be generalized on a geographical scale?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingólfsson, Agnar

    2009-07-01

    Experimental manipulations of invertebrate prey and predators on rocky shores have been done by many authors. In the northern Atlantic the predators involved are usually the green crab Carcinus maenas and/or the dogwhelk Nucella lapillus, and the prey species studied are acorn barnacles (balanid Cirripedia), mussels ( Mytilus spp.) and winkles ( Littorina spp.). Usually the predators are found to have a regulating "top-down" effect on the prey species. In Iceland the acorn barnacle Semibalanus balanoides, the blue mussel Mytilus edulis and the flat periwinkle Littorina obtusata (including to some extent Littorina mariae) are found on rocky shores all around Iceland in what would seem to be near-optimal physical conditions. The predators Carcinus maenas and Nucella lapillus, on the other hand, are relatively southern species that do not thrive on the colder coasts of Iceland. Thus general surveys of different coasts of Iceland would seem to offer opportunities to see whether the results of local experiments can be discerned on a geographical scale (hundreds of km). The roughly 4900 km of the rocky coastline in Iceland was in this study subdivided into four regions, I-IV, according to the commonness or presence of the two predators. With the hope of reducing compounding factors the surveys were confined to sheltered or semi-sheltered fucoid shores, which were further divided into Ascophyllum (more sheltered) and Fucus vesiculosus (less sheltered) shores. Estuaries or other low-salinity environments were avoided. The study was based on 761 stations distributed around the rocky coastline on these two types of shores. The results for barnacles and mussels, being generally more abundant in regions were predators were scarce or absent, and being less common in Ascophyllum than F. vesiculosus shores in contrast to the predatory dogwelks, were in large measure in accord with predictions from experiments indicating "top-down" regulation. The results for the periwinkles

  9. Washington State biomass data book

    SciTech Connect

    Deshaye, J.A.; Kerstetter, J.D.

    1991-07-01

    This is the first edition of the Washington State Biomass Databook. It assess sources and approximate costs of biomass fuels, presents a view of current users, identifies potential users in the public and private sectors, and lists prices of competing energy resources. The summary describes key from data from the categories listed above. Part 1, Biomass Supply, presents data increasing levels of detail on agricultural residues, biogas, municipal solid waste, and wood waste. Part 2, Current Industrial and Commercial Use, demonstrates how biomass is successfully being used in existing facilities as an alternative fuel source. Part 3, Potential Demand, describes potential energy-intensive public and private sector facilities. Part 4, Prices of Competing Energy Resources, shows current suppliers of electricity and natural gas and compares utility company rates. 49 refs., 43 figs., 72 tabs.

  10. INDIAN HEAVEN ROADLESS AREA, WASHINGTON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, S.E.; Barnes, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of geologic, geochemical, and mining activity surveys the Indian Heaven Roadless Area, Washington offers little promise for the occurrence of metallic or nonmetallic mineral resources. Preliminary investigations of the geothermal potential of the area are inconclusive; however, a hot spring is located approximately 10 mi south of the roadless area, and the data indicate an aquifer of unknown extent at a temperature of less than 212 degree F. Geothermal lease applications were filed on about 23. 5 sq mi of the roadless area indicating potential interest in the development of a geothermal resource. In addition, about 39 sq mi of the roadless area have been leased for oil and gas exploration.

  11. 78 FR 2390 - CSOLAR IV South, LLC, Wistaria Ranch Solar, LLC, CSOLAR IV West, LLC, CSOLAR IV North, LLC v...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-11

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission CSOLAR IV South, LLC, Wistaria Ranch Solar, LLC, CSOLAR IV West, LLC, CSOLAR IV North, LLC v. California Independent System Operator Corporation; Notice of Complaint Take notice... IV South, LLC, Wistaria Ranch Solar, LLC, CSOLAR IV West, LLC and CSOLAR IV North, LLC...

  12. Elevation of grove looking northeast toward Washington Monument 1910 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevation of grove looking northeast toward Washington Monument - 1910 Japanese Flowering Cherry Trees , East Potomac Golf Course, East Potomac Park, Hains Point vicinity, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  13. View of book shop on elevator reboarding level Washington ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of book shop on elevator reboarding level - Washington Monument, High ground West of Fifteenth Street, Northwest, between Independence & Constitution Avenues, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  14. dBASE IV basics

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, P.

    1994-09-01

    This is a user`s manual for dBASE IV. dBASE IV is a popular software application that can be used on your personal computer to help organize and maintain your database files. It is actually a set of tools with which you can create, organize, select and manipulate data in a simple yet effective manner. dBASE IV offers three methods of working with the product: (1) control center: (2) command line; and (3) programming.

  15. Cascading effects of fire exclusion in Rocky Mountain ecosystems: a literature review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keane, R.E.; Ryan, K.C.; Veblen, T.T.; Allen, C.D.; Logan, J.; Hawkes, B.

    2002-01-01

    The health of many Rocky Mountain ecosystems is in decline because of the policy of excluding fire in the management of these ecosystems. Fire exclusion has actually made it more difficult to fight fires, and this poses greater risks to the people who fight fires and for those who live in and around Rocky Mountain forests and rangelands. This paper discusses the extent of fire exclusion in the Rocky Mountains, then details the diverse and cascading effects of suppressing fires in the Rocky Mountain landscape by spatial scale, ecosystem characteristic, and vegetation type. Also discussed are the varied effects of fire exclusion on some important, keystone ecosystems and human concerns.

  16. Petroleum geology of the state of Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Lingley, William S.; Law, Ben E.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the potential petroleum resources of Washington State as recently summarized in the 1995 U.S. Geological Survey National Assessment of Oil and Gas Resources. Eight conventional petroleum plays, three coal-bed gas plays, and two continuous-type gas plays are defined and characterized. Of these plays, the potential for significant petroleum accumulations appears greatest in the Columbia Plateau region of eastern Washington. Potential accumulations in western Washington are smaller but could have local economic significance. The absence of high-quality petroleum source rocks is probably the most important factor limiting development of large accumulations.

  17. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdnack, James A.; Zhou, Xiaobin; Larrabee, Glenn J.; Millis, Scott R.; Salthouse, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-fourth edition (WAIS-IV) and the Wechsler Memory Scale-fourth edition (WMS-IV) were co-developed to be used individually or as a combined battery of tests. The independent factor structure of each of the tests has been identified; however, the combined factor structure has yet to be determined. Confirmatory…

  18. Improving IV-A/IV-D Interface. Trainer Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. for Child Support Enforcement, Chevy Chase, MD.

    Effective interface between the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (IV-A) and the Child Support Enforcement (IV-D) programs is a key factor in assisting families in becoming self-sufficient, reducing welfare expenditures, and enforcing parental responsibility to support their children. Consequently, overcoming the procedural, technological,…

  19. Improving IV-A/IV-D Interface. Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. for Child Support Enforcement, Chevy Chase, MD.

    Effective interface between the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (IV-A) and the Child Support Enforcement (IV-D) programs is a key factor in assisting families in becoming self-sufficient, reducing welfare expenditures, and enforcing parental responsibility to support their children. Consequently, overcoming the procedural, technological,…

  20. ASTER Washington, D.C.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The White House, the Jefferson Memorial, and the Washington Monument with its shadow are all visible in this image of Washington, D.C. With its 15-meter spatial resolution, ASTER can see individual buildings. Taken on June 1, 2000, this image covers an area 14 kilometers (8.5 miles) wide and 13.7 kilometers (8.2 miles) long in three bands of the reflected visible and infrared wavelength region. The combination of visible and near infrared bands displays vegetation in red and water in dark grays. The Potomac River flows from the middle left to the bottom center. The large red area west of the river is Arlington National Cemetery.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high-resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Examples of applications include monitoring glacial advances and retreats, potentially active volcanoes, thermal pollution, and coral reef degradation; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; evaluating wetlands

  1. A Special Treat Awaits Zoophiles in Washington.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Edwards

    1993-01-01

    Describes the Amazonia exhibit at the Smithsonian's National Zoological Park, in Washington DC. The exhibit provides an example of the plant and animal life that exist in a tropical rain forest. (MDH)

  2. Charging Up in King County, Washington

    ScienceCinema

    Constantine, Dow; Oliver, LeAnn; Inslee, Jay; Sahandy, Sheida; Posthuma, Ron; Morrison, David

    2016-07-12

    King County, Washington is spearheading a regional effort to develop a network of electric vehicle charging stations. It is also improving its vehicle fleet and made significant improvements to a low-income senior housing development.

  3. NATIONAL COASTAL CONDITION REPORT IV

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Coastal Condition Report IV (NCCR IV) is the fourth in a series of environmental assessments of U.S. coastal waters and the Great Lakes. The report includes assessments of all the nation’s estuaries in the contiguous 48 states and Puerto Rico, south-eastern Alaska, ...

  4. 76 FR 78915 - Washington 10 Storage Corporation; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-20

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Washington 10 Storage Corporation; Notice of Filing Take notice that on December 13, 2011, Washington 10 Storage Corporation (Washington 10) filed a Statement of Operating... Loaning Service to add to Washington 10's possible remedies should Shipper have a negative Parking...

  5. 76 FR 26719 - Washington 10 Storage Corporation; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-09

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Washington 10 Storage Corporation; Notice of Filing Take notice that on April 29, 2011, Washington 10 Storage Corporation (Washington 10) filed a revised Statement of Operating Conditions (SOC) to comply with an April 25, 2011, Commission Order (135 FERC ] 61,071 (2011)). Washington...

  6. Cascading Effects of Ocean Acidification in a Rocky Subtidal Community

    PubMed Central

    Asnaghi, Valentina; Chiantore, Mariachiara; Mangialajo, Luisa; Gazeau, Frédéric; Francour, Patrice; Alliouane, Samir; Gattuso, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Temperate marine rocky habitats may be alternatively characterized by well vegetated macroalgal assemblages or barren grounds, as a consequence of direct and indirect human impacts (e.g. overfishing) and grazing pressure by herbivorous organisms. In future scenarios of ocean acidification, calcifying organisms are expected to be less competitive: among these two key elements of the rocky subtidal food web, coralline algae and sea urchins. In order to highlight how the effects of increased pCO2 on individual calcifying species will be exacerbated by interactions with other trophic levels, we performed an experiment simultaneously testing ocean acidification effects on primary producers (calcifying and non-calcifying algae) and their grazers (sea urchins). Artificial communities, composed by juveniles of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus and calcifying (Corallina elongata) and non-calcifying (Cystoseira amentacea var stricta, Dictyota dichotoma) macroalgae, were subjected to pCO2 levels of 390, 550, 750 and 1000 µatm in the laboratory. Our study highlighted a direct pCO2 effect on coralline algae and on sea urchin defense from predation (test robustness). There was no direct effect on the non-calcifying macroalgae. More interestingly, we highlighted diet-mediated effects on test robustness and on the Aristotle's lantern size. In a future scenario of ocean acidification a decrease of sea urchins' density is expected, due to lower defense from predation, as a direct consequence of pH decrease, and to a reduced availability of calcifying macroalgae, important component of urchins' diet. The effects of ocean acidification may therefore be contrasting on well vegetated macroalgal assemblages and barren grounds: in the absence of other human impacts, a decrease of biodiversity can be predicted in vegetated macroalgal assemblages, whereas a lower density of sea urchin could help the recovery of shallow subtidal rocky areas affected by overfishing from barren grounds to

  7. Cascading effects of ocean acidification in a rocky subtidal community.

    PubMed

    Asnaghi, Valentina; Chiantore, Mariachiara; Mangialajo, Luisa; Gazeau, Frédéric; Francour, Patrice; Alliouane, Samir; Gattuso, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Temperate marine rocky habitats may be alternatively characterized by well vegetated macroalgal assemblages or barren grounds, as a consequence of direct and indirect human impacts (e.g. overfishing) and grazing pressure by herbivorous organisms. In future scenarios of ocean acidification, calcifying organisms are expected to be less competitive: among these two key elements of the rocky subtidal food web, coralline algae and sea urchins. In order to highlight how the effects of increased pCO2 on individual calcifying species will be exacerbated by interactions with other trophic levels, we performed an experiment simultaneously testing ocean acidification effects on primary producers (calcifying and non-calcifying algae) and their grazers (sea urchins). Artificial communities, composed by juveniles of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus and calcifying (Corallina elongata) and non-calcifying (Cystoseira amentacea var stricta, Dictyota dichotoma) macroalgae, were subjected to pCO2 levels of 390, 550, 750 and 1000 µatm in the laboratory. Our study highlighted a direct pCO2 effect on coralline algae and on sea urchin defense from predation (test robustness). There was no direct effect on the non-calcifying macroalgae. More interestingly, we highlighted diet-mediated effects on test robustness and on the Aristotle's lantern size. In a future scenario of ocean acidification a decrease of sea urchins' density is expected, due to lower defense from predation, as a direct consequence of pH decrease, and to a reduced availability of calcifying macroalgae, important component of urchins' diet. The effects of ocean acidification may therefore be contrasting on well vegetated macroalgal assemblages and barren grounds: in the absence of other human impacts, a decrease of biodiversity can be predicted in vegetated macroalgal assemblages, whereas a lower density of sea urchin could help the recovery of shallow subtidal rocky areas affected by overfishing from barren grounds to

  8. Rocky Flats Neutron Detector Testing at Valduc, France

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S S; Dulik, G M

    2011-01-03

    Recent program requirements of the US Department of Energy/NNSA have led to a need for a criticality accident alarm system to be installed at a newly activated facility. The Criticality Safety Group of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was able to recover and store for possible future use approximately 200 neutron criticality detectors and 20 master alarm panels from the former Rocky Flats Plant in Golden, Colorado when the plant was closed. The Criticality Safety Group participated in a facility analysis and evaluation, the engineering design and review process, as well as the refurbishment, testing, and recalibration of the Rocky Flats criticality alarm system equipment to be used in the new facility. In order to demonstrate the functionality and survivability of the neutron detectors to the effects of an actual criticality accident, neutron detector testing was performed at the French CEA Valduc SILENE reactor from October 7 to October 19, 2010. The neutron detectors were exposed to three criticality events or pulses generated by the SILENE reactor. The first excursion was performed with a bare or unshielded reactor, and the second excursion was made with a lead shielded/reflected reactor, and the third excursion with a polyethylene reflected core. These tests of the Rocky Flats neutron detectors were performed as a part of the 2010 Criticality Accident Alarm System Benchmark Measurements at the SILENE Reactor. The principal investigators for this series of experiments were Thomas M. Miller and John C. Wagner of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with Nicolas Authier and Nathalie Baclet of CEA Valduc. Several other organizations were also represented, including the Y-12 National Security Complex, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, CEA Saclay, and Babcock International Group.

  9. Indian Education Act--Title IV. Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Elementary, Secondary and Vocational Education of the Committee on Education and Labor. House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.

    Hearings on proposed changes in Title IV of the Indian Education Act were held in Washington, D.C. on February 22, 1983. Witnesses representing American Indian tribes and students presented testimony regarding the Administration's proposed rescision and subsequent elimination of Title IV programs in fiscal 1984. Representatives of the National…

  10. State geothermal commercialization programs in seven Rocky Mountain states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunis, B. C.

    1982-08-01

    The activities and findings of the seven state commercialization teams participating in the Rocky Mountain Basin and Range commercialization program are described. The period covered is July through December 1981. Background information is provided, program objectives and the technical approach used are discussed, and the benefits of the program are described. Prospect identification, area development plans, site specific development analyses, time-phased project plans, the aggregated prospective geothermal energy use, and institutional analyses are discussed. Public outreach activities are covered and findings and recommendations are summarized.

  11. Dynamics of Rocky Mountain Lee Waves Observed During Success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean-Day, J.; Chan, K. R.; Bowen, S. W.; Bui, T. P.; Gary, B. L.; Chan, K. Roland (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    On two days during SUCCESS, the DC-8 sampled wave clouds which formed downstream of the ridges east of the Rocky Mountains. Wave morphology for both flights is deduced from temperature and 3-dimensional wind measurements from the MMS, isentrope profiles from the MTP, and linear perturbation theory. The waves observed on 960430 are smaller and found to be decaying with altitude, while the waves sampled on 960502 are vertically propagating and consist of larger, multiple wave scales. Wave orientations are consistent with the underlying topography and regions of high ice crystal concentration. Updraft velocities were estimated from the derived wave properties and are consistent with MMS vertical winds.

  12. Rocky Flats plant qualification testing for PRES Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kautz, D.D.; Tanaka, G.J.

    1994-06-24

    The authors recently completed several tests for EG&G - Rocky Flats, Inc. (RFP) to qualify welding procedures for the PRESS program. The welds that were tested were the Monel 400 to vanadium friction weld used in the Sail-A and the vanadium electron beam welds from the Mast Inner Subassembly. Tests were performed to determine the structural properties of the parts under conditions similar to those encountered in a weapons handling and storage environment. These tests included impact, tensile and pressure loading. Metallographic analysis was done where appropriate to document weld quality. All results were satisfactory for PRESS program purposes.

  13. The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site beryllium characterization project

    SciTech Connect

    Morrell, D.M.; Miller, J.R.; Allen, D.F.

    1999-06-01

    A site beryllium characterization project was completed at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) in 1997. Information from historical reviews, previous sampling surveys, and a new sampling survey were used to establish a more comprehensive understanding of the locations and levels of beryllium contamination in 35 buildings. A feature of the sampling strategy was to test if process knowledge was a good predictor of where beryllium contamination could be found. Results revealed that this technique was effective at identifying where surface contamination levels might exceed the RFETS smear control level but that it was not effective in identifying where low concentrations of beryllium might be found.

  14. [Rocky mountain spotted fever: report of two cases].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Medina, Miguel Angel; Padilla-Zamudio, Guillermo; Solís-Gallardo, Lilia Patricia; Guevara-Tovar, Marcela

    2005-01-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is an acute febrile illness caused by infection with Ricketsia Rickettsii, characterized by the presence of petechial rash. Even though the etiology, clinical characteristics and availability of effective antibiotics are known, RMSF related deaths have a prevalence of 4%. In its early stages RMFS can resemble many others infectious conditions and the diagnosis can be difficult. The present paper reports two patients with RMSF; these cases underscore the importance of prompt diagnosis and appropriate antimicrobial therapy, and consider RMSF as a differential diagnosis in any patient who develops fever and rash in an endemic area.

  15. 78 FR 7852 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Rocky Mountain...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-04

    ... Rocky Mountain Metropolitan Airport, Broomfield, CO AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... public comment on the release of land at the Rocky Mountain Metropolitan Airport under the provisions of..., Manager, Federal Aviation Administration, Northwest Mountain Region, Airports Division, Denver...

  16. 77 FR 28874 - ONEOK Rockies Midstream, L.L.C.; Notice of Redesignation of Proceeding

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-16

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission ONEOK Rockies Midstream, L.L.C.; Notice of Redesignation of Proceeding On April 11, 2012, ONEOK Rockies Midstream, L.L.C. (ORM) filed a letter in the above-docketed proceeding... Presidential Permit issued June 16, 2000, in Docket No. CP96-684- 001 \\1\\ to Bear Paw Energy, L.L.C....

  17. 78 FR 70033 - Encana Marketing (USA) Inc. v. Rockies Express Pipeline LLC; Notice of Complaint

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-22

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Encana Marketing (USA) Inc. v. Rockies Express Pipeline LLC; Notice of... Procedures of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission), 18 CFR 385.206, Encana Marketing (USA) Inc. (Encana Marketing or Complainant), filed a complaint against Rockies Express Pipeline...

  18. 76 FR 29264 - Minor Boundary Revision at Rocky Mountain National Park

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-20

    ... National Park Service Minor Boundary Revision at Rocky Mountain National Park AGENCY: National Park Service....S.C. 4601-9(c)(1), the boundary of Rocky Mountain National Park is modified to include an additional... National Park and northeast of Grand Lake. The boundary revision is depicted on Map No. 121/105,475...

  19. 78 FR 60309 - Minor Boundary Revision at Rocky Mountain National Park

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... National Park Service Minor Boundary Revision at Rocky Mountain National Park AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notification of Boundary Revision. SUMMARY: The boundary of Rocky Mountain National Park... depicting this boundary revision is available for inspection at the following locations: National...

  20. 76 FR 47577 - Rocky Mountain Natural Gas LLC; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Rocky Mountain Natural Gas LLC; Notice of Filing Take notice that on July 28, 2011, Rocky Mountain Natural Gas LLC filed a revised Statement of Operating Conditions to comply...

  1. Aqueous complexation of thorium(IV), uranium(IV), neptunium(IV), plutonium(III/IV), and cerium(III/IV) with DTPA.

    PubMed

    Brown, M Alex; Paulenova, Alena; Gelis, Artem V

    2012-07-16

    Aqueous complexation of Th(IV), U(IV), Np(IV), Pu(III/IV), and Ce(III/IV) with DTPA was studied by potentiometry, absorption spectrophotometry, and cyclic voltammetry at 1 M ionic strength and 25 °C. The stability constants for the 1:1 complex of each trivalent and tetravalent metal were calculated. From the potentiometric data, we report stability constant values for Ce(III)DTPA, Ce(III)HDTPA, and Th(IV)DTPA of log β(101) = 20.01 ± 0.02, log β(111) = 22.0 ± 0.2, and log β(101) = 29.6 ± 1, respectively. From the absorption spectrophotometry data, we report stability constant values for U(IV)DTPA, Np(IV)DTPA, and Pu(IV)DTPA of log β(101) = 31.8 ± 0.1, 32.3 ± 0.1, and 33.67 ± 0.02, respectively. From the cyclic voltammetry data, we report stability constant values for Ce(IV) and Pu(III) of log β(101) = 34.04 ± 0.04 and 20.58 ± 0.04, respectively. The values obtained in this work are compared and discussed with respect to the ionic radius of each cationic metal.

  2. Monitoring forest change at ecotones in the Colorado Rockies

    SciTech Connect

    Stohlgren, T.J.; Bachand, R.R. )

    1994-06-01

    We are assessing the potential effect of global climate change on the Front Range of the Colorado Rockies, including Rocky Mountain National Park. Our objective is quantify the abiotic and biotic controls on forest distribution and productivity as a basis for assessing potential vegetation change for a range of projected climate scenarios. A series of long-term vegetation transects are being established to relate soil characteristics (e.g., soil type, texture, moisture, nitrogen content) and microclimate (air and soil temperature) to vegetation characteristics (e.g., basal area, leaf area index, tree age structure, resource use efficiency, primary production) across lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia) ecotones. Results from five 200+ ectonal transects (68 20 m x 20 m plots; over 3,753 trees) show that basal area gradients from lodgepole pine to spruce-fir (Picea engelmannii, Abies lasiocarpa), ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), and limber pine (Pinus flexilis) forests are correlated strongly (but not linearly), to soil texture and summer soil moisture. Factors controlling species-specific radial growth patterns along ecotones are more complex.

