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Sample records for iyengari nematoda mermithidae

  1. Host Penetration and Emergence Patterns of the Mosquito-Parasitic Mermithids Romanomermis iyengari and Strelkovimermis spiculatus (Nematoda: Mermithidae).

    PubMed

    Sanad, Manar M; Shamseldean, Muhammad S M; Elgindi, Abd-Elmoneim Y; Gaugler, Randy

    2013-03-01

    Romanomermis iyengari and Strelkovimermis spiculatus are mermithid nematodes that parasitize mosquito larvae. We describe host penetration and emergence patterns of Romanomermis iyengari and Strelkovimermis spiculatus in laboratory exposures against Culex pipiens pipiens larvae. The mermithid species differed in host penetration behavior, with R. iyengari juveniles attaching to the host integument before assuming a rigid penetration posture at the lateral thorax (66.7%) or abdominal segments V to VIII (33.3%). Strelkovimermis spiculatus attached first to a host hair in a coiled posture that provided a stable base for penetration, usually through the lateral thorax (83.3%). Superparasitism was reduced by discriminating against previously infected hosts, but R. iyengari's ability to avoid superparasitism declined at a higher inoculum rate. Host emergence was signaled by robust nematode movements that induced aberrant host swimming. Postparasites of R. iyengari usually emerged from the lateral prothorax (93.2%), whereas S. spiculatus emergence was peri-anal. In superparasitized hosts, emergence was initiated by males in R. iyengari and females in S. spiculatus; emergence was otherwise nearly synchronous. Protandry was observed in R. iyengari. The ability of S. spiculatus to sustain an optimal sex ratio suggested superior self-regulation. Mermithid penetration and emergence behaviors and sites may be supplementary clues for identification. Species differences could be useful in developing production and release strategies.

  2. Release of Romanomermis iyengari (Nematoda:Mermithidae) to control Aedes taeniorhynchus (Diptera:Culicidae) in Punta del Este, Isla de la Juventud, Cuba.

    PubMed

    Santamarina Mijares, A; García Avila, I; Rivera Rosales, J; Solís Montero, A

    1996-07-01

    Preparasites of Romanomermis iyengari Welch were applied at the rate of 1,000 preparasites per square meter of surface area in 5 natural breeding sites in carbonate rock depressions to control Aedes taeniorhynchus Wiedeman larvae. Larval parasitism averaged 100, 97, 81, and 80% in 1-4 instars, respectively. Three of 5 sites produced parasitism in excess of 90%. The range of salinity and water depth had little influence on the levels of parasitism. Ae. taeniorhynchus density was reduced from 78 to 96% at the 5 sites 8 d posttreatment.

  3. Efficacy of a mermithid nematode Romanomermis iyengari (Welch) (Nematoda: Mermithidae) in controlling tree hole-breeding mosquito Aedes albopictus (Skuse) (Diptera: Culicidae) in a rubber plantation area of Kerala, India.

    PubMed

    Paily, K P; Chandhiran, K; Vanamail, P; Kumar, N Pradeep; Jambulingam, P

    2013-03-01

    In rubber plantations, tree holes are one of the major types of breeding habitats of Aedes mosquitoes which transmit dengue and chikungunya. A mermithid nematode, Romanomermis iyengari, was evaluated in tree holes for its efficacy in controlling Aedes albopictus. Infection of mosquito larvae by the nematode was determined through microscopic examination on the next day of application, and evaluation of immature density of mosquito was done on the seventh day. After application of the infective stage of the nematode in a host-parasite ratio of 1:3 or 1:4, the infection rates on the different larval instars of mosquito were similar, 85.7-95.8 % in first to third instars and 79.3 % in fourth instar larvae or 100 and 92.9 %, respectively. Parasite burden varied from 1.1 to 2.4, respectively, among first and third instar larvae applied at 1:3. At 1:4, the parasite burden was between 1.6 (fourth instar) and 4 (second instar). The increase in parasite burden due to parasite density was significant in all the larval instars (P < 0.05). High parasite burden is detrimental to parasite recycling as it can cause premature mortality of the host. Hence, the dosage of 1:3 could be considered as suitable for rubber tree hole habitats. In the nematode-applied tree holes, there was a significant level (P < 0.05) of reduction in the immature density of A. albopictus, especially late instars and pupae, confirming the efficacy of R. iyengari in infecting the mosquito and controlling pupal emergence.

  4. A Contribution to our Knowledge of the Mermithidae (Nematoda)

    PubMed Central

    Nickle, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    The genera of the insect parasitic nematode family Mermithidae axe reviewed, and 16 of them axe redescribed and illustrated. Information is given on methods of rearing adult mermithid specimens and on host specificity. The four types of merrnithid life cycles axe described in detail. One figure shows the variety of insects parasitized by merrnithids and the location and size of the nematode within the insect. Several mermithid eggs are illustrated, and their usefulness in identification is discussed. Taxonomically, the primary emphasis is on the adult stages of the merrnithJds with larval and egg characteristics supplementaxy. An emended family diagnosis is given. Merrnis subnigrescens is considered a synonym of M. nigrescens, and M. tahitiensis is synonymized with M. mirabilis. Hydromermis contorta is accepted, leaving the genus Paramermis in an uncertain position. Study of the Steiner collections of Limnornermis bathybia indicates that Limnornerrnis is accepted as a valid genus. The adults of Agamermis decaudata are descried and illustrated for the first time. The genus Gastromermis is limited to the long single-spiculed forms, as it is now apparent that five or more genera have ventrally shifted mouth orifices. Amphirnermis tinyi n. sp. is described from damselflies from Louisiana. The genus Lanceimermis is accepted, and three species in this genus are illustrated. The taxon Reesimermis nielseni has been accepted for this important parasite of more than 20 mosquito species. This nematode previously has been referred to as Romanomermis sp. Romanomermis iyengari is transferred to the genus Reesirnermis. Diximermis peterseni n. gen., n. sp., from anopheline mosquitoes, is described and iUustrated. The adults of Agamomermis culicis which parasitize Aedes sollicitans, are described for the first time, and the species placed in a new genus, Perutilimermis. The new genus Neornesornermis is proposed for Mesomermis flumenalis Welch, 1962. Several problems on mermithid

  5. Strelkovimermis spiculatus n. sp. (Mermithidae: Nematoda) Parasitizing Aedes albifasciatus Mac. (Culicidae: Diptera) in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Poinar, George O.; Camino, Nora B.

    1986-01-01

    Strelkovimermis spiculatus n. sp. (Mermithidae: Nematoda), a parasite of the mosquito Aedes albifasciatus Mac. in Argentina, is described. Diagnostic characters of this species include a ventrally shifted mouth opening and spicules fused at the tips. The mermithid has been reared on Culex pipiens L. larvae in the laboratory. PMID:19294184

  6. Gastromermis kolleonis n. sp. (Nematoda: Mermithidae), a Parasite of Midges (Chironomus sp. Chironomidae) from Argentina

    PubMed Central

    de Doucet, Maria M. A.; Poinar, George O.

    1984-01-01

    Gastromermis kolleonis n. sp. (Nematoda: Mermithidae) is described from the Arroyo Saldan River in Córdoba, Argentina. This species parasitizes midges of the genus Chironomus (Chironomidae: Diptera). It is distinguished from other members of the genus by the presence of six longitudinal chords, vulval flaps, degree of ventral displacement of the mouth, and size and shape of the spicule and amphids. PMID:19294020

  7. Agamermis (Nematoda: Mermithidae) Infection in South Carolina Agricultural Pests

    PubMed Central

    Stubbins, Francesca L.; Agudelo, Paula; Reay-Jones, Francis P. F.; Greene, Jeremy K.

    2016-01-01

    Native and invasive stink bugs (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) and the closely related invasive Megacopta cribraria (Hemiptera: Plataspidae) are agricultural pests in the southeastern United States. Natural enemies, from various phyla, parasitize these pests and contribute to population regulation. We specifically investigated Nematoda infections in pentatomid and plataspid pests in one soybean field in South Carolina in 2015. Nematodes were identified through molecular and morphological methods and assigned to family Mermithidae, genus Agamermis. This study reports mermithid nematode infection in immature M. cribraria for the first time and provides the first mermithid host record for the stink bugs Chinavia hilaris, Euschistus servus, and another Euschistus species, and a grasshopper (Orthoptera: Acrididae) in South Carolina. The same Agamermis species infected all hosts. The broad host range and prevalence suggests that Agamermis may be an important contributor to natural mortality of pentatomid and plataspid pests. Previous mermithid host records for the Pentatomidae and Plataspidae worldwide are summarized. Further work is needed to assess the impact of infection on populations over a broader range of agricultural fields and geographic localities. PMID:28154435

  8. Nematode (Nematoda: Mermithidae) and hairworm (Nematomorpha: Chordodidae) parasites in Early Cretaceous amber.

    PubMed

    Poinar, George; Buckley, Ron

    2006-09-01

    The present report describes a mermithid nematode (Nematoda: Mermithidae) and a gordiid hairworm (Nematomorpha: Chordodidae) from Early Cretaceous Burmese amber dated at 100-110 million years. The mermithid, Cretacimermis protus sp. n., is emerging from a biting midge (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) while the hairworm, Cretachordodes burmitis, gen. n., sp. n. had already emerged from its host. These rare specimens represent the first fossil mermithid parasite of a ceratopogonid midge and second oldest described nematode and the earliest known and only Mesozoic fossil of the phylum Nematomorpha. A list of previously described fossil mermithids is included.

  9. Allomermis solenopsi n. sp. (Nematoda: Mermithidae) parasitising the fire ant Solenopsis invicta Buren (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Poinar, George O; Porter, Sanford D; Tang, Sha; Hyman, Bradley C

    2007-10-01

    Allomermis solenopsi n. sp. (Mermithidae: Nematoda) is described from the fire ant Solenopsis invicta Buren (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in Argentina. Diagnostic characters of the new species include stiff and erect processes on the surface of the mature egg, small female amphids, extension of the latero-medial rows of male genital papillae beyond the middle rows, an obliquely truncate spicule tip and a ventrally swollen male terminus. This is the first record of Allomermis Steiner, 1924 from South America and the first host record for members of this genus. Previous records of mermithids from Solenopsis spp. are summarised. The placement in Allomermis was confirmed by molecular analyses based on nuclear 18S ribosomal DNA sequences, the first such molecular framework for the Mermithidae. The possible life-cycle of the parasite is discussed, with the aim of using A. solenopsi as a biological control agent for fire ants in the United States.

  10. Anomalomermis ephemerophagis n. g., n. sp. (Nematoda: Mermithidae) parasitic in the mayfly Ephemerella maculata Traver (Ephermeroptera: Ephermerellidae) in California, USA.

    PubMed

    Poinar, George; Walder, Larissa; Uno, Hiromi

    2015-03-01

    A new nematode, Anomalomermis ephemerophagis n. g., n. sp. (Nematoda: Mermithidae) is described from the mayfly Ephemerella maculata Traver (Ephermeroptera: Ephermerellidae) in California. The new species is characterised by six cephalic papillae and four additional disk papillae located on the head between the cephalic papillae and stoma. Additional diagnostic characters are: a terminal mouth opening; absence of X-fibers in the cuticle of both postparasitic juveniles and adults; paired, curved, medium-sized spicules; a straight barrow-shaped vagina and large eggs. Two infectious agents were present in some specimens. This is the first description of an adult nematode from a mayfly.

  11. The mermithid species Isomermis lairdi (Nematoda, Mermithidae), previously only known in Africa, found in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Gradinarov, Denis

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The present work contributs to the knowledge on the aquatic mermithids (Nematoda, Mermithidae) occurring in black flies – an insufficiently studied group of parasitic nematodes. Isomermis lairdi Mondet, Poinar & Bernadou, 1977, described from larvae of Simulium damnosum Theobald, 1903 in Western Africa, is reported to occur in Bulgaria. The species was isolated from larvae of Simulium ornatum Meigen, 1818 in a local population of simuliids in a mountain stream near Jeleznitsa Village, Sofia district. Postparasitic juveniles of mermithids were obtained from the hosts and reared to the adult stage. The species was identified by morphological and morphometrical characters of postparasitic juveniles, and of male and female individuals. In the summer of 2012 a relatively high rate of mermithid infection in a local host population was detected (prevalence up to 44.1%). In August of the next year host abundance had considerably declined and other simuliid species, Simulium variegatum Meigen, 1818 and Simulium reptans (Linnaeus, 1758), predominated in the investigated locality. In West Africa, Isomermis lairdi is considered to be a potential biological agent for reducing the population density of the Simulium damnosum complex – the main vector of human onchocerciasis. In Europe, species of the Simulium ornatum complex are among the vectors of onchocerciasis of cattle and deer. The mermithids presumably play a certain role in the epidemiology of these diseases. A brief discussion on the taxonomy of the genus Isomermis Coman, 1953, and of the feasibility of molecular methods in mermithid taxonomy is provided. The species Isomermis lairdi is reported for the first time from Europe. PMID:25493063

  12. New North American records of aquatic insects as paratenic hosts of pheromermis (nematoda : mermithidae).

    SciTech Connect

    Molloy, D. P.; Vinikour, W. S.; Anderson, R. V.; Environmental Assessment; New York State Museum; Western Illinois Univ.

    1999-07-01

    Several species of aquatic insects in Trout Park Nature Preserve (Elgin, IL) were observed to have small, black spots (<0.1 mm diameter) visible within their bodies. Microscopic examination revealed these spots to be coiled juveniles of a mermithid (Nematoda: Mermithidae). Based on host habitat (seepage areas and rivulets), host species (aquatic insects), and size (mean diameter of coiled juveniles = 79 {mu}m), it is likely that these mermithids were in the genus Pheromermis. Since adult mermithids were not found, species determination was not feasible, and the possibility of a new species cannot be ruled out. Pheromermis pachysoma and Pheromermis vesparum, however, are two species known to use aquatic insects as paratenic (i.e., transport) hosts in order to reach their definitive hosts, vespid wasps. Wasp larvae are infected by consuming the flesh of adult aquatic insects that contain the coiled juveniles of these Pheromermis spp. Of the 19 macroinvertebrate species examined in this study, Pheromermis juveniles were found in 4 caddisfly species (Hesperophylax designatus, Lepidostoma liba, Glossosoma intermedium, and Diplectrona modesta) and in 2 stonefly species (Clioperla clio and Amphinemura delosa). In addition to all 6 insect species being new host records for Pheromermis infection, this also represents the first report of nematode infection in stoneflies within the Western Hemisphere and of a Pheromermis sp. in Illinois. Among trophic groups, insect detritivores have been frequently recorded infected with coiled Pheromermis juveniles because of their direct consumption of eggs, and we also observed this for detritivores in our investigation (e.g., L. liba and A. delosa). Because C. clio was intensively infected, however, our study also provided evidence that predatory insects can be paratenic hosts. Coiled juveniles were typically present in muscle and fat body and present in almost all body regions. Not every infected paratenic host had external signs of

  13. Effects of insect growth regulators on the mosquito-parasitic nematode Romanomermis iyengari.

    PubMed

    Suman, Devi Shankar; Brey, Christopher W; Wang, Yi; Sanad, Manar; Shamseldean, Muhammed S M; Gaugler, Randy

    2013-02-01

    Pyriproxyfen, a juvenile hormone analogue, diflubenzuron, a chitin synthesis inhibitor, and azadirachtin, an ecdysone agonist, are three insect growth regulators (IGRs) considered as selective and effective insecticides for mosquitoes. Romanomermis iyengari (Welch) is a mosquito-parasitic mermithid that can provide biological control against many medically important mosquito species. The compatibility of these two control tactics was tested by evaluating the sublethal effects of exposure to IGR on nematode developmental stages (preparasitic, parasitic, and preparasitic + parasitic) using Culex pipiens larvae as the host. Sublethal concentrations of IGRs were 90 % emergence inhibition of host mosquito. Preparasitic exposure to pyriproxyfen, azadirachtin, and diflurbenzuron had no effect on infectivity, parasite load, sex ratio, or male size but reduced nematode female length and increased male sex ratio at one parasite/larva. When IGRs treatments were made against the parasitic and preparasitic + parasitic stages, pyriproxyfen and azadirachtin reduced R. iyengari infectivity, parasite load, and male nematode length, whereas pyriproxyfen exposure increased male sex ratio and reduced the female R. iyengari length. Thus, IGRs have significant negative impacts on different stages of mosquito mermithid that can destabilize the balance of host-parasite population interaction. Therefore, IGRs should be used with caution in mosquito habitats where these parasites have established.

  14. A new genus and species of mermithid (Nematoda) emerging from chironomid imagos eclosing from the Mississippi River headwaters area in northern Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Arthur A; Kleve, Maurice G

    2009-12-01

    Fibromermis roarki n. gen., n. sp. (Nematoda: Mermithidae) is described from the hemocoel of chironomid imagos of Ablabesmyia monilis (L.) eclosing from the headwaters of the Mississippi River at Gulsvig Landing in northern Minnesota in the summer of 2007. The new genus is described, distinguished from the most closely related tetrapapillate aquatic mermithid genus, and the new species described. Intensity and sex specificity of infection are recorded from 28 host adult chironomids of a single cohort. The new species represents the fourth tetrapapillate mermithid species described from the area and the third tetrapapillate genus.

  15. First record of a Mermithidae (Nematoda) from the meloid beetle Meloe violaceus Marsham, 1802 (Coleoptera: Meloidae).

    PubMed

    Lückmann, Johannes; Poinar, George O

    2003-05-01

    A new record of nematode parasitism of meloid beetles is reported and all earlier records are summarised. Rates of parasitism could be influenced by the toxic compound cantharidin that these beetles possess.

  16. Field application of Romanomermis culicivorax (Mermithidae: Nematoda) to control anopheline larvae in southern Iran.

    PubMed

    Zaim, M; Ladonni, H; Ershadi, M R; Manouchehri, A V; Sahabi, Z; Nazari, M; Shahmohammadi, H

    1988-09-01

    The efficacy of the parasitic nematode Romanomermis culcivorax in controlling anopheline larvae, including malaria vectors, was studied in Fars and Baluchistan provinces. Twenty sites were treated once with the preparastic stage of R. culicivorax in 1984 with 3,000, 5,000 or 10,000 preparasites per m2 surface area, depending on larval density. The average parasitism of anopheline larvae ranged from 56 to 69% based on 24 hr posttreatment dissections. No correlation was found between the level of parasitism and the density of mosquito larvae present in a site. About 61% parasitism was obtained when different rates of preparasites were released in 14 larval breeding sites in 1985. No apparent difference was observed in the rate of parasitism in 10 sites receiving one treatment compared with four sites receiving two treatments, with a seven day interval between each treatment. Romanomermis culcivorax was established in the release sites but caused only minor reductions in anopheline larval populations. The nematode would be of limited use in antimalaria campaigns in southern Iran.

  17. Divisispiculimermis mirus n. gen., n. sp. (Mermithidae: Nematoda) Parasitizing Midges in Córdoba, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Agüera de Doucet, María M.

    1986-01-01

    Divisispiculimermis mirus n. gen., n. sp., a mermithid parasitizing larvae of Chironomus sp. in the Cajón o Grande Stream, Córdoba, Argentina, is described. The new genus differs from all other mermithid genera in having paired spicules which are separated and divided into proximal and distal sectors. The other diagnostic characters of the genus are medium size, nematodes with the cuticle appearing smooth (lacking cross fibers under the light microscope); head separated from the rest of the body by a slight constriction at the level of the amphids, six cephalic papillae, mouth papillae absent, mouth opening posterior to level of cephalic papillae; six hypodermal chords at midbody; weakly S-shaped vagina; postparasitic juvenile with a tail appendage. PMID:19294174

  18. Thalassomermis megamphis n. gen., n. sp. (Mermithidae: Nemata) from the Bathyal South Atlantic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Tchesunov, A.V.; Hope, W. D.

    1997-01-01

    Thalassomermis megamphis n. gen., n. sp. (Mermithidae: Nemata) was extracted from sediment collected off the coast of Brazil at a depth of approximately 1,000 m. Although the food of this new nematode is unknown, the reduction of the stoma and esophagus and presence of a trophosome indicate that it is parasitic in its juvenile stages. Thalassomermis megaraphis n. gen., n. sp. is assigned to Mermithidae because of its similarity to that family in the appearance of the cephalic sensory receptors, the long and tubular vagina, and copulatory muscles of the male extending posteriorly throughout most of the length of the tail. Thalassomermis megamphis n. gen., n. sp. differs from all other members of Mermithidae by the large, lenticular, intracuticular amphidial fovea with coiled, emergent terminal filaments as well as the small amphidial aperture situated over the center of the fovea. PMID:19274181

  19. A new species of mermithid (Nematoda) in chironomids eclosing from a northern Minnesota bog.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Arthur A; Kleve, Maurice G

    2008-12-01

    Hydromermis haggardi n. sp. (Nematoda: Mermithidae) is described from the hemocoel of chironomid imagos eclosing from Lake Alice Bog in northern Minnesota in June and July 2007. The species is distinguished from the other 27 described members of the genus by the subventral mouth, tulip shape to anterior end of esophagus, colorless vesicular trophosome, single nonbifurcated spicule, short body lengths of both males and females, structure of the S-shaped vagina, decrease in body width at vulva, brevity of postparasitic stage, and the greater development of a posterior ventral protractor muscle in the males. An anomalous adult male bearing large oval structures in the posterior testis is reported. Evidence is presented for the developmental interaction of the new species with Lanceimermis palustris Johnson and Kleve, 2004.

  20. Reduction of malaria prevalence after introduction of Romanomermis culicivorax (Mermithidae: Nematoda) in larval Anopheles habitats in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, W.; Northup, J.; Gallo, O.; Montoya, A. E.; Montoya, F.; Restrepo, M.; Nimnich, G.; Arango, M.; Echavarria, M.

    1987-01-01

    The worldwide resurgence of malaria has become a major public health problem. New methods of controlling the vectors of the disease are required, and we therefore studied the biological control of Anopheles albimanus by Romanomermis culicivorax in Colombia. The investigation was carried out in El Valle and Nuquí, two towns on the northern Pacific coast of the country. All of the mosquito larval habitats surrounding El Valle were seeded with the eggs and adults of R. culicivorax. The nematode established itself in the new habitat and recycled over 27 months. The larval population of A. albimanus, the only malarial vector detected in the two towns, decreased in El Valle. In contrast, no change in the larval populations of the vector was detected in ponds located near Nuquí, the untreated control town. A rapid and progressive decrease of the prevalence of malaria among schoolchildren in El Valle was observed during the 2-year evaluation period. PMID:3499249

  1. Distribution and prevalence of Octomyomermis troglodytis (Nematoda: Mermithidae), a parasite of the western tree hole mosquito, Aedes sierrensis.

    PubMed

    Washburn, J O; Anderson, J R; Egerter, D E

    1986-09-01

    Octomyomermis troglodytis was found infecting Aedes sierrensis larvae in 14.5% of 165 tree holes sampled between 1982 and 1986. Mermithid infections were detected in tree hole waters that ranged in pH from 6.5 to 9.3 and electrical conductivities between 0.10 and 5.11 mmhos/cm. Third and fourth instar larvae were most frequently infected, and most immatures that succumbed to infections died while in the fourth instar. Most hosts contained only one nematode. Infected adults were obtained from emergence traps over tree holes, from field-collected immatures reared in the laboratory, and from mosquito collections from sentinel humans. Octomyomermis troglodytis escaped from adults into water vials in the laboratory, suggesting that infected adult mosquitoes serve as dispersal agents for this parasite.

  2. Nematodes (Mermithidae) parasitizing grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae) in the Pampean region, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Rusconi, J M; Camino, N B; Achinelly, M F

    2016-07-04

    This work provides the results of a survey of entomonematodes parasites of grasshoppers in grasslands of the Pampean Region, Argentina. Nymphs of Staurorhectus longicornis Giglio-Tos, Laplatacris dispar Rhen, 1939, Dichroplus elongatus Giglio-Tos, 1894 and Metaleptea brevicornis (L.) (Orthoptera: Acrididae) were collected. Mermithidae was the only family registered with seven species: Agamermis decaudata Cobb, Steiner and Christie, 1923, Amphimermis bonaerensis Miralles and Camino, 1983, Amphimermis dichroplusi Camino and Lange, 1997, Amphimermis ronderosi Camino and Lange, 1997, Hexamermis coclhearius Stock and Camino, 1992, Hexamermis ovistriata Stock and Camino, 1992, and Longimermis acridophila Camino and Stock, 1989. The values of parasitism ranged between 1-12%, and intensity not overcome the number of 5.0 nematodes per larva. The nematodes observed showed specificity, not registering the same species of parasite in more than one host species. The Pampean region constituted an area with high diversity of mermithids where new species could be consider as bioregulator agents of this troublesome insect pests in agricultural areas of Argentina.

  3. Mermithids (Nematoda: Mermithidae) parasitizing different blackfly (Diptera: Simuliidae) populations in Quebec: environmental parameters related to their presence or absence in the studied brooks.

    PubMed

    St-Onge, Mylène; Charpentier, Guy

    2008-09-01

    Specimens of Isomermis wisconsinensis, Gastromermis viridis, Mesomermis flumenalis, and Mesomermis camdenensis have been found in 14 out of 28 studied sites. Their hosts were the following blackfly species: Cnephia dacotensis, Cnephia mutata, Prosimulium sp., Simulium decorum, Simulium tuberosum, Simulium venustum/verecundum complex, and Simulium vittatum. Superparasitism was observed in several simuliid larvae and, occasionally, with 2 different mermithid species. The prevalence of different mermithid species varies according to seasons: Mesomermis genus is more abundant during winter, whereas Isomermis and Gastromermis are found in higher number during summer. The study of environmental parameters related to mermithid presence or absence shows that only stream depth makes a difference.

  4. Strelkovimermis rubtsovi n. sp. and Strelkovimermis ozawindibi n. sp. (Nematoda: Mermithidae) parasitizing chironomid (Insecta: Diptera) adults eclosing from northern Minnesota glacial lakes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Arthur A; Kleve, Maurice G

    2002-10-01

    Two new species of Strelkovimermis are described from chironomid imagoes eclosing from northern Minnesota glacial lakes. The 2 species are distinguished from the other 12 species in the genus by terminal mouths, rounded or nippled posterior ends, short buccal funnels, short terminal limbs of the S-shaped vagina, and presence of a bursal sleeve. Strelkovimermis rubtsovi n. sp. is distinguished from S. ozawindibi n. sp. by the presence of a dorsal protractor. Procladius (Psilotanypus) bellus (Loew) is the host of S. rubtsovi. The chironomid host of S. ozawindibi has not been determined. An artificial key is provided to distinguish the 14 species of the genus.

  5. High-pressure freezing and freeze-substitution fixation reveal the ultrastructure of immature and mature spermatozoa of the plant-parasitic nematode Trichodorus similis (Nematoda; Triplonchida; Trichodoridae).

    PubMed

    Lak, Behnam; Yushin, Vladimir V; Slos, Dieter; Claeys, Myriam; Decraemer, Wilfrida; Bert, Wim

    2015-10-01

    The spermatozoa from testis and spermatheca of the plant-parasitic nematode Trichodorus similis Seinhorst, 1963 (Nematoda; Triplonchida; Trichodoridae) were studied with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), being the first study on spermatogenesis of a representative of the order Triplonchida and important to unravel nematode sperm evolution. Comprehensive results could only be obtained using high-pressure freezing (HPF) and freeze-substitution instead of chemical fixation, demonstrating the importance of cryo-fixation for nematode ultrastructural research. The spermatozoa from the testis (immature spermatozoa) are unpolarized cells covered by numerous filopodia. They contain a centrally-located nucleus without a nuclear envelope, surrounded by mitochondria. Specific fibrous bodies (FB) as long parallel bundles of filaments occupy the peripheral cytoplasm. No structures resembling membranous organelles (MO), as found in the sperm of many other nematodes, were observed in immature spermatozoa of T. similis. The spermatozoa from the uterus (mature or activated spermatozoa) are bipolar cells with an anterior pseudopod and posterior main cell body (MCB), which include a nucleus, mitochondria and MO appearing as large vesicles with finger-like invaginations of the outer cell membrane, or as large vesicles connected to the inner cell membrane. The peripheral MO open to the exterior via pores. In the mature sperm, neither FBs nor filopodia were observed. An important feature of T. similis spermatozoa is the late formation of MO; they first appear in mature spermatozoa. This pattern of MO formation is known for several other orders of the nematode class Enoplea: Enoplida, Mermithida, Dioctophymatida, Trichinellida but has never been observed in the class Chromadorea.

  6. Molecular determinants archetypical to the phylum Nematoda

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Nematoda diverged from other animals between 600–1,200 million years ago and has become one of the most diverse animal phyla on earth. Most nematodes are free-living animals, but many are parasites of plants and animals including humans, posing major ecological and economical challenges around the world. Results We investigated phylum-specific molecular characteristics in Nematoda by exploring over 214,000 polypeptides from 32 nematode species including 27 parasites. Over 50,000 nematode protein families were identified based on primary sequence, including ~10% with members from at least three different species. Nearly 1,600 of the multi-species families did not share homology to Pfam domains, including a total of 758 restricted to Nematoda. Majority of the 462 families that were conserved among both free-living and parasitic species contained members from multiple nematode clades, yet ~90% of the 296 parasite-specific families originated only from a single clade. Features of these protein families were revealed through extrapolation of essential functions from observed RNAi phenotypes in C. elegans, bioinformatics-based functional annotations, identification of distant homology based on protein folds, and prediction of expression at accessible nematode surfaces. In addition, we identified a group of nematode-restricted sequence features in energy-generating electron transfer complexes as potential targets for new chemicals with minimal or no toxicity to the host. Conclusion This study identified and characterized the molecular determinants that help in defining the phylum Nematoda, and therefore improved our understanding of nematode protein evolution and provided novel insights for the development of next generation parasite control strategies. PMID:19296854

  7. Molecular determinants archetypical to the phylum Nematoda.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yong; Martin, John; Abubucker, Sahar; Wang, Zhengyuan; Wyrwicz, Lucjan; Rychlewski, Leszek; McCarter, James P; Wilson, Richard K; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2009-03-18

    Nematoda diverged from other animals between 600-1,200 million years ago and has become one of the most diverse animal phyla on earth. Most nematodes are free-living animals, but many are parasites of plants and animals including humans, posing major ecological and economical challenges around the world. We investigated phylum-specific molecular characteristics in Nematoda by exploring over 214,000 polypeptides from 32 nematode species including 27 parasites. Over 50,000 nematode protein families were identified based on primary sequence, including approximately 10% with members from at least three different species. Nearly 1,600 of the multi-species families did not share homology to Pfam domains, including a total of 758 restricted to Nematoda. Majority of the 462 families that were conserved among both free-living and parasitic species contained members from multiple nematode clades, yet approximately 90% of the 296 parasite-specific families originated only from a single clade. Features of these protein families were revealed through extrapolation of essential functions from observed RNAi phenotypes in C. elegans, bioinformatics-based functional annotations, identification of distant homology based on protein folds, and prediction of expression at accessible nematode surfaces. In addition, we identified a group of nematode-restricted sequence features in energy-generating electron transfer complexes as potential targets for new chemicals with minimal or no toxicity to the host. This study identified and characterized the molecular determinants that help in defining the phylum Nematoda, and therefore improved our understanding of nematode protein evolution and provided novel insights for the development of next generation parasite control strategies.

  8. The Evolution of Tyrosine-Recombinase Elements in Nematoda

    PubMed Central

    Szitenberg, Amir; Koutsovoulos, Georgios; Blaxter, Mark L.; Lunt, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Transposable elements can be categorised into DNA and RNA elements based on their mechanism of transposition. Tyrosine recombinase elements (YREs) are relatively rare and poorly understood, despite sharing characteristics with both DNA and RNA elements. Previously, the Nematoda have been reported to have a substantially different diversity of YREs compared to other animal phyla: the Dirs1-like YRE retrotransposon was encountered in most animal phyla but not in Nematoda, and a unique Pat1-like YRE retrotransposon has only been recorded from Nematoda. We explored the diversity of YREs in Nematoda by sampling broadly across the phylum and including 34 genomes representing the three classes within Nematoda. We developed a method to isolate and classify YREs based on both feature organization and phylogenetic relationships in an open and reproducible workflow. We also ensured that our phylogenetic approach to YRE classification identified truncated and degenerate elements, informatively increasing the number of elements sampled. We identified Dirs1-like elements (thought to be absent from Nematoda) in the nematode classes Enoplia and Dorylaimia indicating that nematode model species do not adequately represent the diversity of transposable elements in the phylum. Nematode Pat1-like elements were found to be a derived form of another Pat1-like element that is present more widely in animals. Several sequence features used widely for the classification of YREs were found to be homoplasious, highlighting the need for a phylogenetically-based classification scheme. Nematode model species do not represent the diversity of transposable elements in the phylum. PMID:25197791

  9. The evolution of tyrosine-recombinase elements in Nematoda.

    PubMed

    Szitenberg, Amir; Koutsovoulos, Georgios; Blaxter, Mark L; Lunt, David H

    2014-01-01

    Transposable elements can be categorised into DNA and RNA elements based on their mechanism of transposition. Tyrosine recombinase elements (YREs) are relatively rare and poorly understood, despite sharing characteristics with both DNA and RNA elements. Previously, the Nematoda have been reported to have a substantially different diversity of YREs compared to other animal phyla: the Dirs1-like YRE retrotransposon was encountered in most animal phyla but not in Nematoda, and a unique Pat1-like YRE retrotransposon has only been recorded from Nematoda. We explored the diversity of YREs in Nematoda by sampling broadly across the phylum and including 34 genomes representing the three classes within Nematoda. We developed a method to isolate and classify YREs based on both feature organization and phylogenetic relationships in an open and reproducible workflow. We also ensured that our phylogenetic approach to YRE classification identified truncated and degenerate elements, informatively increasing the number of elements sampled. We identified Dirs1-like elements (thought to be absent from Nematoda) in the nematode classes Enoplia and Dorylaimia indicating that nematode model species do not adequately represent the diversity of transposable elements in the phylum. Nematode Pat1-like elements were found to be a derived form of another Pat1-like element that is present more widely in animals. Several sequence features used widely for the classification of YREs were found to be homoplasious, highlighting the need for a phylogenetically-based classification scheme. Nematode model species do not represent the diversity of transposable elements in the phylum.

  10. The evolution of parasitism in Nematoda.

    PubMed

    Blaxter, Mark; Koutsovoulos, Georgios

    2015-02-01

    Nematodes are abundant and diverse, and include many parasitic species. Molecular phylogenetic analyses have shown that parasitism of plants and animals has arisen at least 15 times independently. Extant nematode species also display lifestyles that are proposed to be on the evolutionary trajectory to parasitism. Recent advances have permitted the determination of the genomes and transcriptomes of many nematode species. These new data can be used to further resolve the phylogeny of Nematoda, and identify possible genetic patterns associated with parasitism. Plant-parasitic nematode genomes show evidence of horizontal gene transfer from other members of the rhizosphere, and these genes play important roles in the parasite-host interface. Similar horizontal transfer is not evident in animal parasitic groups. Many nematodes have bacterial symbionts that can be essential for survival. Horizontal transfer from symbionts to the nematode is also common, but its biological importance is unclear. Over 100 nematode species are currently targeted for sequencing, and these data will yield important insights into the biology and evolutionary history of parasitism. It is important that these new technologies are also applied to free-living taxa, so that the pre-parasitic ground state can be inferred, and the novelties associated with parasitism isolated.

  11. A transcriptomic analysis of the phylum Nematoda.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, John; Mitreva, Makedonka; Whitton, Claire; Thomson, Marian; Daub, Jennifer; Martin, John; Schmid, Ralf; Hall, Neil; Barrell, Bart; Waterston, Robert H; McCarter, James P; Blaxter, Mark L

    2004-12-01

    The phylum Nematoda occupies a huge range of ecological niches, from free-living microbivores to human parasites. We analyzed the genomic biology of the phylum using 265,494 expressed-sequence tag sequences, corresponding to 93,645 putative genes, from 30 species, including 28 parasites. From 35% to 70% of each species' genes had significant similarity to proteins from the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. More than half of the putative genes were unique to the phylum, and 23% were unique to the species from which they were derived. We have not yet come close to exhausting the genomic diversity of the phylum. We identified more than 2,600 different known protein domains, some of which had differential abundances between major taxonomic groups of nematodes. We also defined 4,228 nematode-specific protein families from nematode-restricted genes: this class of genes probably underpins species- and higher-level taxonomic disparity. Nematode-specific families are particularly interesting as drug and vaccine targets.

  12. Helminth parasites (Cestoidea: Nematoda) of select herpetofauna from Paraguay.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chris T; Bursey, Charles R; Freed, Paul S

    2010-02-01

    Thirty-four amphibians (6 families, 12 species) and 28 reptiles (5 families, 16 species) from Paraguay were examined for helminths. Fifteen (44%) amphibians and 6 (21%) reptiles were found to harbor at least 1 species of helminth; 4 (12%) amphibians and 2 (7%) reptiles harbored multiple infections. Three species of Cestoidea and 17 species of Nematoda were found in the herptiles surveyed. Fourteen new host and 12 new locality records are documented, including the first report of the filaroid nematode, Macdonaldius grassi (Caballero, 1954) Chabaud and Frank, 1961, from South America.

  13. Euschistus servus (Say): A new host record for Mermithidae (Mermithida)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The brown stink bug complex (Euschistus spp.) and related hemipterans are key pests of cotton, and fruit and nut crops, affecting yield quality and quanitity. In an ongoing study assessing seasonal abundance of Euschistus servus (Say) (Hempitera: Pentatomidae) and related species in Central Texas, ...

  14. On the evolution of early development in the Nematoda.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, B

    2001-01-01

    The phylum Nematoda serves as an excellent model system for exploring how development evolves, using a comparative approach to developmental genetics. More than 100 laboratories are studying developmental mechanisms in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and many of the methods that have been developed for C. elegans can be applied to other nematodes. This review summarizes what is known so far about steps in early development that have evolved in the nematodes, and proposes potential experiments that could make use of these data to further our understanding of how development evolves. The promise of such a comparative approach to developmental genetics is to fill a wide gap in our understanding of evolution--a gap spanning from mutations in developmental genes through to their phenotypic results, on which natural selection may act. PMID:11604120

  15. Evolution of plant parasitism in the phylum Nematoda.

    PubMed

    Quist, Casper W; Smant, Geert; Helder, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Within the species-rich and trophically diverse phylum Nematoda, at least four independent major lineages of plant parasites have evolved, and in at least one of these major lineages plant parasitism arose independently multiple times. Ribosomal DNA data, sequence information from nematode-produced, plant cell wall-modifying enzymes, and the morphology and origin of the style(t), a protrusible piercing device used to penetrate the plant cell wall, all suggest that facultative and obligate plant parasites originate from fungivorous ancestors. Data on the nature and diversification of plant cell wall-modifying enzymes point at multiple horizontal gene transfer events from soil bacteria to bacterivorous nematodes resulting in several distinct lineages of fungal or oomycete-feeding nematodes. Ribosomal DNA frameworks with sequence data from more than 2,700 nematode taxa combined with detailed morphological information allow for explicit hypotheses on the origin of agronomically important plant parasites, such as root-knot, cyst, and lesion nematodes.

  16. Mating pheromones of Nematoda: olfactory signaling with physiological consequences.

    PubMed

    Leighton, Daniel Hw; Sternberg, Paul W

    2016-06-01

    Secreted pheromones have long been known to influence mating in the phylum Nematoda. The study of nematode sexual behavior has greatly benefited in the last decade from the genetic and neurobiological tools available for the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, as well as from the chemical identification of many pheromones secreted by this species. The discovery that nematodes can influence one another's physiological development and stress responsiveness through the sharing of pheromones, in addition to simply triggering sexual attraction, is particularly striking. Here we review recent research on nematode mating pheromones, which has been conducted predominantly on C. elegans, but there are beginning to be parallel studies in other species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. On the evolution of early development in the Nematoda.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, B

    2001-10-29

    The phylum Nematoda serves as an excellent model system for exploring how development evolves, using a comparative approach to developmental genetics. More than 100 laboratories are studying developmental mechanisms in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and many of the methods that have been developed for C. elegans can be applied to other nematodes. This review summarizes what is known so far about steps in early development that have evolved in the nematodes, and proposes potential experiments that could make use of these data to further our understanding of how development evolves. The promise of such a comparative approach to developmental genetics is to fill a wide gap in our understanding of evolution--a gap spanning from mutations in developmental genes through to their phenotypic results, on which natural selection may act.

  18. Potential Conservation of Circadian Clock Proteins in the phylum Nematoda as Revealed by Bioinformatic Searches

    PubMed Central

    Romanowski, Andrés; Garavaglia, Matías Javier; Goya, María Eugenia; Ghiringhelli, Pablo Daniel; Golombek, Diego Andrés

    2014-01-01

    Although several circadian rhythms have been described in C. elegans, its molecular clock remains elusive. In this work we employed a novel bioinformatic approach, applying probabilistic methodologies, to search for circadian clock proteins of several of the best studied circadian model organisms of different taxa (Mus musculus, Drosophila melanogaster, Neurospora crassa, Arabidopsis thaliana and Synechoccocus elongatus) in the proteomes of C. elegans and other members of the phylum Nematoda. With this approach we found that the Nematoda contain proteins most related to the core and accessory proteins of the insect and mammalian clocks, which provide new insights into the nematode clock and the evolution of the circadian system. PMID:25396739

  19. Potential conservation of circadian clock proteins in the phylum Nematoda as revealed by bioinformatic searches.

    PubMed

    Romanowski, Andrés; Garavaglia, Matías Javier; Goya, María Eugenia; Ghiringhelli, Pablo Daniel; Golombek, Diego Andrés

    2014-01-01

    Although several circadian rhythms have been described in C. elegans, its molecular clock remains elusive. In this work we employed a novel bioinformatic approach, applying probabilistic methodologies, to search for circadian clock proteins of several of the best studied circadian model organisms of different taxa (Mus musculus, Drosophila melanogaster, Neurospora crassa, Arabidopsis thaliana and Synechoccocus elongatus) in the proteomes of C. elegans and other members of the phylum Nematoda. With this approach we found that the Nematoda contain proteins most related to the core and accessory proteins of the insect and mammalian clocks, which provide new insights into the nematode clock and the evolution of the circadian system.

  20. An emerging example of tritrophic coevolution between flies (Diptera: Fergusoninidae) and nematodes (Nematoda: Neotylenchidae) on Myrtaceae host plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A unique obligate mutualism occurs between species of Fergusonina Malloch flies (Diptera: Fergusoninidae) and nematodes of the genus Fergusobia Currie (Nematoda: Neotylenchidae). These mutualists together form different types of galls on Myrtaceae, mainly in Australia. The galling association appear...

  1. Aprocta cylindrica (Nematoda) infection in a European Robin (Erithacus rubecula) in Britain.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Katie M; Harris, Eileen; Pocknell, Ann M; John, Shinto K; Macgregor, Shaheed K; Cunningham, Andrew A; Lawson, Becki

    2014-10-01

    A European Robin (Erithacus rubecula) found dead in England had marked blepharitis and periocular alopecia associated with Aprocta cylindrica (Nematoda: Aproctidae) and concurrent mixed fungal infections. Aprocta cylindrica should be considered a differential diagnosis in periocular abnormalities of robins and other insectivorous, migratory passerines in Western Europe.

  2. Teaching Population Growth Using Cultures of Vinegar Eels, "Turbatrix aceti" (Nematoda)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    A simple laboratory exercise is presented that follows the population growth of the common vinegar eel, "Turbatrix aceti" (Nematoda), in a microcosm using a simple culture medium. It lends itself to an exercise in a single semester course. (Contains 4 figures.)

  3. Mitochondrial genome diversity in dagger and needle nematodes (Nematoda: Longidoridae)

    PubMed Central

    Palomares-Rius, J. E.; Cantalapiedra-Navarrete, C.; Archidona-Yuste, A.; Blok, V. C.; Castillo, P.

    2017-01-01

    Dagger and needle nematodes included in the family Longidoridae (viz. Longidorus, Paralongidorus, and Xiphinema) are highly polyphagous plant-parasitic nematodes in wild and cultivated plants and some of them are plant-virus vectors (nepovirus). The mitochondrial (mt) genomes of the dagger and needle nematodes, Xiphinema rivesi, Xiphinema pachtaicum, Longidorus vineacola and Paralongidorus litoralis were sequenced in this study. The four circular mt genomes have an estimated size of 12.6, 12.5, 13.5 and 12.7 kb, respectively. Up to date, the mt genome of X. pachtaicum is the smallest genome found in Nematoda. The four mt genomes contain 12 protein-coding genes (viz. cox1-3, nad1-6, nad4L, atp6 and cob) and two ribosomal RNA genes (rrnL and rrnS), but the atp8 gene was not detected. These mt genomes showed a gene arrangement very different within the Longidoridae species sequenced, with the exception of very closely related species (X. americanum and X. rivesi). The sizes of non-coding regions in the Longidoridae nematodes were very small and were present in a few places in the mt genome. Phylogenetic analysis of all coding genes showed a closer relationship between Longidorus and Paralongidorus and different phylogenetic possibilities for the three Xiphinema species. PMID:28150734

  4. Nematoda from the terrestrial deep subsurface of South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgonie, G.; García-Moyano, A.; Litthauer, D.; Bert, W.; Bester, A.; van Heerden, E.; Möller, C.; Erasmus, M.; Onstott, T. C.

    2011-06-01

    Since its discovery over two decades ago, the deep subsurface biosphere has been considered to be the realm of single-cell organisms, extending over three kilometres into the Earth's crust and comprising a significant fraction of the global biosphere. The constraints of temperature, energy, dioxygen and space seemed to preclude the possibility of more-complex, multicellular organisms from surviving at these depths. Here we report species of the phylum Nematoda that have been detected in or recovered from 0.9-3.6-kilometre-deep fracture water in the deep mines of South Africa but have not been detected in the mining water. These subsurface nematodes, including a new species, Halicephalobus mephisto, tolerate high temperature, reproduce asexually and preferentially feed upon subsurface bacteria. Carbon-14 data indicate that the fracture water in which the nematodes reside is 3,000-12,000-year-old palaeometeoric water. Our data suggest that nematodes should be found in other deep hypoxic settings where temperature permits, and that they may control the microbial population density by grazing on fracture surface biofilm patches. Our results expand the known metazoan biosphere and demonstrate that deep ecosystems are more complex than previously accepted. The discovery of multicellular life in the deep subsurface of the Earth also has important implications for the search for subsurface life on other planets in our Solar System.

  5. Nematoda from the terrestrial deep subsurface of South Africa.

    PubMed

    Borgonie, G; García-Moyano, A; Litthauer, D; Bert, W; Bester, A; van Heerden, E; Möller, C; Erasmus, M; Onstott, T C

    2011-06-02

    Since its discovery over two decades ago, the deep subsurface biosphere has been considered to be the realm of single-cell organisms, extending over three kilometres into the Earth's crust and comprising a significant fraction of the global biosphere. The constraints of temperature, energy, dioxygen and space seemed to preclude the possibility of more-complex, multicellular organisms from surviving at these depths. Here we report species of the phylum Nematoda that have been detected in or recovered from 0.9-3.6-kilometre-deep fracture water in the deep mines of South Africa but have not been detected in the mining water. These subsurface nematodes, including a new species, Halicephalobus mephisto, tolerate high temperature, reproduce asexually and preferentially feed upon subsurface bacteria. Carbon-14 data indicate that the fracture water in which the nematodes reside is 3,000-12,000-year-old palaeometeoric water. Our data suggest that nematodes should be found in other deep hypoxic settings where temperature permits, and that they may control the microbial population density by grazing on fracture surface biofilm patches. Our results expand the known metazoan biosphere and demonstrate that deep ecosystems are more complex than previously accepted. The discovery of multicellular life in the deep subsurface of the Earth also has important implications for the search for subsurface life on other planets in our Solar System.

  6. Nematoda: genes, genomes and the evolution of parasitism.

    PubMed

    Blaxter, Mark L

    2003-01-01

    Nematodes are remarkably successful, both as free-living organisms and as parasites. The diversity of parasitic lifestyles displayed by nematodes, and the diversity of hosts used, reflects both a propensity towards parasitism in the phylum, and an adaptability to new and challenging environments. Parasitism of plants and animals has evolved many times independently within the Nematoda. Analysis of these origins of parasitism using a molecular phylogeny highlights the diversity underlying the parasitic mode of life. Many vertebrate parasites have arthropod-associated sister taxa, and most invade their hosts as third stage larvae: these features co-occur across the tree and thus suggest that this may have been a shared route to parasitism. Analysis of nematode genes and genomes has been greatly facilitated by the Caenorhabditis elegans project. However, the availability of the whole genome sequence from this free-living rhabditid does not simply permit definition of 'parasitism' genes; each nematode genome is a mosaic of conserved features and evolutionary novelties. The rapid progress of parasitic nematode genome projects focussing on species from across the diversity of the phylum has defined sets of genes that have patterns of evolution that suggest their involvement with various facets of parasitism, in particular the problems of acquisition of nutrients in new hosts and the evasion of host immune defences. With the advent of functional genomics techniques in parasites, and in particular the possibility of gene knockout using RNA interference, the roles of many putative parasitism genes call now be tested.

  7. A molecular evolutionary framework for the phylum Nematoda.

    PubMed

    Blaxter, M L; De Ley, P; Garey, J R; Liu, L X; Scheldeman, P; Vierstraete, A; Vanfleteren, J R; Mackey, L Y; Dorris, M; Frisse, L M; Vida, J T; Thomas, W K

    1998-03-05

    Nematodes are important: parasitic nematodes threaten the health of plants, animals and humans on a global scale; interstitial nematodes pervade sediment and soil ecosystems in overwhelming numbers; and Caenorhabditis elegans is a favourite experimental model system. A lack of clearly homologous characters and the absence of an informative fossil record have prevented us from deriving a consistent evolutionary framework for the phylum. Here we present a phylogenetic analysis, using 53 small subunit ribosomal DNA sequences from a wide range of nematodes. With this analysis, we can compare animal-parasitic, plant-parasitic and free-living taxa using a common measurement. Our results indicate that convergent morphological evolution may be extensive and that present higher-level classification of the Nematoda will need revision. We identify five major clades within the phylum, all of which include parasitic species. We suggest that animal parasitism arose independently at least four times, and plant parasitism three times. We clarify the relationship of C. elegans to major parasitic groups; this will allow more effective exploitation of our genetic and biological knowledge of this model species.

  8. Origins of the parasitic habit in the nematoda.

    PubMed

    Clark, W C

    1994-12-01

    Circumstances that probably attended and influenced the adoption and development of the parasitic habit amongst the Nematoda are examined. Features that allowed early terrestrial nematodes to exploit discontinuous habitats such as decomposing organic matter, are considered to have been advantageous to microbivorous Secernentea that became parasites of animals and plants. This development followed the appearance of a land flora and that the Amphibia were the first vertebrate hosts of nematodes. Life cycles involving intermediate hosts were essential in drier environments and in a aquatic ones where intermediate hosts preserve the infective stages; keeps them "in circulation", and makes them attractive to predators. It is concluded that the parasitic habit was adopted repeatedly in both Secernentea and Adenophorea, though the latter did not diversify as much. Convergence is a common feature of nematode evolution, and the typical life history pattern of 5 stadia separated by 4 moults is often greatly modified by suppression, extension and diversification of stages and their roles. There is a need to examine the nematodes, especially of invertebrates in the remaining rain forests of Gondwanaland before they disappear.

  9. Mitochondrial genome diversity in dagger and needle nematodes (Nematoda: Longidoridae).

    PubMed

    Palomares-Rius, J E; Cantalapiedra-Navarrete, C; Archidona-Yuste, A; Blok, V C; Castillo, P

    2017-02-02

    Dagger and needle nematodes included in the family Longidoridae (viz. Longidorus, Paralongidorus, and Xiphinema) are highly polyphagous plant-parasitic nematodes in wild and cultivated plants and some of them are plant-virus vectors (nepovirus). The mitochondrial (mt) genomes of the dagger and needle nematodes, Xiphinema rivesi, Xiphinema pachtaicum, Longidorus vineacola and Paralongidorus litoralis were sequenced in this study. The four circular mt genomes have an estimated size of 12.6, 12.5, 13.5 and 12.7 kb, respectively. Up to date, the mt genome of X. pachtaicum is the smallest genome found in Nematoda. The four mt genomes contain 12 protein-coding genes (viz. cox1-3, nad1-6, nad4L, atp6 and cob) and two ribosomal RNA genes (rrnL and rrnS), but the atp8 gene was not detected. These mt genomes showed a gene arrangement very different within the Longidoridae species sequenced, with the exception of very closely related species (X. americanum and X. rivesi). The sizes of non-coding regions in the Longidoridae nematodes were very small and were present in a few places in the mt genome. Phylogenetic analysis of all coding genes showed a closer relationship between Longidorus and Paralongidorus and different phylogenetic possibilities for the three Xiphinema species.

  10. Species of Angiostrongylus (Nematoda: Metastrongyloidea) in wildlife: A review.

    PubMed

    Spratt, David M

    2015-08-01

    Twenty-one species of Angiostrongylus plus Angiostrongylus sp. (Nematoda: Metastrongyloidea) are known currently in wildlife. These occur naturally in rodents, tupaiids, mephitids, mustelids, procyonids, felids, and canids, and aberrantly in a range of avian, marsupial and eutherian hosts including humans. Adults inhabit the pulmonary arteries and right atrium, ventricle and vena cava, bronchioles of the lung or arteries of the caecum and mesentery. All species pass first-stage larvae in the faeces of the host and all utilise slugs and/or aquatic or terrestrial snails as intermediate hosts. Gastropods are infected by ingestion or penetration of first-stage larvae; definitive hosts by ingestion of gastropods or gastropod slime. Transmission of at least one species may involve ingestion of paratenic hosts. Five developmental pathways are identified in these life cycles. Thirteen species, including Angiostrongylus sp., are known primarily from the original descriptions suggesting limited geographic distributions. The remaining species are widespread either globally or regionally, and are continuing to spread. Small experimental doses of infective larvae (ca. 20) given to normal or aberrant hosts are tolerated, although generally eliciting a granulomatous histopathological response; large doses (100-500 larvae) often result in clinical signs and/or death. Two species, A. cantonensis and A. costaricensis, are established zoonoses causing neurological and abdominal angiostrongliasis respectively. The zoonotic potential of A. mackerrasae, A. malaysiensis and A. siamensis particularly warrant investigation. Angiostrongylus cantonensis occurs in domestic animals, mammalian and avian wildlife and humans in the metropolitan areas of Brisbane and Sydney, Australia, where it has been suggested that tawny frogmouths and brushtail possums may serve as biosentinels. A major conservation issue is the devastating role A. cantonensis may play around zoos and fauna parks where captive

  11. Species of Angiostrongylus (Nematoda: Metastrongyloidea) in wildlife: A review

    PubMed Central

    Spratt, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-one species of Angiostrongylus plus Angiostrongylus sp. (Nematoda: Metastrongyloidea) are known currently in wildlife. These occur naturally in rodents, tupaiids, mephitids, mustelids, procyonids, felids, and canids, and aberrantly in a range of avian, marsupial and eutherian hosts including humans. Adults inhabit the pulmonary arteries and right atrium, ventricle and vena cava, bronchioles of the lung or arteries of the caecum and mesentery. All species pass first-stage larvae in the faeces of the host and all utilise slugs and/or aquatic or terrestrial snails as intermediate hosts. Gastropods are infected by ingestion or penetration of first-stage larvae; definitive hosts by ingestion of gastropods or gastropod slime. Transmission of at least one species may involve ingestion of paratenic hosts. Five developmental pathways are identified in these life cycles. Thirteen species, including Angiostrongylus sp., are known primarily from the original descriptions suggesting limited geographic distributions. The remaining species are widespread either globally or regionally, and are continuing to spread. Small experimental doses of infective larvae (ca. 20) given to normal or aberrant hosts are tolerated, although generally eliciting a granulomatous histopathological response; large doses (100–500 larvae) often result in clinical signs and/or death. Two species, A. cantonensis and A. costaricensis, are established zoonoses causing neurological and abdominal angiostrongliasis respectively. The zoonotic potential of A. mackerrasae, A. malaysiensis and A. siamensis particularly warrant investigation. Angiostrongylus cantonensis occurs in domestic animals, mammalian and avian wildlife and humans in the metropolitan areas of Brisbane and Sydney, Australia, where it has been suggested that tawny frogmouths and brushtail possums may serve as biosentinels. A major conservation issue is the devastating role A. cantonensis may play around zoos and fauna parks where

  12. Neuropeptide-like protein diversity in phylum Nematoda.

    PubMed

    McVeigh, Paul; Alexander-Bowman, Susan; Veal, Emma; Mousley, Angela; Marks, Nikki J; Maule, Aaron G

    2008-11-01

    This study reports the identification of nematode neuropeptide-like protein (nlp) sequelogs from the GenBank expressed sequence tag (EST) database, using BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool) search methodology. Search strings derived from peptides encoded by the 45 known Caenorhabditis elegans nlp genes were used to identify more than 1000 ESTs encoding a total of 26 multi-species nlp sequelogs. The remaining 18 nlps (nlp-4, -16, -24 through -36, -39, -41 and -45) were identified only in C. elegans, while the sole EST representative of nlp-23 was from Caenorhabditis remanei. Several ESTs encoding putative antibacterial peptides similar to those encoded by the C. elegans genes nlp-24-33 were observed in several parasite species. A novel gene (nlp-46) was identified, encoding a single, amidated dodecapeptide (NIA[I/T]GR[G/A]DG[F/L]RPG) in eight species. Secretory signal peptides were identified in at least one species representing each nlp sequelog, confirming that all 46 nematode nlp genes encode secretory peptides. A random sub-set of C. elegans NLPs was tested physiologically in Ascaris suum ovijector and body wall muscle bioassays. None of the peptides tested were able to modulate ovijector activity, while only three displayed measurable myoactivity on somatic body wall muscle. AFAAGWNRamide (from nlp-23) and AVNPFLDSIamide (nlp-3) both produced a relaxation of body wall muscle, while AIPFNGGMYamide (nlp-10) induced a transient contraction. Numerical analyses of nlp-encoding ESTs demonstrate that nlp-3, -13, -14, -15 and -18 are amongst the most highly represented transcripts in the dataset. Using available bioinformatics resources, this study delineates the nlp complement of phylum Nematoda, providing a rich source of neuropeptide ligands for deorphanisation of nematode neuropeptide receptors.

  13. Trypanoxyuris (Paraoxyuronema) lagothricis (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) in Lagothrix cana (Primates: Atelidae) from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Hudson Alves; Ferreira Junior, Francisco Carlos; Mati, Vitor Luís Tenório; Melo, Alan Lane de

    2013-01-01

    During necropsy of a specimen of Lagothrix cana (É. Geoffroy, 1812) (Primates: Atelidae) from the Brazilian Amazon, pinworms were found in the large intestine. The intensity of infection was 64 parasites (17 males and 47 females) and there were no gross pathological changes related to parasitism. After morphological analysis the parasites were identified as Trypanoxyuris (Paraoxyuronema) lagothricis (Buckley, 1931) (Nematoda: Oxyuridae). This is the first record of this oxyurid species in primates in Brazil.

  14. New species of kathlaniid (Nematoda: Cosmocercoidea) collected from hynobiid salamanders in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hideo; Nishikawa, Kanto

    2009-02-01

    Falcaustra odaiensis n. sp. (Nematoda: Cosmocercoidea: Kathlaniidae) is described from the Japanese clawed salamander, Onychodactylus japonicus (Houttuyn, 1782), and Ishizuchi salamander, Hynobius hirosei Lantz, 1931 (Caudata: Hynobiidae), in Japan. This nematode is characterized by having multiple pseudosuckers in the male. It resembles Falcaustra araxiana, Falcaustra duyagi, Falcaustra lambdiensis, Falcaustra pillaii, Falcaustra siamensis, and Falcaustra washingtonensis, but is readily distinguished by the spicule length and/or egg size. This is the first Falcaustra species described from Japanese salamanders.

  15. Two new species of Pharyngodonidae (Nematoda: Oxyuroidea) and other nematodes in Agama caudospina (Squamata: Agamidae) from Kenya, Africa.

    PubMed

    Bursey, Charles R; Goldberg, Stephen R

    2005-06-01

    Parapharyngodon kenyaensis n. sp. and Thelandros samburuensis n. sp. (Nematoda: Pharyngodonidae) from the large intestine of the agamid lizard (Agama caudospina) are described and illustrated. Parapharyngodon kenyaensis n. sp. is the 41st species assigned to the genus, and it differs from other species in that genus by possessing 3 pairs of caudal papillae, cloacal lip adornment, and spicules of 112-120 microm in length. Thelandros samburuensis n. sp. is the 31st species assigned to the genus, and it differs from other species in that genus by possessing swollen posterior annulations, 6 caudal papillae, a smooth anterior cloacal lip, and spicules of 43-52 microm in length. In addition to the 2 new nematode species, Abbreviata ortleppi (Nematoda: Physalopteridae) and Strongyluris ornata (Nematoda: Heterakidae) were found.

  16. New genus of Pharyngodonidae (Nematoda: Oxyuridea) and other helminths in Platymantis nexipus (Anura: Ranidae) from Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Bursey, Charles R; Goldberg, Stephen R; Kraus, Fred

    2009-06-01

    Rokroknema novaebritanniae n. gen., n. sp. (Nematoda: Pharyngodonidae) from the large intestine of Platymantis nexipus (Anura: Ranidae) is described and illustrated. Rokroknema represents the second Australo-Papuan genus assigned to the family Pharyngodonidae known to infect frogs. It is similar to Parathelandros (the other genus), but it is readily distinguished because the posterior pair of caudal papillae is not in the form of a rosette. Platymantis nexipus also was found to harbor 1 species of Digenea, Opisthioglyphe cophixali, and 5 additional species of Nematoda, adults of Aplectana krausi, Cosmocerca novaeguineae, Falcaustra batrachiensis, Icosiella papuensis, and larvae in cysts of Abbreviata sp., plus unidentified cystacanths of 1 species of acanthocephalan.

  17. Revision of the Australasian genus Fergusobia (Nematoda: Neotylenchida), with molecular phylogeny, and descriptions of clades and associated Fergusonina fly larvae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In a mutualistic association with Fergusonina flies, Fergusobia nematodes form galls on Myrtaceous hosts. The genus Fergusobia (Nematoda: Neotylenchida) is revised, an emended diagnosis of the genus is presented, and its putative phylogeny is discussed. There is molecular and morphological evidence ...

  18. New species of Spauligodon (Nematoda: Pharyngodonidae) in Lepidodactylus novaeguineae (Sauria: Gekkonidae) from Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Bursey, Charles R; Goldberg, Stephen R; Kraus, Fred

    2005-04-01

    Spauligodon zweifeli n. sp. (Nematoda: Pharyngodonidae) from the large intestines of a gecko, Lepidodactylus novaeguineae (Sauria: Gekkonidae), is described and illustrated. Prevalence of infection was 57% (mean intensity 8.5, range 1-23). Spauligodon zweifeli n. sp. is the 43rd species to be assigned to this genus and differs from other species in the genus by possessing asymmetrical fusiform eggs in which the ends are extended as digitiform processes. It is the second species to be described from the Australian biogeographical realm.

  19. A new Syphacia species (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) collected from Bunomys spp. (Rodentia: Muridae) in central Sulawesi, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Dewi, Kartika; Hasegawa, Hideo

    2010-02-01

    Syphacia (Syphacia) rifaii sp. n. (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) is described from endemic Bunomys chrysocomus and Bunomys prolatus (Rodentia: Muridae) on Sulawesi Island, Indonesia. The new species is closest morphologically to Syphacia (Syphacia) sulawesiensis , parasitic in Rattus xanthurus from Sulawesi Island, by having large vesicular lateral alae in males, but is readily distinguished by having a smaller body, a round cephalic plate in both sexes, the absence of lateral alae in females, a longer relative distance between excretory pore and vulva, and smaller eggs. Syphacia (S.) rifaii is surmised to be a specific parasite of Bunomys spp. and has evolved from a common ancestor with S. (S.) sulawesiensis on Sulawesi Island.

  20. New species of Parapharyngodon (Nematoda: Pharyngodonidae) in Rhinella marina (Anura: Bufonidae) from Grenada, West Indies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bursey, Charles; Drake, Michael; Cole, Rebecca; Sterner, Mauritz; Pinckney, Rhonda; Zieger, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Parapharyngodon grenadaensis n. sp. (Nematoda: Pharyngodonidae) from the large intestine of the cane toad, Rhinella marina, is described and illustrated. Parapharyngodon grenadaensis n. sp. is the 48th species assigned to the genus and the 16th species from the Neotropical region. It differs from other species in the genus by possessing 4 pairs of caudal papillae, an echinate anterior cloacal lip, and a blunt spicule of 67–104 μm. This is only the second report of R. marina harboring a species of Parapharyngodon.

  1. Cosmocercoides himalayanus sp. nov. (Nematoda, Cosmocercidae) in Duttaphrynus himalayanus (Amphibia, Anura) from Dehradun (Uttarakhand), India.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Anjum N; Bursey, Charles R

    2014-03-01

    Cosmocercoides himalayanus sp. nov. (Nematoda, Cosmocercidae) from the large intestine of Duttaphrynus himalayanus (Amphibia, Anura) from Dehradun, India is described and illustrated. Cosmocercoides himalayanus sp. nov. represents the 21st species assigned to the genus and the 9th species from the Oriental biogeographical region. Cosmocercoides himalayanus sp. nov. differs from the previously described Oriental species in number and position of rosette papillae; it is the only species possessing 24 or more rosette papillae to have 4 postcloacal papillae. In addition, a list of species assigned to Cosmocercoides is provided; however, C. fotedari Arya, 1992 is removed from the genus and until further study is considered a species inquirenda.

  2. HISTOPATHOLOGY OF GASTRIC WALL IN CHINESE ALLIGATOR ALLIGATOR SINENSIS INFECTED WITH ORTLEPPASCARIS SINENSIS (NEMATODA: ASCARIDOIDEA).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinhong; Wang, Shaosheng; Tu, Genjun; Zhou, Yongkang; Wu, Xiaobing; Li, Chaopin

    2015-09-01

    Crocodiles are susceptible to infection with a wide array of external and internal gastrointestinal helminths, yet little is known on the histopathology following infection or the effects of these parasites. The present study was aimed at evaluating the impact of infection by Ortleppascaris sinensis (Nematoda: Ascaridoidea) on the stomach of captive Alligator sinensis. The histological examination of the stomach revealed presence of superficial ulcer in mucous layer and granulomatous inflammation in submucous layer at entire gastric walls of the Alligator sinensis. Our findings also confirm that development of Ortleppascaris sinensis is in close association with the wall of the stomach. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  3. A new species of Thelastomathidae (Nematoda) a parasite of Neocurtilla claraziana Saussure (Orthoptera, Gryllotalpidae) in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Camino, Nora B; Maiztegui, Bárbara

    2002-07-01

    Gryllophila cephalobulata n. sp. (Nematoda, Thelastomatidae) a parasite of the mole cricket Neocurtilla claraziana (Orthoptera, Gryllotalpidae) isolated in Buenos Aires Province, is described and illustrated. It is characterized by cuticle annulated all along the length of the body; the first ring has 4 lobules, the second one has 14 lobules, the others rings are simple, the stoma is short and has 4 small teeth, the genital papillae are arranged in 5 pairs, of which 3 pairs are preanal and 2 pairs are postanal. The tail appendage of the male is long and filiform.

  4. A new species of Parapharyngodon (Nematoda: Pharyngodonidae) infecting Dermatonotus muelleri (Anura: Microhylidae) from Caatinga, Northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Araujo Filho, João A; Brito, Samuel V; Almeida, Waltécio De O; Morais, Drausio H; Ávila, Robson W

    2015-09-03

    Parapharyngodon silvoi n. sp. (Nematoda: Pharyngodonidae) is described from the large and small intestine of the Muller's termite frog Dermatonotus muelleri (Boettger, 1885) from the biome Caatinga, Exu municipality, Pernambuco State, Brazil, Dermatonotus muelleri is a fossorial species with a specialized termite diet, and feeding and reproductive behavior occurring only during the wet season. The new species is distinguished from other species of the genus Parapharyngodon by showing ovary not coiled around the esophagus, morphology of anterior cloacal lip, spicule size and number of caudal papillae.

  5. First report of parasitism by Ophidascaris robertsi (Nematoda) in a sugar glider (Petaurus breviceps, Marsupialia).

    PubMed

    Gallego Agúndez, Miguel; Villaluenga Rodríguez, Jose Enrique; Juan-Sallés, Carles; Spratt, David M

    2014-12-01

    Third-stage larvae of Ophidascarsis robertsi (Nematoda: Ascaridoidea) were found on necropsy in a female sugar glider, Petaurus breviceps (Marsupialia: Petauridae), two in heart chambers and one free in the peritoneal cavity. The animal was bred in captivity and had previous contact with Australian pythons captured in nature, which could be the source of the infection. The histopathologic diagnosis was intraluminal and perivascular pulmonary hemorrhage possibly due to the parasitosis. It is the first report of parasitism by O. robertsi in a sugar glider.

  6. New species of Parapharyngodon (Nematoda: Pharyngodonidae) in Rhinella marina (Anura: Bufonidae) from Grenada, West Indies.

    PubMed

    Bursey, Charles; Drake, Michael; Cole, Rebecca; Sterner Iii, Mauritz; Pinckney, Rhonda; Zieger, Ulrike

    2013-06-01

    Parapharyngodon grenadaensis n. sp. (Nematoda: Pharyngodonidae) from the large intestine of the cane toad, Rhinella marina, is described and illustrated. Parapharyngodon grenadaensis n. sp. is the 48th species assigned to the genus and the 16th species from the Neotropical region. It differs from other species in the genus by possessing 4 pairs of caudal papillae, an echinate anterior cloacal lip, and a blunt spicule of 67-104 μm. This is only the second report of R. marina harboring a species of Parapharyngodon.

  7. New species of Orientatractis (Nematoda: Atractidae), new species of Rondonia (Nematoda: Atractidae) and other helminths in Austrochaperina basipalmata (Anura: Microhylidae) from Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Bursey, Charles R; Goldberg, Stephen R; Kraus, Fred

    2014-03-01

    Two new nematode species, Orientatractis hamabatrachos sp. nov. and Rondonia batrachogena sp. nov. (Nematoda: Atractidae), from the gastrointestinal tract of Austrochaperina basipalmata (Anura: Microhylidae) collected in Papua New Guinea are described. Orientatractis hamabatrachos sp. nov. is characterized by the presence of the cephalic end armed with 4 wellsclerotized structures, consisting of 2 "horns" extending outward and downward and immediately below a single well-sclerotized spine. It differs from 5 congeners in spicule lengths and caudal papillae arrangements. Rondonia batrachogena sp. nov. is characterized by the presence of a female cloaca. It differs from 2 congeners primarily in body size. Orientatractis hamabatrachos sp. nov. and Rondonia batrachogena sp. nov. represent the first species assigned to either genus found to infect anurans or to occur in the Australo-Papuan region.

  8. Operon Conservation and the Evolution of trans-Splicing in the Phylum Nematoda

    PubMed Central

    Guiliano, David B; Blaxter, Mark L

    2006-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is unique among model animals in that many of its genes are cotranscribed as polycistronic pre-mRNAs from operons. The mechanism by which these operonic transcripts are resolved into mature mRNAs includes trans-splicing to a family of SL2-like spliced leader exons. SL2-like spliced leaders are distinct from SL1, the major spliced leader in C. elegans and other nematode species. We surveyed five additional nematode species, representing three of the five major clades of the phylum Nematoda, for the presence of operons and the use of trans-spliced leaders in resolution of polycistronic pre-mRNAs. Conserved operons were found in Pristionchus pacificus, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, Strongyloides ratti, Brugia malayi, and Ascaris suum. In nematodes closely related to the rhabditine C. elegans, a related family of SL2-like spliced leaders is used for operonic transcript resolution. However, in the tylenchine S. ratti operonic transcripts are resolved using a family of spliced leaders related to SL1. Non-operonic genes in S. ratti may also receive these SL1 variants. In the spirurine nematodes B. malayi and A. suum operonic transcripts are resolved using SL1. Mapping these phenotypes onto the robust molecular phylogeny for the Nematoda suggests that operons evolved before SL2-like spliced leaders, which are an evolutionary invention of the rhabditine lineage. PMID:17121468

  9. Operon conservation and the evolution of trans-splicing in the phylum Nematoda.

    PubMed

    Guiliano, David B; Blaxter, Mark L

    2006-11-24

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is unique among model animals in that many of its genes are cotranscribed as polycistronic pre-mRNAs from operons. The mechanism by which these operonic transcripts are resolved into mature mRNAs includes trans-splicing to a family of SL2-like spliced leader exons. SL2-like spliced leaders are distinct from SL1, the major spliced leader in C. elegans and other nematode species. We surveyed five additional nematode species, representing three of the five major clades of the phylum Nematoda, for the presence of operons and the use of trans-spliced leaders in resolution of polycistronic pre-mRNAs. Conserved operons were found in Pristionchus pacificus, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, Strongyloides ratti, Brugia malayi, and Ascaris suum. In nematodes closely related to the rhabditine C. elegans, a related family of SL2-like spliced leaders is used for operonic transcript resolution. However, in the tylenchine S. ratti operonic transcripts are resolved using a family of spliced leaders related to SL1. Non-operonic genes in S. ratti may also receive these SL1 variants. In the spirurine nematodes B. malayi and A. suum operonic transcripts are resolved using SL1. Mapping these phenotypes onto the robust molecular phylogeny for the Nematoda suggests that operons evolved before SL2-like spliced leaders, which are an evolutionary invention of the rhabditine lineage.

  10. A new metastrongyloidean species (Nematoda) parasitizing pulmonary arteries of Puma (Herpailurus) yagouaroundi (É. Geoffroy, 1803) (Carnivora: Felidae) from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Fabiano M; Muniz-Pereira, Luís C; de Souza Lima, Sueli; Neto, Antonio H A Moraes; Guimarães, Erick V; Luque, José L

    2013-04-01

    Angiostrongylus felineus n. sp. (Nematoda, Metastrongyloidea), parasitic in Puma (Herpailurus) yagouaroundi (É. Geoffroy, 1803) (Carnivora, Felidae) from the municipality of Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais state, Brazil, is described and illustrated herein. Angiostrongylus felineus n. sp. differs from all congeneric species by having the anterior extremity with accentuated cuticular expansion and by smaller size of spicules. This study describes for the first time a species of Angiostrongylus in a wild Felidae in Brazil.

  11. New species of Falcaustra (Nematoda: Kathlaniidae) in Nyctimystes cheesmani (Anura: Hylidae) from Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Bursey, Charles R; Goldberg, Stephen R; Kraus, Fred

    2009-02-01

    Falcaustra batrachiensis n. sp. (Ascaridida, Kathlaniidae) from the large intestine of Nyctimystes cheesmani (Anura, Hylidae) is described and illustrated. Falcaustra batrachiensis represents the fifth Australo-Papuan species assigned to the genus and is distinguished from other Australo-Papuan species by the distribution pattern of the caudal papillae (8 precloacal, 2 adcloacal, 6 postcloacal, and 1 median), length of spicules (1.4-1.6 mm) and presence of pseudosuckers (5 or 6). Nyctimystes cheesmani was found to harbor 7 additional species of Nematoda, adults of Cosmocerca novaeguineae, Maxvachonia ewersi, Meteterakis crombiei, Physalopteroides milnensis, Pseudorictularia dipsarilis, Seuratascaris numidica, larvae in cysts of Abbreviata sp., and 1 species of Acanthocephala, Acanthocephalus bufonis. Nyctimystes cheesmani represents a new host record for each of these helminth species.

  12. Ancylostoma (Ancylostoma) buckleyi (Nematoda: Ancylostomatidae): new wild host and distribution expansion.

    PubMed

    Scioscia, Nathalia Paula; Beldomenico, Pablo Martín; Denegri, Guillermo María

    2016-06-07

    Here we report the occurrence of Ancylostoma (Ancylostoma) buckleyi (Le Roux and Biocca, 1957) (Nematoda: Ancylostomatidae) in the small intestine of Pampas foxes (Lycalopex gymnocercus) (Mammalia: Canidae). This fox is the most abundant native carnivore in southern South America, where it inhabits grasslands, open woodlands and areas highly modified by extensive ranching and agricultural activities. Material from 80 foxes in rural areas of southern Buenos Aires province, Argentina was examined. The intestinal tracts were carefully removed from each carcass and subsequently isolated by ligatures (pylorus and rectum). Examination of the intestinal content was performed using the sedimentation and counting technique. Four foxes (5%) were found to be parasitized with adult specimens of A. buckleyi. This is the first report of Ancylostoma (A.) buckleyi in Argentina and adds L. gymnocercus as new host of this nematode species.

  13. Microtopography of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis (Nematoda: Heligmosomatidae): free-living larval stages.

    PubMed

    Nembo, B; Goudey-Perriere, F; Gayral, P; Perriere, C; Brousse-Gaury, P

    1993-09-01

    Microtopographic features of the various growth stages of the three free-living larval stages of the rat hookworm Nippostrongylus brasiliensis (Nematoda) were surveyed by scanning electron microscopy. These worms have a rounded anterior end and an elongated tail. Cuticular annulations were observed along the body, which also bore two ribbon-like lateral alae. Two rings of six lip-like lappets were observed around the triradiate oral opening in all larval stages. The cephalic space contained two lateral amphidial pits. The excretory pore in the third anterior part was observed in a ventral view of the larvae. No deirids were observed. The anus with a crescent-shape opening was located posteriorly. Phasmidial apertures, only observed in the third-stage larvae, opened on the lateral alae in the tail region.

  14. On a new species of Aplectana (Nematoda, Cosmocercidae) from Kulti, Burdwan, West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Sou, Sujan K; Sow, Kanchan K; Nandi, Anadi P

    2014-10-01

    During routine survey for amphibian nematodes from coalfield areas of West Bengal, India 7 male and 12 female nematodes were recovered from the rectum of one out of three Duttaphrynus melanostictus (Schneider, 1899) examined for helminth infection from Kulti, Burdwan. On examination the recovered nematodes were found to belong to a new species of the genus Aplectana (Nematoda: Cosmocercidae) and the name Aplectana duttaphryni sp. nov. is proposed for them. This species is most similar to those species which possess gubernaculum but differs from all by distribution pattern of caudal papillae. Aplectana duttaphryni sp. nov. represents 49(th) species assigned to the genus, but only the 4(th) species reported from Oriental realm and second from India.

