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Sample records for ivory shell babylonia

  1. Impact of Tributyltin and Triphenyltin on Ivory Shell (Babylonia japonica) Populations

    PubMed Central

    Horiguchi, Toshihiro; Kojima, Mitsuhiro; Hamada, Fumihiko; Kajikawa, Akira; Shiraishi, Hiroaki; Morita, Masatoshi; Shimizu, Makoto

    2006-01-01

    We histopathologically examined gonads and chemically determined organotin compounds in tissues of the ivory shell, Babylonia japonica. Imposex (a superimposition of male-type genital organs on females) occurred in approximately 80–90% of B. japonica specimens that we examined, with the penis and vas deferens both well developed. No oviduct blockage by vas deferens formation was observed. Ovarian spermatogenesis and suppressed ovarian maturation were observed in the females that exhibited imposex, although no histopathological abnormalities were found in males. Tissue distributions of organotin compounds [tributyltin (TBT), triphenyltin (TPhT), and their metabolites] were different for butyltins and phenyltins; a remarkably high accumulation of TBT was observed in the ctenidium, osphradium, and heart, whereas high concentrations of TPhT were detected in the ovary and digestive gland. More than one-third of TBT accumulated in the digestive glands of both males and females, followed by the testis, ctenidium, muscle, and heart tissues in males and in the muscle, ovary, ctenidium, and head tissues (including the central nervous system ganglia) in females. In both males and females, more than half of total TPhT accumulated in the digestive glands, followed by the gonads. The next highest values were in the muscle, ctenidium, and heart tissues in males and in the muscle, oviduct, and head tissues in females. Both TBT and TPhT concentrations in the gonads were positively correlated with penis length in females. Our findings strongly suggest that reproductive failure in adult females accompanied by imposex, possibly induced by TBT and TPhT from antifouling paints, may have caused the marked decline of B. japonica populations in Japan. PMID:16818241

  2. Ivory Basements and Ivory Towers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Tanya

    2012-01-01

    The metaphors of the ivory tower and ivory basement are used in this chapter to reflect how many women understand and experience the academy. The ivory tower signifies a place that is protected, a place of privilege and authority and a place removed from the outside world (and consequently the rigours of the market place). The ivory tower, by…

  3. Ivory Snowmen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Ann

    2005-01-01

    Recalling memories from her own third grade art classes, Ann Mueller, recreated an updated version for her students showing her students how to make snow scenes from Ivory Snow flakes. She showed students the video, The Snowman based on Raymond Briggs's book of the same name. Its beautiful images spur the imagination, and the musical score is…

  4. Effects of elevated pCO2 on reproductive properties of the benthic copepod Tigriopus japonicus and gastropod Babylonia japonica.

    PubMed

    Kita, Jun; Kikkawa, Takashi; Asai, Takamasa; Ishimatsu, Atsushi

    2013-08-30

    We investigated the effects of elevated pCO2 in seawater both on the acute mortality and the reproductive properties of the benthic copepod Tigriopus japonicus and gastropod Babylonia japonica with the purpose of accumulating basic data for assessing potential environmental impacts of sub-sea geological storage of anthropogenic CO2 in Japan. Acute tests showed that nauplii of T. japonicus have a high tolerance to elevated pCO2 environments. Full life cycle tests on T. japonicus indicated NOEC=5800μatm and LOEC=37,000μatm. Adult B. japonica showed remarkable resistance to elevated pCO2 in the acute tests. Embryonic development of B. japonica showed a NOEC=1500μatm and LOEC=5400μatm. T. japonicus showed high resistance to elevated pCO2 throughout the life cycle and B. japonica are rather sensitive during the veliger stage when they started to form their shells.

  5. The Ivory Tower Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chantler, Abigail

    2016-01-01

    The corollary of the concept of the "ivory tower", as reflected in the writings of Plato and Newman amongst others, was, paradoxically, the vital importance of the university for wider society. Nevertheless from the mid-twentieth century, the esteem in which a "liberal" university education was held was diminished by rising…

  6. Structure of ivory.

    PubMed

    Locke, Michael

    2008-04-01

    Profiles with all orientations have been used to visualize the 3D structure of ivory from tusks of elephant, mammoth, walrus, hippopotamus, pig (bush, boar, and warthog), sperm whale, killer whale, and narwhal. Polished, forming, fractured, aged, and stained surfaces were prepared for microscopy using epi-illumination. Tusks have a minor peripheral component, the cementum, a soft derivative of the enamel layer, and a main core of dentine=ivory. The dentine is composed of a matrix of particles 5-20 microm in diameter in a ground substance containing dentinal tubules about 5 microm in diameter with a center to center spacing of 10-20 microm. Dentinal tubules may be straight (most) or curly (pigs). The main findings relate to the way that dentinal tubules align in sheets to form microlaminae in the length of the tusk. Microlaminae are sheets of laterally aligned dentinal tubules. They are axial but may be radial (most), angled to the forming face (pigs and hippopotamus canines), or radial but helical (narwhals). Within the microlaminae the dentinal tubules may be radial, angled to the axis (whales, walrus, and pigs), or may change their orientation from one microlamina to the next in helicoids (canines of hippopotamuses, incisors of proboscidea). In the nonbanded, featureless ivories from the hippopotamus incisors, the dentinal tubules form radial microlamina from which the arrangements in other ivories can be derived. In the canines of hippopotamuses and incisors of proboscidea, the dentinal tubule orientation changes incrementally from one microlamina to the next in a helicoid, a stack of dentinal tubules that change their orientation by 180 degrees anticlockwise. Dentinal tubules having different orientations are laid down concurrently, not layer by layer as in most examples of helicoidal architecture (e.g., insect cuticle). In proboscidean ivory, the microlaminae are radial, normal to the banding of growth layers marking the plane of deposition. They form radial

  7. Ivory vertebra and systemic mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Laurent; Suarez, Felipe; Chandesris, Marie-Olivia; Hermine, Olivier

    2012-05-01

    The ivory vertebra sign seen on a standard radiograph of the spine should prompt investigations for a cause, which is most likely to be a bone metastasis, a lymphoma, or Paget's disease of bone. A diagnosis of idiopathic ivory vertebra can be given if no cause is identified. We report an unusual case of ivory vertebra sign that was due to systemic mastocytosis and improved with specific treatment. Although osteoporosis is the most common bone abnormality in systemic mastocytosis, an isolated sclerotic or lytic lesion may be found. The ivory vertebra sign should not be considered idiopathic until tests are done for mastocytosis, particularly given the availability of effective treatments.

  8. Can We Sustainably Harvest Ivory?

    PubMed

    Lusseau, David; Lee, Phyllis C

    2016-11-07

    Despite the 1989 ivory trade ban, elephants continue to be killed to harvest their tusks for ivory. Since 2008, this poaching has increased to unprecedented levels driven by consumer demand for ivory products. CITES is now considering the development of a legal ivory trade [1, 2]. The proposal relies on three assumptions: (1) harvest regulation will cease all illegal activities, (2) defined sustainable quotas can be enforced, and (3) we can define meaningful sustainable quotas that come close to the current demand. We know that regulation of harvest does not stop illegal takes. Despite whaling regulation after World War II, illegal whaling continued for decades [3]. The introduction of wolf culls in the US actually increased poaching activities [4], and one-off ivory sales in 1999 and 2008 did nothing to halt elephant poaching. Governance issues over the ivory supply chains, including stockpiling, make enforcing quotas challenging, if not impossible [5, 6]. We have not yet adequately assessed what could be a sustainable ivory yield. To do so, we develop a compartmental model composed of a two-sex age-structured demographic model and an ivory production and harvest model. We applied several offtake and quota strategies to define how much ivory could be sustainably harvested. We found that the sustainability space is very small. Only 100 to 150 kg of ivory could be removed from a reference population of 1,360 elephants, levels well below the current demand. Our study shows that lifting the ivory ban will not address the current poaching challenge. We should instead focus on reducing consumer demand.

  9. [The spectrum characteristic analysis of mammoth ivory].

    PubMed

    Yin, Zuo-wei; Luo, Qin-feng; Zheng, Chen; Bao, De-qing; Li, Xiao-lu; Li, Yu-ling; Chen, Quan-li

    2013-09-01

    Due to the similarities between mammoth ivory ornaments and modern elephant ivory ones in the market, the spectral properties of the two kinds of ivories were analyzed and compared in the present paper through the gemological tests, infrared spectrum and X-ray powder diffraction, etc. The research found that the refractive index and specific gravity of the two ivories are very similar. The refractive index of mammoth ivory is 1.52-1.53 whereas that of elephant ivory is 1.54-1.55. The specific gravity of mammoth ivory is 1.77 and that of elephant ivory is 1.72. It should be careful that Schreger angles are used to distinguish the two kinds of ivories, because the angles of inner and middle layers in the two kinds of tusks are similar except the angles of elephant tusk out-layers are larger than those of mammoth (The Schreger angle of the sample mammoth ivory belonging to out-layer tusks is 100 degrees nd that of elephant ivory is 115 degrees). In addition, the out-layer Schreger angles of Asian elephants are normally less than 120 degrees, while those of Africa elephants are bigger than 120 degrees (This can be used to identify Asian and Africa elephant ivories). The infrared spectroscopy test shows that the water-molecule-related absorption peaks of 3319, 1642 and 1557 cm(-1) are more obvious in the modern elephant ivory samples than in the mammoth ivory samples; the collagen-related absorption peaks of 2927and 2855 cm(-1) are obvious in the modern elephant ivory but extremely weak in the mammoth ivory. The results indicate that collagen and crystallized water in mammoth ivory reduced to a very low level after having been buried for a long period. X-ray powder diffraction results show that the diffraction peak splits of mammoth ivories are more obvious and sharp than that of elephant ivories, which means hydroxyapatites crystallized better despite being buried for thousands of years. Hence, it is an important reference for identifying the two kinds of ivories that

  10. Earliest datable records of aurora-like phenomena in the astronomical diaries from Babylonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Hisashi; Mitsuma, Yasuyuki; Ebihara, Yusuke; Kawamura, Akito Davis; Miyahara, Hiroko; Tamazawa, Harufumi; Isobe, Hiroaki

    2016-11-01

    The astronomical diaries from Babylonia (ADB) are excellent sources of information of natural phenomena, including astronomical ones, in pre-Christ era because it contains the record of highly continuous and systematic observations. In this article, we present results of a survey of aurora-like phenomena in ADB, spanning from BCE 652 to BCE 61. We have found nine records of aurora-like phenomena. Philological and scientific examinations suggest that five of them can be considered as likely candidate for aurora observations. They provide unique information about the solar and aurora activities in the first millennium BCE. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. Earliest datable records of aurora-like phenomena in the astronomical diaries from Babylonia.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Hisashi; Mitsuma, Yasuyuki; Ebihara, Yusuke; Kawamura, Akito Davis; Miyahara, Hiroko; Tamazawa, Harufumi; Isobe, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    The astronomical diaries from Babylonia (ADB) are excellent sources of information of natural phenomena, including astronomical ones, in pre-Christ era because it contains the record of highly continuous and systematic observations. In this article, we present results of a survey of aurora-like phenomena in ADB, spanning from BCE 652 to BCE 61. We have found nine records of aurora-like phenomena. Philological and scientific examinations suggest that five of them can be considered as likely candidate for aurora observations. They provide unique information about the solar and aurora activities in the first millennium BCE. Graphical abstract.

  12. Ultrastructure of oogenesis in imposex females of Babylonia areolata (Caenogastropoda: Buccinidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muenpo, C.; Suwanjarat, J.; Klepal, W.

    2011-09-01

    During a tributyltin (TBT)-exposure experiment, the ultrastructural features of oogenesis have been examined in TBT-induced imposex females of Babylonia areolata and compared with those of the normal female. The results obtained from such experiment demonstrates that B. areolata exhibits a low to moderate intensity of imposex because all VDSI values are never higher than 3. Ultrastructures of germ cell development including oogonia, pre-vitellogenic, early vitellogenic, late vitellogenic and mature oocytes show that oogenesis in imposex female is similar to that of normal females except for the presence of numerous lipid droplets in the cytoplasm of the oocytes and the follicle cells in imposex females, indicating the degeneration of their oocytes. Vitellogenesis in B. areolata involves both auto- and heterosynthetic processes that resemble those of the basal gastropods and the pulmonates. In addition, the presence of cortical granules and microvilli are unique structures of this species.

  13. Dissecting the illegal ivory trade: an analysis of ivory seizures data.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Fiona M; Burn, Robert W; Milliken, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Reliable evidence of trends in the illegal ivory trade is important for informing decision making for elephants but it is difficult to obtain due to the covert nature of the trade. The Elephant Trade Information System, a global database of reported seizures of illegal ivory, holds the only extensive information on illicit trade available. However inherent biases in seizure data make it difficult to infer trends; countries differ in their ability to make and report seizures and these differences cannot be directly measured. We developed a new modelling framework to provide quantitative evidence on trends in the illegal ivory trade from seizures data. The framework used Bayesian hierarchical latent variable models to reduce bias in seizures data by identifying proxy variables that describe the variability in seizure and reporting rates between countries and over time. Models produced bias-adjusted smoothed estimates of relative trends in illegal ivory activity for raw and worked ivory in three weight classes. Activity is represented by two indicators describing the number of illegal ivory transactions--Transactions Index--and the total weight of illegal ivory transactions--Weights Index--at global, regional or national levels. Globally, activity was found to be rapidly increasing and at its highest level for 16 years, more than doubling from 2007 to 2011 and tripling from 1998 to 2011. Over 70% of the Transactions Index is from shipments of worked ivory weighing less than 10 kg and the rapid increase since 2007 is mainly due to increased consumption in China. Over 70% of the Weights Index is from shipments of raw ivory weighing at least 100 kg mainly moving from Central and East Africa to Southeast and East Asia. The results tie together recent findings on trends in poaching rates, declining populations and consumption and provide detailed evidence to inform international decision making on elephants.

  14. Dissecting the Illegal Ivory Trade: An Analysis of Ivory Seizures Data

    PubMed Central

    Underwood, Fiona M.; Burn, Robert W.; Milliken, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Reliable evidence of trends in the illegal ivory trade is important for informing decision making for elephants but it is difficult to obtain due to the covert nature of the trade. The Elephant Trade Information System, a global database of reported seizures of illegal ivory, holds the only extensive information on illicit trade available. However inherent biases in seizure data make it difficult to infer trends; countries differ in their ability to make and report seizures and these differences cannot be directly measured. We developed a new modelling framework to provide quantitative evidence on trends in the illegal ivory trade from seizures data. The framework used Bayesian hierarchical latent variable models to reduce bias in seizures data by identifying proxy variables that describe the variability in seizure and reporting rates between countries and over time. Models produced bias-adjusted smoothed estimates of relative trends in illegal ivory activity for raw and worked ivory in three weight classes. Activity is represented by two indicators describing the number of illegal ivory transactions – Transactions Index – and the total weight of illegal ivory transactions – Weights Index – at global, regional or national levels. Globally, activity was found to be rapidly increasing and at its highest level for 16 years, more than doubling from 2007 to 2011 and tripling from 1998 to 2011. Over 70% of the Transactions Index is from shipments of worked ivory weighing less than 10 kg and the rapid increase since 2007 is mainly due to increased consumption in China. Over 70% of the Weights Index is from shipments of raw ivory weighing at least 100 kg mainly moving from Central and East Africa to Southeast and East Asia. The results tie together recent findings on trends in poaching rates, declining populations and consumption and provide detailed evidence to inform international decision making on elephants. PMID:24250744

  15. Taking the Plunge off the Ivory Tower.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mauzerall, Jorgette

    1997-01-01

    Relates the experiences of a white academic teaching in a black rural state college--a plunge into the world of black experience which shocked the academic. States that everything was different--students' names, their manner of dress, their reaction to the O.J. Simpson verdict. Finds that leaving the ivory tower was not easy, but the job exceeded…

  16. Using morphometric and analytical techniques to characterize elephant ivory.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rina Rani; Goyal, Surendra Prakash; Khanna, Param Pal; Mukherjee, Pulok Kumar; Sukumar, Raman

    2006-10-16

    There is a need to characterize Asian elephant ivory and compare with African ivory for controlling illegal trade and implementation of national and international laws. In this paper, we characterize ivory of Asian and African elephants using Schreger angle measurements, elemental analysis {X-ray fluorescence (XRF), inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS)} and isotopic analysis. We recorded Schreger angle characteristics of elephant ivory at three different zones in ivory samples of African (n=12) and Asian (n=28) elephants. The Schreger angle ranged from 32 degrees to 145 degrees and 30 degrees to 153 degrees in Asian and African ivory, respectively. Elemental analysis (for Asian and African ivory) by XRF, ICP-AES and ICP-MS provided preliminary data. We attempted to ascertain source of origin of Asian elephant ivory similarly as in African ivory based on isotopes of carbon, nitrogen and strontium. We determined isotopic ratios of carbon (n=31) and nitrogen (n=31) corresponding to diet and rainfall, respectively. Reference ivory samples from five areas within India were analyzed using collagen and powder sample and the latter was found more suitable for forensic analysis. During our preliminary analysis, the range of delta13C values (-13.6+/-0.15 per thousand and -25.6+/-0.15 per thousand) and delta15N values (10.2+/-0.15 per thousand and 3.5+/-0.15 per thousand) were noted.

  17. [Implementation of palliative care in Ivory Coast].

    PubMed

    Coulibaly, J Didi-Kouko; Datie, A-M; Binlin-Dadie, R; Kouame, I; N'guessan, Zc; Barouan, M-C; Koffi, E; Coulibaly, I; Mensah, J; Yenou, H Memain; Dedomey, E; Echimane, Ka; Plo, Kj; Kouassi, B

    2009-05-01

    Ivory Coast adhered to the strategy of the primary cares of health whose leading principles served basis to the definition of the National politics of sanitary development, exposed in the National plan of sanitary development 1996-2005. The improvement of the quality of the cares is the main objective of this plan. The attack of this objective cannot make itself without the hold in account of the palliative cares that are a component of the cares for the patients affected by chronic and incurable affections, since the diagnosis until the death and even after the death. Conscious of the necessity to develop the palliative cares to improve the quality of life of the patients and their families, the ministry in charge of health, in collaboration with the partners to the development, initiated a project of development of the palliative care in Ivory Coast. It is about an innovating gait in Ivory Coast concerning politics of health. This work has for goal to present the big lines and the setting in which this politics has been put in place.

  18. Histological response to ivory implanted in rabbit mandibles.

    PubMed

    Ceravolo, F J; Molinari, J A; Baumhammers

    1975-01-01

    Ivory rod implants were found to be biologically unacceptable in rabbit mandibles. Fibrous connective-tissue capsules containing numerous multinucleated giant cells formed around the implants. Resorption of the ivory was also apparent. In addition, osteoid deposition and ankylosis at the experimental sites were not evident.

  19. Geographic variation of stable isotopes in African elephant ivory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, S.; Merker, S.; Jacob, D.

    2012-04-01

    In 1989, the international community listed the African elephant in Appendix I of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) thus prohibiting commercial ivory trade. Recent surveillance data show that the illegal trade in ivory has been growing worldwide. Long-term preservation of many of the African elephant populations can be supported with a control mechanism that helps with the implementation of remedial conservation action. Therefore, setting up a reference database that predicts the origin of ivory specimens can assist in determining smuggling routes and the provenance of illegal ivory. Our research builds on earlier work to seek an appropriate method for determining the area of origin for individual tusks. Several researchers have shown that the provenance of elephant ivory can be traced by its isotopic composition, but this is the first attempt to produce an integrated isotopic reference database of elephant ivory provenance. We applied a combination of various routine geochemical analyses to measure the stable isotope ratios of hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulphur. Up to now, we analysed 606 ivory samples of known geographical origin from African range states, museums and private collections, comprising 22 African elephant range states. The isotopic measurements were superimposed with data layers from vegetation, geology and climate. A regression function for the isotope composition of the water isotopes in precipitation and collagen in ivory was developed to overcome the problem of imprecise origin of some of the sampled material. Multivariate statistics, such as nearest neighborhood and discriminate analysis were applied to eventually allow a statistical determination of the provenance for ivory of unknown origin. Our results suggest that the combination of isotopic parameters have the potential to provide predictable and complementary markers for estimating the origin of seized elephant ivory.

  20. Ivory vertebra: imaging findings in different diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Braun, Richard Andreas; Milito, Carlos Felipe do Rego Barros; Goldman, Suzan Menasce; Fernandes, Eloy de Ávila

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain is often managed at all levels of healthcare. In general, diagnostic investigation begins with radiography of the lumbar spine. In addition to the most common findings, radiologists can identify increased density of a vertebral body, referred to as ivory vertebra. The objective of this study was to describe the main diseases that can present with this radiologic sign, such as Hodgkin lymphoma, Paget's disease, metastatic prostate cancer, breast cancer, and osteomyelitis. It is extremely important that radiologists be aware of this finding in order to inform the requesting physician of the possible etiologies, given that it can be the initial radiologic presentation for these diseases.

  1. New data on selected Ivory Coast tektites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cuttitta, F.; Carron, M.K.; Annell, C.S.

    1972-01-01

    Fourteen Ivory Coast tektites exhibit a range of bulk indices of refraction of 1.5156 to 1.5217 ?? 0.0004 and of bulk specific gravities of 2.428 to 2.502 ??0.005. Seven of these Ivory Coast (IVC) tektites were analyzed for major and minor element content. Compared to tektites from other strewn fields, their SiO2 content is low (67.2-69.1 %), A12O3 relatively high (15.8-16.8 %), and total iron relatively high but with a more restricted range (6.3-6.8 % as FeO). Their lime content is low (0.71-1.35%) compared to Australasian tektites but their MgO CaO ratio (about 3.1) is unusually high. All other tektite groups have Na2O K2O ratios less than unity, but the Na2O K2O ratio of the IVC tektites is slightly greater than unity. Their K Rb ratios range from 200 to 256 and average 227, which is higher than those determined for Australasian tektites, but similar to some obtained for moldavites. The Li content (41-48 ppm) is about the same as that of the Australasian tektites, but the Cs and Rb are lower, being 1.9 to 2.9 and 57 to 86 ppm, respectively. The IVC tektites are high in Cr (260-375 ppm), Co (19-25 ppm) and Ni (101-167 ppm), and particularly in Pb (<10-18 ppm), Cu (13-21 ppm) and Ga (14-23 ppm). The high Cr Ni ratios of the IVC tektites (range 2-3.6) are similar to those found for australites, philippinites and thailandites, but not the javanites and indochinites. Evaluation of these and other reported data show that compositional similarities between the IVC tektites and green or black Bosumtwi Crater glasses strongly support the hypothesis of a common impact origin-i.e. the Bosumtwi Crater site. Comparison of the IVC tektite composition with those of returned lunar materials (gabbros, basalts, breccia and soils) do not support a lunar origin for the Ivory Coast tektites. ?? 1972.

  2. Ivory identification by DNA profiling of cytochrome b gene.

    PubMed

    Lee, James Chun-I; Hsieh, Hsing-Mei; Huang, Li-Hung; Kuo, Yi-Chen; Wu, Jane-Hong; Chin, Shih-Chien; Lee, An-Hsing; Linacre, Adrian; Tsai, Li-Chin

    2009-03-01

    Ivory can be visually identified in its native form as coming from an elephant species; however, determining from which of the three extant elephant species a section of ivory originates is more problematic. We report on a method that will identify and distinguish the protected and endangered elephant species, Elephas maximus or Loxodonta sp. To identify the species of elephant from ivory products, we developed three groups of nested PCR amplifications within the cytochrome b gene that generate amplification products using highly degraded DNA isolated from confiscated ivory samples dating from 1995. DNA from a total of 382 out of 453 ivory samples were successfully isolated and amplified leading to species identification. All sequences were searched against GenBank and found to match with E. maximus and Loxodonta sp. with at least 99% similarity. The samples that were tested came from eight Asian elephants, 14 African forest elephants (Loxodonta cyclotis), and 360 African savannah elephants (Loxodonta africana). This study demonstrates a high success rate in species identification of ivory by a nested PCR approach within the cytochrome b gene which provides the necessary information for the protection of endangered species conservation.

  3. 75 FR 53012 - Culturally Significant Object Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Ivory Mirror Case”

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Object Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Ivory Mirror Case'' SUMMARY: Notice..., I hereby determine that the object to be included in the exhibition ``Ivory Mirror Case,''...

  4. Distinguishing real from fake ivory products by elemental analyses: A Bayesian hybrid classification method.

    PubMed

    Buddhachat, Kittisak; Brown, Janine L; Thitaram, Chatchote; Klinhom, Sarisa; Nganvongpanit, Korakot

    2017-03-01

    As laws tighten to limit commercial ivory trading and protect threatened species like whales and elephants, increased sales of fake ivory products have become widespread. This study describes a method, handheld X-ray fluorescence (XRF) as a noninvasive technique for elemental analysis, to differentiate quickly between ivory (Asian and African elephant, mammoth) from non-ivory (bones, teeth, antler, horn, wood, synthetic resin, rock) materials. An equation consisting of 20 elements and light elements from a stepwise discriminant analysis was used to classify samples, followed by Bayesian binary regression to determine the probability of a sample being 'ivory', with complementary log log analysis to identify the best fit model for this purpose. This Bayesian hybrid classification model was 93% accurate with 92% precision in discriminating ivory from non-ivory materials. The method was then validated by scanning an additional ivory and non-ivory samples, correctly identifying bone as not ivory with >95% accuracy, except elephant bone, which was 72%. It was less accurate for wood and rock (25-85%); however, a preliminary screening to determine if samples are not Ca-dominant could eliminate inorganic materials. In conclusion, elemental analyses by XRF can be used to identify several forms of fake ivory samples, which could have forensic application.

  5. Ehrlichia canis in Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks in the Ivory Coast.

    PubMed

    Socolovschi, Cristina; Gomez, José; Marié, Jean-Lou; Davoust, Bernard; Guigal, Pierre-Michel; Raoult, Didier; Parola, Philippe

    2012-12-01

    Canine monocytic ehrlichiosis caused by Ehrlichia canis is distributed globally, but its prevalence in Africa is poorly known. In the study reported herein, 27% of Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks collected from watchdogs in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, were positive for E. canis using quantitative real-time PCR. A new molecular strategy is proposed that can be used not only for epidemiological study, but also for the diagnosis of canine monocytic ehrlichiosis. Our findings show for the first time the presence of E. canis using molecular tools in the Ivory Coast, providing direct evidence for the presence of this pathogen.

  6. Trapped in an Ivory Tower? Take These Steps to Freedom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Coleen

    1989-01-01

    To avoid the ivory tower syndrome, responsible school executives can adopt a class (instead of teaching one), meet with employees on their own turf (but not their own time), humanize and personalize remarks, arm themselves with specifics about students and staff, and listen more than they talk. (MLH)

  7. Illegal killing for ivory drives global decline in African elephants.

    PubMed

    Wittemyer, George; Northrup, Joseph M; Blanc, Julian; Douglas-Hamilton, Iain; Omondi, Patrick; Burnham, Kenneth P

    2014-09-09

    Illegal wildlife trade has reached alarming levels globally, extirpating populations of commercially valuable species. As a driver of biodiversity loss, quantifying illegal harvest is essential for conservation and sociopolitical affairs but notoriously difficult. Here we combine field-based carcass monitoring with fine-scale demographic data from an intensively studied wild African elephant population in Samburu, Kenya, to partition mortality into natural and illegal causes. We then expand our analytical framework to model illegal killing rates and population trends of elephants at regional and continental scales using carcass data collected by a Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species program. At the intensively monitored site, illegal killing increased markedly after 2008 and was correlated strongly with the local black market ivory price and increased seizures of ivory destined for China. More broadly, results from application to continental data indicated illegal killing levels were unsustainable for the species between 2010 and 2012, peaking to ∼ 8% in 2011 which extrapolates to ∼ 40,000 elephants illegally killed and a probable species reduction of ∼ 3% that year. Preliminary data from 2013 indicate overharvesting continued. In contrast to the rest of Africa, our analysis corroborates that Central African forest elephants experienced decline throughout the last decade. These results provide the most comprehensive assessment of illegal ivory harvest to date and confirm that current ivory consumption is not sustainable. Further, our approach provides a powerful basis to determine cryptic mortality and gain understanding of the demography of at-risk species.

  8. Ivory species identification using electrophoresis-based techniques.

    PubMed

    Kitpipit, Thitika; Thanakiatkrai, Phuvadol; Penchart, Kitichaya; Ouithavon, Kanita; Satasook, Chutamas; Linacre, Adrian

    2016-12-01

    Despite continuous conservation efforts by national and international organizations, the populations of the three extant elephant species are still dramatically declining due to the illegal trade in ivory leading to the killing of elephants. A requirement to aid investigations and prosecutions is the accurate identification of the elephant species from which the ivory was removed. We report on the development of the first fully validated multiplex PCR-electrophoresis assay for ivory DNA analysis that can be used as a screening or confirmatory test. SNPs from the NADH dehydrogenase 5 and cytochrome b gene loci were identified and used in the development of the assay. The three extant elephant species could be identified based on three peaks/bands. Elephas maximus exhibited two distinct PCR fragments at approximate 129 and 381 bp; Loxodonta cyclotis showed two PCR fragments at 89 and 129 bp; and Loxodonta africana showed a single fragment of 129 bp. The assay correctly identified the elephant species using all 113 ivory and blood samples used in this report. We also report on the high sensitivity and specificity of the assay. All single-blinded samples were correctly classified, which demonstrated the assay's ability to be used for real casework. In addition, the assay could be used in conjunction with the technique of direct amplification. We propose that the test will benefit wildlife forensic laboratories and aid in the transition to the criminal justice system.

  9. [Some African gregarines (Ivory Coast, Gaboon) (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Théodoridès, J; Desportes, I; Mateu, J

    1976-01-01

    We study in the present paper two collections of Gregarines (all parasite of terrestrial arthropods) from the Ivory Coast and the Gaboon. Among the 17 species studied, three are new for science: Gregarina darchenae, Gregarina pycnoceri and Gigaductus africanus. The other species have been already found in closely related hosts.

  10. Secondary School Alternatives in the Ivory Coast: Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAnany, Emile G.

    Intended to provide information for Ivorian decision makers, this paper presents an overview of technological alternatives for the delivery of instruction at the post-primary level and their accompanying costs. Five alternatives for regular secondary education as it now exists in the Ivory Coast are reviewed: traditional, audiovisual-traditional,…

  11. Fourier-transform Raman spectra of ivory. III: Identification of mammalian specimens.

    PubMed

    Edwards, H G; Farwell, D W; Holder, J M; Lawson, E E

    1997-11-01

    The FT-Raman spectra of six mammalian ivories, other than elephant and mammoth, are presented and spectral differences formulated into a protocol for the identification of animal species from the ivory samples. In this study, sperm whale, walrus, wart hog, narwhal, hippopotamus and domestic pig are considered. The results, which are obtained non-destructively from a variety of specimens, suggest that FT-Raman spectroscopy provides a potentially useful method for the identification of mammalian ivory.

  12. Fourier-transform Raman spectroscopy of ivory: II. Spectroscopic analysis and assignments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, H. G. M.; Farwell, D. W.; Holder, J. M.; Lawson, E. E.

    1997-11-01

    The FT-Raman spectra of African and Asian elephant and woolly mammoth ivory are reported and comprehensive molecular vibrational assignments are proposed. Since ivory is composed of proteinaceous collagen embedded in an inorganic matrix of carbonated hydroxyapatite, the Raman spectrum of pure natural collagen recorded under similar conditions aids the identification of the vibrational modes. Several bands are identified which could be used for the Raman spectroscopic characterisation of the mammalian ivories studied.

  13. Fourier-transform Raman spectra of ivory III: identification of mammalian specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, H. G. M.; Farwell, D. W.; Holder, J. M.; Lawson, E. E.

    1997-11-01

    The FT-Raman spectra of six mammalian ivories, other than elephant and mammoth, are presented and spectral differences formulated into a protocol for the identification of animal species from the ivory samples. In this study, sperm whale, walrus, wart hog, narwhal, hippopotamus and domestic pig are considered. The results, which are obtained non-destructively from a variety of specimens, suggest that FT-Raman spectroscopy provides a potentially useful method for the identification of mammalian ivory.

  14. Identification of the source of ivory idol by DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sandeep Kumar; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy; Singh, Lalji

    2011-09-01

    In this study, we describe a forensic case dealing with the identification of the source of the processed ivory object by DNA analysis. Two pieces of Lord Krishna's idols from a shop were confiscated by an investigating agency of the Indian government and forwarded to us to identify the source of its origin. We succeeded in isolating DNA from both processed ivory idols by using the phenol/chloroform DNA extraction method. The extracted DNA was subjected to PCR amplification using an elephant-specific mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) D-loop marker. DNA sequence analysis of the amplified fragment of mtDNA D-loop region confirmed that the idols were consistent with Asian elephant with 99% similarity.

  15. Radiocarbon dating of seized ivory confirms rapid decline in African elephant populations and provides insight into illegal trade.

    PubMed

    Cerling, Thure E; Barnette, Janet E; Chesson, Lesley A; Douglas-Hamilton, Iain; Gobush, Kathleen S; Uno, Kevin T; Wasser, Samuel K; Xu, Xiaomei

    2016-11-22

    Carbon-14 measurements on 231 elephant ivory specimens from 14 large ivory seizures (≥0.5 ton) made between 2002 and 2014 show that most ivory (ca 90%) was derived from animals that had died less than 3 y before ivory was confiscated. This indicates that the assumption of recent elephant death for mortality estimates of African elephants is correct: Very little "old" ivory is included in large ivory shipments from Africa. We found only one specimen of the 231 analyzed to have a lag time longer than 6 y. Patterns of trade differ by regions: East African ivory, based on genetic assignments of geographic origin, has a much higher fraction of "rapid" transit than ivory originating in the Tridom region of Cameroon-Gabon-Congo. Carbon-14 is an important tool in understanding patterns of movement of illegal wildlife products.

  16. Radiocarbon dating of seized ivory confirms rapid decline in African elephant populations and provides insight into illegal trade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerling, Thure E.; Barnette, Janet E.; Chesson, Lesley A.; Douglas-Hamilton, Iain; Gobush, Kathleen S.; Uno, Kevin T.; Wasser, Samuel K.; Xu, Xiaomei

    2016-11-01

    Carbon-14 measurements on 231 elephant ivory specimens from 14 large ivory seizures (≥0.5 ton) made between 2002 and 2014 show that most ivory (ca. 90%) was derived from animals that had died less than 3 y before ivory was confiscated. This indicates that the assumption of recent elephant death for mortality estimates of African elephants is correct: Very little “old” ivory is included in large ivory shipments from Africa. We found only one specimen of the 231 analyzed to have a lag time longer than 6 y. Patterns of trade differ by regions: East African ivory, based on genetic assignments of geographic origin, has a much higher fraction of “rapid” transit than ivory originating in the Tridom region of Cameroon-Gabon-Congo. Carbon-14 is an important tool in understanding patterns of movement of illegal wildlife products.

  17. Radiocarbon dating of seized ivory confirms rapid decline in African elephant populations and provides insight into illegal trade

    PubMed Central

    Cerling, Thure E.; Barnette, Janet E.; Chesson, Lesley A.; Douglas-Hamilton, Iain; Gobush, Kathleen S.; Wasser, Samuel K.; Xu, Xiaomei

    2016-01-01

    Carbon-14 measurements on 231 elephant ivory specimens from 14 large ivory seizures (≥0.5 ton) made between 2002 and 2014 show that most ivory (ca. 90%) was derived from animals that had died less than 3 y before ivory was confiscated. This indicates that the assumption of recent elephant death for mortality estimates of African elephants is correct: Very little “old” ivory is included in large ivory shipments from Africa. We found only one specimen of the 231 analyzed to have a lag time longer than 6 y. Patterns of trade differ by regions: East African ivory, based on genetic assignments of geographic origin, has a much higher fraction of “rapid” transit than ivory originating in the Tridom region of Cameroon–Gabon–Congo. Carbon-14 is an important tool in understanding patterns of movement of illegal wildlife products. PMID:27821744

  18. The Influence of Predisposing, Enabling and Need Factors on Condom Use in Ivory Coast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngamini Ngui, Andre

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to identify key determinants of condom use in Ivory Coast. Data stem from Ivory Coast Demographic Health Survey (DHS) conducted by ORC Macro in 2005 among a representative sample of 9,686 persons aged 15 - 49. Following the behavioral model, we use logistic regression to assess the effect of predisposing,…

  19. 75 FR 41886 - Recovery Plan for the Ivory-billed Woodpecker (Campephilus principalis)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-19

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Recovery Plan for the Ivory-billed Woodpecker (Campephilus principalis...-billed Woodpecker (Campephilus principalis). This final recovery plan includes criteria and measures that... measures. Prior to European settlement, the ivory-billed woodpecker appeared to be ] widely...

  20. Geographic variations in the composition of ivory of the African elephant (Loxodonta africana).

    PubMed

    Raubenheimer, E J; Brown, J M; Rama, D B; Dreyer, M J; Smith, P D; Dauth, J

    1998-08-01

    Tracing the source of origin of illegal ivory will contribute to the identification of poorly managed game parks and facilitate steps taken to prevent the African elephant from becoming extinct. This study was aimed at establishing a database on the composition of ivory obtained from elephant sanctuary areas in Southern Africa. Fragments of elephant ivory from seven geographically distinct areas in South Africa, Namibia and Botswana were analysed for inorganic and organic content. A total of 20 elements was detected in the inorganic fraction of ivory, some in concentrations as low as 0.25 microg/g. The concentrations of calcium, phosphate, magnesium, fluoride, cobalt and zinc showed statistically significant differences (p < 0.007) between ivory obtained from different regions. Analyses of the organic fraction identified 17 amino acids. Ivory from arid regions showed significantly lower proline plus hydroxyproline content and under-hydroxylation of lysine residues. This study indicates that chemical analyses of ivory could be beneficial in tracing the source of illegal ivory.

  1. Histogenesis of the unique morphology of proboscidean ivory.

    PubMed

    Virág, Attila

    2012-12-01

    The chequered pattern (often called Schreger pattern), which can be seen by unaided eye on transverse profiles of several proboscidean tusks and which can be emphasized by the spreading pattern of the cracks or by mineral discoloration, is an autapomorph feature of the clade Elephantoidea. The pattern differs among proboscidean taxa; therefore, it allows the coarse differentiation of elephants, mammoths, and some other basal groups. Such identification methods could facilitate efforts concerned with protection of the remaining elephant populations through ivory trade restrictions, since the tooth dentine from extinct Mammuthusprimigenius and from extant Loxodontaafricana and Elephasmaximus are the most common raw materials of the ivory carvings. The aim of this study was to show the internal structure of proboscidean ivory and to revise the existing theories on the aforementioned pattern of the elephantoids with reflections on the events which lead to the development of this microstructure. Thin sections and natural crack surfaces with various orientations of M.primigenius, Elephasantiquus, Prodeinotherium, and Deinotherium tusk fragments were used to produce a three-dimensional model which explains the features on all profiles. The "phase shift" model is introduced, which assumes a sinusoid undulation of the dentinal tubules in radial profiles in the case of elephantoids. The model was confirmed by photomicrographs, scanning electron microscopic images, interpretation of natural crack surfaces, and radial displacement analysis of the dentinal tubules. The latter proved that the adjacent waves are not in the same phase. Several new nondestructive distinguishing methods are described here on the basis of the correlation between some microscopic and macroscopic features related to the Schreger pattern.

  2. Detection of Mycobacterium ulcerans DNA in the Environment, Ivory Coast

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Roger Bi Diangoné; Niamké, Sébastian; Tissot-Dupont, Hervé; Drancourt, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Background Ivory Coast is a West African country with the highest reported cases of Buruli ulcer, a disabling subcutaneous infection due to Mycobacterium ulcerans. However, the prevalence of environmental M. ulcerans is poorly known in this country. Methods We collected 496 environmental specimens consisting of soil (n = 100), stagnant water (n = 200), plants (n = 100) and animal feces (n = 96) in Ivory Coast over five months in the dry and wet seasons in regions which are free of Buruli ulcer (control group A; 250 specimens) and in regions where the Buruli ulcer is endemic (group B; 246 specimens). After appropriate total DNA extraction incorporating an internal control, the M. ulcerans IS2404 and KR-B gene were amplified by real-time PCR in samples. In parallel, a calibration curve was done for M. ulcerans Agy99 IS2404 and KR-B gene. Results Of 460 samples free of PCR inhibition, a positive real-time PCR detection of insertion sequence IS2404 and KR-B gene was observed in 1/230 specimens in control group A versus 9/230 specimens in group B (P = 0.02; Fisher exact test). Positive specimens comprised seven stagnant water specimens, two feces specimens confirmed to be of Thryonomys swinderianus (agouti) origin by real-time PCR of the cytb gene; and one soil specimen. Extrapolation from the calibration curves indicated low inoculums ranging from 1 to 102 mycobacteria/mL. Conclusion This study confirms the presence of M. ulcerans in the watery environment surrounding patients with Buruli ulcer in Ivory Coast. It suggests that the agouti, which is in close contacts with populations, could play a role in the environmental cycle of M. ulcerans, as previously suggested for the closely related possums in Australia. PMID:26982581

  3. [Toxic waste and health effects in Abidjan City, Ivory Coast].

    PubMed

    Bohand, X; Monpeurt, C; Bohand, S; Cazoulat, A

    2007-12-01

    Accidental chemical pollution can have serious effects on human health. In 2006, the tanker vessel Probo Koala discharged hundreds of tons of toxic waste at many sites in Abidjan City, Ivory Coast. In the following days and weeks, thousands of people presented signs of poisoning. Analysis of the waste demonstrated the presence of toxic chemicals such as mercaptans and hydrogen sulfide. The final toll was 8 dead, dozens hospitalized, and about 100,000 seeking medical advice. This event provides evidence that, like international immigration, exportation of industrial waste can result in serious public health hazards.

  4. Ancient biodeterioration: an FT-Raman spectroscopic study of mammoth and elephant ivory.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Howell G M; Jorge Villar, Susana E; Nik Hassan, Nik F; Arya, Nlin; O'Connor, Sonia; Charlton, Donna M

    2005-10-01

    Raman spectra of mammoth ivory specimens have been recorded using near-infrared excitation, and comparisons made with modern Asian and African elephant ivories. Whereas the most ancient mammoth ivory (60-65 ky) showed no evidence for an organic collagen component, more recent samples of mammoth ivory indicated that some preservation had occurred, although with biodeterioration of the protein structure exhibited by the amide I and III bands in the 1200-1700 cm(-1) region of the Raman spectrum. The consequent difficulties encountered when applying chemometrics methods to ancient ivory analysis (which are successful for modern specimens) are noted. In the most ancient mammoth ivory specimens, which are extensively fragmented, evidence of mineralization is seen, with the production of gypsum, calcite and limonite; Raman microscopic analysis of crystalline material inside the fissures of the mammoth ivory shows the presence of gypsum as well as cyanobacterial colonisation. The application of Raman spectroscopy to the nondestructive analysis of archaeological materials in order to gain information of relevance to their preservation or restoration is highlighted.

  5. Biodegradation of ivory (natural apatite): possible involvement of fungal activity in biodeterioration of the Lewis Chessmen.

    PubMed

    Pinzari, Flavia; Tate, James; Bicchieri, Marina; Rhee, Young Joon; Gadd, Geoffrey Michael

    2013-04-01

    Fungal biodeterioration of ivory was investigated with in vitro inoculation of samples obtained from boar and walrus tusks with the fungi Aspergillus niger and Serpula himantioides, species of known geoactive abilities. A combination of light and scanning electron microscopy together with associated analytical techniques was used to characterize fungal interactions with the ivory, including changes in ivory composition, dissolution and tunnelling, and the formation of new biominerals. The research was aimed at providing further understanding of the potential roles of fungi in the colonization and deterioration of ivory in terrestrial environments, but also contributes to our knowledge regarding the possible origins of the surface damage observed on early medieval sculptures made largely from walrus tusks, referred to as 'the Lewis hoard of gaming pieces', that were presumably produced for playing chess. The experiments have shown that the possibility of damage to ivory being caused by fungi is realistic. Scanning electron microscopy revealed penetration of fungal hyphae within cracks in the walrus tusk that showed also widespread tunnelling by fungal hyphae as well as 'fungal footprints' where the surface was etched as a consequence of mycelial colonization. Similar phenomena were observed with boar tusk ivory, while production of metabolites could lead to complete dissolution of the sample. Colonization of ivory and/or exposure to fungal activity lead to extensive secondary biomineral formation, and this was identified as calcium oxalate, mainly as the monohydrate, whewellite.

  6. Using DNA to track the origin of the largest ivory seizure since the 1989 trade ban

    PubMed Central

    Wasser, Samuel K.; Mailand, Celia; Booth, Rebecca; Mutayoba, Benezeth; Kisamo, Emily; Clark, Bill; Stephens, Matthew

    2007-01-01

    The illegal ivory trade recently intensified to the highest levels ever reported. Policing this trafficking has been hampered by the inability to reliably determine geographic origin of contraband ivory. Ivory can be smuggled across multiple international borders and along numerous trade routes, making poaching hotspots and potential trade routes difficult to identify. This fluidity also makes it difficult to refute a country's denial of poaching problems. We extend an innovative DNA assignment method to determine the geographic origin(s) of large elephant ivory seizures. A Voronoi tessellation method is used that utilizes genetic similarities across tusks to simultaneously infer the origin of multiple samples that could have one or more common origin(s). We show that this joint analysis performs better than sample-by-sample methods in assigning sample clusters of known origin. The joint method is then used to infer the geographic origin of the largest ivory seizure since the 1989 ivory trade ban. Wildlife authorities initially suspected that this ivory came from multiple locations across forest and savanna Africa. However, we show that the ivory was entirely from savanna elephants, most probably originating from a narrow east-to-west band of southern Africa, centered on Zambia. These findings enabled law enforcement to focus their investigation to a smaller area and fewer trade routes and led to changes within the Zambian government to improve antipoaching efforts. Such outcomes demonstrate the potential of genetic analyses to help combat the expanding wildlife trade by identifying origin(s) of large seizures of contraband ivory. Broader applications to wildlife trade are discussed. PMID:17360505

  7. Using DNA to track the origin of the largest ivory seizure since the 1989 trade ban.

    PubMed

    Wasser, Samuel K; Mailand, Celia; Booth, Rebecca; Mutayoba, Benezeth; Kisamo, Emily; Clark, Bill; Stephens, Matthew

    2007-03-06

    The illegal ivory trade recently intensified to the highest levels ever reported. Policing this trafficking has been hampered by the inability to reliably determine geographic origin of contraband ivory. Ivory can be smuggled across multiple international borders and along numerous trade routes, making poaching hotspots and potential trade routes difficult to identify. This fluidity also makes it difficult to refute a country's denial of poaching problems. We extend an innovative DNA assignment method to determine the geographic origin(s) of large elephant ivory seizures. A Voronoi tessellation method is used that utilizes genetic similarities across tusks to simultaneously infer the origin of multiple samples that could have one or more common origin(s). We show that this joint analysis performs better than sample-by-sample methods in assigning sample clusters of known origin. The joint method is then used to infer the geographic origin of the largest ivory seizure since the 1989 ivory trade ban. Wildlife authorities initially suspected that this ivory came from multiple locations across forest and savanna Africa. However, we show that the ivory was entirely from savanna elephants, most probably originating from a narrow east-to-west band of southern Africa, centered on Zambia. These findings enabled law enforcement to focus their investigation to a smaller area and fewer trade routes and led to changes within the Zambian government to improve antipoaching efforts. Such outcomes demonstrate the potential of genetic analyses to help combat the expanding wildlife trade by identifying origin(s) of large seizures of contraband ivory. Broader applications to wildlife trade are discussed.

  8. Legal ivory trade in a corrupt world and its impact on African elephant populations.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Elizabeth L

    2015-02-01

    Illegal hunting of African elephants (Loxodonta africana) for ivory is causing rapid declines in their populations. Since 2007, illegal ivory trade has more than doubled. African elephants are facing the most serious conservation crisis since 1989, when international trade was banned. One solution proposed is establishment of a controlled legal trade in ivory. High prices for ivory mean that the incentives to obtain large quantities are high, but the quantity of tusks available for trade are biologically constrained. Within that context, effective management of a legal ivory trade would require robust systems to be in place to ensure that ivory from illegally killed elephants cannot be laundered into a legal market. At present, that is not feasible due to corruption among government officials charged with implementing wildlife-related legislation. With organized criminal enterprises involved along the whole commodity chain, corruption enables the laundering of illegal ivory into legal or potentially legal markets. Poachers and traffickers can rapidly pay their way out of trouble, so the financial incentives to break the law heavily outweigh those of abiding by it. Maintaining reliable permitting systems and leak-proof chains of custody in this context is challenging, and effective management breaks down. Once illegal ivory has entered the legal trade, it is difficult or impossible for enforcement officers to know what is legal and illegal. Addressing corruption throughout a trade network that permeates countries across the globe will take decades, if it can ever be achieved. That will be too late for wild African elephants at current rates of loss. If we are to conserve remaining wild populations, we must close all markets because, under current levels of corruption, they cannot be controlled in a way that does not provide opportunities for illegal ivory being laundered into legal markets.

  9. Ivory Harvesting Pressure on the Genome of the African Elephant: A Phenotypic Shift to Tusklessness.

    PubMed

    Raubenheimer, Erich J; Miniggio, Hilde D

    2016-09-01

    The unique chequered pattern of elephant ivory has made it a desired commodity for the production of various works of art. The demand however outstrips the supply and with soaring prices, illegal tusk harvesting is thriving on the African continent. Formal restrictions placed on trade in elephant products have been ineffective in reversing the rapid decline in elephant numbers. We are presently facing the reality of extinction of free roaming elephant on the African continent. This paper describes the histogenesis of the chequered pattern, the genomic impact of ivory harvesting on the phenotype of breeding herds, and the contribution of science to tracing the origin of illegal ivory.

  10. Innovative production system goes in off Ivory Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Childers, M.; Barnes, J. |

    1995-07-17

    The phased field development of the Lion and Panthere fields, offshore the Ivory Coast, includes a small floating production, storage, and offloading (FPSO) tanker with minimal processing capability as an early oil production system (EPS). For the long-term production scheme, the FPSO will be replaced by a converted jack up mobile offshore production system (MOPS) with full process equipment. The development also includes guyed-caisson well platforms, pipeline export for natural gas to fuel an onshore power plant, and a floating storage and offloading (FSO) tanker for oil export. Pipeline export for oil is a future possibility. This array of innovative strategies and techniques seldom has been brought together in a single project. The paper describes the development plan, early oil, jack up MOPS, and transport and installation.

  11. Science education in rural America: Adaptations for the ivory tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Doren, Gregory S.

    This thesis illustrated what can happen when academic culture disconnects from the cultures surrounding it. It showed that formal school environments are not always the best places to learn. A discussion of the debate between coherence and fragmentation learning theories illustrated academic chasms and a mindset that science education must originate from within ivory towers to be valued. Rationales for place-based science education were developed. Two National Science Foundation initiatives were compared and contrasted for relevance to Native Science education (a) Informal Science Education and (b) Science Education for New Civic Engagement and Responsibilities. A National Science Foundation instrument, known as the Self-Assessment of Learning Gains, was selected to field-test measures of learning science outside of university science courses. Principles of chemistry were taught in community workshops, and those participant self-assessments were compared to self-assessments of students in introductory chemistry courses at two universities. University students consistently claimed the greatest learning gains, in the post-course survey, for the same areas that they claimed to have the greatest understanding, in the pre-course survey. The workshop participant responses differed, depending upon location of the learning environment. When held in a university laboratory, ideas were not related to other cultures, even when a Native Elder was present to describe those relationships. When held in a cultural center, those relationships were among the highest learning gains claimed. One of the instrument's greatest assets was the ability to measure reactions, level 4 of Bennett's (1976) hierarchy of evidence for program evaluation. A long-term commitment to informal science education (not short-term exhibits or programs), combined with negotiated place-based education was recommended as a crucially needed initiative, if relationships between universities and Native American

  12. African and classical swine fever situation in Ivory-Coast and neighboring countries, 2008-2013.

    PubMed

    Kouakou, K V; Michaud, V; Biego, H G; Gnabro, H P G; Kouakou, A V; Mossoun, A M; Awuni, J A; Minoungou, G L; Aplogan, G L; Awoumé, F K; Albina, E; Lancelot, R; Couacy-Hymann, E

    2017-02-01

    This study was conducted from 2008 to 2013 to determine the animal health status of Ivory Coast and neighboring countries (Burkina Faso, Ghana, Togo and Benin) for African swine fever (ASF) and classical swine fever (CSF), and to assess the risk factors for ASF introduction in Ivory Coast. Ivory Coast had probably been free from ASF from 1998 to 2014 when it was re-introduced in this country. However, the ASF virus was found in all neighboring countries. In contrast, no evidence of CSF infection was found so far in Ivory Coast and neighboring countries. To assess the risk of ASF reintroduction in Ivory Coast, we surveyed 59 modern pig farms, and 169 pig owners in 19 villages and in two towns. For the village livestock, the major risk factor was the high frequency of pig exchanges with Burkinabe villages. In the commercial sector, many inadequate management practices were observed with respect to ASF. Their identification should enable farmers and other stakeholders to implement a training and prevention program to reduce the introduction risk of ASF in their farms.

  13. Energy assessment of Ivory Coast, Morocco, Nigeria, and Senegal

    SciTech Connect

    Ghirardi, A.; Sathaye, J.; Goering, P.

    1986-11-01

    This report is an overview of the energy market in four West African countries: The Ivory Coast, Morocco, Nigeria, and Senegal. We feel these countries are representative of the West African region. Together they account for 75% of the total energy use in West Africa, 78% of GDP, and 76% of population. The purpose of the study is to analyze the evolution of energy demand in the context of the general socio-economic background of the region. The study also examines energy supply and trade related to the energy sector. The analysis focuses on the study of commercial fuels. Although we have reviewed studies of wood, solar, wind, and agricultural residues, we leave out detailed discussions of these non-commercial energy forms. The first part of the report is an assessment of the trends in energy demand in the four study countries. We discuss the main factors driving energy demand sector by sector. This is followed by a review of the primary energy resources of the countries, and of the capacity for production of secondary fuels. The last section looks at energy trade, with particular emphasis on the role of the United States.

  14. Ivory Coast-Ghana margin: model of a transform margin

    SciTech Connect

    Mascle, J.; Blarez, E.

