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Sample records for izobretenija velikogo leonardo

  1. Leonardo's Tree Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werner, Suzanne K.

    2003-01-01

    Describes a series of activities exploring Leonardo da Vinci's tree theory that are designed to strengthen 8th grade students' data collection and problem solving skills in physical science classes. (KHR)

  2. [Leonardo da Vinci--a dyslectic genius?].

    PubMed

    Røsstad, Anna

    2002-12-10

    Leonardo da Vinci's texts consist almost exclusively of scientific notes. Working on a book on Leonardo's art, I studied all Leonardo's published texts carefully for any new information. In some prefaces I came to suspect that Leonardo might have suffered from dyslexia. This article considers the question of whether it is possible to find indications of dyslexia in Leonardo's texts and in the accounts of his life.

  3. Michelangelo in Florence, Leonardo in Vinci.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herberholz, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    Provides background information on the lives and works of Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci. Focuses on the artwork of the artists and the museums where their work is displayed. Includes museum photographs of their work. (CMK)

  4. STS-102 MPLM Leonardo moves into PCR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- In the payload changeout room on the Rotating Service Structure, Launch Pad 39B, workers move the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo out of the payload canister. From the PCR Leonardo then will be transferred into Space Shuttle Discovery'''s payload bay. One of Italy'''s major contributions to the International Space Station program, Leonardo is a reusable logistics carrier. It is the primary delivery system used to resupply and return Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Leonardo is the primary payload on mission STS-102 and will deliver up to 10 tons of laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments and supplies for outfitting the newly installed U.S. Laboratory Destiny. STS-102 is scheduled to launch March 8 at 6:45 a.m. EST.

  5. STS-102 MPLM Leonardo moves into PCR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Inside the payload changeout room on the Rotating Service Structure, Launch Pad 39B, the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo is ready for the payload ground-handling mechanism (PGHM) to remove it from the canister. A worker beneath the MPLM checks equipment. Leonardo then will be transferred into Space Shuttle Discovery'''s payload bay. One of Italy'''s major contributions to the International Space Station program, Leonardo is a reusable logistics carrier. It is the primary delivery system used to resupply and return Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Leonardo is the primary payload on mission STS-102 and will deliver up to 10 tons of laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments and supplies for outfitting the newly installed U.S. Laboratory Destiny. STS-102 is scheduled to launch March 8 at 6:45 a.m. EST.

  6. Leonardo da Vinci and the Downburst.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gedzelman, Stanley David

    1990-05-01

    Evidence from the drawings, experiments, and writings of Leonardo da Vinci are presented to demonstrate that da Vinci recognized and, possibly, discovered the downburst and understood its associated airflow. Other early references to vortex flows resembling downbursts are mentioned.

  7. [Studies of vision by Leonardo da Vinci].

    PubMed

    Berggren, L

    2001-01-01

    Leonardo was an advocate of the intromission theory of vision. Light rays from the object to the eye caused visual perceptions which were transported to the brain ventricles via a hollow optic nerve. Leonardo introduced wax injections to explore the ventricular system. Perceptions were assumed to go to the "senso comune" in the middle (3rd) ventricle, also the seat of the soul. The processing station "imprensiva" in the anterior lateral horns together with memory "memoria" in th posterior (4th) ventricle integrated the visual perceptions to visual experience. - Leonardo's sketches with circular lenses in the center of the eye reveal that his dependence on medieval optics prevailed over anatomical observations. Drawings of the anatomy of the sectioned eye are missing although Leonardo had invented a new embedding technique. In order to dissect the eye without spilling its contents, the eye was first boiled in egg white and then cut. The procedure was now repeated and showed that the ovoid lens after boiling had become spherical. - Leonardo described that light rays were refracted and reflected in the eye but his imperfect anatomy prevented a development of physiological optics. He was, however, the first to compare the eye with a pin-hole camera (camera obscura). Leonardo's drawings of the inverted pictures on the back wall of a camera obscura inspired to its use as an instrument for artistic practice. The camera obscura was for centuries a model for explaining human vision.

  8. Pychoanalysis and art, Freud and Leonardo.

    PubMed

    Blum, H P

    2001-01-01

    Freud was the first to apply psychoanalysis to art, choosing for his subject the life and work of Leonardo da Vinci. Observing Leonardo's partly fused image of the Virgin and St. Anne, he inferred that the artist had depicted his two mothers, his biological mother and his stepmother. This very early analytic discourse on parent loss and adoption changed the course of the interpretation of art. Freud explored the psychology of art, the artist, and aesthetic appreciation. Confronting the age-old enigma of the Mona Lisa, he proposed a daring solution to the riddle of the sphinxlike smile of this icon of art. His paper prefigures concepts of narcissism, homosexuality, parenting, and sublimation. Lacking modern methodology and theory, Freud's pioneering insights overshadow his naive errors. In this fledgling inquiry, based on a childhood screen memory and limited knowledge of Leonardo's artistic and scientific contributions, Freud identified with this Renaissance genius in his own self-analytic and creative endeavor.

  9. Leonardo da Vinci's contributions to neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Pevsner, Jonathan

    2002-04-01

    Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) made far-reaching contributions to many areas of science, technology and art. Leonardo's pioneering research into the brain led him to discoveries in neuroanatomy (such as those of the frontal sinus and meningeal vessels) and neurophysiology (he was the first to pith a frog). His injection of hot wax into the brain of an ox provided a cast of the ventricles, and represents the first known use of a solidifying medium to define the shape and size of an internal body structure. Leonardo developed an original, mechanistic model of sensory physiology. He undertook his research with the broad goal of providing physical explanations of how the brain processes visual and other sensory input, and integrates that information via the soul.

  10. How to Think Like Leonardo da Vinci

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caouette, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    To be effective and relevant in twenty-first-century learning, art needs to be more inclusive. In this article, the author discusses how teachers can find a good example in Leonardo da Vinci for building an art program. His art, design, and curiosity are the perfect foundation for any art program, at any level. (Contains 3 resources and 3 online…

  11. Hidden sketches by Leonardo da Vinci revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumé, Belle

    2009-02-01

    Three drawings on the back of Leonardo da Vinci's The Virgin and Child with St Anne (circa 1508) have been discovered by researchers led by Michel Menu from the Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musées de France (C2RMF) and the Louvre Museum in Paris.

  12. Astronomy in the Age of Leonardo.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welther, B. L.

    1997-12-01

    In the 1450s, when Leonardo da Vinci was born, horoscopes were still based primarily on the 13th-century tables developed in the court of Alfonso el Sabio of Spain. By the 15th century European astronomers were computing revised forms of the tables. In Italy, for example, Giovanni Bianchini of Ferrara completed his Tabulae astronomicae in the 1440s. It was finally published posthumously in Venice in 1495. By the 1480s Domenico Maria Novara, a professor of astronomy in Bologna, was publishing annual prognostications of eclipses, conjunctions, and other celestial phenomena. Against this background of traditional astronomy in Italy, two Florentines recorded observations of the sun and moon, comets, and meteorology. Paolo dal Pozzi Toscanelli flourished in the first half of the 15th century and Leonardo da Vinci in the last half. Their observations of celestial phenomena were not primarily for astronomical purposes; they were spinoffs of other pursuits such as medicine, astrology, optics, engineering, and studies of light and shadow. As a physician and cartographer, Toscanelli practiced astrology, studied omens, observed comets and plotted their paths on homemade maps. He also was associated with the construction of a gnomon at the top of the Duomo to observe the summer solstice. It was this project that may have brought him into contact with the young artisan, Leonardo da Vinci. As a painter, Leonardo's approach to science and engineering was to observe, sketch and analyze. His interest in light and shadow led him to notice how the earth, moon and planets all reflect sunlight. His extant manuscripts have geometric sketches for eclipses and for the phenomenon known as "old moon in new moon's arms." Unfortunately, because neither Toscanelli nor Leonardo published their observations, they made no impact on the history of astronomical thought or observation. Their contemporaries did not know or write about their work. Astronomers in the 16th century did not know about

  13. Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Painter, inventor and polymath, born in Vinci (near Empolia), Italy. Although astronomy does not figure large in Leonardo's works, he realized the possibility of constructing a telescope (`making glasses to see the Moon enlarged'). He suggested that `… in order to observe the nature of the planets, open the roof and bring the image of a single planet onto the base of a concave mirror. The image o...

  14. The Real Code of Leonardo da Vinci

    PubMed Central

    Ose, Leiv

    2008-01-01

    Leonardo da Vinci was born in Italy. Among the researchers and scientists, he is favourably known for his remarkable efforts in scientific work. His investigations of atherosclerosis judiciously combine three separate fields of research. In 1506, he finished his masterpiece, painting of Mona Lisa. A careful clinical examination of the famous painting reveals a yellow irregular leather-like spot at the inner end of the left upper eyelid and a soft bumpy well-defined swelling of the dorsum of the right hand beneath the index finger about 3 cm long. This is probably the first case of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). The FH code of Leonardo da Vinci was given immense consideration by scientists like Carl Muller, who described the xanthomas tuberosum and angina pectoris. On the contrary, Akira Endo searched for microbial metabolites that would inhibit HMG-CoA reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of cholesterol and finally, Michael Brown and Joseph Goldstein published a remarkable series of elegant and insightful papers in the 70s and 80s. They established that the cellular uptake of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) essentially requires the LDL receptor. In conclusion: this was the real Code of Leonardo da Vinci. PMID:19924278

  15. In search of Leonardo: computer-based facial image analysis of Renaissance artworks for identifying Leonardo as subject

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, Christopher W.; Smith, William A. P.; Stork, David G.

    2012-03-01

    One of the enduring mysteries in the history of the Renaissance is the adult appearance of the archetypical "Renaissance Man," Leonardo da Vinci. His only acknowledged self-portrait is from an advanced age, and various candidate images of younger men are difficult to assess given the absence of documentary evidence. One clue about Leonardo's appearance comes from the remark of the contemporary historian, Vasari, that the sculpture of David by Leonardo's master, Andrea del Verrocchio, was based on the appearance of Leonardo when he was an apprentice. Taking a cue from this statement, we suggest that the more mature sculpture of St. Thomas, also by Verrocchio, might also have been a portrait of Leonardo. We tested the possibility Leonardo was the subject for Verrocchio's sculpture by a novel computational technique for the comparison of three-dimensional facial configurations. Based on quantitative measures of similarities, we also assess whether another pair of candidate two-dimensional images are plausibly attributable as being portraits of Leonardo as a young adult. Our results are consistent with the claim Leonardo is indeed the subject in these works, but we need comparisons with images in a larger corpora of candidate artworks before our results achieve statistical significance.

  16. On the sexual intercourse drawings of Leonardo da Vinci.

    PubMed

    Morris, A G

    1986-04-12

    Leonardo da Vinci's marvellous anatomical drawings have been praised by both artists and medical historians over the centuries. Specific reference is made here to Leonardo's drawings of the act of sexual intercourse. It is shown that his illustrations are not based purely on original observation. Rather, they are an attempt to illustrate and clarify anatomy and physiology as presented in the textbooks of the time.

  17. Leonardo da Vinci's studies of the heart.

    PubMed

    Shoja, Mohammadali M; Agutter, Paul S; Loukas, Marios; Benninger, Brion; Shokouhi, Ghaffar; Namdar, Husain; Ghabili, Kamyar; Khalili, Majid; Tubbs, R Shane

    2013-08-20

    Leonardo da Vinci's detailed drawings are justly celebrated; however, less well known are his accounts of the structures and functions of the organs. In this paper, we focus on his illustrations of the heart, his conjectures about heart and blood vessel function, his experiments on model systems to test those conjectures, and his unprecedented conclusions about the way in which the cardiovascular system operates. In particular, da Vinci seems to have been the first to recognize that the heart is a muscle and that systole is the active phase of the pump. He also seems to have understood the functions of the auricles and pulmonary veins, identified the relationship between the cardiac cycle and the pulse, and explained the hemodynamic mechanism of valve opening and closure. He also described anatomical variations and changes in structure and function that occurred with age. We outline da Vinci's varied career and suggest ways in which his personality, experience, skills and intellectual heritage contributed to these advances in understanding. We also consider his influence on later studies in anatomy and physiology.

  18. Leonardo Da Vinci, the genius and the monsters. Casual encounters?

    PubMed

    Ciseri, Lorenzo Montemagno

    2014-01-01

    This article analyses Leonardo's interest in monsters and deformed reality, one of the lesser known aspects of his vast and multifaceted output. With the possible exception of his studies of physiognomy, relevant drawings, sketches and short stories represent a marginal aspect of his work, but they are nevertheless significant for historians of teratology. The purpose of this study is to provide a broad overview of the relationship between Leonardo and both the literature on mythological monsters and the reports on monstrous births that he either read about or witnessed personally. While aspects of his appreciation and attention to beauty and the pursuit of perfection and good proportions are the elements most emphasised in Leonardo's work, other no less interesting aspects related to deformity have been considered of marginal importance. My analysis will demonstrate that Leonardo approached the realm of monstrosity as if he considered abnormality a mirror of normality, deformity a mirror of harmony, and disease a mirror of health, as if to emphasise that, ultimately, it is the monster that gives the world the gift of normality. Two special cases of monstrosity are analysed: the famous monster of Ravenna, whose image was found among his papers, and a very rare case of parasitic conjoined twins (thoracopagus parasiticus) portrayed for the first time alive, probably in Florence, by Leonardo himself.

  19. Leonardo Da Vinci, the genius and the monsters. Casual encounters?

    PubMed

    Ciseri, Lorenzo Montemagno

    2014-01-01

    This article analyses Leonardo's interest in monsters and deformed reality, one of the lesser known aspects of his vast and multifaceted output. With the possible exception of his studies of physiognomy, relevant drawings, sketches and short stories represent a marginal aspect of his work, but they are nevertheless significant for historians of teratology. The purpose of this study is to provide a broad overview of the relationship between Leonardo and both the literature on mythological monsters and the reports on monstrous births that he either read about or witnessed personally. While aspects of his appreciation and attention to beauty and the pursuit of perfection and good proportions are the elements most emphasised in Leonardo's work, other no less interesting aspects related to deformity have been considered of marginal importance. My analysis will demonstrate that Leonardo approached the realm of monstrosity as if he considered abnormality a mirror of normality, deformity a mirror of harmony, and disease a mirror of health, as if to emphasise that, ultimately, it is the monster that gives the world the gift of normality. Two special cases of monstrosity are analysed: the famous monster of Ravenna, whose image was found among his papers, and a very rare case of parasitic conjoined twins (thoracopagus parasiticus) portrayed for the first time alive, probably in Florence, by Leonardo himself. PMID:25702382

  20. Leonardo da Vinci: the search for the soul.

    PubMed

    Del Maestro, R F

    1998-11-01

    The human race has always contemplated the question of the anatomical location of the soul. During the Renaissance the controversy crystallized into those individuals who supported the heart ("cardiocentric soul") and others who supported the brain ("cephalocentric soul") as the abode for this elusive entity. Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) joined a long list of other explorers in the "search for the soul." The method he used to resolve this anatomical problem involved the accumulation of information from ancient and contemporary sources, careful notetaking, discussions with acknowledged experts, and his own personal search for the truth. Leonardo used a myriad of innovative methods acquired from his knowledge of painting, sculpture, and architecture to define more clearly the site of the "senso comune"--the soul. In this review the author examines the sources of this ancient question, the knowledge base tapped by Leonardo for his personal search for the soul, and the views of key individuals who followed him.