  15. Two new species of Trichuris (Nematoda: Trichuridae) collected from endemic murines of Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hideo; Dewi, Kartika

    2017-04-12

    Two new species of the genus Trichuris (Nematoda: Trichuridae) parasitic in the old endemic murids of Indonesia are described: T. musseri sp. nov. from Echiothrix centrosa (Murinae: Rattini) in Sulawesi and T. mallomyos sp. nov. from Mallomys rothschildi (Murinae: Hydromyini) in Papua Indonesia. Both species are characterized by having a gradually tapered and sharply pointed distal end of the spicule, being readily distinguished from most of the congeners known from murid rodents. Trichuris musseri is readily distinguished from T. mallomyos by having a much smaller body and large number of nuclei per subdivision of stichosome. The resemblance in spicule morphology between the two new species is of special interest because both hosts belong to different tribes and have different habitats and habits. It remains to be elucidated whether the resemblance is merely homoplasy or actually reflects close phylogenetic relationship of the parasites.

  16. First record of Bourgelatia diducta (Nematoda: Chabertiidae) from wild boars in the Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Kyu-Sung; Oh, Dae-Sung; Ahn, Ah-Jin; Suh, Guk-Hyun; Shin, Sung-Shik

    2013-08-01

    This study describes the first record of Bourgelatia diducta (Nematoda: Chabertiidae) from wild boars in the Republic of Korea (=South Korea). Gastrointestinal tracts of 87 Korean wild boars (Sus scrofa coreanus) hunted in mountains in the south-western part of South Korea between 2009 and 2012 were examined for their visceral helminths. B. diducta, as identified by morphological characteristics of the head and tail, were recovered from the large intestine of 47 (54%) wild boars. The average length of adult female worms was 11.3±0.87 mm and the thickest part of the body measured 0.54±0.04 mm in maximum width, while those of males were 9.8±0.72 and 0.45±0.03 mm, respectively. The characteristic J-shaped type II ovejector was observed in females, and the type II dorsal ray with 2 rami on each side of the median fissure was uniquely seen in males. The buccal capsule was small, relatively thin-walled, cylindrical, very short, and ring-shaped. The externodorsal ray arose from a common stem with the dorsal ray. The cervical groove was absent. The anterior extremity was equipped with 20-22 external corona radiata, 4 cephalic papillae and 2 lateral amphids around the mouth. The eggs were 66.0×38.9 µm in average size. By the present study, B. diducta (Nematoda: Chabertiidae) is recorded for the first time in South Korea. Additionally, morphological characteristics and identification keys provided in the present study will be helpful in the faunistic or taxonomic studies for strongylid nematodes related.

  17. On the Extent and Origins of Genic Novelty in the Phylum Nematoda

    PubMed Central

    Wasmuth, James; Schmid, Ralf; Hedley, Ann; Blaxter, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Background The phylum Nematoda is biologically diverse, including parasites of plants and animals as well as free-living taxa. Underpinning this diversity will be commensurate diversity in expressed genes, including gene sets associated specifically with evolution of parasitism. Methods and Findings Here we have analyzed the extensive expressed sequence tag data (available for 37 nematode species, most of which are parasites) and define over 120,000 distinct putative genes from which we have derived robust protein translations. Combined with the complete proteomes of Caenorhabditis elegans and Caenorhabditis briggsae, these proteins have been grouped into 65,000 protein families that in turn contain 40,000 distinct protein domains. We have mapped the occurrence of domains and families across the Nematoda and compared the nematode data to that available for other phyla. Gene loss is common, and in particular we identify nearly 5,000 genes that may have been lost from the lineage leading to the model nematode C. elegans. We find a preponderance of novelty, including 56,000 nematode-restricted protein families and 26,000 nematode-restricted domains. Mapping of the latest time-of-origin of these new families and domains across the nematode phylogeny revealed ongoing evolution of novelty. A number of genes from parasitic species had signatures of horizontal transfer from their host organisms, and parasitic species had a greater proportion of novel, secreted proteins than did free-living ones. Conclusions These classes of genes may underpin parasitic phenotypes, and thus may be targets for development of effective control measures. PMID:18596977

  18. The genome of Romanomermis culicivorax: revealing fundamental changes in the core developmental genetic toolkit in Nematoda

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The genetics of development in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been described in exquisite detail. The phylum Nematoda has two classes: Chromadorea (which includes C. elegans) and the Enoplea. While the development of many chromadorean species resembles closely that of C. elegans, enoplean nematodes show markedly different patterns of early cell division and cell fate assignment. Embryogenesis of the enoplean Romanomermis culicivorax has been studied in detail, but the genetic circuitry underpinning development in this species has not been explored. Results We generated a draft genome for R. culicivorax and compared its gene content with that of C. elegans, a second enoplean, the vertebrate parasite Trichinella spiralis, and a representative arthropod, Tribolium castaneum. This comparison revealed that R. culicivorax has retained components of the conserved ecdysozoan developmental gene toolkit lost in C. elegans. T. spiralis has independently lost even more of this toolkit than has C. elegans. However, the C. elegans toolkit is not simply depauperate, as many novel genes essential for embryogenesis in C. elegans are not found in, or have only extremely divergent homologues in R. culicivorax and T. spiralis. Our data imply fundamental differences in the genetic programmes not only for early cell specification but also others such as vulva formation and sex determination. Conclusions Despite the apparent morphological conservatism, major differences in the molecular logic of development have evolved within the phylum Nematoda. R. culicivorax serves as a tractable system to contrast C. elegans and understand how divergent genomic and thus regulatory backgrounds nevertheless generate a conserved phenotype. The R. culicivorax draft genome will promote use of this species as a research model. PMID:24373391

  19. First Record of Bourgelatia diducta (Nematoda: Chabertiidae) from Wild Boars in the Republic of Korea

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Kyu-Sung; Oh, Dae-Sung; Ahn, Ah-Jin; Suh, Guk-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the first record of Bourgelatia diducta (Nematoda: Chabertiidae) from wild boars in the Republic of Korea (=South Korea). Gastrointestinal tracts of 87 Korean wild boars (Sus scrofa coreanus) hunted in mountains in the south-western part of South Korea between 2009 and 2012 were examined for their visceral helminths. B. diducta, as identified by morphological characteristics of the head and tail, were recovered from the large intestine of 47 (54%) wild boars. The average length of adult female worms was 11.3±0.87 mm and the thickest part of the body measured 0.54±0.04 mm in maximum width, while those of males were 9.8±0.72 and 0.45±0.03 mm, respectively. The characteristic J-shaped type II ovejector was observed in females, and the type II dorsal ray with 2 rami on each side of the median fissure was uniquely seen in males. The buccal capsule was small, relatively thin-walled, cylindrical, very short, and ring-shaped. The externodorsal ray arose from a common stem with the dorsal ray. The cervical groove was absent. The anterior extremity was equipped with 20-22 external corona radiata, 4 cephalic papillae and 2 lateral amphids around the mouth. The eggs were 66.0×38.9 µm in average size. By the present study, B. diducta (Nematoda: Chabertiidae) is recorded for the first time in South Korea. Additionally, morphological characteristics and identification keys provided in the present study will be helpful in the faunistic or taxonomic studies for strongylid nematodes related. PMID:24039287

  20. The genome of Romanomermis culicivorax: revealing fundamental changes in the core developmental genetic toolkit in Nematoda.

    PubMed

    Schiffer, Philipp H; Kroiher, Michael; Kraus, Christopher; Koutsovoulos, Georgios D; Kumar, Sujai; Camps, Julia I R; Nsah, Ndifon A; Stappert, Dominik; Morris, Krystalynne; Heger, Peter; Altmüller, Janine; Frommolt, Peter; Nürnberg, Peter; Thomas, W Kelley; Blaxter, Mark L; Schierenberg, Einhard

    2013-12-27

    The genetics of development in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been described in exquisite detail. The phylum Nematoda has two classes: Chromadorea (which includes C. elegans) and the Enoplea. While the development of many chromadorean species resembles closely that of C. elegans, enoplean nematodes show markedly different patterns of early cell division and cell fate assignment. Embryogenesis of the enoplean Romanomermis culicivorax has been studied in detail, but the genetic circuitry underpinning development in this species has not been explored. We generated a draft genome for R. culicivorax and compared its gene content with that of C. elegans, a second enoplean, the vertebrate parasite Trichinella spiralis, and a representative arthropod, Tribolium castaneum. This comparison revealed that R. culicivorax has retained components of the conserved ecdysozoan developmental gene toolkit lost in C. elegans. T. spiralis has independently lost even more of this toolkit than has C. elegans. However, the C. elegans toolkit is not simply depauperate, as many novel genes essential for embryogenesis in C. elegans are not found in, or have only extremely divergent homologues in R. culicivorax and T. spiralis. Our data imply fundamental differences in the genetic programmes not only for early cell specification but also others such as vulva formation and sex determination. Despite the apparent morphological conservatism, major differences in the molecular logic of development have evolved within the phylum Nematoda. R. culicivorax serves as a tractable system to contrast C. elegans and understand how divergent genomic and thus regulatory backgrounds nevertheless generate a conserved phenotype. The R. culicivorax draft genome will promote use of this species as a research model.

  1. On the extent and origins of genic novelty in the phylum Nematoda.

    PubMed

    Wasmuth, James; Schmid, Ralf; Hedley, Ann; Blaxter, Mark

    2008-07-02

    The phylum Nematoda is biologically diverse, including parasites of plants and animals as well as free-living taxa. Underpinning this diversity will be commensurate diversity in expressed genes, including gene sets associated specifically with evolution of parasitism. Here we have analyzed the extensive expressed sequence tag data (available for 37 nematode species, most of which are parasites) and define over 120,000 distinct putative genes from which we have derived robust protein translations. Combined with the complete proteomes of Caenorhabditis elegans and Caenorhabditis briggsae, these proteins have been grouped into 65,000 protein families that in turn contain 40,000 distinct protein domains. We have mapped the occurrence of domains and families across the Nematoda and compared the nematode data to that available for other phyla. Gene loss is common, and in particular we identify nearly 5,000 genes that may have been lost from the lineage leading to the model nematode C. elegans. We find a preponderance of novelty, including 56,000 nematode-restricted protein families and 26,000 nematode-restricted domains. Mapping of the latest time-of-origin of these new families and domains across the nematode phylogeny revealed ongoing evolution of novelty. A number of genes from parasitic species had signatures of horizontal transfer from their host organisms, and parasitic species had a greater proportion of novel, secreted proteins than did free-living ones. These classes of genes may underpin parasitic phenotypes, and thus may be targets for development of effective control measures.

  2. New species of Bakeria (Nematoda; Strongylida; Molineidae), new species of Falcaustra (Nematoda; Ascaridida; Kathlaniidae) and other helminths in Cnemaspis mcguirei (Sauria; Gekkonidae) from Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Bursey, Charles R; Goldberg, Stephen R; Grismer, L Lee

    2014-10-01

    Two new nematode species, Bakeria schadi sp. nov. and Falcaustra malaysiaia sp. nov. from the gastrointestinal tract of McGuire's rock gecko, Cnemaspis mcguirei (Sauria: Gekkonidae) collected in Peninsular Malaysia are described. The two species now assigned to Bakeria are separated on the bases of male bursa type and location of the excretory pore: type II in B. schadi sp. nov. and type I in B. bakeri; location of excretory pore, anterior to nerve ring in B. schadi sp. nov. and posterior to nerve ring in B. bakeri. Falcaustra malaysiaia sp. nov. is most similar to F. chabaudi, F. concinnae, F. condorcanquii, F. barbi, F. dubia, and F. tchadi in that these 7 species possess 1 pseudosucker, 1 median papilla plus 10 pairs caudal papillae, and spicules with lengths between 1 and 2 mm. F. barbi and F. tchadi lack adcloacal papillae; the remaining 5 species possess 1 pair of adcloacal papillae. Falcaustra chabaudi is known from Nearctic salamanders; F. concinnae from Nearctic turtles; F. condorcanquii from Neotropical frogs, F. dubia from Oriental frogs, and F. malaysiaia sp. nov. from Oriental geckos. Two additional species of Nematoda were found, Cosmocerca ornata and Meteterakis singaporensis. Cnemaspis mcguirei represents a new host record for Cosmocerca ornata and Meteterakis singaporensis.

  3. An 18S ribosomal DNA barcode for the study of Isomermis lairdi, a parasite of the blackfly Simulium damnosum s.l.

    PubMed

    Crainey, J L; Wilson, M D; Post, R J

    2009-09-01

    The mermithid parasite, Isomermis lairdi Mondet, Poinar & Bernadou (Nematoda: Mermithidae), is known to have a major impact on populations of Simulium damnosum s.l. Theobald (Diptera: Simuliidae) and on their efficiency as vectors of Onchocerca volvulus (Leuckart) (Nematoda: Filarioidea). However, the value of I. lairdi and other mermithid parasites as potential means of integrated vector control has not been fully realized. This is partly because traditional taxonomic approaches have been insufficient for describing and analysing important aspects of their biology and host range. In total, rDNA barcode sequences have been obtained from over 70 I. lairdi mermithids found parasitizing S. damnosum s.l. larvae in three different rivers. No two sequences were found to vary by more than 0.5%, and cytospecies identification of mermithid hosts revealed that I. lairdi with identical rDNA barcodes can parasitize multiple cytoforms of the S. damnosum complex, including S. squamosum (Enderlein). Phylogenetic analysis using a partial sequence from the 18S ribosomal DNA barcode, grouped I. lairdi in a monophyletic group with Gastromermis viridis Welch (Nematoda: Mermithidae) and Isomermis wisconsinensis Welch (Nematoda: Mermithidae).

  4. Discovery of new Ohbayashinema spp. (nematoda: heligomosomoidea) in Ochotona princeps and O. cansus (lagomorpha: ochotonidae) from western North America and central Asia, with considerations of historical biogeography

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Three new species of Ohbayashinema (Nematoda, Heligmosomoidea) are described from localities in western North America and central Asia. Two of these species, Ohbayashinema nearctica n. sp and O. aspeira n. sp. are parasitic in American pika, Ochotona princeps. Ohbayashinema nearctica is differentiat...

  5. A new species of Cosmocerca (Nematoda, Cosmocercidae) and other helminths from Barygenys atra (Anura, Microhylidae) from Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Bursey, Charles R; Goldberg, Stephen R; Kraus, Fred

    2013-03-01

    Cosmocerca oroensis sp. nov. (Ascaridida, Cosmocercidae) from the large intestine of Barygenys atra (Anura, Microhylidae) is described and illustrated. Cosmocerca oroensis represents the 26th species assigned to the genus and the 7th from the Australo-Papuan biogeographical region. Cosmocerca oroensis sp. nov. differs from the previously described Australo-Papuan species in number of plectanes: C. oroensis with 2 pairs; C. australis, 3-4 pairs; C. archeyi, C. tyleri and C. zugi, 4 pairs; C. limnodynastes and C. novaeguineae, 5 pairs. In addition to the new nematode species, Meteterakis crombiei (Nematoda, Heterakidae) was also found.

  6. [Cammalanus Railliet and Henry, 1915 (Nematoda, Camallanidae). Parasite from Hydrodynastes gigas (Reptilia, Serpentes, Colubridae) from Argentine Chaco].

    PubMed

    Ramallo, G

    1996-01-01

    Adult specimens of Camallanus genus (Nematoda, Camallanidae), parasitizing a Hydrodynastes gigas (Serpentes, Colubridae) from Chaco in the North East of Argentina, are described for the first time. The morphologic and morphometric parasitological studies were carried out using diaphanization by lactophenol technique. The specimens described were drawn and photographed. With this investigation the analysis of the reptilian pathologies, the knowledge of which is necessary to make projects, to manage and control the biomedic aspects in breeders, zoos and/or reserves has started. Thus, it enables us to know associated nematofauna providing facts about the biodiversity of nematode parasites of reptiles.

  7. Pterygodermatites (Mesopectines) quentini (Nematoda, Rictulariidae), a parasite of Praomys rostratus (Rodentia, Muridae) in Mali: scanning electron and light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Diouf, Malick; Quilichini, Yann; Granjon, Laurent; Bâ, Cheikh Tidiane; Marchand, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Pterygodermatites (Mesopectines) quentini n. sp. (Nematoda, Rictulariidae) is described from the murine host Praomys rostratus in the south of the Republic of Mali. It differs from other species of the subgenus by the morphology of the head, which bears four simple cephalic papillae and a nearly axial oral opening, the number of caudal papillae, the number of precloacal cuticular formations, unequal spicules and the ratio of spicule lengths/body length. The use of scanning electron microscopy in combination with conventional light microscopy enabled us to give a detailed description of the morphological characters of this new species. © M. Diouf et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2013.

  8. Pterygodermatites (Mesopectines) quentini (Nematoda, Rictulariidae), a parasite of Praomys rostratus (Rodentia, Muridae) in Mali: scanning electron and light microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Pterygodermatites (Mesopectines) quentini n. sp. (Nematoda, Rictulariidae) is described from the murine host Praomys rostratus in the south of the Republic of Mali. It differs from other species of the subgenus by the morphology of the head, which bears four simple cephalic papillae and a nearly axial oral opening, the number of caudal papillae, the number of precloacal cuticular formations, unequal spicules and the ratio of spicule lengths/body length. The use of scanning electron microscopy in combination with conventional light microscopy enabled us to give a detailed description of the morphological characters of this new species. PMID:24025692

  9. A new genus and species of Heligmonellidae (Nematoda: Trichostrongylina) parasitic in Delomys dorsalis (Rodentia: Sigmodontinae) from Misiones, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Digiani, María Celina; Kinsella, John M

    2014-10-01

    Alippistrongylus bicaudatus gen. et sp. n. (Nematoda: Heligmonellidae) is described from the striped Atlantic forest rat, Delomys dorsalis (Hensel) (Rodentia: Sigmodontinae), from the province of Misiones in Argentina. The new genus and species is characterised by a synlophe of 21 unequal ridges in both sexes without a gradient in size, with two ridges weakly sclerotised and oriented perpendicularly in the dorsal left quadrant; males with a highly dissymmetrical bursa with a hypertrophied right lobe, and females with a dorsal conical appendage just posterior to the vulva, conferring a two-tailed appearance to the female worms.

  10. Pseudascarophis brasiliensis sp. nov. (Nematoda: Cystidicolidae) parasitic in the Bermuda chub Kyphosus sectatrix (Perciformes: Kyphosidae) from southeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Felipe Bisaggio; Pereira, Aldenice de Nazaré; Timi, Juan Tomás; Luque, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    A new species of Pseudascarophis (Nematoda: Cystidicolidae) found in the stomach of Kyphosus sectatrix (Linnaeus) (Kyphosidae), off Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, is described. The new species can be differentiated from the other congeners by the presence of lateral alae, distinct but inconspicuous cephalic papillae at the anterior end, three pairs of precloacal and one pair of adcloacal papillae in males, egg morphology and morphometry of glandular oesophagus and spicules. Pseudascarophis tropica is transferred to Ascarophis as Ascarophis tropica (Solov'eva) comb. n. due to its ambiguous diagnosis. PMID:23828003

  11. Pseudascarophis brasiliensis sp. nov. (Nematoda: Cystidicolidae) parasitic in the Bermuda chub Kyphosus sectatrix (Perciformes: Kyphosidae) from southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Felipe Bisaggio; Pereira, Aldenice de Nazaré; Timi, Juan Tomás; Luque, José Luis

    2013-06-01

    A new species of Pseudascarophis (Nematoda: Cystidicolidae) found in the stomach of Kyphosus sectatrix (Linnaeus) (Kyphosidae), off Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, is described. The new species can be differentiated from the other congeners by the presence of lateral alae, distinct but inconspicuous cephalic papillae at the anterior end, three pairs of precloacal and one pair of adcloacal papillae in males, egg morphology and morphometry of glandular oesophagus and spicules. Pseudascarophis tropica is transferred to Ascarophis as Ascarophis tropica (Solov'eva) comb. n. due to its ambiguous diagnosis.

  12. A new host record of Camelostrongylus mentulatus (Nematoda; Trichostrongyloidea) from abomasum of a giraffe at a zoo in Japan.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, S; Uchida, T; Ohbayashi, M; Ikebe, Y; Sasano, S

    1996-12-01

    Camelostrongylus mentulatus (Railliet et Henry, 1909) Orloff, 1933 (Nematoda; Trichostrongyloidea) was found from the abomasum of a three-year-old female cape giraffe, Giraffa camelopardalis giraffa, born and died in a zoo park in Yamaguchi prefecture, Japan. This is the new host record from Giraffidae and geographical distribution of C. mentulatus. Present case of C. mentulatus might be infected from other ruminants, e.g., camels, antelopes and goats, kept at a same paddock in the zoo. Risk of imported parasitic diseases by the zoo animals from outside of Japan is discussed.

  13. Trichospirura amphibiophila n. sp. (Nematoda: Rhabdochonidae) in the frog Eleutherodactylus martinicensis from La Désirade, French Antilles.

    PubMed

    Moravec, F; Kaiser, H

    1994-02-01

    Trichospirura amphibiophila n. sp. (Nematoda) is described from the abdominal cavity (encapsulated near the liver) of the frog Eleutherodactylus martinicensis (Anura: Leptodactylidae) from the island of La Désirade in the French Antilles. It is characterized by the length of its spicules (459 microns and 90 microns) and their length ratio (1:5), by the presence of deirids and 7 pairs of caudal papillae in the male (2 preanal and 5 postanal), and by the site of localization (abdominal cavity) in the host. Trichospirura amphibiophila is the first known species of the genus parasitizing amphibians.

  14. A new species of Biacantha (Nematoda: Molineidae), a parasite of the common vampire bat from the Yungas, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Oviedo, Mirna C; Ramallo, Geraldine; Claps, Lucía E; Miotti, M Daniela

    2012-12-01

    A new species of Biacantha Wolfgang, 1954 (Nematoda: Molineidae), is described from the common vampire bat, Desmodus rotundus Geoffroy and St. Hilaire, 1810, from northwest Argentina. Biacantha normaliae n. sp. Oviedo, Ramallo, and Claps, is characterized by the disposition and number of ridges of the synlophe, the excretory pore located on a knob, 2 lateral processes on the tail of females, the male caudal bursa morphology, and lack of gubernaculum. This is the first species of nematode described in a vampire bat from Argentina.

  15. Redescription and genetic characterization of selected Contracaecum spp. (Nematoda: Anisakidae) from various hosts in Australia.

    PubMed

    Shamsi, Shokoofeh; Norman, Richard; Gasser, Robin; Beveridge, Ian

    2009-06-01

    In the present study, five species of Contracaecum Railliet & Henry 1912 (Nematoda: Ascaridida), including Contracaecum bancrofti, Contracaecum microcephalum, Contracaecum variegatum, Contracaecum eudyptulae, and Contracaecum ogmorhini, were redescribed using light and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, in order to elucidate their taxonomic status, first and second internal transcribed spacers (ITS-1 and ITS-2, respectively) of nuclear ribosomal DNA of each morphospecies were characterized. Analyses of sequence and morphological data sets suggested that C. bancrofti, infecting the Australian pelican Pelecanus conspicillatus, is a valid species and is distinct from C. micropapillatum reported from pelicans in the northern hemisphere. C. microcephalum from cormorants Phalacrocorax melanoleucos and C. variegatum from the darter Anhinga melanogaster and from P. conspicillatus as well as C. eudyptulae from the little penguin Eudyptula minor were also considered as distinct species, which can be differentiated from one another morphologically based on the lengths of spicules and genetically based on the sequences of ITS-1 and ITS-2. Comparison of sequence data of ITS-1 and ITS-2 for the members of C. ogmorhini sensu lato from pinnipeds with those of previous studies suggested that only ITS-2 can be used for differentiation between C. ogmorhini sensu stricto and Contracaecum margolisi, occurring in the southern and northern hemispheres, respectively. Analyses of the ITS-1 and ITS-2 sequence data of Contracaecum spp. in the present study supported the distinction among species of Contracaecum based on morphological data and were useful in confirming the taxonomic status of individual species in Australia.

  16. Microtopography of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis (Nematoda: Heligmosomatidae): parasitic larval stages and adults.

    PubMed

    Nembo, B; Goudey-Perriere, F; Gayral, P; Perriere, C; Brousse-Gaury, P

    1993-09-01

    Specimens of the rat hookworm, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis (Nematoda) were recovered from lungs (third- and fourth-stage larvae) and intestine (fourth-stage larvae and adults). The following features were studied in the different stages by scanning electron microscopy: cephalic structures, especially sense organs, synlophe, cervical region, and caudal part. The main differences between the third and fourth stages concerned the lip-like structures around the oral aperture, the appearance of the cephalic space with the presence of a cephalic cap in fourth-stage larvae, the pattern of longitudinal ridges, and sexual differentiation. Pore-like papillae, not seen in third-stage larvae, developed in later stages. Deirids were observed only in adults, and phasmids were poorly discerned. Some of these morphological features, such as the cephalic sense organ apertures and cuticle pores and micropores, can be observed only by scanning electron microscopy. The possible functions of these different structures and their relationship with the behavior of the worms during their life cycle are discussed.

  17. First description of Onchocerca jakutensis (Nematoda: Filarioidea) in red deer (Cervus elaphus) in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Felix; Manzanell, Ralph; Mathis, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    Twenty-seven species of the genus Onchocerca (Nematoda; Filarioidea) can cause a vector-borne parasitic disease called onchocercosis. Most Onchocerca species infect wild and domestic ungulates or the dog, and one species causes river blindness in humans mainly in tropical Africa. The European red deer (Cervus e. elaphus) is host to four species, which are transmitted by blackflies (simuliids) or biting midges (ceratopogonids). Two species, Onchocerca flexuosa and Onchocerca jakutensis, produce subcutaneous nodules, whereas Onchocerca skrjabini and Onchocerca garmsi live free in the hypodermal serous membranes. During the hunting season, September 2013, red deer (n = 25), roe deer (Capreolus c. capreolus, n = 6) and chamois (Rupicapra r. rupicapra, n = 7), all shot in the Grisons Region (Switzerland) were investigated for the presence of subcutaneous nodules which were enzymatically digested, and the contained Onchocerca worms were identified to species by light and scanning electron microscopy as well as by PCR/sequencing. In addition, microfilariae from skin samples were collected and genetically characterized. Neither nodules nor microfilariae were discovered in the roe deer and chamois. Adult worms were found in 24% of red deer, and all of them were identified as O. jakutensis. Two morphologically different microfilariae were obtained from five red deer, and genetic analysis of a skin sample of one red deer indicated the presence of another Onchocerca species. This is the first report of O. jakutensis in Switzerland with a prevalence in red deer similar to that in neighbouring Germany.

  18. Phylogenetic analysis of the genus Cylicocyclus (Nematoda: Strongylidae) based on nuclear ribosomal sequence data.

    PubMed

    Bu, Yanzhen; Niu, Hongxing; Zhang, Luping

    2013-06-01

    Seven species of Cylicocyclus Ihle, 1922 (Nematoda: Strongylidae) were collected from donkeys from Henan Province, China. Five samples of each species were selected for sequencing. Sixteen different internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences representing the seven species of Cylicocyclus were obtained. Sequence differences in the first internal transcribed spacer (ITS-1) among species was lower than that of the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS-2). Phylogenetic analyses were conducted using the combined ITS-1 and ITS-2 data sets from the present study and using reference sequences from the GenBank database. The MP and ML trees were similar in topology. The phylogenetic trees were divided into two clades. Clade I included 8 species of Cylicocyclus; within this group, Cylicocyclus leptostomus (Kotlan, 1920) is nested between different samples of Cylicocyclus ashworthi (LeRoux, 1924), suggesting C. ashworthi may represent a species complex. Clade II included Cylicocyclus elongatus (Looss, 1900) and Cylicocyclus ultrajectinus (Ihle, 1920); however, these two species always clustered with the comparative species (Petrovinema poculatum (Looss, 1900) and Poteriostomum imparidentatum Quiel, 1919), suggesting that C. elongatus and C. ultrajectinus represent members of other genera.

  19. Oscheius onirici sp. n. (Nematoda: Rhabditidae): a new entomopathogenic nematode from an Italian cave.

    PubMed

    Torrini, Giulia; Mazza, Giuseppe; Carletti, Beatrice; Benvenuti, Claudia; Roversi, Pio Federico; Fanelli, Elena; De Luca, Francesca; Troccoli, Alberto; Tarasco, Eustachio

    2015-03-26

    Oscheius onirici sp. n. (Nematoda: Rhabditidae) was isolated from a karst cave soil of Central Italy. Molecular and morphological analyses were performed. Total DNA was extracted from individual nematodes and the mitochondrial COI, the ITS containing region, the D2-D3 expansion domains of the 28S rRNA gene and the 18S rRNA gene were amplified and sequenced. BLAST search at NCBI by using all molecular markers revealed that this taxon is similar to Oscheius species. Phylogenetic trees of ITS, 28S and 18S rDNA revealed that O. onirici sp. n. belongs to Dolichura-group. Oscheius onirici sp. n. is characterized by small body size and stoma rhabditoid type. Female reproductive system is amphidelphic. Males are rare with peloderan bursa, spicules slender and small, nine pairs of papillae of different lengths, arranged in a 1+1+1/3+3 pattern. Entomopathogenicity bioassay revealed that this nematode is capable of infecting larvae of Galleria mellonella and Tenebrio molitor.

  20. Evidence of morphine like substance and μ-opioid receptor expression in Toxacara canis (Nematoda: Ascaridae)

    PubMed Central

    Golabi, Mostafa; Naem, Soraya; Imani, Mehdi; Dalirezh, Nowruz

    2016-01-01

    Toxocara canis (Nematoda: Ascaridae) is an intestinal nematode parasite of dogs, which can also cause disease in humans. Transmission to humans usually occurs because of direct contact with T. canis eggs present in soil contaminated with the feces of infected dogs. This nematode has extraordinary abilities to survive for many years in different tissues of vertebrates, and develop to maturity in the intestinal tract of its definitive host. Survival of parasitic nematodes within a host requires immune evasion using complicated pathways. Morphine-like substance, as well as opioids, which are known as down regulating agents, can modulate both innate and acquired immune responses, and let the parasite survives in their hosts. In the present study, we aimed to find evidences of morphine-like substance and µ-opiate receptor expression in T. canis, using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results indicated that T. canis produced morphine-like substances at the level of 2.31± 0.26 ng g-1 wet weight, and expressed µ-opiate receptor as in expected size of 441 bp. According to our findings, it was concluded that T. canis, benefits using morphine-like substance to modulate host immunity. PMID:28144426

  1. Evidence of morphine like substance and μ-opioid receptor expression in Toxacara canis (Nematoda: Ascaridae).

    PubMed

    Golabi, Mostafa; Naem, Soraya; Imani, Mehdi; Dalirezh, Nowruz

    2016-01-01

    Toxocara canis (Nematoda: Ascaridae) is an intestinal nematode parasite of dogs, which can also cause disease in humans. Transmission to humans usually occurs because of direct contact with T. canis eggs present in soil contaminated with the feces of infected dogs. This nematode has extraordinary abilities to survive for many years in different tissues of vertebrates, and develop to maturity in the intestinal tract of its definitive host. Survival of parasitic nematodes within a host requires immune evasion using complicated pathways. Morphine-like substance, as well as opioids, which are known as down regulating agents, can modulate both innate and acquired immune responses, and let the parasite survives in their hosts. In the present study, we aimed to find evidences of morphine-like substance and µ-opiate receptor expression in T. canis, using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results indicated that T. canis produced morphine-like substances at the level of 2.31± 0.26 ng g(-1) wet weight, and expressed µ-opiate receptor as in expected size of 441 bp. According to our findings, it was concluded that T. canis, benefits using morphine-like substance to modulate host immunity.

  2. Two Procamallanus (Spirocamallanus) species (Nematoda: Camallanidae) from freshwater fishes in the Lower Congo River.

    PubMed

    Moravec, František; Jirků, Miloslav

    2015-06-01

    Based on light and scanning electron microscopical studies, one known and one previously undescribed Procamallanus (Spirocamallanus) species (Nematoda: Camallanidae) are described from specimens collected in the intestine of freshwater fishes in the Lower Congo River, Democratic Republic of Congo: P. (S.) daleneae (Boomker 1993) from Synodontis acanthomias Boulenger (Mochokidae, Siluriformes) (new host and geographical records) and P. (S.) parachannae sp. nov. from Parachanna insignis (Sauvage) (Channidae, Perciformes). The new species is most similar to P. (S.) serranochromis Moravec et Van As 2015, a parasite of African cichlids (Serranochromis spp.), differing from it mainly in the absence of any outgrowths on the female tail tip, a distinctly longer (546 μm) right spicule, a different length ratio of both spicules (1:2.6) and in the morphology of fourth-stage larvae. P. (S.) daleneae, a specific parasite of squeakers (Synodontis spp.), is redescribed; in contrast to the original description, the number of postanal papillae was found to be identical (6 pairs) with that of other related species.

  3. Biological responses of Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to Steinernema carpocapsae (Nematoda: Steinernematidae).

    PubMed

    Manachini, Barbara; Schillaci, Domenico; Arizza, Vincenzo

    2013-08-01

    Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier 1790) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is becoming a serious problem in Mediterranean areas where it is well-adapted, and now is present even in the United States (California). The infestations are primarily in urban areas where chemical control is not advisable and million of Euros are spent to control it. The effects of the entomopathogenic nematode Steinernema carpocapsae (Nematoda: Steinernematidae) on mortality, growth, as well as the immune activity of R. ferrugineus larvae, were investigated. R. ferrugineus mortality exhibited a positive trend with the dosage and duration of exposure to S. carpocapsae. The median lethal dose and median lethal time, important to optimize the treatments, were calculated. S. carpocapsae also had a detrimental effect on R. ferrugineus weight. In vivo and in vitro effects of S. carpocapsae on the phagocytic responses of R. ferrugineus hemocytes also were recorded. S. carpocapsae was not encapsulated by R.ferrugineus hemocytes. After 24 h, the number of hemocytes recorded in treated larvae was reduced. To investigate the defensive abilities of R. ferrugineus humoral and cellular immune systems, specifically against the bacterium Xenorhabdus nematophila (Enterobacteraceae), the minimum inhibitory concentration that inhibits bacterial growth was measured. This is the first time that this technique is applied to entomopathogenic bacteria.

  4. The occurrence and pathogenicity of Serratospiculum tendo (Nematoda: Diplotriaenoidea) in birds of prey from southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Santoro, M; D'Alessio, N; Di Prisco, F; Kinsella, J M; Barca, L; Degli Uberti, B; Restucci, B; Martano, M; Troisi, S; Galiero, G; Veneziano, V

    2016-05-01

    The air sacs of free-ranging birds of prey (n= 652) from southern Italy, including 11 species of Accipitriformes and six of Falconiforms, were examined for infections with Serratospiculum tendo (Nematoda: Diplotriaenoidea). Of the 17 species of birds examined, 25 of 31 (80.6%) peregrine falcons (Falco peregrinus) from Calabria Region and a single northern goshawk (Accipiter gentilis) from Campania Region were infected with S. tendo, suggesting a strong host specificity for the peregrine falcon. The northern goshawk and 18 of 25 infected peregrine falcons showed cachexia and all infected birds had bone fractures. At gross examination, air sacculitis and pneumonia were the most common lesions in infected birds. Microscopically, the air-sac walls showed thickening of the smooth muscle cells, resulting in a papillary appearance, along with hyperplasia of the mesothelium and epithelium, and foci of plasma cell infiltration and macrophages associated with several embryonated eggs and adult parasites. Extensive areas of inflammation were found in the lungs, characterized by lymphocytes, macrophages and fibroblasts surrounding embryonated eggs. The northern goshawk also had detachment of the dextral lung with several necrotic foci. In this case, the death of the bird was directly attributed to S. tendo infection. Lesions and pathological changes observed here suggest that S. tendo can cause disease.

  5. Trichuris spp. (Nematoda: Trichuridae) from two rodents, Mastomys natalensis and Gerbilliscus vicinus in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Ribas, Alexis; López, Sergi; Makundi, Rhodes H; Leirs, Herwig; de Bellocq, Joëlle Goüy

    2013-10-01

    During a survey of the helminth community of several rodent species in the Morogoro region (Tanzania), Trichuris whipworms (Nematoda: Trichuridae) were found in the ceca of the Natal multimammate mouse, Mastomys natalensis and a gerbil, Gerbilliscus vicinus (both Rodentia: Muridae). The taxonomic literature regarding Trichuris from African native rodents describes 10 species, but includes few metric and morphologic characters that discriminate between some of the pairs. The whipworms we sampled in Tanzanian Natal multimammate mice and gerbils were morphologically identified, respectively, as Trichuris mastomysi Verster, 1960 and Trichuris carlieri Gedoelst, 1916 sensu lato, but with characters that overlap or partially overlap with the cosmopolitan Murinae whipworm, Trichuris muris , already reported from several rodents in Africa. To clarify our identification, we sequenced the ITS-1, 5.8S, and ITS-2 ribosomal DNA region of the worms' nuclear genome. The genetic analyses clearly distinguish the whipworms we found in M. natalensis from those found in the gerbil, and both of these from T. muris whipworm reference sequences. The overlap of morphological characters between rodent whipworms suggests that reports of T. muris from rodent species not closely related to Murinae in other parts of Africa should be treated with caution.

  6. Trichuris colobae n. sp. (Nematoda: Trichuridae), a new species of Trichuris from Colobus guereza kikuyensis.

    PubMed

    Cutillas, Cristina; de Rojas, Manuel; Zurita, Antonio; Oliveros, Rocío; Callejón, Rocío

    2014-07-01

    In the present work, a morphological and biometrical study of whipworms Trichuris Roederer, 1761 (Nematoda: Trichuridae) parasitizing Colobus guereza kikuyensis has been carried out. Biometrical and statistical data showed that the mean values of individual variables between Trichuris suis and Trichuris sp. from C. g. kikuyensis differed significantly (P < 0.001) when Student's t test was performed: seven male variables (width of esophageal region of body, maximum width of posterior region of body, width in the place of junction of esophagus and the intestine, length of bacillary stripes, length of spicule, length of ejaculatory duct, and distance between posterior part of testis and tail end of body) and three female variables (width of posterior region of body, length of bacillary stripes, and distance of tail end of body and posterior fold of seminal receptacle). The combination of these characters permitted the discrimination of T. suis with respect to Trichuris sp. from C. g. kikuyensis, suggesting a new species of Trichuris. Furthermore, males of Trichuris sp. from C. g. kikuyensis showed a typical subterminal pericloacal papillae associated to a cluster of small papillae that were absent in males of T. suis, while females of Trichuris from Colobus appeared with a vulval region elevated/over-mounted showing a crater-like appearance. The everted vagina showed typical triangular sharp spines by optical microscopy and SEM. Thus, the existence of a new species of Trichuris parasitizing C. g. kikuyensis has been proposed.

  7. Uncinaria sanguinis sp. n. (Nematoda: Ancylostomatidae) from the endangered Australian sea lion, Neophoca cinerea (Carnivora: Otariidae).

    PubMed

    Marcus, Alan D; Higgins, Damien P; Slapeta, Jan; Gray, Rachael

    2014-06-01

    This study investigates the identity of hookworms parasitising the Australian sea lion, Neophoca cinerea (Péron), from three colonies in South Australia, Australia. The Australian sea lion is at risk of extinction because its population is small and genetically fragmented. Using morphological and molecular techniques, we describe a single novel species, Uncinaria sanguinis sp. n. (Nematoda: Ancylostomatidae). The new species is most similar to hookworms also parasitic in otariid hosts, Uncinaria lucasi Stiles, 1901 and Uncinaria hamiltoni Baylis, 1933. Comparative morphometrics offered limited utility for distinguishing between species within this genus whilst morphological features and differences in nuclear ribosomal DNA sequences delineated U. sanguinis sp. n. from named congeners. Male specimens of U. sanguinis sp. n. differ from U. lucasi and U. hamiltoni by relatively shorter anterolateral and externodorsal rays, respectively, and from other congeners by the relative lengths and angulations of bursal rays, and in the shape of the spicules. Female specimens of U. sanguinis sp. n. are differentiated from Uncinaria spp. parasitic in terrestrial mammals by differences in vulval anatomy and the larger size of their eggs, although are morphologically indistinguishable from U. lucasi and U. hamiltoni. Molecular techniques clearly delimited U. sanguinis sp. n. as a distinct novel species. Obtaining baseline data on the parasites of wildlife hosts is important for the investigation of disease and the effective implementation and monitoring of conservation management.

  8. Descriptions of Deladenus albizicus n. sp. and D. processus n. sp. (Nematoda: Hexatylina) from Haryana, India

    PubMed Central

    Tomar, V. V. S.; Somvanshi, Vishal S.; Bajaj, Harish K.

    2015-01-01

    Two different nematodes were isolated from the bark of Albizia lebbeck trees; one from insect infested and another from noninfested, healthy tree. Based on the biological, morphological, and molecular evidences, the nematodes are described as Deladenus albizicus n. sp. and D. processus n. sp. (Nematoda: Hexatylina). Deladenus albizicus n. sp., isolated from insect-infested tree, multiplied on the fungus Nigrospora oryzae. Myceliophagous females of this nematode reproduced by parthenogenesis and spermathecae were indistinct. Infective females, readily produced in the cultures, are dorsally curved. Only one type of males containing small-sized sperms in their genital tracts were produced in the culture. Myceliophagous females: L = 0.75 to 1.71 mm, a = 32.3 to 50.8, b = 9.3 to 11.2, b’ = 5.2 to 7.3, c = 27.2 to 35.6, V = 91.0 to 93.3, c’ = 2.0 to 2.9, stylet = 11 to 12 µm, excretory pore in the region of median pharyngeal bulb, 43 to 47 µm anterior to hemizonid. Deladenus processus n. sp., isolated from bark of healthy A. lebbeck tree, was cultured on Alternaria alternata. Myceliophagous females reproduced by amphimixis and their spermathecae contained rounded sperms. Infective females were never produced, even in old cultures. Myceliophagous females: L = 0.76 to 0.99 mm, a = 34 to 49, b = 13.3 to 17.7, b’ = 3.8 to 5.8, c = 19.6 to 22.8, V = 92.2 to 93.5, c’ = 2.7 to 3.5, stylet = 6 to 7 µm, excretory pore in the proximity of hemizonid, tail conoid, tapering from both sides to a long pointed central process. It is proposed to classify Deladenus species in three groups: durus, siricidicola, and laricis groups based on female and spermatogonia dimorphism, mode of reproduction, and insect parasitism. PMID:25861116

  9. The caudal bursa in the Heligmonellidae (Nematoda: Trichostrongylina). Characterization and hypothesis on its evolution

    PubMed Central

    Durette-Desset, M.C.; Digiani, M.C.

    2012-01-01

    The different patterns of the caudal bursa of the Heligmonellidae (Nematoda) are redefined, taking into account the grouping of rays 2-6 and the sequence of origin of these rays from their common trunk. The type of symmetry of the caudal bursa is also redefined. The following patterns were observed and characterized: the basic patterns: types 2-3, 2-2-1, 1-3-1 and 1-4 and the intermediary patterns: type 2-3 tending to type 2-2-1, type 2-2-1 tending to type 1-3-1, type 1-3-1 tending to type 1-4 and type 2-2-1 tending to type 1-4. An evolutionary interpretation of the patterns is attempted and seems to follow the direction: 2-3 to 2-2-1 to 1-3-1 to 1-4. Seven atypical patterns are described. The caudal bursae were classified based on their symmetry: subsymmetrical, dissymmetrical and asymmetrical. Independently of the type of symmetry, the two latero-ventral lobes may have the same or different patterns. The type of symmetry, the ratio between the two latero-ventral lobes and a characteristic pattern were utilized to characterize the caudal bursae at the level of the genus and the subfamily. The combination of the right/left ratio and the type of symmetry gives heterogeneous results, with no real association between these characters. The most conspicuous asymmetries and dissymmetries were found among the Nippostrongylinae. The most frequent pattern in the Heligmonellidae is the basic type 2-2-1; types 1-3-1 and 1-4 are less frequent but are characteristic of several genera; type 1-4 is absent from the Heligmonellinae. Whatever the pattern, in the Heligmonellidae rays 4 and 5 are the last to diverge from the common trunk of rays 2-6. PMID:22314236

  10. Prevalence of Dirofilaria immitis (Nematoda: Filarioidea) in mosquitoes from northeast Arkansas, the United States.

    PubMed

    Mckay, Tanja; Bianco, T; Rhodes, L; Barnett, S

    2013-07-01

    A mosquito survey was conducted to identify which species of mosquitoes carry Dirofilaria immitis (Leidy) (Nematoda: Filarioidea), dog heartworm, in northeast Arkansas. Using polymerase chain reaction, mosquitoes were analyzed for D. immitis, Dirofilaria repens Railliet & Henry, and Acanthocheilonema dracunculoides Cobbold. Mosquitoes were collected from April to October 2009 using black light ultraviolet traps baited with dry ice. Sixteen mosquito species were identified. D. immitis was identified in nine mosquito species, which included Aedes vexans (Meigen), Anopheles quadrimaculatus Say, Anopheles punctipennis (Say), Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus Say, Culex erraticus (Dyer & Knab), Culiseta inornata (Williston), Psorophora columbiae (Dyer & Knab), Psorophora ferox (Humboldt), and Psorophora howardii Coquillett. No D. repens or A. dracunculoides DNA was amplified. Of the 1,212 mosquito pools tested, 7.3% were positive for D. immitis. Frequency of D. immitis infections from six collection sites ranged from 2.1 to 19.4%. Ae. vexans and An. quadrimaculatus were the two most abundant species, composing 58.7 and 23.7% of the total mosquitoes collected, with 9.6 and 6.9% of pools positive for D. immitis, respectively. To investigate localized vector infection rates of D. immitis, mosquitoes were collected from inside the kennel of a heartworm-positive dog. Of the 114 mosquitoes collected, 84 (73.7%) were positive for D. immitis. The frequency of D. immitis-infected mosquitoes collected near a heartworm-positive dog was considerably higher than in the original six collection sites, suggesting a single heartworm-positive dog potentially increases infection pressure on susceptible animals sharing mosquito exposure.

  11. Analysis of the Na+/Ca2+ Exchanger Gene Family within the Phylum Nematoda

    PubMed Central

    He, Chao; O'Halloran, Damien M.

    2014-01-01

    Na+/Ca2+ exchangers are low affinity, high capacity transporters that rapidly transport calcium at the plasma membrane, mitochondrion, endoplasmic (and sarcoplasmic) reticulum, and the nucleus. Na+/Ca2+ exchangers are widely expressed in diverse cell types where they contribute homeostatic balance to calcium levels. In animals, Na+/Ca2+ exchangers are divided into three groups based upon stoichiometry: Na+/Ca2+ exchangers (NCX), Na+/Ca2+/K+ exchangers (NCKX), and Ca2+/Cation exchangers (CCX). In mammals there are three NCX genes, five NCKX genes and one CCX (NCLX) gene. The genome of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans contains ten Na+/Ca2+ exchanger genes: three NCX; five CCX; and two NCKX genes. Here we set out to characterize structural and taxonomic specializations within the family of Na+/Ca2+ exchangers across the phylum Nematoda. In this analysis we identify Na+/Ca2+ exchanger genes from twelve species of nematodes and reconstruct their phylogenetic and evolutionary relationships. The most notable feature of the resulting phylogenies was the heterogeneous evolution observed within exchanger subtypes. Specifically, in the case of the CCX exchangers we did not detect members of this class in three Clade III nematodes. Within the Caenorhabditis and Pristionchus lineages we identify between three and five CCX representatives, whereas in other Clade V and also Clade IV nematode taxa we only observed a single CCX gene in each species, and in the Clade III nematode taxa that we sampled we identify NCX and NCKX encoding genes but no evidence of CCX representatives using our mining approach. We also provided re-annotation for predicted CCX gene structures from Heterorhabditis bacteriophora and Caenorhabditis japonica by RT-PCR and sequencing. Together, these findings reveal a complex picture of Na+/Ca2+ transporters in nematodes that suggest an incongruent evolutionary history of proteins that provide central control of calcium dynamics. PMID:25397810

  12. An improved molecular phylogeny of the Nematoda with special emphasis on marine taxa.

    PubMed

    Meldal, Birgit H M; Debenham, Nicola J; De Ley, Paul; De Ley, Irma Tandingan; Vanfleteren, Jacques R; Vierstraete, Andy R; Bert, Wim; Borgonie, Gaetan; Moens, Tom; Tyler, Paul A; Austen, Melanie C; Blaxter, Mark L; Rogers, Alex D; Lambshead, P J D

    2007-03-01

    Phylogenetic reconstructions of relations within the phylum Nematoda are inherently difficult but have been advanced with the introduction of large-scale molecular-based techniques. However, the most recent revisions were heavily biased towards terrestrial and parasitic species and greater representation of clades containing marine species (e.g. Araeolaimida, Chromadorida, Desmodorida, Desmoscolecida, Enoplida, and Monhysterida) is needed for accurate coverage of known taxonomic diversity. We now add small subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA) sequences for 100 previously un-sequenced species of nematodes, including 46 marine taxa. SSU rDNA sequences for >200 taxa have been analysed based on Bayesian inference and LogDet-transformed distances. The resulting phylogenies provide support for (i) the re-classification of the Secernentea as the order Rhabditida that derived from a common ancestor of chromadorean orders Araeolaimida, Chromadorida, Desmodorida, Desmoscolecida, and Monhysterida and (ii) the position of Bunonema close to the Diplogasteroidea in the Rhabditina. Other, previously controversial relationships can now be resolved more clearly: (a) Alaimus, Campydora, and Trischistoma belong in the Enoplida, (b) Isolaimium is placed basally to a big clade containing the Axonolaimidae, Plectidae, and Rhabditida, (c) Xyzzors belongs in the Desmodoridae, (d) Comesomatidae and Cyartonema belongs in the Monhysterida, (e) Globodera belongs in the Hoplolaimidae and (f) Paratylenchus dianeae belongs in the Criconematoidea. However, the SSU gene did not provide significant support for the class Chromadoria or clear evidence for the relationship between the three classes, Enoplia, Dorylaimia, and Chromadoria. Furthermore, across the whole phylum, the phylogenetically informative characters of the SSU gene are not informative in a parsimony analysis, highlighting the short-comings of the parsimony method for large-scale phylogenetic modelling.

  13. Analysis of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger gene family within the phylum Nematoda.

    PubMed

    He, Chao; O'Halloran, Damien M

    2014-01-01

    Na+/Ca2+ exchangers are low affinity, high capacity transporters that rapidly transport calcium at the plasma membrane, mitochondrion, endoplasmic (and sarcoplasmic) reticulum, and the nucleus. Na+/Ca2+ exchangers are widely expressed in diverse cell types where they contribute homeostatic balance to calcium levels. In animals, Na+/Ca2+ exchangers are divided into three groups based upon stoichiometry: Na+/Ca2+ exchangers (NCX), Na+/Ca2+/K+ exchangers (NCKX), and Ca2+/Cation exchangers (CCX). In mammals there are three NCX genes, five NCKX genes and one CCX (NCLX) gene. The genome of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans contains ten Na+/Ca2+ exchanger genes: three NCX; five CCX; and two NCKX genes. Here we set out to characterize structural and taxonomic specializations within the family of Na+/Ca2+ exchangers across the phylum Nematoda. In this analysis we identify Na+/Ca2+ exchanger genes from twelve species of nematodes and reconstruct their phylogenetic and evolutionary relationships. The most notable feature of the resulting phylogenies was the heterogeneous evolution observed within exchanger subtypes. Specifically, in the case of the CCX exchangers we did not detect members of this class in three Clade III nematodes. Within the Caenorhabditis and Pristionchus lineages we identify between three and five CCX representatives, whereas in other Clade V and also Clade IV nematode taxa we only observed a single CCX gene in each species, and in the Clade III nematode taxa that we sampled we identify NCX and NCKX encoding genes but no evidence of CCX representatives using our mining approach. We also provided re-annotation for predicted CCX gene structures from Heterorhabditis bacteriophora and Caenorhabditis japonica by RT-PCR and sequencing. Together, these findings reveal a complex picture of Na+/Ca2+ transporters in nematodes that suggest an incongruent evolutionary history of proteins that provide central control of calcium dynamics.

  14. Prevalence and Morphological Characterization of Cheilospirura hamulosa, Diesing, 1861 (Nematoda: Acuarioidea), from Partridges in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Maryam; Rouhani, Soheila; Mobedi, Iraj; Rostami, Ali; Khazan, Hoshang; Ahoo, Mohammad Bagher

    2015-01-01

    This study reports data on the prevalence, morphology, and morphometry of the nematode Cheilospirura hamulosa on the basis of light and stereoscopic microscopy and also camera lucida. Specimens were recovered after necropsies of 100 partridges (Alectoris chukar) from Taleqan County in Alborz Province, Iran. The prevalence of C. hamulosa in partridges was of 30% with a mean intensity of 3.9 and range of infection of 1–12. The mean length and width of females were 17.5 ± 2.14 and 0.39 ± 0.04 mm, while those of males were 12.2 ± 0.67 and 0.3 ± 0.06 mm, respectively. The characteristic digitiform tail was observed in females, and the unequal spicules, caudal alae, and ten pairs of caudal papillae were seen in males. The taxonomic characteristic longitudinal cordons and muscular and glandular oesophagus were observed in both sexes. Ratio between cordons and body length in males and females was 1 : 1.33 and 1 : 1.68, respectively. Ratio between long and short spicules in males was 1 : 2.3. The average size of embryonated eggs was 51.25 × 29.5 μm. In the present study, C. hamulosa (Nematoda: Acuarioidea) is recorded for the first time from partridges in Iran. Therefore, the morphological characters described in this study will be useful in the future diagnostic and taxonomic studies of Acuarioidea family. PMID:26693346

  15. First report, morphological and molecular characterization of Xiphinema elongatum and X. pachtaicum (Nematoda, Longidoridae) from Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Getaneh, Gezahegne; Bert, Wim; Decraemer, Wilfrida

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A total of six soil samples were collected around rhizosphere of citrus plants during 2010 from Melkassa Agricultural Research Center experimental station, Ethiopia. From these samples two most important ecto-plant parasitic nematodes of the genus Xiphinema were found and analysed. The genus Xiphinema is a large group of the phylum nematoda which constitutes more than 260 species. They are polyphagous root- ectoparasites of many crop plants and some species of this genus cause damage by direct feeding on root tips and transmit nepoviruses. The delimitation and discrimination of two species in the genus is presented, described herein as Xiphinema elongatum and Xiphinema pachtaicum. Morphological and morphometric data were done using light microscopy and results of both species were fit within the previously described nematode species of Xiphinema elongatum and Xiphinema pachtaicum. 18S rDNA were analysed using Bayesian inference (BI) method to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships of the studied Xiphinema sp. (KP407872 Xiphinema elongatum and KP407873 Xiphinema pachtaicum) with other Xiphinema species. The 18S rDNA sequence of Xiphinema pachtaicum was alike to previously described species from the GenBank but Xiphinema elongatum exhibited very small levels of nucleotides differences (0.4%) which might be possible intra-specific divergence. Though this region of rDNA has less resolution on complex species, its combination with morphological and morphometric analyses, suggests these species as Xiphinema elongatum and Xiphinema pachtaicum with the GenBank accession number of KP407872 and KP407873, respectively. Short notes, morphological measurements, illustrations, and molecular data are given to these species. These species are reported for the first time from Ethiopia and it provides new geographical information of these organisms. PMID:25878528

  16. First report, morphological and molecular characterization of Xiphinemaelongatum and X.pachtaicum (Nematoda, Longidoridae) from Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Getaneh, Gezahegne; Bert, Wim; Decraemer, Wilfrida

    2015-01-01

    A total of six soil samples were collected around rhizosphere of citrus plants during 2010 from Melkassa Agricultural Research Center experimental station, Ethiopia. From these samples two most important ecto-plant parasitic nematodes of the genus Xiphinema were found and analysed. The genus Xiphinema is a large group of the phylum nematoda which constitutes more than 260 species. They are polyphagous root- ectoparasites of many crop plants and some species of this genus cause damage by direct feeding on root tips and transmit nepoviruses. The delimitation and discrimination of two species in the genus is presented, described herein as Xiphinemaelongatum and Xiphinemapachtaicum. Morphological and morphometric data were done using light microscopy and results of both species were fit within the previously described nematode species of Xiphinemaelongatum and Xiphinemapachtaicum. 18S rDNA were analysed using Bayesian inference (BI) method to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships of the studied Xiphinema sp. (KP407872Xiphinemaelongatum and KP407873Xiphinemapachtaicum) with other Xiphinema species. The 18S rDNA sequence of Xiphinemapachtaicum was alike to previously described species from the GenBank but Xiphinemaelongatum exhibited very small levels of nucleotides differences (0.4%) which might be possible intra-specific divergence. Though this region of rDNA has less resolution on complex species, its combination with morphological and morphometric analyses, suggests these species as Xiphinemaelongatum and Xiphinemapachtaicum with the GenBank accession number of KP407872 and KP407873, respectively. Short notes, morphological measurements, illustrations, and molecular data are given to these species. These species are reported for the first time from Ethiopia and it provides new geographical information of these organisms.

  17. Phylogenetic relationships between pinworms (Nematoda: Enterobiinae) parasitising the critically endangered orang-utan, according to the characterisation of molecular genomic and mitochondrial markers.

    PubMed

    Foitová, Ivona; Civáňová, Kristína; Baruš, Vlastimil; Nurcahyo, Wisnu

    2014-07-01

    Pinworms (Nematoda: Enterobiinae) include 52 species parasitising primates throughout the world. In the present study, we performed the first ever molecular analysis to investigate the phylogenetic position of recently described pinworms parasitising the Sumatran orang-utan. The phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial CO1 and chromosomal 18S rDNA and ITS1 regions could support the independent status of several Nematoda species. Our molecular data clearly suggest that Enterobius (Colobenterobius) buckleyi and Lemuricola (Protenterobius) pongoi together with Pongobius hugoti form separate clades among other studied species, which significantly supports the hypothesis of recently described new species parasitising the orang-utan (Pongo abelii and Pongo pygmaeus). The phylogenetic tree based on cytochrome oxidase 1 (CO1) gene variability showed possible close relationships between L. (Protenterobius) pongoi and P. hugoti; thus, we can assume that these species could have initially diverged in sympatry from a common ancestor.

  18. Description of a new species of Chabaudus Inglis and Ogden, 1965 (Nematoda: Seuratoidea) from the frog Euphlyctis cyanophlyctis from Dehrandun, Uttarakhand, India.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Anjum N; Bursey, Charles R; Maity, Pallab

    2016-01-01

    Chabaudus dehradunensis sp. nov. (Nematoda: Seuratoidea) from the large intestine of the water skipper, Euphlyctis cyanophlyctis (Anura, Dicroglossidae), from Dehrandun, India is described and illustrated. Chabaudus dehradunensis sp. nov. is the 6th species assigned to the genus and 1st species reported from India. It is separated from its congeners based upon the number and arrangement of caudal papillae and the length of spicule. Euphlyctis cyanophlyctis is the new host record for the genus Chabaudus.

  19. Parapharyngodon duniae n. sp. (Nematoda: Pharyngodonidae) in Phrynohyas venulosa (Anura: Hylidae) from the Area de Conservación Guanacaste, Guanacaste, Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Bursey, Charles R; Brooks, Daniel R

    2004-02-01

    Parapharyngodon duniae n. sp. (Nematoda: Pharyngodonidae) in the large intestine of the veined tree frog, Phrynohyas venulosa, from the Area de Conservación Guanacaste in northwestern Costa Rica is described and illustrated. Parapharyngodon duniae n. sp. represents the 34th species assigned to the genus, the 10th species from the Neotropical Realm, and only the third species to parasitize anurans. It is distinguished from the other Neotropical species by having postbulbar ovaries and a prebulbar excretory pore.

  20. Metaparasitylenchus hypothenemi n. sp. (Nematoda: Allantonematidae), a parasite of the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    PubMed

    Poinar, George; Vega, Fernando E; Castillo, Alfredo; Chavez, Inti E; Infante, Francisco

    2004-10-01

    Metaparasitylenchus hypothenemi n. sp. (Nematoda: Allantonematidae) is described from the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari) (Curculionidae: Scolytinae), in Chiapas, Mexico. This species differs from other members of the genus by its small size, annulated cuticle, lateral fields with 3 ridges, free-living stages with an excretory pore located between the pharyngeal gland orifices, a distinct stylet with basal swellings in free-living females, a postvulval uterine extension, a thin stylet lacking basal swellings in males, 2 separate spicules, a gubernaculum, and a peloderan bursa. Parasitic females are white, with a straight or slightly curved body and are ovoviviparous. Third-stage juveniles emerge from parasitized beetles and molt twice before reaching the adult stage. Because the coffee berry borer is the most important pest of coffee throughout the world and this parasite partially or completely sterilizes female beetles, it is worthy of further investigation as a potential biological control agent.

  1. Dracunculus mulbus n. sp. (Nematoda: Spirurida) from the water python Liasis fuscus (Serpentes: Boidae) in northern Australia.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hugh I; Mulder, Eridani

    2007-03-01

    A new species of Dracunculus Reichard, 1759 (Nematoda: Spirurida) is described from the tissues surrounding organs in the body-cavity of the water python Liasis fuscus Peters in northern Australia. One to 14 worms were recovered from 22% (27/120) of pythons examined. Males were located principally around the lungs, liver and heart of the hosts, and females were recovered from peritoneal tissue surrounding the intestines and lining the body-cavity. This species differs from previously described species of Dracunculus in the position of the papillae at the posterior end in males, and in the possession of thick, narrow caudal alae. Submedian cephalic papillae are single in both sexes. Dorsal and ventral anterior cephalic papillae are absent in males. This is the first report of a species of Dracunculus from the Australian region.

  2. New genus of Cosmocercidae (Nematoda) and other helminths in Hylarana volkerjane (Anura: Ranidae) from Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Bursey, Charles R; Goldberg, Stephen R; Kraus, Fred

    2012-08-01

    Paraplesiohedruris rinse n. gen., n. sp. (Ascaridida; Cosmocercoidae; Cosmocercidae) from the large intestine of Hylarana volkerjane (Anura; Ranidae) is described and illustrated. The new genus is assigned to the Cosmocercinae of the Cosmocercidae based on the presence of an esophagus composed of a short pharynx, cylindrical corpus, isthmus, and valved bulb; on the presence in males of paired spicules and numerous caudal papillae; plus the presence in the female of an equatorial vulva, 2 uteri, a short tail, and thin-shelled eggs. The Cosmocercinae now contains 10 genera. Hylarana volkerjane was also found to harbor 6 additional species of Nematoda, adults of Aplectana macintoshii, Icosiella papuensis, Meteterakis crombiei, Paracapillaria spratti, Physalopteroides milnensis, and larvae of Abbreviata sp., as well as 1 species of Acanthocephala, Pseudoacanthocephalus bufonis.

  3. Description of Riouxgolvania kapapkamui Sp. N. (Nematoda: Muspiceoidea: Muspiceidae), a peculiar intradermal parasite of bats in Hokkaido, Japan.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hideo; Satô, Masahiko; Maeda, Kishio; Murayama, Yoshiko

    2012-10-01

    Riouxgolvania kapapkamui sp. n. (Nematoda: Muspiceoidea: Muspiceidae), a peculiar intradermal parasite, is described based on gravid adults, eggs, and first-, second-, and third-stage larvae collected from dermal nodules formed in Myotis macrodactylus and Myotis ikonnikovi bats from Hokkaido, Japan. The nematode is readily distinguished from 3 previously described congeners in having a globular body with brown, transverse striae in the anterior region of fully grown females. The third-stage larva is also distinguished from other congeners by having a round tail end. Nucleotide sequences of the analyzed partial SSU rDNA-ITS1 region and partial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 of mtDNA showed greater similarity to chromadoreans rather than to enopleans. This is the first report of muspiceoid nematodes from Asia.

  4. Hasanuddinia maxomyos n. gen., n. sp. and Heligmonoides musseri n. sp. (Nematoda: Heligmonellidae) collected from endemic murines of Sulawesi, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, H; Syafruddin

    1994-10-01

    Two new nematodes belonging to the subfamily Nippostrongylinae (Nematoda: Trichostrongyloidea: Heligmonellidae) are described based on specimens from endemic murines of Sulawesi, Indonesia: Hasanuddinia maxomyos n. gen., n. sp. from Maxomys musschenbroekii and Eropeplus canus, and Heligmonoides musseri n. sp. from M. musschenbroekii, E. canus, and Margaretamys elegans. Hasanuddinia is closest to Rattusstrongylus of Malaysian rats in lacking a carene and in having a lateromedian gradient in the size of the synlophe ridges in the ventral side of the midbody but is distinguished in that the dorsal ray is divided in the distal half. Heligmonoides musseri most resembles H. bulbosus of Maxomys whiteheadi of Malaysia in having a carene supported by slender ridges of which the proximal portion is not thickened but is distinguished in having longer externodorsal rays and longer spicules. The ancestors of the present Sulawesi nematodes seem to have originated on the southeast Asian continent, were introduced to Sulawesi with the dispersal of some murines, and subsequently speciated.

  5. Two new genera of the pharyngodonidae (Nematoda: Oxyuroidea) found in rhacophorid frogs of the Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hideo

    2005-02-01

    Okinawandros goldbergi n. gen., n. sp. and Ataronema sekii n. gen., n. sp. (Nematoda: Pharyngodonidae) are described from rhacophorid frogs of the Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan. Okinawandros n. gen. resembles Batracholandros Freitas et Ibañez, 1965 and Synodontisia Petter, Vassiliades et Troncy, 1972 but is readily distinguished from the former in lacking laterally situated genital papillae and by having anteriorly directed vagina and from the latter by having operculated eggs and lacking a spicule. Ataronema n. gen. most closely resembles Parathelandros Baylis, 1930 but is readily distinguished because the posterior pair of caudal papillae is not rosette shaped and the eggs are not operculated. Morphological notes of Pharyngodon polypedatis Yamaguti, 1941 are included.

  6. Whipworm diversity in West African rodents: a molecular approach and the description of Trichuris duplantieri n. sp. (Nematoda: Trichuridae).

    PubMed

    Ribas, Alexis; Diagne, Christophe; Tatard, Caroline; Diallo, Mamoudou; Poonlaphdecha, Srisupaph; Brouat, Carine

    2017-04-01

    Whipworms were collected from rodents (Muridae) from six West African countries: Burkina-Faso, the Islamic Republic of Mauritania, and the Republics of Benin, Guinea, Mali and Senegal. Molecular sequences (ITS-1, 5.8S and ITS-2 of the ribosomal DNA gene) and morphometric characters were analysed in Trichuris (Nematoda: Trichuridae) specimens found in seven host species: Arvicanthis niloticus, Gerbilliscus gambianus, Gerbillus gerbillus, G. tarabuli, Mastomys erythroleucus, M. huberti and M. natalensis. Phylogenetic analyses revealed three clades, one recognised as Trichuris mastomysi, previously recorded in M. natalensis from Tanzania, and the other two previously undescribed. A new species named Trichuris duplantieri n. sp., found in Gerbillus spp. from Mauritania, was characterised using molecular and morphometric methods.

  7. Redescription of Trichuris pampeana (Nematoda: Trichuridae) from the South American subterranean rodent Ctenomys talarum Thomas, 1898 (Rodentia: Octodontidae).

    PubMed

    Rossin, M Alejandra; Malizia, Ana I

    2005-02-01

    Trichuris pampeana Suriano and Navone, 1994 (Nematoda: Trichuridae) is redescribed from voucher specimens from the type host Ctenomys azarae Thomas, 1903 (Rodentia: Octodontidae) and from parasites collected from 2 populations of the subterranean rodent C. talarum Thomas, 1898 from Mar de Cobo and Necochea, Buenos Aires Province, Argentina. After a revision of these nematodes, it was confirmed that the following characters were not considered in the original description: bacillary band, cells from the esophagointestinal junction, ejaculatory duct, vas deferens, adanal papillae, vagina, oviduct, and rectum. Additional information about the spicular sheath, vulva, uteri, and ovary is provided. The morphological features given in this redescription allow to confirm the identity of T. pampeana as a valid species and also to distinguish it more clearly from other species of the genus.

  8. Maturation feeding and transmission of Bursaphelenchus xylophilus (Nematoda: Parasitaphelenchidae) by Monochamus alternatus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) inoculated with Beauveria bassiana (Deuteromycotina: Hyphomycetes).

    PubMed

    Maehara, Noritoshi; He, Xueyou; Shimazu, Mitsuaki

    2007-02-01

    We examined the amount of maturation feeding and transmission of pinewood nematodes, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus (Steiner et Buhrer) Nickle (Nematoda: Parasitaphelenchidae), to healthy pine (Pinus spp.) trees by pine sawyer Monochamus alternatus Hope (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) adults infected with Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) Vuill. (Deuteromycotina: Hyphomycetes). Inoculated beetles fed less than noninoculated beetles, probably because feeding by inoculated beetles began to decrease at about 4 d postinoculation and inoculated beetles ceased to feed for several days before their death. In inoculated beetles carrying >1,000 nematodes, some beetles died before nematode departure. The remaining heavily nematode-infested beetles lived until the beginning of nematode departure, but they had stopped feeding, preventing the nematodes from entering pine twigs. We suggest that microbial control of pine sawyer adults by B. bassiana may be effective in preventing transmission of pine wilt disease to healthy pine trees.

  9. A new species of Syphacia (Seuratoxyuris) (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) from Sooretamys angouya Fischer, 1814 (Rodentia: Cricetidae) in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Robles, María del Rosario; Panisse, Guillermo; Navone, Graciela Teresa

    2014-11-01

    Syphacia (Seuratoxyuris) hugoti n. sp. (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) is described from the cecum of Sooretamys angouya (Cricetidae: Sigmodontinae: Oryzomyini) captured in Formosa Province, Argentina. The diagnosis of the subgenus is emended, and the new species is separated from eight congeners by the distribution of submedian papillae and amphids, shape of the cephalic plate, presence of deirids, absence of cervical and lateral alae, length of the spicule, structure of the accessory hook of the gubernaculum and distance of excretory pore and vulva from the anterior extremity. The analysis suggests that S. (Se.) oryzomyos should be removed from Seuratoxyuris and redesignated as S. (Syphacia) oryzomyos n. comb. To date, of the species of Syphacia found in South and North American, 7 parasitize Oryzomyini rodents, of which two are distributed in Argentina. The present study constitutes the first record of the subgenus Seuratoxyuris from Argentina and the third record of a Syphacia species from rodents of the tribe Oryzomyini.

  10. Syphacia (Syphacia) maxomyos sp. n. (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) from Maxomys spp. (Rodentia: Muridae) from Sulawesi and Sumatra, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    DEWI, Kartika; HASEGAWA, Hideo; FITRIANA, Yuli Sulistya; ASAKAWA, Mitsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The present report describes Syphacia (Syphacia) maxomyos sp. n. (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) from two species of spiny rats, Maxomys musschenbroekii from Sulawesi and M. whiteheadi from Sumatra. It is characterized by a cephalic plate extending laterally with dorsoventral constriction and stumpy eggs with an operculum rim reaching pole. It is readily distinguishable by the former feature from all of hitherto known representatives of this genus in Indonesia, but it resembles parasites in Murini and Hydromyni rodents in continental Asia and Sahul. This is the first Syphacia species distributed in both the Sunda Shelf and Sulawesi with the exception of Syphacia muris, a cosmopolitan pinworm found in rodents of the of genus Rattus. It is surmised that S. maxomyos is specific to Maxomys and that it was introduced to Sulawesi by dispersal of some Maxomys from the Sunda Shelf. PMID:26062434

  11. Codon usage patterns in Nematoda: analysis based on over 25 million codons in thirty-two species

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Background Codon usage has direct utility in molecular characterization of species and is also a marker for molecular evolution. To understand codon usage within the diverse phylum Nematoda, we analyzed a total of 265,494 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from 30 nematode species. The full genomes of Caenorhabditis elegans and C. briggsae were also examined. A total of 25,871,325 codons were analyzed and a comprehensive codon usage table for all species was generated. This is the first codon usage table available for 24 of these organisms. Results Codon usage similarity in Nematoda usually persists over the breadth of a genus but then rapidly diminishes even within each clade. Globodera, Meloidogyne, Pristionchus, and Strongyloides have the most highly derived patterns of codon usage. The major factor affecting differences in codon usage between species is the coding sequence GC content, which varies in nematodes from 32% to 51%. Coding GC content (measured as GC3) also explains much of the observed variation in the effective number of codons (R = 0.70), which is a measure of codon bias, and it even accounts for differences in amino acid frequency. Codon usage is also affected by neighboring nucleotides (N1 context). Coding GC content correlates strongly with estimated noncoding genomic GC content (R = 0.92). On examining abundant clusters in five species, candidate optimal codons were identified that may be preferred in highly expressed transcripts. Conclusion Evolutionary models indicate that total genomic GC content, probably the product of directional mutation pressure, drives codon usage rather than the converse, a conclusion that is supported by examination of nematode genomes. PMID:26271136

  12. Codon usage patterns in Nematoda: analysis based on over 25 million codons in thirty-two species.

    PubMed

    Mitreva, Makedonka; Wendl, Michael C; Martin, John; Wylie, Todd; Yin, Yong; Larson, Allan; Parkinson, John; Waterston, Robert H; McCarter, James P

    2006-01-01

    Codon usage has direct utility in molecular characterization of species and is also a arker for molecular evolution. To understand codon usage within the diverse phylum Nematoda,we analyzed a total of 265,494 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from 30 nematode species. The full genomes of Caenorhabditis elegans and C. briggsae were also examined. A total of 25,871,325 codons ere analyzed and a comprehensive codon usage table for all species was generated. This is the first codon usage table available for 24 of these organisms. Codon usage similarity in Nematoda usually persists over the breadth of a genus but thenrapidly diminishes even within each clade. Globodera, Meloidogyne, Pristionchus, and Strongyloides have the most highly derived patterns of codon usage. The major factor affecting differences in codon usage between species is the coding sequence GC content, which varies in nematodes from 32%to 51%. Coding GC content (measured as GC3) also explains much of the observed variation in the effective number of codons (R = 0.70), which is a measure of codon bias, and it even accounts for differences in amino acid frequency. Codon usage is also affected by neighboring nucleotides(N1 context). Coding GC content correlates strongly with estimated noncoding genomic GC content (R = 0.92). On examining abundant clusters in five species, candidate optimal codons were identified that may be preferred in highly expressed transcripts. Evolutionary models indicate that total genomic GC content, probably the product of directional mutation pressure, drives codon usage rather than the converse, a conclusion that is supported by examination of nematode genomes.

  13. Moving towards a complete molecular framework of the Nematoda: a focus on the Enoplida and early-branching clades

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The subclass Enoplia (Phylum Nematoda) is purported to be the earliest branching clade amongst all nematode taxa, yet the deep phylogeny of this important lineage remains elusive. Free-living marine species within the order Enoplida play prominent roles in marine ecosystems, but previous molecular phylogenies have provided only the briefest evolutionary insights; this study aimed to firmly resolve internal relationships within the hyper-diverse but poorly understood Enoplida. In addition, we revisited the molecular framework of the Nematoda using a rigorous phylogenetic approach in order to investigate patterns of early splits amongst the oldest lineages (Dorylaimia and Enoplia). Results Morphological identifications, nuclear gene sequences (18S and 28S rRNA), and mitochondrial gene sequences (cox1) were obtained from marine Enoplid specimens representing 37 genera. The 18S gene was used to resolve deep splits within the Enoplia and evaluate the branching order of major clades in the nematode tree; multiple phylogenetic methods and rigorous empirical tests were carried out to assess tree topologies under different parameters and combinations of taxa. Significantly increased taxon sampling within the Enoplida resulted in a well-supported, robust phylogenetic topology of this group, although the placement of certain clades was not fully resolved. Our analysis could not unequivocally confirm the earliest splits in the nematode tree, and outgroup choice significantly affected the observed branching order of the Dorylaimia and Enoplia. Both 28S and cox1 were too variable to infer deep phylogeny, but provided additional insight at lower taxonomic levels. Conclusions Analysis of internal relationships reveals that the Enoplia is split into two main clades, with groups consisting of terrestrial (Triplonchida) and primarily marine fauna (Enoplida). Five independent lineages were recovered within the Enoplida, containing a mixture of marine and terrestrial species

  14. Moving towards a complete molecular framework of the Nematoda: a focus on the Enoplida and early-branching clades.

    PubMed

    Bik, Holly M; Lambshead, P John D; Thomas, W Kelley; Lunt, David H

    2010-11-12

    The subclass Enoplia (Phylum Nematoda) is purported to be the earliest branching clade amongst all nematode taxa, yet the deep phylogeny of this important lineage remains elusive. Free-living marine species within the order Enoplida play prominent roles in marine ecosystems, but previous molecular phylogenies have provided only the briefest evolutionary insights; this study aimed to firmly resolve internal relationships within the hyper-diverse but poorly understood Enoplida. In addition, we revisited the molecular framework of the Nematoda using a rigorous phylogenetic approach in order to investigate patterns of early splits amongst the oldest lineages (Dorylaimia and Enoplia). Morphological identifications, nuclear gene sequences (18S and 28S rRNA), and mitochondrial gene sequences (cox1) were obtained from marine Enoplid specimens representing 37 genera. The 18S gene was used to resolve deep splits within the Enoplia and evaluate the branching order of major clades in the nematode tree; multiple phylogenetic methods and rigorous empirical tests were carried out to assess tree topologies under different parameters and combinations of taxa. Significantly increased taxon sampling within the Enoplida resulted in a well-supported, robust phylogenetic topology of this group, although the placement of certain clades was not fully resolved. Our analysis could not unequivocally confirm the earliest splits in the nematode tree, and outgroup choice significantly affected the observed branching order of the Dorylaimia and Enoplia. Both 28S and cox1 were too variable to infer deep phylogeny, but provided additional insight at lower taxonomic levels. Analysis of internal relationships reveals that the Enoplia is split into two main clades, with groups consisting of terrestrial (Triplonchida) and primarily marine fauna (Enoplida). Five independent lineages were recovered within the Enoplida, containing a mixture of marine and terrestrial species; clade structure suggests that

  15. Redescription of Enterobius (Enterobius) macaci Yen, 1973 (Nematoda: Oxyuridae: Enterobiinae) based on material collected from wild Japanese macaque, Macaca fuscata (Primates: Cercopithecidae).