  3. Rocky Mountain National Park reduced nitrogen source apportionment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Tammy M.; Rodriguez, Marco A.; Barna, Michael G.; Gebhart, Kristi A.; Hand, Jennifer L.; Day, Derek E.; Malm, William C.; Benedict, Katherine B.; Collett, Jeffrey L., Jr.; Schichtel, Bret A.

    2015-05-01

    Excess wet and dry deposition of nitrogen-containing compounds are a concern at a number of national parks. The Rocky Mountain Atmospheric Nitrogen and Sulfur Study Part II (RoMANS II) campaign was conducted from November 2008 to November 2009 to characterize the composition of reactive nitrogen and sulfur deposited in Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP). RoMANS II identified reduced nitrogen as the major contributor to reactive nitrogen deposition in RMNP, making up over 50% of the total. Motivated by this finding, the particulate source apportionment technology within the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with extensions was used here to estimate source apportionment of reduced nitrogen concentrations at RMNP. Source apportionment results suggest that approximately 40% of reduced nitrogen deposition to RMNP comes from ammonia sources within Colorado. However, the model evaluation also suggests that this number could be underrepresenting ammonia sources in eastern Colorado due to the difficulty of capturing upslope airflow on the eastern side of the Continental Divide with meteorological models. Emissions from California, the western model boundary, and the Snake River Valley in Idaho, the next three most influential sources, contribute approximately 15%, 8%, and 7%, respectively, to total reduced nitrogen measured in RMNP. Within Colorado, about 61%, 26%, and 13% of the total Colorado contribution comes from sources to the east of the Continental Divide, sources to the west of the Continental Divide, and from the park itself.

  4. A Simple Analytical Model for Rocky Planet Interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Li; Jacobsen, Stein B.

    2017-03-01

    This work aims to explore the scaling relations among rocky exoplanets. The assumption that the internal gravity increases linearly in the core and stays constant in the mantle is tested against numerical simulations, and a simple model is constructed, applicable to rocky exoplanets of CMF (core mass fraction) = 0.2–0.35 and mass = 0.1–30 M ⊕. Various scaling relations are derived: (1) CMF ≈ CRF2 (core radius fraction squared), (2) {P}{typical}∼ {g}s2 (typical interior pressure scales as surface gravity squared), (3) energy released in core formation is ∼ \\tfrac{1}{10} the total gravitational energy, (4) effective heat capacity of the mantle ≈ ≤ft(\\tfrac{{M}p}{{M}\\oplus }\\right)× 7.5× {10}27 J K‑1, (5) moment of inertia ≈ \\tfrac{1}{3}{M}p{R}p2. These relations, though approximate, are handy for quick use owing to their simplicity and lucidity, and provide insights into the interior structures of those exoplanets.

  5. Markov chain analysis of succession in a rocky subtidal community.

    PubMed

    Hill, M Forrest; Witman, Jon D; Caswell, Hal

    2004-08-01

    We present a Markov chain model of succession in a rocky subtidal community based on a long-term (1986-1994) study of subtidal invertebrates (14 species) at Ammen Rock Pinnacle in the Gulf of Maine. The model describes successional processes (disturbance, colonization, species persistence, and replacement), the equilibrium (stationary) community, and the rate of convergence. We described successional dynamics by species turnover rates, recurrence times, and the entropy of the transition matrix. We used perturbation analysis to quantify the response of diversity to successional rates and species removals. The equilibrium community was dominated by an encrusting sponge (Hymedesmia) and a bryozoan (Crisia eburnea). The equilibrium structure explained 98% of the variance in observed species frequencies. Dominant species have low probabilities of disturbance and high rates of colonization and persistence. On average, species turn over every 3.4 years. Recurrence times varied among species (7-268 years); rare species had the longest recurrence times. The community converged to equilibrium quickly (9.5 years), as measured by Dobrushin's coefficient of ergodicity. The largest changes in evenness would result from removal of the dominant sponge Hymedesmia. Subdominant species appear to increase evenness by slowing the dominance of Hymedesmia. Comparison of the subtidal community with intertidal and coral reef communities revealed that disturbance rates are an order of magnitude higher in coral reef than in rocky intertidal and subtidal communities. Colonization rates and turnover times, however, are lowest and longest in coral reefs, highest and shortest in intertidal communities, and intermediate in subtidal communities.

  6. Cementation of residue ion exchange resins at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect

    Dustin, D.F.; Beckman, T.D.; Madore, C.M.

    1998-03-03

    Ion exchange resins have been used to purify nitric acid solutions of plutonium at Rocky Flats since the 1950s. Spent ion exchange resins were retained for eventual recovery of residual plutonium, typically by incineration followed by the aqueous extraction of plutonium from the resultant ash. The elimination of incineration as a recovery process in the late 1980s and the absence of a suitable alternative process for plutonium recovery from resins led to a situation where spent ion exchange resins were simply placed into temporary storage. This report describes the method that Rocky Flats is currently using to stabilize residue ion exchange resins. The objective of the resin stabilization program is: (1) to ensure their safety during interim storage at the site, and (2) to prepare them for ultimate shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. Included in the discussion is a description of the safety concerns associated with ion exchange resins, alternatives considered for their stabilization, the selection of the preferred treatment method, the means of implementing the preferred option, and the progress to date.

  7. Rocky Mountain spotted fever: epidemiology of an increasing problem.

    PubMed

    Hattwick, M A; O'Brien, R J; Hanson, B F

    1976-06-01

    Reported cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in the United States have been increasing since 1960 and reached an all-time high of 754 cases in 1974. Detailed clinical and epidemiologic information was obtained on 1522 (55%) of the 2757 cases reported in the 5-year period 1970 through 1974. Fifty-one percent of cases were confirmed by one or more laboratory test. The increase has occurred predominantly in the southeastern part of the United States. A comparison of laboratory-confirmed and unconfirmed cases suggests that a variety of febrile exanthems may be confused with Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Neither a history of tick bite nor rash was universally present, and both were significantly less frequent in fatal cases. The overall death-to-case ratio during this period was 6.8%. Death-to-case ratios were significantly higher for nonwhites (13.9) than whites (5.8), for male patients (8.2) than female patients (4.5), and for person older than 30 (13.9) than persons younger than 30 (5.4).

  8. The chemical agent experience at Rocky Mountain Arsenal

    SciTech Connect

    Mohrman, G.

    1995-06-01

    Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA) was constructed and commissioned in 1942 for the production of sulfur mustard and other chemical munitions for possible use in World War II. RMA also became a production site for Lewisite and Sarin, including synthesis and munition filling. Other chemical agents such as Phosgene were routinely handled, filled into munitions and demilitarized. During the 1970`s and the early 1980`s, RMA served as a primary demilitarization facility for the destruction of chemical agents. Throughout its chemical weapons history, RMA generated waste materials from production, neutralization, decontamination and testing. These operations led to the possibility of chemical agent contamination in soils, process equipment and structures that have required special attention as part of the overall Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) environmental cleanup operations being conducted by the Program Manager Rocky Mountain Arsenal (PMRMA). Adjusting normal sampling operations associated with CERCLA-type activities for the special Army regulations covering chemical agents has been a difficult task. This presentation will describe the evolution of chemical agent related efforts and operations as they pertain to RMA environmental cleanup activities, to include field sampling requirements, analytical methods, commercial laboratory use and the role of the on-site PMRMA laboratory.

  9. Human influences on trophic cascades along rocky shores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindberg, D.R.; Estes, J.A.; Warheit, K.I.

    1998-01-01

    A three-trophic-level interaction among American Black Oystercatchers (Haematopus bachmani), limpets (Lottia spp.), and erect fleshy algae in rocky intertidal communities of central and southern California was documented via manipulative and 'natural' experiments. Removal of the territorial limpet (Lottia gigantea) initially caused large increases in the percent cover of erect fleshy algae, followed by a more gradual increase in density of small limpets (Lottia spp.) and a decline in algal cover. Algal cover increased following the removal of small limpets at the sites from which L. gigantea had been removed earlier, thus demonstrating that the large and small limpets had similar inhibitory effects on plant populations. A comparison of sites with and without oyster-catchers showed that L. gigantea occupied substrate inclinations in proportion to their availability at sites where oystercatchers were rare, whereas the distribution of L. gigantea was skewed toward vertically inclined substrates where oystercatchers were common. Survival rates of limpets translocated to horizontal and vertical substrates were similar in sites lacking oystercatcher predation, but were much lower on horizontal substrates where oystercatchers were common. Our results are consistent with those from several prior studies in demonstrating that shorelines frequented by humans typically lack oystercatchers. Humans also exploit L. gigantea and reduce populations to low densities of small individuals. These findings may explain why the midlittoral zone of rocky intertidal communities in western North America are so often dominated by high population densities of small limpets.

  10. Change analysis of karst rocky desertification for almost 40 years: a case study of Guangxi, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Zhou, Guoqing; Mao, Guodong; Shi, Yujun; Zhang, Rongting; Su, Chengjie

    2015-12-01

    The paper first studied the geometric correction of historical CORONA satellite imagery in the 1960s and used the historical imagery to extract KRD (karst rocky desertification). The study area is located in the karst region of Guangxi Province, China. Finally, we used the Landsat-5 imagery to extract rocky desertification in 2005, then we could find the changes of the karst rocky desertification in Guangxi from 1960s to 2005 about nearly 40 years. And comparison analysis was conducted and the results showed that, over the 40 years, Guangxi karst rocky desertification area has significantly changed. Guangxi has typical karst environment and is one of the most serious areas of rocky desertification in southwest China provinces, thus our research on this has great practical significance.

  11. The adsorption of plutonium IV and V on goethite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Arthur L.; Murray, James W.; Sibley, Thomas H.

    1985-11-01

    The adsorption of Pu(IV) and Pu(V) on goethite (αFeOOH) from NaNO 3 solution shows distinct differences related to the different hydrolytic character of these two oxidation states. Under similar solution conditions, the adsorption edge of the more strongly hydrolyzable Pu(IV) occurs in the pH range 3 to 5 while that for Pu(V) is at pH 5 to 7. The adsorption edge for Pu(V) shifts with time to lower pH values and this appears to be due to the reduction of Pu(V) to Pu(IV) in the presence of the goethite surface. These results suggest that redox transformations may be an important aspect of Pu adsorption chemistry and the resulting scavenging of Pu from natural waters. Increasing ionic strength (from 0.1 M to 3 M NaCl or NaNO 3 and 0.03 M to 0.3 M Na 2SO 4) did not influence Pu(IV) or Pu(V) adsorption. In the presence of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), Pu(V) reduction to Pu(IV) occurred in solution. Pu(IV) adsorption on goethite decreased by 30% in the presence of 240 ppm natural DOC found in Soap Lake, Washington waters. Increasing concentrations of carbonate ligands decreased Pu(IV) and Pu(V) adsorption on goethite, with an alkalinity of 1000 meq/l totally inhibiting adsorption. The Pu-goethite adsorption system provides the data base for developing a thermodynamic model of Pu interaction with an oxide surface and with dissolved ligands, using the MINEQL computer program. From the model calculations we determined equilibrium constants for the adsorption of Pu(IV) hydrolysis species. The model was then applied to Pu adsorption in carbonate media to see how the presence of CO 3-2 could influence the mobility of Pu. The decrease in adsorption appears to be due to formation of a Pu-CO 3 complex. Model calculations were used to predict what the adsorption curves would look like if Pu-CO 3 complexes formed.

  12. Public Schools Energy Conservation Measures, Report Number 10: Washington Elementary School, Kennewick, Washington.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of School Administrators, Arlington, VA.

    Reported is an engineering study of energy conservation opportunities at Washington Elementary School, Kennewick, Washington. The investigation is a component of the first phase of a five-part Saving Schoolhouse Energy Project initiated by the American Association of School Administrators and funded in part by the Federal Energy Administration.…

  13. Better Jobs, Brighter Futures, a Stronger Washington. Washington's Community and Technical Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The world is changing rapidly. With changes in technology, demographics, and workforce trends, Washington needs colleges to not only keep pace, but lead the way. Washington's 34 community and technical colleges answer that call. The community and technical colleges have proven uniquely positioned to adapt to, embrace, and ignite change. Community…

  14. 75 FR 10446 - Security Zone; Potomac River, Washington Channel, Washington, DC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ..., Washington, DC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard... New Jersey Avenue, SE., Washington, DC 20590-0001. (4) Hand Delivery: Same as mail address above..., DC 20590, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. We have...

  15. 75 FR 28757 - Security Zone; Potomac River, Washington Channel, Washington, DC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-24

    ..., Washington, DC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is... Transportation, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12-140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE., Washington, DC 20590..., DC on Monday, May 24, 2010. To address security concerns during the event, the Captain of the...

  16. Retro-action model for the erosion of rocky coasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapoval, B.; Baldassarri, A.

    2009-12-01

    Rocky coasts are estimated to represent 75% of the world’s shorelines [1]. We discuss various situations where the formation of rocky coast morphology could be attributed to the retro-action of the coast morphology on the erosive power of the see. In the case of rocky coasts, erosion can spontaneously create irregular seashores. But, in turn, the geometrical irregularity participates to the damping of sea-waves, decreasing the average wave amplitude and erosive power. There may then exist a mutual self-stabilization of the waves amplitude together with the irregular morphology of the coast. A simple model of such stabilization is discussed. It leads, through a complex dynamics of the earth-sea interface, to the spontaneous appearance of an irregular sea-shore. The final coast morphology is found to depend on the morphology/damping coupling of the coast and on the possible existence of built-in correlations within the coast lithologic properties. This is illustrated in the figure. In the limit case where the morphology/damping coupling is weak and when the earth lithology distribution exhibit only short range correlations, the process spontaneously build fractal morphologies with a dimension close to 4/3 [2]. It is shown that this dimension refers to the dimension of the so-called accessible perimeter in gradient percolation. However, even rugged but non-fractal sea-coasts morphology may emerge for strong damping or during the erosion process. When the distributions of the lithologies exhibit long range correlations, a variety of complex morphologies are obtained which mimics observed coastline complexity, well beyond simple fractality. On a somewhat different perspective, the design of breakwaters is suggested to be improved by using global irregular geometry with features sizes of the order of the wave-length of the sea oscillations. [1] R. A. Davis, Jr, D. M. Fitzgerald, Beaches and Coasts,(Blackwell, Oxford 2004). [2] B. Sapoval, A. Baldassarri, A. Gabrielli

  17. Temporal limits on the habitability of rocky worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Elizabeth Anne

    The epoch of habitability on a rocky world is dictated by the suite of geological events and processes it experiences. A planet may be habitable for a long stretch of its history, but that period has limits. When is too soon for life to arise on a planet, and when is it too late for it to continue? Limits for habitability on Earth-like planets can be defined by extracting Earth's history from the geochemical record to infer that of the rocky planets lying far beyond the reaches of our solar system. The Late Veneer was the last recorded impact event capable of melting the Earth's crust---and extinguishing any extant life. Eoarchean ultramafic schists (metakomatiites) from Greenland and Canada show highly siderophile element depletions consistent with a deep mantle that had yet to be fully contaminated by Late Veneer material. Whether it was one impactor or multiple, it is clear that the iteration of life from which we originate must have arisen no earlier than the Late Veneer. Planetary accretion stymies the emergence of life, but geophysics might provide its eventual demise. Plate tectonics operates on Earth as a globate climate moderator, keeping Earth's surface temperate. Geological activity is maintained largely by the long-lived, heat-producing radionuclides 40K, 232Th, 235U, and 238U, whose concentrations decline as Earth ages. Eventually, these isotopes will no longer be able to provide the heat required for mantle convection, and plate tectonics will shut down, calling into question Earth's ability to maintain habitability on a global scale. Here, the Late Veneer is proposed for the first time as a hard constraint for when life could have arisen on Earth, and age is shown to be a key player in the long-term thermal regimes of conventionally defined Earth-like exoplanets. Provided with limits on the reign of life on Earth, the habitability of rocky exoplanets can be evaluated: those that are too young will still be experiencing surface-sterilizing impact

  18. 77 FR 46117 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-02

    ...); Nooksack Indian Tribe of Washington; Port Gamble Indian Community of the Port Gamble Reservation... Tribe of Washington; Port Gamble Indian Community of the Port Gamble Reservation, Washington;...

  19. 75 FR 434 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ... Cultural Items: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA AGENCY... cultural items in the possession of the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke...

  20. Anencephaly: An Ongoing Investigation in Washington State.

    PubMed

    Barron, Sara

    2016-03-01

    : In the spring of 2012, a nurse in Washington State detected a cluster of babies born with anencephaly-a fatal condition in which infants are born without parts of the brain or skull. The resulting investigation initially confirmed a rate of anencephaly between January 2010 and January 2013 of 8.4 per 10,000 live births-more than four times the national average. As of November 2015, cases of anencephaly in Washington State have continued to increase, with the current rate estimated at 9.5 per 10,000 live births. While no distinct cause has yet been determined, neural tube defects-including anencephaly-are known to have multiple causes, including folic acid deficit, genetic variants in the folate pathway, and exposure to a variety of environmental and occupational toxins. This article describes many of these risk factors and explores the findings of Washington's ongoing investigation.

  1. Geophysical constraints on Washington convergent margin structure

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, C. )

    1990-11-10

    Gravity and magnetic maps of western Washington reveal the lateral structure and fabric of the Washington Coast Range, Puget Basin, and southern Washington Cascade Range. The magnetic and gravity maps show large amplitude positive anomalies associated with the shallow but largely buried section of Washington Coast Range mafic rocks which are separated by negative anomalies over deep sedimentary basins. The positive anomalies indicate that the Coast Range mafic basement extends farther east than previously thought, at least as far east as the longitude of Seattle. Linear and steep gravity and magnetic gradients indicate many unmapped, often buried faults in the Washington Coast Range Province. Magnetic highs are also associated with mapped batholiths in the Cascade arc. Two-dimensional gravity and magnetic modeling constrained with geological and other geophysical data indicate that the Coast Range Province rocks are about 1 km thick at the coast, thickening to as much as 30 km near their postulated eastern edge. A maximum boundary on the average density of the upper 15-20 km of the rocks that compose the Coast Range Province of 2,920 kg/m{sup 3} was established by the modeling, suggesting a composition largely of basalt and gabbro with little interbedded sediments. The author's Washington model requires that the proposed subduction complex be more dense than the trench sediments and, therefore, that material denser than sediments be incorporated within it. The absence of continental mantle and the modeled wedge shape of the Coast Range Province upper crust suggest that erosion of the bottom of the overriding plate by subduction processes may have occurred.

  2. Rocky Planets Basking In The Warmth of Other Suns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Just four years ago the prospect of finding rocky planets around other stars was still the subject of science fiction—none had been found and reasonable estimates put us decades away from such momentous discoveries. All of that has changed very recently on the heels of the extraordinarily successful NASA Kepler mission. I will provide an overview of Kepler science and the new view it has provided us on the demographics of exoplanets throughout the Galaxy. In addition to the statistics of exoplanets, I will also show highlights from the many unusual individual discoveries that have expanded our understanding of planet formation and allowed us to view our Solar System within a much broader context than ever before.

  3. Disk Accretion of Tidally Disrupted Rocky Bodies onto White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, W.; Desch, S.

    2017-03-01

    The prevailing model for the pollution of white dwarf photospheres invokes accretion from a disk of gas and solid particles, fed by tidal disruption of rocky bodies inside the Roche radius. Current models can successfully explain the accretion rates of metals onto white dwarfs, provided the gaseous disks viscously spread at rates consistent with a partially suppressed magnetorotational instability (Metzger et al. 2012); however, these models do not explore the extent of the magnetorotational instability in disks by calculating the degree of ionization. We present ionization fractions for thermal and non-thermal processes to assess the extent of the magnetorotational instability in white dwarf disks. We determine that the disk viscosity parameter α can be as high as 0.1 in white disks, implying that the magnetorotational instability must be carefully modeled.

  4. Rocky Flats Plant Live-Fire Range Risk Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolosi, S.L.; Rodriguez, M.A.

    1994-04-01

    The objective of the Live-Fire Range Risk Analysis Report (RAR) is to provide an authorization basis for operation as required by DOE 5480.16. The existing Live-Fire Range does not have a safety analysis-related authorization basis. EG&G Rocky Flats, Inc. has worked with DOE and its representatives to develop a format and content description for development of an RAR for the Live-Fire Range. Development of the RAR is closely aligned with development of the design for a baffle system to control risks from errant projectiles. DOE 5480.16 requires either an RAR or a safety analysis report (SAR) for live-fire ranges. An RAR rather than a SAR was selected in order to gain flexibility to more closely address the safety analysis and conduct of operation needs for a live-fire range in a cost-effective manner.

  5. Field trips in the southern Rocky Mountains, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E.P.; Erslev, E.A.

    2004-07-01

    The theme of the 2004 GSA Annual Meeting and Exposition, 'Geoscience in a Changing World' covers both new and traditional areas of the earth sciences. The Front Range of the Rocky Mountains and the High Plains preserve an outstanding record of geological processes from Precambrian through Quaternary times, and thus served as excellent educational exhibits for the meeting. The chapters in this field guide all contain technical content as well as a field trip log describing field trip routes and stops. Of the 25 field trips offered at the Meeting. 14 are described in the guidebook, covering a wide variety of geoscience disciplines, with chapters on tectonics (Precambrian and Laramide), stratigraphy and paleoenvironments (e.g., early Paleozoic environments, Jurassic eolian environments, the K-T boundary, the famous Oligocene Florissant fossil beds), economic deposits (coal and molybdenum), geological hazards, and geoarchaeology. Two papers have been abstracted separately for the Coal Abstracts database.

  6. Association between sepsis and Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Bacci, Marcelo Rodrigues; Namura, José Jorge

    2012-12-06

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a disease caused by the Gram-negative coccobacillus Rickettsia ricketsii which has been on the rise since the last decade in the USA. The symptoms are common to the many viral diseases, and the classic triad of fever, rash and headache is not always present when RMSF is diagnosed. It may progress to severe cases such as renal failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation and septicaemia. This report aims to present a fulminant case of RMSF associated with sepsis. It describes a female patient's case that quickly progressed to sepsis and death. The patient showed non-specific symptoms for 5 days before being admitted to a hospital. The fact that she lived in an area highly infested with Amblyomma aureolatum ticks was unknown to the medical staff until the moment she died.

  7. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Panama: a cluster description.

    PubMed

    Tribaldos, Maribel; Zaldivar, Yamitzel; Bermudez, Sergio; Samudio, Franklyn; Mendoza, Yaxelis; Martinez, Alexander A; Villalobos, Rodrigo; Eremeeva, Marina E; Paddock, Christopher D; Page, Kathleen; Smith, Rebecca E; Pascale, Juan Miguel

    2011-10-13

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a tick-borne infection caused by Rickettsia rickettsii. We report a cluster of fatal cases of RMSF in 2007 in Panama, involving a pregnant woman and two children from the same family.  The woman presented with a fever followed by respiratory distress, maculopapular rash, and an eschar at the site from which a tick had been removed.  She died four days after disease onset.  This is the second published report of an eschar in a patient confirmed by PCR to be infected with R. rickettsii.  One month later, the children presented within days of one another with fever and rash and died three and four days after disease onset. The diagnosis was confirmed by immunohistochemistry, PCR and sequencing of the genes of R. rickettsii in tissues obtained at autopsy. 