  1. [Regarding the Manuscript D " Dell' occhio " of Leonardo da Vinci].

    PubMed

    Heitz, Robert F

    2009-01-01

    Leonardo da Vinci's Manuscript D consists of five double pages sheets, which, folded in two, comprise ten folios. This document, in the old Tuscan dialect and mirror writing, reveals the ideas of Leonardo on the anatomy of the eye in relation to the formation of images and visual perception. Leonardo explains in particular the behavior of the rays in the eye in terms of refraction and reflection, and is very mechanistic in his conception of the eye and of the visual process. The most significant innovations found in these folios are the concept of the eye as a camera obscura and the intersection of light rays in the interior of the eye. His texts nevertheless show hesitation, doubts and a troubled confusion, reflecting the ideas and uncertainties of his era. He did not share his results in his lifetime, despite both printing and etching being readily available to him.

  2. LEONARDO DA VINCI AND THE ORIGIN OF SEMEN.

    PubMed

    Noble, Denis; DiFrancesco, Dario; Zancani, Diego

    2014-12-20

    It is well known that Leonardo da Vinci made several drawings of the human male anatomy. The early drawings (before 1500) were incorrect in identifying the origin of semen, where he followed accepted teaching of his time. It is widely thought that he did not correct this mistake, a view that is reflected in several biographies. In fact, he made a later drawing (after 1500) in which the description of the anatomy is remarkably accurate and must have been based on careful dissection. In addition to highlighting this fact, acknowledged previously in only one other source, this article reviews the background to Leonardo's knowledge of the relevant anatomy.

  3. Leonardo da Vinci and the origin of semen

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Denis; DiFrancesco, Dario; Zancani, Diego

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that Leonardo da Vinci made several drawings of the human male anatomy. The early drawings (before 1500) were incorrect in identifying the origin of semen, where he followed accepted teaching of his time. It is widely thought that he did not correct this mistake, a view that is reflected in several biographies. In fact, he made a later drawing (after 1500) in which the description of the anatomy is remarkably accurate and must have been based on careful dissection. In addition to highlighting this fact, acknowledged previously in only one other source, this article reviews the background to Leonardo's knowledge of the relevant anatomy. PMID:27494016

  4. Leonardo da Vinci and the sinuses of Valsalva.

    PubMed

    Robicsek, F

    1991-08-01

    Recent studies indicate that eddy currents generated by the sinuses of Valsalva play an important role in the physiologic closure of the aortic valve. This process is briefly discussed and evidence is presented that this fact was well known and elaborated upon by the renaissance artist Leonardo da Vinci. This fact is illustrated with his words and drawings.

  5. Studying and Working Abroad. Leonardo da Vinci Series: Good Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium). Directorate-General for Education and Culture.

    This document profiles recent successful examples of students studying and working abroad as part of the European Commission's Leonardo da Vinci program, which is designed to give students across the European Union the opportunity to experience vocational training in a foreign country. The following examples are presented: (1) 3 Finnish students…

  6. Training and Health. Leonardo da Vinci Series: Good Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium). Directorate-General for Education and Culture.

    This document profiles programs in the fields of health and medicine that are offered through the European Commission's Leonardo da Vinci program. The following programs are profiled: (1) CYTOTRAIN (a transnational vocational training program in cervical cancer screening); (2) Apollo (a program of open and distance learning for paramedical…

  7. Women and Technical Professions. Leonardo da Vinci Series: Good Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium). Directorate-General for Education and Culture.

    This document profiles programs for women in technical professions that are offered through the European Commission's Leonardo da Vinci program. The following programs are profiled: (1) Artemis and Diana (vocational guidance programs to help direct girls toward technology-related careers); (2) CEEWIT (an Internet-based information and…

  8. Leonardo da Vinci and the first hemodynamic observations.

    PubMed

    Martins e Silva, J

    2008-02-01

    Leonardo da Vinci was a genius whose accomplishments and ideas come down to us today, five centuries later, with the freshness of innovation and the fascination of discovery. This brief review begins with a summary of Leonardo's life and a description of the most important works of art that he bequeathed us, and then concentrates on his last great challenge. There was a point at which Leonardo's passion for art gave way to the study of human anatomy, not only to improve his drawing but to go beyond what had been simply a representation of form to understand the underlying functioning. Among his many interests, we focus on his study of the heart and blood vessels, which he observed carefully in animals and human autopsies, and reproduced in drawings of great quality with annotations of astonishing acuteness. The experience that he had acquired from observing the flow of water in currents and around obstacles, and the conclusions that he drew concerning hydrodynamics, were central to his interpretation of the mechanisms of the heart and of blood flow, to which he devoted much of his time between 1508 and 1513. From these studies, immortalized in drawings of great clarity, come what are acknowledged to be the first hemodynamic records, in which Leonardo demonstrates the characteristics of blood flow in the aorta and great vessels and the importance of blood reflux and the formation of eddies in the sinus in aortic valve his assiduous and careful observations, and his subsequent deductions, Leonardo put forward detailed findings on hemodynamic questions that advanced technology has only recently enabled us to confirm.

  9. Leonardo da Vinci, visual perspective and the crystalline sphere (lens): if only Leonardo had had a freezer.

    PubMed

    Hilloowala, Rumy

    2004-06-01

    This study confirms Leonardo's claim to have experimented on the bovine eye to determine the internal anatomy of the eye. The experiment, as described by Leonardo, was repeated in our laboratory. The study further discusses Leonardo's primary interest in the study of the eye (especially the lens), to determine how the image of an object which enters the eye in an inverted form is righted. The study shows the evolution of Leonardo's understanding of the anatomy and the physiology of vision. Initially, in keeping with his reading of the literature, the lens was placed in the centre but he made it globular. Later he promulgated two theories, reflection from the uvea and refraction within the lens to explain reversal of the image in the eye. Subsequently he rejected the first theory and, putting credence in the second theory, experimented (1509) to show that the lens is globular and is centrally placed. The fact that the present knowledge about the lens is at variance from his findings is not because he did not carry out the experiment, as suggested by some modern authors, but because of the limitation of the techniques available to him at the time.

  10. [Leonardo Torres Quevedo: the most prodigious inventor of his time].

    PubMed

    de Posada, Francisco González

    2007-01-01

    Leonardo Torres Quevedo's contribution to "the conquest of the air", to which humanity devoted so much effort in the early twentieth century is describe and his original inventions on dirigibles -the "Torres Quevedo", the "Astra-Torres" and the "Coastal"- and cable cars - Monte Ulía (San Sebastián) y Spanish Aerocar (Niágara, Canáda) are emphasised.

  11. A Response to Zeus Leonardo's "Critical Empiricism: Reading Data with Social Theory"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apple, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    In this article the author briefly brings up two related conceptual and political areas that Zeus Leonardo and the author might want to discuss further. These concern the status of the language of "resistance" and "agency," terms that play a large part in Leonardo's essay and that are now among the pantheon of accepted political and analytic…

  12. Leonardo da Vinci and Kethem-Kiveris vena.

    PubMed

    Dolezal, Antonín; Skorepova-Honzlova, Zita; Jelen, Karel

    2012-01-01

    In the drawing of coitus by Leonardo da Vinci are pictured the contemporary hypotheses regarding this act. The authors analyze the mamillaruteral connection depicted by the artist and grow up to believe that this is a hypothetical kiveris vena, female vein described by Anatomist Master Nicolai Physicus from the Salerno School. The Hebrew roots were found in the name. The connection is described also by Mondino in The Anathomia. The same connection can be found in the picture of the pregnant woman in Fasciculus Medicinæ by Johannes De Ketham.

  13. STS-102 Onboard Photograph-Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, Leonardo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    A crewmember of Expedition One, cosmonaut Yuri P. Gidzenko, is dwarfed by transient hardware aboard Leonardo, the Italian Space Agency-built Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM), a primary cargo of the STS-102 mission. The Leonardo MPLM is the first of three such pressurized modules that will serve as the International Space Station's (ISS's) moving vans, carrying laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments and supplies to and from the Space Station aboard the Space Shuttle. The cylindrical module is approximately 21-feet long and 15- feet in diameter, weighing almost 4.5 tons. It can carry up to 10 tons of cargo into 16 standard Space Station equipment racks. Of the 16 racks the module can carry, 5 can be furnished with power, data, and fluid to support refrigerators or freezers. In order to function as an attached station module as well as a cargo transport, the logistics module also includes components that provide life support, fire detection and suppression, electrical distribution, and computer functions. The eighth Shuttle mission to visit the ISS, the STS-102 mission served as a crew rotation flight. It delivered the Expedition Two crew to the Station and returned the Expedition One crew back to Earth.

  14. Multipurpose Logistics Module, Leonardo, Rests in Discovery's Payload Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This in-orbit close up shows the Italian Space Agency-built multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM), Leonardo, the primary cargo of the STS-102 mission, resting in the payload bay of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery. The Leonardo MPLM is the first of three such pressurized modules that will serve as the International Space Station's (ISS') moving vans, carrying laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments, and supplies to and from the Station aboard the Space Shuttle. The cylindrical module is approximately 21-feet long and 15- feet in diameter, weighing almost 4.5 tons. It can carry up to 10 tons of cargo in 16 standard Space Station equipment racks. Of the 16 racks the module can carry, 5 can be furnished with power, data, and fluid to support refrigerators or freezers. In order to function as an attached station module as well as a cargo transport, the logistics module also includes components that provide life support, fire detection and suppression, electrical distribution, and computer functions. The eighth station assembly flight and NASA's 103rd overall flight, STS-102 launched March 8, 2001 for an almost 13 day mission.

  15. STS-102 Onboard Photograph Inside Multipurpose Logistics Module, Leonardo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Pilot James M. Kelly (left) and Commander James D. Wetherbee for the STS-102 mission, participate in the movement of supplies inside Leonardo, the Italian Space Agency built Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM). In this particular photograph, the two are handling a film magazine for the IMAX cargo bay camera. The primary cargo of the STS-102 mission, the Leonardo MPLM is the first of three such pressurized modules that will serve as the International Space Station's (ISS') moving vans, carrying laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments, and supplies to and from the Station aboard the Space Shuttle. The cylindrical module is approximately 21-feet long and 15- feet in diameter, weighing almost 4.5 tons. It can carry up to 10 tons of cargo in 16 standard Space Station equipment racks. Of the 16 racks the module can carry, 5 can be furnished with power, data, and fluid to support refrigerators or freezers. In order to function as an attached station module as well as a cargo transport, the logistics module also includes components that provide life support, fire detection and suppression, electrical distribution, and computer functions. The eighth station assembly flight, the STS-102 mission also served as a crew rotation flight. It delivered the Expedition Two crew to the Station and returned the Expedition One crew back to Earth.

  16. MPLM-1, Leonardo, arrives at the SLF at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    An Airbus Beluga transporter parks on the Shuttle Landing Facility to deliver the first of three Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules (MPLMs), designed to transport experiments and supplies in a pressurized environment to and from the International Space Station (ISS). The MPLMs will be carried in the payload bay of a Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the ISS. The modules are being provided by Alenia Aerospazio, in Italy, and will be operated by NASA and supported by ASI, the Italian space agency. The first MPLM has been named Leonardo, and is scheduled to be launched on STS-100 in December 1999. The second, to be handed over in April 1999, is named Raffaello. A third module, to be named Donatello, is due to be delivered in October 2000 for launch in January 2001.

  17. MPLM-1, Leonardo, arrives at the SLF at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    An Airbus Beluga transporter taxis down the Shuttle Landing Facility to deliver the first of three Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules (MPLMs), designed to transport experiments and supplies in a pressurized environment to and from the International Space Station (ISS). The MPLMs will be carried in the payload bay of a Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the ISS. The modules are being provided by Alenia Aerospazio, in Italy, and will be operated by NASA and supported by ASI, the Italian space agency. The first MPLM has been named Leonardo and is scheduled to be launched on STS-100 in December 1999. The second, to be handed over in April 1999, is named Raffaello. A third module, to be named Donatello, is due to be delivered in October 2000 for launch in January 2001.

  18. Sine ars scientia nihil est: Leonardo da Vinci and beyond.

    PubMed

    Kickhöfel, Eduardo H P

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this article is to reflect on the relationship between art and science so far as it concerns a symposium on neurosciences. We undertake a historical overview of that relationship, paying particular attention to the sui generis case of Leonardo da Vinci, who very often is regarded as the man who worked on art and science with equal ease. We then explain why his idea of merging these two forms of knowledge failed, considering the clear-cut distinction between art and science in his time. With this clarification, we explore the matter today. We look at Raphael's The Transfiguration, in which the representation of the possessed boy is seen by neuroscientists as indicative of an epileptic seizure. We also look at the ideas of neuroscientists Semir Zeki and Vilayanur Ramachandran, who study particular aspects of brain function and suggest a new merging of art and science.

  19. [Project Leonardo-da-Vinci for better nursing care].

    PubMed

    Gábor, Katalin; Csanádi, Lajosné; Helembai, Kornélia; Szögi, Zoltánné; Tulkán, Ibolya; Unginé, Kántor Katalin

    2002-08-18

    The aim of the present paper is to inform physicians about the work completed by nurses and professors of baccalaureat nurses in the framework of Leonardo da Vinci project, organised and sponsored by the European Union. The goal of the project was to increase the effectiveness of chief nurses throughout their further training programme in the field of management. The team of Szeged chose the human resource management, since in this field is possible to achieve the greatest improvement with the smallest financial investment. We measured the fluctuations and the absentees of the nurses, the changes in the degree of education, the nurse' and patient' satisfaction at the beginning and at the end of the period studied. Except the patient's satisfaction all the other parameters improved by the end of tested period. The project provided a unique possibility to compare the state of the Hungarian nursing with that of the countries belonging to the European Union, to exchange the experience and to learn some new methods. In the framework of this project a book of two volumes was prepared containing the suggestions of EU. This book is widely available in English and in French.

  20. On the purported discovery of the bronchial circulation by Leonardo da Vinci.

    PubMed

    Mitzner, W; Wagner, E

    1992-09-01

    Among modern physiologists and anatomists, there has been a nearly universal acceptance that Leonardo da Vinci was the first to identify the anatomy of the bronchial circulation. However, because of certain ambiguities in both his anatomic drawing that was supposed to have shown this circulation and the accompanying descriptive text, we questioned whether he really could have been the first to discover this small but important vasculature. To address this question, we set out to repeat Leonardo's dissections in the ox. We reasoned that perhaps the normally tiny bronchial vessels would be considerably more noticeable in this very large species. Our dissections, however, failed to provide any evidence that Leonardo's drawing was that of the bronchial circulation. Furthermore we observed a set of distinct small pulmonary veins to the left upper and right middle lobes that Leonardo, given his lack of understanding of the function of the lung and its circulation, could have easily mistaken for a separate circulation. We thus conclude that Leonardo da Vinci did not describe the anatomy of the bronchial circulation. We believe that the first person to clearly and unequivocally describe the anatomy of this circulation was the Dutch Professor of Anatomy and Botany, Frederich Ruysch.