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hideo; Sato, Hiroshi; Torii, Harumi

    2012-02-01

    Enterobius (Enterobius) macaci Yen, 1973 (Nematoda: Oxyuridae: Enterobiinae) was collected from a Japanese macaque, Macaca fuscata, in Nara and Yamaguchi Prefectures, Honshu Island, Japan, for the first time. A redescription is presented along with DNA sequence data. This pinworm is a typical member of the subgenus Enterobius and is characteristic in the spicule morphology, being readily distinguished from other congeners. Phylogenetic analyses based on 18S ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) Cox1 gene assign its position in the pinworm lineage adapted to the Old World primates, showing divergence before the splitting of the chimpanzee and human pinworms.

  16. Crenosoma brasiliense sp. n. (Nematoda: Metastrongyloidea) parasitic in lesser grison, Galictis cuja (Molina, 1782) (Carnivora, Mustelidae) from Brazil, with a key to species of Crenosoma Molin, 1861.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Fabiano M; Muniz-Pereira, Luis C; de Souza, Lima Sueli; Neto, Antonio H A Moraes; Gonçalves, Pamela R; Luque, José L

    2012-09-01

    This study describes Crenosoma brasiliense (Nematoda, Metastrongyloidea), a new species parasitic in bronchi and bronchioles of Galictis cuja (Molina) (Carnivora, Mustelidae) from Brazil. This species differs from other 11 species of Crenosoma by having a cuticular projection at the distal end of the spicules, forming a prominent blade at the tip of the spicule, a vulval cuticular appendage with a triangular shape and prominent vulval lips. There are no previous records of species of Metastrongyloidea in G. cuja or species of Crenosoma in South America. Therefore, the new species represents the first host record and first geographical record of species of Crenosoma in South America.

  17. Current distribution of Achatina fulica, in the state of São Paulo including records of Aelurostrongylus abstrusus (Nematoda) larvae infestation.

    PubMed

    Ohlweiler, Fernanda Pires; Guimarães, Marisa Cristina de Almeida; Takahashi, Fernanda Yoshika; Eduardo, Juliana Manas

    2010-01-01

    The currently known distribution range of Achatina fulica Bowdich, 1822, in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, is presented. The record of A. fulica naturally infested with Aelurostrongylus abstrusus larvae (Railliet, 1898) (Nematoda: Metastrongylidae) can be found in the city of Guaratinguetá. It was found A. fulica with Metastrongylidae larvae without known medical and veterinary importance in the cities of Carapicuíba, Embu-Guaçu, Itapevi, São Caetano do Sul, São Paulo and Taboão da Serra.

  18. Syphacia sp. (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) in coprolites of Kerodon rupestris Wied, 1820 (Rodentia: Caviidae) from 5,300 years BP in northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Souza, Mônica Vieira de; Sianto, Luciana; Chame, Marcia; Ferreira, Luiz Fernando; Araújo, Adauto

    2012-06-01

    We present the results of paleoparasitological analyses in coprolites of Kerodon rupestris, rodent endemic to rocky areas of Brazil's semiarid region. The coprolites were collected from excavations at the archaeological site of Toca dos Coqueiros, in the National Park of Serra da Capivara, southeastern of state of Piauí. Syphacia sp. (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) eggs were identified in coprolites dated at 5,300 ± 50 years before present. This is the first record of the genus Syphacia in rodent coprolites in the Americas.

  19. Description and molecular characterisation of Cloacina johnstoni sp. nov. (Nematoda: Strongyloidea) from the wallaroo, Macropus robustus (Marsupialia: Macropodidae) and relationships with the synhospitalic species C. macropodis.

    PubMed

    Shuttleworth, Mary; Jabbar, Abdul; Beveridge, Ian

    2016-09-01

    Cloacina johnstoni sp. nov. (Nematoda: Strongyloidea) is described from the sacculated forestomach of the wallaroo, Macropus robustus (Marsupialia: Macropodidae) from Australia. It resembles the synhospitalic species Cloacina macropodis but differs from it principally in the shape of the cephalic papillae. The two species are also distinguishable based on differences in the first and second internal transcribed spacers (ITS) of nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA). Cloacina johnstoni commonly co-occurs in the same individual host as C. macropodis but has a more restricted geographical distribution.

  20. Two new species of philometrid nematodes (Nematoda: Philometridae) in Epinephelus coioides (Hamilton, 1822) from the South Bali Sea, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Dewi, Kartika; Palm, Harry W

    2013-01-25

    Based on light and scanning electron microscopy, two new species of philometrid nematodes, Spirophilometra endangae sp. nov. and Philometra epinepheli sp. nov. (Nematoda: Dracunculoidea: Philometridae) are described from Epinephelus coioides (Hamilton, 1822) (Perciformes: Serranidae) from the South Bali Sea, Indonesia. Spirophilometra endangae sp. nov. was isolated from the fins of E. coioides. The new species can be distinguished from the most closely related S. eichleri Parukhin, 1971 by a larger total body length and the site of infection in the host. The new species differs from S. centropomi (Caballero, 1974) also in the larger body size of the gravid females and the site of infection in the host. S. en-dangae sp. nov. differs from S. pacifica (Moravec, Santana-Pineros, Gonzales-Solis & Torres-Huerta, 2007) in the struc-ture and arrangement of the spines on the middle part of the body, the infection site of the worm, the type host and the zoogeographical host distribution. Philometra epinepheli sp. nov. differs from all other Philometra spp. congeners so far recorded from Ephinepelus groupers in the total body length and the site of infection. This is the first opercula-infecting species of Philometra described from the fish family Serranidae.

  1. Dichelyne (Cucullanellus) romani n. sp. (Nematoda: Cucullanidae) in notacanthid fishes from the Northeast Atlantic and Western Mediterranean.

    PubMed

    Isbert, Wolf; Montero, Francisco Esteban; Carrassón, Maite; González-Solís, David

    2015-05-01

    A new cucullanid, Dichelyne (Cucullanellus) romani n. sp. (Nematoda: Cucullanidae), is described from the digestive tract of two notacanthid fishes, Notacanthus chemnitzii Bloch and N. bonaparte Risso (Notacanthiformes: Notacanthidae), from the Northeast Atlantic and Western Mediterranean. The presence of a precloacal sucker and ten pairs of caudal papillae in males allocates it to the subgenus Cucullanellus Törnquist, 1931. The new species differs from other members of this subgenus in its larger body size, smaller spicule/body length ratio, the distribution of caudal papillae, and the position of deirids and excretory pore. Both notacanthid fishes act as definitive hosts with slightly larger nematode specimens detected in N. chemnitzii. A wide intraspecific variability was found in the distribution of caudal papillae, and in some specimens the position of deirids, excretory pore and length of intestinal caecum also varied. A complete list of all assigned species of the subgenus Cucullanellus is presented and discussed as there are several uncertainties regarding the validity and synonymy of some species. This is the first species of Dichelyne Jägerskiöld, 1902 in a notacanthid fish and one of the only two records in deep-sea fish species.

  2. Redescription of the females of Hystrignathus rigidus Leidy, 1850 (Nematoda: Hystrignathidae), parasites of Odontotaenius disjunctus (Coleoptera: Passalidae) from eastern USA.

    PubMed

    Morffe, Jans; García, Nayla; Davis, Andrew K

    2015-03-30

    The female of Hystrignathus rigidus Leidy, 1850 (Nematoda: Hystrignathidae) is redescribed on the basis of new material from Odontotaenius disjunctus (Coleoptera: Passalidae) from Athens, Georgia, USA; which also constitutes a new locality record. SEM images are provided for the first time for the species. It is also first shown that H. rigidus presents ridged-shelled eggs. A differential diagnosis is provided. H. rigidus can be differentiated from the rest of the species of this genus by having a short, non inflated first cephalic annule; spines that surpass the level of the oesophagus, an absence of lateral alae, ridged-shelled eggs and its length of the body and tail. The material from the present study differs from a previous redescription by Christie (1934) by its shorter body (2.125-2.950 vs. 2.130-4.200), first cephalic annule (0.003-0.005 vs. 0.012) and oesophagus (0.350-0.430 vs. 0.650-0.670).

  3. Gonad-infecting species of Philometra (Nematoda: Philometridae) from groupers Epinephelus spp. (Osteichthyes: Serranidae) in the Bay of Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Moravec, František; Manoharan, Jayaraman

    2014-10-01

    Based on light and scanning electron microscopical studies, two new and one specifically not identified gonad-infecting species of Philometra Costa, 1845 (Nematoda: Philometridae) are described from the ovary of marine fishes of the genus Epinephelus Bloch (Serranidae, Perciformes) in the Bay of Bengal, off the eastern coast of India: P. indica sp. nov. (male and females) from the honeycomb grouper E. merra Bloch, P. tropica sp. nov. (males and females) from the duskytail grouper E. bleekeri (Vaillant) and Philometra sp. (only females) from the cloudy grouper E. erythrurus (Valenciennes). Philometra indica is mainly characterized by the length of spicules 192-195 μm and the gubernaculum 84 μm, the distal tip of the gubernaculum without a dorsal protuberance, and by the presence of five pairs of caudal papillae. Philometra tropica is mainly characterized by the spicules conspicuously ventrally distended at their posterior halves, the distal tip of the gubernaculum with a dorsal protuberance, and the presence of three pairs of caudal papillae.

  4. Description of a new species, Trichuris ursinus n. sp. (Nematoda: Trichuridae) from Papio ursinus Keer, 1792 from South Africa.

    PubMed

    Callejón, Rocío; Halajian, Ali; Cutillas, Cristina

    2017-07-01

    In the present work, we carried out a morphological, biometrical and molecular study of whipworms Trichuris Roederer, 1761 (Nematoda: Trichuridae) parasitizing Papio ursinus Keer 1792 (Chacma baboon). Biometrical and molecular data suggest a new species of Trichuris parasitizing baboons. In addition of main morphological features (spicule, spicule sheath, spicule tube, proximal cloacal tube, distal cloacal tube, vulva, vagina), the mean values of individual variables between Trichuris colobae, Trichuris suis, Trichuris trichiura examined by Student's t tests suggest that T. ursinus n. sp. constitutes a new species. The combined analysis of three markers (cox1, cob and ITS2) revealed a sister relationships between T. colobae and T. ursinus n. sp. Mitochondrial sequences revealed a higher inter-specific similarity between T. ursinus n. sp., T. suis and T. colobae. Phylogenetic hypotheses for both mitochondrial genes strongly supported distinct genetic lineages corresponding to different species of the genus Trichuris associated with certain hosts. Thus, T. suis, T. colobae and T. ursinus n. sp. appeared as a sister group and separated from Trichuris spp. from humans and other species of primates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. New species of Trichuris (Nematoda:Trichuridae) from Akodon montensis, Thomas, 1913, of the Paranaense Forest in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Robles, María del Rosario

    2011-04-01

    Species of Trichuris (Nematoda:Trichuridae) parasitize a broad range of mammalian hosts. To date, 21 Trichuris species infecting nine families of rodents have been found in North and South America. Trichuris navonae n. sp. is described on the basis of specimens recovered from a species of forest-dwelling mice, Akodon montensis (Cricetidae: Sigmodontinae), from nine localities of Misiones Province, Argentina. A comparison with all the species of Trichuris from North and South American rodents is given. The separation of the new species of Trichuris is based on morphologic and morphometrica features, such as the absence of a spicular tube, the presence of a cylindrical spicular sheath with sharp spines, a non-protrusive vulva, a long anterior-posterior portion of the body, a lengthy spicule, and a proximal and distal cloacal tube. This is the third record of this genus in rodents of the Sigmodontinae from Argentina and the fifth record from South American rodents. Despite the large number of potential host species, only about 1.9% of sigmodontine rodent species have been reported as hosts of Trichuris spp. It is suggested that this number represents but a small fraction of Trichuris spp. that occur in sigmodontine rodents, and that additional survey of this group should yield additional species.

  6. Characterization of the complete mitochondrial genome of Ortleppascaris sinensis (Nematoda: Heterocheilidae) and comparative mitogenomic analysis of eighteen Ascaridida nematodes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J H; Tu, G J; Wu, X B; Li, C P

    2017-06-22

    Ortleppascaris sinensis (Nematoda: Ascaridida) is a dominant intestinal nematode of the captive Chinese alligator. However, the epidemiology, molecular ecology and population genetics of this parasite remain largely unexplored. In this study, the complete mitochondrial (mt) genome sequence of O. sinensis was first determined using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based primer-walking strategy, and this is also the first sequencing of the complete mitochondrial genome of a member of the genus Ortleppascaris. The circular mitochondrial genome (13,828 bp) of O. sinensis contained 12 protein-coding, 22 transfer RNA and 2 ribosomal RNA genes, but lacked the ATP synthetase subunit 8 gene. Finally, phylogenetic analysis of mtDNAs indicated that the genus Ortleppascaris should be attributed to the family Heterocheilidae. It is necessary to sequence more mtNDAs of Ortleppascaris nematodes in the future to test and confirm our conclusion. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of O. sinensis reported here should contribute to molecular diagnosis, epidemiological investigations and ecological studies of O. sinensis and other related Ascaridida nematodes.

  7. The mitochondrial genome sequence of Enterobius vermicularis (Nematoda: Oxyurida)--an idiosyncratic gene order and phylogenetic information for chromadorean nematodes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seokha; Sultana, Tahera; Eom, Keeseon S; Park, Yung Chul; Soonthornpong, Nathan; Nadler, Steven A; Park, Joong-Ki

    2009-01-15

    The complete mitochondrial genome sequence was determined for the human pinworm Enterobius vermicularis (Oxyurida: Nematoda) and used to infer its phylogenetic relationship to other major groups of chromadorean nematodes. The E. vermicularis genome is a 14,010-bp circular DNA molecule that encodes 36 genes (12 proteins, 22 tRNAs, and 2 rRNAs). This mtDNA genome lacks atp8, as reported for almost all other nematode species investigated. Phylogenetic analyses (maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, neighbor joining, and Bayesian inference) of nucleotide sequences for the 12 protein-coding genes of 25 nematode species placed E. vermicularis, a representative of the order Oxyurida, as sister to the main Ascaridida+Rhabditida group. Tree topology comparisons using statistical tests rejected an alternative hypothesis favoring a closer relationship among Ascaridida, Spirurida, and Oxyurida, which has been supported from most studies based on nuclear ribosomal DNA sequences. Unlike the relatively conserved gene arrangement found for most chromadorean taxa, E. vermicularis mtDNA gene order is very unique, not sharing similarity to any other nematode species reported to date. This lack of gene order similarity may represent idiosyncratic gene rearrangements unique to this specific lineage of the oxyurids. To more fully understand the extent of gene rearrangement and its evolutionary significance within the nematode phylogenetic framework, additional mitochondrial genomes representing a greater evolutionary diversity of species must be characterized.

  8. Prevalence, intensity, and differential development of Pseudodelphis oligocotti (Nematoda: Dracunculoidea) in sympatric fish hosts of the northeastern Pacific coast.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Shannon N; Adamson, Martin L

    2004-08-01

    Counter to expectations of coevolved parasite-host relationships, parasites frequently infect hosts that never contribute to their reproduction, making the identification of a parasite's true host-specificity problematic. Pseudodelphis oligocotti (Nematoda: Dracunculoidea) infects several coastal Pacific fishes, but its course of development appears highly variable, suggesting that incidence does not reflect effective host range. To determine the host range of P. oligocotti and describe its relationship to various potential hosts, 24 fish species were examined from several British Columbia localities for prevalence, intensity, and extent and tissue location of parasite development. Pseudodelphis oligocotti infects 9 species of fishes from 5 orders, of which penpoint gunnel, Apodichthys flavidus, showed the highest prevalence and intensity, up to 80% and 19 (+/- 17.1 SD) worms per host, respectively. Although subadult and adult P. oligocotti occurred in all 9 fishes, larvigerous P. oligocotti only occurred in A. flavidus and rarely in the northern clingfish, Gobiesox maeandricus. Infective first-stage larvae were recovered from gill tissue of A. flavidus. Thus, at most only 2 of the 9 host species infected by P. oligocotti actually contribute to its transmission. The occurrence of P. oligocotti in diverse hosts may be accounted for by the parasite's indiscriminant mode of transmission via ingestion of free-living intermediate copepod hosts, where highly exposed or more suitable fishes (or both) are closely related by diet and microhabitat. This study demonstrates how parasite transmission and host ecology can greatly affect observed host range and ultimately its potential for expansion.

  9. Liver histopathology in the cane toad, Rhinella marina (Amphibia: Bufonidae), induced by Ortleppascaris sp. larvae (Nematoda: Ascarididae).

    PubMed

    Silva, Jefferson P E; da Silva, Djane C B; Melo, Francisco T V; Giese, Elane G; Furtado, Adriano P; Santos, Jeannie N

    2013-04-01

    Exposure to parasites is considered to be an important factor in the development of many diseases and histopathologies which are the result of the parasite-host interaction. The present study evaluated the impact of natural infection by larvae of Ortleppascaris sp. (Nematoda: Ascaridida) in the liver of the cane toad Rhinella marina (Linnaeus, 1758). Larvae were encysted in nodules delimited by collagenous fibers and fibroblasts or freely within the hepatic parenchyma, provoking a clear response from the host. The histological examination of the liver revealed viable larvae in a number of different developmental stages, as well as cysts filled with amorphous material and cell residues and surrounded by dense fibrotic tissue. The infection of the liver by these larvae induces a significant increase in the area occupied by melanomacrophages and a reduction or deficit in the vascularization of the liver, hypertrophy of the hepatocytes, vacuolar bodies, and cytoplasmatic granules. Focal concentrations of inflammatory infiltrates were observed enclosing the unencapsulated early-stage larvae. These results indicate that infection by Ortleppascaris sp. induces severe physiological problems and histopathological lesions in the liver of R. marina .

  10. New evidence on a cold case: trophic transmission, distribution and host-specificity in Hedruris spinigera (Nematoda: Hedruridae).

    PubMed

    Luque, José L; Vieira, Fabiano M; Herrmann, Kristin; King, Tania M; Poulin, Robert; Lagrue, Clément

    2010-09-01

    The life cycle of Hedruris spinigera Baylis, 1931 (Nematoda: Hedruridae) is determined here with the first formal identification of the parasite's intermediate host: the crustacean amphipod Paracorophium excavatum Thomson. Adult H. spinigera are redescribed from specimens collected from the stomach of fishes, Retropinna retropinna (Richardson) and Aldrichettaforsteri (Valenciennes), from Lake Waihola, New Zealand. Immature adults of the parasite collected from intermediate hosts (P. excavatum) are also described for the first time. The prevalence, abundance and intensity of infection of H. spinigera in several fish species are quantified along with the occurrence of P. excavatum, the parasite's intermediate host, in fish stomach contents. Although H. spinigera's transmission mode (trophic transmission) and fish diet potentially expose all fish species to infection, some level of host specificity must exist as parasite prevalence, abundance and intensity of infection vary greatly between potential definitive host species. We suggest here that the anatomy of the fish digestive tract and especially that of the stomach plays an important role in host suitability for H. spinigera. While P. excavatum is the only intermediate host in Lake Waihola, H. spinigera was found in six different fish species: Aldrichetta forsteri, Galaxias maculatus (Jenyns), Retropinna retropinna, Rhombosolea retiaria Hutton, Perca fluviatilis Linnaeus and Salmo trutta Linnaeus; although typical hedrurid attachment and mating positions were observed only in R. retropinna and A. forsteri. The limited distribution of H. spinigera is most likely due to that of its different host species (intermediate and definitive), all inhabitants of coastal fresh and brackish waters.

  11. Identification and Prevalence of Globocephalus samoensis (Nematoda: Ancylostomatidae) among Wild Boars (Sus scrofa coreanus) from Southwestern Regions of Korea.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Kyu-Sung; Ahn, Ah-Jin; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Suh, Guk-Hyun; Joo, Kyoung-Woong; Shin, Sung-Shik

    2015-10-01

    This study describes the first record of Globocephalus samoensis (Nematoda: Ancylostomatidae) recovered in wild boars from southwestern regions of Korea. Gastrointestinal tracts of 111 Korean wild boars (Sus scrofa coreanus) hunted from mountains in Suncheon-si, Gwangyang-si, and Boseong-gun between 2009 and 2012 were examined for their visceral helminths. G. samoensis, as identified by morphological characteristics of the head and tail, were recovered from the small intestine of 51 (45.9%) wild boars. Worms were found from 7 of 28 wild boars (25.0%) from Suncheon-si, 40 of 79 (50.6%) from Gwangyang-si, and all 4 (100%) from Boseong-gun. The length of adult females was 7.2±0.5 mm, and the thickest part of the body measured the average 0.47±0.03 mm, while those of males were 6.52±0.19 and 0.37±0.02 mm, respectively. The buccal cavity was equipped with a pair of large and bicuspid subventral lancets near the base of the capsule. The average length of spicules of males was 0.45±0.02 mm. By the present study, G. samoensis is recorded for the first time in southwestern regions of Korea. Additionally, morphological characteristics and identification keys provided in the present study will be helpful in the faunistic and taxonomic studies for strongylid nematodes in both domestic and wild pigs. The infection of G. samoensis apparently did not elicit pathologic lesions, as revealed by macroscopic observation during the autopsy of all wild boars in this study.

  12. Integrated taxonomy: traditional approach and DNA barcoding for the identification of filarioid worms and related parasites (Nematoda)

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Emanuele; Barbuto, Michela; Bain, Odile; Galimberti, Andrea; Uni, Shigehiko; Guerrero, Ricardo; Ferté, Hubert; Bandi, Claudio; Martin, Coralie; Casiraghi, Maurizio

    2009-01-01

    Background We compared here the suitability and efficacy of traditional morphological approach and DNA barcoding to distinguish filarioid nematodes species (Nematoda, Spirurida). A reliable and rapid taxonomic identification of these parasites is the basis for a correct diagnosis of important and widespread parasitic diseases. The performance of DNA barcoding with different parameters was compared measuring the strength of correlation between morphological and molecular identification approaches. Molecular distance estimation was performed with two different mitochondrial markers (coxI and 12S rDNA) and different combinations of data handling were compared in order to provide a stronger tool for easy identification of filarioid worms. Results DNA barcoding and morphology based identification of filarioid nematodes revealed high coherence. Despite both coxI and 12S rDNA allow to reach high-quality performances, only coxI revealed to be manageable. Both alignment algorithm, gaps treatment, and the criteria used to define the threshold value were found to affect the performance of DNA barcoding with 12S rDNA marker. Using coxI and a defined level of nucleotide divergence to delimit species boundaries, DNA barcoding can also be used to infer potential new species. Conclusion An integrated approach allows to reach a higher discrimination power. The results clearly show where DNA-based and morphological identifications are consistent, and where they are not. The coherence between DNA-based and morphological identification for almost all the species examined in our work is very strong. We propose DNA barcoding as a reliable, consistent, and democratic tool for species discrimination in routine identification of parasitic nematodes. PMID:19128479

  13. Identification and Prevalence of Globocephalus samoensis (Nematoda: Ancylostomatidae) among Wild Boars (Sus scrofa coreanus) from Southwestern Regions of Korea

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Kyu-Sung; Ahn, Ah-Jin; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Suh, Guk-Hyun; Joo, Kyoung-Woong; Shin, Sung-Shik

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the first record of Globocephalus samoensis (Nematoda: Ancylostomatidae) recovered in wild boars from southwestern regions of Korea. Gastrointestinal tracts of 111 Korean wild boars (Sus scrofa coreanus) hunted from mountains in Suncheon-si, Gwangyang-si, and Boseong-gun between 2009 and 2012 were examined for their visceral helminths. G. samoensis, as identified by morphological characteristics of the head and tail, were recovered from the small intestine of 51 (45.9%) wild boars. Worms were found from 7 of 28 wild boars (25.0%) from Suncheon-si, 40 of 79 (50.6%) from Gwangyang-si, and all 4 (100%) from Boseong-gun. The length of adult females was 7.2±0.5 mm, and the thickest part of the body measured the average 0.47±0.03 mm, while those of males were 6.52±0.19 and 0.37±0.02 mm, respectively. The buccal cavity was equipped with a pair of large and bicuspid subventral lancets near the base of the capsule. The average length of spicules of males was 0.45±0.02 mm. By the present study, G. samoensis is recorded for the first time in southwestern regions of Korea. Additionally, morphological characteristics and identification keys provided in the present study will be helpful in the faunistic and taxonomic studies for strongylid nematodes in both domestic and wild pigs. The infection of G. samoensis apparently did not elicit pathologic lesions, as revealed by macroscopic observation during the autopsy of all wild boars in this study. PMID:26537041

  14. Deep subsurface mine stalactites trap endemic fissure fluid Archaea, Bacteria, and Nematoda possibly originating from ancient seas.

    PubMed

    Borgonie, Gaëtan; Linage-Alvarez, Borja; Ojo, Abidemi; Shivambu, Steven; Kuloyo, Olukayode; Cason, Errol D; Maphanga, Sihle; Vermeulen, Jan-G; Litthauer, Derek; Ralston, Colin D; Onstott, Tullis C; Sherwood-Lollar, Barbara; Van Heerden, Esta

    2015-01-01

    Stalactites (CaCO3 and salt) from water seeps are frequently encountered in ceilings of mine tunnels whenever they intersect water-bearing faults or fractures. To determine whether stalactites could be mineralized traps for indigenous fracture water microorganisms, we analyzed stalactites collected from three different mines ranging in depth from 1.3 to 3.1 km. During sampling in Beatrix gold mine (1.4 km beneath the surface), central South Africa, CaCO3 stalactites growing on the mine tunnel ceiling were collected and observed, in two cases, to contain a living obligate brackish water/marine nematode species, Monhystrella parvella. After sterilization of the outer surface, mineral layers were physically removed from the outside to the interior, and DNA extracted. Based upon 16S and 18S rRNA gene sequencing, Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya in different combinations were detected for each layer. Using CT scan and electron microscopy the inner structure of CaCO3 and salt stalactites were analyzed. CaCO3 stalactites show a complex pattern of lamellae carrying bacterially precipitated mineral structures. Nematoda were clearly identified between these layers confirming that bacteria and nematodes live inside the stalactites and not only in the central straw. Salt stalactites exhibit a more uniform internal structure. Surprisingly, several Bacteria showing highest sequence identities to marine species were identified. This, together with the observation that the nematode M. parvella recovered from Beatrix gold mine stalactite can only survive in a salty environment makes the origin of the deep subsurface colonization enigmatic. The possibility of a Permian origin of fracture fluids is discussed. Our results indicate stalactites are suitable for biodiversity recovery and act as natural traps for microorganisms in the fissure water long after the water that formed the stalactite stopped flowing.

  15. A new species of Potoroxyuris (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) from the woylie Bettongia penicillata (Marsupialia: Potoroidae) from southwestern Australia.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Russell P; Elliot, Aileen D

    2016-12-01

    Potoroxyuris keninupensis n.sp. (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) is described based on specimens recovered from the caecum and colon of two woylies, Bettongia penicillata (Marsupialia: Potoroidae) from Western Australia. Only one other species of Potoroxyuris has been described previously, Potoroxyuris potoroo (Johnston and Mawson, 1939) Mawson, 1964, from Potorous tridactylus. The new species is most easily differentiated from P. potoroo by the shape of the pharyngeal lobes. The pharyngeal lobes of P. keninupensis n. sp. are widest at the base while those of P. potoroo are widest at the tip. The genus Potoroxyuris most closely resembles Macropoxyuris based especially on structures of the caudal end of males. The other three genera of oxyurids known to infect Australian marsupials have longer caudal alae, and more caudal papillae than these two genera. The genus Potoroxyuris has previously been defined by the characteristic that the pharyngeal lobes protrude through the oral opening. However, the pharyngeal lobes of P. keninupensis n. sp. do not quite protrude, so the definition of the genus should be modified as follows. The genus Potoroxyuris can be easily differentiated from Macropoxyuris by the following differences in the morphology of the buccal cavity. The pharyngeal lobes of Potoroxyuris almost reach the oral opening, or protrude beyond it, whereas those of Macropoxyuris only reach to about the anterior third of the buccal cavity. The buccal cavity of Potoroxyuris is poorly cuticularized compared to Macropoxyuris and other genera of oxyurids known from Australian marsupials, and does not contain inter-radial lamellae.

  16. Anisakis pegreffii (Nematoda: Anisakidae) products modulate oxidative stress and apoptosis-related biomarkers in human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Messina, Concetta Maria; Pizzo, Federica; Santulli, Andrea; Bušelić, Ivana; Boban, Mate; Orhanović, Stjepan; Mladineo, Ivona

    2016-11-25

    In countries with elevated prevalence of zoonotic anisakiasis and high awareness of this parasitosis, a considerable number of cases that associate Anisakis sp. (Nematoda, Anisakidae) and different bowel carcinomas have been described. Although neoplasia and embedded larvae were observed sharing the common site affected by chronic inflammation, no association between the nematode and malignancy were directly proved. Similarly, no data are available about the effect of secretory and excretory products of infecting larvae at the host's cellular level, except in respect to allergenic interaction. To test the mechanisms by which human non-immune cells respond to the larvae, we exposed the fibroblast cell line HS-68 to two Anisakis products (ES, excretory/secretory products; and EC, crude extract) and evaluated molecular markers related to stress response, oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis, such as p53, HSP70, TNF-α, c-jun and c-fos, employing cell viability assay, spectrophotometry, immunoblotting and qPCR. Both Anisakis products led to increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), especially in EC-treated cells. While the ES treatment induces activation of kinases suggesting inflammation and cell proliferation (or inhibition of apoptosis), in EC-treated cells, other signaling pathways indicate the inhibition of apoptosis, marked by strong upregulation of Hsp70. Elevated induction of p53 in fibroblasts treated by both Anisakis products, suggests a significantly negative effect on the host DNA. This study shows that in vitro cell response to Anisakis products can result in at least two different scenarios, which in both cases lead to inflammation and DNA damage. Although these preliminary results are far from proving a relationship between the parasite and cancer, they are the first to support the existence of conditions where such changes are feasible.

  17. Deep subsurface mine stalactites trap endemic fissure fluid Archaea, Bacteria, and Nematoda possibly originating from ancient seas

    PubMed Central

    Borgonie, Gaëtan; Linage-Alvarez, Borja; Ojo, Abidemi; Shivambu, Steven; Kuloyo, Olukayode; Cason, Errol D.; Maphanga, Sihle; Vermeulen, Jan-G; Litthauer, Derek; Ralston, Colin D.; Onstott, Tullis C.; Sherwood-Lollar, Barbara; Van Heerden, Esta

    2015-01-01

    Stalactites (CaCO3 and salt) from water seeps are frequently encountered in ceilings of mine tunnels whenever they intersect water-bearing faults or fractures. To determine whether stalactites could be mineralized traps for indigenous fracture water microorganisms, we analyzed stalactites collected from three different mines ranging in depth from 1.3 to 3.1 km. During sampling in Beatrix gold mine (1.4 km beneath the surface), central South Africa, CaCO3 stalactites growing on the mine tunnel ceiling were collected and observed, in two cases, to contain a living obligate brackish water/marine nematode species, Monhystrella parvella. After sterilization of the outer surface, mineral layers were physically removed from the outside to the interior, and DNA extracted. Based upon 16S and 18S rRNA gene sequencing, Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya in different combinations were detected for each layer. Using CT scan and electron microscopy the inner structure of CaCO3 and salt stalactites were analyzed. CaCO3 stalactites show a complex pattern of lamellae carrying bacterially precipitated mineral structures. Nematoda were clearly identified between these layers confirming that bacteria and nematodes live inside the stalactites and not only in the central straw. Salt stalactites exhibit a more uniform internal structure. Surprisingly, several Bacteria showing highest sequence identities to marine species were identified. This, together with the observation that the nematode M. parvella recovered from Beatrix gold mine stalactite can only survive in a salty environment makes the origin of the deep subsurface colonization enigmatic. The possibility of a Permian origin of fracture fluids is discussed. Our results indicate stalactites are suitable for biodiversity recovery and act as natural traps for microorganisms in the fissure water long after the water that formed the stalactite stopped flowing. PMID:26441844

  18. Distribution of Thelastomatoid Nematodes (Nematoda: Oxyurida) in Endemic and Introduced Cockroaches on the Galápagos Island Archipelago, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Sinnott, Devinn; Carreno, Ramon A; Herrera, Henri

    2015-08-01

    The thelastomatoid pinworm fauna (Nematoda: Oxyurida: Thelastomatoidea) was surveyed in 3 endemic species and 6 introduced species of cockroach hosts (Insecta: Blattaria) in the Galápagos Islands, Ecuador. A total of 658 host specimens were examined from preserved collections that had been collected between 1966 and 2003 from 7 islands in the archipelago. Eight species of pinworms were identified from these cockroach hosts, including the dominant species Cephalobellus ovumglutinosus and a Severianoia sp. as well as Leidynema appendiculata, Hammerschmidtiella diesingi, an unidentified Cephalobellus species resembling Cephalobellus magalhaesi, an unidentified Protrellus species closely resembling Protrellus shamimi, and an undescribed Blattophila sp. Five new host records are identified for C. ovumglutinosus including the endemic Galápagos cockroaches Chorisoneura carpenteri, Ischnoptera snodgrassii, and Ischnoptera santacruzensis. These endemics were also infected with an undescribed Blatticola sp. Other species recorded resemble known pinworms from other hosts around the world. Prevalence between islands and between host species was variable, but total prevalence for individual pinworm species was consistently low (<10%). A single host specimen examined was infected with more than 1 pinworm species; otherwise only a single species was observed in each infected host. At least 1 introduced pinworm species carried to the islands via invasive cockroach hosts was present in endemic host species, but several globally widespread introduced pinworm species were absent from endemic cockroaches. Santa Cruz was inhabited by the greatest number of pinworm species, likely due to a higher rate of invasive host introduction. This survey, the first from this region, showed that the distribution and transmission of pinworms in the Galápagos Islands is complex and may provide future models of invertebrate dispersal and speciation in an ecosystem already rich with examples of

  19. New genus, new species of Cestoda (Anoplocephalidae), new species of Nematoda (Cosmocercidae) and other helminths in Cyrtodactylus louisiadensis (Sauria: Gekkonidae) from Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Bursey, Charles R; Goldberg, Stephen R; Kraus, Fred

    2005-08-01

    Gekkotaenia novaeguineaensis n. gen., n. sp. (Cestoda: Anoplocephalidae) from the small intestine and Cosmocerca zugi n. sp. (Nematoda: Cosmocercidae) from the large intestine of the ring-tailed gecko, Cyrtodactylus louisiadensis (Sauria: Gekkonidae) are described and illustrated. Gekkotaenia novaeguineaensis n. gen., n. sp. is unique among the acraspedote Linstowiinae in possessing a poral female reproductory system. Cosmocerca zugi n. sp. is the 22nd species to be assigned to the genus and differs from other species in the genus by possessing 4 pairs of rosette papillae on plectanes and having a gubernaculum longer than the spicules. It is the fifth species to be described from the Australian biogeographical region. Eight additional helminth species were found: the digenean, Allopharynx macallisteri; 2 cestodes, cysticercoids of Cyclophyllidea gen. sp. and tetrathyridia of Mesocestoides sp.; 5 nematodes, larvae in cysts of Abbreviata sp., Aplectana macintoshii, Oswaldocruzia bakeri, Parapharyngodon maplestonei, and an undescribed species of Physalopteroides. Cyrtodactylus louisiadensis represents a new host record for each of these helminths.

  20. A review of Gongylonema spp. (Nematoda: Gongylonematidae) in North American rodents with description of a new species from the cotton rat, Sigmodon hispidus (Mammalia: Cricetidae).

    PubMed

    Kinsella, John M; Robles, Maria Del Rosario; Preisser, Whitney C

    2016-05-02

    Gongylonema archboldi n. sp. (Nematoda: Gongylonematidae) is described from tunnels in the gastric mucosa of the stomach of the cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) from Highlands County, Florida, U.S.A. Measurements are also given for specimens from cotton mice (Peromyscus gossypinus), oldfield mice (Peromyscus polionotus), Florida mice (Podomys floridanus), and golden mice (Ochrotomys nuttalli) from the same locality. Additional specimens were collected from the cotton rat and the rice rat (Oryzomys palustris) from Berry Island, San Patricio County, Texas. The new species is differentiated from congeners by a combination of the following characters: length of the left spicule, length and shape of the gubernaculum, distribution of cuticular bosses, length of esophagus, and distance of the vulva from the posterior end. The status of the genus Gongylonema in North American rodents is reviewed.

  1. A new species of Hedruris Nitzsch, 1821 (Nematoda: Hedruridae) parasitic in the freshwater fish Oligosarcus jenynsii (Günther, 1864) (Characidae) from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Rossin, María Alejandra; Timi, Juan Tomás

    2016-11-01

    Nematodes belonging to genus Hedruris Nitzsch, 1821 (Nematoda: Hedruridae) were found in the stomach of the freshwater fish Oligosarcus jenynsii (Günther, 1864) (Characidae) from a shallow eutrophic lake in Argentina. Morphological comparisons with congeneric relatives showed that these nematodes belong to a new species, for which H. bifida n. sp. is proposed. Hedruris bifida n. sp. can be distinguished from its congeners by the following combination of characters: bifid deirids, absence of precloacal papillae and nine pairs of postcloacal papillae and non-mammillated eggs. The new species closely resembles Hedruris suttonae Brugni & Viozzi, 2010¸ the only known species from Argentina; however, the bifid deirids in the new species and the distribution pattern of perianal spines in females clearly distinguish both species. Hedruris bifida n. sp. represents the second nominal species of the genus in Argentina and the eighth species described in the Neotropical region.

  2. First record of larvae of Hysterothylacium (Nematoda: Anisakidae) with zoonotic potential in the pirarucu Arapaima gigas (Osteichthyes: Arapaimidae) from South America.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Porto, S M; Cárdenas, M Q; Martins, M L; Oliveira, J K Q; Pereira, J N; Araújo, C S O; Malta, J C O

    2015-11-01

    Third-stage larvae (L3) of Hysterothylacium sp. were collected by the first time in juveniles of pirarucu Arapaima gigas farmed in the Rio Preto da Eva, Amazonas state. Ninety-eight (98) out of 100 examined fish showed to be parasitized. Five hundred and ninety larvae of Hysterothylacium sp. were collected from the intestines, stomach and pyloric caeca. The mean intensity of parasite indexes was 6.02 (±5.75) ranging from 1 to 40 larvae per host and the mean abundance was 5.9 (±5.76). The A. gigas is the new host record for larvae of Hysterothylacium sp. in Brazil, and this is the first record of larvae of Hysterothylacium (Nematoda: Anisakidae) with zoonotic potential in the pirarucu from South America.

  3. First record of larvae of Hysterothylacium (Nematoda: Anisakidae) with zoonotic potential in the pirarucu Arapaima gigas (Osteichthyes: Arapaimidae) from South America.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Porto, S M; Cárdenas, M Q; Martins, M L; Oliveira, J K Q; Pereira, J N; Araújo, C S O; Malta, J C O

    2015-11-27

    Third-stage larvae (L3) of Hysterothylacium sp. were collected by the first time in juveniles of pirarucu Arapaima gigas farmed in the Rio Preto da Eva, Amazonas state. Ninety-eight (98) out of 100 examined fish showed to be parasitized. Five hundred and ninety larvae of Hysterothylacium sp. were collected from the intestines, stomach and pyloric caeca. The mean intensity of parasite indexes was 6.02 (±5.75) ranging from 1 to 40 larvae per host and the mean abundance was 5.9 (±5.76). The A. gigas is the new host record for larvae of Hysterothylacium sp. in Brazil, and this is the first record of larvae of Hysterothylacium (Nematoda: Anisakidae) with zoonotic potential in the pirarucu from South America.

  4. Spinitectus aguapeiensis n. sp. (Nematoda: Cystidicolidae) from Pimelodella avanhandavae Eigenmann (Siluriformes: Heptapteridae) in the River Aguapeí, Upper Paraná River Basin, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Aline Angelina; González-Solís, David; da Silva, Reinaldo José

    2017-07-01

    Nematodes belonging to Spinitectus Fourment, 1883 (Nematoda: Cystidicolidae) were found in the intestine of Pimelodella avanhandavae Eigenmann (Siluriformes: Heptapteridae) from the Aguapeí River, Brazil. They represent a new species, Spinitectus aguapeiensis n. sp., which differs morphologically from its congeners in the body length, the number of spinose rings, the location of the excretory pore, the number of precloacal papillae and the length of the spicules. The new species is the first South American species within the genus with a remarkably spirally coiled posterior extremity in males and the largest spicules. It is also the second species with the highest number of precloacal papillae and has unique shape of the small spicule. Spinitectus aguapeiensis n. sp. is the first helminth species found in P. avanhandavae, the fourth species of this genus recorded in the River Paraná Basin and the sixth species of Spinitectus in South America.

  5. Musserakis sulawesiensis gen. et sp. n. (Nematoda: Heterakidae) collected from Echiothrix centrosa (Rodentia: Muridae), an old endemic rat of Sulawesi, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hideo; Dewi, Kartika; Asakawa, Mitsuhiko

    2014-11-04

    Musserakis sulawesiensis gen. et sp. n. (Nematoda: Heterakidae) is described from the large-bodied shrew rat, Echiothrix centrosa, one of the old endemic rats of Sulawesi, Indonesia. Musserakis is readily distinguished from other heterakid genera by having non-recurrent and non-anastomosing cephalic cordons, by lacking papillae between papillae groups around precloacal sucker and cloacal aperture and by lacking teeth in the pharyngeal portion. The spicules are equal but with marked dimorphism among individuals. Heterakids collected from other old endemic murids examined, i.e., Crunomys celebensis, Tateomys macrocercus and Tateomys rhinogradoides, and the new endemic rats of Sulawesi, were Heterakis spumosa Schneider, 1866, a cosmopolitan nematode of various murids. It is suggested that M. sulawesiensis is specific to Echiothrix.

  6. Three new gonad-infecting species of Philometra (Nematoda: Philometridae) parasitic in Lutjanus spp. (Lutjanidae) in the northern Gulf of Mexico off Florida, USA.

    PubMed

    Moravec, Frantisek; Bakenhaster, Micah; Fajer-Avila, Emma J

    2014-08-01

    Based on light and scanning electron microscopical studies, three new gonad-infecting species of Philometra Costa, 1845 (Nematoda: Philometridae) are described from marine fishes of the genus Lutjanus Bloch (Perciformes: Lutjanidae) in the northern Gulf of Mexico: P. longispicula sp. n. from the ovary of the northern red snapper L. campechanus (Poey) (type host) and silk snapper L. vivanus (Cuvier); P. latispicula sp. n. from the ovary and rarely testes of the grey snapper L. griseus (Linnaeus); and P. synagridis sp. n. (only males available) from the ovary of the lane snapper Lutjanus synagris (Linnaeus). These species are mainly characterised by the lengths of spicules (378-690 microm, 135-144 microm and 186-219 microm, respectively) and spicule shapes, structure of the distal portion of the gubernaculum and the structure of the male caudal end. These are the first valid, nominal species of gonad-infecting philometrids reported from fishes of the family Lutjanidae in the western Atlantic region.

  7. Procamallanus (Spirocamallanus) spp. (Nematoda: Camallanidae) from fishes of the Okavango River, Botswana, including P. (S.) serranochromis n. sp. parasitic in Serranochromis spp. (Cichlidae).

    PubMed

    Moravec, František; Van As, Liesl L

    2015-02-01

    Three species of Procamallanus (Spirocamallanus) Baylis, 1923 (Camallanidae) (Nematoda: Camallanidae) were found in the digestive tract of freshwater fishes from the Okavango River, Botswana, i.e. P. (S.) daleneae (Boomker, 1993) from Synodontis vanderwaali Skelton & White (Mochokidae), P. (S.) spiralis Baylis, 1923 from Clarias stappersi Boulenger, C. theodorae Weber (both Clariidae) and Hepsetus odoe (Bloch) (Hepsetidae), and P. (S.) serranochromis n. sp. from Serranochromis macrocephalus (Boulenger) (type-host), S. angusticeps (Boulenger) and S. robustus (Günther) (all Cichlidae). All findings of the two previously known species represent new host records. The specimens were studied using both light and scanning electron microscopy. Spirocamallanus mazabukae Yeh, 1957 is considered a junior synonym of P. (S.) spiralis. A key to the species of Procamallanus (Spirocamallanus) parasitising fishes of continental Africa is provided.

  8. Morphological and molecular genetic characterization of three Capillaria spp. (Capillaria anatis, Capillaria pudendotecta, and Capillaria madseni) and Baruscapillaria obsignata (Nematoda: Trichuridae: Capillariinae) in avians.

    PubMed

    Tamaru, Masae; Yamaki, Seiya; Jimenez, Lea Angsinco; Sato, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    Morphological and genetic analyses were performed on four avian species of the subfamily Capillariinae (Nematoda: Trichuridae), i.e., Capillaria anatis from chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) in Japan and the Philippines, Baruscapillaria obsignata from chickens and captive swans (Cygnus olor and Cygnus atratus) in Japan, Capillaria pudendotecta from captive swans in Japan, and Capillaria madseni from carrion and jungle crows (Corvus corone and Corvus macrorhynchos) in Japan. Although morphometric variations of male and female worms from different hosts and/or localities made the species identification difficult, the 18S ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) sequences clarified their taxonomic position and phylogenetic relationships. Species of the same genus clustered robustly into a single clade in the phylogenetic tree based on the 18S rDNA, demonstrating to the extent possible the validity of the latest classification of the subfamily following Moravec's rearrangement in 1982. Male worms of C. pudendotecta are described here for the first time.

  9. A new species of Rhabdias Stiles et Hassall, 1905 (Nematoda: Rhabdiasidae) from Blommersia domerguei (Guibé) (Amphibia: Mantellidae) in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Kuzmin, Yuriy; Junker, Kerstin; du Preez, Louis; Bain, Odile

    2013-11-01

    Rhabdias blommersiae sp. n. (Nematoda: Rhabdiasidae) is described from the lungs of Domergue's Madagascar frog, Blommersia domerguei (Guibé) (Amphibia: Mantellidae), in Madagascar. The new species differs from congeners parasitizing amphibians in having a smaller body and buccal capsule, six equal lips, large excretory glands of unequal length and a posteriorly inflated body vesicle. A combination of characters distinguishes it from Afromalagasy species of Rhabdias Stiles et Hassall, 1905. Rhabdias blommersiae is the third species of the genus described from amphibians in Madagascar. Close similarities in the number and shape of circumoral structures in two Rhabdias species described from mantellid hosts in Madagascar suggest a close relationship and common origin of the two species, with subsequent adaptation to separate hosts within the Mantellidae.

  10. A multilocus approach to assessing co-evolutionary relationships between Steinernema spp. (Nematoda: Steinernematidae) and their bacterial symbionts Xenorhabdus spp. (gamma-Proteobacteria: Enterobacteriaceae).

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Min; Stock, S Patricia

    2010-09-01

    Nematodes of the genus Steinernema Travassos, 1927 (Nematoda: Steinernematidae) and their associated bacteria, Xenorhabdus spp. (gamma-Proteobacteria), are an emergent model of terrestrial animal-microbe symbiosis. Interest in this association initially arose out of their potential as biocontrol agents against insect pests, but, despite advances in their field application and the growing popularity of this model system, relatively little has been published to uncover the evolutionary facets of this beneficial partnership. This study adds to the body of knowledge regarding nematode-bacteria symbiosis by proposing a possible scenario for their historical association in the form of a cophylogenetic hypothesis. Topological and likelihood based testing methods were employed to reconstruct a history of association between 30 host-symbiont pairs and to gauge the level of similarity between their inferred phylogenetic patterns.

  11. In vitro and in vivo anthelmintic effects of Caesalpinia bonducella (L.) Roxb. leaf extract on Hymenolepis diminuta (Cestoda) and Syphacia obvelata (Nematoda)

    PubMed Central

    Gogoi, Shyamalima; Yadav, Arun K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Leaves of Caesalpinia bonducella (L.) Roxb. have been traditionally used as an herbal remedy to treat the intestinal helminthic infections in traditional medicine of India. Aim: This study was undertaken to evaluate the potential in vitro and in vivo anthelmintic effects of C. bonducella leaf extract against Syphacia obvelata (Nematoda) and Hymenolepis diminuta (Cestoda). Materials and Methods: The in vitro anthelmintic activity of the extract was investigated on adult worms of S. obvelata (Nematoda) and H. diminuta (Cestoda) in terms of physical motility and mortality of parasites. The in vivo study was performed in H. diminuta-rat model and S. obvelata-mice model, by monitoring the egg per gram of feces count and worm count of animals following the treatment with different doses of plant extract. Results: The study recorded significant and dose-dependent anthelmintic effects of the extract on both the parasites. In the in vitro study, 30 mg/ml concentration of extract caused mortality of H. diminuta in 2.5 ± 0.2 h and S. obvelata in 3.57 ± 0.16 h. In the in vivo study, the extract showed a comparatively better efficacy on S. obvelata, where its 800 mg/kg dose revealed 93% reduction of worm load in mice, as compared to 85% worm load reduction of H. diminuta in rats. Conclusions: The findings suggest that leaf extract of C. bonducella possesses significant anthelmintic effects and supports its use as an anthelmintic in traditional medicine. This appears to be the first report of in vivo anthelmintic activity of C. bonducella against these parasites. PMID:27757275

  12. Molecular diversity of bacterial endosymbionts associated with dagger nematodes of the genus Xiphinema (Nematoda: Longidoridae) reveals a high degree of phylogenetic congruence with their host.

    PubMed

    Palomares-Rius, Juan E; Archidona-Yuste, Antonio; Cantalapiedra-Navarrete, Carolina; Prieto, Pilar; Castillo, Pablo

    2016-12-01

    Bacterial endosymbionts have been detected in some groups of plant-parasitic nematodes, but few cases have been reported compared to other groups in the phylum Nematoda, such as animal-parasitic or free-living nematodes. This study was performed on a wide variety of plant-parasitic nematode families and species from different host plants and nematode populations. A total of 124 nematode populations (previously identified morphologically and molecularly) were screened for the presence of potential bacterial endosymbionts using the partial 16S rRNA gene and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and confocal microscopy. Potential bacterial endosymbionts were only detected in nematode species belonging to the genus Xiphinema and specifically in the X. americanum group. Fifty-seven partial 16S rRNA sequences were obtained from bacterial endosymbionts in this study. One group of sequences was closely related to the genus 'Candidatus Xiphinematobacter' (19 bacterial endosymbiont sequences were associated with seven nematode host species, including two that have already been described and three unknown bacterial endosymbionts). The second bacterial endosymbiont group (38 bacterial endosymbiont sequences associated with six nematode species) was related to the family Burkholderiaceae, which includes fungal and soil-plant bacterial endosymbionts. These endosymbionts were reported for the first time in the phylum Nematoda. Our findings suggest that there is a highly specific symbiotic relationship between nematode host and bacterial endosymbionts. Overall, these results were corroborated by a phylogeny of nematode host and bacterial endosymbionts that suggested that there was a high degree of phylogenetic congruence and long-term evolutionary persistence between hosts and endosymbionts. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. An annotated checklist by genus and species of 93 species level names for 51 recognized species of small strongyles (Nematoda: Strongyloidea: Cyathostominea) of horses, asses and zebras of the world.

    PubMed

    Lichtenfels, J R; Kharchenko, V A; Krecek, R C; Gibbons, L M

    1998-09-01

    The results of an international collaborative effort to prepare a recommended list of scientific names for the small strongyles (Nematoda: Strongyloidea: Cyathostominea) of horses, donkeys and zebras are reported. Fifty-one valid species are recognized in 13 genera, including Cyathostomum, Coronocyclus, Cylicodontophorus, Cylicocyclus, Cylicostephanus, Skrjabinodentus, Tridentoinfundibulum, Petrovinema, Poteriostomum, Parapoteriostomum, Hsiungia, Cylindropharynx and Caballonema. In addition, 42 other species level names are listed as synonyms of the 51 recognized species or as species inquirendae (10 species) or nomen nudum (one species). Numerous annotations provide information on the nomenclatural and systematics history, current status and additional studies needed.

  14. Morphology of Enterobius (Colobenterobius) colobis Vuylstéke, 1964 (Nematoda: Oxyuridae: Enterobiinae) collected from an ashy red colobus, Procolobus rufomitratus tephrosceles (Elliot, 1907) (Primates: Cercopithecidae: Colobinae), in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hideo; Greiner, Ellis C; Gillespie, Thomas R

    2008-10-01

    Enterobius (Colobenterobius) colobis Vuylstéke, 1964 (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) is redescribed based on males and females collected from an ashy red colobus, Procolobus rufomitratus tephrosceles (Elliot, 1907) (Primates: Cercopithecidae: Colobinae), in Uganda. Two morphotypes are recognized among females, which are readily distinguished by tail length, termination level of lateral alae, and egg size. The relative position of cellular wall greatly varied in the ovijector, indicating its limited systematic value. The males possess a much shorter spicule than those in previous descriptions, suggesting the presence of polymorphism.

  15. Larval Contracaecum sp. (Nematoda: Anisakidae) in the Great Cormorant [Phalacrocorax carbo (L., 1758)] from north-eastern Poland: a morphological and morphometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Kanarek, Gerard; Bohdanowicz, Jerzy

    2009-12-03

    Stomachs of the Great Cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo) from north-eastern Poland were found to contain adult nematode Contracaecum rudolphii [Hartwich, G., 1964. Revision der Vogelparasitischen Nematoden Mitteleuropas II. Die Gattung Contracaecum Railliet & Henry, 1912. Mitt. Zool. Mus. Berlin 40, 15-53.] sensu lato and nematode larvae which, based on their morphology, were identified as the third (L3) and fourth (L4) stage larvae of Contracaecum sp. Morphology and biometry of the L3 isolated from the Great Cormorant were very similar to those of the L3 of C. rudolphii described by Bartlett [Bartlett, C.M., 1996. Morphogenesis of Contracaecum rudolphii (Nematoda: Ascaridoidea), a parasite of fish-eating birds, in its copepod precursor and fish intermediate hosts. Parasite 4, 367-376.]. In our opinion, L3 and L4 to be larval stages of C. rudolphii. The paper contains detailed descriptions of the L3 and L4 stages of C. rudolphii; the L4 morphology is described in detail for the first time ever. The descriptions are supplemented by drawings and SEM images. Morphology and biometry of larvae were compared with the literature data and discussed.

  16. New host, geographic records, and histopathologic studies of Angiostrongylus spp (Nematoda: Angiostrongylidae) in rodents from Argentina with updated summary of records from rodent hosts and host specificity assessment.

    PubMed

    Robles, María del Rosario; Kinsella, John M; Galliari, Carlos; Navone, Graciela T

    2016-03-01

    To date, 21 species of the genus Angiostrongylus (Nematoda: Angiostrongylidae) have been reported around the world, 15 of which are parasites of rodents. In this study, new host, geographic records, and histopathologic studies of Angiostrongylus spp in sigmodontine rodents from Argentina, with an updated summary of records from rodent hosts and host specificity assessment, are provided. Records of Angiostrongylus costaricensis from Akodon montensis and Angiostrongylus morerai from six new hosts and geographical localities in Argentina are reported. The gross and histopathologic changes in the lungs of the host species due to angiostrongylosis are described. Published records of the genus Angiostrongylus from rodents and patterns of host specificity are presented. Individual Angiostrongylus species parasitise between one-19 different host species. The most frequent values of the specificity index (STD) were between 1-5.97. The elevated number of host species (n = 7) of A. morerai with a STD = 1.86 is a reflection of multiple systematic studies of parasites from sigmodontine rodents in the area of Cuenca del Plata, Argentina, showing that an increase in sampling effort can result in new findings. The combination of low host specificity and a wide geographic distribution of Angiostrongylus spp indicates a troubling epidemiological scenario although, as yet, no human cases have been reported.

  17. Redescription of Spinitectus tabascoensis (Nematoda: Cystidicolidae) from fishes of the Lacandon rain forest in Chiapas, southern Mexico, with remarks on Spinitectus macrospinosus and S. osorioi.

    PubMed

    Moravec, Frantisek; Salgado-Maldonado, Guillermo; Caspeta-Mandujano, Juan M; González-Solís, David

    2009-12-01

    Two little-known species of Spinitectus (Nematoda: Cystidicolidae) were, for the first time, recorded from fishes of the Lacantún River (Usumacinta River basin) in the Lacandon rain forest, Chiapas, southern Mexico: S. tabascoensis Moravec, Garcia-Magaña et Salgado-Maldonado, 2002 in intestines of Ictalurus furcatus (Valenciennes) (Ictaluridae) (adults and juveniles), Cathorops aguadulce (Meek) and Potamarius nelsoni (Evermann et Goldsborough) (both Ariidae) (in both only juveniles), and S. osorioi Choudhury et Pérez-Ponce de León, 2001 in Atherinella alvarezi (Díaz-Pardo) (Atherinopsidae) (adults in intestine) and Eugerres mexicanus (Steindachner) (Gerreidae) (adults and juveniles in stomach). Eugerres mexicanus, C. aguadulce and P. nelsoni represent new host records. Detailed light and electron microscopical studies of S. tabascoensis revealed some taxonomically important, previously not observed features, such as cuticular spines arranged in four sectors, the cephalic structure, the number (2) of ventral precloacal ridges or the structure of the male caudal end. Therefore, Spinitectus tabascoensis is redescribed. Spinitectus macrospinosus Choudhury et Perryman, 2003, described from ictalurids in Canada and the USA, is considered its junior synonym. Spinitectus tabascoensis seems to be a specific parasite of Ictalurus spp., whereas C. aguadulce and P. nelsoni, as well as some other fishes, serve only as its paratenic hosts. The definitive hosts of S. osorioi are atherinopsid fish (A. alvarezi, Chirostoma spp.), whereas the gerreid E. mexicanus probably serves only as its postcyclic host.

  18. New host, geographic records, and histopathologic studies of Angiostrongylus spp (Nematoda: Angiostrongylidae) in rodents from Argentina with updated summary of records from rodent hosts and host specificity assessment

    PubMed Central

    Robles, María del Rosario; Kinsella, John M; Galliari, Carlos; Navone, Graciela T

    2016-01-01

    To date, 21 species of the genus Angiostrongylus (Nematoda: Angiostrongylidae) have been reported around the world, 15 of which are parasites of rodents. In this study, new host, geographic records, and histopathologic studies of Angiostrongylus spp in sigmodontine rodents from Argentina, with an updated summary of records from rodent hosts and host specificity assessment, are provided. Records of Angiostrongylus costaricensis from Akodon montensis andAngiostrongylus morerai from six new hosts and geographical localities in Argentina are reported. The gross and histopathologic changes in the lungs of the host species due to angiostrongylosis are described. Published records of the genus Angiostrongylus from rodents and patterns of host specificity are presented. Individual Angiostrongylusspecies parasitise between one-19 different host species. The most frequent values of the specificity index (STD) were between 1-5.97. The elevated number of host species (n = 7) of A. morerai with a STD = 1.86 is a reflection of multiple systematic studies of parasites from sigmodontine rodents in the area of Cuenca del Plata, Argentina, showing that an increase in sampling effort can result in new findings. The combination of low host specificity and a wide geographic distribution of Angiostrongylus spp indicates a troubling epidemiological scenario although, as yet, no human cases have been reported. PMID:26982178

  19. Description of two free-living nematode species of Halomonhystera disjuncta complex (Nematoda: Monhysterida) from two peculiar habitats in the sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchesunov, Alexei V.; Portnova, Daria A.; van Campenhout, Jelle

    2015-03-01

    Morphological descriptions of two Halomonhystera species (Nematoda, Monhysterida) are presented ( Halomonhystera hermesi and Halomonhystera socialis). Halomonhystera hermesi sp. n. occurs in a dense monospecific and homogeneous population on bacterial mats in the Håkon Mosby mud volcano in the Barents Sea at a depth of 1,280 m. The species is an endemic lineage distinctly separated from other shallow-water cryptotaxa of the Halomonhystera disjucta species complex on the base of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome oxidase subunit I (genetic divergence 19.6-23.8 %) and nuclear genetic markers, and on the base of morphometrics by Van Campenhout et al. (2014). H. socialis (Bütschli 1874) is redescribed on the basis of White Sea specimens. This species dwells in mass on the detached kelp accumulation in the upper sublittoral. H. socialis is differentiated from other species of the Halomonhystera disjuncta complex morphometrically by a larger body size and by genetic divergence in nuclear markers. The genus Halomonhystera Andrássy 2006 is redefined, and its morphospecies list is reviewed. Species H. bathislandica (Riemann 1995) comb. n., H. fisheri (Zekely et al. 2006) comb. n., H. islandica (De Coninck 1943) comb. n. and H. vandoverae (Zekely et al. 2006) comb. n. are transferred to Halomonhystera from Thalassomonhystera; H. paradisjuncta (de Coninck 1943) comb. n., H. rotundicapitata (Filipjev 1922) comb. n. and H. taurica (Tsalolikhin 2007) comb. n. transferred to Halomonhystera from Geomonhystera. Halomonhystera ambiguoides (Bütschli 1874) is considered as species inquirenda because of incompleteness of its diagnosis.

  20. Seven new and four known species of the genus Acantholaimus (Nematoda: Chromadoridae) from the abyssal manganese nodule field (Clarion-Clipperton Fracture Zone, North-Eastern Tropical Pacific)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miljutina, Maria A.; Miljutin, Dmitry M.

    2012-09-01

    The descriptions of seven new and supplemental descriptions of four known species of the genus Acantholaimus (Nematoda: Chromadoridae) from about 5,000 m depth in the abyssal manganese nodule field of the French Claim of the Clarion-Clipperton Fracture Zone (north-eastern tropical Pacific) are given. A. arthrochaeta sp. n. differs from other Acantholaimus species in having jointed cephalic setae. A. barbatus sp. n. is characterized by long cephalic setae and the presence of numerous somatic setae at the level of the pharynx. A. cornutus sp. n. possesses strong onchia and rugae and short cephalic setae. A. robustus sp. n. is characterized by a very large body size, two very large onchia, strongly developed rugae, and cervical setae grouped in threes. A. sieglerae sp. n. is a comparatively small species, though with very large onchia. A. tchesunovi sp. n. can be differentiated from the other species by the lateral differentiation of the body cuticle, consisting of 6-7 longitudinal rows of pores. A. veitkoehlerae sp. n. has a narrow elongate anterior end, two cervical setae, and strong onchia. A. angustus and A. occultus were found about 5,200 km from their type localities in the Peru Basin, south-east Pacific. A. iubilus and A. maks were previously found in different parts of the Atlantic and in the Peru Basin.

  1. Physaloptera bainae n. sp. (Nematoda: Physalopteridae) parasitic in Salvator merianae (Squamata: Teiidae), with a key to Physaloptera species parasitizing reptiles from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Felipe B; Alves, Philippe V; Rocha, Bárbara M; de Souza Lima, Sueli; Luque, José L

    2014-04-01

    Physaloptera bainae n. sp. (Nematoda: Physalopteridae) from stomach of the large "tegú" lizard Salvator merianae (Squamata: Teiidae), collected in an ecological park that is part of the Atlantic Rainforest biome in Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais, Brazil, is described. The new species which has females with didelphic uterus, is the only species of the genus exhibiting external teeth in the form of 4 spines that are organized in a cross-shaped pattern at the anterior apical end, with 2 minute adcloacal papillae on the anterior part of cloacal aperture in males and a large cuticular expansion at the anterior end of females. Moreover, P. bainae n. sp. can be differentiated from the other congeners by the combination of other features, e.g., number (23) and pattern of caudal papillae, spicule size (left 554-600; right 589-617) and vulval position (on the first third of body), and because the specimens are particularly large and robust. Physaloptera monodens is considered a junior synonym of P. obtusissima. In addition, a key to Physaloptera species parasitizing reptiles from Brazil is provided.

  2. A new species of Syncuaria Gilbert, 1927 (Nematoda: Acuarioidea: Acuariidae) in the wood stork, Mycteria americana L. (Aves: Ciconiiformes: Ciconiidae) from the Area de Conservacion Guanacaste, Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luping; Brooks, Daniel R; Causey, Douglas

    2003-10-01

    Syncuaria mycteriae n. sp. (Nematoda: Acuarioidea) was collected under the lining of the gizzard of a wood stork, Mycteria americana L., from the Area de Conservacion Guanacaste, Costa Rica. The new species can be distinguished from all known species of Syncuaria by having irregular dotted ornamentations on the caudal alae of males, a complex distal end of the left spicule comprising 3 protuberances, and a spicule ratio of 1:9.3. Preliminary phylogenetic analysis of 11 Syncuaria spp. based on 9 morphological characters produced 2 equally parsimonious cladograms with a consistency index of 85%, differing only in the placement of S. hargilae. The phylogenetic analysis suggests that the new species is the sister species of S. leptoptili, whose male members have a single protuberance on the left spicule. Furthermore, the analysis suggests that the plesiomorphic host group for the genus is Ciconiiformes, specifically Ciconiidae (host for 5 species), with 2 species occurring in Threskiornithidae (also Ciconiiformes), possibly as a result of cospeciation, and 2 species each occurring in Pelecaniformes and Podicipediformes, resulting from 4 episodes of speciation by host switching.

  3. Morphometric and phylogenetic analyses of Serpentirhabdias viperidicus n. sp. (Nematoda: Rhabdiasidae) from the lancehead snake Bothrops moojeni Hoge, 1966 (Reptilia: Serpentes: Viperidae) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Morais, D H; Aguiar, A; Müller, M I; Narciso, R B; da Silva, L A F; da Silva, R J

    2017-05-01

    Serpentirhabdias viperidicus n. sp. (Nematoda: Rhabdiasidae) is described from the lungs of the 'Brazilian lancehead' Bothrops moojeni (Hoge, 1966) from the savannah in São Paulo State, Brazil. The new species is the eighth species of Serpentirhabdias described in the Neotropical region, and differs from other species mainly by a combination of characters: lips slightly notable, presence of fine striations at posterior ends, presence of two parallel lines with intercalated pores, a pore-shaped phasmid situated at the level of the anal aperture and another two in the posterior half of the tail. It is the first species of Serpentirhabdias reported in this snake host and the second species of this genus found parasitizing South American viperidian snakes. Molecular phylogenetic analysis using ribosomal (ITS and 28S partial) genes confirms Serpentirhabdias viperidicus n. sp. as a new species that clustered in the Serpentirhabdias clade, sister taxon to Serpentirhabdias fuscovenosa and Serpentirhabdias elaphe. This is the first description of Serpentirhabdias species from Brazil using molecular approaches and morphological characters to confirm the monophyly of this recent genus.

  4. Two gonad-infecting species of Philometra (Nematoda: Philometridae) from groupers (Serranidae) off Tunisia, with a key to Philometra species infecting serranid gonads.

    PubMed

    Moravec, František; Chaabane, Amira; Justine, Jean-Lou; Neifar, Lassad

    2016-01-01

    Based on light and scanning electron microscopical studies of nematode specimens (males and mature females) collected from the ovary of groupers (Serranidae, Perciformes) in the Mediterranean Sea off Tunisia (near Tunis and Sfax), two gonad-infecting species of Philometra Costa, 1845 (Nematoda, Philometridae) are reported: Philometra inexpectata n. sp. from the mottled grouper Mycteroperca rubra and P. jordanoi (López-Neyra, 1951) from the dusky grouper Epinephelus marginatus. Identification of both fish species was confirmed by molecular barcoding. The new species is mainly characterized by the length of equally long spicules (147-165 μm), the gubernaculum (63-93 μm long) bearing at the tip two dorsolateral lamellar parts separated from each other by a smooth median field, a V-shaped mound on the male caudal extremity, the presence of a pair of large caudal papillae located posterior to the cloaca and by the body length of the males (1.97-2.43 mm). Philometra inexpectata n. sp. is the fifth known gonad-infecting philometrid species parasitizing serranid fishes in the Mediterranean region. The males of P. jordanoi were examined by scanning electron microscopy for the first time; this detailed study revealed some new taxonomically important morphological features, such as the number and arrangement of cephalic and caudal papillae, presence of amphids and phasmids and mainly the lamellate structures at the posterior end of the gubernaculum. A key to gonad-infecting species of Philometra parasitic in serranid fishes is provided.

  5. Experimental studies on lead accumulation in the eel-specific endoparasites Anguillicola crassus (Nematoda) and Paratenuisentis ambiguus (Acanthocephala) as compared with their host, Anguilla anguilla.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, S; Sures, B; Taraschewski, H

    1999-08-01

    The effect of salinity and the mode of application (oral versus aqueous) on the lead accumulation in different tissues of the fish host eel (Anguilla anguilla) and its parasites Anguillicola crassus (Nematoda) and Paratenuisentis ambiguus (Acanthocephala) was investigated. Waterborne as well as dietary lead exposure caused an increase in the metal levels of different eel tissues and the parasites. The mode of lead application had a significant influence on the distribution of lead in the fish tissues. No significant difference on the lead concentration due to water salinity was found for the fish tissues. Among the analyzed tissues and helminths, the intestinal acanthocephalan P. ambiguus contained the significantly highest amounts of lead, which were affected by neither the mode of application nor the water salinity. In contrast, the lead level of the nematode A. crassus dwelling in the swim bladder of eels was even below the levels detected for host liver, intestine, and bile. Thus, depending on the mode of lead application, the resulting metal concentrations were approximately 20 to 2,000 times higher in P. ambiguus than in A. crassus. These differences may be due to the different microhabitats and nutrient uptake mechanisms of both parasite species. This study presents important new facts for the use of intestinal fish parasites as biological indicators for water quality, not only in freshwater, but also in marine and estuarine ecosystems. The combination of the results obtained from the host and the parasites could reveal a more detailed tool to ascertain the source of an environmental contamination than a study based on a single species.http://link.springer-ny. com/link/service/journals/00244/bibs/37n2p190.html

  6. Two new species of Philometra Costa, 1845 (Nematoda: Philometridae) from Mycteroperca spp. (Serranidae) in the North-West Atlantic and northern Gulf of Mexico, USA.

    PubMed

    Moravec, František; Bakenhaster, Micah D; Adams, Douglas H

    2016-06-01

    Based on light and scanning electron microscopical studies, two new species of Philometra Costa, 1845 (Nematoda: Philometridae) are described from two species of Mycteroperca Gill (Serranidae), marine perciform fishes, in coastal waters off Florida, USA: Philometra deburonae n. sp. from the inner side of operculum of the yellowfin grouper Mycteroperca venenosa (L.) and P. incognita n. sp. from the ovary of the gag M. microlepis (Goode & Bean). Philometra deburonae n. sp. is mainly characterised by the body length of males (1.90-2.38 mm), the length of the spicules (78-84 µm) and gubernaculum (54 µm) and the presence of small outer cephalic papillae, a pair of fairly large caudal projections and the oesophageal gland extending anteriorly beyond the nerve-ring in subgravid females. Philometra incognita n. sp. is distinguished by the caudal mound consisting of two lateral reniform parts widely separated dorsally from each other, the absence of a pair of large papillae situated posteriorly to the cloaca, the shape and structure of the distal end of the gubernaculum plus the lengths of the spicules (117-141 µm) and gubernaculum (60-81 µm) in the male, the absence of caudal projections and the comparatively large larvae in the uterus (660-675 µm long) of the gravid female, as well as, the body length of both males (2.45-3.11 mm) and gravid females (120-180 mm). The present descriptions of an additional two new philometrids increases the number of recorded nominal species of Philometra parasitising groupers (Serranidae) in the Gulf of Mexico to nine.

  7. Unravelling the Biodiversity and Molecular Phylogeny of Needle Nematodes of the Genus Longidorus (Nematoda: Longidoridae) in Olive and a Description of Six New Species.

    PubMed

    Archidona-Yuste, Antonio; Navas-Cortés, Juan A; Cantalapiedra-Navarrete, Carolina; Palomares-Rius, Juan E; Castillo, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The genus Longidorus includes a remarkable group of invertebrate animals of the phylum Nematoda comprising polyphagous root-ectoparasites of numerous plants including several agricultural crops and trees. Damage is caused by direct feeding on root cells as well as by transmitting nepoviruses that cause disease on those crops. Thus, correct identification of Longidorus species is essential to establish appropriate control measures. We provide the first detailed information on the diversity and distribution of Longidorus species infesting wild and cultivated olive soils in a wide-region in southern Spain that included 159 locations from which 449 sampling sites were analyzed. The present study doubles the known biodiversity of Longidorus species identified in olives by including six new species (Longidorus indalus sp. nov., Longidorus macrodorus sp. nov., Longidorus onubensis sp. nov., Longidorus silvestris sp. nov., Longidorus vallensis sp. nov., and Longidorus wicuolea sp. nov.), two new records for wild and cultivate olives (L. alvegus and L. vineacola), and two additional new records for wild olive (L. intermedius and L. lusitanicus). We also found evidence of some geographic species associations to western (viz. L. alvegus, L. intermedius, L. lusitanicus, L. onubensis sp. nov., L. vineacola, L. vinearum, L. wicuolea sp. nov.) and eastern distributions (viz. L. indalus sp. nov.), while only L. magnus was detected in both areas. We developed a comparative study by considering morphological and morphometrical features together with molecular data from nuclear ribosomal RNA genes (D2-D3 expansion segments of 28S, ITS1, and partial 18S). Results of molecular and phylogenetic analyses confirmed the morphological hypotheses and allowed the delimitation and discrimination of six new species of the genus described herein and four known species. Phylogenetic analyses of Longidorus spp. based on three molecular markers resulted in a general consensus of these species

  8. Two gonad-infecting species of Philometra (Nematoda: Philometridae) from groupers (Serranidae) off Tunisia, with a key to Philometra species infecting serranid gonads

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Based on light and scanning electron microscopical studies of nematode specimens (males and mature females) collected from the ovary of groupers (Serranidae, Perciformes) in the Mediterranean Sea off Tunisia (near Tunis and Sfax), two gonad-infecting species of Philometra Costa, 1845 (Nematoda, Philometridae) are reported: Philometra inexpectata n. sp. from the mottled grouper Mycteroperca rubra and P. jordanoi (López-Neyra, 1951) from the dusky grouper Epinephelus marginatus. Identification of both fish species was confirmed by molecular barcoding. The new species is mainly characterized by the length of equally long spicules (147–165 μm), the gubernaculum (63–93 μm long) bearing at the tip two dorsolateral lamellar parts separated from each other by a smooth median field, a V-shaped mound on the male caudal extremity, the presence of a pair of large caudal papillae located posterior to the cloaca and by the body length of the males (1.97–2.43 mm). Philometra inexpectata n. sp. is the fifth known gonad-infecting philometrid species parasitizing serranid fishes in the Mediterranean region. The males of P. jordanoi were examined by scanning electron microscopy for the first time; this detailed study revealed some new taxonomically important morphological features, such as the number and arrangement of cephalic and caudal papillae, presence of amphids and phasmids and mainly the lamellate structures at the posterior end of the gubernaculum. A key to gonad-infecting species of Philometra parasitic in serranid fishes is provided. PMID:26956219

  9. PUDICINAE (NEMATODA: HELIGMONELLIDAE) PARASITIC IN ENDEMIC CHILEAN RODENTS (CAVIOMORPHA: OCTODONTIDAE AND ABROCOMIDAE): DESCRIPTION OF A NEW SPECIES AND EMENDED DESCRIPTION OF PUDICA DEGUSI (BABERO AND CATTAN) N. COMB.

    PubMed

    Digiani, María Celina; Landaeta-Aqueveque, Carlos; Serrano, Paula Carolina; Notarnicola, Juliana

    2017-09-01

    We report the finding of 2 species of Pudica (Nematoda: Heligmonellidae: Pudicinae) in 2 rodents endemic to Chile, the Common Degu Octodon degus (Octodontidae) and the Bennett's Chinchilla Rat Abrocoma bennettii (Abrocomidae). Pudica degusi (Babero and Cattan, 1975) n. comb., originally described as a species of Longistriata (Heligmosomidae), was found in the Common Degu; through the study of its synlophe, the species is reassigned to the Heligmonellidae: Pudicinae and the genus Pudica, and is revalidated through comparison with the remaining species of the genus. Pudica cattani n. sp. is described from both O. degus and A. bennettii. It is characterized by its large body size, bursal pattern of type 1-3-1 on right lobe, 1-3-1 tending to 1-4 on left lobe, synlophe with 11 ridges including a careen, dorsal ray of the bursa dividing proximally and bursal rays 9 and 10 relatively short. Pudica degusi n. comb. and Pudica cattani n. sp. were found in the same host species but not as coparasitic in the same individuals. The Common Degu is confirmed as the sole and primary host of Pudica degusi n. comb. It is unlikely that it is the primary host for Pudica cattani n. sp., whose host affinities are less clear, mainly due to the scarcity of data. Pudica cattani n. sp. is the first helminth reported from the Bennett's Chinchilla Rat. Both findings enlarge the host range of the Pudicinae to the families Octodontidae and Abrocomidae, i.e. 9 out of the 11 extant families of caviomorphs, thereby establishing the presence of this nematode subfamily as typical parasites of the Neotropical Hystricognathi.

  10. Hysterothylacium aduncum (Nematoda, Anisakidae) with a new host record from the common sole Solea solea (Soleidae) and its role as a biological indicator of pollution.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Ghaffar, Fathy; Abdel-Gaber, Rewaida; Bashtar, Abdel-Rahman; Morsy, Kareem; Mehlhorn, Heinz; Al Quraishy, Saleh; Saleh, Rehab

    2015-02-01

    Hysterothylacium aduncum (Nematoda, Anisakidae) was isolated from the intestine of the common sole Solea solea (Family, Soleidae) collected from coasts along Alexandria City at the Mediterranean Sea in Egypt, during the period from May to September 2013. Light and scanning electron microscopy revealed that this nematode parasite belongs to the family Anisakidae in the genus Hysterothylacium. The type species is named H. aduncum, based on the presence of three interlocked lips with the interlabium in between, the presence of cephalic papillae, and large numbers of caudal papillae in males. Body measurements showed that the male worms were smaller than females measuring 13.9-18 mm (16.2 ± 0.2) in length and 0.26-0.34 mm (0.30 ± 0.01) in width. Females measured 20.5-24.5 mm (22.7 ± 0.2) in length and 0.41-0.52 mm (0.45 ± 0.01) in width. The morphological characteristics of this species was confirmed by molecular analysis of 18S rDNA for these parasites followed by comparison between sequence data for them with those obtained from the Genbank showing that H. aduncum is deeply embedded in the genus Hysterothylacium with a sequence similarity between 95.5-94.3 % with close relationships to other H. aduncum specimens and Hysterothylacium sp.. Furthermore, it was shown that this parasitic nematode is able to accumulate larger concentrations of heavy metals such as Fe, Cu, Cd, and Ni within its tissues than of its host fish and thus it can be used as a useful bio-indicator of water pollution.