  8. Persisting impairment following Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, J W; Braddom, R L; Kaelin, D L

    1997-11-01

    A patient initially presented in the emergency room with fever, confusion, and a petechial rash. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) was diagnosed and appropriate treatment was initiated. He subsequently became obtunded and required mechanical ventilation and temporary cardiac pacing. Four weeks later, he presented to our rehabilitation unit with ataxia, hyperreflexia and upper motor neuron signs, dysesthesias, sensorimotor axonopathy demonstrated by electrodiagnostic studies, and a global decrement in cognitive capability. Although he significantly improved in functional mobility and self-care, he exhibited little improvement in his cognitive impairment at 6-month follow-up. An understanding of the natural history of, and long-term impairments associated with, RMSF will be helpful to physiatrists in developing rehabilitation care plans and in assisting such patients with community re-entry.

  9. Plutonium releases from the 1957 fire at Rocky Flats.

    PubMed

    Mongan, T R; Ripple, S R; Brorby, G P; diTomasso, D G

    1996-10-01

    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment sponsored a study to reconstruct contaminant doses to the public from the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant. This analysis of the September 1957 fire in a plutonium fabrication building that breached the building air filtration system is part of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment study. The plutonium release from this fire is estimated using environmental data collected around the time of the fire and an air dispersion model. The approximate upper bound on the total plutonium release from the fire is 1.9 GBq (0.05 Ci), with an uncertainty of about two orders of magnitude. Off-site air concentrations and deposition of plutonium resulting from the approximate upper-bound release are estimated. The highest predicted off-site effective dose resulting from the approximate upper-bound release is about 13 microSv (1.3 mrem).

  10. Churned-Up Rocky Debris and Dust (True Color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has been analyzing sulfur-rich rocks and surface materials in the 'Columbia Hills' in Gusev Crater on Mars. This image shows rocky debris and dust, which planetary scientists call 'regolith' or 'soil,' that has been churned up by the rover wheels. This 40-centimeter-wide (16-inch-wide) patch of churned-up dirt, nicknamed 'Paso Robles,' contains brighter patches measured to be high in sulfur by Spirit's alpha particle X-ray Spectrometer. Spirit's panoramic camera took this image on martian day, or sol, 400 (Feb. 16, 2005). The image represents the panoramic camera team's best current attempt at generating a true color view of what this scene would look like if viewed by a human on Mars. The image was generated from a combination of six calibrated, left-eye images acquired through filters ranging from 430-nanometer to 750-nanometer wavelengths.

  11. Loss of native rocky reef biodiversity in Australian metropolitan embayments.

    PubMed

    Stuart-Smith, Rick D; Edgar, Graham J; Stuart-Smith, Jemina F; Barrett, Neville S; Fowles, Amelia E; Hill, Nicole A; Cooper, Antonia T; Myers, Andrew P; Oh, Elizabeth S; Pocklington, Jacqui B; Thomson, Russell J

    2015-06-15

    Urbanisation of the coastal zone represents a key threat to marine biodiversity, including rocky reef communities which often possess disproportionate ecological, recreational and commercial importance. The nature and magnitude of local urban impacts on reef biodiversity near three Australian capital cities were quantified using visual census methods. The most impacted reefs in urbanised embayments were consistently characterised by smaller, faster growing species, reduced fish biomass and richness, and reduced mobile invertebrate abundance and richness. Reef faunal distribution varied significantly with heavy metals, local population density, and proximity to city ports, while native fish and invertebrate communities were most depauperate in locations where invasive species were abundant. Our study adds impetus for improved urban planning and pollution management practises, while also highlighting the potential for skilled volunteers to improve the tracking of changes in marine biodiversity values and the effectiveness of management intervention.

  12. Epidemiologic surveillance. Annual report for EG&G Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    Epidemiologic surveillance at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities consists of regular and systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of data on absences resulting from illness and injury in the work force. Its purpose is to provide an early warning system for health problems occurring among employees at participating sites. Data are collected by coordinators at each site and submitted to the Epidemiologic Surveillance Data Center, located at the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, where quality control procedures and analyses are carried out. Rates of absences and rates of diagnoses associated with absences are analyzed by occupation and other relevant variables. They may be compared with the disease experience of different groups within the DOE work force and with populations that do not work for DOE to identify disease patterns or clusters that may be associated with work activities. This report presents the 1994 morbidity data for the Rocky Flats plant.

  13. Estimating Longwave Atmospheric Emissivity in the Canadian Rocky Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, S.; Marshall, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Incoming longwave radiation is an important source of energy contributing to snow and glacier melt. However, estimating the incoming longwave radiation from the atmosphere is challenging due to the highly varying conditions of the atmosphere, especially cloudiness. We analyze the performance of some existing models included a physically-based clear-sky model by Brutsaert (1987) and two different empirical models for all-sky conditions (Lhomme and others, 2007; Herrero and Polo, 2012) at Haig Glacier in the Canadian Rocky Mountains. Models are based on relations between readily observed near-surface meteorological data, including temperature, vapor pressure, relative humidity, and estimates of shortwave radiation transmissivity (i.e., clear-sky or cloud-cover indices). This class of models generally requires solar radiation data in order to obtain a proxy for cloud conditions. This is not always available for distributed models of glacier melt, and can have high spatial variations in regions of complex topography, which likely do not reflect the more homogeneous atmospheric longwave emissions. We therefore test longwave radiation parameterizations as a function of near-surface humidity and temperature variables, based on automatic weather station data (half-hourly and mean daily values) from 2004 to 2012. Results from comparative analysis of different incoming longwave radiation parameterizations showed that the locally-calibrated model based on relative humidity and vapour pressure performs better than other published models. Performance is degraded but still better than standard cloud-index based models when we transfer the model to another site, roughly 900 km away, Kwadacha Glacier in the northern Canadian Rockies.

  14. Rocky Mountain Snowpack Chemistry at Selected Sites, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingersoll, George P.; Mast, M. Alisa; Nanus, Leora; Handran, Heather H.; Manthorne, David J.; Hultstrand, Douglas M.

    2007-01-01

    During spring 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the National Park Service and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service collected and analyzed snowpack samples for 65 sites in the Rocky Mountain region from New Mexico to Montana. Snowpacks were sampled from late February through early April and generally had well-below-average- to near-average snow-water equivalent. Regionally, on April 1, snow-water equivalent ranged from 50 to 89 percent. At most regional sites monitored during 1993-2004, snowpack ammonium, nitrate, and sulfate concentrations for 2004 were lower than the 12-year averages. Snowpack ammonium concentrations in the region were lower than average concentrations for the period at 61 percent of sites in the region, but showed a new pattern compared to previous years with three of the four highest 2004 concentrations observed in northern Colorado. Nitrate concentrations in 2004 were lower than the 12-year average for the year at 53 percent of regional sites, and typically occurred at sites in Wyoming, Idaho, and Montana where powerplants and large industrial areas were limited. A regional decrease in sulfate concentrations across most of the Rocky Mountains (with concentrations lower than the 12-year average at 84 percent of snowpack sites) was consistent with other monitoring of atmospheric deposition in the Western United States. Total mercury concentrations, although data are only available for the past 3 years, decreased slightly for the region as a whole in 2004 relative to 2003. Ratios of stable sulfur isotopes indicated a similar regional pattern as observed in recent years with sulfur-34 (d34S) values generally increasing northward from northern New Mexico and southern Colorado to northern Colorado, Wyoming, Idaho, and Montana.

  15. ESPRESSO: the ultimate rocky exoplanets hunter for the VLT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mégevand, Denis; Zerbi, Filippo M.; Cabral, Alexandre; Di Marcantonio, Paolo; Amate, Manuel; Pepe, Francesco; Cristiani, Stefano; Rebolo, Rafael; Santos, Nuno C.; Dekker, Hans; Abreu, Manuel; Affolter, Michael; Avila, Gerardo; Baldini, Veronica; Bristow, Paul; Broeg, Christopher; Carvas, Pedro; Cirami, Roberto; Coelho, João.; Comari, Maurizio; Conconi, Paolo; Coretti, Igor; Cupani, Guido; D'Odorico, Valentina; De Caprio, Vincenzo; Delabre, Bernard; Figueira, Pedro; Fleury, Michel; Fragoso, Ana; Genolet, Ludovic; Gomes, Ricardo; Gonzalez Hernandez, Jonay; Hughes, Ian; Iwert, Olaf; Kerber, Florian; Landoni, Marco; Lima, Jorge; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Lovis, Christophe; Maire, Charles; Mannetta, Marco; Martins, Carlos; Moitinho, André; Molaro, Paolo; Monteiro, Manuel; Rasilla, José Luis; Riva, Marco; Santana Tschudi, Samuel; Santin, Paolo; Sosnowska, Danuta; Sousa, Sergio; Spanò, Paolo; Tenegi, Fabio; Toso, Giorgio; Vanzella, Eros; Viel, Matteo; Zapatero Osorio, Maria Rosa

    2012-09-01

    ESPRESSO, the VLT rocky exoplanets hunter, will combine the efficiency of modern echelle spectrograph with extreme radial-velocity precision. It will be installed at Paranal on ESO's VLT in order to achieve a gain of two magnitudes with respect to its predecessor HARPS, and the instrumental radial-velocity precision will be improved to reach 10 cm/s level. We have constituted a Consortium of astronomical research institutes to fund, design and build ESPRESSO on behalf of and in collaboration with ESO, the European Southern Observatory. The project has passed the preliminary design review in November 2011. The spectrograph will be installed at the so-called "Combined Coudé Laboratory" of the VLT, it will be linked to the four 8.2 meters Unit Telescopes (UT) through four optical "Coudé trains" and will be operated either with a single telescope or with up to four UTs. In exchange of the major financial and human effort the building Consortium will be awarded with guaranteed observing time (GTO), which will be invested in a common scientific program. Thanks to its characteristics and the ability of combining incoherently the light of 4 large telescopes, ESPRESSO will offer new possibilities in many fields of astronomy. Our main scientific objectives are, however, the search and characterization of rocky exoplanets in the habitable zone of quiet, near-by G to M-dwarfs, and the analysis of the variability of fundamental physical constants. In this paper, we present the ambitious scientific objectives, the capabilities of ESPRESSO, the technical solutions for the system and its subsystems, enlightening the main differences between ESPRESSO and its predecessors. The project aspects of this facility are also described, from the consortium and partnership structure to the planning phases and milestones.

  16. Sampling for Soil Carbon Stock Assessment in Rocky Agricultural Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beem-Miller, Jeffrey P.; Kong, Angela Y. Y.; Ogle, Stephen; Wolfe, David

    2016-01-01

    Coring methods commonly employed in soil organic C (SOC) stock assessment may not accurately capture soil rock fragment (RF) content or soil bulk density (rho (sub b)) in rocky agricultural soils, potentially biasing SOC stock estimates. Quantitative pits are considered less biased than coring methods but are invasive and often cost-prohibitive. We compared fixed-depth and mass-based estimates of SOC stocks (0.3-meters depth) for hammer, hydraulic push, and rotary coring methods relative to quantitative pits at four agricultural sites ranging in RF content from less than 0.01 to 0.24 cubic meters per cubic meter. Sampling costs were also compared. Coring methods significantly underestimated RF content at all rocky sites, but significant differences (p is less than 0.05) in SOC stocks between pits and corers were only found with the hammer method using the fixed-depth approach at the less than 0.01 cubic meters per cubic meter RF site (pit, 5.80 kilograms C per square meter; hammer, 4.74 kilograms C per square meter) and at the 0.14 cubic meters per cubic meter RF site (pit, 8.81 kilograms C per square meter; hammer, 6.71 kilograms C per square meter). The hammer corer also underestimated rho (sub b) at all sites as did the hydraulic push corer at the 0.21 cubic meters per cubic meter RF site. No significant differences in mass-based SOC stock estimates were observed between pits and corers. Our results indicate that (i) calculating SOC stocks on a mass basis can overcome biases in RF and rho (sub b) estimates introduced by sampling equipment and (ii) a quantitative pit is the optimal sampling method for establishing reference soil masses, followed by rotary and then hydraulic push corers.

  17. Sampling for Soil Carbon Stock Assessment in Rocky Agricultural Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beem-Miller, Jeffrey P.; Kong, Angela Y. Y.; Ogle, Stephen; Wolfe, David

    Coring methods commonly employed in soil organic C (SOC) stock assessment may not accurately capture soil rock fragment (RF) content or soil bulk density (rho (sub b)) in rocky agricultural soils, potentially biasing SOC stock estimates. Quantitative pits are considered less biased than coring methods but are invasive and often cost-prohibitive. We compared fixed-depth and mass-based estimates of SOC stocks (0.3-meters depth) for hammer, hydraulic push, and rotary coring methods relative to quantitative pits at four agricultural sites ranging in RF content from less than 0.01 to 0.24 cubic meters per cubic meter. Sampling costs were also compared. Coring methods significantly underestimated RF content at all rocky sites, but significant differences (p is less than 0.05) in SOC stocks between pits and corers were only found with the hammer method using the fixed-depth approach at the less than 0.01 cubic meters per cubic meter RF site (pit, 5.80 kilograms C per square meter; hammer, 4.74 kilograms C per square meter) and at the 0.14 cubic meters per cubic meter RF site (pit, 8.81 kilograms C per square meter; hammer, 6.71 kilograms C per square meter). The hammer corer also underestimated rho (sub b) at all sites as did the hydraulic push corer at the 0.21 cubic meters per cubic meter RF site. No significant differences in mass-based SOC stock estimates were observed between pits and corers. Our results indicate that (i) calculating SOC stocks on a mass basis can overcome biases in RF and rho (sub b) estimates introduced by sampling equipment and (ii) a quantitative pit is the optimal sampling method for establishing reference soil masses, followed by rotary and then hydraulic push corers.

  18. Geologic settings and controls of shallow gas, Rocky Mountain area

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, D.D. )

    1991-06-01

    Shallow gas is generated by the degradation of organic matter by anaerobic bacteria and is referred to as microbial or bacterial gas. Bacterial gas can be generated and can accumulate in significant quantities and is an important resource in the Rocky Mountain area. Factors controlling bacterial gas generation after sediment burial are anoxic conditions, low sulfate content, low temperatures, abundant organic matter, sufficient pore space, and rapid sediment deposition. Bacterial gas is distinguished by its chemical and isotopic composition; the hydrocarbon fraction generally contains more than 98% methane, and {delta}{sup 13}C{sub 1} values are generally lighter than {minus}55{per thousand}. In the Rocky Mountain area, bacterial gas accumulations occur in three main geologic settings: clastic shelves, carbonate shelves, and coal swamps. In the clastic shelf setting, bacterial gas occurs in thick (200 ft) sequences of sandstone, siltstone, and shale. The siltsone and sandstone occur as thin (a few inches thick), discontinuous lenses and laminae that serve as low-permeability reservoirs because of their small grain size. The enclosing shales are organic rich (average 2% total organic carbon (TOC)), contain type 3 kerogen, and serve as the source of and seal for the bacterial gas. The carbonate shelf setting is analogous to the clastic shelf with rythmically bedded couplets (a few inches thick) of low-permeability chalk (reservoir) and shale (source and seal). These shales are also organic rich (average 3.2% TOC) but contain type 2 kerogen. In the swamp setting, thick (as much as 200 ft), humic (type 3 kerogen) coal beds serve as both the source of and reservoir for the bacterial gas. The gas is trapped by the low porosity and permeability of coal and gas adsorption enhanced by hydrostatic pressure.

  19. 30 CFR 947.700 - Washington Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Washington conducted on non-Federal and non-Indian lands. The rules in Subchapter D of this chapter apply to.... (2) Washington Food Fish and Shell Fish Laws pertaining to the Department of Fisheries on...

  20. 30 CFR 947.700 - Washington Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Washington conducted on non-Federal and non-Indian lands. The rules in Subchapter D of this chapter apply to.... (2) Washington Food Fish and Shell Fish Laws pertaining to the Department of Fisheries on...

  1. 30 CFR 947.700 - Washington Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Washington conducted on non-Federal and non-Indian lands. The rules in Subchapter D of this chapter apply to.... (2) Washington Food Fish and Shell Fish Laws pertaining to the Department of Fisheries on...

  2. Photocopy of original blackandwhite silver gelatin print, VIEW FROM WASHINGTON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of original black-and-white silver gelatin print, VIEW FROM WASHINGTON MONUMENT, October 3, 1929, photography Commercial Photo - Internal Revenue Service Headquarters Building, 1111 Constitution Avenue Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  3. 16. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy courtesy of Washington Room, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy courtesy of Washington Room, D.C. Public Library POTOMAC AQUEDUCT, 1879-1887 - Potomac Aqueduct, Georgetown abutment at Georgetown waterfront, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  4. 11. Photocopy of photograph by Commission of Fine Arts, Washington, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photocopy of photograph by Commission of Fine Arts, Washington, DC. Date and photographer unknown. CLOSE UP OF ARMILLARY SPHERE - Meridian Hill Park, Bounded by Fifteenth, Sixteenth, Euclid & W Streets, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  5. View of inside second floor stairwell of George Washington Junior ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of inside second floor stairwell of George Washington Junior High School looking at double doors, facing north. - George Washington Junior High School, 707 Columbus Drive, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  6. Natural phenomena hazards, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Conrads, T.J.

    1998-09-29

    This document presents the natural phenomena hazard loads for use in implementing DOE Order 5480.28, Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation, and supports development of double-shell tank systems specifications at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. The natural phenomena covered are seismic, flood, wind, volcanic ash, lightning, snow, temperature, solar radiation, suspended sediment, and relative humidity.

  7. Washington Irving and the American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlefield, Daniel F., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Some modern scholars feel that Washington Irving vacillated between romanticism and realism in his literary treatment of the American Indian. However, a study of all his works dealing with Indians, placed in context with his non-Indian works, reveals that his attitude towards Indians was intelligent and enlightened for his time. (CM)

  8. [President George Washington and his oral complaints].

    PubMed

    Eijkman, M A J

    2012-09-01

    George Washington, the first president of the United States of America, suffered for most of his life from continuous oral pain. Through letters, diaries, and other personal information from this president, much has become known concerning his oral problems and the level of oral healthcare in the United States in the mid and late 18th century.

  9. Washington: The State and Its Educational System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgkinson, Harold L.

    A profile of Washington is presented, which examines trends in the state's economy, environment, population, and educational system. A contradiction exists between the state's beautiful scenery and well-educated population and its high crime and suicide rates. The state is characterized by a highly educated work force, a less diversified economy,…

  10. Teaching about George Washington. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vontz, Thomas S.; Nixon, William A.

    No generation in U.S. history has matched that of the founding era for its array of talented and influential political thinkers and actors. These individuals (such as George Washington, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, and James Madison) possessed traits of character and intellect that significantly shaped the…

  11. State of Washington Strategic Information Technology Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Dept. of Information Services, Olympia. Policy and Regulation Div.

    The Strategic Information Technology Plan of Washington is introduced and explained. The plan is mandated by state law to create a new framework for communication and collaboration to bring together agency technology planning with the achievement of statewide information technology goals and strategies. It provides a point of reference for the…

  12. Key Facts about Higher Education in Washington

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Higher Education Coordinating Board, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Since its establishment in the 1860s, Washington's higher education system has evolved rapidly to meet a myriad of state needs in fields as diverse as agriculture, bioscience, chemistry, environmental sciences, engineering, medicine, law, business, computer science, and architecture. Today, higher education, like other vital state functions, faces…

  13. Human Diphyllobothrium nihonkaiense Infection in Washington State

    PubMed Central

    Billman, Zachary P.; Wallis, Carolyn K.; Abbott, April N.; Olson, John C.; Dhanireddy, Shireesha; Murphy, Sean C.

    2015-01-01

    A patient in Washington State harbored a fish tapeworm most likely acquired from eating raw salmon. Diphyllobothrium nihonkaiense was identified by cox1 sequence analysis. Although this is the first documented human D. nihonkaiense infection in the United States, the parasite may have been present earlier but misidentified as Diphyllobothrium latum. PMID:25609724

  14. Human Diphyllobothrium nihonkaiense infection in Washington State.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ferric C; Billman, Zachary P; Wallis, Carolyn K; Abbott, April N; Olson, John C; Dhanireddy, Shireesha; Murphy, Sean C

    2015-04-01

    A patient in Washington State harbored a fish tapeworm most likely acquired from eating raw salmon. Diphyllobothrium nihonkaiense was identified by cox1 sequence analysis. Although this is the first documented human D. nihonkaiense infection in the United States, the parasite may have been present earlier but misidentified as Diphyllobothrium latum.

  15. The March on Washington: A Teacher's Remembrance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mugleston, William F.

    1999-01-01

    Reminisces about the day of the March on Washington; in particular, the anticipatory atmosphere that swept the city, the fears of what might occur, and the daily plans that ceased to exist. Concentrates on the passion and fervor of the people who participated in the March and listened to Dr. King's speech. (CMK)

  16. Doctors of Osteopathy Licensed in Washington.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senters, Jo

    Based on information gathered by the Health Manpower Project through a survey cosponsored with the Washington Osteopathic Medical Association, this report begins with a statement of philosophy of osteopathic medicine and proceeds to comment on where such professional education is available. Remarks on the type of educational background of the…

  17. Connect the Book. George Washington's Teeth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2005-01-01

    February celebrates both National Children's Dental Health Month and President's Day (February 21), so this month's "Connect the Book" column features a book with connections to both events. George Washington, the first President of the United States (1789-1797) and known as the "Father of Our Country," had a serious dental health problem that…

  18. Washington Play Fairway Analysis Geothermal GIS Data

    SciTech Connect

    Corina Forson

    2015-12-15

    This file contains file geodatabases of the Mount St. Helens seismic zone (MSHSZ), Wind River valley (WRV) and Mount Baker (MB) geothermal play-fairway sites in the Washington Cascades. The geodatabases include input data (feature classes) and output rasters (generated from modeling and interpolation) from the geothermal play-fairway in Washington State, USA. These data were gathered and modeled to provide an estimate of the heat and permeability potential within the play-fairways based on: mapped volcanic vents, hot springs and fumaroles, geothermometry, intrusive rocks, temperature-gradient wells, slip tendency, dilation tendency, displacement, displacement gradient, max coulomb shear stress, sigma 3, maximum shear strain rate, and dilational strain rate at 200m and 3 km depth. In addition this file contains layer files for each of the output rasters. For details on the areas of interest please see the 'WA_State_Play_Fairway_Phase_1_Technical_Report' in the download package. This submission also includes a file with the geothermal favorability of the Washington Cascade Range based off of an earlier statewide assessment. Additionally, within this file there are the maximum shear and dilational strain rate rasters for all of Washington State.