  1. How did Leonardo perceive himself? Metric iconography of da Vinci's self-portraits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, Christopher W.

    2010-02-01

    Some eighteen portraits are now recognized of Leonardo in old age, consolidating the impression from his bestestablished self-portrait of an old man with long white hair and beard. However, his appearance when younger is generally regarded as unknown, although he was described as very beautiful as a youth. Application of the principles of metric iconography, the study of the quantitative analysis of the painted images, provides an avenue for the identification of other portraits that may be proposed as valid portraits of Leonardo during various stages of his life, by himself and by his contemporaries. Overall, this approach identifies portraits of Leonardo by Verrocchio, Raphael, Botticelli, and others. Beyond this physiognomic analysis, Leonardo's first known drawing provides further insight into his core motivations. Topographic considerations make clear that the drawing is of the hills behind Vinci with a view overlooking the rocky promontory of the town and the plain stretching out before it. The outcroppings in the foreground bear a striking resemblance to those of his unique composition, 'The Virgin of the Rocks', suggesting a deep childhood appreciation of this wild terrain. and an identification with that religious man of the mountains, John the Baptist, who was also the topic of Leonardo's last known painting. Following this trail leads to a line of possible selfportraits continuing the age-regression concept back to a self view at about two years of age.

  2. MPLM-1, Leonardo, is offloaded from the cargo plane at the SLF at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Cranes lower the canister containing the first Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM), the Leonardo, destined for use in constructing the International Space Station (ISS). The Leonardo module arrived at KSC aboard the Airbus Beluga transporter, at left of the canister. Leonardo is scheduled to be launched on STS-100 in December 1999. Three modules are being provided by Alenia Aerospazio, in Italy, and will be operated by NASA and supported by ASI, the Italian space agency. The MPLMs will be carried in the payload bay of a Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the ISS. The second MPLM, to be handed over in April 1999, is named Raffaello. A third module, to be named Donatello, is due to be delivered in October 2000 for launch in January 2001.

  3. Urodynamics in the anatomical work of Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519).

    PubMed

    Schultheiss, D; Grünewald, V; Jonas, U

    1999-06-01

    Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) incorporates the symbiosis of art and medicine and can be addressed as the founder of medical illustration in the time of the Renaissance. His anatomy studies were not published in his time, which explains why Leonardo's outstanding knowledge of anatomy, physiology, and medicine had no impact on his scientific contemporaries and is therefore primarily of retrospective importance in the history of medicine. The collection of anatomical illustrations remained unknown until their rediscovery in the eighteenth century and their wide publication at the beginning of our century. This article systematically reviews Leonardo's genitourinary drawings with regard to urodynamic aspects of the upper and lower urinary tract, highlighting topics such as vesicoureteral reflux and urinary sphincter mechanisms.

  4. Tree Branching: Leonardo da Vinci's Rule versus Biomechanical Models

    PubMed Central

    Minamino, Ryoko; Tateno, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    This study examined Leonardo da Vinci's rule (i.e., the sum of the cross-sectional area of all tree branches above a branching point at any height is equal to the cross-sectional area of the trunk or the branch immediately below the branching point) using simulations based on two biomechanical models: the uniform stress and elastic similarity models. Model calculations of the daughter/mother ratio (i.e., the ratio of the total cross-sectional area of the daughter branches to the cross-sectional area of the mother branch at the branching point) showed that both biomechanical models agreed with da Vinci's rule when the branching angles of daughter branches and the weights of lateral daughter branches were small; however, the models deviated from da Vinci's rule as the weights and/or the branching angles of lateral daughter branches increased. The calculated values of the two models were largely similar but differed in some ways. Field measurements of Fagus crenata and Abies homolepis also fit this trend, wherein models deviated from da Vinci's rule with increasing relative weights of lateral daughter branches. However, this deviation was small for a branching pattern in nature, where empirical measurements were taken under realistic measurement conditions; thus, da Vinci's rule did not critically contradict the biomechanical models in the case of real branching patterns, though the model calculations described the contradiction between da Vinci's rule and the biomechanical models. The field data for Fagus crenata fit the uniform stress model best, indicating that stress uniformity is the key constraint of branch morphology in Fagus crenata rather than elastic similarity or da Vinci's rule. On the other hand, mechanical constraints are not necessarily significant in the morphology of Abies homolepis branches, depending on the number of daughter branches. Rather, these branches were often in agreement with da Vinci's rule. PMID:24714065

  5. Leonardo Da Vinci and stroke - vegetarian diet as a possible cause.

    PubMed

    Oztürk, Serefnur; Altieri, Marta; Troisi, Pina

    2010-01-01

    Leonardo da Vinci (April 15, 1452 to May 2, 1519) was an Italian Renaissance architect, musician, anatomist, inventor, engineer, sculptor, geometer, and painter. It has been gleaned from the many available historical documents that da Vinci was a vegetarian who respected and loved animals, and that he suffered from right hemiparesis in the last 5 years of his life. A vegetarian diet has both positive and negative influences on the cerebrovascular system. In this report, a possible relation between a vegetarian diet and stroke is discussed from various perspectives as related to Leonardo da Vinci's stroke.

  6. STS-102 MPLM Leonardo is transferred from the PCR into Discovery's payload bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - In the Payload Changeout Room, Launch Pad 39B, the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo is ready to be transferred into Space Shuttle Discovery'''s payload bay. Discovery is scheduled to launch March 8 at 6:42 a.m. EST on mission STS-102, the eighth construction flight to the International Space Station. The primary delivery system used to resupply and return Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment, Leonardo will deliver up to 10 tons of laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments and supplies for outfitting the newly installed U.S. Laboratory Destiny.

  7. STS-102 MPLM Leonardo is transferred from the PCR into Discovery's payload bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - The Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo is moved into Space Shuttle Discovery'''s payload bay. The primary delivery system used to resupply and return Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment, Leonardo will deliver up to 10 tons of laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments and supplies for outfitting the newly installed U.S. Laboratory Destiny. Discovery is scheduled to launch March 8 at 6:42 a.m. EST on mission STS-102, the eighth construction flight to the International Space Station.

  8. Leonardo-BRDF: A New Generation Satellite Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esper, Jaime; Neeck, Steven; Wiscombe, Warren; Ryschkewitsch, Michael; Andary, J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Instantaneous net radiation flux at the top of the atmosphere is one of the primary drivers of climate and global change. Since the dawn of the satellite era, great efforts and expense have gone into measuring this flux from single satellites and even (for a several-year period) from a constellation of three satellites called ERBE. However, the reflected solar flux is an angular and spectral integral over the so-called "BRDF" or Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function, which is the angular distribution of reflected solar radiation for each solar zenith angle and each wavelength. Previous radiation flux satellites could not measure instantaneous BRDF, so scientists have had to fall back on models or composites. Because their range of observed solar zenith angles was very limited due to sunsynchronous orbits, the resultant flux maps are too inaccurate to see the dynamics of radiation flux or to reliably correlate it with specific phenomena (hurricanes, biomass fires, urban pollution, dust outbreaks, etc.). Accuracy only becomes acceptable after monthly averaging, but this washes out almost all cause-and-effect information, further exacerbated by the lack of spectral resolution. Leonardo-BRDF is a satellite system designed to measure the instantaneous spectral BRDF using a formation of highly coordinated satellites, all pointing at the same Earth targets at the same time. It will allow scientists for the first time to assess the radiative forcing of climate due to specific phenomena, which is bound to be important in the ongoing debate about global warming and what is causing it. The formation is composed of two satellite types having, as instrument payloads, single highly-integrated miniature imaging spectrometers or radiometers. Two nearby "keystone" satellites anchor the formation and fly in static orbits. They employ wide field of view imaging spectrometers that are extremely light and compact. The keystone satellites are identical and can operate in

  9. The handedness of Leonardo da Vinci: a tale of the complexities of lateralisation.

    PubMed

    McManus, I C; Drury, Helena

    2004-07-01

    The handedness of Leonardo da Vinci is controversial. Although there is little doubt that many of his well-attributed drawings were drawn with the left hand, the hatch marks of the shading going downwards from left to right, it is not clear that he was a natural left-hander, there being some suggestion that he may have become left-handed as the result of an injury to his right hand in early adulthood. Leonardo's lateralisation may be illuminated by an obscure passage in his notebooks in which he describes crouching down to look into a dark cave, putting his left hand on his knee, and shading his eyes with his right hand. We carried out a questionnaire survey, using 33 written and photographic items, to find whether this behaviour was typical of right handers or left handers. In fact the 'Leonardo task' showed almost no direct association with handedness, meaning that it contributes little to the immediate problem of elucidating Leonardo's handedness. However, the lateralisation of the task did relate to other aspects of behavioural laterality in surprisingly complex ways. This suggests that individual differences in handedness, and behavioural laterality in general, have a structural complexity which is not fully encompassed by simple measures of direction or degree of handedness.

  10. Leonardo da Vinci's "A skull sectioned": skull and dental formula revisited.

    PubMed

    Gerrits, Peter O; Veening, Jan G

    2013-05-01

    What can be learned from historical anatomical drawings and how to incorporate these drawings into anatomical teaching? The drawing "A skull sectioned" (RL 19058v) by Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), hides more detailed information than reported earlier. A well-chosen section cut explores sectioned paranasal sinuses and ductus nasolacrimalis. A dissected lateral wall of the maxilla is also present. Furthermore, at the level of the foramen mentale, the drawing displays compact and spongious bony components, together with a cross-section through the foramen mentale and its connection with the canalis mandibulae. Leonardo was the first to describe a correct dental formula (6424) and made efforts to place this formula above the related dental elements. However, taking into account, the morphological features of the individual elements of the maxilla, it can be suggested that Leonardo sketched a "peculiar dental element" on the position of the right maxillary premolar in the dental sketch. The fact that the author did not make any comment on that special element is remarkable. Leonardo could have had sufficient knowledge of the precise morphology of maxillary and mandibular premolars, since the author depicted these elements in the dissected skull. The fact that the author also had access to premolars in situ corroborates our suggestion that "something went wrong" in this part of the drawing. The present study shows that historical anatomical drawings are very useful for interactive learning of detailed anatomy for students in medicine and dentistry.

  11. Historical continuity in the methodology of modern medical science: Leonardo leads the way.

    PubMed

    Pasipoularides, Ares

    2014-02-01

    Early modern medical science did not arise ex nihilo, but was the culmination of a long history stretching back through the Renaissance, the Middle Ages, Byzantium and Roman times, into Greek Antiquity. The long interval between Aristotle and Galen and Harvey and Descartes was punctuated by outstanding visionaries, including Leonardo, the ultimate Renaissance man. His attitude and mindset were based on Aristotelian pursuit of empirical fact and rational thought. He declared himself to be a "man without letters" to underscore his disdain for those whose culture was only mnemonics and philosophical inferences from authoritative books. Leonardo read the Book of Nature with the immense curiosity of the pioneering scientist, ushering in the methodology of modern medical science with help from forerunners. He left no publications, but extensive personal Notebooks: on his scientific research, hydrodynamics, physiological anatomy, etc. Apparently, numerous successors availed themselves of his methodologies and insights, albeit without attribution. In his Notebooks, disordered and fragmentary, Leonardo manifests the exactitude of the engineer and scientist, the spontaneous freshness of one speaking of what he has at heart and that he knows well. His style is unrefined, but intensely personal, rich with emotion and, sometimes, poetic. Leonardo, the visionary anatomist, strived consistently not merely to imitate nature by depicting body structures, but to perceive through analysis and simulations the intimate physiologic processes; i.e., the biomechanics underlying the workings of all bodily organs and components, even the mysterious beating heart. It is fitting to regard him as the first modern medical scientist.

  12. Leonardo da Vinci, One Year on...a Different Look at Vocational Training in Europe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Magazine, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the success of the Leonardo da Vinci program, a European laboratory of innovation in vocational training, a priority focus of investment in human resources and intelligence, and a way to mobilize innovative forces beyond national boundaries. Trends identified by the program focus on new information and communication technologies. (JOW)

  13. Transparency of Vocational Qualifications: The Leonardo da Vinci Approach. CEDEFOP Panorama Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjornavold, Jens; Pettersson, Sten

    This report gives an overview of the situation of transparency of vocational qualifications by presenting measures introduced at the European Community level and by drawing attention to projects within the Leonardo da Vinci Program dealing with the issue. A 16-page executive summary appears first. Chapter 1 provides general background and aims.…

  14. Historical continuity in the methodology of modern medical science: Leonardo leads the way.

    PubMed

    Pasipoularides, Ares

    2014-02-01

    Early modern medical science did not arise ex nihilo, but was the culmination of a long history stretching back through the Renaissance, the Middle Ages, Byzantium and Roman times, into Greek Antiquity. The long interval between Aristotle and Galen and Harvey and Descartes was punctuated by outstanding visionaries, including Leonardo, the ultimate Renaissance man. His attitude and mindset were based on Aristotelian pursuit of empirical fact and rational thought. He declared himself to be a "man without letters" to underscore his disdain for those whose culture was only mnemonics and philosophical inferences from authoritative books. Leonardo read the Book of Nature with the immense curiosity of the pioneering scientist, ushering in the methodology of modern medical science with help from forerunners. He left no publications, but extensive personal Notebooks: on his scientific research, hydrodynamics, physiological anatomy, etc. Apparently, numerous successors availed themselves of his methodologies and insights, albeit without attribution. In his Notebooks, disordered and fragmentary, Leonardo manifests the exactitude of the engineer and scientist, the spontaneous freshness of one speaking of what he has at heart and that he knows well. His style is unrefined, but intensely personal, rich with emotion and, sometimes, poetic. Leonardo, the visionary anatomist, strived consistently not merely to imitate nature by depicting body structures, but to perceive through analysis and simulations the intimate physiologic processes; i.e., the biomechanics underlying the workings of all bodily organs and components, even the mysterious beating heart. It is fitting to regard him as the first modern medical scientist. PMID:24360160

  15. Leonardo's rule, self-similarity, and wind-induced stresses in trees.

    PubMed

    Eloy, Christophe

    2011-12-16

    Examining botanical trees, Leonardo da Vinci noted that the total cross section of branches is conserved across branching nodes. In this Letter, it is proposed that this rule is a consequence of the tree skeleton having a self-similar structure and the branch diameters being adjusted to resist wind-induced loads.

  16. Leonardo's Rule, Self-Similarity, and Wind-Induced Stresses in Trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eloy, Christophe

    2011-12-01

    Examining botanical trees, Leonardo da Vinci noted that the total cross section of branches is conserved across branching nodes. In this Letter, it is proposed that this rule is a consequence of the tree skeleton having a self-similar structure and the branch diameters being adjusted to resist wind-induced loads.