  11. Unravelling the Biodiversity and Molecular Phylogeny of Needle Nematodes of the Genus Longidorus (Nematoda: Longidoridae) in Olive and a Description of Six New Species

    PubMed Central

    Archidona-Yuste, Antonio; Navas-Cortés, Juan A.; Cantalapiedra-Navarrete, Carolina; Palomares-Rius, Juan E.; Castillo, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The genus Longidorus includes a remarkable group of invertebrate animals of the phylum Nematoda comprising polyphagous root-ectoparasites of numerous plants including several agricultural crops and trees. Damage is caused by direct feeding on root cells as well as by transmitting nepoviruses that cause disease on those crops. Thus, correct identification of Longidorus species is essential to establish appropriate control measures. We provide the first detailed information on the diversity and distribution of Longidorus species infesting wild and cultivated olive soils in a wide-region in southern Spain that included 159 locations from which 449 sampling sites were analyzed. The present study doubles the known biodiversity of Longidorus species identified in olives by including six new species (Longidorus indalus sp. nov., Longidorus macrodorus sp. nov., Longidorus onubensis sp. nov., Longidorus silvestris sp. nov., Longidorus vallensis sp. nov., and Longidorus wicuolea sp. nov.), two new records for wild and cultivate olives (L. alvegus and L. vineacola), and two additional new records for wild olive (L. intermedius and L. lusitanicus). We also found evidence of some geographic species associations to western (viz. L. alvegus, L. intermedius, L. lusitanicus, L. onubensis sp. nov., L. vineacola, L. vinearum, L. wicuolea sp. nov.) and eastern distributions (viz. L. indalus sp. nov.), while only L. magnus was detected in both areas. We developed a comparative study by considering morphological and morphometrical features together with molecular data from nuclear ribosomal RNA genes (D2–D3 expansion segments of 28S, ITS1, and partial 18S). Results of molecular and phylogenetic analyses confirmed the morphological hypotheses and allowed the delimitation and discrimination of six new species of the genus described herein and four known species. Phylogenetic analyses of Longidorus spp. based on three molecular markers resulted in a general consensus of these species

  12. Redescription of Heligmosomoides neopolygyrus, Asakawa and Ohbayashi, 1986 (Nematoda: Heligmosomidae) from a Chinese Rodent, Apodemus peninsulae (Rodentia: Muridae); with comments on Heligmosomoides polygyrus polygyrus (Dujardin, 1845) and related species in China and Japan

    PubMed Central

    Massoni, J.; Durette-Desset, M.C.; Quéré, J.P.; Audebert, F.

    2012-01-01

    Heligmosomoides neopolygyrus, Asakawa and Ohbayashi, 1986 (Nematoda, Heligmosomoidea) is redescribed from Apodemus peninsulae from Rangtang, Sichuan, China. A morphological review of the Heligmosomoides spp. belonging to the “polygyrus line” proposed by Asakawa (1988) is made using new characters. This enabled us to distinguish two subspecies in Mus musculus (Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri from Japan and H. p. polygyrus from China) and two valid species in Apodemus spp. (H. neopolygyrus from Japan [in A. peninsulae] and from China [in A. agrarius] and H. asakawae from China [in A. uralensis]). Three parasite species of A. agrarius and A. peninsulae, previously identified by Asakawa et al. (1993) as H. neopolygyrus, are considered to be Heligmosomoides incertae sedis. This is the first report of H. neopolygyrus in A. peninsulae from China. PMID:23193521

  13. Redescription of Heligmosomoides neopolygyrus, Asakawa and Ohbayashi, 1986 (Nematoda: Heligmosomidae) from a Chinese rodent, Apodemus peninsulae (Rodentia: Muridae); with comments on Heligmosomoides polygyrus polygyrus (Dujardin, 1845) and related species in China and Japan.

    PubMed

    Massoni, J; Durette-Desset, M C; Quéré, J P; Audebert, F

    2012-11-01

    Heligmosomoides neopolygyrus, Asakawa and Ohbayashi, 1986 (Nematoda, Heligmosomoidea) is redescribed from Apodemus peninsulae from Rangtang, Sichuan, China. A morphological review of the Heligmosomoides spp. belonging to the "polygyrus line" proposed by Asakawa (1988) is made using new characters. This enabled us to distinguish two subspecies in Mus musculus (Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri from Japan and H. p. polygyrus from China) and two valid species in Apodemus spp. (H. neopolygyrus from Japan (in A. peninsulae) and from China (in A. agrarius) and H. asakawae from China (in A. uralensis)). Three parasite species of A. agrarius and A. peninsulae, previously identified by Asakawa et al. (1993) as H. neopolygyrus, are considered to be Heligmosomoides incertae sedis. This is the first report of H. neopolygyrus in A. peninsulae from China.

  14. Remarkable Diversity and Prevalence of Dagger Nematodes of the Genus Xiphinema Cobb, 1913 (Nematoda: Longidoridae) in Olives Revealed by Integrative Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Archidona-Yuste, Antonio; Navas-Cortés, Juan A.; Cantalapiedra-Navarrete, Carolina; Palomares-Rius, Juan E.

    2016-01-01

    The genus Xiphinema includes a remarkable group of invertebrates of the phylum Nematoda comprising ectoparasitic animals of many wild and cultivated plants. Damage is caused by direct feeding on root cells and by vectoring nepoviruses that cause diseases on several crops. Precise identification of Xiphinema species is critical for launching appropriate control measures. We make available the first detailed information on the diversity and distribution of Xiphinema species infesting wild and cultivated olive in a wide-region in southern Spain that included 211 locations from which 453 sampling sites were analyzed. The present study identified thirty-two Xiphinema spp. in the rhizosphere of olive trees, ten species belonging to Xiphinema americanum-group, whereas twenty-two were attributed to Xiphinema non-americanum-group. These results increase our current knowledge on the biodiversity of Xiphinema species identified in olives and include the description of four new species (Xiphinema andalusiense sp. nov., Xiphinema celtiense sp. nov., Xiphinema iznajarense sp. nov., and Xiphinema mengibarense sp. nov.), and two new records for cultivate olives (X. cadavalense and X. conurum). We also found evidence of remarkable prevalence of Xiphinema spp. in olive trees, viz. 85.0% (385 out of 453 sampling sites), and they were widely distributed in both wild and cultivated olives, with 26 and 17 Xiphinema spp., respectively. Diversity indexes (Richness, Hill´s diversity, Hill´s reciprocal of D and Hill´s evenness) were significantly affected by olive type. We also developed a comparative morphological and morphometrical study together with molecular data from three nuclear ribosomal RNA genes (D2-D3 expansion segments of 28S, ITS1, and partial 18S). Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analyses allowed the delimitation and discrimination of four new species of the genus described herein and three known species. Phylogenetic analyses of Xiphinema spp. resulted in a

  15. Remarkable Diversity and Prevalence of Dagger Nematodes of the Genus Xiphinema Cobb, 1913 (Nematoda: Longidoridae) in Olives Revealed by Integrative Approaches.

    PubMed

    Archidona-Yuste, Antonio; Navas-Cortés, Juan A; Cantalapiedra-Navarrete, Carolina; Palomares-Rius, Juan E; Castillo, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The genus Xiphinema includes a remarkable group of invertebrates of the phylum Nematoda comprising ectoparasitic animals of many wild and cultivated plants. Damage is caused by direct feeding on root cells and by vectoring nepoviruses that cause diseases on several crops. Precise identification of Xiphinema species is critical for launching appropriate control measures. We make available the first detailed information on the diversity and distribution of Xiphinema species infesting wild and cultivated olive in a wide-region in southern Spain that included 211 locations from which 453 sampling sites were analyzed. The present study identified thirty-two Xiphinema spp. in the rhizosphere of olive trees, ten species belonging to Xiphinema americanum-group, whereas twenty-two were attributed to Xiphinema non-americanum-group. These results increase our current knowledge on the biodiversity of Xiphinema species identified in olives and include the description of four new species (Xiphinema andalusiense sp. nov., Xiphinema celtiense sp. nov., Xiphinema iznajarense sp. nov., and Xiphinema mengibarense sp. nov.), and two new records for cultivate olives (X. cadavalense and X. conurum). We also found evidence of remarkable prevalence of Xiphinema spp. in olive trees, viz. 85.0% (385 out of 453 sampling sites), and they were widely distributed in both wild and cultivated olives, with 26 and 17 Xiphinema spp., respectively. Diversity indexes (Richness, Hill´s diversity, Hill´s reciprocal of D and Hill´s evenness) were significantly affected by olive type. We also developed a comparative morphological and morphometrical study together with molecular data from three nuclear ribosomal RNA genes (D2-D3 expansion segments of 28S, ITS1, and partial 18S). Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analyses allowed the delimitation and discrimination of four new species of the genus described herein and three known species. Phylogenetic analyses of Xiphinema spp. resulted in a

  16. Halophilanema prolata n. gen., n. sp. (Nematoda: Allantonematidae), a parasite of the intertidal bug, Saldula laticollis (Reuter)(Hemiptera: Saldidae) on the Oregon coast

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background It is rare to find terrestrial nematode lineages parasitizing arthropods inhabiting the intertidal or littoral zone of the oceans. During an ecological study along the Oregon dunes, an allantonematid nematode (Tylenchomorpha: Allantonematidae) was discovered parasitizing the intertidal shore bug, Saldula laticollis (Reuter)(Hemiptera: Saldidae). This shore bug is adapted to an intertidal environment and can survive short periods of submergence during high tides. The present study describes the nematode parasite and discusses aspects of its development, ecology and evolution. Methods Adults and last instar nymphs of S. laticollis (Hemiptera: Saldidae) were collected from the high intertidal zone among clumps of Juncus L. (Juncaceae) plants at Waldport, Oregon on October 3, 2011. The bugs were dissected in 1% saline solution and the nematodes killed in 1% Ringers solution and immediately fixed in 5% formalin (at 20°C). Third stage juveniles removed from infected hosts were maintained in 1% saline solution until they matured to the adult stage, molted and mated. Results Halophilanema prolata n. gen., n. sp. (Nematoda: Allantonematidae) is described from last instar nymphs and adults of the intertidal bug, Saldula laticollis on the Oregon coast. The new genus can be distinguished from other genera in the Allantonematidae by a stylet lacking basal knobs in both sexes, an excretory pore located behind the nerve ring, ribbed spicules, a gubernaculum, the absence of a bursa and the elongate-tubular shape of the ovoviviparous parasitic females. Studies of the organogenesis of Halophilanema showed development to third stage juveniles in the uterus of parasitic females. Maturation to the free-living adults and mating occurred in the environment. The incidence of infection of S. laticollis ranged from 0% to 85% depending on the microhabitat in the intertidal zone. Conclusions Based on the habitat and morphological characters, it is proposed that Halophilanema

  17. Halophilanema prolata n. gen., n. sp. (Nematoda: Allantonematidae), a parasite of the intertidal bug, Saldula laticollis (Reuter)(Hemiptera: Saldidae) on the Oregon coast.

    PubMed

    Poinar, George O

    2012-02-01

    It is rare to find terrestrial nematode lineages parasitizing arthropods inhabiting the intertidal or littoral zone of the oceans. During an ecological study along the Oregon dunes, an allantonematid nematode (Tylenchomorpha: Allantonematidae) was discovered parasitizing the intertidal shore bug, Saldula laticollis (Reuter)(Hemiptera: Saldidae). This shore bug is adapted to an intertidal environment and can survive short periods of submergence during high tides. The present study describes the nematode parasite and discusses aspects of its development, ecology and evolution. Adults and last instar nymphs of S. laticollis (Hemiptera: Saldidae) were collected from the high intertidal zone among clumps of Juncus L. (Juncaceae) plants at Waldport, Oregon on October 3, 2011. The bugs were dissected in 1% saline solution and the nematodes killed in 1% Ringers solution and immediately fixed in 5% formalin (at 20°C). Third stage juveniles removed from infected hosts were maintained in 1% saline solution until they matured to the adult stage, molted and mated. Halophilanema prolata n. gen., n. sp. (Nematoda: Allantonematidae) is described from last instar nymphs and adults of the intertidal bug, Saldula laticollis on the Oregon coast. The new genus can be distinguished from other genera in the Allantonematidae by a stylet lacking basal knobs in both sexes, an excretory pore located behind the nerve ring, ribbed spicules, a gubernaculum, the absence of a bursa and the elongate-tubular shape of the ovoviviparous parasitic females. Studies of the organogenesis of Halophilanema showed development to third stage juveniles in the uterus of parasitic females. Maturation to the free-living adults and mating occurred in the environment. The incidence of infection of S. laticollis ranged from 0% to 85% depending on the microhabitat in the intertidal zone. Based on the habitat and morphological characters, it is proposed that Halophilanema adapted a parasitic existence fairly

  18. Influence of parasitism on trace element contents in tissues of red fox (Vulpes vulpes) and its parasites Mesocestoides spp. (Cestoda) and Toxascaris leonina (Nematoda).

    PubMed

    Jankovská, Ivana; Miholová, Daniela; Bejcek, Vladimír; Vadlejch, Jaroslav; Sulc, Miloslav; Száková, Jirina; Langrová, Iva

    2010-02-01

    Bioaccumulation of cadmium, chromium, copper, manganese, nickel, lead, and zinc in 56 foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and their parasites Mesocestoides spp. (Cestoda) and Toxascaris leonina (Nematoda) was studied. The levels of heavy metals were determined in the livers and kidneys of the animals depending on parasitism in the following ranges: Pb, 0.029-3.556; Cd, 0.055-9.967; Cr, 0.001-0.304; Cu, 4.15-41.15; Mn, 1.81-19.94; Ni: 0.037-0.831; Zn, 52.0-212.9 microg/g dry weight (dw). Cd in parasites (0.038-3.678 microg/g dw) were comparable with those in the livers of the host and lower than in the kidneys (0.095-6.032 microg/g dw). Contents of Pb, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, and Zn in cestodes were predominantly higher than those in the kidney and liver of the host. Median lead levels in Mesocestoides spp. (45.6 microg/g dw) were 52-fold higher than in the kidney and liver of the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) infected by both parasites and median Pb values in T. leonina (8.98 microg/g dw) were 8-fold higher than in the tissues of the parasitized red fox. Bioaccumulation factors of copper, zinc, nickel, and manganese are lower than those of lead and mostly range from 1.9 to 24 for Mesocestoides spp. and from 1.5 to 6 for nematode T. leonina depending on the tissue of host and element. A significant decrease in the content of Pb was found in the kidney of animals infected by T. leonina (0.260 microg/g dw) as well as those infected by Mesocestoides spp. (0.457 microg/g dw) in comparison with the lead content (0.878 microg/g dw) in the kidneys of the nonparasitized red fox. Regardless of a bioaccumulation of copper and manganese in the parasites, a significant increase of the concentrations of Mn and Cu was observed in the host's livers infected predominantly by Mesocestoides spp.

  19. Agamermis unka (Mermithidae) Parasitism of Nilaparvata lugens in Rice Fields in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Ho Yul; Kaya, Harry K.; Kim, Jeong Boo

    1989-01-01

    The mermithid Agamermis unka, a parasite of the brown planthopper (BPH), was found in many rice paddies in Gyeongnam Province, Korea. Nematode parasitism of adult BPH varied from year to year, reaching as high as 50% in paddies not treated with an insecticide. Parasitism was lower in insecticide-treated paddies. Generally, mermithid parasitism was higher in BPH adults collected from the lower part (19%) compared with adults collected from the upper part (8%) of the rice plant and in brachypterous (57%) compared with macropterous forms (8%). No difference in parasitism between first (54%) and second (57%) generation was observed. PMID:19287605

  20. Anisakid nematodes (Nematoda: Anisakidae) from the marine fishes Plectropomus laevis Lacépède (Serranidae) and Sphyraena qenie Klunzinger (Sphyraenidae) off New Caledonia, including two new species of Hysterothylacium Ward & Magath, 1917.

    PubMed

    Moravec, František; Justine, Jean-Lou

    2015-11-01

    Based on light and scanning electron microscopical studies, two new species of Hysterothylacium Ward & Magath, 1917 (Nematoda: Anisakidae) are described from the digestive tract of perciform fishes off New Caledonia: H. alatum n. sp. from Plectropomus laevis (Lacépède) (Serranidae) and H. sphyraenae n. sp. from Sphyraena qenie Klunzinger (Sphyraenidae). The former species (H. alatum) is mainly characterised by its large body (male 42.05 mm, gravid females 51.18-87.38 mm long), the shape of the dorsal lip, conspicuously broad cervical alae, a short caecum and a long ventricular appendix, the length of the spicules (925 µm), the number (25 pairs) and distribution of the genital papillae and the tail tip bearing numerous minute cuticular protuberances. The other species (H. sphyraenae) is mainly characterised by the presence of narrow lateral alae, a short caecum and a long ventricular appendix, the length (762-830 µm) and shape of the spicules, the number (37-38 pairs) and arrangement of the genital papillae, and by the tail tip which lacks any distinct cuticular projections visible under the light microscope. In addition, and unidentifiable at the species level, conspicuously large (45.71-66.10 mm long) larvae of Contracaecum Railliet & Henry, 1912, were found in the body cavity of P. laevis, which serves as a paratenic host for this parasite.

  1. Protostrongylus pulmonalis (Frölich, 1802) and P. oryctolagi Baboš, 1955 (Nematoda: Protostrongylidae), parasites of the lungs of European hare (Lepus europaeus L.) in France: morphological and molecular approaches.

    PubMed

    Lesage, Célia; Jouet, Damien; Patrelle, Cécile; Guitton, Jean-Sébastien; Decors, Anouk; Ferté, Hubert

    2014-06-01

    Pulmonary protostrongyliasis of hare is a parasitic disease caused by nematodes belonging to the genus Protostrongylus (Nematoda, Protostrongylidae). During survey of wildlife disease in the South-East of France, pathologic examination of lungs from European hares found dead or hunter-killed between 2009 and 2012 was performed. Adult male worms were morphologically characterized and the identification confirmed by molecular biology (D2 domain of the 28S and ITS2 of rDNA). Two different species were identified: the first one, Protostrongylus pulmonalis, is identical with the haplotype previously deposited in GenBank. Based on morphological criteria of copulatory bursa of adult male worms (especially length of spicules and gubernaculum structure), we identified a second species found in France as Protostrongylus oryctolagi. This is the first report of P. oryctolagi in France from European hare and rabbit. P. oryctolagi was isolated from 248 hares and 3 rabbits in the South of France. P. pulmonalis was isolated from four hares found dead in the Northern France and from one hare in the South, which was co-parasitized by P. oryctolagi and P. pulmonalis. It's the first coinfection observed with these two species from a lung of hare in France.

  2. Two new gonad-infecting philometrids (Nematoda: Philometridae) from the yellowedge grouper Hyporthodus flavolimbatus (Serranidae) and the great northern tilefish Lopholatilus chamaeleonticeps (Malacanthidae) in the northern Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Moravec, František; Bakenhaster, Micah

    2013-10-01

    Based on light and scanning electron microscopical studies, two new gonad-infecting species of Philometra Costa, 1845 (Nematoda: Philometridae) are described from marine perciform fishes in the northern Gulf of Mexico: P. hyporthodi n. sp. from the ovary of the yellowedge grouper Hyporthodus flavolimbatus (Poey) (Serranidae) and P. lopholatili n. sp. from the ovary of the great northern tilefish Lopholatilus chamaeleonticeps Goode & Bean (Malacanthidae). Philometra hyporthodi is mainly characterised by the body length of both the males (3.62-4.07 mm) and gravid female (105 mm), the length of the spicules (135-138 μm) and the presence of dorsal transverse lamella-like structures on the distal portion of the gubernaculum. Philometra lopholatili is distinguished by the presence of a distinct dorsal protuberance consisting of two dorsolateral lamellated parts separated from each other by a smooth median field, an uninterrupted mound on the male caudal extremity, the length of the spicules (165-189 μm) and the body length of the males (2.19-2.34 mm) and gravid female (280 mm). Philometra lopholatili is the first representative of the genus and the second philometrid species reported from fishes of the family Malacanthidae.

  3. Anisakis (Nematoda: Ascaridoidea) from Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Palm, H W; Theisen, S; Damriyasa, I M; Kusmintarsih, E S; Oka, I B M; Setyowati, E A; Suratma, N A; Wibowo, S; Kleinertz, S

    2017-03-06

    Despite Indonesia's high marine biodiversity, there is a lack of information regarding fish parasites in Indonesian waters. During a sampling of 136 teleost species from Indonesian waters, 22 of them were infected with larvae of Anisakis Dujardin, 1845, a genus with zoonotic potential. We genetically identified 118 worms, provide a revision of all available sequences of the ITS-1-5.8S-ITS-2 marker from Indonesian Anisakis in GenBank (n = 125), and establish 16 new host records. So far, 53 Indonesian teleosts harbour Anisakis spp., 32 of them with known sequence data, increasing the worldwide teleosts with genetically identified Anisakis from 155 to 177. Sequence analyses of this marker in the 243 Anisakis specimens identified 3 Anisakis sp. HC-2005 and 39 (16%) A. typica (sensu stricto). A. berlandi and A. pegreffii are reported for the first time from teleosts in the equatorial region and A. physeteris from the Pacific Ocean. The latter 3 species were exclusively found in the migratory scombrid Auxis rochei. Most common infection sites were the body cavity, with 299 (of 848) worms in the mesenteries surrounding the liver, and 129 unattached. Musculature infection was very low, demonstrating minor risk of anisakiasis for human consumers. A total of 193 worms (~79%) had a distinct genotype distinguished from A. typica by 4 positions in the ITS-1 region. This genotype is reported since 2008 as 'A. typica', 'sibling', 'Anisakis sp./type 1', 'sp. I', 'sp. 2' or 'sp. II'. To avoid further misleading identification, we hereby apply the subspecific entity Anisakis typica var. indonesiensis until description of the adults becomes available.

  4. Descriptions of Philometra aenei n. sp. and P. tunisiensis n. sp. (Nematoda: Philometridae) from Epinephelus spp. off Tunisia confirm a high degree of host specificity of gonad-infecting species of Philometra Costa, 1845 in groupers (Serranidae).

    PubMed

    Moravec, František; Chaabane, Amira; Neifar, Lassad; Gey, Delphine; Justine, Jean-Lou

    2016-02-01

    Based on light and electron microscopical studies of males and mature females, two new gonad-infecting species of Philometra Costa, 1845 (Nematoda: Philometridae) are described from the ovary of groupers, Epinephelus spp. (Perciformes; Serranidae), in the Mediterranean Sea off Tunisia (near Sfax): Philometra aenei n. sp. from the white grouper E. aeneus (Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire) and P. tunisiensis n. sp. from the goldblotch grouper E. costae (Steindachner). Identification of both fish hosts was confirmed by barcoding of the infected fish specimens. Philometra aenei is mainly characterised by the length of conspicuously distended spicules (108-123 µm), the presence of a distinct dorsal barb at the middle region of the gubernaculum and a distinct protuberance consisting of two dorsolateral lamellar parts separated from each other by a smooth median field at its distal tip, a V-shaped mound on the male caudal extremity and by the body length of the males (2.34-3.05 mm). The male of this species was found to possess minute deirids in the cervical region, which is quite exceptional within the Philometridae. Philometra tunisiensis is distinguished from other gonad-infecting congeneric species parasitising serranids by the length of the needle-like spicules and gubernaculum (201-219 and 78-87 µm, respectively), spicule length representing 9-11% of body length, the gubernaculum/spicules length ratio of 1:2.52-2.77, the length of oesophagus in the male comprising 15-16% of the body length, the absence of a dorsal protuberance on the distal lamellar part of the gubernaculum and a pair of large papillae posterior to the cloaca, a dorsally interrupted mound on the male caudal extremity and the body length of the male (2.01-2.42 mm). The presence of three morphologically very different species of Philometra in congeneric hosts in the Mediterranean Sea confirms a high degree of host specificity of these gonad-infecting nematodes parasitising groupers.

  5. Species of Philometra (Nematoda, Philometridae) from fishes off the Mediterranean coast of Africa, with a description of Philometra rara n. sp. from Hyporthodus haifensis and a molecular analysis of Philometra saltatrix from Pomatomus saltatrix

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Two gonad-infecting species of Philometra Costa, 1845 (Nematoda, Philometridae) were recorded for the first time from marine perciform fishes off Tunisia and Libya: Philometra rara n. sp. from the rare, deep-water Haifa grouper Hyporthodus haifensis (Serranidae) off Libya and Philometra saltatrix Ramachandran, 1973 from the bluefish Pomatomus saltatrix (Pomatomidae) off Tunisia. Identification of both fish species was confirmed by molecular barcoding. Light and scanning electron microscope studies of Ph. rara n. sp. showed that it is characterized by the length of spicules (216–219 μm) and the gubernaculum (90–93 μm), the gubernaculum/spicules length ratio (1:2.32–2.43), and mainly by the shape and structure of the distal end of the gubernaculum (shovel-shaped with a wide median smooth field in dorsal view), appearing as having a dorsal protuberance in lateral view, and by the structure of the male caudal mound (dorsally interrupted); large subgravid females (70–137 mm long) are characterized by the presence of four oval submedian cephalic elevations, each of them bearing a pair of cephalic papillae of the outer circle. The finding of Ph. saltatrix off Tunisia confirms that this species is widespread throughout the Mediterranean region. A molecular analysis of our Ph. saltatrix specimens and other available philometrid cytochrome c oxidase 1 (COI) sequences showed that most species have robust clades. Sequences of Ph. saltatrix from Tunisia diverge from Ph. saltatrix from Brazil and the USA, suggesting that speciation is currently occurring between populations from both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. PMID:28287390

  6. Species of Philometra (Nematoda, Philometridae) from fishes off the Mediterranean coast of Africa, with a description of Philometra rara n. sp. from Hyporthodus haifensis and a molecular analysis of Philometra saltatrix from Pomatomus saltatrix.

    PubMed

    Moravec, František; Chaabane, Amira; Neifar, Lassad; Gey, Delphine; Justine, Jean-Lou

    2017-01-01

    Two gonad-infecting species of Philometra Costa, 1845 (Nematoda, Philometridae) were recorded for the first time from marine perciform fishes off Tunisia and Libya: Philometra rara n. sp. from the rare, deep-water Haifa grouper Hyporthodus haifensis (Serranidae) off Libya and Philometra saltatrix Ramachandran, 1973 from the bluefish Pomatomus saltatrix (Pomatomidae) off Tunisia. Identification of both fish species was confirmed by molecular barcoding. Light and scanning electron microscope studies of Ph. rara n. sp. showed that it is characterized by the length of spicules (216-219 μm) and the gubernaculum (90-93 μm), the gubernaculum/spicules length ratio (1:2.32-2.43), and mainly by the shape and structure of the distal end of the gubernaculum (shovel-shaped with a wide median smooth field in dorsal view), appearing as having a dorsal protuberance in lateral view, and by the structure of the male caudal mound (dorsally interrupted); large subgravid females (70-137 mm long) are characterized by the presence of four oval submedian cephalic elevations, each of them bearing a pair of cephalic papillae of the outer circle. The finding of Ph. saltatrix off Tunisia confirms that this species is widespread throughout the Mediterranean region. A molecular analysis of our Ph. saltatrix specimens and other available philometrid cytochrome c oxidase 1 (COI) sequences showed that most species have robust clades. Sequences of Ph. saltatrix from Tunisia diverge from Ph. saltatrix from Brazil and the USA, suggesting that speciation is currently occurring between populations from both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. © F. Moravec et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2017.

  7. A revision of the genus Paracanthonchus (Cyatholaimidae, Nematoda) with a tabular key to species and a description of P. mamubiae sp. n. from the deep North-Western Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miljutina, Maria A.; Miljutin, Dmitry M.

    2015-01-01

    The species-rich genus of marine free-living nematodes, Paracanthonchus Mikoletzky 1924 (Nematoda: Cyatholaimidae), is revised. The genus numbers 72 valid species; twenty are indicated as species inquirenda because of poor descriptions and/or doubtful placement in the genus. Species of the genus were described from all oceans and latitudes. Of valid species, 64 ones (90%) were described from the tidal or upper subtidal zones, four species were recorded from the medium or lower shelf, and three species are abyssal. Thirty one species (43%) are known from Europe and the Northern Africa; 19 and 9 ones were described from South and North America (respectively); 8 ones were recorded from Asia; and 6 ones from the Australian region. The type species, Paracanthonchus caecus Mikoletzky 1924 has been recorded by a number of authors from various oceans around the World, yet many of these specimens have only roughly resembled the type description. Evidently, this species represents a complex of closely related species. Possibly, the same situation is in some other Paracanthonchus species, the repeated findings of which have no strong resemblance to type specimens. A tabular key to species is provided. A new abyssal species Paracanthonchus mamubiae from the Zenkevich Rise (North-Western Pacific, off North Japan, 5350 m depth) is described. The new species is characterized by: the tail, which is long with a thin, cylindrical terminal section; the absence of lateral differentiation of the cuticle; the presence of two groups of lateral pores (level of posterior part of pharynx and in cloacal region); one large dorsal tooth and two pairs of small subventral teeth combined with pharyngostomal cuticular ridges forming two denticles which may appear as a third pair of subventral teeth; 3-5 indistinct tubular preanal supplements; and a massive, proximally paired gubernaculum possessing broad flattened plates on each distal end. Each flattened gubernacular plate bears numerous (50

  8. Redescription and first genetic characterisation of Procamallanus (Spirocamallanus) macaensis Vicente & Santos, 1972 (Nematoda: Camallanidae), including re-evaluation of the species of Procamallanus (Spirocamallanus) from marine fishes off Brazil.

    PubMed

    Sardella, Carla J; Pereira, Felipe B; Luque, José L

    2017-07-01

    Newly collected specimens of Procamallanus (Spirocamallanus) macaensis Vicente & Santos, 1972 from the intestine of Paralonchurus brasiliensis (Steindachner), off Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, are redescribed and genetically characterised. Additionally, all congeners deposited in the Coleção Helmintológica do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz (CHIOC) parasitic in marine fishes of the South Atlantic, including types of P. (S.) macaensis, were re-evaluated. The following features are described for the first time in P. (S.) macaensis: morphology and arrangement of cephalic structures, shape of deirids and location of phasmids. The position of the excretory pore, the number and arrangement of caudal papillae in males, the structure of the spicules and of tail end in both males and females are rectified. Most specimens deposited in the CHIOC identified as P. (S.) pereirai Annereaux, 1946 were transferred to P. (S.) macaensis and others were designated as Procamallanus (S.) sp. Procamallanus (S.) cruzi Guimarães, Cristófaro & Rodrigues, 1976 is considered a species inquirenda due to its poor description and the lack of match of its original description with the type-material re-examined. Moreover, several taxonomic problems were noted after observations of the specimens (mostly poorly preserved), including inadequate morphological reports as well as misidentifications. Phylogenies inferred using sequences of the SSU rDNA from camallanids (Nematoda: Camallanidae) mostly generated weakly supported clades; however, Camallanus Railliet & Henry, 1915 and Procamallanus Baylis, 1923 do not seem to be monophyletic. Based on the present results and the lack of molecular data, it would be pertinent to adopt the widely-used classification for the subgenera of Procamallanus.

  9. Mermithid nematodes found in adult Anopheles from southeastern Senegal

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Over two dozen mermithid nematodes have been described parasitizing mosquitoes worldwide, however, only two species were found in Africa. Mermithid nematodes kill their mosquito host upon emergence, which suggests that they could be developed as biological control agents of mosquitoes. Both Romanomermis culicivorax and Romanomermis iyengari have been reared for mass release to control numerous Anopheles species vector populations, and in one instance this may have led to reduced malaria prevalence in a human population. Methods Anopheles mosquitoes were collected during a malaria study in southeastern Senegal. Two different adult blood fed mosquitoes had a single mermithid nematode emerge from their anus while they were being held post-capture. Primers from the 18 S rDNA were developed to sequence nematode DNA and screen mosquitoes for mermithid DNA. 18 S rDNA from the Senegalese mermithid and other mermithid entries in GenBank were used to create a Maximum Parsimony tree of the Mermithidae family. Results The mermithid was present in 1.8% (10/551) of the sampled adult Anopheles species in our study area. The mermithid was found in An. gambiae s.s., An. funestus, and An. rufipes from the villages of Ndebou, Boundoucondi, and Damboucoye. Maximum parsimony analysis confirmed that the nematode parasites found in Anopheles were indeed mermithid parasites, and of the mermithid sequences available in GenBank, they are most closely related to Strelkovimermis spiculatus. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first report of mermithids from adult Anopheles mosquitoes in Senegal. The mermithid appears to infect Anopheles mosquitoes that develop in diverse larval habitats. Although maximum parsimony analysis determined the mermithid was closely related to Strelkovimermis spiculatus, several characteristics of the mermithid were more similar to the Empidomermis genus. Future mermithid isolations will hopefully allow: formal taxonomic identification

  10. Pathogenicity Tests on Nine Mosquito Species and Several Non-target Organisms with Strelkovimermis spiculatus (Nemata Mermithidae)

    PubMed Central

    Becnel, James J.; Johnson, Margaret A.

    1998-01-01

    Nine species of mosquitoes and several species of non-target aquatic organisms were tested for susceptibility to the mernaithid nematode, Strelkovimermis spiculatus. All species of Anopheles, Aedes, Culex, and Toxorhynchites exposed to S. spiculatus were susceptible. Of the nine mosquito species tested, C. pipiens quinquefasciatus had the greatest tolerance to initial invasion and the highest percent infection of those that survived. High levels of infection were also achieved with Aedes taeniorhynchus and A. albopictus, but these mosquitoes were significantly less tolerant to parasitism than C. pipiens quinquefasciatus. Strelkovimermis spiculatus did not infect or develop in any of the non-target hosts tested. PMID:19274233

  11. Pathogenicity Tests on Nine Mosquito Species and Several Non-target Organisms with Strelkovimermis spiculatus (Nemata Mermithidae).

    PubMed

    Becnel, J J; Johnson, M A

    1998-12-01

    Nine species of mosquitoes and several species of non-target aquatic organisms were tested for susceptibility to the mernaithid nematode, Strelkovimermis spiculatus. All species of Anopheles, Aedes, Culex, and Toxorhynchites exposed to S. spiculatus were susceptible. Of the nine mosquito species tested, C. pipiens quinquefasciatus had the greatest tolerance to initial invasion and the highest percent infection of those that survived. High levels of infection were also achieved with Aedes taeniorhynchus and A. albopictus, but these mosquitoes were significantly less tolerant to parasitism than C. pipiens quinquefasciatus. Strelkovimermis spiculatus did not infect or develop in any of the non-target hosts tested.

  12. ZYGOTE FORMATION IN ASCARIS LUMBRICOIDES (NEMATODA)

    PubMed Central

    Foor, W. Eugene

    1968-01-01

    Ultrastructural observations of the in utero sperm of Ascaris lumbricoides reveal that it consists of a relatively clear, ameboid anterior region and a conical posterior region containing numerous surface membrane specializations, dense mitochondria, a lipid-like refringent body of variable size, and a dense nucleus which lacks an apparent nuclear envelope. No acrosomal complex was observed. Pseudopods emanating from the anterior cytoplasm make first contact with the primary oocytes and appear to be responsible for the localized removal of the extraneous coat covering the oolemma. Subsequently the gamete membranes interdigitate and finally fuse. Because this pseudopodial action appears similar to that reported for the acrosomal filaments in flagellated sperm, the anterior region of the Ascaris sperm is thought to serve an acrosomal function. Following gamete-membrane fusion, the sperm nucleus acquires a particulate appearance and becomes disorganized. Once inside the oocyte, the sperm cytoplasm consists of dense mitochondria, ribosomes, and vesicles derived from the surface membrane specializations. The refringent body, whose contents possibly contribute to the synthesis of ribosomes, is usually absent by the time the sperm cytoplasm attains a central position in the egg. PMID:5678444

  13. Shedding patterns of Daubaylia potomaca (Nematoda: Rhabditida).

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Michael R; Luth, Kyle E; Esch, Gerald W

    2013-12-01

    Daubaylia potomaca is a nematode parasite that exhibits an unusual direct life cycle in planorbid snails in which adult females are the infective stage, after being shed from a definitive host. The present study examined the shedding patterns of this nematode to determine what cues or mechanisms might lead to the parasite leaving its host. A correlation was found between host death and the frequency and number of D. potomaca shed, suggesting that the nematodes can detect that the host is dying and may leave in search of a new host. Furthermore, elevated intensities of D. potomaca in the snail induce shedding earlier, suggesting that competition for space and resources may also play a role in the shedding patterns of the nematode, but not when time to death is controlled. Finally, nematodes shed a longer time before host death were significantly longer and more likely to be gravid than those shed as time to snail death approached, implying that the nematode reaching maturity or being inseminated might also be cues for D. potomaca to leave its snail host. In summary, the shedding patterns of D. potomaca appear to be a complex mix of host death detection, competition, and nematode maturation.

  14. Criconematina (nematoda: tylenchida) from the Aleutian Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, E.C.

    1982-01-01

    A new genus (Cerchnotocriconema) and three new species (C. psephinum, Hemicycliophora anchitkaensis, and Paratylenchus amundseni) are described from Adak and Amchitka Islands in the Aleutian chain. The new genus differs from all other criconematid genera in having irregular, convex sculpturing consisting of small, oval plates on the anterior and posterior regions of each annule, with the mid-annular region minutely punctate or dentate. H. amchitkaensis n. sp. resembles H. sinilis Thorne and H. zuckermani Brzeski, but has only one head annule, instead of two. P. amundseni n. sp., which has a stylet 17 to 19 ..mu..m long, is similar to P. tatea Wu and Townsend and P. labiosus Anderson and Kimpinski, but differs by the presence of males and the possession of conoid-truncate lip region, functional spermatheca, and long male tail (c = 8.5 to 9.5). Seriespinula seymouri Wu (Mehta and Raski), Nothocriconema longulum (Gunhold) De Grisse and Loof, and Macroposthonia xenoplax (Raski) De Grisse and Loof are also reported from the islands.

  15. Comparative and experimental embryogenesis of Plectidae (Nematoda).

    PubMed

    Lahl, Vera; Halama, Christian; Schierenberg, Einhard

    2003-02-01

    Comparative analysis of early embryogenesis indicates that considerable differences exist among nematode species. To better understand to what extent the well-studied development of Caenorhabditis elegans is representative for nematodes in general, we extended our earlier studies to other families of this phylum. Here we report our findings on seven species of Plectidae. We found that Plectidae embryos share a number of developmental similarities with one branch of nematodes (Secernentea), including C. elegans, but not with the other branch (Adenophorea), and thus support conclusions concerning their phylogenetic position drawn from molecular data. However, Plectidae also show developmental differences to other Secernentea, suggesting an early separation from them. Prominent characteristics of Plectidae are (1) strict left-right divisions of somatic founder cells generating a prominent early bilateral symmetry and (2) a very early start of gastrulation with immigration of a single gut precursor cell. To determine whether gastrulation with two gut precursors is crucial for C. elegans embryos, we induced it to gastrulate with a single blastomere like in Plectidae. As this alteration is compatible with an essentially normal subsequent embryogenesis, cleavage of the gut precursor before gastrulation is obviously not required. As major differences exist among nematodes concerning the potential to compensate for eliminated early blastomeres, we tested this feature in one Plectus species. We found that Plectus does not replace a lost cell but behaves like C. elegansin this respect, in contrast to our previous findings in Acrobeloides nanus, another member of the Secernentea.

  16. The complete mitochondrial genomes of three parasitic nematodes of birds: a unique gene order and insights into nematode phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Analyses of mitochondrial (mt) genome sequences in recent years challenge the current working hypothesis of Nematoda phylogeny proposed from morphology, ecology and nuclear small subunit rRNA gene sequences, and raise the need to sequence additional mt genomes for a broad range of nematode lineages. Results We sequenced the complete mt genomes of three Ascaridia species (family Ascaridiidae) that infest chickens, pigeons and parrots, respectively. These three Ascaridia species have an identical arrangement of mt genes to each other but differ substantially from other nematodes. Phylogenetic analyses of the mt genome sequences of the Ascaridia species, together with 62 other nematode species, support the monophylies of seven high-level taxa of the phylum Nematoda: 1) the subclass Dorylaimia; 2) the orders Rhabditida, Trichinellida and Mermithida; 3) the suborder Rhabditina; and 4) the infraorders Spiruromorpha and Oxyuridomorpha. Analyses of mt genome sequences, however, reject the monophylies of the suborders Spirurina and Tylenchina, and the infraorders Rhabditomorpha, Panagrolaimomorpha and Tylenchomorpha. Monophyly of the infraorder Ascaridomorpha varies depending on the methods of phylogenetic analysis. The Ascaridomorpha was more closely related to the infraorders Rhabditomorpha and Diplogasteromorpha (suborder Rhabditina) than they were to the other two infraorders of the Spirurina: Oxyuridorpha and Spiruromorpha. The closer relationship among Ascaridomorpha, Rhabditomorpha and Diplogasteromorpha was also supported by a shared common pattern of mitochondrial gene arrangement. Conclusions Analyses of mitochondrial genome sequences and gene arrangement has provided novel insights into the phylogenetic relationships among several major lineages of nematodes. Many lineages of nematodes, however, are underrepresented or not represented in these analyses. Expanding taxon sampling is necessary for future phylogenetic studies of nematodes with mt genome

  17. Prevalence and Molecular Identification of Nematode and Dipteran Parasites in an Australian Alpine Grasshopper (Kosciuscola tristis)

    PubMed Central

    Umbers, Kate D. L.; Byatt, Lachlan J.; Hill, Nichola J.; Bartolini, Remo J.; Hose, Grant C.; Herberstein, Marie E.; Power, Michelle L

    2015-01-01

    In alpine Australia, Orthoptera are abundant, dominant herbivores, important prey species, and hosts for parasites and parasitoids. Despite the central role of orthopterans in alpine ecosystems, the impact of parasites on orthopteran populations is under-explored. In this study we describe the relationship between parasite prevalence and host sex, body size and year of collection. We accessed an existing, preserved collection of 640 Kosciuscola tristis collected from across its range between 2007 and 2011. Upon dissection we collected juvenile parasites and used molecular tools to identify them to three families (Nematoda; Mermithidae, and Arthropoda: Diptera: Tachinidae and Sarcophagidae). The prevalence of nematodes ranged from 3.5% to 25.0% and dipterans from 2.4% to 20.0%. Contrary to predictions, we found no associations between parasite prevalence and grasshopper sex or size. Although there was an association between prevalence of both nematodes and dipterans with year of collection, this is likely driven by a small sample size in the first year. Our results provide a foundation for future studies into parasite prevalence within the alpine environment and the abiotic factors that might influence these associations. PMID:25919745

  18. Five new species of the genus Tripylella (Nematoda: Enoplida: Tripylidae).

    PubMed

    Prado-Vera, Ignacio Cid Del; Ferris, Howard; Nadler, Steven A

    2016-05-06

    Five new species of the genus Tripylella are described, two from México, one from Fátima, Portugal, one from Quito, Ecuador, and one from California, USA. Tripylella mexicana sp. n. is characterized by its short body (average 0.74 mm), short pharynx (average 161 μm), short tail (average 117 μm), presence of an excretory pore and small setae distributed sparsely along the body, the presence of body pores, the posterior position of the subventral teeth in relation to the small dorsal tooth with all teeth in contiguous stomal chambers, the finely-striated cuticle with many anastomoses, the non-protruding vulval lips, and the presence of sclerotized pieces in the vulval region. Tripylella muscusi sp. n. is characterized by its body length (average 0.94 mm), pharynx length (average 201 μm), tail length (average 140 μm), the anterior position of the subventral teeth in relation to the small dorsal tooth in a single stomal chamber, the presence of an excretory pore, the presence of body pores and sparse somatic setae, the finely-striated cuticle with sparse anastomoses, protruding vulval lips and sclerotized oval-shaped pieces present in the vulval region. Tripylella quitoensis sp. n. is characterized by the short body length (average 0.72 mm), the short outer labial setae, the short pharynx (average 175 μm), the location of the anterior subventral teeth and posterior dorsal tooth in the same stomal chamber, the short tail (average 98 μm), the apparent absence of an excretory pore, presence of body pores, presence of somatic setae, a finely-striated cuticle, non-protruding vulval lips, and very small oval sclerotized pieces in the vulva. Tripylella fatimaensis sp. n. is characterized by the short body, (average 0.74 mm) long, by the length of the pharynx (average 180 μm), the length of the tail (average 110 μm) and in the length of its reduced diameter portion, 45-58 μm, the presence of an excretory pore, body pores and three pairs of caudal setae (one pair each latero-ventral, latero-dorsal and ventral). Tripylella dentata sp. n. is characterized, and differs from all the species of the genus, by the presence of two adjacent stomal chambers, with two large teeth, one dorsal and one ventral, in the posterior stomal chamber and two subventral teeth in the anterior smaller chamber, short body (average 0.85 mm), pharynx length (average 209 μm), tail length (average 115 μm), the apparent absence of an excretory pore, the presence of two cervical setae in a lateral position, and by the presence of conspicuous pores along the body.

  19. First report of Xiphinema rivesi (Nematoda, Longidoridae) in Washington State

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The dagger nematode Xiphinema rivesi Dalmasso 1969 transmits several viruses in North America and Europe (2), causing severe yield reduction in crops. During a routine survey of cherry orchards suffering from cherry rasp leaf disease caused by Cherry rasp leaf virus (CRLV) (genus Cheravirus) in Che...

  20. Nematoda of Kinosternon scorpioides (Testudines: Kinosternidae) from Northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Viana, Diego C; Rodrigues, João Fabrício M; Madelaire, Carla B; Clara, Ana; Santos, G; Sousa, Alana L

    2016-02-01

    The scorpion mud turtle (Kinosternon scorpioides) is a small freshwater turtle broadly distributed in South America and commonly consumed in some Brazilian regions. This study aimed to identify the species of helminths that parasitize the digestive tract of K. scorpioides and report infection parameters such as parasite prevalence, mean intensity of the infection, abundance, and the relationship between these nematodes and host body size in this species. We captured 20 adult male K. scorpioides, and 6 animals had nematodes in their gastrointestinal tract. These animals had Serpinema magathi (prevalence = 0.3) and Spiroxys figueiredoi (prevalence = 0.25). There were no correlations between the number of total parasites and carapace length (rs = 0.17, n = 6, P = 0.74) or the length of the gastrointestinal tract (rs = 0.18, n = 6, P = 0.73).

  1. Scanning electron microscopy of adult Gongylonema pulchrum (Nematoda: Spirurida).

    PubMed

    Naem, S; Seifi, H; Simon, G T

    2000-05-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to study the surface ultrastructure of adult worms of Gongylonema pulchrum. The anterior end in both sexes was covered by numerous cuticular platelets. There was a pair of lateral cervical papillac. The buccal opening was small and extended in the dorsoventral direction. Around the mouth a cuticular elevation enclosed the labia, and eight papillae were located laterodorsally and lateroventrally. Two large lateral amphids were seen. On the lateral sides of the female's tail, phasmidal apertures were observed. The caudal end of the male was asymmetrically alate and bore 10 pairs of papillae and two phasmidal apertures.

  2. Synlophe patterns of the Haemonchinae of ruminants (Nematoda: Trichostrongyloidea).

    PubMed

    Lichtenfels, J R; Pilitt, P A

    2000-10-01

    The pattern of longitudinal ridges (synlophe) on the external cuticular surface of trichostrongylid nematodes has been shown to be of value for distinguishing species and determining relationships among higher taxa. In the process of studying Mecistocirrus digitatus, the large stomach worm of bovids of Asia that has been imported and established in the Americas, we observed remarkably similar synlophe patterns to those described for 3 species of Haemonchus and to those we examined in a species of Ashworthius. In all 3 genera, the synlophe is absent from the posterior part of the body. Only in Haemonchus does the synlophe extend beyond midbody. In both M. digitatus and Ashworthius sidemi, the synlophe extends posteriorly only about 1/4 of body length. In all 3 genera, the synlophe consists of about 30 ridges in the region of the esophagus with variation among species in specific areas, including additional pairs of subventral and subdorsal ridges and different lengths of sublateral ridges. This information is useful for identifying species and determining relationships among these large stomach worm parasites of cattle, sheep, goats, and farmed and wild cervids.

  3. Four New Species of the Genus Hemicriconemoides (Nematoda:Criconematidae)

    PubMed Central

    Pinochet, J.; Raski, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    Four new species of the genus Hemicriconemoides (H. californianus n.sp., H. taiwanensis n.sp., H. annulatus n. sp., and H. nitida n.sp.) are described. The range of total length of H. mangiferae is increased on the basis of specimens collected in Israel, Observations on H. mangiferae and H. litchi support the validity of H. litchi as distinct from H. mangiferae. PMID:19308169

  4. Criconema proclivus n. sp. (Nematoda: Criconematinae) from Woodlands.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, J K

    1973-04-01

    Criconema proclivis n. sp. from soil around roots of woodland trees in the northeastern USA is described and illustrated. It is characterized by a total of 67-74 annules, two naked offset head annules, a stylet length of 68.7 -80.7 mu, a sculpted vulval flap, and forward-projecting body annules. The annules at midbody are covered with a continuous fringe of 60-70 spines.

  5. Three new species of heteroderoidea (nematoda) from the Aleutian Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, E.C.

    1981-10-01

    Three new species of Heteroderoidea are described from Adak and Amchitka Islands in the Aleutian chain. Second-stage juveniles of Thecavermiculatus crassicrustata, n. sp., differ from those of T. gracililancea Robbins by having longer stylets (40 to 50 ..mu..m vs 19 to 22 ..mu..m). The female of T. crassicrustata has a longer neck, a more posterior excretory pore, and lacks a posterior protuberance. Meloidodera eurytyla, n. sp., differs from other Meloidodera spp. in that second-stage juveniles have longer stylets (32 to 35 ..mu..m) and much more massive styletknobs, while males have a longitudinally striated basal head annule. Meloidogyne subarctica, n. sp., can be separated from other Meloidogyne spp. by combinations of the following characteristics: perineal pattern with large oval areas in the tail region devoid of striae, arch with few unbroken striae; female excretory pore 1.5 to 2.5 x the stylet length from the anterior end; haploid chromosome number = 18; the spermatheca filled with sperm; stylet length of second-stage juveniles 13.5 to 15.4 ..mu..m.

  6. Sectonema caobangense sp. n. from Vietnam (Nematoda, Dorylaimida, Aporcelaimidae)

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Ortega, Sergio; Duong Nguyen, Thi Anh; Abolafia, Joaquín; Bonkowski, Michael; Peña-Santiago, Reyes

    2016-01-01

    Sectonema caobangense sp. n. from evergreen forest soil in Vietnam is described, including scanning electron micrograph (SEM) observations and D2-D3 LSU rDNA analysis. The new species is characterized by its 3.12 to 5.80 mm long body, lip region offset by deep constriction and 21 to 23 μm broad, mural tooth 13 to 14 μm long at its ventral side, 940 to 1,112 μm long neck, pharyngeal expansion occupying 61% to 69% of total neck length, uterus a long simple tube-like structure 292 to 363 μm long or 2.7 to 2.9 times the corresponding body diameter, pars refringens vaginae well developed, V = 48 to 56, short (36–51 μm, c = 77–132, c′ = 0.5–0.8) and rounded tail, 87 to 99 μm long spicules, and four or five irregularly spaced ventromedian supplements bearing hiatus. Sectonema caobangense sp. n. differs from the typical pattern of Sectonema in the nature of the stomatal protrusible structure, bearing a mural tooth attached to the ventral side of the stoma. Molecular data obtained and the derived evolutionary trees support a close phylogenetic relationship with other Sectonema species. PMID:27418702

  7. Ultrastructure of Coelomocytes in Sphaerolaimus gracilis de Man, 1876 (Nematoda)

    PubMed Central

    Turpeenniemi, Tuomo A.

    1993-01-01

    The structure of coelomocytes in the adenophorean aquatic nematode Sphaerolaimus gracilis de Man 1876 was studied with light and electron microscopes. Acid phosphatase and catalase activities were demonstrated by electron microscopy. Two pairs of coelomocytes occurred laterally posterior to the esophagointestinaljunction. The anterior pair of the coelomocytes, with the renette cell and gonad, lay in either the left or the right lateral side of the body. The posterior pair of coelomocytes was in the opposite side of the body, usually posterior to the renette. A long, thin, cell-extension-like structure appeared to originate from the coelomocytes. Coelomocytes were characterized by specialized organelles (CC-organelle) and large vacuoles. The CC-organelle contained crystalline structures like those in peroxisomes. Acid phosphatase and catalase activities were detected in the matrix of CC-organelles and catalase activity in the vacuoles. It was assumed that vacuoles originate from the CC-organelles. Coelomocytes showed pinocytotic activities, and numerous vesicles were observed between the cell membranes and the vacuoles. PMID:19279818

  8. Criconemella anastomoides n. sp. (Nematoda: Criconematina) from Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Maqbool, M. A.; Shahina, F.

    1985-01-01

    Criconemella anastomoides, described and illustrated herein, is characterized by the presence of regular anastomosis on the body, two zig zag lateral lines, stylet knobs sloping posteriorly, short stylet, and short body length. PMID:19294086

  9. A MOLECULAR PHYLOGENY FOR THE PROTOSTRONGYLIDAE (NEMATODA: METASTRONGYLINA)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Protostrongylids, a putative monophyletic group among the lungworms (Metastrongylina: Metastrongyloidea), are economically important pathogens infecting domestic and free-ranging ungulate and leporid hosts throughout the world. Here, we reconstruct a molecular phylogeny based on ribosomal DNA (28S) ...

  10. Book review: Systematics of Cyst Nematodes (Nematoda: Heteroderinae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The cyst nematodes are an important group of plant-parasitic nematodes that cause billions of dollars in economic damage to crops every year. This article reviews a recently published, two-volume monograph that describes the morphological and molecular characteristics of these agriculturally signif...

  11. Description of Globodera ellingtonae n. sp. (Nematoda: Heteroderidae) from Oregon

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A new species of cyst nematode, Globodera ellingtoni, is described from soil collected from a field with a cropping history including potatoes in Oregon. It is characterized in having second-stage juveniles (J2) with a body length of 450 um (365-515), stylet length of 20.9 um (19-22.5) with basal kn...

  12. Rapid counting of nematoda in salmon by peptic digestion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stern, Joseph A.; Chakravarti, Diptiman; Uzmann, Joseph R.; Hesselholt, M.N.

    1958-01-01

    The population of Anisakis sp., larvae in chum salmon appears to be concentrated in the ventral section of the fish, that is, below the lateral line, which ಟ್ಗ that only the ventral quarters of the fish need to be examined for estimating infection intensity.

  13. Swedish Plectida (Nematoda). Part 9. The genus Leptolaimoides Vitiello, 1971.

    PubMed

    Holovachov, Oleksandr

    2015-05-01

    Three known and two new species of Leptolaimoides are described from bottom sediments collected in Skagerrak off the west coast of Sweden. The following known species are redescribed: Leptolaimoides haploopis Jensen, 1978, L. tubulosus Vitiello, 1971 and L. hexatubulosus Hoang Lai-Phu et al., 2009. Leptolaimoides filicaudatus sp. n. is characterised by the 431-543 µm long body; cephalic sensilla papilliform; amphid 23-26 µm long, located 9-10 µm from anterior end; first body pore located 35-37 µm from anterior end; lateral field simple along most of body, areolated on tail, arising 36-40 µm from anterior end; female without supplements, vagina without pars refringens, vulva midventral; male without tubular and without alveolar supplements; spicules arcuate and 16 µm long. Leptolaimoides leptomicron sp. n. is characterised by the 776-847 µm long body; cephalic sensilla papilliform; amphid 15-17 µm long, located 9-13 µm from anterior end; first body pore located 40-46 µm from anterior end; lateral field areolated, arising 26-28 µm from anterior end; female without supplements, vagina without pars refringens, vulva midventral; male with three tubular and without alveolar supplements, spicules arcuate and 28-29 µm long. The diagnosis of the genus Leptolaimoides is emended and a tabular compendium and dichotomous identification key to species of the genus Leptolaimoides are provided.

  14. Nematoda: aerobic respiratory pathways of adult parasitic species.

    PubMed

    Fry, M; Jenkins, D C

    1984-02-01

    Aerobic respiratory pathways have been compared in adult parasitic nematodes, including Trichostrongylus colubriformis, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, Ostertagia ostertagi, Cooperia oncophora, Haemonchus contortus, Oesophagostomum venulosum, Chabertia ovina, Dictyocaulus filaria, Dictyocaulus viviparus, and Ascaridia galli. Respiration was measured in both whole worm or tissue homogenates and isolated mitochondrial fractions, and delineated into the mammalian type or alternative respiratory pathways on the basis of their inhibition by antimycin A. The alternative, antimycin A-insensitive respiratory pathway was of comparable activity in all parasitic nematodes studied, irrespective of the body diameter or habitat of the worm. The mammalian-type, antimycin A-sensitive respiratory pathway showed variations; the extent of this pathway correlated with both the body diameter and habitat of the worm, being greater in thinner worms and those worms whose habitat is supposedly more aerobic.

  15. Genomics and transcriptomics across the diversity of the Nematoda.

    PubMed

    Blaxter, M; Kumar, S; Kaur, G; Koutsovoulos, G; Elsworth, B

    2012-01-01

    The diversity of biology in nematodes is reflected in the diversity of their genomes. Parasitic species in particular have evolved mechanisms to invade and outwit their hosts, and these offer opportunities for the development of control measures. Genomic analyses can reveal the molecular underpinnings of phenotypes such as parasitism and thus, initiate and support research programmes that explore the manipulation of host and parasite physiologies to achieve favourable outcomes. Wide sampling across nematode diversity allows phylogenetically informed formulation of research hypotheses, identification of core features shared by all species or important evolutionary novelties present in isolated clades. Many nematode species have been investigated through the use of the expressed sequence tag approach, which samples from the transcribed genome. Gene catalogues generated in this way can be explored to reveal the patterns of expression associated with parasitism and candidates for testing as drug targets or vaccine components. Analysis environments, such as NEMBASE facilitate exploitation of these data. The development of new high-throughput DNA-sequencing technologies has facilitated transcriptomic and genomic approaches to parasite biology. Whole genome sequencing offers more complete catalogues of genes and assists a systems approach to phenotype dissection. These efforts are being coordinated through the 959 Nematode Genomes initiative. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Revision of the Genus Hemicriconemoides Chitwood &Birchfield, 1957 (Nematoda: Criconematidae)

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, D. R.; Raski, D. J.; Van Gundy, S. D.

    1969-01-01

    In the present study, evaluations of the nominal species and descriptions (H. parvus, H. intermedius, H. insignis, H. microdoratus and H. brevicaudatus) are made of five new species. H. squamosus is proposed as a species inquirenda; H. mangiferae is judged a valid species. H. litchi and H. birchfieldi are synonymized with H. mangiferae and H. ureshinoensis with H. kanayaensis. H. strictathecatus is considered a valid species. A key to the species of the genus is given. The limitation of use of male diagnostic characters in a mixture of populations of Hemicriconemoides with some other criconematids is discussed. The life cycle of H. chitwoodi has four complete molts; one in the egg, three in soil, two of which have spines. The adult female has a sheath cuticle from an incomplete fifth molt. PMID:19325667

  17. Description of Hoplolaimus magnistylus n. sp. (Nematoda: Hoplolaimidae)

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, R. T.

    1982-01-01

    Hoplolaimus magnistylus n. sp. is described and illustrated. It was found in soil around roots of soybean in Arkansas and Mississippi. It is similar to H. galeatus and H. concaudajuvencus. It differs from H. galeatus in all stages primarily by possession of a longer stylet. It differs from H. concaudajuvencus by the possession of rounded tails in second-stage juveniles vs. conically pointed tails with acute termini, having fewer subdivisions in female basal lip annules, and the greater distance from female anterior end to posterior end of esophageal lobes. Morphometrics and descriptions of second-, third-, and fourth-stage juveniles are given. A paratype female of H. sheri was examined and found to have six esophageal gland nuclei. PMID:19295743

  18. Mitochondrial Genome Supports Sibling Species of Angiostrongylus costaricensis (Nematoda: Angiostrongylidae)

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Hoi-Sen; Song, Sze-Looi; Eamsobhana, Praphathip; Goh, Share-Yuan; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Chow, Wan-Loo; Chan, Kok-Gan; Abrahams-Sandi, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Angiostrongylus costaricensis is a zoonotic parasitic nematode that causes abdominal or intestinal angiostrongyliasis in humans. It is endemic to the Americas. Although the mitochondrial genome of the Brazil taxon has been published, there is no available mitochondrial genome data on the Costa Rica taxon. We report here the complete mitochondrial genome of the Costa Rica taxon and its genetic differentiation from the Brazil taxon. The whole mitochondrial genome was obtained from next-generation sequencing of genomic DNA. It had a total length of 13,652 bp, comprising 36 genes (12 protein-coding genes—PCGs, 2 rRNA and 22 tRNA genes) and a control region (A + T rich non-coding region). It is longer than that of the Brazil taxon (13,585 bp). The larger mitogenome size of the Costa Rica taxon is due to the size of the control region as the Brazil taxon has a shorter length (265 bp) than the Costa Rica taxon (318 bp). The size of 6 PCGs and the start codon for ATP6, CYTB and NAD5 genes are different between the Costa Rica and Brazil taxa. Additionally, the two taxa differ in the stop codon of 6 PCGs. Molecular phylogeny based on 12 PCGs was concordant with two rRNA, 22 tRNA and 36 mitochondrial genes. The two taxa have a genetic distance of p = 16.2% based on 12 PCGs, p = 15.3% based on 36 mitochondrial genes, p = 13.1% based on 2 rRNA genes and p = 10.7% based on 22 tRNA genes, indicating status of sibling species. The Costa Rica and Brazil taxa of A. costaricensis are proposed to be accorded specific status as members of a species complex. PMID:26230642

  19. Description of Globodera ellingtonae n. sp. (Nematoda: Heteroderidae) from Oregon

    PubMed Central

    Handoo, Zafar A.; Carta, Lynn K.; Skantar, Andrea M.; Chitwood, David J.

    2012-01-01

    A new species of cyst nematode, Globodera ellingtonae, is described from soil collected from a field in Oregon. Second-stage juveniles (J2) of the species are characterized by body length of 365-515 μm, stylet length of 19-22.5 μm, basal knobs rounded posteriorly and pointed anteriorly, tail 39-55 μm, hyaline tail terminus 20-32.5 μm, and tail tapering uniformly but abruptly narrowing and constricted near the posterior third of the hyaline portion, ending with a peg-like, finely rounded to pointed terminus. Cysts are spherical to sub-spherical, dark to light brown and circumfenestrate and cyst wall pattern is ridge-like with heavy punctations. Males have a stylet length of 21-25 μm and spicule length of 30-37 μm with a pointed thorn-like tip. Females have a stylet length of 20-22.5 μm, one head annule and labial disc, heavy punctations on the cuticle, and short vulval slit 7.5-8 μm long. Morphologically this new, round-cyst species differs from the related species G. pallida, G. rostochiensis, G. tabacum complex and G. mexicana by its distinctive J2 tail, and by one or another of the following: shorter mean stylet length in J2, females and males; number of refractive bodies in the hyaline tail terminus of J2; cyst morphology including Granek’s ratio; number of cuticular ridges between the anus and vulva; and in the shape and length of spicules in males. Its relationship to these closely related species are discussed. Based upon analysis of ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences, G. ellingtonae n. sp. is distinct from G. pallida, G. rostochiensis, G. tabacum and G. mexicana. Bayesian and Maximum Parsimony analysis of cloned ITS rRNA gene sequences indicated three clades, with intraspecific variability as high as 2.8%. In silico analysis revealed ITS restriction fragment length polymorphisms for enzymes Bsh 1236I, Hinf I, and Rsa I that overlap patterns for other Globodera species. PMID:23483076

  20. Pathogenesis of Eustrongylides ignotus (Nematoda: Dioctophymatoidea) in Ciconiiformes.

    PubMed

    Spalding, M G; Forrester, D J

    1993-04-01

    Natural (n = 157) and experimental (n = 5) infections with the nematode Eustrongylides ignotus are described for ciconiforms collected in Florida (USA). Larvae perforated the ventriculus in 3 to 5 hr and caused hemorrhage and bacterial peritonitis that sometimes progressed to a fibrous peritonitis with extensive adhesions. Severity of the disease was related inversely to the age of the bird and directly to the number of parasites involved. Some infections in adult birds were resolved. As a consequence of eustrongylidosis, anorexia and behavioral abnormalities resulted in emaciation and may have predisposed birds to traumatic death. Host-parasite adaptations apparently were not adequate for nestling ciconiforms as death of nestlings usually occurred before infections become patent (longer than 14 days, less than 23 days). Patent infections were found in both color morphs of the great blue heron (Ardea herodius), and in great egrets (Casmerodius albus) and snowy egrets (Egretta thula). We propose that birds of the family Ardeidae are the primary definitive hosts.

  1. Scanning electron microscopic study on Toxascaris transfuga (Rudolphi, 1819) (Nematoda).

    PubMed

    Tenora, F; Mituch, J; Hovorka, I

    1989-01-01

    The authors present original observations on the species Toxascaris transfuga obtained by means of scanning electron microscopy. Attention was paid to the structure of head end, morphology of papillae of the head and abdominal end, specific morphological traits of cloacae edges and morphology of the egg surface. Presented are morphological criteria which apparently differentiate the species T. transfuga from T. leonina (Linstow, 1902). T. transfuga and T. multipapillata Kreis, 1938 seem to be conspecific.

  2. Criconema proclivus n. sp. (Nematoda: Criconematinae) from Woodlands

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, J. K.

    1973-01-01

    Criconema proclivis n. sp. from soil around roots of woodland trees in the northeastern USA is described and illustrated. It is characterized by a total of 67-74 annules, two naked offset head annules, a stylet length of 68.7 -80.7 μ, a sculpted vulval flap, and forward-projecting body annules. The annules at midbody are covered with a continuous fringe of 60-70 spines. PMID:19319323

  3. Description of Bakernema dauniense n. sp. (Nematoda: Criconematidae) from Italy

    PubMed Central

    Vovlas, Nicola

    1992-01-01

    Bakernema dauniense n. sp., a bisexual species from the rhizosphere of Pinus halepensis Mill. in Italy, is described and illustrated. Primary differentiating characteristics of the female are body annules bearing short, membranous projections 1.4-2.2 μm long, an anterior vulval lip slightly overlapping the posterior, and a linearly arcuate vagina. The juvenile differs markedly from adults by having annules with a beaded margin, which lack membranous projections. Generic and specific relationships of B. dauniense n. sp. are discussed. This occurrence is the first for a species of Bakernema in Europe. PMID:19283202

  4. Description of Quercorhabditis rajouriensis gen. n., sp. n. (Nematoda: Rhabditidae).

    PubMed

    Shah, Ali Asghar; Hussain, Abid; Vaid, Shavish

    2013-01-01

    Quercorhabditis rajouriensis gen. n., sp. n. is described and illustrated. Distinctive characters include a labial region set off by a constriction and wider than adjoining body, heavily sclerotized cheilostom with arched rhabdions, barely differentiable stegostom, amphidelphic gonads, spicules with a free dorsal arm, and a leptoderan bursa with ten pairs of bursal papillae. The new genus resembles Diploscapteriodes Rahm, 1928 in the shape of cheilostom, presence of amphidelphic gonads, leptoderan bursa and long conoid tail. However, it can be differentiated from the latter genus in the shape of labial region, cheilostomal sclerotization, absence of ridge-like tooth in gymnostom, having spicules with a free dorsal arm, somewhat boat-shaped gubernaculum and in having ten pairs of bursal papillae. The new genus also resembles Curviditis (Dougherty, 1953) Andrássy, 1983, Rhabditella (Cobb, 1929) Chitwood, 1933 and Metarhabditis Tahseen et. al., 2004 in having spicules with free dorsal arm. However, it can be differentiated from these related genera by its heavily cuticularised cheilostom with arched rhabdions and barely differentiable stegostom. The new genus can further be differentiated from Curviditis and Rhabditella in having a well developed bursa and from Metarhabditis by its leptoderan bursa with ten pairs of bursal papillae arranged in 3+4+3 arrangement.

  5. Arthropod intermediate hosts of Abbreviata antarctica (Nematoda: Physalopteridae) in Australia.

    PubMed

    King, C; Jones, H I; Tay, Chin Yen

    2013-08-01

    This study examines potential arthropod intermediate hosts for the nematode Abbreviata antarctica. Five species of arthropod (tropical native cricket Teleogryllus oceanicus; native roach Drymoplaneta communis; native termite Nasutitermes exitiosus; and 2 introduced species, the East African roach Naupheta cinerea and the Asian cricket Acheta domesticus) were fed feces from a skink, Tiliqua rugosa, containing embryonated eggs of A. antarctica . The insects were dissected at 4 intervals (1 day, 4 days, 8-16 days, and 25-26 days). Viable third-stage larvae were recovered from cysts on the external wall of the midgut and hindgut of 62.5% nymphal and adult T. oceanicus crickets at 25-26 days post-infection and from a single nymphal A. domesticus cricket. No roaches contained eggs or first-stage larvae after 48 hr, and neither eggs nor larvae were found in termites.

  6. Neotobrilus nicsmolae n. sp. (Tobrilidae: Nematoda) and Chronogaster carolinensis n. sp. (Chronogasteridae: Nematoda) from Lake Phelps, North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Abebe, Eyualem; Ferebee, Briana; Taylor, Tarreyca; Mundo-Ocampo, Manuel; Mekete, Tesfamariam; De Ley, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Two new species, Neotobrilus nicsmolae n. sp. and Chronogaster carolinensis n. sp. are described from a small, acidic, temperate, natural lake in North Carolina. N. nicsmolae n. sp. comes close to three members of the genus reported from North America, N. filipjevi, N. longus, and N. hopei. However, N. nicsmolae is unique with in the genus in having a combination of characters: size smaller than 1,700 μm, shorter outer labial and cephalic setae, tail shorter than 250 μm, last ventromedian supplement close (about 5 μm) to cloacal opening, spicule length of 61 to 85 μm, flagelloid sperm, and possession of subterminal setae. Assessment of relationships among clades within the Triplonchida using DNA sequences of the D2D3 expansion segment of the LSU rDNA showed that the family Trichodoridae and the genus Tripyla were recovered as monophyletic. The genus Tobrilus was recovered as monophyletic in the neighbor-joining and maximum likelihood trees, but that was not so in the maximum-parsimony tree. The separation among genera of the Trichodoridae, i.e., Trichodorus and Paratrichodorus, was not clear-cut in all phylograms. Chronogaster carolinensis n. sp. in having one ventral mucro with no spine and vacuolated lateral glandular bodies comes close to C. typica and C. ethiopica but differs from all hitherto known species in a combination of characteristics: in having long cephalic setae, long stoma, crystalloid bodies, vacuolated lateral glandular bodies, and a tail terminus with blunt ventral mucro, and its lack of lateral line. PMID:23589662

  7. New species of Oswaldocruzia (Nematoda: Molineoidae), new species of Rhabdias (Nematoda: Rhabdiasidae), and other helminths in Rana cf. forreri (Anura: Ranidae) from Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Bursey, Charles R; Goldberg, Stephen R

    2005-06-01

    Oswaldocruzia costaricensis n. sp. (Strongylida: Molineidae) from the intestines and Rhabdias savagei n. sp. (Rhabditida: Rhabdiasidae) from the lungs of Rana cf. forreri (Anura: Ranidae) are described and illustrated. Oswaldocruzia costaricensis represents the 77th species assigned to the genus and differs from the other Neotropical species in the genus by possessing a Type II bursa and long cervical alae. Rhabdias savagei represents the 47th species assigned to the genus and differs from other Neotropical species in the genus by possession of 4 lips and a postequatorial vulva. Rana cf. forreri was also found to harbor the trematodes, Haematoloechus parcivitellarius and Megalodiscus temperatus, the nematodes, Aplectana incerta, Aplectana itzocanensis, Cosmocerca podicipinus, Foleyellides striatus, Subulascaris falcaustriformis, and a larva of the nematode Brevimulticaecum sp. Cosmocerca panamaensis is considered to be a synonym of Cosmocerca podicipinus.

  8. Hepatic parasitosis in two wood mice, Apodemus sylvaticus (Rodentia: Muridae), due to Aonchotheca annulosa (Nematoda: Trichuridae), and Eucoleus bacillatus (Nematoda: Trichuridae). Erratic parasitism or post mortem migration?

    PubMed

    Debenedetti, Ángela L; Sáez-Durán, Sandra; Sainz-Elipe, Sandra; Galán-Puchades, Maria Teresa; Fuentes, Màrius V

    2014-10-01

    Aonchotheca annulosa and Eucoleus bacillatus are two capillariin nematodes parasitizing the intestinal and stomach mucosa, respectively, of various rodent species, and two, among others, component species of the helminth fauna of the wood mouse, Apodemus sylvaticus. A capillariin each was found in the liver parenchyma of two wood mice in a post-fire regeneration enclave in Serra Calderona Natural Park (Valencian Community, Spain). Due to their location, the preliminary identification of the helminths corresponded to Calodium hepaticum, a hepatic capillariin with rodents as its main host. So far, this species had never been found in Serra Calderona. To verify the preliminary identification, a comparative morphometric study between the specimens from Serra Calderona and a preserved individual of C. hepaticum from another enclave was carried out. Morphometric analysis revealed that the adult helminth as well as the eggs found in the liver of the first mouse belonged to A. annulosa, whereas the second one was identified as a male E. bacillatus. Moreover, the liver from both hosts showed a visible pathology, being the consequence of aberrant migration of the parasites. This is the first evidence that A. annulosa and E. bacillatus may migrate erratically and thus produce ectopic foci in other organs.

  9. Pasteuria endospores from Heterodera cajani (Nematoda: Heteroderidae) exhibit inverted attachment and altered germination in cross-infection studies with Globodera pallida (Nematoda: Heteroderidae).

    PubMed

    Mohan, Sharad; Mauchline, Tim H; Rowe, Janet; Hirsch, Penny R; Davies, Keith G

    2012-03-01

    The Pasteuria group of Gram-positive, endospore-forming bacteria are parasites of invertebrates and exhibit differences in host specificity. We describe a cross-infection study between an isolate of Pasteuria from pigeon pea cyst nematode, Heterodera cajani, which also infects the potato cyst nematode, Globodera pallida, from the United Kingdom. A proportion of the attached endospores, 13% on H. cajani and 22% on G. pallida adhere to the cuticle in an inverted orientation. Inverted and conventionally attached endospores germinated and produced bacillus-like rods that completed their life cycle in < 15 weeks within females of G. pallida. This is the first example in which the life cycle of a Pasteuria population was systematically followed in two different nematode genera. A 1430-base pair fragment of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of the Pasteuria isolate from H. cajani revealed 98.6% similarity to the orthologous gene in Pasteuria nishizawae. Additionally, their respective endospore sizes were not significantly different, in contrast their host ranges are. Potential reasons for this remain unclear and are discussed.

  10. Micoletzkya chinaae n. sp. (Nematoda: Diplogastridae), a potential predacious nematode and Ektaphelenchus macrobulbosus (Nematoda: Ektaphelenchinae) isolated from Simao pine in South-western China

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ren-E; Liang, Jun; Lu, Quan

    2010-01-01

    Detailed morphology of a new diplogastrid and a known ektaphelenchid species isolated from Simao pine in south-western China were illustrated and described/redescribed. Micoletzkya chinaae n. sp. is characterized by a relatively short body length (601-802 μm in female and 505-773 μm in male), undivided cheilorhabdia (forming an entire ring), dimorphic buccal cavity (eury- or stenostomatous), a large claw-like dorsal tooth and a large right subventral tooth in the stoma of eurystomatous form, typical diplogastrid pharynx, didelphic female gonads, nine pairs of genital papillae on male tail region with two ventral pairs (GP1 and GP2) closely associated, a unique gubernaculum morphology, and a long filiform tail in both sexes. The new diplogastrid belongs to the Group 1 category of Micoletzkya species sensu Massey, 1966, which is characterized by stoma equipped with a large dorsal and a large subventral tooth, and both teeth can cross near the center of the pharynx. The new species can be easily distinguished from other species within this group except for M. tomea Massey, 1966 with the long filiform female and male tails. However, it shows great similarities to Mononchoides spp., Koerneria spp., Fictor spp., and Acrostichus members in some aspects. More morphological features as well as molecular data of this clade should be available before relationships between and within these genera can be better interpreted. The two large moveable teeth in eurystomatous worms indicate their potentially predacious habits, and re-isolation of this species is necessary. Morphology of south-western Chinese population of Ektaphelenchus macrobulbosus (Rühm,1956) Massey, 1974 conforms well to the previous descriptions except for a few minor variations. It is characterized by medium-long female and male bodies (676-791 and 613-685 μm, respectively), three incisures in the lateral field, offset cephalic region, knobless stylet 18-20 μm long, oblong median bulb with posteriorly situated valves, two to three rows of developing oocytes, short postuterine sac, absence of female rectum and anus, two pairs of subventral papillae on the male tail region, a cucullus (apophysis) present on the dorsal distal end of the spicule, and the conoid female and male tails. PMID:22736862

  11. Preferential host switching and codivergence shaped radiation of bark beetle symbionts, nematodes of Micoletzkya (Nematoda: Diplogastridae).