  19. Laptop Circulation at Eastern Washington University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munson, Doris; Malia, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    In 2001, Eastern Washington University's Libraries began a laptop circulation program with seventeen laptops. Today, there are 150 laptops in the circulation pool, as well as seventeen digital cameras, eleven digital handycams, and thirteen digital projectors. This article explains how the program has grown to its present size, the growing pains…

  20. 1984 Population Trends for Washington State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Office of Financial Management, Olympia.

    As of April 1, 1984, Washington's population was estimated at 4,328,100, an increase of 43,000 over last year's population. This report provides data pertaining to the: official April 1, 1984 population and housing estimates for cities, towns, and counties and components of population change. The following special reports are also presented:…

  1. Endangered Plants in Oregon and Washington.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Rhoda M.

    1985-01-01

    Presents a partial list of the 132 Oregon and Washington plants which have been proposed for federal protection under the Endangered Species Act. Suggestions for student/citizen involvement in preserving these species and a description of a videotape about rare/endangered species of the Willamette Valley (Oregon) are included. (DH)

  2. George Washington Carver: A Most Inventive Mind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Marci

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the life of George Washington Carver. Explains how he achieved his goals of educating a better southern farmer and creating a better southern citizen based on his principles of agriculture economics. Discusses Carver's educational and teaching experiences that eventually lead to an expansion of human potential. (JS)

  3. 76 FR 18290 - Washington Disaster #WA-00032

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-01

    ... State of Washington (FEMA- 1963-DR), dated 03/25/2011. Incident: Severe winter storm, flooding, landslides, and mudslides. Incident Period: 01/11/2011 through 01/21/2011. Effective Date: 03/25/2011. Physical Loan Application Deadline Date: 05/24/2011. Economic Injury (EIDL) Loan Application Deadline...

  4. Famous Americans: George Washington & Abraham Lincoln.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Maria

    Introducing students in grade 1-3 to George Washington and Abraham Lincoln, this book presents thematic units that present biographical information, and literature links such as poems, songs, stories, cross-curricular activities, and hands-on reproducibles. Chapters in the book are: (1) Getting to Know George; (2) The Father and His Country; (3)…

  5. Famous Americans: George Washington and Abraham Lincoln.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Maria

    This book provides background information and ideas for teaching about George Washington and Abraham Lincoln at the primary grade level. Cross-curricular activities include work in music, writing, art, research, plays, and games. A pull-out poster with a poem on "President's Day" is stapled in the center of the book. Chapters in the book…

  6. 1988 Population Trends for Washington State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Office of Financial Management, Olympia.

    This statistical profile provides current demographic data for Washington State and its counties, incorporated cities and towns. Seventeen tables show population by age and sex; population for counties, incorporated cities and towns, and the state; components of population change; a rank order of total persons in incorporated cities and towns;…

  7. 1987 Population Trends for Washington State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Office of Financial Management, Olympia.

    This statistical profile provides current demographic data for Washington State and is also broken down by counties, incorporated cities, and towns. Fifteen tables show population figures; components of population change; housing units by structure type; annexations, incorporations and municipal boundary changes; growth of households; estimates of…

  8. Geophysical constraints on Washington convergent margin structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finn, C.

    1990-01-01

    Gravity and magnetic maps of western Washington reveal the lateral structure and fabric of the Washington Coast Range, Puget Basin, and southern Washington Cascade Range. Two-dimensional gravity and magnetic modeling constrained with geological and other geophysical data indicate that the Coast Range Province rocks are about 1 km thick at the coast, thickening to as much as 30 km near their postulated eastern edge. A composition largely of basalt and gabbro with little interbedded sediments is suggested. Under these rocks may be mantle or a subduction complex composed of dense mafic, ultramafic, and sedimentary rocks like that proposed to underlie Vancouver Island. The Washington model requires that the proposed subduction complex be more dense than the trench sediments and, therefore, that material denser than sediments be incorporated within it. The absence of continental mantle and the modeled wedge shape of the Coast Range Province upper crust suggest that erosion of the bottom of the overriding plate by subduction processes may have occurred. -from Author

  9. Washington State System of Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheidt, Omar H.

    The highly centralized Washington State System of Community Colleges, as created by the Community College Act of 1967, is administered by a governor-appointed state board with one member from each of the seven congressional districts. Reporting to the state board on all revenues and expenditures made are 22 local boards of trustees. A commission…

  10. Alternative Maternity Services in Washington State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starzyk, Patricia M.

    The nature of maternity services has changed in the past 20 years, with a movement away from traditional (physician delivery in a hospital) towards other alternative services. This study examined alternative maternity services in Washington State, which ranks eighth in the country in the use of such services. Data were collected from birth and…

  11. Licensed Child Care in Washington State: 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Marna Geyer; Schrager, Laura

    This study is one of an ongoing series of biennial surveys of all child care centers and some licensed family home providers by Washington State's Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS). A total of 1,137 child care centers and 1,527 family home providers were interviewed in spring 1998. Major findings include: (1) Over the period 1990 to…

  12. Washington Partners: How Relationships Shape Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tavalin, Kuna

    2016-01-01

    This article describes how positioning an organization to be seen as trusted and expert on an issue requires careful relationship-building, patience, and an abundance of time. Such an effort often requires help, and so American Indian Higher Education Consortium (AIHEC) and Washington Partners are working together to further AIHEC's goals.…

  13. Report on Indian Education; State of Washington.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Sally E.; Brooks, Joseph T.

    Most treaties negotiated with Indian tribes between 1778 and 1868 contain a clause insuring that the federal government will provide Indians with full educational opportunity in exchange for their ceded lands. This promise has not been fulfilled. Indian students are dropping out of Washington schools at rates estimated between 38-60 percent;…

  14. Watershed Models for Decision Support for Inflows to Potholes Reservoir, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastin, Mark C.

    2009-01-01

    A set of watershed models for four basins (Crab Creek, Rocky Ford Creek, Rocky Coulee, and Lind Coulee), draining into Potholes Reservoir in east-central Washington, was developed as part of a decision support system to aid the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, in managing water resources in east-central Washington State. The project is part of the U.S. Geological Survey and Bureau of Reclamation collaborative Watershed and River Systems Management Program. A conceptual model of hydrology is outlined for the study area that highlights the significant processes that are important to accurately simulate discharge under a wide range of conditions. The conceptual model identified the following factors as significant for accurate discharge simulations: (1) influence of frozen ground on peak discharge, (2) evaporation and ground-water flow as major pathways in the system, (3) channel losses, and (4) influence of irrigation practices on reducing or increasing discharge. The Modular Modeling System was used to create a watershed model for the four study basins by combining standard Precipitation Runoff Modeling System modules with modified modules from a previous study and newly modified modules. The model proved unreliable in simulating peak-flow discharge because the index used to track frozen ground conditions was not reliable. Mean monthly and mean annual discharges were more reliable when simulated. Data from seven USGS streamflow-gaging stations were used to compare with simulated discharge for model calibration and evaluation. Mean annual differences between simulated and observed discharge varied from 1.2 to 13.8 percent for all stations used in the comparisons except one station on a regional ground-water discharge stream. Two thirds of the mean monthly percent differences between the simulated mean and the observed mean discharge for these six stations were between -20 and 240 percent, or in absolute terms, between -0.8 and 11 cubic feet per

  15. Confirmatory factor analysis of the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV.

    PubMed

    Holdnack, James A; Xiaobin Zhou; Larrabee, Glenn J; Millis, Scott R; Salthouse, Timothy A

    2011-06-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-fourth edition (WAIS-IV) and the Wechsler Memory Scale-fourth edition (WMS-IV) were co-developed to be used individually or as a combined battery of tests. The independent factor structure of each of the tests has been identified; however, the combined factor structure has yet to be determined. Confirmatory factor analysis was applied to the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV Adult battery (i.e., age 16-69 years) co-norming sample (n = 900) to test 13 measurement models. The results indicated that two models fit the data equally well. One model is a seven-factor solution without a hierarchical general ability factor: Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning, Processing Speed, Auditory Working Memory, Visual Working Memory, Auditory Memory, and Visual Memory. The second model is a five-factor model composed of Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning, Processing Speed, Working Memory, and Memory with a hierarchical general ability factor. Interpretative implications for each model are discussed.

  16. Contribution of alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) Collagen IV to the Mechanical Properties of the Glomerular Basement Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyoneva, Lazarina

    The glomerular basement membrane (GBM) is a vital part of the blood-urine filtration barrier in the kidneys. In healthy GBMs, the main tension-resisting component is alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) type IV collagen, but in some diseases it is replaced by other collagen IV isoforms. As a result, the GBM becomes leaky and disorganized, ultimately resulting in kidney failure. Our goal is to understanding the biomechanical aspects of the alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) chains and how their absence could be responsible for (1) the initial injury to the GBM and (2) progression to kidney failure. A combination of experiments and computational models were designed for that purpose. A model basement membrane was used to compare experimentally the distensibility of tissues with the alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) chains present and missing. The experiments showed basement membranes containing alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) chains were less distensible. It has been postulated that the higher level of lateral cross-linking (supercoiling) in the alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) networks contributes additional strength/stability to basement membranes. In a computational model of supercoiled networks, we found that supercoiling greatly increased the stiffness of collagen IV networks but only minimally decreased the permeability, which is well suited for the needs of the GBM. It is also known that the alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) networks are more protected from enzymatic degradation, and we explored their significance in GBM remodeling. Our simulations showed that the more protected network was needed to prevent the system from entering a dangerous feedback cycle due to autoregulation mechanisms in the kidneys. Overall, the work adds to the evidence of biomechanical differences between the alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) networks and other collagen IV networks, points to supercoiling as the main source of biomechanical differences, discusses the suitability of alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV

  17. 75 FR 14462 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Central Washington University, Department of Anthropology...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-25

    ... Anthropology, Ellensburg, WA, and Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington... of Anthropology, Ellensburg, WA, and the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke Museum... Henebry-DeLeon, NAGPRA Program Director, Department of Anthropology, Central Washington...

  18. The MAX IV imaging concept.

    PubMed

    Matěj, Zdeněk; Mokso, Rajmund; Larsson, Krister; Hardion, Vincent; Spruce, Darren

    2017-01-01

    The MAX IV Laboratory is currently the synchrotron X-ray source with the beam of highest brilliance. Four imaging beamlines are in construction or in the project phase. Their common characteristic will be the high acquisition rates of phase-enhanced images. This high data flow will be managed at the local computing cluster jointly with the Swedish National Computing Infrastructure. A common image reconstruction and analysis platform is being designed to offer reliable quantification of the multidimensional images acquired at all the imaging beamlines at MAX IV.

  19. Spacelab being closed up for move to Washington, DC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Jim Dumoulin, NASA Payload Electrical Systems engineer, crawls out of the Spacelab module for the last time after stowing some equipment for its final trip to the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC. He has worked on the Spacelab program since its first launch on STS-9 in November 1983 as part of the NASA Civil Service Level IV experiment integration team. Spacelab was designed by the European Space Agency (ESA) for the Space Shuttle program. Its final flight was the STS-90 Neurolab mission in April 1998. The Spacelab concept of modular experiment racks in a pressurized shirt-sleeve environment made it highly user-friendly and accessible. Numerous experiments conceived by hundreds of scientists on the ground were conducted by flight crews in orbit. Spacelab modules served as on-orbit homes for everything from squirrel monkeys to plant seeds. They supported astronomical as well as Earth observations, for servicing the Hubble Space Telescope and for research preparatory to the International Space Station. One of the greatest benefits afforded by the Spacelab missions was the opportunity to fly a mission more than once, with the second or third flight building on the experiences and data gathered from its predecessors.

  20. The Department of Energy`s Rocky Flats Plant: A guide to record series useful for health-related research. Volume I, introduction

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This guide consists of seven volumes which describe records useful for conducting health-related research at the DOE`s Rocky Flats Plant. Volume I is an introduction, and the remaining six volumes are arranged by the following categories: administrative and general, facilities and equipment, production and materials handling, waste management, workplace and environmental monitoring, and employee occupational exposure and health. Volume I briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Project and provides information on the methodology used to inventory and describe the records series contained in subsequent volumes. Volume II describes records concerning administrative functions and general information. Volume III describes records series relating to the construction and routine maintenance of plant buildings and the purchase and installation of equipment. Volume IV describes records pertaining to the inventory and production of nuclear materials and weapon components. Records series include materials inventories, manufacturing specifications, engineering orders, transfer and shipment records, and War Reserve Bomb Books. Volume V describes records series pertaining to the storage, handling, treatment, and disposal of radioactive, chemical, or mixed materials produced or used at Rocky Flats. Volume VI describes records series pertaining to monitoring of the workplace and of the environment outside of buildings onsite and offsite. Volume VII describes records series pertaining to the health and occupational exposures of employees and visitors.

  1. 29 CFR 2.2 - Employees attached to Washington office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Employees attached to Washington office. 2.2 Section 2.2 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GENERAL REGULATIONS General § 2.2 Employees attached to Washington office. No person who has been an employee of the Department and attached to the Washington...

  2. 29 CFR 2.2 - Employees attached to Washington office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Employees attached to Washington office. 2.2 Section 2.2 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GENERAL REGULATIONS General § 2.2 Employees attached to Washington office. No person who has been an employee of the Department and attached to the Washington...

  3. 29 CFR 2.2 - Employees attached to Washington office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Employees attached to Washington office. 2.2 Section 2.2 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GENERAL REGULATIONS General § 2.2 Employees attached to Washington office. No person who has been an employee of the Department and attached to the Washington...

  4. 78 FR 46258 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation Lake Washington, Seattle, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-31

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation Lake Washington, Seattle, WA AGENCY... (State Route 520 across Lake Washington) at Seattle, WA. This deviation is necessary to accommodate the... the Evergreen Point Floating Bridge (State Route 520 across Lake Washington) remain closed to...

  5. 29 CFR 2.2 - Employees attached to Washington office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Employees attached to Washington office. 2.2 Section 2.2 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GENERAL REGULATIONS General § 2.2 Employees attached to Washington office. No person who has been an employee of the Department and attached to the Washington...

  6. 29 CFR 2.2 - Employees attached to Washington office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Employees attached to Washington office. 2.2 Section 2.2 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GENERAL REGULATIONS General § 2.2 Employees attached to Washington office. No person who has been an employee of the Department and attached to the Washington...

  7. 75 FR 73073 - Washington Gas Light Company; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Washington Gas Light Company; Notice of Filing November 18, 2010. Take notice that on November 15, 2010, Washington Gas Light Company (Washington Gas) filed its annual...

  8. 75 FR 53964 - Washington Gas Light Company; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Washington Gas Light Company; Notice of Filing August 27, 2010. Take notice that on August 24, 2010, Washington Gas Light Company (Washington Gas) filed to revise the Statement...

  9. Getting Veterans Back to Work. Washington's Community and Technical Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Each year about 13,000 military personnel leave the service and select Washington state as their home, bringing with them a wealth of experience and a wide range of skills. Washington ranks among the top five most popular states for military personnel separating from the service. Washington's 34 community and technical colleges are a perfect fit…

  10. 75 FR 13236 - FM Table of Allotments, Port Angeles, Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-19

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 FM Table of Allotments, Port Angeles, Washington AGENCY: Federal Communications... Broadcasting, Inc., the licensee of Station KANY(FM), Ocean Shores, Washington, and the permittee of Station KSWW(FM), Montesano, Washington, to substitute FM Channel 271A for vacant Channel 229A at Port...

  11. 33 CFR 117.1051 - Lake Washington Ship Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lake Washington Ship Canal. 117.1051 Section 117.1051 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Washington § 117.1051 Lake Washington...

  12. 33 CFR 117.1051 - Lake Washington Ship Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lake Washington Ship Canal. 117.1051 Section 117.1051 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Washington § 117.1051 Lake Washington...

  13. 33 CFR 117.1051 - Lake Washington Ship Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lake Washington Ship Canal. 117.1051 Section 117.1051 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Washington § 117.1051 Lake Washington...

  14. 33 CFR 117.1051 - Lake Washington Ship Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lake Washington Ship Canal. 117.1051 Section 117.1051 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Washington § 117.1051 Lake Washington...

  15. 33 CFR 117.1051 - Lake Washington Ship Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lake Washington Ship Canal. 117.1051 Section 117.1051 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Washington § 117.1051 Lake Washington...

  16. Key Facts about Higher Education in Washington. 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Higher Education Coordinating Board, 2012

    2012-01-01

    "Key Facts about Higher Education in Washington" provides vital data to chart higher education's progress and challenges. First published in 2002 by the Washington Higher Education Coordinating Board, this annual report highlights "Key Facts" about Washington's postsecondary institutions--including faculty, students, budgets,…

  17. 1979-1980 Geothermal Resource Assessment Program in Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Korosec, M.A.; Schuster, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for seven papers. Also included are a bibliography of geothermal resource information for the State of Washington, well temperature information and locations in the State of Washington, and a map of the geology of the White Pass-Tumac Mountain Area, Washington. (MHR)

  18. The Washington Monument: Tribute in Stone. Teaching with Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopin, Stephanie A.

    The Washington Monument (District of Columbia) is one of the most recognizable structures in the United States. Its prominence comes because it commemorates George Washington, who remains one of this country's most admired leaders. The history of the monument reflects Washington's contributions to the development of the United States and shows how…

  19. 76 FR 52602 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Anacostia River, Washington, DC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ..., Washington, DC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard... the Anacostia River, mile 3.4 at Washington, DC. The proposed change will alter the eight hour advance..., SE., Washington, DC 20590-0001. (4) Hand delivery: Same as mail address above, between 9 a.m. and 5...

  20. 76 FR 52566 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Anacostia River, Washington, DC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Anacostia River, Washington, DC... Washington, DC. This deviation will test a change to the drawbridge operation schedule to determine whether a..., SE., Washington, DC 20590-0001. (4) Hand delivery: Same as mail address above, between 9 a.m. and 5...

  1. 77 FR 25781 - Environmental Impact Statement; Washington, DC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-01

    ... Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement; Washington, DC AGENCY: U.S. Federal Highway... Washington, DC is issuing this notice to advise agencies and the public that a Draft Environmental Impact... Avenue Tunnel in Washington, DC. The tunnel is owned and operated by CSX Transportation, Inc. (CSX),...

  2. 77 FR 14968 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Anacostia River, Washington, DC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-14

    ..., Washington, DC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is changing the..., mile 3.4, at Washington, DC. The change will alter the eight hour advance notice requirement for a... Avenue SE., Washington, DC 20590, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except...

  3. 7 CFR 923.322 - Washington cherry handling regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Washington cherry handling regulation. 923.322 Section... CHERRIES GROWN IN DESIGNATED COUNTIES IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Grade, Size, Container and Pack Regulation § 923.322 Washington cherry handling regulation. (a) Grade. No handler shall...

  4. No Easy Answers: Persistent Poverty in the Metropolitan Washington Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Joan Paddock

    This paper examines the extent and nature of poverty in Metropolitan Washington, D.C., how it compares to poverty in other similar metropolitan areas, and what can be done to reduce the numbers of persons suffering from persistent poverty in Washington. According to 1970 and 1980 U.S. Census Bureau data, poverty in the Washington, D.C.,…

  5. 12 CFR 4.4 - Washington office and web site.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Washington office and web site. 4.4 Section 4.4... EXAMINERS Organization and Functions § 4.4 Washington office and web site. The Washington office of the OCC...'s Web site is at http://www.occ.gov....

  6. 12 CFR 4.4 - Washington office and web site.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Washington office and web site. 4.4 Section 4.4... EXAMINERS Organization and Functions § 4.4 Washington office and web site. The Washington office of the OCC...'s Web site is at http://www.occ.gov....

  7. 12 CFR 4.4 - Washington office and web site.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Washington office and web site. 4.4 Section 4.4... EXAMINERS Organization and Functions § 4.4 Washington office and web site. The Washington office of the OCC...'s Web site is at http://www.occ.gov....

  8. 76 FR 21404 - Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Long Draw Reservoir Special Use Authorization, Rocky...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-15

    ...: Lawrence Gamble, Chief of Planning and Compliance, Rocky Mountain National Park, Estes Park, CO 80517, telephone 970-586-1320, e-mail larry_gamble@nps.gov ; Dyce Gayton, Forest Planner, Arapaho and...

  9. Synthetic Minor NSR Permit: Tesoro Logistics-Rockies - Ponderosa Compressor Station

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page contains documents related to the synthetic minor NSR permit for the Tesoro Logistics-Rockies Ponderosa Compressor Station, located on the Uintah and Ouray Indian Reservation in Uintah County, UT.

  10. 5. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST OF BUILDING 444. (1/1/98) Rocky ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST OF BUILDING 444. (1/1/98) - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  11. 4. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHEAST AT BUILDING 444. (1/1/98) Rocky ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHEAST AT BUILDING 444. (1/1/98) - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  12. 4. FIRSTFLOOR SHOWER/LOCKER ROOM. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. Rocky Mountain ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. FIRST-FLOOR SHOWER/LOCKER ROOM. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Administration-Laboratory- Change House-Bomb Rail, 420 feet South of December Seventh Avenue; 530 feet West of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  13. 4. BUILDING 741/742. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. Rocky Mountain Arsenal, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. BUILDING 741/742. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Refrigeration Napalm & Incendiary Bomb Warehouse-Bomb Filling, 825 feet South of December Seventh Avenue; 2425 feet East of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  14. 6. BUILDING 741/742. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. Rocky Mountain Arsenal, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. BUILDING 741/742. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Refrigeration Napalm & Incendiary Bomb Warehouse-Bomb Filling, 825 feet South of December Seventh Avenue; 2425 feet East of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  15. 3. BUILDING 741/742. VIEW TO WEST. Rocky Mountain Arsenal, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. BUILDING 741/742. VIEW TO WEST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Refrigeration Napalm & Incendiary Bomb Warehouse-Bomb Filling, 825 feet South of December Seventh Avenue; 2425 feet East of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  16. 2. BUILDING 741/742. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. Rocky Mountain Arsenal, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. BUILDING 741/742. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Refrigeration Napalm & Incendiary Bomb Warehouse-Bomb Filling, 825 feet South of December Seventh Avenue; 2425 feet East of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  17. 5. BUILDING 741/742. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. Rocky Mountain Arsenal, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. BUILDING 741/742. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Refrigeration Napalm & Incendiary Bomb Warehouse-Bomb Filling, 825 feet South of December Seventh Avenue; 2425 feet East of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  18. 1. BUILDING 741/742. VIEW TO SOUTH. Rocky Mountain Arsenal, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. BUILDING 741/742. VIEW TO SOUTH. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Refrigeration Napalm & Incendiary Bomb Warehouse-Bomb Filling, 825 feet South of December Seventh Avenue; 2425 feet East of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  19. MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS OF MACROINVERTEBRATE ASSEMBLAGES TO DETERMINE IMPACTS ON ROCKY MOUNTAIN STREAM ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using reduncancy (RDA) and canonical correlation analysis (CCA) we assessed relationships between chemical and physical characteristics and periphyton at 105 stream sites sampled by REMAP in the mineral belt of the southern Rockies ecoregion in Colorado. We contrasted results ob...