  17. Hard-Boiled for Hard Times in Leonardo Padura Fuentes's Detective Fiction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, H. Rosi

    2009-01-01

    Focusing on Leonardo Padura Fuentes's hard-boiled fiction, this essay traces the origin and evolution of the genre in Cuba. Padura Fuentes has challenged the officially sanctioned socialist "literatura policial" that became popular in the 1970s and 1980s. creating a new model of criticism that is not afraid to confront the island's socio-economic…

  18. MPLM-1, Leonardo, is transported to the SSPF from the SLF at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The first Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM), destined for use in constructing the International Space Station (ISS), rests on the truck that will move it to the Space Station ProcessingFacility. Named the Leonardo, the MPLM arrived aboard the Airbus Beluga transporter, at left. Leonardo is scheduled to be launched on STS-100 in December 1999. Three modules are being provided by Alenia Aerospazio, in Italy, and will be operated by NASA and supported by ASI, the Italian space agency. The MPLMs will be carried in the payload bay of a Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the ISS. The second MPLM, to be handed over in April 1999, is named Raffaello. A third module, to be named Donatello, is due to be delivered in October 2000 for launch in January 2001.

  19. MPLM-1, Leonardo, is transported to the SSPF from the SLF at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The canister containing the first Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM), the Leonardo, passes the Vehicle Assembly Building on its way to the Space Station Processing Facility. Destined for use in constructing the International Space Station (ISS), the MPLM arrived aboard an Airbus Beluga transporter. Leonardo is scheduled to be launched on STS-100 in December 1999. Three modules are being provided by Alenia Aerospazio, in Italy, and will be operated by NASA and supported by ASI, the Italian space agency. The MPLMs will be carried in the payload bay of a Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the ISS. The second MPLM, to be handed over in April 1999, is named Raffaello. A third module, to be named Donatello, is due to be delivered in October 2000 for launch in January 2001.

  20. MPLM-1, Leonardo, is offloaded from the cargo plane at the SLF at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    KSC personnel watch as workers at the Shuttle Landing Facility begin unloading the canister containing the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM), the Leonardo, from the Airbus Beluga transporter. Leonardo is scheduled to be launched on STS-100 in December 1999. The modules are being provided by Alenia Aerospazio, in Italy, and will be operated by NASA and supported by ASI, the Italian space agency. The MPLMs will be carried in the payload bay of a Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the International Space Station. The second MPLM, to be handed over in April 1999, is named Raffaello. A third module, to be named Donatello, is due to be delivered in October 2000 for launch in January 2001.

  1. MPLM-1, Leonardo, is offloaded from the cargo plane at the SLF at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    With the nose of the Airbus Beluga transporter open, KSC workers prepare to unload the canister holding the first Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM), at the Shuttle Landing Facility. Dubbed Leonardo, the module is destined for use in constructing the International Space Station (ISS). Leonardo is scheduled to be launched on STS-100 in December 1999. The modules are being provided by Alenia Aerospazio, in Italy, and will be operated by NASA and supported by ASI, the Italian space agency. The MPLMs will be carried in the payload bay of a Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the ISS. The second MPLM, to be handed over in April 1999, is named Raffaello. A third module, to be named Donatello, is due to be delivered in October 2000 for launch in January 2001.

  2. Visual degradation in Leonardo da Vinci's iconic self-portrait: A nanoscale study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conte, A. Mosca; Pulci, O.; Misiti, M. C.; Lojewska, J.; Teodonio, L.; Violante, C.; Missori, M.

    2014-06-01

    The discoloration of ancient paper, due to the development of oxidized groups acting as chromophores in its chief component, cellulose, is responsible for severe visual degradation in ancient artifacts. By adopting a non-destructive approach based on the combination of optical reflectance measurements and time-dependent density functional theory ab-initio calculations, we describe and quantify the chromophores affecting Leonardo da Vinci's iconic self-portrait. Their relative concentrations are very similar to those measured in modern and ancient samples aged in humid environments. This analysis quantifies the present level of optical degradation of the Leonardo da Vinci's self-portrait which, compared with future measurements, will assess its degradation rate. This is a fundamental information in order to plan appropriate conservation strategies.

  3. The Handedness of Leonardo da Vinci: A Tale of the Complexities of Lateralisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McManus, I. C.; Drury, Helena

    2004-01-01

    The handedness of Leonardo da Vinci is controversial. Although there is little doubt that many of his well-attributed drawings were drawn with the left hand, the hatch marks of the shading going downwards from left to right, it is not clear that he was a natural left-hander, there being some suggestion that he may have become left-handed as the…

  4. Leonardo da Vinci and Andreas Vesalius; the shoulder girdle and the spine, a comparison.

    PubMed

    Ganseman, Y; Broos, P

    2008-01-01

    Leonardo Da Vinci and Andreas Vesalius were two important renaissance persons; Vesalius was a surgeon-anatomist who delivered innovative work on the study of the human body, Leonardo da Vinci was an artist who delivered strikingly accurate and beautiful drawings on the human body. Below we compare both masters with regard to their knowledge of the working of the muscles, their method and system of dissection and their system and presentation of the drawings. The investigation consisted of a comparison between both anatomists, in particular concerning their study on the shoulder girdle and spine, by reviewing their original work as well as already existing literature on this subject. The investigation led to the conclusion that the drawings mentioned meant a change in history, and were of high quality, centuries ahead of their time. Both were anatomists, both were revolutionary, only one changed history at the moment itself, while the other changed history centuries later. Leonardo has made beautiful drawings that are at a match with the drawings of today or are even better. Vesalius set the start for medicine as a science as it is until this day. Their lives differed as strongly as their impact. In the light of their time, the achievement they made was extraordinary. PMID:18807610

  5. Leonardo da Vinci and Andreas Vesalius; the shoulder girdle and the spine, a comparison.

    PubMed

    Ganseman, Y; Broos, P

    2008-01-01

    Leonardo Da Vinci and Andreas Vesalius were two important renaissance persons; Vesalius was a surgeon-anatomist who delivered innovative work on the study of the human body, Leonardo da Vinci was an artist who delivered strikingly accurate and beautiful drawings on the human body. Below we compare both masters with regard to their knowledge of the working of the muscles, their method and system of dissection and their system and presentation of the drawings. The investigation consisted of a comparison between both anatomists, in particular concerning their study on the shoulder girdle and spine, by reviewing their original work as well as already existing literature on this subject. The investigation led to the conclusion that the drawings mentioned meant a change in history, and were of high quality, centuries ahead of their time. Both were anatomists, both were revolutionary, only one changed history at the moment itself, while the other changed history centuries later. Leonardo has made beautiful drawings that are at a match with the drawings of today or are even better. Vesalius set the start for medicine as a science as it is until this day. Their lives differed as strongly as their impact. In the light of their time, the achievement they made was extraordinary.

  6. STS-102 MPLM Leonardo is moved to the payload canister for transfer to Launch Pad 39B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane begins lifting the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. The MPLM is being moved to the payload canister for transfer to Launch Pad 39B and installation in Space Shuttle Discovery. The Leonardo, one of Italy'''s major contributions to the International Space Station program, is a reusable logistics carrier. It is the primary delivery system used to resupply and return Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Leonardo is the primary payload on mission STS-102 and will deliver up to 10 tons of laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments and supplies for outfitting the newly installed U.S. Laboratory Destiny. STS-102 is scheduled to launch March 8 at 6:45 a.m. EST.

  7. [The Vitruvian Man: an anatomical drawing for proportions by Leonardo Da Vinci].

    PubMed

    Le Floch-Prigent, P

    2008-12-01

    The aim of the study was to find out and to analyse the text by Vitruvius which inspired the famous drawing by Leonardo da Vinci (circa 1490) kept in the Galleria dell'Accademia, in Venezia, Italy: the man inscribed in one circle and in one square. The book "de Architectura" by Vitruvius Marcus Pollio was printed several times since the Renaissance when both the roman architecture of antiquity and this text became very popular. From a French translation by Claude Perrault in 1864, it became easy to find a French translation with the original text in Latin (Paris, 2003, Les Belles Lettres, French text by Pierre Gros). The drawing by Leonardo da Vinci illustrates with great accuracy and fidelity the quotation of Vitruvius (with the exception of two of the 12 main relationships). The genius of Leonardo da Vinci was to keep only one trunk, head and neck for two pairs of limbs: scapular and pelvic; to make the circle tangent to the lower edge of the square; to adjust a few features of the quotation for the equilibrium of the whole figure; and of course to bring his incredible skill as a drawer (one of the best of his century). The drawing was made on a sheet of paper 344x245mm, in black ink which became dark brown with time; several lines complete the figure above and below; a short caption and a horizontal scale appear just under the drawing. The celebrity of the drawing, a symbol of the Renaissance, of the equilibrium of man and mankind, of the universality of the artists and intellectuals of the time (Humanism) made it iconic and it has been constantly reproduced and adapted especially for advertisement and logos, not only in the medical field.

  8. [The anatomy of a reduced skull model--visualisation of Leonardo da Vinci's anthropology].

    PubMed

    Ahner, E

    2008-04-01

    The article focuses on a rare example of a miniature skull of unknown origin. The profoundness of the anatomical details, conjoint with outstanding virtuosity, reminds of Leonardo da Vinci's anatomical skull studies and asks for additional interpretation beside the emblematic "memento mori"-character. Following the miscellaneous topics of his skull studies an anatomical-anthropological interpretation is proposed. For such a project the mergence of anthropology, history of medicine and history of art was mandatory. Concerning some discrepancies within the anatomical realism, the depiction of a pathology is discussed and beyond the visualisation of a historic concept of brain function.

  9. OCT structural examination of Madonna dei Fusi by Leonardo da Vinci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Targowski, Piotr; Iwanicka, Magdalena; Sylwestrzak, Marcin; Kaszewska, Ewa A.; Frosinini, Cecilia

    2013-05-01

    Madonna dei Fusi (`Madonna of the Yarnwider') is a spectacular example of Italian Renaissance painting, attributed to Leonardo da Vinci. The aim of this study is to give an account of past restoration procedures. The evidence of a former retouching campaign will be presented with cross-sectional images obtained non-invasively with Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). Specifically, the locations of overpaintings/retouchings with respect to the original paint layer and secondary varnishes will be given. Additionally, the evidence of a former transfer of the pictorial layer to the new canvas support by detecting the presence of its structure incised into paint layer will be shown.

  10. [Leonardo da Vinci the first human body imaging specialist. A brief communication on the thorax oseum images].

    PubMed

    Cicero, Raúl; Criales, José Luis; Cardoso, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    The impressive development of computed tomography (CT) techniques such as the three dimensional helical CT produces a spatial image of the thoracic skull. At the beginning of the 16th century Leonardo da Vinci drew with great precision the thorax oseum. These drawings show an outstanding similarity with the images obtained by three dimensional helical CT. The cumbersome task of the Renaissance genius is a prime example of the careful study of human anatomy. Modern imaging techniques require perfect anatomic knowledge of the human body in order to generate exact interpretations of images. Leonardo's example is alive for anybody devoted to modern imaging studies.

  11. The uncatchable smile in Leonardo da Vinci's La Bella Principessa portrait.

    PubMed

    Soranzo, Alessandro; Newberry, Michelle

    2015-08-01

    A portrait of uncertain origin recently came to light which, after extensive research and examination, was shown to be that rarest of things: a newly discovered Leonardo da Vinci painting entitled La Bella Principessa. This research presents a new illusion which is similar to that identified in the Mona Lisa; La Bella Principessa's mouth appears to change slant depending on both the Viewing Distance and the Level of Blur applied to a digital version of the portrait. Through a series of psychophysics experiments, it was found that a perceived change in the slant of the La Bella Principessa's mouth influences her expression of contentment thus generating an illusion that we have coined the "uncatchable smile". The elusive quality of the Mona Lisa's smile has been previously reported (Science, 290 (2000) 1299) and so the existence of a similar illusion in a portrait painted prior to the Mona Lisa becomes more interesting. The question remains whether Leonardo da Vinci intended this illusion. In any case, it can be argued that the ambiguity created adds to the portrait's allure.

  12. Leonardo's branching rule in trees: How self-similar structures resist wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eloy, Christophe

    2011-11-01

    In his notebooks, Leonardo da Vinci observed that ``all the branches of a tree at every stage of its height when put together are equal in thickness to the trunk,'' which means that the total cross-sectional area of branches is conserved across branching nodes. The usual explanation for this rule involves vascular transport of sap, but this argument is questionable because the portion of wood devoted to transport varies across species and can be as low as 5%. It is proposed here that Leonardo's rule is a consequence of the tree skeleton having a self-similar structure and the branch diameters being adjusted to resist wind-induced loads. To address this problem, a continuous model is first considered by neglecting the geometrical details of branching and wind incident angles. The robustness of this analytical model is then assessed with numerical simulations on tree skeletons generated with a simple branching rule producing self-similar structures. This study was supported by the European Union through the fellowship PIOF-GA-2009-252542.

  13. The oldest anatomical handmade skull of the world c. 1508: 'the ugliness of growing old' attributed to Leonardo da Vinci.

    PubMed

    Missinne, Stefaan J

    2014-06-01

    The author discusses a previously unknown early sixteenth-century renaissance handmade anatomical miniature skull. The small, naturalistic skull made from an agate (calcedonia) stone mixture (mistioni) shows remarkable osteologic details. Dr. Saban was the first to link the skull to Leonardo. The three-dimensional perspective of and the search for the senso comune are discussed. Anatomical errors both in the drawings of Leonardo and this skull are presented. The article ends with the issue of physiognomy, his grotesque faces, the Perspective Communis and his experimenting c. 1508 with the stone mixture and the human skull. Evidence, including the Italian scale based on Crazie and Braccia, chemical analysis leading to a mine in Volterra and Leonardo's search for the soul in the skull are presented. Written references in the inventory of Salai (1524), the inventory of the Villa Riposo (Raffaello Borghini 1584) and Don Ambrogio Mazenta (1635) are reviewed. The author attributes the skull c. 1508 to Leonardo da Vinci.

  14. Virtual Mobility in Reality: A Study of the Use of ICT in Finnish Leonardo da Vinci Mobility Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valjus, Sonja

    An e-mail survey and interviews collected data on use of information and communications technology (ICT) in Finnish Leonardo da Vinci mobility projects from 2000-02. Findings showed that the most common ICT tools used were e-mail, digital tools, and the World Wide Web; ICT was used during all project phases; the most common problems concerned…

  15. Educating in the Design and Construction of Built Environments Accessible to Disabled People: The Leonardo da Vinci AWARD Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frattari, Antonio; Dalpra, Michela; Bernardi, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    An interdisciplinary partnership within an European Leonardo da Vinci project has developed a new approach aimed at educating secondary school students in the creation of built environments accessible to disabled people and at sensitizing them towards the inclusion of people with disabilities in all realms of social life. The AWARD (Accessible…

  16. Thinking like Leonardo da Vinci and its implications for the modern doctor.

    PubMed

    Baum, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Most people when asked to name the most creative, innovative, and multidimensional people in history would agree that Leonardo da Vinci is either at the top or very close to the number one position on that list. Wouldn't it be nice to think like da Vinci? This article shares the seven unique principles of thinking that da Vinci used that enabled him to be the greatest painter, sculptor, architect, musician, mathematician, engineer, inventor, anatomist, geologist, cartographer, botanist, and writer of his (if not of all) time. This article will take you deep into the notebooks and codices of da Vinci, and suggest ways his ideas can be used by anyone in the healthcare profession to make them a better healthcare provider.