    PubMed

    Susoy, V; Herrmann, M

    2014-05-01

    Host-symbiont systems are of particular interest to evolutionary biology because they allow testable inferences of diversification processes while also providing both a historical basis and an ecological context for studies of adaptation. Our investigations of bark beetle symbionts, predatory nematodes of the genus Micoletzkya, have revealed remarkable diversity of the group along with a high level of host specificity. Cophylogenetic analyses suggest that evolution of the nematodes was largely influenced by the evolutionary history of beetles. The diversification of the symbionts, however, could not be attributed to parallel divergence alone; our results indicate that adaptive radiation of the nematodes was shaped by preferential host shifts among closely related beetles along with codivergence. Whereas ecological and geographic isolation have played a major role in the diversification of Micoletzkya at shallow phylogenetic depths, adaptations towards related hosts have played a role in shaping cophylogenetic structure at a larger evolutionary scale.

  12. Taxonomy and Morphology of Axonchium (Nematoda: Belondiroidea), and a description of A. thornei n. sp.

    PubMed Central

    Hechler, H. C.

    1969-01-01

    Useful diagnostic characters in the nematode genus A xonchium include: lip shape, styler length, shape of the esophageal constriction, presence or absence of spiral musculature in the esophageal sheath, proportion of the esophageal length occupied by the esophageal expansion, length and shape of cardia, shape of the vulva and vaginal cuticularization, development of the anterior gonad, shape of the posterior uterus, subcuticle thickness at mid-body, tail shape, number and arrangement of supplements and caudal pores, and body measurements. A. thornei n. sp. is separated from A. choristum by its thinner subcuticle at mid-body, number of supplements, and shorter spicules, from A. solitare by presence of males, and from both species by the female tail shape and shorter stylet. A. saccatum is synonymized with A. gossypii and A. nitidum is synonymized with A. bulbosum. A. leptocephalum, A. Iongicollis, A. magnicollis, and A. tenuicollis are made species inquirendae. A key to 25 species of Axonchium is given. PMID:19325694

  13. Four events of host switching in Aspidoderidae (Nematoda) involve convergent lineages of mammals.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, F Agustín; Gardner, Scott L; Navone, Graciela; Ortí, Guillermo

    2012-12-01

    The Great American Interchange resulted in the mixing of faunistic groups with different origins and evolutionary trajectories that underwent rapid diversification in North and South America. As a result, groups of animals of recent arrival converged into similar habits and formed ecological guilds with some of the endemics. We present a reconstruction of the evolutionary events in Aspidoderidae, a family of nematodes that infect mammals that are part of this interchange, i.e., dasypodids, opossums, and sigmodontine, geomyid, and hystricognath rodents. By treating hosts as discrete states of character and using parsimony and Bayesian inferences to optimize these traits into the phylogeny of Aspidoderidae, we reconstructed Dasypodidae (armadillos) as the synapomorphic host for the family. In addition, 4 events of host switching were detected. One consisted of the switch from dasypodids to hystricognath rodents, and subsequently to geomyid rodents. The remaining set of events consisted of a switch from dasypodids to didelphid marsupials and then to sigmodontine rodents. The reconstruction of the ancestral distribution suggests 3 events of dispersal into the Nearctic. Two of these invasions would suggest that 2 different lineages of dasypodid parasites entered the Northern Hemisphere at different times, which is consistent with the presence of 2 lineages of armadillos in Mexico.

  14. Meloidogyne polycephannulata n. sp. (Nematoda: Meloidogynidae), a root-knot nematode parasitizing carrot in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Charchar, João M.; Vieira, Jairo V.; Fonseca-Boiteux, Maria Esther de N.; Boiteux, Leonardo S.

    2009-01-01

    Meloidogyne polycephannulata n. sp. is described from specimens collected from an area cultivated with carrot cv. Brasilia, in the city of Rio Paranaíba, in the region of Alto Paranaíba, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. The perineal pattern of the female is circular to ovoid with a high dorsal arch that has widely spaced, coarse annulations. The lateral field may have a deep furrow separating the dorsal and ventral arches. The medial lips are short and wide, whereas the lateral lips are large and triangular. The female stylet is 15-16 μm long with wide knobs, distinctly divided by an indentation in the center. Its tip is slightly curved dorsally. The excretory pore opens 34-65 μm from the anterior end. Females retain eggs and second-stage juveniles in their body cavity, similar to that of the cyst-forming nematodes. Males are 1.3-1.7 mm long and have a high head cap that is rounded and slopes posteriorly. The labial disc is fused to the medial lips. The head region has several irregular annulations that are similar in appearance to the first or second body annules that are likewise irregular, making the head region appear to be extremely large. The stylet of the male is 21-24 μm long; it is slender, and has small, rounded knobs, that are distinctly indented medially and appear heart-shaped. The shaft has several tiny projections throughout its length. Mean second-stage juvenile length is 411.7 μm. The juvenile head cap is elevated, the medial lips are small, and the lateral lips are elongate to triangular-shaped. The head region has several short, incomplete and irregular transverse annulations. The juvenile stylet is 14-23 μm long with small, rounded, and sloping knobs. The thin tail ends with a short hyaline portion that is variable in size (16-26 μm) and with a small, rounded tip. Isozyme profiles of esterases from Meloidogyne javanica show 3 strong bands (SB) at Rm 46, 59, and 66; profiles of M. polycephannulata n. sp. show a SB at Rm 47 and a weak band (WB) at Rm 52; M. petuniae has two SB at Rm 44 and 53; M. phaseoli has a SB at 53, 58, and 64 Rm; M. brasilensis has three SB at Rm 40, 58, and 66 and a WB at Rm 71; M. pisi has a SB at Rm 40, 60, and 64 and two WB at 46 and 50 Rm. Data from sequencing the 18S rDNA region of M. polycephannulata n. sp. confirms that it is different from M. arabicida, M. arenaria, M. ethiopica, M. incognita, M. javanica, M. paranaensis, and M. thailandica. Sequence identity among these eight species ranged between 85 to 93.4%. Meloidogyne polycephannulata n. sp. reproduces very well on carrot and tomato; poorly on pepper; and not at all on cotton, peanut, tobacco, watermelon, and sweet corn. PMID:22736812

  15. Pan-Nematoda Transcriptomic Elucidation of Essential Intestinal Functions and Therapeutic Targets With Broad Potential

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi; Rosa, Bruce A.; Jasmer, Douglas P.; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2015-01-01

    The nematode intestine is continuous with the outside environment, making it easily accessible to anthelmintics for parasite control, but the development of new therapeutics is impeded by limited knowledge of nematode intestinal cell biology. We established the most comprehensive nematode intestinal functional database to date by generating transcriptional data from the dissected intestines of three parasitic nematodes spanning the phylum, and integrating the results with the whole proteomes of 10 nematodes (including 9 pathogens of humans or animals) and 3 host species and 2 outgroup species. We resolved 10,772 predicted nematode intestinal protein families (IntFams), and studied their presence and absence within the different lineages (births and deaths) among nematodes. Conserved intestinal cell functions representing ancestral functions of evolutionary importance were delineated, and molecular features useful for selective therapeutic targeting were identified. Molecular patterns conserved among IntFam proteins demonstrated large potential as therapeutic targets to inhibit intestinal cell functions with broad applications towards treatment and control of parasitic nematodes. PMID:26501106

  16. Molecular and morphological characterization of Contracaecum pelagicum (Nematoda) parasitizing Spheniscus magellanicus (Chordata) from Brazilian waters.

    PubMed

    Borges, Juliana Novo; Santos, Helena Lúcia Carneiro; Brandão, Martha Lima; dos Santos, Everton Gustavo Nunes; de Miranda, Daniele Ferreira; Balthazar, Daniel de Almeida; Luque, José Luis; Santos, Cláudia Portes

    2014-03-01

    Three new sequences of Mitochondrial cytochrome c-oxidase subunit 2 (mtDNA cox-2) from C. pelagicum parasite of Spheniscus magellanicus, the Magelanicus penguin, were determined from Brazilian waters. The sequences presented 99 and 98% of similarity with C. pelagicum sequences from Argentina, deposited on GenBank for the same genetic region and with a strong statistical support inferred from the phylogenetic tree. The morphological and ultrastructural studies that were carried out confirmed the genetic analysis.

  17. Occurrence and identification of Anisakis spp. (Nematoda: Anisakidae) isolated from chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) in Korea.

    PubMed

    Setyobudi, Eko; Jeon, Chan-Hyeok; Lee, Cheul-Ho; Seong, Ki-Baik; Kim, Jeong-Ho

    2011-03-01

    The prevalence of infection and the identification of anisakid larvae in chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) from the Namdae River, the east coast of Korea, were investigated. In total, 8,358 larvae were collected from 120 fish samples (male = 58 fish, female = 62 fish) in 2008. Fish samples were collected during October and November 2008. All the chum salmon samples (120/120, 100%) caught were infected with anisakid larvae with a high intensity (69.65 ± 48.58 larvae/host). They were mostly found in muscles (98.00%). Based on the morphological and the molecular analysis of PCR-RFLP and sequencing of mitochondrial DNA cox2 gene markers, these nematodes were identified as Anisakis simplex (sensu stricto) third-stage larvae. This is the first report on the molecular identification of anisakid worms from salmonid fishes in Korea. The high occurrence of anisakid worms in chum salmon may pose considerable food safety problems if they were consumed as raw or undercooked, although their commercial value is relatively lower than other salmonid species.

  18. Oncholaimus zhangi sp. nov. (Oncholaimidae, Nematoda) from the intertidal zone of the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Qun; Huang, Yong

    2016-10-01

    A new species of free-living marine nematode is described from intertidal sediment of the East China Sea. The new species belongs to the Oncholaimidae family. Oncholaimus zhangi sp. nov. is characterized by males having a large ventral swelling situated just posterior to the middle of the tail, no precloacal papilla, and a row of 6-7 ventral genital setae. The tails of both males and females are similar, being conico-cylindrical in shape. The new species is distinguished from other closely related species by the presence of a prominent ventral swelling at the tail of males and a similar tail shape in both sexes. About 110 valid species in this genus have been recorded to date.

  19. [Parasitism of Ips sexdentatus (Insecta: Scolytidae) by Parasitorhabditis ipsophila (Nematoda: Rhabditidae)].

    PubMed

    Lieutier, F

    1984-01-01

    The study of parasitism percentages and contaminations intensity in Ips sexdentatus parasitized by P. ipsophila as well as the examination of the wormholes in the galleries of the bark beetle gave better insight into certain features of nematode biology. Larvae of I. sexdentatus could be infected, whereas pupae could not. Adults were contaminated from initial stages of maturation and throughout preswarming maturation. Following swarming and installation on a new tree, insects were rapidly decontaminated, but recontamination could occur by the end of oviposition. P. ipsophila larvae were found in the mesenteron before they penetrated into the hind gut. Seemingly, the parasite underwent no evolution within its host. All developmental stages of the nematode could be observed in the galleries of the bark beetle as long as the latter was present. No apparent relation exists between parasitism of the digestive tract by P. ipsophila and parasitism of the body or fat body by Parasitaphelenchus or Contortylenchus diplogaster. P. ipsophila exerts very limited effects on I. sexdentatus populations. A slight delay in swarming and initiation of oviposition, and a very low decrease in density of notches of oviposition and of eggs was observed, but the features of the gallery of oviposition (total length, length before the first notch) showed no alteration. No mortality was detected.

  20. New species of Falcaustra (Nematoda: Kathlaniidae) from Heosemys grandis (Testudines: Emydidae).

    PubMed

    Bursey, Charles R; Freeman, Jennifer M

    2005-10-01

    Falcaustra kinsellai n. sp. from the intestines of the turtle Heosemys grandis is described and illustrated. Falcaustra kinsellai represents the 30th Oriental species assigned to the genus and is distinguished from other species by the distribution pattern of caudal papillae (6 precloacal, 6 adcloacal, 10 postcloacal, and 1 median), length of spicules (427-451 microm), presence of a pseudosucker, and presence of a toothed chamber between vestibule and pharynx.

  1. Spatial distribution of subtidal Nematoda communities along the salinity gradient in southern European estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adão, Helena; Alves, Ana Sofia; Patrício, Joana; Neto, João Magalhães; Costa, Maria José; Marques, João Carlos

    2009-03-01

    This study investigated the spatial distribution of subtidal nematode communities along the salinity gradients of two Portuguese estuaries exposed to different degrees of anthropogenic stress: the Mira and the Mondego. The nematode communities were mainly composed of Sabatieria, Metachromadora, Daptonema, Anoplostoma, Sphaerolaimus and Terschellingia species, closely resembling the communities of Northern European estuaries. In both estuaries, nematode density and community composition followed the salinity gradient, naturally establishing three distinct estuarine sections: (i) freshwater and oligohaline - characterised by the presence of freshwater nematodes, low nematode density and diversity; (ii) mesohaline - dominated by Terschellingia, Sabatieria and Daptonema, with low total density and diversity; and (iii) polyhaline and euhaline - where nematodes reached the highest density and diversity, and Paracomesoma, Synonchiella, and Odontophora were dominant. Despite the similarities in community composition and total nematode density, the proportion of different nematode feeding types were remarkably different in the two estuaries. In Mira, selective deposit feeders were dominant in the oligohaline section, while non-selective deposit feeders were dominant in the other sections. On the contrary, in the Mondego estuary, epigrowth-feeders and omnivores/predators were dominant in the freshwater sections and in the euhaline sector of the southern arm. Differences observed along each estuarine gradient were much stronger than overall differences between the two estuaries. In the Mondego estuary, the influence of anthropogenic stressors seemed not to be relevant in determining the nematodes' spatial distribution patterns, therefore suggesting that mesoscale variability responded essentially to natural stressors, characteristic of estuarine gradients. Nevertheless, the proportion of the different feeding types was different between the two estuaries, indicating that the response of nematode feeding guilds is able to reflect anthropogenic-induced stress and can be useful in assessing biological quality in transitional waters ecosystems.

  2. Screening for haplotypic variability within Oesophagostomum bifurcum (Nematoda) employing a single-strand conformation polymorphism approach.

    PubMed

    de Gruijter, J M; Polderman, A M; Zhu, X Q; Gasser, R B

    2002-06-01

    Genetic markers in the mitochondrial genome have proven useful for population genetic studies because of their maternal inheritance and relatively high evolutionary rates. In this study, we exploited the high resolution capacity of PCR-coupled single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) to screen for sequence variation in part of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene (p cox 1) among individuals of the parasitic nematode, Oesophagostomum bifurcum from human or Mona monkey hosts from Africa. SSCP analysis revealed distinct profiles among some of the individuals, and subsequent sequence analysis of representative samples defined 10 different haplotypes. For comparative purposes, the p cox 1 sequences for representatives of four other species of Oesophagostomum from livestock were included. While there were high levels (11.5-13.7%) of sequence difference among the latter species, there was no fixed nucleotide difference between O. bifurcum individuals from humans and those from monkeys. The data support the proposal that O. bifurcum from the two primate hosts represents a single species and that the haplotypic variability in p cox 1 represents population variation. The results reinforce the usefulness of the SSCP-sequencing approach for studying genetic variation in nematode populations using mitochondrial markers.

  3. A new species of Rhabdias (Nematoda: Rhabdiasidae) from agamid lizards on Luzon Island, Philippines.

    PubMed

    Kuzmin, Yuriy; Tkach, Vasyl V; Bush, Sarah E

    2012-06-01

    Rhabdias odilebaini n. sp. is described on the basis of specimens found in the lungs of 2 species of agamid lizards: the Philippine flying lizard Draco spilopterus and the marbled bloodsucker Bronchocela marmorata . Specimens were collected in Aurora Province, Luzon Island, Philippines. The new species of Rhabdias is characterized by presence of 4 submedian lips, inconspicuous lateral lips, rounded cross-shaped oral opening, and tail end bent dorsally. This species is morphologically distinct from other Rhabdias spp. that parasitize reptilian and amphibian hosts, including 3 other species known to parasitize lizards of the Agamidae.

  4. Genetic divergence and reproductive isolation between Anisakis brevispiculata and Anisakis physeteris (Nematoda: Anisakidae)s.

    PubMed

    Mattiucci, S; Paggi, L; Nascetti, G; Abollo, E; Webb, S C; Pascual, S; Cianchi, R; Bullini, L

    2001-01-01

    In order to assess the taxonomic status of Anisakis brevispiculata Dollfus, 1966 population samples of this taxon from central and south-eastern Atlantic ocean were compared at 22 enzymatic loci with samples belonging to Anisakis physeteris Baylis, 1923 from the Mediterranean sea and central-eastern Atlantic ocean. Very low interpopulational genetic divergence was observed both within A. brevispiculata (average D(Nei) = 0.008) and within A. physeteris (D(Nei) = 0.009) despite the geographic distance among the samples, indicating high levels of gene flow in both taxa. On the other hand, the average genetic distance between A. brevispiculata and A. physeteris was found to be D(Nei) = 0.80, a value generally observed between well differentiated congeneric species. The reproductive isolation between A. brevispiculata and A. physeteris is indicated by the following observations: (1) no F(1) hybrids or recombinant genotypes were until now observed; and (2) the two Anisakis species do not seem to share their definitive hosts. The main definitive host of A. brevispiculata is the pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps), while for A. physeteris it is the sperm whale (Physeter catodon). Only adult males differ slightly in spicule length, while females and larval stages are not differentiated morphologically. Both A. brevispiculata and A.physeteris show a type II larva. The correct recognition of A. brevispiculata from A. physeteris and from other Anisakis species studied, in either sexes and at any life stage, is made easy by allozyme markers (e.g. Icdh, Gapdh, Sod-1, Np, Aat-2, Adk-2, fEst-2, PepB, PepC-2, Mpi). Diagnostic keys, which can be used for routine identification in the field of these Anisakis worms, based on genetic markers, are given.

  5. Observations on the distribution and biology of Huffmanela huffmani (Nematoda: Trichosomoididae).

    PubMed

    Cox, Marlin K; Huffman, David G; Moravec, Frantisek

    2004-03-01

    The nematode parasite Huffmanela huffmani Moravec, 1987 (Trichosomoididae) infects swimbladders of fishes in the family Centrarchidae. Only fish collected from the upper San Marcos River (Texas) have been found infected with H. huffmani eggs with a prevalence of 90%. Hundreds of thousands of H. huffmani eggs have been observed in these fish but only a few specimens of adult worms have ever been found. The San Marcos River arises from springs along the Balcones Fault Zone in San Marcos, Hays County, Texas. The restriction of the parasite to the upper San Marcos River and the high prevalence of the parasite eggs in centrarchids would seem to enable one to solve the life cycle of H. huffmani but this has proved false. Here, the insights and experiments used to help define some of the aspects concerning the life cycle of this enigmatic parasite are described. This study of H. huffmani includes a description of the habitat, the known limits of geographic distribution of the parasite, possible dispersal processes, egg characteristics, the testing of a possible intermediate host, Palaemonetes antrorum (Benedict) (Decapoda: Palaemonidae), and the effects of the digestion process on H. huffmani eggs.

  6. Redescription of Spirura guianensis (Nematoda: Spiruridae) from a rare South American Gracile Opossum.

    PubMed

    Torres, E J Lopes; Maldonado, A; Anjos, D H da Silva; de Souza, W; Miranda, K

    2015-10-01

    Spirura genus Blanchard, 1849 comprise of nematode parasites that infect primate and marsupial species. Although several taxonomical studies have shown that the infection by this species occurs primarily in the esophagus of primates, evidence for the occurrence of these parasites in other hosts (marsupials, rodents and bats) has become the subject of investigation by several groups. In this work, we describe the presence of Spirura guianensis Ortlepp, 1924 in the marsupial Gracilinanus agilis (Marsupialia: Didelphidae) found in the Pantanal of Mato Grosso do Sul state of Brazil. Structural characteristics of this nematode were identified using light microscopy (bright field and fluorescence stereomicroscopy) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) approaches. Details of the surface topography such as cephalic projections, ventral boss, details of the caudal papillae and cuticular ornamentations were shown, providing taxonomic characteristics that may help in the establishment of diagnostic protocols. In addition, the presence of this species in a new host and new geographical area of Brazil provide grounds for a revision on the distribution of S. guianensis in South America.

  7. Species-specific PCR for the identification of Cooperia curticei (Nematoda: Trichostrongylidae) in sheep.

    PubMed

    Amarante, M R V; Bassetto, C C; Neves, J H; Amarante, A F T

    2014-12-01

    Agricultural ruminants usually harbour mixed infections of gastrointestinal nematodes. A specific diagnosis is important because distinct species can differ significantly in their fecundity and pathogenicity. Haemonchus spp. and Cooperia spp. are the most important gastrointestinal nematodes infecting ruminants in subtropical/tropical environments. In Brazil, C. punctata is more adapted to cattle than sheep. Additionally, C. spatulata appears to be more adapted to cattle, whereas C. curticei is more adapted to sheep. However, infection of sheep with C. punctata is common when cattle and sheep share the same pasture. Although morphological analyses have been widely used to identify nematodes, molecular methods can overcome technical limitations and help improve species-specific diagnoses. Genetic markers in the first and second internal transcribed spacers (ITS-1 and ITS-2, respectively) of nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) have been used successfully to detect helminths. In the present study, the ITS-1 region was analysed and used to design a species-specific oligonucleotide primer pair to identify C. curticei. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product was sequenced and showed 97% similarity to C. oncophora partial ITS-1 clones and 99% similarity to the C. curticei sequence JF680982. The specificity of this primer pair was corroborated by the analysis of 17 species of helminths, including C. curticei, C. punctata and C. spatulata. Species-specific diagnosis, which has implications for rapid and reliable identification, can support studies on the biology, ecology and epidemiology of trichostrongylid nematodes in a particular geographical location.

  8. First report of parasitism by Hexametra boddaertii (Nematoda: Ascaridae) in Oxyrhopus guibei (Serpentes: Colubridae).

    PubMed

    Peichoto, María E; Sánchez, Matías N; López, Ariel; Salas, Martín; Rivero, María R; Teibler, Pamela; Toledo, Gislayne de Melo; Tavares, Flávio L

    2016-07-15

    The current study summarizes the postmortem examination of a specimen of Oxyrhopus guibei (Serpentes, Colubridae) collected in Iguazu National Park (Argentina), and found deceased a week following arrival to the serpentarium of the National Institute of Tropical Medicine (Argentina). Although the snake appeared to be in good health, a necropsy performed following its death identified the presence of a large number of roundworms in the coelomic cavity, with indications of peritonitis and serosal adherence. Additional observations from the necropsy revealed small calcifications in the mesothelium of the coelomic cavity; solid and expressive content in the gallbladder; massive gastrointestinal obstruction due to nematodes; and lung edema and congestion. Histopathological analyses of lung sections also showed proliferative heterophilic and histiocytic pneumonia. Parasites isolated from both the intestine and coelomic cavity were identified as Hexametra boddaertii by a combination of light and scanning electron microscopic examination. Results from this necropsy identify O. guibei as a new host for H. boddaertii, and is the first report of a natural infection by Hexametra in Argentina. Since Hexametra parasites may contribute to several pathological conditions in humans, and with the recent availability of O. guibei specimens through the illegal pet trade, it is necessary to consider the possibility of zoonotic helminth transmission of Hexametra from snake to human.

  9. Oscheius wisconsinensis n. sp. (Nematoda: Rhabditidae), a potential entomopathogenic nematode from the marshlands of Wisconsin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Oscheius wisconsinensis n. sp. (Rhabditidae) was recovered through the Galleria bait method from a wild cranberry marsh in Jackson County, Wisconsin, USA. Morphological studies with light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, as well as molecular analyses of the near-full-length small subunit...

  10. Genetic diversity and population genetics of large lungworms (Dictyocaulus, Nematoda) in wild deer in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Ács, Zoltán; Hayward, Alexander; Sugár, László

    2016-09-01

    Dictyocaulus nematode worms live as parasites in the lower airways of ungulates and can cause significant disease in both wild and farmed hosts. This study represents the first population genetic analysis of large lungworms in wildlife. Specifically, we quantify genetic variation in Dictyocaulus lungworms from wild deer (red deer, fallow deer and roe deer) in Hungary, based on mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) sequence data, using population genetic and phylogenetic analyses. The studied Dictyocaulus taxa display considerable genetic diversity. At least one cryptic species and a new parasite-host relationship are revealed by our molecular study. Population genetic analyses for Dictyocaulus eckerti revealed high gene flow amongst weakly structured spatial populations that utilise the three host deer species considered here. Our results suggest that D. eckerti is a widespread generalist parasite in ungulates, with a diverse genetic backround and high evolutionary potential. In contrast, evidence of cryptic genetic structure at regional geographic scales was observed for Dictyocaulus capreolus, which infects just one host species, suggesting it is a specialist within the studied area. D. capreolus displayed lower genetic diversity overall, with only moderate gene flow compared to the closely related D. eckerti. We suggest that the differing vagility and dispersal behaviour of hosts are important contributing factors to the population structure of lungworms, and possibly other nematode parasites with single-host life cycles. Our findings are of relevance for the management of lungworms in deer farms and wild deer populations.

  11. Meloidogyne aberrans sp. nov. (Nematoda: Meloidogynidae), a new root-knot nematode parasitizing kiwifruit in China.

    PubMed

    Tao, Ye; Xu, Chunling; Yuan, Chunfen; Wang, Honghong; Lin, Borong; Zhuo, Kan; Liao, Jinling

    2017-01-01

    High infection rates of roots of wild kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis Planch) and soil infestation by a root-knot nematode were found in Anshun, GuiZhou Province, China. Morphology, esterase phenotype and molecular analyses confirmed that this nematode was different from previously described root-knot nematodes. In this report, the species is described, illustrated and named Meloidogyne aberrans sp. nov. The new species has a unique combination of characters. A prominent posterior protuberance, round and faint perineal pattern and a medium-length stylet (13.6-15.5 μm) characterized the females. Second-stage juveniles (J2) were characterized by a smooth lip region with distinctly protruded medial lips and a depression in outline at the oral aperture, a relatively long stylet (15.9-16.8 μm), four incisures in the lateral field and a very short, even poorly defined, hyaline tail terminus (2.2-5.5 μm). More incisures (11-15) existed in the lateral field of males, and the stylet and spicules of males were 18.2-19.6 μm and 22.7-36.8 μm long respectively. Egg masses were typically produced within the roots of kiwifruit. The new species had a rare Est phenotype, S2. Phylogenetic trees inferred from SSU, LSU D2D3, ITS, and partial coxII-16S rRNA revealed that M. aberrans sp. nov. was within the Meloidogyne clade and was distinguished from all described root-knot nematodes. Moreover, from histopathological observations, M. aberrans sp. nov. induced the formation of multinucleate giant cells.

  12. Molecular phylogeny and host specificity of the larval Eustrongylides (Nematoda: Dioctophmidae) from freshwater fish in China.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Fan; Li, Wen X; Wu, Shan G; Zou, Hong; Wang, Gui T

    2013-02-01

    The nematodes Eustrongylides spp. collected from different fish species in China were examined for their intra- and interspecific evolutionary variations using the molecular markers mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase c subunit 1 (COI) gene and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) rDNA regions. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that Eustrongylides species are divided into 3 well-supported clades. The ITS divergence between the clades suggested that clades 2 and 3 might represent the same species, whereas clade 1 represent another cryptic species. The host specificity of these nematodes was analyzed according to prevalence data, host range, and phylogenetic information. Clade 1 was found in 4 fish species, i.e., Odontobutis obscurus, Silurus asotus, Culter mongolicus, and Acanthogobius flavimanus, but was predominant in the 2 perciform species, O. obscurus and A. flavimanus. Clade 2 was found in 3 fish species, Monopterus albus, Channa argus, and Channa asiatica, but was predominant in M. albus, reported to feed primarily on oligochaetes, the first intermediate host of Eustrongylides sp. Clade 3 was found in 9 species, but its low prevalence suggests accidental infection in all species. Although the larval nematode presented low host specificity, it exhibited some host preference.

  13. Pathological lesions in European bison (Bison bonasus) with infestation by Ashworthius sidemi (Nematoda, Trichostrongylidae).

    PubMed

    Osińska, B; Demiaszkiewicz, A W; Lachowicz, J

    2010-01-01

    Asworthius sidemi Schulz, 1933 is a blood sucking gastrointestinal nematode, primarily typical for Asiatic deer. It was found for the first time in Poland in European bison in 1997. To estimate the level of invasion of A. sidemi and histopathological changes connected with the presence of the parasite in the years 2004-2007 parasitological and histopathological examinations of 54 European bison from Białowieza Forest were carried out. Parasitological examination was carried out by the sedimentation method and A. sidemi were diagnosed under a binocular microscope. Samples for histological examination were collected from the abomasum and duodenum walls as well as from regional lymph nodes. Tissue samples were then fixed with 10% buffered formalin, embedded in paraffin, cut in to 5 microm thick sections and stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). Parasitological examinations showed the presence of fourth stage larvae and juvenile forms of A. sidemi. The maximal intensity of invasion rose systematically from 4470 A. sidemi nematodes in 2004/2005 to 44310 in 2006/2007. Histopathological examinations showed infiltrations of inflammatory cells in the walls of abomasa and duodena at various levels of intensity (mainly lymphoid cells and eosinophils), hyperemiae, oedemae and lesions of mucosa and proliferation of lymphatic follicles. In individual cases of dysplasia of epithelial cells, atrophy or hyperplasia of glands and the presence of parasites in the lumen or walls of the abomasum/duodenum were observed. In one case, parasitic nodules were found. In regional lymph nodes proliferation of lymphatic follicles, presence of eosinophils and desolation of reproduction centers were observed. Intensification of histopathological changes was connected to a considerable degree with the developmental stage of A. sidemi as shown by parasitological examination.

  14. Expansion of the Asiatic parasite Ashworthius sidemi (Nematoda, Trichostrongylidae) in wild ruminants in Polish territory.

    PubMed

    Dród, Jan; Demiaszkiewicz, Aleksander W; Lachowicz, Jacek

    2003-01-01

    The abomasa of 40 wild ruminants (18 red deer, 9 roe deer, 13 European bison) shot in the Bieszczady Mountains and another 8 European bison shot in Bialowieza Primeval Forest, were examined for worms. Ashworthius sidemi was found in all of the animals from the Bieszczady Mountains, and the intensity of infection was usually massive. In Bialowieza Forest few specimens of A. sidemi were noted among three bison. Wild ruminants were infected by A. sidemi from June to September. The nematodes originating from this infection only attained sexual maturity in June of the following year, and from September the process of expelling the parasites of that generation began. From June to autumn, two generations of nematodes, one consisting of mature individuals from the previous year and the other of the current year comprising fourth stage larvae as well as juveniles, occur in these hosts. In the winter and spring periods until June, only one generation of the parasite, arrested fourth-stage larvae and juveniles, occurs in the hosts.

  15. Ashworthius sidemi (Nematoda, Trichostrongylidae) in wild ruminants in Białowieza Forest.

    PubMed

    Demiaszkiewicz, A W; Lachowicz, J; Osińska, B

    2009-01-01

    Between 2003-2007, abomasa of 91 European bison (Bison bonasus), 4 red deer (Cervus elaphus) and 2 roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) shot in the Białowieza Primeval Forest (Poland) were examined for worms presence. All the animals examined were infected with nematodes A. sidemi with an exception of one bison, that was shot in year 2003. There was much higher average intensity of invasion in bison (5529), than in red deer (85) and in roe deer (1837). The animals were shot in a period from December to March, and the nematodes found in them were fourth stage larvae and immature adult specimens. In the following years of examinations, a gradual increase in average intensity of infection was observed. In 2007, it reached in bison 10814 nematodes. Maximum intensity of invasion was found in this year as well and it reached 44310 nematodes in one bison. Pathological changes such as an oedema, hyperaemia and effusion in the abomasum and duodenum mucosa were most clearly seen in the calves that were highly infected. These changes probably lead to chronic diarrhoea, deterioration and deaths of young animals.

  16. Species of Typhlophoros von Linstow, 1906 (Nematoda: Ascaridoidea) in Old World crocodilians.

    PubMed

    Sprent, J F

    1999-07-01

    A new species of the genus Typhlophoros von Linstow, 1906, T. spratti, is described from the freshwater crocodile Crocodylus johnstoni and the saltwater crocodile C. porosus in northern Australia. Specimens of the new species could not be compared with the type-species, T. lamellaris, as no preserved specimens of the latter species are known to exist. The new species differs from the descriptions of von Linstow (1906) and Maplestone (1930) in the number of interlabial ridges, the form of the ventriculus and absence of lateral alae. The taxonomic status and affinities of Typhlophoros are discussed.

  17. Natural infection of Culex theileri (Diptera: Culicidae) with Dirofilaria immitis (Nematoda: Filarioidea) on Madeira Island, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Santa-Ana, Marta; Khadem, Manhaz; Capela, Ruben

    2006-01-01

    Field and laboratory studies were performed to verify whether Culex theileri Theobald functions as a natural vector of Dirofilaria immitis (Leidy) on Madeira Island, Portugal. CO2-baited light traps (EVS traps) were use to sample mosquitoes monthly basis between February 2002 and February 2003 in the area of Quebradas (Funchal). Three mosquito species were captured, including 58 Culex pipiens L., 790 Cx. theileri, and three Culiseta longiareolata (Macquart). Only C. theileri tested positive for D. immitis. The presence of this filarial worm was detected by direct observation, infectivity assay dissection technique, and polymerase chain reaction methods. Infected mosquitoes were recovered in October and December 2002 and January 2003. These data provide evidence that Cx. theileri could be the main vector of D. immitis in Funchal, Madeira.

  18. Camallanus cotti (Nematoda: Camallanidae), an introduced parasite of fishes in New Caledonia.

    PubMed

    Moravec, Frantisek; Justine, Jean-Lou

    2006-12-01

    A pathogenic Asian nematode species of Camallanus, C. cotti Fujita, 1927, was found in New Caledonia, South Pacific, for the first time; it was recorded from two native fishes, Awaous guamensis (Valenciennes) (Gobiidae) (prevalence 51%, intensity 1-25) and Kuhlia marginata (Cuvier) (Kuhliidae) (a single specimen found), of the La Foa River, about 100 km north of Nouméa; the latter represents a new host record. Morphological data on C. cotti based on New Caledonian specimens and those previously collected from aquarium-kept Misgurnus anguillicaudatus (Cantor) in Canada have been provided. The SEM examination of C. cotti, applied for the first time in this species, made it possible to study some of its morphological details; first-stage larvae from the female's uterus were found to possess several digit-like processes on the tail tip, not previously reported for any species of the Camallanidae. Camallanus moraveci Petter, Cassone et France, 1974 is considered a junior synonym of C. cotti. A list of hitherto recorded hosts of C. cotti is provided. Camallanus cotti is assumed to be introduced into New Caledonia along with the introduction of the exotic poeciliid fishes, which are known to be among the most common hosts of C. cotti in aquarium cultures worldwide.

  19. Two new genera and species of cystidicolids (Nematoda, Cystidicolidae) from marine fishes off New Caledonia.

    PubMed

    Moravec, Frantisek; Justine, Jean-Lou

    2010-06-01

    Two new nematode species of the family Cystidicolidae, each representing a new genus, were recovered from marine perciform fishes off New Caledonia, South Pacific: Ascarophisnema tridentatum n. gen., n. sp. from the stomach of the Japanese large-eye bream, Gymnocranius euanus (Günther) (Lethrinidae) and Metabronemoides mirabilis n. gen., n. sp. from the stomach of the painted sweetlip, Diagramma pictum (Thunberg) (Haemulidae). Ascarophisnema is characterized mainly by its cephalic structures (presence of two tooth-like projections on either side of the base of each pseudolabium, dorsal and ventral inner extensions of each pseudolabium recurved laterally in apical view, and submedian sublabia fused together dorsally and ventrally) and the presence of trident-like deirids, and Metabronemoides by its unique cephalic structures (presence of one dorsal and one ventral labium and four large dorsolateral and ventrolateral labia, and absence of sublabia). Rhabdochona gymnocranius (considered a species inquirenda) is provisionally transferred to the former genus as Ascarophisnema gymnocranius (Yamaguti, 1935) n. comb. To date, a total of seven species of cystidicolids are reported from marine fishes off New Caledonia.

  20. Philometrids (Nematoda: Philometridae) in carangid and serranid fishes off New Caledonia, including three new species

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A recent examination of newly obtained specimens of philometrid nematodes (Philometridae) parasitising carangid and serranid fishes off New Caledonia, South Pacific, revealed the presence of several nematodes of the genus Philometra Costa, 1845, including three new species: P. austropacifica n. sp. (males and females) from the ovary of Alepes vari (Carangidae), P. piscaria n. sp. (males) from the ovary of Epinephelus coioides (Serranidae), and P. selaris n. sp. (males) probably from the abdominal cavity (found in washings) of Selar crumenophthalmus (Carangidae). The new species are characterised mainly by the length and structure of the spicules and gubernaculum, body size, their location in the host and the type of host. Philometra austropacifica n. sp. is the first known nominal gonad-infecting species of Philometra parasitising a carangid fish. In addition, the gravid female of P. fasciati Moravec & Justine, 2008 from the ovary of Epinephelus fasciatus (Serranidae) is described for the first time. Carangid host fish were identified by both morphology and DNA barcoding. PMID:24836940

  1. Philometrids (Nematoda: Philometridae) in carangid and serranid fishes off New Caledonia, including three new species.

    PubMed

    Moravec, František; Justine, Jean-Lou

    2014-01-01

    A recent examination of newly obtained specimens of philometrid nematodes (Philometridae) parasitising carangid and serranid fishes off New Caledonia, South Pacific, revealed the presence of several nematodes of the genus Philometra Costa, 1845, including three new species: P. austropacifica n. sp. (males and females) from the ovary of Alepes vari (Carangidae), P. piscaria n. sp. (males) from the ovary of Epinephelus coioides (Serranidae), and P. selaris n. sp. (males) probably from the abdominal cavity (found in washings) of Selar crumenophthalmus (Carangidae). The new species are characterised mainly by the length and structure of the spicules and gubernaculum, body size, their location in the host and the type of host. Philometra austropacifica n. sp. is the first known nominal gonad-infecting species of Philometra parasitising a carangid fish. In addition, the gravid female of P. fasciati Moravec & Justine, 2008 from the ovary of Epinephelus fasciatus (Serranidae) is described for the first time. Carangid host fish were identified by both morphology and DNA barcoding. © F. Moravec & J.-L. Justine, published by EDP Sciences, 2014.

  2. Trichinella patagoniensis n. sp. (Nematoda), a new encapsulated species infecting carnivorous mammals in South America.

    PubMed

    Krivokapich, Silvio J; Pozio, Edoardo; Gatti, Graciana M; Prous, Cinthia L Gonzalez; Ribicich, Mabel; Marucci, Gianluca; La Rosa, Giuseppe; Confalonieri, Viviana

    2012-09-01

    Until a few years ago, Trichinella spiralis was the only taxon of the genus Trichinella detected in both domestic and wild animals of South America. Recently, a new genotype, named Trichinella T12, was identified in cougars (Puma concolor) from Argentina, on the basis of molecular studies using mitochondrial and nuclear ribosomal markers. In the present study, cross-breeding experiments indicated that Trichinella T12 is reproductively isolated from all other encapsulated Trichinella spp. and suggested that it is biologically more similar to Trichinella britovi and Trichinella murrelli than to the other encapsulated species/genotypes. Biological assays revealed that the reproductive capacity index of Trichinella T12 was ~4 and >2000 times lower than those of T. spiralis in mice and rats, respectively. The reproductive capacity index of Trichinella T12 in domestic pigs ranged from 0.0 to 0.05. Larvae parasitising the muscles of carnivores were infective to mice after freezing at -5°C for 3 months, but they lost infectivity after freezing at -18°C for 1 week. The region within the rDNA, known as the expansion segment V, showed a unique sequence which differs from those of all other known Trichinella spp./genotypes. The biological, geographical and molecular data support the classification of the genotype Trichinella T12 as a new species widespread in the Neotropical region, for which we propose the name Trichinella patagoniensis n. sp. Copyright © 2012 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Longidorus carniolensis sp. n. (Nematoda, Longidoridae) from vineyard soil in Slovenia

    PubMed Central

    Širca, Saša; Urek, Gregor; Lazarova, Stela; Elshishka, Milka; Peneva, Vlada

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A new needle nematode, Longidorus carniolensis sp. n., recovered from the soil around the roots of grapevine Vitis vinifera L. from Slovenia, is described and illustrated. Longidorus carniolensisis an amphimictic species, characterised by females with a moderately long (L=5.6–8.2 mm) and plump (a=51–72.4, ave. 66.3) body, assuming a spiral to C-shape when heat relaxed. Head region continuous, anteriorly almost flat, lip region 23–25 µm wide; guiding ring situated posteriorly (42–47 μm, 43–50 μm in males), odontostyle long (ave. 146.6 (136–157) μm); pharyngeal glands with normal location, their nuclei of approximately equal size; tail bluntly conoidal to almost hemispherical. Males abundant, spicules slender and long (122–145 μm), ventromedian supplements 13–17, irregularly spaced, preceded by an adanal pair. Four juvenile stages present, the first stage juvenile with bluntly conoidal tail. Codes for identifying the new species when using the key by Chen et al. (1997) are: A 56, B 4, C 4, D 1, E 4, F 35, G 1, H 1, I 2. The new species is morphologically the most similar to Longidorus poessneckensis Altherr, 1974, Longidorus macrosoma Hooper, 1961, Longidorus caespiticola Hooper, 1961, Longidorus helveticus Lamberti et al., 2001, Longidorus macroteromucronatus Altherr, 1974, Longidorus pius Barsi & Lamberti, 2001, Longidorus raskii Lamberti & Agostinelli, 1993, Longidorus kheirii Pedram et al. 2008, Longidorus silvae Roca, 1993, Longidorus iuglandis Roca et al., 1985, Longidorus vinearum Bravo & Roca, 1995 and Longidorus major Roca & d’Erico, 1987, but differs from these species either by the body and odontostyle length, position of guide ring, head region and tail shape or the shape of the first stage juvenile tail. Sequence data from the D2-D3 region of the 28S rDNA distinguishes this new species from other speciesof the genus Longidorus with known sequences. Relationships of Longidorus carniolensis sp. n. with other Longidorus species based on analysis of this DNA fragment and morphology are discussed. PMID:22287876

  4. Predicting the potential distribution of Vexillata (Nematoda: Ornithostrongylidae) and its hosts (Mammalia: Rodentia) within America.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Salazar, E A; Escalante, T; Linaje, M; Falcón-Ordaz, J

    2013-12-01

    Species distribution modelling has been a powerful tool to explore the potential distribution of parasites in wildlife, being the basis of studies on biogeography. Vexillata spp. are intestinal nematodes found in several species of mammalian hosts, such as rodents (Geomyoidea) and hares (Leporidae) in the Nearctic and northern Neotropical regions. In the present study, we modelled the potential distribution of Vexillata spp. and their hosts, using exclusively species from the Geomyidae and Heteromyidae families, in order to identify their distributional patterns. Bioclimatic and topographic variables were used to identify and predict suitable habitats for Vexillata and its hosts. Using these models, we identified that temperature seasonality is a significant environmental factor that influences the distribution of the parasite genus and its host. In particular, the geographical distribution is estimated to be larger than that predicted for its hosts. This suggests that the nematode has the potential to extend its geographical range and also its spectrum of host species. Increasing sample size and geographical coverage will contribute to recommendations for conservation of this host-parasite system.

  5. Dirofilariaformia pulmoni sp. n. (Nematoda: Onchocercidae) from the eastern gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis Gmelin).

    PubMed

    Davidson, W R

    1975-04-01

    Dirofilariaeformia pulmoni sp. n. from the eastern gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis Gmelin) is differentiated from other species of the genus by its smaller body size, shorter spicules, arrangement of caudal papillae, and morphology of microfilariae. Adult filarids were found in the pulmonary artery and its branches, and the microfilariae occurred in the blood. A large antemortem thrombus that occluded approximately two-thirds of the lumen of the artery was associated with infection in one squirrel.

  6. Histopathological changes induced by Hysterothylacium deardorffoverstreetorum larvae (Nematoda: Raphidascarididae) in Priacanthus arenatus Cuvier, 1829 (Actinopterygii).

    PubMed

    Kuraiem, Bianca Porto; Knoff, Marcelo; Felizardo, Nilza Nunes; Menezes, Rodrigo Caldas; Gomes, Delir Corrêa; Clemente, Sérgio Carmona de São

    2017-01-01

    Priacanthus arenatus is a fish that occurs in the waters of the western Atlantic Ocean and has few records of parasitism. This study aimed to report histological changes caused by the larvae of Hysterothylacium deardorffoverstreetorum. Between July and December, 2013, 30 samples of P. arenatus were obtained from fish markets in the cities of Niterói and Rio de Janeiro, state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Fragments of spleen, liver, stomach wall and mesentery tissues containing nodules and free parasites were extracted to histopathological study. Through histological analysis it was verified that these nodules consisted of connective tissue capsules, in which the parasites were located, with granulomatous inflammation mainly comprised of macrophages and lymphocytes. These nodules also consisted of a central portion of acellular amorphous material, formed by concentric layers, which was slightly basophilic and contained tunnels and, sometimes, parasite debris. The presence of tunnels in acellular amorphous material suggests that the larvae are initially located at the center of the nodules and then they migrate to the surface.

  7. New morphological data of Litomosoides chagasfilhoi (Nematoda: Filarioidea) parasitizing Nectomys squamipes in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Muniz-Pereira, Luís Cláudio; Gonçalves, Paula Araujo; Guimarães, Erick Vaz; Fonseca, Fábio de Oliveira; Santos, José Augusto Albuquerque Dos; Maldonado-Júnior, Arnaldo; Moraes, Antonio Henrique Almeida de

    2016-01-01

    Litomosoides chagasfilhoi, originally described by Moraes Neto, Lanfredi & De Souza (1997) parasitizing the abdominal cavity of the wild rodent, Akodon cursor (Winge, 1887), was found in the abdominal cavity of Nectomys squamipes (Brants, 1827), from the municipality of Rio Bonito, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. This study led to addition of new morphological data and a new geographical distribution for this filarioid in Brazil. Several characters were detailed and emended to previous records of L. chagasfilhoi in N. squamipes, and confirming the original description in A. cursor: buccal capsule longer than wide with walls thinner than the lumen, right spicule slightly sclerotized, with membranous distal extremity slender, with a small tongue-like terminal portion, left spicule with handle longer than the blade, whose edges form large membranous wings folded longitudinally.

  8. Swedish Plectida (Nematoda). Part 6. Neocamacolaimus parasiticus gen. n., sp. n.

    PubMed

    Holovachov, Oleksandr; Boström, Sven

    2014-06-25

    A new genus Neocamacolaimus gen. n., with one new species N. parasiticus gen. n., sp. n. is described from the benthic polychaete Sphaerosyllis cf. hystrix collected in the Skagerrak off the west coast of Sweden. Neocamacolaimus gen. n. is placed in the family Camacolaimidae and is particularly characterised by having annulated cuticle with lateral alae; setiform cephalic sensilla located at level with amphids; amphidial fovea ventrally spiral; buccal cavity without armament; pharynx muscular; nerve ring located at base of pharynx; male reproductive system diorchic with outstretched testes; spicules weakly arcuate with straight manubrium; gubernaculum absent; alveolar supplements located in the pharyngeal region; tubular supplements absent; tail conoid; caudal glands and spinneret present. Juveniles of this genus are particularly characterised by their parasitic lifestyle and the following unique morphological features: lips form a dorso-ventrally elongated perioral disc with internal sclerotizations: one midventral and two dorsosublateral (right and left); cephalic sensilla setiform, subventral sensilla are noticeably longer than the subdorsal ones; intestine extends posterior to rectum and anal opening, forming a post-anal pouch.

  9. Proteolytic activity in Hysterothylacium aduncum (Nematoda: Anisakidae), a fish gastrointestinal parasite of worldwide distribution.

    PubMed

    Malagón, David; Benítez, Rocío; Adroher, Francisco Javier; Díaz-López, Manuel

    2011-12-29

    Proteases have a significant role in the life cycle of parasites and the pathogen-host relationship, being regarded as important virulence factors. In the parasitic nematode Hysterothylacium aduncum proteolytic activity was measured during in vitro development from third larval stage (L3) to mature adult, using DQ red casein as a fluorogenic substrate. Proteolytic activity was detected in all the developmental stages studied and at all pH values within the range employed (2.0-7.5). The assay with specific inhibitors permitted the determination of metalloprotease activity, and, to a lesser extent, that of aspartate- and cysteine-protease. Serine-protease activity was the lowest of those studied. In L3 recently collected from the host fish (L3-0 h), the greatest activity was found at an optimum pH of 4.0 and was mainly inhibited by 1,10-phenathroline (metalloprotease inhibitor). This metalloprotease activity in L3-0 h (infective stage) may be related to the invasion of the host tissues by this larva. In the other developmental stages, the greatest protease activity was found at pH 5.5, although at pH 4.0 a lower activity peak was detected. On the other hand, our data show that the proteolytic activity of the nematode varies according to the presence of pepsin (an aspartic-protease) in the culture medium. Thus, at pH 4.0, activity was greater in the absence of pepsin, with increasing aspartic-protease activity. Together with the detection of aspartic-, cysteine- and metallo-protease (enzymes involved in digestion in invertebrates) in all the developmental stages of the parasite taking place in the digestive tract of the host fish, this allows us to suggest that the pepsin in the culture medium mimics the predigestion conditions in the habitat of the worm within the host and that the activity detected may have, amongst others, a digestive function.

  10. Collagenolytic activity related to metalloproteases (and serine proteases) in the fish parasite Hysterothylacium aduncum (Nematoda: Anisakidae).

    PubMed

    Malagón, David; Adroher, Francisco Javier; Díaz-López, Manuel; Benítez, Rocío

    2010-06-11

    Proteases play a vital role in both the life cycle of parasites and the parasite-host relationship and are considered important virulence factors. In the present study, the presence of proteases with collagenolytic activity was investigated in the fish nematode Hysterothylacium aduncum during in vitro development. Collagenolytic activity was found in all studied developmental stages of the nematode (third [L3] and fourth [L4] larval stages and adults). In L3, the activity was maximum at pH 6.5 and, in the other stages, at 7.0. Pepsin is known to favour in vitro development of the worm, but, in this study, collagenolytic activity was shown to be significantly greater when no pepsin was added to the culture medium (at pH 6.5, p = 0.011). At pH 7.0, most activity was observed in the immature adult, after the final moult, suggesting that the collagenolytic activity may be involved in remodelling of the cuticle and in sexual maturity. On the other hand, at pH 6.5, activity may be related to tissue migration by L3 within the host. Using specific inhibitors, it was demonstrated that most of the collagenolytic activity detected in all the developmental stages was due to metalloproteases (40 to 100%), although serine proteases were also detected in L4 and adults (10 to 30%).

  11. Some factors which influence the in vitro maintenance of Anisakis simplex (Nematoda).

    PubMed

    Iglesias, L; Valero, A; Adroher, F J

    1997-01-01

    Several culture media as well as some factors that may affect the in vitro development of the nematode Anisakis simplex Rudolphi, 1809 have been studied. After testing six media and four temperatures, the conditions for the in vitro culture selected were as follows: RPMI-1640 + 20% (v/v) heat-inactived fetal bovine serum or Meyer's M3 (without agar) media, at 37 degrees C, under 5% CO2 in air atmosphere, and renewal of the medium twice a week. The average survival rates of the larvae were significantly increased when the pH of the culture medium was increased (from 4.0 to 7.2) or decreased (from 7.2 to 4.0) after L3 to L4 moulting. The length of the larvae at the onset of culture affected the survival and moulting of themselves, but these were culture medium-dependent. On the other hand, we have observed that several L3 and L4 were attached, by means of a brown unknown substance apparently secreted by themselves, to the bottom of the substratum. Frequently, when a larva was spontaneously detached, a "cap" of the brown substance blocked, apparently, its mouth. The possible absorption of nutrients through the L3 larvae cuticle of A. simplex is discussed.

  12. Larval anisakids (Nematoda: Ascaridoidea) in horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus) from the fish market in Granada (Spain).

    PubMed

    Adroher, F J; Valero, A; Ruiz-Valero, J; Iglesias, L

    1996-01-01

    Horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus) from the fish market in Granada, South Spain, were surveyed for anisakid nematodes. The fish came from fishing ports all over the country. Larval anisakids were found in 39.4% of the fish examined. In all, 26.1% were infected with third-stage larvae (L3s) of Anisakis simplex; 0.3%, with A. physeteris L3s; 31.1%, with Hysterothylacium aduncum L3s; and 1.7%, with fourth-stage larvae (L4s) of Hysterothylacium sp. Horse mackerel from Mediterranean Sea coast ports (South and Southeast Spain) had the lowest levels of infection and those from Cantabrian Sea coast ports (North Spain) had the highest levels. Variations in infection levels with host size (age) and season of capture were surveyed.

  13. Steinernema biddulphi n. sp., a New Entomopathogenic Nematode (Nematoda: Steinernematidae) from South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Cimen, Harun; Půža, Vladimír; NermuŤ, JiŘí; Hatting, Justin; Ramakuwela, Tshima; Hazir, Selcuk

    2016-01-01

    A new species of entomopathogenic nematode (EPN), Steinernema biddulphi n. sp., was isolated from a maize field in Senekal, Free State Province of South Africa. Morphological and molecular studies indicated the distinctness of S. biddulphi n. sp. from other Steinernema species. Steinernema biddulphi n. sp. is characterized IJs with average body length of 663 μm (606–778 μm), lateral fields with six ridges in mid-body region forming the formula 2,6,2. Excretory pore located anterior to mid-pharynx (D% = 46). Hyaline layer occupies approximately half of tail length. Male spicules slightly to moderately curved, with a sharp tip and golden brown in color. The first generation of males lacking a mucron on the tail tip while the second generation males with a short filamentous mucron. Genital papillae with 11 pairs and one unpaired preanal papilla. The new species is further characterized by sequences of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and partial 28S regions (D2-D3) of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA). Phylogenetic data show that S. biddulphi n. sp. belongs to the “bicornutum” clade within the Steinernematidae family. PMID:27765988

  14. Dioctophyme renale (Nematoda: Dioctophymatoidea) in the abdominal cavity of Rattus norvegicus in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tokiwa, Toshihiro; Harunari, Tsunehito; Tanikawa, Tsutomu; Akao, Nobuaki; Ohta, Nobuo

    2011-09-01

    We collected 24 brown rats, Rattus norvegicus, in Kanagawa Prefecture in Japan and found one rat harboring a dioctophymatid nematode. A single male and a female worm were recovered from the abdominal cavity and were identified as Dioctophyme renale based on morphologic features and a BLAST DNA sequence analysis. We describe the morphological features of the adult worms and eggs from this extremely rare case of D. renale infection in a brown rat. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A Key and Diagnostic Compendium to the Species of the Genus Hoplolaimus Daday, 1905 (Nematoda: Hoplolaimidae)

    PubMed Central

    Handoo, Zafar A.; Golden, A. Morgan

    1992-01-01

    An identification key to 29 valid species of Hoplolaimus is given. A compendium of the most important diagnostic characters for use in identification of species is included as a practical alternative and supplement to the key. Diagnosis of Hoplolaimus is emended and lists of species of the genus, their synonymies, species inquirendae, nomina nuda, and species transferred to other genera are given. Hoplolaimus sheri, H. chambus, H. casparus, and H. capensis are recognized as valid species. PMID:19283201

  16. Abbreviata terrapenis (Nematoda: Physalopteridae): an accidental parasite of the banded rock rattlesnake (Crotalus lepidus klauberi).

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Stephen R; Bursey, Charles R; Holycross, Andrew T

    2002-04-01

    The nematode, Abbreviata terrapenis (Physalopteridae) was found in 16 (6%) of 267 banded rock rattlesnakes (Crotalus lepidus klauberi) from Arizona and New Mexico. Abbreviata terrapenis in C. lepidus represents an accidental parasite in that "infection" was acquired by the ingestion of lizard prey. Feeding captive snakes on wild-caught lizards poses a risk of introducing nematodes to the snakes.

  17. Rhabdias kongmongthaensis sp. n. (Nematoda: Rhabdiasidae) from Polypedates leucomystax (Amphibia: Anura: Rhacophoridae) in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kuzmin, Yuriy; Tkach, Vasyl V; Vaughan, Jefferson A

    2005-11-01

    Rhabdias kongmongthaensis sp. n. is described based on specimens found in the lungs of the tree frog Polypedates leucomystax (Gravenhorst) (Amphibia: Rhacophoridae) from Kanchanaburi Province, western Thailand. The new species is similar to two North-American species, Rhabdias ranae and R. americanus, by presence of two lateral pseudolabia, each with two inner submedian protuberances. R. kongmongthaensis differs from both species by relative length and shape of the tail, and by its distribution and host specificity. Presence of lateral pseudolabia distinguishes the new species from the geographically closest Rhabdias species as well as from those parasitizing other rhacophorid frogs.

  18. Rhinella marina (Amphibia: Bufonidae) Versus Rhabdias paraensis (Nematoda: Rhabdiasidae): Expanding the View on a Natural Infection.

    PubMed

    Santos, Jeannie Nascimento Dos; da Silva, Djane Clarys Baia; Feitosa, Lucas Aristóteles das Neves; Furtado, Adriano Penha; Giese, Elane Guerreiro; de Vasconcelos Melo, Francisco Tiago

    2016-06-01

    Amphibian and reptile lungs are frequently infected with Rhabdias parasites, and this condition ultimately leads to reduced survival, performance, and growth because of granulomatous inflammation, nodule formation, and nematodal pneumonia onset. Here we investigate the histopathological features of naturally infected Rhinella marina by the lung nematode Rhabdias paraensis. A total of 10 host animals were captured in peridomiciliar areas in the eastern Brazilian Amazon, and anatomic-histological analyses were performed on both the infected and non-infected lungs of these amphibians. Helminths were usually found within the secondary and primary septa of infected lungs whereas parasites were not detected within vessels or adhering to tissues. In addition, we observed discrete erythrocytes, diapedesis foci, few granulocytes and erythrocytes in the interseptal spaces, discrete cell infiltration, and a small number of melanomacrophages, and no granulomas or cysts were observed. New aspects related to changes in tissue and helminth-host interactions are discussed for the relationship of R. paraensis × Rhi. marina from the Amazon region.

  19. Cosmopolitanism and Biogeography of the Genus Manganonema (Nematoda: Monhysterida) in the Deep Sea.

    PubMed

    Zeppilli, Daniela; Vanreusel, Ann; Danovaro, Roberto

    2011-09-05

    Spatial patterns of species diversity provide information about the mechanisms that regulate biodiversity and are important for setting conservation priorities. Present knowledge of the biogeography of meiofauna in the deep sea is scarce. This investigation focuses on the distribution of the deep-sea nematode genus Manganonema, which is typically extremely rare in deep-sea sediment samples. Forty-four specimens of eight different species of this genus were recorded from different Atlantic and Mediterranean regions. Four out of the eight species encountered are new to science. We report here that this genus is widespread both in the Atlantic and in the Mediterranean Sea. These new findings together with literature information indicate that Manganonema is a cosmopolitan genus, inhabiting a variety of deep-sea habitats and oceans. Manganonema shows the highest diversity at water depths >4,000 m. Our data, therefore, indicate that this is preferentially an abyssal genus that is able, at the same time, to colonize specific habitats at depths shallower than 1,000 m. The analysis of the distribution of the genus Manganonema indicates the presence of large differences in dispersal strategies among different species, ranging from locally endemic to cosmopolitan. Lacking meroplanktonic larvae and having limited dispersal ability due to their small size, it has been hypothesized that nematodes have limited dispersal potential. However, the investigated deep-sea nematodes were present across different oceans covering macro-scale distances. Among the possible explanations (hydrological conditions, geographical and geological pathways, long-term processes, specific historical events), their apparent preference of colonizing highly hydrodynamic systems, could suggest that these infaunal organisms are transported by means of deep-sea benthic storms and turbidity currents over long distances.

  20. Diplotriaena darnaudii sp. n. (Nematoda: Diplotriaenidae) from D'Arnaud's barbet, Trachyphonus darnaudii.

    PubMed

    Webster, W A; Speckmann, G

    1976-06-01

    Diplotriaena darnaudii sp. n. is described from 13 specimens collected from the thoracic air sacs of a D'Arnaud's barbet (Trachyphonus darnaudii) originating in the Lake Baringo area of Kenya and which died in captivity in Canada. In morphology it is similar to D. bargusinica Skrjabin 1917, D. campanae Anderson 1959, D. dollfusi Anderson 1959, and D. epsilon Johnston and Mawson 1940, but can be separated from these species by combinations of trident size and spicule size and morphology.

  1. The occurance of Pterygodermatites nycticebi (Nematoda: Rictulariidae) in a captive slow loris, Nycticebus coucang

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tuggle, B.N.; Beehler, B.A.

    1984-01-01

    Adult and immature rictulariid nematodes were recovered at necropsy from the small intestine of an adult slow loris, Nycticebus coucang, from the Milwaukee County Zoo in Wisconsin. The lumen of the entire small intestine was packed with more than 100 nematodes, the intestinal wall appeared thickened and the mucosal surface contained numerous petechial hemorrhagic foci. The cause of death was diagnosed as a septicemia and possible lupus erythematosis.

  2. Toxocara cati (Nematoda: Ascarididae) in Didelphis albiventris (Marsupialia: Didelphidae) from Brazil: a case of pseudoparasitism.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Hudson Alves; Mati, Vitor Luís Tenório; Melo, Alan Lane de

    2014-01-01

    Eggs of Toxocara cati were found in the feces of Didelphis albiventris from a peridomestic urban environment in Brazil. Negative fecal tests following short-term captivity of the opossums, as well as the absence of ascaridids during necropsy, suggest the occurrence of pseudoparasitism. Implications of the findings for the epidemiology of toxocariasis are discussed.

  3. Strongyluris amazonicus n. sp. (Nematoda: Heterakidae): a parasite of Tropidurus oreadicus from the Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Jeannie Nascimento; de Vasconcelos Melo, Francisco Tiago; Nazaré, Lodney Coelho; Furtado, Adriano Penha; Giese, Elane Guerreiro

    2013-10-01

    Tropidurus oreadicus Rodrigues 1987 is a recently described species, thus there are no reports of helminthes parasites for this species. In this study, a morphological characterisation was performed of a nematode species parasite of the large intestine of T. oreadicus captured in an urban area. This urban area is similar to the estuarine dale from Guamá river and the "igarapés" of Belém, Pará State, Brazil. Morphological analysis suggested that the parasite is a new species of nematode, based mainly on the number and distribution pattern of the caudal papillae in males, which is unique for this species. In the present work, we describe for the first time the structure, number, and disposition of the cervical papillae. The morphological data were supported by scanning electron microscopy, which served as an important tool for distinguishing these nematodes from other species of the genus. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Transcriptomic Analysis of the Rice White Tip Nematode, Aphelenchoides besseyi (Nematoda: Aphelenchoididae)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Danlei; Wang, Zhiying; Dong, Airong; Chen, Qiaoli; Liu, Xiaohan

    2014-01-01

    Background The rice white tip nematode Aphelenchoides besseyi, a devastating nematode whose genome has not been sequenced, is distributed widely throughout almost all the rice-growing regions of the world. The aims of the present study were to define the transcriptome of A. besseyi and to identify parasite-related, mortality-related or host resistance-overcoming genes in this nematode. Methodology and Principal Findings Using Solexa/Illumina sequencing, we profiled the transcriptome of mixed-stage populations of A. besseyi. A total of 51,270 transcripts without gaps were produced based on high-quality clean reads. Of all the A. besseyi transcripts, 9,132 KEGG Orthology assignments were annotated. Carbohydrate-active enzymes of glycoside hydrolases (GHs), glycosyltransferases (GTs), carbohydrate esterases (CEs) and carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) were identified. The presence of the A. besseyi GH45 cellulase gene was verified by in situ hybridization. Given that 13 unique A. besseyi potential effector genes were identified from 41 candidate effector homologs, further studies of these homologs are merited. Finally, comparative analyses were conducted between A. besseyi contigs and Caenorhabditis elegans genes to look for orthologs of RNAi phenotypes, neuropeptides and peptidases. Conclusions and Significance The present results provide comprehensive insight into the genetic makeup of A. besseyi. Many of this species' genes are parasite related, nematode mortality-related or necessary to overcome host resistance. The generated transcriptome dataset of A. besseyi reported here lays the foundation for further studies of the molecular mechanisms related to parasitism and facilitates the development of new control strategies for this species. PMID:24637831

  5. Redescription of Raphidascaris gigi Fujita, 1928 (Nematoda: Anisakidae), a parasite of freshwater fishes in Japan.

    PubMed

    Moravec, Frantisek; Nagasawa, Kazuya

    2002-07-01

    A redescription is given of Raphidascaris gigi Fujita, 1928 based on newly collected specimens from the intestine of masu salmon Oncorhynchus masou (Brevoort) in the Kinu River in Japan. The species is characterised by the absence of interlabia and lateral alae, by the presence of lips without lateral membranous flanges and by numerous pre-anal and postanal papillae in the male. Although the general morphology of this species resembles that of Ichthyascaris spp. as defined by Bruce (1990), who transferred R. biwakoensis (= R. gigi) to this genus, the absence of the alae uniting close the ventrolateral lips shows clearly that it belongs to Raphidascaris Railliet & Henry, 1915. Ichthyascaris Wu, 1949 is here considered a subgenus of Raphidascaris, and two species described in the former genus are transferred to the latter as R. gymnocraniae (Bruce, 1990) n. comb. and R. sillagoides (Bruce, 1990) n. comb. The finding of R. gigi in O. masou represents a new host record.

  6. Exoskeletal thinning in Cephalotes atratus ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) parasitized by Myrmeconema neotropicum (Nematoda: Tetradonematidae).

    PubMed

    Verble, Robin M; Meyer, Ashley D; Kleve, Maurice G; Yanoviak, Stephen P

    2012-02-01

    Some parasites modify the color of their arthropod hosts, presumably to facilitate transmission to a new host. Mechanisms for such changes often are unknown, but altered exoskeletal color in adult insects typically occurs via structural modifications or redistribution of pigments. Here, we examine the cuticle structure of workers of the Neotropical canopy ant Cephalotes atratus infected with the nematode Myrmeconema neotropicum. We hypothesized that the conspicuous red color of the gaster (the globular posterior body region) of infected ants results from structural changes, specifically localized exoskeletal thinning. We used scanning electron microscopy to quantify the thickness of gaster cuticle in healthy and infected ants. For comparison, we also measured the cuticle thickness of the head of each ant, which is black in both infected and healthy individuals. The gaster cuticle was 23% thinner in infected ants (average ±SE: 14.8 ± 1.02 µm) versus healthy ants (19.2 ± 0.65 µm) after correcting for body size. In contrast, the thickness of the head exoskeleton was similar among groups. We conclude that parasite-induced thinning of the exoskeleton is associated with the red color of the gaster. Other mechanisms, including translocation or leaching of melanin (by the ant or the parasite, respectively) may operate in concert with thinning to effect the color change, and would be an appropriate extension of this research.

  7. Description of Distorhabditis poonchiana n. gen., n. sp. (Nematoda: Rhabditidae) from Jammu and Kashmir, India

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ali Asghar; Vaid, Shavish; Hussain, Abid; Ahmad, Rakeeb

    2015-01-01

    Distorhabditis poonchiana n. gen., n. sp. from humus in Jammu and Kashmir, India, is described and illustrated. The new genus is characterized by a small body; slightly setoff labial region; long tubular gymnostom; prominently cuticularized cheilostom; absence of glottoid apparatus; monoprodelphic reproductive system; vulva (V) = 81 to 84; spicules with trifurcated distal ends, simple gubernaculum, peloderan bursa with eight pairs of bursal papillae arranged in 1 + 1 + 1 + 2 + 1 + 2 arrangement. PMID:26941466

  8. Emended Description of Litomosoides molossi (Nematoda: Onchocercidae) and First Records of Litomosoides Species Parasitizing Argentinean Bats.

    PubMed

    Oviedo, Mirna C; Notarnicola, Juliana; Miotti, M Daniela; Claps, Lucía E

    2016-08-01

    :  During a long-term study on biodiversity of bats in the Yungas and Entre Ríos provinces, 1,304 specimens of bats included in the families Noctilionidae, Phyllostomidae, Vespertilionidae, and Molossidae were collected and checked for filarioids. Litomosoides molossi Esslinger, 1973 was recovered from the thoracic and abdominal cavities of Molossus molossus (prevalence [P] = 6.4%); Litomosoides chandleri Esslinger, 1973 from Artibeus planirostris (P = 6.9%), Sturnira oporaphilum (P = 66.6%), Sturnira erythromos (P = 23.8%), Sturnira lilium (P = 7.2%), and Eumops perotis (P = 50%); and Litomosoides saltensis n. sp. was collected from Eptesicus furinalis (P = 1.7%). In this paper, we emend the description of L. molossi; describe a new species, Litomosoides saltensis n. sp., on the basis of 1 female specimen; and report for the first time L. molossi and L. chandleri parasitizing Argentinean bats, expanding the host and locality records. Litomosoides molossi exhibits a slender buccal capsule, with an anterior segment transparent, and the posterior chitinous portion displays 2 thickenings in the first third; possesses 1 dorsal prominent cephalic papilla and 4 labial papillae distributed around the mouth; cuticle with lateral punctuations all along the hypodermic chords in both sexes; and male with area rugosa and tail without cloacal papillae. In L. chandleri, the lateral punctuations are distributed on the posterior extremity of the body in both sexes. Litomosoides saltensis n. sp. displays a thick buccal capsule with a posterior segment well cuticularized, possessing 2 thickenings in the anterior half; 4 labial and 2 ventral cephalic papillae; a globular vulva located anterior to the esophagus-intestine junction; cuticle with lateral punctuations in the posterior extremity of the body; and tail with salient phasmids. We also provide a taxonomic key for the identification of the Litomosoides sp. of bat dwelling. Long-term studies and large sample sizes are needed to detect the presence of Litomosoides sp. in bats, in contrast to the findings in cricetid rodents, which seem to be more frequently collected.

  9. Molecular detection of Setaria tundra (Nematoda: Filarioidea) and an unidentified filarial species in mosquitoes in Germany

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Knowledge of the potential vector role of Culicidae mosquitoes in Germany is very scanty, and until recently it was generally assumed that they are not involved in the transmission of anthroponotic or zoonotic pathogens in this country. However, anticipated changes in the course of global warming and globalization may alter their status. Methods We conducted a molecular mass screening of mosquitoes for filarial parasites using mitochondrial 12S rRNA-based real-time PCR. Results No parasites causing disease in humans such as Dirofilaria spp. were detected in about 83,000 mosquitoes tested, which had been collected in 2009 and 2010 in 16 locations throughout Germany. However, minimum infection rates of up to 24 per 1000 mosquitoes were revealed, which could be attributed to mosquito infection with Setaria tundra and a yet unidentified second parasite. Setaria tundra was found to be widespread in southern Germany in various mosquito species, except Culex spp. In contrast, the unidentified filarial species was exclusively found in Culex spp. in northern Baden-Württemberg, and is likely to be a bird parasite. Conclusions Although dirofilariasis appears to be emerging and spreading in Europe, the absence of Dirofilaria spp. or other zoonotic filariae in our sample allows the conclusion that the risk of autochthonous infection in Germany is still very low. Potential vectors of S. tundra in Germany are Ochlerotatus sticticus, Oc. cantans, Aedes vexans and Anopheles claviger. Technically, the synergism between entomologists, virologists and parasitologists, combined with state-of-the-art methods allows a very efficient near-real-time monitoring of a wide spectrum of both human and veterinary pathogens, including new distribution records of parasite species and the incrimination of their potential vectors. PMID:22236560

  10. The Behavior Response of Amphipods Infected by Hedruris suttonae (Nematoda) and Pseudocorynosoma sp. (Acanthocephala).

    PubMed

    Casalins, Laura M; Brugni, Norma L; Rauque, Carlos A

    2015-12-01

    The manipulation of intermediate host behavior may increase chances of parasite transmission to the definitive host. In freshwater environments of the Neotropical Region, studies on behavioral manipulations by parasites are rare, and the majority of these consider only a single parasite species and/or 1 life stage of a particular parasite species. In Andean Patagonian lakes of Argentina, the amphipod Hyalella patagonica is infected by larvae of the fish nematode Hedruris suttonae and by the bird acanthocephalan Pseudocorynosoma sp. The 3 objectives of the present study were to determine whether H. suttonae and Pseudocorynosoma sp. differ in their effects on behavior of H. patagonica , whether such modification is associated with parasite development, and to assess the associations between behavioral traits. From naturally parasitized amphipods, activity (swimming levels) and phototaxis (light preference) was measured. Only in phototaxis trials did larvae of H. suttonae induce significantly higher levels of photophilia, suggesting that they are manipulative. Scores of activity and phototaxis were positive and significantly related for non-parasitized female amphipods and for amphipods parasitized by larvae of Pseudocorynosoma sp. but were not associated in amphipods parasitized with larvae of H. suttonae (infective and non-infective), suggesting that infection separated the relationship between these variables.

  11. Molecular and morphological characterization of Veleshkinema iranicum n. gen., n. sp. (Nematoda: Hexatylina, Sphaerularioidea) from Iran.

    PubMed

    Miraeiz, Esmaeil; Heydari, Ramin; Álvarez-Ortega, Sergio; Pedram, Majid; Atighi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-08-19

    Veleshkinema  iranicum n. gen., n. sp. is described and illustrated based on morphological, morphometric and molecular characters. The new genus is characterized by having slender females and males, stylet with asymmetrical knobs, dorsal gland orifice just posterior to subventral knob, lip region with flattened apex and eight sectors, pharynx with a non-muscular and non-valvular median bulb, pharyngeal glands slightly overlapping intestine dorsally, visible cellular cardia, female with a single gonad having a quadricolumellate crustaformeria with 8-10 cells in each column, no postvulval uterine sac and rounded and offset spermatheca containing spheroid sperm cells, males with arcuate tylenchoid spicules and subterminal bursa. The new genus is morphologically compared with four genera: Abursanema, Deladenus, Prothallonema and Sphaerularia. Molecular phylogenetic studies of the new genus using 808 bp partial sequences of SSU ribosomal RNA gene placed the new genus in a clade with Sphaerularia spp. In phylogenetic analyses using 756 bp partial sequences of the 28S ribosomal RNA gene (D2-D3 segments), the new genus formed a monophyletic group with Abursanema iranicum and Sphaerularia spp.

  12. [Experimental infection of 2 species of laboratory rodents with invasive larvae of Elaphostrongylus cervi (Nematoda, Metastrongyloidea)].

    PubMed

    Demiaszkiewicz, A W

    1989-01-01

    Single doses (from 300 to 1000 larvi per an animal) of invasive larvae E. cervi Cameron, 1931, obtained from experimentally infected snails Helix pomatia L. were given to 17 guinea pigs and 17 golden hamsters. Clinical nervous symptoms in the form of paresis and paralysis of limbs occurred only in the guinea pigs which were given a dose of 1000 larvi. These animals died in the period from the 75th to 117th day of infection. From their central nervous system single adult males and females of E. cervi were isolated. In the lungs and mesenteries of 2 dead pigs live larvae of E. cervi were found. This fact proves that the guinea pig can fulfil the role of a final and a paratenic host of E. cervi. No clinical symptoms were noticed in any hamster. In hamsters dissected on the 7th day of infection live larvae of E. cervi were found in the mesentery and in the fleshy part of the diaphgram. After 14 days the larvae found both in the mesentery and in the diaphragm were dead and surrounded by cellular infiltration. A strong tissue reaction of the hamster after the administration of E. cervi larvae is responsible for the larvae destruction and resorption.

  13. Pseudolella major sp. nov. (Axonolaimidae, Nematoda) from the intertidal zone of the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunming; Huang, Yong

    2016-03-01

    A new species of free-living nematode, Pseudolella major sp. nov. is described from the intertidal mudflats of Ximen Island in the East China Sea. Pseudolella major sp. nov. is characterized as follows: body length ~1 300 μm; short cephalic setae, 2-3 μm long; amphidial fovea loop-shaped with elongated ventral branch; ventral branch 50-60 μm long and extending past the base of buccal cavity; buccal cavity cylindrical with arching or spherical base; three heavy outwardly-curving odontia with blunt tips located at anterior of buccal cavity; pharynx short with posterior bulb; ventral gland cell elongate oval-shaped, located posterior to pharyngo-intestinal junction; excretory pore situated at the level of the middle of buccal cavity; tail conical to cylindrical; spicules arched, with double-cephalate proximal end; gubernaculum with a strong dorsal caudal apophysis.

  14. A new species of Parodontophora (Nematoda: Axonolaimidae) from the intertidal zone of the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haixia; Huang, Yong

    2016-02-01

    This study described a new species of free-living nematode discovered in the intertidal mudflat of Ximen Island, East China Sea. The new species, designated Parodontophora longiamphidata sp. nov., was characterized by a cylindrical body with tapering extremeties; cuticle smooth without somatic setae; four short cephalic setae; cylindrical buccal cavity with six clawlike teeth at the top of stoma; pharynx cylindrical with widened base; amphidial fovea crook-shaped with elongated scalariform branch extending past level of base of pharynx and ventral gland; ventral gland cell long-oval shaped located posterior to pharyngo-intestinal junction; excretory pore at level of middle of buccal cavity; tail conico-cylindrical with enlarged tip; three caudal gland cells, male spicules arched with cephalic proximal end and tapered distal end; gubernaculum with dorso-caudal apophysis; female with two opposed outstretched ovaries; and vulva at slightly post-midpoint of body length. This new species was close to P. wuleidaowanensis Zhang, 2005 and P. polita Gerlach, 1955 in terms of long amphidial fovea branch. The newly found species was easily distinguishable from the two documented; its amphidial fovea branch (255-290 µm versus 72-106 and 125-150 µm) was obviously longer. Key to the Parodontophora species with a longer amphidial fovea branch was given.

  15. Fine Structure of the Stoma of Bunonema sp. and Teratorhabditis palmarum (Nematoda) and Its Phylogenetic Significance

    PubMed Central

    Dolinski, C. M.; Baldwin, J. G.