  20. Pacific lamprey artificial propogation and rearing investigations: Rocky Reach Lamprey Management Plan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,; ,; ,; ,; ,

    2011-01-01

    The impetus for developing this document is through implementing the Rocky Reach Pacific Lamprey Management Plan (PLMP), a component of the Rocky Reach Comprehensive Settlement Agreement, both of which are discussed more thoroughly in Section 1.2. The ultimate goal of the PLMP is to achieve No Net Impact (NNI) to Pacific lamprey of ongoing operations of the Rocky Reach Hydroelectric Project. Conducting artificial propagation of Pacific lamprey was considered by the state and federal fishery agencies and Tribes that are parties to the Settlement Agreement as a potential Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement measure (PME) for achieving NNI during the term of the current Rocky Reach license. This document is intended to provide guidance as to the feas ibility of culturing Pacific lamprey, the associated facilities necessary for culture practices, and identifying uncertainties for monitoring culture efficacy and rationale for implementing Pacific lamprey artificial propagation

  1. Model Study of Diisopropylmethylphosphonate (DIMP) Contamination, Rocky Mountain Arsenal Near Denver, Colorado. Phase 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-02-01

    8217, < ," ’ ,• , • - - " , • . ,:... u.•..... , - - • ’- - .... ’ " ,/ •N OIL 10 COLORADO WATER RESOURCESI *v j,/N"u \\ \\I ’K t3 MODEL STUDY OF DIMP...Gruundwater study of the Rocky Mountain Arsenal and some surrounding area: Colorado Dept. Health, Water Quality Control Div., 21 p. Smith, R. 0., Schneider...COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE .5 FUNDING NUMBERSMODEL STUDY OF DIISOPROPYLMETHYLPHOSPHONATE (DIMP) CONTAMINATION, ROCKY MOUNTAIN ARSENAL NEAR DENVER

  2. A tectonic redefinition of the Southern Rocky Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, Gordon P.

    1986-12-01

    The Southern Rocky Mountains of the Western United States, physiographically defined and described by N.M. Fenneman nearly 60 yrs ago, are tectonically redefined and extended. They are shown to constitute the crestal range of a mammoth, continental, arch-like feature here named the Alvarado ridge. Its axis trends south from Casper, Wyoming at least as far south as El Paso, Texas, beyond which the ridge begins to lose morphological identity. Maximum elevations along the crest of the ridge exceed 4.2 km. The summit ranges are bordered on either side by gently sloping rises that extend outward for at least 1300 km, falling to elevations of less than 400 m. Modest rift structures along the ridge axis continue beyond the southern terminus of the mountains before playing out. A major sediment-filled axial graben exists over the southern two-thirds of the ridge, but equivalent parts of it farther north were stripped of their Neogene fill by erosion in the headwaters areas of the Colorado and North Platte rivers. The maximum elevation of earlier Laramide mountains in this area has been estimated to have been no more than 2 km in Colorado, half that of the present range. Related topography was nearly obliterated by erosion prior to late Eocene time. Lateral stream planation produced a southeast-sloping, major late Eocene erosion surface across the region that had what was probably an isostatically adjusted, average maximum elevation of less than 900 m. Present day elevations and relief on the ridge crest are the result of steep crestal normal faulting, pronounced block uplift, and regional arching, with extensional strain limited to an axial corridor less than 200 km wide. This episode of mountain building began in middle Miocene time (17 to 12 Ma), culminating in latest Miocene and early Pliocene time, between 7 and 4 Ma ago. Debris from the newly elevated range (the Southern Rocky Mountains, sensu lato) was shed along the full length of the Neogene Alvarado ridge down

  3. Analysis of offsite Emergency Planning Zones (EPZ) for the Rocky Flats Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgin, C.R.; Armstrong, C.; Daugherty, N.M.; Foppe, T.L.; Petrocchi, A.J.; Southward, B.

    1990-05-01

    This project plan for Phase II summarizes the design of a project to complete analysis of offsite Emergency Planning Zones (EPZ) for the Rocky Flats Plant. Federal, state, and local governments develop emergency plans for facilities that may affect the public in the event of an accidental release of nuclear or hazardous materials. One of the purposes of these plans is to identify EPZs where actions might be necessary to protect public health. Public protective actions include sheltering, evacuation, and relocation. Agencies use EPZs to develop response plans and to determine needed resources. The State of Colorado, with support from the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Rocky Flats contractors, has developed emergency plans and EPZs for the Rocky Flats Plant periodically beginning in 1980. In Phase II, Interim Emergency Planning Zones Analysis, Maximum Credible Accident'' we will utilize the current Rocky Flats maximum credible accident (MCA), existing dispersion methodologies, and upgraded dosimetry methodologies to update the radiological EPZs. Additionally, we will develop recommendations for EPZs for nonradiological hazardous materials releases and evaluate potential surface water releases from the facility. This project will allow EG G Rocky Flats to meet current commitments to the state of Colorado and make steady, tangible improvements in our understanding of risk to offsite populations during potential emergencies at the Rocky Flats Plant. 8 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory code assessment of the Rocky Flats transuranic waste

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This report is an assessment of the content codes associated with transuranic waste shipped from the Rocky Flats Plant in Golden, Colorado, to INEL. The primary objective of this document is to characterize and describe the transuranic wastes shipped to INEL from Rocky Flats by item description code (IDC). This information will aid INEL in determining if the waste meets the waste acceptance criteria (WAC) of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The waste covered by this content code assessment was shipped from Rocky Flats between 1985 and 1989. These years coincide with the dates for information available in the Rocky Flats Solid Waste Information Management System (SWIMS). The majority of waste shipped during this time was certified to the existing WIPP WAC. This waste is referred to as precertified waste. Reassessment of these precertified waste containers is necessary because of changes in the WIPP WAC. To accomplish this assessment, the analytical and process knowledge available on the various IDCs used at Rocky Flats were evaluated. Rocky Flats sources for this information include employee interviews, SWIMS, Transuranic Waste Certification Program, Transuranic Waste Inspection Procedure, Backlog Waste Baseline Books, WIPP Experimental Waste Characterization Program (headspace analysis), and other related documents, procedures, and programs. Summaries are provided of: (a) certification information, (b) waste description, (c) generation source, (d) recovery method, (e) waste packaging and handling information, (f) container preparation information, (g) assay information, (h) inspection information, (i) analytical data, and (j) RCRA characterization.

  5. An approach using multi-factor combination to evaluate high rocky slope safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Huaizhi; Yang, Meng; Wen, Zhiping

    2016-06-01

    A high rocky slope is an open complex giant system for which there is contradiction among different influencing factors and coexistence of qualitative and quantitative information. This study presents a comprehensive intelligent evaluation method of high rocky slope safety through an integrated analytic hierarchy process, extension matter element model and entropy weight to assess the safety behavior of the high rocky slope. The proposed intelligent evaluation integrates subjective judgments derived from the analytic hierarchy process with the extension matter model and entropy weight into a multiple indexes dynamic safety evaluation approach. A combined subjective and objective comprehensive evaluation process, a more objective study, through avoiding subjective effects on the weights, and a qualitative safety assessment and quantitative safety amount are presented in the proposed method. The detailed computational procedures were also provided to illustrate the integration process of the above methods. Safety analysis of one high rocky slope is conducted to illustrate that this approach can adequately handle the inherent imprecision and contradiction of the human decision-making process and provide the flexibility and robustness needed for the decision maker to better monitor the safety status of a high rocky slope. This study was the first application of the proposed integrated evaluation method in the safety assessment of a high rocky slope. The study also indicated that it can also be applied to other similar problems.

  6. Dynamics of Late Cretaceous rocky shores (Rosario Formation) from Baja California, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Lescinsky, H.L. ); Ledesma-Vazquez, J. ); Johnson, M.E. )

    1991-04-01

    Two rocky-shore deposits are described at localities of Late Cretaceous age in Baja California, Mexico. The main locality, at Las Minas, is characterized by a carbonate matrix containing clasts derived from an underlying andesite flow. Basal boulders give way up section to smaller cobbles and silt, indicating a transgression. The biotas from the sites include encrusting forms (coralline algae, bryozoans, serpulids, ostreids, spondylids), pholadid bivalve borings, and several nestling and mobile taxa. The well exposed boulder zone contains clusters of nestling pectinids preserved in growth position. This is the first such observation from an ancient rocky shore. Echinoids also lived within the relatively stable boulder interstices. Rocky-shore biotas of Late Cretaceous age from around the world contain many elements in common, including large encrusting oysters, spondylids, serpulids, rhynconellid brachiopods, and echinoids. Other groups common to rocky shores today are found at only some Cretaceous localities (e.g., barnacles, trochid and cerithiid gastropods, limpets, chitons). More archaic taxa, such as crinoids and large inarticulate brachiopods, are rarely represented at the known Cretaceous localities. Reconstructions of the biotas of ancient rocky shores offer a new avenue for the study of evolution on hard substrates. As the number and quality of described rocky-shore localities increases, it will be possible to put into a broader context evolutionary trends derived strictly from hard-grounds or other hard-substrate types.

  7. [Relationships between landscape structure and rocky desertification in karst region of northwestern Guangxi].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-nan; Wang, Ke-lin; Chen, Hong-song; Zhang, Wei

    2008-11-01

    By using canonical correspondence analysis (CCA), sixteen landscape indices were adopted to quantitatively analyze the relationships between the landscape structure and rocky desertification in karst region of Huanjiang County, Guangxi Province. The results showed that the first and the second ordination axis of CCA were strongly correlated to the factors of average patch area, average dry land patch area, landscape shape index, and landscape aggregation index. The potential rocky desertification in the region was highly positively correlated with the average dry land patch area and the average fractal dimensions of dry land and shrub land, but negatively correlated with the patch numbers of dry land. Light rocky desertification had obvious positive correlations with the fractal dimension index, average fractal dimension of unused land, and patch numbers of shrub land; while moderate and strong rocky desertification had high positive correlations with the average unused land patch area but negative correlation with the average fractal dimension of shrub land. To some extent, rocky desertification degree might be represented by the values of landscape indices. The gradient variation in karst rocky desertification along landscape structure was clearly presented by the results of CCA.

  8. Facile Routes to Th(IV), U(IV), and Np(IV) Phosphites and Phosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Eric M.; Wang, Shuao; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2011-08-05

    Three actinide(IV) phosphites and a NpIV phosphate, AnIV(HPO₃)₂(H₂O)₂ (An = Th, U, Np) and Cs[Np(H1.5PO₄)(PO₄)]₂, respectively, were synthesized using mild hydrothermal conditions. The first three phases are isotypic and were obtained using similar reaction conditions. Cs[Np(H1.5PO₄)(PO₄)]₂ was synthesized using an analogous method to that of Np(HPO₃)₂(H₂O)₂. However, this fourth phase is quite different in comparison to the other phases in both composition and structure. The structure of Cs[Np(H1.5PO₄)(PO₄)]₂ is constructed from double layers of neptunium(IV) phosphate with caesium cations in the interlayer region. In contrast, An(HPO₃)₂(H₂O)₂ (An = Th, U, Np) form dense 3D networks. The actinide contraction is detected in variety of metrics obtained from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. Changes in the oxidation state of the neptunium starting materials yield different products.

  9. Reported Historic Asbestos Mines, Historic Asbestos Prospects, and Other Natural Occurrences of Asbestos in Oregon and Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Gosen, Bradley S.

    2010-01-01

    This map and its accompanying dataset provide information for 51 natural occurrences of asbestos in Washington and Oregon, using descriptions found in the geologic literature. Data on location, mineralogy, geology, and relevant literature for each asbestos site are provided. Using the map and digital data in this report, the user can examine the distribution of previously reported asbestos occurrences and their geological characteristics in the Pacific Northwest States of Washington and Oregon. This report is part of an ongoing study by the U.S. Geological Survey to identify and map reported natural asbestos occurrences in the United States, which thus far includes similar maps and datasets of natural asbestos occurrences within the Eastern United States (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2005/1189/), the Central United States (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2006/1211/), the Rocky Mountain States (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1182/), and the Southwestern United States (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1095/). These reports are intended to provide State and local government agencies and other stakeholders with geologic information on natural occurrences of asbestos in the United States.

  10. Seismic equipment qualification at Rocky Flats Plant: Lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Peregoy, W.; Herring, K.

    1993-08-01

    Seismic equipment qualification is being evaluated as a part of the Systematic Evaluation Program (SEP) at Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). Initially it was believed that the experience database developed by the Seismic Qualification Utility Group (SQUG) for commercial nuclear power plants, as outlined in their Generic Implementation Procedure (GIP), would provide a substantial benefit for the seismic adequacy verification of equipment at RFP. However, further review of the simplified guidelines contained in the GIP with respect to the specific RFP structures and components revealed substantial differences from the GIP criteria. Therefore, the number of ``outliers`` from the experience database defined in the GIP is greater than was initially anticipated. This paper presents details of the differences found between the RFP structures and components and those represented in the GIP, and the challenges presented for their evaluation at RFP. Approaches necessary to develop seismic verification data are also discussed. The discussions focus on experience with one of the nuclear facilities at RFP, Building 707. However, the conclusions are generally applicable to other similar facilities that typically comprise the RFP nuclear facilities.

  11. Major-ion chemistry of the Rocky Mountain snowpack, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turk, J.T.; Taylor, H.E.; Ingersoll, G.P.; Tonnessen, K.A.; Clow, D.W.; Mast, M.A.; Campbell, D.H.; Melack, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    During 1993-97, samples of the full depth of the Rocky Mountain snowpack were collected at 52 sites from northern New Mexico to Montana and analyzed for major-ion concentrations. Concentrations of acidity, sulfate, nitrate, and calcium increased from north to south along the mountain range. In the northern part of the study area, acidity was most correlated (negatively) with calcium. Acidity was strongly correlated (positively) with nitrate and sulfate in the southern part and for the entire network. Acidity in the south exceeded the maximum acidity measured in snowpack of the Sierra Nevada and Cascade Mountains. Principal component analysis indicates three solute associations we characterize as: (1) acid (acidity, sulfate, and nitrate), (2) soil (calcium, magnesium, and potassium), and (3) salt (sodium, chloride, and ammonium). Concentrations of acid solutes in the snowpack are similar to concentrations in nearby wetfall collectors, whereas, concentrations of soil solutes are much higher in the snowpack than in wetfall. Thus, dryfall of acid solutes during the snow season is negligible, as is gypsum from soils. Snowpack sampling offers a cost-effective complement to sampling of wetfall in areas where wetfall is difficult to sample and where the snowpack accumulates throughout the winter. Copyright ?? 2001 .

  12. Sufentanil and xylazine immobilization of Rocky Mountain elk.

    PubMed

    Kreeger, Terry J; Huizenga, Matthew; Hansen, Cole; Wise, Benjamin L

    2011-07-01

    From October 2009 through July 2010, five captive, 3-yr-old, female Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus) and nine free-ranging elk (one male, eight female) were immobilized with 0.1 mg/kg sufentanil plus 0.5 mg/kg xylazine which was antagonized with 1 mg/kg naltrexone and 2 mg/kg tolazoline. Induction and recovery times averaged 4.9 ± 0.3 min and 3.9 ± 0.4 min, respectively. Physiologic and blood gas parameters as well as bispectral index (BIS) were measured on the captive elk every 10 min for 30 min. Immobilization induced profound hypoxemia via hypoventilation and ventilation-perfusion mismatching as demonstrated by depressed partial pressure of arterial oxygen (P(a)O(2)) and increased partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (P(a)CO(2)). The only values to significantly (P<0.05) change over time were base excess (BE), bicarbonate (HCO(3)), and lactate. Bispectral index is a measure of anesthetic depth. The average BIS value over the 30 min period (59.1 ± 2.4) was higher than the BIS value at the approximate point where elk lose consciousness, which indicated that this drug combination produced neuroleptanalgesia but not general anesthesia. Sufentanil and xylazine provided effective remote immobilization in elk and could be substituted for carfentanil or thiafentanil and xylazine should the need arise.

  13. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Rocky Flats Plant, Golden, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Rocky Flats Plant (RFP), conducted August 11 through 22, 1986. The Survey is being conducted by an multidisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team members are outside experts supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the RFP. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulations. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data observations of the operations carried on at RFP, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain environmental problems identified during its on-site activates. The Sampling and Analysis Plan is being executed by DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the RFP Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the RFP Survey. 75 refs., 24 figs., 33 tabs.

  14. Trace fossils as environment indicators in the Rocky Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, B.

    1983-08-01

    Throughout time, organisms have left various types of traces while engaged in different activities. The two major types of lebensspuren were made by suspension feeders found in turbulent water where organic matter is held in suspension, and by deposit feeders whose habitat is found in quiet, deeper waters where large quantities of organic matter settle from suspension. The different activities which occur in these two environments are the cause of the traces found in sediments. These include escape structures resulting from degradation or aggradation of sediments, feeding structures, dwelling structures, grazing traces, crawling traces, and resting traces. The use of trace fossils in hydrocarbon exploration is especially helpful in the Cretaceous sandstones of the Rocky Mountains because of the relative abundance of outcrops and the scarcity of body fossils. By combining the interpretation of physical processes with the biological traces, one more tool is made available in the determination of rock environments as an aid in hydrocarbon exploration. Materials exhibited include 8 x 10 color prints of different Cretaceous lebensspuren, hand-drawn cartoons of the six different trace activities, and a regional cross section of the Eagle sandstone illustrated by photographs of different traces near each location, as well as a variety of rock samples.

  15. Regional-scale analysis of subtidal rocky shore community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrien-Courtel, Sandrine; Le Gal, Aodren; Grall, Jacques

    2013-12-01

    The French monitoring network, REseau BENThique (REBENT), was launched by the Ministry of the Environment in 2003 following the 1999 Erika oil spill. REBENT aimed to acquire baseline knowledge of coastal benthic habitat distributions with a special focus on biological diversity. This study analyzed data from 38 subtidal rocky reef sites collected by a single diving team of marine biologists along the coast of Brittany from 2004 to 2010. At each site, the depth limits of the algal belts were determined between 0 and -40 m Chart Datum (CD); the flora and fauna compositions and abundances were sampled at -3 and -8 m CD. A total of 364 taxa (156 flora and 208 fauna), belonging to 12 phyla, were identified. The results showed that the depth limit and density of kelp beds increased as water turbidity decreased; moreover, several changes in community structure could be related to water turbidity and temperature. Thus, northern and southern Brittany showed strong differences in diversity and structure of the dominant kelp species ( Laminaria hyperborea and Saccorhiza polyschides). The results from this kelp habitat composition survey (dominant kelp species and indicator species) provided important information for local pressure assessments, like increases in turbidity. The data also provided a reference that could be useful for detecting changes in coastal water temperatures due to global warming.

  16. Formation of Massive Rocky Exomoons by Giant Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Amy C.; Syal, Megan Bruck

    2017-01-01

    The formation of satellites is thought to be a natural by-product of planet formation in our Solar System, and thus, moons of extrasolar planets (exomoons) may be abundant in extrasolar planetary systems, as well. Exomoons have yet to be discovered. However, moons larger than 0.1 Earth masses can be detected and characterized using current transit techniques. Here, we show that collisions between rocky planets with masses between a quarter to ten Earth masses can create impact-generated debris disks that could accrete into moons. Collisions between like-sized objects, at oblique impact angles, and velocities near escape speed create disks massive enough to form satellites that are dynamically stable against planetary tides. Impacts of this type onto a superearth between 2 to 7 Earth masses can launch into orbit enough mass to create a satellite large enough to be detected in Kepler transit data. Impact velocity is a crucial controlling factor on disk mass, which has been overlooked in all prior studies of moon formation via planetary collision.

  17. Rocky Mountain Snowpack Chemistry at Selected Sites, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingersoll, George P.; Mast, M. Alisa; Nanus, Leora; Manthorne, David J.; Clow, David W.; Handran, Heather M.; Winterringer, Jesse A.; Campbell, Donald H.

    2004-01-01

    During spring 2002, the chemical composition of annual snowpacks in the Rocky Mountain region of the Western United States was analyzed. Snow samples were collected at 75 geographically distributed sites extending from New Mexico to Montana. Near the end of the 2002 snowfall season, the snow-water equivalent (SWE) in annual snowpacks sampled generally was below average in most of the region. Regional patterns in the concentrations of major ions (including ammonium, nitrate, and sulfate), mercury, and stable sulfur isotope ratios are presented. The 2002 snowpack chemistry in the region differed from the previous year. Snowpack ammonium concentrations were higher at 66 percent of sites in Montana compared to concentrations in the 2001 snowpack but were lower at 74 percent of sites in Wyoming, Colorado, and New Mexico. Nitrate was lower at all Montana sites and lower at all but one Wyoming site; nitrate was higher at all but two Colorado sites and higher at all New Mexico sites. Sulfate was lower across the region at 77 percent of sites. The range of mercury concentrations for the region was similar to those of 2001 but showed more variability than ammonium, nitrate, and sulfate concentrations. Concentrations of stable sulfur isotope ratios exhibited a strong regional pattern with values increasing northward from southern Colorado to northern Colorado and Wyoming.

  18. CIG's Bullfrog No. 1 sets frac depth record for Rockies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    The Rocky Mt. depth record for hydraulic fracturing has been pushed still deeper following treatment of a CIG exploration well in the Waltman deep field of Natrona County, Wyoming. Bullfrog No. 1, approx. 46 miles west of Casper in the Wind River Basin, was treated through 5 sets of perforations tapping 4 formations between 19,830 ft and 20,510 ft. The Bullfrog No. 1 was targeted for a total 157,500 lb proppant to be delivered in 2 stages - 15,000 lb 100 mesh sand, 15,000 lb 40/70 bauxite, and 48,750 lb 20/40 bauxite/stage - but the formation screened out late in the first stage. All the 100 mesh sand and 40/70 bauxite was delivered and 16,400 lb of 20/40 bauxite was placed in the formation. The screen-out left 13,600 lb of the 20/40 bauxite in the tubing. Despite the screen-out, at which point pressure at the wellhead reached 15,200 psi, the well cleaned up easily, production increased substantially, and CIG officials have termed the treatment a success.