  17. Bell's palsy: the answer to the riddle of Leonardo da Vinci's 'Mona Lisa'.

    PubMed

    Maloney, W J

    2011-05-01

    The smile of the famed portrait 'The Mona Lisa' has perplexed both art historians and researchers for the past 500 years. There has been a multitude of theories expounded to explain the nature of the model's enigmatic smile. The origin of the model's wry smile can be demonstrated through a careful analysis of both documented facts concerning the portrait--some gathered only recently through the use of modern technology--and a knowledge of the clinical presentation of Bell's palsy. Bell's palsy is more prevalent in women who are either pregnant or who have recently given birth. This paper postulates that the smile of the portrait's model was due to Leonardo da Vinci's anatomically precise representation of a new mother affected by Bell's palsy subsequent to her recent pregnancy.

  18. Thinking like Leonardo da Vinci and its implications for the modern doctor.

    PubMed

    Baum, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Most people when asked to name the most creative, innovative, and multidimensional people in history would agree that Leonardo da Vinci is either at the top or very close to the number one position on that list. Wouldn't it be nice to think like da Vinci? This article shares the seven unique principles of thinking that da Vinci used that enabled him to be the greatest painter, sculptor, architect, musician, mathematician, engineer, inventor, anatomist, geologist, cartographer, botanist, and writer of his (if not of all) time. This article will take you deep into the notebooks and codices of da Vinci, and suggest ways his ideas can be used by anyone in the healthcare profession to make them a better healthcare provider. PMID:24228380

  19. Alchemy in popular culture: Leonardo Fioravanti and the search for the philosopher's stone.

    PubMed

    Eamon, W

    2000-05-01

    This article examines the alchemical ideas and practices of the sixteenth-century Italian surgeon Leonardo Fioravanti. I argue that Fioravanti's "search for the philosopher's stone" was as much an effort at self-fashioning as a search for alchemical gold. Exploiting the fashion for alchemical drugs, he framed a "new theory" of healing that relied on the use of distilled drugs as a means of purging bodily corruptions. His theory resonated with popular culture, and made him the focus of an alternative medical movement. I conclude that Fioravanti's alchemy was not Paracelsianism, but relied much more on more immediate sources such as Arnald of Villanova, the pseudo-Lull, and the contemporary Milanese alchemist Ettore Ausonio.

  20. Microbiological Analysis of Surfaces of Leonardo Da Vinci's Atlantic Codex: Biodeterioration Risk.

    PubMed

    Tarsitani, Gianfranco; Moroni, Catia; Cappitelli, Francesca; Pasquariello, Giovanna; Maggi, Oriana

    2014-01-01

    Following the discovery of discoloration on some pages of the Atlantic Codex (AC) of Leonardo da Vinci kept in the Biblioteca Ambrosiana in Milan, some investigations have been carried out to verify the presence of microorganisms, such as bacteria and fungi. To verify the presence of microorganisms a noninvasive method of sampling has been used that was efficient and allowed us to highlight the microbial facies of the material that was examined using conventional microbiological techniques. The microclimatic conditions in the storage room as well as the water content of the volume were also assessed. The combined observations allowed the conclusion that the discoloration of suspected biological origin on some pages of AC is not related to the presence or current attack of microbial agents.

  1. Microbiological Analysis of Surfaces of Leonardo Da Vinci's Atlantic Codex: Biodeterioration Risk

    PubMed Central

    Moroni, Catia; Pasquariello, Giovanna; Maggi, Oriana

    2014-01-01

    Following the discovery of discoloration on some pages of the Atlantic Codex (AC) of Leonardo da Vinci kept in the Biblioteca Ambrosiana in Milan, some investigations have been carried out to verify the presence of microorganisms, such as bacteria and fungi. To verify the presence of microorganisms a noninvasive method of sampling has been used that was efficient and allowed us to highlight the microbial facies of the material that was examined using conventional microbiological techniques. The microclimatic conditions in the storage room as well as the water content of the volume were also assessed. The combined observations allowed the conclusion that the discoloration of suspected biological origin on some pages of AC is not related to the presence or current attack of microbial agents. PMID:25574171

  2. [The art of Leonardo Da Vinci as a resource to science and the ideal of nursing care].

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Maria Aparecida de Luca; de Brito, Isabela Jorge; Dehoul, Marcelo da Silva

    2003-01-01

    Theoretical reflection whose goal is to demonstrate the art a nursing team is required to show in order to perform a technical procedure for transfer of solutions from a normal vial to a microdrops vial, based on Leonardo Da Vinci's theoretical referential, inspired by his work called "Vitruvian Man", so that body harmony is kept. The authors emphasize its relationship to nursing care, viewing it from its broadest sense, and its own motto--"Science, Art and Ideal".

  3. The proportion of the face in younger adults using the thumb rule of Leonardo da Vinci.

    PubMed

    Oguz, O

    1996-01-01

    The present study was conducted to examine whether the thumb rule of Leonardo da Vinci could be an objective method in the determination of the natural and artistic proportions of human face. In this study, a sample of 400 subjects (200 male and 200 female, 22-25 years old) was used. Measurements were made of the length of thumb, the length of ear, the approximate distances between the hair line and the glabella or eyebrows, between the glabella or eyebrows and the tip of the nose and the distance between the nose and the chin, and the distance between the ear and the lateral aspect of the eye. The results obtained in the males and females showed significant (p < 0.01) correlations between the length of thumb and the proportions of the face examined in the study. Additionally, the height of the face was found to be almost three times the length of the thumb. However, the measurements obtained from female subjects were on average smaller than those taken from males. The results obtained in this experiment could be of value in understanding of the evaluation of the face for the people working in plastic surgery or art.

  4. From Comparison Between Scientists to Gaining Cultural Scientific Knowledge. Leonardo and Galileo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galili, Igal

    2016-03-01

    Physics textbooks often present items of disciplinary knowledge in a sequential order of topics of the theory under instruction. Such presentation is usually univocal, that is, isolated from alternative claims and contributions regarding the subject matter in the pertinent scientific discourse. We argue that comparing and contrasting the contributions of scientists addressing similar or the same subject could not only enrich the picture of scientific enterprise, but also possess a special appealing power promoting genuine understanding of the concept considered. This approach draws on the historical tradition from Plutarch in distant past and Koyré in the recent history and philosophy of science. It gains a new support in the discipline-culture structuring of the physics curriculum, seeking cultural content knowledge (CCK) of the subject matter. Here, we address two prominent individuals of Italian Renaissance, Leonardo and Galileo, in their dealing with issues relevant for introductory science courses. Although both figures addressed similar subjects of scientific content, their products were essentially different. Considering this difference is educationally valuable, illustrating the meaning of what students presently learn in the content knowledge of mechanics, optics and astronomy, as well as the nature of science and scientific knowledge.

  5. From Leonardo to da Vinci: the history of robot-assisted surgery in urology.

    PubMed

    Yates, David R; Vaessen, Christophe; Roupret, Morgan

    2011-12-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Numerous urological procedures can now be performed with robotic assistance. Though not definitely proven to be superior to conventional laparoscopy or traditional open surgery in the setting of a randomised trial, in experienced centres robot-assisted surgery allows for excellent surgical outcomes and is a valuable tool to augment modern surgical practice. Our review highlights the depth of history that underpins the robotic surgical platform we utilise today, whilst also detailing the current place of robot-assisted surgery in urology in 2011. The evolution of robots in general and as platforms to augment surgical practice is an intriguing story that spans cultures, continents and centuries. A timeline from Yan Shi (1023-957 bc), Archytas of Tarentum (400 bc), Aristotle (322 bc), Heron of Alexandria (10-70 ad), Leonardo da Vinci (1495), the Industrial Revolution (1790), 'telepresence' (1950) and to the da Vinci(®) Surgical System (1999), shows the incredible depth of history and development that underpins the modern surgical robot we use to treat our patients. Robot-assisted surgery is now well-established in Urology and although not currently regarded as a 'gold standard' approach for any urological procedure, it is being increasingly used for index operations of the prostate, kidney and bladder. We perceive that robotic evolution will continue infinitely, securing the place of robots in the history of Urological surgery. Herein, we detail the history of robots in general, in surgery and in Urology, highlighting the current place of robot-assisted surgery in radical prostatectomy, partial nephrectomy, pyeloplasty and radical cystectomy.

  6. The mother relationship and artistic inhibition in the lives of Leonardo da Vinci and Erik H. Erikson.

    PubMed

    Capps, Donald

    2008-12-01

    In four earlier articles, I focused on the theme of the relationship of melancholia and the mother, and suggested that the melancholic self may experience humor (Capps, 2007a), play (Capps, 2007b), dreams (Capps, 2008a), and art (Capps, 2008b) as restorative resources. I argued that Erik H. Erikson found these resources to be valuable remedies for his own melancholic condition, which had its origins in the fact that he was illegitimate and was raised solely by his mother until he was three years old, when she remarried. In this article, I focus on two themes in Freud's Leonardo da Vinci and a memory of his childhood (1964): Leonardo's relationship with his mother in early childhood and his inhibitions as an artist. I relate these two themes to Erikson's own early childhood and his failure to achieve his goal as an aspiring artist in his early twenties. The article concludes with a discussion of Erikson's frustrated aspirations to become an artist and his emphasis, in his psychoanalytic work, on children's play.

  7. The mother relationship and artistic inhibition in the lives of Leonardo da Vinci and Erik H. Erikson.

    PubMed

    Capps, Donald

    2008-12-01

    In four earlier articles, I focused on the theme of the relationship of melancholia and the mother, and suggested that the melancholic self may experience humor (Capps, 2007a), play (Capps, 2007b), dreams (Capps, 2008a), and art (Capps, 2008b) as restorative resources. I argued that Erik H. Erikson found these resources to be valuable remedies for his own melancholic condition, which had its origins in the fact that he was illegitimate and was raised solely by his mother until he was three years old, when she remarried. In this article, I focus on two themes in Freud's Leonardo da Vinci and a memory of his childhood (1964): Leonardo's relationship with his mother in early childhood and his inhibitions as an artist. I relate these two themes to Erikson's own early childhood and his failure to achieve his goal as an aspiring artist in his early twenties. The article concludes with a discussion of Erikson's frustrated aspirations to become an artist and his emphasis, in his psychoanalytic work, on children's play. PMID:19093682

  8. The LEONARDO-DA-VINCI pilot project "e-learning-assistant" - Situation-based learning in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Pfefferle, Petra Ina; Van den Stock, Etienne; Nauerth, Annette

    2010-07-01

    E-learning will play an important role in the training portfolio of students in higher and vocational education. Within the LEONARDO-DA-VINCI action programme transnational pilot projects were funded by the European Union, which aimed to improve the usage and quality of e-learning tools in education and professional training. The overall aim of the LEONARDO-DA-VINCI pilot project "e-learning-assistant" was to create new didactical and technical e-learning tools for Europe-wide use in nursing education. Based on a new situation-oriented learning approach, nursing teachers enrolled in the project were instructed to adapt, develop and implement e- and blended learning units. According to the training contents nursing modules were developed by teachers from partner institutions, implemented in the project centers and evaluated by students. The user-package "e-learning-assistant" as a product of the project includes two teacher training units, the authoring tool "synapse" to create situation-based e-learning units, a student's learning platform containing blended learning modules in nursing and an open sourced web-based communication centre.

  9. Big Data Sensors of Organic Advocacy: The Case of Leonardo DiCaprio and Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Althouse, Benjamin M.; Dredze, Mark; Obradovich, Nick; Fowler, James H.; Noar, Seth M.; Allem, Jon-Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The strategies that experts have used to share information about social causes have historically been top-down, meaning the most influential messages are believed to come from planned events and campaigns. However, more people are independently engaging with social causes today than ever before, in part because online platforms allow them to instantaneously seek, create, and share information. In some cases this “organic advocacy” may rival or even eclipse top-down strategies. Big data analytics make it possible to rapidly detect public engagement with social causes by analyzing the same platforms from which organic advocacy spreads. To demonstrate this claim we evaluated how Leonardo DiCaprio’s 2016 Oscar acceptance speech citing climate change motivated global English language news (Bloomberg Terminal news archives), social media (Twitter postings) and information seeking (Google searches) about climate change. Despite an insignificant increase in traditional news coverage (54%; 95%CI: -144 to 247), tweets including the terms “climate change” or “global warming” reached record highs, increasing 636% (95%CI: 573–699) with more than 250,000 tweets the day DiCaprio spoke. In practical terms the “DiCaprio effect” surpassed the daily average effect of the 2015 Conference of the Parties (COP) and the Earth Day effect by a factor of 3.2 and 5.3, respectively. At the same time, Google searches for “climate change” or “global warming” increased 261% (95%CI, 186–335) and 210% (95%CI 149–272) the day DiCaprio spoke and remained higher for 4 more days, representing 104,190 and 216,490 searches. This increase was 3.8 and 4.3 times larger than the increases observed during COP’s daily average or on Earth Day. Searches were closely linked to content from Dicaprio’s speech (e.g., “hottest year”), as unmentioned content did not have search increases (e.g., “electric car”). Because these data are freely available in real time our

  10. Big Data Sensors of Organic Advocacy: The Case of Leonardo DiCaprio and Climate Change.

    PubMed

    Leas, Eric C; Althouse, Benjamin M; Dredze, Mark; Obradovich, Nick; Fowler, James H; Noar, Seth M; Allem, Jon-Patrick; Ayers, John W

    2016-01-01

    The strategies that experts have used to share information about social causes have historically been top-down, meaning the most influential messages are believed to come from planned events and campaigns. However, more people are independently engaging with social causes today than ever before, in part because online platforms allow them to instantaneously seek, create, and share information. In some cases this "organic advocacy" may rival or even eclipse top-down strategies. Big data analytics make it possible to rapidly detect public engagement with social causes by analyzing the same platforms from which organic advocacy spreads. To demonstrate this claim we evaluated how Leonardo DiCaprio's 2016 Oscar acceptance speech citing climate change motivated global English language news (Bloomberg Terminal news archives), social media (Twitter postings) and information seeking (Google searches) about climate change. Despite an insignificant increase in traditional news coverage (54%; 95%CI: -144 to 247), tweets including the terms "climate change" or "global warming" reached record highs, increasing 636% (95%CI: 573-699) with more than 250,000 tweets the day DiCaprio spoke. In practical terms the "DiCaprio effect" surpassed the daily average effect of the 2015 Conference of the Parties (COP) and the Earth Day effect by a factor of 3.2 and 5.3, respectively. At the same time, Google searches for "climate change" or "global warming" increased 261% (95%CI, 186-335) and 210% (95%CI 149-272) the day DiCaprio spoke and remained higher for 4 more days, representing 104,190 and 216,490 searches. This increase was 3.8 and 4.3 times larger than the increases observed during COP's daily average or on Earth Day. Searches were closely linked to content from Dicaprio's speech (e.g., "hottest year"), as unmentioned content did not have search increases (e.g., "electric car"). Because these data are freely available in real time our analytical strategy provides substantial lead time