    2003-01-01

    Fine structure of the stoma, including the cheilostom, gymnostom, and stegostom of Bunonema sp. and Teratorhabditis palmarum was compared with Caenorhabditis elegans to consider fine structural characters that may be phylogenetically informative. The stegostom, enclosed by the anterior end of the pharynx, includes a triradiate lumen surrounded by radial cells (interradial or pairs of adradial cells) repeated in the dorsal and subventral sectors; in Rhabditina, typically the stegostom includes anteriorly two sets of epithelial and posteriorly two sets of muscular radial cells. These muscle cells are anteriorly m1 and posteriorly m2. In Bunonema sp., unlike T. palmarum and C. elegans, the stegostom has a third set of interradial epithelial cells. In Bunonema sp., m1 is expressed by three interradial cells, whereas in T. palmarum and C. elegans m1 is three pairs of adradial muscle cells (i.e., six cells). In all three taxa m2 is expressed as three pairs of adradial muscle cells. Posterior processes of adjacent adradial cells fuse, and closely apposed nuclei may present a figure-eight shape. However, in Bunonema the three interradial m1 cells each have a long posterior process enclosing two separate round nuclei. In combination with additional characters, these diverse stoma features may prove phylogenetically informative. Specifically, the radial epithelial cells of the stegostom appear to be a synapomorphy consistent with a bunonemid-diplogastrid-rhabditid clade, whereas a thickening in the dorsal sector of the stoma cuticle lining is interpreted as a synapomorphy supporting a bunonemid-diplogastrid clade. PMID:19262757

  16. Purification and characterization of acid trehalase from muscle of Ascaris suum (Nematoda).

    PubMed

    Dmitryjuk, Małgorzata; Zółtowska, Krystyna

    2003-09-01

    Acid trehalase (EC 3.2.1.28) was isolated from muscle of Ascaris suum by fractionating with ammonium sulfate, acetone and column chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and phenyl sepharose CL-4B. The purified homogeneous preparation of native acid trehalase exhibited a molecular mass of 76 kDa and of 38 kDa on SDS-PAGE. The enzyme has the optimum pH 4.9, pI 4.3, Km of 6.6 mM and Vmax=34.5 nM min(-1) x mg(-1). Besides trehalose, it hydrolyses sucrose, isomaltose and maltose and, to a lesser degree melezitose, and it does not act on cellobiose and lactose. Acid trehalase was activated by MgCl2, KNO3, NaCl, CaCl2, CH2ICOOH and p-chloromercuribenzoate and inhibited by EDTA, ZnSO4 and FeCl3.

  17. Pterygodermatites (Pterygodermatites) mexicana n. sp. (Nematoda: Rictulariidae), a parasite of Balantiopteryx plicata (Chiroptera) in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A new species of nematode, Pterygodermatites (Pterygodermatites) mexicana n. sp., is described based on specimens recovered from the intestine of the gray sac-winged bat, Balantiopteryx plicata (Chiroptera, Emballonuridae), from the Biosphere Reserve “Sierra de Huautla” in the state of Morelos, Mexico. This is the second species in the genus described from bats in the New World, since most of the rictaluriids reported in these hosts belong to the closely related genus Rictularia Froelich, 1802. However, members of Rictularia possess only a single oesophageal tooth at the base of the buccal capsule, whereas in the current nematodes three conspicuous oesophageal teeth are present. They are therefore included in Pterygodermatites Wedl, 1861. The new species is characterized by the presence of 23 small denticles on the periphery of the buccal capsule and by the presence of 40 and 66 pairs of cuticular processes in males and females, respectively. Additionally, males possess 3–4 ventral precloacal fan-like processes, and the cuticular processes of females are divided into 40 pairs of comb-like and 26 pairs of spine-like processes; the vulva opens on the level of approximately pair 40. The dorsally directed stoma and the 40 prevulvar cuticular processes makes it difficult to place the species in any of the subgenera present in the New World, yet characters correspond with the diagnosis of Pterygodermatites (Pterygodermatites) in the Mediterranean region and North Africa. PMID:24267823

  18. Studies on some spirurids (Nematoda: Spirurida) from fishes of the Okavango River, Botswana.

    PubMed

    Moravec, František; Van As, Liesl L

    2015-06-01

    Based on light and scanning electron microscopical studies, three adult spirurid nematode species, Camallanus (Zeylanema) ctenopomae Vassiliadès & Petter, 1972, Paracamallanus cyathopharynx (Baylis, 1923) (both Camallanidae) and Spinitectus polli Campana-Rouget, 1961 (Cystidicolidae), are redescribed from specimens collected in fishes of the Okavango River, Botswana: C. (Z.) ctenopomae from Ctenopoma sp. (Anabantidae), P. cyathopharynx from Clarias stappersi Boulenger, C. theodorae Weber (both new hosts, Clariidae) and C. gariepinus (Burchell), as well as S. polli from Synodontis nigromaculatus Boulenger (new host, Mochokidae). Moreover, spirurid larvae of an additional three species were found in fishes from the same locality: Rhabdochona paski Baylis, 1928 fourth-stage larva (Rhabdochonidae) in S. nigromaculatus (Mochokidae), Physalopteridae gen. sp. 1 third-stage larva in C. gariepinus (Clariidae) and Physalopteridae gen. sp. 2 third-stage larva in Serranochromis angusticeps (Boulenger) (Cichlidae), all representing new host and geographical records. Spinitectus zambezensis Boomker, 1993 is considered a junior synonym of S. polli.

  19. Leptojacobus dorci n. gen., n. sp. (Nematoda: Diplogastridae), an Associate of Dorcus Stag Beetles (Coleoptera: Lucanidae)

    PubMed Central

    Kanzaki, Natsumi; Ragsdale, Erik J.; Susoy, Vladislav; Sommer, Ralf J.

    2014-01-01

    A new species of diplogastrid nematode, Leptojacobus dorci n. gen., n. sp., was isolated from adults of the stag beetle Dorcus ritsemae (Coleoptera: Lucanidae) that were purchased from a pet shop in Japan. Leptojacobus n. gen. is circumscribed by a very thin, delicate body and by a small stoma with minute armature. A combination of other stomatal characters, namely the division of the cheilostom into adradial plates, the symmetry of the subventral stegostomatal sectors, and the presence of a thin, conical dorsal tooth, further distinguishes Leptojacobus n. gen. from other genera of Diplogastridae. Phylogenetic analysis of nearly full-length SSU rRNA sequences support the new species, together with an isolate identified previously as Koerneria luziae, to be excluded from a clade including all other molecularly characterized diplogastrids with teeth and stomatal dimorphism. Therefore, the new species will be of importance for reconstruction of ancestral character histories in Diplogastridae, a family circumscribed by a suite of feeding-related novelties. PMID:24644371

  20. Seasonal dynamics of cyathostomin (Nematoda - Cyathostominae) infective larvae in Brachiaria humidicola grass in tropical southeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Claudia N; de Souza, Luciene S; Quinelato, Simone B; do Couto, Melissa C M; Pinheiro, Jairo; Rodrigues, M Lurdes de A

    2011-08-25

    The ecology of cyathostomin larvae was evaluated in different seasons, from July 2007 to June 2008, in the municipality of Seropédica, Rio de Janeiro state, southeastern Brazil. Samples of feces and grass were collected every 15 days at 8 AM and 5 PM and the infective larvae were recovered by the Baermann technique. Leaves of the grass Brachiaria humidicola were cut to 20 cm, which is the length containing most of the larvae. The highest number of larvae was recorded at 8 AM the winter (8300 L(3)kg(-1)dm) and spring (5300 L(3)kg(-1)dm). These results demonstrate that climate conditions can affect the recovery of larvae and that rain and temperature contributed to the migration and survival of the larvae, which were available throughout the year in the study area.

  1. Thubunaea eleodori sp. nov. (Nematoda: Physalopteridae) from Liolaemus eleodori (Sauria: Liolaemidae) from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Ramallo, Geraldine; Goldberg, Stephen; Bursey, Charles; Castillo, Gabriel; Acosta, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Thubunaea eleodori sp. nov. is described from the stomach of Liolaemus eleodori (Sauria: Liolaemidae) from San Guillermo National Park, Province of San Juan, Argentina. T. eleodori is most similar to those species lacking spicules, T. cnemidophorus, T. fitsimonsi, T. parkeri, T. schukurovi, and T. smogorzhewskii. T. eleodori is separated from these species based on the papilla pattern. T. eleodori has 12 pedunculate papillae and 14 sessile papillae, T. smogorzhewskii lacks pedunculate papillae, T. fitsimonsi and T. parkeri lack sessile papillae, and T. cnemidophorus has14-16 pedunculate papillae and 12 sessile papillae. T. eleodori represents the first member of the genus to be reported from Argentina.

  2. Dioctophyme renale (Nematoda: Enoplida) in domestic dogs and cats in the extreme south of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rappeti, Josaine Cristina da Silva; Mascarenhas, Carolina Siqueira; Perera, Soliane Carra; Müller, Gertrud; Grecco, Fabiane Borelli; Silva, Luísa Mariano Cerqueira da; Sapin, Carolina da Fonseca; Rausch, Stella Falkenberg; Cleff, Marlete Brum

    2016-12-01

    Dioctophyme renale is a zoonotic nematode that parasites the kidneys of wild and domestic carnivores, and it has been reported frequently in Brazil. The aim here was to register the number of cases of dogs and cats diagnosed with dioctophymosis by necropsy (1981 to 2014) and ultrasound examination (2010 to 2015) in Pelotas-RS. In this context, a survey was conducted on dioctophymosis cases diagnosed at the Veterinary Pathology Laboratory (LPV) and Veterinary Clinical Hospital (HCV) of the Federal University of Pelotas (UFPel), and at a specialist veterinary imaging diagnostics clinic. In total, 95 cases were registered. The high series of the disease in dogs can be related to the presence of a large number of stray and semi-domestic dogs in the city, and also due to the ingestion of intermediate hosts of D. renale parasitized with the infective larvae. Thus, it can be concluded that Pelotas is a city with favorable conditions for the occurrence of dioctophymosis with high rate of disease in recent years.

  3. Two new species of Rhabdochona (Nematoda: Rhabdochonidae) from freshwater fishes in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Moravec, Frantisek; Yooyen, Thanapon

    2011-09-01

    Two new species ofrhabdochonid nematodes are described from the intestine of freshwater fishes in Chiang Mai Province, northern Thailand: Rhabdochona (Rhabdochona) pseudomysti sp. n. from the catfish Pseudomystus siamensis (Regan) (Bagridae, Siluriformes) in the Fang Brook, a tributary of the Kok River (the Mekong River basin), Fang District and Rhabdochona (Globochona) thaiensis sp. n. from the cyprinid Mystacoleucus marginatus (Valenciennes) (Cyprinidae, Cypriniformes) in the Ping River (the Chao Phraya River basin), Muang District. Rhabdochona pseudomysti is mainly characterized by simple, leaf-like oval deirids (a unique feature among Rhabdochona spp.), a prostom with 14 anterior teeth, the presence of basal prostomal teeth, the length ratio of the muscular and glandular portions of oesophagus (1:2.1-2.6), an unusually long left spicule (1.10-1.22 mm), length ratio of spicules (1:11.5-14.7), arrangement of genital papillae, and conspicuously elevated vulval lips. Rhabdochona thaiensis differs from other representatives of the subgenus Globochona Moravec, 1972 possessing caudal projections on the tail tip in that it has only 2 claw-shaped projections located ventrally on the tail tip of both males and females; the species is mainly characterized by the presence of distinct pseudolabia, 8 anterior prostomal teeth, absence of basal teeth, bifurcated deirids, length ratio of the muscular and glandular portions of oesophagus (1:11.3-11.9), conspicuously short (135-141 microm) left spicule, arrangement of genital papillae, and somewhat elevated vulval lips. Fully developed eggs of R. pseudomysti and R. thaiensis remain unknown. These are the first nominal species of Rhabdochona reported from Thailand.

  4. Molecular and morphological comparison of two different types of Habronema muscae (Nematoda: Habronematidae) in horse.

    PubMed

    Rakhshandehroo, Ehsan; Sharifiyazdi, Hassan; Shayegh, Hossein; Ahmadi, Amin

    2014-12-01

    Habronema muscae is a spirurid nematode that undergoes developmental stages in the stomach of equids, causing chronic catarrhal gastritis. Despite preceding investigations have developed polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assays for molecular diagnosis, we aimed to assess the applicability of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) sequences to identify the H. muscae infection and to assess the level of intraspecific variations in this parasite obtained from affected horses in Southern Iran. According to the morphological characterizations, two different isolates of H. muscae were identified. Although the majority of the recovered specimens had normal characterizations of H. muscae, a number of parasites showed an abnormal feature as large, asymmetrical, and thick cuticular extensions was observed at their anterior end (head region) in gross and histologic examinations. Unexpectedly, molecular assay disclosed that both morphologically distinct samples were completely identical to each other based on cox1 sequence. Multiple alignment of the cox1 amino acid sequences showed that all polymorphism sites were silent. Also, phylogenetic analysis provided strong support that H. muscae form a sister group to Spirocerca lupi and Thelazia callipaeda.

  5. Surgical extraction of intraocular Parelaphostrongylus tenuis (Nematoda: Metastrongyloidea) in a horse

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Case Description – A 4-year-old Hanoverian horse from Wisconsin presented for evaluation of a worm-like structure in the anterior chamber of the right eye. Clinical Findings – Ophthalmic examination of the right eye revealed a white, thin, mobile parasite, presumably a nematode, present in the ventr...

  6. Two new species of Chromadoridae (Chromadorida: Nematoda) from the East China Sea.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong; Gao, Qun

    2016-07-26

    Two new species of Chromadoridae, a family of free-living marine nematodes, are described from intertidal sediments of the East China Sea. Ptycholaimellus pirus sp. nov. is characterized by having a cuticle with six longitudinal rows of double dots and long somatic setae, relatively long cephalic setae, a pear-shaped terminal pharyngeal bulb occupying less than 30% of pharyngeal length, and an elongate conical tail. The new species is distinguished from all related species by the unique character of the cuticle, with six longitudinal rows of horizontal double dots, and the pear-shaped terminal pharyngeal bulb. Hypodontolaimus ventrapophyses sp. nov. is characterized by having a cylindrical body with a slightly expanded anterior end and a conical tail, a homogeneous cuticle with lateral differentiation of two longitudinal rows of larger dots, a well developed pharynx with oval-shaped buccal bulb and terminal bulb, and a large ventral gland. Males have slender, strongly curved spicules and a gubernaculum with a ventral apophysis, and precloacal supplements are absent. The new species differs from all related species in this genus by the structure of the gubernaculum, which has a ventral apophysis.

  7. Morphological and molecular characterization of Pratylenchus lentis n. sp. (Nematoda: Pratylenchidae) from Sicily

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pratylenchus lentis n. sp. parasitizing roots of lentil in Sicily, Italy, is described and illustrated. The new species is characterized by a high lip region with three annuli, stylet mean length of 16 micrometers with anteriorly flattened knobs, cylindrical body with a relatively anterior vulva, l...

  8. Description of Schistonchus altissimus n. sp. (Nematoda: Aphelenchoididae), an associate of Ficus altissima in China.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yongsan; Ye, Weimin; Huang, Jianghua; Li, Changhui; Giblin-Davis, Robin M

    2013-01-01

    A new nematode species was recovered from the syconia of Ficus altissima from the residential area of Huajingxincheng, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, China during a survey of nematode diversity. Schistonchus altissimus n. sp. is characterised by having females with a short post-uterine sac, an ovoid spermatheca and a conoid tail with a mucron in the female, excretory pore located near the lip; and males with amoeboid sperm, a conoid tail without a mucron and three pairs of subventral papillae, no gubernaculum, and hook-shaped spicules with a cucullus and a thorn-shaped rostrum. Schistonchus altissimus n. sp. is typologically differentiated from all other described species in this genus, except for S. microcarpus, by having a spicule with cucullus on the male tail tip. Schistonchus altissimus n. sp. is easily differentiated from other sequenced species by the partial small subunit rRNA gene (SSU), D3 expansion segment of the large subunit rRNA gene (LSU) and mitochondrial DNA subunit I (mtCOI). Phylogenetic analysis with partial SSU sequences suggests that S. altissimus n. sp. is in a highly supported monophyletic clade with two Chinese species (S. microcarpus and S. centerae) and two neotropical species (S. aureus and Schistonchus sp. ex Ficus colubrinae Standl.). Based on inferences using LSU D3 sequence data, S. altissimus n. sp. has a closer relationship with four Chinese species (S. centerae, S. fistulosus, S. guangzhouensis and S. microcarpus) than with S. hirtus and S. superbus, also from China.

  9. Resolving phylogenetic incongruence to articulate homology and phenotypic evolution: a case study from Nematoda

    PubMed Central

    Ragsdale, Erik J.; Baldwin, James G.

    2010-01-01

    Modern morphology-based systematics, including questions of incongruence with molecular data, emphasizes analysis over similarity criteria to assess homology. Yet detailed examination of a few key characters, using new tools and processes such as computerized, three-dimensional ultrastructural reconstruction of cell complexes, can resolve apparent incongruence by re-examining primary homologies. In nematodes of Tylenchomorpha, a parasitic feeding phenotype is thus reconciled with immediate free-living outgroups. Closer inspection of morphology reveals phenotypes congruent with molecular-based phylogeny and points to a new locus of homology in mouthparts. In nematode models, the study of individually homologous cells reveals a conserved modality of evolution among dissimilar feeding apparati adapted to divergent lifestyles. Conservatism of cellular components, consistent with that of other body systems, allows meaningful comparative morphology in difficult groups of microscopic organisms. The advent of phylogenomics is synergistic with morphology in systematics, providing an honest test of homology in the evolution of phenotype. PMID:20106846

  10. Paratylenchus shenzhenensis n. sp. (Nematoda: Paratylenchinae) from the rhizosphere soil of Anthurium andraeanum in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Xie, Hui; Li, Yu; Xu, Chun-Ling; Yu, Lu; Wang, Dong-Wei

    2013-12-18

    Paratylenchus shenzhenensis n. sp. was collected from the rhizosphere soil of Anthurium andraeanum in Shenzhen, Guangdong Province, China. The new species is characterized by having a female with a small body (249-302 μm), well developed stylet (17-21 μm), rounded head with four submedian lobes and lip-region with a slight depression at the oral area, small post-vulval uterine sac with a few vestigial cells; male with body dorsally curved behind the cloacal opening, stylet absent, pharynx degenerate, prominent penial sheath; and juveniles with a stylet. It is morphologically similar to P. minutus. The internal transcribed spacer sequences of ribosomal DNA (ITS-rDNA) of the new species only have 72-73% identity with P. minutus, confirming its status as a separate species. The D2/D3 region of 28S ribosomal DNA (28S rDNA) and 18S small subunit ribosomal DNA (18S rDNA) from P. shenzhenensis n. sp. were also amplified and sequenced in this study. 

  11. COI haplotype groups in Mesocriconema (Nematoda: Criconematidae) and their morphospecies associations.

    PubMed

    Powers, T O; Bernard, E C; Harris, T; Higgins, R; Olson, M; Lodema, M; Mullin, P; Sutton, L; Powers, K S

    2014-07-03

    Without applying an a priori bias for species boundaries, specimen identities in the plant-parasitic nematode genus Mesocriconema were evaluated by examining mitochondrial COI nucleotide sequences, morphology, and biogeography. A total of 242 specimens that morphologically conformed to the genus were individually photographed, measured, and amplified by a PCR primer set to preserve the linkage between specimen morphology and a specific DNA barcode sequence. Specimens were extracted from soil samples representing 45 locations across 23 ecoregions in North America. Dendrograms constructed by neighbor-joining, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian Inference using a 721-bp COI barcode were used to group COI haplotypes. Each tree-building approach resulted in 24 major haplotype groups within the dataset. The distinctiveness of these groups was evaluated by node support, genetic distance, absence of intermediates, and several measures of distinctiveness included in software used for the exploration of species boundaries. Five of the 24 COI haplotype groups corresponded to morphologically characterized, Linnaean species. Morphospecies conforming to M. discus, Discocriconemella inarata, M. rusticum, M. onoense, and M. kirjanovae were represented by groups composed of multiple closely related or identical COI haplotypes. In other cases, morphospecies names could be equally applied to multiple haplotype groups that were genetically distant from each other. Identification based on morphology alone resulted in M. curvatum and M. ornatum species designations applied to seven and three groups, respectively. Morphological characters typically used for species level identification were demonstrably variable within haplotype groups, suggesting caution in assigning species names based on published compendia that solely consider morphological characters. Morphospecies classified as M. xenoplax formed a monophyletic group composed of seven genetically distinct COI subgroups. The species Discocriconemella inarata is transferred to Mesocriconema inaratum based on its phylogenetic position on the COI tree as well as previous phylogenetic analyses using 18S, ITS1, and cytochrome b nucleotide sequences. This study indicates that some of the species considered cosmopolitan in their distribution are actually multispecies polyphyletic groupings and an accurate assessment of Mesocriconema species distributions will benefit from molecular determination of haplotype relationships. The groups revealed by COI analysis should provide a useful framework for the evaluation of additional Mesocriconema species and will improve the reliability of designating taxonomic units in studies of nematode biodiversity. 

  12. Guide to the Parasites of Fishes of Canada Part V: Nematoda.

    PubMed

    Arai, Hisao P; Smith, John W

    2016-11-08

    Keys are provided for the identification of the nematode species known to be parasites of Canadian fishes. The nematodes are described and illustrated, with a note of the site(s) they occupy in named fish host(s) and their geographical distribution. Parasite records are given by author and date, full details of which can be found in a bibliography of over 800 references. Diagnoses and keys for 22 Families, 47 genera and 88 species of nematodes are also given, together with a glossary of terms, a host-parasite list, and indices to both nematode parasites and hosts.

  13. Two new species of Parasaveljevia Wieser, 1953 (Thoracostomopsidae, Nematoda) from Argentinean coasts (Chubut, Argentina).

    PubMed

    Pastor, Catalina; Lo Russo, Virginia; Villares, Gabriela

    2015-10-06

    Two new Parasavaljevia species are described, one from Puerto Madryn, and one from El Límite beach, San Jorge Gulf, Chubut Province, Argentina. The two species are characterised by a combination of characters. Parasavaljevia uncinoa n. sp. is characterised by having a long rectangular cirrus, positioned at the level of the inner labial setae, rectangular mandibles with prominent lateral hooks bearing denticles in three lines of nine each, and six cephalic setae of the same length, inserted at the anterior end of a small head capsule. Parasavaljevia limitense n. sp. is characterized by having a cirrus posterior positioned, between the labial and cephalic setae, rectangular-arched mandibles bearing denticles in five lines of ten each in a gradient of sizes; a small buccal cavity, small cephalic capsule and abundant cervical setae (4+10). An emendation of the genus diagnosis and a new key are given and discussed.

  14. Pterygodermatites (Paucipectines) baiomydis n. sp. (Nematoda: Rictulariidae), a parasite of Baiomys taylori (Cricetidae)

    PubMed Central

    Lynggaard, Christina; García-Prieto, Luis; Guzmán-Cornejo, Carmen; Osorio-Sarabia, David

    2014-01-01

    Pterygodermatites (Paucipectines) baiomydis n. sp., an intestinal parasite of the northern pygmy mouse, Baiomys taylori (Cricetidae), collected in La Yerbabuena, Colima, Mexico, is described herein. Specimens were studied using light and scanning electronic microscopy. This is the 19th species of the subgenus Paucipectines described worldwide and the fourth collected in Mexico. It is differentiated from the remaining species in the subgenus by having 25 perioral denticles, arranged in a triangle (seven on each lateroventral margin, and eleven on the dorsal margin), and 10 pairs of caudal papillae. PMID:25375029

  15. Steinernema poinari sp. n. (Nematoda: Steinernematidae) a new entomopathogenic nematode from the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Mráček, Zdeněk; Nermuť, Jiří

    2014-02-03

    A new steinernematid nematode, herein described as Steinernema poinari sp. n., was recovered by baiting soil samples with the last instar wax moth larvae Galleria mellonella in three localities of southwest Bohemia, Czech Republic. Morphological and molecular data confirmed this nematode as a new species which belongs to the affine/intermedium group. S. poinari sp. n. was characterized by male, female and infective juvenile morphological observations. Male spicules are robust with a pointed tip, SW% = 109 (98-123) and GS% = 70 (58-87). The tail terminus of the first generation have a papillated mucron, whereas in the second generation a short filamentous mucron sometimes develops. Females of the first generation have a moderately protruding vulva, postanal swelling absent or slightly developed. Second generation females have a long filamentous mucron on the tail tip. Infective juvenile have a body length of 768 µm, lateral field formula 2, 5, 6, 5, 2, 1, ratio D% of 46 (40-55), E% of 84 (76-95) and H% of 50 (43-56). The new species was characterized by sequences of ITS and D2D3 regions of ribosomal DNA. S. poinari sp. n. can also be separated from S. affine and S. intermedium by cross-breeding tests.

  16. Re-description of Craspodema reflectans (Nematoda, Cyatholaimidae) using confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Semprucci, Federica; Burattini, Sabrina

    2015-06-12

    Craspodema reflectans, erected by Gerlach 1964, is here re-described from some specimens recently found in the Maldivian archipelago and the implication of the new findings for the taxonomy of the Craspodema genus is discussed. Accordingly, an emended diagnosis of Craspodema genus and C. reflectans species are proposed. New data are also provided with the aid of the confocal laser scanning microscopy, using the natural fluorescence of the nematodes. The approach described here lays new foundations for the study of Museum collection material and it may be decisive for capture of new morphological details.

  17. Host status and damage potential of Paratrichodorus renifer and Pratylenchus penetrans (Nematoda) to blueberry (Vaccinium spp.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Stubby root nematodes (Paratrichodorus species) and root lesion nematodes (Pratylenchus species) have been associated with blueberry in most blueberry-growing regions of North America. Relatively little is known, however, of the host status and pathogenicity of these nematodes to blueberry. We per...

  18. The complete mitochondrial genome of Koerneria sudhausi (Diplogasteromorpha: Nematoda) supports monophyly of Diplogasteromorpha within Rhabditomorpha.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeho; Kim, Jiyeon; Nadler, Steven A; Park, Joong-Ki

    2016-05-01

    Testing hypotheses of monophyly for different nematode groups in the context of broad representation of nematode diversity is central to understanding the patterns and processes of nematode evolution. Herein sequence information from mitochondrial genomes is used to test the monophyly of diplogasterids, which includes an important nematode model organism. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Koerneria sudhausi, a representative of Diplogasteromorpha, was determined and used for phylogenetic analyses along with 60 other nematode species. The mtDNA of K. sudhausi is comprised of 16,005 bp that includes 36 genes (12 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and 22 transfer RNA genes) encoded in the same direction. Phylogenetic trees inferred from amino acid and nucleotide sequence data for the 12 protein-coding genes strongly supported the sister relationship of K. sudhausi with Pristionchus pacificus, supporting Diplogasteromorpha. The gene order of K. sudhausi is identical to that most commonly found in members of the Rhabditomorpha + Ascaridomorpha + Diplogasteromorpha clade, with an exception of some tRNA translocations. Both the gene order pattern and sequence-based phylogenetic analyses support a close relationship between the diplogasterid species and Rhabditomorpha. The nesting of the two diplogasteromorph species within Rhabditomorpha is consistent with most molecular phylogenies for the group, but inconsistent with certain morphology-based hypotheses that asserted phylogenetic affinity between diplogasteromorphs and tylenchomorphs. Phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial genome sequences strongly supports monophyly of the diplogasteromorpha.

  19. A new species of the genus Discolaimus Cobb, 1913 (Nematoda: Dorylaimida: Qudsianematidae) from Qinghai, China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen-Jia; Yan, Lin; Xu, Chun-Ling; Wang, Ke; Jin, Sheng-Ying; Xie, Hui

    2016-03-07

    A new species of the family Qudsianematidae Jairajpuri, 1965 collected from soil from Qinghai Province, China is described as Discolaimus anemaqen n. sp. It is mainly characterized by having a disc-like lip region with six labial sectors separated by six Y-shaped radial grooves; amphid fovea an inverted-stirrup shape; odontostyle aperture 53-59% of its length; anterior part of pharynx with two swellings, basal part expanded gradually with a sheath of tissue visible ventrally and at the base; no groups of large cells observed in cardiac region; female genital system amphidelphic; tail dorsally convex, conoid, with flat ventral side and bluntly rounded terminus, and males not found. The new species is close to D. major Thorne, 1939, D. similis Thorne, 1939 and D. silvicolus Sauer & Annells, 1985 in most measurements, but can be differentiated from them by lip morphology, pharynx structure, body size, and tail shape. A key to the species of Discolaimus is also provided.

  20. Heth impalutiensis n. sp. (Nematoda: Ransomnematoidea: Hethidae) a millipede parasite from Central Mindanao, Philippines.

    PubMed

    Malysheva, Svetlana V; Mohagan, Alma B; Spiridonov, Sergei E

    2015-03-04

    The nematode Heth impalutiensis n. sp. is described from an unidentified spirostreptid millipede (Harpagophoridae) from the Bukidnon Province of Mindanao, the Philippines. Based on morphological characters, H. impalutiensis n. sp. is closest to Asian-Pacific representatives of the genus. Females of H. impalutiensis n. sp. are close to H. dimorphum and H. vietnamensis in body size and form of the lateral lappets, but can be distinguished by the significantly longer tail. Males of H. impalutiensis n. sp. strongly resemble that of H. xaniophora by the presence of such a rare character combinations as mammiform papillae and a bursa-like cuticular fold, but can be easily differentiated by the numbers of genital papillae (7 vs 6 pairs, respectively). Heth impalutiensis n. sp. can be distinguished from all nominal species by hypertrophy of the anterior anal lip in females which overlaps the anal aperture. Phylogenetic analysis based on the newly obtained set of sequences did not provide an evidence of infraorder Rhigonematomorpha monophyly as two superfamilies Ransomnematoidea and Rhigonematoidea formed independent clades in the frames of ascaridid-spirurid-oxyurid super clade (Clade III of Nadler et al., 2007).

  1. Survey of entomopathogenic nematodes from the families Steinernematidae and Heterorhabditidae (Nematoda: Rhabditida) in Colima, Mexico

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A survey of entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN) in the Families Steinernematidae and Heterorhabditidae was conducted on the coast of the State of Colima, Mexico, to determine their occurrence, recovery frequency, and predominant plant species in disturbed and undisturbed habitats. Nineteen soil samples...

  2. The diet of Enoplus brevis (Nematoda) in a supralittoral salt marsh of the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellwig-Armonies, Monika; Armonies, Werner; Lorenzen, Sievert

    1991-09-01

    The gut content of nearly 2000 specimens of Enoplus brevis was quantitatively analysed. E. brevis is an opportunistic omnivore. Main food categories found were cyanobacteria, diatoms, oligochaetes, nematodes, and rotifers. With a few exceptions, the diet of females and males was identical. Predominantly, juveniles fed on cyanobacteria and adults on animal prey. Experiments revealed that living oligochaetes are attacked and preyed upon. The quantities of the food categories eaten by Enoplus varied according to their ambient abundance, both temporarily and spatially on a small scale. At least the nematode prey was strongly selected: some species were significantly preferred and others avoided.

  3. Paragnomoxyala gen. nov. (Xyalidae, Monhysterida, Nematoda) from the East China Sea.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Weijun; Huang, Yong

    2015-11-05

    A new genus, Paragnomoxyala gen. nov., and a new species, Paragnomoxyala breviseta sp. nov. are described from the East China Sea. Paragnomoxyala gen. nov. is characterized by having large funnel-shaped buccal cavity with cuticularized walls and extended anteriorly; lips very high; striated cuticle; four cephalic setae, absence of outer labial setae; circular amphidial fovea; straight spicules and absence of gubernaculum; tail conico-cylindrical with three terminal setae; female monodelphic with an anterior outstretched ovary. It differs from similar genera by having a large buccal cavity unique in Xyalidae, straight spicules, lacking gubernaculum, and conico-cylindrical tail with terminal setae. Paragnomoxyala breviseta sp. nov. is characterized by having a large funnel-shaped buccal cavity, with cuticularized walls and extended anteriorly, 1.6-1.8 hd long and 63-79% cbd wide; four cephalic setae 3-4 µm long; circular amphids 6-9 µm in diameter; spicules straight but slightly bent at both ends; absence of gubernaculum and precloacal supplement.

  4. Transcriptomic analysis of the rice white tip nematode, Aphelenchoides besseyi (Nematoda: Aphelenchoididae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Li, Danlei; Wang, Zhiying; Dong, Airong; Liu, Lihong; Wang, Buyong; Chen, Qiaoli; Liu, Xiaohan

    2014-01-01

    The rice white tip nematode Aphelenchoides besseyi, a devastating nematode whose genome has not been sequenced, is distributed widely throughout almost all the rice-growing regions of the world. The aims of the present study were to define the transcriptome of A. besseyi and to identify parasite-related, mortality-related or host resistance-overcoming genes in this nematode. Using Solexa/Illumina sequencing, we profiled the transcriptome of mixed-stage populations of A. besseyi. A total of 51,270 transcripts without gaps were produced based on high-quality clean reads. Of all the A. besseyi transcripts, 9,132 KEGG Orthology assignments were annotated. Carbohydrate-active enzymes of glycoside hydrolases (GHs), glycosyltransferases (GTs), carbohydrate esterases (CEs) and carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) were identified. The presence of the A. besseyi GH45 cellulase gene was verified by in situ hybridization. Given that 13 unique A. besseyi potential effector genes were identified from 41 candidate effector homologs, further studies of these homologs are merited. Finally, comparative analyses were conducted between A. besseyi contigs and Caenorhabditis elegans genes to look for orthologs of RNAi phenotypes, neuropeptides and peptidases. The present results provide comprehensive insight into the genetic makeup of A. besseyi. Many of this species' genes are parasite related, nematode mortality-related or necessary to overcome host resistance. The generated transcriptome dataset of A. besseyi reported here lays the foundation for further studies of the molecular mechanisms related to parasitism and facilitates the development of new control strategies for this species.

  5. Two new species of Oswaldocruzia (Nematoda, Molineidae) parasitising lizards in Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Svitin, Roman

    2017-05-09

    Two new species, Oswaldocruzia lisnykiensis sp. n. and Oswaldocruzia lacertica sp. n., are described from Anguis fragilis L. (Reptilia: Anquidae) and Lacerta agilis L. (Reptilia: Lacertidae) respectively. Both species belong to the Palaearctic group of species which have spicules divided in three main branches (blade, fork and shoe) with fork division above its distal third. The new species differs from all previously known Palaearctic species by several morphological characters: type of caudal bursa (type III in O. lisnykiensis and type I in O. lacertica), shape of spicules (blade distally divided into four tips and specific shape of shoe) and synlophe structure (narrow cervical alae consist of three crests in both species). Illustrated descriptions of O. lisnykiensis and O. lacertica based on 63 and 38 specimens respectively are presented. Host specificity and geographical distribution of the species are discussed. O. dispar is considered as a species inquirenda.

  6. The Distribution of Lectins across the Phylum Nematoda: A Genome-Wide Search.

    PubMed

    Bauters, Lander; Naalden, Diana; Gheysen, Godelieve

    2017-01-04

    Nematodes are a very diverse phylum that has adapted to nearly every ecosystem. They have developed specialized lifestyles, dividing the phylum into free-living, animal, and plant parasitic species. Their sheer abundance in numbers and presence in nearly every ecosystem make them the most prevalent animals on earth. In this research nematode-specific profiles were designed to retrieve predicted lectin-like domains from the sequence data of nematode genomes and transcriptomes. Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins that play numerous roles inside and outside the cell depending on their sugar specificity and associated protein domains. The sugar-binding properties of the retrieved lectin-like proteins were predicted in silico. Although most research has focused on C-type lectin-like, galectin-like, and calreticulin-like proteins in nematodes, we show that the lectin-like repertoire in nematodes is far more diverse. We focused on C-type lectins, which are abundantly present in all investigated nematode species, but seem to be far more abundant in free-living species. Although C-type lectin-like proteins are omnipresent in nematodes, we have shown that only a small part possesses the residues that are thought to be essential for carbohydrate binding. Curiously, hevein, a typical plant lectin domain not reported in animals before, was found in some nematode species.

  7. Oncholaimus zhangi sp. nov. (Oncholaimidae, Nematoda) from the intertidal zone of the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Qun; Huang, Yong

    2017-09-01

    A new species of free-living marine nematode is described from intertidal sediment of the East China Sea. The new species belongs to the Oncholaimidae family. Oncholaimus zhangi sp. nov. is characterized by males having a large ventral swelling situated just posterior to the middle of the tail, no precloacal papilla, and a row of 6-7 ventral genital setae. The tails of both males and females are similar, being conico-cylindrical in shape. The new species is distinguished from other closely related species by the presence of a prominent ventral swelling at the tail of males and a similar tail shape in both sexes. About 110 valid species in this genus have been recorded to date.

  8. Fecundity of various species of strongylids (Nematoda: Strongylidae)--parasites of domestic horses.

    PubMed

    Kuzmina, T A; Lyons, E T; Tolliver, S C; Dzeverin, I I; Kharchenko, V A

    2012-12-01

    The aims of the study were to determine fecundity of several strongylid species parasitizing domestic horses and analyze possible relations between numbers of eggs in female uteri and size of both the eggs and the nematodes as well as the influence of fecundity on proportion of species in the strongylid community. Twenty-five specimens from each of 15 strongylid species (Strongylus vulgaris, Strongylus edentatus, Triodontophorus serratus, Triodontophorus brevicauda, Triodontophorus tenuicollis, Cyathostomum catinatum, Coronocyclus coronatus, Cylicocyclus nassatus, Cylicocyclus insigne, Cylicocyclus leptostomus, Cylicostephanus calicatus, Cylicostephanus goldi, Cylicostephanus longibursatus, Cylicostephanus minutus, and Poteriostomum imparidentatum) collected after necropsy were studied. The reproductive system was extracted from the female body; all eggs were removed, counted, and measured under a light microscope. Significant differences in number of eggs in female uteri of various strongylid species were observed (Kruskal-Wallis test, p < 0.001); the least numbers of eggs were registered in C. longibursatus (average = 49) and C. leptostomus (63) and the largest number in S. edentatus (5,918). Significant correlation between nematode body size and number of eggs was observed (p < 0.001). Correlation between size of eggs and body size was insignificant (Spearman R = 0.11, p = 0.70). Negative correlation was observed between number of eggs in female uteri and proportion of these species in strongylid community (Spearman R = -0.78, p < 0.001). Multiple linear regression of species proportion in the community on three predictors (number of eggs, body size, and egg size) was not significant (p > 0.05). However, the question on influence of fecundity on proportion of species in strongylid community needs further studies.

  9. Swedish Plectida (Nematoda). Part 4. The genus Leptolaimus de Man, 1876.

    PubMed

    Holovachov, Oleksandr; Boström, Sven

    2013-11-25

    Twelve known and nine new species of Leptolaimus are described from bottom sediments collected in marine habitats of Sweden, including the Bothnian Sea and Bothnian Bay, the Baltic Sea proper, Gullmarn Fjord and the Skagerrak. Three of these species have been previously recorded in Sweden while nine are new records for the Swedish fauna. The following known species are redescribed: Leptolaimus papilliger de Man, 1876, L. cupulatus Lorenzen, 1972, L. danicus Jensen, 1978, L. donsi (Allgén, 1946) comb. n., L. mixtus Lorenzen, 1972, L. pellucidus (Southern, 1914) comb. n., L. venustus Lorenzen, 1972, L. lorenzeni (Boucher & de Bovée, 1972) comb. n., L. alatus Vitiello, 1971, L. macer Lorenzen, 1972, L. septempapillatus Platt, 1973, L. elegans (Schuurmans Stekhoven & De Coninck, 1933) Gerlach, 1958. Leptolaimus primus sp. n. is characterised by the 319-472 µm long body; rounded labial region continuous with body contour; cephalic setae 1.5-2.0 µm long; amphid located 7.0-11.5 µm from anterior end; first body pore located 18.5-28.0 µm from anterior end; lateral field originating 35 µm from anterior end; female without supplements, vagina without pars refringens, vulva midventral; male without tubular and with four alveolar supplements, alveolar supplements without sclerotized inner ring; spicules arcuate and 13.5-16.0 µm long. Leptolaimus secundus sp. n. is characterised by the 576-645 µm long body; rounded labial region continuous with body contour; cephalic setae 2.0 µm long; amphid located 6.5-7.0 µm from anterior end; first body pore located 23.0-28.5 µm from anterior end; lateral field originating 18.0-23.0 µm from anterior end; female without supplements, vagina without pars refringens, vulva midventral; male with single tubular and 9-15 alveolar supplements, tubular supplement weakly arcuate with blunt tips, alveolar supplements with sclerotized lining; spicules arcuate and 23.0-26.5 µm long. Leptolaimus tertius sp. n. is characterised by the 576-579 µm long body; rounded labial region continuous with body contour; cephalic setae 2 µm long; amphid located 4-5 µm from anterior end; first body pore located 21.0-23.5 µm from anterior end; lateral field originating 26-29 µm from anterior end; male with four tubular and 7-10 alveolar supplements, tubular supplements weakly arcuate with blunt tips, alveolar supplements with sclerotized inner ring; spicules arcuate and 25-26 µm long. Leptolaimus quartus sp. n. is characterised by the 597-686 mm long body; rounded labial region continuous with body contour; cephalic setae 2.0-3.5 µm long; amphid located 5.0-7.0 µm from anterior end; first body pore located 23.5-27.0 µm from anterior end; lateral field originating 19.0-27.0 µm from anterior end; male with three tubular and 8-9 alveolar supplements, tubular supplements straight with blunt expanded tips, alveolar supplements with sclerotized inner ring; spicules arcuate and 23.0-25.0 µm long. Leptolaimus quintus sp. n. is characterised by the 443-528 µm long body; rounded labial region continuous with body contour; cephalic setae 1.0-2.0 µm long; amphid located 7.0-10.0 µm from anterior end; first body pore located 18.0-28.5 µm from anterior end; lateral field originating 25.0-41.0 µm from anterior end; female with two tubular supplements (one just posterior to cardia and one in front of anus), vagina without pars refringens, vulva right-sublateral; male with 8-10 tubular and without alveolar supplements, tubular supplements weakly arcuate with anchor-like tips; spicules arcuate and 17.0-22.0 µm long. Leptolaimus sextus sp. n. is characterised by the 626-728 µm long body; truncated labial region offset from body contour; cephalic setae 1.5-2.0 µm long; amphid located 8.0-12.0 µm from anterior end; first body pore located 41.0-48.5 µm from anterior end; lateral field originating 28.0-41.0 µm from anterior end; female without supplements, vagina without pars refringens, vulva midventral; male with five (rarely six) tubular and without alveolar supplements, tubular supplements weakly S-shaped with bifid tips; spicules arcuate and 39.0-46.0 µm long. Leptolaimus septimus sp. n. is characterised by the 679-850 µm long body; truncate labial region offset from body contour; cephalic setae 2.5-3.5 µm long; amphid located 8.5-11.5 µm from anterior end; first body pore located 37.0-44.0 µm from anterior end; lateral field originating 26.5-37.0 µm from anterior end; female without supplements, vagina without pars refringens, vulva midventral; male with four (rarely five) tubular and without alveolar supplements, tubular supplements weakly S-shaped, with bifid or blunt tips; spicules arcuate and 31.0-33.5 µm long. Leptolaimus octavus sp. n. is characterised by the 541-638 µm long body; truncate labial region continuous with body contour; cephalic setae 1.5-2.0 µm long; amphid located 8.5-12.0 µm from anterior end; first body pore located 31.5-41.0 µm from anterior end; lateral field originating 26.0-40.0 µm from anterior end and expanding into bursa-like structures along the tail; female without supplements, vagina without pars refringens, vulva midventral; male with four tubular and without alveolar supplements, tubular supplements weakly S-shaped with dentate tips; spicules arcuate and 30.0-31.5 µm long. Leptolaimus nonus sp. n. is characterised by the 403-633 µm long body; rounded labial region continuous with body contour; cephalic setae 1.5-3.0 µm long; amphid located 8.0-10.0 µm from anterior end; first body pore located 16.5-29.0 µm from anterior end; lateral field originating 47.0-99.0 µm from anterior end and expanding into bursa-like structures along the proximal part of the tail; female without supplements, vagina with bacilliform pars refringens, vulva right-subventral; male with 4-5 tubular and without alveolar supplements, tubular supplements weakly arcuate with dentate tips; spicules arcuate and 17.0-26.0 µm long. The following nomenclatorial changes are proposed: Eutelolaimus donsi Allgén, 1947 is transferred to the genus Leptolaimus, as L. donsi (Allgén, 1947) comb. n.; Halaphanolaimus cangionensis Gagarin & Nguyen Vu Thanh, 2007 is transferred to the genus Leptolaimus, as L. cangionensis (Gagarin & Nguyen Vu Thanh, 2007) comb. n.; Halaphanolaimus harpaga Boucher & de Bovée, 1972 is transferred to the genus Leptolaimus, as L. harpaga (Boucher & de Bovée, 1972) comb. n.; Halaphanolaimus lorenzeni Boucher & de Bovée, 1972 is transferred to the genus Leptolaimus, as L. lorenzeni (Boucher & de Bovée, 1972) comb. n.; Halaphanolaimus pellucidus Southern, 1914 is transferred to the genus Leptolaimus, as L. pellucidus (Southern, 1914) comb. n.; Halaphanolaimus rivalis Gagarin & Nguyen Vu Thanh, 2007 is transferred to the genus Leptolaimus, as L. rivalis (Gagarin & Nguyen Vu Thanh, 2007) comb. n.; Halaphanolaimus marinus Kamran, Nasira & Shahina, 2010 is transferred to the genus Leptolaimus as L. marinus (Kamran, Nasira & Shahina, 2010) comb. n. and considered a junior synonym of Leptolaimus rivalis (Gagarin & Nguyen Vu Thanh, 2007) comb. n.; Halaphanolaimus sergeevae Ürkmez & Brennan, 2013 is transferred to the genus Leptolaimus as L. sergeevae (Ürkmez & Brennan, 2013) comb. n.; Leptolaimus vitielloi nom. nov. is proposed for Leptolaimus minutus Vitiello, 1971 nec L. minutus (Schuurmans Stekhoven, 1942) comb. n.; Polylaimium exile Cobb, 1920 is transferred to the genus Leptolaimus, as L. exilis (Cobb, 1920) comb. n. and is considered species inquirendae. A taxonomic review, tabular compendium and identification key for species of the genus Leptolaimus are also given. 

  10. Swedish Plectida (Nematoda). Part 10. The genus Deontolaimus de Man, 1880.

    PubMed

    Holovachov, Oleksandr; Boström, Sven

    2015-10-28

    The genus Deontolaimus de Man, 1880 is revised and the genus Camacolaimus de Man, 1889 is considered a junior synonym of Deontolaimus based on re-examination of type material of Camacolaimus tardus de Man, 1889 and C. barbatus Warwick, 1970. Two known and three new species of Deontolaimus are described from bottom sediments collected in marine habitats of Sweden: Deontolaimus uniformis (Cobb, 1920) comb. n., D. longicauda (de Man, 1922) comb. n., Deontolaimus catalinae sp. n., D. paraguillei sp. n. and Deontolaimus timmi sp. n. Deontolaimus catalinae sp. n. is characterized by body length of 1.3-1.7 mm; anterior-most somatic sensilla located short distance posterior to amphid; cephalic sensilla equal to 0.2 labial region diameter in length; amphidial fovea ventrally-unispiral with one turn, located in front of cephalic sensilla bases; excretory pore located short distance posterior to onchiostyle base; onchiostyle with bluntly rounded tip and subcylindrical body; male with alveolar supplements extending from anterior end to middle of body, tubular supplements absent; spicules 36-40 µm long; and didelphic female reproductive system. Deontolaimus paraguillei sp. n. is characterized by body length of 1.4-1.8 mm; anterior-most somatic sensilla located at level with onchiostyle; cephalic sensilla equal to 0.2-0.3 labial region diameter in length; amphidial fovea ventrally-unispiral with one turn, located at level with cephalic sensilla bases; excretory pore located just posterior to nerve ring level; onchiostyle with bluntly rounded tip and subcylindrical body; male with alveolar supplements extending from anterior end to about three body diameters in front of cloaca, tubular supplements absent; spicules 42-46 µm long; and didelphic female reproductive system. Deontolaimus timmi sp. n. is characterized by body length of 0.7-0.9 mm; anterior-most somatic sensilla located at level with onchiostyle; cephalic sensilla equal to 0.2-0.3 labial region diameter in length; amphidial fovea ventrally-unispiral with one turn, located just in front of cephalic sensilla bases; excretory pore located just posterior to nerve ring level; onchiostyle with triangular tip with bluntly rounded apex and strongly sclerotized dorsal edge, and subcylindrical body; male with alveolar supplements extending from anterior end to anterior part of intestine, tubular supplements absent; spicules 28 µm long; and didelphic female reproductive system. The following nomenclatorial changes are proposed: genera Acontiolaimus Filipjev, 1918, Camacolaimoides De Coninck & Schuurmans Stekhoven, 1933, Camacolaimus de Man, 1889, Digitonchus Cobb, 1920 and Ypsilon Cobb, 1920 are synonimized with the genus Deontolaimus de Man, 1880; Camacolaimus reykjanesi De Coninck, 1943 and Camacolaimus glauxicola Allgén, 1951a are considered junior synonyms of Deontolaimus papillatus de Man, 1880; Camacolaimus barbatus apud Pastor de Ward, 1984 is described as the separate species Deontolaimus catalinae sp. n.; Camacolaimus tardus apud Lorenzen, 1969 is considered to be the separate species Deontolaimus lorenzeni nom. n.; Camacolaimus tardus apud Timm, 1963 is described as the separate species Deontolaimus timmi sp. n.; Camacolaimus barbatus Warwick, 1970 is considered a junior synonym of Deontolaimus tardus (de Man, 1889) comb. n.; Camacolaimus parvus Timm, 1961 is transferred to the genus Deontolaimus as D. parvus (Timm, 1961) comb. n.; Digitonchus cylindricaudatus Chitwood, 1951 is transferred to the genus Deontolaimus as D. cylindricaudatus (Chitwood, 1951) comb. n.; Ypsilon exile Cobb, 1920 is transferred to the genus Deontolaimus as D. exilis (Cobb, 1920) comb. n.; Camacolaimus guillei de Bovee, 1977 is transferred to the genus Deontolaimus as D. guillei (de Bovee, 1977) comb. n.; Camacolaimus longicauda de Man, 1922 is transferred to the genus Deontolaimus as D. longicauda (de Man, 1922) comb. n.; Camacolaimus monhystera Gerlach, 1967 is transferred to the genus Deontolaimus as D. monhystera (Gerlach, 1967) comb. n.; Camacolaimus pontollittoralis Uzunov, 1977 is transferred to the genus Deontolaimus as D. pontollittoralis (Uzunov, 1977) comb. n.; Camacolaimus praedator de Man, 1922 is transferred to the genus Deontolaimus as D. praedator (de Man, 1922) comb. n.; Camacolaimus prytherchi Chitwood, 1935 is transferred to the genus Deontolaimus as D. prytherchi (Chitwood, 1935) comb. n.; Camacolaimus tardus de Man, 1889 is transferred to the genus Deontolaimus as D. tardus (de Man, 1889) comb. n.; Camacolaimus trituberculatus Blome, 1982 is transferred to the genus Deontolaimus as D. trituberculatus (Blome, 1982) comb. n.; and Digitonchus uniformis Cobb, 1920 is transferred to the genus Deontolaimus as D. uniformis (Cobb, 1920) comb. n. A taxonomic review and identification key for species of the genus Deontolaimus are also given.

  11. Development of Ascarophis sp. (Nematoda: Cystidicolidae) to maturity in Gammarus deubeni (Amphipoda).

    PubMed

    Appy, Ralph G; Butterworth, Eric W

    2011-12-01

    Experimentally transmitted Ascarophis sp. (Spirurida) developed to adult worms in the invertebrate host, Gammarus deubeni (Amphipoda), collected in the intertidal zone in Passamaquoddy Bay, New Brunswick, Canada. The morphological development and growth of larval stages is very similar to other cystidicolids, which are found as adults in fish. Unlike virtually all other Spirurida, which require a vertebrate definitive host, infective larvae of Ascarophis sp. migrate from the invertebrate host musculature into the hemocoel where they molt twice to become adults. Gravid females appear at 80 days and 69 days post-infection at 10-12 C and 18-20 C, respectively. While there is little evident host reaction to the parasite within the muscle tissue, within the hemocoel there is hemocytic reaction to shed nematode cuticles, released eggs, and sometimes the worm itself, including some melanization. The worms are morphologically similar to Ascarophis sp. from G. oceanicus in the Baltic and White seas and among Ascarophis species from fish is most similar to A. arctica. It is suggested that Ascarophis sp. no longer requires a vertebrate host and is transmitted between amphipods either through death and disintegration of infected amphipods and dispersal of the nematode eggs, or more likely through cannibalism or necrophagy.

  12. Molineus torulosus (Nematoda, Trichostrongylina, Molineoidea) a parasite of Neotropical primates: new morphological and histological data.

    PubMed

    Durette-Desset, M C; Fribourg Blanc, L A; Vuong, P N

    2001-03-01

    Molineus torulosus (Molin, 1861) parasite of Cebus spp. from South America is redescribed in Cebus apella and C. olivecaeus (new host) from French Guyana with emphasis on the synlophe. During the maturation process, the larvae dwelt in the cysts carved alongside the external part of the small intestine. The turn-out of the mature worms and the laid eggs depended on the tissular organisation of cyst walls as the inflammatory process waned and fibrosis progressed to seal the cystic lumen. Adult worms entwine themselves in the cysts, live there permanently as their presence has never been evidenced in the intestinal lumen. They copulated, laid eggs, degenerated and died once entrapped by the fibrotic process. Laid eggs released in the intestinal lumen through a narrow channel ensured the continuation of the developmental cycle. However, erratic migration was possible via the vascular channels surrounding the cysts.

  13. The Enterobiinae subfam. Nov. (Nematoda, Oxyurida) pinworm parasites of primates and rodents.

    PubMed

    Hugot, J P; Gardner, S L; Morand, S

    1996-02-01

    Recent redescriptions of most members of the Oxyuridae Cobbold, 1864 parasitic in primates revealed that they share following derived characters: sexual dimorphism of lateral alae (single-crested in the males, double-crested in the females); in males a second pair of genital papillae always surrounded by strongly cuticularized rings; in females, uterine tube divided into 2 parts by a cellular wall forming a diaphragm. These characters are interpreted as synapomorphies, providing evidence that these taxa represent a monophyletic group, and we propose to classify them in a new subfamily of the Oxyuridae: the Enterobiinae subfam.nov. The Enterobiinae as recognized herein occurs in both Old World and New World Primates and rodents of the family Sciuridae (tribe Sciurini in the Holarctic region and tribe Xerini in the Ethiopian region). The new subfamily includes the following genera: Enterobius Leach, 1853; Colobenterobius Quentin, Betterton & Krishnasamy, 1979; Rodentoxyuris Quentin & Tenora 1974; Xeroxyuris Hugot, 1995; Lemuricola Chabaud & Petter, 1959; Protenterobius Inglis, 1961; Madoxyuris Chabaud, Brygoo & Petter, 1965; Trypanoxyuris Vevers, 1923; Hapaloxyuris Inglis & Cosgrove, 1965 and Paraoxyuronema Artigas, 1936. The genus Paraoxyuronema is revalidated as a subgenus of Trypanoxyuris due to its specialized buccal structures. This genus groups all pinworm nematodes specific for primates of the family Atelidae, including: P. brachytelesi Artigas, 1937 occurring in Brachyteles arachnoides; P. atelis (Cameron, 1929) occurring in Ateles spp., and P. duplicidens (Buckley, 1931) and P. lagothricis (Buckley, 1931), which are parasites of Lagothrix spp. Inglisoxyuris inglisi Chabaud, Petter & Golvan, 1961, included in the monospecific genus Inglisoxyuris and previously classified as a subgenus of the Lemuricola, does not share the characters of the new subfamily and, until its precise classification can be considered with more information, it is proposed to refer to this species as an Oxyuridae sensu lato. A diagnosis and a key of the genera included in the new subfamily are given.

  14. The larval development of Habronema muscae (Nematoda: Habronematidae) affects its intermediate host, Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae).

    PubMed

    Schuster, Rolf Karl; Sivakumar, Saritha

    2017-02-01

    Although the life cycle of the equid stomach parasite Habronema muscae was disclosed more than 100 years ago, little is known about the effect of the developing nematode larvae in its intermediate host, Musca domestica. In a series of experiments, freshly hatched M. domestica larvae were exposed to H. muscae eggs contained in a faecal sample of a naturally infected horse. In daily intervals, 50 fly larvae were removed and transferred on a parasite-free larval rearing medium where they completed their development. Hatched flies were examined for the presence of Habronema third-stage larvae. In two subsequent control groups, flies spend their entire larval life in contaminated horse faeces and in a parasite-free larval rearing medium, respectively. Out of the 700 fly larvae used in the infection experiments, 304 developed into adult flies of which 281 were infected. The average nematode larval burden rose from 3.6 in the group with the shortest exposure to more than 25 in the groups with the longest exposure. The proportion of larvae that developed into the adult insect fell from 82 % in the uninfected control group to 27 % in the positive control group. The pupae of the positive control group were smaller and lighter than those of the uninfected control group. Lower pupal size and weight in the positive control group as well as a lower insect developing rate might be attributed to the destruction of adipose cells in the maggots by Habronema larvae.

  15. Congenital Filariasis Caused by Setaria bidentata (Nematoda: Filarioidea) in the Red Brocket Deer (Mazama americana).

    PubMed

    Gomez-Puerta, Luis A; Mayor, Pedro

    2017-02-01

    The filarial nematode Setaria bidentata was found in 10 of 31 fetuses of the red brocket deer ( Mazama americana ) from the Loreto region of the Peruvian Amazon. A total of 25 specimens were collected and morphologically identified as S. bidentata. Filarial nematodes were found in the peritoneal cavity of 9 deer fetuses and the thoracic cavity of 1 fetus. Most specimens were adult stage. In this report, we provide morphometric data for these filarial specimens. This is the first study to demonstrate prenatal S. bidentata infection in cervid fetuses. Also, the finding of S. bidentata in Peru expands the geographic range of this parasite.

  16. Occurrence of Anisakis (Nematoda: Anisakidae) larvae in unusual hosts in Southern hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Shamsi, Shokoofeh; Briand, Marine J; Justine, Jean-Lou

    2017-08-07

    Nematodes belonging to the genus Anisakis are important parasites due to their abundance in seafood and health impacts on humans. In the present study Anisakis larvae were found in a number of uncommon hosts including the Grey petrel, Procellaria cinerea, the Little penguin, Eudyptula minor, Blue-lipped sea krait, Laticauda laticaudata and Spinner shark, Carcharhinus brevipinna. Morphological examination showed nematodes in these animals are Anisakis larval type I. Genetic characterisation suggested that the larva from one Grey petrel was Anisakis berlandi, whereas the other larvae from the second Grey petrel and from the little penguin were Anisakis pegreffii. A number of larvae found in Blue-lipped sea krait and Spinner shark were identified as Anisakis typica. This is the first report of infective stage of Anisakis larvae parasitising hosts other than teleost fish. Understanding of the extent of infection and the pathogenicity of anisakid nematodes in hosts found in the present study is important in the conservation studies and management plans of these hosts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A new species of Pterygodermatites (Nematoda: Rictulariidae) from the Incan shrew opossum, Lestoros inca.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, F Agustín; Patterson, Bruce D

    2012-06-01

    Pterygodermatites ( Paucipectines ) hymanae n. sp. (Rictulariidae) collected from the Incan shrew opossum, Lestoros inca , from Peru is described herein. These nematodes show a subapical, slightly dorsal oral opening and a laterally compressed buccal capsule with 2 conspicuous lateral walls and a dorsal wall. Each lateroventral wall possesses 4 relatively large denticles, and the dorsal wall has 6 denticles. Females are characterized by a conspicuously large postvulvar 37th spine, which may reach 1 mm. This is the first record of endoparasites in the Incan shrew opossum and the fifth species of Pterygodermatites recorded in New World marsupials.

  18. Description of Pratylenchus gutierrezi n. sp. (Nematoda: Pratylenchidae) from Coffee in Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Golden, A. Morgan; López Ch., Róger; Vílchez R., Hernán

    1992-01-01

    A lesion nematode, Pratylenchus gutierrezi n. sp., collected from the roots of coffee in the Central Plateau of Costa Rica, is described and illustrated. Its relationships to Pratylenchus flakkensis, P. similis, and P. gibbicaudatus, the only other species of the genus having two head annules, males, or spermatheca with sperm, and an annulated tail terminus, is discussed. Other distinctive characters are its posterior vulva (mean of 80%); its prominently rounded stylet knobs, low head, and subcylindrical tail. SEM observations provide additional details of females and males, especially face views, which show for the first time sexual dimorphism. PMID:19282999

  19. Taxonomic and Molecular Identification of Mesocriconema and Criconemoides Species (Nematoda: Criconematidae)

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, Marco A.; Robbins, Robert T.; Szalanski, Allen L.

    2012-01-01

    Populations of Mesocriconema curvatum, M. kirjanovae, M. onoense, M. ornatum, M. sphaerocephala, M. surinamense, M. vadense, M. xenoplax, and Criconemoides informis from different geographical areas in the continental United States were characterized morphologically and molecularly. A new ring nematode from Washington County, Arkansas, is also described and named Mesocriconema ozarkiense n. sp., This new species is characterized by females with small flattened submedian lobes, lower than or at the same level as the labial disc, vagina straight, very well developed spermatheca without sperm, no more than one anastomoses, L=379-512 μm, V=89-93, stylet length = 49-61 μm, R=107-119, annuli with slightly crenate margins on tail portion and a simple anterior vulval lip. The molecular characterization of M. ozarkiense n. sp. using the ITS rRNA gene sequence and the phylogenesis relationship of this new species with the ring nematodes included in this study are provided. PMID:23482878

  20. One new and three known species of Geocenamus Thorne & Malek, 1968
    (Nematoda: Merliniidae) from Iran.

    PubMed

    Ghaderi, Reza; Karegar, Akbar

    2016-02-11

    Soil samples collected from different plants and localities in Iran yielded one new and three known species of the genus Geocenamus with tessellated cuticle. Geocenamus conicaudatus n. sp. is characterised by a hemispherical cephalic region, set-off from the rest of body by a constriction, a slender stylet 17-20 µm long with laterally directed knobs, coarsely annulated cuticle with 32-34 longitudinal striae and a conical tail with smooth, finely rounded terminus. Morphological and molecular studies on the populations of G. paniculoides and G. tartuensis indicated that G. paniculoides may be considered as a valid species. Intraspecific variability of some characters of 30 Iranian populations of G. rugosus were studied. An identification key to 32 valid species of the genus Geocenamus is given.

  1. Laimaphelenchus hyrcanus n. sp. (Nematoda: Aphelenchoididae), a new species from northern Iran.

    PubMed

    Miraeiz, Esmaeil; Heydari, Ramin; Maafi, Zahra Tanha; Bert, Wim

    2015-02-05

    Laimaphalenchus hyrcanus n. sp., from bark samples of cypress (Cupressus sp.) and jujube (Ziziphus jujube Miller) from Gorgan, Golestan province in northern Iran, is described and illustrated based on morphological and molecular characters. The new species is characterized by females with 670-870 μm body length, slender stylet of 11-12 µm, six-lobed cephalic region not divided by ribs, three incisures in the lateral field with slightly areolated outer lines in the posterior region, cuticular vulval flap, males with two pairs of caudal papillae, and subcylindrical tail in both sexes ending in a single stalk-like terminus with four pedunculate tubercles bearing 9-10 finger-like projections. The new species most closely resembles L. persicus and L. penardi but it can be differentiated by its having three incisures in the lateral field and two pairs of caudal papillae in males. Molecular analysis of the D2/D3 region of the 28S ribosomal RNA gene indicates a sister-taxon relationship with L. penardi (Steiner, 1914) Filipjev & Schuurmans Stekhoven, 1941 and L. deconincki Elmiligy & Geraert, 1972. 

  2. Rotylenchus castilloi n. sp. (Nematoda: Hoplolaimidae), a new species with long stylet from northern Iran.

    PubMed

    Talezari, Atefeh; Pourjam, Ebrahim; Kheiri, Ahmad; Liébanas, Gracia; Aliramaji, Farzad; Pedram, Majid; Rezaee, Saeed; Atighi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-03-11

    Rotylenchus castilloi n. sp., a new bisexual species is described and illustrated based on morphological, morphometric and molecular data. The new species is characterised by having a hemispherical, continuous lip region with an irregular corncob-like appearance under SEM, very long stylet (62-68 µm), vulva located at 49.7-62.2% of body length from anterior end, with a protruding double epiptygma, a rounded to convex-conoid (rarely bi-lobed) tail with 8-12 annuli and specific sequences of D2-D3 segments of 28S and ITS1-rRNA genes. Differences between the new species and four other species of the genus (R. mesorobustus, R. cazorlaensis, R. magnus and R. jaeni) are discussed. Morphologically, the new species can be separated from these species mostly by its body length, lip region characters, stylet length and location of phasmid. Phylogenetic analyses using 721 bp partial sequences of D2-D3 expansion segments of the 28S and 590 bp ITS1-rRNA genes revealed the new species forming a clade with two isolates of R. eximius and two isolates of R. unisexus, two morphologically unrelated species.

  3. Does scavenging extend the host range of entomopathogenic nematodes (Nematoda: Steinernematidae)?

    PubMed

    Půza, Vladimír; Mrácek, Zdenĕk

    2010-05-01

    Living and freeze-killed natural and laboratory hosts, with different susceptibility to entomopathogenic nematodes, were exposed to the larvae of Steinernema affine and Steinernema kraussei in two different experimental arenas (Eppendorf tubes, Petri dishes), and the success of the colonisation and eventual progeny production were observed. Both nematodes were able to colonise both living and dead larvae of Galleria mellonella (Lepidoptera) and adult Blatella germanica (Blattodea) even though the progeny production in dead hosts was lower on average. Living carabid beetles, Poecilus cupreus, and elaterid larvae (Coleoptera) were resistant to the infection, however, both nematodes were able to colonise and multiply in several dead P. cupreus and in a majority of dead elaterid larvae. By scavenging, EPNs can utilise cadavers of insects that are naturally resistant to EPN infection, and so broaden their host range.

  4. Morphological and histochemical observations on the intestinal epithelium of Ascardia galli (Nematoda: Ascaridida).

    PubMed

    Parshad, V R; Guraya, S S

    1978-06-30

    The intestinal epithelium of Ascardia galli has been studied with various cytological and cytochemical techniques. It consists of large epithelial cells resting on a thick collagenous basal lamina. Their luminal surface is provided with microvilli. The intestinal cells store considerable amounts of glycogen and neutral lipids. Some intracellular granular inclusions, which stain for proteins, phospholipids and lipoproteins, are distributed throughout the cytoplasm. The brush border is composed of microvilli whereas the outer surface coat consists of saliva resistant PAS-positive material. The detailed histochemical analysis of surface material has revealed that it is composed of nonacetylated acid mucopolysaccharides rich in hyaluronic acid with carboxylate polyanions. The brush border shows intense activities of acid phosphatase and glucose-6-phosphatase, moderate of ATPase, and lipase, weak of 5'-nucleotidase. Acid phosphatase-positive intracellular structures are seen in the intestinal epithelium which form distinct aggregations.

  5. Species identification of North American guinea worms (Nematoda: Dracunculus) with DNA barcoding.

    PubMed

    Elsasser, Sarah C; Floyd, Robin; Hebert, Paul D N; Schulte-Hostedde, Albrecht I

    2009-05-01

    Dracunculus insignis is a nematode parasite that infects the subcutaneous tissues of mammals such as raccoon (Procyon lotor), mink (Neovison vison) and fisher (Martes pennanti). D. lutrae, a morphologically similar species, has only been recovered from the otter (Lontra canadensis). Species identification of these two North American guinea worms has only been achieved by morphology of males and host identity. As a result, where only female specimens are present, accurate identifications are not possible. To date, specimens recovered from otter have been assumed to be D. lutrae, while those from all other hosts are assumed to be D. insignis. This study uses DNA barcoding to differentiate between these two North American dracunculoids. Our results show that D. insignis is a 'true' generalist, showing little sequence divergence regardless of host association, although our studies did validate its occurrence in a new host - the otter. Interestingly, specimens of the host specialist, D. lutrae, showed some sequence divergence, although it was low. The finding of D. insignis in otter substantiates the need to supplement morphology-based methods in providing species identifications for certain dracunculoids. © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Dujardinascaris gigantea sp. n. (Nematoda: Ascaridida) from the critically endangered crocodile Alligator sinensis Fauvel (Reptilia: Crocodylia).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jin-Hong; Li, Liang; Guo, Yan-Ning; Zhang, Lu-Ping

    2015-03-01

    The Chinese alligator Alligator sinensis Fauvel (Reptilia: Crocodylia) is considered as one of the most critically endangered species of the 23 extant crocodiles. However, our knowledge of the helminth parasites of this rare animal is completely lacking. During a helminthological survey of reptiles in China, we found a new ascaridoid nematode, Dujardinascaris gigantea sp. n. from A. sinensis. The morphology of D. gigantea sp. n. was studied using light and scanning electron microscopy. The new species was also characterised using molecular methods by sequencing and analysing the small ribosomal DNA (18S) and the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS-2).

  7. Phylogenetic confirmation of the genus Robbea (Nematoda: Desmodoridae, Stilbonematinae) with the description of three new species

    PubMed Central

    Ott, Jörg A.; Gruber-Vodicka, Harald R.; Leisch, Nikolaus; Zimmermann, Judith

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Stilbonematinae are a monophyletic group of marine nematodes that are characterized by a coat of thiotrophic bacterial symbionts. Among the ten known genera of the Stilbonematinae, the genus Robbea Gerlach 1956 had a problematic taxonomic history of synonymizations and indications of polyphyletic origin. Here we describe three new species of the genus, R. hypermnestra sp. nov., R. ruetzleri sp. nov. and R. agricola sp. nov., using conventional light microscopy, interference contrast microscopy and SEM. We provide 18S rRNA gene sequences of all three species, together with new sequences for the genera Catanema and Leptonemella. Both our morphological analyses as well as our phylogenetic reconstructions corroborate the genus Robbea. In our phylogenetic analysis the three species of the genus Robbea form a distinct clade in the Stilbonematinae radiation and are clearly separated from the clade of the genus Catanema, which has previously been synonymized with Robbea. Surprisingly, in R. hypermnestra sp. nov. all females are intersexes exhibiting male sexual characters. Our extended dataset of Stilbonematinae 18S rRNA genes for the first time allows the identification of the different genera, e.g. in a barcoding approach. http://zoobank.org/urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:D37C3F5A-CF2B-40E6-8B09-3C72EEED60B0 PMID:27630534

  8. Nematicidal Activity of Cassia and Cinnamon Oil Compounds and Related Compounds toward Bursaphelenchus xylophilus (Nematoda: Parasitaphelenchidae)

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Jeong-Ok; Lee, Sang-Myung; Moon, Yil-Seong; Lee, Sang-Gil; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2007-01-01

    The nematicidal activity of two cassia, Cinnamomum cassia, oils (Especial and true), four cinnamon, Cinnamomum zey-lanicum, oils (technical, #500, bark and green leaf), and their compounds (e.g., trans-cinnamaldehyde and trans-cinnamic acid) toward adult Bursaphelenchus xylophilus was examined by a direct contact bioassay. Results were compared with those of 34 related compounds. As judged by 24-hour LC50 values, two cassia oils (0.084–0.085 mg/ml) and four cinnamon oils (0.064–0.113 mg/ml) were toxic toward adult B. xylophilus. Of 45 test compounds, trans-cinnamaldehyde (0.061 mg/ml) was the most active nematicide, followed by ethyl cinnamate, α-methyl-trans-cinnamaldehyde, methyl cinnamate and allyl cinnamate (0.114–0.195 mg/ml). Potent nematicidal activity was also observed with 4-methoxycinnamonitrile, trans-4-methoxycinnamaldehyde, trans-2-methoxy-cinnamaldehyde, ethyl α-cyanocinnamate, cinnamonitrile and cinnamyl bromide (0.224–0.502 mg/ml). Structure-activity relationships indicate that structural characteristics, such as types of functional groups, saturation and carbon skeleton, appear to play a role in determining the toxicities to adult B. xylophilus. Cassia and cinnamon oils and test compounds described merit further study as potential nematicides or leads for the control of pine wilt disease caused by B. xylophilus. PMID:19259472

  9. Morphological, molecular and phylogenetic analyses of Diplotriaena bargusinica Skrjabin, 1917 (Nematoda: Diplotriaenidae).

    PubMed

    Dutra Vieira, Thainá; Pegoraro de Macedo, Marcia Raquel; Fedatto Bernardon, Fabiana; Müller, Gertrud

    2017-10-01

    The nematode Diplotriaena bargusinica is a bird air sac parasite, and its taxonomy is based mainly on morphological and morphometric characteristics. Increasing knowledge of genetic information variability has spurred the use of DNA markers in conjunction with morphological data for inferring phylogenetic relationships in different taxa. Considering the potential of molecular biology in taxonomy, this study presents the morphological and molecular characterization of D. bargusinica, and establishes the phylogenetic position of the nematode in Spirurina. Twenty partial sequences of the 18S region of D. bargusinica rDNA were generated. Phylogenetic trees were obtained through the Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian Inference methods where both had similar topology. The group Diplotriaenoidea is monophyletic and the topologies generated corroborate the phylogenetic studies based on traditional and previously performed molecular taxonomy. This study is the first to generate molecular data associated with the morphology of the species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Antifilarial activity of Mallotus philippensis Lam. on Setaria cervie (Nematoda: Filarioidea) in vitro.

    PubMed

    Singh, R; Singhal, K C; Khan, N U

    1997-10-01

    The effect of aqueous and alcoholic extracts of the leaves of Mallotus philippensis (Lam.) Muell. Arg. was studied on the spontaneous movements of the whole worm and nerve-muscle (n.m.) preparation of Setaria cervi and on the survival of microfilariae in vitro. Both the extracts caused inhibition of spontaneous motility of whole worm and the n.m. preparation of S. Cervi characterized by initial stimulation followed by depression in amplitude. The tone and rate of contractions remained visibly unaffected. Aqueous extract at higher concentration showed immediate reduction in tone. The concentration required to inhibit the movements of n.m. preparation was 1/5th for aqueous and 1/11th for alcoholic extract compared to that for the whole worm, suggesting a cuticular permeability barrier. The stimulatory response of acetylcholine was blocked by aqueous extract on whole worm movements. On the microfilariae the LC50 and LC90 were 18 and 20 ng/ml for aqueous and 12 and 15 ng/ml for alcoholic extracts respectively.

  11. Systematics of Mexiconema cichlasomae (Nematoda: Daniconematidae) based on sequences of SSU rDNA.

    PubMed

    Mejia-Madrid, H H; Aguirre-Macedo, M L

    2011-02-01

    The molecular characterization of the daniconematid dracunculoid Mexiconema cichlasomae Moravec, Vidal, and Salgado-Maldonado, 1992 through the sequencing of SSU rDNA from adult individuals is presented herein. Additionally, preliminary genetic relationships of this nematode are inferred from alignment of sequences generated previously for other dracunculoids. Maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood analyses recovered identical trees. As anticipated by previous taxonomic work, M. cichlasomae is putatively closely related to skrjabillanid dracunculoids represented by Molnaria intestinalis (Dogiel and Bychovsky, 1934) and Skrjabillanus scardinii Molnár, 1966 SSU rDNA sequences, but the relationships of this newly discovered clade to other dracunculoid clades remain unresolved.

  12. Two New and Two Recharacterized Species from a Radiation of Pristionchus (Nematoda: Diplogastridae) in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Kanzaki, Natsumi; Ragsdale, Erik J.; Herrmann, Matthias; Sommer, Ralf J.

    2014-01-01

    Two new species of Pristionchus, P. lucani n. sp. and P. bulgaricus n. sp., are described from France and Bulgaria, respectively. Additionally, new morphological and morphometric data are provided for two previously described species from Europe, P. brevicauda (Kotlán, 1928) Paramonov, 1952 and P. clavus (von Linstow, 1901) Sudhaus and Fürst von Lieven, 2003. A phylogeny including these four species was inferred from a dataset including 26 ribosomal protein-coding genes, sequences of which are original for P. bulgaricus n. sp. and P. clavus. Relationships support a radiation of all sequenced European Pristionchus species from a single, gonochoristic common ancestor, and current knowledge of species ranges supports “western” and “eastern” clades. Similar diagnostic morphologies reflect the close relationships among the new and recharacterized species, especially P. bulgaricus n. sp., P. brevicauda, and P. clavus, although mating tests as well as genetic and phylogenetic separation support their identities as unique species. Our results show that Pristionchus species in Europe are more diverse than typological characters suggest, and thus biological and molecular profiling will be essential for future delimitation of Pristionchus species from the region. PMID:24644372

  13. Leptojacobus dorci n. gen., n. sp. (Nematoda: Diplogastridae), an Associate of Dorcus Stag Beetles (Coleoptera: Lucanidae).

    PubMed

    Kanzaki, Natsumi; Ragsdale, Erik J; Susoy, Vladislav; Sommer, Ralf J

    2014-03-01

    A new species of diplogastrid nematode, Leptojacobus dorci n. gen., n. sp., was isolated from adults of the stag beetle Dorcus ritsemae (Coleoptera: Lucanidae) that were purchased from a pet shop in Japan. Leptojacobus n. gen. is circumscribed by a very thin, delicate body and by a small stoma with minute armature. A combination of other stomatal characters, namely the division of the cheilostom into adradial plates, the symmetry of the subventral stegostomatal sectors, and the presence of a thin, conical dorsal tooth, further distinguishes Leptojacobus n. gen. from other genera of Diplogastridae. Phylogenetic analysis of nearly full-length SSU rRNA sequences support the new species, together with an isolate identified previously as Koerneria luziae, to be excluded from a clade including all other molecularly characterized diplogastrids with teeth and stomatal dimorphism. Therefore, the new species will be of importance for reconstruction of ancestral character histories in Diplogastridae, a family circumscribed by a suite of feeding-related novelties.