  19. Washing of Rocky Flats Combustible Residues (Conducted March - May 1995)

    SciTech Connect

    Mary E. Barr; Ann R. Schake; David A. Romero; Gordon D. Jarvinen

    1999-03-01

    The scope of this project is to determine the feasibility of washing plutonium-containing combustible residues using ultrasonic disruption as a method for dislodging particulate. Removal of plutonium particulate and, to a lesser extent, solubilized plutonium from the organic substrate should substantially reduce potential fire, explosion or radioactive release hazards due to radiolytic hydrogen generation or high flammability. Tests were conducted on polypropylene filters which were used as pre-filters in the rich-residue ion-exchange process at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility. These filters are similar to the Ful-Flo{reg_sign} cartridges used at Rocky Flats that make up a substantial fraction of the combustible residues with the highest hazard rating. Batch experiments were run on crushed filter material in order to determine the amount of Pu removed by stirring, stirring and sonication, and stirring and sonication with the introduction of Pu-chelating water-soluble polymers or surfactants. Significantly more Pu is removed using sonication and sonication with chelators than is removed with mechanical stirring alone.

  20. Equilibrium Chemistry of the Atmospheres of Scorched Rocky Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Laura; Lodders, K.; Fegley, B., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The Kepler and COROT missions and Earth-based observations detected putative rocky exoplanets. Some of the planets are exposed to extreme temperatures as they orbit close to their host stars, e.g., CoRot-7b. Such planets can develop atmospheres through (partial) vaporization of their exterior crusts or even mantle silicates. We investigated the chemical equilibrium composition of such heated systems from 500 - 4000 K and total pressures from 10-6 to 10+2.5 bars. The major gas phase species formed by the volatile elements H, C, N, O, and S, and the lithophile elements Na, K, Fe, Si, Mg, Al, Ca, and Ti are H2O and CO2 at low temperatures, and Na, K, O2, SiO, and O at high temperatures. The effects on overall elemental composition of the evaporated systems will be discussed. The computational results will be useful in planning spectroscopic studies of the atmospheres of hot Earth-like exoplanets. This work was supported by the NSF Astronomy Program and the NASA Astrobiology Program.

  1. Northeast-southwest structural transect: Rocky Mountain foreland, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, D.S.

    1987-08-01

    A northeast-southwest structural transect has been constructed across the Rocky Mountain foreland in Wyoming, a distance of about 400 mi. The line of transect begins in the northern Black Hills and traverses the northern Powder River basin, the Bighorn Mountains from Buffalo to Bonanza, the Big Horn basin from Worland to Hamilton dome, the Owl Creek Mountains, the northern Wind River basin at Maverick Springs, the Wind River Mountains to Pinedale in the Green River basin, the Moxa Arch at Big Piney and Riley Ridge, and into the thrust belt, ending at the Idaho border. In terms of a vertical and horizontal scale of 1 in. = 2000 ft, the section is about 90 ft long (i.e., the section is approximately 409 mi long). The data base for the transect includes published geologic maps, commercial photogeologic mapping, well data, and modern seismic data through critical parts of the basin areas. The data base provides an excellent found for analyzing structural relationships on both a regional and a local scale. Regional horizontal shortening of the foreland has occurred primarily through basement-involved displacements on basin-boundary megathrusts, which separate the mountain ranges from sedimentary basins, and on the smaller, intrabasin thrusts, which produced the anticlinal traps for Paleozoic oil accumulations.

  2. Mass-Radius Relation for Rocky Planets Based on PREM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Li; Sasselov, Dimitar D.; Jacobsen, Stein B.

    2016-03-01

    Several small dense exoplanets are now known, inviting comparisons to Earth and Venus. Such comparisons require translating their masses and sizes to composition models of evolved multi-layer interior planets. Such theoretical models rely on our understanding of the Earth’s interior, as well as independently derived equations of state, but so far have not involved direct extrapolations from Earth’s seismic model: the Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM). To facilitate more detailed compositional comparisons between small exoplanets and the Earth, we derive here a semi-empirical mass-radius relation for two-layer rocky planets based on PREM, \\frac{R}{{R}\\oplus }=(1.07-0.21\\cdot {CMF})\\cdot {≤ft(\\frac{M}{{M}\\oplus }\\right)}1/3.7, where CMF stands for core mass fraction. It is applicable to 1 ˜ 8 M⊕ and a CMF of 0.0 ˜ 0.4. Applying this formula to Earth and Venus and several known small exoplanets with radii and masses measured to better than ˜30% precision gives a CMF fit of 0.26 ± 0.07.

  3. Trail impact monitoring in Rocky Mountain National Park, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svajda, J.; Korony, S.; Brighton, I.; Esser, S.; Ciapala, S.

    2015-11-01

    This paper examines impacts of increased visitation leading to human trampling of vegetation and soil along several trails in Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP) to understand how abiotic factors and level of use can influence trail conditions. RMNP is one of the most visited national parks in the USA with 3.3 million visitors in 2012 across 1075 km2 and 571 km of hiking trails. 95 % of the park is designated wilderness making the balance between preservation and visitor use challenging. This research involves the application of trail condition assessments to 56 km of trails to determine prevailing factors and what, if any, connection between them exist. The study looked at a variety of inventory and impact indicators and standards to determine their importance and to develop a baseline condition of trails. The data can be used for future comparison and evaluation of development trends. We found that trail widening (mean trail width 88.9 cm) and soil loss (cross sectional area 172.7 cm2) are the most visible effects of trail degradation. Further statistical analyses of data identified the role and influence of various factors (e.g. use level and topography). Insights into the influence of these factors can lead to the selection of appropriate management measures to avoid or minimize negative consequences from increased visitation.

  4. Trail impact monitoring in Rocky Mountain National Park, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svajda, J.; Korony, S.; Brighton, I.; Esser, S.; Ciapala, S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines impacts of increased visitation leading to human trampling of vegetation and soil along several trails in Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP) to understand how abiotic factors and level of use can influence trail conditions. RMNP is one of the most visited national parks in the USA, with 3.3 million visitors in 2012 across 1075 km2 and 571 km of hiking trails. 95 % of the park is designated wilderness, making the balance between preservation and visitor use challenging. This research involves the application of trail condition assessments to 56 km of trails to determine prevailing factors and what, if any, connection between them exist. The study looked at a variety of inventory and impact indicators and standards to determine their importance and to develop a baseline condition of trails. The data can be used for future comparison and evaluation of development trends. We found that trail widening (mean trail width 88.9 cm) and soil loss (cross-sectional area 172.7 cm2) are the most visible effects of trail degradation. Further statistical analyses of data identified the role and influence of various factors (e.g., use level and topography). Insights into the influence of these factors can lead to the selection of appropriate management measures to avoid or minimize negative consequences from increased visitation.

  5. Rocky mountain spotted fever hospitalizations among American Indians.

    PubMed

    Demma, Linda J; Holman, Robert C; Mikosz, Christina A; Curns, Aaron T; Swerdlow, David L; Paisano, Edna L; Cheek, James E

    2006-09-01

    To describe the epidemiology of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) among American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs), we conducted a retrospective analysis of hospitalization records with an RMSF diagnosis using Indian Health Service (IHS) hospital discharge data for calendar years 1980-2003. A total of 261 RMSF hospitalizations were reported among AIs, for an average annual hospitalization rate of 1.21 per 100,000 persons; two deaths were reported (0.8%). Most hospitalizations (88.5%) occurred in the Southern Plains region, where the rate was 4.23 per 100,000 persons. Children 1-4 years of age had the highest age-specific hospitalization rate of 2.50 per 100,000 persons. The overall annual RMSF hospitalization rate declined during the study period. Understanding the epidemiology of RMSF among AI/ANs and educating IHS/tribal physicians on the diagnosis of tick-borne diseases remain important for the prompt treatment of RMSF and the reduction of the disease occurrence among AI/ANs, particularly in high-risk areas.

  6. Disturbance regime and disturbance interactions in Rocky Mountain subalpine forest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Veblen, Thomas T.; Hadley, Keith S.; Nel, Elizabeth M.; Kitzberger, Thomas; Reid, Marion; Villalba, Ricardo

    1994-01-01

    1 The spatial and temporal patterns of fire, snow avalanches and spruce beetle out-breaks were investigated in Marvine Lakes Valley in the Colorado Rocky Mountains in forests of Picea engelmannii, Abies lasiocarpa, Pseudotsuga menziesiiand Populus tremuloides. Dates and locations of disturbances were determined by dendrochronological techniques. A geographic information system (GIS) was used to calculate areas affected by the different disturbance agents and to examine the spatial relationships of the different disturbances. 2 In the Marvine Lakes Valley, major disturbance was caused by fire in the 1470s, the 1630s and the 1870s and by spruce beetle outbreak in c. 1716, 1827 and 1949. 3 Since c. 1633, 9% of the Marvine Lakes Valley has been affected by snow avalanches, 38.6% by spruce beetle outbreak and 59.1% by fire. At sites susceptible to avalanches, avalanches occur at a near-annual frequency. The mean return intervals for fire and spruce beetle outbreaks are 202 and 116.5 years, respectively. Turnover times for fire and spruce beetle outbreaks are 521 and 259 years, respectively. 4 Several types of disturbance interaction were identified. For example, large and severe snow avalanches influence the spread of fire. Similarly, following a stand-devastating fire or avalanche, Picea populations will not support a spruce beetle outbreak until individual trees reach a minimum diameter which represents at least 70 years' growth. Thus, recent fires and beetle outbreaks have nonoverlapping distributions.

  7. Atmospheric Heat Redistribution and Collapse on Tidally Locked Rocky Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wordsworth, Robin

    2015-06-01

    Atmospheric collapse is likely to be of fundamental importance to tidally locked rocky exoplanets, but it remains understudied. Here, general results on the heat transport and stability of tidally locked terrestrial-type atmospheres are reported. First, the problem is modeled with an idealized three-dimensional (3D) general circulation model (GCM) with gray gas radiative transfer. It is shown that over a wide range of parameters that the atmospheric boundary layer, rather than the large-scale circulation, is the key to understanding the planetary energy balance. Through a scaling analysis of the interhemispheric energy transfer, theoretical expressions for the day-night temperature difference and surface wind speed are created that reproduce the GCM results without tuning. Next, the GCM is used with correlated-k radiative transfer to study heat transport for two real gases ({{CO}}2 and CO). For {{CO}}2, empirical formulae for the collapse pressure as a function of planetary mass and stellar flux are produced, and critical pressures for atmospheric collapse at Earth’s stellar flux are obtained that are around five times higher (0.14 bar) than previous gray gas estimates. These results provide constraints on atmospheric stability that will aid in future interpretations of observations and exoplanet habitability modeling.

  8. Status and health of biota at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal

    SciTech Connect

    Macrander, A.M.; Mackey, C.V.; Reagen, D.P.; Tate, D.J.

    1994-12-31

    Field studies have been conducted on the populations and communities of the biota at Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA) since the late 1950`s. While earlier studies were primarily documentation of mortality events, a diverse program of studies conducted since 1982 has assessed a number of relevant endpoints. Studies of sedentary species (e.g. plants, earthworm, grasshoppers) focused on contaminated areas within RMA to identify potential contaminant effects. Studies on more mobile species (e.g. deer, great horned owls, kestrels) were conducted throughout RMA to evaluate effects on their RMA-wide populations. Both on- and off-post reference sites were used in some of the studies. Ecological endpoints were selected that were focused upon the population-level effects that could have a causal relationship to the RMA contaminants, such as population abundance and reproductive success, biomarkers, and community organization. Current EPA guidance on conducting ecological risk assessment encourages the use of observational field studies. Although many of these studies were conducted prior to the issuance of this guidance, they are consistent with its scope and intent. Investigators on the effects of contamination at RMA during the past decade indicate that while some effects may still be present in biota at RMA, the wildlife communities and populations are viable and appear healthy.

  9. Project Fever - Fostering Electric Vehicle Expansion in the Rockies

    SciTech Connect

    Swalnick, Natalia

    2013-06-30

    Project FEVER (Fostering Electric Vehicle Expansion in the Rockies) is a part of the Clean Cities Community Readiness and Planning for Plug-in Electric Vehicles and Charging Infrastructure Funding Opportunity funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for the state of Colorado. Tasks undertaken in this project include: Electric Vehicle Grid Impact Assessment; Assessment of Electrical Permitting and Inspection for EV/EVSE (electric vehicle/electric vehicle supply equipment); Assessment of Local Ordinances Pertaining to Installation of Publicly Available EVSE;Assessment of Building Codes for EVSE; EV Demand and Energy/Air Quality Impacts Assessment; State and Local Policy Assessment; EV Grid Impact Minimization Efforts; Unification and Streamlining of Electrical Permitting and Inspection for EV/EVSE; Development of BMP for Local EVSE Ordinances; Development of BMP for Building Codes Pertaining to EVSE; Development of Colorado-Specific Assessment for EV/EVSE Energy/Air Quality Impacts; Development of State and Local Policy Best Practices; Create Final EV/EVSE Readiness Plan; Develop Project Marketing and Communications Elements; Plan and Schedule In-person Education and Outreach Opportunities.

  10. Hydrogeologic data for the northern Rocky Mountains intermontane basins, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dutton, DeAnn M.; Lawlor, Sean M.; Briar, D.W.; Tresch, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey began a Regional Aquifer- System Analysis of the Northern Rocky Mountains Intermontane Basins of western Montana and central and central and northern Idaho in 1990 to establish a regional framework of information for aquifers in 54 intermontane basins in an area of about 77,500 square miles. Selected hydrogeologic data have been used as part of this analysis to define the hydro- logic systems. Records of 1,376 wells completed in 31 of the 34 intermontane basins in the Montana part of the study area are tabulated in this report. Data consist of location, alttiude of land surface, date well constructed, geologic unit, depth of well, diameter of casing, type of finish, top of open interval, primary use of water, water level, date water level measured, discharge, specific capacity, source of discharge data, type of log available, date water-quality parameters measured, specific conductance, pH, and temperature. Hydrographs for selected wells also are included. Locations of wells and basins are shown on the accompanying plate.

  11. Effects of productivity, consumers, competitors, and El Nino events on food chain patterns in a rocky intertidal community

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, J.T.; Pfister, C.A.; Paine, R.T.

    1996-11-06

    We experimentally manipulated nutrient input to a rocky intertidal community, using nutrient-diffusing flowerpots, to determine (i) whether nutrients limited intertidal productivity, (ii) how a large-scale oceanographic disturbance (an El Nino event) affected patterns of nutrient limitation, (iii) the relative impacts of molluscan grazers and nutrient limitation, and (iv) if responses to experimental nutrient addition among trophic levels were more consistent with prey-dependent or ratio-dependent food chain models. Nutrients measurably increased the abundance of micrograzers (amphipods and chironomid larvae), but not algal biomass, during the summer of an El Nino years and during the autumn of an El Nino year. Adding nutrients did not affect food chain stability as assessed by temporal variation in algal biomass and micrograzer abundance. Large molluscan grazers caused large reductions in micrograzers and smaller reductions in algae, indicating consistent consumer effects. The results demonstrate that in this intertidal community, nutrient limitation can occur under conditions of nutrient stress, that top-down grazing effects are typically stronger than bottom-up nutrient effects, and that prey-dependent models are more appropriate than ratio-dependent models. 40 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  12. Low-temperature geothermal resources of Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, J.E.; Bloomquist, R.G.

    1994-06-01

    This report presents information on the location, physical characteristics, and water chemistry of low-temperature geothermal resources in Washington. The database includes 941 thermal (>20C or 68F) wells, 34 thermal springs, lakes, and fumaroles, and 238 chemical analyses. Most thermal springs occur in the Cascade Range, and many are associated with stratovolcanoes. In contrast, 97 percent of thermal wells are located in the Columbia Basin of southeastern Washington. Some 83.5 percent are located in Adams, Benton, Franklin, Grant, Walla Walla, and Yakima Counties. Yakima County, with 259 thermal wells, has the most. Thermal wells do not seem to owe their origin to local sources of heat, such as cooling magma in the Earth`s upper crust, but to moderate to deep circulation of ground water in extensive aquifers of the Columbia River Basalt Group and interflow sedimentary deposits, under the influence of a moderately elevated (41C/km) average geothermal gradient.

  13. WENAHA TUCANNON WILDERNESS, WASHINGTON AND OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swanson, Donald A.; Munts, Steven R.

    1984-01-01

    A geologic and mineral survey conducted in the Wenaha Tucannon Wilderness, southeast Washington and northeast Oregon, indicates little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources. Thin seams of low-grade coal possibly occur in the subsurface in the southeast corner of the wilderness. Additional study of the pre-Tertiary rocks north of the wilderness might reveal important features to aid in further evaluating the pre-Tertiary rocks in the northern tip of the wilderness.

  14. Estimated freshwater withdrawals in Washington, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lane, Ron C.; Welch, Wendy B.

    2015-03-18

    The amount of public- and self-supplied water used for domestic, irrigation, livestock, aquaculture, industrial, mining, and thermoelectric power was estimated for state, county, and eastern and western regions of Washington during calendar year 2010. Withdrawals of freshwater for offstream uses were estimated to be about 4,885 million gallons per day. The total estimated freshwater withdrawals for 2010 was approximately 15 percent less than the 2005 estimate because of decreases in irrigation and thermoelectric power withdrawals.

  15. ALPINE LAKES WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, WASHINGTON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gualtieri, J.L.; Thurber, H.K.

    1984-01-01

    The Alpine Lakes Wilderness study area, located in the central part of the Cascade Mountains of Washington was examined for its mineral-resource potential. On the basis of that study the area was found to contain deposits of copper, other base metals, and gold and silver. Probable or substantiated mineral-resource potential exists for these commodities in the southwest-central, northwest, and southeast-central parts of the area. The geologic terrane precludes the occurrence of fossil fuel resources.

  16. Petroleum potential of Oregon and Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Billo, S.M. )

    1990-06-01

    The states of Oregon and Washington border the Pacific Ocean within an area of diverse topography, climate, and vegetation with altitudes ranging from sea level to more than 8,000 ft. The Mesozoic and Paleozoic rocks are quasi-eugeosynclinal but badly indurated and/or metamorphosed, implying that almost all the pre-Tertiary rocks were unfavorable for oil and gas except some 700 mi{sup 2} of outcropping Mesozoic rocks exposed through windows in the overlying volcanics along the SW extension of the Blue and the Klamath mountains, accordingly. A profound angular and erosional unconformity separates the Tertiary sediments and volcanics from the older rocks. During Late Mesozoic and Tertiary time, uplift accompanied by erosion caused the removal of large areas of metamorphosed sediments and the development of pre-Miocene surface of large relief. Crustal movements of Late Miocene age produced NW-SE folds in Washington, and NS folds in the Coast range of Oregon. Some of the exploration methods (excluding wildcat drilling) were inconvenient. Seismic and gravity methods are impeded, the first by glacial till, basalt flows, sills, and dikes, and the second by laccoliths. Although the region is not the best place for hustling, drilling activity for development of potential oil and gas ushered 78% success rate in Oregon, and Shell and Exxon earned significant bonus bids in Washington.

  17. Pedestrian crashes in Washington, DC and Baltimore.

    PubMed

    Preusser, David F; Wells, JoAnn K; Williams, Allan F; Weinstein, Helen B

    2002-09-01

    Police crash reports were obtained for pedestrian-motor vehicle crashes in Washington, DC (N = 852) and Baltimore (N = 1234) for the year 1998. Reports were coded using procedures developed and applied in these two cities during the 1970s, including the determination of pedestrian crash type, primary precipitating factor, and culpability. Results indicated substantial differences between crash patterns observed during the 1970s and those observed during 1998. Midblock dart-dash crashes, which typically involve a precipitating factor or critical error by a child pedestrian, decreased (from 37% to 15% in Washington). Across all crashes in both cities, the number of drivers who made a critical error leading to the crash was nearly equivalent to the number of pedestrians who made a critical error. Overall, pedestrians were slightly more likely to be judged culpable (50% vs. 39%). Turning vehicle crashes, which typically involve a driver's failure to grant a pedestrian the right of way at a signalized intersection, increased (from 9% to 25% in Washington). Countermeasures to reduce the number of pedestrians hit by turning vehicles are discussed.

  18. Magnitude and frequency of floods in Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cummans, J.E.; Collings, Michael R.; Nasser, Edmund George

    1975-01-01

    Relations are provided to estimate the magnitude and frequency of floods on Washington streams. Annual-peak-flow data from stream gaging stations on unregulated streams having 1 years or more of record were used to determine a log-Pearson Type III frequency curve for each station. Flood magnitudes having recurrence intervals of 2, 5, i0, 25, 50, and 10years were then related to physical and climatic indices of the drainage basins by multiple-regression analysis using the Biomedical Computer Program BMDO2R. These regression relations are useful for estimating flood magnitudes of the specified recurrence intervals at ungaged or short-record sites. Separate sets of regression equations were defined for western and eastern parts of the State, and the State was further subdivided into 12 regions in which the annual floods exhibit similar flood characteristics. Peak flows are related most significantly in western Washington to drainage-area size and mean annual precipitation. In eastern Washington-they are related most significantly to drainage-area size, mean annual precipitation, and percentage of forest cover. Standard errors of estimate of the estimating relations range from 25 to 129 percent, and the smallest errors are generally associated with the more humid regions.

  19. Late Quaternary mammalian zoogeography of eastern Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyman, R. Lee; Livingston, Stephanie D.

    1983-11-01

    The late Quaternary mammalian zoogeographic history of eastern Washington as revealed by archaeological and paleontological research conforms to a set of past environmental conditions inferred from botanical data. During the relatively cool and moist late Pleistocene and early Holocene, Cervus cf. elaphus, Ovis canadensis, Vulpes vulpes, Martes americana, Alopex lagopus, and perhaps Rangifer sp., taxa with ecological preferences for mesic steppe habitats, were present in the now xeric Columbia Basin. As the climate became progressively warmer and drier during the late Pleistocene and early Holocene, Antilocapra americana, Onychomys leucogaster, Spermophilus townsendii, and Neotoma cinerea, taxa with ecological preferences for xeric steppe habitats, appear in the Columbia Basin. Bison sp. and Taxidea taxus may have been present in eastern Washington for the last 20,000 yr. Middle and late Holocene records for Oreamnos americanus, Spermophilus columbianus, S. townsendii, Lagurus curtatus, and Urocyon cinereoargenteus in central eastern Washington suggest fluctuations in the ranges of these taxa that conform to a middle Holocene period of less effective precipitation and a ca. 3500-yr-old period of more effective precipitation before essentially modern environmental conditions prevailed.

  20. Clutch sizes and nests of tailed frogs from the Olympic Peninsula, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bury, R. Bruce; Loafman, P.; Rofkar, D.; Mike, K.

    2001-01-01

    In the summers 1995-1998, we sampled 168 streams (1,714 in of randomly selected 1-m bands) to determine distribution and abundance of stream amphibians in Olympic National Park, Washington. We found six nests (two in one stream) of the tailed frog, compared to only two nests with clutch sizes reported earlier for coastal regions. This represents only one nest per 286 in searched and one nest per 34 streams sampled. Tailed frogs occurred only in 94 (60%) of the streams and, for these waters, we found one nest per 171 in searched or one nest per 20 streams sampled. The numbers of eggs for four masses ((x) over bar = 48.3, range 40-55) were low but one single strand in a fifth nest had 96 eggs. One nest with 185 eggs likely represented communal egg deposition. Current evidence indicates a geographic trend with yearly clutches of relatively few eggs in coastal tailed frogs compared to biennial nesting with larger clutches for inland populations in the Rocky Mountains.