  11. Big Data Sensors of Organic Advocacy: The Case of Leonardo DiCaprio and Climate Change.

    PubMed

    Leas, Eric C; Althouse, Benjamin M; Dredze, Mark; Obradovich, Nick; Fowler, James H; Noar, Seth M; Allem, Jon-Patrick; Ayers, John W

    2016-01-01

    The strategies that experts have used to share information about social causes have historically been top-down, meaning the most influential messages are believed to come from planned events and campaigns. However, more people are independently engaging with social causes today than ever before, in part because online platforms allow them to instantaneously seek, create, and share information. In some cases this "organic advocacy" may rival or even eclipse top-down strategies. Big data analytics make it possible to rapidly detect public engagement with social causes by analyzing the same platforms from which organic advocacy spreads. To demonstrate this claim we evaluated how Leonardo DiCaprio's 2016 Oscar acceptance speech citing climate change motivated global English language news (Bloomberg Terminal news archives), social media (Twitter postings) and information seeking (Google searches) about climate change. Despite an insignificant increase in traditional news coverage (54%; 95%CI: -144 to 247), tweets including the terms "climate change" or "global warming" reached record highs, increasing 636% (95%CI: 573-699) with more than 250,000 tweets the day DiCaprio spoke. In practical terms the "DiCaprio effect" surpassed the daily average effect of the 2015 Conference of the Parties (COP) and the Earth Day effect by a factor of 3.2 and 5.3, respectively. At the same time, Google searches for "climate change" or "global warming" increased 261% (95%CI, 186-335) and 210% (95%CI 149-272) the day DiCaprio spoke and remained higher for 4 more days, representing 104,190 and 216,490 searches. This increase was 3.8 and 4.3 times larger than the increases observed during COP's daily average or on Earth Day. Searches were closely linked to content from Dicaprio's speech (e.g., "hottest year"), as unmentioned content did not have search increases (e.g., "electric car"). Because these data are freely available in real time our analytical strategy provides substantial lead time

  12. Leonardo da Vinci's drapery studies: characterization of lead white pigments by µ-XRD and 2D scanning XRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Victor; Calligaro, Thomas; Pichon, Laurent; Wallez, Gilles; Mottin, Bruno

    2015-11-01

    This work focuses on the composition and microstructure of the lead white pigment employed in a set of paintworks, using a combination of µ-XRD and 2D scanning XRF, directly applied on five drapery studies attributed to Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) and conserved in the Département des Arts Graphiques, Musée du Louvre and in the Musée des Beaux- Arts de Rennes. Trace elements present in the composition as well as in the lead white highlights were imaged by 2D scanning XRF. Mineral phases were determined in a fully noninvasive way using a special µ-XRD diffractometer. Phase proportions were estimated by Rietveld refinement. The analytical results obtained will contribute to differentiate lead white qualities and to highlight the artist's technique.

  13. A psychoanalytic understanding of the desire for knowledge as reflected in Freud's Leonardo da Vinci and a memory of his childhood.

    PubMed

    Blass, Rachel B

    2006-10-01

    The author offers an understanding of the psychoanalytic notion of the desire for knowledge and the possibility of attaining it as it fi nds expression in Freud's Leonardo da Vinci and a memory of his childhood. This understanding has not been explicitly articulated by Freud but may be considered integral to psychoanalysis' Weltanschauung as shaped by Freud's legacy. It emerges through an attempt to explain basic shifts, contradictions, inconsistencies and tensions that become apparent from a close reading of the text of Leonardo. Articulating this implicit understanding of knowledge provides the grounds for a stance on epistemology that is integral to psychoanalysis and relevant to contemporary psychoanalytic concerns on this topic. This epistemology focuses on the necessary involvement of passion, rather than detachment, in the search for knowledge and views the psychoanalytic aim of self-knowledge as a derivative, and most immediate expression, of a broader and more basic human drive to know.

  14. 2D and 3D optical diagnostic techniques applied to Madonna dei Fusi by Leonardo da Vinci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, R.; Gambino, M. C.; Greco, M.; Marras, L.; Materazzi, M.; Pampaloni, E.; Pelagotti, A.; Pezzati, L.; Poggi, P.; Sanapo, C.

    2005-06-01

    3D measurement and modelling have been traditionally applied to statues, buildings, archeological sites or similar large structures, but rarely to paintings. Recently, however, 3D measurements have been performed successfully also on easel paintings, allowing to detect and document the painting's surface. We used 3D models to integrate the results of various 2D imaging techniques on a common reference frame. These applications show how the 3D shape information, complemented with 2D colour maps as well as with other types of sensory data, provide the most interesting information. The 3D data acquisition was carried out by means of two devices: a high-resolution laser micro-profilometer, composed of a commercial distance meter mounted on a scanning device, and a laser-line scanner. The 2D data acquisitions were carried out using a scanning device for simultaneous RGB colour imaging and IR reflectography, and a UV fluorescence multispectral image acquisition system. We present here the results of the techniques described, applied to the analysis of an important painting of the Italian Reinassance: `Madonna dei Fusi', attributed to Leonardo da Vinci.

  15. Amid the possible causes of a very famous foxing: molecular and microscopic insight into Leonardo da Vinci's self‐portrait

    PubMed Central

    Tafer, Hakim; Sterflinger, Katja; Pinzari, Flavia

    2015-01-01

    Summary Leonardo da Vinci's self‐portrait is affected by foxing spots. The portrait has no fungal or bacterial infections in place, but is contaminated with airborne spores and fungal material that could play a role in its disfigurement. The knowledge of the nature of the stains is of great concern because future conservation treatments should be derived from scientific investigations. The lack of reliable scientific data, due to the non‐culturability of the microorganisms inhabiting the portrait, prompted the investigation of the drawing using non‐invasive and micro‐invasive sampling, in combination with scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging and molecular techniques. The fungus E urotium halophilicum was found in foxing spots using SEM analyses. Oxalates of fungal origin were also documented. Both findings are consistent with the hypothesis that tonophilic fungi germinate on paper metabolizing organic acids, oligosaccharides and proteic compounds, which react chemically with the material at a low water activity, forming brown products and oxidative reactions resulting in foxing spots. Additionally, molecular techniques enabled a screening of the fungi inhabiting the portrait and showed differences when different sampling techniques were employed. Swabs samples showed a high abundance of lichenized Ascomycota, while the membrane filters showed a dominance of A cremonium sp. colonizing the drawing. PMID:26111623

  16. [A Fragment Of De speculis comburentibus of Regiomontanus Copied by Toscanelli and Inserted in the Books of Leonardo (Codex Atlanticus, 611rb / 915ra)].

    PubMed

    Raynaud, Dominique

    2015-07-01

    This article studies a fragment on the conic sections that appear in the Codex Atlanticus, fols. 611rb/915ra. Arguments are put forward to assemble these two folios. Their comparison with the Latin texts available before 1500 shows that they derive from the De speculis comburentibus of Alhacen and the De speculis comburentibus of Regiomontanus, joined together in his autograph manuscript (Vienna, Oster. Nationalbibliothek, Cod. 5258). Having identified the sources, and discussed their mathematics, the issue of their transmission is targeted. It is shown that these notes were written by Paolo dal Pozzo Toscanelli, through whom they reached the notebooks of Leonardo da Vinci.

  17. The left ventricle as a mechanical engine: from Leonardo da Vinci to the echocardiographic assessment of peak power output-to-left ventricular mass.

    PubMed

    Dini, Frank L; Guarini, Giacinta; Ballo, Piercarlo; Carluccio, Erberto; Maiello, Maria; Capozza, Paola; Innelli, Pasquale; Rosa, Gian M; Palmiero, Pasquale; Galderisi, Maurizio; Razzolini, Renato; Nodari, Savina

    2013-03-01

    The interpretation of the heart as a mechanical engine dates back to the teachings of Leonardo da Vinci, who was the first to apply the laws of mechanics to the function of the heart. Similar to any mechanical engine, whose performance is proportional to the power generated with respect to weight, the left ventricle can be viewed as a power generator whose performance can be related to left ventricular mass. Stress echocardiography may provide valuable information on the relationship between cardiac performance and recruited left ventricular mass that may be used in distinguishing between adaptive and maladaptive left ventricular remodeling. Peak power output-to-mass, obtained during exercise or pharmacological stress echocardiography, is a measure that reflects the number of watts that are developed by 100 g of left ventricular mass under maximal stimulation. Power output-to-mass may be calculated as left ventricular power output per 100 g of left ventricular mass: 100× left ventricular power output divided by left ventricular mass (W/100 g). A simplified formula to calculate power output-to-mass is as follows: 0.222 × cardiac output (l/min) × mean blood pressure (mmHg)/left ventricular mass (g). When the integrity of myocardial structure is compromised, a mismatch becomes apparent between maximal cardiac power output and left ventricular mass; when this occurs, a reduction of the peak power output-to-mass index is observed.

  18. Reforming Upper Secondary Education in Europe. The Leonardo da Vinci Project Post-16 Strategies. Surveys of Strategies for Post-16 Education To Improve the Parity of Esteem for Initial Vocational Education in Eight European Educational Systems. Theory into Practice 92. Institute for Educational Research Publication Series B.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasonen, Johanna, Ed.

    This book contains the following papers on the Leonardo da Vinci project: "Looking for Post-16 Education Strategies for Parity of Esteem in Europe" (Lasonen); "Improving Parity of Esteem as a Policy Goal" (Makinen, Volanen); "Alternative Strategies for Parity of Esteem between General/Academic and Vocational Education in Europe" (Kamarainen);…

  19. A second Leonardo da Vinci?

    PubMed

    Nakano, Mitsuko; Endo, Toshitaka; Tanaka, Shigeki

    2003-10-01

    We describe a young woman who suddenly began mirror writing with her right hand and has not reverted to normal writing for more than 6 years, although she writes normally with her left hand. She is ambidextrous, although she had previously used only her right hand for writing and drawing. Since it is much easier for her to use right-handed mirror writing, she uses her left hand only for writing meant to be read by others and her right hand for all other writing. Her hobbies are sculpture and painting, and her chief complaint is migraine accompanied by sensory and perceptive disturbances.

  20. Station Tour: Cupola and Leonardo

    NASA Video Gallery

    Expedition 33 Commander Suni Williams continues the tour of the International Space Station with a look at the station's observation deck, the cupola, as well as the Advanced Resistive Exercise Dev...

  1. Tourism. Leonardo da Vinci Series: Good Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium). Directorate-General for Education and Culture.

    This brochure, part of a series about good practices in vocational training in the European Union, describes 10 projects that have promoted investment in human resources through training in the tourism sector to promote sustainable, or responsible, tourism. The projects and their countries of origin are as follows: (1) BEEFT, training of mobility…

  2. Distance Learning. Leonardo da Vinci Series: Good Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium). Directorate-General for Education and Culture.

    This brochure, part of a series about good practices in vocational training in the European Union, describes 12 projects that use distance learning to promote lifelong learning in adults. The projects and their countries of origin are as follows: (1) 3D Project, training in the use of IT tools for 3D simulation and animation and practical…

  3. Scientific Aspects of Leonardo da Vinci's Drawings: An Interdisciplinary Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Struthers, Sally A.

    While interdisciplinary courses can help demonstrate the relevance of learning to students and reinforce education from different fields, they can be difficult to implement and are often not cost effective. An interdisciplinary art history course at Ohio's Sinclair Community College incorporates science into the art history curriculum, making use…

  4. [From Leonardo Da Vinci to present days; from the history of antiplague costume].

    PubMed

    Kalmykov, A A; Aminev, R M; Korneev, A G; Polyakov, V S; Artebyakin, S V

    2016-01-01

    As a prototype of the antiplague costume can be considered a special clothing, which physicians in medieval Europe wear for protection in plague nidus. Inventor of the first antiplague costume is considered to be a French doctor Charles de Lorme (1619). Much later, in 1878, a Russian professor Pashutin V V offered to use a costume, which looked like a hermetically sealed "bag" with a special breathing device aimed at protection of medical staff. Later, professor O.I. Dogel's respirator became well-known (1889). At the beginning of 20th century as part of the antiplague costume was used a charcoal filter mask, invented by Zelinsky N.D. Requirements to order the use of modern means of individual protection when working in nidus of especially dangerous infections identified sanitary-epidemiological rules, which reflect issues of laboratory workers working and protective clothing, respiratory protection, and view, especially operation, the procedure of putting on, removing and disinfecting antiplague costumes, pneumocostumes, pneumohelmets, isolation suits, gas-protection boxes, etc. PMID:27120957

  5. [From Leonardo Da Vinci to present days; from the history of antiplague costume].

    PubMed

    Kalmykov, A A; Aminev, R M; Korneev, A G; Polyakov, V S; Artebyakin, S V

    2016-01-01

    As a prototype of the antiplague costume can be considered a special clothing, which physicians in medieval Europe wear for protection in plague nidus. Inventor of the first antiplague costume is considered to be a French doctor Charles de Lorme (1619). Much later, in 1878, a Russian professor Pashutin V V offered to use a costume, which looked like a hermetically sealed "bag" with a special breathing device aimed at protection of medical staff. Later, professor O.I. Dogel's respirator became well-known (1889). At the beginning of 20th century as part of the antiplague costume was used a charcoal filter mask, invented by Zelinsky N.D. Requirements to order the use of modern means of individual protection when working in nidus of especially dangerous infections identified sanitary-epidemiological rules, which reflect issues of laboratory workers working and protective clothing, respiratory protection, and view, especially operation, the procedure of putting on, removing and disinfecting antiplague costumes, pneumocostumes, pneumohelmets, isolation suits, gas-protection boxes, etc.

  6. Moving towards Optimising Demand-Led Learning: The 2005-2007 ECUANET Leonardo Da Vinci Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dealtry, Richard; Howard, Keith

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present the key project learning points and outcomes as a guideline for the future quality management of demand-led learning and development. Design/methodology/approach: The research methodology was based upon a corporate university blueprint architecture and browser toolkit developed by a member of the…

  7. Social and Occupational Integration of Disadvantaged People. Leonardo da Vinci Good Practices Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium). Directorate-General for Education and Culture.

    This document profiles nine European programs that exemplify good practice in social and occupational integration of disadvantaged people. The programs profiled are as follows: (1) Restaurant Venezia (a CD-ROM program to improve the reading and writing skills of young people in Luxembourg who have learning difficulties); (2) an integrated…

  8. Building Skills and Qualifications among SME Employees. Leonardo da Vinci Good Practices Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium). Directorate-General for Education and Culture.