  14. Angiostrongylus cantonensis (Nematoda: Metastrongylidae) in the Ryukyu Islands tree rat (Diplothrix legata).

    PubMed

    Okano, Tsukasa; Haga, Atsushi; Mizuno, Eriko; Onuma, Manabu; Nakaya, Yumiko; Nagamine, Takashi

    2014-04-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is a zoonotic nematode with rodents serving as natural definitive hosts. We report A. cantonensis in the Ryukyu Islands tree rat (Diplothrix legata, Thomas, 1906), a native endangered species in Japan. Adult and larvae of A. cantonensis were macroscopically, histologically, and genetically detected in three tree rats collected between August 2011 and January 2012 in the Yambaru area of Okinawa Prefecture, Japan. Pathologic observations of the lungs of rats showed that infection may be lethal. We also conducted a retrospective genetic survey of helminths parasitic in lung in cryopreserved lung samples of Ryukyu Islands tree rats collected between 2007 and 2011 in the Yambaru area and found A. cantonensis DNA in one of 29 samples, which was collected in December 2010.

  15. Illustrated identification keys to strongylid parasites (Strongylidae: Nematoda) of horses, zebras and asses (Equidae).

    PubMed

    Lichtenfels, J Ralph; Kharchenko, Vitaliy A; Dvojnos, Grigory M

    2008-09-15

    The Equidae (the horse, Equus caballus, the ass, Equus asinus, zebras and their hybrids) are hosts to a great variety of nematode parasites, some of which can cause significant morbidity or mortality if individual hosts are untreated. Worldwide the nematode parasites of horses belong to 7 suborders, 12 families, 29 genera and 83 species. The great majority (19 of 29 genera and 64 of 83 species) are members of the family Strongylidae, which includes the most common and pathogenic nematode parasites of horses. Only the Strongylidae are included in this treatise. The Strongylidae (common name strongylids) of horses--nematodes with a well-developed buccal capsule, a mouth collar with two leaf-crowns, and a strongyloid (common name of superfamily Strongyloidea) copulatory bursa--can be separated into two subfamilies: Strongylinae (common name strongylins), usually large or medium-sized with a globular or funnel-shaped buccal capsule; and Cyathostominae (common name cyathostomins), usually small to medium-sized with a cylindrical buccal capsule. The increased attention to strongylid nematode parasites of horses has resulted in the need for updated diagnostic keys to these parasites using readily recognizable characters and the most recent literature on their systematics. Because the cyathostomins have been historically difficult to identify, and because they have emerged as the most significant nematode pathogens of horses, we provide a brief nomenclatural and taxonomic history and an introduction to the morphology of this group. This treatise is intended to serve as a basic working tool--providing easy identifications to genus and species of adult strongylid nematodes of equids. All strongylid nematodes normally parasitic in horses, the ass (and their hybrids), and zebras are included. The keys are illustrated with line drawings and halftone photomicrographs of each species. A short discussion of the systematics of the genus and species is provided for each genus following the species descriptions. Species diagnoses and a synonymy of each species is provided. Geographic distribution, prevalence, and location in host are also given for each species.

  16. Molecular Characterization of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis (Nematoda: Heligmosomatidae) from Mus musculus in India

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Anshu; Goswami, Urvashi; Singh, Hridaya Shanker

    2016-01-01

    Mus musculus (Rodentia: Muridae) has generally been infected with a rodent hookworm Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. In this report, we present morphological and molecular identification of N. brasiliensis by light and scanning electron microscopy and PCR amplification of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene and the protein sequences encoded by cox1 gene, respectively. Despite the use of N. brasiliensis in many biochemistry studies from India, their taxonomic identification was not fully understood, especially at the species level, and no molecular data is available in GenBank from India. Sequence analysis of cox1 gene in this study revealed that the present specimen showed close identity with the same species available in GenBank, confirming that the species is N. brasiliensis. This study represents the first record of molecular identification of N. brasiliensis from India and the protein structure to better understand the comparative phylogenetic characteristics. PMID:28095659

  17. Porrocaecum parvum n. sp. and P. reticulatum (Linstow, 1899) (Nematoda: Ascaridoidea) from birds in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Guo, Yan-Ning; Zhang, Lu-Ping

    2015-10-01

    Porrocaecum parvum n. sp. is described from the grey-faced buzzard Butastur indicus (Gmelin) (Accipitriformes: Accipitridae) in China. The new species differs from its congeners in having well-developed cervical alae, small interlabia and very short intestinal caecum (0.34 mm long, representing 11.9% of oesophageal length) and in the number and arrangement of the caudal papillae (29 pairs in total, arranged as follows: 21 pairs precloacal, single double pair paracloacal and seven pairs postcloacal) and in the morphology of the male tail. In addition, Porrocaecum reticulatum (Linstow, 1899), collected from the purple heron Ardea purpurea L., the grey heron A. cinerea L. and the little egret Egretta garzetta (L.) (Pelecaniformes: Ardeidae) in China, was also studied using light and, for the first time, scanning electron microscopy. Previously unreported and erroneous morphological features of taxonomic significance are revealed, including the presence of narrow cervical alae, single pair of small, submedial pores and single, short medial ditch on each lip, interlabia with very pointed anterior prolongation, single medio-ventral precloacal papilla on anterior cloacal lip and double paracloacal papillae slightly posterior to cloaca.

  18. Baylisascaris procyonis (Nematoda: Ascaridoidea) eggs in raccoon (Procyon lotol) latrine scats in Orange County, California.

    PubMed

    Evans, R H

    2002-02-01

    Baylisascaris procyonis is the common intestinal nematode of the raccoon and is well-recognized as a cause of visceral, ocular, and neural larva migrans in many species of wild and domestic birds and mammals, including humans. To develop data on the prevalence of B. procyonis in Orange County, California, 800 distinct raccoon latrine sites were sampled in 4 spatial zones from 15 January to 31 December 2000. Counts of fecal eggs per gram (EPG) were determined and evaluated with reference to spatial zone and season of collection. No significant differences in EPG were noted among the spatial zones. However, EPG exhibited a significant rise (37,730 +/- 1,865) in the fall and a significant decline (26,204 +/- 1,446) in the winter (ANOVA, P = 0.045). The overall egg prevalence was 100%, and the overall mean EPG was 30,265 +/- 867.

  19. Heterorhabditis pakistanense n. sp. (Nematoda: Heterorhabditidae) a new entomopathogenic nematode from Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Shahina, F; Tabassum, K A; Salma, J; Mehreen, G; Knoetze, R

    2017-03-01

    A new entomopathogenic nematode species of Heterorhabditis, described as H. pakistanense n. sp., was isolated from soil samples around the roots of grass at Malir, Karachi, Sindh, Pakistan. The new species is characterized morphologically by features of males: body size 819 μm (720-1013 μm), D% ((distance from anterior end to excretory pore divided by pharynx length) × 100) 119 (110-126), SW% ((spicule length divided by anal body diameter) × 100) 156 (144-191), GS% ((gubernaculum length divided by spicule length) × 100) 58 (48-65) and variations in the number of bursal papillae of the terminal group: 8th and 9th papillae sometimes absent on both sides, sometimes eight papillae present on the right side whereas six papillae present on the left side. On the right side the arrangement of papillae is 1 + 2 + 3 + 2 whereas on the left side it is 1 + 2 + 3. The hermaphrodite has a prominent post-anal swelling and a conoid tail 82 μm (64-95 μm) long with a pointed terminus. Hermaphrodites of H. pakistanense n. sp. can be distinguished from all species of Heterorhabditis except H. downesi by having a mucronate tail. Infective juveniles have a medium-sized body (581 μm (558-624 μm)), long pharynx (117 μm (113-125 μm)), ensheathed tail (99 μm (95-110 μm)) and E% ((distance from anterior end to excretory pore divided by tail length) × 100) 100 (95-107). The new species can be distinguished from all species of Heterorhabditis by the absence of the 7th, 8th and 9th bursal papillae. Heterorhabditis pakistanense is further characterized by the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and the D2D3 region of the 28S rDNA gene. The closest species H. indica, H. gerrardi, H. amazonensis and H. noenieputensis being separated by 9, 7, 66 and 15 bp, respectively, in the ITS region. Molecular phylogenetic trees based on sequences of ITS rDNA, D2D3 regions and the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene support the description of H. pakistanense as a new species.

  20. Trehalose metabolism genes of Aphelenchoides besseyi (Nematoda: Aphelenchoididae) in hypertonic osmotic pressure survival

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiaoli; Li, Danlei; Zhang, Ruizhi; Ling, Yaming

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Some organisms can survive extreme desiccation caused by hypertonic osmotic pressure by entering a state of suspended animation known as osmobiosis. The free-living mycophagous nematode Aphelenchoides besseyi can be induced to enter osmobiosis by soaking in osmolytes. It is assumed that sugars (in particular trehalose) are instrumental for survival under environmental stress. In A. besseyi, two putative trehalose-6-phosphate synthase genes (TPS) encoding enzymes catalyzing trehalose synthesis, and a putative trehalase gene (TRE) encoding enzymes that catalyze hydrolysis of trehalose were identified and then characterized based on their transcriptome. RT-qPCR analyses showed that each of these genes is expressed as mRNA when A. besseyi is entering in, during and recovering from osmobiosis, but only for certain periods. The changes of TRE activity were consistent with the transcript level changes of the TRE gene, and the trehalose level declined at certain periods when the nematodes were in, as well as recovering from, osmobiosis; this suggested that the hydrolysis of threhalose is essential. The feeding method of RNA interference (RNAi) was used to temporarily knock down the expression of each of the TPS and TRE genes. No obviously different phenotype was observed from any of the genes silenced individually or simultaneously, but the survival under hypertonic osmotic pressure reduced significantly and the recovery was delayed. These results indicated that trehalose metabolism genes should play a role in osmobiosis regulation and function within a restricted time frame. PMID:28396490

  1. Morphology and ultrastructure of the bacterial receptacle in Steinernema nematodes (Nematoda: Steinernematidae).

    PubMed

    Kim, Sam Kyu; Flores-Lara, Yolanda; Patricia Stock, S

    2012-07-01

    Infective juveniles of entomopathogenic nematodes in the genus Steinernema harbor symbiotic bacteria, Xenorhabdus spp., in a discrete structure located in the anterior portion of the intestine known as the 'bacterial receptacle' (formerly known as the bacterial or intestinal vesicle). The receptacle itself is a structured environment in which the bacteria are spatially restricted. Inside this receptacle, bacterial symbionts are protected from the environment and grow to fill the receptacle. Until now, no comparative study across different Steinernema spp. has been undertaken to investigate if morphological variation in this structure exists at the interspecific level. In this study, we examined the bacterial receptacles of 25 Steinernema spp. representatives of the currently accepted five evolutionary clades. Our observations confirmed the bacterial receptacle is a modification of the two most anterior cells of the ventricular portion of the intestine. Size of the bacterial receptacle varied across the examined species. Steinernema monticolum (clade II) had the largest receptacle of all examined species (average: 46×17 μm) and S. rarum (no clade affiliation) was noted as the species with the smallest observed receptacle (average: 8×5 μm). At the morphological level, species can be grouped into two categories based on the presence or absence of vesicle within the receptacle. The receptacles of all examined species harbored an intravesicular structure (IVS) with variable morphology. All examined taxa members of the 'feltiae' (clade III) and 'intermedium' (clade II) clades were characterized by having a vesicle. This structure was also observed in S. diaprepesi (clade V), S. riobrave (clade IV) and S. monticolum (clade I). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Ultrastructure of the Head of Okranema eileenae Greenslade and Nicholas, 1991 (Thoracostomopsidae: Nematoda).

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Warwick L

    2002-03-01

    Okranema eileenae is a marine nematode from Australian sandy beaches. The structure of its cephalic region is described by light, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy. Three large lips, separated by three deep clefts and surmounted by flexible liplets, surround the mouth. Transverse and longitudinal sections of the head have been used to investigate the ultrastructure of the lips, buccal cavity, mandibles, and cephalic sensilla. The pharyngeal muscles are attached to the external head cuticle over a broad band, forming the cephalic capsule, which terminates in the three connected cuticular cephalic arches-one in each lip. Three mandibles form the central core of each lip, cuticular structures from which two small teeth-denticles and one large central tooth, the onchium-project into the buccal cavity. The onchia are anterior extensions of the pharynx that contain the ducts of pharyngeal glands that discharge into the buccal cavity. Epidermal tissue extends anteriorly as far as the cephalic arch. Cephalic structures, apart from sensory setae, are formed from an expanded cephalic cuticle.The inner labial, outer labial, and cephalic setae each contain two dendritic processes. Aspects of amphidial structure are described for the first time in Thoracostomopsidae. The external apertures are illustrated by scanning electron microscopy and the internal structure in sections by transmission electron microscopy. Two bundles of about 100 dendritic processes are enclosed by the amphidial sheath cell, as well as a group of four other dendritic processes. Two amphidial duct cells are present on each side of the head, but without containing dendritic processes. However, the ultrastructural description of the amphids is incomplete.

  3. Introducing Alphitobius diaperinus, (Insecta: Tenebrionidae) as a New Intermediate Host of Hadjelia truncata (Nematoda)

    PubMed Central

    Alborzi, AR; Rahbar, A

    2012-01-01

    Background Hadjelia truncata is a nematode that causes lesions in the gizzard lining of pigeons, which may even lead to death. The aim of this study was to introduce Alphitobius diaperinus as a new intermediate host for Hadjelia truncata. Methods H. truncata infection was identified in a pigeon flock in Ahvaz City, Khuzestan Province, Iran by performing fecal examination and autopsy. Adult and larval stages of beetles were collected from the litter of pigeon houses, and identified morphologically. The beetle larvae were cultured in a medium, containing feces of the infected pigeons. Nematode larval stages from naturally and experimentally (culturally) infected adult beetles were fed to two groups of pigeons Results The collected beetles were identified as Alphitobius diaperinus. Average length and width of the adult beetles were 6.31 mm and 2.88 mm respectively. Infection rates of naturally and experimentally infected beetles with larval stages of the nematode were 66.2% and 45.1% respectively. The adult nematodes collected from gizzards of experimentally infected pigeons were identified as H. truncata. Nematode infection rates in pigeons after feeding the infective larvae collected from naturally and experimentally infected beetles were 44.7% and 32.5% respectively. Conclusion A. diaperinus can serve as a natural intermediate host for H. truncata. PMID:23109952

  4. Mitochondrial haplotypes of Aelurostrongylus abstrusus and Troglostrongylus brevior (Nematoda, Metastrongyloidea) from domestic and wild felids.

    PubMed

    Traversa, Donato; Veronesi, Fabrizia; Diakou, Anastasia; Iorio, Raffaella; Simonato, Giulia; Marcer, Federica; Di Cesare, Angela

    2017-04-01

    The lungworm Aelurostrongylus abstrusus is the most important respiratory parasite of domestic cats. Pulmonary aelurostrongylosis has been reported in wild felids, though unequivocally evidence of wildlife infection by A. abstrusus is scant. Recently, Troglostrongylus brevior, a lungworm usually infecting wild felids, has been described in domestic cats from Mediterranean areas. The present work evaluates the sequence variation of an informative region within the gene encoding the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 of A. abstrusus and T. brevior, in order to provide novel information on the genetic make-up of these lungworms. Parasitic stages of A. abstrusus and T. brevior were collected from domestic and wild hosts (i.e., domestic cat, European wildcat, caracal, serval, and lion) from Italy, Greece, and South Africa. Five (HI-HV) and four (HI-HIV) haplotypes were recorded for A. abstrusus and T. brevior, respectively, mostly shared between domestic and wild felids in different geographical areas. The phylogenetic analysis showed that all haplotypes of A. abstrusus and T. brevior clustered as monophyletic groups with a strong nodal support, indicating that all haplotypes identified were distinct from each other. All sequence types represent two distinct species, A. abstrusus and T. brevior, and these genetic convergences are also detected within and among populations of these nematodes, irrespective of their hosts and geographical origin. The occurrence of A. abstrusus and T. brevior haplotypes in different hosts from the same regions and between different countries indicates that the same lungworm populations circulate in domestic and wild hosts under the same routes of transmission.

  5. Experimental infection of Contracaecum multipapillatum (Nematoda: Anisakinae) from Mexico in the domestic cat.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Martínez, V M; Osorio-Sarabia, D; Overstreet, R M

    1994-08-01

    Juveniles of Contracaecum multipapillatum infected the Mayan cichlid (Cichlasoma urophthalmus) and adults infected the olivaceous cormorant (Phalacrocorax olivaceus) and the great egret (Casmerodius albus) in the coastal lagoon at Celestun, State of Yucatan, Mexico. All are new host records, and, even though the geographic locality record of Mexico for the species has not been published, unidentified but presumably conspecific specimens have been reported from there. When juveniles of C. multipapillatum were fed to a kitten, but not rats, ducks, or chickens, they developed into adults. Measurements and morphological data are provided on the specimens from the kitten. Development of an avian ascaridoid in the intestine of a mammal increases the potential of this widespread species to infect other mammals, including humans.

  6. Spontaneous cure after natural infection with Gnathostoma turgidum (Nematoda) in Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana).

    PubMed

    Torres-Montoya, Hilario; Galaviz-Renteria, Xochilth; Castillo-Ureta, Hipólito; Lopez-Moreno, Hector; Nawa, Yukifumi; Bojorquez-Contreras, Angel; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Sergio; Díaz-Camacho, Sylvia; Rocha-Tirado, Rodrigo; Rendon-Maldonado, Jose

    2014-04-01

    Seasonality of the nematode Gnathostoma turgidum in Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana) in the wild has been reported; however, the mechanisms involved in deworming are unknown. We monitored the parasitologic and biologic changes in four Virginia opossums naturally infected with G. turgidum by coproparasitologic examination and abdominal ultrasonography. Eggs became detectable in the feces of opossums in May, peaked in July and August, and suddenly decreased in October. Adults of G. turgidum were expelled in the feces mainly in September. Ultrasonography of the liver showed slight damage during May. Lesions in the stomach appeared in April and persisted until September. The abnormalities of the liver and stomach were resolved in November. These data suggest that G. turgidum is likely expelled as a result of host immunologic mechanisms, although termination of a natural life span cannot be definitively excluded.

  7. Desiccation tolerance of Muellerius cf. capillaris (Nematoda: Protostrongylidae) first-stage larvae.

    PubMed

    Solomon, A; Ilan, P; Itamar, G

    1998-08-01

    Muellerius cf. capillaris is the most common lung worm of wild Nubian ibex (Capra ibex nubiana) in the northern Negev desert, Israel. The capacity of the free-living stages (L1) of the parasite to survive extreme desiccation was tested under 2 different dehydration regimes at 23 C: rapid dehydration through direct exposure to 0% relative humidity (RH), and a slow dehydration regime of preconditioning at 33% RH for 7 days prior to exposure to 0% RH for a further 21 days. In direct exposures to 0% and 33% RH, by day 11 survival rates of L1 were significantly higher than when stored in water and in 97% RH (P < 0.05). The slow dehydration regime enhanced the survival of L1 up to 10-fold by day 28 as compared with direct exposure to 0% RH. The same mean numbers of larvae were recovered from the land snail Theba pisana infected with L1 exposed for 21 days at 33% RH and from T. pisana infected with nondesiccated L1 (P > 0.1). L1 surviving after 21 days of desiccation at 0% RH were, on the other hand, less infective to T. pisana. The percentage of such postdesiccated L1 reaching infective stage (L3) was, however, the same as that of the control group. The ability of M. cf. capillaris L1 to survive anhydrobiosis and retain infectivity to land snails after extreme desiccation enables their coexistence with the Nubian ibex in desert habitat.

  8. The first report of Angiostrongylus vasorum (Nematoda; Metastrongyloidea) in Poland, in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes).

    PubMed

    Demiaszkiewicz, Aleksander W; Pyziel, Anna M; Kuligowska, Izabela; Lachowicz, Jacek

    2014-10-01

    Angiostrongylus vasorum belongs to the superfamily of Metastrongyloidea. This nematode occurs in foxes, dogs and other predators. The Nematode A. vasorum place themselves in the pulmonary artery and its branches, and in the right ventricle and atrium of the heart. Numerous species of land snails are the intermediate hosts of the parasite. In 2013, lungs and hearts of 76 foxes shot in the Forest District Głęboki Bród in Augustowska Primeval Forest were parasitologically necropsied. Four of the examined foxes were infected with the nematode A. vasorum, a prevalence of 5.2%. In one fox pericardium there were 6 male and 6 female nematodes. In the remaining three foxes nematodes were localized in the pulmonary artery. In two foxes 2 specimens of nematodes were detected (male and female, and two females) while 1 female was detected in the other fox. This is the first report of the presence of the nematode A. vasorum in fox in Poland.

  9. A New Species and New Combinations of Brevitobrilus Tsalolikhin, 1981 (Nematoda: Tobrilidae) from Spain

    PubMed Central

    Ocaña, A.; Hernández, J. A.; Martín, I.

    1996-01-01

    A new species of Brevitobrilus Tsalolikhin, Brevitobrilus montanus n. sp., found in high mountain lakes and rivers in Granada, Spain, is described. Additional data on Brevitobrilus granatensis (Ocafia &Zullini, 1988) n. comb. are provided. Brevitobrilus raontanus n. sp. is characterized by moderate size (1.3-1.8 mm), amphid aperture width one-quarter the head width, subterminal seta distance from terminus four times the width of the terminal end of the tail, and supplements S5 and S6 separated. Tobrilus granatensis Ocafia &Zullini, 1988; Tobrilus sardus Vinciguerra &Zullini, 1991; and Tobrilus siculus Vinciguerra &Zullini, 1991 are all transferred to Brevitobrilus. Differences among the 13 species of Brevitobrilus are discussed. PMID:19277134

  10. New Cyst Nematode, Heterodera sojae n. sp. (Nematoda: Heteroderidae) from Soybean in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Heonil; Eun, Geun; Ha, Jihye; Kim, Yongchul; Park, Namsook; Kim, Donggeun; Choi, Insoo

    2016-01-01

    A new soybean cyst nematode Heterodera sojae n. sp. was found from the roots of soybean plants in Korea. Cysts of H. sojae n. sp. appeared more round, shining, and darker than that of H. glycines. Morphologically, H. sojae n. sp. differed from H. glycines by fenestra length (23.5–54.2 µm vs. 30–70 µm), vulval silt length (9.0–24.4 µm vs. 43–60 µm), tail length of J2 (54.3–74.8 µm vs. 40–61 µm), and hyaline part of J2 (32.6–46.3 µm vs. 20–30 µm). It is distinguished from H. elachista by larger cyst (513.4–778.3 µm × 343.4–567.1 µm vs. 350–560 µm × 250–450 µm) and longer stylet length of J2 (23.8–25.3 µm vs. 17–19 µm). Molecular analysis of rRNA large subunit (LSU) D2–D3 segments and ITS gene sequence shows that H. sojae n. sp. is more close to rice cyst nematode H. elachista than H. glycines. Heterodera sojae n. sp. was widely distributed in Korea. It was found from soybean fields of all three provinces sampled. PMID:28154434

  11. Description of Sectonema septentrionale sp. n. (Nematoda: Dorylaimida: Aporcelaimidae) from Northern Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Peña-Santiago, Reyes; Álvarez-Ortega, Sergio

    2015-04-17

    A new species of the genus Sectonema, collected from natural forests in the Spanish provinces of León and Palencia, is described and illustrated with line drawings and LM pictures. Sectonema septentrionale sp. n. is characterized by its 5.59-6.90 mm long body, lip region 25-29 μm broad and offset by deep constriction, mural tooth 18-19 μm long at its ventral side and occupying most of the stomatal lumen, pharyngeal expansion 618-926 μm long or 60-73% of total neck length, uterus tripartite and 370-493 μm long or 2.9-4.3 times the corresponding body diameter, V = 48-52, tail short and rounded (40-62 μm, c = 108-146, c' = 0.6-0.8), spicules 100-145 μm long, and 5-11 irregularly spaced ventromedian supplements with hiatus. It is very close to S. demani, but differs both in the nature of the mural tooth and of the uterus.

  12. Lanzavecchia mangrovi sp. n. (Nematoda, Dorylaimida) from mangroves of Red River Estuary, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Gagarin, Vladimir G

    2014-02-12

    A new nematode species found in the Red River Estuary of Vietnam is described. Lanzavecchia mangrovi sp. n. is morphologically close to L. coomansi Nicholas, Stewart, 1984, but differs in its longer body (L = 2.71-3.76 µm versus L = 2.2-2.9 µm), shorter spicules (63-65 mm versus 72-88), longer prerectum (500-675 mm versus 262-310 µm) and shorter distal portion of tail in relation to the proximal portion (0.6-0.8 versus 0.9-2.3).

  13. Cattiena fansipanis n. sp. (Nematoda: Rhigonematida: Carnoyidae) from a millipede (Myriapoda: Diplopoda: Spirobolida) in North Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Malysheva, Svetlana V; Van Luc, Pham

    2012-02-01

    A new species of Cattiena Hunt & Spiridonov, 2001 from a diplopod (Spirobolida: Pseudospirobolellidae Brolemann) collected near Sa Pa, Lao Cai Province, Vietnam, is described. Females of Cattiena fansipanis n. sp. are closely related to females of two other known species of the genus, C. trachelomegali Hunt & Spiridonov, 2001 and C. trigoniuli Hunt & Spiridonov, 2001, but can be distinguished by the distinctly more anterior position of the vulva, abrupt constriction of the body at the vulval level, presence of two swollen portions of the oviducts, and longer body and tail. Males of new species differ by having a rounded cephalic region followed by 13-14 annules which are larger than those which follow them, a different size and shape of the spicules and gubernaculum, and body and tail length. Three size groups of juveniles were found in the host gut lumen, presumably representing second, third and fourth juvenile stages. The morphology of the juvenile stages is described.

  14. A new species of free-living marine nematode (Nematoda: Chromadoridae) from the East China Sea.

    PubMed

    Chunming, Wang; Liguo, An; Yong, Huang

    2015-04-15

    A new species of free-living marine nematodes, Ptycholaimellus longibulbus sp. nov., is described from the East China Sea. Ptycholaimellus longibulbus sp. nov. is characterized by having body length of about 1100-1400 μm, cephalic seta 9 µm long (half a head diameter), a relatively long double posterior pharyngeal bulb occupying 44-49% of pharyngeal length, a voluminous ventral gland with a large ampulla, cuticle with transverse rows of punctations and lateral differentiation with two longitudinal rows of thick dots, relatively long spicules 45-55 μm long, an arcuate gubernaculum 25 µm long, and a conico-cylindrical tail with a distinct long finger-like spinneret. A key to species of Ptycholaimellus is given.

  15. Two new species of free-living marine nematodes (Nematoda: Oncholaimida: Enchelidiidae) from Maemul Island, Korea.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jung-Ho; Lee, Wonchoel

    2014-04-04

    Two new species of the family Enchelidiidae Filipjev, 1918 were collected from marine sediments near Maemul Island in South Korea: a new species of Abelbolla Huang & Zhang, 2004 and a new species of Ledovitia Filipjev, 1927. Abelbolla maemulensis sp. nov. is characterized by its small size (1,493 × 38 µm, body length × maximum body diameter); the presence of a circular amphid; the gubernacular apophysis with swollen distal tip; and the complex structure of the gubernaculum. It is close to Abelbolla huanghaiensis Huang & Zhang, 2004, but differs by the structure of gubernacular apophysis and body length (1,493 vs 2,303 µm). Ledovitia brevis sp. nov. can be separated from its congeners by its small size of body, the length of gubernacular apophysis, and the length of the spicules. It is close to Ledovitia pharetrata Wieser, 1953a, but differs by the length of the body (1,699 vs 2,640 µm) and the spicules (40 vs 100 µm).

  16. Revision of the species complex Amidostomum acutum (Lundahl, 1848) (Nematoda: Amidostomatidae) by use of molecular techniques.

    PubMed

    Kavetska, Katarzyna M; Polasik, Daniel; Dzierzba, Emil; Jędrzejczak, Małgorzata; Kalisińska, Elżbieta; Rząd, Izabella

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the work is to confirm the species differentiation of the nematodes of the Amidostomatidae family: Amidostomoides acutum (Lundahl, 1848) Lomakin, 1991; Amidostomoides monodon (Linstow, 1882) Lomakin, 1991, and Amidostomoides petrovi (Shakhtahtinskaya, 1956) Lomakin, 1991, which still are used in the parasitological literature as synonyms of Amidostomum acutum (Lundahl, 1848). The research material consisted of nematodes isolated from gizzards of dabbling ducks from the north-west of Poland. To confirm the species differentiation, DNA from the nematodes was isolated and approximately 630bp of the 28S rRNA gene were sequenced. The obtained DNA sequences were tabulated and then phylogenetic analysis were conducted using the UPGMA method. The results of the research distinctly diversify the nematodes of the genus Amidostomoides at the DNA level, which together with morphological and ecological differences among them (hosts from different systematic groups) enables to classify them into the separate species.

  17. Characterization of a Caenorhabditis elegans glc seven-like phosphatase (gsp) orthologue from Haemonchus contortus (Nematoda).

    PubMed

    Campbell, Bronwyn E; Rabelo, Elida M; Hofmann, Andreas; Hu, Min; Gasser, Robin B

    2010-08-01

    A full-length complementary DNA (cDNA; designated Hc-stp-1) encoding a serine/threonine phosphatase (Hc-STP-1) was isolated from Haemonchus contortus, a strongylid nematode parasite of small ruminants. Hc-stp-1 was shown to be transcribed in males of both adults and fourth-stage larvae, but not in females, early larval stages or eggs. The full-length gene (2854 bp) contained ten exons and nine introns, and encoded a cDNA of 951 bp. Comparisons of the conceptually translated protein (316 amino acids, estimated at approximately 35 kDa) with serine/threonine phosphatases (STPs) from other organisms revealed the presence of the conserved motif LRGNHE. Structural analysis, by comparative modelling, confirmed strict conservation of residues and features involved in catalytic activity, and variation in the ligand-binding interface. Phylogenetic analysis of amino acid sequence data revealed that Hc-STP-1 clustered with STPs from other nematodes (including Caenorhabditis elegans, Trichostrongylus vitrinus, Oesophagostomum dentatum, Ascaris suum and Brugia malayi) to the exclusion of STPs from other organisms. The protein was inferred to be most closely related to the PP1 class of STPs of C. elegans, within a group containing STPs encoded, amongst others, by the genes gsp-3 and gsp-4 in this free-living nematode. The functions of proteins GSP-3 and GSP-4 are known to be central to spermatogenesis and other male-specific processes in C. elegans. The findings from the present and previous studies support the proposal that Hc-stp-1 and its product play a significant role in reproductive and/or developmental processes in maturing or adult male H. contortus.

  18. Molecular phylogeny of the Tylenchina and evolution of the female gonoduct (Nematoda: Rhabditida).

    PubMed

    Bert, Wim; Leliaert, Frederik; Vierstraete, Andy R; Vanfleteren, Jacques R; Borgonie, Gaetan

    2008-08-01

    Tylenchina are a morphologically and functionally diverse group of nematode species that range from free-living bacteriovores, over transitory grazing root-hair feeders to highly specialized plant-parasites with complex host associations. We performed phylogenetic analyses of small subunit rDNA sequences from 97 species including an analysis that account for the RNA secondary structure in the models of evolution. The present study confirms the sister relationship of the bacteriovore Cephalobidae with the predominantly plant-parasitic Tylenchomorpha. All analyses appoint the fungal-feeding Aphelenchidae and Aphelenchoididae as being polyphyletic but the morphology based hypothesis of their monophyly could not be significantly rejected. Within the Tylenchomorpha, the families that exclusively parasitize higher plants are joined in a single clade. However, only the monophyletic position of the (super)families Hoplolaimidae and Criconematoidea were supported; Anguinidae, Tylenchidae, Belonolaimidae and Pratylenchidae appeared to be paraphyletic or polyphyletic. Parsimony and likelihood ancestral state reconstruction revealed that burrowing endoparasitism and sedentary endoparasitism each evolved, respectively, at least six and at least three times independently, mostly from migratory ectoparasitic ancestors. Only root-knot nematodes have evolved from burrowing endoparasitic nematodes. Traditional classifications are partially misled by this convergent evolution of feeding type and associated morphology. Contrastingly, mapping attributes of the gonoduct cellular architecture, including newly obtained data of 18 species belonging to the Aphelenchoidea, Criconematoidea, Anguinidae and Panagrolaimidae, revealed a broad congruence of the gonoduct characters and the molecular phylogenetic hypothesis. Yet, the presence of an offset spermatheca and proliferation of uterus cells has evolved multiple times, the latter associated with derived endoparasitic feeding specialization and resulting reproduction mode. Ancestral state reconstruction further revealed that the gonoduct of the morphologically and ecologically dissimilar tylenchid and cephalobid nematodes evolved from a common ancestor.

  19. A new species of Sciurodendrium (Nematoda: Heligmonellidae) in Sciurus aureogaster (Rodentia: Sciuridae) from Morelos, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Falcón-Ordaz, Jorge; Lamothe-Argumedo, Marcos Rafael

    2006-06-01

    Sciurodendrium bravohollisae n. sp. (Heligmonellidae) is described as an intestinal parasite of 2 squirrels, Sciurus aureogaster Cuvier, 1829, collected from Los Robles, Municipio de Tlalnepantla, Morelos State, Mexico. The new species differs from all other congeners in possessing a very well-developed and sacciform genital cone. This is the seventh species described for the genus and the first one recorded in Mexico.

  20. Identification of Anisakis species (Nematoda: Anisakidae) in marine fish hosts from Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Koinari, M; Karl, S; Elliot, A; Ryan, U; Lymbery, A J

    2013-03-31

    The third-stage larvae of several genera of anisakid nematodes are important etiological agents for zoonotic human anisakiasis. The present study investigated the prevalence of potentially zoonotic anisakid larvae in fish collected on the coastal shelves off Madang and Rabaul in Papua New Guinea (PNG) where fish represents a major component of the diet. Nematodes were found in seven fish species including Decapterus macarellus, Gerres oblongus, Pinjalo lewisi, Pinjalo pinjalo, Selar crumenophthalmus, Scomberomorus maculatus and Thunnus albacares. They were identified by both light and scanning electron microscopy as Anisakis Type I larvae. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and the mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase subunit II (cox2) gene identified all nematodes as Anisakis typica. This study represents the first in-depth characterisation of Anisakis larvae from seven new fish hosts in PNG. The overall prevalence of larvae was low (7.6%) and no recognised zoonotic Anisakis species were identified, suggesting a very low threat of anisakiasis in PNG. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Morphological and molecular characterization of Anisakis larvae (Nematoda: Anisakidae) in Beryx splendens from Japanese waters.

    PubMed

    Murata, Rie; Suzuki, Jun; Sadamasu, Kenji; Kai, Akemi

    2011-06-01

    The third-stage (L3) larvae of Anisakis, which are the etiological agents of human anisakiasis, have been categorized morphologically into Anisakis Type I larvae and Anisakis Type II larvae. Genetic analysis has allowed easy identification of these larvae: Anisakis Type I larvae include the species Anisakis simplex sensu stricto, Anisakis pegreffii, Anisakis simplex C, Anisakis typica, Anisakis ziphidarum, and Anisakis nascettii, whereas Anisakis Type II larvae include the species Anisakis physeteris, Anisakis brevispiculata, and Anisakis paggiae. Since human consumption of raw fish and squid is common in Japan, we investigated Anisakis L3 larvae in 44 specimens of Beryx splendens from Japanese waters. A total of 730 Anisakis L3 larvae collected from B. splendens were divided morphologically into 4 types: Type I, Type II, and 2 other types that were similar to Anisakis Type III and Type IV described by Shiraki (1974). Anisakis Type II, Type III, and Type IV larvae all had a short ventriculus, but their tails were morphologically different. In addition, data from genetic analysis indicated that Anisakis Type II, Type III, and Type IV larvae could be identified as A. physeteris, A. brevispiculata, and A. paggiae, respectively. Therefore, A. physeteris, A. brevispiculata, and A. paggiae can be readily differentiated not only by genetic analysis but also by morphological characteristics of L3 larvae. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Molecular identification of Anisakis species (Nematoda: Anisakidae) from marine fishes collected in Turkish waters.

    PubMed

    Pekmezci, Gokmen Zafer; Onuk, Ertan Emek; Bolukbas, Cenk Soner; Yardimci, Banu; Gurler, Ali Tumay; Acici, Mustafa; Umur, Sinasi

    2014-03-17

    Anisakid nematodes are important etiological agents for zoonotic human anisakiasis (or anisakidosis). These parasites in the Turkish waters still remain unexplored. This study aims the molecular identification of Anisakis species in Turkey's coast from Black, Aegean and Mediterranean Sea and specifically to screen for zoonotic species in commonly commercialized a total of 1145 fish belonging to 31 different species using both polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (PCR-RFLP) and sequencing of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions and the mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase subunit II (cox2) gene. A total of 776 Anisakis type I larvae were isolated in 56/1145 (4.8%) fish of 7 species from Turkish waters. The combining all of our results, e.g., morphology, PCR-RFLP, ITS region, and the cox2 gene, conclusively supported the identification of 3 Anisakis spp. taken from marine fish hosts, namely Anisakis pegreffii, Anisakis typica and Anisakis simplex sensu stricto (s.str.)/A. pegreffii hybrid genotype. No Anisakis larvae were isolated from the Black Sea whereas A. pegreffii, A. typica and A. simplex s.str./A. pegreffii hybrid genotype was found in the Aegean Sea and A. pegreffii was only isolated from the Mediterranean Sea. This study represents the first identification of A. typica and A. simplex s.str./A. pegreffii hybrid genotypes from Turkish waters. Moreover, in the present study first record of the presence of A. pegreffii is also reported from Turkish coasts of Aegean and Mediterranean Sea. No zoonotic Anisakis species were found in commonly commercialized 1025 fish belonging to 16 different species from the Black Sea, thus Turkish populations who consume captured fish from the Black Sea may have a less risk of human anisakiasis or allergies. However, the prevalence of larvae were 47.1% and 46% and recognized zoonotic A. pegreffii were identified from the Aegean and Mediterranean Sea coast, suggesting a high threat of anisakiasis or allergies for Turkish populations who consume fish originating in these regions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Pan-Nematoda Transcriptomic Elucidation of Essential Intestinal Functions and Therapeutic Targets With Broad Potential.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Rosa, Bruce A; Jasmer, Douglas P; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2015-09-01

    The nematode intestine is continuous with the outside environment, making it easily accessible to anthelmintics for parasite control, but the development of new therapeutics is impeded by limited knowledge of nematode intestinal cell biology. We established the most comprehensive nematode intestinal functional database to date by generating transcriptional data from the dissected intestines of three parasitic nematodes spanning the phylum, and integrating the results with the whole proteomes of 10 nematodes (including 9 pathogens of humans or animals) and 3 host species and 2 outgroup species. We resolved 10,772 predicted nematode intestinal protein families (IntFams), and studied their presence and absence within the different lineages (births and deaths) among nematodes. Conserved intestinal cell functions representing ancestral functions of evolutionary importance were delineated, and molecular features useful for selective therapeutic targeting were identified. Molecular patterns conserved among IntFam proteins demonstrated large potential as therapeutic targets to inhibit intestinal cell functions with broad applications towards treatment and control of parasitic nematodes.

  4. Biological control of cyathostomin (Nematoda: Cyathostominae) with nematophagous fungus Monacrosporium thaumasium in tropical southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Tavela, Alexandre de Oliveira; Araújo, Jackson Victor; Braga, Fábio Ribeiro; Silva, André Ricardo; Carvalho, Rogério Oliva; Araujo, Juliana Milani; Ferreira, Sebastião Rodrigo; Carvalho, Giovanni Ribeiro

    2011-01-10

    Horses are hosts to a wide variety of helminthes; the most important are the cyathostomin, or small strongyles. The viability of a fungal formulation (pellets) using the nematode-trapping fungus Monacrosporium thaumasium was assessed in biological control of horse cyathostomin. Two groups (fungus-treated and control) consisted of six mares in each group, crossbred (ages of 2.5 and 3.5 years), were placed in pastures of Cynodon sp. naturally infected with horse cyathostomin larvae. In the treated group, each animal received 1g/10 kg body weight (0.2g/10 kg live weight of fungus) of pellets of sodium alginate matrix containing the fungus M. thaumasium orally, twice a week for 6 months. In the control group, animals received (1g/10 kg body weight) of pellets without fungus. The egg count per gram of feces showed difference (p<0.01) in the animals treated with the fungus in relation to the control animals during all months of the experiment. The EPG percentage decrease were 87.5%, 89.7%, 68.3%, 58.7%, 52.5% and 35.2% during June, July, August, September, October and November, respectively. In faecal cultures, there was difference (p<0.05) among animals treated with fungus was found in relation to the control animals during all the experiment month, with percentage reduction of 67.5%, 61.4% and 31.8% in September, October and November, respectively. Difference (p<0.01) was observed in the recovery of infective larvae from pastures that were collected up to 20 cm from the dung pats in pastures in the group treated with the fungus in relation to the control group with a reduction of 60.9% and between 0-20 and 0-40 cm from the faecal pat reduction (p<0.01) was about 56% in the group treated with the fungus M. thaumasium in relation to the control group pasture. There was no difference (p>0.05) between the average weight gains in both animal groups. The treatment of horses with pellets containing the nematophagous fungus M. thaumasium can be effective in controlling cyathostomin in the tropical region of southeastern Brazil. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Srivastavanema cynocephali n. sp. (Nematoda, Trichostrongylina, Heligmosomoidea), a parasite of a dermopteran from Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Durette-Desset, M C; Purwaningsih, E

    1999-03-01

    Srivastavanema cynocephali n. sp., a parasite of Cynocephalus variegatus (Dermoptera) from Indonesia, is described. This species is closely related to S. yapi Durette-Desset & Lim Boo Liat, 1975, in the characters of the synlophe at the mid-body and in the shape of the caudal bursa, but it is distinguished by the pattern of the synlophe in the posterior part of the body, very long, thin rays 2 and 3, a less developed genital cone, the absence of a membrane between left and right rays 6, and longer spicules. Its morphology is slightly less specialised than the four previously known species of the genus, which are all parasites of petauristines. The genus Srivastavanema (Singh, 1962) has a systematic position between the Heligmonellinae and the Brevistriatinae. Therefore, it may be a parasite of the Dermoptera which could have secondarily evolved within the Petauristinae. The Dermoptera may have played an important role in the evolution of the Heligmonellinae.

  6. Characterization of the complete mitochondrial genomes of two whipworms Trichuris ovis and Trichuris discolor (Nematoda: Trichuridae).

    PubMed

    Liu, Guo-Hua; Wang, Yan; Xu, Min-Jun; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Ye, Yong-Gang; Li, Jia-Yuan; Song, Hui-Qun; Lin, Rui-Qing; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2012-12-01

    For many years, whipworms (Trichuris spp.) have been described with a relatively narrow range of both morphological and biometrical features. Moreover, there has been insufficient discrimination between congeners (or closely related species). In the present study, we determined the complete mitochondrial (mt) genomes of two whipworms Trichuris ovis and Trichuris discolor, compared them and then tested the hypothesis that T. ovis and T. discolor are distinct species by phylogenetic analyses using Bayesian inference, maximum likelihood and maximum parsimony) based on the deduced amino acid sequences of the mt protein-coding genes. The complete mt genomes of T. ovis and T. discolor were 13,946 bp and 13,904 bp in size, respectively. Both mt genomes are circular, and consist of 37 genes, including 13 genes coding for proteins, 2 genes for rRNA, and 22 genes for tRNA. The gene content and arrangement are identical to that of human and pig whipworms Trichuris trichiura and Trichuris suis. Taken together, these analyses showed genetic distinctiveness and strongly supported the recent proposal that T. ovis and T. discolor are distinct species using nuclear ribosomal DNA and a portion of the mtDNA sequence dataset. The availability of the complete mtDNA sequences of T. ovis and T. discolor provides novel genetic markers for studying the population genetics, diagnostics and molecular epidemiology of T. ovis and T. discolor. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Studies on ascaridid, oxyurid and enoplid nematodes (Nematoda) from fishes of the Okavango River, Botswana.

    PubMed

    Moravec, Frantisek; Van As, Liesl L

    2015-07-22

    Based on light and scanning electron microscopical studies, eight species (five adult and three larval) of nematodes belonging to the Ascaridida, Oxyurida and Enoplida were collected from fishes of the Okavango River, Botswana, namely Falcaustra similis Moravec et Van As, 2004, Atractidae gen. sp. (only female) (both Cosmocercoidea), Cucullanus sp. (only female) (Seuratoidea), Cithariniella longicaudata sp. n., Synodontisia annulata sp. n. (both Oxyuroidea), Contracaecum sp. third-stage larvae, third-stage larvae of Galeiceps sp. (both Ascaridoidea) and Eustrongylides sp. fourth-stage larvae (Dioctophymatoidea). The new species Citharinella longicaudata (type host Schilbe intermedius Rüppel) is mainly characterised by the shape and size of cephalic papillae and the spicule 108 µm long, and Synodontisia annulata (type host S. intermedius) by the shape of cephalic papillae, body length of gravid females (4.88-5.33 mm) and a short spicule (66 µm long). The female specimen of Cucullanus sp. from Tilapia sparmanni Smith markedly differs from congeners parasitising inland fishes in Africa by the elongate pseudobuccal capsule and by the excretory pore far posterior to the oesophago-intestinal junction; apparently, it belongs to an undescribed species. Galeiceps larvae parasitising fishes are described for the first time. Cithariniella gonzalezi Van Waerebeke, Chabaud, Bain et Georges, 1988 is considered a junior synonym of C. khalili Petter, Vassiliadès et Troncy, 1972, and the previous records of Cithariniella citharini Khalil, 1964 from Synodontis spp. in Egypt concern, in fact, Cithariniella khalili Petter, Vassiliadès et Troncy, 1972. The specimens of Cithariniella reported by Koubková et al. (2010) from Paradistichodus dimidiatus (Pellegrin) in Senegal and misidentified as C. gonzalesi Van Waerebeke, Chabaud, Bain et Georges, 1988 are considered to represent a new species, C. koubkovae sp. n.; this is established by reference to the description and drawings provided by Koubková et al. (2010).

  8. [Nematodes (Nematoda) from bats (Chiroptera) of the Samarskaya Luka Peninsula (Russia)].

    PubMed

    Kirillova, N Iu; Kirillov, A A; Vekhnik, V P

    2008-01-01

    Fauna of parasitic nematodes from Chiroptera of the Samarskaya Luka has been studied. Seven nematode species has been recorded. Numbers of host specimens, indices of extensiveness and intensiveness of the invasion, parasite abundance, and brief characteristics of the nematode species are given. Some nematode species were for the first time recorded in bats of Russia.

  9. Lagochilascaris minor Leiper, 1909 (Nematoda: Ascarididae) in Mexico: three clinical cases from the Peninsula of Yucatan.

    PubMed

    Barrera-Pérez, Mario; Manrique-Saide, Pablo; Reyes-Novelo, Enrique; Escobedo-Ortegón, Javier; Sánchez-Moreno, Manuel; Sánchez, Cuauhtémoc

    2012-12-01

    Human lagochilascariasis (HL) is a parasite produced by Lagochilascaris minor Leiper 1909 that also can be found in cats and dogs. HL is considered an emerging zoonosis in the Americas, spreading from Mexico to Argentina, and the Caribbean Islands. The present paper describes three HL cases from the Peninsula of Yucatan, Mexico, recorded in the last decade. It describes the characteristics of the lesions and discusses the route of transmission in humans and particularly in the observed patients.

  10. Temporal and Spatial Distribution of Enterobius vermicularis (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) in the Prehistoric Americas.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, Karl J; Araújo, Adauto; Morrow, Johnica J

    2016-10-01

    Investigations of Enterobius sp. infection in prehistory have produced a body of data that can be used to evaluate the geographic distribution of infection through time in the Americas. Regional variations in prevalence are evident. In North America, 119 pinworm positive samples were found in 1,112 samples from 28 sites with a prevalence of 10.7%. Almost all of the positive samples came from agricultural sites. From Brazil, 0 pinworm positive samples were found in 325 samples from 7 sites. For the Andes region, 22 pinworm positive samples were found in 411 samples from 26 sites for a prevalence of 5.3%. Detailed analyses of these data defined several trends. First, preagricultural sites less frequently show evidence of infection compared to agricultural populations. This is especially clear in the data from North America, but is also evident in the data from South America. Second, there is an apparent relationship between the commonality of pinworms in coprolites and the manner of constructing villages. These analyses show that ancient parasitism has substantial value in documenting the range of human behaviors that influence parasitic infections.

  11. Xiphidorus amazonensis n. sp. (Nematoda: Longidoridae) from the Brazilian Amazon Basin.

    PubMed

    Uesugi, C H; Huang, C S; Cares, J E

    1985-07-01

    Xiphidorus amazonensis n. sp. was found in the rhizospheres of Jatropha curcas, Musa sp., Anona muricata, Cassia tora, Panicum laxum, Paspalum fasciculatum, Aeschynomene sensitiva, Saccharum officinarum, Manihot esculenta, Abelmoschus esculentus, Tamarindus indica, Mangifera indica, Vigna unguiculata, Zea mays, Commelina sp., Cyperus rotundus, Fimbristylis miliacea, Citrus sinensis, and Eichhornia crassipes on the Amazon River island of Xiborena, approximately 40 km southeast of Manaus, capital of the State of Amazonas. The type habitat is flooded annually for about 6 months by the Amazon River. Xiphidorus amazonensis n. sp. differs from the closely related species Xiphidorus yepesara Monteiro, 1976 by the larger size, by a, b, and c values, and by the rounded tail terminus. It also resembles Xiphidorus tucumanensis Chaves and Coomans, 1984, but can be distinguished by its larger size, larger a, b, and c values, more conical female tail, bilobed amphidial pouch, and the presence of a spermatheca full of sperm.

  12. The phylogenetic relationships of endemic Australasian trichostrongylin families (Nematoda: Strongylida) parasitic in marsupials and monotremes.

    PubMed

    Chilton, Neil B; Huby-Chilton, Florence; Koehler, Anson V; Gasser, Robin B; Beveridge, Ian

    2015-10-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of the endemic (or largely endemic) Australasian trichostrongylin nematode families Herpetostrongylidae, Mackerrastrongylidae and Nicollinidae as well as endemic trichostrongylin nematodes currently placed in the families Trichostrongylidae and Molineidae were examined using the complete large subunit (28S) ribosomal RNA gene. The Herpetostrongylinae proved to be monophyletic. However, representatives of the Nicollinidae nested with the Herpetostrongylinae. The Mackerrastrongylidae was also a monophyletic group and included Peramelistrongylus, currently classified within the Trichostrongylidae. The Globocephaloidinae, currently considered to be a subfamily of the Herpetostrongylidae, was excluded from the family in the current analysis. Ollulanus and Libyostrongylus, included for the first time in a molecular phylogenetic analysis, were placed within the Trichostrongylidae. This study provided strong support for the Herpetostrongylidae (including within it the Nicollinidae, but excluding the Globocephaloidinae) and the Mackerrastrongylidae as monophyletic assemblages. Additional studies are required to resolve the relationships of the remaining endemic Australasian trichostrongylin genera.

  13. INCORPORATION OF TRITIATED THYMIDINE IN THE CELLS OF CAENORHABDITIS BRIGGSAE (NEMATODA) REARED IN AXENIC CULTURE

    PubMed Central

    Nonnenmacher-Godet, Jacqueline; Dougherty, Ellsworth C.

    1964-01-01

    In the rhabditid nematode Caenorhabditis briggsae the incorporation of thymidine-H3 has been studied by autoradiography after Feulgen staining, with animals maintained under axenic conditions in a medium of only partly defined composition. Labeling has been followed in adults left in the presence of thymidine-H3 for periods of from ½ to 24 hours, as well as in adults reared from larvae in the presence of the tritiated nucleoside. A massive incorporation is found in the nuclei of the gonads and intestine; also a less intense particulate cytoplasmic incorporation is clear in certain cells, especially those of the intestine. In general, all labeling has proved to be sensitive to DNase, but resistant to RNase. The label's stability has been tested by the transfer of adults into a medium containing "cold" thymidine. They remain there for up to 48 hours. A transfer for 24 hours results in a considerable decrease in the intensity of nuclear and cytoplasmic labeling; a stay of 48 hours leads to its complete disappearance from non-dividing (intestinal) as well as dividing (gonadal) nuclei. A phenomenon of DNA turnover is envisaged and discussed as a possible physiological attribute of C. briggsae. PMID:14195615

  14. A new molineid (Nematoda: Trichostrongylina) parasite of Dasypus hybridus (Xenarthra: Dasypodidae) from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Ezquiaga, María C; Digiani, María C; Navone, Graciela T

    2012-12-01

    Delicata abbai n. sp. collected from the small intestine of the southern long-nosed armadillo, Dasypus hybridus, from Argentina is herein described. This new species is characterized by vulvar opening within second half of body length, female tail conical, ending bluntly with a terminal spine, complex spicules, presence of a bursal membrane supported by 2 small rays, and a synlophe with bilateral symmetry and 26 cuticular ridges. By the morphology of the caudal bursa, caudal end of female, and shape of spicules, the new species resembles Delicata cameroni Travassos, 1935 and Delicata variabilis Travassos, 1935 . However, it differs from D. cameroni by having rays 5 and 6 diverging more proximally, rays 8 shorter than the dorsal ray, and spicules with a different shape. Delicata abbai n. sp. is distinguished from D. variabilis mainly by the spicules, which have a different shape and proportion of their constitutive parts. This is the first report of a species of Delicata in Argentina.

  15. Growth and development of Gnathostoma spinigerum (Nematoda: Gnathostomatidae) larvae in Mesocyclops aspericornis (Cyclopoida: Cyclopidae).

    PubMed

    Janwan, Penchom; Intapan, Pewpan M; Sanpool, Oranuch; Sadaow, Luxkhana; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2011-05-27

    Gnathostoma spinigerum larva is pathogenic, causing gnathostomiasis in humans and certain animals, and is prevalent mainly in Asia. Growth and development of Gnathostoma spinigerum larvae in the cyclopoid copepod Mesocyclops aspericornis, the first intermediate host, were examined. When newly hatched, ensheathed second-stage larvae (L2) were ingested by M. aspericornis, they immediately appeared exsheathed in the stomach of M. aspericornis. They then penetrated the stomach wall and entered the body cavity, where they immediately metamorphosed to a stunted form with the body length/width ratio equal to the early third-stage larvae (EL3) up to 2 h after being ingested. During metamorphosis, the anterior spine-like structure of L2 transformed into unequal transparent lips. The larvae moulted into EL3 in the body cavity of the copepod at around day 5-7 post-infection. Minute cuticular striations were seen on the whole body, with prominent single-pointed spines on the anterior part of the body. The head bulb had four rows of hooklets and two lateral trilobed lips. The size of EL3 in copepods continuously increased towards day 12 and showed a negative correlation to their density per copepod (R = -0.881, P < 0.05 for body length, and R = -0.906, P < 0.05 for body width). The results revealed for the first time that M. aspericornis, one of the most abundant freshwater copepods in Thailand, is a suitable first intermediate host for G. spinigerum. High susceptibility of M. aspericornis suggests its importance for the maintenance of the life cycle of G. spinigerum in Thailand.

  16. The Distribution of Lectins across the Phylum Nematoda: A Genome-Wide Search

    PubMed Central

    Bauters, Lander; Naalden, Diana; Gheysen, Godelieve

    2017-01-01

    Nematodes are a very diverse phylum that has adapted to nearly every ecosystem. They have developed specialized lifestyles, dividing the phylum into free-living, animal, and plant parasitic species. Their sheer abundance in numbers and presence in nearly every ecosystem make them the most prevalent animals on earth. In this research nematode-specific profiles were designed to retrieve predicted lectin-like domains from the sequence data of nematode genomes and transcriptomes. Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins that play numerous roles inside and outside the cell depending on their sugar specificity and associated protein domains. The sugar-binding properties of the retrieved lectin-like proteins were predicted in silico. Although most research has focused on C-type lectin-like, galectin-like, and calreticulin-like proteins in nematodes, we show that the lectin-like repertoire in nematodes is far more diverse. We focused on C-type lectins, which are abundantly present in all investigated nematode species, but seem to be far more abundant in free-living species. Although C-type lectin-like proteins are omnipresent in nematodes, we have shown that only a small part possesses the residues that are thought to be essential for carbohydrate binding. Curiously, hevein, a typical plant lectin domain not reported in animals before, was found in some nematode species. PMID:28054982

  17. Pseudostertagia bullosa (Nematoda: Trichostrongyloidea) in artiodactyl hosts from North America: redescription and comments on systematics.

    PubMed

    Hoberg, E P; Abrams, A

    2005-04-01

    A relationship for Pseudostertagia bullosa within the trichostrongyloids has been enigmatic or unresolved. Studies of the synlophe in males and females of P. bullosa revealed a tapering system anterior to the deirids and a pattern of parallel ridges extending to near the caudal extremity in both lateral and median fields. Structurally, the synlophe differs considerably from that seen among the Cooperiinae and exhibits homoplasy with respect to ridge systems among some Ostertagiinae. Other structural characters due to symplesiomorphy, homoplasy or because they represent autapomorphies do not serve to reveal the putative relationships for P. bullosa with other trichostrongyloids. Although somewhat equivocal, the 2-2-1 pattern of the bursa and position of rays 2 and 3 suggest an association with the Cooperinae, as postulated by Durette-Desset and others. Pseudostertagia bullosa appears to be a species that has survived in the pronghorn, Antilocapra americana, a relictual pecoran artiodactyl that occurs in xeric regions of western North America; pronghorn are the sole remnant of the late Tertiary radiation for Antilocapridae across North America. Pseudostertagia bullosa may occur in mixed infections with a number of ostertagiines in the abomasa of mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) and domestic sheep (Ovis aries) in regions of sympatry for pronghorn and these artiodactyl hosts.

  18. Morphology and molecular characterization hold hands: clarifying the taxonomy of Hysterothylacium (Nematoda: Anisakidae) larval forms.

    PubMed

    Pantoja, Camila S; Pereira, Felipe B; Santos, Cláudia P; Luque, José L

    2016-11-01

    During the last decade, many morphotypes of larval forms of Hysterothylacium have been proposed; however, their boundaries are taxonomically unclear. We compare newly collected material with data available for Hysterothylacium larvae, based on genetics and morphology, in order to evaluate their relationships and simplify their classification. The previously described Hysterothylacium larval type IV, type V, and type X were found in several marine fishes from Brazil. A new Hysterothylacium larval type XV, parasitic in Elops saurus from State of Sergipe, north-eastern Brazil, was proposed based on its genetic singularity and the presence of numerous spines throughout the body. Based upon phylogenetic reconstruction using the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) ITS2 sequences along with morphological traits, the following third stage larvae were considered valid (synonyms are inside parenthesis) type III (= types VII and VIII), type V (= types VI, XII, and XIII), and type X (= type XIV). Despite the lack of molecular data, Hysterothylacium larval type II is considered as synonym of type I because of their identical morphology. The morphometry of Hysterothylacium third stage larvae proved to be weak as a diagnostic tool due to its high rates of variation. Phylogenetic reconstruction using the concatenated sequences of rDNA ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 and the mitochondrion DNA (mtDNA) cox2 revealed that the sampled Hysterothylacium larval types V may represent three different species and H. deardorffovestreetorum may represent two different taxa. Furthermore, H. deardorffovestreetorum is considered species inquirenda due to its problematic description and diagnosis which are based only on larvae. A key to Hysterothylacium larvae from marine fishes is provided.

  19. Foleyellides rhinellae sp. nov. (Nematoda, Onchocercidae) a new filaria parasitizing Rhinella marina (Anura, Bufonidae) in Mexico.

    PubMed

    García-Prieto, Luis; Ruiz-Torres, Nallely; Osorio-Sarabia, David; Merlo-Serna, Aldo

    2014-09-01

    A new nematode species, Foleyellides rhinellae sp. nov. (Onchocercidae), is described from specimens found in the body cavity of the cane toad, Rhinella marina (Linnaeus) (Anura, Bufonidae), in the Laguna de Coyuca, Guerrero, in the Pacific slope of Mexico. The new species differs from the other nine species of Foleyellides by infecting bufonid anurans and by the number and arrangement of caudal papillae. Other distinguishing feature of the new species is the size of the left spicule (0.16-0.23 long), the smallest recorded among the species included in the genus. Foleyellides rhinellae sp. nov. is the second known species of the genus recorded from amphibians of Mexico.

  20. Global assessment of molecularly identified Anisakis Dujardin, 1845 (Nematoda: Anisakidae) in their teleost intermediate hosts.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Thomas; Hailer, Frank; Palm, Harry W; Klimpel, Sven

    2013-05-01

    Here, we present the ITS ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequence data on 330 larvae of nematodes of the genus Anisakis Dujardin, 1845 collected from 26 different bony fish species from 21 sampling locations and different climatic zones. New host records are provided for Anisakis simplex (Rudolphi, 1809) sensu stricto (s.s.) and A. pegreffli Campana-Rouget et Biocca, 1955 from Anoplopoma fimbria (Pallas) (Santa Barbara, East Pacific), A. typica (Diesing, 1860) from Caesio cuning (Bloch), Lepturacanthus savala (Cuvier) and Katsuwonus pelamis (Linnaeus) (Indonesia, West Pacific), A. simplex s.s. from Cololabis saira (Brevoort) (Hawaii, Central Pacific), A. simplex C of Nascetti et al. (1986) from Sebastolobus alascanus Bean (Santa Barbara, East Pacific) and A. physeteris Baylis, 1923 from Synaphobranchus kaupii Johnson (Namibia, East Atlantic). Comparison with host records from 60 previous molecular studies of Anisakis species reveals the teleost host range so far recorded for the genus. Perciform (57 species) and gadiform (21) fishes were the most frequently infected orders, followed by pleuronectiforms (15) and scorpaeniforms (15). Most commonly infected fish families were Scombridae (12), Gadidae (10), Carangidae (8) and Clupeidae (7), with Merluccius merluccius (Linnaeus) alone harbouring eight Anisakis species. Different intermediate host compositions implicate differing life cycles for the so far molecularly identified Anisakis sibling species.

  1. Philometra floridensis (Nematoda: Philometridae) damages ovarian tissue without reducing host (Sciaenops ocellatus) fecundity.

    PubMed

    Bakenhaster, Micah D; Lowerre-Barbieri, Susan; Kiryu, Yasunari; Walters, Sarah; Fajer-Avila, Emma J

    2014-04-03

    The parasitic nematode Philometra floridensis infects the ovary of its only host, the economically important fish species Sciaenops ocellatus, but the factors influencing host susceptibility and potential pathogenic effects are unknown. Here we report new information on these topics from evaluations of infected and uninfected hosts collected from the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Fish length and age were evaluated vis-à-vis nematode prevalence to check for ontogenetic differences in host susceptibility. To evaluate health and reproductive consequences of infection, we looked for effects in Fulton's condition factor (K) and batch fecundity estimates (BF), and we evaluated ovarian tissue histologically to check for oocyte atresia and other host responses. We observed localized pathological changes in fish ovarian tissue associated with female nematodes, including leucocytic exudates, granulomatous inflammation, and Langhans-type multinucleated giant cells; the hosts, however, appeared to maintain high fecundity and actually exhibited, on average, better health index scores and higher relative fecundity than did uninfected fish. These differences are likely explained by the parasite's tendency to disproportionately infect the largest, actively spawning fish and by the localization of pathogenic changes, which could have masked effects that otherwise would have been reflected in mass-based health indicators. Although we did not detect negative effects on measures of overall health or reproductive output, further research is needed to better elucidate the relationship between these parasites and other factors affecting host reproductive potential, such as egg quality.

  2. Taxonomic and Molecular Identification of Hemicaloosia, Hemicycliophora, Gracilacus and Paratylenchus Species (Nematoda: Criconematidae)

    PubMed Central

    Cordero López, Marco A.; Robbins, Robert T.; Szalanski, Allen L.

    2013-01-01

    Populations of Hemicycliophora epicharoides, H. gigas, H. labiata, H. pruni, H. shepherdi, H. vidua, H. zuckermani, Gracilacus straeleni, and Paratylenchus labiosus were obtained from different geographical areas in the continental United States and characterized morphological and molecularly. Two new species of Hemicycliophorinae: Hemicaloosia uarki n. sp from Pinetree, St. Francis County, Arkansas, and Hemicycliophora wyei n. sp from Wayne County, North Carolina, are also described. Hemicaloosia uarki n. sp. is characterized by having two lip annuli separated from the rest of body and directed anteriorly, a long stylet (106-124 μm), long body length (1,081-1,326 μm) and a single lateral fields demarcated by interruptions of the body annuli. Hemicycliophora wyei n. sp. showed a lateral fields demarked by two faint lines with transverse anastomoses and/or breaks of the striae; an elongated not offset conical tail with distinct annulations and a rounded tip and long vulval lips with a vulval sleeve. The molecular characterizations of the new (H. uarki n. sp. and H. wyei n. sp.) and known species of Criconematidae using the ITS1 rDNA gene sequence and the molecular phylogenetic relationships are provided. PMID:24115782

  3. Description and Larval Heteromorphism of Hoplolaimus concaudajuvencus, n. sp. (Nematoda: Hoplolain-lidae)

    PubMed Central

    Golden, A. M.; Minton, N. A.

    1970-01-01

    Hoplolaimus concaudajuvencus n. sp., of the genus Hoplolaimus Daday, 1905, characterized by larval heteromorphism, is described and illustrated as recovered from ryegrass/bermudagrass golf green turf in Florida. Females and males are closely related to H. galeatus (Cobb, 1913) Thorne, 1935, but have longer stylets with more definitely tulip-shaped stylet knobs which anteriorly tend to close upon the stylet shaft more than in H. galeatus. First and second-stage larvae have a conically-pointed tail unlike any known species of the genus. Subsequent stages, including females, have rounded tails essentially similar to other species of the genus and males possess the typical hopolaimid tail and bursa. The first molt was found to occur within the egg. PMID:19322290

  4. Description of Hoplolaimus bachlongviensis sp. n. (Nematoda: Hoplolaimidae) from banana soil in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tien Huu; Bui, Quang Duc

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background The genus Hoplolaimus Daday, 1905 belongs to the subfamily Hoplolaimine Filipiev, 1934 of family Hoplolaimidae Filipiev, 1934 (Krall 1990). Daday established this genus on a single female of H. tylenchiformis recovered from a mud hole on Banco Island, Paraguay in 1905 (Sher 1963​, Krall 1990). Hoplolaimus species are distributed worldwide and cause damage on numerous agricultural crops (Luc et al. 1990 Robbins et al. 1998​). In 1992, Handoo and Golden reviewed 29 valid species of genus Hoplolaimus Dayday, 1905 (Handoo and Golden 1992). Siddiqi (2000) recognised three subgenera in Hoplolaimus: Hoplolaimus (Hoplolaimus) with ten species, is characterized by lateral field distinct, with four incisures, excretory pore behind hemizonid; Hoplolaimus (Basirolaimus) with 18 species, is characterized by lateral field with one to three incisures, obliterated, excretory pore anterior to hemizonid, dorsal oesophageal gland quadrinucleate; and Hoplolaimus (Ethiolaimus) with four species is characterized by lateral field with one to three incisures, obliterated; excretory pore anterior to hemizonid, dorsal oesophageal gland uninucleate (Siddiqi 2000). Since then, Hoplolaimus puriensis Ali, Shaheen & Pervez, 2009 has been described (​Ali et al. 2009). Up to now, there have been two species of genus Hoplolaimus reported in Vietnam, viz H. seinhorsti and H. chambus (Nguyen and Nguyen 2000). New information Hoplolaimus bachlongviensis sp. n. was isolated from banana soil in Bach Long Vi Island, Vietnam. The female of this species is described and illustrated below. Some diagnostic characters of this species include body slightly curved ventrally, offset lip region exhibiting three to four annules, lateral field reduced, pharyngeal glands with six nuclei, excretory pore anterior to hemizonid, epiptygma absent, intestine not overlapping rectum and male was not found. PMID:26696764

  5. Taxonomic and Molecular Identification of Bakernema, Criconema, Hemicriconemoides, Ogma and Xenocriconemella Species (Nematoda: Criconematidae)

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, Marco A.; Robbins, Robert T.; Szalanski, Allen L.

    2012-01-01

    Populations of Bakernema inaequale, C. petasum, C. sphagni, C. mutabile, Ogma octangulare, Xenocriconemella macrodora and Hemicriconemoides chitwoodi were identified and re-described from different geographical areas in the continental United States and molecularly characterized. Two new species of spine nematodes Criconema arkaense n. sp. from Washington County and Lee County, Arkansas and Criconema warrenense n. sp from Warren, Bradley County, Arkansas are also described and named. Criconema arkaense is characterize by having a conspicuous lip region offset from the body with two annuli, short rounded tail with a thin cuticular sheath and subterminal anus. Criconema warrenense n. sp. has two lip region annuli about the same width, first annulus directed posteriorly, separated by a narrow neck annulus and a short conoid tail, unilobed non-folded annulus. The molecular characterization of Criconema arkaense and Criconema warrenense using ITS1 rDNA gene sequence and the molecular phylogenetic relationships of these new species along with the known spines nematodes are provided. PMID:23482683

  6. Description and Larval Heteromorphism of Hoplolaimus concaudajuvencus, n. sp. (Nematoda: Hoplolain-lidae).

    PubMed

    Golden, A M; Minton, N A

    1970-04-01

    Hoplolaimus concaudajuvencus n. sp., of the genus Hoplolaimus Daday, 1905, characterized by larval heteromorphism, is described and illustrated as recovered from ryegrass/bermudagrass golf green turf in Florida. Females and males are closely related to H. galeatus (Cobb, 1913) Thorne, 1935, but have longer stylets with more definitely tulip-shaped stylet knobs which anteriorly tend to close upon the stylet shaft more than in H. galeatus. First and second-stage larvae have a conically-pointed tail unlike any known species of the genus. Subsequent stages, including females, have rounded tails essentially similar to other species of the genus and males possess the typical hopolaimid tail and bursa. The first molt was found to occur within the egg.

  7. Pathology and morphometry of Hystrichis acanthocephalicus (Nematoda) from Phimosus infuscatus (Pelecaniformes) in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Scheer, Simone; Macedo, Márcia Raquel Pegoraro; Soares, Mauro Pereira; Schramm, Camila Costa; Muller, Gertrud

    2017-01-26

    Species of Hystrichis are parasite nematodes of the digestive tract of aquatic birds in South America, Europe and Asia. In Brazil, Hystrichis acanthocephalicus has been reported in Phimosus infuscatus. There are few data on the morphometry of this species and there are no reports on pathological conditions that it causes. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to report morphometric data from H. acanthocephalicus and describe the pathological effects of this parasite on the Phimosus infuscatus proventriculus. Thirty gastrointestinal tracts of P. infuscatus were examined to search for nematodes and H. acanthocephalicus occurred in 83% of hosts. Were measured the total length and body width of males and females, and of their respective cuticular spines, esophagus, spicules and eggs, and the internal and external diameter of copulatory bursa. Histopathological examination revealed parasitic structures in the proventriculus from the lumen (anterior end) to the outer layers of the organ (intermediate and posterior parts), in which we observed inflammatory reaction with infiltration of heterophils, hemorrhage and hemosiderin. The results of this study of histopathology, morphometry and parasitological indices are the first ones reported to H. acanthocephalicus and should contribute to the identification and recognition in cases of outbreaks in the Neotropical region.

  8. Stepwise and Canonical Discriminant Analysis of Longidorus Species (Nematoda: Longidoridae) from Arkansas

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Weimin; Robbins, R. T.

    2004-01-01

    During a 1998-to-2001 survey from Arkansas, nine distinct species of Longidorus were found including five new species. Morphometrics of these nine species were used in a stepwise and canonical discrimination to select a subset of characteristics that best identified each species. Student's t test was applied to compare Longidorus breviannulatus Norton &Hoffman, 1975; L. crassus Thorne, 1974; L. diadecturus Eveleigh &Allen, 1982; L. fragilis Thorne, 1974; L. biformis Ye &Robbins, 2004; L. glycines Ye &Robbins, 2004; L. grandis Ye &Robbins, 2003; L. paralongicaudatus Ye &Robbins, 2003; and L. paravineacola Ye &Robbins, 2003 to examine interspecies variation and test for the most useful morphometric characters in species discrimination. Most of the morphometric characters were useful to differentiate species, but species identification could not be based on a single character because the morphometric character ranges often overlap. Stepwise discriminant analysis indicated that the guide ring position, head width, tail length, body length, odontostyle length, and anal body width were the most important variables. These were used to generate canonical variables in discriminating the species. The first three canonical variables accounted for 95% of the total variance. The scatterplots by the first three canonical variables grouped and separated the Longidorus species from Arkansas. Stepwise and canonical discriminant analyses were useful for examining the groupings and morphometric relationships of the nine Longidorus species. PMID:19262825

  9. Description of non-type Seinura winchesi from mushroom compost (Nematoda: Seinuridae).

    PubMed

    Kaisa, T R

    2002-06-01

    Non-type material identified as Seinura winchesi, and deposited in the collection of the Nematology Department, Rothamsted Experimental Station, England, is described. The material was collected from mushroom compost in Leeds, England, in 1957. Females of this population are characterized by a set-off head, knobless stylet (20-21 microm), two rows of oogonia-oocytes, and absence of a postuterine sac. The median bulb is oblong and, at times, is constricted in the middle. The body is 565 to 675 microm long and tapers posteriorly to a pointed terminus. The cuticle is finely annulated, and there are three incisures in the lateral field. The ovary is outstretched and overlaps the esophageal gland lobes. A spermatheca is present, and spermatozoa are visible. The vulva is posteriorly located (V = 77-80), and a flap is absent. Males are 550 to 680 microm long with a spicate tail that bears three pairs of subventral papillae. The spike is short (14-18 microm), about one-half the tail length. The testis is 360 to 412 microm long, not reflexed, and at times overlaps the esophageal gland lobes. Spermatogonia-spermatocytes are in two rows. Spicules are 14 to 15 microm long with a prominent apex, and small rostrum. A bursa and gubernaculum are absent.

  10. A new species of Falcaustra (Nematoda: Kathlaniidae) in Nactus pelagicus (Squamata: Gekkonidae) from Tanna Island, Vanuatu.

    PubMed

    Bursey, Charles R; Goldberg, Stephen R; Hamilton, Alison M; Austin, Christopher C

    2010-10-01

    Falcaustra tannaensis n. sp. (Ascaridida: Kathlaniidae) from the large intestine of Nactus pelagicus (Squamata: Gekkonidae) is described and illustrated. Falcaustra tannaensis represents the first species from Oceanica to be assigned to the genus and is distinguished from other species of Falcaustra by the distribution pattern of caudal papillae (8 precloacal, 2 adcloacal, 10 postcloacal, and 1 median), length of spicules (2.43-2.68 mm), and presence of a pseudosucker.

  11. Physico-chemical properties of the female sex pheromone of Heterodera schachtii (Nematoda: Heteroderidae).

    PubMed

    Aumann, J; Dietsche, E; Rutencrantz, S; Ladehoff, H

    1998-11-01

    Several physico-chemical properties of the female sex pheromone of the beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii were elucidated. At least one component of the pheromone can be extracted from aqueous solutions with diethyl ether. However, the pheromone has a higher solubility in water, as most of the pheromone activity remained in the water fraction. Ion exchange chromatography revealed that the pheromone or at least one of its components is positively charged, whereas another pheromone component may be negatively charged. Fractional distillation of pheromone extracts showed that it is, indeed, composed of at least two components. These components may interact additively rather than synergistically.

  12. The life cycle of Ohbayashinema erbaevae (Nematoda, Heligmosomoidea, Heligmosomidae) in Ochotona rufescens rufescens (Ochotonidae).

    PubMed

    Audebert, F; Cassone, J; Baccam, D; Kerboeuf, D; Durette-Desset, M C

    2001-12-01

    The morphogenesis and the chronology of the life cycle of Ohbayashinema erbaevoe Durette-Desset et al, 2000, a parasite of Ochotona daurica from Buriatia were studied in detail in an experimental host, Ochotona rufescens rufescens. Worm-free pikas were each infected per os with O. erbaevae larvae and were killed at one day post infection (DPI 1) and every 12 hours from 1.5 to 8 days post infection. By DPI 1, all the larvae were exsheathed and in the small intestine. The third moult occurred in 2.5-3.0 days. The last moult occurred in 4.0-4.5 days. The prepatent period was eight days and the patent period lasted between two and 12 weeks. The distribution of O. erbaevae along the small intestine of the pikas was assessed. For each experiment, a morphological description of the different stages of the life cycle was provided. The morphogenesis and the chronology of the life cycle of O. erbaevae appear to be identical with those of two other genera of the family of the Heligmosomidae, Heligmosomum Railliet & Henry, 1909 and Heligmosomoides Hall, 1916. They confirm that the three genera belong to the same family. The presence of an abortive posterior genital branch in the female of O. erbaevae, which represents the posterior part of the genital primordium of the didelphic females, supports the systematic position of the genus Ohbayashinema between the didelphic genus Citellinema Hall, 1916 and the monodelphic genera Heligmosomum and Heligmosomoides.

  13. Photomicrographic images of some features of Uncinaria spp (Nematoda: Ancylostomatidae) from otariid pinnipeds.

    PubMed

    Lyons, E T; DeLong, R L

    2005-03-01

    Photomicrographs of several morphologic features of hookworms (Uncinaria spp) from northern fur seal (Callorhinus ursinus) and California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) pups are presented. The main purpose is to show and describe some physical characteristics of hookworms from the two hosts; it is not to decide from these attributes whether the Uncinaria spp are the same species. The number of species of Uncinaria in pinnipeds is uncertain and specimens need to be examined from the various infected seals and sea lions before the taxonomy of these parasites can be clarified. Information in the present paper should aid in this determination.

  14. Granular Formulations of Steinernema carpocapsae (strain All) (Nematoda: Rhabditida) with Improved Shelf Life

    PubMed Central

    Connick, W. J.; Nickle, W. R.; Williams, K. S.; Vinyard, B. T.