    1987-05-01

    The authors present a marine study of the eastern Ivory Coast-Ghana continental margins which they consider one of the most spectacular extinct transform margins. This margin has been created during Early-Lower Cretaceous time and has not been submitted to any major geodynamic reactivation since its fabric. Based on this example, they propose to consider during the evolution of the transform margin four main and successive stages. Shearing contact is first active between two probably thick continental crusts and then between progressively thinning continental crusts. This leads to the creation of specific geological structures such as pull-apart graben, elongated fault lineaments, major fault scarps, shear folds, and marginal ridges. After the final continental breakup, a hot center (the mid-oceanic ridge axis) is progressively drifting along the newly created margin. The contact between two lithospheres of different nature should necessarily induce, by thermal exchanges, vertical crustal readjustments. Finally, the transform margin remains directly adjacent to a hot but cooling oceanic lithosphere; its subsidence behavior should then progressively be comparable to the thermal subsidence of classic rifted margins.

  15. Mid-Pleistocene divergence of Cuban and North American ivory-billed woodpeckers.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Robert C; Kirchman, Jeremy J; Dumbacher, John P; Bevier, Louis; Dove, Carla; Rotzel, Nancy C; Edwards, Scott V; Lammertink, Martjan; Miglia, Kathleen J; Moore, William S

    2006-09-22

    We used ancient DNA analysis of seven museum specimens of the endangered North American ivory-billed woodpecker (Campephilus principalis) and three specimens of the species from Cuba to document their degree of differentiation and their relationships to other Campephilus woodpeckers. Analysis of these mtDNA sequences reveals that the Cuban and North American ivory bills, along with the imperial woodpecker (Campephilus imperialis) of Mexico, are a monophyletic group and are roughly equidistant genetically, suggesting each lineage may be a separate species. Application of both internal and external rate calibrations indicates that the three lineages split more than one million years ago, in the Mid-Pleistocene. We thus can exclude the hypothesis that Native Americans introduced North American ivory-billed woodpeckers to Cuba. Our sequences of all three woodpeckers also provide an important DNA barcoding resource for identification of non-invasive samples or remains of these critically endangered and charismatic woodpeckers.

  16. Sickle cell trait in Ivory Coast athletic champions, 1956-1989.

    PubMed

    Le Gallais, D; Préfaut, C; Dulat, C; Macabies, J; Lonsdorfer, J

    1991-10-01

    Thirteen sickle cell trait carriers (SCTC) were found among 129 Ivory Coast champions or record holders in races for the period from 1956 to 1989 (10.1%). These 13 SCTC won 33 titles and national records (7.0%): 32 (12.5%) in races of 400 m or less and only one (0.004%) in races of 800 m or more, and the highest-performing SCTC won 8 titles and national records. A comparison with non-SCTC Ivory Coast champions shows that SCTC won significantly fewer titles than non-SCTC in long-distance races and that they won fewer titles during their careers.

  17. [Chloroquine resistance and malaria control in Ivory Coast].

    PubMed

    Henry, M C; Koné, M; Guillet, P; Mouchet, J

    1998-01-01

    We present here data from the Ivory Coast on the susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum to chloroquine, obtained since the first chloroquine-resistant strains were discovered in 1987. Susceptibility was assessed using the WHO 7-day field test. Almost all the tests were carried out in the capital, Adidjan, and in the southern forest zone. The frequency of chloroquine resistance was below 30% in most cases, the actual frequency differing between regions. The frequency of R3 chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum was very low. Such resistant parasites were found only on an oil-palm plantation and in the south west of the country, probably due to the free medical care available at both locations. In general, access to health care is limited. Fevers attributed to malaria are generally treated at home using plants or incomplete courses of chloroquine. Our data suggest that R3 chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum strains are selected by repeated high doses of chloroquine, rather than by low doses. Thus, symptomatic treatment of uncomplicated malaria and treatment at home with the "correct" medication may be more effective than systematic medication, for limiting the level of chloroquine resistance in the parasite. Pyrethroid-resistant Anopheles gambiae s.l. is present in West Africa and this may reduce the short-term effectiveness of impregnated mosquito nets. In the absence of R3 chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum, self-medication at home may be a practical and realistic way to treat malaria. However, more knowledge about the effectiveness of anti-malaria drugs, their use in various social, cultural and economic environments and the geographical distribution of insecticide-resistant vectors is required before effective strategies can be designed. However, it would certainly be of value to consistently check the quality of anti-malaria drugs and to try to improve the effectiveness of self-medication at home.

  18. A novel application of mark-recapture to examine behaviour associated with the online trade in elephant ivory.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Lydia M; McCrea, Rachel S; Roberts, David L

    2017-01-01

    The illegal trade in elephant ivory is driving the unlawful killing of elephants such that populations are now suffering unsustainable reductions. The internet is increasingly being used as a platform to conduct illegal wildlife trade, including elephant ivory. As a globally accessible medium the internet is as highly attractive to those involved in the illegal trade as it is challenging to regulate. Characterising the online illegal wildlife (ivory) trade is complex, yet key to informing enforcement activities. We applied mark-recapture to investigate behaviour associated with the online trade in elephant ivory on eBay UK as a generalist online marketplace. Our results indicate that trade takes place via eBay UK, despite its policy prohibiting this, and that two distinct trading populations exist, characterised by the pattern of their ivory sales. We suggest these may represent a large number of occasional (or non-commercial) sellers and a smaller number of dedicated (or commercial) sellers. Directing resource towards reducing the volume of occasional sales, such as through education, would enable greater focus to be placed upon characterising the extent and value of the illegal, "commercial" online ivory trade. MRC has the potential to characterise the illegal trade in ivory and diverse wildlife commodities traded using various online platforms.

  19. A novel application of mark-recapture to examine behaviour associated with the online trade in elephant ivory

    PubMed Central

    McCrea, Rachel S.; Roberts, David L.

    2017-01-01

    The illegal trade in elephant ivory is driving the unlawful killing of elephants such that populations are now suffering unsustainable reductions. The internet is increasingly being used as a platform to conduct illegal wildlife trade, including elephant ivory. As a globally accessible medium the internet is as highly attractive to those involved in the illegal trade as it is challenging to regulate. Characterising the online illegal wildlife (ivory) trade is complex, yet key to informing enforcement activities. We applied mark-recapture to investigate behaviour associated with the online trade in elephant ivory on eBay UK as a generalist online marketplace. Our results indicate that trade takes place via eBay UK, despite its policy prohibiting this, and that two distinct trading populations exist, characterised by the pattern of their ivory sales. We suggest these may represent a large number of occasional (or non-commercial) sellers and a smaller number of dedicated (or commercial) sellers. Directing resource towards reducing the volume of occasional sales, such as through education, would enable greater focus to be placed upon characterising the extent and value of the illegal, “commercial” online ivory trade. MRC has the potential to characterise the illegal trade in ivory and diverse wildlife commodities traded using various online platforms. PMID:28289565

  20. Unusual appearance of Schreger-like pattern in Hippopotamus amphibius ivory: wildlife forensics investigation of a netsuke.

    PubMed

    Sims, Margaret E

    2010-07-15

    The National Fish and Wildlife Forensics Laboratory routinely receives confiscated wildlife parts and products (including ivory) for identification purposes as part of wildlife law enforcement casework. Identification of evidentiary ivory typically involves a detailed and comprehensive visual and microscopic examination of the objects, as well as observation with ultraviolet light. Of thousands of ivory objects examined at the Lab, the author has observed unusual non-Proboscidean (elephant) objects with Schreger-like (cross-hatched) pattern. One of these objects was a small well-polished netsuke carved from a hippopotamus canine.

  1. Lassa virus isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast represent an emerging fifth lineage

    PubMed Central

    Manning, John T.; Forrester, Naomi; Paessler, Slobodan

    2015-01-01

    Previous imported cases of Lassa fever (LF) into the United Kingdom from the Ivory Coast and Mali, as well as the detection of Lassa virus (LASV) among the Mastomys natalensis population within Mali has led to the suggestion that the endemic area for LF is expanding. Initial phylogenetic analyses arrange isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast separately from the classical lineage IV isolates taken from Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Liberia. The availability of full genome sequences continues to increase, allowing for a more complete phylogenetic comparison of the isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast to the other existing isolates. In this study, we utilized a Bayesian approach to infer the demographic histories of each LASV isolate for which the full sequence was available. Our results indicate that the isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast group separately from the isolates of lineage IV, comprising a distinct fifth lineage. The split between lineages IV and V is estimated to have occurred around 200–300 years ago, which coincides with the colonial period of West Africa. PMID:26483768

  2. Asians in the Ivory Tower: Dilemmas of Racial Inequality in American Higher Education. Multicultural Education Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teranishi, Robert T.

    2010-01-01

    Highly respected scholar Robert Teranishi draws on his vast research to present this timely and compelling examination of the experience of Asian Americans in higher education. "Asians in the Ivory Tower" explores why and how Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) are important to our nation's higher education priorities and places the…

  3. Dating ivory by determination of 14C, 90Sr and 228/232Th.

    PubMed

    Schmied, Stefanie A K; Brunnermeier, Matthias J; Schupfner, Robert; Wolfbeis, Otto S

    2012-09-10

    A method is described to determine the time of death of elephants. This is accomplished by analysis of the radionuclides 14C, 90Sr and 228/232Th in known samples of ivory, and in samples of unknown age. The reliability of this method is considerably increased by multi nuclide analysis.

  4. From the Ivory Tower to the Schoolhouse: How Scholarship Becomes Common Knowledge in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Why do so many promising ideas generated by education research fail to penetrate the world of classroom practice? In "From the Ivory Tower to the Schoolhouse," education historian Jack Schneider seeks to answer this familiar and vexing question by turning it on its head. He looks at four well-known ideas that emerged from the world of…

  5. Lassa virus isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast represent an emerging fifth lineage.

    PubMed

    Manning, John T; Forrester, Naomi; Paessler, Slobodan

    2015-01-01

    Previous imported cases of Lassa fever (LF) into the United Kingdom from the Ivory Coast and Mali, as well as the detection of Lassa virus (LASV) among the Mastomys natalensis population within Mali has led to the suggestion that the endemic area for LF is expanding. Initial phylogenetic analyses arrange isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast separately from the classical lineage IV isolates taken from Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Liberia. The availability of full genome sequences continues to increase, allowing for a more complete phylogenetic comparison of the isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast to the other existing isolates. In this study, we utilized a Bayesian approach to infer the demographic histories of each LASV isolate for which the full sequence was available. Our results indicate that the isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast group separately from the isolates of lineage IV, comprising a distinct fifth lineage. The split between lineages IV and V is estimated to have occurred around 200-300 years ago, which coincides with the colonial period of West Africa.

  6. Combating the illegal trade in African elephant ivory with DNA forensics.

    PubMed

    Wasser, Samuel K; Joseph Clark, William; Drori, Ofir; Stephen Kisamo, Emily; Mailand, Celia; Mutayoba, Benezeth; Stephens, Matthew

    2008-08-01

    International wildlife crime is burgeoning in this climate of global trade. We contend that the most effective way to contain this illegal trade is to determine where the wildlife is being removed. This allows authorities to direct law enforcement to poaching hot spots, potentially stops trade before the wildlife is actually killed, prevents countries from denying their poaching problems at home, and thwarts trade before it enters into an increasingly complex web of international criminal activity. Forensic tools have been limited in their ability to determine product origin because the information they can provide typically begins only at the point of shipment. DNA assignment analyses can determine product origin, but its use has been limited by the inability to assign samples to locations where reference samples do not exist. We applied new DNA assignment methods that can determine the geographic origin(s) of wildlife products from anywhere within its range. We used these methods to examine the geographic origin(s) of 2 strings of seizures involving large volumes of elephant ivory, 1 string seized in Singapore and Malawi and the other in Hong Kong and Cameroon. These ivory traffickers may comprise 2 of the largest poaching rings in Africa. In both cases all ivory seized in the string had common origins, which indicates that crime syndicates are targeting specific populations for intense exploitation. This result contradicts the dominant belief that dealers are using a decentralized plan of procuring ivory stocks as they became available across Africa. Large quantities of ivory were then moved, in multiple shipments, through an intermediate country prior to shipment to Asia, as a risk-reduction strategy that distances the dealer from the poaching locale. These smuggling strategies could not have been detected by forensic information, which typically begins only at the shipping source.

  7. [History of an epidemiological route between Ivory Coast and Burkina Faso: the case of the Koudougou sleeping sickness foci].

    PubMed

    Kiendrébéogo, D; Kambiré, R; Jamonneau, V; Lingué, K; Solano, P; Courtin, F

    2012-11-01

    In the first half of the XXth century, while Upper-Volta (now Burkina Faso) was suffering a terrible epidemic of sleeping sickness, the French colonial administration encouraged the movement of people from Upper-Volta to Ivory Coast to meet their demands for labour. This led to the establishment of Mossi villages, such as those of Koudougou, in the Ivorian forest with populations originating from areas of Upper-Volta that were not only densely populated but also severely affected by sleeping sickness. Since 2000, most cases of sleeping sickness in the Koudougou district of Burkina Faso have been in people originally from Ivory Coast. Who are they? Where did they settle in Burkina Faso? Where do they come from in Ivory Coast? After having retraced the epidemiological history of Koudougou villages in Burkina Faso and Ivory Coast, the history of ten cases of sleeping sickness detected passively at Koudougou hospital since 2000 were analysed. All cases originated from the forest area of Ivory Coast. Understanding the spread of sleeping sickness between Burkina Faso and Ivory Coast will assist in the identification of areas of disease risk.

  8. Osmium isotopes in Ivory Coast tektites: Confirmation of a meteoritic component and rhenium depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koeberl, Christian; Shirey, Steven B.

    1993-01-01

    The sensitive negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry method was used for the measurement of concentrations and isotopic ratios of osmium and rhenium in four Ivory Coast tektites. These tektites have crustal major and trace element composition, as well as large negative epsilon(sub Nd)(-20) and positive epsilon(sub Sr)(+260 to +300) which are characteristic for old continental crust. Os concentrations ranging from 0.09 to 0.30 ppb were found, clearly much higher than average crustal values, Os-187/Os-186 ratios of about 1.2-1.7, and low Re-187/Os-186 ratios. These results show unambiguously the existence of a meteoritic component (on the order of 0.06%) in the Ivory Coast tektites. Low Re abundances are the result of fractionation of Re during the impact.

  9. Genetic population study of Y-chromosome markers in Benin and Ivory Coast ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Fortes-Lima, Cesar; Brucato, Nicolas; Croze, Myriam; Bellis, Gil; Schiavinato, Stephanie; Massougbodji, Achille; Migot-Nabias, Florence; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel

    2015-11-01

    Ninety-six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and seventeen short tandem repeat (STRs) were investigated on the Y-chromosome of 288 unrelated healthy individuals from populations in Benin (Bariba, Yoruba, and Fon) and the Ivory Coast (Ahizi and Yacouba). We performed a multidimensional scaling analysis based on FST and RST genetic distances using a large extensive database of sub-Saharan African populations. There is more genetic homogeneity in Ivory Coast populations compared with populations from Benin. Notably, the Beninese Yoruba are significantly differentiated from neighbouring groups, but also from the Yoruba from Nigeria (FST>0.05; P<0.01). The Y-chromosome dataset presented here provides new valuable data to understand the complex genetic diversity and human male demographic events in West Africa.

  10. Heat induced transformation of fossil mastodon ivory into turquoise 'odontolite'. Structural and elemental characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiche, I.; Vignaud, C.; Menu, M.

    2000-10-01

    The present work deals with the structural and elemental analysis of turquoise mineral imitations as 'odontolite' or bone turquoise by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDX) and particle induced X-ray and γ-ray emission (PIXE-PIGE). The aim of the work is to evidence the former deliberate transformation of fossilised ivory by man in order to transform them into semi-precious stones. We show that the crystal structure of 'odontolite' artefacts consisting of fluorapatite (Ca 5(PO 4) 3F) corresponds to that of heated fossil mastodon ivory (12-15 million years old). Metallic traces detected by PIXE-PIGE in these 'odontolites' are discussed in order to explain their role for coloration. Other more greenish turquoise imitations have a bone-like structure and composition, and carbonate-hydroxylapatite. The presence of copper salts at the surface is responsible for their green coloration.

  11. Sickle cell trait in Ivory Coast athletic throw and jump champions, 1956-1995.

    PubMed

    Bilé, A; Le Gallais, D; Mercier, J; Bogui, P; Préfaut, C

    1998-04-01

    In order to assess the performance of subjects with sickle cell trait (SCT) during brief and explosive exercise involving mainly alactic anaerobic metabolism, the percentage of athletes with SCT was determined in Ivory Coast track and field throw and jump champions, both men and women, for the period 1956-1995. Thirty-four (27.8%) sickle cell trait carriers (SCTC) were identified among the 122 national champions that we were able to contact. These 34 SCTC had won 78 national titles (24.5%) and established 37 national records (43.5%), distributed among the throw and jump events. These percentages were significantly higher than the prevalence of SCT in the general Ivory Coast population (12.0%). The women's high jump and men's shot put events had the highest percentages of SCTC record holders (90.9% and 87.5%, respectively). Moreover, the two top national record holders and title winners, one man and one woman, were SCTC athletes, and their hemoglobin S percentage (HbS: 39.1% and 39.4%, respectively) and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) excluded an associated alpha-thalassemia. We conclude that the significantly higher percentage of SCTCs among Ivory Coast track and field champions, as compared to the percentage in the general population suggests that SCT may be a determinant factor for success in brief and explosive track and field events involving mainly alactic anaerobic metabolism.

  12. Rapidly increasing methyl mercury in endangered ivory gull (Pagophila eburnea) feathers over a 130 year record.

    PubMed

    Bond, Alexander L; Hobson, Keith A; Branfireun, Brian A

    2015-04-22

    Mercury (Hg) is increasing in marine food webs, especially at high latitudes. The bioaccumulation and biomagnification of methyl mercury (MeHg) has serious effects on wildlife, and is most evident in apex predators. The MeHg body burden in birds is the balance of ingestion and excretion, and MeHg in feathers is an effective indicator of overall MeHg burden. Ivory gulls (Pagophila eburnea), which consume ice-associated prey and scavenge marine mammal carcasses, have the highest egg Hg concentrations of any Arctic bird, and the species has declined by more than 80% since the 1980s in Canada. We used feathers from museum specimens from the Canadian Arctic and western Greenland to assess whether exposure to MeHg by ivory gulls increased from 1877 to 2007. Based on constant feather stable-isotope (δ(13)C, δ(15)N) values, there was no significant change in ivory gulls' diet over this period, but feather MeHg concentrations increased 45× (from 0.09 to 4.11 µg g(-1) in adults). This dramatic change in the absence of a dietary shift is clear evidence of the impact of anthropogenic Hg on this high-latitude threatened species. Bioavailable Hg is expected to increase in the Arctic, raising concern for continued population declines in high-latitude species that are far from sources of environmental contaminants.

  13. Rapidly increasing methyl mercury in endangered ivory gull (Pagophila eburnea) feathers over a 130 year record

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Alexander L.; Hobson, Keith A.; Branfireun, Brian A.

    2015-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is increasing in marine food webs, especially at high latitudes. The bioaccumulation and biomagnification of methyl mercury (MeHg) has serious effects on wildlife, and is most evident in apex predators. The MeHg body burden in birds is the balance of ingestion and excretion, and MeHg in feathers is an effective indicator of overall MeHg burden. Ivory gulls (Pagophila eburnea), which consume ice-associated prey and scavenge marine mammal carcasses, have the highest egg Hg concentrations of any Arctic bird, and the species has declined by more than 80% since the 1980s in Canada. We used feathers from museum specimens from the Canadian Arctic and western Greenland to assess whether exposure to MeHg by ivory gulls increased from 1877 to 2007. Based on constant feather stable-isotope (δ13C, δ15N) values, there was no significant change in ivory gulls' diet over this period, but feather MeHg concentrations increased 45× (from 0.09 to 4.11 µg g−1 in adults). This dramatic change in the absence of a dietary shift is clear evidence of the impact of anthropogenic Hg on this high-latitude threatened species. Bioavailable Hg is expected to increase in the Arctic, raising concern for continued population declines in high-latitude species that are far from sources of environmental contaminants. PMID:25788594

  14. A Sustainable Substitute for Ivory: the Jarina Seed from the Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Yinghao; Meyers A, Marc A.; Wang, Bin; Yang, Wen; Jung, Jae-Young; Coimbra, Carlos F. M.

    2015-01-01

    The dried endosperm of the seed of Phytelephas sp is widely used for artisanal work in the Amazon region due to its favorable mechanical properties and pleasant appearance that resemble elephant ivory. While the seeds have enjoyed popularity and limited use by selected industries (e.g., military uniform buttons and piano keys) and handicraft applications, little is known about the mechanical properties and structure of this sustainable material. This work is the first to characterize the dried Jarina endosperm and to investigate its functionality as a viable substitute for elephant ivory. Structural analysis of typical seeds reveals the prevalence of tubules that align in rings and radiate from the (usually hollow) core of the seed. This seed, in the absence of a reinforcement structure or mineral phase, possesses mechanical properties slightly inferior to elephant ivory and selected plastics, while retaining the visual appeal of a naturally occurring material. A synthetic structure inspired on the seed is created and suggestions for further development are discussed. PMID:26399626

  15. [Prevalence and risk factors for otomycosis treated in the hospital setting in Abidjan (Ivory Coast)].

    PubMed

    Yavo, W; Kassi, R R; Kiki-Barro, P C; Bamba, A; Kplé, T; Menan, E I; Ehouo, F; Koné, M

    2004-01-01

    Otomycosis is frequently encountered in tropical and subtropical zones. In Ivory Coast diagnosis of this disease is often based solely on the clinical symptoms. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence, predisposing factors, and etiologic agents associated with otomycosis at the Treichville University Hospital Center in Abidjan, Ivory Coast. Mycological examinations were performed on specimens obtained from 115 patients presenting with external otitis at the d'Oto-Rhino-Laryngology Department. Fungi-positive cultures were obtained in 49 patients for an overall otomycosis prevalence of 42.6 (95% Confidence Interval (CI), 34.4-52.2). Univariate analysis showed that the predisposing factors for otomycosis were frequent swimming in natural or artificial pools (Relative Risk (RR) 3.7; CI 1.7-8.1), daily ear cleaning (RR 3.5; CI 1.8-6.8) and excessive use of eardrops containing antibiotics and corticoids (RR = 9.3; IC95% = 4.3-20.1). The most common etiologic agents were Aspergillus flavus (20.4%), Candida albicans (16.3%), Candida parapsilosis (14.3%), and Aspergillus niger (12.2%). A combination of two agents was found in five cases. These data show that otomycosis is endemic in Ivory Coast. Management of otomycosis must include mycological examination for diagnosis as well as changing behavior patterns leading to infection.

  16. Living on the edge of a shrinking habitat: the ivory gull, Pagophila eburnea, an endangered sea-ice specialist.

    PubMed

    Gilg, Olivier; Istomina, Larysa; Heygster, Georg; Strøm, Hallvard; Gavrilo, Maria V; Mallory, Mark L; Gilchrist, Grant; Aebischer, Adrian; Sabard, Brigitte; Huntemann, Marcus; Mosbech, Anders; Yannic, Glenn

    2016-11-01

    The ongoing decline of sea ice threatens many Arctic taxa, including the ivory gull. Understanding how ice-edges and ice concentrations influence the distribution of the endangered ivory gulls is a prerequisite to the implementation of adequate conservation strategies. From 2007 to 2013, we used satellite transmitters to monitor the movements of 104 ivory gulls originating from Canada, Greenland, Svalbard-Norway and Russia. Although half of the positions were within 41 km of the ice-edge (75% within 100 km), approximately 80% were on relatively highly concentrated sea ice. Ivory gulls used more concentrated sea ice in summer, when close to their high-Arctic breeding ground, than in winter. The best model to explain the distance of the birds from the ice-edge included the ice concentration within approximately 10 km, the month and the distance to the colony. Given the strong links between ivory gull, ice-edge and ice concentration, its conservation status is unlikely to improve in the current context of sea-ice decline which, in turn, will allow anthropogenic activities to develop in regions that are particularly important for the species.

  17. Nondestructive discrimination of ivories and prediction of their specific gravity by Fourier-transform Raman spectroscopy and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Shimoyama, Masahiko; Ninomiya, Toshio; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2003-07-01

    Fourier-transform (FF) Raman spectroscopy and chemometrics were used for nondestructive analysis of ivories. The discrimination of five kinds of ivories, two subspecies of African elephant, mammoth, hippopotamus, and sperm whale, was investigated, and a calibration model for predicting their specific gravity was developed. FT-Raman spectra were measured in situ for them and chemometrics analyses were carried out for the 3050-350 cm(-1) region. The five kinds of ivories were clearly discriminated from each other on the scores plots of two or three principal components (PCs) obtained by principal component analysis (PCA). The loadings plot for PC 1 shows that the discrimination relies on the content ratio of organic collagenous protein and inorganic hydroxyapatite of ivories. The loadings plot for PC 2 shows that bands due to the CH3 and CH2 stretching modes of the protein also play a role in the discrimination. Using partial least squares regression (PLSR), we developed a calibration model that predicts the specific gravity of the ivories from the FT-Raman spectra. The correlation coefficient and root mean square error of cross validation (RMSECV) of this model were 0.980 and 0.024, respectively.

  18. The identification of elephant ivory evidences of illegal trade with mitochondrial cytochrome b gene and hypervariable D-loop region.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-jung; Lee, Yang-han; Moon, Seo-hyun; Kim, Nam-ye; Kim, Soon-hee; Yang, Moon-sik; Choi, Dong-ho; Han, Myun-soo

    2013-04-01

    DNA analysis of elephant ivory of illegal trade was handled in this work. The speciation and geographical origin of nine specimens of elephant ivory were requested by the police. Without national authorization, the suspect had purchased processed ivory seals from January to May, 2011 by Internet transactions from a site in a neighboring country. The DNA of decalcified ivory evidences was isolated with QIAGEN Micro Kit. The total 844-904 base pair sized sequences of mitochondrial cytochrome b and D-loop region could be acquired using direct sequencing analysis. They were compared with the sequences registered in GenBank. It was confirmed that most specimens were likely from African forest elephants (Loxodonta cyclotis), one from African savanna elephant (Loxodonta africana) and one from Asian elephant (Elephas maximus). Analysis of the mitochondrial hypervariable D-loop region sequence of elephants verified that one African savanna elephant might be from South Africa and one Asian elephant from Laos. Cytochrome b and D-loop region located in the mitochondrial DNA resulted in the successful determination of elephant DNA from nine processed ivory specimens.

  19. Shell Games.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Bill

    1982-01-01

    The author critiques the program design and educational aspects of the Shell Games, a program developed by Apple Computer, Inc., which can be used by the teacher to design objective tests for adaptation to specific assessment needs. (For related articles, see EC 142 959-962.) (Author)

  20. Vibration of Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leissa, A. W.

    1973-01-01

    The vibrational characteristics and mechanical properties of shell structures are discussed. The subjects presented are: (1) fundamental equations of thin shell theory, (2) characteristics of thin circular cylindrical shells, (3) complicating effects in circular cylindrical shells, (4) noncircular cylindrical shell properties, (5) characteristics of spherical shells, and (6) solution of three-dimensional equations of motion for cylinders.

  1. Building Atoms Shell by Shell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sussman, Beverly

    1993-01-01

    Describes an atom-building activity where students construct three-dimensional models of atoms using a styrofoam ball as the nucleus and pom-poms, gum drops, minimarshmallows, or other small items of two different colors to represent protons and neutrons attached. Rings of various sizes with pom-poms attached represent electron shells and…

  2. One-step synthesis of collagen hybrid gold nanoparticles and formation on Egyptian-like gold-plated archaeological ivory.

    PubMed

    Spadavecchia, Jolanda; Apchain, Emilande; Albéric, Marie; Fontan, Elisabeth; Reiche, Ina

    2014-08-04

    A one-step method is reported to synthesize hybrid gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) by reduction of HAuCl4 in acetic solution in the presence of collagen (Col), dicarboxylic acid-terminated polyethylene glycol (PEG), and cetyltetrammonium bromide (CTAB) mixed with hydoxyapatite (HAP) as surfactants. Such formation process of AuNPs was shown to be responsible for purple stains naturally formed on Egyptianizing archaeological gilded ivories from 8th BC Syria. The understanding of this formation mechanism, which most likely involves a step with hybrid AuNPs, allows the establishing of an authenticity marker of ancient gold-plated ivories.

  3. Shell worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Kenneth I.; Kennedy, Robert G., III; Fields, David E.

    2013-02-01

    The traditional concept of terraforming assumes ready availability of candidate planets with acceptable qualities: orbiting a star in its "Goldilocks zone", liquid water, enough mass, years longer than days, magnetic field, etc. But even stipulating affordable interstellar travel, we still might never find a good candidate elsewhere. Whatever we found likely would require centuries of heavy terraforming, just as Mars or Venus would here. Our increasing appreciation of the ubiquity of life suggests that any terra nova would already possess it. We would then face the dilemma of introducing alien life forms (us, our microbes) into another living world. Instead, we propose a novel method to create habitable environments for humanity by enclosing airless, sterile, otherwise useless planets, moons, and even large asteroids within engineered shells, which avoids the conundrum. These shells are subject to two opposing internal stresses: compression due to the primary's gravity, and tension from atmospheric pressure contained inside. By careful design, these two cancel each other resulting in zero net shell stress. Beneath the shell an Earth-like environment could be created similar in almost all respects to that of Home, except for gravity, regardless of the distance to the sun or other star. Englobing a small planet, moon, or even a dwarf planet like Ceres, would require astronomical amounts of material (quadrillions of tons) and energy, plus a great deal of time. It would be a quantum leap in difficulty over building Dyson Dots or industrializing our solar system, perhaps comparable to a mission across interstellar space with a living crew within their lifetime. But when accomplished, these constructs would be complete (albeit small) worlds, not merely large habitats. They could be stable across historic timescales, possibly geologic. Each would contain a full, self-sustaining ecology, which might evolve in curious directions over time. This has interesting implications

  4. Bone and ivory points in the Lower and Middle Paleolithic of Europe.

    PubMed

    Villa, P; d'Errico, F

    2001-08-01

    The existence of shaped bone and ivory points, to be used as awls or with wooden hafts, has been suggested for the Lower Paleolithic sites of Torralba and Ambrona and for several Middle Paleolithic sites, such as Vaufrey, Combe Grenal, Pech de l'Azé I and Camiac. The use of hafted bone and ivory points would imply a spear armature technology similar to that well documented in the Upper Paleolithic, often considered an innovation introduced to Europe by anatomically modern humans. The controversial ivory points from the two Spanish sites, whose fracture morphology is considered natural by G. Haynes (1991), have been reanalyzed, checking for putative traces of human manufacture and utilization as described by Howell & Freeman (1983), i.e., polish, flaking of stem, ground edges, striations from manufacture and contact with a haft or binding. We have been able to study 19 new proboscidean tusk tips from the ongoing Ambrona excavations by a Spanish team. For these and nine other Middle Paleolithic bone and antler points we use optical and SEM microscope analysis, taphonomic analysis, comparative observations of Upper Paleolithic bone points, experimental observations of manufacturing traces, modern tusk samples, and data on several bone and antler pseudo-points from carnivore accumulations. We show that none of the objects we have studied can be interpreted as an intentionally shaped point. The absence of hafted bone points in the Middle Paleolithic of Europe is contrasted with evidence of the use of hafted stone points since OIS 5 or earlier in Eurasia and Africa. We suggest that the absence of organic spear armatures in the Middle Paleolithic is not due to a deficiency in the technology of Neandertals but may be tied to the organizational strategies of the hunters and to patterns of game choice and capture.

  5. CONSERVATION. Genetic assignment of large seizures of elephant ivory reveals Africa's major poaching hotspots.

    PubMed

    Wasser, S K; Brown, L; Mailand, C; Mondol, S; Clark, W; Laurie, C; Weir, B S

    2015-07-03

    Poaching of elephants is now occurring at rates that threaten African populations with extinction. Identifying the number and location of Africa's major poaching hotspots may assist efforts to end poaching and facilitate recovery of elephant populations. We genetically assign origin to 28 large ivory seizures (≥0.5 metric tons) made between 1996 and 2014, also testing assignment accuracy. Results suggest that the major poaching hotspots in Africa may be currently concentrated in as few as two areas. Increasing law enforcement in these two hotspots could help curtail future elephant losses across Africa and disrupt this organized transnational crime.

  6. At home in the postcolony: Ecology, empire and domesticity at the Lamto field station, Ivory Coast.

    PubMed

    Lachenal, Guillaume

    2016-12-01

    This article is a history of the field station Lamto, in Ivory Coast, which was created by French ecologists in 1962, after independence. It retraces the origins, the logics and the contradictions of an extraordinarily ambitious scientific project, which aimed at the systematic, holistic, quantitative and multi-disciplinary description of a unit of African nature - the savannah ecosystem. It explores how knowledge-making was articulated with work hierarchies and postcolonial politics, lifestyles, values and affects. It reconstitutes the political ecology of a research station in ecology, following in its residences, laboratories and open-air experiments the co-production of domesticity, nature, science and (post-)colonial situations.

  7. Non-destructive analysis of the two subspecies of African elephants, mammoth, hippopotamus, and sperm whale ivories by visible and short-wave near infrared spectroscopy and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Shimoyama, Masahiko; Morimoto, Susumu; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2004-06-01

    Visible (VIS) and short-wave near infrared (SW-NIR) spectroscopy was used for non-destructive analysis of ivories. VIS-SW-NIR (500-1000 nm) spectra were measured in situ for five kinds of ivories, that is two subspecies of African elephants, mammoth, hippopotamus, and sperm whale. Chemometrics analyses were carried out for the spectral data from 500 to 1000 nm region. The five kinds of ivories were clearly discriminated from each other on the scores plot of two principal components (PCs) obtained by principal component analysis (PCA). It was noteworthy that the ivories of the two subspecies of African elephants were discriminated by the scores of PC 1. The loadings plot for PC 1 showed that the discrimination relies on the intensity changes in bands due to collagenous proteins and water interacting with proteins. It was found that the scores plot of PC 2 is useful to distinguish between the ivories of the two subspecies of African elephants and the other ivories. We also developed a calibration model that predicted the specific gravity of five kinds of ivories from their VIS-SW-NIR spectral data using partial least squares (PLS)-1 regression. The correlation coefficient and root mean square error of cross validation (RMSECV) of this model were 0.960 and 0.037, respectively.

  8. Circumpolar contamination in eggs of the high-Arctic ivory gull Pagophila eburnea.

    PubMed

    Lucia, Magali; Verboven, Nanette; Strøm, Hallvard; Miljeteig, Cecilie; Gavrilo, Maria V; Braune, Birgit M; Boertmann, David; Gabrielsen, Geir W

    2015-07-01

    The ivory gull Pagophila eburnea is a high-Arctic species threatened by climate change and contaminants. The objective of the present study was to assess spatial variation of contaminant levels (organochlorines [OCs], brominated flame retardants [BFRs], perfluorinated alkyl substances [PFASs], and mercury [Hg]) in ivory gulls breeding in different areas across the Arctic region as a baseline for potential future changes associated with climate change. Contaminants were already determined in eggs from Canada (Seymour Island; except PFASs), Svalbard in Norway (Svenskøya), and 3 sites in Russia (Nagurskoe, Cape Klyuv, and Domashny). New data from Greenland allowed the investigation of a possible longitudinal gradient of contamination. The most quantitatively abundant OCs were p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) and polychlorobiphenyls. Mercury concentrations were higher in Canada compared with other colonies. Eggs from Nagurskoe often were characterized by higher OC and BFR concentrations. Concentrations gradually decreased in colonies situated east of Nagurskoe. In contrast, PFAS concentrations, especially perfluorooctanoate and perfluorononanoate, were higher in Greenland. Some of the contaminants, especially Hg and p,p'-DDE, exceeded published thresholds known to disrupt the reproductive success of avian species. Overall, the levels of OCs, BFRs, and PFASs did not suggest direct lethal exposure to these compounds, but their potential synergetic/additive sublethal effects warrant monitoring.

  9. Assigning African elephant DNA to geographic region of origin: Applications to the ivory trade

    PubMed Central

    Wasser, Samuel K.; Shedlock, Andrew M.; Comstock, Kenine; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Mutayoba, Benezeth; Stephens, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    Resurgence of illicit trade in African elephant ivory is placing the elephant at renewed risk. Regulation of this trade could be vastly improved by the ability to verify the geographic origin of tusks. We address this need by developing a combined genetic and statistical method to determine the origin of poached ivory. Our statistical approach exploits a smoothing method to estimate geographic-specific allele frequencies over the entire African elephants' range for 16 microsatellite loci, using 315 tissue and 84 scat samples from forest (Loxodonta africana cyclotis) and savannah (Loxodonta africana africana) elephants at 28 locations. These geographic-specific allele frequency estimates are used to infer the geographic origin of DNA samples, such as could be obtained from tusks of unknown origin. We demonstrate that our method alleviates several problems associated with standard assignment methods in this context, and the absolute accuracy of our method is high. Continent-wide, 50% of samples were located within 500 km, and 80% within 932 km of their actual place of origin. Accuracy varied by region (median accuracies: West Africa, 135 km; Central Savannah, 286 km; Central Forest, 411 km; South, 535 km; and East, 697 km). In some cases, allele frequencies vary considerably over small geographic regions, making much finer discriminations possible and suggesting that resolution could be further improved by collection of samples from locations not represented in our study. PMID:15459317

  10. Assigning African elephant DNA to geographic region of origin: applications to the ivory trade.

    PubMed

    Wasser, Samuel K; Shedlock, Andrew M; Comstock, Kenine; Ostrander, Elaine A; Mutayoba, Benezeth; Stephens, Matthew

    2004-10-12

    Resurgence of illicit trade in African elephant ivory is placing the elephant at renewed risk. Regulation of this trade could be vastly improved by the ability to verify the geographic origin of tusks. We address this need by developing a combined genetic and statistical method to determine the origin of poached ivory. Our statistical approach exploits a smoothing method to estimate geographic-specific allele frequencies over the entire African elephants' range for 16 microsatellite loci, using 315 tissue and 84 scat samples from forest (Loxodonta africana cyclotis) and savannah (Loxodonta africana africana) elephants at 28 locations. These geographic-specific allele frequency estimates are used to infer the geographic origin of DNA samples, such as could be obtained from tusks of unknown origin. We demonstrate that our method alleviates several problems associated with standard assignment methods in this context, and the absolute accuracy of our method is high. Continent-wide, 50% of samples were located within 500 km, and 80% within 932 km of their actual place of origin. Accuracy varied by region (median accuracies: West Africa, 135 km; Central Savannah, 286 km; Central Forest, 411 km; South, 535 km; and East, 697 km). In some cases, allele frequencies vary considerably over small geographic regions, making much finer discriminations possible and suggesting that resolution could be further improved by collection of samples from locations not represented in our study.

  11. Serological survey of canine leptospirosis in three countries of tropical Africa: Sudan, Gabon and Ivory Coast.

    PubMed

    Roqueplo, Cédric; Marié, Jean-Lou; André-Fontaine, Geneviève; Kodjo, Angeli; Davoust, Bernard

    2015-02-01

    A cross-sectional survey was conducted to estimate the presence of leptospiral antibodies among 475 dogs from three countries of tropical Africa: Sudan (n=62), Gabon (n=255) and Ivory Coast (n=158). Sixteen reference strains belonging to seven serogroups were used as antigen in the microscopic agglutination test. Overall, considering titres ≥1:40, 453 samples were positive towards one or several serovars of pathogenic leptospires. Focusing on high titres, i.e. ≥1:320, the seroprevalence was 40.8%. In Gabon, the seroprevalence was higher in rural areas than in an urban environment (p<0.001). In Ivory Coast, the seroprevalence for serogroups Icterohaemorrhagiae and Canicola was not statistically different according to the vaccinal status. Predominant serogroups varied according to the countries but Grippotyphosa and Sejroë were the most common, while Icterohaemorragiae and Canicola were dominant in Sudan. In these three countries, dogs are heavily exposed to pathogenic Leptospira and humans living in the same environment are also at risk of infection.

  12. How Much Ivory Does This Tower Need? What We Spend on, and Get from, Higher Education. Policy Analysis. No. 686

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCluskey, Neal

    2011-01-01

    It is commonly asserted, especially by people within higher education, that the American Ivory Tower is strapped for cash and tightfisted taxpayers are to blame. Taxpayer support for postsecondary education has long been in decline, this narrative goes, and has forced schools to continually raise tuition to make up for the losses. Tallying…

  13. L'Enonce Toura-Cote d'Ivoire (The Spoken Language of Toura-Ivory Coast).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bearth, Thomas

    The spoken language of Toura, a language spoken by nearly 20,000 inhabitants of a mountainous region situated in the north of Man, the administrative center of the West Ivory Coast, is systematically analyzed in this linguistic study. Sixteen major chapters include: (1) grammatical generalizations, (2) phonemic unities, (3) classification of…

  14. The Case of the Ivory-Billed Woodpecker: The Scientific Process and How It Relates to Everyday Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanger-Hall, Kathrin; Merriam, Jennifer; Greuling, Ruth Ann

    2007-01-01

    In this case study, based on the reported rediscovery of the Ivory-billed Woodpecker in April 2005, students examine a real-world example of the scientific process and explore the practical implications of their conclusions. The case tells the story of Brad Murky, a student and research assistant who must decide whether the available evidence is…

  15. NIF Double Shell outer-shell experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, E. C.; Montgomery, D. S.; Kline, J. L.; Daughton, W. S.; Wilson, D. C.; Dodd, E. S.; Renner, D. B.; Cardenas, T.; Batha, S. H.

    2016-10-01

    At the core of the Double Shell concept is the kinetic energy transfer from the outer shell to the inner shell via collision. This collision sets both the implosion shape of the inner shell, from imprinting of the shape of the outer shell, as well as the maximum energy available to compress the DT fuel. Therefore, it is crucial to be able to control the time-dependent shape of the outer shell, such that the outer shell is nominally round at the collision time. We present the experiment results from our sub-scale ( 1 MJ) NIF outer-shell only shape tuning campaign, where we vary shape by changing a turn-on time delay between the same pulse shape on the inner and outer cone beams. This type of shape tuning is unique to this platform and only possible since the Double Shell design uses a single-shock drive (4.5 ns reverse ramp pulse). The outer-shell only targets used a 5.75 mm diameter standard near-vacuum NIF hohlraum with 0.032 mg/cc He gas fill, and a Be capsule with 0.4% uniform Cu dopant, with 242 um thick ablator. We also present results from a third outer-shell only shot used to measure shell trajectory, which is critical in determining the shell impact time. This work conducted under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LANL under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  16. Relation between the Macroscopic Pattern of Elephant Ivory and Its Three-Dimensional Micro-Tubular Network

    PubMed Central

    Albéric, Marie; Dean, Mason N.; Gourrier, Aurélien; Wagermaier, Wolfgang; Dunlop, John W. C.; Staude, Andreas; Fratzl, Peter; Reiche, Ina

    2017-01-01

    Macroscopic, periodic, dark and bright patterns are observed on sections of elephant tusk, in the dentin part (ivory). The motifs—also called Schreger pattern—vary depending on the orientation in the tusk: on sections perpendicular to the tusk axis, a checkerboard pattern is present whereas on sections longitudinal to it, alternating stripes are observed. This pattern has been used to identify elephant and mammoth ivory in archeological artifacts and informs on the continuous tissue growth mechanisms of tusk. However, its origin, assumed to be related to the 3D structure of empty microtubules surrounded by the ivory matrix has yet to be characterized unequivocally. Based on 2D observations of the ivory microtubules by means of a variety of imaging techniques of three different planes (transverse, longitudinal and tangential to the tusk axis), we show that the dark areas of the macroscopic pattern are due to tubules oblique to the surface whereas bright areas are related to tubules parallel to it. The different microstructures observed in the three planes as well as the 3D data obtained by SR-μCT analysis allow us to propose a 3D model of the microtubule network with helical tubules phase-shifted in the tangential direction. The phase shift is a combination of a continuous phase shift of π every 1 mm with a stepwise phase shift of π/2 every 500 μm. By using 3D modeling, we show how the 3D helical model better represents the experimental microstructure observed in 2D planes compared to previous models in the literature. This brings new information on the origin of the unique Schreger pattern of elephant ivory, crucial for better understanding how archaeological objects were processed and for opening new routes to rethink how biological materials are built. PMID:28125603

  17. [Malaria in military personnel: the case of the Ivory Coast in 2002-2003].

    PubMed

    Migliani, R; Josse, R; Hovette, P; Keundjian, A; Pages, F; Meynard, J-B; Ollivier, L; Sbai Idrissi, K; Tifratene, K; Orlandi, E; Rogier, C; Boutin, J-P

    2003-01-01

    French troops were sent to the Ivory Coast on September 22, 2002 within the framework of Operation Unicorn in response to the political unrest. From September 22 to October 20, a total of 37 cases of malaria were reported, i.e., 35.7 cases per 1000 man-months. As of October 11, the central headquarters of the Armed Services Health Corps decided to use doxycycline as the exclusive agent for drug prophylaxis in military personnel on duty in the Ivory Coast and to enhance vector control measures. The incidence of malaria decreased to 2 cases per 1000 man-months at the sixth month. A recrudescence of malaria to 15 cases per 1000 man-months was observed with the rainy season in April. During this period one person presenting severe malaria with coma required emergency evacuation to France. In May 2003, several studies were undertaken to determine the factors that caused this recrudescence. These studies included surveys to evaluate awareness concerning malaria and monitor compliance with drug prophylaxis and tolerance of doxycycline, a case-control study to identify factors related to malarious episodes and an entomological study. Awareness of malaria was high with 75% of the 477 respondents stating that malaria could be transmitted by single mosquito bite. The case-control study showed a correlation between occurrence of malarious bouts and non-compliance with drug prophylaxis (p < 10(-5)). The odds-ratio was 3.05 (95% confidence interval, 1.52-6.14) for subjects claiming zero to one incident of non-compliance per week and 7.51 (IC95%, 3.24-17.40) for those claiming more than one incident of non-compliance per week. Tolerance of doxycyline was good since 72% of respondents reported no adverse effects. The main vector was Anopheles gambiae. The number of bites per man per night ranged from 25 to 2 and the number of infected bites ranged from 2 to 3 per week. Treatment was initiated promptly using quinine at a total dose of 25 mg/kg in 3 daily doses for 7 days by the

  18. Trace Element Concentrations in Relation to the Trophic Behaviour of Endangered Ivory Gulls (Pagophila eburnea) During Their Stay at a Breeding Site in Svalbard.

    PubMed

    Lucia, Magali; Strøm, Hallvard; Bustamante, Paco; Gabrielsen, Geir W

    2016-11-01

    The ivory gull is a high-Arctic species considered endangered in most parts of its breeding range. Ivory gulls must cope with both the reduction of sea ice cover triggered by climate change and increasing contaminant loads due to changes in global contaminant pathways. The objective of this study was to assess the concentration of 14 essential and nonessential trace elements at four colonies of ivory gulls breeding on Barentsøya, Svalbard, and the relationship between contaminant exposure and the diet of individuals. Contaminants and stable isotopes (δ(15)N, δ(13)C) were determined in blood (red blood cells and whole blood), and feathers of ivory gulls collected over several years. The most quantitatively abundant nonessential trace element found in the ivory gull was mercury (Hg). Selenium (Se) was present in substantial surplus compared with Hg, which would imply relative protection against Hg toxic effects but raises concern about Se potential toxicity. Moreover, other elements were detected, such as silver, arsenic, cadmium, and lead, which would warrant monitoring because of the potential additive/synergetic effects of these compounds. This study demonstrated individual differences in trophic behaviour that triggered discrepancies in Hg concentrations, highlighting the potential biomagnifying ability of this metal in the ivory gull's food web. Results highlighted the mixing of birds coming from different geographical areas on Barentsøya.

  19. Anhemialges suteui n. sp. (Astigmata: Analgidae) from Hylia prasina (Cassin) (Passeriformes, Macrosphenidae) in Ivory Coast.

    PubMed

    Constantinescu, Ioana Cristina; Chişamera, Gabriel Bogdan; Yao, Patrick Kouassi; Hilare, Yaokokore-Béibro; Adam, Costică; D'Amico, Gianluca; Gherman, Călin M; Mihalca, Andrei D; Sándor, Attila D

    2016-10-01

    Anhemialges suteui n. sp. (Astigmata: Analgidae: Analginae) is described from the green hylia Hylia prasina (Cassin) (Passeriformes, Macrosphenidae) in Ivory Coast. The new species differs from the closest species, Anhemialges mironovi Kolarova, 2010, by the following features: in both sexes, solenidion σ on genu II is modified and widened in a form of leaf; dorsal setae c2, d2 and e2 are longer; and sternum and epimerites II are thinner. In males of the new species ambulacral discs of legs IV extend beyond the level of the lobar apices; in females, dorsal setae c2, d2 and e2 are situated on small oval shields and the anterior margin of epigynum exceeds the level of mesal extremities of epimerites II.

  20. Allele and haplotype diversity of X-chromosomal STRs in Ivory Coast.

    PubMed

    Pasino, Serena; Caratti, Stefano; Del Pero, Massimiliano; Santovito, Alfredo; Torre, Carlo; Robino, Carlo

    2011-09-01

    Twenty-one X-chromosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci, including the six clusters of linked markers DXS10148-DXS10135-DXS8378 (Xp22), DXS7132-DXS10079-DXS10074 (Xq12), DXS6801-DXS6809-DXS6789 (Xq21), DXS7424-DXS101 (Xq22), DXS10103-HPRTB-DXS10101 (Xq26), DXS8377-DXS10146-DXS10134-DXS7423 (Xq28) and the loci DXS6800, GATA172D05 and DXS10011 were typed in a population sample from Ivory Coast (n=125; 51 men and 74 women). Allele and haplotype frequencies as well as linkage disequilibrium data for kinship calculations are provided. On the whole, no significant differences in the genetic variability of X-STR markers were observed between Ivorians and other sub-Saharan African populations belonging to the Niger-Kordofanian linguistic group.

  1. Acceptability of tetanus toxoid vaccine by pregnant women in two health centres in Abidjan (Ivory Coast).

    PubMed

    Ymba, Awa; Perrey, Christophe

    2003-07-28

    A study was conducted in two health centres in Abidjan, Ivory Coast (Abobo and Port Bouet) to compare the knowledge of pregnant women regarding tetanus and hepatitis B and to evaluate the acceptability of tetanus immunisation. A total of 124 women were interviewed. In spite of Information Education Communication (IEC) meetings held by midwives focusing on both diseases, knowledge about tetanus appeared to be substantially higher than that about hepatitis B. The acceptability of tetanus toxoid vaccine was good, the only barrier being the fear of useless injections. However, the risk of tetanus transmission during delivery should be better explained to women, who often give birth at home in the presence of traditional birth assistants. The awareness of men should also be raised by information campaigns, using different local networks.

  2. [The epidemiological profile of subjects exposed to rabies in Abidjan, Ivory Coast].

    PubMed

    Tiembré, Issaka; Vroh Benié Bi, Joseph; N'Cho Dagnan, Simplice; Kouadio Ekra, Daniel; Zebe, Sonia; Tagliante-Saracino, Janine

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the epidemiological profile of subjects exposed to rabies in the anti-rabies center of Abidjan in Ivory Coast. The paper is based on a cross-sectional study conducted among all people exposed to the risk of rabies and followed in the anti-rabies center from January to December 2008. During the study period, 2,673 subjects were exposed, i.e. 5 exposures for every 10,000 persons. 1,534 patients (57.4%) were male. The most exposed age groups were the 0-9 and 10-19 age groups (22.4% and 29.5% respectively). In Abidjan, 608 individuals (22.7%) were exposed in Cocody, 471 individuals (17.6%) in Abobo, and 310 individuals (11.6%) in Yopougon. Exposure occurred in 76.9% of cases (2,055 subjects) at home and exclusively concerned visitors of the family. Exposures by animal bites represented 88.1% (2,354 subjects) of all cases, while 23.2% (620 subjects) of exposures were category III. The average period between exposure and consultation was 10 days. Subjects were exposed as a result of contact with a dog in 92.1 % of cases (2,462 subjects). The animal was found alive in 74.9% (2,002 cases) and was not immunized in 87.2% of cases (2,331). Post-exposure prophylaxis was given up by 1,470 persons (55.2%). 13 subjects were received at the stage of clinical rabies. Increased knowledge of the epidemiological profile of rabies exposure will contribute to improving the management of the disease in Ivory Coast.

  3. Origins and dispersal of the mitochondrial DNA region V 9 bp deletion and insertion in Nigeria and the Ivory Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Merriwether, D.A.; Huston, S.L.; Bunker, C.A.

    1994-09-01

    An intergenic region V Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) 9 bp deletion located between the genes for tRNA{sup LYS} and cytochrome oxidase II was discovered in a small percentage of Nigerian and Ivory Coast natives. Previously this deletion has been described as Asian-specific and has been reported throughout the New World, Asia, S.E. Asia, and the Pacific Islands at frequencies ranging from 0% to 100%. In the New World and the Pacific Islands, the deletion is almost always accompanied by an Hae III restriction site gain at nt 16517. All 9 occurrences of the deletion observed in Africa (from four different populations) co-occur with the Hae III 16517 site gain, indicating that the African deletion probably shares a common origin with the deletion described as {open_quotes}Asian-specific{close_quotes}. The deletion was found in Benin and Sokoto, Nigeria in 2/54 Edo Bini, 1/2 Edo Ishan, 3/99 Hausa, 0/18 Fulani, and 0/16 other Nigerians. The deletion was also detected in 3/115 Ivory Coast natives from Abidjan. A 9 bp insertion (triplication) was observed in 1/115 Ivory Coast natives. The triplicated individual also possessed the Hae III 16517 site gain. The fragment containing the African deletion was sequenced and found to be identical in sequence to the Asian deletion region. D-loop sequence of nts 15975 to 00048 revealed that 2 of the 3 Ivory Coast deleted individuals and 1 of the 6 Nigerians deleted (Hausa) had a T-C transition at nt position 16189 which is common in New World-deleted individuals. These results raise the possibility that the occurrence of this deletion predates the separation of Asian and African populations from a common ancestral populations, or that the deletion has occurred more than once in human evolution. Either explanation requires that caution be exercised when using the 9 bp deletion as a population marker.

  4. Astronomy and Chronology - Babylonia, Assyria, and Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Rolf

    Astronomical chronology is the dating of historical events that are linked to astronomical observation. Its prerequisite is an uninterrupted and precisely known calendar in which the observations are expressed. It rests on an interplay of astronomy and relative chronology which requires more discussion than astronomy does. If relative chronology allows for a large interval for an event, then the periodic repetition of astronomical phenomena will prevent the singling out of a specific year. The astronomically datable events which are studied here refer to lunar and solar eclipses and last and first visibilities of Venus in Mesopotamian sources, and to lunar observations and Sirius risings in Egyptian sources.

  5. Multiple shells in IRC+10216: shell properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauron, N.; Huggins, P. J.