    This document profiles 10 European programs that exemplify good practice in building skills and qualifications among employees of small and medium enterprises (SMEs). The programs profiled are as follows: (1) TRICTSME (a program providing World Wide Web-based information and communication technologies training for SMEs in manufacturing); (2)…

  9. From Comparison between Scientists to Gaining Cultural Scientific Knowledge: Leonardo and Galileo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galili, Igal

    2016-01-01

    Physics textbooks often present items of disciplinary knowledge in a sequential order of topics of the theory under instruction. Such presentation is usually univocal, that is, isolated from alternative claims and contributions regarding the subject matter in the pertinent scientific discourse. We argue that comparing and contrasting the…

  10. Integrating Leonardo da Vinci's principles of demonstration, uncertainty, and cultivation in contemporary nursing education.

    PubMed

    Story, Lachel; Butts, Janie

    2014-03-01

    Nurses today are facing an ever changing health care system. Stimulated by health care reform and limited resources, nursing education is being challenged to prepare nurses for this uncertain environment. Looking to the past can offer possible solutions to the issues nursing education is confronting. Seven principles of da Vincian thinking have been identified (Gelb, 2004). As a follow-up to an exploration of the curiosità principle (Butts & Story, 2013), this article will explore the three principles of dimostrazione, sfumato, and corporalita. Nursing faculty can set the stage for a meaningful educational experience through these principles of demonstration (dimostrazione), uncertainty (sfumato), and cultivation (corporalita). Preparing nurses not only to manage but also to flourish in the current health care environment that will enhance the nurse's and patient's experience.

  11. Imaging atherosclerosis with hybrid [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging: what Leonardo da Vinci could not see.

    PubMed

    Cocker, Myra S; Mc Ardle, Brian; Spence, J David; Lum, Cheemun; Hammond, Robert R; Ongaro, Deidre C; McDonald, Matthew A; Dekemp, Robert A; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Beanlands, Rob S B

    2012-12-01

    Prodigious efforts and landmark discoveries have led toward significant advances in our understanding of atherosclerosis. Despite significant efforts, atherosclerosis continues globally to be a leading cause of mortality and reduced quality of life. With surges in the prevalence of obesity and diabetes, atherosclerosis is expected to have an even more pronounced impact upon the global burden of disease. It is imperative to develop strategies for the early detection of disease. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging utilizing [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) may provide a non-invasive means of characterizing inflammatory activity within atherosclerotic plaque, thus serving as a surrogate biomarker for detecting vulnerable plaque. The aim of this review is to explore the rationale for performing FDG imaging, provide an overview into the mechanism of action, and summarize findings from the early application of FDG PET imaging in the clinical setting to evaluate vascular disease. Alternative imaging biomarkers and approaches are briefly discussed.

  12. First International Conference between West and East—Leonardo and Lao-Tze. Western Science Meets Eastern Wisdom. Experiences of Scientists and Intellectuals for the Creation of a New Paradigm of Modern Science

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The Conference was organized and supported by: Nei Dan School (European School of Internal Martial Arts), NIB (Laboratory of Molecular Biology and Stem Cell Bioengineering, National Institute of Biostructures and Biosystems, Institute of Cardiology, S.Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna), WACIMA (Worldwide Association Chinese Internal Martial Arts), Arti D’Oriente (Magazine of Eastern culture and traditions), Nuovo Orizzonte (Taiji Quan School in Florence), Samurai (Journal on Martial Arts), and Pinus (First National Institute for the Unification of Medical Strategies). Nei Dan School (www.taichineidan.com, neidan@libero.it) was in charge of the organization. Future meetings of the Centro studi ‘Tao and Science’ will take place in spring 2007 in Firenze and in October 2007 in Bologna. For information: E-mail: neidan@libero.it; web site: www.taichineidan.com, www.taoandscience.com PMID:18317548

  13. Interdisciplinary Literacy Unit: Transformation of Italian Folklore through Shadow Theater. Pinocchio, Son of Leonardo, Survivor of Vesuvius: A Strong Body of Research Supports the Common-Sense Assumption that by Teaching Interdisciplinary Curriculum, Concepts become More Relevant to Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwirn, Susan Goetz; Fusco, Esther

    2009-01-01

    In the summer of 2007, the authors had the opportunity to lead a group of Hofstra University students, pre- and inservice, undergraduate and graduate, elementary and art teachers, to Sorrento, Italy, for interdisciplinary courses in both literacy and art education. The culminating project, a shadow theater play and performance, brought together…

  14. Reflections on Post-16 Strategies in European Countries. Interim Report of the Leonardo da Vinci/Multiplier Effect Project III.3.a. Priority 2: Forging Links between Educational Establishments and Enterprises (1997-2000) ID 27009. Working Papers, No. 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stenstrom, Marja-Leena, Ed.

    This four-part publication contains 19 papers on educational practices and promises for post-16 education in European countries. Part I, the introduction, contains these three papers: "Sharpening Post-16 Education Strategies: Building on the Results of the Previous Projects" (Johanna Lasonen); "'Parity of Esteem' and 'Integrated…

  15. A Creative Approach to the Common Core Standards: The Da Vinci Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaucer, Harry

    2012-01-01

    "A Creative Approach to the Common Core Standards: The Da Vinci Curriculum" challenges educators to design programs that boldly embrace the Common Core State Standards by imaginatively drawing from the genius of great men and women such as Leonardo da Vinci. A central figure in the High Renaissance, Leonardo made extraordinary contributions as a…

  16. Kids as Curators: Virtual Art at the Seattle Museum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scanlan, Laura Wolff

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the use of technology at the Seattle Art Museum (Washington). Includes a Web site that enables students in grades six through ten to act as curators and offers integrations of technology in the exhibition "Leonardo Lives: The Codex Leicester and Leonardo da Vinci's Legacy of Art and Science." (CMK)

  17. Strategies for Reforming Initial Vocational Education and Training in Europe. Final Report of the Project. Leonardo da Vinci/Transnational Pilot Projects: Multiplier Effect, Strand III.3.a. Sharpening Post-16 Education Strategies by Horizontal and Vertical Networking (1997-2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stenstrom, Marja-Leena, Ed.; Lasonen, Johanna, Ed.

    This document contains 24 papers examining strategies for reforming initial vocational education and training (VET) in Europe. The following papers are included: "Reassessing VET Reform Strategies in a New Context: Implementation of the SPES-NET (Sharpening Post-16 Education Strategies by Horizontal and Vertical Networking) Project" (Marja-Leena…

  18. Anatomy and art.

    PubMed

    Laios, Konstantinos; Tsoukalas, Gregory; Karamanou, Marianna; Androutsos, George

    2013-01-01

    Leonardo da Vinci, Jean Falcon, Andreas Vesalius, Henry Gray, Henry Vandyke Carter and Frank Netter created some of the best atlases of anatomy. Their works constitute not only scientific medical projects but also masterpieces of art. PMID:24640589

  19. 76 FR 2686 - Video Programming and Emergency Access Advisory Committee; Announcement of Establishment and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-14

    ... Blindness--Louis Herrera AT&T--Leonardo Velazquez Audio Description Associates--Joel Snyder Bright House... Accessible Media--Larry Goldberg World Wide Web Consortium--Judy Brewer To request materials in...

  20. Kate Steinitz, Librarian, Artist, Scholar; Being a Thirteen-Part Tribute to One Whose Verve Has Enlivened Some Eight Decades on Two Continents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson Libr Bull, 1970

    1970-01-01

    Personal reminiscences about the Dada artist, expert on Leonardo da Vinci, and librarian at the UCLA Library of Vinciana by museum directors, scholars, and friends. Includes selected bibliography of her works, a chronology, poems, sketches, and photographs. (JS)

  1. Clip and Save.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Guy

    2003-01-01

    Focuses on the facial expression in the "Mona Lisa" by Leonardo da Vinci. Offers background information on da Vinci as well as learning activities for students. Includes a reproduction of the "Mona Lisa" and information about the painting. (CMK)

  2. Da Vinci's codex and the anatomy of healthcare.

    PubMed

    Stephens-Borg, Keith

    2012-08-01

    We usually display a laid-back approach to medical jargon throughout our theatre work. The word 'perioperative' is built from the Greek word 'peri' (around) and the Latin 'operari' (to work). Latin and Greek became the prefixed language of choice for Leonardo da Vinci, and his research was pivotal in determining the way in which surgical procedures are documented. Ancient manuscripts aided the unfolding of the secrets of anatomy, and Leonardo revealed that art was the key in expressive detailed explanation.

  3. The STS-105 crew check out the payload and orbiter during CEIT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- During Crew Equipment Interface Test activities, STS-105 Commander Scott Doc Horowitz checks out the orbiter Discovery in Orbiter Processing Facility bay 2. STS-105 is the 11th mission to the International Space Station. The payload includes the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo, which was built by the Italian Space Agency. Leonardo will be outfitted with 12 racks of experiments and equipment. Discovery is scheduled to launch July 12 from Launch Pad 39A.

  4. STS-102 crew arrives at KSC's SLF for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. STS-102 Mission Specialist Susan V. Helms smiles on her arrival for launch. She is also one of the Expedition Two crew who will be replacing Expedition One on the International Space Station. STS-102 will be carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo, the primary delivery system used to resupply and return Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Leonardo will deliver up to 10 tons of laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments and supplies for outfitting the newly installed U.S. Laboratory Destiny. STS-102 is scheduled to launch March 8 at 6:42 a.m. EST.

  5. Work continues on Destiny, the U.S. Lab module, in the Space Station Processing Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), work continues on the U.S. Lab module, Destiny, which is scheduled to be launched on Space Shuttle Endeavour in early 2000. It will become the centerpiece of scientific research on the International Space Station. Destiny shares space in the SSPF with the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and Leonardo, the Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM) built by the Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI). The SRTM is targeted for launch on mission STS-99 in September 1999. Leonardo is scheduled to launch on mission STS- 102 in June 2000.

  6. Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea

    2004-06-01

    Vanitas vanitatum et omnia vanitas: bubbles are emptiness, non-liquid, a tiny cloud shielding a mathematical singularity. Born from chance, a violent and brief life ending in the union with the (nearly) infinite. But a wealth of phenomena spring forth from this nothingness: underwater noise, sonoluminescence, boiling, and many others. Some recent results on a "blinking bubble" micropump and vapor bubbles in sound fields are outlined. The last section describes Leonardo da Vinci's observation of the non-rectlinear ascent of buoyant bubbles and justifies the name Leonardo's paradox recently attributed to this phenomenon.

  7. Differential PIXE for investigating the layer structure of paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandò, P. A.; Fedi, M. E.; Grassi, N.; Migliori, A.

    2005-09-01

    This paper reports an example of how the differential PIXE technique can be successfully applied to the investigation of wood or canvas paintings. The work analysed is a famous wood painting by Leonardo da Vinci, the "Madonna dei fusi" (ex-Reford version, 1501), chosen for a pilot study in a wide international project aimed at analysing Leonardo's works of art by means of non-destructive techniques. While illustrating the results obtained concerning the identification of pigments and the discrimination of the stratigraphy of layers, the merits and limits of differential PIXE in general are pointed out.

  8. The STS-105 crew check out the payload and orbiter during CEIT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During Crew Equipment Interface Test activities in Orbiter Processing Facility bay 2, members of the STS-105 crew check out some of the payload, doing sharp edge inspection. From left are Mission Specialists Patrick Forrester and Daniel Barry, accompanied by a Boeing technician (behind) and the bucket operator (right). STS-105 is the 11th mission to the International Space Station. The payload includes the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo, which was built by the Italian Space Agency. Leonardo will be outfitted with 12 racks of experiments and equipment. Discovery is scheduled to launch July 12 from Launch Pad 39A

  9. The STS-105 crew check out the payload and orbiter during CEIT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- During Crew Equipment Interface Test activities in Orbiter Processing Facility bay 2, members of the STS-105 crew take a close look at equipment and some of the payload. From left are Mission Specialists Patrick Forrester and Daniel Barry. Behind them is a Boeing technician. STS-105 is the 11th mission to the International Space Station. The payload includes the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo, which was built by the Italian Space Agency. Leonardo will be outfitted with 12 racks of experiments and equipment. Discovery is scheduled to launch July 12 from Launch Pad 39A.

  10. Clustering Analysis of Common Tasks Undertaken by Engineering Technicians in Informatics and Manufacturing in Seven European Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papadourakis, George M.; Natsika, Christina; Magnan, Myrna; Barsics, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    VALEURTECH is a pilot project under the European Commission's Leonardo II programme. It includes 35 partners from higher education institutions and professional organizations in eight European countries and has the major objectives: of (a) setting up a homogeneous "labelling" process, such as a diploma supplement, based on a common reference…

  11. English for Airport Ground Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutting, Joan

    2012-01-01

    This article describes part of a European Commission Leonardo project that aimed to design a multimedia course for English language learners seeking work as ground staff in European airports. The structural-functional analysis of the dialogues written from the course showed that, across the four trades explored (security guards, ground handlers,…

  12. Shoptalk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meade, Jeff

    1991-01-01

    Describes innovative programs for teaching elementary school students. In Illinois, students learn about the artists Raphael, Michelangelo, Leonardo, and Donatello using the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. An Oregon program prints student poetry and places it on cafeteria tables. In rural Texas, students learn about restaurant etiquette through play…

  13. Bringing Climate Change into the Life Science Classroom: Essentials, Impacts on Life, and Addressing Misconceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Amy J.; Stark, Louisa A.

    2016-01-01

    Climate change is at the forefront of our cultural conversation about science, influencing everything from presidential debates to Leonardo DiCaprio's 2016 Oscar acceptance speech. The topic is becoming increasingly socially and scientifically relevant but is no closer to being resolved. Most high school students take a life science course but…

  14. The Fibonacci Numbers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onstad, Torgeir

    1991-01-01

    After a brief historical account of Leonardo Pisano Fibonacci, some basic results concerning the Fibonacci numbers are developed and proved, and entertaining examples are described. Connections are made between the Fibonacci numbers and the Golden Ratio, biological nature, and other combinatorics examples. (MDH)

  15. Racial Arrested Development: A Critical Whiteness Analysis of the Campus Ecology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabrera, Nolan L.; Watson, Jesse S.; Franklin, Jeremy D.

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyzes the campus ecology (Renn, 2003, 2004) literature from the perspective of Critical Whiteness specifically problematizing perceptions of safety and inclusion on the college campus. Relying upon Sullivan's (2006) ontological expansiveness, Mills's (1997) epistemology of ignorance, and Leonardo and Porter's (2010) Fanonian…

  16. Art as science: scientific illustration, 1490-1670 in drawing, woodcut and copper plate.

    PubMed

    Pyle, C M

    2000-01-01

    Observation, depiction and description are active forces in the doing of science. Advances in observation and analysis come with advances in techniques of description and communication. In this article, these questions are related to the work of Leonardo da Vinci, 16th-century naturalists and artists like Conrad Gessner and Teodoro Ghisi, and 17th-century micrographers like Robert Hooke.