  1. Rocky Mountain evolution: Tying Continental Dynamics of the Rocky Mountains and Deep Probe seismic experiments with receiver functions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rumpfhuber, E.-M.; Keller, Gordon R.; Sandvol, E.; Velasco, A.A.; Wilson, D.C.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we have determined the crustal structure using three different receiver function methods using data collected from the northern transect of the Continental Dynamics of the Rocky Mountains (CD-ROM) experiment. The resulting migrated image and crustal thickness determinations confirm and refine prior crustal thickness measurements based on the CD-ROM and Deep Probe experiment data sets. The new results show a very distinct and thick lower crustal layer beneath the Archean Wyoming province. In addition, we are able to show its termination at 42??N latitude, which provides a seismic tie between the CD-ROM and Deep Probe seismic experiments and thus completes a continuous north-south transect extending from New Mexico into Alberta, Canada. This new tie is particularly important because it occurs close to a major tectonic boundary, the Cheyenne belt, between an Archean craton and a Proterozoic terrane. We used two different stacking techniques, based on a similar concept but using two different ways to estimate uncertainties. Furthermore, we used receiver function migration and common conversion point (CCP) stacking techniques. The combined interpretation of all our results shows (1) crustal thinning in southern Wyoming, (2) strong northward crustal thickening beginning in central Wyoming, (3) the presence of an unusually thick and high-velocity lower crust beneath the Wyoming province, and (4) the abrupt termination of this lower crustal layer north of the Cheyenne belt at 42??N latitude. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Fish Assemblages on Estuarine Artificial Reefs: Natural Rocky-Reef Mimics or Discrete Assemblages?

    PubMed Central

    Folpp, Heath; Lowry, Michael; Gregson, Marcus; Suthers, Iain M.

    2013-01-01

    If the primary goal of artificial reef construction is the creation of additional reef habitat that is comparable to adjacent natural rocky-reef, then performance should be evaluated using simultaneous comparisons with adjacent natural habitats. Using baited remote underwater video (BRUV) fish assemblages on purpose-built estuarine artificial reefs and adjacent natural rocky-reef and sand-flat were assessed 18 months post-deployment in three south-east Australian estuaries. Fish abundance, species richness and diversity were found to be greater on the artificial reefs than on either naturally occurring reef or sand-flat in all estuaries. Comparisons within each estuary identified significant differences in the species composition between the artificial and natural rocky-reefs. The artificial reef assemblage was dominated by sparid species including Acanthopagrus australis and Rhabdosargus sarba. The preference for a range of habitats by theses sparid species is evident by their detection on sand-flat, natural rocky reef and artificial reef habitats. The fish assemblage identified on the artificial reefs remained distinct from the adjacent rocky-reef, comprising a range of species drawn from naturally occurring rocky-reef and sand-flat. In addition, some mid-water schooling species including Trachurus novaezelandiae and Pseudocaranx georgianus were only identified on the artificial reef community; presumably as result of the reef's isolated location in open-water. We concluded that estuarine artificial reef assemblages are likely to differ significantly from adjacent rocky-reef, potentially as a result of physical factors such as reef isolation, coupled with species specific behavioural traits such as the ability of some species to traverse large sand flats in order to locate reef structure, and feeding preferences. Artificial reefs should not be viewed as direct surrogates for natural reef. The assemblages are likely to remain distinct from naturally occurring

  3. Fish assemblages on estuarine artificial reefs: natural rocky-reef mimics or discrete assemblages?

    PubMed

    Folpp, Heath; Lowry, Michael; Gregson, Marcus; Suthers, Iain M

    2014-01-01

    If the primary goal of artificial reef construction is the creation of additional reef habitat that is comparable to adjacent natural rocky-reef, then performance should be evaluated using simultaneous comparisons with adjacent natural habitats. Using baited remote underwater video (BRUV) fish assemblages on purpose-built estuarine artificial reefs and adjacent natural rocky-reef and sand-flat were assessed 18 months post-deployment in three south-east Australian estuaries. Fish abundance, species richness and diversity were found to be greater on the artificial reefs than on either naturally occurring reef or sand-flat in all estuaries. Comparisons within each estuary identified significant differences in the species composition between the artificial and natural rocky-reefs. The artificial reef assemblage was dominated by sparid species including Acanthopagrus australis and Rhabdosargus sarba. The preference for a range of habitats by theses sparid species is evident by their detection on sand-flat, natural rocky reef and artificial reef habitats. The fish assemblage identified on the artificial reefs remained distinct from the adjacent rocky-reef, comprising a range of species drawn from naturally occurring rocky-reef and sand-flat. In addition, some mid-water schooling species including Trachurus novaezelandiae and Pseudocaranx georgianus were only identified on the artificial reef community; presumably as result of the reef's isolated location in open-water. We concluded that estuarine artificial reef assemblages are likely to differ significantly from adjacent rocky-reef, potentially as a result of physical factors such as reef isolation, coupled with species specific behavioural traits such as the ability of some species to traverse large sand flats in order to locate reef structure, and feeding preferences. Artificial reefs should not be viewed as direct surrogates for natural reef. The assemblages are likely to remain distinct from naturally occurring

  4. Three-dimensional modeling of fecal coliform in the Tidal Basin and Washington Channel, Washington, DC.

    PubMed

    Bai, Sen; Lung, Wu-Seng

    2006-01-01

    Fecal coliform are widely used as bacterial indicator in the United States and around the world. Fecal coliform impaired water is highly possible to be polluted by pathogenic bacteria. The Tidal Basin and Washington Channel in Washington, DC are on the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) list due to the high fecal coliform level. To support TMDL development, a three-dimensional numerical model of fecal coliform was developed using the EFDC framework. The model calculates the transport of fecal coliform under the influences of flap gate operations and tidal elevation. The original EFDC code was modified to calculate the die-off of fecal coliform under the impact of temperature and solar radiation intensity. The watershed contribution is expressed as storm water inflow and the load carried by the runoff. Model results show that fecal coliform vary strongly in space in both the Tidal Basin and Washington Channel. The storm water only impacts a small area around the storm water outfall in the Tidal Basin and the impacts are negligible in the Washington Channel due to dilution. The water from the Potomac River may affect the fecal coliform level in the area close to the flap gate in the Tidal Basin. The fecal coliform level in the Washington Channel is mainly controlled by the fecal coliform level in the Anacostia River, which is located at the open boundary of the Washington Channel. The potential sediment layer storage of fecal coliform was analyzed and it was found that the sediment layer fecal coliform level could be much higher than the water column fecal coliform level and becomes a secondary source under high bottom shear stress condition. The developed model built solid connection of fecal coliform source and concentration in the water column and has been used to develop TMDL.

  5. Climate insensitivity of treeline in the Canadian Rocky Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, E. A.; Macias Fauria, M.

    2011-12-01

    Successful modelling efforts demonstrate that tree presence over a ~ 200 km2 alpine/subalpine area in the Front Ranges of the Canadian Rocky Mountains results from a multi-scale spatiotemporal process competition involving not only growing season temperatures but also topographical shelter, water availability, and substrate stability and availability. The study area was selected to represent the diversity of substrates and geomorphologic processes found in the Canadian Rockies, and ranges in elevation from 1400 to > 2800 meters above sea level. Tree presence was mapped at 10m resolution using a combination of remote sensing imagery (taken in 2008) and intensive ground truthing, and modelled with an ensemble of state-of-the-art environmental envelope models. Explanatory variables chosen represented not only temperature and moisture availability (computed over 1971-2000 climate normals), but also substrate diversity, slope angle and type, geomorphologic features, modelled regolith depth, and concavity/convexity of the terrain. Such variables were meant to serve as proxies for known convergent and divergent processes that occur on steep landscapes and that have profound influence on tree establishment and survival. Model performance was very high and revealed substrate and geomorphology to be the most important explanatory variables for tree presence in the area. Available high-resolution imagery for 1954 enabled the mapping of tree presence over most of the study area and the identification of changes in the distribution of trees over the last nearly six decades. Overall, the only major observed changes were related to post-fire stand recovery, and areas with treeline advance were insignificant at the landscape scale. Tree suitable sites were projected onto high resolution grids of late 21st century climatic conditions predicted by regional climate models driven by atmosphere-ocean general circulation models. Emissions scenario was A2 (as defined in the Special

  6. "Smoky" Days in the Canadian Rockies, 1907-1925

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvin, C.

    2004-05-01

    The incidence of forest fires may be a proxy for climate, but consistent records are scarce before the widespread use of aerial photography in the mid-20th century. During his tenure as fourth Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution (1907-1927), Charles D. Walcott spent 19 summers as a paleontologist in the Rocky Mountains, all but two of them in the Canadian Rockies west and northwest of Calgary. Prior to becoming Secretary, Walcott had been the second Director of the U.S. Geological Survey, with responsibility for the Forest Reserves established by Presidents Cleveland and McKinley. Walcott was frequently quoted in the newspapers on the subject of forest fire. During the 17 Canadian summers, Walcott camped an average of 86 days per summer, measured from the date he made his first camp to the date he broke his last camp of the summer. He wrote brief daily comments in diaries that did not change in size or style. The small diary page began with a pre-printed prompt to describe the weather, and there were summers when Walcott frequently wrote "Smoky" at the start of diary entries. Here is a summary of eight Canadian summers (two 4-yr sets), with inclusive dates of his camping: 1908(26Jun-19Sep)was wet or clear until 1, 2, 3 Aug when he reports "forest fire", a rumor that Fernie, B.C., had been "destroyed by fire", and "RR station at Fernie burned". 9, 10 Aug had "Smoky atmosphere". On 6 Sep, "Mr Clark left us to go & fight a forest fire." 1909(18Jul-8Sep) has only one mention of "forest fire" (13 Aug). This was the summer when Walcott discovered the Burgess shale fossils. 1910(28Jun-13Sep) contains no diary record suggesting forest fire. This was a summer when Walcott exploited the Burgess shale fossils. 1911(6Aug-21Sep) was the shortest of Walcott's field seasons, most of it on the Burgess shale quarry, with no record relating to forest fire. 1922(23Jun-1Oct) reports "Smoky" on 30 Jun, 1, 2, 3, 18, 19, 20, 21, 28, 29, 30, 31 Jul, and 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 28, 29

  7. 21 CFR 1308.14 - Schedule IV.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Schedule IV. 1308.14 Section 1308.14 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Schedules § 1308.14 Schedule IV. (a) Schedule IV shall consist of the drugs and other substances,...

  8. Isotopes in Rocky Mountain Snowpack 1993-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, L.; Berkelhammer, M. B.; Mast, A.

    2015-12-01

    We present ~1300 new isotopic measurements (δ18O and δ2H) from a network of snowpack sites in the Rocky Mountains (IRMS) that have been sampled since 1993. The network includes 177 locations where depth-integrated snow samples are collected each spring near peak accumulation. At 57 of these locations snowpack samples were obtained for 10 to 21 years and their isotopic measurements provide unprecedented spatial and temporal documentation of snowpack isotope values at mid-latitudes. For environments where snowfall accounts for the majority of annual precipitation, snowmelt is likely to have the strongest influence on isotope values retained in proxy archives. In this first presentation of the dataset we (1) describe the basic features of the isotope values in relation to the Global Meteoric Water Line (GMWL), (2) evaluate space for time substitutions traditionally used to establish δ18O-temperature relations, (3) evaluate site-to-site similarities across the network and identify those that are the most regionally representative, (4) examine atmospheric circulation patterns for several years with spatially coherent isotope patterns, and (5) provide examples of the implications this new dataset has for interpreting paleoclimate records (Bison Lake, Colorado and Minnetonka Cave, Idaho). Results indicate that snowpack δ18O is rarely a simple proxy of temperature. Instead, it exhibits a high degree of spatial heterogeneity and temporal variance that reflect additional processes such as vapor transport and post-depositional modification. Despite these complexities we identify consistent climate-isotope patterns and regionally representative locations that serve to better define Holocene hydroclimate estimates and their uncertainty. Climate change has and will affect western U.S. snowpack and we suggest these changes can be better understood and anticipated by hydrogen and oxygen isotope-based reconstructions of Holocene hydroclimate using a process-based understanding

  9. Isotopes in North American Rocky Mountain Snowpack 1993-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Lesleigh; Berkelhammer, Max; Mast, M. Alisa

    2016-01-01

    We present ∼1300 new isotopic measurements (δ18O and δ2H) from a network of snowpack sites in the Rocky Mountains that have been sampled since 1993. The network includes 177 locations where depth-integrated snow samples are collected each spring near peak accumulation. At 57 of these locations snowpack samples were obtained for 10-21 years and their isotopic measurements provide unprecedented spatial and temporal documentation of snowpack isotope values at mid-latitudes. For environments where snowfall accounts for the majority of annual precipitation, snowmelt is likely to have the strongest influence on isotope values retained in proxy archives. In this first presentation of the dataset we (1) describe the basic features of the isotope values in relation to the Global Meteoric Water Line (GMWL), (2) evaluate space for time substitutions traditionally used to establish δ18O-temperature relations, (3) evaluate site-to-site similarities across the network and identify those that are the most regionally representative, (4) examine atmospheric circulation patterns for several years with spatially coherent isotope patterns, and (5) provide examples of the implications this new dataset has for interpreting paleoclimate records (Bison Lake, Colorado and Minnetonka Cave, Idaho). Results indicate that snowpack δ18O is rarely a simple proxy of temperature. Instead, it exhibits a high degree of spatial heterogeneity and temporal variance that reflect additional processes such as vapor transport and post-depositional modification. Despite these complexities we identify consistent climate-isotope patterns and regionally representative locations that serve to better define Holocene hydroclimate estimates and their uncertainty. Climate change has and will affect western U.S. snowpack and we suggest these changes can be better understood and anticipated by oxygen and hydrogen isotope-based reconstructions of Holocene hydroclimate using a process-based understanding of the

  10. Distal ejecta from lunar impacts: Extensive regions of rocky deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandfield, Joshua L.; Cahill, Joshua T. S.; Carter, Lynn M.; Neish, Catherine D.; Patterson, G. Wesley; Williams, Jean-Pierre; Paige, David A.

    2017-02-01

    Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Diviner Radiometer, Mini-RF, and LRO Camera data were used to identify and characterize rocky lunar deposits that appear well separated from any potential source crater. Two regions are described: 1) A ∼18,000 km2 area with elevated rock abundance and extensive melt ponds and veneers near the antipode of Tycho crater (167.5°E, 42.5°N). This region has been identified previously, using radar and imaging data. 2) A much larger and more diffuse region, covering ∼730,000 km2, centered near 310°E, 35°S, containing elevated rock abundance and numerous granular flow deposits on crater walls. The rock distributions in both regions favor certain slope azimuths over others, indicating a directional component to the formation of these deposits. The spatial distribution of rocks is consistent with the arrival of ejecta from the west and northwest at low angles (∼10-30°) above the horizon in both regions. The derived age and slope orientations of the deposits indicate that the deposits likely originated as ejecta from the Tycho impact event. Despite their similar origin, the deposits in the two regions show significant differences in the datasets. The Tycho crater antipode deposit covers a smaller area, but the deposits are pervasive and appear to be dominated by impact melts. By contrast, the nearside deposits cover a much larger area and numerous granular flows were triggered. However, the features in this region are less prominent with no evidence for the presence of impact melts. The two regions appear to be surface expressions of a distant impact event that can modify surfaces across wide regions, resulting in a variety of surface morphologies. The Tycho impact event may only be the most recent manifestation of these processes, which likely have played a role in the development of the regolith throughout lunar history.

  11. Effect of recreational diving on Patagonian rocky reefs.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Gonzalo; Márquez, Federico; Marzinelli, Ezequiel M; Mendez, María M; Bigatti, Gregorio

    2015-03-01

    Tourism has grown considerably in the last decades, promoting activities such as recreational SCUBA diving that may affect marine benthic communities. In Puerto Madryn, Patagonia Argentina, sub-aquatic tourism areas (STA) receive about 7,000 divers per year. Diving is concentrated on a few small rocky reefs and 50% of the dives occur in summer. In this work, we evaluated the effect of recreational diving activities on benthic communities and determined whether diving causes a press (long-term) or a pulse (short-term) response. We quantified the percentage cover of benthic organisms and compared benthic assemblage structure and composition between two sites with contrasting usage by divers, 'highly disturbed' and 'moderately disturbed' sites, and two 'control' sites with similar physical characteristics but no diving activity, twice before and after the diving peak in summer. We found differences in benthic assemblage structure (identity and relative abundance of taxa) and composition (identity only) among diving sites and controls. These differences were consistent before and after the peak of diving in summer, suggesting that recreational diving may produce a press impact on overall benthic assemblage structure and composition in these STA. At the moderately disturbed site, however, covers of specific taxa, such as some key habitat-forming or highly abundant species, usually differed from those in controls only immediately after summer, after which they begun to resemble controls, suggesting a pulse impact. Thus, STA in Golfo Nuevo seem to respond differently to disturbances of diving depending on the usage of the sites. This information is necessary to develop sound management strategies in order to preserve local biodiversity.

  12. Science and management of Rocky Mountain grizzly bears

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mattson, D.J.; Herrero, S.; Wright, R.G.; Pease, C.M.

    1996-01-01

    The science and management of grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) in the Rocky Mountains of North America have spawned considerable conflict and controversy. Much of this can be attributed to divergent public values, but the narrow perceptions and incomplete and fragmented problem definitions of those involved have exacerbated an inherently difficult situation. We present a conceptual model that extends the traditional description of the grizzly bear conservation system to include facets of the human domain such as the behavior of managers, elected officials, and the public. The model focuses on human-caused mortality, the key determinant of grizzly bear population growth in this region and the interactions and feedback loops among humans that have a major potential influence on bear mortality. We also briefly evaluate existing information and technical methods relevant to understanding this complex human-biophysical system. We observe not only that the extant knowledge is insufficient for prediction (and in some cases for description), but also that traditional positivistic science alone is not adequate for dealing with the problems of grizzly bear conservation. We recommend changes in science and management that could improve learning and responsiveness among the involved individuals and organizations, clarify some existing uncertainty, and thereby increase the effectiveness of grizzly bear conservation and management. Although adaptive management is a promising approach, we point out some keya??as yet unfulfilleda??contingencies for implementation of a method such as this one that relies upon social processes and structures that promote open learning and flexibility in all facets of the policy process.

  13. Technical safety appraisal: Buildings 776/777 Rocky Flats Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Field, H C

    1988-03-01

    Buildings 776/777 at the Rocky Flats Plant are major components of the production complex at the plant site. They have been in operation since 1957. The operations taking place in the buildings are nuclear weapons production support, processing of weapons assemblies returned from Pantex, waste processing, research and development in support of production, special projects, and those generated by support groups, such as maintenance. The appraisal team identified nine deficiencies that it believed required prompt attention. DOE management for EH, the program office (Defense Programs), and the field office analyzed the information provided by the appraisal team and instituted compensatory measures for closer monitoring of contractor activities by knowledgeable DOE staff and staff from other sites. Concurrently, the contractor was requested to address both short-term and long-term remedial measures to correct the identified issues as well as the underlying problems. The contractor has provided his action plan, which is included. This plan was under evaluation by EH and the DOE program office at the time this report was prepared. In addressing the major areas of concern identified above, a well as the specific deficiencies identified by the appraisal team, the contractor and the field office are cautioned to search for the root causes for the problems and to direct corrective actions to those root causes rather than solely to the symptoms to assure the sustainability of the improvements being made. The results of prior TSAs led DOE to conclude that previous corrective actions were not sufficient in that a large number of the individual findings are recurrent. Pending completion of remedial actions over the next few months, enhanced DOE oversight of the contractor is warranted.

  14. Habitat selection of Rocky Mountain elk in a nonforested environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sawyer, H.; Nielson, R.M.; Lindzey, F.G.; Keith, L.; Powell, J.H.; Abraham, A.A.

    2007-01-01

    Recent expansions by Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus) into nonforested habitats across the Intermountain West have required managers to reconsider the traditional paradigms of forage and cover as they relate to managing elk and their habitats. We examined seasonal habitat selection patterns of a hunted elk population in a nonforested high-desert region of southwestern Wyoming, USA. We used 35,246 global positioning system locations collected from 33 adult female elk to model probability of use as a function of 6 habitat variables: slope, aspect, elevation, habitat diversity, distance to shrub cover, and distance to road. We developed resource selection probability functions for individual elk, and then we averaged the coefficients to estimate population-level models for summer and winter periods. We used the population-level models to generate predictive maps by assigning pixels across the study area to 1 of 4 use categories (i.e., high, medium-high, medium-low, or low), based on quartiles of the predictions. Model coefficients and predictive maps indicated that elk selected for summer habitats characterized by higher elevations in areas of high vegetative diversity, close to shrub cover, northerly aspects, moderate slopes, and away from roads. Winter habitat selection patterns were similar, except elk shifted to areas with lower elevations and southerly aspects. We validated predictive maps by using 528 locations collected from an independent sample of radiomarked elk (n = 55) and calculating the proportion of locations that occurred in each of the 4 use categories. Together, the high- and medium-high use categories of the summer and winter predictive maps contained 92% and 74% of summer and winter elk locations, respectively. Our population-level models and associated predictive maps were successful in predicting winter and summer habitat use by elk in a nonforested environment. In the absence of forest cover, elk seemed to rely on a combination of shrubs

  15. Rocky Mountain snowpack chemistry at selected sites for 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingersoll, George P.; Mast, M. Alisa; Clow, David W.; Nanus, Leora; Campbell, Donald H.; Handran, Heather

    2003-01-01

    Because regional-scale atmospheric deposition data in the Rocky Mountains are sparse, a program was designed by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, and other agencies, to more thoroughly determine the chemical composition of precipitation and to identify sources of atmospherically deposited contaminants in a network of high-elevation sites. Samples of seasonal snowpacks at 57 geographically distributed sites, in a regional network from New Mexico to Montana, were collected and analyzed for major ions (including ammonium, nitrate, and sulfate), alkalinity, and dissolved organic carbon during 2001. Sites selected in this report have been sampled annually since 1993, enabling identification of increases or decreases in chemical concentrations from year to year. Spatial patterns in snowpack-chemical data for concentrations of ammonium, nitrate, and sulfate indicate that concentrations of these acid precursors in less developed areas of the region are lower than concentrations in the heavily developed areas. Results for the 2001 snowpack-chemistry analyses, however, indicate increases in concentrations of ammonium and nitrate in particular at sites where past concentrations typically were lower. Since 1993, concentrations of nitrate and sulfate were highest from snowpack samples in northern Colorado that were collected from sites adjacent to the Denver metropolitan area to the east and the coal-fired powerplants to the west. In 2001, relatively high concentrations of nitrate (12.3 to 23.0 microequivalents per liter (?eq/L) and sulfate (7.7 to 12.5 ?eq/L) were detected in Montana and Wyoming. Ammonium concentrations were highest in north-central Colorado (14.5 to 16.9 ?eq/L) and southwestern Montana (12.8 to 14.2 ?eq/L).