    2000-07-01

    We report on the properties of the multiple shells in the circumstellar envelope of IRC+10216, using deep optical imaging, including data from the Hubble Space Telescope. The intensity profiles confirm the presence of thin ( ~ 0farcs5 -3'' ec), limb-brightened shells in the envelope, seen in stellar and ambient Galactic light scattered by dust. The shells are spaced at irregular intervals of ~ 5'' ec-20'' ec, corresponding to time scales of 200-800 yr, although intervals as short as ~ 1'' ec (40 yr) are seen close to the star. The location of the main shells shows a good correlation with high-resolution, molecular line maps of the inner envelope, indicating that the dust and gas are well coupled. The shell/intershell density contrast is typically ~ 3, and we find that the shells form the dominant mass component of the circumstellar envelope. The shells exhibit important evolutionary effects: the thickness increases with increasing radius, with an effective dispersion velocity of 0.7 km s-1 and there is evidence for shell interactions. Despite the presence of bipolar structure close to the star, the global shell pattern favors a roughly isotropic, episodic mass loss mechanism, with a range of time scales. Based on observations made with the Canada-France-Hawaii telescope, operated by CNRS, NRCC and UH, and on dearchived observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, operated by AURA Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555

  6. Mapping the Elephants of the 19th Century East African Ivory Trade with a Multi-Isotope Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lee-Thorp, Julia; Collins, Matthew J.; Lane, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    East African elephants have been hunted for their ivory for millennia but the nineteenth century witnessed strongly escalating demand from Europe and North America. It has been suggested that one consequence was that by the 1880s elephant herds along the coast had become scarce, and to meet demand, trade caravans trekked farther into interior regions of East Africa, extending the extraction frontier. The steady decimation of elephant populations coupled with the extension of trade networks have also been claimed to have triggered significant ecological and socio-economic changes that left lasting legacies across the region. To explore the feasibility of using an isotopic approach to uncover a ‘moving frontier’ of elephant extraction, we constructed a baseline isotope data set (δ13C, δ15N, δ18O and 87Sr/86Sr) for historic East African elephants known to have come from three distinct regions (coastal, Rift Valley, and inland Lakes). Using the isotope results with other climate data and geographical mapping tools, it was possible to characterise elephants from different habitats across the region. This baseline data set was then used to provenance elephant ivory of unknown geographical provenance that was exported from East Africa during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries to determine its likely origin. This produced a better understanding of historic elephant geography in the region, and the data have the potential to be used to provenance older archaeological ivories, and to inform contemporary elephant conservation strategies. PMID:27760152

  7. Mapping the Elephants of the 19th Century East African Ivory Trade with a Multi-Isotope Approach.

    PubMed

    Coutu, Ashley N; Lee-Thorp, Julia; Collins, Matthew J; Lane, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    East African elephants have been hunted for their ivory for millennia but the nineteenth century witnessed strongly escalating demand from Europe and North America. It has been suggested that one consequence was that by the 1880s elephant herds along the coast had become scarce, and to meet demand, trade caravans trekked farther into interior regions of East Africa, extending the extraction frontier. The steady decimation of elephant populations coupled with the extension of trade networks have also been claimed to have triggered significant ecological and socio-economic changes that left lasting legacies across the region. To explore the feasibility of using an isotopic approach to uncover a 'moving frontier' of elephant extraction, we constructed a baseline isotope data set (δ13C, δ15N, δ18O and 87Sr/86Sr) for historic East African elephants known to have come from three distinct regions (coastal, Rift Valley, and inland Lakes). Using the isotope results with other climate data and geographical mapping tools, it was possible to characterise elephants from different habitats across the region. This baseline data set was then used to provenance elephant ivory of unknown geographical provenance that was exported from East Africa during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries to determine its likely origin. This produced a better understanding of historic elephant geography in the region, and the data have the potential to be used to provenance older archaeological ivories, and to inform contemporary elephant conservation strategies.

  8. Classification Shell Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Etzold, Carol

    1983-01-01

    Discusses shell classification exercises. Through keying students advanced from the "I know what a shell looks like" stage to become involved in the classification process: observing, labeling, making decisions about categories, and identifying marine animals. (Author/JN)

  9. Infrasound from lightning measured in Ivory Coast from 2004 to 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farges, Thomas; Le Pichon, Alexis; Ceranna, Lars; Diawara, Adama

    2016-04-01

    It is well established that more than 2,000 thunderstorms occur continuously around the world and that about 45 lightning flashes are produced per second over the globe. 80 % of the infrasound stations of the International Monitoring System (IMS) of the CTBTO (Comprehensive nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organisation) are now certified and routinely measure signals due to natural activity (e.g., airflow over mountains, aurora, microbaroms, surf, volcanoes, severe weather including lightning flashes …). Some of the IMS stations are located where lightning activity is high (e.g. Africa, South America). These infrasound stations are well localised to study lightning flash activity and its disparity, which is a good proxy for global warming. Progress in infrasound array data processing over the past ten years makes such lightning studies possible. Assink et al. (2008) and Farges and Blanc (2010) show clearly that it is possible to measure lightning infrasound from thunderstorms within 300 km. One-to-one correlation is possible when the thunderstorm is within about 75 km from the station. When the lightning flash occurs within 20 km, it is also possible to rebuild the 3D geometry of the discharges when the network size is less than 100 m (Arechiga et al., 2011; Gallin, 2014). An IMS infrasound station has been installed in Ivory Coast since 2002. The lightning rate of this region is 10-20 flashes/km²/year from space-based instrument OTD (Christian et al., 2003). Ivory Coast is therefore a good place to study infrasound data associated with lightning activity and its temporal variation. First statistical results will be presented in this paper based on 10 years of data (2005-2014). Correlation between infrasound having a mean frequency higher than 1 Hz and lightning flashes detected by the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) is systematically looked for. One-to-one correlation is obtained for flashes occurring within about 100 km. An exponential decrease of the

  10. Phenetic and genetic structure of tsetse fly populations (Glossina palpalis palpalis) in southern Ivory Coast

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sleeping sickness, transmitted by G. p. palpalis, is known to be present in the Ivory Coast. G. p. palpalis has recently been reported to occur in several places within the town of Abidjan, including: (i) the Banco forest, (ii) the Abobo Adjamé University campus and (iii) the zoological park. Could these three places be treated sequentially, as separate tsetse populations, or should they be taken as one area comprising a single, panmictic population? Methods The amount of gene flow between these places provides strategic information for vector control. It was estimated by the use of both microsatellite DNA and morphometric markers. The idea was to assess the interest of the faster and much less expensive morphometric approach in providing relevant information about population structure. Thus, to detect possible lack of insect exchange between these neighbouring areas of Abidjan, we used both genetic (microsatellite DNA) and phenetic (geometric morphometrics) markers on the same specimens. Using these same markers, we also compared these samples with specimens from a more distant area of south Ivory Coast, the region of Aniassué (186 km north from Abidjan). Results Neither genetic nor phenetic markers detected significant differentiation between the three Abidjan G. p. palpalis samples. Thus, the null hypothesis of a single panmictic population within the city of Abidjan could not be rejected, suggesting the control strategy should not consider them separately. The markers were also in agreement when comparing G. p. palpalis from Abidjan with those of Aniassué, showing significant divergence between the two sites. Conclusions Both markers suggested that a successful control of tsetse in Abidjan would require the three Abidjan sites to be considered together, either by deploying control measures simultaneously in all three sites, or by a continuous progression of interventions following for instance the "rolling carpet" principle. To compare the

  11. Video analysis of the escape flight of Pileated Woodpecker Dryocopus pileatus: does the Ivory-billed Woodpecker Campephilus principalis persist in continental North America?

    PubMed Central

    Collinson, J Martin

    2007-01-01

    Background The apparent rediscovery of the Ivory-billed Woodpecker Campephilus principalis in Arkansas, USA, previously feared extinct, was supported by video evidence of a single bird in flight (Fitzpatrick et al, Science 2005, 308:1460–1462). Plumage patterns and wingbeat frequency of the putative Ivory-billed Woodpecker were said to be incompatible with the only possible confusion species native to the area, the Pileated Woodpecker Dryocopus pileatus. Results New video analysis of Pileated Woodpeckers in escape flights comparable to that of the putative Ivory-billed Woodpecker filmed in Arkansas shows that Pileated Woodpeckers can display a wingbeat frequency equivalent to that of the Arkansas bird during escape flight. The critical frames from the Arkansas video that were used to identify the bird as an Ivory-billed Woodpecker are shown to be equally, or more, compatible with the Pileated Woodpecker. Conclusion The identification of the bird filmed in Arkansas in April 2004 as an Ivory-billed Woodpecker is best regarded as unsafe. The similarities between the Arkansas bird and known Pileated Woodpeckers suggest that it was most likely a Pileated Woodpecker. PMID:17362504

  12. The retrieval of fingerprint friction ridge detail from elephant ivory using reduced-scale magnetic and non-magnetic powdering materials.

    PubMed

    Weston-Ford, Kelly A; Moseley, Mark L; Hall, Lisa J; Marsh, Nicholas P; Morgan, Ruth M; Barron, Leon P

    2016-01-01

    An evaluation of reduced-size particle powdering methods for the recovery of usable fingermark ridge detail from elephant ivory is presented herein for the first time as a practical and cost-effective tool in forensic analysis. Of two reduced-size powder material types tested, powders with particle sizes ≤ 40 μm offered better chances of recovering ridge detail from unpolished ivory in comparison to a conventional powder material. The quality of developed ridge detail of these powders was also assessed for comparison and automated search suitability. Powder materials and the enhanced ridge detail on ivory were analysed by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and interactions between their constituents and the ivory discussed. The effect of ageing on the quality of ridge detail recovered showed that the best quality was obtained within 1 week. However, some ridge detail could still be developed up to 28 days after deposition. Cyanoacrylate and fluorescently-labelled cyanoacrylate fuming of ridge detail on ivory was explored and was less effective than reduced-scale powdering in general. This research contributes to the understanding and potential application of smaller scale powdering materials for the development of ridge detail on hard, semi-porous biological material typically seized in wildlife-related crimes.

  13. African elephants show high levels of interest in the skulls and ivory of their own species.

    PubMed

    McComb, Karen; Baker, Lucy; Moss, Cynthia

    2006-03-22

    An important area of biology involves investigating the origins in animals of traits that are thought of as uniquely human. One way that humans appear unique is in the importance they attach to the dead bodies of other humans, particularly those of their close kin, and the rituals that they have developed for burying them. In contrast, most animals appear to show only limited interest in the carcasses or associated remains of dead individuals of their own species. African elephants (Loxodonta africana) are unusual in that they not only give dramatic reactions to the dead bodies of other elephants, but are also reported to systematically investigate elephant bones and tusks that they encounter, and it has sometimes been suggested that they visit the bones of relatives. Here, we use systematic presentations of object arrays to demonstrate that African elephants show higher levels of interest in elephant skulls and ivory than in natural objects or the skulls of other large terrestrial mammals. However, they do not appear to specifically select the skulls of their own relatives for investigation so that visits to dead relatives probably result from a more general attraction to elephant remains.

  14. Regulation of business activities of petroleum contractors in Cameroon, Congo, Gabon, and Ivory Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Frilet, M.; Newman, J.

    1982-03-01

    Foreign companies engaging in business in Cameroon, Congo, Gabon, and Ivory Coast are subject to a broad range of regulations. This article deals only with those aspects of the regulations that are most important to petroleum contractors intending to engage in business in these countries. The regulator scheme actually applicable in a given case will depend on the legal structure through which a corporation operates. An American corporation may envisage engaging in business on a long-term basis through a local subsidiary or branch. On the other hand, it may wish only to perform temporary activities pursuant to one or more fixed-duration contracts with petroleum companies operating in one of countries. Each of these situations is dealt with. Common features of each area of regulation were described and the differences in regulations were presented. These topics were included: exchange control regulation, corporate forms of business association, authorization to engage in business, requirement of government or local participation in capital, investment code incentives, labor law requirements, taxation of corporations, taxation of profits, taxation of income from movable capital, taxation of amounts paid abroad as technical assistance fees, royalties and similar compensation, turnover taxes, payroll taxes, taxation of business performed without forming a local company or branch, taxation of employees and Social Security contributions. (DP)

  15. Mapping Potential Ivory Billed Woodpecker Habitat using Lidar and Hyperspectral Data Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swatantran, A.; Dubayah, R.; Hofton, M.; Blair, J. B.; Handley, L.

    2008-12-01

    Multisensor fusion is a powerful approach towards characterizing forest structure for effective management of wildlife habitats. The rediscovery of the Ivory Billed Woodpecker in 2005 reinforced the need to map and conserve suitable habitat for the previously thought extinct bird. In this study we fused waveform lidar and hyperspectral data to map potential habitat for the woodpecker along the Lower Mississippi Valley of Arkansas. Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) data was processed to produce high-resolution forest structure maps. We used multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis (MESMA) to map stressed and dead vegetation from the Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data. LVIS and AVIRIS maps were fused to identify habitat hot-spots based on historical records of habitat preferences of the bird. Results indicate several small hotspots in the bottomland hardwood forests, but very few large and continuous patches qualify as potential woodpecker habitat. Results from this study are expected to aid search efforts for the woodpecker and also provide useful insights into lidar fusion for large scale habitat mapping.

  16. Shell Worlds: The Question of Shell Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, K. L.; Kennedy, R. G., III; Fields, D. E.

    The initial idea of shell worlds was first proposed in the January 2009 edition of JBIS. In that paper the stability of the shell around a central world was not discussed at any length except to say that it was stable due to forces induced by gravity. This paper demonstrates in a qualitative and quantitative manner that a material shell supported by atmospheric pressure around a moon or small planet is indeed stable and does not require active measures to remain centered, provided that the central body is large enough. The minimal size of the central body to provide this stability is discussed.

  17. Fluctuating shells under pressure

    PubMed Central

    Paulose, Jayson; Vliegenthart, Gerard A.; Gompper, Gerhard; Nelson, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal fluctuations strongly modify the large length-scale elastic behavior of cross-linked membranes, giving rise to scale-dependent elastic moduli. Whereas thermal effects in flat membranes are well understood, many natural and artificial microstructures are modeled as thin elastic shells. Shells are distinguished from flat membranes by their nonzero curvature, which provides a size-dependent coupling between the in-plane stretching modes and the out-of-plane undulations. In addition, a shell can support a pressure difference between its interior and its exterior. Little is known about the effect of thermal fluctuations on the elastic properties of shells. Here, we study the statistical mechanics of shape fluctuations in a pressurized spherical shell, using perturbation theory and Monte Carlo computer simulations, explicitly including the effects of curvature and an inward pressure. We predict novel properties of fluctuating thin shells under point indentations and pressure-induced deformations. The contribution due to thermal fluctuations increases with increasing ratio of shell radius to thickness and dominates the response when the product of this ratio and the thermal energy becomes large compared with the bending rigidity of the shell. Thermal effects are enhanced when a large uniform inward pressure acts on the shell and diverge as this pressure approaches the classical buckling transition of the shell. Our results are relevant for the elasticity and osmotic collapse of microcapsules. PMID:23150558

  18. Multiple shell fusion targets

    DOEpatents

    Lindl, J.D.; Bangerter, R.O.

    1975-10-31

    Multiple shell fusion targets for use with electron beam and ion beam implosion systems are described. The multiple shell targets are of the low-power type and use a separate relatively low Z, low density ablator at large radius for the outer shell, which reduces the focusing and power requirements of the implosion system while maintaining reasonable aspect ratios. The targets use a high Z, high density pusher shell placed at a much smaller radius in order to obtain an aspect ratio small enough to protect against fluid instability. Velocity multiplication between these shells further lowers the power requirements. Careful tuning of the power profile and intershell density results in a low entropy implosion which allows breakeven at low powers. For example, with ion beams as a power source, breakeven at 10-20 Terrawatts with 10 MeV alpha particles for imploding a multiple shell target can be accomplished.

  19. Pharmaceutical interventions in the management of tuberculosis in a pneumophtisiology department, Ivory Coast

    PubMed Central

    Abrogoua, Danho Pascal; Kamenan, Boua Alexis Thierry; Ahui, Brou Jean Marcel; Doffou, Elisée

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aims to analyze the profile and relevance of pharmaceutical interventions (PIs) in the management of tuberculosis (TB) at inpatient settings. Patients and methods Cross-sectional descriptive study conducted from March to December 2014 within the inpatient unit of pneumophtisiology department, Ivory Coast. Information collected was based on the classification of drug-related problems (DRPs) and PIs outlined by the French Society of Clinical Pharmacy. A score was assigned to each PI according to the importance of the potential clinical impact. This score was correlated with the severity of clinical consequences avoided by the intervention. The listing of interventions was made by pneumophtisiology specialists. The score assigned to each intervention ranged from 0 (without clinical impact) to 3 (vital clinical impact). The acceptance rate of interventions by physicians was evaluated. Results Of 130 patients, 28.5% received PIs. The main reasons for interventions were drug–drug interactions (26.4%), noncompliance with recommendations (24.5%), and adverse effects (24.5%). Antituberculosis drugs were involved in 40.3% of DRPs. Interventions were predominantly proposals for monitoring treatment effectiveness and safety parameters (52.7%) followed by proposals of therapeutic choice (28.1%). All interventions were accepted by the physicians. Most interventions (59.6%) were listed as interventions with significant clinical impact. Conclusion The presence of a pharmacist at inpatient setting has contributed to the prevention and resolution of problems related to the pharmacotherapeutic management of TB. Pharmacists can position themselves as major players in the therapeutic management of TB inpatient in resource-limited setting. PMID:27920544

  20. Fluid dipping technology of chimpanzees in Comoé National Park, Ivory Coast.

    PubMed

    Lapuente, Juan; Hicks, Thurston C; Linsenmair, K Eduard

    2016-12-21

    Over a 6 month period during the dry season, from the end of October 2014 to the beginning of May 2015, we studied tool use behavior of previously unstudied and non-habituated savanna chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) living in the Comoé National Park, Ivory Coast (CI). We analyzed all the stick tools and leaf-sponges found that the chimpanzees used to forage for ants, termites, honey, and water. We found a particular behavior to be widespread across different chimpanzee communities in the park, namely, dipping for water from tree holes using sticks with especially long brush-tip modifications, using camera traps, we recorded adults, juveniles, and infants of three communities displaying this behavior. We compared water dipping and honey dipping tools used by Comoé chimpanzees and found significant differences in the total length, diameter, and brush length of the different types of fluid-dipping tools used. We found that water dipping tools had consistently longer and thicker brush-tips than honey dipping tools. Although this behavior was observed only during the late dry season, the chimpanzees always had alternative water sources available, like pools and rivers, in which they drank without the use of a tool. It remains unclear whether the use of a tool increases efficient access to water. This is the first time that water dipping behavior with sticks has been found as a widespread and well-established behavior across different age and sex classes and communities, suggesting the possibility of cultural transmission. It is crucial that we conserve this population of chimpanzees, not only because they may represent the second largest population in the country, but also because of their unique behavioral repertoire.

  1. Imperfection Insensitive Thin Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Xin

    The buckling of axially compressed cylindrical shells and externally pressurized spherical shells is extremely sensitive to even very small geometric imperfections. In practice this issue is addressed by either using overly conservative knockdown factors, while keeping perfect axial or spherical symmetry, or adding closely and equally spaced stiffeners on shell surface. The influence of imperfection-sensitivity is mitigated, but the shells designed from these approaches are either too heavy or very expensive and are still sensitive to imperfections. Despite their drawbacks, these approaches have been used for more than half a century. This thesis proposes a novel method to design imperfection-insensitive cylindrical shells subject to axial compression. Instead of following the classical paths, focused on axially symmetric or high-order rotationally symmetric cross-sections, the method in this thesis adopts optimal symmetry-breaking wavy cross-sections (wavy shells). The avoidance of imperfection sensitivity is achieved by searching with an evolutionary algorithm for smooth cross-sectional shapes that maximize the minimum among the buckling loads of geometrically perfect and imperfect wavy shells. It is found that the shells designed through this approach can achieve higher critical stresses and knockdown factors than any previously known monocoque cylindrical shells. It is also found that these shells have superior mass efficiency to almost all previously reported stiffened shells. Experimental studies on a design of composite wavy shell obtained through the proposed method are presented in this thesis. A method of making composite wavy shells and a photogrametry technique of measuring full-field geometric imperfections have been developed. Numerical predictions based on the measured geometric imperfections match remarkably well with the experiments. Experimental results confirm that the wavy shells are not sensitive to imperfections and can carry axial compression

  2. Oxygen isotopes as tracers of tektite source rocks: An example from the Ivory Coast tektites and Lake Bosumtwi Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, Joel D.; Koeberl, Christian; Chamberlain, C. Page

    1993-01-01

    Oxygen isotope studies of tektites and impact glasses provide an important tool to help in identifying the target lithologies for terrestrial impacts, including the K-T boundary impact. However, such studies may be complicated by modification of the original oxygen isotope values of some source rocks during the tektite formation process either by vapor fractionation or incorporation of meteoric water. To further investigate the relationship between the oxygen isotopic composition of tektites and their source rocks, Ivory Coast tektites and samples of impact glasses and bedrock lithologies from the Bosumtwi Crater in Ghana--which is widely believed to be the source crater for the Ivory Coast tektites--were studied. Our preliminary results suggest that the phyllites and metagraywackes from the Bosumtwi Crater were the predominant source materials for the impact glasses and tektites and that no significant oxygen isotope modification (less than 1 percent delta(O-18)) took place during impact melting. This contrasts with previous studies of moldavites and Australasian tektites and their sedimentary source materials which suggests a 4 to 5 percent lowering of delta(O-18) due to meteoric water incorporation during impact melting.

  3. Cost Analysis of Non-Formal ETV Systems: A Case Study of the "Extra-Scolaire" System in the Ivory Coast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klees, Steven J.

    Building on previous evaluations of the ETV systems--both formal and informal--of the Ivory Coast, this study examines the system costs of the "Extra Scolaire" (E/S) program for rural adults. Educational television is utilized through the Ivorian primary system, and battery operated televisions have been widely distributed to schools in…

  4. The Red Light in the Ivory Tower: Contexts and Implications of Entrepreneurial Education. Counterpoints: Studies in the Postmodern Theory of Education. Volume 401

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breault, Donna Adair; Callejo Perez, David M.

    2012-01-01

    "The Red Light in the Ivory Tower: Contexts and Implications of Entrepreneurial Education" critically analyzes the operational behaviors of prestigious and prestige-seeking universities, particularly within the context of budget shortfalls and increasing competition. The book challenges entrepreneurial activities within universities by exploring…

  5. Welcoming Blue-Collar Scholars into the Ivory Tower: Developing Class-Conscious Strategies for Student Success. Series on Special Student Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soria, Krista M.

    2015-01-01

    "Welcoming Blue-Collar Scholars Into the Ivory Tower" is the first volume in a new book series designed to explore how institutional policies, practices, and cultures shape learning, development, and success for students who have been historically underserved or given limited consideration in the design of higher education contexts.…

  6. Petrology and geochemistry of target rocks from the Bosumtwi impact structure, Ghana, and comparison with Ivory Coast tektites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeberl, Christian; Reimold, Wolf Uwe; Blum, Joel D.; Chamberlain, C. Page

    1998-06-01

    The 10.5 km diameter Bosumtwi crater in Ghana, West Africa, is the most likely source crater for the Ivory Coast tektites, as the tektites and the crater have the same age (1.07 Ma), and there are close similarities between the isotopic and chemical compositions of the tektites and crater rocks. The crater is excavated in 2.1-2.2 Ga old metasediments and metavolcanics of the Birimian Supergroup. Here we present the first integrated petrographic and geochemical study of rocks from the Bosumtwi impact crater. A variety of target rocks from the Bosumtwi impact structure were selected to represent the major rock types that have been described before, resulting in four groups: shale, phyllite-graywacke, and two different types of granites (from dispersed dikes and from the so-called Pepiakese intrusion at the northeastern side of the crater). These rocks were analyzed for their major and trace element composition and their petrographic characteristics. In addition, representative samples were also analyzed for their O, Sr, and Nd isotopic compositions. The target rocks do not show any unambiguous evidence of shock metamorphism (i.e., planar deformation features, PDFs). Distinct impact-characteristic shock effects (PDFs) were identified only in clasts within suevite-derived melt fragments. The compositional range of the target rocks is significantly wider than that of the Ivory Coast tektites, but overlap the tektite compositions. A best-fit line for the Bosumtwi crater rocks in a Rb-Sr isotope evolution diagram yields an "age" of 1.98 Ga, and an initial 87Sr/ 86Sr ratio of 0.701, which is close to results previously obtained for granitoid intrusions in the Birimian of Ghana. Our Nd isotopic data yield depleted mantle model ages ranging from 2.16 to 2.64 Ga, and ɛ Nd values of -17.2 to -25.9‰. Harmonic least-squares (HMX) mixing calculations were able to reproduce the composition of Ivory Coast tektites from a mixture of Bosumtwi country rocks that include about 70

  7. Hollow spherical shell manufacture

    DOEpatents

    O'Holleran, Thomas P.

    1991-01-01

    A process for making a hollow spherical shell of silicate glass composition in which an aqueous suspension of silicate glass particles and an immiscible liquid blowing agent is placed within the hollow spherical cavity of a porous mold. The mold is spun to reduce effective gravity to zero and to center the blowing agent, while being heated so as to vaporize the immiscible liquid and urge the water carrier of the aqueous suspension to migrate into the body of the mold, leaving a green shell compact deposited around the mold cavity. The green shell compact is then removed from the cavity, and is sintered for a time and a temperature sufficient to form a silicate glass shell of substantially homogeneous composition and uniform geometry.

  8. Hollow spherical shell manufacture

    DOEpatents

    O'Holleran, T.P.

    1991-11-26

    A process is disclosed for making a hollow spherical shell of silicate glass composition in which an aqueous suspension of silicate glass particles and an immiscible liquid blowing agent is placed within the hollow spherical cavity of a porous mold. The mold is spun to reduce effective gravity to zero and to center the blowing agent, while being heated so as to vaporize the immiscible liquid and urge the water carrier of the aqueous suspension to migrate into the body of the mold, leaving a green shell compact deposited around the mold cavity. The green shell compact is then removed from the cavity, and is sintered for a time and a temperature sufficient to form a silicate glass shell of substantially homogeneous composition and uniform geometry. 3 figures.

  9. Shell forming system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor); Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Hollow shells of high uniformity are formed by emitting liquid through an outer nozzle and gas through an inner nozzle, to form a hollow extrusion, by flowing the gas at a velocity between about 1.3 and 10 times the liquid velocity. The natural breakup rate of the extrusion can be increased to decrease shell size by applying periodic perturbations to one of the materials prior to exiting the nozzles, to a nozzle, or to the extrusion.

  10. Shells and Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutley, Jane

    2009-01-01

    "Shells and Patterns" was a project the author felt would easily put smiles on the faces of her fifth-graders, and teach them about unity and the use of watercolor pencils as well. It was thrilling to see the excitement in her students as they made their line drawings of shells come to life. For the most part, they quickly got the hang of…

  11. Off-shell CHY amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, C. S.; Yao, York-Peng

    2016-06-01

    The Cachazo-He-Yuan (CHY) formula for on-shell scattering amplitudes is extended off-shell. The off-shell amplitudes (amputated Green's functions) are Möbius invariant, and have the same momentum poles as the on-shell amplitudes. The working principles which drive the modifications to the scattering equations are mainly Möbius covariance and energy momentum conservation in off-shell kinematics. The same technique is also used to obtain off-shell massive scalars. A simple off-shell extension of the CHY gauge formula which is Möbius invariant is proposed, but its true nature awaits further study.

  12. Multi-Shell Hollow Nanogels with Responsive Shell Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Andreas J.; Dubbert, Janine; Rudov, Andrey A.; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Lindner, Peter; Karg, Matthias; Potemkin, Igor I.; Richtering, Walter

    2016-01-01

    We report on hollow shell-shell nanogels with two polymer shells that have different volume phase transition temperatures. By means of small angle neutron scattering (SANS) employing contrast variation and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations we show that hollow shell-shell nanocontainers are ideal systems for controlled drug delivery: The temperature responsive swelling of the inner shell controls the uptake and release, while the thermoresponsive swelling of the outer shell controls the size of the void and the colloidal stability. At temperatures between 32 °C < T < 42 °C, the hollow nanocontainers provide a significant void, which is even larger than the initial core size of the template, and they possess a high colloidal stability due to the steric stabilization of the swollen outer shell. Computer simulations showed, that temperature induced switching of the permeability of the inner shell allows for the encapsulation in and release of molecules from the cavity. PMID:26984478

  13. Sex, fertility and menstruation among the Beng of the Ivory Coast: a symbolic analysis.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, A

    1982-01-01

    An attempt is made in this discussion to relocate the topic of menstruation in a new framework, one not directly defined by gender and not restricted to the view that menstrual blood and menstrual pollution are by definition viewed negatively. The Beng (Ivory Coast) notions of menstruation are explored as they relate to wider concepts of pollution and fertility. The analysis demonstrates how menstrual pollution among the Beng forms part of another type of pollution--the spatio symbolic pollution of human fertility when it is removed from its proper place--and how, rather than debasing women, menstruation serves to have added value to a major aspect of women's labor--that of cooking. There are 3 rules which Beng observe concerning menstruation: no initiated, married, or previously married woman who is menstruating may set foot in the forest for any reason other than to defecate; a menstruating woman may not touch a corpse; and a man may not eat food cooked by his wife during the days she is menstruating, nor may a Master of the Earth eat food cooked by any menstruating woman. At first, these taboos appear to be another case of the pollution of women through menstruation and another instance of women's oppression. When explored, the Master of Earth explained that menstrual blood is considered as special because it carries in it a living being and that menstrual blood is like the flower which must emerge before the fruit--the baby--can be born. No answer was provided to the question of pollution. There seemed to be no other rules specifying what activities a woman should or should not pursue during menstruation. She is not isolated from the flux of social life, and sexual activiity during menstruation, though not commonly done, is not taboo. The fact that it is only working in the forest, and not other activities, that is prohibited to menstruating women reveals that menstruation is not regarded as dangerous to men or as polluting in general. Rather, menstrual blood

  14. Prevalence of Newcastle disease virus and infectious bronchitis virus in avian influenza negative birds from live bird markets and backyard and commercial farms in Ivory-Coast.

    PubMed

    Kouakou, A V; Kouakou, V; Kouakou, C; Godji, P; Kouassi, A L; Krou, H A; Langeois, Q; Webby, R J; Ducatez, M F; Couacy-Hymann, E

    2015-10-01

    Newcastle disease (ND) and infectious bronchitis (IB) are two major viral diseases affecting the respiratory tracts of birds and whose impact on African poultry is still poorly known. In the present study we aimed at assessing NDV and IBV prevalences in Ivory-Coast by molecular screening of >22,000 avian swabs by nested PCR and by serology testing of close to 2000 avian sera from 2010 through 2012. The NDV and IBV seroprevalences over the study period reached 22% and 72%, respectively. We found 14.7% pooled swabs positive by PCR for NDV and 14.6% for IBV. Both pathogens are therefore endemic in Ivory-Coast. Economic losses associated with NDV and IBV infections still need to be evaluated.

  15. Shell Biorefinery: Dream or Reality?

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Yang, Huiying; Yan, Ning

    2016-09-12

    Shell biorefinery, referring to the fractionation of crustacean shells into their major components and the transformation of each component into value-added chemicals and materials, has attracted growing attention in recent years. Since the large quantities of waste shells remain underexploited, their valorization can potentially bring both ecological and economic benefits. This Review provides an overview of the current status of shell biorefinery. It first describes the structural features of crustacean shells, including their composition and their interactions. Then, various fractionation methods for the shells are introduced. The last section is dedicated to the valorization of chitin and its derivatives for chemicals, porous carbon materials and functional polymers.

  16. Sensational spherical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Kendall, J. M., Jr.; Bahrami, P. A.; Wang, T. G.

    1986-01-01

    Fluid-dynamic and capillary forces can be used to form nearly perfect, very small spherical shells when a liquid that can solidify is passed through an annular die to form an annular jet. Gravity and certain properties of even the most ideal materials, however, can cause slight asymmetries. The primary objective of the present work is the control of this shell formation process in earth laboratories rather than space microgravity, through the development of facilities and methods that minimize the deleterious effects of gravity, aerodynamic drag, and uncontrolled cooling. The spherical shells thus produced can be used in insulation, recyclable filter materials, fire retardants, explosives, heat transport slurries, shock-absorbing armor, and solid rocket motors.

  17. Fabrication of diamond shells

    SciTech Connect

    Hamza, Alex V.; Biener, Juergen; Wild, Christoph; Woerner, Eckhard

    2016-11-01

    A novel method for fabricating diamond shells is introduced. The fabrication of such shells is a multi-step process, which involves diamond chemical vapor deposition on predetermined mandrels followed by polishing, microfabrication of holes, and removal of the mandrel by an etch process. The resultant shells of the present invention can be configured with a surface roughness at the nanometer level (e.g., on the order of down to about 10 nm RMS) on a mm length scale, and exhibit excellent hardness/strength, and good transparency in the both the infra-red and visible. Specifically, a novel process is disclosed herein, which allows coating of spherical substrates with optical-quality diamond films or nanocrystalline diamond films.

  18. Oyster shell conveyor used to lift shells from the dock ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oyster shell conveyor used to lift shells from the dock into the receiving room housed in the 1965 concrete block addition. - J.C. Lore Oyster House, 14430 Solomons Island Road, Solomons, Calvert County, MD

  19. Shell Higher Olefins Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutz, E. F.

    1986-01-01

    Shows how olefin isomerization and the exotic olefin metathesis reaction can be harnessed in industrial processes. Indicates that the Shell Higher Olefins Process makes use of organometallic catalysts to manufacture alpha-olefins and internal carbon-11 through carbon-14 alkenes in a flexible fashion that can be adjusted to market needs. (JN)

  20. Shell Creek Summers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seier, Mark; Goedeken, Suzy

    2005-01-01

    In 2002 Shell Creek Watershed Improvement Group turned to the Newman Grove Public Schools' science department to help educate the public on water quality in the watershed and to establish a monitoring system that would be used to improve surface and groundwater quality in the creek's watershed. Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality provided…

  1. Snail Shell Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Catherine

    1992-01-01

    Presents three inquiry-based lessons to develop the science process skills of observation, identification, and classification. Activities use whelk eggs and snail shells as the focus of the students' inquiries. Provides a list of 19 facts about whelks and snails. (MDH)

  2. Multi-shell effective interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunoda, Naofumi; Takayanagi, Kazuo; Hjorth-Jensen, Morten; Otsuka, Takaharu

    2014-02-01

    Background: Effective interactions, either derived from microscopic theories or based on fitting selected properties of nuclei in specific mass regions, are widely used inputs to shell-model studies of nuclei. The commonly used unperturbed basis functions are given by the harmonic oscillator. Until recently, most shell-model calculations have been confined to a single oscillator shell like the sd shell or the pf shell. Recent interest in nuclei away from the stability line requires, however, larger shell-model spaces. Because the derivation of microscopic effective interactions has been limited to degenerate models spaces, there are both conceptual and practical limits to present shell-model calculations that utilize such interactions. Purpose: The aim of this work is to present a novel microscopic method to calculate effective nucleon-nucleon interactions for the nuclear shell model. Its main difference from existing theories is that it can be applied not only to degenerate model spaces but also to nondegenerate model spaces. This has important consequences, in particular for intershell matrix elements of effective interactions. Methods: The formalism is presented in the form of a many-body perturbation theory based on the recently developed extended Kuo-Krenciglowa method. Our method enables us to microscopically construct effective interactions not only in one oscillator shell but also for several oscillator shells. Results: We present numerical results using effective interactions within (i) a single oscillator shell (a so-called degenerate model space) like the sd shell or the pf shell and (ii) two major shells (nondegenerate model space) like the sdf7p3 shell or the pfg9 shell. We also present energy levels of several nuclei that have two valence nucleons on top of a given closed-shell core. Conclusions: Our results show that the present method works excellently in shell-model spaces that comprise several oscillator shells, as well as in a single oscillator

  3. Biomechanics of turtle shells: how whole shells fail in compression.

    PubMed

    Magwene, Paul M; Socha, John J

    2013-02-01

    Turtle shells are a form of armor that provides varying degrees of protection against predation. Although this function of the shell as armor is widely appreciated, the mechanical limits of protection and the modes of failure when subjected to breaking stresses have not been well explored. We studied the mechanical properties of whole shells and of isolated bony tissues and sutures in four species of turtles (Trachemys scripta, Malaclemys terrapin, Chrysemys picta, and Terrapene carolina) using a combination of structural and mechanical tests. Structural properties were evaluated by subjecting whole shells to compressive and point loads in order to quantify maximum load, work to failure, and relative shell deformations. The mechanical properties of bone and sutures from the plastral region of the shell were evaluated using three-point bending experiments. Analysis of whole shell structural properties suggests that small shells undergo relatively greater deformations before failure than do large shells and similar amounts of energy are required to induce failure under both point and compressive loads. Location of failures occurred far more often at sulci than at sutures (representing the margins of the epidermal scutes and the underlying bones, respectively), suggesting that the small grooves in the bone created by the sulci introduce zones of weakness in the shell. Values for bending strength, ultimate bending strain, Young's modulus, and energy absorption, calculated from the three-point bending data, indicate that sutures are relatively weaker than the surrounding bone, but are able to absorb similar amounts of energy due to higher ultimate strain values.

  4. Shell funds chair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Shell Companies Foundation, Inc., of Houston, Tex., has given $750,000 to the University of Texas at Austin to establish the Shell Distinguished Chair in Geophysics. The 5-year, $150,000-per-year grant will support the studies of John G. Sclater. Sclater, currently a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, has accepted a joint position that begins July 1 in the geological sciences department and in the Institute for Geophysics at UT Austin.Sclater's research into the formation of ocean basins has applications for understanding the way petroleum deposits mature. He has studied the reconstruction of movements of the continents and the subsidence of ocean basins. He is considered an expert in the interpretation of geothermal and seismic data.

  5. Shell model calculations of 109Sb in the sdgh shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikmen, E.; Novoselsky, A.; Vallieres, M.

    2001-12-01

    The energy spectra of the antimony isotope 109Sb in the sdgh shell are calculated in the nuclear shell model approach by using the CD-Bonn nucleon-nucleon interaction. The modified Drexel University parallel shell model code (DUPSM) was used for the calculations with maximum Hamiltonian dimension of 762 253 of 5.14% sparsity. The energy levels are compared to the recent experimental results. The calculations were done on the Cyborg Parallel Cluster System at Drexel University.

  6. Synthesis of stiffened conical shells.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    The development of a method to effect the automated minimum weight design of ring and stringer stiffened shells is presented. Membrane theory is used for the shell prebuckling analysis. The buckling analysis is based upon an arbitrary shell of revolution computer program. The structural analysis includes both buckling and yielding modes of failure. The synthesis involves the coupling of an exterior penalty function with a method for the unconstrained minimization of a function comprised of a sum of squares. Results of the application of the method to the design of the Viking Aeroshell cone are presented. The least weight Viking Aeroshell appears to be an all magnesium shell with ring stiffeners of hollow circular cross section. Because the method incorporates a general shell of revolution buckling analysis, it can be readily modified and applied to the design of any axisymmetrically loaded uniformly stiffened shell of revolution for which a membrane prebuckling solution exists.

  7. Resource wars and conflict ivory: the impact of civil conflict on elephants in the Democratic Republic of Congo--the case of the Okapi Reserve.

    PubMed

    Beyers, Rene L; Hart, John A; Sinclair, Anthony R E; Grossmann, Falk; Klinkenberg, Brian; Dino, Simeon

    2011-01-01

    Human conflict generally has substantial negative impacts on wildlife and conservation. The recent civil war (1995-2006) in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) resulted in a significant loss of wildlife, including elephants, due to institutional collapse, lawlessness and unbridled exploitation of natural resources such as minerals, wood, ivory and bushmeat. We used data from distance sampling surveys conducted before and after the war in a protected forest, the Okapi Faunal Reserve, to document changes in elephant abundance and distribution. We employed Generalized Additive Models to relate changes in elephant distribution to human and environmental factors. Populations declined by nearly fifty percent coinciding with a major increase in elephant poaching as indicated by reports of ivory trade during the war. Our results suggest that humans influenced elephant distribution far more than habitat, both before and after the war, but post-war models explained more of the variation. Elephant abundance declined more, closer to the park boundary and to areas of intense human activity. After the war, elephant densities were relatively higher in the centre of the park where they were better protected, suggesting that this area may have acted as a refuge. In other sites in Eastern DRC, where no protection was provided, elephants were even more decimated. Post-war dynamics, such as weakened institutions, human movements and availability of weapons, continue to affect elephants. Survival of remaining populations and recovery will be determined by these persistent factors and by new threats associated with growing human populations and exploitation of natural resources. Prioritizing wildlife protection, curbing illegal trade in ivory and bushmeat, and strengthening national institutions and organizations in charge of conservation will be crucial to counter these threats.

  8. Resource Wars and Conflict Ivory: The Impact of Civil Conflict on Elephants in the Democratic Republic of Congo - The Case of the Okapi Reserve

    PubMed Central

    Beyers, Rene L.; Hart, John A.; Sinclair, Anthony R. E.; Grossmann, Falk; Klinkenberg, Brian; Dino, Simeon

    2011-01-01

    Human conflict generally has substantial negative impacts on wildlife and conservation. The recent civil war (1995-2006) in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) resulted in a significant loss of wildlife, including elephants, due to institutional collapse, lawlessness and unbridled exploitation of natural resources such as minerals, wood, ivory and bushmeat. We used data from distance sampling surveys conducted before and after the war in a protected forest, the Okapi Faunal Reserve, to document changes in elephant abundance and distribution. We employed Generalized Additive Models to relate changes in elephant distribution to human and environmental factors. Populations declined by nearly fifty percent coinciding with a major increase in elephant poaching as indicated by reports of ivory trade during the war. Our results suggest that humans influenced elephant distribution far more than habitat, both before and after the war, but post-war models explained more of the variation. Elephant abundance declined more, closer to the park boundary and to areas of intense human activity. After the war, elephant densities were relatively higher in the centre of the park where they were better protected, suggesting that this area may have acted as a refuge. In other sites in Eastern DRC, where no protection was provided, elephants were even more decimated. Post-war dynamics, such as weakened institutions, human movements and availability of weapons, continue to affect elephants. Survival of remaining populations and recovery will be determined by these persistent factors and by new threats associated with growing human populations and exploitation of natural resources. Prioritizing wildlife protection, curbing illegal trade in ivory and bushmeat, and strengthening national institutions and organizations in charge of conservation will be crucial to counter these threats. PMID:22096529

  9. Ultrasonic scattering from anisotropic shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittleman, John; Thompson, R. B.; Roberts, R.

    The exact differential equations for elastic wave scattering from spherical shells with spherically orthotropic properties are presently shown to be separable; the angular equations are satisfied by Legendre polynomials that are independent of material properties. The results thus obtained have been validated by exact solutions for the case with vanishing shell thickness, and that of isotropic elastic constants. Excellent agreement is thus obtained over a wide range of shell thicknesses and wave numbers.

  10. The structure of circumstellar shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fix, John D.

    1993-01-01

    This document provides a report on research activities carried out with the support of NASA grant NAG 5-1174, the Structure of Circumstellar Shells, funded under the Astrophysics Data Program. The research carried out with the support of this grant is a study of the properties of circumstellar dust shells for which spectra are available through IRAS low resolution spectrometry (LRS). This research consisted of the development and application of models of axisymmetric circumstellar shells and a preliminary survey of the applicability of neural nets for analysis of the IRAS LRS spectra of circumstellar dust shells.

  11. Shell Analysis Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1968-04-01

    plane strains o 0 0 el, e 2 , el2 Components of nonlinear in-plane middle surface strains; also, strains corresponding to equilibrium configuration el...plates) in the treatment of shell problems. This theory, often referred to as Love’s first approximation, has since occupied a position of prominence...Materials such as wood and synthetic fiberboard possess this property. For this case, the generalized Hooke’s Law reduces to oII = El Fl + E 2 p 2 1

  12. Automated shell theory for rotating structures (ASTROS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, B. J.; Thomas, J. M.

    1971-01-01

    A computer program for analyzing axisymmetric shells with inertial forces caused by rotation about the shell axis is developed by revising the STARS II shell program. The basic capabilities of the STARS II shell program, such as the treatment of the branched shells, stiffened wall construction, and thermal gradients, are retained.

  13. Using Lidar-derived 3-D Vegetation Structure Maps to Assist in the Search for the Ivory- billed Woodpecker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofton, M. A.; Blair, J. B.; Rabine, D.; Dubayah, R.; Greim, H.

    2006-12-01

    Averaging about 20 inches in length, the ivory-billed woodpecker is among the world's largest woodpeckers. It once ranged through swampy forests in the southeastern and lower Mississippi valley states, and until recently was believed to have become extinct in the 1940's when commercial logging destroyed its last known habitat. Recent sightings however, may indicate the birds' survival in remaining bottomland hardwood forest adjacent to the Cache and White Rivers in Arkansas. In June-July 2006, NASA's Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) was used to map approximately 5000 km2 of the White River National Wildlife Refuge in Arkansas, including sites where recent possible sightings of the bird occurred. LVIS is an airborne, medium- footprint (5- to 25-meter diameter), full waveform-recording, airborne, scanning lidar system which has been used extensively for mapping forest structure, habitat, carbon and natural hazards. The system digitally records the shape of the returning laser echo, or waveform, after its interaction with the various reflecting surfaces of the earth (leaves, branches, ground, etc.), providing a true 3-dimensional record of the surface structure. Data collected included ground elevation and canopy height measurements for each laser footprint, as well as the vertical distribution of intercepted surfaces (the return waveform). Experimental metrics such as canopy structure metrics based on energy quartiles, as well as ground energy/canopy cover and waveform complexity metrics will be derived from each waveform. The project is a collaborative effort between the University of Maryland, NASA, USGS, and the US Fish and Wildlife Service. The LVIS-generated data of the 3- D vegetation structure and underlying terrain will be used as a means to guide local, ground-based search efforts in the upcoming field season as well as identify the remaining areas of habitat suitable for protection should the bird be found.

  14. Hi shells, supershells, shell-like objects, and ''worms''

    SciTech Connect

    Heiles, C.

    1984-08-01

    We present photographic representations of the combination of two Hi surveys, so as to eliminate the survey boundaries at Vertical BarbVertical Bar = 10/sup 0/. We also present high-contrast photographs for particular velocities to exhibit weak Hi features. All of these photographs were used to prepare a new list of Hi shells, supershells, and shell-like objects. We discuss the structure of three shell-like objects that are associated with high-velocity gas, and with gas at all velocities that is associated with radio continuum loops I, II, and III. We use spatial filtering to find wiggly gas filaments: ''worms'': crawling away from the galactic plane in the inner Galaxy. The ''worms'' are probably parts of shells that are open at the top; such shells should be good sources of hot gas for the galactic halo.

  15. Microscopic Shell Model Calculations for sd-Shell Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Bruce R.; Dikmen, Erdal; Maris, Pieter; Shirokov, Andrey M.; Smirnova, Nadya A.; Vary, James P.

    Several techniques now exist for performing detailed and accurate calculations of the structure of light nuclei, i.e., A ≤ 16. Going to heavier nuclei requires new techniques or extensions of old ones. One of these is the so-called No Core Shell Model (NCSM) with a Core approach, which involves an Okubo-Lee-Suzuki (OLS) transformation of a converged NCSM result into a single major shell, such as the sd-shell. The obtained effective two-body matrix elements can be separated into core and single-particle (s.p.) energies plus residual two-body interactions, which can be used for performing standard shell-model (SSM) calculations. As an example, an application of this procedure will be given for nuclei at the beginning ofthe sd-shell.

  16. Foam shell cryogenic ICF target

    DOEpatents

    Darling, Dale H.

    1987-01-01

    A uniform cryogenic layer of DT fuel is maintained in a fusion target having a low density, small pore size, low Z rigid foam shell saturated with liquid DT fuel. Capillary action prevents gravitational slumping of the fuel layer. The saturated shell may be cooled to produce a solid fuel layer.

  17. Biomineralisation in Mollusc shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauphin, Y.; Cuif, J. P.; Salomé, M.; Williams, C. T.

    2009-04-01

    The main components of Mollusc shells are carbonate minerals: calcite and aragonite. ACC is present in larval stages. Calcite and aragonite can be secreted simultaneously by the mantle. Despite the small number of varieties, the arrangement of the mineral components is diverse, and dependant upon the taxonomy. They are also associated with organic components much more diverse, the diversity of which reflects the large taxonomic diversity. From TGA analyses, the organic content (water included) is high (>5% in some layers). The biomineralisation process is not a passive precipitation process, but is strongly controlled by the organism. The biological-genetic control is shown by the constancy of the arrangement of the layers, the mineralogy and the microstructure in a given species. Microstructural units (i.e. tablets, prisms etc.) have shapes that do not occur in non-biogenic counterparts. Nacreous tablets, for example, are flattened on their crystallographic c axis, which is normally the axis of maximum growth rate for non-biogenic aragonite. Morever, their inner structure is species-specific: the arrangements of nacreous tablets in Gastropoda - Cephalopoda, and in Bivalvia differ, and the inner arrangement of the nacreous tablets is different in ectocochlear and endocochlear Cephalopoda. The organic-mineral ratios also differ in the various layers of a shell. Differences in chemical composition also demonstrates the biological-genetic control: for example, aragonite has a low Sr content unknown in non-biogenic samples; two aragonitic layers in a shell have different Sr and Mg contents, S is higher in calcitic layers. Decalcification releases soluble (SOM) and insoluble (IOM) organic components. Insoluble components form the main part of the intercrystalline membranes, and contain proteins, polysaccharides and lipids. Soluble phases are present within the crystals and the intercrystalline membranes. These phases are composed of more or less glycosylated proteins

  18. Real-time PCR detection and quantification of elephantid DNA: species identification for highly processed samples associated with the ivory trade.

    PubMed

    Wozney, Kristyne Michelle; Wilson, Paul J

    2012-06-10

    The ivory industry is the single most serious threat to global elephant populations. A highly sensitive, species-specific real-time PCR assay has been developed to detect and quantify African elephant (Loxodonta africana), Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) and Woolly Mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) mitochondrial DNA from highly processed samples involved in the international ivory trade. This assay is especially useful for highly processed samples where there are no distinguishing morphological features to identify the species of origin. Using species-specific Taqman(®) probes targeting a region of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene, we developed an assay that can be used to positively identify samples containing elephant or Woolly mammoth DNA faster and more cost-effectively than traditional sequencing methods. Furthermore, this assay provides a diagnostic result based on probe hybridization that eliminates ambiguities associated with traditional DNA sequence protocols involving low template DNA. The real-time method is highly sensitive, producing accurate and reproducible results in samples with as few as 100 copies of template DNA. This protocol can be applied to the enforcement of the Convention on the International Trade of Endangered Species (CITES), when positive identification of species from illegally traded products is required by conservation officers in wildlife forensic cases.

  19. Real-time PCR assay for discrimination of Plasmodium ovale curtisi and Plasmodium ovale wallikeri in the Ivory Coast and in the Comoros Islands

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Plasmodium ovale is one of the five malaria species infecting humans. Recent data have shown that the name of this neglected species masks two distinct genotypes also called curtisi and wallikeri. Some authors show that these species could be sympatric. These two subspecies are not differentiated by microscopy techniques and malaria rapid diagnostic tests. This diagnostic defect is the result of low parasitaemia, antigenic polymorphism and absence of antibodies performance and requires the use of sequencing techniques. An accurate and easy discrimination detection method is necessary. Methods A new molecular assay was developed to easily identify the two genotypes of P. ovale. This tool allowed the study of 90 blood samples containing P. ovale, confirmed by molecular biology techniques, which were obtained from patients with imported malaria. Results The new marker was validated on well genotyped samples. The genotype of 90 P. ovale samples mainly imported from the Ivory Coast and the Comoros Islands was easily and quickly realized. The distribution of the two subspecies was described with a significant number of samples and showed that the two genotypes were present in the studied countries. Conclusion This work confirms the presence of the two species in the same country for the first time, in the Ivory Coast and the Comoros Islands. A better genotyping of P. ovale types may improve a better characterization of the clinical pathophysiology for each. PMID:22947418

  20. Les sous-prefectures de Sikensi et Dabakala, Cote-d'Ivoire. (The Regions of Sikensi and Dabakala, Ivory Coast.) Method de preparation de la carte scolaire: etudes de cas 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallak, J.; And Others

    This volume contains the results of the first study of the problems associated with using educational television in curriculum planning in the Ivory Coast. The study was conducted in two districts of this African country, one relatively developed and situated in the southern part of the country, and the other more characteristic of the poorer…

  1. Shell forming apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Granett, Dan (Inventor); Akutagawa, Wesley M. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A nozzle assembly is described for use in a system that forms small gas-filled shells, which avoids the need for holding a miniature inner nozzle precisely concentric with a miniature outer nozzle. The outer nozzle has a diameter which is less than about 0.7 millimeter, which results in fluid passing through the nozzle having a progressively greater velocity at locations progressively further from the walls of the outer nozzle across most of the nozzle. This highly variable velocity profile automatically forces gas to the center of the outer nozzle. The end of the inner nozzle, which emits gas, is spaced upstream from the tip of the outer nozzle, to provide a distance along which to center the gas. This self-centering characteristic permits the inner nozzle to be positioned so its axis is not concentric with the axis of the outer nozzle.

  2. Composite shell spacecraft seat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barackman, Victor J. (Inventor); Pulley, John K. (Inventor); Simon, Xavier D. (Inventor); McKee, Sandra D. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A two-part seat (10) providing full body support that is specific for each crew member (30) on an individual basis. The two-part construction for the seat (10) can accommodate many sizes and shapes for crewmembers (30) because it is reconfigurable and therefore reusable for subsequent flights. The first component of the two-part seat construction is a composite shell (12) that surrounds the crewmember's entire body and is generically fitted to their general size in height and weight. The second component of the two-part seat (10) is a cushion (20) that conforms exactly to the specific crewmember's entire body and gives total body support in more complex environment.

  3. Crack problems in cylindrical and spherical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.

    1976-01-01

    Standard plate or shell theories were used as a starting point to study the fracture problems in thin-walled cylindrical and spherical shells, assuming that the plane of the crack is perpendicular to the surface of the sheet. Since recent studies have shown that local shell curvatures may have a rather considerable effect on the stress intensity factor, the crack problem was considered in conjunction with a shell rather than a plate theory. The material was assumed to be isotropic and homogeneous, so that approximate solutions may be obtained by approximating the local shell crack geometry with an ideal shell which has a solution, namely a spherical shell with a meridional crack, a cylindrical shell with a circumferential crack, or a cylindrical shell with an axial crack. A method of solution for the specially orthotropic shells containing a crack was described; symmetric and skew-symmetric problems are considered in cylindrical shells with an axial crack.