    1994-01-01

    Shelf life (nematode survival) of Steinernema carpocapsae (strain All) nematodes at 21 C in "Pesta" granules, made by a pasta-like process, was increased from 8 to 26 weeks by incorporating low concentrations of formaldehyde. Pesta samples containing an average of 427,000 nematodes/g were prepared with wheat flour (semolina or bread flour), kaolin, bentonite, peat moss, nematode slurry, and formaldehyde (0-1.4% w/w) and were dried to a water content of 23.6-26.9%. Nematodes emerged from Pesta (S. carpocapsae) granules when placed in water or on moist filter paper. Incorporation of 0.2% w/w formaldehyde (nominal; 0.05% by analysis) was optimum for increasing nematode survival in semolina-based Pesta, and also inhibited fungal growth on the granules. Bread flour Pesta samples prepared by formaldehyde addition to the nematode slurry prior to dough preparation, rather than by addition to a mixture of dry ingredients, had longer shelf life. Nematodes recovered from granules made with 0.2% formaldehyde and stored 20 weeks at 21 C caused 100% mortality of wax moth (Galleria mellonella) larvae. PMID:19279903

  15. Uncinaria hamiltoni (Nematoda: Ancylostomatidae) in South American sea lions, Otaria flavescens, from northern Patagonia, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Berón-Vera, B; Crespo, E A; Raga, J A; Pedraza, S N

    2004-08-01

    Thirty-one South American sea lion pups (Otaria flavescens) found dead in Punta León, Argentina, during the summer of 2002, were examined for hookworms (Uncinaria hamiltoni). Parasite parameters were analyzed in 2 locations of the rookery, i.e., a traditional, well-structured breeding area and an expanding area with juveniles and a lax social structure. Prevalence of hookworms was 50% in both localities, and no difference was observed in prevalence between pup sexes (P > 0.05). Hookworms were concentrated in the small intestine. Transmammary transmission is assumed because only adult hookworms were found in the pups. The mean intensity of hookworms per pup was 135; the mean intensity in females (92.78) was significantly different (P < 0.05) from that of males (230.25). No difference (P > 0.05) in intensity was found between the 2 breeding areas, although prevalence was higher in the traditional breeding area than in the other area. Location was the only factor affecting hookworm prevalence (P log-linear model: 0.9552; chi2: 1.5629). No apparent trend between body condition and intensity of hookworms was observed.

  16. A new method for loading Bursaphelenchus xylophilus (Nematoda: Aphelenchoididae) on adult Monochamus alternatus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae).

    PubMed

    Togashi, Katsumi

    2004-06-01

    A new method was developed for loading the pinewood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus (Steiner et Buhrer) Nickle, on the beetle Monochamus alternatus Hope. Postdiapause beetle larvae were sterilized with 70 and 99.9% aqueous ethanol and placed singly in flasks where B. xylophilus reproduced on the fungus Ophiostoma minus (Hedgcock) H. et P. Sydow that had been grown on autoclaved barley grain and Pinus densifiora Sieb. et Zucc. wood chips. The fungus produced a large nematode population that developed to a high proportion of third-stage dispersal juveniles that molted to the fourth-stage dispersal juveniles. The survival rate was 80%, and the mean nematode load was 10,096. It took a mean of 5 wk to obtain the nematode-infested beetles after the initiation of nematode rearing.

  17. Inhibitory Effect of Bursaphelenchus mucronatus (Nematoda: Aphelenchoididae) on B. xylophilus Boarding Adult Monochamus alternatus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae).

    PubMed

    Jikumaru, Shota; Togashi, Katsumi

    2004-03-01

    Inhibitory effects of Bursaphelenchus mucronatus on the number of B. xylophilus carried by an adult Monochamus alternatus were investigated using artificial pupal chambers. When pupal chambers were infested with either B. xylophilus or B. mucronatus, the load of B. xylophilus onto the beetle was greater (P < 0.001) than that of B. mucronatus. However, within the pupal chamber there was no difference in the abundance of the third-stage dispersal juveniles, which would molt to the fourth-stage dispersal juveniles to board beetles. The nematode load on beetles that emerged from pupal chambers infested with both Bursaphelenchus species was smaller (P = 0.015) than that of beetles with B. xylophilus alone but greater (P < 0.001) than that of beetles with B. mucronatus alone, suggesting an inhibitory effect of B. mucronatus. As a result of this study, the rate of inhibition of B. mucronatus on molting of third-stage dispersal juveniles of B. xylophilus to fourth-stage dispersal juveniles was 0.65, which resulted in great inhibition on boarding beetles at a rate of 0.7.

  18. Analysis of FMRFamide-like peptide (FLP) diversity in phylum Nematoda.

    PubMed

    McVeigh, Paul; Leech, Suzanne; Mair, Gunnar R; Marks, Nikki J; Geary, Timothy G; Maule, Aaron G

    2005-09-01

    This study reports a series of systematic BLAST searches of nematode ESTs on the Genbank database, using search strings derived from known nematode FLPs (those encoded by Caenorhabditis elegans flp genes as well as those isolated from other nematodes including Ascaris suum), as well as query sequences representative of theoretical FLPs. Over 1000 putative FLP-encoding ESTs were identified from multiple nematode species. A total of 969 ESTs representing sequelogs of the 23 known C. elegans flp genes were identified in 32 species, from clades I, III, IV and V. Numerical analysis of EST numbers suggests that flp-1, flp-11 and flp-14 are amongst the most highly expressed flp genes. Speculative BLAST searches were performed using theoretical FLP C-termini as queries, in an attempt to identify putative novel FLP sequences in the EST database. These searches yielded eight multi-species sequelogs encoding FLPs with novel signatures that are believed to identify distinct flp genes. These novel genes encode 25 distinct previously unidentified FLPs, and raise the current total of known nematode flp genes to 31. Additionally, software-based analyses of the presence of signal peptides were performed, with signal peptides being identified on at least one member of each group of flp ESTs, further confirming their status as secreted peptides. The data reveal that nematode FLPs encompass the most complex neuropeptide family known within the metazoa. Moreover, individual FLPs and FLP motifs are highly conserved across the nematodes with little evidence for inter-clade or inter-lifestyle variation, supporting their fundamental role in free-living and parasitic species.

  19. The Esophageal Glands of Pratylenchus Filipjev and Apratylenchoides belli n. gen. n. sp. (Nematoda: Tylenchoidea)

    PubMed Central

    Sher, S. A.

    1973-01-01

    The esophageal glands in the genus Pratylenchus occur in a large, single ventral lobe except for four populations in which a few specimens had the glands located dorsally. Apratylenchoides belli n. gen. n. sp. in the subfamily Radopholinae is proposed for a species having two esophageal glands in a large dorsal lobe and one gland in a smaller, shorter ventral lobe. PMID:19319335

  20. New isolate of Mononchoides composticola Steel, Moens, Scholaert, Boshoff, Houthoofd & Bert, 2011 (Nematoda: Neodiplogasteridae) from Iran.

    PubMed

    Shokoohi, Ebrahim; Seddiqi, Elahe; Panahi, Hadi; Abolafia, Joaquín

    2015-11-17

    Mononchoides composticola was isolated during a survey on free living nematodes from vermicompost in Iran. This population of M. composticola is characterised by a dorsal claw-like tooth; 7-9 µm long and 3-5 µm wide, 14-15 finely visible longitudinal ridges on the cuticle, in which each ridge comprises two lines, long spicules (39-45 μm long), a short gubernaculum (15-17 µm or less than half of the spicule length), two pairs of precloacal papillae, five pairs of postcloacal papillae, papillae (v3) comprising three small papillae, and a long filiform tail (418-654 μm in females, 382-455 μm in males). Molecular analysis of M. composticola based on sequence of the 18S rDNA placed it close to M. composticola (GU943511; GU943512; from Belgium) and M. striatus (AY593924; from The Netherlands) in a well supported clade (1.00 posterior probability). Measurements, illustrations, LM and SEM pictures, and the phylogenetic position of M. composticola are given.

  1. Pathogenicity of Steinernema carpocapsae and Steinernema glaseri (Nematoda:Steinernematidae) to Ixodes Scapularis (Acari:Ixodidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhioua, E.; LeBrun, R.A.; Ginsberg, H.S.; Aeschliman, A.

    1995-01-01

    The entomopathogenic nematodes Steinernema carpocapsae (Weiser) and S. glaseri (Steiner) are pathogenic to engorged adult, blacklegged ticks, Ixodes scapularis (Say), but not to unfed females, engorged nymphs, or engorged larvae. Nematodes apparently enter the tick through the genital pore, thus precluding infection of immature ticks. The timing of tick mortality, and overall mortality after 17 d, did not differ between infections by S. carpocapsae and S. glaseri. These nematodes typically do not complete their life cycles or produce infective juveniles in I. scapularis. However, both species successfully produced infective juveniles when the tick body was slit before nematode infection. Mortality of engorged I. scapularis females infected by S. carpocapsae was greater than uninfected controls, but did not vary significantly with nematode concentration (50-3,000 infective juveniles per 5-cm-diameter petri dish). The LC50 was 347.8 infective juveniles per petri dish (5 ticks per dish). Hatched egg masses of infected ticks weighed less than those of uninfected controls. Mortality of infected ticks was greatest between 20 and 30?C, and was lower at 15?C.

  2. Immunoreactive proteins of Acanthocheilonema viteae (Nematoda: Filarioidea) adults: solubilization in various detergents.

    PubMed

    Misra, S; Singh, D P; Fatma, N; Chatterjee, R K

    1993-01-01

    For optimal solubilization of immunoreactive proteins of filarial parasites, adult worms of Acanthocheilonema viteae were extracted in different detergents including anionic, cationic, nonionic and zwitterionic agents under varying incubation periods. Each preparation was then analysed by SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting using pooled sera from Mastomys natalensis infected with A. viteae. Amongst the detergents used, maximum immunoreactive proteins were exposed by sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS), closely followed by sodium deoxycholate (DOC). Nevertheless, a few additional protein bands were recognized by infected sera in DOC preparations, but not in SDS, and vice versa. Most of the proteins were completely or partially dissolved within 2 hrs extraction time. It is felt that DOC may be used in place of SDS because of the strong denaturing character of the latter.

  3. Integrative taxonomy of Goezia spinulosa (Nematoda: Raphidascarididae) from arapaimas in the northwestern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Maralina Torres da; Oliveira Cavalcante, Pedro Hercílio de; Camargo, Ana Carolina Alves de; Chagas Moutinho, Vanessa Aparecida das; Santos, Everton Gustavo Nunes Dos; Santos, Cláudia Portes

    2017-08-15

    Arapaima gigas, a fish with a high market value, has been farmed in different localities within Brazil. Among its parasites, adults of Goezia spinulosa are reported to cause ulcers in the stomach and to result in the death of farmed fingerlings. Due to the veterinary importance of this nematode in cultured arapaimas, an integrative taxonomic study is proposed, combining morphological, ultrastructural and genetic profiles of this parasite. The fish were obtained from semi-intensive fish farming in Acre State, Brazil. The fish measured 7-42cm in total length and the intensity of infection was 1-60 parasites per fish. The site of infection was mainly the stomach. Morphological and ultrastructural analyses of G. spinulosa showed the importance of its spiny body in firmly attaching the worm to the gastric mucosa, resulting in lesions, ulcers and deep gastric perforations of the stomach wall. New sequences for partial 18S rDNA, ITS1, 5.8S and ITS2 rDNA, partial 28S rDNA, cox1 mtDNA and for cox2 mtDNA are presented. Phylogenetic reconstructions based on the partial 18S and 28S rDNA shows species of Goezia occur in a clade well separated from other genera in both analyses. Both the partial 18S and 28S rDNA genes represented good genetic markers for distinguishing genera of the Raphidascarididae, with exception of Hysterothylacium. This integrated taxonomic study produced a robust profile for G. spinulosa that will aid the diagnosis of both adults and larval stages from arapaimas and possible intermediate hosts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Phasmarhabditis bonaquaense n. sp. (Nematoda: Rhabditidae), a new slug-parasitic nematode from the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Nermuť, Jiří; Půža, Vladimír; Mekete, Tesfamariam; Mráček, Zdeněk

    2016-10-31

    Phasmarhabditis bonaquaense n. sp. is described and illustrated from the body of Malacolimax tenellus, from the locality of České Švýcary near the village of Dobrá Voda, the Czech Republic. Females are characterized by a body length of 2349 (1878-2626) µm and a cupola shaped tail with a long hyaline hair-like tail tip. Extremely prominent papilla-like phasmids present. Males 1829 (1414-2121) µm long. Peloderan bursa with nine pairs of rays (papillae), 1/1/1/2/1/3. One non-paired apparent papilla-like structure located near the ventral appendage anterior to the cloaca. Prominent papilla-like phasmids located close to the tail tip. Small subunit (18S), ITS, and D2-D3 expansion segments of the large subunit of ribosomal DNA were used to analyze the phylogenetic relationships of sequenced species in the genus Phasmarhabditis and other closely related species. Phasmarhabditis bonaquaense n. sp. varied from other related nematodes both in morphological characterizations and phylogenetic analysis. The life cycle of the newly described species is not well known but it is probably a facultative, mollusc-parasitic nematode able to survive permanently in the saprobic phase on decaying organic matter.

  5. Lagochilascaris minor (Nematoda: Ascarididae) from a Wild Cougar ( Puma concolor ) in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Falcón-Ordaz, Jorge; Iturbe-Morgado, José Carlos; Rojas-Martínez, Alberto Enrique; García-Prieto, Luis

    2016-07-01

    We document parasitation of a wild cougar ( Puma concolor ) by the nematode Lagochilascaris minor in Hidalgo State, Mexico. This finding contributes to our understanding of the epidemiology of this zoonotic agent in Mexico.

  6. First report of Xiphinema brevicolle Lordello et Costa, 1961 (Nematoda, Longidoridae) in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiromichi; Takeda, Ai; Mizukubo, Takayuki

    2011-01-01

    Mixed populations of Xiphinema americanum-group species were detected from a root zone soil sample of Japanese holly, Ilex crenata, during a survey for plant-parasitic nematodes of commercial ornamental plant nurseries in Chiba Prefecture, Japan. From the result of the morphological study, the species were identified as Xiphinema brevicolle and Xiphinema sp. This is the first record of Xiphinema brevicolle in Japan. Morphometrics of Xiphinema brevicolle generally agree with those of the type specimens and the topotype specimens. Xiphinema sp. morphometrically resembles Xiphinema paramonovi except for tail length. The mitochondrial COI region, the nuclear 18S rDNA and the nuclear large subunit rDNA D2/D3 region of the species were sequenced and compared in the molecular study. For the COI region, PCR primers were newly designed to obtain longer sequences, ca. 900 bp, than previously used. Sequence identities of COI, 18S and D2/D3 regions between these two populations were 84.0-84.1%, 99.9% and 98.1-98.2%, respectively. Phylogenetic analyses of maximum likelihood trees were carried out to compare genetic relationships among the group and some suggestions were made on the Xiphinema brevicolle-subgroup.

  7. First report of Xiphinema brevicolle Lordello et Costa, 1961 (Nematoda, Longidoridae) in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Hiromichi; Takeda, Ai; Mizukubo, Takayuki

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Mixed populations of Xiphinema americanum-group species were detected from a root zone soil sample of Japanese holly, Ilex crenata, during a survey for plant-parasitic nematodes of commercial ornamental plant nurseries in Chiba Prefecture, Japan. From the result of the morphological study, the species were identified as Xiphinema brevicolle and Xiphinema sp. This is the first record of Xiphinema brevicolle in Japan. Morphometrics of Xiphinema brevicolle generally agree with those of the type specimens and the topotype specimens. Xiphinema sp. morphometrically resembles Xiphinema paramonovi except for tail length. The mitochondrial COI region, the nuclear 18S rDNA and the nuclear large subunit rDNA D2/D3 region of the species were sequenced and compared in the molecular study. For the COI region, PCR primers were newly designed to obtain longer sequences, ca. 900 bp, than previously used. Sequence identities of COI, 18S and D2/D3 regions between these two populations were 84.0-84.1%, 99.9% and 98.1-98.2%, respectively. Phylogenetic analyses of maximum likelihood trees were carried out to compare genetic relationships among the group and some suggestions were made on the Xiphinema brevicolle-subgroup. PMID:22259299

  8. Description and SEM Observations of Meloidogyne sasseri n. sp. (Nematoda: Meloidogynidae), Parasitizing Beachgrasses

    PubMed Central

    Handoo, Zafar A.; Huettel, Robin N.; Golden, A. Morgan

    1993-01-01

    Meloidogyne sasseri n. sp. is described and illustrated from American beachgrass (Ammophila breviliffulata) originally collected from Henlopen State Park and Fenwick Island near the Maryland state line in Delaware, United States (6). Its relationship to M. graminis, M. spartinae, and M. californiensis is discussed. Primary distinctive characters of the female perineal pattern were a high to rounded arch with shoulders, widely spaced lateral lines interrupting transverse striations, a sunken vulva and anus, and coarse broken striae around the anal area. Second-stage juvenile body length was 554 μm (470-550), stylet length 14 μm (13-14.5), tail length 93 μm (83-115), tapering to a finely rounded terminus. Male stylet length 20 μm (19-21.5), spicule length 33 μm (30-36). Scanning electron microscope observations provided additional details of perineal patterns and face views of the female, male, and J2 head. Wheat, rice, oat, Ammophila sp., Panicum sp., bermudagrass, zoysiagrass and St. Augustinegrass were tested as hosts. Distribution of the species was the coasts of Delaware and Maryland. The common name "beachgrass root-knot" is proposed for M. sasseri n. sp. PMID:19279820

  9. Rhabditis pellio Schneider (Nematoda) from the Earthworm, Aporrectodea trapezoides Duges (Annelida)

    PubMed Central

    Poinar, G. O.; Thomas, G. M.

    1975-01-01

    Studies were conducted on the behak, ior of the nematode, Rhabditis pellio, in the earthworm, Aporrectodea trapezoides, from southern California. Juvenile and adult nematodes were found in the bladders and tubules of the metanephridia of the host. Similar nematodes that entered the coelom were encapsulated and incorporated into multiple capsules ("brown bodies"). It was demonstrated that this host response is an effective defense reaction since dead and dying nematodes, as well as living forms, were found in the capsules. PMID:19308185

  10. New cystidicolid species (Nematoda) from Galaxias platei (Osmeriformes: Galaxiidae) in Patagonian freshwater environments.

    PubMed

    Brugni, Norma L; Viozzi, Gustavo P

    2008-08-01

    During a parasitological survey of Galaxias platei Steindachner, 1898, from Patagonian Andean Lakes, a new species of Cystidicolidae was found in the stomach of fish. The new species was described using light and scanning electron microscopy; the species has characteristics of Ascarophis and is distinguishable from other species by a combination of the following features: well-developed pseudolabia with T-shaped inner extensions, bifurcate deirids, small ratio GE:ME, small left spicule, small ratio LS:RS, and larvigerous eggs with thick and fine filaments in both poles. Intraspecific variation in the morphology of larvigerous eggs was studied. This is the first species of Ascarophis described from freshwater fishes.

  11. Pathology and frequency of Cheilospirura hamulosa (Nematoda, Acuarioidea) in Galliformes hosts from backyard flocks.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Rodrigo Caldas; Tortelly, Rogério; Gomes, Delir Corrêa; Pinto, Roberto Magalhães

    2003-04-01

    This investigation reports data on frequency and pathology related to the nematode Cheilospirura hamulosa in 28 ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus) and 30 domestic chickens (Gallus g. domesticus) from backyard flocks of five localities of the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The prevalence of C. hamulosa in pheasants was of 14.3%, with a mean intensity of 1.5 and range of infection of 1-2. In chickens these values were of 26.7%, 4 and 1-12, respectively. Parasitized birds did not present with clinical signs. In spite of the low parasite burdens, the lesions induced by C. hamulosa were severe in the two species of investigated hosts, causing severe gross lesions in the gizzard such as haemorrhages, ulcers and thickening of the mucosa and cuticle, and single yellowish nodules on the caudoventral muscle. The microscopic lesions, also severe, were characterized by chronic diffuse inflammatory processes and ulcers in the mucosa, and granulomas in the muscular, submucosa and serosa layers of this organ.

  12. Effect of Soil Depth and Moisture on the Vertical Distribution of Steinernema riobrave (Nematoda: Steinernematidae)

    PubMed Central

    Gouge, Dawn H.; Smith, Kirk A.; Lee, Linda L.; Henneberry, Thomas J.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of soil moisture on the distribution of Steinernema riobrave in a sand column was determined. Larvae of Pectinophora gossypiella were used to detect S. riobrave infective juveniles (IJ) in each 2.5-cm section of 30-cm-long soil columns. Soil moisture was determined for each section and related to the numbers of nematodes recovered from infected insect baits. Infective juveniles of S. riobrave applied on the sand column surface showed some degree of positive geotaxis. IJ in soil columns with a consistent moisture gradient grouped in the upper 12.7 cm within a water potential range of ¯40 to ¯0.0055 MPa (2% to 14% moisture). Nematodes in sand columns that were gradually dehydrating moved down the soil column, aggregating on the 28th day between 15-23 cm in depth. Nematode redistribution over time allowed IJ to remain within a water potential range of ¯0.1 to ¯0.012 MPa (5.2% to 9.5% moisture). PMID:19270970

  13. Dracunculus brasiliensis sp. n. (Nematoda: Dracunculidae) from the anaconda, Eunectes murinus (Ophidia: Boidae).

    PubMed

    Moravec, F; Santos, C P

    2009-02-01

    Dracunculus brasiliensis sp. n. (Dracunculidae), is described based on a single female specimen found in the body cavity of the anaconda, Eunectes murinus (L.) (Ophidia: Boidae), from the Mexiana Island, Amazon River delta, Brazil and one female previously recorded from the subcutaneous tissue of this host species imported from South America into Europe (ZOO in the Czech Republic). The new species is characterised mainly by markedly large, anteriorly protruding dorsal and ventral double papillae of the internal circle and small lateral papillae of the same circle, a widely rounded caudal end, the excretory pore situated just posterior to the nerve ring, a distinctly transversely striated cuticle and by the length (396-429 mum) of larvae from uterus. This is the first species of Dracunculus described from reptiles in South America.

  14. [Fecundity of Thominx neopulchra (Nematoda:Capillariidae) from bats of the genus Myotis (Chiroptera:Vespertilionidae)].

    PubMed

    Kirillova, N Iu; Kirillov, A A; Evlanov, I A

    2011-01-01

    Variability of absolute fecundity of nematode Thominx neopulchra from three species of genus Myotis was studies on the territory Zhiguli State Reserve in 2007, 2008. Significant differences in the fecundity of the nematode females depending on host species and sex, size of the parasite, number of the helminthes in a given host, and season of year were revealed.

  15. Temporal and Spatial Distribution of Enterobius vermicularis (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) in the Prehistoric Americas

    PubMed Central

    Reinhard, Karl J.; Araújo, Adauto; Morrow, Johnica J.

    2016-01-01

    Investigations of Enterobius sp. infection in prehistory have produced a body of data that can be used to evaluate the geographic distribution of infection through time in the Americas. Regional variations in prevalence are evident. In North America, 119 pinworm positive samples were found in 1,112 samples from 28 sites with a prevalence of 10.7%. Almost all of the positive samples came from agricultural sites. From Brazil, 0 pinworm positive samples were found in 325 samples from 7 sites. For the Andes region, 22 pinworm positive samples were found in 411 samples from 26 sites for a prevalence of 5.3%. Detailed analyses of these data defined several trends. First, preagricultural sites less frequently show evidence of infection compared to agricultural populations. This is especially clear in the data from North America, but is also evident in the data from South America. Second, there is an apparent relationship between the commonality of pinworms in coprolites and the manner of constructing villages. These analyses show that ancient parasitism has substantial value in documenting the range of human behaviors that influence parasitic infections. PMID:27853116

  16. Biological Survey Along the St. Lawrence River for the St. Lawrence Seaway. Additional Locks and other Navigation Improvements Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-01

    only one month (Table 6). Nine phylums were represented - Porifera, Coelenterata, Platyhelminthes , Nematoda, Nematomorpha, Firyozoa, Annel-ida...Hydroids) - colonies Phylum Platyhelminthes Class Turbellaria (Flatworms) Phylum Nematoda (Roundworms) Phylum Nematomorpha (Horsehair worms) Phylum

  17. Fish, Benthic-Macroinvertebrate, and Stream-Habitat Data From Two Estuaries Near Galveston Bay, Texas, 2000-2001

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    Leptocerinae Oecetis sp. 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 0 0 0 11 Malacostraca Decapoda Decapoda 0 0 0 0 0 2 11 0 0 0 13 Nematoda Nematoda 0 0 81 11 1,159 33 186 70...DCK05 QMH DCK05 DTH T ab le 5 15 Nematoda Nematoda 72 16 2 1 0 17 0 19 65 40 232 Nemertea Nemertea 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 22 24 Oligochaeta

  18. Commencement Bay Study. Volume IV. Invertebrates.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-31

    BAY Taxa Epibenthic Pump Infaunal Core Hydrozoa Hydroida (polyp) + Scyphozoa Scyphozoan medusae + Nemertea + Nematoda + + Turbellaria Polycladida...several species included Cumacea (7 species), ysidacea (4 species), and Tanaidacea (4 species) (Table 4). The Nematoda and Oligochaeta were often very...harpacticoid copepods, Corophium, Cumella vulgaris, and Pancolus californiensis. Nematoda , Oligochaeta, and Harpacticoida are distributed over all the

  19. Potentialities of Mermithid Nematodes for the Biocontrol of Blackflies (Diptera: Simuliidae)--A Review,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    population of blackflies . The taxonomy of the Mermithidae has been only partially evaluated and the taxonomic status of many representatives is...Mermithids cause pathogenic effects upon several blackfly tissues, although no information is available concerning physiological manifestations of mermithid...parasitism in blackflies . A brief review of the present state of knowledge of simuliid taxonomy and bionomics is presented. (Modified author abstract)

  20. Nematodes from the caecum and colon of Pogonomys (Muridae: Anisomyini) from Papua New Guinea with the descriptions of a new genus of Oxyuridae (Nematoda: Oxyurida) and a new species of Trichuridae (Nematoda: Enoplida).

    PubMed

    Smales, L R

    2013-01-10

    Nematodes, comprising 2 species, a new genus from the family Syphaciidae and a new species from the family Trichuridae were collected from the lower digestive tracts of 4 species of Pogonomys; P. championi, Flannery (12 individuals), P. loriae, Thomas (14 individuals), P. macrourus, (Milne Edwards) (19 individuals) and P. sylvestris, Thomas (27 individuals) from Papua, Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. Pogonomicola rugala n. gen., n. sp. differs from all other genera in the Sypaciidae in having cervical alae with numerous folds and a single weakly defined mamelon. Trichuris germani n. sp. differs from all congeners, including the cosmopolitan T. muris, the only other trichurid reported from the region, by the lengths of the spicules and vagina, the ratio of anterior to posterior body length and the number of convolutions of the testis. The genus Pogonomys, with four species from four nematode families had a relatively rich helminth fauna in the lower digestive tract compared to other ansomyins studied. The Oxyuridae, with three genera comprising 5 species was the dominant group found in the lower digestive tract of the Anisomyini, indicating the possibility that the isolation of the old endemic rodents in New Guinea has been associated with a period of coevolution between anisomyin hosts and their syphaciine parasites.

  1. Description of Meloidogyne nataliei n. sp. (Nematoda: Meloidogynidae) from Grape (Vitis labrusca) in Michigan, with SEM Observations

    PubMed Central

    Golden, A. Morgan; Rose, Lindy M.; Bird, George W.

    1981-01-01

    Meloidogyne nataliei n. sp. is described and illustrated from grape (Vitis labrusca) in a declining vineyard at Mattawan, Michigan, USA. Infected grape roots exhibit no hyperplastic symptoms. Females protrude from the roots and are surrounded by a massive egg sac containing many eggs. This new species is distinguishable from other species of the genus especially by its large, striking perineal pattern with, usually, two ropelike separated striae on each side extending laterally from the vulval and anal areas. Among other diagnostic characters are the location of the female excretory pore adjacent to or near the base of the head and the heavy larval stylet averaging about 22 μm in length. Examination of males, females, and larvae with the scanning electron microscope confirmed observations made by optical microscopy and revealed diagnostic and other structures in greater detail. Of particular significance was the nature of the male head, with a massive circular labial disc on which is located a rectangular structure surrounding the oral opening, and the six distinct lips appearing as a rosette in en face view. The known distribution of this new species is presently limited to its original location in Michigan. PMID:19300781

  2. New Record of Schistorophus cirripedesmi (Nematoda: Acuariidae) from a Bar-Tailed Godwit, Limosa lapponica baueri (Charadriformes: Scolopacidae) in Korea.

    PubMed

    Choe, Seongjun; Kim, Hyun; Lim, Junsik; Lee, Dongmin; Park, Hansol; Jeon, Hyeong-Kyu; Kim, Heejong; Kim, Youngjun; Eom, Keeseon S

    2016-06-01

    In July 2014, a nematode species, Schistorophus cirripedesmi Rhizhikov and Khokhlova, 1964, was recovered from a bar-tailed godwit, Limosa lapponica baueri that was stored in a -20˚C freezer in the Chungnam Wild Animal Rescue Center. The bird was collected in 2012 from the coastal region of Pyeongtaek-si (City), Gyeonggi-do (Province) in the Republic of Korea, although the exact date is not clear. At necropsy, 9 nematodes were found in the gizzard of the bird. The parasites had 4 horn-like cephalic cuticular ornamentations. After morphometric comparison and morphological observations, including scanning electron microscopy, the nematodes were identified as S. cirripedesmi. This is the first description of a nematode species in a shorebird in Korea. This is also the first time this genus and species have been found in Korea.

  3. New species of Pseudabbreviata (Nematoda: Physalopteridae) and other helminths in two species of Hypsilurus (Sauria: Agamidae) from Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Bursey, Charles R; Goldberg, Stephen R; Kraus, Fred

    2009-08-01

    Pseudabbreviata novaeguineaensis n. sp. from the stomach of Hypsilurus modestus (Agamidae) from Papua New Guinea is described and illustrated. The new species was also found in the stomach of Hypsilurus papuensis from Papua New Guinea. Pseudabbreviata novaeguineaensis n. sp. represents the sixth species assigned to the genus and the first from the Australo-Papuan Region. The new species differs from other species assigned to Pseudabbreviata by the vulva position in the female and pedunculate papillae arrangement in the male tail morphology. In addition to the new species, H. modestus harbored Meteterakis crombiei, Strongyluris gonyocephali, and larvae of Abbreviata sp. (in cysts).

  4. Morphological and molecular genetic diversity of Strongyluris calotis (Nematoda: Ascaridida: Heterakidae) in South East and East Asian lizards.

    PubMed

    Tran, Binh Thi; Ong, An Vinh; Luc, Pham Van; Sato, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Strongyluris calotis is a heterakid nematode in the large intestine of agamid lizards (Reptilia: Sauria: Agamidae) from the Oriental Region. The standard light microscopic definition of the species counts the "caudal papillae" as 10 pairs on male worms. However, previous work from our group using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on the heterakid from agamid lizards in Japan, Taiwan, and Singapore revealed that this counting contained a pair of phasmids and that two pairs of postcloacal papillae were completely fused to form a pair of united papillae, thus resulting in "10 pairs." In the present study, we examined S. calotis specimens from the Emma Gray's forest lizard, Calotes emma (Agamidae), living in the plain forest at low altitude, and the Vietnam false bloodsucker, Pseudocalotes brevipes (Agamidae), living in the mountainous forest at high altitude in the northern part of Vietnam. Using SEM, the arrangement of caudal papillae in male worms from an Emma Gray's forest lizard was found to be comparable to classical S. calotis specimens from agamid lizards collected in Japan, Taiwan, and Singapore. However, male worms from Vietnam false bloodsuckers did not have a pair of united papillae but had 10 pairs of independent caudal papillae with a pair of phasmids. Molecular genetic analyses of the ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) of worms of the classical S. calotis morphotype from Japan and Singapore and two S. calotis morphotypes from Vietnam demonstrated absolutely identical nucleotide sequences of partial 18S rDNA (at least 1764 base pairs (bp)) and 5.8S rDNA (158 bp). However, intraspecific differences were detected in other regions of the rDNA, related to the geographical distribution of hosts regardless of morphotype: 97.8-98.5 % identity (443-446 bp/453 bp) in the internal transcribed spacer (ITS)-1 region, 96.6-98.0 % identity (425-431 bp/440 bp) in the ITS-2 region, and 99.6-99.7 % identity (1149-1151 bp/1154 bp) in the 28S rDNA. Thus, in the future, taxonomic relationships of S. calotis distributed widely in the Oriental Region as well as other nominal Oriental Strongyluris spp., currently six in number, need to be extensively explored based on molecular genetic analyses in addition to intensive morphological characterization.

  5. Molecular Characterization of Meloidogyne christiei Golden and Kaplan, 1986 (Nematoda, Meloidogynidae) Topotype Population Infecting Turkey Oak (Quercus laevies) in Florida

    PubMed Central

    Brito, J. A.; Subbotin, S. A.; Han, H.; Stanley, J. D.; Dickson, D. W.

    2015-01-01

    Meloidogyne christiei isolated from turkey oak, Quercus laevies, from the type locality in Florida was characterized using isozyme profiles and ribosomal and mitochondrial gene sequences. The phenotype N1a detected from a single egg-laying female of M. christiei showed one very strong band of malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity; however, no esterase (EST) activity was identified from macerate of one or even 20 females per well. Phylogenetic relationships within the genus Meloidogyne as inferred from Bayesian analysis of partial 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA), D2-D3 of 28S rRNA, internal transcribed spacer (ITS) rRNA, and cytochrome oxidase subunit II (COII)-16S rRNA of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) gene fragments showed that M. christiei formed a separate lineage within the crown group of Meloidogyne and its relationships with any of three Meloidogyne clades were not resolved. PMID:26527837

  6. Transmission of a pathogenic virus (Iridoviridae) of Culex pipiens larvae mediated by the mermithid Strelkovimermis spiculatus (Nematoda).

    PubMed

    Muttis, Evangelina; Micieli, María Victoria; Urrutia, María Inés; García, Juan José

    2015-07-01

    Little progress been made in elucidating the transmission pathway of the invertebrate iridescent virus (MIV). It has been proposed that the MIV has no active means to enter the mosquito larva. We have previously found that the presence of the mermithid nematode Strelkovimermis spiculatus is associated with MIV infection in Culex pipiens under field conditions. In the present study, we evaluated the transmission of MIV to C. pipiens larvae mediated by S. spiculatus and several factors involved in this pathway (mosquito instars, nematode:mosquito larva ratio, amount of viral inoculum). Our results indicate that S. spiculatus functions as an MIV vector to C. pipiens larvae and seems to be an important pathway of virus entry into this system. Moreover, TEM images of S. spiculatus exposed to the viral suspension showed no infections inside the nematode but showed that viral particles are carried over the cuticle of this mermithid. This explains the correspondence between MIV infection and the factors that affect the parasitism of S. spiculatus in C. pipiens larvae. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification and characterization of a novel specific secreted protein family for selected members of the subfamily Ostertagiinae (Nematoda).

    PubMed

    Saverwyns, H; Visser, A; Nisbet, A J; Peelaers, I; Gevaert, K; Vercruysse, J; Claerebout, E; Geldhof, P

    2008-01-01

    It has been shown that the bovine abomasal parasite, Ostertagia ostertagi, drastically modulates its microenvironment, causing epithelial cell damage, accumulation of inflammatory cells and pH changes in the stomach. The mechanisms used by the parasite to change the abomasal environment are largely unknown, but an important role has been attributed to excretory-secretory (ES) products from the parasite. In this study we have identified proteins representing a novel ES protein family, characterized by the SCP/Tpx-1/Ag5/PR-1/Sc7 protein motif. These proteins were named Oo-AL1 and Oo-AL2 (O. ostertagi ASP-like protein). Both proteins contain a signal peptide and 1 predicted N-glycosylation site. The transcript for Oo-AL1 was present from the L4 stage onwards in both male and female adult worms, whereas the Oo-AL2 transcript was hardly detectable. Western blots of somatic extracts and ES products from different developmental stages of O. ostertagi, probed with anti-Oo-AL1 antibodies, revealed Oo-AL proteins in the ES products of adult worms. An analysis of the nematode genome and EST databases indicated that these novel ES proteins are unique to O. ostertagi and its relative, Teladorsagia circumcincta, suggesting a key function in these abomasal parasites.

  8. Two new Huffmanela species, H. japonica n. sp. and H. shikokuensis n. sp. (Nematoda: Trichosomoididae), from marine fishes in Japan.

    PubMed

    Moravec, F; Koudela, B; Ogawa, K; Nagasawa, K

    1998-06-01

    Two new species of trichuroid nematodes. Huffmanela japonica n. sp. and Huffmanela shikokuensis n. sp., are established on the basis of their egg morphology and biological characters; the eggs of both species occur in the musculature of marine fishes from the Inland Sea of Japan. The dark-shelled eggs of H. japonica are found locally in masses ("black spots") in the flesh of Upeneus bensasi (Temminck et Schlegel) (Mullidae, Perciformes) and are characterized mainly by their shape and size (58-69 x 26-30 microm), an aspinose superficial transparent envelope enclosing the egg proper, relatively small polar plugs, and by their thick egg wall (4-5 microm). The eggs of H. shikokuensis are also dark-colored and are found evenly distributed in the musculature of Stephanolepis cirrhifer (Temminck et Schlegel) (Monacanthidae, Tetraodontiformes); they are characterized mainly by their shape and size (78-90 X 36-45 microm), by a very thin and aspinose superficial transparent envelope, large polar plugs, and relatively thin egg wall (3 microm). Histological sections of the host's infected musculature showed the presence of H. shikokuensis nematodes inside the muscle cells and in the intercellular spaces. A key to Huffmanela species based on egg morphology is provided.

  9. A Nearctic parasite in a Palearctic host: Parelaphostrongylus andersoni (Nematoda; Protostrongylidae) infecting semi-domesticated reindeer in Alaska

    PubMed Central

    Verocai, Guilherme G.; Lejeune, Manigandan; Finstad, Greg L.; Kutz, Susan J.

    2013-01-01

    Parelaphostrongylus andersoni is a muscle-dwelling protostrongylid nematode that infects caribou and white-tailed deer across North America, and can cause significant muscular and pulmonary pathology in these species. We collected 44 fecal samples from semi-domesticated reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus) from the Kakarak herd of western Seward Peninsula, Alaska, USA. This herd has no record of historical contact and extremely limited possibility of contemporary contact with native Grant’s caribou (Rangifer tarandus granti) of the Western Arctic herd. Fecal samples were processed using the Baermann technique, and 22.7% (n = 10) were positive for protostrongylid dorsal-spined larvae (DSL). Genomic DNA extracted from individual DSL from each of the ten positive reindeer (total of 48 DSL) was amplified by PCR targeting the ITS-2 region of ribosomal RNA. Forty of 48 DSL were successfully sequenced and confirmed as P. andersoni and one representative sequence for each of the ten positive samples was deposited in GenBank. No other protostrongylids, including Varestrongylus sp., presumed to be widespread across caribou range, and Elaphostrongylus rangiferi, which could have been introduced with reindeer from Eurasia, were detected in these samples. P. andersoni is likely widespread among introduced reindeer in Alaska, potentially causing subtle but deleterious effects with negative economic impacts on commercial herding activities. PMID:24533324

  10. Two new species of Parapharyngodon parasites of Sceloporus pyrocephalus, with a key to the species found in Mexico (Nematoda, Pharyngodonidae)

    PubMed Central

    Garduño-Montes de Oca, Edgar Uriel; Mata-López, Rosario; León-Règagnon, Virginia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Two new species of Parapharyngodon collected from the intestine of the Mexican boulder spiny lizard Sceloporus pyrocephalus are described. This study increases to 49 the number of valid species assigned to Parapharyngodon worldwide, 11 of them distributed in Mexico. Males of the two new species share the presence of four pairs of caudal papillae, an anterior echinate cloacal lip and the presence of lateral alae; however, both differ from each other in lateral alae extension and echinate cloacal anterior lip morphology. Females of both species have a prebulbar uterus and eggs shell punctuate with pores, characteristics shared with few other species of Parapharyngodon. Both new species differ from other congeneric species in the papillar arrangement, the anterior cloacal lip morphology, the lateral alae extension and total length/spicule ratio. A taxonomic key for the species of Parapharyngodon distributed in Mexico is provided. PMID:27006602

  11. WITHDRAWN: Alterations in the mitochondrial physiology of Biomphalaria glabrata (Mollusca: Gastropoda) after experimental infection by Angiostrongylus cantonensis (Nematoda: Metastongylidae).

    PubMed

    Tunholi-Alves, Vinícius Menezes; Tunholi, Victor Menezes; Teixeira Santos, Anderson; Dos Santos Bonfim, Tatiane Cristina; da Silva Garcia, Juberlan; Maldonado, Arnaldo; da-Silva, Wagner Seixas; Pinheiro, Jairo

    2016-05-27

    This article has been withdrawn at the request of the author(s) and/or editor. The Publisher apologizes for any inconvenience this may cause. The full Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal can be found at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy.

  12. The influence of Angiostrongylus cantonensis (Nematoda, Metastrongylidae) infection on the aerobic metabolism of Biomphalaria straminea and Biomphalaria tenagophila (Mollusca, Gastropoda).

    PubMed

    Lima, Mariana G; Tunholi-Alves, Vinícius M; Gaudêncio, Fabrício N; Martins, Florence G; Castro, Rosane N; Thiengo, Silvana C; Garcia, Juberlan S; Maldonado, Arnaldo; Pinheiro, Jairo

    2016-12-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is considered the main agent responsible for human eosinophilic meningoencephalitis. This parasite has low specificity for mollusk hosts and it can also use aquatic snails as auxiliary hosts. Studies based on the metabolic profile of Biomphalaria spp. infected by A. cantonensis have been conducted to observe parasite-host interactions. In the present study, the glucose content in the hemolymph and glycogen content in the digestive gland and cephalopedal mass of Biomphalaria tenagophila and Biomphalaria straminea experimentally infected by A. cantonensis were evaluated, along with the activity of LDH. The snails were dissected from 6 to 21days after infection to collect the hemolymph and separate the tissues. Decreases of 96% and 6.4% in the glucose content triggered a transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism in the two infected snail species, B. straminea and B. tenagophila, respectively. That finding was confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography. These results indicate that when infected, these snails are able to change their metabolic profile, suggesting a strategy to maintain their homeostatic balance.

  13. Morphological characterization of Eustrongylides sp. larvae (Nematoda, Dioctophymatoidea) parasite of Rhinella marina (Amphibia: Bufonidae) from Eastern Amazonia.

    PubMed

    Melo, Francisco Tiago de Vasconcelos; Melo, Caroline do Socorro Barros; Nascimento, Luciana de Cássia Silva do; Giese, Elane Guerreiro; Furtado, Adriano Penha; Santos, Jeannie Nascimento Dos

    2016-06-07

    Absctract Eustrongylides spp. nematodes have birds as final hosts and uses other vertebrates as intermediate/paratenic host (fish, amphibians and reptiles) and have zoonotic potential. In amphibians, the larvae may be located in the subcutaneous tissues, liver and mesentery, between the muscle fibres, especially in the lower limbs. Rhinella marina, which is widely observed in Brazil, has exhibited complex diversity in its helminth fauna, reflecting the unique habitat of the Amazon biome. For the first time, this study describes the morphological aspects of third-stage larvae of Eustrongylides sp. in Rhinella marina from Santa Cruz do Ararí, Marajó Archipelago, Eastern Amazonia, using light and scanning electron microscopy.

  14. Observation of Early Cleavage in Animal Development: A Simple Technique for Obtaining the Eggs of Rhabditis (Nematoda)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinchliffe, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Outlines the advantages of using the readily available eggs of the nematode Rhabditis in studying the early cleavage stages of animal development. Discusses the identification and life history of Rhabditis, how to culture and examine the organism, the cleavage stages and cell lineage, and sources of visual aids. (JR)

  15. The first genetically confirmed case of Dioctophyme renale (Nematoda: Dioctophymatida) in a patient with a subcutaneous nodule.

    PubMed

    Tokiwa, Toshihiro; Ueda, Wataru; Takatsuka, Satoshi; Okawa, Kiyotaka; Onodera, Masayuki; Ohta, Nobuo; Akao, Nobuaki

    2014-02-01

    We describe a nematode larva in a subcutaneous nodule excised from a 44-year-old Chinese male who had been living in Japan for 15 years. Morphological features suggested that the worm was a dioctophimatid nematode. PCR amplification and sequencing of small subunit ribosomal DNA and mitochondrial cytochrome subunit c oxidase genes allowed us to identify the larva as the giant kidney worm, Dioctophyme renale (Goeze, 1972). This is the first molecularly confirmed human case of a dermal D. renale infection. © 2013.

  16. First report of Angiostrongylus cantonensis (Nematoda: Angiostrongylidae) infections in invasive rodents from five islands of the Ogasawara Archipelago, Japan.

    PubMed

    Tokiwa, Toshihiro; Hashimoto, Takuma; Yabe, Tatsuo; Komatsu, Noriyuki; Akao, Nobuaki; Ohta, Nobuo

    2013-01-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis (Chen, 1935) is a parasite of murid rodents and causative agent of human neuro-angiostrongyliasis. In 2011, the Ogasawara Islands in the western North Pacific were assigned a World Natural Heritage site status. The occurrence of A. cantonensis is well documented in the Chichijima, Hahajima, and Anijima Islands. However, the occurrence of A. cantonensis in the other islands of the Ogasawara Islands has not been reported. Between March 2010 and July 2011, 57 Rattus norvegicus and 79 R. rattus were collected from 9 islands (the Hahajima group: Anejima, Imoutojima, Meijima, Mukohjima, and Hirajima; Chichijima group: Minamijima; Mukojima group: Nakoudojima and Yomejima; and Iwojima group: Iwojima). Adult nematodes were found in the pulmonary artery of 46 R. norvegicus collected in the 5 islands of the Hahajima group (Anejima, Meijima, Imoutojima, Hrajima, and Mukohjima Islands). These nematodes were identified by molecular analysis as A. cantonensis. Comparison of the mitochondrial DNA sequences confirmed that all the samples from the Ogasawara Islands shared only a single lineage of A. cantonensis, which has been previously detected in the Okinawa, Hawaii, and Brazil. We describe new endemic foci of rat angiostrongyliasis in the Hahajima group (Anejima, Meijima, Imoutojima, Hirajima, and Mukohjima Islands) of the Ogasawara Islands. These findings indicate that the endemic foci of A. cantonensis are widely distributed in the Ogasawara Islands. Although human cases have not yet been reported in the Ogasawara Islands, the widespread detection of A. cantonensis could be of importance from the perspective of public health.

  17. Genome-Wide Analyses of Individual Strongyloides stercoralis (Nematoda: Rhabditoidea) Provide Insights into Population Structure and Reproductive Life Cycles

    PubMed Central

    Aung, Myo Pa Pa Thet Hnin Htwe; Afrin, Tanzila; Nagayasu, Eiji; Tanaka, Ryusei; Higashiarakawa, Miwa; Win, Kyu Kyu; Hirata, Tetsuo; Htike, Wah Win; Fujita, Jiro; Maruyama, Haruhiko

    2016-01-01

    The helminth Strongyloides stercoralis, which is transmitted through soil, infects 30–100 million people worldwide. S. stercoralis reproduces sexually outside the host as well as asexually within the host, which causes a life-long infection. To understand the population structure and transmission patterns of this parasite, we re-sequenced the genomes of 33 individual S. stercoralis nematodes collected in Myanmar (prevalent region) and Japan (non-prevalent region). We utilised a method combining whole genome amplification and next-generation sequencing techniques to detect 298,202 variant positions (0.6% of the genome) compared with the reference genome. Phylogenetic analyses of SNP data revealed an unambiguous geographical separation and sub-populations that correlated with the host geographical origin, particularly for the Myanmar samples. The relatively higher heterozygosity in the genomes of the Japanese samples can possibly be explained by the independent evolution of two haplotypes of diploid genomes through asexual reproduction during the auto-infection cycle, suggesting that analysing heterozygosity is useful and necessary to infer infection history and geographical prevalence. PMID:28033376

  18. Description of Amplimerlinius uramanatiensis sp. n. (Nematoda: Merliniidae) and observations on three other species of the genus from Iran.

    PubMed

    Ghaderi, Reza; Karegar, Akbar

    2014-09-29

    A new species of the genus Amplimerlinius is described and illustrated from the rhizosphere of Vitis sp. from Kurdistan province in western Iran. A. uramanatiensis sp. n. is characterized by having seven to eight head annuli up to the end of the outer extension of the cephalic framework, 29-31 µm long stylet and cylindrical-clavate tail with a thin hyaline region (9-11 µm) and smooth terminus. Furthermore, A. paraglobigerus and A. macrurus were identified and intra-specific variability of A. globigerus was studied in detail, based on 21 populations collected from different regions of Iran. A key and diagnostic compendium to the species of the genus is provided.

  19. Population biology of Contracaecum rudolphii sensu lato (Nematoda) in the great cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo) from northeastern Poland.

    PubMed

    Kanarek, Gerard

    2011-04-01

    Parameters related to the occurrence, aggregation, and population structure of the nematode Contracaecum rudolphii Hartwich, 1964 , in the great cormorant ( Phalacrocorax carbo ) from northeastern Poland were analyzed. A total of 491 birds of different ages (adults, immatures, and nestlings) was examined; the cormorants studied were taken from both fresh- and brackish water habitats. Contracaecum rudolphii were found in stomachs of 454 birds (92.5%); the 46,244 nematodes included third- (L3) and fourth-stage larvae (L4), and sub-adult and adult females and males. The distribution of nematodes in the host population were highly aggregated. The occurrence of C. rudolphii was significantly dependent on the host's age and habitat, as well as on season; the proportion of development stages differed significantly depending on birds' age and season (the latter only in adult birds). The infrapopulations of C. rudolphii in the adult cormorants showed distinct density-dependent correlations: that is, as the infrapopulation size increased, the number of adult females C. rudolphii decreased, and the proportion of larvae and sub-adult females increased. A higher proportion of larvae and sub-adult females characterized the component population structure of the nematodes in the cormorant nestlings, compared with adult birds, probably because of immune system deficiency in the immature birds, coupled with the development of the nematode population. Seasonal changes in the C. rudolphii population, observed in the adult cormorants, were not related to seasonality of the L3 occurrence in food; instead, the changes are believed to have resulted from independent processes of elimination of the oldest nematodes and their replacement by larval stages that subsequently matured.

  20. Capillariid nematodes (Nematoda: Capillariidae) parasitic in the common cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo), with redescription of Baruscapillaria carbonis (Dubinin et Dubinina, 1940).

    PubMed

    Frantová, D

    2001-01-01

    Two species of the genus Baruscapillaria Moravec, 1982 are known to parasitise the small intestine of the common cormorant, Phalacrocorax carbo (L.): Baruscapillaria carbonis (Dubinin et Dubinina, 1940) and B. rudolphii Moravec, Scholz et Nasincová, 1994. A redescription of the former species, based on specimens collected from common cormorants shot in South Bohemia, Czech Republic, is provided. Morphological features distinguishing B. carbonis and B. rudolphii are specified. B. carbonis is characterised mainly by the well-developed membranous bursa in the male, composed of five distinct lobes (four lateral and one spur-shaped dorsal); the length of the spicule is 1.9-2.3 mm; gravid females are provided with a long vulvar appendage. Males of B. rudolphii have reduced, bi-lobed membranous bursa and the spicule is 0.9-1.3 mm long; the vulvar appendage is absent in gravid females. This is the first record of B. carbon is in the Czech Republic.

  1. Two new species of Rhabdias Stiles et Hassall, 1905 (Nematoda: Rhabdiasidae) from anuran amphibians in Pará, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Kuzmin, Yuriy; Vasconcelos Melo, Francisco Tiago de; Filho, Heriberto Figueira da Silva; Nascimento Dos Santos, Jeannie

    2016-05-03

    Two new lung-dwelling nematode species of the genus Rhabdias Stiles et Hassall, 1905 were discovered in Caxiuanã National Forest, Pará state, Brazil. Rhabdias galactonoti sp. n. was found in a dendrobatid frog Adelphobates galactonotus (Steindachner). The species is characterised by the regularly folded inner surface of the anterior part of the buccal capsule seen in apical view, flask-shaped oesophageal bulb and narrow, elongated tail. Rhabdias stenocephala sp. n. from two species of leptodactylid frogs, Leptodactylus pentadactylus (Laurenti) (type host) and L. paraensis (Heyer), is characterised by a narrow anterior end that is separated from the remaining body by a constriction. Both species possess six small but distinct lips, a cuticle that is inflated along the whole body, a doliiform buccal capsule separated into a longer anterior and a shallow, ring-shaped posterior part, lateral pores in the body cuticle and zones of spermatogenesis in the syngonia. Rhabdias galactonoti sp. n. is the first species of the genus found in Dendrobatidae; R. stenocephala sp. n. is the second species described from Leptodactylidae in eastern Amazonia.

  2. Chapiniella variabilis (Nematoda) parasitizing Chelonoidis carbonarius and C. denticulatus (Testudinidae) in the state of Piauí.

    PubMed

    Freire, Simone Mousinho; Leal, Anangela Ravena da Silva; Knoff, Marcelo; Gomes, Delir Corrêa; Santos, Jeannie Nascimento Dos; Giese, Elane Guerreiro; Silva, Reinaldo José da; Mendonça, Ivete Lopes

    2017-03-16

    Chapiniella variabilis (Chapin, 1924), a strongylid nematode, was collected parasitizing the large intestine of the tortoises Chelonoidis carbonarius (Spix, 1824) (Cc) and C. denticulatus (Linnaeus, 1766) (Cd) in the Zoobotanical Park of the municipality of Teresina, state of Piauí, Brazil. The taxonomic identification was based on morphological and morphometric features, using bright-field and scanning electron microscopy. The present study adds new observations on the morphology, mainly relating to the mouth papillae, external and internal leaf-crown elements, excretory pore, deirids and male and female posterior end. The parasitic indices of prevalence (P), mean intensity (MI), mean abundance (MA) and range of infection (RI) of C. variabilis in these two tortoise species were: P = 100%, MI = 833.3, MA = 833.3, RI = 500-1,500 (Cc); P = 100%, MI = 472.2, MA = 472.2, RI = 333-500 (Cd). This record expands occurrences of C. variabilis to a new host, C. carbonarius, and to another state in Brazil, in the Neotropical region of South America. Adjustment to host management with the aim of improving hygiene and health conditions is suggested.

  3. Morphological characterization of Eustrongylides sp. larvae (Nematoda, Dioctophymatoidea) parasite of Rhinella marina (Amphibia: Bufonidae) from Eastern Amazonia.

    PubMed

    Melo, Francisco Tiago de Vasconcelos; Melo, Caroline do Socorro Barros; Nascimento, Luciana de Cássia Silva do; Giese, Elane Guerreiro; Furtado, Adriano Penha; Santos, Jeannie Nascimento Dos

    2016-06-07

    Absctract Eustrongylides spp. nematodes have birds as final hosts and uses other vertebrates as intermediate/paratenic host (fish, amphibians and reptiles) and have zoonotic potential. In amphibians, the larvae may be located in the subcutaneous tissues, liver and mesentery, between the muscle fibres, especially in the lower limbs. Rhinella marina, which is widely observed in Brazil, has exhibited complex diversity in its helminth fauna, reflecting the unique habitat of the Amazon biome. For the first time, this study describes the morphological aspects of third-stage larvae of Eustrongylides sp. in Rhinella marina from Santa Cruz do Ararí, Marajó Archipelago, Eastern Amazonia, using light and scanning electron microscopy.

  4. A new species of philometrid parasite (Nematoda, Philometridae) and histopathological lesions in juvenile whitemouth croakers, Micropogonias furnieri (Desmarest).

    PubMed

    Montes, M M; Plaul, S E; Martorelli, S R

    2016-09-01

    A new species of nematode parasite, Philometroides tahieli sp. nov. is described. The juvenile whitemouth croaker, Micropogonias furnieri Desmarest, was collected during the spring and summer of the years 2008-2010 from estuarial environments of Argentina. During investigations of the parasite fauna a nematode encapsulated in the musculature of the operculum was found. The nematodes were removed from the host's muscle tissue and slide-mounted in lactophenol solution to clarify the specimens. Opercular muscle with the parasite was processed for histopathological examination. Philometroides tahieli sp. nov. can be identified by the location of gravid females in the host, presence of anterior oesophageal bulb, bosses on the surface of the body, presence of transversal mounds and 14 cephalic papillae in two circular rows. The pathogenicity of the parasite is low in the natural environment, but lesions are consistent with a chronic process. The appearance of caseous necrosis suggests the presence of a locally acting substance. Philometroides tahieli sp. nov. is the second species of this genera described from brackish waters, and since the discovery of Philometroides maplestoni in 1928, is the first species of this genus recorded for South America.

  5. Molecular and epidemiological data on Anisakis spp. (Nematoda: Anisakidae) in commercial fish caught off northern Sardinia (western Mediterranean Sea).

    PubMed

    Piras, M C; Tedde, T; Garippa, G; Virgilio, S; Sanna, D; Farjallah, S; Merella, P

    2014-06-16

    Anisakiasis is a fish-borne zoonosis caused by third stage larvae of the nematode Anisakis sp. present in fish or cephalopods. This is the first contribution to the molecular identification and epidemiology of Anisakis spp. in commercial fish from the Gulf of Asinara (Sardinia, western Mediterranean Sea). Between April 2006 to November 2011, 777 specimens of 10 fish species (Engraulis encrasicolus, Merluccius merluccius, Micromesistius poutassou, Phycis blennoides, Sardina pilchardus, Sardinella aurita, Scomber colias, Sphyraena viridensis, Trachurus mediterraneus, Trachurus trachurus) were examined for Anisakis sp. larvae. A total of 1286 larvae were found in 218 fish. The great majority of larvae were located in the body cavity, and only a small part (60, 4.7%) in the muscle. All the Type I larvae (1272) were identified as Anisakis pegreffii and all the Type II (14) as Anisakis physeteris, confirming that A. pegreffii is the dominant species and the most important agent of human anisakiasis in the western Mediterranean Sea.

  6. Onchocerca takaokai n. sp. (Nematoda: Filarioidea) in Japanese wild boars (Sus scrofa leucomystax): Description and molecular identification of intradermal females.

    PubMed

    Uni, Shigehiko; Fukuda, Masako; Agatsuma, Takeshi; Bain, Odile; Otsuka, Yasushi; Nakatani, Jun; Matsubayashi, Makoto; Harada, Masashi; Omar, Hasmahzaiti; Ramli, Rosli; Hashim, Rosli; Azirun, Mohd Sofian; Takaoka, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-01

    Human zoonotic onchocercosis is caused by Onchocerca dewittei japonica, parasitic in wild boars (Sus scrofa leucomystax) in Japan. Previously, microfilariae longer than those of Onchocerca dewittei japonica were observed in skin snips from wild boars during the study of O. dewittei japonica. Moreover, the third-stage larvae (L3) of these longer microfilariae were obtained from the blackfly Simulium bidentatum after experimental injections. Based on morphometric and molecular studies, similar L3 were found in blackflies during fieldwork in Oita, Japan. However, except for O. dewittei japonica, adult worms of Onchocerca have not been found in wild boars. In this study, we discovered adult females of a novel Onchocerca species in the skin of a wild boar in Oita, and named it Onchocerca takaokai n. sp. Females of this new species had longer microfilariae and differed from O. dewittei japonica in terms of their morphological characteristics and parasitic location. The molecular characteristics of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and 12S rRNA genes of the new species were identical to those of the longer microfilariae and L3 previously detected, but they differed from those of O. dewittei japonica at the species level. However, both species indicated a close affinity among their congeners and Onchocerca ramachandrini, parasitic in the warthog in Africa, was basal in the Suidae cluster of the 12S rRNA tree.

  7. Status and origin of Haemonchinae (Nematoda: Trichostrongylidae) in deer: a survey conducted in France from 1985 to 1998.

    PubMed

    Ferté, H; Cléva, D; Depaquit, J; Gobert, S; Léger, N

    2000-07-01

    During our investigations on helminthofauna in roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) and red deer (Cervus elaphus) in France (1985-1998) we isolated nematodes not only of the genus Haemonchus Cobb, 1898 but also of the genus Ashworthius Le Roux 1930, both of which belong to the same subfamily of Haemonchinae. The prevalence of Ashworthius was 22% (65/294) in roe deer and 40% (10/25) in red deer. H. contortus was not found in red deer, whereas its prevalence was only 3% (9/294) in roe deer. These data contrast with those observed in other European countries. The presence of A. sidemi in red and roe deers in France suggests a case of parasitism imported via sika deer. A hypothesis of their spread is proposed.

  8. A new species of Trichuris Roederer, 1761 (Nematoda: Trichuridae) from Heteromys gaumeri Allen & Chapman (Rodentia: Heteromyidae) in Yucatan, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Panti-May, Jesús Alonso; Robles, María Del Rosario

    2016-09-01

    In Mexico, four species of Trichuris Roederer, 1761 have been recorded in wild rodents belonging to the family Heteromyidae. In the present paper, we describe a new species based on specimens collected from Heteromys gaumeri Allen & Chapman (Heteromyidae: Heteromyinae) in the tropical forests of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. Trichuris silviae n. sp. can be differentiated from the congeners described in North and South American rodents by morphological and morphometric features, such as the possession of a wide spicular tube, a thicker proximal cloacal tube, a shorter distal cloacal tube and a cylindrical spicular sheath. This is the first description of a Trichuris spp. from heteromyid rodents in Mexico and the fourth in North America. Despite the broad distribution of Heteromys spp., few cases of Trichuris infection have been reported. Further studies are necessary to verify if the new species is present in other heteromyid rodents in order to increase our knowledge about its geographical and host distribution.

  9. Morphological variability and molecular identification of Uncinaria spp. (Nematoda: Ancylostomatidae) from grizzly and black bears: new species or phenotypic plasticity?

    PubMed

    Catalano, Stefano; Lejeune, Manigandan; van Paridon, Bradley; Pagan, Christopher A; Wasmuth, James D; Tizzani, Paolo; Duignan, Pádraig J; Nadler, Steven A

    2015-04-01

    The hookworms Uncinaria rauschi Olsen, 1968 and Uncinaria yukonensis ( Wolfgang, 1956 ) were formally described from grizzly ( Ursus arctos horribilis) and black bears ( Ursus americanus ) of North America. We analyzed the intestinal tracts of 4 grizzly and 9 black bears from Alberta and British Columbia, Canada and isolated Uncinaria specimens with anatomical traits never previously documented. We applied morphological and molecular techniques to investigate the taxonomy and phylogeny of these Uncinaria parasites. The morphological analysis supported polymorphism at the vulvar region for females of both U. rauschi and U. yukonensis. The hypothesis of morphological plasticity for U. rauschi and U. yukonensis was confirmed by genetic analysis of the internal transcribed spacers (ITS-1 and ITS-2) of the nuclear ribosomal DNA. Two distinct genotypes were identified, differing at 5 fixed sites for ITS-1 (432 base pairs [bp]) and 7 for ITS-2 (274 bp). Morphometric data for U. rauschi revealed host-related size differences: adult U. rauschi were significantly larger in black bears than in grizzly bears. Interpretation of these results, considering the historical biogeography of North American bears, suggests a relatively recent host-switching event of U. rauschi from black bears to grizzly bears which likely occurred after the end of the Wisconsin glaciation. Phylogenetic maximum parsimony (MP) and maximum likelihood (ML) analyses of the concatenated ITS-1 and ITS-2 datasets strongly supported monophyly of U. rauschi and U. yukonensis and their close relationship with Uncinaria stenocephala (Railliet, 1884), the latter a parasite primarily of canids and felids. Relationships among species within this group, although resolved by ML, were unsupported by MP and bootstrap resampling. The clade of U. rauschi, U. yukonensis, and U. stenocephala was recovered as sister to the clade represented by Uncinaria spp. from otariid pinnipeds. These results support the absence of strict host-parasite co-phylogeny for Uncinaria spp. and their carnivore hosts. Phylogenetic relationships among Uncinaria spp. provided a framework to develop the hypothesis of similar transmission patterns for the closely related U. rauschi, U. yukonensis, and U. stenocephala.

  10. [VARIABILITY AND DETERMINING FACTORS OF THE BODY SIZE STRUCTURE OF THE INFRAPOPULATION OF COSMOCERCA ORNATA (NEMATODA: COSMOCERCIDAE) IN MARSH FROGS].

    PubMed

    Kirillov, A A; Kirillova, N Yu

    2015-01-01

    Variability of the body size in females of the Cosmocerca ornata (Dujardin, 1845), a parasite of marsh frogs, is studied. The influence of both biotic (age, sex and a phenotype of the host, density of the parasite population) and abiotic (a season of the year, water temperature) factors on the formation of the body size structure in the C. ornata hemipopulation (infrapopulation) is demonstrated. The body size structure of the C. ornata hemipopulation is characterized by the low level of individual variability as within certain subpopulation groups of amphibians (sex, age and phenotype), so within the population of marsh frogs as a whole. The more distinct are the differences in biology and ecology of these host subpopulations, the more pronounced is the variability in the body size of C ornata.

  11. Huffmanela lata n. sp. (Nematoda: Trichosomoididae: Huffmanelinae) from the shark Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos (Elasmobranchii: Carcharhinidae) off New Caledonia.

    PubMed

    Justine, Jean-Lou

    2005-07-01

    Huffmanela lata n. sp. is described from eggs only, which were found in a small black spot on the skin near the gill opening of a shark, Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos, caught off Nouméa, New Caledonia, South-West Pacific. The eggs are 77-88 (mean 84) microm in length and 52-63 (mean 57) microm in width, with a thick (6-8 microm) shell, apparently spinose. Mobile larvae, 200-250 microm in length, were visible in the eggs. The species is distinguished from other members of the genus by the dimensions and shape of its eggs, which are the broadest ever reported. This is the second species of Huffmanela described from a shark, after H. carcharhini (MacCallum, 1925), to which it appears closely related in terms of its site in the skin and the nature of the egg surface.

  12. Three new species of Huffmanela Moravec, 1987 (Nematoda: Trichosomoididae) from the gills of marine fish off New Caledonia.

    PubMed

    Justine, Jean-Lou

    2004-09-01

    Three new species of Huffmanela, here described from eggs only, are reported from the gills of marine fish caught off Nouméa, New Caledonia. Eggs of Huffmanela branchialis n. sp., from Nemipterus furcosus (Nemipteridae), are 45-52 (mean 48) microm in length and 23-30 (mean 25) microm in width, with thin shells. Each egg is enclosed in a thin membrane forming a spindle-shaped envelope 53-85 (mean 63) microm in length. Eggs of H. filamentosa n. sp., from Gymnocranius grandoculis (Lethrinidae), are 48-53 (mean 50) microm in length and 25-30 (mean 27) microm in width, with thin shells. Each egg bears a few long (150 microm), thin filaments. Eggs of these two new species were compared to those of H. paronai Moravec & Garibaldi, 2000, which are redescribed. Eggs of H. ossicola n. sp. were found within the branchial arch bone of Bodianus loxozonus (Labridae) and also filled the spinal chord bone and other bones. This is the first species of Huffmanela reported from bone tissue. Eggs are large, 72-88 (mean 79) microm in length and 32-40 (mean 36) microm in width, with a very thick shell. Each egg is covered with numerous filaments enclosed in a thin envelope. Fresh eggs were unembryonated, but embryos were visible after incubation in seawater. The three new species can be distinguished from other species of Huffmanela by size and the nature of the egg covering. Egg morphology of and their location in the host suggest different life-cycles: those of the first two species (small eggs, thin shells, egg covering possibly favouring flotation) are released from the gill mucosa with the turnover of living tissues and immediately continue their life-cycle, but eggs of H. ossicola (large eggs, thick shell) are only available for the continuation of the life-cycle after the host's death.

  13. Redescription of Metabronema magnum (Nematoda: Cystidicolidae), a swimbladder parasite of the carangid fish Gnathanodon speciosus off New Caledonia.

    PubMed

    Moravec, Frantisek; Justine, Jean-Lou

    2007-11-01

    The cystidicolid nematode Metabronema magnum (Taylor, 1925) is redescribed from specimens collected from the swimbladder of the fish (golden trevally) Gnathanodon speciosus (Forsskål) (Carangidae, Perciformes) off New Caledonia, South Pacific (a new geographical record). The light and scanning electron microscopical examination made it possible to study in detail the morphology of this so far little-known species. Its pseudolabia were found to possess distinct anterior protrusions (protuberances), sublabia are absent, only four cephalic papillae are present, deirids are bifurcated, and the male possesses six pairs of postanal papillae. By its morphology, M. magnum seems to be most similar to species of Salvelinema Trofimenko, 1962, also from the swimbladder of fishes, differing from them mainly in the presence of median wedge-shaped outgrowths in the mouth, lateral alae, the longer spicule on the right side, and a fewer number of pairs of preanal papillae in the male. Since the morphology of M. magnum considerably differs from that of other representatives of the Cystidicolidae, Metabronema in Rasheed's (1966) conception is considered a valid genus.

  14. Two new gonad-infecting Philometra species (Nematoda: Philometridae) from the marine fish Lutjanus vitta (Perciformes: Lutjanidae) off New Caledonia.

    PubMed

    Moravec, Frantisek; Justine, Jean-Lou

    2011-11-01

    Two new gonad-infecting species of Philometra Costa, 1845 (Philometridae), P. brevicollis sp. n. and P. mira sp. n., are described from the ovary of the brownstripe red snapper, Lutjanus vitta (Quoy et Gaimard) (Lutjanidae, Perciformes), from the South Pacific Ocean off the coast of New Caledonia. Based on light and scanning electron microscopy examination, these new nematodes are compared with all other gonad-infecting species of Philometra. The former species (males and mature and gravid females available) mainly differs from its congeners in the length of males (5.39-5.92 mm), equally long spicules (279-312 microm), and the gubernaculum (151-168 microm), in that the distal end of the gubernaculum bears dorsolateral transverse lamella-like structures, and in the structure of the male caudal end. The latter species (only males available) is characterized by the length of males (3.47-3.66 mm), equally long spicules (96-105 microm), and the gubernaculum (78-84 microm), the absence of a dorsal reflected barb or lamella-like structures on the distal end of gubernaculum, and by the structure of the male caudal end. Judging from the occurrence in the host, P. brevicollis is the main philometrid parasitizing the gonads of L. vitta, in which it can reproduce, whereas this fish probably serves as only the paradefinitive host for P. mira. Both P. brevicollis and P. mira are the first nominal species of Philometra described from fishes of the family Lutjanidae.

  15. Cucullanid nematodes (Nematoda: Cucullanidae) from deep-sea marine fishes off New Caledonia, including Dichelyne etelidis n. sp.

    PubMed

    Moravec, František; Justine, Jean-Lou

    2011-02-01

    Three nematode species of the family Cucullanidae, intestinal parasites of marine perciform fishes, are reported from off New Caledonia: Cucullanus bourdini Petter & Le Bel, 1992 from the crimson jobfish Pristipomoides filamentosus (Valenciennes) and the goldflag jobfish Pristipomoides auricilla (Jordan, Evermann & Tanaka) (new host record) (both Lutjanidae); Dichelyne etelidis n. sp. from the deep-water red snapper Etelis carbunculus Cuvier (type-host) and the deep-water longtail red snapper Etelis coruscans Valenciennes (both Lutjanidae); and Dichelyne sp. (only one female) from the trumpet emperor Lethrinus miniatus (Forster) (Lethrinidae). Detailed light and electron microscopical studies revealed in C. bourdini some taxonomically important, previously unreported features, such as the location of the excretory pore, nature of the vulva and the size of fully-developed eggs. The new species, D. etelidis, is characterised mainly by the length of the spicules (462-748 μm), a single intestinal caecum, the location of the deirids and excretory pore, the arrangement of the genital papillae and the host group.

  16. Description of Meloidoderita polygoni n. sp. (Nematoda: Meloidoderitidae) from USA and Observations on M. kirjanovae from Israel and USSR

    PubMed Central

    Golden, A. Morgan; Handoo, Zafar A.

    1984-01-01

    Meloidoderita polygoni n. sp. is described and illustrated from roots of smartweed (Polygonum hydropiperoides) from Beltsville, Maryland. This new species is similar to M. kirjanovae but differs especially in having larger spines on the cystoid bodies, females with the anus much closer to the vulva, and more posterior excretory pore. M. polygoni differs from M. safrica particularly in having females with a shorter stylet, a DGO much closer to base of stylet, greater distance between vulva and anus, and larger cystoid bodies. LM and SEM observations showed only three incisures in lateral fields of juveniles and males and no bursa in males. Morphometric data and illustrations are given for M. kirjanovae from mint (Mentha longifolia) in Israel and some details on a limited number of specimens from Armenian SSR. LM examination of juveniles from both these areas indicated only three incisures in lateral fields. Males from Israel had no detectable bursa and appeared to have only three incisures in lateral fields. (Males from Armenian SSR not observed.) PMID:19294022

  17. Integrative taxonomy of Anisakidae and Raphidascarididae (Nematoda) in Paralichthys patagonicus and Xystreurys rasile (Pisces: Teleostei) from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Michelle Cristie Gonçalves da; Knoff, Marcelo; Felizardo, Nilza Nunes; Di Azevedo, Maria Isabel N; Torres, Eduardo José Lopes; Gomes, Delir Corrêa; Iñiguez, Alena Mayo; São Clemente, Sérgio Carmona de

    2016-10-17

    Thirty-six Paralichthys patagonicus and 30 Xystreurys rasile were collected in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil to investigate the presence of anisakid and raphidascaridid nematodes. Anisakis typica, Terranova sp., Contracaecum sp., Hysterothylacium deardorffoverstreetorum, and Raphidascaris sp. were identified using integrative taxonomy of morphological and genetic data. Morphological and morphometric analysis was conducted using bright field microscopy with scanning electron microscopy for topographic characterization of the cuticular surface. Phylogenetic analysis, using ITS and cox2 molecular targets, clearly demonstrated the species identification of A. typica and H. deardorffoverstreetorum and the high diversity of H. deardorffoverstreetorum. This is the first report of A. typica, H. deardorffoverstreetorum, and Raphidascaris sp. parasitizing P. patagonicus and X. rasile. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. In vitro cultivation of Hysterothylacium aduncum (Nematoda: Anisakidae) from 3rd-stage larvae to egg-laying adults.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, L; Valero, A; Gálvez, L; Benítez, R; Adroher, F J

    2002-11-01

    This is the first demonstration of the in vitro development of the 3rd-stage larvae (L3) of Hysterothylacium aduncum to the adult. This was achieved in a semi-defined medium that is easy to prepare and to reproduce. The L3, collected from the peritoneal cavity of horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus), were individually inoculated into RPMI-1640 medium +20% heat-inactivated fetal bovine serum (IFBS). It has been demonstrated that the optimum temperature for development is around 13 degrees C and is stimulated by the presence of 5% CO2 in the growth atmosphere, increasing the percentage moulting to the 4th larval stage (L4) by 1.9-fold (from 44 to 82%) and the average survival of the nematodes by 1.6 times (from 60 to 96 days). When the larvae were grown at different pHs, optimum development occurred at pH 4.0. Under these conditions, all the larvae moulted to the L4 and more than two-thirds transformed to the adult stage--in which 25-30% of the females laid eggs--and reached an average survival of over 4 months. When this medium was supplemented with 1% (w/v) of commercial pepsin, all the larvae reached the adult stage, at least 45% of the females oviposited, laying around 12-fold more eggs per female than in the medium without pepsin. The mean size of the eggs (non-fertilized) obtained was 56.8 x 47.6 microm. The mean length of the adult males obtained was between 3.2 and 5.2 cm and the females were between 3.0 and 6.5 cm. The adult specimens were morphologically identified as Hysterothylacium aducum aduncum. This culture medium (RPMI-1640+20% (v/v) IFBS+1 commercial pepsin, at pH 4.0, 13 degrees C and 5% CO2 in air) could facilitate the identification of at least some of the larvae of the genus Hysterothylacium--and perhaps other anisakids--for which the specific identification and the biological study of these parasites is often difficult.

  19. Larval anisakids (Nematoda:Ascaridoidea) in horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus) from the fish market in Granada, Spain.

    PubMed

    Adroher, F J; Valero, A; Ruiz-Valero, J; Iglesias, L

    1996-01-01

    Horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus) from the fish market in Granada, southern Spain, were surveyed for anisakid nematodes. The fish came from fishing ports all over the country. Larval anisakids were found in 39.4% of the fish examined; 26.1% were infected with third-stage larvae (L3s) of Anisakis simplex; 0.3%, with A. physeteris L3s; 31.1%, with Hysterothylacium aduncum L3s; and 1.7%, with fourth-stage larvae (L4s) of Hysterothylacium sp. Horse mackerel from Mediterranean Sea coastal ports (South and South-east Spain) had the lowest levels of infection, and those from Cantabrian Sea coastal ports (North Spain) had the highest. The variation in infection levels with host size (age) and season of capture are surveyed.

  20. Host specificity of North American Rhabdias spp. (Nematoda: Rhabdiasidae): combining field data and experimental infections with a molecular phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Langford, Gabriel J; Janovy, John

    2013-04-01

    Lungworms of the cosmopolitan genus Rhabdias are among the most common parasites of amphibians and squamate reptiles. The present study used experimental infections, field studies, and a molecular phylogeny to determine the host specificity of 6 Rhabdias spp. that infect snakes and anurans from North America. The molecular phylogeny suggests Rhabdias ranae from Nebraska and Mississippi may represent separate, cryptic species. In addition, the phylogeny strongly supports separate clades for anuran and snake lungworms. Field studies and experimental infections indicate that snake lungworms are generalist snake parasites; however, laboratory experiments also suggest that lizards can be infected under some environmental conditions. Lungworms from anurans were found not to infect salamanders or reptiles, in nature or in the laboratory; anuran lungworm species ranged from strict host specificity, e.g., R. ranae from Nebraska, to relative generalist, e.g., Rhabdias joaquinensis from Nebraska. Overall, host specificity for species of Rhabdias does not provide support for the evolution of progressive specialization over time. For most species of lungworms, host specificity in nature appears to be limited by both ecological and physiological factors, which vary between species and their hosts. Furthermore, some lungworms, e.g., Rhabdias bakeri from Missouri, appear to be tracking host resources instead of host phylogenies, an example of ecological fitting.