  16. Isotopes in North American Rocky Mountain snowpack 1993–2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Lesleigh; Max Berkelhammer,; Mast, M. Alisa

    2015-01-01

    We present ∼1300 new isotopic measurements (δ18O and δ2H) from a network of snowpack sites in the Rocky Mountains that have been sampled since 1993. The network includes 177 locations where depth-integrated snow samples are collected each spring near peak accumulation. At 57 of these locations snowpack samples were obtained for 10–21 years and their isotopic measurements provide unprecedented spatial and temporal documentation of snowpack isotope values at mid-latitudes. For environments where snowfall accounts for the majority of annual precipitation, snowmelt is likely to have the strongest influence on isotope values retained in proxy archives. In this first presentation of the dataset we (1) describe the basic features of the isotope values in relation to the Global Meteoric Water Line (GMWL), (2) evaluate space for time substitutions traditionally used to establish δ18O-temperature relations, (3) evaluate site-to-site similarities across the network and identify those that are the most regionally representative, (4) examine atmospheric circulation patterns for several years with spatially coherent isotope patterns, and (5) provide examples of the implications this new dataset has for interpreting paleoclimate records (Bison Lake, Colorado and Minnetonka Cave, Idaho). Results indicate that snowpack δ18O is rarely a simple proxy of temperature. Instead, it exhibits a high degree of spatial heterogeneity and temporal variance that reflect additional processes such as vapor transport and post-depositional modification. Despite these complexities we identify consistent climate-isotope patterns and regionally representative locations that serve to better define Holocene hydroclimate estimates and their uncertainty. Climate change has and will affect western U.S. snowpack and we suggest these changes can be better understood and anticipated by oxygen and hydrogen isotope-based reconstructions of Holocene hydroclimate using a process-based understanding of the

  17. Nutritional condition of elk in rocky mountain national park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bender, L.C.; Cook, J.G.

    2005-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that elk in Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP) were at ecological carrying capacity by determining herd-specific levels of nutritional condition and fecundity. Ingesta-free body fat levels in adult cows that were lactating were 10.6% (s = 1.7; range = 6.2-15.4) and 7.7% (s = 0.5; range = 5.9-10.1) in November 2001 for the Horseshoe and Moraine Park herds, respectively. Cows that were not lactating were able to accrue significantly more body fat: 14.0% (s = 1.1; range = 7.7-19.3) and 11.5% (s = 0.8; range = 8.6-15.1) for the Horseshoe and Moraine Park herds, respectively. Cow elk lost most of their body fat over winter (April 2002 levels were 3.9% [s = 0.4] and 2.9% [s = 0.4] for the Horseshoe and Moraine Park herds, respectively). Nutritional condition indicated that both Horseshoe Park and Moraine Park elk were well below condition levels elk can achieve on very good-excellent nutrition (i.e., >15% body fat; Cook et al. 2004) and were comparable to other free-ranging elk populations. However, condition levels were higher than those expected at a "food-limited" carrying capacity, and a proportion of elk in each herd were able to achieve condition levels indicative of very good-excellent nutrition. Elk in RMNP are likely regulated and/or limited by a complex combination of density-independent (including significant heterogeneity in forage conditions across RMNP's landscape) and density-dependent processes, as condition levels contradict a simple density-dependent model of a population at ecological carrying capacity.

  18. Rocky super-Earths: variety in composition and energy budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valencia, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    Solid exoplanets offer a unique opportunity for comparative planetology with the small solar system planets, and in particular with Earth. With more than 40 low-mass planets (with masses less than 10 earth-masses) with measured masses and radii, it is now possible to distinguish trends in the data. Although most of these planets have a substantial envelope that makes them closer in nature to Uranus and Neptune, there are about 10 low-mass exoplanets that are potentially rocky. Despite the uncertainties in the data (especially in the mass), it is becoming evident that there is variety in compositions expressed mostly in a wide range of Fe/Si ratios that may affect the interior dynamics and thermal evolution of these planets. In addition, numerous observing campaigns have targeted M stars to find super-Earths in the habitable zone, as this region is closer to the host star. It is well recognized that these planets may also be subjected to variable amounts of early and/or sustained tidal heating. This may in turn affect the mode of convection and outgassing of these planets. I will present results on the lessons learned from the super-Earth data and the implications of variable Fe/Si ratio and tidal heating for the dynamics of the interior using the model by [1] including a simple degassing model for water. [1] Tackley, P. J., M. Ammann, J. P. Brodholt, D. P. Dobson and D. Valencia (2013) Mantle dynamics in super-Earths: Post-perovskite rheology and self-regulation of viscosity, Icarus 225(1), 50-61

  19. Body mass and antler development patterns of Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) in Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bender, L.C.; Carlson, E.; Schmitt, S.M.; Haufler, J.B.

    2003-01-01

    We documented mean and maximum body mass, mass accretion patterns and ander development patterns of Rocky Mountain elk in Michigan. Mean body mass of bulls averaged 9-11% heavier, and maximum body mass 23-27% heavier, in Michigan than in other Rocky Mountain elk populations. Mean live body mass of cows averaged 11% heavier in Michigan, but mean eviscerated body mass did not differ. Maximum body mass of cows was 10-24% heavier in Michigan. Body mass peaked at age 7.5 for bulls and 8.5 for cows, similar to other Rocky Mountain elk populations despite the greater body mass achieved in Michigan. Sexual dimorphism in bull and cow body mass increased until peak body mass was attained, whereupon bulls were ???38% heavier than cows. Antler development of bull elk peaked at age 10.5, comparable to other Rocky Mountain elk populations. Relations between antler development and body mass within age classes were highly variable, but generally weak. Greater body mass seen in Michigan, and the peaking of antler development well after body mass in bulls, suggested a phenotypic response to nutritional conditions that allow Rocky Mountain elk in Michigan to maximize the species growth potential.

  20. FINAL REPORT FORMER RADIATION WORKER MEDICAL SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM AT ROCKY FLATS For Department of Energy Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Joe M. Aldrich

    2004-11-01

    The Former Radiation Worker Medical Surveillance Program at Rocky Flats was conducted in Arvada, CO, by Oak Ridge Associated Universities through the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education under DOE Contract DE-AC05-00OR22750. Objectives of the program were to obtain information on the value of medical surveillance among at-risk former radiation workers and to provide long-term internal radiation dosimetry information to the scientific community. This program provided the former radiation workers of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (formerly Rocky Flats Plant) an opportunity to receive follow-up medical monitoring and a re-evaluation of their internal radiation dose. The former Rocky Flats radiation worker population is distinctive because it was a reasonably stable work force that received occupational exposures, at times substantial, over several decades. This report reflects the summation of health outcomes, statistical analyses, and dose assessment information on former Rocky Flats radiation workers to the date of study termination as of March 2004.

  1. Hanford/Rocky Flats collaboration on development of supercritical carbon dioxide extraction to treat mixed waste

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, D.W.; Biyani, R.K.; Brown, C.M.; Teter, W.L.

    1995-11-01

    Proposals for demonstration work under the Department of Energy`s Mixed Waste Focus Area, during the 1996 through 1997 fiscal years included two applications of supercritical carbon dioxide to mixed waste pretreatment. These proposals included task RF15MW58 of Rocky Flats and task RL46MW59 of Hanford. Analysis of compatibilities in wastes and work scopes yielded an expectation of substantial collaboration between sites whereby Hanford waste streams may undergo demonstration testing at Rocky Flats, thereby eliminating the need for test facilities at Hanford. This form of collaboration is premised the continued deployment at Rocky Flats and the capability for Hanford samples to be treated at Rocky Flats. The recent creation of a thermal treatment contract for a facility near Hanford may alleviate the need to conduct organic extraction upon Rocky Flats wastes by providing a cost effective thermal treatment alternative, however, some waste streams at Hanford will continue to require organic extraction. Final site waste stream treatment locations are not within the scope of this document.

  2. Establishing bounding internal dose estimates for thorium activities at Rocky Flats.

    PubMed

    Ulsh, Brant A; Rich, Bryce L; Chew, Melton H; Morris, Robert L; Sharfi, Mutty; Rolfes, Mark R

    2008-07-01

    As part of an evaluation of a Special Exposure Cohort petition filed on behalf of workers at the Rocky Flats Plant, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) was required to demonstrate that bounding values could be established for radiation doses due to the potential intake of all radionuclides present at the facility. The main radioactive elements of interest at Rocky Flats were plutonium and uranium, but much smaller quantities of several other elements, including thorium, were occasionally handled at the site. Bounding potential doses from thorium has proven challenging at other sites due to the early historical difficulty in detecting this element through urinalysis methods and the relatively high internal dose delivered per unit intake. This paper reports the results of NIOSH's investigation of the uses of thorium at Rocky Flats and provides bounding dose reconstructions for these operations. During this investigation, NIOSH reviewed unclassified reports, unclassified extracts of classified materials, material balance and inventory ledgers, monthly progress reports from various groups, and health physics field logbooks, and conducted interviews with former Rocky Flats workers. Thorium operations included: (1) an experimental metal forming project with 240 kg of thorium in 1960; (2) the use of pre-formed parts in weapons mockups; (3) the removal of Th from U; (4) numerous analytical procedures involving trace quantities of thorium; and (5) the possible experimental use of thorium as a mold coating compound. The thorium handling operations at Rocky Flats were limited in scope, well-monitored and documented, and potential doses can be bounded.

  3. Test Review: Advanced Clinical Solutions for WAIS-IV and WMS-IV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Yiting; Lai, Mark H. C.; Xu, Yining; Zhou, Yuanyuan

    2012-01-01

    The authors review the "Advanced Clinical Solutions for WAIS-IV and WMS-IV". The "Advanced Clinical Solutions (ACS) for the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition" (WAIS-IV; Wechsler, 2008) and the "Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition" (WMS-IV; Wechsler, 2009) was published by Pearson in 2009. It is a…

  4. Oxovanadium(IV) silsesquioxane complexes.

    PubMed

    Ohde, Christian; Limberg, Christian; Stösser, Reinhard; Demeshko, Serhiy

    2010-03-01

    In the context of a potential modeling of reduced oxovanadium species occurring on the surfaces of silica-supported vanadia catalysts in the course of its turnover, the incompletely condensed silsesquioxane H(3)(c-pentyl)T(7) was reacted with Cl(4)V(THF)(2) (where THF = tetrahydrofuran) in the presence of triethylamine. Precipitation of 3 equiv of HNEt(3)Cl seemed to point to the clean formation of [((c-pentyl)T(7))(V(IV)Cl)] (1), which was supported by electron paramagnetic resonance studies performed for the resulting solutions, but further analytical and spectroscopic investigations showed that the processes occurring at that stage are more complex than that and even include the formation of [((c-pentyl)T(7))(V(V)O)](2) as a side product. Storage of a red-brown hexane solution of this product mixture reproducibly led to the precipitation of blue crystals belonging to the chloride-free compound [((c-pentyl)T(7))(2)(V(IV)=O)(3)(THF)(2)] (2), as revealed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Performing the same reaction in the presence of 2 equiv of pyridine leads to an analogous product, where the THF ligands are replaced by pyridine. Subsequent investigations showed that the terminal oxo ligands at the vanadium centers are, on the one hand, due to the presence of adventitious water; on the other hand, the [(c-pentyl)T(7)](3-) ligand also acted as a source of O(2-). The results of SQUID measurements performed for 2 can be interpreted in terms of a ferromagnetic coupling between the vanadyl units. Exposing 2 to a dioxygen atmosphere resulted in its immediate oxidation to yield the V(V) complex [((c-pentyl)T(7))(V(V)O)](2), which may model a fast reoxidation reaction of oxovanadium(IV) trimers on silica surfaces.

  5. Washington DC Area Computer Aided Surgery Society Monthly Meetings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    05-1-0072 TITLE: Washington DC Area Computer Aided Surgery Society Monthly Meetings PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Kevin R. Cleary, Ph.D...Feb 2005-21 Feb 2009 4. Title and Subtitle Washington DC Area Computer Aided Surgery Society Monthly Meetings 5. Award Number W81XWH-05-1-0072...Area Computer-Aided Surgery Society (WashCAS) has become the major vehicle in the Washington/Baltimore area for exploring the issues in the emerging

  6. PREPARATION OF OXOPORPHINATOMANGANESE (IV) COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Willner, I.; Otvos, J.; Calvin, M.

    1980-07-01

    Oxo-manganese-tetraphenylporphyrin (O=Mn{sup IV}-TPP) has been prepared by an oxygen-transfer reaction from iodosylbenzene to MnIITPP and characterized by its i.r. and field desorption mass spectra, which are identical to those of the product obtained by direct oxidation of Mn{sup III}(TPP) in an aqueous medium; it transfers oxygen to triphenylphosphine to produce triphenylphosphine oxide, and it is suggested that similar intermediates are important in oxygen activation by cytochrome P-450 as well as in the photosynthetic evolution of oxygen.

  7. Estimated Water Use in Washington, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lane, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    Water use in the State of Washington has evolved in the past century from meager domestic and stock water needs to the current complex requirements of domestic-water users, large irrigation projects, industrial plants, and numerous other uses such as fish habitat and recreational activities. Since 1950, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has, at 5-year intervals, compiled data on the amount of water used in homes, businesses, industries, and on farms throughout the State. This water-use data, combined with other related USGS information, has facilitated a unique understanding of the effects of human activity on the State's water resources. As water availability continues to emerge as an important issue in the 21st century, the need for consistent, long-term water-use data will increase to support wise use of this essential natural resource. This report presents state and county estimates of the amount of public- and self-supplied water used for domestic, irrigation, livestock, aquaculture, industrial, mining, and thermoelectric power purposes in the State of Washington during 2005. Offstream fresh-water use was estimated to be 5,780 million gallons per day (Mgal/d). Domestic water use was estimated to be 648 Mgal/d or 11 percent of the total. Irrigation water use was estimated to be 3,520 Mgal/d, or 61 percent of the total. Industrial fresh-water use was estimated to be 520 Mgal/d, or 9 percent of the total. These three categories accounted for about 81 percent (4,690 Mgal/d) of the total of the estimated offstream freshwater use in Washington during 2005.

  8. Water resources rata - Washington water year 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimbrough, R.A.; Wiggins, W.D.; Smith, R.R.; Ruppert, G.P.; Knowles, S.M.; Renslow, V.F.

    2002-01-01

    The Washington Water-Data Report includes records for both surface and ground water in the State. The report contains discharge records for 244 stream-gaging stations, stage only records for 9 gaging stations, discharge measurements for 211 miscellaneous streamflow stations, and annual maximum discharge for 3 crest-stage partial-record streamflow stations; stage and(or) content records for 36 lakes and reservoirs; water-quality records for 40 surface-water sites; water-level records for 25 observation wells; and water quality records for 11 observation wells.

  9. Water resources of Washington Parish, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, Vincent E.; Prakken, Lawrence B.

    2016-06-13

    In 2010, about 34.55 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of water were withdrawn in Washington Parish, including about 28.10 Mgal/d from groundwater sources and 6.44 Mgal/d from surface-water sources1 (table 1). Withdrawals for industrial use accounted for about 52 percent (17.80 Mgal/d) of the total water withdrawn (table 2). Other categories of use included public supply, rural domestic, irrigation, and livestock. Water-use data collected at 5-year intervals from 1960 to 2010 (fig. 2) indicated that water withdrawals peaked in 1975 at about 51.9 Mgal/d.

  10. Landslide Hazards in the Seattle, Washington, Area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baum, Rex; Harp, Ed; Highland, Lynn

    2007-01-01

    The Seattle, Washington, area is known for its livability and its magnificent natural setting. The city and nearby communities are surrounded by an abundance of rivers and lakes and by the bays of Puget Sound. Two majestic mountain ranges, the Olympics and the Cascades, rim the region. These dramatic natural features are products of dynamic forces-landslides, earthquakes, tsunamis, glaciers, volcanoes, and floods. The same processes that formed this beautiful landscape pose hazards to the ever-growing population of the region. Landslides long have been a major cause of damage and destruction to people and property in the Seattle area.

  11. It's Not Really Over: Thurston County, Washington's Vegetation Management Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacGregor, Jean

    1992-01-01

    Describes the establishment and results of a study committee asked to review existing pesticide policy, vegetation management programs and provide improvement recommendations in Thurston County, Washington. (MCO)

  12. Photo Gallery for Anacostia Watershed (Washington, DC/Maryland)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Anacostia Watershed (Washington, DC/Maryland) of the Urban Waters Federal Partnership (UWFP) reconnects urban communities with their waterways by improving coordination among federal agencies and collaborating

  13. Alternative Fuels for Washington's School Buses: A Report to the Washington State Legislature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, John Kim; McCoy, Gilbert A.

    This document presents findings of a study that evaluated the use of both propane and compressed natural gas as alternative fuels for Washington State school buses. It discusses air quality improvement actions by state- and federal-level regulators and summarizes vehicle design, development, and commercialization activities by all major engine,…

  14. Social Marketing and the "New" Technology: Proceedings of a Washington Roundtable (Washington, DC, March 25, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academy for Educational Development, Washington, DC.

    This document examines some of the key issues raised during the second Washington Roundtable on Social Marketing, convened by the Academy for Educational Development (AED) in 1998. AED invited participants to examine whether the interactive technologies that are revolutionizing commercial marketing--personal computers, the Internet (especially the…

  15. Washington's Future. 1989-1990 Annual Report of Washington State's Early Childhood Education and Assistance Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Dept. of Community Development, Olympia.

    As part of an effort to correct major social problems, the Early Childhood Education and Assistance Program (ECEAP) was created in the State of Washington. The ECEAP offers comprehensive, quality preschool programs for children of families who have an income at or below the federal poverty level. An introductory section of the report provides…

  16. Comparative risk analysis for the Rocky Flats Plant integrated project planning

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.E.; Shain, D.I.

    1994-05-01

    The Rocky Flats Plant is developing, with active stakeholder a comprehensive planning strategy that will support transition of the Rocky Flats Plant from a nuclear weapons production facility to site cleanup and final disposition. Final disposition of the Rocky Flats Plant materials and contaminants requires consideration of the interrelated nature of sitewide problems, such as material movement and disposition, facility and land use endstates, costs relative risks to workers and the public, and waste disposition. Comparative Risk Analysis employs both incremental risk and cumulative risk evaluations to compare risks from postulated options or endstates. These postulated options or endstates can be various remedial alternatives, or future endstate uses of federal agency land. Currently, there does not exist any approved methodology that aggregates various incremental risk estimates. Comparative Risk Analysis has been developed to aggregate various incremental risk estimates to develop a site cumulative risk estimate. This paper discusses development of the Comparative Risk Analysis methodology, stakeholder participation and lessons learned from these challenges.

  17. Ecology of a key ecosystem engineer on hard coastal infrastructure and natural rocky shores.

    PubMed

    Martins, Gustavo M; Neto, Ana I; Cacabelos, Eva

    2016-02-01

    The numbers of hard coastal artificial structures is increasing worldwide and there is now cumulative evidence that they support assemblages that are less diverse than natural shores. Here we investigated patterns of distribution and demography of the native barnacle Chthamalus stellatus on hard coastal structures and on natural rocky shores. Barnacles were 35% less abundant on hard structures regardless of substratum type (concrete or basalt). On a subset of sites we found that temporal population stability, growth and mortality were similar on natural rocky shores and hard structures. In contrast, barnacles were significantly larger and recruited more onto natural rocky shores. These results emphasise the important role of recruitment in determining the abundance of a key space occupier on hard coastal structures. Experimental work building on these results may generate insights that can be used as guidelines for the management of urbanised coastal areas.

  18. Plutonium burdens in people living around the Rocky Flats plant. Final report 1976-79

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, J.C.; Eversole, B.C.; Archer, P.G.; Taggart, R.; Efurd, D.W.

    1982-11-01

    A study was conducted to determine whether the tissues of people who lived near to or downwind from the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons facility in Colorado contained more plutonium than the tissues from people who lived farther away. Information was collected on the age, sex, smoking history, residence history, presence of disease, and plutonium level in selected tissues from individuals autopsied in various Eastern Colorado hospitals. The 236, 238, 239 and 240 isotopes of plutonium were determined. Plutonium levels in lung and liver tissues were affected by age and smoking history more than by distance from the Rocky Flats Plant. Though the measured 240/239 isotope ratio indicated a small contribution from Rocky Flats, the total amount of plutonium in the samples was no different than in similar samples collected from other areas of the U.S.

  19. Understanding coupled climatic, hydrological, and ecosystem responses to global climate change in the Colorado Rockies

    SciTech Connect

    Stohlgren, T.J.; Baron, J. )

    1993-06-01

    A long-term research program to assess the potential effect of global climate change on the Front Range of the Colorado Rockies, including Rocky Mountain National Park is underway. Specifically, three integrated studies are designed to: (1) project future climate change for the Colorado Rockies using a mesoscale atmospheric model to downscale general circulation model results; (2) develop an understanding of the abiotic and biotic controls on forest distribution and productivity as a basis for assessing potential vegetation change for a range of projected climate scenarios; and (3) evaluate potential responses of hydrologic and aquatic ecosystem processes to climate change at watershed, drainage basin and regional scales. The synthesis of these studies will, in addition, assess the interaction between regional vegetation distribution, mesoscale climate, and hydrology. Our goal is to develop a better understanding of regional climate and hydrologic patterns and of species-environment relationships to determine which species and ecosystem processes are most sensitive to rapid environmental change.

  20. Critical thermal maxima of common rocky intertidal fish and shrimps — A preliminary assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinagre, Catarina; Dias, Marta; Roma, Joana; Silva, Ana; Madeira, Diana; Diniz, Mário S.

    2013-08-01

    Rocky shore ecosystems are considered sentinels of climate warming because they are in close contact with the atmosphere and their shallow waters present low thermal inertia. Concerns on the vulnerability of rocky shore species subject to climate warming make the investigation of their thermal tolerance an urgent topic. The aim of this study was to determine the upper thermal limits of species that are common in tidal pools of rocky shore ecosystems of the Northeast Atlantic. The method used was the Critical Thermal Maximum (CTMax), which allowed the ranking of species in terms of their upper thermal limits as follows: Coryphoblennius galerita (32.0 °C), Palaemon serratus (33.0 °C), Gobius paganellus (33.1 °C), Palaemon elegans (33.4 °C), Lipophrys pholis (33.9 °C) and Paralipophrys trigloides (35.0 °C). Intraspecific variability was always lower than 2%.