  4. Glass shell manufacturing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downs, R. L.; Ebner, M. A.; Nolen, R. L., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Highly-uniform, hollow glass spheres (shells), which are used for inertial confinement fusion targets, were formed from metal-organic gel powder feedstock in a vertical furnace. As a result of the rapid pyrolysis caused by the furnace, the gel is transformed to a shell in five distinct stages: (a) surface closure of the porous gel; (b) generation of a closed-cell foam structure in the gel; (c) spheridization of the gel and further expansion of the foam; (d) coalescence of the closed-cell foam to a single-void shell; and (e) fining of the glass shell. The heat transfer from the furnace to the falling gel particle was modeled to determine the effective heating rate of the gel. The model predicts the temperature history for a particle as a function of mass, dimensions, specific heat, and absorptance as well as furnace temperature profile and thermal conductivity of the furnace gas. A model was developed that predicts the gravity-induced degradation of shell concentricity in falling molten shells as a function of shell characteristics and time.

  5. Optimum rotationally symmetric shells for flywheel rotors

    DOEpatents

    Blake, Henry W.

    2000-01-01

    A flywheel rim support formed from two shell halves. Each of the shell halves has a disc connected to the central shaft. A first shell element connects to the disc at an interface. A second shell element connects to the first shell element. The second shell element has a plurality of meridional slits. A cylindrical shell element connects to the second shell element. The cylindrical shell element connects to the inner surface of the flywheel rim. A flywheel rim support having a disc connected an outer diameter of a shaft. Two optimally shaped shell elements connect to the optimally shaped disc at an interface. The interface defines a discontinuity in a meridional slope of said support. A cylindrical shell element connects to the two shell elements. The cylindrical shell element has an outer surface for connecting to the inner surface of the flywheel rim. A flywheel rim casing includes an annular shell connected to the central shaft. The annular shell connects to the flywheel rim. A composite shell surrounds the shaft, annular shell and flywheel rim.

  6. MicroShell Minimalist Shell for Xilinx Microprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werne, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    MicroShell is a lightweight shell environment for engineers and software developers working with embedded microprocessors in Xilinx FPGAs. (MicroShell has also been successfully ported to run on ARM Cortex-M1 microprocessors in Actel ProASIC3 FPGAs, but without project-integration support.) Micro Shell decreases the time spent performing initial tests of field-programmable gate array (FPGA) designs, simplifies running customizable one-time-only experiments, and provides a familiar-feeling command-line interface. The program comes with a collection of useful functions and enables the designer to add an unlimited number of custom commands, which are callable from the command-line. The commands are parameterizable (using the C-based command-line parameter idiom), so the designer can use one function to exercise hardware with different values. Also, since many hardware peripherals instantiated in FPGAs have reasonably simple register-mapped I/O interfaces, the engineer can edit and view hardware parameter settings at any time without stopping the processor. MicroShell comes with a set of support scripts that interface seamlessly with Xilinx's EDK tool. Adding an instance of MicroShell to a project is as simple as marking a check box in a library configuration dialog box and specifying a software project directory. The support scripts then examine the hardware design, build design-specific functions, conditionally include processor-specific functions, and complete the compilation process. For code-size constrained designs, most of the stock functionality can be excluded from the compiled library. When all of the configurable options are removed from the binary, MicroShell has an unoptimized memory footprint of about 4.8 kB and a size-optimized footprint of about 2.3 kB. Since MicroShell allows unfettered access to all processor-accessible memory locations, it is possible to perform live patching on a running system. This can be useful, for instance, if a bug is

  7. Comparative study of shell swab and shell crush methods for the recovery of Salmonella from shell eggs.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Swabbing (SW) is the standard methodology for the recovery of resident microorganisms from shell eggs in Japan. A comparative study of shell swab (SW) and a shell crush (CR) technique was performed to recover the laboratory-inoculated Salmonella from shell eggs. It was found that the recovery of ...

  8. Recovery of Salmonella from commercial shell eggs by shell rinse and shell crush methodologies.

    PubMed

    Musgrove, M T; Jones, D R; Northcutt, J K; Harrison, M A; Cox, N A; Ingram, K D; Hinton, A J

    2005-12-01

    Salmonella is the most important human pathogen associated with shell eggs. Salmonella Enteritidis is the serotype most often implicated in outbreaks, although other serotypes have been recovered from eggs and from the commercial shell egg washing environment. Many sample methods are used to recover microorganisms from eggshells and membranes. A shell rinse and modified shell-and-membrane crush method for recovery of Salmonella were compared. Eggs were collected from 3 commercial shell-washing facilities (X, Y, and Z) during 3 visits. Twelve eggs were collected from each of 10 to 12 locations along the egg processing chain. After being transported back to the laboratory, each egg was sampled first by a shell rinse method and then by a shell crush method. For each technique (rinse or crush), 2 pools of 5 eggs per location sampled were selectively enriched for the recovery of Salmonella. Presumptive samples positive for Salmonella were confirmed serologically. Overall, there were 10.1% (40/396) Salmonella-positive pooled samples. Salmonella were recovered by the shell rinse and shell crush techniques (4.8 vs. 5.3%, respectively). Plant X yielded 21.5% Salmonella positives, whereas less than 5% of samples from plants Y and Z were found to be contaminated with the organism (4.2 and 4.5%, respectively). Salmonella was recovered more often from unwashed eggs (15.8%) than from washed eggs (8.3%). For some eggs, Salmonella was only recovered by one of the methods. Use of both approaches in the same experiment increased sampling sensitivity, although in most cases, crushing provided more sensitive Salmonella recovery.

  9. 7 CFR 996.19 - Shelled peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Shelled peanuts. 996.19 Section 996.19 Agriculture... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.19 Shelled peanuts. Shelled peanuts means the kernels or portions of kernels of peanuts after the shells are removed....

  10. 7 CFR 996.19 - Shelled peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shelled peanuts. 996.19 Section 996.19 Agriculture... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.19 Shelled peanuts. Shelled peanuts means the kernels or portions of kernels of peanuts after the shells are removed....

  11. 7 CFR 996.19 - Shelled peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Shelled peanuts. 996.19 Section 996.19 Agriculture... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.19 Shelled peanuts. Shelled peanuts means the kernels or portions of kernels of peanuts after the shells are removed....

  12. 7 CFR 996.19 - Shelled peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Shelled peanuts. 996.19 Section 996.19 Agriculture... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.19 Shelled peanuts. Shelled peanuts means the kernels or portions of kernels of peanuts after the shells are removed....

  13. 7 CFR 996.19 - Shelled peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Shelled peanuts. 996.19 Section 996.19 Agriculture... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.19 Shelled peanuts. Shelled peanuts means the kernels or portions of kernels of peanuts after the shells are removed....

  14. Insulative laser shell coupler

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Phillip A.; Anderson, Andrew T.; Alger, Terry W.

    1994-01-01

    A segmented coaxial laser shell assembly having at least two water jacket sections, two pairs of interconnection half rings, a dialectric break ring, and a pair of threaded ring sections. Each water jacket section with an inner tubular section that defines an inner laser cavity with water paths adjacent to at least a portion of the exterior of the inner tubular section, and mating faces at the end of the water jacket section through which the inner laser cavity opens and which defines at least one water port therethrough in communication with the water jackets. The water paths also define in their external surface a circumferential notch set back from and in close proximity to the mating face. The dielectric break ring has selected thickness and is placed between, and in coaxial alignment with, the mating faces of two of the adjacent water jacket sections. The break ring also defines an inner laser cavity of the same size and shape as the inner laser cavity of the water jacket sections and at least one water passage through the break ring to communicate with at least one water port through the mating faces of the water jacket sections.

  15. Insulative laser shell coupler

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, P.A.; Anderson, A.T.; Alger, T.W.

    1994-09-20

    A segmented coaxial laser shell assembly having at least two water jacket sections, two pairs of interconnection half rings, a dielectric break ring, and a pair of threaded ring sections is disclosed. Each water jacket section with an inner tubular section that defines an inner laser cavity with water paths adjacent to at least a portion of the exterior of the inner tubular section, and mating faces at the end of the water jacket section through which the inner laser cavity opens and which defines at least one water port therethrough in communication with the water jackets. The water paths also define in their external surface a circumferential notch set back from and in close proximity to the mating face. The dielectric break ring has selected thickness and is placed between, and in coaxial alignment with, the mating faces of two of the adjacent water jacket sections. The break ring also defines an inner laser cavity of the same size and shape as the inner laser cavity of the water jacket sections and at least one water passage through the break ring to communicate with at least one water port through the mating faces of the water jacket sections. 4 figs.

  16. A test of the hypothesis on the Guyana and the West-African Shield assembly: New Paleoproterozoic paleomagnetic results from French Guyana and Ivory-Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastien, N.; Sebastien, N.; yan, C.; Gilbert, F.; Andre, P.; Andre, P.; Max, V.; yao, D.

    2001-12-01

    In the last 3 decades the hypotheis of a Paleoproterozoic supercontinent has been debated. It is generally accepted that the supercontinent assembly was initiated with the groupment of Guyana and West-African shields. However, the existing paleomagnetic database is neither quantitatively nor qualitatively sufficient to precise when this assembly began. In order to better understand the paleogeographic evolution of the Guyana and West African shields, a total of 59 sites of granitoids and metavolcanic rocks were sampled (33 from French Guyana and 26 from Ivory-Coast). Rock magnetic, petrographic and paleomagnetic measurements were carried out on this collection Both automorphous magnetite and hematite are identified as the main magnetic remanent carriers and characteristic magnetic components were isolated. These paleomagnetic directions are distinct from both the present Earth field and the local Early Jurassic ones. Positive reversal tests are also observed for the two age-groups from French Guyana. Based on above arguments, the magnetic remanence can be consiered as the primary Paleoproterozoic magnetization. Four mean poles are therefore calculated, named A, B for French Guyana and C1, C2 for Ivory-Coast: A: lambdaA = -62oN, phiA = 61oE, k=18, A95 =10o, N =15; B: lambdaB = -5oN, phiB = 50oE, k= 26, A95 = 18o, N = 5 ; C1: lambdaC1 = -82oN, phiC1 = 292oN, k = 28, A95 = 13o, N = 6 ; C2: lambdaC2 = -25oN, phiC2 = 83oE, k= 11, A95 = 16o, N = 9. 40Ar/39Ar data suggest a magnetization age ranging from 2.04 to 1.97 Ga and 2.10 to 2.00 Ga for the poles from for the French Guyana and Ivory-Coast, respectively. Two Paleoproterozoic APWPs are proposed for these two shields. The comparison of these two paths confirms that the two cratons were intergrated to a same block at about 2.00 Ga and, however, separated before 2.02 Ga. This hypothesis is supported by field geological and tectonic observations. Nevertheless, more paleomagnetic and geochronological constaints are needed

  17. [Private companies: an opportunity for hepatitis B virus (HBV) prevention and care in Ivory Coast in the wake of HIV/AIDS?].

    PubMed

    Bekelynck, A

    2015-02-01

    In the 1990s, defenders of "aids exceptionnalism" have promised that the inequities caused by HIV/AIDS could provide leverage in the care of other health issues later. Fifteen years later, this argument can be rethought at the light of the current context of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in Ivory Coast. In fact, in this country, the challenges caused by HBVecho those of HIV/AIDS fifteen years ago: high prevalence (8-10%), ignorance of the disease, and high cost of care. To this end, this article compares the role of private companies in the fights against HIV/AIDS in the 2000s and its role in the fight against HBV today. Although some private firms played a critical role in the promotion of universal access to ART, today, they are one of the few places where HBV screening, vaccination and treatment are offered in the country. HIV/AIDS opened the door for private companies to address other diseases through their health care systems. However, many challenges still need to be met: the absence of qualitative ongoing training for health professionals, illness representations and the costs of treatments, which are all related to the lack of international and national collective action. In Ivory Coast, at the early stage of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, national authorities took up the leadership in the fight against AIDS in West Africa, by developing extraverted strategies (Xth ICASA's organization, Unaids initiative hosting). The exceptional international mobilization and the creation of innovative funding mechanisms [International Therapeutic Solidarity Fund (ITSF), Global Fund (GM), and President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR)] have facilitated easy access to ARV. Although 380 million people are infected by chronic HBV in the world, even so, international and national collective actions are fledgling and remained weak. Moreover, private firms have represented leverage for testing, treatment, and the provision of universal access to medication in the context of the HIV

  18. Computerized Buckling Analysis of Shells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    bl block nurmber) Shells Composites Buckl ing Stiffened Numerical Methods Elastic-Plastic Nonlinear Survey 20 AES’RACT (Con’inue on re, ense Ride If...Contract F33615-76-C-3105. The work was completed under Task 2307NI, "Basic Research in Behavior of Metallic and Composite Components of Airframe Struc...and Internal Pressure ....... ................. ... 134 Stiffened Cylindrical Shells Under Combined Loading .... ........ 136 - Buckling of Composite

  19. Rotating thin-shell wormhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovgun, A.

    2016-11-01

    We construct a rotating thin-shell wormhole using a Myers-Perry black hole in five dimensions, using the Darmois-Israel junction conditions. The stability of the wormhole is analyzed under perturbations. We find that exotic matter is required at the throat of the wormhole to keep it stable. Our analysis shows that stability of the rotating thin-shell wormhole is possible if suitable parameter values are chosen.

  20. Nematic textures in spherical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitelli, V.; Nelson, D. R.

    2006-08-01

    The equilibrium texture of nematic shells is studied as a function of their thickness. For ultrathin shells the ground state has four short (1)/(2) disclination lines but, as the thickness of the film increases, a three-dimensional escaped configuration composed of two pairs of half-hedgehogs becomes energetically favorable. We derive an exact solution for the nematic ground state in the one Frank constant approximation and study the stability of the corresponding texture against thermal fluctuations.

  1. Triton shells of intact erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sheetz, M P; Sawyer, D

    1978-01-01

    About 40% of human erythrocyte membrane protein is resistant to solubilization in 0.5% Triton X-114. These components comprise a structure called a Triton shell roughly similar in size and shape to the original erythrocyte and thus constitute a cytoskeleton. With increasing concentrations of Triton the lipid content of the Triton shell decreases dramatically, whereas the majority of the protein components remain constant. Exceptions to this rule include proteins contained in band 3, the presumed anion channel, and in band 4 which decrease with increasing Triton concentration. The Triton-insoluble complex includes spectrin (bands 1 and 2), actin (band 5), and bands 3' and 7. Component 3' has an apparent molecular weight of 88,000 daltons as does 3; but unlike 3, it is insensitive to protease treatment of the intact cell, has a low extinction coefficient at 280 nm, and is solubilized from the shells in alkaline water solutions. Component 7 also has a low extinction coefficient at 280 nm. Spectrin alone is solubilized from the Triton shells in isotonic media. The solubilized spectrin contains no bound Triton and coelectrophoreses with spectrin eluted in hypotonic solutions from ghosts. Electron micrographs of fixed Triton shells stained with uranyl acetate show the presence of numerous filaments which appear beaded and are 80--120 A in diameter. The filaments cannot be composed mainly af actin, but enough spectrin is present to form the filaments. Triton shells may provide an excellent source of material useful in the investigation of the erythrocyte cytoskeleton.

  2. Time-resolved microscopy reveals the driving mechanism of particle formation during ultrashort pulse laser ablation of dentin-like ivory.

    PubMed

    Domke, Matthias; Gavrilova, Anna; Rapp, Stephan; Frentzen, Matthias; Meister, Joerg; Huber, Heinz P

    2015-07-01

    In dental health care, the application of ultrashort laser pulses enables dental tissue ablation free from thermal side effects, such as melting and cracking. However, these laser types create undesired micro- and nanoparticles, which might cause a health risk for the patient or surgeon. The aim of this study was to investigate the driving mechanisms of micro- and nanoparticle formation during ultrashort pulse laser ablation of dental tissue. Time-resolved microscopy was chosen to observe the ablation dynamics of mammoth ivory after irradiation with 660 fs laser pulses. The results suggest that nanoparticles might arise in the excited region. The thermal expansion of the excited material induces high pressure in the surrounding bulk tissue, generating a pressure wave. The rarefaction wave behind this pressure wave causes spallation, leading to ejection of microparticles.

  3. Time-resolved microscopy reveals the driving mechanism of particle formation during ultrashort pulse laser ablation of dentin-like ivory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domke, Matthias; Gavrilova, Anna; Rapp, Stephan; Frentzen, Matthias; Meister, Joerg; Huber, Heinz P.

    2015-07-01

    In dental health care, the application of ultrashort laser pulses enables dental tissue ablation free from thermal side effects, such as melting and cracking. However, these laser types create undesired micro- and nanoparticles, which might cause a health risk for the patient or surgeon. The aim of this study was to investigate the driving mechanisms of micro- and nanoparticle formation during ultrashort pulse laser ablation of dental tissue. Time-resolved microscopy was chosen to observe the ablation dynamics of mammoth ivory after irradiation with 660 fs laser pulses. The results suggest that nanoparticles might arise in the excited region. The thermal expansion of the excited material induces high pressure in the surrounding bulk tissue, generating a pressure wave. The rarefaction wave behind this pressure wave causes spallation, leading to ejection of microparticles.

  4. The role of savannas in the terrestrial Si cycle: A case-study from Lamto, Ivory Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandre, A. E.; Abbadie, L.

    2011-12-01

    Savannas currently occupy a fifth of the earth's land surface and are predicted to expand in the next few centuries at the expense of tropical forests, mainly as a result of deforestation and human fires. Can such a vegetation trend impact, through changes in plant Si cycling, the lithogenic silicon (LSi) release into soils (through chemical weathering) and the net dissolved Si (DSi) outputs from soils to stream water (through chemical denudation)? The first step of an investigation requires quantifying the net Si fluxes involved in the plant/soil system. Here, a schematic steady-state Si cycle, established for a tropical humid savanna (Lamto, Ivory Coast) that developed on a ferruginous soil and is subjected to annual fires, is presented. Erosion was assumed to be insignificant. LSi and biogenic Si (BSi under the form of phytoliths) pools were measured, and Si fluxes were estimated from Si concentrations and mass balance calculation. Identification of plant and soil phytoliths indicated that the soil BSi pool is in equilibrium with the current BSi input by the savanna. In the soil column, mixing between a young rapidly recycled BSi pool and an old stable BSi pool is attested by a mixing line equation. Storage of the old BSi pool is assimilated as a BSi output from the plant/soil system. A BSi output additionally occurs after annual fires, when ashes are exported. Both BSi outputs decrease as much the BSi dissolution. In order to uptake constant DSi flux, the savanna increases by three to eight times the net LSi release, depending upon the post-fire ash exportation scenario. A comparison between savanna and rainforest Si cycles that maximizes the differences in plant/soil systems and minimizes differences in climate is presented. The comparison revealed that BSi storage is higher in the savanna soil than in the rainforest soil, mainly due to BSi production that is twice higher in the savanna (127 vs 67 kg/ha/yr). The resulting LSi release that is enhanced by plant

  5. The role of savannas in the terrestrial Si cycle: A case-study from Lamto, Ivory Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandre, Anne; Bouvet, Mickael; Abbadie, Luc

    2011-08-01

    Savannas currently occupy a fifth of the earth's land surface and are predicted to expand in the next few centuries at the expense of tropical forests, mainly as a result of deforestation and human fires. Can such a vegetation trend impact, through changes in plant Si cycling, the lithogenic silicon (LSi) release into soils (through chemical weathering) and the net dissolved Si (DSi) outputs from soils to stream water (through chemical denudation)? The first step of an investigation requires quantifying the net Si fluxes involved in the plant/soil system. Here, a schematic steady-state Si cycle, established for a tropical humid savanna (Lamto, Ivory Coast) that developed on a ferruginous soil and is subjected to annual fires, is presented. Erosion was assumed to be insignificant. LSi and biogenic Si (BSi under the form of phytoliths) pools were measured, and Si fluxes were estimated from Si concentrations and mass balance calculation. Identification of plant and soil phytoliths indicated that the soil BSi pool is in equilibrium with the current BSi input by the savanna. In the soil column, mixing between a young rapidly recycled BSi pool and an old stable BSi pool is attested by a mixing line equation. Storage of the old BSi pool is assimilated as a BSi output from the plant/soil system. A BSi output additionally occurs after annual fires, when ashes are exported. Both BSi outputs decrease as much the BSi dissolution. In order to uptake constant DSi flux, the savanna increases by three to eight times the net LSi release, depending upon the post-fire ash exportation scenario. A comparison between savanna and rainforest Si cycles that maximizes the differences in plant/soil systems and minimizes differences in climate is presented. The comparison revealed that BSi storage is higher in the savanna soil than in the rainforest soil, mainly due to BSi production that is twice higher in the savanna (127 vs 67 kg/ha/yr). The resulting LSi release that is enhanced by plant

  6. Semiclassical environment of collapsing shells

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Kinjal; Paranjape, Aseem

    2009-12-15

    We explore in detail the semiclassical environment of collapsing shells of matter, and determine the semiclassical flux measured by a variety of observers. This study is a preliminary step in a broader investigation of thermodynamic properties of the geometry of collapsing objects. Specifically, in this paper we consider spherically symmetric null and timelike collapsing shells which form an event horizon, and calculate the flux measured by observers both inside and outside the shell, and both inside and outside the event horizon, and find nontrivial results in most of the cases. Additionally, we also investigate the environment of a shell which collapses but does not form a horizon, halting at some radius larger than the Schwarzschild radius, and find that such an object generically gives rise to a pulse of radiation which is sharply peaked as it travels inwards and is reflected at the origin, and eventually emerges from the shell in a thermalized form. Our results have potential consequences in addressing questions pertaining, e.g. to black hole entropy and backreaction.

  7. Shell models of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plunian, Franck; Stepanov, Rodion; Frick, Peter

    2013-02-01

    Shell models of hydrodynamic turbulence originated in the seventies. Their main aim was to describe the statistics of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence in spectral space, using a simple set of ordinary differential equations. In the eighties, shell models of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence emerged based on the same principles as their hydrodynamic counter-part but also incorporating interactions between magnetic and velocity fields. In recent years, significant improvements have been made such as the inclusion of non-local interactions and appropriate definitions for helicities. Though shell models cannot account for the spatial complexity of MHD turbulence, their dynamics are not over simplified and do reflect those of real MHD turbulence including intermittency or chaotic reversals of large-scale modes. Furthermore, these models use realistic values for dimensionless parameters (high kinetic and magnetic Reynolds numbers, low or high magnetic Prandtl number) allowing extended inertial range and accurate dissipation rate. Using modern computers it is difficult to attain an inertial range of three decades with direct numerical simulations, whereas eight are possible using shell models. In this review we set up a general mathematical framework allowing the description of any MHD shell model. The variety of the latter, with their advantages and weaknesses, is introduced. Finally we consider a number of applications, dealing with free-decaying MHD turbulence, dynamo action, Alfvén waves and the Hall effect.

  8. Foam shell project: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Overturf, G.; Reibold, B.; Cook, B.; Schroen-Carey, D.

    1994-03-25

    The authors report on their work to produce a foam shell target for two possible applications: (1) as liquid-layered cryogenic target on Omega Upgrade, and (2) as a back-up design for the NIF. This target consists of a roughly 1 mm diameter and 100 {mu}m thick spherical low-density foam shell surrounding a central void. The foam will be slightly overfilled with liquid D{sub 2} or DT, the overfilled excess being symmetrically distributed on the inside of the shell and supported by thermal gradient techniques. The outside of the foam is overcoated with full density polymer which must be topologically smooth. The technology for manufacturing this style of foam shell involves microencapsulation techniques and has been developed by the Japanese at ILE. Their goal is to determine whether this technology can be successfully adapted to meet US ICF objectives. To this end a program of foam shell development has been initiated at LLNL in collaboration with both the General Atomics DOE Target Fabrication Contract Corporation and the Target Fabrication Group at LLE.

  9. Closed-shell and open-shell 2D nanographenes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhe; Wu, Jishan

    2014-01-01

    This chapter describes a series of two-dimensional (2D) expanded arene networks, also known as nanographenes, with either closed-shell or open-shell electronic structure in the ground state. These systems are further categorized into three classes on a basis of different edge structures: those with zigzag edges only, those with armchair edges only, and those possessing both. Distinctive physical properties of these 2D aromatic systems are closely related to their structural characteristics and provide great potential for them as materials for different applications.

  10. Leaving the Ivory Tower

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCarlo, Carmine

    2010-01-01

    It all began with casual conversation between a university supervisor and classroom teachers and approval to use an unused classroom at a local elementary school. The space became the hub of an exciting professional development (PD) opportunity for classroom teachers. This article describes how hosting an on-site university science methods course…

  11. Scaling the Ivory Tower

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Jamal Eric

    2011-01-01

    It used to be that newly minted Ph.D.s had to establish themselves and cut their academic teeth at less competitive colleges and universities. That was certainly true for young Black scholars. The prospects of landing a coveted teaching position at one of the nation's eight Ivy League institutions were dim. In the years leading up to the Civil…

  12. Engineers and Ivory Towers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heterick, Robert C., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The winner of the 1994 CAUSE Award for Exemplary Leadership and Information Technology Excellence offers his view of information technology, resources, and management. Engineering principles are applied to information technology issues, such as access versus security and client/server versus mainframe systems. College/university information…

  13. Plastic buckling of cylindrical shells

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, K.; Xu, J.; Shteyngart, S.; Eckert, H.

    1994-05-01

    Cylindrical shells exhibit buckling under axial loads at stresses much less than the respective theoretical critical stresses. This is due primarily to the presence of geometrical imperfections even through such imperfections could be very small (e.g., comparable to thickness). Under internal pressure, the shell regains some of its buckling strength. For a relatively large radius-to-tickness ratio and low internal pressure, the effect can be reasonably estimated by an elastic analysis. However, for low radius-to-thickness ratios and greater pressures, the elastic-plastic collapse controls the failure load. In order to quantify the elastic-plastic buckling capacity of cylindrical shells, an analysis program was carried out by use of the computer code BOSOR5 developed by Bushnell of Lockheed Missiles and Space company. The analysis was performed for various radius-to- thickness ratios and imperfection amplitudes. The analysis results are presented in this paper.

  14. Asymptotic safety goes on shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, Dario

    2012-01-01

    It is well known in quantum field theory that the off-shell effective action depends on the gauge choice and field parametrization used in calculating it. Nevertheless, the typical scheme in which the scenario of asymptotically safe gravity is investigated is an off-shell version of the functional renormalization group equation. Working with the Einstein-Hilbert truncation as a test bed, we develop a new scheme for the analysis of asymptotically safe gravity in which the on-shell part of the effective action is singled out and we show that the beta function for the essential coupling has no explicit gauge dependence. In order to reach our goal, we introduce several technical novelties, including a different decomposition of the metric fluctuations, a new implementation of the ghost sector and a new cut-off scheme. We find a nontrivial fixed point, with a value of the cosmological constant that is independent of the gauge-fixing parameters.

  15. Conservation genetics of high-arctic Gull species at risk: I. Diversity in the mtDNA control region of circumpolar populations of the Endangered Ivory Gull (Pagophila eburnea).

    PubMed

    Royston, Stephanie R; Carr, Steven M

    2016-11-01

    The high-arctic Ivory Gull (Pagophila eburnea) has recently undergone a sharp decline in numbers, and in Canada it is listed as "Endangered" under the Species-At-Risk Act. To test for circumpolar genetic distinctiveness, we examined 264 bp of the mtDNA Control Region Domain I from 127 museum specimens collected during the breeding season from northern Canada, Greenland, and Norway, and during the non-breeding season from adjacent overwintering grounds in Canada, Greenland, and a disjunct area in Alaska adjacent to the Bering Sea. Partition of genetic variance according to various phylogeographic and breeding ground models indicates no strong population structure, except that Alaska birds are consistently differentiated from other locations, and there are significant temporal shifts in haplotype frequencies. The evidence suggests that Ivory Gulls in Canada, Greenland, and Norway are a single genetic entity, in contrast to Alaska birds, which may represent a distinctive Siberian population.

  16. Glass shell manufacturing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolen, R. L., Jr.; Ebner, M. A.; Downs, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    A heat transfer model was developed that mathematically describes the heating and calculates the thermal history of a gel particle in free-fall through the furnace. The model parameters that greatly affect the calculations were found to be gel particle mass, geometry, specific heat, and furnace gas. Empirical testing of the model has commenced. The code calculations and the initial empirical testing results both indicate that the gel-to-shell transformation occurs early and rapidly in the thermal history of the gel particle, and that for current work the heat transfer rate is not a limitation in shell production.

  17. On Closed Shells in Nuclei

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Mayer, M. G.

    1948-02-01

    It has been suggested in the past that special numbers of neutrons or protons in the nucleus form a particularly stable configuration.{sup1} The complete evidence for this has never been summarized, nor is it generally recognized how convincing this evidence is. That 20 neutrons or protons (Ca{sup40}) form a closed shell is predicted by the Hartree model. A number of calculations support this fact.{sup2} These considerations will not be repeated here. In this paper, the experimental facts indicating a particular stability of shells of 50 and 82 protons and of 50, 82, and 126 neutrons will be listed.

  18. Shell may expand detergent alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-23

    Shell Chemical is studying plans to expand detergent alcohols capacity in the US, CW has learned. The company is considering adding capacity for about 80 million lbs/year. If the project is approved, it would be implemented at the company`s Geismar, LA site. Shell will make a final decision on whether to proceed with the project within six months. It has been rumored to be considering a capacity addition as a result of tightening supply of natural and synthetic detergent alcohols.

  19. Shell Games: Uncovering Periodic Properties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, William G.

    1983-01-01

    Describes activities (demonstrations/experiments) used to introduce history of periodic properties--without electrons, orbitals, filling shells, or any conception of atoms beyond Dalton's model. Activities supplement first chapter in a currently available chemistry text. Indicates potential danger of experiments if proper safety precautions are…

  20. Finite element shell instability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Formulation procedures and the associated computer program for finite element thin shell instability analysis are discussed. Data cover: (1) formulation of basic element relationships, (2) construction of solution algorithms on both the conceptual and algorithmic levels, and (3) conduction of numerical analyses to verify the accuracy and efficiency of the theory and related programs therein are described.

  1. Recent advances in shell theory. [application of asymptotic approach to thin walled shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmonds, J. G.

    1976-01-01

    The results reviewed are divided into two categories: those that relate two-dimensional shell theory to three-dimensional elasticity theory and those concerned with shell theory per se. In the second category results for general elastic systems that carry over, by specialization or analogy, to shells and results that are unique to shell theory itself are considered.

  2. 7 CFR 981.6 - Shelled almonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Shelled almonds. 981.6 Section 981.6 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 981.6 Shelled almonds. Shelled almonds mean raw or roasted almonds...

  3. 7 CFR 981.6 - Shelled almonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Shelled almonds. 981.6 Section 981.6 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 981.6 Shelled almonds. Shelled almonds mean raw or roasted almonds...

  4. 7 CFR 981.6 - Shelled almonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Shelled almonds. 981.6 Section 981.6 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 981.6 Shelled almonds. Shelled almonds mean raw or roasted almonds...

  5. 7 CFR 981.6 - Shelled almonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Shelled almonds. 981.6 Section 981.6 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 981.6 Shelled almonds. Shelled almonds mean raw or roasted almonds...

  6. 7 CFR 981.6 - Shelled almonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shelled almonds. 981.6 Section 981.6 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 981.6 Shelled almonds. Shelled almonds mean raw or roasted almonds...

  7. Protein profiles of hatchery egg shell membrane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Eggshells, which consist largely of calcareous outer shell and shell membranes, constitute a significant part of poultry hatchery waste. The shell membranes (ESM) not only contain proteins that originate from egg whites but also from the developing embryos and different contaminants of m...

  8. 7 CFR 983.29 - Shelled pistachios.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Shelled pistachios. 983.29 Section 983.29 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA, ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Definitions § 983.29 Shelled pistachios. Shelled pistachios means...

  9. 7 CFR 983.29 - Shelled pistachios.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Shelled pistachios. 983.29 Section 983.29 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA, ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Definitions § 983.29 Shelled pistachios. Shelled pistachios means...

  10. 7 CFR 983.29 - Shelled pistachios.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Shelled pistachios. 983.29 Section 983.29 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA, ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Definitions § 983.29 Shelled pistachios. Shelled pistachios means...

  11. Thin-shell wormholes in dilaton gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Eiroa, Ernesto F.; Simeone, Claudio

    2005-06-15

    In this work we construct charged thin-shell Lorentzian wormholes in dilaton gravity. The exotic matter required for the construction is localized in the shell and the energy conditions are satisfied outside the shell. The total amount of exotic matter is calculated and its dependence with the parameters of the model is analyzed.

  12. Developments in Cylindrical Shell Stability Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Today high-performance computing systems and new analytical and numerical techniques enable engineers to explore the use of advanced materials for shell design. This paper reviews some of the historical developments of shell buckling analysis and design. The paper concludes by identifying key research directions for reliable and robust methods development in shell stability analysis and design.

  13. 7 CFR 984.10 - Shelled walnuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Shelled walnuts. 984.10 Section 984.10 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 984.10 Shelled walnuts. Shelled walnuts means walnut kernels after...

  14. 7 CFR 984.10 - Shelled walnuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shelled walnuts. 984.10 Section 984.10 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 984.10 Shelled walnuts. Shelled walnuts means walnut kernels after...

  15. 7 CFR 984.10 - Shelled walnuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Shelled walnuts. 984.10 Section 984.10 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 984.10 Shelled walnuts. Shelled walnuts means walnut kernels after...

  16. 7 CFR 984.10 - Shelled walnuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Shelled walnuts. 984.10 Section 984.10 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 984.10 Shelled walnuts. Shelled walnuts means walnut kernels after...

  17. 7 CFR 984.10 - Shelled walnuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Shelled walnuts. 984.10 Section 984.10 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 984.10 Shelled walnuts. Shelled walnuts means walnut kernels after...

  18. Cacao bean shell poisoning in a dog.

    PubMed

    Drolet, R; Arendt, T D; Stowe, C M

    1984-10-15

    Cacao bean shells contain potentially toxic quantities of theobromine, a xanthine compound similar in effects to caffeine and theophylline. A dog, which ingested a lethal quantity of garden mulch made from cacao bean shells, developed severe convulsions and died 17 hours later. Analysis of the stomach contents and the ingested cacao bean shells revealed the presence of lethal amounts of theobromine.

  19. Vibrations of cantilevered circular cylindrical shells Shallow versus deep shell theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. K.; Leissa, A. W.; Wang, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Free vibrations of cantilevered circular cylindrical shells having rectangular planforms are studied in this paper by means of the Ritz method. The deep shell theory of Novozhilov and Goldenveizer is used and compared with the usual shallow shell theory for a wide range of shell parameters. A thorough convergence study is presented along with comparisons to previously published finite element solutions and experimental results. Accurately computed frequency parameters and mode shapes for various shell configurations are presented. The present paper appears to be the first comprehensive study presenting rigorous comparisons between the two shell theories in dealing with free vibrations of cantilevered cylindrical shells.

  20. Shell Model Depiction of Isospin Mixing in sd Shell

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Yi Hua; Smirnova, Nadya A.; Caurier, Etienne

    2011-11-30

    We constructed a new empirical isospin-symmetry breaking (ISB) Hamiltonian in the sd(1s{sub 1/2}, 0d{sub 5/2} and 0d{sub 3/2}) shell-model space. In this contribution, we present its application to two important case studies: (i){beta}-delayed proton emission from {sup 22}Al and (ii) isospin-mixing correction to superallowed 0{sup +}{yields}0{sup +}{beta}-decay ft-values.

  1. Assessment of Mycotoxin Exposure in Côte d’ivoire (Ivory Coast) Through Multi-Biomarker Analysis and Possible Correlation with Food Consumption Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Kouadio, James Halbin; Lattanzio, Veronica M. T.; Ouattara, Djeneba; Kouakou, Brou; Visconti, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Scope: The aim of the presented study was to investigate the mycotoxin exposure of Ivorian population related to the consumption patterns of maize, peanuts, millet, and cassava product (attiéké). Materials and Methods: Maize flour samples (n = 51) were purchased from all Abidjan local markets, in the south of Ivory Coast, and urine (n = 99) was collected during the same reference period (July–September 2011) from volunteers living in Abidjan and Daloa cities. Reversed-phase liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) was used to analyze aflatoxins (AFB1, AFB2, AFG1, and AFG2), ochratoxin A (OTA), fumonisins (FB1, FB2), deoxynivalenol (DON), zearalenone (ZEA), and T-2 and HT-2 toxins in maize flour samples, and their relevant biomarkers (AFM1, DON, DON + de-epoxydeoxynivalenol (DOM-1), FB1, α-zearalenol (ZOL), β-ZOL, and OTA) in urine samples. Results: Critical maize contamination was observed by AFs occurrence (total AFs 4.5 – 330.0 μg/kg) while OTA was found in 13% of samples analyzed. AFM1 was detected in 40% of urines samples (0.06 – 14.11 ng/ml), OTA in 37% (0.01 – 0.42 ng/ml), FB1 in 27% (0.07 to 15.31 ng/ml) and, DON was found in 21% of samples at levels up to 10.0 ng/ml. The correlation coefficients (R2) obtained by plotting the percentage of biomarker occurrence (positive samples) versus the frequency of food consumption revealed maize, peanuts, millet and attiéké were strongly linked to AFB1 and OTA exposure with values of R2 ranged from 0.462 to 0.956. Conclusion: The present study provided data on mycotoxin risk in Ivory Coast, revealing a frequent co-exposure to the major mycotoxins such as AFs, OTA, and fumonisins, which appeared to be related to the frequency of peanuts, maize, millet and attiéké consumption. PMID:25948962

  2. Pressure Shell Approach to Integrated Environmental Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Kriss J.

    2011-01-01

    The next generation of exploration mission human systems will require environmental protection such as radiation protection that is effective and efficient. In order to continue human exploration, habitat systems will require special shells to protect astronauts from hostile environments. The Pressure Shell Approach to integrated environmental (radiation) protection is a multi-layer shell that can be used for multifunctional environmental protection. Self-healing, self-repairing nano technologies and sensors are incorporated into the shell. This shell consists of multiple layers that can be tailored for specific environmental protection needs. Mainly, this innovation focuses on protecting crew from exposure to micrometeorites, thermal, solar flares, and galactic cosmic ray (GCR) radiation. The Pressure Shell Approach consists of a micrometeoroid and secondary ejecta protection layer; a thin, composite shell placed in between two layers that is non-structural; an open cavity layer that can be filled with water, regolith, or polyethylene foam; a thicker composite shell that is a structural load bearing that is placed between two layers; and a bladder coating on the interior composite shell. This multi-layer shell creates an effective radiation protection system. Most of its layers can be designed with the materials necessary for specific environments. In situ materials such as water or regolith can be added to the shell design for supplemental radiation protection.

  3. Shell Model Approach to Nuclear Level Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horoi, Mihai

    2000-04-01

    Nuclear level densities (NLD) are traditionally estimated using variations of Fermi Gas Formula (FGF) or combinatoric techniques. Recent investigations using Monte Carlo Shell Model (MCSM) techniques indicate that a shell model description of NLD may be an accurate and stable approach. Full shell model calculations of NLD are very difficult. We calculated the NLD for all nuclei in the sd shell and show that the results can be described by a single particle combinatoric model, which depends on two parameters similar to FGF. We further investigated other models and find that a sum of gaussians with means and variances given by French and Ratcliff averages (Phys. Rev. C 3, 94(1971)) is able to accurately describe shell model NLD, even when shell effects are present. The contribution of the spurious center-of-mass motion to the shell model NLD is also discussed.

  4. Turbine blade with spar and shell

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, Daniel O; Peterson, Ross H

    2012-04-24

    A turbine blade with a spar and shell construction in which the spar and the shell are both secured within two platform halves. The spar and the shell each include outward extending ledges on the bottom ends that fit within grooves formed on the inner sides of the platform halves to secure the spar and the shell against radial movement when the two platform halves are joined. The shell is also secured to the spar by hooks extending from the shell that slide into grooves formed on the outer surface of the spar. The hooks form a serpentine flow cooling passage between the shell and the spar. The spar includes cooling holes on the lower end in the leading edge region to discharge cooling air supplied through the platform root and into the leading edge cooling channel.

  5. The shell coal gasification process

    SciTech Connect

    Koenders, L.O.M.; Zuideveld, P.O.

    1995-12-01

    Future Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (ICGCC) power plants will have superior environmental performance and efficiency. The Shell Coal Gasification Process (SCGP) is a clean coal technology, which can convert a wide range of coals into clean syngas for high efficiency electricity generation in an ICGCC plant. SCGP flexibility has been demonstrated for high-rank bituminous coals to low rank lignites and petroleum coke, and the process is well suited for combined cycle power generation, resulting in efficiencies of 42 to 46% (LHV), depending on choice of coal and gas turbine efficiency. In the Netherlands, a 250 MWe coal gasification combined cycle plant based on Shell technology has been built by Demkolec, a development partnership of the Dutch Electricity Generating Board (N.V. Sep). The construction of the unit was completed end 1993 and is now followed by start-up and a 3 year demonstration period, after that the plant will be part of the Dutch electricity generating system.

  6. Glass shell manufacturing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolen, R. L.; Downs, R. L.; Ebner, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    Highly-uniform, hollow glass spheres, which are used for inertial-confinement fusion targets, are formed from metal-organic gel powder feedstock in a drop-tower furnace. The modelling of this gel-to-sphere transformation has consisted of three phases: gel thermochemistry, furnance-to-gel heat transfer, and gravity-driven degradation of the concentricity of the molten shell. The heat transfer from the furnace to the free-falling gel particle was modelled with forced convection. The gel mass, dimensions, and specific heat as well as furnace temperature profile and furnace gas conductivity, were controlled variables. This model has been experimentally verified. In the third phase, a mathematical model was developed to describe the gravity-driven degradation of concentricity in molten glass shells.

  7. Density Measurements of Be Shells

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, R C

    2005-02-15

    The purpose of this memo is to lay out the uncertainties associated with the measurement of density of Be ablators by the weigh and volume method. I am counting on the readers to point out any faulty assumptions about the techniques or uncertainties associated with them. Based on the analysis presented below we should expect that 30 {micro}m thick shells will have an uncertainty in the measured density of about 2% of the value, coming more or less equally from the mass and volume measurement. The uncertainty is roughly inversely proportional to the coating thickness, thus a 60 {micro}m walled shell would result in a 1% uncertainty in the density.

  8. Shell Evolutions and Nuclear Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorlin, O.

    2014-03-01

    During the last 30 years, and more specifically during the last 10 years, many experiments have been carried out worldwide using different techniques to study the shell evolution of nuclei far from stability. What seemed not conceivable some decades ago became rather common: all known magic numbers that are present in the valley of stability disappear far from stability and are replaced by new ones at the drip line. By gathering selected experimental results, beautifully consistent pictures emerge, that very likely take root in the properties of the nuclear forces.The present manuscript describes some of these discoveries and proposes an intuitive understanding of these shell evolutions derived from observations. Extrapolations to yet unstudied regions, as where the explosive r-process nucleosynthesis occurs, are proposed. Some remaining challenges and puzzling questions are also addressed.

  9. Buckling of spherical shells revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchinson, John W.

    2016-11-01

    A study is presented of the post-buckling behaviour and imperfection sensitivity of complete spherical shells subject to uniform external pressure. The study builds on and extends the major contribution to spherical shell buckling by Koiter in the 1960s. Numerical results are presented for the axisymmetric large deflection behaviour of perfect spheres followed by an extensive analysis of the role axisymmetric imperfections play in reducing the buckling pressure. Several types of middle surface imperfections are considered including dimple-shaped undulations and sinusoidal-shaped equatorial undulations. Buckling occurs either as the attainment of a maximum pressure in the axisymmetric state or as a non-axisymmetric bifurcation from the axisymmetric state. Several new findings emerge: the abrupt mode localization that occurs immediately after the onset of buckling, the existence of an apparent lower limit to the buckling pressure for realistically large imperfections, and comparable reductions of the buckling pressure for dimple and sinusoidal equatorial imperfections.

  10. Shell's Middle Distillate Synthesis process

    SciTech Connect

    Voetter, H.; VanDerBurgt, M.J. B.V., The Hague )

    1988-01-01

    The basis of the Shell Middle Distillate Synthesis (SMDS) process is the classic Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. For the case of middle distillate production from natural gas the procedure has been developed to commercial maturity, making use of tailored line-up for synthesis gas production and of proprietary modern catalysts in synthesis. Development work over the last years has in particular lead to improvement of the economy of the process altogether via catalyst performance, reactor sizing and syngas manufacturing line-up.

  11. Vibration Control of Shallow Shell Structures Using a Shell-Type Dynamic Vibration Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aida, T.; Aso, T.; Nakamoto, K.; Kawazoe, K.

    1998-11-01

    In this study, a new shell-type dynamic vibration absorber is presented for suppressing several modes of vibration of the shallow shell (main shell) under harmonic load. It consists of a shallow shell (the dynamic absorbing shell), under the same boundary condition and with the same shape as those of the main shell, with connecting springs and dampers in the vertical direction between the main and dynamic absorbing shells. Formulae for an approximate tuning method for the shell-type dynamic absorber are also presented using the optimum tuning method for a dynamic absorber in the two-degree-of-freedom system, obtained by the Den Hartog method. Subsequently, numerical calculations are presented which demonstrate the usefulness of the shell-type dynamic vibration absorbers.

  12. Atomic inner-shell transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crasemann, B.; Chen, M. H.; Mark, H.

    1984-01-01

    Atomic inner-shell processes have quite different characteristics, in several important aspects, from processes in the optical regime. Energies are large, e.g., the 1s binding energy reaches 100 keV at Z = 87; relativistic and quantum-electrodynamic effects therefore are strong. Radiationless transitions vastly dominate over photon emission in most cases. Isolated inner-shell vacancies have pronounced single-particle character, with correlations generally contributing only approximately 1 eV to the 1s and 2p binding energies; the structure of such systems is thus well tractable by independent-particle self-consistent-field atomic models. For systems containing multiple deep inner-shell vacancies, or for highly stripped ions, the importance of relativistic intermediate coupling and configuration interaction becomes pronounced. Cancellation of the Coulomb interaction can lead to strong manifestations of the Breit interaction in such phenomena as multiplet splitting and hypersatellite X-ray shifts. Unique opportunities arise for the test of theory.

  13. Health cooperation in an hospital of a rural area of Ivory Coast: analysis of the priorities and of the different levels at which cooperation can take place.

    PubMed

    Brusamolino, Ercole; Maffi, Guido

    2004-01-01

    This paper critically reviews an experience of health cooperation in an hospital of a rural area of Ivory Coast. This particular situation is analysed in the more general frame of health problems in low-income countries and may suggest priorities for international health cooperation. The analysis of the main causes of avoidable death in poor countries does indicate targets and tools of intervention. In this case, the target was the reduction of infant mortality from anaemia of different origin and from HIV-1 mother-to-infant transmission. The major tool for intervention was the partnership between an Italian teaching and research hospital and the African hospital, with the catalyst of a non-governmental organisation. This paper analyses the different levels at which cooperation developed in this project, from sheer economic support to the implementation of disease-oriented twinning programs that can improve health care and strengthen research capacity on both sides. Besides, medical, ethical and social implications of the ongoing cooperation program are discussed, with particular reference to the problems of preventing mortality from severe anaemia (diet fortification in children and pregnancy and transfusional guidelines in severe malaria) and of preventing mother-to-child neonatal transmission of HIV-1 infection (counselling and testing pregnant women for HIV-1, nevirapine administering to the mother and the baby and breast-feeding).

  14. Primate remains from African crowned eagle (Stephanoaetus coronatus) nests in Ivory Coast's Tai Forest: implications for primate predation and early hominid taphonomy in South Africa.

    PubMed

    McGraw, W Scott; Cooke, Catherine; Shultz, Susanne

    2006-10-01

    Understanding the initial processes of deposition can help with interpretations of fossil assemblages. Here we discuss the taphonomy of primate remains collected under 16 nests of African crowned eagles (Stephanoaetus coronatus) in the Tai Forest, Ivory Coast. From 1,200 bones collected, including 669 primate bones, we calculated minimum number of individuals (MNI), survivability profiles, and damage profiles using methods identical to those employed by Sanders et al. (2003 J. Hum. Evol. 44:87-105) in their analysis of bones from eagle nests in Uganda. Crowned eagles leave a consistent taphonomic signature on their prey remains; hence, results from our analysis of the Tai assemblage are similar to those from the Ugandan sample. Hindlimb and cranial bones are relatively abundant in the sample, while ribs, vertebrae, carpals, and tarsals do not survive well. Primate crania typically display puncture marks around the eye, long bones remain largely intact, and scapulae exhibit raked breakage. These data have implications for understanding the dynamic between extant primates and one of their principle predators, as well as the taphonomy of hominid-bearing caves in South Africa. We concur with Berger and Clarke (1995 J. Hum. Evol. 29:275-299) that a large raptor could have been responsible for the death of the Taung child, Australopithecus africanus.

  15. Rigid shells enhance survival of gekkotan eggs.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Robin M

    2015-11-01

    The majority of lizards and snakes produce permeable parchment-shelled eggs that require high moisture conditions for successful embryonic development. One clade of gekkotan lizards is an exception; females produce relatively impermeable rigid-shelled eggs that normally incubate successfully under low moisture conditions. I tested the hypothesis that the rigid-shell increases egg survival during incubation, but only under low moisture conditions. To test this hypothesis, I incubated rigid-shelled eggs of Chondrodactylus turneri under low and under high moisture conditions. Eggs were incubated with parchment-shelled eggs of Eublepharis macularius to insure that incubation conditions were suitable for parchment-shelled eggs. Chondrodactylus turneri eggs had very high survival (>90%) when they were incubated under low moisture conditions. In contrast, eggs incubated under high moisture conditions had low survival overall, and lower survival than those of the parchment-shelled eggs of E. macularius. Mortality of C. turneri and E. macularius eggs incubated under high moisture conditions was the result of fungal infection, a common source of egg mortality for squamates under laboratory and field conditions. These observations document high survival of rigid-shelled eggs under low moisture conditions because eggs escape from fungal infection. Highly mineralized rigid shells also make egg survival independent of moisture availability and may also provide protection from small invertebrates in nature. Enhanced egg survival could thus compensate for the low reproductive output of gekkotans that produce rigid-shelled eggs.

  16. Cracked shells under skew-symmetric loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lelale, F.

    1982-01-01

    A shell containing a through crack in one of the principal planes of curvature and under general skew-symmetric loading is considered. By employing a Reissner type shell theory which takes into account the effect of transverse shear strains, all boundary conditions on the crack surfaces are satisfied separately. Consequently, unlike those obtained from the classical shell theory, the angular distributions of the stress components around the crack tips are shown to be identical to the distributions obtained from the plane and antiplane elasticity solutions. Extensive results are given for axially and circumferentially cracked cylindrical shells, spherical shells, and toroidal shells under uniform inplane shearing, out of plane shearing, and torsion. The effect of orthotropy on the results is also studied.

  17. SPSM and its application in cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Wu; Zhou, Su-Lian; Peng, Hui

    2008-03-01

    In naval architectures, the structure of prismatic shell is used widely. But there is no suitable method to analyze this kind of structure. Stiffened prismatic shell method (SPSM) presented in this paper, is one of the harmonic semi-analytic methods. Theoretically, strong stiffened structure can be analyzed economically and accurately. SPSM is based on the analytical solution of the governing differential equations for orthotropic cylindrical shells. In these differential equations, the torsional stiffness, bending stiffness and the exact position of each stiffener are taken into account with the Heaviside singular function. An algorithm is introduced, in which the actions of stiffeners on shells are replaced by external loads at each stiffener position. Stiffened shells can be computed as non-stiffened shells. Eventually, the displacement solution of the equations is acquired by the introduction of Green function. The stresses in a corrugated transverse bulkhead without pier base of an oil tanker are computed by using SPSM.

  18. Flow past a porous approximate spherical shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasacharya, D.

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, the creeping flow of an incompressible viscous liquid past a porous approximate spherical shell is considered. The flow in the free fluid region outside the shell and in the cavity region of the shell is governed by the Navier Stokes equation. The flow within the porous annulus region of the shell is governed by Darcy’s Law. The boundary conditions used at the interface are continuity of the normal velocity, continuity of the pressure and Beavers and Joseph slip condition. An exact solution for the problem is obtained. An expression for the drag on the porous approximate spherical shell is obtained. The drag experienced by the shell is evaluated numerically for several values of the parameters governing the flow.

  19. Adaptive finite element strategies for shell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, G.; Levit, I.; Stehlin, B.; Hurlbut, B.

    1992-01-01

    The present paper extends existing finite element adaptive refinement (AR) techniques to shell structures, which have heretofore been neglected in the AR literature. Specific challenges in applying AR to shell structures include: (1) physical discontinuities (e.g., stiffener intersections); (2) boundary layers; (3) sensitivity to geometric imperfections; (4) the sensitivity of most shell elements to mesh distortion, constraint definition and/or thinness; and (5) intrinsic geometric nonlinearity. All of these challenges but (5) are addressed here.

  20. Advances in shell side condensation for refrigerants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Ralph L.

    The design of shell and tube condensers used in air conditioning and refrigeration applications is discussed. The geometry of interest involves condensation on the shell side of a horizontal tube bundle. Enhanced heat transfer geometries are typically used for condensation on the shell side. The heat transfer is removed by water on the tube side, which typically have tube side enhancement. Single tube and row effect condensation data are presented. Thermal design methods for sizing of the condenser are outlined.

  1. Integrable structure in discrete shell membrane theory

    PubMed Central

    Schief, W. K.

    2014-01-01

    We present natural discrete analogues of two integrable classes of shell membranes. By construction, these discrete shell membranes are in equilibrium with respect to suitably chosen internal stresses and external forces. The integrability of the underlying equilibrium equations is proved by relating the geometry of the discrete shell membranes to discrete O surface theory. We establish connections with generalized barycentric coordinates and nine-point centres and identify a discrete version of the classical Gauss equation of surface theory. PMID:24808755

  2. Boson shells harboring charged black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta; Laemmerzahl, Claus; List, Meike

    2010-11-15

    We consider boson shells in scalar electrodynamics coupled to Einstein gravity. The interior of the shells can be empty space, or harbor a black hole or a naked singularity. We analyze the properties of these types of solutions and determine their domains of existence. We investigate the energy conditions and present mass formulae for the composite black hole-boson shell systems. We demonstrate that these types of solutions violate black hole uniqueness.

  3. Single Shell Tank (SST) Retrieval Sequence & Double Shell Tank (DST) Space Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    HOHL, T.M.

    2001-09-20

    This document describes the baseline single-shell tank (SST) waste retrieval sequence for the River Protection Project updated for Fiscal Year 2002. The double-shell tank (DST) space evaluation presents projected DST needs for Hanford for additional DSTs.

  4. Single Shell Tank (SST) Retrieval Sequence & Double Shell Tank (DST) Space Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    STRODE, J.N.

    2002-09-23

    This document describes the baseline single-shell tank (SST) waste retrieval sequence for the River Protection Project updated for Fiscal Year 2002. The double-shell tank (DST) space evaluation presents projected DST needs for Hanford for additional DSTs.

  5. Single Shell Tank (SST) Retrieval Sequence and Double Shell Tank (DST) Space Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    KIRCH, N.W.

    2003-09-23

    This document describes the baseline single-shell tank (SST) waste retrieval sequence for the River Protection Project updated for Fiscal Year 2002. The double-shell tank (DST) space evaluation presents projected DST needs for Hanford for additional DSTs.

  6. Shell boosts recovery at Kernridge

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, S.

    1984-01-01

    Since acquiring the Kernridge property in December 1979, Shell Oil Co. has drilled more than 1,800 wells and steadily increased production from 42,000 to 89,000 b/d of oil. Currently, the Kernridge Production Division of Shell California Production Inc. (SCPI), a newly formed subsidiary of Shell Oil Co., is operator for the property. The property covers approximately 35,000 mostly contiguous net acres, with production concentrated mainly on about 5,500 net acres. SCPI's four major fields in the area are the North and South Belridge, Lost Hills, and Antelope Hills. Most of the production comes from the North and South Belridge fields, which were previously held by the Belridge Oil Co. Productive horizons in the fields are the Tulare, Diatomite, Brown Shale, Antelope Shale, 64 Zone, and Agua sand. The Tulare and Diatomite are the two major reservoirs SCPI is developing. The Tulare, encountered between 400 and 1,300 ft, is made up of fine- to coarse-grained, unconsolidated sands with interbedded shales and silt stones and contains 13 /sup 0/ API oil. Using steam drive as the main recovery method, SCPI estimates an ultimate recovery from the Tulare formation of about 60% of the original 1 billion barrels in place. The Diatomite horizon, found between 800 and 3,500 ft and containing light, 28 /sup 0/ API oil, has high porosity (more than 60%), low permeability (less than 1 md), and natural fractures. Because of the Diatomite's low permeability, fracture stimulation is being used to increase well productivity. SCPI anticipates that approximately 5% of the almost 2 billion barrels of oil originally in place will be recovered by primary production.

  7. Material with core-shell structure

    DOEpatents

    Luhrs, Claudia [Rio Rancho, NM; Richard, Monique N [Ann Arbor, MI; Dehne, Aaron [Maumee, OH; Phillips, Jonathan [Rio Rancho, NM; Stamm, Kimber L [Ann Arbor, MI; Fanson, Paul T [Brighton, MI

    2011-11-15

    Disclosed is a material having a composite particle, the composite particle including an outer shell and a core. The core is made from a lithium alloying material and the outer shell has an inner volume that is greater in size than the core of the lithium alloying material. In some instances, the outer mean diameter of the outer shell is less than 500 nanometers and the core occupies between 5 and 99% of the inner volume. In addition, the outer shell can have an average wall thickness of less than 100 nanometers.

  8. Fracture Mitigation Strategies in Gastropod Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, Christopher; Kisailus, David

    2013-04-01

    For hundreds of millions of years, gastropods have been evolving, modifying their external calcified shells for defense against shell-breaking and drilling predators. They have evolved primarily to use two different aragonitic microstructures: the evolutionary older Nacre (mother of pearl) structure and the more recently developed crossed-lamellar structure. By using both of these structures, gastropods are able to produce shells that are significantly tougher then geologic aragonite. However, the crossed-lamellar structure allows for a wider variety of shell morphologies, ensuring its increasing presence since the Mesozoic Marine Revolution more than 200 million years ago.

  9. Thermal buckling of laminated composite shells

    SciTech Connect

    Thangaratnam, R.K.; Palaninathan, R.; Ramachandran, J. )

    1990-05-01

    The linear buckling analysis of laminated composite cylindrical and conical shells under thermal load using the finite element method is reported here. Critical temperatures are presented for various cases of cross-ply and angly-ply laminated shells. The effects of radius/thickness ratio, number of layers, ratio of coefficients of thermal expansion, and the angle of fiber orientation have been studied. The results indicate that the buckling behavior of laminated shell under thermal load is different from that of mechanically loaded shell with respect to the angle of fiber orientation. 6 refs.

  10. Hydrate Shell Growth Measured Using NMR.

    PubMed

    Haber, Agnes; Akhfash, Masoumeh; Loh, Charles K; Aman, Zachary M; Fridjonsson, Einar O; May, Eric F; Johns, Michael L

    2015-08-18

    Benchtop nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) pulsed field gradient (PFG) and relaxation measurements were used to monitor the clathrate hydrate shell growth occurring in water droplets dispersed in a continuous cyclopentane phase. These techniques allowed the growth of hydrate inside the opaque exterior shell to be monitored and, hence, information about the evolution of the shell's morphology to be deduced. NMR relaxation measurements were primarily used to monitor the hydrate shell growth kinetics, while PFG NMR diffusion experiments were used to determine the nominal droplet size distribution (DSD) of the unconverted water inside the shell core. A comparison of mean droplet sizes obtained directly via PFG NMR and independently deduced from relaxation measurements showed that the assumption of the shell model-a perfect spherical core of unconverted water-for these hydrate droplet systems is correct, but only after approximately 24 h of shell growth. Initially, hydrate growth is faster and heat-transfer-limited, leading to porous shells with surface areas larger than that of spheres with equivalent volumes. Subsequently, the hydrate growth rate becomes mass-transfer-limited, and the shells become thicker, spherical, and less porous.

  11. Core/shell colloidal semiconductor nanoplatelets.

    PubMed

    Mahler, Benoit; Nadal, Brice; Bouet, Cecile; Patriarche, Gilles; Dubertret, Benoit

    2012-11-14

    We have recently synthesized atomically flat semiconductor colloidal nanoplatelets with quasi 2D geometry. Here, we show that core/shell nanoplatelets can be obtained with a 2D geometry that is conserved. The epitaxial growth of the shell semiconductor is performed at room temperature. We report the detailed synthesis of CdSe/CdS and CdSe/CdZnS structures with different shell thicknesses. The shell growth is characterized both spectroscopically and structurally. In particular, the core/shell structure appears very clearly on high-resolution, high-angle annular dark-field transmission electron microscope images, thanks to the difference of atomic density between the core and the shell. When the nanoplatelets stand on their edge, we can precisely count the number of atomic planes forming the core and the shell. This provides a direct measurement, with atomic precision, of the core nanoplatelets thickness. The constraints exerted by the shell growth on the core is analyzed using global phase analysis. The core/shell nanoplatelets we obtained have narrow emission spectra with full-width at half-maximum close to 20 nm, and quantum yield that can reach 60%.

  12. Carbon isotopes in mollusk shell carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnaughey, Ted A.; Gillikin, David Paul

    2008-10-01

    Mollusk shells contain many isotopic clues about calcification physiology and environmental conditions at the time of shell formation. In this review, we use both published and unpublished data to discuss carbon isotopes in both bivalve and gastropod shell carbonates. Land snails construct their shells mainly from respired CO2, and shell δ13C reflects the local mix of C3 and C4 plants consumed. Shell δ13C is typically >10‰ heavier than diet, probably because respiratory gas exchange discards CO2, and retains the isotopically heavier HCO3 -. Respired CO2 contributes less to the shells of aquatic mollusks, because CO2/O2 ratios are usually higher in water than in air, leading to more replacement of respired CO2 by environmental CO2. Fluid exchange with the environment also brings additional dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) into the calcification site. Shell δ13C is typically a few ‰ lower than ambient DIC, and often decreases with age. Shell δ13C retains clues about processes such as ecosystem metabolism and estuarine mixing. Ca2+ ATPase-based models of calcification physiology developed for corals and algae likely apply to mollusks, too, but lower pH and carbonic anhydrase at the calcification site probably suppress kinetic isotope effects. Carbon isotopes in biogenic carbonates are clearly complex, but cautious interpretation can provide a wealth of information, especially after vital effects are better understood.

  13. Electron Shell as a Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpeshin, F. F.

    2002-11-01

    Main principles of the resonance effect arising in the electron shells in interaction of the nuclei with electromagnetic radiation are analyzed and presented in the historical aspect. Principles of NEET are considered from a more general position, as compared to how this is usually presented. Characteristic features of NEET and its reverse, TEEN, as internal conversion processes are analyzed, and ways are offered of inducing them by laser radiation. The ambivalent role of the Pauli exclusion principles in NEET and TEEN processes is investigated.

  14. Composted oyster shell as lime fertilizer is more effective than fresh oyster shell.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Han; Islam, Shah Md Asraful; Hong, Sun Joo; Cho, Kye Man; Math, Renukaradhya K; Heo, Jae Young; Kim, Hoon; Yun, Han Dae

    2010-01-01

    Physio-chemical changes in oyster shell were examined, and fresh and composted oyster shell meals were compared as lime fertilizers in soybean cultivation. Structural changes in oyster shell were observed by AFM and FE-SEM. We found that grains of the oyster shell surface became smoother and smaller over time. FT-IR analysis indicated the degradation of a chitin-like compound of oyster shell. In chemical analysis, pH (12.3+/-0.24), electrical conductivity (4.1+/-0.24 dS m(-1)), and alkaline powder (53.3+/-1.12%) were highest in commercial lime. Besides, pH was higher in composted oyster shell meal (9.9+/-0.53) than in fresh oyster shell meal (8.4+/-0.32). The highest organic matter (1.1+/-0.08%), NaCl (0.54+/-0.03%), and moisture (15.1+/-1.95%) contents were found in fresh oyster shell meal. A significant higher yield of soybean (1.33 t ha(-1)) was obtained by applying composted oyster shell meal (a 21% higher yield than with fresh oyster shell meal). Thus composting of oyster shell increases the utility of oyster shell as a liming material for crop cultivation.

  15. Apparatus and methods for installing, removing and adjusting an inner turbine shell section relative to an outer turbine shell section

    DOEpatents

    Leach, David; Bergendahl, Peter Allen; Waldo, Stuart Forrest; Smith, Robert Leroy; Phelps, Robert Kim

    2001-01-01

    A turbine includes upper and lower inner shell sections mounting the nozzles and shrouds and which inner shell is supported by pins secured to a surrounding outer shell. To disassemble the turbine for access to the inner shell sections and rotor, an alignment fixture is secured to the lower outer shell section and has pins engaging the inner shell section. To disassemble the turbine, the inner shell weight is transferred to the lower outer shell section via the alignment fixture and cradle pins. Roller assemblies are inserted through access openings vacated by support pins to permit rotation of the lower inner shell section out of and into the lower outer shell section during disassembly and assembly. The alignment fixture includes adjusting rods for adjusting the inner shell axially, vertically, laterally and about a lateral axis. A roller over-cage is provided to rotate the inner shell and a dummy shell to facilitate assembly and disassembly in the field.

  16. The ultimate step towards a tailored engineering of core@shell and core@shell@shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Llamosa, D; Ruano, M; Martínez, L; Mayoral, A; Roman, E; García-Hernández, M; Huttel, Y

    2014-11-21

    Complex core@shell and core@shell@shell nanoparticles are systems that combine the functionalities of the inner core and outer shell materials together with new physico-chemical properties originated by their low (nano) dimensionality. Such nanoparticles are of prime importance in the fast growing field of nanotechnology as building blocks for more sophisticated systems and a plethora of applications. Here, it is shown that although conceptually simple a modified gas aggregation approach allows the one-step generation of well-controlled complex nanoparticles. In particular, it is demonstrated that the atoms of the core and the shell of the nanoparticles can be easily inverted, avoiding intrinsic constraints of chemical methods.

  17. Climate change sensitivity of the African ivory nut palm, Hyphaene petersiana Klotzsch ex Mart. (Arecaceae) - a keystone species in SE Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blach-Overgaard, A.; Svenning, J.-C.; Balslev, H.

    2009-11-01

    Africa is the most vulnerable continent to future climate change. Profound changes are projected for southwestern Africa with increased drying, notably with delayed onset of the rainy season in September-November, and temperature increases in all seasons. The projected climate changes combined with land-use changes are thought to constitute the main threats to biodiversity in the 21st century. To be able to predict the potential impact on biodiversity, it is crucial to achieve a better insight into the controls of contemporary species ranges. Using species distribution modeling, we assessed the climate sensitivity of the key-stone palm species Hyphaene petersiana (African ivory nut palm) in southern Africa. We tested the relative roles of climate vs. non-climatic range-controls and found that climate had a clear effect on the range of H. petersiana and that especially water-related variables (annual precipitation and precipitation driest quarter) were of high importance. Nevertheless, latitude was the overall most dominant variable, reflecting spatial constraints on the continental-scale distribution. Of the remaining non-climatic factors, soil type and human influence were as important as the climatic factors. A future decrease in annual precipitation below 400 mm and hydrological changes towards drier conditions could cause a dramatic decline in H. petersiana populations, while the influence of temperature changes is less clear. The ongoing, unsustainable utilization pressures on this palm species by humans and livestock are likely to exacerbate the negative effect of future climate changes on its populations, especially, given the expected human population increase in Africa.

  18. Layzer type models for pressure driven shells

    SciTech Connect

    Hurricane, O A

    2004-09-16

    Models for the nonlinear instability of finite thickness shells driven by pressure are constructed in the style of Layzer. Equations for both Cartesian and cylindrically convergent/divergent geometries are derived. The resulting equations are appropriate for incompressible shells with unity Atwood number. Predictions from the equations compare well with two-dimensional simulations.

  19. A Geometric Theory of Nonlinear Morphoelastic Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadik, Souhayl; Angoshtari, Arzhang; Goriely, Alain; Yavari, Arash

    2016-08-01

    Many thin three-dimensional elastic bodies can be reduced to elastic shells: two-dimensional elastic bodies whose reference shape is not necessarily flat. More generally, morphoelastic shells are elastic shells that can remodel and grow in time. These idealized objects are suitable models for many physical, engineering, and biological systems. Here, we formulate a general geometric theory of nonlinear morphoelastic shells that describes both the evolution of the body shape, viewed as an orientable surface, as well as its intrinsic material properties such as its reference curvatures. In this geometric theory, bulk growth is modeled using an evolving referential configuration for the shell, the so-called material manifold. Geometric quantities attached to the surface, such as the first and second fundamental forms, are obtained from the metric of the three-dimensional body and its evolution. The governing dynamical equations for the body are obtained from variational consideration by assuming that both fundamental forms on the material manifold are dynamical variables in a Lagrangian field theory. In the case where growth can be modeled by a Rayleigh potential, we also obtain the governing equations for growth in the form of kinetic equations coupling the evolution of the first and the second fundamental forms with the state of stress of the shell. We apply these ideas to obtain stress-free growth fields of a planar sheet, the time evolution of a morphoelastic circular cylindrical shell subject to time-dependent internal pressure, and the residual stress of a morphoelastic planar circular shell.

  20. Isothermal Circumstellar Dust Shell Model for Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, G.; Towers, I. N.; Jovanoski, Z.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a model of radiative transfer in circumstellar dust shells. By assuming that the shell is both isothermal and its thickness is small compared to its radius, the model is simple enough for students to grasp and yet still provides a quantitative description of the relevant physical features. The isothermal model can be used in a…

  1. Statistical Mechanics of Thin Spherical Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Košmrlj, Andrej; Nelson, David R.

    2017-01-01

    We explore how thermal fluctuations affect the mechanics of thin amorphous spherical shells. In flat membranes with a shear modulus, thermal fluctuations increase the bending rigidity and reduce the in-plane elastic moduli in a scale-dependent fashion. This is still true for spherical shells. However, the additional coupling between the shell curvature, the local in-plane stretching modes, and the local out-of-plane undulations leads to novel phenomena. In spherical shells, thermal fluctuations produce a radius-dependent negative effective surface tension, equivalent to applying an inward external pressure. By adapting renormalization group calculations to allow for a spherical background curvature, we show that while small spherical shells are stable, sufficiently large shells are crushed by this thermally generated "pressure." Such shells can be stabilized by an outward osmotic pressure, but the effective shell size grows nonlinearly with increasing outward pressure, with the same universal power-law exponent that characterizes the response of fluctuating flat membranes to a uniform tension.

  2. Thick-shell nanocrystal quantum dots

    DOEpatents

    Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Chen, Yongfen; Klimov, Victor I.; Htoon, Han; Vela, Javier

    2011-05-03

    Colloidal nanocrystal quantum dots comprising an inner core having an average diameter of at least 1.5 nm and an outer shell, where said outer shell comprises multiple monolayers, wherein at least 30% of the quantum dots have an on-time fraction of 0.80 or greater under continuous excitation conditions for a period of time of at least 10 minutes.

  3. A Well-Defined Bipolar Outflow Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Taoling; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Patel, Nimesh

    1992-12-01

    A well-defined "eggplant-shaped" thin shell is revealed in the Mon R2 central core region by CO and (13) CO J=1-0 maps obtained with QUARRY. This thin shell outlines the extended blue lobe of the massive bipolar outflow. The projected length and width of the shell are about 5.7 pc and 2.5 pc respectively, and the averaged projected thickness of the shell is ~ 0.3 pc. The shape of this shell can be satisfactorily accounted for quantitatively in terms of limb-brightening within the framework of the Shu et al shell model with radially directed wind, although the model seems to be oversimplified with respect to the complexity that our data reveal. The outflow shell's symmetry axis is estimated to be inclined by ~ 70(deg) with respect to the line of sight. We suggest that the coincident blue- and red-shifted emission and the bending of the red-shifted lobe are the result of the red-shifted shell being compressed, rather than having a second bipolar outflow aligned roughly perpendicular to the axis of the first bipolar outflow.

  4. Layzer type models for pressure driven shells

    SciTech Connect

    Hurricane, O.A.

    2005-05-01

    Models for the nonlinear instability of finite thickness shells driven by pressure are constructed in the style of Layzer. Equations for both Cartesian and cylindrically convergent/divergent geometries are derived. The resulting equations are appropriate for incompressible shells with unity Atwood number. Predictions from the equations compare well with two-dimensional simulations.

  5. Semiclassical shell structure in rotating Fermi systems

    SciTech Connect

    Magner, A. G.; Sitdikov, A. S.; Khamzin, A. A.; Bartel, J.

    2010-06-15

    The collective moment of inertia is derived analytically within the cranking model for any rotational frequency of the harmonic-oscillator potential well and at a finite temperature. Semiclassical shell-structure components of the collective moment of inertia are obtained for any potential by using the periodic-orbit theory. We found semiclassically their relation to the free-energy shell corrections through the shell-structure components of the rigid-body moment of inertia of the statistically equilibrium rotation in terms of short periodic orbits. The shell effects in the moment of inertia exponentially disappear with increasing temperature. For the case of the harmonic-oscillator potential, one observes a perfect agreement of the semiclassical and quantum shell-structure components of the free energy and the moment of inertia for several critical bifurcation deformations and several temperatures.

  6. Ecology and shell chemistry of Loxoconcha matagordensis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.; Kamiya, T.; Dwyer, G.S.; Belkin, H.; Vann, C.D.; Schwede, S.; Wagner, R.

    2005-01-01

    Studies of the seasonal ecology and shell chemistry of the ostracode Loxoconcha matagordensis and related species of Loxoconcha from regions off eastern North America reveal that shell size and trace elemental (Mg/Ca ratio) composition are useful in paleothermometry using fossil populations. Seasonal sampling of populations from Chesapeake Bay, augmented by samples from Florida Bay, indicate that shell size is inversely proportional to water temperature and that Mg/Ca ratios are positively correlated with the water temperature in which the adult carapace was secreted. Microprobe analyses of sectioned valves reveal intra-shell variability in Mg/Ca ratios but this does not strongly influence the utility of whole shell Mg/Ca analyses for paleoclimate application.

  7. Engineered Magnetic Core-Shell Structures.

    PubMed

    Alavi Nikje, Mir Mohammad; Vakili, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, engineered magnetic core-shell structures are playing an important role in the wide range of various applications. These magnetic core-shell structures have attracted considerable attention because of their unique properties and various applications. Also, the synthesis of engineered magnetic core-shell structures has attracted practical interest because of potential applications in areas such as ferrofluids, medical imaging, drug targeting and delivery, cancer therapy, separations, and catalysis. So far a large number of engineered magnetic core-shell structures have been successfully synthesized. This review article focuses on the recent progress in synthesis and characterization of engineered magnetic core-shell structures. Also, this review gives a brief description of the various application of these structures. It is hoped that this review will play some small part in helping future developments in important field.

  8. Buckling of axially compressed conical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C.-H.; Katz, L.

    1980-01-01

    The buckling of a truncated elastic conical shell subjected to an axial compression is a classical problem in shell structures. The paper reinvestigates the buckling of an axially compressed truncated conical shell with rigid bulkheads. Two improvements are achieved. First, the condition that the total horizontal displacement must vanish due to rigid bulkhead and axisymmetry is treated as a constraint. This constraint is incorporated into the system through the use of the Lagrange multiplier; then the variational method is used to derive a complete set of boundary conditions for conical shells. Second, the stability is evaluated in the deformed state using the asymptotic solutions of the pair of Donnell-type equations for axisymmetric configuration. The results indicate that the buckling strength of conical shells depends mainly on the condition of the smaller end. In addition to the vertex angle, the distance ratio plays, at least, an equally important role.

  9. Shell explores a cheaper route to MMA

    SciTech Connect

    Rotman, D.

    1993-02-17

    A novel methyl methacrylate (MMA) technology developed by Shell Research (Amsterdam) could be simpler and far cheaper than existing MMA manufacturing processes, according to a recent analysis by SRI International (Menlo Park, CA). The Shell palladium-catalyzed process makes MMA from methyl acetylene, avoiding the classic acetone cyanohydrin route. And, says Robert Schwaar, a senior SRI consultant, while availability of methyl acetylene feedstock may limit plant sizes, the Shell technology could make MMA for 44 cts/lb in a 100-million lbs/yr unit. Other commercial and developmental processes, he says, produce MMA at roughly 47 cts-58cts/lb in a 250-million lbs/yr plant. Shell-which is not an MMA producer-has not yet decided the technology's fate. The key question about Shell's process is whether producers can get enough cheap methyl acetylene. The technology calls for separating the methyl acetylene from the mixed C[sub 3] by-product stream.

  10. Variability in shell models of GRBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumner, M. C.; Fenimore, E. E.

    1997-01-01

    Many cosmological models of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) assume that a single relativistic shell carries kinetic energy away from the source and later converts it into gamma rays, perhaps by interactions with the interstellar medium or by internal shocks within the shell. Although such models are able to reproduce general trends in GRB time histories, it is difficult to reproduce the high degree of variability often seen in GRBs. The authors investigate methods of achieving this variability using a simplified external shock model. Since the model emphasizes geometric and statistical considerations, rather than the detailed physics of the shell, it is applicable to any theory that relies on relativistic shells. They find that the variability in GRBs gives strong clues to the efficiency with which the shell converts its kinetic energy into gamma rays.

  11. Faraday Wave Turbulence on a Spherical Liquid Shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, R. Glynn; Trinh, Eugene H.

    1996-01-01

    Millimeter-radius liquid shells are acoustically levitated in an ultrasonic field. Capillary waves are observed on the shells. At low energies (minimal acoustic amplitude, thick shell) a resonance is observed between the symmetric and antisymmetric thin film oscillation modes. At high energies (high acoustic pressure, thin shell) the shell becomes fully covered with high-amplitude waves. Temporal spectra of scattered light from the shell in this regime exhibit a power-law decay indicative of turbulence.

  12. Gravity on-shell diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Enrico; Trnka, Jaroslav

    2016-11-01

    We study on-shell diagrams for gravity theories with any number of super-symmetries and find a compact Grassmannian formula in terms of edge variables of the graphs. Unlike in gauge theory where the analogous form involves only d log-factors, in gravity there is a non-trivial numerator as well as higher degree poles in the edge variables. Based on the structure of the Grassmannian formula for {N}=8 supergravity we conjecture that gravity loop amplitudes also possess similar properties. In particular, we find that there are only logarithmic singularities on cuts with finite loop momentum and that poles at infinity are present, in complete agreement with the conjecture presented in [1].

  13. The structure of circumstellar shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fix, John D.; Cobb, Michael L.

    1988-01-01

    Speckle-interferometric measurements are reported for the brightness distributions of the OH/IR stars OH 26.5 + 0.6 and IRC + 10420 at wavelengths which are near the center of and just outside the 10-micron absorption/emission feature produced by circumstellar dust. For OH 26.5 + 0.6, the angular size within the absorption feature is 0.50 + or - 0.02 arcsec, while the angular size outside the feature is less than 0.2 arcsec. For IRC + 10420, the angular sizes inside and outside the emission feature are both 0.42 + or - 0.02 arcsec. Simple models of the circumstellar shells are calculated which can account for the measured angular sizes and flux distributions of the objects. The models give the wavelength dependence of the opacity of the circumstellar material, which is quite different for the two objects.

  14. Gas chromatographic determination and mechanism of formation of D-amino acids occurring in fermented and roasted cocoa beans, cocoa powder, chocolate and cocoa shell.

    PubMed

    Pätzold, R; Brückner, H

    2006-07-01

    Fermented cocoa beans of various countries of origin (Ivory Coast, Ghana, Sulawesi), cocoa beans roasted under defined conditions (100-150 degrees C; 30-120 min), low and high fat cocoa powder, various brands of chocolate, and cocoa shells were analyzed for their contents of free L-and D-amino acids. Amino acids were isolated from defatted products using a cation exchanger and converted into volatile N(O)-pentafluoropropionyl amino acid 2-propyl esters which were analyzed by enantioselective gas chromatography mass spectrometry on a Chirasil-L-Val capillary column. Besides common protein L-amino acids low amounts of D-amino acids were detected in fermented cocoa beans. Quantities of D-amino acids increased on heating. On roasting cocoa beans of the Forastero type from the Ivory Coast at 150 degrees C for 2 h, relative quantities of D-amino acids approached 17.0% D-Ala, 11.7% D-Ile, 11.1% D-Asx (Asp + Asn), 7.9% D-Tyr, 5.8% D-Ser, 4.8% D-Leu, 4.3% D-Phe, 37.0% D-Pro, and 1.2% D-Val. In cocoa powder and chocolate relative quantities amounted to 14.5% D-Ala, 10.6% D-Tyr, 9.8% D-Phe, 8.1% L-Asx, and 7.2% D-Ile. Lower quantities of other D-amino acids were also detected. In order to corroborate our hypothesis that D-amino acids are generated from Amadori compounds (fructose amino acids) formed in the course of the Maillard reaction, fructose-L-phenylalanine and fructose-D-phenylalanine were synthesized and heated at 200 degrees C for 5-60 min. Already after 5 min release of 11.7% D-Phe and 11.8% L-Phe in the free form could be analyzed. Based on the data a racemization mechanism is presented founded on the intermediate and reversible formation of an amino acid carbanion in the Amadori compounds.

  15. Heat conduction in plates and shells with emphasis on a conical shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, M. B.

    This paper is concerned with analyzing heat conduction in rigid shell-like bodies. The thermal equations of the theory of a Cosserat surface are used to calculate the average (through-the-thickness) temperature and temperature gradient directly, without resorting to integration of three-dimensional results. Specific attention is focused on a conical shell. The conical shell is particularly interesting because it has a converging geometry, so that the shell near its tip is 'thick' even though the shell near its base may be 'thin'. Generalized constitutive equations are developed here in a consistent manner which include certain geometrical features of shells. These equations are tested by considering a number of problems of plates, circular cylindrical shells and spherical shells, and comparing the results with exact solutions. In all cases, satisfactory results are predicted even in the thick-shell limit. Finally, a problem of transient heat conduction in a conical shell is solved. It is shown that the thermal bending moment produced by the average temperature gradient is quite severe near the tip, and it attains its maximum value in a relatively short time.

  16. Double Shell Plans and First Results from Outer Shell Keyhole Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, D. S.; Merritt, E. C.; Daughton, W. S.; Loomis, E. N.; Wilson, D. C.; Dodd, E. S.; Kline, J. L.; Batha, S. H.; Robey, H. F.

    2016-10-01

    Double-shells are an alternative approach to achieving indirect drive ignition on NIF. These targets consist of a low-Z ablatively-driven outer shell that impacts a high-Z inner shell filled with DT fuel. In contrast to single-shell designs, double-shell targets burn the fuel via volume ignition, albeit with a lower gain. While double-shell capsules are complicated to fabricate, their design includes several beneficial metrics such as a low convergence pusher (C.R. < 10), low implosion speed (250 km/s), a simple few-ns laser drive in a vacuum hohlraum, less sensitivity to hohlraum asymmetries, and low expected laser-plasma instabilities. We describe plans for developing double shell capsule implosions on NIF, and discuss challenges as well as uncertainties and trade-offs in the physics issues compared to single-shells, such as sensitivity to hard x-ray preheat of the inner shell. First experimental results measuring hard x-ray preheat, shock breakout and shock symmetry from outer-shell experiments using the NIF Keyhole platform will be presented. Work performed under the auspices of DOE by LANL under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  17. A comparison of shell theories for large-amplitude vibrations of circular cylindrical shells: Lagrangian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amabili, M.

    2003-07-01

    Large-amplitude (geometrically non-linear) vibrations of circular cylindrical shells subjected to radial harmonic excitation in the spectral neighbourhood of the lowest resonances are investigated. The Lagrange equations of motion are obtained by an energy approach, retaining damping through Rayleigh's dissipation function. Four different non-linear thin shell theories, namely Donnell's, Sanders-Koiter, Flügge-Lur'e-Byrne and Novozhilov's theories, which neglect rotary inertia and shear deformation, are used to calculate the elastic strain energy. The formulation is also valid for orthotropic and symmetric cross-ply laminated composite shells. The large-amplitude response of perfect and imperfect, simply supported circular cylindrical shells to harmonic excitation in the spectral neighbourhood of the lowest natural frequency is computed for all these shell theories. Numerical responses obtained by using these four non-linear shell theories are also compared to results obtained by using the Donnell's non-linear shallow-shell equation of motion. A validation of calculations by comparison with experimental results is also performed. Both empty and fluid-filled shells are investigated by using a potential fluid model. The effects of radial pressure and axial load are also studied. Boundary conditions for simply supported shells are exactly satisfied. Different expansions involving from 14 to 48 generalized co-ordinates, associated with natural modes of simply supported shells, are used. The non-linear equations of motion are studied by using a code based on an arclength continuation method allowing bifurcation analysis.

  18. Large ultrathin shelled drops produced via non-confined microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, Ankur S; Josephides, Dimitris N; Sajjadi, Shahriar

    2015-02-02

    We present a facile approach for producing large and monodisperse core-shell drops with ultrathin shells using a single-step process. A biphasic compound jet is introduced into a quiescent third (outer) phase that ruptures to form core-shell drops. Ultrathin shelled drops could only be produced within a certain range of surfactant concentrations and flow rates, highlighting the effect of interfacial tension in engulfing the core in a thin shell. An increase in surfactant concentrations initially resulted in drops with thinner shells. However, the drops with thinnest shells were obtained at an optimum surfactant concentration, and a further increase in the surfactant concentrations increased the shell thickness. Highly monodisperse (coefficient of variation smaller than 3 %) core-shell drops with diameter of ∼200 μm-2 mm with shell thickness as small as ∼2 μm were produced. The resulting drops were stable enough to undergo polymerisation and produce ultrathin shelled capsules.

  19. Probabilistic Dynamic Buckling of Smart Composite Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Abumeri, Galib H.

    2007-01-01

    A computational simulation method is presented to evaluate the deterministic and nondeterministic dynamic buckling of smart composite shells. The combined use of intraply hybrid composite mechanics, finite element computer codes, and probabilistic analysis enable the effective assessment of the dynamic buckling load of smart composite shells. A universal plot is generated to estimate the dynamic buckling load of composite shells at various load rates and probabilities. The shell structure is also evaluated with smart fibers embedded in the plies right next to the outer plies. The results show that, on the average, the use of smart fibers improved the shell buckling resistance by about 10% at different probabilities and delayed the buckling occurrence time. The probabilistic sensitivities results indicate that uncertainties in the fiber volume ratio and ply thickness have major effects on the buckling load while uncertainties in the electric field strength and smart material volume fraction have moderate effects. For the specific shell considered in this evaluation, the use of smart composite material is not recommended because the shell buckling resistance can be improved by simply re-arranging the orientation of the outer plies, as shown in the dynamic buckling analysis results presented in this report.

  20. Probabilistic Dynamic Buckling of Smart Composite Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abumeri, Galib H.; Chamis, Christos C.

    2003-01-01

    A computational simulation method is presented to evaluate the deterministic and nondeterministic dynamic buckling of smart composite shells. The combined use of composite mechanics, finite element computer codes, and probabilistic analysis enable the effective assessment of the dynamic buckling load of smart composite shells. A universal plot is generated to estimate the dynamic buckling load of composite shells at various load rates and probabilities. The shell structure is also evaluated with smart fibers embedded in the plies right below the outer plies. The results show that, on the average, the use of smart fibers improved the shell buckling resistance by about 10 percent at different probabilities and delayed the buckling occurrence time. The probabilistic sensitivities results indicate that uncertainties in the fiber volume ratio and ply thickness have major effects on the buckling load while uncertainties in the electric field strength and smart material volume fraction have moderate effects. For the specific shell considered in this evaluation, the use of smart composite material is not recommended because the shell buckling resistance can be improved by simply re-arranging the orientation of the outer plies, as shown in the dynamic buckling analysis results presented in this report.

  1. Laminated anisotropic reinforced plastic plates and shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korolev, V. I.

    1981-01-01

    Basic technical theories and engineering calculation equations for anisotropic plates and shells made of rigid reinforced plastics, mainly laminated fiberglass, are presented and discussed. Solutions are given for many problems of design of structural plates and shells, including curved sections and tanks, as well as two chapters on selection of the optimum materials, are given. Accounting for interlayer shearing and transverse separation, which are new engineering properties, are discussed. Application of the results obtained to thin three ply plates and shells wth a light elastic filler is presented and discussed.

  2. Core/shell nanoparticles in biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Krishnendu; Sarkar, Sreerupa; Jagajjanani Rao, K; Paria, Santanu

    2014-07-01

    Nanoparticles have several exciting applications in different areas and biomedial field is not an exception of that because of their exciting performance in bioimaging, targeted drug and gene delivery, sensors, and so on. It has been found that among several classes of nanoparticles core/shell is most promising for different biomedical applications because of several advantages over simple nanoparticles. This review highlights the development of core/shell nanoparticles-based biomedical research during approximately past two decades. Applications of different types of core/shell nanoparticles are classified in terms of five major aspects such as bioimaging, biosensor, targeted drug delivery, DNA/RNA interaction, and targeted gene delivery.

  3. Thermoelastic bending of locally heated orthotropic shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, V. P.; Gol'tsev, A. S.

    2007-03-01

    The thermoelastic bending of locally heated orthotropic shells is studied using the classical theory of thermoelasticity of thin shallow orthotropic shells and the method of fundamental solutions. Linear distribution of temperature over thickness and the Newton's law of cooling are assumed. Numerical analysis is carried out for orthotropic shells of arbitrary Gaussian curvature made of a strongly anisotropic material. The behavior of thermal forces and moments near the zone of local heating is studied for two areas of thermal effect: along a coordinate axis and along a circle of unit radius. Generalized conclusions are drawn

  4. Photon propagator in light-shell gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgi, Howard; Kestin, Greg; Sajjad, Aqil

    2016-05-01

    We derive the photon propagator in light-shell gauge (LSG) vμAμ=0 , where vμ=(1,r ^ ) μ . This gauge is an important ingredient of the light-shell effective theory—an effective theory for describing high energy jet processes on a 2-dimensional spherical shell expanding at the speed of light around the point of the initial collision producing the jets. Since LSG is a noncovariant gauge, we cannot calculate the LSG propagator by using the standard procedure for covariant gauges. We therefore employ a new technique for computing the propagator, which we hope may be of relevance in other gauges as well.

  5. Advances in shell side boiling of refrigerants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Ralph L.

    The design of shell and tube evaporators used in air conditioning and refrigeration applications is discussed. The heat exchanger geometry of interest involves evaporation or condensation on the shell side of a horizontal tube bundle. Enhanced heat transfer geometries are typically used for shell side evaporation and for forced convection to water on the tube side. Refrigerant boiling data and forced convection refrigerant boiling correlations are described. The refrigerants of interest include R-11, 12, 22, 123, and 134a. Thermal design methods for sizing of the evaporator and condenser are outlined. A computer model for prediction of the evaporator performance is described.

  6. Synthesis of stiffened shells of revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, W. A.

    1974-01-01

    Computer programs for the synthesis of shells of various configurations were developed. The conditions considered are: (1) uniform shells (mainly cones) using a membrane buckling analysis, (2) completely uniform shells (cones, spheres, toroidal segments) using linear bending prebuckling analysis, and (3) revision of second design process to reduce the number of design variables to about 30 by considering piecewise uniform designs. A perturbation formula was derived and this allows exact derivatives of the general buckling load to be computed with little additional computer time.

  7. Effective Interactions from No Core Shell Model

    SciTech Connect

    Dikmen, E.; Lisetskiy, A. F.; Barrett, B. R.; Navratil, P.; Vary, J. P.

    2008-11-11

    We construct the many-body effective Hamiltonian for pf-shell by carrying out 2({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega}. NCSM calculations at the 2-body cluster level. We demonstrate how the effective Hamiltonian derived from realistic nucleon-nucleon (NN) potentials for the 2({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega} NCSM space should be modified to properly account for the many-body correlations produced by truncating to the major pf-shell. We obtain two-body effective interactions for the pf-shell by using direct projection and use them to reproduce the results of large scale NCSM for other light Ca isotopes.

  8. THE PYTHON SHELL FOR THE ORBIT CODE

    SciTech Connect

    Shishlo, Andrei P; Gorlov, Timofey V; Holmes, Jeffrey A

    2009-01-01

    A development of a Python driver shell for the ORBIT simulation code is presented. The original ORBIT code uses the SuperCode shell to organize accelerator-related simulations. It is outdated, unsupported, and it is an obstacle to future code development. The necessity and consequences of replacing the old shell language are discussed. A set of core modules and extensions that are currently in PyORBIT are presented. They include particle containers, parsers for MAD and SAD lattice files, a Python wrapper for MPI libraries, space charge calculators, TEAPOT trackers, and a laser stripping extension module.

  9. Thin shells joining local cosmic string geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiroa, Ernesto F.; Rubín de Celis, Emilio; Simeone, Claudio

    2016-10-01

    In this article we present a theoretical construction of spacetimes with a thin shell that joins two different local cosmic string geometries. We study two types of global manifolds, one representing spacetimes with a thin shell surrounding a cosmic string or an empty region with Minkowski metric, and the other corresponding to wormholes which are not symmetric across the throat located at the shell. We analyze the stability of the static configurations under perturbations preserving the cylindrical symmetry. For both types of geometries we find that the static configurations can be stable for suitable values of the parameters.

  10. On the vibration of axisymmetric shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heppler, G. R.; Wahl, L.

    1989-05-01

    The application of nonconventional basis functions to the linear vibration problem is explored. By employing shell coordinates the elements allow the exact geometrical modelling of shells of revolution with arbitrary meridians and the elements are able to reproduce strain free states under an arbitrary rigid body motion due to the use of these special basis functions. A generalization of the Reissner Mindlin plate theories is used because they have a broader range of applicability than the usual thin/shallow shell theories and also the trial functions need only be of class C(sup 0). The geometry treated is a hyperbola of revolution, in two configurations.

  11. Vibration of fluid loaded conical shells.

    PubMed

    Caresta, Mauro; Kessissoglou, Nicole J

    2008-10-01

    An analytical model is presented to describe the vibration of a truncated conical shell with fluid loading in the low frequency range. The solution for the dynamic response of the shell is presented in the form of a power series. Fluid loading is taken into account by dividing the shell into narrow strips which are considered to be locally cylindrical. Analytical results are presented for different boundary conditions and have been compared with the computational results from a boundary element model. Limitations of the model to the low frequency range are discussed.

  12. Gross shell structure of moments of inertia

    SciTech Connect

    Deleplanque, M.A.; Frauendorf, S.; Pashkevich, V.V.; Chu, S.Y.; Unzhakova, A.

    2002-07-01

    Average yrast moments of inertia at high spins, where the pairing correlations are expected to be largely absent, were found to deviate from the rigid-body values. This indicates that shell effects contribute to the moment of inertia. We discuss the gross dependence of moments of inertia and shell energies on the neutron number in terms of the semiclassical periodic orbit theory. We show that the ground-state shell energies, nuclear deformations and deviations from rigid-body moments of inertia are all due to the same periodic orbits.

  13. Comparison on pore development of activated carbon produced from palm shell and coconut shell.

    PubMed

    Daud, Wan Mohd Ashri Wan; Ali, Wan Shabuddin Wan

    2004-05-01

    A series of experiments were conducted to compare the pore development in palm-shell and coconut-shell-based activated carbons produced under identical experimental conditions. Carbonization and activation processes were carried out at 850 degrees C using a fluidized bed reactor. Within the range of burn-off studied, at any burn-off, the micropore and mesopore volumes created in palm-shell-based activated carbon were always higher than those of coconut-shell-based activated carbon. On macropore volume, for palm-shell-based activated carbon, the volume increased with increase in burn-off up to 30% and then decreased. However, for coconut-shell-based activated carbon, the change in macropore volume with burn-off was almost negligible but the absolute macropore volume decreased with burn-off.

  14. Synthesis of core-shell structured magnetic nanoparticles with a carbide shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Shushan; Chi, Yue; Zhao, Zhankui

    2017-03-01

    Core-shell structured materials combining the functionalities of the core and shell have great application potential in many fields. In this work, by combining solvothermal, polymerization and the high temperature carbonization, we have successfully developed a facile method to generate core-shell structured nanoparticles which possess an internal magnetic nanoparticle with a carbide shell. The thickness of resorcinol formaldehyde resin as intermediate transition shell could be easily adjusted by changing the concentration of the RF precursor. The resulting nanoparticles possess well-defined structure, uniform size and high magnetization. The unique nanostructure of the magnetic core-shell structured nanoparticles could lead to many promising applications in areas ranging from drug delivery to the purifyication of sewage.

  15. Hospital-based surveillance of rotavirus gastroenteritis among children under 5 years of age in the Republic of Ivory Coast: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Akoua-Koffi, Chantal; Asse Kouadio, Vincent; Yao Atteby, Jean Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the proportion of rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) among children aged less than 5 years who had been diagnosed with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) and admitted to hospitals and emergency rooms (ERs). The seasonal distribution of RVGE and most prevalent rotavirus (RV) strains was also assessed. Design A cross-sectional hospital-based surveillance study. Setting 5 reference paediatric hospitals across Abidjan. Participants Children aged less than 5 years, who were hospitalised/visiting ERs for WHO-defined AGE, were enrolled. Written informed consent was obtained from parents/guardians before enrolment. Children who acquired nosocomial infection were excluded from the study. Primary and secondary outcome measures The proportion of RVGE among AGE hospitalisations and ER visits was expressed with 95% exact CI. Stool samples were collected from all enrolled children and were tested for the presence of RV using an enzyme immunoassay. RV-positive samples were serotyped using reverse transcriptase-PCR. Results Of 357 enrolled children (mean age 13.6±11.14 months), 332 were included in the final analyses; 56.3% (187/332) were hospitalised and 43.7% (145/332) were admitted to ERs. The proportion of RVGE hospitalisations and ER visits among all AGE cases was 30.1% (95% CI 23.6% to 37.3%) and 26.9% (95% CI 19.9% to 34.9%), respectively. Ninety-five children (28.6%) were RV positive; the highest number of RVGE cases was observed in children aged 6–11 months. The number of GE cases peaked in July and August 2008; the highest percentage of RV-positive cases was observed in January 2008. G1P[8] wild-type and G8P[6] were the most commonly detected strains. Conclusions RVGE causes substantial morbidity among children under 5 years of age and remains a health concern in the Republic of Ivory Coast, where implementation of prevention strategies such as vaccination might help to reduce disease burden. PMID:24486676

  16. A circumferential crack in a cylindrical shell under tension.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan-Fama, M. E.; Sanders, J. L., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A closed cylindrical shell under uniform internal pressure has a slit around a portion of its circumference. Linear shallow shell theory predicts inverse square-root-type singularities in certain of the stresses at the crack tips. This paper reports the computed strength of these singularities for different values of a dimensionless parameter based on crack length, shell radius and shell thickness.

  17. Theory of conformational transitions of viral shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guérin, Thomas; Bruinsma, Robijn

    2007-12-01

    We propose a continuum theory for the conformational transitions of viral shells. Conformational transitions of viral shells, as encountered during viral maturation, are associated with a soft mode instability of the capsid proteins [F. Tama and C. L. Brooks, J. Mol. Biol. 345(2), 299 (2005)]. The continuum theory presented here is an adaptation of the Ginzburg-Landau theory of soft-mode structural phase transitions of solids to viral shells. The theory predicts that the conformational transitions are characterized by a pronounced softening of the shell elasticity in the critical region. We demonstrate that the thermodynamics of the conformational transition can be probed quantitatively by a micromechanical atomic force microscope study. The external force can drive a capsid into a state of phase coexistence characterized by a highly nonlinear force deformation curve.

  18. Shell deformation studies using holographic interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmerter, R. R.

    1974-01-01

    The buckling of shallow spherical shells under pressure has been the subject of many theoretical and experimental papers. Experimental data above the theoretical buckling load of Huang have given rise to speculation that shallow shell theory may not adequately predict the stability of nonsymmetric modes in higher-rise shells which are normally classified as shallow by the Reissner criterion. This article considers holographic interferometry as a noncontact, high-resolution method of measuring prebuckling deformations. Prebuckling deformations of a lambda = 9, h/b = 0.038 shell are Fourier-analyzed. Buckling is found to occur in an N = 5 mode as predicted by Huang's theory. The N = 4 mode was unusually stable, suggesting that even at this low value of h/b, stabilizing effects may be at work.

  19. On the Calculation of Shallow Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambartsumyan, S. A.

    1956-01-01

    This paper considers a sufficiently thin shallow shell of nonzero Gaussian curvature. It also presents a system of symmetrically constructed differential equations, constructed by the mixed method through the stress function and the displpacement function.

  20. The photoproduction of circumstellar OH maser shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huggins, P. J.; Glassgold, A. E.

    1982-01-01

    The structure of OH shells formed from the photodestruction of H2O by ambient UV photons in the thick, expanding envelopes around cool evolved stars is investigated. The properties of the shells are governed mainly by the envelope shielding which in turn is primarily controlled by the mass-loss rate M. The peak OH densities and column densities through the shells are, respectively, slowly decreasing and increasing functions of M. The characteristic radii of the shells also depend on M, increasing from about 4(15) cm for M = 1(-6) solar mass/yr to about 1(17) cm for M = 1(-4) solar mass/yr; this dependence is well matched by recent observational data, and lends support to the OH photoproduction mechanism.

  1. Wireless energy transfer between anisotropic metamaterials shells

    SciTech Connect

    Díaz-Rubio, Ana; Carbonell, Jorge; Sánchez-Dehesa, José

    2014-06-15

    The behavior of strongly coupled Radial Photonic Crystals shells is investigated as a potential alternative to transfer electromagnetic energy wirelessly. These sub-wavelength resonant microstructures, which are based on anisotropic metamaterials, can produce efficient coupling phenomena due to their high quality factor. A configuration of selected constitutive parameters (permittivity and permeability) is analyzed in terms of its resonant characteristics. The coupling to loss ratio between two coupled resonators is calculated as a function of distance, the maximum (in excess of 300) is obtained when the shells are separated by three times their radius. Under practical conditions an 83% of maximum power transfer has been also estimated. -- Highlights: •Anisotropic metamaterial shells exhibit high quality factors and sub-wavelength size. •Exchange of electromagnetic energy between shells with high efficiency is analyzed. •Strong coupling is supported with high wireless transfer efficiency. •End-to-end energy transfer efficiencies higher than 83% can be predicted.

  2. Hawking radiation from a collapsing quantum shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullin, Jorge; Eyheralde, Rodrigo; Gambini, Rodolfo

    2017-01-01

    We study Hawking radiation from a collapsing shell with uncertainty in its position and momentum. We see there are deviations from the usual spectrum early on in the evolution, tending asymptotically to the usual spectrum plus small corrections.

  3. Indentation of pressurized viscoplastic polymer spherical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tvergaard, V.; Needleman, A.

    2016-08-01

    The indentation response of polymer spherical shells is investigated. Finite deformation analyses are carried out with the polymer characterized as a viscoelastic/viscoplastic solid. Both pressurized and unpressurized shells are considered. Attention is restricted to axisymmetric deformations with a conical indenter. The response is analyzed for various values of the shell thickness to radius ratio and various values of the internal pressure. Two sets of material parameters are considered: one set having network stiffening at a moderate strain and the other having no network stiffening until very large strains are attained. The transition from an indentation type mode of deformation to a structural mode of deformation involving bending that occurs as the indentation depth increases is studied. The results show the effects of shell thickness, internal pressure and polymer constitutive characterization on this transition and on the deformation modes in each of these regimes.

  4. Expanding and collapsing scalar field thin shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Abbas, G.

    2012-09-01

    This paper deals with the dynamics of scalar field thin shell in the Reissner-Nordstr öm geometry. The Israel junction conditions between Reissner-Nordstr öm spacetimes are derived, which lead to the equation of motion of scalar field shell and Klien-Gordon equation. These equations are solved numerically by taking scalar field model with the quadratic scalar potential. It is found that solution represents the expanding and collapsing scalar field shell. For the better understanding of this problem, we investigate the case of massless scalar field (by taking the scalar field potential zero). Also, we evaluate the scalar field potential when p is an explicit function of R. We conclude that both massless as well as massive scalar field shell can expand to infinity at constant rate or collapse to zero size forming a curvature singularity or bounce under suitable conditions.

  5. Shell Eggs from Farm to Table

    MedlinePlus

    ... and stored and transported under refrigeration and ambient temperature of no greater than 45 °F. USDA also ... transported under refrigeration at an ambient (surrounding) air temperature not to exceed 45 °F; All packed shell ...

  6. Single Shell Tank (SST) Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    HAASS, C.C.

    2000-03-21

    This document provides an initial program plan for retrieval of the single-shell tank waste. Requirements, technical approach, schedule, organization, management, and cost and funding are discussed. The program plan will be refined and updated in fiscal year 2000.

  7. Magnetotelluric Sounding of Europa's Ice Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, R. E.; Delory, G. T.; Espley, J. R.; Stillman, D. E.

    2016-10-01

    A magnetometer alone in insufficient to determine thicknesses of water layers in the ice shell because electromagnetic souce geometry is indeterminate at the "high" frequencies ( 1 Hz) needed for adequate resolution.

  8. Double Shell Tank (DST) Transfer Valving Specification

    SciTech Connect

    GRAVES, C.E.

    2001-01-17

    This specification establishes the performance requirements and provides references to the requisite codes and standards to be applied during design of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Transfer Valving Subsystem that supports the first phase of Waste Feed Delivery.

  9. Nuclear Quadrupole Moments and Nuclear Shell Structure

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Townes, C. H.; Foley, H. M.; Low, W.

    1950-06-23

    Describes a simple model, based on nuclear shell considerations, which leads to the proper behavior of known nuclear quadrupole moments, although predictions of the magnitudes of some quadrupole moments are seriously in error.

  10. Membrane Shell Reflector Segment Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Houfei; Im, Eastwood; Lin, John; Moore, James

    2012-01-01

    The mesh reflector is the only type of large, in-space deployable antenna that has successfully flown in space. However, state-of-the-art large deployable mesh antenna systems are RF-frequency-limited by both global shape accuracy and local surface quality. The limitations of mesh reflectors stem from two factors. First, at higher frequencies, the porosity and surface roughness of the mesh results in loss and scattering of the signal. Second, the mesh material does not have any bending stiffness and thus cannot be formed into true parabolic (or other desired) shapes. To advance the deployable reflector technology at high RF frequencies from the current state-of-the-art, significant improvements need to be made in three major aspects: a high-stability and highprecision deployable truss; a continuously curved RF reflecting surface (the function of the surface as well as its first derivative are both continuous); and the RF reflecting surface should be made of a continuous material. To meet these three requirements, the Membrane Shell Reflector Segment (MSRS) antenna was developed.

  11. Experimental study of upper sd shell nuclei and evolution of sd-fp shell gap

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, M. Saha

    2012-06-27

    The intruder orbitals from the fp shell play important role in the structure of nuclei around the line of stability in the upper sd shell. Experimentally we have studied {sup 35}Cl, {sup 30}P, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 37}Ar and {sup 34}Cl in this mass region using the INGA setup. Large basis cross-shell shell model calculations have indicated the need for change of the sd-fp energy gap for reliable reproduction of negative parity and high spin positive parity states. Indication of population of states of large deformation has been found in our data. Theoretical interpretation of these states has been discussed.

  12. Au/SiO2/QD core/shell/shell nanostructures with plasmonic-enhanced photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ping; Kawasaki, Kazunori; Ando, Masanori; Murase, Norio

    2012-09-01

    A sol-gel method has been developed to fabricate Au/SiO2/quantum dot (QD) core-shell-shell nanostructures with plasmonic-enhanced photoluminescence (PL). Au nanoparticle (NP) was homogeneously coated with a SiO2 shell with adjusted thickness through a Stöber synthesis. When the toluene solution of hydrophobic CdSe/ZnS QDs was mixed with partially hydrolyzed 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APS) sol, the ligands on the QDs were replaced by a thin functional SiO2 layer because the amino group in partially hydrolyzed APS has strong binding interaction with the QDs. Partially hydrolyzed APS plays an important role as a thin functional layer for the transfers of QDs to water phase and the subsequent connection to aqueous SiO2-coated Au NPs. Although Au NPs were demonstrated as efficient PL quenchers when the SiO2 shell on the Au NPs is thin (less than 5 nm), we found that precise control of the spacing between the Au NP core and the QD shell resulted in QDs with an enhancement of 30 % of PL efficiency. The Au/SiO2/QD core/shell/shell nanostructures also reveal strong surface plasmon scattering, which makes the Au/SiO/QD core-shell-shell nanostructures an excellent dual-modality imaging probe. This technology can serve as a general route for encapsulating a variety of discrete nanomaterials because monodispersed nanostructures often have a similar surface chemistry.

  13. Silica shell/gold core nanoparticles: correlating shell thickness with the plasmonic red shift upon aggregation.

    PubMed

    Vanderkooy, Alan; Chen, Yang; Gonzaga, Ferdinand; Brook, Michael A

    2011-10-01

    Differences in the wavelengths of the surface plasmon band of gold nanoparticles (AuNP)--before and after particle aggregation--are widely used in bioanalytical assays. However, the gold surfaces in such bioassays can suffer from exchange and desorption of noncovalently bound ligands and from nonspecific adsorption of biomolecules. Silica shells on the surfaces of the gold can extend the available surface chemistries for bioconjugation and potentially avoid these issues. Therefore, silica was grown on gold surfaces using either hydrolysis/condensation of tetraethyl orthosilicate 1 under basic conditions or diglyceroxysilane 2 at neutral pH. The former precursor permitted slow, controlled growth of shells from about 1.7 to 4.3 nm thickness. By contrast, 3-4 nm thick silica shells formed within an hour using diglyceroxysilane; thinner or thicker shells were not readily available. Within the range of shell thicknesses synthesized, the presence of a silica shell on the gold nanoparticle did not significantly affect the absorbance maximum (~5 nm) of unaggregated particles. However, the change in absorbance wavelength upon aggregation of the particles was highly dependent on the thickness of the shell. With silica shells coating the AuNP, there was a significant decrease in the absorbance maximum of the aggregated particles, from ~578 to ~536 nm, as the shell thicknesses increased from ~1.7 to ~4.3 nm, because of increased distance between adjacent gold cores. These studies provide guidance for the development of colorimetric assays using silica-coated AuNP.

  14. Trapping of intense light in hollow shell

    SciTech Connect

    Luan, Shixia; Yu, Wei; Yu, M. Y.; Weng, Suming; Wang, Jingwei; Xu, Han; Zhuo, Hongbin; Wong, A. Y.

    2015-09-15

    A small hollow shell for trapping laser light is proposed. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation shows that under appropriate laser and plasma conditions a part of the radiation fields of an intense short laser pulse can enter the cavity of a small shell through an over-critical density plasma in an adjacent guide channel and become trapped. The trapped light evolves into a circulating radial wave pattern until its energy is dissipated.

  15. Kramers' Restricted Closed Shell CCSD Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visscher, Lucas; Dyall, Kenneth G.; Lee, Timothy J.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A Kramers' restricted version of the closed shell coupled cluster singles doubles theory is presented. The theory may be used in conjunction with 2 or 4-component relativistic reference wavefunctions. The intrinsic treatment of the spin-orbit coupling doubles the number of independent quantities (amplitudes and integrals) relative to a spin-independent formalism. The number of operations required to evaluate the equations is four times larger than in the optimal spin-independent closed shell formalism.

  16. Shell model for buoyancy-driven turbulence.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhishek; Verma, Mahendra K

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we present a unified shell model for stably stratified and convective turbulence. Numerical simulation of this model for stably stratified flow shows Bolgiano-Obukhbov scaling in which the kinetic energy spectrum varies as k(-11/5). The shell model of convective turbulence yields Kolmogorov's spectrum. These results are consistent with the energy flux and energy feed due to buoyancy, and are in good agreement with direct numerical simulations of Kumar et al. [Phys. Rev. E 90, 023016 (2014)].

  17. Double shell tank waste analysis plan

    SciTech Connect

    Mulkey, C.H.; Jones, J.M.

    1994-12-15

    Waste analysis plan for the double shell tanks. SD-WM-EV-053 is Superseding SD-WM-EV-057.This document provides the plan for obtaining information needed for the safe waste handling and storage of waste in the Double Shell Tank Systems. In Particular it addresses analysis necessary to manage waste according to Washington Administrative Code 173-303 and Title 40, parts 264 and 265 of the Code of Federal Regulations.

  18. New developments of the nuclear shell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poves, Alfredo

    2002-04-01

    More than fifty years ago, the independent particle model of the nucleus was proposed by M. Goeppert-Mayer and H. Jensen. The label "shell model" has since changed meaning and nowadays it applies mainly to the description of the nucleus that results of the mixing of many Slater determinants by an effective "in medium" interaction, usually limited to one and two-body terms. The advent of efficient new algorithms to solve the secular problem, together with the increase in speed and storage capacity of modern computers, has brought into the reach of large scale shell model calculations entire regions of nuclei and of nuclear phenomena traditionally considered to be out of the shell model realm. This enormous extension of its field of practical applications has occurred simultaneously with a regain of experimental interest in the nuclear spectroscopy, in particular in very neutron rich and N=Z nuclei. The shell model work in large model spaces demands a very complete understanding of the effective nuclear interaction, a basic goal of the nuclear theory. Besides, the huge increase of dimensionality that occurs when many valence orbits and valence particles are involved, is a formidable challenge for both the direct diagonalization shell model codes and for the many different approximations, based most often in physically guided truncations of the full shell model basis. In this talk I aim to transmit the effervescence of the field by highlighting the most important recent advances and applications.

  19. Experiments on shells under base excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellicano, Francesco; Barbieri, Marco; Zippo, Antonio; Strozzi, Matteo

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present paper is a deep experimental investigation of the nonlinear dynamics of circular cylindrical shells. The specific problem regards the response of circular cylindrical shells subjected to base excitation. The shells are mounted on a shaking table that furnishes a vertical vibration parallel to the cylinder axis; a heavy rigid disk is mounted on the top of the shells. The base vibration induces a rigid body motion, which mainly causes huge inertia forces exerted by the top disk to the shell. In-plane stresses due to the aforementioned inertias give rise to impressively large vibration on the shell. An extremely violent dynamic phenomenon suddenly appears as the excitation frequency varies up and down close to the linear resonant frequency of the first axisymmetric mode. The dynamics are deeply investigated by varying excitation level and frequency. Moreover, in order to generalise the investigation, two different geometries are analysed. The paper furnishes a complete dynamic scenario by means of: (i) amplitude frequency diagrams, (ii) bifurcation diagrams, (iii) time histories and spectra, (iv) phase portraits and Poincaré maps. It is to be stressed that all the results presented here are experimental.

  20. Physics Considerations for Double-Shell Capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daughton, W.; Montgomery, D. S.; Wilson, D.; Simakov, A.; Dodd, E.; Merritt, L.; Cardenas, T.; Kline, J. L.; Batha, S.

    2016-10-01

    Double-shell capsules offer an alternative approach for achieving burn on the National Ignition Facility. These capsules consist of a low-Z ablatively driven outer shell that converges a factor of 3 before colliding with a high-Z inner shell filled with liquid DT. Such targets permit short simple laser pulses using near vacuum hohlraum conditions, which have been shown to eliminate laser plasma instabilities, resulting in good coupling efficiency. The adiabat of the fuel is set predominantly by a single strong shock, followed by the nearly adiabatic compression of the fuel volume by a convergence ratio of 9 . In this talk, we present some key physics consideration for double-shell targets, including design constraints for optimizing the kinetic energy transfer to the inner shell. These basics considerations are confirmed by a series of 1D simulations, resulting in several optimized point designs. Two-dimensional simulations are employed to evaluate the influence of low-mode asymmetries, as well as the stability of both the outer and inner shells as the implosion proceeds.

  1. Buckling of conical shell with local imperfections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, P. A.; Dexter, C. B.

    1974-01-01

    Small geometric imperfections in thin-walled shell structures can cause large reductions in buckling strength. Most imperfections found in structures are neither axisymmetric nor have the shape of buckling modes but rather occur locally. This report presents the results of a study of the effect of local imperfections on the critical buckling load of a specific axially compressed thin-walled conical shell. The buckling calculations were performed by using a two-dimensional shell analysis program referred to as the STAGS (Structural Analysis of General Shells) computer code, which has no axisymmetry restrictions. Results show that the buckling load found from a bifurcation buckling analysis is highly dependent on the circumferential arc length of the imperfection type studied. As the circumferential arc length of the imperfection is increased, a reduction of up to 50 percent of the critical load of the perfect shell can occur. The buckling load of the cone with an axisymmetric imperfections is nearly equal to the buckling load of imperfections which extended 60 deg or more around the circumference, but would give a highly conservative estimate of the buckling load of a shell with an imperfection of a more local nature.

  2. Distributed neural signals on parabolic cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. D.; Li, H.; Tzou, H. S.

    2013-06-01

    Parabolic cylindrical shells are commonly used as key components in communication antennas, space telescopes, solar collectors, etc. This study focuses on distributed modal neural sensing signals on a flexible simply-supported parabolic cylindrical shell panel. The parabolic cylindrical shell is fully laminated with a piezoelectric layer on its outer surface and the piezoelectric layer is segmented into infinitesimal elements (neurons) to investigate the microscopic distributed neural sensing signals. Since the dominant vibration component of the shell is usually the transverse oscillation, a new transverse mode shape function is defined. Two shell cases, i.e., the ratio of the meridian height to the half span distance of a parabola at 1:4 (shallow) and 1:1 (deep), are studied to reveal the curvature effect to the neural sensing signals. Studies suggest that the membrane signal component dominates for lower natural modes and the bending signal component dominates for higher natural modes. The meridional membrane and bending signal components are mostly concentrated on the high-curvature areas, while the longitudinal bending component is mostly concentrated on the relatively flat areas. The concentration behavior becomes more prominent as the parabolic cylindrical shell deepens, primarily resulting from the enhanced membrane effect due to the increased curvature.

  3. Controllable self-assembly of amphiphilic macrocycles into closed-shell and open-shell vesicles, nanotubes, and fibers.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Atanu; Panda, Dillip K; Corson, Lucas J; Saha, Sourav

    2013-05-21

    Depending on functional groups, amphiphilic hexaamide macrocycles self-assemble into closed-shell and open-shell vesicles in polar solvents. In the presence of water, open-shell vesicles morph into closed-shell vesicles, whereas acidification of the medium transforms vesicles into nanotubes and fibers.

  4. Adsorption of volatile organic compounds by pecan shell- and almond shell-based granular activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Bansode, R R; Losso, J N; Marshall, W E; Rao, R M; Portier, R J

    2003-11-01

    The objective of this research was to determine the effectiveness of using pecan and almond shell-based granular activated carbons (GACs) in the adsorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of health concern and known toxic compounds (such as bromo-dichloromethane, benzene, carbon tetrachloride, 1,1,1-trichloromethane, chloroform, and 1,1-dichloromethane) compared to the adsorption efficiency of commercially used carbons (such as Filtrasorb 200, Calgon GRC-20, and Waterlinks 206C AW) in simulated test medium. The pecan shell-based GACs were activated using steam, carbon dioxide or phosphoric acid. An almond shell-based GAC was activated with phosphoric acid. Our results indicated that steam- or carbon dioxide-activated pecan shell carbons were superior in total VOC adsorption to phosphoric acid-activated pecan shell or almond shell carbons, inferring that the method of activation selected for the preparation of activated carbons affected the adsorption of VOCs and hence are factors to be considered in any adsorption process. The steam-activated, pecan shell carbon adsorbed more total VOCs than the other experimental carbons and had an adsorption profile similar to the two coconut shell-based commercial carbons, but had greater adsorption than the coal-based commercial carbon. All the carbons studied adsorbed benzene more effectively than the other organics. Pecan shell, steam-activated and acid-activated GACs showed higher adsorption of 1,1,1-trichloroethane than the other carbons studied. Multivariate analysis was conducted to group experimental carbons and commercial carbons based on their physical, chemical, and adsorptive properties. The results of the analysis conclude that steam-activated and acid-activated pecan shell carbons clustered together with coal-based and coconut shell-based commercial carbons, thus inferring that these experimental carbons could potentially be used as alternative sources for VOC adsorption in an aqueous environment.

  5. Sound Transmission through Two Concentric Cylindrical Sandwich Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Yvette Y.; Silcox, Richard J.; Robinson, Jay H.

    1996-01-01

    This paper solves the problem of sound transmission through a system of two infinite concentric cylindrical sandwich shells. The shells are surrounded by external and internal fluid media and there is fluid (air) in the annular space between them. An oblique plane sound wave is incident upon the surface of the outer shell. A uniform flow is moving with a constant velocity in the external fluid medium. Classical thin shell theory is applied to the inner shell and first-order shear deformation theory is applied to the outer shell. A closed form for transmission loss is derived based on modal analysis. Investigations have been made for the impedance of both shells and the transmission loss through the shells from the exterior into the interior. Results are compared for double sandwich shells and single sandwich shells. This study shows that: (1) the impedance of the inner shell is much smaller than that of the outer shell so that the transmission loss is almost the same in both the annular space and the interior cavity of the shells; (2) the two concentric sandwich shells can produce an appreciable increase of transmission loss over single sandwich shells especially in the high frequency range; and (3) design guidelines may be derived with respect to the noise reduction requirement and the pressure in the annular space at a mid-frequency range.

  6. Adaptation from restricted geometries: the shell inclination of terrestrial gastropods.

    PubMed

    Okajima, Ryoko; Chiba, Satoshi

    2013-02-01

    The adaptations that occur for support and protection can be studied with regard to the optimal structure that balances these objectives with any imposed constraints. The shell inclination of terrestrial gastropods is an appropriate model to address this problem. In this study, we examined how gastropods improve shell angles to well-balanced ones from geometrically constrained shapes. Our geometric analysis and physical analysis showed that constantly coiled shells are constrained from adopting a well-balanced angle; the shell angle of such basic shells tends to increase as the spire index (shell height/width) increases, although the optimum angle for stability is 90° for flat shells and 0° for tall shells. Furthermore, we estimated the influences of the geometric rule and the functional demands on actual shells by measuring the shell angles of both resting and active snails. We found that terrestrial gastropods have shell angles that are suited for balance. The growth lines of the shells indicated that this adaptation depends on the deflection of the last whorl: the apertures of flat shells are deflected downward, whereas those of tall shells are deflected upward. Our observations of active snails demonstrated that the animals hold their shells at better balanced angles than inactive snails.

  7. Thin Shell Manufacturing for large Wavefront correctors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruch, Eric; Poutriquet, Florence

    2011-09-01

    One of the major key elements in large adaptive optical systems is the thin shell, used as a deformable mirror. Although the optical prescriptions are relaxed with respect to a passive mirror, especially in the low spatial frequency domain, other requirements, such as the cosmetic defects (scratch & dig), the tight control of the thickness uniformity and of course the fragility of the piece having an aspect ratio up to 1000:1, generate new problems during the manufacturing, testing and handling of such optics. Moreover, the optical surface has to be tested in two different ways: a classical optical test bench allows us to create a surface map of the mirror. This map is then computed to determine the force required by the actuators to flatten the mirror and this becomes also a specification for polishing and implies a good interaction with the voice coil manufacturer. More than twenty years ago Sagem - Reosc developed the first meter class thin shell for early adaptive optics experiments. Since then, large thin shell have been used as the optical part in composite mirrors and more recently the aspheric shell for the VLT Deformable Secondary Mirror has been polished and prototypes, up to scale 1, of the E-ELT M4 Adaptive Mirror have been delivered to ESO in 2010. This paper will present some recent results in the manufacturing and testing technologies of large this shell, especially focusing on the development of the 1,1 meter convex aspherical shell for the VLT M2 mirror and on the results obtained on the largest thin shell produced so far (2,5 meter in diameter) developed as a demonstrator for the future E-ELT M4.

  8. Comparisons of Backscattering from Cylindrical Shells Described by Thin Shell and Elasticity Theories.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-04

    term that describes inextensional motion. The first equation represents the normal stress at the midsurface of the shell, which is equal to the...that the normal velocity at the midsurface of the shell is proportional to the normal derivative of the total pressw e. The scattered pressure ps can

  9. Simplified dispersion curves for circular cylindrical shells using shallow shell theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Abhijit; Sonti, Venkata R.

    2009-04-01

    An alternative derivation of the dispersion relation for the transverse vibration of a circular cylindrical shell is presented. The use of the shallow shell theory model leads to a simpler derivation of the same result. Further, the applicability of the dispersion relation is extended to the axisymmetric mode and the high frequency beam mode.

  10. Shell thickness determination of polymer-shelled microbubbles using transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Härmark, Johan; Hebert, Hans; Koeck, Philip J B

    2016-06-01

    Intravenously injected microbubbles (MBs) can be utilized as ultrasound contrast agent (CA) resulting in enhanced image quality. A novel CA, consisting of air filled MBs stabilized with a shell of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) has been developed. These spherical MBs have been decorated with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) in order to serve as both ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) CA. In this study, a mathematical model was introduced that determined the shell thickness of two types of SPIONs decorated MBs (Type A and Type B). The shell thickness of MBs is important to determine, as it affects the acoustical properties. In order to investigate the shell thickness, thin sections of plastic embedded MBs were prepared and imaged using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). However, the sections were cut at random distances from the MB center, which affected the observed shell thickness. Hence, the model determined the average shell thickness of the MBs from corrected mean values of the outer and inner radii observed in the TEM sections. The model was validated using simulated slices of MBs with known shell thickness and radius. The average shell thickness of Type A and Type B MBs were 651nm and 637nm, respectively.

  11. Comparative study of the shell development of hard- and soft-shelled turtles.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Hiroshi; Shibata, Masahiro; Taniguchi, Mari; Ueno, Shintaro; Kamezaki, Naoki; Sato, Noboru

    2014-07-01

    The turtle shell provides a fascinating model for the investigation of the evolutionary modifications of developmental mechanisms. Different conclusions have been put forth for its development, and it is suggested that one of the causes of the disagreement could be the differences in the species of the turtles used - the differences between hard-shelled turtles and soft-shelled turtles. To elucidate the cause of the difference, we compared the turtle shell development in the two groups of turtle. In the dorsal shell development, these two turtle groups shared the gene expression profile that is required for formation, and shared similar spatial organization of the anatomical elements during development. Thus, both turtles formed the dorsal shell through a folding of the lateral body wall, and the Wnt signaling pathway appears to have been involved in the development. The ventral portion of the shell, on the other hand, contains massive dermal bones. Although expression of HNK-1 epitope has suggested that the trunk neural crest contributed to the dermal bones in the hard-shelled turtles, it was not expressed in the initial anlage of the skeletons in either of the types of turtle. Hence, no evidence was found that would support a neural crest origin.

  12. Cluster aspects of p-shell and sd-shell nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kanada-En'yo, Y.; Kobayashi, F.; Suhara, T.; Kimura, M.; Taniguchi, Y.

    2011-05-06

    We report some topics on cluster structures studied by using a theoretical method of antisymmetrized molecular dynamics(AMD). Cluster features of p-shell and sd-shell nuclei are discussed. In particular, three alpha cluster structures in the excited states of {sup 12}C and {sup 14}C are focused. Dineutron correlations in neutron-rich nuclei are also discussed.

  13. Supercooling Self-Assembly of Magnetic Shelled Core/Shell Supraparticles.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaotong; Yan, Bingyun; Wu, Fengluan; Zhang, Jinlong; Qu, Shuxin; Zhou, Shaobing; Weng, Jie

    2016-09-14

    Molecular self-assembly has emerged as a powerful technique for controlling the structure and properties of core/shell structured supraparticles. However, drug-loading capacities and therapeutic effects of self-assembled magnetic core/shell nanocarriers with magnetic nanoparticles in the core are limited by the intervention of the outer organic or inorganic shell, the aggregation of superparamagnetic nanoparticles, the narrowed inner cavity, etc. Here, we present a self-assembly approach based on rebalancing hydrogen bonds between components under a supercooling process to form a new core/shell nanoscale supraparticle with magnetic nanoparticles as the shell and a polysaccharide as a core. Compared with conventional iron oxide nanoparticles, this magnetic shelled core/shell nanoparticle possesses an optimized inner cavity and a loss-free outer magnetic property. Furthermore, we find that the drug-loaded magnetic shelled nanocarriers showed interesting in vitro release behaviors at different pH conditions, including "swelling-broken", "dissociating-broken", and "bursting-broken" modes. Our experiments demonstrate the novel design of the multifunctional hybrid nanostructure and provide a considerable potential for the biomedical applications.

  14. Revisiting chameleon gravity: Thin-shell and no-shell fields with appropriate boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Tamaki, Takashi; Tsujikawa, Shinji

    2008-10-15

    We derive analytic solutions of a chameleon scalar field {phi} that couples to a nonrelativistic matter in the weak gravitational background of a spherically symmetric body, paying particular attention to a field mass m{sub A} inside of the body. The standard thin-shell field profile is recovered by taking the limit m{sub A}r{sub c}{yields}{infinity}, where r{sub c} is a radius of the body. We show the existence of 'no-shell' solutions where the field is nearly frozen in the whole interior of the body, which does not necessarily correspond to the 'zero-shell' limit of thin-shell solutions. In the no-shell case, under the condition m{sub A}r{sub c}>>1, the effective coupling of {phi} with matter takes the same asymptotic form as that in the thin-shell case. We study experimental bounds coming from the violation of equivalence principle as well as solar-system tests for a number of models including f(R) gravity and find that the field is in either the thin-shell or the no-shell regime under such constraints, depending on the shape of scalar-field potentials. We also show that, for the consistency with local gravity constraints, the field at the center of the body needs to be extremely close to the value {phi}{sub A} at the extremum of an effective potential induced by the matter coupling.

  15. SHELLS: A thin-shell program for modeling neotectonics of regional or global lithosphere with faults

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, X.; Bird, P.

    1995-11-10

    This report discusses a geophysical computer program called SHELLS, which model neotectonics of regional or global lithosphere with faults. This model is based on spherical shell elements which uses isostacy and vertical integration of lithospheric strength to reduce this to a two-dimensional problem.

  16. Lithography-free shell-substrate isolation for core-shell GaAs nanowires.

    PubMed

    Haggren, Tuomas; Perros, Alexander Pyymaki; Jiang, Hua; Huhtio, Teppo; Kakko, Joona-Pekko; Dhaka, Veer; Kauppinen, Esko; Lipsanen, Harri

    2016-07-08

    A facile and scalable lithography-free technique(5) for the rapid construction of GaAs core-shell nanowires incorporating shell isolation from the substrate is reported. The process is based on interrupting NW growth and applying a thin spin-on-glass (SOG) layer to the base of the NWs and resuming core-shell NW growth. NW growth occurred in an atmospheric pressure metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE) system with gold nanoparticles used as catalysts for the vapour-liquid-solid growth. It is shown that NW axial core growth and radial shell growth can be resumed after interruption and even exposure to air. The SOG residues and native oxide layer that forms on the NW surface are shown to prevent or perturb resumption of epitaxial NW growth if not removed. Both HF etching and in situ annealing of the air-exposed NWs in the MOVPE were shown to remove the SOG residues and native oxide layer. While both procedures are shown capable of removing the native oxide and enabling resumption of epitaxial NW growth, in situ annealing produced the best results and allowed construction of pristine core-shell NWs. No growth occurred on SOG and it was observed that axial NW growth was more rapid when a SOG layer covered the substrate. The fabricated p-core/n-shell NWs exhibited diode behaviour upon electrical testing. The isolation of the NW shells from the substrate was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and electrical measurements. The crystal quality of the regrown core-shell NWs was verified with a high resolution transmission electron microscope. The reported technique potentially provides a pathway using MOVPE for scalable and high-throughput production of shell-substrate isolated core-shell NWs on an industrial scale.

  17. Lithography-free shell-substrate isolation for core-shell GaAs nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haggren, Tuomas; Pyymaki Perros, Alexander; Jiang, Hua; Huhtio, Teppo; Kakko, Joona-Pekko; Dhaka, Veer; Kauppinen, Esko; Lipsanen, Harri

    2016-07-01

    A facile and scalable lithography-free technique5 for the rapid construction of GaAs core-shell nanowires incorporating shell isolation from the substrate is reported. The process is based on interrupting NW growth and applying a thin spin-on-glass (SOG) layer to the base of the NWs and resuming core-shell NW growth. NW growth occurred in an atmospheric pressure metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE) system with gold nanoparticles used as catalysts for the vapour-liquid-solid growth. It is shown that NW axial core growth and radial shell growth can be resumed after interruption and even exposure to air. The SOG residues and native oxide layer that forms on the NW surface are shown to prevent or perturb resumption of epitaxial NW growth if not removed. Both HF etching and in situ annealing of the air-exposed NWs in the MOVPE were shown to remove the SOG residues and native oxide layer. While both procedures are shown capable of removing the native oxide and enabling resumption of epitaxial NW growth, in situ annealing produced the best results and allowed construction of pristine core-shell NWs. No growth occurred on SOG and it was observed that axial NW growth was more rapid when a SOG layer covered the substrate. The fabricated p-core/n-shell NWs exhibited diode behaviour upon electrical testing. The isolation of the NW shells from the substrate was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and electrical measurements. The crystal quality of the regrown core-shell NWs was verified with a high resolution transmission electron microscope. The reported technique potentially provides a pathway using MOVPE for scalable and high-throughput production of shell-substrate isolated core-shell NWs on an industrial scale.

  18. Structural Assessment of Advanced Composite Tow-Steered Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Stanford, Bret K.; Hrinda, Glenn A.; Wang, Zhuosong; Martin, Robert a.; Kim, H. Alicia

    2013-01-01

    The structural performance of two advanced composite tow-steered shells, manufactured using a fiber placement system, is assessed using both experimental and analytical methods. The fiber orientation angles vary continuously around the shell circumference from 10 degrees on the shell crown and keel, to 45 degrees on the shell sides. The two shells differ in that one shell has the full 24-tow course applied during each pass of the fiber placement system, while the second shell uses the fiber placement system s tow drop/add capability to achieve a more uniform shell wall thickness. The shells are tested in axial compression, and estimates of their prebuckling axial stiffnesses and bifurcation buckling loads are predicted using linear finite element analyses. These preliminary predictions compare well with the test results, with an average agreement of approximately 10 percent.

  19. Removable inner turbine shell with bucket tip clearance control

    DOEpatents

    Sexton, Brendan F.; Knuijt, Hans M.; Eldrid, Sacheverel Q.; Myers, Albert; Coneybeer, Kyle E.; Johnson, David Martin; Kellock, Iain R.

    2000-01-01

    A turbine includes a plurality of inner shell sections mounting first and second stage nozzle and shroud portions. The inner shell sections are pinned to an outer containment shell formed of sections to preclude circumferential movement of the inner shell relative to the outer shell and enable thermal expansion and contraction of the inner shell relative to the outer shell. Positive bucket tip clearance control is afforded by passing a thermal medium about the inner shell in heat transfer relation with the shrouds about the first and second stage bucket tips, the thermal medium being provided from a source of heating/cooling fluid independent of the turbine. Access is provided to the rotor and turbine buckets by removing the outer and inner shell sections.

  20. Novel highly ordered core–shell nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Sonal; Hossain, Mohammad D.; Mayanovic, Robert A.; Wirth, Richard; Gordon, Robert A.

    2016-10-26

    Core–shell nanoparticles have potential for a wide range of applications due to the tunability of their magnetic, catalytic, electronic, optical, and other physicochemical properties. A frequent drawback in the design of core–shell nanoparticles and nanocrystals is the lack of control over an extensive, disordered, and compositionally distinct interface that occurs due to the dissimilarity of structural and compositional phases of the core and shell. In this work, we demonstrate a new hydrothermal nanophase epitaxy (HNE) technique to synthesize highly structurally ordered α-Cr2O3@α-Co0.38Cr1.62O2.92 inverted core–shell nanoparticles (CSNs) with evidence for the nanoscale growth of corundum structure beginning from the core and extending completely into the shell of the CSNs with minimal defects at the interface. The high-resolution TEM results show a sharp interface exhibiting epitaxial atomic registry of shell atoms over highly ordered core atoms. The XPS and Co K-edge XANES analyses indicate the +2 oxidation state of cobalt is incorporated in the shell of the CSNs. Our XPS and EXAFS results are consistent with oxygen vacancy formation in order to maintain charge neutrality upon substitution of the Co2+ ion for the Cr3+ ion in the α-Co0.38Cr1.62O2.92 shell. Furthermore, the CSNs exhibit the magnetic exchange bias effect, which is attributed to the exchange anisotropy at the interface made possible by the nanophase epitaxial growth of the α-Co0.38Cr1.62O2.92 shell on the α-Cr2O3 core of the nanoparticles. The combination of a well-structured, sharp interface and novel nanophase characteristics is highly desirable for nanostructures having enhanced magnetic properties.

  1. Do freshwater mussel shells record road-salt pollution?

    PubMed Central

    O'Neil, Dane D.; Gillikin, David P.

    2014-01-01

    Road-salt pollution in streams in the Northeastern United States has become a major concern, but historical data are scarce. Freshwater bivalve shells have the ability to record past environmental information, and may act as archives of road-salt pollution. We sampled Elliptio complanata shells from four streams, as well as specimens collected in 1877. Average [Na/Ca]shell was highest in modern shells from the stream with the highest sodium concentrations, and low in shells collected from this same stream in 1877 as well as in the shells from other streams, suggesting that [Na/Ca]shell serves as a proxy for road-salt pollution. We expected higher [Na/Ca]shell in winter and spring. However, high-resolution [Na/Ca]shell analyses along the growth axis of one shell did not reveal any clear subannual patterns, which could be the result of shell growth cessation in winter and/or during periods of high stream sodium concentrations. Therefore, bulk [Na/Ca]shell analysis from multiple shells can be used as a proxy of large changes in stream sodium concentrations, but high-resolution variations in stream sodium concentrations do not seem to be recorded in the shells. PMID:25418687

  2. Do freshwater mussel shells record road-salt pollution?

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Dane D; Gillikin, David P

    2014-11-24

    Road-salt pollution in streams in the Northeastern United States has become a major concern, but historical data are scarce. Freshwater bivalve shells have the ability to record past environmental information, and may act as archives of road-salt pollution. We sampled Elliptio complanata shells from four streams, as well as specimens collected in 1877. Average [Na/Ca]shell was highest in modern shells from the stream with the highest sodium concentrations, and low in shells collected from this same stream in 1877 as well as in the shells from other streams, suggesting that [Na/Ca]shell serves as a proxy for road-salt pollution. We expected higher [Na/Ca]shell in winter and spring. However, high-resolution [Na/Ca]shell analyses along the growth axis of one shell did not reveal any clear subannual patterns, which could be the result of shell growth cessation in winter and/or during periods of high stream sodium concentrations. Therefore, bulk [Na/Ca]shell analysis from multiple shells can be used as a proxy of large changes in stream sodium concentrations, but high-resolution variations in stream sodium concentrations do not seem to be recorded in the shells.

  3. Core-shell silicon nanowire solar cells.

    PubMed

    Adachi, M M; Anantram, M P; Karim, K S

    2013-01-01

    Silicon nanowires can enhance broadband optical absorption and reduce radial carrier collection distances in solar cell devices. Arrays of disordered nanowires grown by vapor-liquid-solid method are attractive because they can be grown on low-cost substrates such as glass, and are large area compatible. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that an array of disordered silicon nanowires surrounded by a thin transparent conductive oxide has both low diffuse and specular reflection with total values as low as < 4% over a broad wavelength range of 400 nm < λ < 650 nm. These anti-reflective properties together with enhanced infrared absorption in the core-shell nanowire facilitates enhancement in external quantum efficiency using two different active shell materials: amorphous silicon and nanocrystalline silicon. As a result, the core-shell nanowire device exhibits a short-circuit current enhancement of 15% with an amorphous Si shell and 26% with a nanocrystalline Si shell compared to their corresponding planar devices.

  4. Thick or Thin Ice Shell on Europa?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Scientists are all but certain that Europa has an ocean underneath its icy surface, but they do not know how thick this ice might be. This artist concept illustrates two possible cut-away views through Europa's ice shell. In both, heat escapes, possibly volcanically, from Europa's rocky mantle and is carried upward by buoyant oceanic currents. If the heat from below is intense and the ice shell is thin enough (left), the ice shell can directly melt, causing what are called 'chaos' on Europa, regions of what appear to be broken, rotated and tilted ice blocks. On the other hand, if the ice shell is sufficiently thick (right), the less intense interior heat will be transferred to the warmer ice at the bottom of the shell, and additional heat is generated by tidal squeezing of the warmer ice. This warmer ice will slowly rise, flowing as glaciers do on Earth, and the slow but steady motion may also disrupt the extremely cold, brittle ice at the surface. Europa is no larger than Earth's moon, and its internal heating stems from its eccentric orbit about Jupiter, seen in the distance. As tides raised by Jupiter in Europa's ocean rise and fall, they may cause cracking, additional heating and even venting of water vapor into the airless sky above Europa's icy surface. (Artwork by Michael Carroll.)

  5. Folding of non-Euclidean curved shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bende, Nakul; Evans, Arthur; Innes-Gold, Sarah; Marin, Luis; Cohen, Itai; Santangelo, Christian; Hayward, Ryan

    2015-03-01

    Origami-based folding of 2D sheets has been of recent interest for a variety of applications ranging from deployable structures to self-folding robots. Though folding of planar sheets follows well-established principles, folding of curved shells involves an added level of complexity due to the inherent influence of curvature on mechanics. In this study, we use principles from differential geometry and thin shell mechanics to establish fundamental rules that govern folding of prototypical creased shells. In particular, we show how the normal curvature of a crease line controls whether the deformation is smooth or discontinuous, and investigate the influence of shell thickness and boundary conditions. We show that snap-folding of shells provides a route to rapid actuation on time-scales dictated by the speed of sound. The simple geometric design principles developed can be applied at any length-scale, offering potential for bio-inspired soft actuators for tunable optics, microfluidics, and robotics. This work was funded by the National Science Foundation through EFRI ODISSEI-1240441 with additional support to S.I.-G. through the UMass MRSEC DMR-0820506 REU program.

  6. Hollow Pollen Shells to Enhance Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Diego-Taboada, Alberto; Beckett, Stephen T.; Atkin, Stephen L.; Mackenzie, Grahame

    2014-01-01

    Pollen grain and spore shells are natural microcapsules designed to protect the genetic material of the plant from external damage. The shell is made up of two layers, the inner layer (intine), made largely of cellulose, and the outer layer (exine), composed mainly of sporopollenin. The relative proportion of each varies according to the plant species. The structure of sporopollenin has not been fully characterised but different studies suggest the presence of conjugated phenols, which provide antioxidant properties to the microcapsule and UV (ultraviolet) protection to the material inside it. These microcapsule shells have many advantageous properties, such as homogeneity in size, resilience to both alkalis and acids, and the ability to withstand temperatures up to 250 °C. These hollow microcapsules have the ability to encapsulate and release actives in a controlled manner. Their mucoadhesion to intestinal tissues may contribute to the extended contact of the sporopollenin with the intestinal mucosa leading to an increased efficiency of delivery of nutraceuticals and drugs. The hollow microcapsules can be filled with a solution of the active or active in a liquid form by simply mixing both together, and in some cases operating a vacuum. The active payload can be released in the human body depending on pressure on the microcapsule, solubility and/or pH factors. Active release can be controlled by adding a coating on the shell, or co-encapsulation with the active inside the shell. PMID:24638098

  7. DECam Observations of the Tidal Shells Around NGC 3923

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Bryan; Grooms, Connor; Puzia, Thomas H.; Matthew, Taylor; Graeme, Candlish; McGaugh, Stacy S.; Mihos, Chris; Smith, Rory; Schirmer, Mischa

    2016-01-01

    Stellar shells around elliptical galaxies are thought to be the results of near-radial mergers with low mass companions. Thus, the shell systems contain information about the merger history and gravitational potential of the elliptical galaxy. We present a preliminary census of the shell system of NGC 3923 from extremely deep g and i-band DECam imaging. NGC 3923 has the largest know shell system, with different studies finding between 27 and 42 shells. We present an overview of the DECam data reduction and an initial analysis of the shell system.

  8. Inner shell radial pin geometry and mounting arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Leach, David; Bergendahl, Peter Allen

    2002-01-01

    Circumferentially spaced arrays of support pins are disposed through access openings in an outer turbine shell and have projections received in recesses in forward and aft sections of an inner turbine shell supported from the outer shell. The projections have arcuate sides in a circumferential direction affording line contacts with the side walls of the recesses and are spaced from end faces of the recesses, enabling radial and axial expansion and contraction of the inner shell relative to the outer shell. All loads are taken up in a tangential direction by the outer shell with the support pins taking no radial loadings.

  9. Expulsion of ions from hydrophobic hydration shells.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Blake M; Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2013-06-19

    Raman spectroscopy is combined with multivariate curve resolution to quantify interactions between ions and molecular hydrophobic groups in water. The molecular solutes in this study all have similar structures, with a trimethyl hydrophobic domain and a polar or charged headgroup. Our results imply that aqueous sodium and fluoride ions are strongly expelled from the first hydration shells of the hydrophobic (methyl) groups, while iodide ions are found to enter the hydrophobic hydration shell, to an extent that depends on the methyl group partial charge. However, our quantitative estimates of the corresponding ion binding equilibrium constants indicate that the iodide concentration in the first hydrophobic hydration shell is generally lower than that in the surrounding bulk water, and so an iodide ion cannot be viewed as having a true affinity for the molecular hydrophobic interface, but rather is less strongly expelled from such an interface than fluoride.

  10. Shell model response analysis of buried pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Takada, Shiro; Katagiri, Shin; Shinmi, Tatsuhiko

    1995-12-31

    A shell model analysis can calculate the cross-sectional deformation and hoop stress of buried pipelines. This paper proposes an analytical method to calculate the response of buried straight and bent pipelines modeled as cylindrical shell structures. A modified transfer matrix method is employed instead of a stiffness matrix method to avoid the problem of computational memory caused by huge matrixes. Results calculated by the developed program are compared with experimental ones obtained by a pipe bending test of straight and bent pipe segments. In addition, several differences of the pipe response between the beam model and the shell model are examined through response simulations of straight and bent pipelines subjected to ground subsidence.

  11. Spherical shell model description of rotational motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuker, A. P.; Retamosa, J.; Poves, A.; Caurier, E.

    1995-10-01

    Exact diagonalizations with a realistic interaction show that configurations with four neutrons in a major shell and four protons in another-or the same-major shell, behave systematically as backbending rotors. The dominance of the q.q component of the interaction is related to an approximate ``quasi-SU3'' symmetry. It is suggested that the onset of rotational motion in the rare earth nuclei is due to the promotion of the eight particle blocks to the major shells above the ones currently filling. Assuming a ``pseudo-SU3'' coupling for the particles in the lower orbits, it is possible to account remarkably well for the observed B(E2) rates at the beginning of the region.

  12. FInal Report - Investment Casting Shell Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Von Richards

    2003-12-01

    This project made a significant contribution to the understanding of the investment casting shell cracking problem. The effects of wax properties on the occurrence of shell cracking were demonstrated and can be measured. The properties measured include coefficient of thermal expansion, heating rate and crystallinity of the structure. The important features of production molds and materials properties have been indicated by case study analysis and fractography of low strength test bars. It was found that stress risers in shell cavity design were important and that typical critical flaws were either oversize particles or large pores just behind the prime coat. It was also found that the true effect of fugitive polymer fibers was not permeability increase, but rather a toughening mechanism due to crack deflection.

  13. Shape-changing shell-like structures.

    PubMed

    Pagitz, M; Bold, J

    2013-03-01

    Plants such as Dionaea muscipula (Venus Flytrap) can change the shape of their shell-like leaves by actively altering the cell pressures. These leaves are hydraulic actuators that do not require any complex controls and that possess an energy efficiency that is unmatched by natural or artificial muscles (Huber et al 1997 Proc. R. Soc. A 453 2185-205). We extend our previous work (Pagitz et al 2012 Bioinspir. Biomim. 7 016007) on pressure-actuated cellular structures by introducing a concept for shape-changing shell-like structures that can significantly alter their Gaussian curvature. The potential of this concept is demonstrated by a hemispherical shell that can reversibly change the sign of its Gaussian curvature. Furthermore, it is shown that a snap-through behaviour, similar to the one known from Dionaea muscipula, can be achieved by lowering the pressure in a single layer of cells.

  14. Magnetic behavior of core shell particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chun-Rong; Wang, Cheng-Chien; Chen, I.-Han

    2006-09-01

    We have prepared composite magnetic core-shell particles using the process of soap-free emulsion polymerization and the co-precipitation method. The shell of the synthesized composite sphere is cobalt ferrite (CoFe 2O 4) nanoparticles and the core consists of poly(styrene-co-methacrylic acid) polymer. The mean crystallite sizes of the coated CoFe 2O 4 nanoparticles were controlled in the range of 2.4-6.7 nm by the concentration of [NH 4+] and heated temperature. The magnetic properties of the core-shell spherical particles can go from superparamagnetic to ferromagnetic behavior depending on the crystalline sizes of CoFe 2O 4.

  15. Shell nebulae around luminous evolved stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufour, Reginald J.

    1989-01-01

    Shell nebulae around luminous Population I Wolf-Rayet, Of, and P-Cygni stars are astrophysically interesting since they are indicators of pre-supernova mass loss and how such massive stars prepare their surrounding interstellar medium prior to explosion. Some twenty-odd such nebulae are known, for which detailed study of their morphological and spectroscopic characteristics have only begun in this decade. In this paper, some of these characteristics are reviewed in general, and new observations are reported. Emphasis has been placed on several 'prototype 'objects (NGC 7635, NGC 2359, NGC 6888, and the Eta Carinae condensations) to illustrate the varied massive-star mass-loss, the physics of their winds and shell ejecta, and related nucleosynthesis effects in the compositions of the winds and shells.

  16. Spectrophotometry of the shell around AG Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitra, P. Mila; Dufour, Reginald J.

    1990-01-01

    Spatially-resolved long-slit spectrophotometry are presented for two regions of the shell nebula around the P-Cygni variable star AG Carinae. The spectra cover the 3700-6800 A wavelength range. Emission-line diagnostics are used to derive extinction, electron temperatures, and densities for various positions in the nebula. The chemical abundances and ionization structure are calculated and compared with other types of planetary nebulae and shells around other luminous stars. It is found that the N/O and N/S ratios of Ag Car are high compared to solar neighborhood ISM values. The O/H depletion found for the AG Car shell approaches that found in the condensations of the Eta Car system.

  17. Spline Approximation of Thin Shell Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    delRosario, R. C. H.; Smith, R. C.

    1996-01-01

    A spline-based method for approximating thin shell dynamics is presented here. While the method is developed in the context of the Donnell-Mushtari thin shell equations, it can be easily extended to the Byrne-Flugge-Lur'ye equations or other models for shells of revolution as warranted by applications. The primary requirements for the method include accuracy, flexibility and efficiency in smart material applications. To accomplish this, the method was designed to be flexible with regard to boundary conditions, material nonhomogeneities due to sensors and actuators, and inputs from smart material actuators such as piezoceramic patches. The accuracy of the method was also of primary concern, both to guarantee full resolution of structural dynamics and to facilitate the development of PDE-based controllers which ultimately require real-time implementation. Several numerical examples provide initial evidence demonstrating the efficacy of the method.

  18. Damage Tolerance of Large Shell Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, L.; Chamis, C. C.

    1999-01-01

    Progressive damage and fracture of large shell structures is investigated. A computer model is used for the assessment of structural response, progressive fracture resistance, and defect/damage tolerance characteristics. Critical locations of a stiffened conical shell segment are identified. Defective and defect-free computer models are simulated to evaluate structural damage/defect tolerance. Safe pressurization levels are assessed for the retention of structural integrity at the presence of damage/ defects. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to fracture are included in the simulations. Damage propagation and burst pressures for defective and defect-free shells are compared to evaluate damage tolerance. Design implications with regard to defect and damage tolerance of a large steel pressure vessel are examined.

  19. Regularity of inviscid shell models of turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin, Peter; Levant, Boris; Titi, Edriss S.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we continue the analytical study of the sabra shell model of energy turbulent cascade. We prove the global existence of weak solutions of the inviscid sabra shell model, and show that these solutions are unique for some short interval of time. In addition, we prove that the solutions conserve energy, provided that the components of the solution satisfy ∣un∣≤Ckn-1/3[nlog(n+1)]-1 for some positive absolute constant C , which is the analog of the Onsager’s conjecture for the Euler’s equations. Moreover, we give a Beal-Kato-Majda type criterion for the blow-up of solutions of the inviscid sabra shell model and show the global regularity of the solutions in the “two-dimensional” parameters regime.

  20. Stresses in rotating composite cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, James T.-S.; Lin, Chien-Chang

    Stresses in composite cylindrical shells rotating with a constant speed about their longitudinal axis are analyzed. Each ply or ply group is treated as a separate thin layer of homogeneous and orthotropic material under the interfacial stresses as surface loading. There is no limitation on the total thickness of the shell. The circumferential stress, motivated by the conventional thin shell theory, is assumed to vary linearly through the thickness of the layer. The radial stress is determined in terms of the circumferential stress through the equilibrium condition, and an average compatibility condition through the thickness of the thin layer is used. Numerical results using the present analysis show nearly perfect agreement with the exact solution for homogeneous and isotropic cylinders. Some results for cylinders having orthotropic layers are presented for illustrative purposes.

  1. Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity

    EIA Publications

    2016-01-01

    Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity is the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) report containing storage capacity data for crude oil, petroleum products, and selected biofuels. The report includes tables detailing working and net available shell storage capacity by type of facility, product, and Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PAD District). Net available shell storage capacity is broken down further to show the percent for exclusive use by facility operators and the percent leased to others. Crude oil storage capacity data are also provided for Cushing, Oklahoma, an important crude oil market center. Data are released twice each year near the end of May (data for March 31) and near the end of November (data for September 30).

  2. Triggered Snap-Through of Bistable Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yijie; Huang, Shicheng; Trase, Ian; Hu, Nan; Chen, Zi

    Elastic bistable shells are common structures in nature and engineering, such as the lobes of the Venus flytrap or the surface of a toy jumping poppers. Despite their ubiquity, the parameters that control the bistability of such structures are not well understood. In this study, we explore how the geometrical features of radially symmetric elastic shells affect the shape and potential energy of a shell's stable states, and how to tune certain parameters in order to generate a snap-through transition from a convex semi-stable state to concave stable state. We fabricated a series of elastic shells with varying geometric parameters out of silicone rubber and measured the resulting potential energy in the semi-stable state. Finite element simulations were also conducted in order to determine the deformation and stress in the shells during snap-through. It was found that the energy of the semi-stable state is controlled by only two geometric parameters and a dimensionless ratio. We also noted two distinct transitions during snap-through, one between monostability and semi-bistability (the state a popper toy is in before it snaps-through and jumps), and a second transition between semi-bistability and true bistability. This work shows that it is possible to use a set of simple parameters to tailor the energy landscape of an elastic shell in order to generate complex trigger motions for their potential use in smart applications. Z.C. acknowledge support from Society in Science-Branco Weiss Fellowship, administered by ETH Zurich.

  3. What's in a Shell? - Interactions of Chemistry and Structure at Submicron Levels in Bivalve Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, D. E.; Piazolo, S.; Trimby, P.

    2014-12-01

    The wide geographical distribution of bivalve shells makes them much favoured paleoclimate proxy archives. However, they are amongst the materials most affected by physiological effects, making the correct deciphering of these archives a challenging task. Shell building plans are usually hierarchic, thus optimizing mechanical properties. However, different structures common to certain bivalve families, such as the prism-nacre or the crossed-lamellar structures, are assembled from very different building blocks. These structural differences coincide with chemical and crystallographic differences suggesting critically different formation mechanisms within the bivalve class. Most importantly some bivalves form their shells from amorphous calcium carbonate that crystallizes in situ once assembled into the shell. We present new correlated multi-scale structural and compositional data for different shell bivalve shell structures such as nacre-prism, cross-lamellar intermediate structures. Data are obtained using EBSD, FIB-assisted TEM and Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction combined with Nano-SIMS and Raman Microspectrometry and suggest that formation from amorphous phases is widespread and results in different calcium carbonate polymorphs to be present in the shell with distinct chemical compositions. The results highlight the complex nature of the biomaterials, which has consequences for the precision and accuracy of paleotemperature calculations.

  4. Theoretical spectroscopy and the fp shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poves, A.; Zuker, A.

    1981-04-01

    The recently developed quasiconfiguration method is applied to fp shell nuclei. Second order degenerate perturbation theory is shown to be sufficient to produce, for low lying states, the same results as large diagonalizations in the full ( f{7}/{2}p{3}/{2}p{1}/{2}f{5}/{2}) n space, due to the operation of linked cluster mechanisms. Realistic interactions with minimal monopole changes are shown to be successful in reproducing spectra, binding energies, quadrupole moments and transition rates. Large shell model spaces are seen to exhibit typical many body behaviour. Quasiconfigurations allow insight into the underlying coupling schemes.

  5. On the elastic stability of shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horton, W. H.

    1976-01-01

    A synopsis of a series of investigations into the instability of axially compressed cylindrical shells is given. The objective of the research, which was made with models, was to devise a technique of nondestructive evaluation. The results show that, with models at any rate, success was achieved. Probing methods which can be used to determine the locations of weakness and the pertinent instability load levels were devised. The research on large scale shells was undertaken to determine the critical loads under as uniform a circumferential distribution of axial compressive force as possible. It is clear from the results presented that this objective was met.

  6. Shell model for buoyancy-driven turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Abhishek; Verma, Mahendra K.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we present a unified shell model for stably stratified and convective turbulence. Numerical simulation of this model for stably stratified flow shows Bolgiano-Obukhbov scaling in which the kinetic energy spectrum varies as k-11 /5. The shell model of convective turbulence yields Kolmogorov's spectrum. These results are consistent with the energy flux and energy feed due to buoyancy, and are in good agreement with direct numerical simulations of Kumar et al. [Phys. Rev. E 90, 023016 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.90.023016].

  7. Transient analysis using conical shell elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J. C. S.; Goeller, J. E.; Messick, W. T.

    1973-01-01

    The use of the NASTRAN conical shell element in static, eigenvalue, and direct transient analyses is demonstrated. The results of a NASTRAN static solution of an externally pressurized ring-stiffened cylinder agree well with a theoretical discontinuity analysis. Good agreement is also obtained between the NASTRAN direct transient response of a uniform cylinder to a dynamic end load and one-dimensional solutions obtained using a method of characteristics stress wave code and a standing wave solution. Finally, a NASTRAN eigenvalue analysis is performed on a hydroballistic model idealized with conical shell elements.

  8. Shell hoop prestress generated by welding

    SciTech Connect

    Meuser, R.B.

    1991-03-01

    For some magnet designs it is desirable to generate a prestress, approaching the yield strength, in the shell surrounding the yoke. If that prestress can be generated by weld shrinkage, then more expensive methods of prestressing can be avoided. Shell-to-yoke friction can reduce the prestress, so it is desirable to minimize it. A quick-and-dirty test was performed to address these matters. While the scatter of the data was large, it appears that weld shrinkage can indeed generate the required prestress. The scatter was too large to give any information about the friction, however. The experiment raised more questions than it answered. 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  9. Single Bump on a Shell Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, R C

    2004-02-17

    At this morning's fill-tube surrogate working group meeting we tentatively decided on a single bump on a shell for the single March shot. This memo shows the calculations needed as background to fabricate such a bump by depositing an appropriate sized drop of polystyrene solution (i.e. the glue) to a shell as discussed in this mornings meeting. While writing this I had another idea for fabricating a bump, which I quickly outlined at the end of this memo. I am distributing this calculation primarily so that group members can quickly check the calculations and ideas and if without error to provide a framework for initial fabrication efforts.

  10. Computation of Thin-Walled Prismatic Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlasov, V. Z.

    1949-01-01

    We consider a prismatic shell consisting of a finite number of narrow rectangular plates and having in the cross-section a finite number of closed contours (fig. 1(a)). We shall assume that the rectangular plates composing the shell are rigidly joined so that there is no motion of any kind of one plate relative to the others meeting at a given connecting line. The position of a point on the middle prismatic surface is considered to be defined by the coordinate z, the distance to a certain initial cross-section z = O, end the coordinate s determining its position on the contour of the cross-section.

  11. Alone in the Ivory Tower

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfinger, Nicholas H.; Goulden, Marc; Mason, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01

    The authors use data from the 2000 Census Public Use Microdata Sample to examine the likelihood of a birth event, defined as the household presence of a child younger than 2 years, for male and female professionals. Physicians have the highest rate of birth events, followed in order by attorneys and academics. Within each profession men have more…

  12. Black Students in "Ivory Towers."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Paul

    1997-01-01

    Interviews with 50 black adult students in British universities revealed their experience of racism in curriculum and staffing. They constructed informal support networks for themselves and were skeptical about the legitimacy of institutional knowledge and their expectations of employment. Although colleges emphasize widening access…

  13. Cosmic Shell-Seekers Find a Beauty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-04-01

    Two scientists have discovered a distinctive shell of hot gas around the site of a distant supernova explosion by combining 150 hours of archived data collected by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This discovery is a significant step forward in solving a decades-old puzzle as to why some stellar explosions display shells and others do not. "The likely answer is that the explosion of every massive star sends a sonic boom rumbling through interstellar space," said Samar Safi-Harb of the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Canada, who is a coauthor with Heather Matheson on a paper describing the research that appears in the journal Advances in Space Research. "It's just that, some of the shells are harder to find than others because of the environment where the explosion occurs." The shell marks a sonic boom, or shock wave, generated by the supernova. Gas is heated to millions of degrees by the shock wave and produces X-rays, but little visible light. By examining the properties of the shell with an X-ray telescope, astronomers can work back to deduce the age (a few thousand years), and energy of the explosion, as well as information about the state of the star a million years before it exploded. Animation of a Supernova Explosion Animation of a Supernova Explosion It is likely that the star that produced the supernova remnant and shell was about 10 times as massive as the Sun. The absence of a detectable shell around this and similar supernova remnants had led astronomers to speculate that another, weaker type of explosion had occurred there. Now this hypothesis seems unlikely. Although many supernovas leave behind bright shells, others do not. This supernova remnant, identified as G21.5-0.9 by radio astronomers 30 years ago, was considered to be one that had no shell. A diffuse cloud of X-rays around the source was detected about 5 years ago by another group of astronomers and independently by Safi-Harb and colleagues using Chandra, but it took the careful

  14. Vibrations of moderately thick shallow spherical shells at large amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyamoorthy, M.

    1994-04-01

    A shallow shell theory is presented for the geometrically nonlinear analysis of moderately thick isotropic spherical shells. Effects of transverse shear deformation and rotatory inertia are included in the governing equations of motion by means of tracing constants. When these effects are ignored, the governing equations readily reduce to those applicable for thin shallow spherical shells. Solutions to the system of thick shell equations are obtained by means of Galerkin's method and the numerical Runge-Kutta procedure. Numerical results are presented for certain cases of shallow spherical shells considering different geometric shell parameters. Transverse shear and rotatory inertia effects are found to be important in linear as well as nonlinear responses of shallow spherical shells. The nonlinear frequency-amplitude behavior is of the softening type for shallow spherical shells and of the hardening type for circular plates. Frequency ratios are lower at any given amplitude when the effects of transverse shear and rotatory inertia are included in the analysis.

  15. 3. General view showing north elevation of Shell Interlocking Tower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. General view showing north elevation of Shell Interlocking Tower and electric relay station. - New York, New Haven, & Hartford Railroad, Shell Interlocking Tower, New Haven Milepost 16, approximately 100 feel east of New Rochelle Junction, New Rochelle, Westchester County, NY

  16. Spherical shell model description of deformation and superdeformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poves, A.; Caurier, E.; Nowacki, F.; Zuker, A.

    2003-04-01

    Large-scale shell model calculations give at present a very accurate and comprehensive description of light and medium-light nuclei, specially when 0hbar ω spaces are adequate. The full pf-shell calculations have made it possible to describe many collective features in an spherical shell model context. Calculations including two major oscillator shells have proven able to describe also superdeformed bands.

  17. Monte Carlo Methods and Applications for the Nuclear Shell Model

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, D.J.; White, J.A.

    1998-08-10

    The shell-model Monte Carlo (SMMC) technique transforms the traditional nuclear shell-model problem into a path-integral over auxiliary fields. We describe below the method and its applications to four physics issues: calculations of sd-pf-shell nuclei, a discussion of electron-capture rates in pf-shell nuclei, exploration of pairing correlations in unstable nuclei, and level densities in rare earth systems.

  18. Method to produce large, uniform hollow spherical shells

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D.

    1985-01-01

    Large, uniform hollow spherical shells are produced by forming uniform size drops of heat decomposable or vaporizable material, evaporating the drops to form dried particles, coating the dried particles with a layer of shell forming material, and heating the composite particles to melt the outer layer and decompose or vaporize the inner particle to form an expanding inner gas bubble which expands the outer layer. By cycling the temperature and pressure on the hollow shells, spherical shells with uniform walls are produced.

  19. The 'shell effect': music from environmental noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diodati, Paolo

    2005-02-01

    The 'shell effect' can be used to play music with a pleasant and characteristic timbre. If you place a sensitive microphone at the rim of pipes of suitable length and diameter to obtain resonance frequencies, ambient noise will produce musical notes. The corresponding optical effect, i.e. extracting visible light from ambient radiation considered dark by the human eye, is also discussed.

  20. Palaeontology: pterosaur egg with a leathery shell.

    PubMed

    Ji, Qiang; Ji, Shu-An; Cheng, Yen-Nien; You, Hai-Lu; Lü, Jun-Chang; Liu, Yong-Qing; Yuan, Chong-Xi

    2004-12-02

    The recent discovery of a pterosaur egg with embryonic skeleton and soft tissues from the Yixian Formation confirmed that the flying pterosaurs were oviparous. Here we describe another pterosaur egg whose exquisite preservation indicates that the shell structure was soft and leathery.

  1. Polarimetry of nacre in iridescent shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzler, R. A.; Burgess, C.; Regan, B.; Spano, S.; Galvez, E. J.

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the light transmitted or reflected from nacre (mother of pearl) taken from the iridescent shell of the bivalve Pinctad a fucata. These nacre surfaces have a rich structure, composed of aragonite crystals arranged as tablets or bricks, 5 μm wide and 400-500 nm thick, surrounded by 30nm thick organic mortar. The light reflected from these shell surfaces, or transmitted through thin polished layers, is rich in its polarization content, exhibiting a space dependent variation in the state of polarization with a high density of polarization singularities. Our goal is to use the polarization information to infer the structure of the biominerals and the role of the organic layer in determining the orientation of the crystals. In the experiments we send the light from a laser with a uniform state of polarization onto the shell, and analyze the light that is either transmitted or reflected, depending on the type of experiment, imaging it after its passage through polarization filters. We use the images from distinct filters to obtain the Stokes parameters, and hence the state of polarization, of each image point. We also construct the Mueller matrix for each imaged point, via 36 measurements. We do this for distinct physical and chemical treatments of the shell sample. Preliminary data shows that the organic layer may be responsible for organizing a multi-crystalline arrangement of aragonite tablets.

  2. On the Theory of Thin Shallow Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nazarov, A. A.

    1956-01-01

    This report is concerned with the theory of thin shallow shells. It does not employ the lines of curvature as the coordinate system, but employs "almost cartesian coordinates" or the coordinates obtained by cutting the surface into two mutually orthogonal systems of parallel planes.

  3. Alternative Storage Environments for Shelled Peanuts.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alternative Storage Environments for Shelled Peanuts. C. L. BUTTS1, K. HORM2, S. POWELL3, B. ANTHONY2, J. BENNETT2, D. COWART3, and M.C. LAMB1. 1USDA, ARS, National Peanut Research Laboratory, Dawson, GA, 2Mars Chocolate NA, Elizabethtown, PA,3 Birdsong Peanuts, Blakely, GA Small chamber studies w...

  4. MPISH : a parallel shell for MPI programs.

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, M.; Lusk, A.; Bradshaw, R.; Lusk, E.

    2006-01-01

    While previous work has shown MPI to provide capabilities for system software, actual adoption has not widely occurred. We discuss process management shortcomings in MPI implementations and their impact on MPI usability for system software and management tasks. We introduce MPISH, a parallel shell designed to address these issues.

  5. On-Shell Methods in Perturbative QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bern, Zvi; Dixon, Lance J.; Kosower, David A.

    2007-04-25

    We review on-shell methods for computing multi-parton scattering amplitudes in perturbative QCD, utilizing their unitarity and factorization properties. We focus on aspects which are useful for the construction of one-loop amplitudes needed for phenomenological studies at the Large Hadron Collider.

  6. 7 CFR 983.29 - Shelled pistachios.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shelled pistachios. 983.29 Section 983.29 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN...

  7. 7 CFR 983.29 - Shelled pistachios.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Shelled pistachios. 983.29 Section 983.29 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN...

  8. Torrefaction of pomaces and nut shells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technical: Apple, grape, olive, and tomato pomaces as well as almond and walnut shells were torrefied at different temperatures and times in a muffle furnace. The fiber content and thermal stability of the raw byproducts were examined using fiber analysis and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), respec...

  9. Quality and Composition of Retail Shell Eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumers are becoming more aware of their food choices. As part of this movement, sourcing and production information is often desired for agricultural products. Furthermore, products associated with added health benefits are also becoming more common in the marketplace. The US shell egg industr...

  10. BOWOOSS: bionic optimized wood shells with sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Göran

    2011-04-01

    In architecture, shell construction is used for the most efficient, large spatial structures. Until now the use of wood rather played a marginal role, implementing those examples of architecture, although this material offers manifold advantages, especially against the background of accelerating shortage of resources and increasing requirements concerning the energy balance. Regarding the implementation of shells, nature offers a wide range of suggestions. The focus of the examinations is on the shells of marine plankton, especially of diatoms, whose richness in species promises the discovery of entirely new construction principles. The project is targeting at transferring advantageous features of these organisms on industrial produced, modular wood shell structures. Currently a transfer of these structures in CAD - models is taking place, helping to perform stress analysis by computational methods. Micro as well as macro structures are the subject of diverse consideration, allowing to draw the necessary conclusions for an architectural design. The insights of these tests are the basis for the development of physical models on different scales, which are used to verify the different approaches. Another important aim which is promoted in the project is to enhance the competitiveness of timber construction. Downsizing of the prefabricated structural elements leads to considerable lower transportation costs as abnormal loads can be avoided as far as possible and means of transportation can be loaded with higher efficiency so that an important contribution to the sustainability in the field of architecture can also be made.

  11. Double Shell Tank (DST) Utilities Specification

    SciTech Connect

    GRAVES, C.E.

    2001-01-18

    This specification establishes the performance requirements and provides references to the requisite codes and standards to be applied to the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Utilities (electrical, raw water, potable water, service air and instrument air), which supports the first phase of Waste Feed Delivery.

  12. New method for calculating shell correction

    SciTech Connect

    Salamon, P.; Kruppa, A. T.; Vertse, T.

    2010-06-15

    A new method is presented for the calculation of the shell correction with the inclusion of the continuum part of the spectrum. The smoothing function used has a finite energy range in contrast to the Gaussian shape of the Strutinski method. The new method is especially useful for light nuclei where the generalized Strutinski procedure cannot be applied.

  13. Double-shell tank emergency pumping guide

    SciTech Connect

    BROWN, M.H.

    1999-02-24

    This Double-Shell Tank Emergency Pumping Guide provides the preplanning necessary to expeditiously remove any waste that may leak from the primary tank to the secondary tank for Hanford's 28 DSTS. The strategy is described, applicable emergency procedures are referenced, and transfer routes and pumping equipment for each tank are identified.

  14. Breakup of finite thickness viscous shell microbubbles by ultrasound: A simplified zero-thickness shell model

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Chahine, Georges L.

    2013-01-01

    A simplified three-dimensional (3-D) zero-thickness shell model was developed to recover the non-spherical response of thick-shelled encapsulated microbubbles subjected to ultrasound excitation. The model was validated by comparison with previously developed models and was then used to study the mechanism of bubble break-up during non-spherical deformations resulting from the presence of a nearby rigid boundary. The effects of the shell thickness and the bubble standoff distance from the solid wall on the bubble break-up were studied parametrically for a fixed insonification frequency and amplitude. A diagram of bubble shapes versus the normalized shell thickness and wall standoff was derived, and the potential bubble shapes at break-up from reentrant jets were categorized resulting in four distinct zones. PMID:23556560

  15. Lightweight Grid Shell Pavilion - Design, Manufacture and Erection of Full Scale Grid Shell Prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaněk, Aleš

    2016-12-01

    The main goal of author's research is to design and construct grid shell structures, which are subsequently realized as experimental structures in full scale. These structures should make the place suitable for various events and also a friendly, pleasant, relaxing and free time space. By thinking about how such structure should look like and what materials and structure types are suitable, there were many kinds of lightweight structures considered. The most logical solution is to create a grid shell structure combining with a single layer membrane that would fulfill all aspects of elegant remarkable lightweight structure using some original details and workflow advancements. These grid shell projects should demonstrate another possibility to build and think about unconventional structures and provoke a deeper interest in these unique structures. The goal of this project was to create a feasible design of a grid shell structure and to build up the structures while being capable to understand the core of such an interesting phenomenon.

  16. An effective theory on the light shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajjad, Aqil

    We describe work on the construction of an effective field theory on a spherical light shell. The motivation arises from classical electromagnetism: If a collision produces charged particles with zero net charge emerging simultaneously from a point and instantaneously accelerating to the speed of light, then the electromagnetic fields due to these charges lie entirely on a spherical shell expanding at the speed of light. We show that this also applies to classical color radiation from high-energy collisions that produce colored particles. Specifically, the color fields produced in such a process are associated with a non-linear sigma-model on the 2D light shell with specific symmetry-breaking terms. The quantum version of such a picture exhibits asymptotic freedom and should therefore be a useful starting point for a light-shell effective theory for QCD. We start in the simplified context of zero-flavor scalar quantum electrodynamics. Our effective theory has 3 major ingredients: breaking down the fields into soft and hard sectors with the large energy of the hard fields in the radial direction scaled out, a special gauge called light-shell gauge in which the picture simplifies, and a gauge-invariant source defined on a spherical light shell having infinitesimal radius. We match the fields between the effective theory and the full theory, meaning zero-flavor scalar QED. This allows us to compute the amplitude for the production of any number of scalars from the gauge-invariant source. We then find the tree-level amplitude for the emission of a photon using our effective theory and show that our result agrees with the full theory. To calculate loop effects in our effective theory, we need the photon propagator in light-shell gauge. We derive this propagator and use it to calculate the 1-loop correction to the amplitude for the production of a scalar and anti-scalar pair arising from virtual photon effects. This reduces to a pair of purely angular integrals in the

  17. Wave propagation in laminated orthotropic circular cylindrical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivas, S.

    1976-01-01

    An exact three-dimensional analysis of wave propagation in laminated orthotropic circular cylindrical-shells is developed. Numerical results are presented for three-ply shells, and for various axial wave lengths, circumferential wave numbers, and thicknesses. Results from a thin shell theory and a refined approximate theory are compared with the exact results.

  18. Mollusc evolution: seven shells on the sea shore.

    PubMed

    Telford, Maximilian J

    2013-11-04

    Recent phylogenies unite two seemingly very different groups of mollusc: the Polyplacophora with multiple shells and the shell-less Aplacophora. The finding of seven muscle rows in larvae of both classes suggests that polyplacophoran-like shell rows have been lost in adult Aplacophora.

  19. Leathery Hull Peanuts – Effect on Shelling Performance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When shelling peanuts from the 2012 peanut crop, various shellers experienced diminished shelling plant throughput when shelling peanuts harvested from isolated geographical regions. Shellers reported a reduction of 25-30% throughput of the first stage sheller bank with significant increases in spli...

  20. Shells. Modified Primary. Revised. Anchorage School District Elementary Science Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defendorf, Jean, Ed.

    This publication provides information and activities for teaching about seashells and process skills including observing, classifying, collecting and interpreting data, inferring, measuring, and predicting. There are 10 lessons. Lessons 1 through 5 deal with an introduction to shells, why animals have shells, observing and classifying shells, the…

  1. Pseudo-Symmetry and Majorana Operators in pf-Shell

    SciTech Connect

    Valencia, J. P.; Wu, H. C.

    2007-10-26

    The Majorana operator of the pseudo ds-shell preserves the SU-tilde(4) symmetry, and in a unified manner it reproduces reasonably well the ground state energies of the nine nuclei in this shell. The study of {beta} decay in the same shell provides further support for the SU-tilde(4) symmetry.

  2. Imperfection sensitivity of pressured buckling of biopolymer spherical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Ru, C. Q.

    2016-06-01

    Imperfection sensitivity is essential for mechanical behavior of biopolymer shells [such as ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) and spherical viruses] characterized by high geometric heterogeneity. In this work, an imperfection sensitivity analysis is conducted based on a refined shell model recently developed for spherical biopolymer shells of high structural heterogeneity and thickness nonuniformity. The influence of related parameters (including the ratio of radius to average shell thickness, the ratio of transverse shear modulus to in-plane shear modulus, and the ratio of effective bending thickness to average shell thickness) on imperfection sensitivity is examined for pressured buckling. Our results show that the ratio of effective bending thickness to average shell thickness has a major effect on the imperfection sensitivity, while the effect of the ratio of transverse shear modulus to in-plane shear modulus is usually negligible. For example, with physically realistic parameters for typical imperfect spherical biopolymer shells, the present model predicts that actual maximum external pressure could be reduced to as low as 60% of that of a perfect UCA spherical shell or 55%-65% of that of a perfect spherical virus shell, respectively. The moderate imperfection sensitivity of spherical biopolymer shells with physically realistic imperfection is largely attributed to the fact that biopolymer shells are relatively thicker (defined by smaller radius-to-thickness ratio) and therefore practically realistic imperfection amplitude normalized by thickness is very small as compared to that of classical elastic thin shells which have much larger radius-to-thickness ratio.

  3. Imperfection sensitivity of pressured buckling of biopolymer spherical shells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Ru, C Q

    2016-06-01

    Imperfection sensitivity is essential for mechanical behavior of biopolymer shells [such as ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) and spherical viruses] characterized by high geometric heterogeneity. In this work, an imperfection sensitivity analysis is conducted based on a refined shell model recently developed for spherical biopolymer shells of high structural heterogeneity and thickness nonuniformity. The influence of related parameters (including the ratio of radius to average shell thickness, the ratio of transverse shear modulus to in-plane shear modulus, and the ratio of effective bending thickness to average shell thickness) on imperfection sensitivity is examined for pressured buckling. Our results show that the ratio of effective bending thickness to average shell thickness has a major effect on the imperfection sensitivity, while the effect of the ratio of transverse shear modulus to in-plane shear modulus is usually negligible. For example, with physically realistic parameters for typical imperfect spherical biopolymer shells, the present model predicts that actual maximum external pressure could be reduced to as low as 60% of that of a perfect UCA spherical shell or 55%-65% of that of a perfect spherical virus shell, respectively. The moderate imperfection sensitivity of spherical biopolymer shells with physically realistic imperfection is largely attributed to the fact that biopolymer shells are relatively thicker (defined by smaller radius-to-thickness ratio) and therefore practically realistic imperfection amplitude normalized by thickness is very small as compared to that of classical elastic thin shells which have much larger radius-to-thickness ratio.

  4. 7 CFR 982.101 - Grade requirements for shelled hazelnuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Grade requirements for shelled hazelnuts. 982.101... HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON Grade and Size Regulation § 982.101 Grade requirements for shelled hazelnuts. (a) Pursuant to § 982.45(a), no handler shall handle any shelled hazelnuts unless such...

  5. 7 CFR 982.101 - Grade requirements for shelled hazelnuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Grade requirements for shelled hazelnuts. 982.101... HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON Grade and Size Regulation § 982.101 Grade requirements for shelled hazelnuts. (a) Pursuant to § 982.45(a), no handler shall handle any shelled hazelnuts unless such...

  6. 7 CFR 982.101 - Grade requirements for shelled hazelnuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Grade requirements for shelled hazelnuts. 982.101... HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON Grade and Size Regulation § 982.101 Grade requirements for shelled hazelnuts. (a) Pursuant to § 982.45(a), no handler shall handle any shelled hazelnuts unless such...

  7. 7 CFR 982.101 - Grade requirements for shelled hazelnuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Grade requirements for shelled hazelnuts. 982.101... HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON Grade and Size Regulation § 982.101 Grade requirements for shelled hazelnuts. (a) Pursuant to § 982.45(a), no handler shall handle any shelled hazelnuts unless such...

  8. Core-shell to yolk-shell nanostructure transformation by a novel sacrificial template-free strategy.

    PubMed

    Han, Jie; Chen, Rong; Wang, Minggui; Lu, Song; Guo, Rong

    2013-12-21

    Au-conducting polymer core-shell nanostructures have been transformed into yolk-shell nanostructures with enhanced catalytic activity through facile swelling-evaporation processes without any sacrificial template.

  9. Constraints for system specifications for the double-shell and single-shell tank systems

    SciTech Connect

    SHAW, C.P.

    1999-05-18

    This is a supporting document for the Level 1 Double-Shell and Single-Shell System Specifications. The rationale for selection of specific regulatory constraining documents cited in the two system specifications is provided. many of the regulations have been implemented by the Project Hanford Management Contract procedures (HNF-PROs) and as such noted and traced back to their origins in State and Federal regulations.

  10. Defects in liquid crystal nematic shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Nieves, A.; Utada, A. S.; Vitelli, V.; Link, D. R.; Nelson, D. R.; Weitz, D. A.

    2006-03-01

    We generate water/liquid crystal (LC)/water double emulsions via recent micro-capillary fluidic devices [A. S. Utada, et.al. Science 308, 537 (2005)]. The resultant objects are stabilized against coalescence by using surfactants or adequate polymers; these also fix the boundary conditions for the director field n. We use 4-pentyl-4-cyanobiphenyl (5CB) and impose tangential boundary conditions at both water/LC interfaces by having polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) dispersed in the inner and outer water phases. We confirm recent predictions [D. R. Nelson, NanoLetters 2, 1125 (2002)] and find that four strength s=+1/2 defects are present; this is in contrast to the two s=+1 defect bipolar configuration observed for bulk spheres [A. Fernandez-Nieves, et.al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 105503 (2004)]. However, these defects do not lie in the vertices of a tetrahedron but are pushed towards each other until certain equilibration distance is reached. In addition to the four defect shells, we observe shells with two s=+1 defects and even with three defects, a s=+1 and two s=+1/2. We argue these configurations arise from nematic bulk distortions that become important as the shell thickness increases. Finally, by adding a different surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), to the outer phase, we can change the director boundary conditions at the outermost interface from parallel to homeotropic, to induce coalescing of the two pair of defects in the four defect shell configuration to yield two defect bipolar shells.

  11. Searching for nova shells around cataclysmic variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahman, D. I.; Dhillon, V. S.; Knigge, C.; Marsh, T. R.

    2015-08-01

    We present the results of a search for nova shells around 101 cataclysmic variables (CVs), using H α images taken with the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope (WHT) and the 2.5-m Isaac Newton Telescope Photometric H α Survey of the Northern Galactic Plane (IPHAS). Both telescopes are located on La Palma. We concentrated our WHT search on nova-like variables, whilst our IPHAS search covered all CVs in the IPHAS footprint. We found one shell out of the 24 nova-like variables we examined. The newly discovered shell is around V1315 Aql and has a radius of ˜2.5 arcmin, indicative of a nova eruption approximately 120 yr ago. This result is consistent with the idea that the high mass-transfer rate exhibited by nova-like variables is due to enhanced irradiation of the secondary by the hot white dwarf following a recent nova eruption. The implications of our observations for the lifetime of the nova-like variable phase are discussed. We also examined four asynchronous polars, but found no new shells around any of them, so we are unable to confirm that a recent nova eruption is the cause of the asynchronicity in the white dwarf spin. We find tentative evidence of a faint shell around the dwarf nova V1363 Cyg. In addition, we find evidence for a light echo around the nova V2275 Cyg, which erupted in 2001, indicative of an earlier nova eruption ˜300 yr ago, making V2275 Cyg a possible recurrent nova.

  12. Glass shell manufacturing in space. [residual gases in spherical shells made from metal-organic gels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolen, R. J.; Ebner, M. A.; Downs, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Residual gases always found in glass shells are CO2, O2 and N2. In those cases where high water vapor pressure is maintained in the furnace, water is also found in the shells. Other evidence for the existence of water in shells is the presence of water-induced surface weathering of the interior shell surface. Water and CO2 are the predominant volatiles generated by the pyrolysis of both inorganic and hydrolyzed metal-organic gels. The pyrolysates of unhydrolyzed metal-organic gels also contain, in addition to water and CO2, significant levels of organic volatiles, such as ethanol and some hydrocarbons; on complete oxidation, these produce CO2 and water as well. Water is most likely the initial blowing agent, it is produced copiously during the initial stages of heating. In the later stages, CO2 becomes the dominant gas as H2O is lost at increasing rates. Water in the shell arises mainly from gel dehydration, CO2 by sodium bicarbonate/carbonate decomposition and carbon oxidation, and O2 and N2 by permeation of the ambient furnace air through the molten shell wall.

  13. Optimised photocatalytic hydrogen production using core-shell AuPd promoters with controlled shell thickness.

    PubMed

    Jones, Wilm; Su, Ren; Wells, Peter P; Shen, Yanbin; Dimitratos, Nikolaos; Bowker, Michael; Morgan, David; Iversen, Bo B; Chutia, Arunabhiram; Besenbacher, Flemming; Hutchings, Graham

    2014-12-28

    The development of efficient photocatalytic routines for producing hydrogen is of great importance as society moves away from energy sources derived from fossil fuels. Recent studies have identified that the addition of metal nanoparticles to TiO2 greatly enhances the photocatalytic performance of these materials towards the reforming of alcohols for hydrogen production. The core-shell structured Au-Pd bimetallic nanoparticle supported on TiO2 has being of interest as it exhibited extremely high quantum efficiencies for hydrogen production. However, the effect of shell composition and thickness on photocatalytic performance remains unclear. Here we report the synthesis of core-shell structured AuPd NPs with the controlled deposition of one and two monolayers (ML) equivalent of Pd onto Au NPs by colloidal and photodeposition methods. We have determined the shell composition and thickness of the nanoparticles by a combination of X-ray absorption fine structure and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Photocatalytic ethanol reforming showed that the core-shell structured Au-Pd promoters supported on TiO2 exhibit enhanced activity compared to that of monometallic Au and Pd as promoters, whilst the core-shell Au-Pd promoters containing one ML equivalent Pd provide the optimum reactivity.

  14. How long does oyster shell last on an oyster reef?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Eric N.; Kraeuter, John N.; Ashton-Alcox, Kathryn A.

    2006-09-01

    A reduction in population abundance, brought on by an unprecedented 6 years of low recruitment, has reduced shell input through natural mortality on Delaware Bay oyster beds. Quantitative stock surveys provide an estimate of surficial shell over the same time period, permitting the reconstruction of the time history of shell since 1998 and estimation of the rates of shell addition and loss. Shell loss rates were unexpectedly high. In most cases, half of the shell added to an oyster bed in Delaware Bay in a given year is lost over a subsequent period of 2-10 years. Unexpectedly, the shortest half-lives, typically two to three years, are at intermediate salinities. Half-lives increase upbay into lower salinity and downbay into higher salinity to about 10 years. Minimal shell doubling times were calculated under the assumption of no shell loss, a maximum accretion rate. Minimal doubling times vary from somewhat less than a decade to more than a score of years. Doubling times of decadal scale emphasize that shell has the potential to accumulate rapidly on human time scales. The rarity of definitive documentation of shell accumulation, in terms of reef vertical accretion or lateral expansion, can only be explained if most shell produced yearly does not long remain recognizably intact. Doubling times are not rapid on the scale of oyster generation time, however. Management of essential fish habitat in the estuarine realm must include management of the shell budget and management of commercial shell-producing species must include the provision of animals as carbonate producers for habitat maintenance. Shell, at least in estuarine habitats, may have low preservational potential, even in areas that, when preserved, will appear to be shellbeds. The biases in the fossil record may not be minimized in shell-rich environments of preservation because shelliness does not imply good preservability.

  15. 76 FR 36954 - Public Notice for Waiver of Aeronautical Land-Use Assurance; Shell Lake Municipal Airport, Shell...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-23

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Public Notice for Waiver of Aeronautical Land-Use Assurance; Shell Lake Municipal Airport, Shell Lake, WI AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration, DOT ACTION: Notice of intent of... to authorize the release of 0.101 acres of the airport property at the ] Shell Lake Municipal...

  16. Accurate stress resultants equations for laminated composite deep thick shells

    SciTech Connect

    Qatu, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    This paper derives accurate equations for the normal and shear force as well as bending and twisting moment resultants for laminated composite deep, thick shells. The stress resultant equations for laminated composite thick shells are shown to be different from those of plates. This is due to the fact the stresses over the thickness of the shell have to be integrated on a trapezoidal-like shell element to obtain the stress resultants. Numerical results are obtained and showed that accurate stress resultants are needed for laminated composite deep thick shells, especially if the curvature is not spherical.

  17. Method of fabricating nested shells and resulting product

    DOEpatents

    Henderson, Timothy M.; Kool, Lawrence B.

    1982-01-01

    A multiple shell structure and a method of manufacturing such structure wherein a hollow glass microsphere is surface treated in an organosilane solution so as to render the shell outer surface hydrophobic. The surface treated glass shell is then suspended in the oil phase of an oil-aqueous phase dispersion. The oil phase includes an organic film-forming monomer, a polymerization initiator and a blowing agent. A polymeric film forms at each phase boundary of the dispersion and is then expanded in a blowing operation so as to form an outer homogeneously integral monocellular substantially spherical thermoplastic shell encapsulating an inner glass shell of lesser diameter.

  18. Shell-resolved melting kinetics of icosahedral cluster.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong H; Jiang, En Y; Bai, Hai L; Wu, Ping; Li, Zhiqing; Sun, Chang Q

    2009-03-01

    Molecular dynamics calculations of the fluctuation of bond vibration revealed the shell-resolved mode of surface melting of the a closed-shell cluster containing 147 atoms with Lennard-Jones type interaction. It is found that the surface melting is imitated by the migrating of the vertex atoms. Although the melting process of the LJ147 cluster could be divided into discrete stages of surface shell-by-shell melting in general, there is still a continuous process of melting from the surface shell to the core interior.

  19. Soundproof characteristics of finite length orthotropic honeycomb shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chonan, S.

    1989-01-01

    Acoustic radiation emanating from the walls of orthotropic honeycomb shells is studied analytically for the case of axisymmetric acoustic mode transmission within the shell. The shell has a finite vibrating length and is mounted on an infinite rigid baffle in a free field. The problem is studied on the basis of a shell theory in which it is assumed that the honeycomb core resists only transverse shear forces and that the facings resist only bending moments. The sound transmission loss through the shell wall, TL, is derived and calculated for various values of the physical parameters involved.

  20. Ocean acidification alters the material properties of Mytilus edulis shells

    PubMed Central

    Fitzer, Susan C.; Zhu, Wenzhong; Tanner, K. Elizabeth; Phoenix, Vernon R.; Kamenos, Nicholas A.; Cusack, Maggie

    2015-01-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) and the resultant changing carbonate saturation states is threatening the formation of calcium carbonate shells and exoskeletons of marine organisms. The production of biominerals in such organisms relies on the availability of carbonate and the ability of the organism to biomineralize in changing environments. To understand how biomineralizers will respond to OA the common blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, was cultured at projected levels of pCO2 (380, 550, 750, 1000 µatm) and increased temperatures (ambient, ambient plus 2°C). Nanoindentation (a single mussel shell) and microhardness testing were used to assess the material properties of the shells. Young's modulus (E), hardness (H) and toughness (KIC) were measured in mussel shells grown in multiple stressor conditions. OA caused mussels to produce shell calcite that is stiffer (higher modulus of elasticity) and harder than shells grown in control conditions. The outer shell (calcite) is more brittle in OA conditions while the inner shell (aragonite) is softer and less stiff in shells grown under OA conditions. Combining increasing ocean pCO2 and temperatures as projected for future global ocean appears to reduce the impact of increasing pCO2 on the material properties of the mussel shell. OA may cause changes in shell material properties that could prove problematic under predation scenarios for the mussels; however, this may be partially mitigated by increasing temperature. PMID:25540244

  1. A Method for Quantifying, Visualising, and Analysing Gastropod Shell Form

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Thor-Seng; Schilthuizen, Menno

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of organismal form is an important component for almost every branch of biology. Although generally considered an easily-measurable structure, the quantification of gastropod shell form is still a challenge because many shells lack homologous structures and have a spiral form that is difficult to capture with linear measurements. In view of this, we adopt the idea of theoretical modelling of shell form, in which the shell form is the product of aperture ontogeny profiles in terms of aperture growth trajectory that is quantified as curvature and torsion, and of aperture form that is represented by size and shape. We develop a workflow for the analysis of shell forms based on the aperture ontogeny profile, starting from the procedure of data preparation (retopologising the shell model), via data acquisition (calculation of aperture growth trajectory, aperture form and ontogeny axis), and data presentation (qualitative comparison between shell forms) and ending with data analysis (quantitative comparison between shell forms). We evaluate our methods on representative shells of the genera Opisthostoma and Plectostoma, which exhibit great variability in shell form. The outcome suggests that our method is a robust, reproducible, and versatile approach for the analysis of shell form. Finally, we propose several potential applications of our methods in functional morphology, theoretical modelling, taxonomy, and evolutionary biology. PMID:27280463

  2. Ocean acidification alters the material properties of Mytilus edulis shells.

    PubMed

    Fitzer, Susan C; Zhu, Wenzhong; Tanner, K Elizabeth; Phoenix, Vernon R; Kamenos, Nicholas A; Cusack, Maggie

    2015-02-06

    Ocean acidification (OA) and the resultant changing carbonate saturation states is threatening the formation of calcium carbonate shells and exoskeletons of marine organisms. The production of biominerals in such organisms relies on the availability of carbonate and the ability of the organism to biomineralize in changing environments. To understand how biomineralizers will respond to OA the common blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, was cultured at projected levels of pCO2 (380, 550, 750, 1000 µatm) and increased temperatures (ambient, ambient plus 2°C). Nanoindentation (a single mussel shell) and microhardness testing were used to assess the material properties of the shells. Young's modulus (E), hardness (H) and toughness (KIC) were measured in mussel shells grown in multiple stressor conditions. OA caused mussels to produce shell calcite that is stiffer (higher modulus of elasticity) and harder than shells grown in control conditions. The outer shell (calcite) is more brittle in OA conditions while the inner shell (aragonite) is softer and less stiff in shells grown under OA conditions. Combining increasing ocean pCO2 and temperatures as projected for future global ocean appears to reduce the impact of increasing pCO2 on the material properties of the mussel shell. OA may cause changes in shell material properties that could prove problematic under predation scenarios for the mussels; however, this may be partially mitigated by increasing temperature.

  3. Geometrically nonlinear analysis of layered composite plates and shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, W. C.; Reddy, J. N.

    1983-01-01

    A degenerated three dimensional finite element, based on the incremental total Lagrangian formulation of a three dimensional layered anisotropic medium was developed. Its use in the geometrically nonlinear, static and dynamic, analysis of layered composite plates and shells is demonstrated. A two dimenisonal finite element based on the Sanders shell theory with the von Karman (nonlinear) strains was developed. It is shown that the deflections obtained by the 2D shell element deviate from those obtained by the more accurate 3D element for deep shells. The 3D degenerated element can be used to model general shells that are not necessarily doubly curved. The 3D degenerated element is computationally more demanding than the 2D shell theory element for a given problem. It is found that the 3D element is an efficient element for the analysis of layered composite plates and shells undergoing large displacements and transient motion.

  4. Symmetries and deformations in the spherical shell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Isacker, P.; Pittel, S.

    2016-02-01

    We discuss symmetries of the spherical shell model that make contact with the geometric collective model of Bohr and Mottelson. The most celebrated symmetry of this kind is SU(3), which is the basis of Elliott’s model of rotation. It corresponds to a deformed mean field induced by a quadrupole interaction in a single major oscillator shell N and can be generalized to include several major shells. As such, Elliott’s SU(3) model establishes the link between the spherical shell model and the (quadrupole component of the) geometric collective model. We introduce the analogue symmetry induced by an octupole interaction in two major oscillator shells N-1 and N, leading to an octupole-deformed solution of the spherical shell model. We show that in the limit of large oscillator shells, N\\to ∞ , the algebraic octupole interaction tends to that of the geometric collective model.

  5. Optimal designs of mollusk shells from bivalves to snails

    PubMed Central

    Okabe, Takuya; Yoshimura, Jin

    2017-01-01

    Bivalve, ammonite and snail shells are described by a small number of geometrical parameters. Raup noted that the vast majority of theoretically possible shell forms do not occur in nature. The constraint factors that regulate the biased distribution of natural form have long since been an open problem in evolution. The problem of whether natural shell form is a result of optimization remains unsolved despite previous attempts. Here we solve this problem by considering the scaling exponent of shell thickness as a morphological parameter. The scaling exponent has a drastic effect on the optimal design of shell shapes. The observed characteristic shapes of natural shells are explained in a unified manner as a result of optimal utilization of shell material resources, while isometric growth in thickness leads to impossibly tight coiling. PMID:28186171

  6. Vibration of cylindrical shells of bimodulus composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bert, C. W.; Kumar, M.

    1982-03-01

    A theory is formulated for the small amplitude free vibration of thick, circular cylindrical shells laminated of bimodulus composite materials, which have different elastic properties depending upon whether the fiber-direction strain is tensile or compressive. The theory used is the dynamic, shear deformable (moderately thick shell) analog of the Sanders best first approximation thin shell theory. By means of tracers, the analysis can be reduced to that of various simpler shell theories, namely Love's first approximation, and Donnell's shallow shell theory. As an example of the application of the theory, a closed form solution is presented for a freely supported panel or complete shell. To validate the analysis, numerical results are compared with existing results for various special cases. Also, the effects of the various shell theories, thickness shear flexibility, and bimodulus action are investigated.

  7. SERS decoding of micro gold shells moving in microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Lee, Saram; Joo, Segyeong; Park, Sejin; Kim, Soyoun; Kim, Hee Chan; Chung, Taek Dong

    2010-05-01

    In this study, in situ surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) decoding was demonstrated in microfluidic chips using novel thin micro gold shells modified with Raman tags. The micro gold shells were fabricated using electroless gold plating on PMMA beads with diameter of 15 microm. These shells were sophisticatedly optimized to produce the maximum SERS intensity, which minimized the exposure time for quick and safe decoding. The shell surfaces produced well-defined SERS spectra even at an extremely short exposure time, 1 ms, for a single micro gold shell combined with Raman tags such as 2-naphthalenethiol and benzenethiol. The consecutive SERS spectra from a variety of combinations of Raman tags were successfully acquired from the micro gold shells moving in 25 microm deep and 75 microm wide channels on a glass microfluidic chip. The proposed functionalized micro gold shells exhibited the potential of an on-chip microfluidic SERS decoding strategy for micro suspension array.

  8. Disappearance of the N=14 shell

    SciTech Connect

    Strongman, M. J.; Spyrou, A.; Frank, N.; Mosby, S.; Peters, W. A.; Thoennessen, M.; Hoffman, C. R.; Tabor, S. L.; Baumann, T.; Bazin, D.; Schiller, A.; Brown, J.; DeYoung, P. A.; Peaslee, G. F.; Finck, J. E.; Rogers, W. F.

    2009-08-15

    An excited state of {sup 22}N unbound with respect to neutron emission was observed in a stripping reaction from a 85 MeV/nucleon {sup 26}F beam. The observed decay energy of 650(50) keV places the level, which is interpreted to be the first 3{sup -} state, at an excitation energy of 1.93(22) MeV. Together with the previously measured bound states of {sup 22}N, reduction of the N=14 shell gap compared to less neutron-rich nitrogen isotopes at the neutron dripline is observed. Based on the magnitude of the reduction of the shell gap for {sup 22}N, a disappearance of the gap and even a level inversion of the {nu}1s{sub 1/2} and the {nu}0d{sub 5/2} levels in the neutron-unbound nucleus {sup 21}C seems likely.

  9. Dynamic Buckling of Composite Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Sai-Wei; Wang, Xiao-Jun

    2016-05-01

    Considering the effect of stress wave, the dynamic buckling governing equations and boundary conditions of composite cylindrical shells under axial step load are derived based on the Hamilton principle. The expression of radial displacement function along the circumferential direction is assumed since the cylindrical shell is closed. The solutions of the governing equations are obtained by the state-space technique. The determinant of the coefficient matrix must be equal to zero if the linear equations have a non-trivial solution. The relationship between the critical load and length and the influences of boundary conditions, modes, etc. on critical load are obtained by programming with MATLAB software before and after the reflection of stress wave.

  10. Shell tension forces propel Dictyostelium slugs forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieu, Jean-Paul; Delanoë-Ayari, Hélène

    2012-12-01

    The Dictyostelium slug is an excellent model system for studying collective movements, as it is comprised of about 105 cells all moving together in the same direction. It still remains unclear how this movement occurs and what the physical mechanisms behind it are. By applying our recently developed 3D traction force microscopy, we propose a simple explanation for slug propulsion. Most of the forces are exerted by the sheath surrounding the slug. This secreted shell is under a rather uniform tension (around 50 mN m-1) and will give rise to a tissue under pressure. Finally, we propose that this pressure will naturally push the slug tip forwards if a gradient of shell mechanical properties takes place in the very anterior part of the raised tip.

  11. Shell model for warm rotating nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, M.; Yoshida, K.; Dossing, T.

    1996-12-31

    Utilizing a shell model which combines the cranked Nilsson mean-field and the residual surface and volume delta two-body forces, the authors discuss the onset of rotational damping in normal- and super-deformed nuclei. Calculation for a typical normal deformed nucleus {sup 168}Yb indicates that the rotational damping sets in at around 0.8 MeV above the yrast line, and about 30 rotational bands of various length exists at a given rotational frequency, in overall agreement with experimental findings. It is predicted that the onset of rotational damping changes significantly in different superdeformed nuclei due to the variety of the shell gaps and single-particle orbits associated with the superdeformed mean-field.

  12. Shape coexistence: the shell model view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poves, A.

    2016-02-01

    We shall discuss the meaning of the ‘nuclear shape’ in the laboratory frame proper to the spherical shell model. A brief historical promenade will bring us from Elliott’s SU3 breakthrough to today’s large scale shell model calculations. A section is devoted to the algebraic model which extends drastically the field of applicability of Elliot’s SU3, providing a precious heuristic guidance for the exploration of collectivity in the nuclear chart. Shape coexistence and shape mixing will be shown to occur as the result of the competition between the main actors in the nuclear dynamics; the spherical mean field, and the pairing and quadrupole-quadrupole interactions. These ideas will be illustrated with examples in magic nuclei (40Ca and 68Ni); neutron rich semi-magic (32Mg, and 64Cr); and in proton rich N = Z (72Kr).

  13. No-Core Shell Model and Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Navratil, P; Ormand, W E; Caurier, E; Bertulani, C

    2005-04-29

    There has been a significant progress in ab initio approaches to the structure of light nuclei. Starting from realistic two- and three-nucleon interactions the ab initio no-core shell model (NCSM) can predict low-lying levels in p-shell nuclei. It is a challenging task to extend ab initio methods to describe nuclear reactions. In this contribution, we present a brief overview of the NCSM with examples of recent applications as well as the first steps taken toward nuclear reaction applications. In particular, we discuss cross section calculations of p+{sup 6}Li and {sup 6}He+p scattering as well as a calculation of the astrophysically important {sup 7}Be(p, {gamma}){sup 8}B S-factor.

  14. Canonical acoustic thin-shell wormholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jusufi, Kimet; Övgün, Ali

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we model a canonical acoustic thin-shell wormhole (CATSW) in the framework of analogue gravity systems. In this model, we apply cut and paste technique to join together two spherically symmetric, analogue canonical acoustic solutions, and compute the analogue surface density/surface pressure of the fluid using the Darmois-Israel formalism. We study the stability analyses by using a linear barotropic fluid (LBF), Chaplygin fluid (CF), logarithmic fluid (LogF), polytropic fluid (PF) and finally Van der Waals Quintessence (VDWQ). We show that a kind of analog acoustic fluid with negative energy is required at the throat to keep the wormhole stable. It is argued that CATSW can be a stabile thin-shell wormhole if we choose a suitable parameter values.

  15. Robust, ultrasmall organosilica nanoparticles without silica shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Eoin; Born, Philip; Weber, Anika; Kraus, Tobias

    2014-07-01

    Traditionally, organosilica nanoparticles have been prepared inside micelles with an external silica shell for mechanical support. Here, we compare these hybrid core-shell particles with organosilica particles that are robust enough to be produced both inside micelles and alone in a sol-gel process. These particles form from octadecyltrimethoxy silane as silica source either in microemulsions, resulting in water-dispersible particles with a hydrophobic core, or precipitate from an aqueous mixture to form particles with both hydrophobic core and surface. We examine size and morphology of the particles by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy and show that the particles consist of Si-O-Si networks pervaded by alkyl chains using nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis.

  16. No-Core Shell Model and Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Navratil, Petr; Ormand, W. Erich; Caurier, Etienne; Bertulani, Carlos

    2005-10-14

    There has been a significant progress in ab initio approaches to the structure of light nuclei. Starting from realistic two- and three-nucleon interactions the ab initio no-core shell model (NCSM) can predict low-lying levels in p-shell nuclei. It is a challenging task to extend ab initio methods to describe nuclear reactions. In this contribution, we present a brief overview of the NCSM with examples of recent applications as well as the first steps taken toward nuclear reaction applications. In particular, we discuss cross section calculations of p+6Li and 6He+p scattering as well as a calculation of the astrophysically important 7Be(p,{gamma})8B S-factor.

  17. Nuclear level density: Shell-model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen'kov, Roman; Zelevinsky, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    Knowledge of the nuclear level density is necessary for understanding various reactions, including those in the stellar environment. Usually the combinatorics of a Fermi gas plus pairing is used for finding the level density. Recently a practical algorithm avoiding diagonalization of huge matrices was developed for calculating the density of many-body nuclear energy levels with certain quantum numbers for a full shell-model Hamiltonian. The underlying physics is that of quantum chaos and intrinsic thermalization in a closed system of interacting particles. We briefly explain this algorithm and, when possible, demonstrate the agreement of the results with those derived from exact diagonalization. The resulting level density is much smoother than that coming from conventional mean-field combinatorics. We study the role of various components of residual interactions in the process of thermalization, stressing the influence of incoherent collision-like processes. The shell-model results for the traditionally used parameters are also compared with standard phenomenological approaches.

  18. BLAZAR FLARES FROM COMPTON DRAGGED SHELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Golan, Omri; Levinson, Amir

    2015-08-10

    We compute the dynamics and emission of dissipative shells that are subject to a strong Compton drag, under simplifying assumptions about the dissipation mechanism. We show that under conditions prevailing in blazars, substantial deceleration is anticipated on sub-parsec and parsec scales in cases of rapid dissipation. Such episodes may be the origin of some of the flaring activity occasionally observed in gamma-ray blazars. The shape of the light curves thereby produced reflects the geometry of the emitting surface if the deceleration is very rapid, or the dynamics of the shell if the deceleration is delayed, or initially more gradual, owing, e.g., to continuous injection of energy and momentum.

  19. Single crystal U–Pb zircon age and Sr–Nd isotopic composition of impactites from the Bosumtwi impact structure, Ghana: Comparison with country rocks and Ivory Coast tektites

    PubMed Central

    Ferrière, Ludovic; Koeberl, Christian; Thöni, Martin; Liang, Chen

    2010-01-01

    The 1.07 Myr old Bosumtwi impact structure (Ghana), excavated in 2.1–2.2 Gyr old supracrustal rocks of the Birimian Supergroup, was drilled in 2004. Here, we present single crystal U–Pb zircon ages from a suevite and two meta-graywacke samples recovered from the central uplift (drill core LB-08A), which yield an upper Concordia intercept age of ca. 2145 ± 82 Ma, in very good agreement with previous geochronological data for the West African Craton rocks in Ghana. Whole rock Rb–Sr and Sm–Nd isotope data of six suevites (five from inside the crater and one from outside the northern crater rim), three meta-graywacke, and two phyllite samples from core LB-08A are also presented, providing further insights into the timing of the metamorphism and a possibly related isotopic redistribution of the Bosumtwi crater rocks. Our Rb–Sr and Sm–Nd data show also that the suevites are mixtures of meta-greywacke and phyllite (and possibly a very low amount of granite). A comparison of our new isotopic data with literature data for the Ivory Coast tektites allows to better constrain the parent material of the Ivory Coast tektites (i.e., distal impactites), which is thought to consist of a mixture of metasedimentary rocks (and possibly granite), but with a higher proportion of phyllite (and shale) than the suevites (i.e., proximal impactites). When plotted in a Rb/Sr isochron diagram, the sample data points (n = 29, including literature data) scatter along a regression line, whose slope corresponds to an age of 1846 ± 160 Ma, with an initial Sr isotope ratio of 0.703 ± 0.002. However, due to the extensive alteration of some of the investigated samples and the lithological diversity of the source material, this age, which is in close agreement with a possible “metamorphic age” of ∼ 1.8–1.9 Ga tentatively derived from our U–Pb dating of zircons, is difficult to consider as a reliable metamorphic age. It may perhaps reflect a common ancient source

  20. Single crystal U-Pb zircon age and Sr-Nd isotopic composition of impactites from the Bosumtwi impact structure, Ghana: Comparison with country rocks and Ivory Coast tektites.

    PubMed

    Ferrière, Ludovic; Koeberl, Christian; Thöni, Martin; Liang, Chen

    2010-08-01

    The 1.07 Myr old Bosumtwi impact structure (Ghana), excavated in 2.1-2.2 Gyr old supracrustal rocks of the Birimian Supergroup, was drilled in 2004. Here, we present single crystal U-Pb zircon ages from a suevite and two meta-graywacke samples recovered from the central uplift (drill core LB-08A), which yield an upper Concordia intercept age of ca. 2145 ± 82 Ma, in very good agreement with previous geochronological data for the West African Craton rocks in Ghana. Whole rock Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotope data of six suevites (five from inside the crater and one from outside the northern crater rim), three meta-graywacke, and two phyllite samples from core LB-08A are also presented, providing further insights into the timing of the metamorphism and a possibly related isotopic redistribution of the Bosumtwi crater rocks. Our Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd data show also that the suevites are mixtures of meta-greywacke and phyllite (and possibly a very low amount of granite). A comparison of our new isotopic data with literature data for the Ivory Coast tektites allows to better constrain the parent material of the Ivory Coast tektites (i.e., distal impactites), which is thought to consist of a mixture of metasedimentary rocks (and possibly granite), but with a higher proportion of phyllite (and shale) than the suevites (i.e., proximal impactites). When plotted in a Rb/Sr isochron diagram, the sample data points (n = 29, including literature data) scatter along a regression line, whose slope corresponds to an age of 1846 ± 160 Ma, with an initial Sr isotope ratio of 0.703 ± 0.002. However, due to the extensive alteration of some of the investigated samples and the lithological diversity of the source material, this age, which is in close agreement with a possible "metamorphic age" of ∼ 1.8-1.9 Ga tentatively derived from our U-Pb dating of zircons, is difficult to consider as a reliable metamorphic age. It may perhaps reflect a common ancient source whose Rb-Sr isotope

  1. Nonlinear axisymmetric flexural vibration of spherical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunieda, H.

    1972-01-01

    Axisymmetric responses are presented of a nonshallow thin-walled spherical shell on the basis of nonlinear bending theory. An ordinary differential equation with nonlinearity of quadratic as well as cubic terms associated with variable time is derived. The derivation is based on the assumption that the deflection mode is the sum of four Legendre polynomials, and the Galerkin procedure is applied. The equation is solved by asymptotic expansion, and a first approximate solution is adopted. Unstable regions of this solution are discussed.

  2. On Closed Shells in Nuclei. II

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Mayer, M. G.

    1949-04-01

    Discussion on the use of spins and magnetic moments of the even-odd nuclei by Feenberg and Nordheim to determine the angular momentum of the eigenfunction of the odd particle; discussion of prevalence of isomerism in certain regions of the isotope chart; tabulated data on levels of square well potential, spectroscopic levels, spin term, number of states, shells and known spins and orbital assignments.

  3. Thin-shell wormholes: Linearization stability

    SciTech Connect

    Poisson, E.; Visser, M.

    1995-12-15

    The class of spherically symmetric thin-shell wormholes provides a particularly elegant collection of exemplars for the study of traversable Lorentzian wormholes. In the present paper we consider linearized (spherically symmetric) perturbations around some assumed static solution of the Einstein field equations. This permits us to relate stability issues to the (linearized) equation of state of the exotic matter which is located at the wormhole throat. {copyright} 1995 The American Physical Society.

  4. Jess, the Java expert system shell

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman-Hill, E.J.

    1997-11-01

    This report describes Jess, a clone of the popular CLIPS expert system shell written entirely in Java. Jess supports the development of rule-based expert systems which can be tightly coupled to code written in the powerful, portable Java language. The syntax of the Jess language is discussed, and a comprehensive list of supported functions is presented. A guide to extending Jess by writing Java code is also included.

  5. HOLE DRILLING BREAKTHROUGH IN BE SHELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, R C

    2004-09-21

    This is a brief memo look at the problem of determining whether one has broken through the inside plastic mandrel of a sputtered Be shell. This is important because the next step is the thermal removal of the mandrel, and failure to break through the plastic, even if through the Be, makes our process at best difficult. Described below are two possible approaches, the first somewhat high tech and maybe not possible, the second definitely low tech but certainly doable.

  6. Fossil dust shells around luminous supergiants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, R.

    1975-01-01

    The observed frequency with which infrared excesses appear in F, G, and K supergiants of luminosity class Ia supports the idea that these excesses arise in a 'fossil' circumstellar dust shell that was formed during a prior M-super-giant phase of evolution. The required leftward evolution of the star on the H-R diagram would then imply that the Ledoux, rather than the Schwarzschild, criterion for convective mixing is the correct criterion to use in stellar evolution calculations.

  7. Photocatalytic activity of Ag/ZnO core–shell nanoparticles with shell thickness as controlling parameter under green environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajbongshi, Himanshu; Bhattacharjee, Suparna; Datta, Pranayee

    2017-02-01

    Plasmonic Ag/ZnO core–shell nanoparticles have been synthesized via a simple two-step wet chemical method for application in Photocatalysis. The morphology, size, crystal structure, composition and optical properties of the nanoparticles are investigated by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), FTIR spectroscopy, ultraviolet–visible (UV–Vis) absorption spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The shell thicknesses are varied by varying the concentration of zinc nitrate hexa-hydrate and triethanolamine. The ZnO shell coating over Ag core enhances the charge separation, whereas the larger shell thickness and increased refractive index of surrounding medium cause red shifts of surface Plasmon resonance (SPR) peak of Ag core. The photoluminescence (PL) spectra of Ag/ZnO core–shell show that the larger shell thickness quenches the near band edge UV emission of ZnO. The electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) i.e. Nyquist plots also confirm the higher charge transfer efficiency of the Ag/ZnO core–shell nanoparticles. The Photocatalytic activities of Ag/ZnO core–shell nanoparticles are investigated by the degradation of methylene blue (MB) dye under direct sunlight irradiation. Compared to pure ZnO nanoparticles (NPs), Ag/ZnO core–shell NPs display efficient sunlight plasmonic photocatalytic activity because of the influence of SPR of Ag core and the electron sink effect. The photocatalytic activity of Ag/ZnO core–shell NPs is found to be enhanced with increase in shell thickness.

  8. Radar attenuation in Europa's ice shell: obstacles and opportunities for constraining shell thickness and thermal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalousova, Klara; Schroeder, Dustin M.; Soderlund, Krista M.; Sotin, Christophe

    2016-10-01

    With its strikingly young surface and possibly recent endogenic activity, Europa is one of the most exciting bodies within our Solar System and a primary target for spacecraft exploration. Future missions to Europa are expected to carry ice penetrating radar instruments which are powerful tools to investigate the subsurface thermophysical structure of its ice shell.Several authors have addressed the 'penetration depth' of radar sounders at icy moons, however, the concept and calculation of a single value penetration depth is a potentially misleading simplification since it ignores the thermal and attenuation structure complexity of a realistic ice shell. Here we move beyond the concept of a single penetration depth by exploring the variation in two-way radar attenuation for a variety of potential thermal structures of Europa's ice shell as well as for a low loss and high loss temperature-dependent attenuation model. The possibility to detect brines is also investigated.Our results indicate that: (i) for all ice shell thicknesses investigated (5-30 km), a nominal satellite-borne radar sounder will penetrate between 15% and 100% of the total thickness, (ii) the maximum penetration depth strongly varies laterally with the deepest penetration possible through the cold downwellings, (iii) the direct detection of the ice/ocean interface might be possible for shells of up to 15 km if the radar signal travels through the cold downwelling, (iv) even if the ice/ocean interface is not detected, the penetration through most of the shell could constrain the deep shell structure through the loss of signal, and (v) for all plausible ice shells the two-way attenuation to the eutectic point is ≤30 dB which shows a robust potential for longitudinal investigation of the ice shell's shallow structure.Part of this work has been performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA. K.K. acknowledges support by the Grant Agency of the

  9. Impact of high ytterbium(III) concentration in the shell on upconversion luminescence of core-shell nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Lei, Lei; Chen, Daqin; Zhu, Wenjuan; Xu, Ju; Wang, Yuansheng

    2014-10-01

    After coating 20 Yb/2 Er:NaGdF4 core nanocrystals with a NaYbF4 shell, upconversion emission of the rare earth ions weakens. So far, the exact reason for this phenomenon is still unclear due to lack of the direct evidence. In this report, a core@shell@shell sandwich-like structure is designed and fabricated to investigate this phenomenon. We find that high Yb(3+) concentration in the shell has mainly two adverse impacts: it promotes not only the deleterious back energy transfer from Er(3+) in the core to Yb(3+) in the shell but also the energy transfer from Yb(3+) in the core to Yb(3+) in the shell. To obtain nanocrystals with high upconversion efficency, appropriate Yb(3+) concentration should be introduced into the shell or the transition layer.

  10. The creation of AGB fallback shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhuo; Frank, Adam; Blackman, Eric G.; Nordhaus, Jason

    2016-04-01

    The possibility that mass ejected during Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stellar evolution phases falls back towards the star has been suggested in applications ranging from the formation of accretion discs to the powering of late-thermal pulses. In this paper, we seek to explicate the properties of fallback flow trajectories from mass-loss events. We focus on a transient phase of mass ejection with sub-escape speeds, followed by a phase of a typical AGB wind. We solve the problem using both hydrodynamic simulations and a simplified one-dimensional analytic model that matches the simulations. For a given set of initial wind characteristics, we find a critical shell velocity that distinguishes between `shell fallback' and `shell escape'. We discuss the relevance of our results for both single and binary AGB stars. In particular, we discuss how our results help to frame further studies of fallback as a mechanism for forming the substantial population of observed post-AGB stars with dusty discs.

  11. Gas distribution and starbursts in shell galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weil, Melinda L.; Hernquist, Lars

    1993-01-01

    Detailed maps of most elliptical galaxies reveal that, whereas the greatest part of their luminous mass originates from a smooth distribution with a surface brightness approximated by a de Vaucouleurs law, a small percentage of their light is contributed by low surface brightness distortions termed 'fine structures'. The sharp-edged features called 'shells' are successfully reproduced by merger and infall models involving accretion from less massive companions. In this context, dwarf spheroidal and compact disk galaxies are likely progenitors of these stellar phenomena. However, it is probable that the sources of shell-forming material also contain significant amounts of gas. This component may play an important role in constraining the formation and evolution of shell galaxies. To investigate the effects of the gaseous component, numerical simulations were performed to study the tidal disruption of dwarf galaxies containing both gas and stars by more massive primaries, and the evolution of the ensuing debris. The calculations were performed with a hybrid N-body/hydrodynamics code. Collisionless matter is evolved using a conventional N-body technique and gas is treated using smoothed particle hydrodynamics in which self-gravitating fluid elements are represented as particles evolving according to Lagrangian hydrodynamic equations. An isothermal equation of state is employed so the gas remains at a temperature 104 K. Owing to the large mass ratio between the primary and companion, the primary is modeled as a rigid potential and the self-gravity of both galaxies is neglected.

  12. Fluorescent Nanodiamonds Embedded in Biocompatible Translucent Shells

    PubMed Central

    Rehor, Ivan; Slegerova, Jitka; Kucka, Jan; Proks, Vladimir; Petrakova, Vladimira; Adam, Marie-Pierre; Treussart, François; Turner, Stuart; Bals, Sara; Sacha, Pavel; Ledvina, Miroslav; Wen, Amy M.; Steinmetz, Nicole F.; Cigler, Petr

    2016-01-01

    High pressure high temperature (HPHT) nanodiamonds (NDs) represent extremely promising materials for construction of fluorescent nanoprobes and nanosensors. However, some properties of bare NDs limit their direct use in these applications: they precipitate in biological solutions, only a limited set of bio-orthogonal conjugation techniques is available and the accessible material is greatly polydisperse in shape. In this work, we encapsulate bright 30-nm fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) in 10–20-nm thick translucent (i.e., not altering FND fluorescence) silica shells, yielding monodisperse near-spherical particles of mean diameter 66 nm. High yield modification of the shells with PEG chains stabilizes the particles in ionic solutions, making them applicable in biological environments. We further modify the opposite ends of PEG chains with fluorescent dyes or vectoring peptide using click chemistry. High conversion of this bio-orthogonal coupling yielded circa 2000 dye or peptide molecules on a single FND. We demonstrate the superior properties of these particles by in vitro interaction with human prostate cancer cells: while bare nanodiamonds strongly aggregate in the buffer and adsorb onto the cell membrane, the shell encapsulated NDs do not adsorb nonspecifically and they penetrate inside the cells. PMID:24500945

  13. Fluorescent nanodiamonds embedded in biocompatible translucent shells.

    PubMed

    Rehor, Ivan; Slegerova, Jitka; Kucka, Jan; Proks, Vladimir; Petrakova, Vladimira; Adam, Marie-Pierre; Treussart, François; Turner, Stuart; Bals, Sara; Sacha, Pavel; Ledvina, Miroslav; Wen, Amy M; Steinmetz, Nicole F; Cigler, Petr

    2014-03-26

    High pressure high temperature (HPHT) nanodiamonds (NDs) represent extremely promising materials for construction of fluorescent nanoprobes and nanosensors. However, some properties of bare NDs limit their direct use in these applications: they precipitate in biological solutions, only a limited set of bio-orthogonal conjugation techniques is available and the accessible material is greatly polydisperse in shape. In this work, we encapsulate bright 30-nm fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) in 10-20-nm thick translucent (i.e., not altering FND fluorescence) silica shells, yielding monodisperse near-spherical particles of mean diameter 66 nm. High yield modification of the shells with PEG chains stabilizes the particles in ionic solutions, making them applicable in biological environments. We further modify the opposite ends of PEG chains with fluorescent dyes or vectoring peptide using click chemistry. High conversion of this bio-orthogonal coupling yielded circa 2000 dye or peptide molecules on a single FND. We demonstrate the superior properties of these particles by in vitro interaction with human prostate cancer cells: while bare nanodiamonds strongly aggregate in the buffer and adsorb onto the cell membrane, the shell encapsulated NDs do not adsorb nonspecifically and they penetrate inside the cells.

  14. Improved Shell models for screened Coulomb balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonitz, M.; Kaehlert, H.; Henning, C.; Baumgartner, H.; Filinov, A.

    2006-10-01

    Spherical Coulomb crystals in dusty plasmas [1] are well described by an isotropic Yukawa-type pair interaction and an external parabolic confinement as was shown by extensive molecular dynamics simulations [2]. A much simpler description is possible with analytical shell models which have been derived for Yukawas plasmas in [3,4]. Here we analyze improved Yukawa shell models which include correlations along the lines proposed for Coulomb crystals in [5]. The shell configurations are efficiently evaluated using a Monte Carlo procedure. [1] O. Arp, A. Piel and A. Melzer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 165004 (2004). [2] M. Bonitz, D. Block, O. Arp, V. Golunychiy, H. Baumgartner, P. Ludwig, A. Piel and A. Filinov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 075001 (2006). [3] H. Totsuji, C. Totsuji, T. Ogawa, and K. Tsuruta, Phys. Rev. E 71, 045401 (2005). [4] C. Henning, M. Bonitz, A. Piel, P. Ludwig, H. Baumgartner, V. Golubnichiy, and D. Block, submitted to Phys. Rev. E [5] W.D. Kraeft and M. Bonitz, J. Phys. Conf. Ser. 35, 94 (2006).

  15. Toroidal metrics: gravitational solenoids and static shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynden-Bell, Donald; Katz, Joseph

    2012-06-01

    In electromagnetism a current along a wire tightly wound on a torus makes a solenoid whose magnetic field is confined within the torus. In Einstein's gravity we give a corresponding solution in which a current of matter moves up on the inside of a toroidal shell and down on the outside, rolling around the torus by the short way. The metric is static outside the torus but stationary inside with the gravomagnetic field confined inside the torus, running around it by the long way. This exact solution of Einstein's equations is found by fitting Bonnor's solution for the metric of a light beam, which gives the required toroidal gravomagnetic field inside the torus, to the general Weyl static external metric in toroidal coordinates, which we develop. We deduce the matter tensor on the torus and find when it obeys the energy conditions. We also give the equipotential shells that generate the simple Bach-Weyl metric externally and find which shells obey the energy conditions.

  16. Shock-Sensitivity in Shell-Like Structures: With Simulations of Spherical Shell Buckling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, J. Michael T.; Sieber, Jan

    Under increasing compression, an unbuckled shell is in a metastable state which becomes increasingly precarious as the buckling load is approached. So to induce premature buckling, a lateral disturbance will have to overcome a decreasing energy barrier which reaches zero at buckling. Two archetypal problems that exhibit a severe form of this behavior are the axially-compressed cylindrical shell and the externally pressurized spherical shell. Focusing on the cylinder, a nondestructive technique was recently proposed to estimate the “shock-sensitivity” of a laboratory specimen using a lateral probe to measure the nonlinear load-deflection characteristic. If a symmetry-breaking bifurcation is encountered on the path, computer simulations showed how this can be suppressed by a controlled secondary probe. Here, we extend our understanding by assessing in general terms how a single control can capture remote saddle solutions: in particular, how a symmetric probe could locate an asymmetric solution. Then, more specifically, we analyze the spherical shell with point and ring probes, to test the procedure under challenging conditions to assess its range of applicability. Rather than a bifurcation, the spherical shell offers the challenge of a destabilizing fold (limit point) under the rigid control of the probe.

  17. Switching closed-shell to open-shell phenalenyl: toward designing electroactive materials.

    PubMed

    Pariyar, Anand; Vijaykumar, Gonela; Bhunia, Mrinal; Dey, Suman Kr; Singh, Santosh K; Kurungot, Sreekumar; Mandal, Swadhin K

    2015-05-13

    Open-shell phenalenyl chemistry started more than half a century back, and the first solid-state phenalenyl radical was realized only 15 years ago highlighting the synthetic challenges associated in stabilizing carbon-based radical chemistry, though it has great promise as building blocks for molecular electronics and multifunctional materials. Alternatively, stable closed-shell phenalenyl has tremendous potential as it can be utilized to create an in situ open-shell state by external spin injection. In the present study, we have designed a closed-shell phenalenyl-based iron(III) complex, Fe(III)(PLY)3 (PLY-H = 9-hydroxyphenalenone) displaying an excellent electrocatalytic property as cathode material for one compartment membraneless H2O2 fuel cell. The power density output of Fe(III)(PLY)3 is nearly 15-fold higher than the structurally related model compound Fe(III)(acac)3 (acac = acetylacetonate) and nearly 140-fold higher than an earlier reported mononuclear Fe(III) complex, Fe(III)(Pc)Cl (Pc = pthalocyaninate), highlighting the role of switchable closed-shell phenalenyl moiety for electron-transfer process in designing electroactive materials.

  18. The heterogeneous ice shell thickness of Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchetti, Alice; Pozzobon, Riccardo; Mazzarini, Francesco; Cremonese, Gabriele; Massironi, Matteo

    2016-10-01

    Saturn's moon Enceladus is the smallest Solar System body that presents an intense geologic activity on its surface. Plumes erupting from Enceladus' South Polar terrain (SPT) provide direct evidence of a reservoir of liquid below the surface. Previous analysis of gravity data determined that the ice shell above the liquid ocean must be 30-40 km thick from the South Pole up to 50° S latitude (Iess et al., 2014), however, understand the global or regional nature of the ocean beneath the ice crust is still challenging. To infer the thickness of the outer ice shell and prove the global extent of the ocean, we used the self-similar clustering method (Bonnet et al., 2001; Bour et al., 2002) to analyze the widespread fractures of the Enceladus's surface. The spatial distribution of fractures has been analyzed in terms of their self-similar clustering and a two-point correlation method was used to measure the fractal dimension of the fractures population (Mazzarini, 2004, 2010). A self-similar clustering of fractures is characterized by a correlation coefficient with a size range defined by a lower and upper cut-off, that represent a mechanical discontinuity and the thickness of the fractured icy crust, thus connected to the liquid reservoir. Hence, this method allowed us to estimate the icy shell thickness values in different regions of Enceladus from SPT up to northern regions.We mapped fractures in ESRI ArcGis environment in different regions of the satellite improving the recently published geological map (Crow-Willard and Pappalardo, 2015). On these regions we have taken into account the fractures, such as wide troughs and narrow troughs, located in well-defined geological units. Firstly, we analyzed the distribution of South Polar Region fracture patterns finding an ice shell thickness of ~ 31 km, in agreement with gravity measurements (Iess et al., 2014). Then, we applied the same approach to other four regions of the satellite inferring an increasing of the ice

  19. Layer-by-Layer Proteomic Analysis of Mytilus galloprovincialis Shell

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin-xing; Bao, Lin-fei; Fan, Mei-hua; Li, Xiao-min; Wu, Chang-wen; Xia, Shu-wei

    2015-01-01

    Bivalve shell is a biomineralized tissue with various layers/microstructures and excellent mechanical properties. Shell matrix proteins (SMPs) pervade and envelop the mineral crystals and play essential roles in biomineralization. Despite that Mytilus is an economically important bivalve, only few proteomic studies have been performed for the shell, and current knowledge of the SMP set responsible for different shell layers of Mytilus remains largely patchy. In this study, we observed that Mytilus galloprovincialis shell contained three layers, including nacre, fibrous prism, and myostracum that is involved in shell-muscle attachment. A parallel proteomic analysis was performed for these three layers. By combining LC-MS/MS analysis with Mytilus EST database interrogations, a whole set of 113 proteins was identified, and the distribution of these proteins in different shell layers followed a mosaic pattern. For each layer, about a half of identified proteins are unique and the others are shared by two or all of three layers. This is the first description of the protein set exclusive to nacre, myostracum, and fibrous prism in Mytilus shell. Moreover, most of identified proteins in the present study are novel SMPs, which greatly extended biomineralization-related protein data of Mytilus. These results are useful, on one hand, for understanding the roles of SMPs in the deposition of different shell layers. On the other hand, the identified protein set of myostracum provides candidates for further exploring the mechanism of adductor muscle-shell attachment. PMID:26218932

  20. Acoustic radiation from single and double ribbed circular cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burroughs, C. B.; Hayek, S. I.; Hallander, J. E.; Bostian, D. A.

    1984-03-01

    Measurements of the acoustic radiation from single and double ribbed circular cylindrical shells were made on the NUSC Transducer Calibration Platform (TCP) in Lake Seneca, NY. Six different types of mechanical drives were used at each of three locations inside the inner shell. Measurements of the shell vibration and acoustic radiation were made with and without outer shells installed around the inner shell structure. For two types of drives, measurements were made with a pressure release layer installed between the inner and outer shell surfaces. Acoustic radiation measurements were made as a function of frequency from 20 to 5,000 Hz and as a function of observation direction at several frequencies for each shell and drive measurement configuration. Measured acoustic radiation data as a function of frequency have been processed. Analysis of the processed data is presented and discussed. It is shown that the location of the drive had a significant effect on the acoustic radiation. The outer shell reduced the acoustic radiation at shell resonant frequencies, but had little effect on other frequencies. The pressure release layer in the double shell had little effect on the acoustic radiation.

  1. Waltzing route toward double-helix formation in cholesteric shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darmon, Alexandre; Benzaquen, Michael; Seč, David; Čopar, Simon; Dauchot, Olivier; Lopez-Leon, Teresa

    2016-08-01

    Liquid crystals, when confined to a spherical shell, offer fascinating possibilities for producing artificial mesoscopic atoms, which could then self-assemble into materials structured at a nanoscale, such as photonic crystals or metamaterials. The spherical curvature of the shell imposes topological constraints in the molecular ordering of the liquid crystal, resulting in the formation of defects. Controlling the number of defects, that is, the shell valency, and their positions, is a key success factor for the realization of those materials. Liquid crystals with helical cholesteric order offer a promising, yet unexplored way of controlling the shell defect configuration. In this paper, we study cholesteric shells with monovalent and bivalent defect configurations. By bringing together experiments and numerical simulations, we show that the defects appearing in these two configurations have a complex inner structure, as recently reported for simulated droplets. Bivalent shells possess two highly structured defects, which are composed of a number of smaller defect rings that pile up through the shell. Monovalent shells have a single radial defect, which is composed of two nonsingular defect lines that wind around each other in a double-helix structure. The stability of the bivalent configuration against the monovalent one is controlled by c = h/p, where h is the shell thickness and p the cholesteric helical pitch. By playing with the shell geometry, we can trigger the transition between the two configurations. This transition involves a fascinating waltz dynamics, where the two defects come closer while turning around each other.

  2. Mercury removal using ground and calcined mussel shell.

    PubMed

    Peña-Rodríguez, Susana; Bermúdez-Couso, Alipio; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Arias-Estévez, Manuel; Fernández-Sanjurjo, María J; Alvarez-Rodríguez, Esperanza; Núñez-Delgado, Avelino

    2013-12-01

    We determined mercury retention on calcined and ground mussel shell, in presence and absence of phosphate, using batch and stirred flow chamber experiments. In batch experiments the calcined shell exhibited higher Hg adsorption, with good fitting to Freundlich equation (R2: 0.925-0.978); the presence of phosphate increased Hg adsorption; mercury desorption was 13% or lower, diminishing up to 2% under the presence of phosphates. In stirred flow chamber experiments calcined shell retained more Hg than ground shells (6300 vs. 4000-5200 micromol/kg); Hg retention increased an additional 40% on calcined shell and up to an additional 70% on ground shells when phosphates were present; mercury desorption was quite similar in all shell types (20%-34%), increasing up to 49%-60% in ground shells when phosphates were present. The higher Hg adsorption on calcined shell would be related to its calcite and dolomite concentrations; mercury-phosphate interactions would cause the increase in Hg retention when phosphates are present. Data on Hg desorption suggest that Hg retention was not easily reversible after batch experiments, increasing in the stirred flow chamber due to convective flow. Calcined and ground mussel shells could be recycled removing Hg from water, with the presence of phosphates in solution improving efficacy.

  3. Xcl---A family of programming lanquage-based shells

    SciTech Connect

    Roschke, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    As the three major UNIX shells have emerged, they have shown little inclination to include syntax and semantics from existing programming languages. The first of these shells, sh, contains only a small amount of C-like syntax. Csh provides some C language expression syntax, but includes very little other C syntax. The newest of these shells, ksh, also includes some C-like expression syntax, although they contain some significantly un-C-like syntax in such areas as relational and logical operators. Several much less widely used shells have been written that much more closely resemble particular programming languages. However, each of these shells have the disadvantage of not being based upon a widely used programming language. In addition, interactive commands tend to be difficult to enter because they must frequently be entered using normal programming language constructs such as function calls. Thus, the vast majority of programmers of today's UNIX shells must deal with a shell interface that is not based upon any familiar programming language. This paper describes some of the features of the xcl family of shells. Each of these shells is based closely upon an existing programming language and provides the user with a familiar and highly programmable shell interface. 7 refs.

  4. Layer-by-Layer Proteomic Analysis of Mytilus galloprovincialis Shell.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Liao, Zhi; Wang, Xin-Xing; Bao, Lin-Fei; Fan, Mei-Hua; Li, Xiao-Min; Wu, Chang-Wen; Xia, Shu-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Bivalve shell is a biomineralized tissue with various layers/microstructures and excellent mechanical properties. Shell matrix proteins (SMPs) pervade and envelop the mineral crystals and play essential roles in biomineralization. Despite that Mytilus is an economically important bivalve, only few proteomic studies have been performed for the shell, and current knowledge of the SMP set responsible for different shell layers of Mytilus remains largely patchy. In this study, we observed that Mytilus galloprovincialis shell contained three layers, including nacre, fibrous prism, and myostracum that is involved in shell-muscle attachment. A parallel proteomic analysis was performed for these three layers. By combining LC-MS/MS analysis with Mytilus EST database interrogations, a whole set of 113 proteins was identified, and the distribution of these proteins in different shell layers followed a mosaic pattern. For each layer, about a half of identified proteins are unique and the others are shared by two or all of three layers. This is the first description of the protein set exclusive to nacre, myostracum, and fibrous prism in Mytilus shell. Moreover, most of identified proteins in the present study are novel SMPs, which greatly extended biomineralization-related protein data of Mytilus. These results are useful, on one hand, for understanding the roles of SMPs in the deposition of different shell layers. On the other hand, the identified protein set of myostracum provides candidates for further exploring the mechanism of adductor muscle-shell attachment.

  5. (Plasmonic Metal Core)/(Semiconductor Shell) Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Caihong

    Over the past several years, integration of metal nanocrystals that can support localized surface plasmon has been demonstrated as one of the most promising methods to the improvement of the light-harvesting efficiency of semiconductors. Ag and Au nanocrystals have been extensively hybridized with semiconductors by either deposition or anchoring. However, metal nanocrystals tend to aggregate, reshape, detach, or grow into large nanocrystals, leading to a loss of the unique properties seen in the original nanocrystals. Fortunately, core/shell nanostructures, circumventing the aforementioned problems, have been demonstrated to exhibit superior photoactivities. To further improve the light-harvesting applications of (plasmonic metal core)/(semiconductor shell) nanostructures, it is vital to understand the plasmonic and structural evolutions during the preparation processes, design novel hybrid nanostructures, and improve their light-harvesting performances. In this thesis, I therefore studied the plasmonic and structural evolutions during the formation of (Ag core)/(Ag2S shell) nanostructures. Moreover, I also prepared (noble metal core)/(TiO2 shell) nanostructures and investigated their plasmonic properties and photon-harvesting applications. Clear understanding of the sulfidation process can enable fine control of the plasmonic properties as well as the structural composition of Ag/Ag 2S nanomaterials. Therefore, I investigated the plasmonic and structural variations during the sulfidation process of Ag nanocubes both experimentally and numerically. The sulfidation reactions were carried out at both the ensemble and single-particle levels. Electrodynamic simulations were also employed to study the variations of the plasmonic properties and plasmon modes. Both experiment and simulation results revealed that sulfidation initiates at the vertices of Ag nanocubes. Ag nanocubes are then gradually truncated and each nanocube becomes a nanosphere eventually. The cubic

  6. Effects of Shell-Buckling Knockdown Factors in Large Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrinda, Glenn A.

    2012-01-01

    Shell-buckling knockdown factors (SBKF) have been used in large cylindrical shell structures to account for uncertainty in buckling loads. As the diameter of the cylinder increases, achieving the manufacturing tolerances becomes increasingly more difficult. Knockdown factors account for manufacturing imperfections in the shell geometry by decreasing the allowable buckling load of the cylinder. In this paper, large-diameter (33 ft) cylinders are investigated by using various SBKF's. An investigation that is based on finite-element analysis (FEA) is used to develop design sensitivity relationships. Different manufacturing imperfections are modeled into a perfect cylinder to investigate the effects of these imperfections on buckling. The analysis results may be applicable to large- diameter rockets, cylindrical tower structures, bulk storage tanks, and silos.

  7. Impacts of seawater saturation state (ΩA = 0.4-4.6) and temperature (10, 25 °C) on the dissolution kinetics of whole-shell biogenic carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, Justin B.; Ghazaleh, Maite N.; Connolly, Brian; Westfield, Isaac; Castillo, Karl D.

    2016-11-01

    Anthropogenic increase of atmospheric pCO2 since the Industrial Revolution has caused seawater pH to decrease and seawater temperatures to increase-trends that are expected to continue into the foreseeable future. Myriad experimental studies have investigated the impacts of ocean acidification and warming on marine calcifiers' ability to build protective shells and skeletons. No studies, however, have investigated the combined impacts of ocean acidification and warming on the whole-shell dissolution kinetics of biogenic carbonates. Here, we present the results of experiments designed to investigate the effects of seawater saturation state (ΩA = 0.4-4.6) and temperature (10, 25 °C) on gross rates of whole-shell dissolution for ten species of benthic marine calcifiers: the oyster Crassostrea virginica, the ivory barnacle Balanus eburneus, the blue mussel Mytilus edulis, the conch Strombus alatus, the tropical coral Siderastrea siderea, the temperate coral Oculina arbuscula, the hard clam Mercenaria mercenaria, the soft clam Mya arenaria, the branching bryozoan Schizoporella errata, and the coralline red alga Neogoniolithon sp. These experiments confirm that dissolution rates of whole-shell biogenic carbonates decrease with calcium carbonate (CaCO3) saturation state, increase with temperature, and vary predictably with respect to the relative solubility of the calcifiers' polymorph mineralogy [high-Mg calcite (mol% Mg > 4) ≥ aragonite > low-Mg calcite (mol% Mg < 4)], consistent with prior studies on sedimentary and inorganic carbonates. Furthermore, the severity of the temperature effects on gross dissolution rates also varied with respect to carbonate polymorph solubility, with warming (10-25 °C) exerting the greatest effect on biogenic high-Mg calcite, an intermediate effect on biogenic aragonite, and the least effect on biogenic low-Mg calcite. These results indicate that both ocean acidification and warming will lead to increased dissolution of biogenic

  8. An investigation of ab initio shell-model interactions derived by no-core shell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, XiaoBao; Dong, GuoXiang; Li, QingFeng; Shen, CaiWan; Yu, ShaoYing

    2016-09-01

    The microscopic shell-model effective interactions are mainly based on the many-body perturbation theory (MBPT), the first work of which can be traced to Brown and Kuo's first attempt in 1966, derived from the Hamada-Johnston nucleon-nucleon potential. However, the convergence of the MBPT is still unclear. On the other hand, ab initio theories, such as Green's function Monte Carlo (GFMC), no-core shell model (NCSM), and coupled-cluster theory with single and double excitations (CCSD), have made many progress in recent years. However, due to the increasing demanding of computing resources, these ab initio applications are usually limited to nuclei with mass up to A = 16. Recently, people have realized the ab initio construction of valence-space effective interactions, which is obtained through a second-time renormalization, or to be more exactly, projecting the full-manybody Hamiltonian into core, one-body, and two-body cluster parts. In this paper, we present the investigation of such ab initio shell-model interactions, by the recent derived sd-shell effective interactions based on effective J-matrix Inverse Scattering Potential (JISP) and chiral effective-field theory (EFT) through NCSM. In this work, we have seen the similarity between the ab initio shellmodel interactions and the interactions obtained by MBPT or by empirical fitting. Without the inclusion of three-body (3-bd) force, the ab initio shell-model interactions still share similar defects with the microscopic interactions by MBPT, i.e., T = 1 channel is more attractive while T = 0 channel is more repulsive than empirical interactions. The progress to include more many-body correlations and 3-bd force is still badly needed, to see whether such efforts of ab initio shell-model interactions can reach similar precision as the interactions fitted to experimental data.

  9. The shell organic matrix of the crossed lamellar queen conch shell (Strombus gigas).

    PubMed

    Osuna-Mascaró, Antonio; Cruz-Bustos, Teresa; Benhamada, Sana; Guichard, Nathalie; Marie, Benjamin; Plasseraud, Laurent; Corneillat, Marion; Alcaraz, Gérard; Checa, Antonio; Marin, Frédéric

    2014-02-01

    In molluscs, the shell organic matrix comprises a large set of biomineral-occluded proteins, glycoproteins and polysaccharides that are secreted by the calcifying mantle epithelium, and are supposed to display several functions related to the synthesis of the shell. In the present paper, we have characterized biochemically the shell matrix associated to the crossed-lamellar structure of the giant queen conch Strombus gigas. The acid-soluble (ASM) and acid-insoluble (AIM) matrices represent an extremely minor fraction of the shell. Both are constituted of polydisperse and of few discrete proteins among which three fractions, obtained by preparative SDS-PAGE and named 1P3, 2P3 and 3P3, are dominant and were further characterized. Compared to other matrices, the acid-soluble matrix is weakly glycosylated (3%) and among the discrete components, only 3P3 seems noticeably glycosylated. The monosaccharide composition of the ASM shows that mannose represents the main monosaccharide. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a high ratio of this sugar in a skeletal matrix. Furthermore, the ASM interacts with the in vitro crystallization of calcium carbonate, but this interaction is moderate. It differs from that of the isolated 1P3 fraction but is similar to that of the 2P3 and 3P3 fractions. At last, antibodies developed from the 3P3 fraction were used to localize this fraction within the shell by immunogold. This study is the first one aiming at characterizing the organic matrix associated to the crossed-lamellar structure of the queen conch shell.

  10. Synthesis and Characterization of Monodisperse Metallodielectric SiO2@Pt@SiO2 Core-Shell-Shell Particles.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Alexey; Lehmann, Hauke; Finsel, Maik; Klinke, Christian; Weller, Horst; Vossmeyer, Tobias

    2016-01-26

    Metallodielectric nanostructured core-shell-shell particles are particularly desirable for enabling novel types of optical components, including narrow-band absorbers, narrow-band photodetectors, and thermal emitters, as well as new types of sensors and catalysts. Here, we present a facile approach for the preparation of submicron SiO2@Pt@SiO2 core-shell-shell particles. As shown by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, the first steps of this approach allow for the deposition of closed and almost perfectly smooth platinum shells onto silica cores via a seeded growth mechanism. By choosing appropriate conditions, the shell thickness could be adjusted precisely, ranging from ∼3 to ∼32 nm. As determined by X-ray diffraction, the crystalline domain sizes of the polycrystalline metal shells were ∼4 nm, regardless of the shell thickness. The platinum content of the particles was determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy and for thin shells consistent with a dense metal layer of the TEM-measured thickness. In addition, we show that the roughness of the platinum shell strongly depends on the storage time of the gold seeds used to initiate reductive platinum deposition. Further, using polyvinylpyrrolidone as adhesion layer, it was possible to coat the metallic shells with very homogeneous and smooth insulating silica shells of well-controlled thicknesses between ∼2 and ∼43 nm. After depositing the particles onto silicon substrates equipped with interdigitated electrode structures, the metallic character of the SiO2@Pt particles and the insulating character of the SiO2 shells of the SiO2@Pt@SiO2 particles were successfully demonstrated by charge transport measurements at variable temperatures.

  11. Small bending and stretching of sandwich-type shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reissner, Eric

    1950-01-01

    A theory has been developed for small bending and stretching of sandwich-type shells. This theory is an extension of the known theory of homogeneous thin elastic shells. It was found that two effects are important in the present problem, which are not normally of importance in the theory of curved shells: (1) the effect of transverse shear deformation and (2) the effect of transverse normal stress deformation. The first of these two effects has been known to be of importance in the theory of plates and beams. The second effect was found to occur in a manner which is typical for shells and has no counterpart in flat-plate theory. The general results of this report have been applied to the solution of problems concerning flat plates, circular rings, circular cylindrical shells, and spherical shells. In each case numerical examples have been given, illustrating the magnitude of the effects of transverse shear and normal stress deformation.

  12. Preparation of aqueous core/silica shell microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Bean, Keith; Black, Camilla F; Govan, Norman; Reynolds, Paul; Sambrook, Mark R

    2012-01-15

    Water core/silica shell microcapsules are prepared via the hydrolysis and subsequent polycondensation of tetraethoxysilane in a surfactant stabilised water-in-oil emulsion. The relationship between preparative conditions, including pH and silane concentration, has been related to final particle structure. Furthermore, the nature of the catalyst has been found to affect the mechanism by which the shells are formed, with an interfacial polymerisation proposed for ammonium hydroxide catalysed synthesis in agreement with previous reports and a new colloidosome assembly process for sodium hydroxide catalysis. In both cases shell aging processes are observed to continue beyond initial shell formation suggesting that trans-shell diffusion of reactants may be feasible, or that rapid hydrolysis is required in order to load high concentrations of the reactants into the internal phase before significant shell formation.

  13. Cracked shells under skew-symmetric loading. [Reissner theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.

    1981-01-01

    The general problem of a shell containing a through crack in one of the principal planes of curvature and under general skew-symmetric loading is considered. By employing a Reissner type shell theory which takes into account the effect of transverse shear strains, all boundary conditions on the crack surfaces are satisfied separately. Consequently, unlike those obtained from the classical shell theory, the angular distributions of the stress components around the crack tips are shown to be identical to the distributions obtained from the plane and anti-plane elasticity solutions. Results are given for axially and circumferentially cracked cylindrical shells, spherical shells, and toroidal shells under uniform in-plane shearing, out of plane shearing, and torsion. The problem is formulated for specially orthostropic materials, therefore, the effect of orthotropy on the results is also studied.

  14. Nonobvious features of dynamics of circular cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leizerovich, G. S.; Taranukha, N. A.

    2008-04-01

    In the framework of the nonlinear theory of flexible shallow shells, we study free bending vibrations of a thin-walled circular cylindrical shell hinged at the end faces. The finite-dimensional shell model assumes that the excitation of large-amplitude bending vibrations inevitably results in the appearance of radial vibrations of the shell. The modal equations are obtained by the Bubnov-Galerkin method. The periodic solutions are found by the Krylov-Bogolyubov method. We show that if the tangential boundary conditions are satisfied "in the mean," then, for a shell of finite length, significant errors arise in determining its nonlinear dynamic characteristics. We prove that small initial irregularities split the bending frequency spectrum, the basic frequency being smaller than in the case of an ideal shell.

  15. Sound Transmission through a Cylindrical Sandwich Shell with Honeycomb Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Yvette Y.; Robinson, Jay H.; Silcox, Richard J.

    1996-01-01

    Sound transmission through an infinite cylindrical sandwich shell is studied in the context of the transmission of airborne sound into aircraft interiors. The cylindrical shell is immersed in fluid media and excited by an oblique incident plane sound wave. The internal and external fluids are different and there is uniform airflow in the external fluid medium. An explicit expression of transmission loss is derived in terms of modal impedance of the fluids and the shell. The results show the effects of (a) the incident angles of the plane wave; (b) the flight conditions of Mach number and altitude of the aircraft; (c) the ratios between the core thickness and the total thickness of the shell; and (d) the structural loss factors on the transmission loss. Comparisons of the transmission loss are made among different shell constructions and different shell theories.

  16. Shell Buckling Design Criteria Based on Manufacturing Imperfection Signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Nemeth, Michael P.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    An analysis-based approach .for developing shell-buckling design criteria for laminated-composite cylindrical shells that accurately accounts for the effects of initial geometric imperfections is presented. With this approach, measured initial geometric imperfection data from six graphite-epoxy shells are used to determine a manufacturing-process-specific imperfection signature for these shells. This imperfection signature is then used as input into nonlinear finite-element analyses. The imperfection signature represents a "first-approximation" mean imperfection shape that is suitable for developing preliminary-design data. Comparisons of test data and analytical results obtained by using several different imperfection shapes are presented for selected shells. Overall, the results indicate that the analysis-based approach presented for developing reliable preliminary-design criteria has the potential to provide improved, less conservative buckling-load estimates, and to reduce the weight and cost of developing buckling-resistant shell structures.

  17. Tailoring magnetic properties of core/shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Hao; Sun, Shouheng; Li, J.; Wang, Z. L.; Liu, J. P.

    2004-08-01

    Bimagnetic FePt /MFe2O4(M =Fe,Co) core/shell nanoparticles are synthesized via high-temperature solution phase coating of 3.5nm FePt core with MFe2O4 shell. The thickness of the shell is controlled from 0.5 to 3nm. An assembly of the core/shell nanoparticles shows a smooth magnetization transition under an external field, indicating effective exchange coupling between the FePt core and the oxide shell. The coercivity of the FePt /Fe3O4 particles depends on the volume ratio of the hard and soft phases, consistent with previous theoretical predictions. These bimagnetic core/shell nanoparticles represent a class of nanostructured magnetic materials with their properties tunable by varying the chemical composition and thickness of the coating materials.

  18. Shell shape as a biomarker of marine pollution historic increase.

    PubMed

    Márquez, F; Primost, M A; Bigatti, G

    2017-01-30

    Buccinanops globulosus is a TBT sensitive marine gastropod, classified as a good indicator of imposex incidence and used as a model to study adverse contamination effects. Population and maritime industries has incremented pollution in Nuevo gulf harbor since 1970s, promoting morphological changes in B. globulosus shell shape. We study the shell shape of the species comparing present day's specimens from the harbor zone with those collected in the same zone before the increasing of maritime activity and pre-Hispanic archaeological Middens. We demonstrated that harbor pollution produces globular shell shape in B. globulosus, an effect that probably allows gastropods to isolate themselves from the external adverse environment. On the contrary, shells from pre-Hispanic periods, unpolluted sites and those collected before the expansion of maritime activities, presented an elongated shell shape. Our study confirms that shell shape variation in marine gastropods can be used as a biomarker of harbor pollution.

  19. Modelling of the collision of two viscoelastic spherical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossikhin, Yury A.; Shitikova, Marina V.; Manh, Duong Tuan

    2016-11-01

    In the present paper, the collision of two viscoelastic spherical shells is investigated using the wave theory of impact. The model developed here suggests that after the moment of impact quasi-longitudinal and quasi-transverse shock waves are generated, which then propagate along the spherical shells. The solution behind the wave fronts is constructed with the help of the theory of discontinuities. Since the local bearing of the materials of the colliding viscoelastic shells is taken into account, the solution in the contact domain is found via the modified Hertz contact theory involving the operator representation of viscoelastic analogs of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio. The collision of two elastic spherical shells is considered first, and then using Volterra correspondence principle, according to which the elastic constants in the governing equations should be replaced by the corresponding viscoelastic operators, the solution obtained for elastic shells is extended over the case of viscoelastic shells.

  20. Gravitationally collapsing shells in (2+1) dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, Robert B.; Oh, John J.

    2006-12-15

    We study gravitationally collapsing models of pressureless dust, fluids with pressure, and the generalized Chaplygin gas (GCG) shell in (2+1)-dimensional spacetimes. Various collapse scenarios are investigated under a variety of the background configurations such as anti-de Sitter (AdS) black hole, de Sitter (dS) space, flat and AdS space with a conical deficit. As with the case of a disk of dust, we find that the collapse of a dust shell coincides with the Oppenheimer-Snyder type collapse to a black hole provided the initial density is sufficiently large. We also find - for all types of shell - that collapse to a naked singularity is possible under a broad variety of initial conditions. For shells with pressure this singularity can occur for a finite radius of the shell. We also find that GCG shells exhibit diverse collapse scenarios, which can be easily demonstrated by an effective potential analysis.

  1. Acoustic radiation from a shell with internal structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Raheb, M.; Wagner, P.

    1989-01-01

    A method is developed to compute frequency response and acoustic radiation of a complex shell. The axisymmetric geometry of the shell includes cylindrical, conical, and spherical segments stiffened by discrete rings and bulkheads. The shell is coupled to internal masses and elastic frames. Shell segments are treated by transfer matrices. Rings, bulkheads, frames, and concentrated masses are treated by impedances at junctions of segments. The shell is coupled to an external acoustic fluid treated by Green's function and curved surface elements. A major issue facing the method's treatment of the fluid would be lack of existence or uniqueness encountered in the uncoupled, external acoustic problem at characteristic wavenumbers. By using a simple spherical shell, without internal structures, this potential hindrance is shown not to arise. A fuller application of the method awaits subsequent results.

  2. Ground state energy fluctuations in the nuclear shell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velázquez, Víctor; Hirsch, Jorge G.; Frank, Alejandro; Barea, José; Zuker, Andrés P.

    2005-05-01

    Statistical fluctuations of the nuclear ground state energies are estimated using shell model calculations in which particles in the valence shells interact through well-defined forces, and are coupled to an upper shell governed by random 2-body interactions. Induced ground-state energy fluctuations are found to be one order of magnitude smaller than those previously associated with chaotic components, in close agreement with independent perturbative estimates based on the spreading widths of excited states.

  3. Core-shell magnetic nanowires fabrication and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalska-Szostko, B.; Klekotka, U.; Satuła, D.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, a new way of the preparation of core-shell magnetic nanowires has been proposed. For the modification Fe nanowires were prepared by electrodeposition in anodic aluminium oxide matrixes, in first step. In second, by wetting chemical deposition, shell layers of Ag, Au or Cu were obtained. Resultant core-shell nanowires structure was characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive x-ray. Whereas magnetic properties by Mössbauer spectroscopy.

  4. Exact and Finite-Element Analysis of Laminated Shells.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-01

    developed originally for thin shells, and are based on the Kirchhoff-Love kinematic hypothesis that plane sections normal to the unde- formed midsurface ...vector of a point in the shell Ri = principal radii of curvature; see Fig. I = position vector of a point on the shell midsurface 29 Sij = the mass...coefficients defined in Eqn. (30) Umn = amplitudes of displacement Ul; see Eqn. (25) ui = displacements of the midsurface u. = displacements of a point in

  5. Elastoplastic deformation of shells of revolution under nonaxisymmetric loading (review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merzlyakov, V. A.; Shevchenko, Yu. N.

    1999-05-01

    Problems of determination of the elastoplastic stress-strain state of shells of revolution under nonaxisymmetric force and heat loads are solved and the results are examined. The deformation characteristics of shells of revolution whose thickness varies in two directions are related using the theory of thin shells for plasticity problems. The mechanical effects are determined by the axial asymmetry of the loads, the thickness variability, and the functional dependence of stresses on deformation, temperature, and time.

  6. Rotordynamic Analysis with Shell Elements for the Transfer Matrix Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-01

    jACCESSION NO. 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) (UNCLASSIFIED) ROTORDYNAMIC ANALYSIS WITH SHELL ELEMENTS FOR THE TRANSFER MATRIX METHOD 12...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE AFIT/CI "OVERPRINT" iii ABSTRACT Rotordynamic Analysis with Shell Elements for the Transfer Matrix Method. (August...analysts in indus- try . ’ . ," Accesiu:, For NTIS CR,4i Fi FilC TA,: [3 0. fi A-1 B I ., ,.................. ,., ROTORDYNAMIC ANALYSIS WITH SHELL ELEMENTS

  7. WHAT IS THE SHELL AROUND R CORONAE BOREALIS?

    SciTech Connect

    Montiel, Edward J.; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Marcello, Dominic C.; Lockman, Felix J. E-mail: gclayton@fenway.phys.lsu.edu E-mail: jlockman@nrao.edu

    2015-07-15

    The hydrogen-deficient, carbon-rich R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars are known for being prolific producers of dust which causes their large iconic declines in brightness. Several RCB stars, including R Coronae Borealis (R CrB), itself, have large extended dust shells seen in the far-infrared. The origin of these shells is uncertain but they may give us clues to the evolution of the RCB stars. The shells could form in three possible ways. (1) They are fossil Planetary Nebula (PN) shells, which would exist if RCB stars are the result of a final, helium-shell flash, (2) they are material left over from a white-dwarf (WD) merger event which formed the RCB stars, or (3) they are material lost from the star during the RCB phase. Arecibo 21 cm observations establish an upper limit on the column density of H I in the R CrB shell implying a maximum shell mass of ≲0.3 M{sub ☉}. A low-mass fossil PN shell is still a possible source of the shell although it may not contain enough dust. The mass of gas lost during a WD merger event will not condense enough dust to produce the observed shell, assuming a reasonable gas-to-dust ratio. The third scenario where the shell around R CrB has been produced during the star’s RCB phase seems most likely to produce the observed mass of dust and the observed size of the shell. But this means that R CrB has been in its RCB phase for ∼10{sup 4} years.

  8. Graded core/shell semiconductor nanorods and nanorod barcodes

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Scher, Erik C.; Manna, Liberato

    2010-12-14

    Graded core/shell semiconductor nanorods and shaped nanorods are disclosed comprising Group II-VI, Group III-V and Group IV semiconductors and methods of making the same. Also disclosed are nanorod barcodes using core/shell nanorods where the core is a semiconductor or metal material, and with or without a shell. Methods of labeling analytes using the nanorod barcodes are also disclosed.

  9. Graded core/shell semiconductor nanorods and nanorod barcodes

    SciTech Connect

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Scher, Erik C.; Manna, Liberato

    2013-03-26

    Graded core/shell semiconductor nanorods and shapped nanorods are disclosed comprising Group II-VI, Group III-V and Group IV semiconductors and methods of making the same. Also disclosed are nanorod barcodes using core/shell nanorods where the core is a semiconductor or metal material, and with or without a shell. Methods of labeling analytes using the nanorod barcodes are also disclosed.

  10. Environmental effects on shell microstructures of Cerastoderma edule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milano, Stefania; Schöne, Bernd R.; Witbaard, Rob

    2015-04-01

    Bivalve shells serve as sensitive recorders of environmental conditions. However, reconstruction of a specific environmental parameter is still challenging. For example, variable shell growth rates simultaneously provide information on water temperature, food availability and food quality. Likewise, shell oxygen isotope values function as a dual proxy of water temperature and salinity (=oxygen isotope signature of the ambient water). Reconstruction of water temperature from δ18Oshell requires knowledge of δ18Oshell and vice versa. Unfortunately, the incorporation of trace elements in the shell is strongly controlled by biological effects and, hence, the element-to-calcium ratios of the shell are difficult to interpret in terms of environmental variables. Here, we studied if the structural properties (shell architecture, shell microstructures, fabrics) of the shell of the common cockle can function as an alternative proxy of environmental variables. Specimens of C. edule were collected alive from the intertidal zone of the North Sea. Temperature and salinity were monitored at the site where the shells lived on hourly basis for almost one year. Each portion of the shell was temporally contextualized with the tidally-deposited growth increments. Shell microstructures (composite prismatic structures) were analyzed under with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The change of the size and shape of the mesocrystals was strongly correlated to water temperature during the growing season (May - Sep.). With rising temperatures, the size of mesocrystals increased and their morphology changed from rounded to elongated shape. Our findings suggest that shell microstructures of C. edule may serve a new, independent proxy for water temperature.

  11. Graded core/shell semiconductor nanorods and nanorod barcodes

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Scher, Erik C.; Manna, Liberato

    2009-05-19

    Disclosed herein is a graded core/shell semiconductor nanorod having at least a first segment of a core of a Group II-VI, Group III-V or a Group IV semiconductor, a graded shell overlying the core, wherein the graded shell comprises at least two monolayers, wherein the at least two monolayers each independently comprise a Group II-VI, Group III-V or a Group IV semiconductor.

  12. Photosensitivity in feedlot calves apparently related to cocoa shells.

    PubMed

    Yeruham, I; Avidar, Y; Perl, S

    2003-10-01

    Primary photosensitization was observed in 11/78 cross-breed calves. The skin lesions were diffuse dermatitis with thickening and wrinkling with areas of alopecia. The severe photosensitivity dermatitis was associated with cocoa shell ingestion. The lesions resolved after removal of the cocoa shells from the feed ration and prevention of exposure to sunlight. Cocoa shells may contain photodynamic agents that cause photosensitization in calves.

  13. Evidence for variable crystallinity in bivalve shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, D. E.; Wehrmeister, U.

    2012-04-01

    Bivalve shells are used as important palaeoclimate proxy archives and monitor regional climate variations. The shells mostly exist of two crystalline polymorphic phases of calcium carbonate calcite (rombohedric) and aragonite (orthorhombic). Calcite is the most stable polymorph at standard conditions, whereas vaterite (hexagonal) is the least stable and only rarely found in these structures. Shells are characterized by organized structures and several micro architectures of mollusc shell structures have been identified: Nacre shows different types: columnar and bricked forms and consists of composite inorganic- organic at the nano-scale. They are well known to display a "brick and mortar" structure. By AFM and FIB/TEM methods it could be shown, that its nanostructure consists of the structures in the range of 50 - 100 nm [1, 2]. These structures are vesicles, consisting of CaCO3 and are individually coated by a membrane. Most probably, the mantle epithelian cells of the bivalve extrude CaCO3 vesicles. By Raman spectroscopic investigations the crystalline CaCO3 polymorphs calcite, aragonite and vaterite, as well as ACC were determined. For some species (Diplodon chilensis patagonicus, Hyriopsis cumingii) pure ACC (i.e. not intermingled with a crystalline phase) could be identified. The presence of an amorphous phase is generally deduced from the lack of definite lattice modes, whereas a broad Raman band in this region is to observe. In most of the cultured pearls (Pinctada maxima and genus Hyriopsis) the ν1-Raman band of ACC clearly displays an asymmetric shape and splits into two different bands according to a nanocrystalline and an amorphous fraction. The FWHMs of most of the crystalline fractions are too high for well crystallized materials and support the assumption of nanocrystalline calcium carbonate polymorph clusters in ACC. They are primarily composed of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) which is later transformed into a crystalline modification [3

  14. Delta Shell: Integrated Modeling by Example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donchyts, G.; Jagers, B.; Baart, F.; Geer, P. V.

    2011-12-01

    We present the integrated modeling environment Delta Shell. It supports the full workflow of integrated environmental modeling: setup, configuration, simulation, analysis and reporting of results. Many components of the environment can be reused independently, allowing development of scientific, geospatial and other applications focused on data analysis, editing, visualization and storage. One of the unique features is that the Delta Shell environment integrates models from many different fields, such as hydrodynamics, hydrology, morphology, ecology, water quality, geospatial and decision support systems. This integration is possible due to flexible general data types, lightweight model coupling framework, the plugin system and the inclusion of a number of high quality open source components. Here we will use the open source morphological model XBeach as an example showing how to integrate models into the Delta Shell environment. Integration of XBeach adds a graphical interface which can be used to make testing coastal safety for complicated coastal areas easier. By using this example, we give an overview of the modeling framework and its possibilities. To increase the usability, the model is integrated with a coastal profile data set covering the whole coast of the Netherlands. This gives the end user a system to easily use the model for scanning the safety of the Dutch coast. The reuse of the components of the environment individually or combined is encouraged. They are available as separate components and have minimal or no dependencies on other components. This includes libraries to work with scientific multidimensional data, geospatial data (in particular geospatial coverages: values of some quantities defined on a spatial domain), editors, visualisation of time-dependent data and the modeling framework (projects, data linking, workflow management, model integration). Most components and the XBeach example are available as open source.

  15. Offshore UK; Shell starts Galleon field pre-drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    Shell U.K. Exploration and Production (Shell), acting as operator for a consortium of companies, has described plans for the two-phase development of Galleon gas field, located 50 miles from the Shell/Esso gas processing plant at Bacton, Norfolk, in 82 ft of water. The field has estimated reserves of 1.4 Tcf. Phase 1 development will cost [Brit pounds]300 million ($500 million); and first production is expected in late 1994. British Gas has agreed to purchase at least Phase 1 gas. Shell will be the operator for the development. A preliminary costsharing arrangement has been agreed to by the co-venturers to bridge the period until equities are determined. The consortium comprises Shell and Esso, with 40% each, and Conoco (U.K.) Ltd. and Oryx U.K. Energy Co., each with 10%. The field is located in Shell/Esso Blocks 48/14, 19a and 20a, and Conoco/Oryx Block 48/15a. Galleon will be the sixth gas field to be developed in the Southern North Sea by Shell, the operator for Shell and Esso. It will be the third field in the Sole Pit area, where total reserves found by Shell/Esso are about 3.0 Tcf.

  16. Vibration of fluid-loaded hemi-prolate spheroidal shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisvert, Jeffrey E.; Hayek, Sabih I.

    2003-04-01

    The equations of motion for nonaxisymmetric vibration of hemi-prolate spheroidal shells of constant thickness were derived using Hamilton's principle. The shell is clamped at the equator and is excited by mechanical surface force fields. The shell theory used in this derivation includes shear deformations and rotatory inertias. The displacements and rotations were expanded in an infinite series of comparison functions. The shell is fluid-filled and is submerged in an infinite fluid medium. The external and internal fluid loading impedances were computed using expansions of prolate spheroidal wavefunctions in each domain. The dynamic response of the fluid-loaded shell was determined using an axisymmetric normal surface force as the excitation input. Numerical results were obtained for the driving and transfer mobilities for several shell thickness-to-length ratios ranging from 0.005 to 0.1, and for various shape parameters, ``a,'' ranging from an elongated hemi-spheroidal shell (a=1.01) to a hemispherical shell (a=100). Results are presented for various combinations of external and internal fluid loading, and comparisons are made to the in-vacuo shell vibration. [Work supported by ONR and the Navy/ASEE Summer Faculty Program.

  17. Vibration analysis of a large underwater shell of revolution

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuzawa, Y.; Kagawa, K.; Takahashi, H.

    1995-12-31

    This is the 2nd report on structural feasibility study of an underwater half drop shaped shell , the 1st one was reported in ISOPE`93. Dynamic characteristics of a large underwater shell of revolution are studied in the paper. Large rotational shell having optimum shape with respect to the hydrostatic pressure can be used for a storage of LNG or vessel of super conducting coil for power storage in the future. In this study, which is one of many structural feasibility studies for the shell, vibration characteristics of the shell are examined using numerical analysis, in which finite elements for the structure and boundary elements for surrounding water are used. Natural frequencies and modes of an underwater drop shaped shell are examined using a developed numerical code DASOR. The code was justified by comparison with other results of vibration analysis of a submerged cylindrical shell for various water levels. The added mass effect of the underwater drop shaped shell in each vibration mode is discussed and the ratio of modal mass of structure in water and in air in the lowest mode proved to be very large specially for axisymmetrical mode and horizontal lowest mode. A seismic response analysis of the underwater shell of revolution with the excitation coming from a horizontally moving seabed is performed numerically and statistically. The analysis using power spectrum density function provide with the responses of distribution of displacements, membrane stresses, and bending moments.

  18. A higher order theory of laminated composite cylindrical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishna Murthy, A. V.; Reddy, T. S. R.

    1986-01-01

    A new higher order theory has been proposed for the analysis of composite cylindrical shells. The formulation allows for arbitrary variation of inplane displacements. Governing equations are presented in the form of a hierarchy of sets of partial differential equations. Each set describes the shell behavior to a certain degree of approximation. The natural frequencies of simply-supported isotropic and laminated shells and stresses in a ring loaded composite shell have been determined to various orders of approximation and compared with three dimensional solutions. These numerical studies indicate the improvements achievable in estimating the natural frequencies and the interlaminar shear stresses in laminated composite cylinders.

  19. Microstructural characacterization of shell components in the mollusc Physa sp.

    PubMed

    de Paula, Silvia M; Silveira, Marina

    2005-01-01

    Shells of the freshwater, pulmonate snail Physa (Mollusca, Gasteropoda), ranging from 0.5 to 10 mm in length, were studied using scanning microscopy, x-ray analysis, and infrared spectroscopy. Results obtained suggest that the shell is composed of aragonite, which occurs in several distinct crystalline forms. A selective distribution of crystalline forms (hexagonal plates, prisms, rhombohedra, and spherulites) occurred along specific sites of the shell. A variable distribution of the forms was also detected in adult shells and in protoconchs of developing embryos. Qualitative elemental analysis, using an energy-dispersive spectrometer, corroborates the presence of calcium, phosphorus and sulphur ions.

  20. Current advances in precious metal core–shell catalyst design

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohong; He, Beibei; Hu, Zhiyu; Zeng, Zhigang; Han, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Precious metal nanoparticles are commonly used as the main active components of various catalysts. Given their high cost, limited quantity, and easy loss of catalytic activity under severe conditions, precious metals should be used in catalysts at low volumes and be protected from damaging environments. Accordingly, reducing the amount of precious metals without compromising their catalytic performance is difficult, particularly under challenging conditions. As multifunctional materials, core–shell nanoparticles are highly important owing to their wide range of applications in chemistry, physics, biology, and environmental areas. Compared with their single-component counterparts and other composites, core–shell nanoparticles offer a new active interface and a potential synergistic effect between the core and shell, making these materials highly attractive in catalytic application. On one hand, when a precious metal is used as the shell material, the catalytic activity can be greatly improved because of the increased surface area and the closed interfacial interaction between the core and the shell. On the other hand, when a precious metal is applied as the core material, the catalytic stability can be remarkably improved because of the protection conferred by the shell material. Therefore, a reasonable design of the core–shell catalyst for target applications must be developed. We summarize the latest advances in the fabrications, properties, and applications of core–shell nanoparticles in this paper. The current research trends of these core–shell catalysts are also highlighted. PMID:27877695