  17. The "Day in the Life of a Teenage Hobo" Project: Integrating Technology with Shneiderman's Collect-Relate-Create- Donate Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reich, Justin; Daccord, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Used wisely, academic technology empowers students to take responsibility for their own learning. "In Leonardo's Laptop," Ben Shneiderman provides teachers with a powerful framework, "Collect-Relate-Create-Donate" (CRCD), for designing student-centered learning opportunities using computers. Shneiderman developed his model by applying new insights…

  18. Spin the Wheels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Critchett, John

    2011-01-01

    The Fibonacci series has been studied since it was first described by Leonardo of Pisa--Fibonacci--in 1202. It begins with the sequence 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8... Each succeeding number is the sum of the previous two. In number theory courses, students are introduced to the concept of modulo arithmetic, sometimes called "clock" arithmetic. In modulo…

  19. Art as science: scientific illustration, 1490-1670 in drawing, woodcut and copper plate.

    PubMed

    Pyle, C M

    2000-01-01

    Observation, depiction and description are active forces in the doing of science. Advances in observation and analysis come with advances in techniques of description and communication. In this article, these questions are related to the work of Leonardo da Vinci, 16th-century naturalists and artists like Conrad Gessner and Teodoro Ghisi, and 17th-century micrographers like Robert Hooke. PMID:10969482

  20. Fibonacci, Flowers and the Golden Number

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Marilyn; Fuller, Nicky

    2012-01-01

    Leonardo Pisano, the son of Guilielmo Bonacci, was born in Pisa, Italy, around 1175. He is better known as Fibonacci, a shortened version of "filius Bonacci" ("son of Bonacci"). He travelled with his father and during these travels, he learned about the enormous advantages of the mathematical systems used in the countries they visited. These…

  1. Discovery and application of energetic principles to feeding systems for beef cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development of nutritional energetics can be traced to the eras of Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) and Lavoisier (1743-1794), who discovered the basic concepts. Lavoisier established relationships among O2 use, CO2 production and heat production (HP). The laws of thermodynamics were discovered in the ...

  2. 75 FR 72868 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Renewals; Vision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... comment period ended on September 23, 2010 (75 FR 52063). Discussion of Comments FMCSA received no... applications, FMCSA renews the Federal vision exemptions for William C. Ball, Terrence L. Benning, Robert S..., Larry D. Curry, Kelly M. Greene, John H. Holmberg, Garry R. Lomen, Leonardo Lopez, Jr., James A....

  3. The Xmath Integration Algorithm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bringslid, Odd

    2009-01-01

    The projects Xmath (Bringslid and Canessa, 2002) and dMath (Bringslid, de la Villa and Rodriguez, 2007) were supported by the European Commission in the so called Minerva Action (Xmath) and The Leonardo da Vinci programme (dMath). The Xmath eBook (Bringslid, 2006) includes algorithms into a wide range of undergraduate mathematical issues embedded…

  4. On the Developing Role of Physical Models in Engineering Design Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Graham; Smrcek, Ladislav

    2006-01-01

    Recent research, undertaken using participative observation methods within the Leonardo Da Vinci project "Open-Dynamic-Design", provides evidence that EU industrial practice continues to value the flexibility of physical models across a range of disciplines. This research is placed within the philosophical educational framework established by…

  5. Nature Foil Reliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Shaw J.

    2012-01-01

    Nature has always been a source of inspiration for artists across the centuries. Artists such as Leonardo da Vinci, Georgia O'Keeffe, Ansel Adams, and Andy Goldsworthy all drew inspiration for their work from nature. Seeds come from the dried pods, which when planted and cared for, bear fruit. In this article, the author describes how her…

  6. Explorers with a Mission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Patricia James

    1991-01-01

    Offers brief summaries of contributions made by several of Christopher Columbus's contemporaries, including Nicholas Cusa, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo Buonarroti, Nicholas Copernicus, Johannes Gutenberg, Sir Thomas More, Desiderius Erasmus, and John Colet. Urges modern Catholic educators to learn from these risk takers and visionaries. (DMM)

  7. Structural Information Retention in Visual Art Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koroscik, Judith Smith

    The accuracy of non-art college students' longterm retention of structural information presented in Leonardo da Vinci's "Mona Lisa" was tested. Seventeen female undergraduates viewed reproductions of the painting and copies that closely resembled structural attributes of the original. Only 3 of the 17 subjects reported having viewed a reproduction…

  8. The Dangers of Art "Appreciation."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irvine, Hope

    1991-01-01

    Addresses the issue of the fame of Leonardo da Vinci's "Mona Lisa." Describes several kitsch objects that have been created about the painting. Maintains that students need to address this issue otherwise such exploitation will depreciate the value of the art work. (KM)

  9. Reach for the Stars: Visions for Literacy Coaching Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFord, Diane

    2012-01-01

    This brief by the Literacy Coaching Clearinghouse is about reaching for the stars--stories of vision and commitment from educators in small and large schools. Everyone knows of people who are held up as "visionaries" throughout history: Leonardo Da Vinci, Mahatma Gandhi, Jules Verne, Thomas Edison, Susan Anthony, or John Dewey, to name a few. The…

  10. Art, Anatomy, and Medicine: Is There a Place for Art in Medical Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Lawrence T. O.; Evans, Darrell J. R.

    2014-01-01

    For many years art, anatomy and medicine have shared a close relationship, as demonstrated by Leonardo da Vinci's anatomical drawings and Andreas Vesalius' groundbreaking illustrated anatomical textbook from the 16th century. However, in the modern day, can art truly play an important role in medical education? Studies have suggested…

  11. Teaching Science: A Picture Perfect Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyden, Michael B.

    1994-01-01

    Explains how teachers can use graphs and graphing concepts when teaching art, language arts, history, social studies, and science. Students can graph the lifespans of the Ninja Turtles' Renaissance namesakes (Donatello, Michelangelo, Raphael, and Leonardo da Vinci) or world population growth. (MDM)

  12. Artsmarts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenman, Geri

    2000-01-01

    Provides information on Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Honore Daumier's "Rue Transonian." Describes an art activity in which students in an advanced drawing class reproduce a famous drawing in the same medium as the original, make the composition contemporary, and include themselves in the composition. (CMK)

  13. Historical Scientific Models and Theories as Resources for Learning and Teaching: The Case of Friction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besson, Ugo

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a history of research and theories on sliding friction between solids. This history is divided into four phases: from Leonardo da Vinci to Coulomb and the establishment of classical laws of friction; the theories of lubrication and the Tomlinson's theory of friction (1850-1930); the theories of wear, the Bowden and Tabor's…

  14. Mobile Distance Learning with PDAs: Development and Testing of Pedagogical and System Solutions Supporting Mobile Distance Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rekkedal, Torstein; Dye, Aleksander

    2007-01-01

    The article discusses basic teaching-learning philosophies and experiences from the development and testing of mobile learning integrated with the online distance education system at NKI (Norwegian Knowledge Institute) Distance Education. The article builds on experiences from three European Union (EU) supported "Leonardo da Vinci" projects on…

  15. Perception, Cognition, and Visualization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnheim, Rudolf

    1991-01-01

    Described are how pictures can combine aspects of naturalistic representation with more formal shapes to enhance cognitive understanding. These "diagrammatic" shapes derive from geometrical elementary and thereby bestow visual concreteness to concepts conveyed by the pictures. Leonardo da Vinci's anatomical drawings are used as examples…

  16. The Future Development of the European Union Education, Training and Youth Programmes After 2006: A Public Consultation Document.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium). Directorate-General for Education and Culture.

    This document launches a wide public consultation with all those involved in and with an interest in the European Union's (EU's) education, training, and youth programs called Socrates, Tempus, Leonardo da Vinci, and Youth for Europe. It is the first step toward preparing the new generation of programs to start in 2007 and will inform the…

  17. Building Systems: Passing Fad or Basic Tool?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rezab, Donald

    Building systems can be traced back to a 1516 A.D. project by Leonardo da Vinci and to a variety of prefabrication projects in every succeeding century. When integrated into large and repetitive spatial units through careful design, building systems can produce an architecture of the first order, as evidenced in the award winning design of…

  18. Putting Dreyfus into Action: The European Credit Transfer System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowitsch, Jorg; Luomi-Messerer, Karin; Becker, Matthias; Spottl, Georg

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to look closely at the development of a European Credit Transfer System for Vocational Education and Training (ECVET). The European Commission, together with the member States, are working on it and several pilot projects have been initiated within the Leonardo da Vinci Programme of the European Commission.…

  19. Comparison of Expert-Based and Empirical Evaluation Methodologies in the Case of a CBL Environment: The ''Orestis'' Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karoulis, Athanasis; Demetriadis, Stavros; Pombortsis, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    This paper compares several interface evaluation methods applied in the case of a computer based learning (CBL) environment, during a longitudinal study performed in three European countries, Greece, Germany, and Holland, and within the framework of an EC funded Leonardo da Vinci program. The paper firstly considers the particularities of the CBL…

  20. The Prelude to the Millennium: The Backstory of Digital Aesthetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Sherry

    2008-01-01

    The artist and scientist have been depicted as polar opposites since Michelangelo claimed that Leonardo da Vinci was wasting time with foolish inventions while his art suffered. However, the artist taking on the role of the researcher has precedent. In the 1960s, Experiments in Art and Technology (E.A.T.), led by Bell Labs' engineer Billy Kluver,…

  1. Humanities in the High School Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stawski, Conrad

    A humanities course that teaches an appreciation of tradition and culture through the visual arts includes consideration of contemporary art as well as classic paintings and sculpture. Study of Leonardo DaVinci's "Last Supper" provides an exercise in the intellectual approach to religious painting, while the portrait of Mona Lisa by the same…

  2. Physical Activity Monitoring: Gadgets and Uses. Article #6 in a 6-Part Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mears, Derrick

    2010-01-01

    An early 15th century drawing by Leonardo da Vinci depicted a device that used gears and a pendulum that moved in synchronization with the wearer as he or she walked. This is believed to be the early origins of today's physical activity monitoring devices. Today's devices have vastly expanded on da Vinci's ancient concept with a myriad of options…

  3. The Renaissance Culture and the Arts. Grades 3-6, The Time Traveler Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pofahl, Jane

    This resource guide encourages grade 3-6 students to explore the social structure, government, culture and art forms, scientific discoveries, and historic personalities of the European Renaissance. The work is organized into 10 topics: (1) The Renaissance; (2) Art; (3) Leonardo da Vinci; (4) The Medicis; (5) Michelangelo; (6) Printing; (7) Music;…

  4. Postmodern Irony as Subversive Rhetorical Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shugart, Helene A.

    1999-01-01

    Contributes to scholarship advancing the understanding of human communication by analyzing Susan Dorothea White's painting, "The First Supper," as a subversive postmodern ironic reading of Leonardo Da Vinci's "The Last Supper." Suggests that subversive irony assumes distinctive and complex technical and theoretical characteristics, thereby…

  5. Speculation and Historical Interpretation for Fifth and Sixth Graders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Elizabeth; Gregory, Leslie A.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a unit for fifth- and sixth-grade students that helps develop critical thinking skills. Explains that students read the book, "Leonardo da Vinci" (Diane Stanley), to develop their historical interpretation skills and demonstrate that there is not just one right answer in history. (CMK)

  6. Kinderet: Developing Training for Early Childhood Educators in Information and Communications Technology (ICT) In Bulgaria, England, Portugal, Spain and Sweden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saude, S.; Carioca, V.; Siraj-Blatchford, J.; Sheridan, S.; Genov, K.; Nuez, R.

    2005-01-01

    In the European context the continuing training of early childhood educators in terms of information and communications technology (ICT) remains limited and is in need of development. The KINDERET project has been funded through the European Commission's "Leonardo da Vinci" programme aimed to identify and understand the theoretical and practical…

  7. 76 FR 60889 - Stephen L. Reitman, M.D.; Decision and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ... Enforcement Administration Stephen L. Reitman, M.D.; Decision and Order On July 20, 2010, Administrative Law... January 19, 2011. In re Stephen Lee Reitman, M.D., Decision at 1 (Cal. Med. Bd. Dec. 20, 2010). I take... substances properly if entrusted with a DEA registration.''' Id. (quoting Leonardo v. Lopez, M.D., 54...

  8. Carpe Diem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegfried, Sheila M.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a spur-of-the-moment curriculum development activity involving primary-school students researching the "real" Leonardo, Donatello, Raphael, and Michelangelo behind the names of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. Notes that the products of the research were shared during a classroom pizza party. (RS)

  9. Specific Reading Disability in Historically Famous Persons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aaron, P. G.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The possibility that four famous men--Thomas Alva Edison, Woodrow Wilson, Hans Christian Andersen, and Leonardo da Vinci--might have been reading disabled is considered by examining information concerning: (1) biographical records, (2) cognitive characteristics, (3) neuropsychological characteristics, and (4) biological characteristics. (Author/DB)

  10. Trans-Nationalization of Educational Policy Making: From European Innovation Projects in Adult Education to an Emerging European Space for Lifelong Learning: What Model for the European Vocational Education and Training Policy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnafous, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    This article is drawn from broader qualitative research on innovation in the field of professional adult training within the framework of European pilot projects such as the LEONARDO projects. This research aims at contributing to a general understanding of the phenomenon of innovation, in the context of European calls for projects, as an…

  11. Reflection by Porro Prisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2010-04-01

    Students all know that reflection from a plane mirror produces an image that is reversed right to left and so cannot be read by anyone but Leonardo da Vinci, who kept his notes in mirror writing. A useful counter-example is the Porro prism, which produces an image that is not reversed.

  12. Sinking with the Titanic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnoli, Franco

    2015-03-01

    In the Titanic movie, when the rear part of the ship is about to sink, Jack Dawson (Leonardo DiCaprio) says to Rose DeWitt Bukater (Kate Winslet) to get ready to swim, because the sinking body will suck them into the abysses. Is this sucking phenomenon really happening? And, if so, why?

  13. "Romeo and Juliet": The Movie.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenz, Sarah L.

    1998-01-01

    Argues that the 1996 film of "Romeo and Juliet" (starring Leonardo Di Caprio and Claire Danes, and transposed to inner-city gang culture) is a gripping presentation of Shakespeare's story of star-crossed lovers in an impulsive, hot-headed, violent world. Suggests that the film is practically guaranteed to make students love Shakespeare. (SR)

  14. Audience Matters: Teaching Issues of Race and Racism for a Predominantly Minority Student Body

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maybee, Julie E.

    2011-01-01

    Some of the literature about teaching issues of race and racism in classrooms has addressed matters of audience. Zeus Leonardo, for example, has argued that teachers should use the language of white domination, rather than white privilege, when teaching about race and racism because the former language presupposes a minority audience, while the…

  15. A panoramic view of the Space Station Processing Facility with Unity connecting module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In this panoramic view of the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) can be seen (left to right) Unity connecting module, the Rack Insertion Device and the first Multi-Purpose Launch Module, the Leonardo. Windows at the right above Leonardo allow visitors on tour to watch the activities in the SSPF. The Unity, scheduled to be launched on STS-88 in December 1998, will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will already be in orbit. STS-88 will be the first Space Shuttle launch for the International Space Station. The Italian-built MPLM, scheduled to be launched on STS-100 on Dec. 2, 1999, will be carried in the payload bay of the Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the International Space Station.

  16. STS-102 MS Helms, Voss and Usachev pose in suit for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - STS-102 Mission Specialists, Susan Helms, Yury Usachev and James Voss pose after suitup. Voss and Helms are making their fifth Shuttle flights and Usachev is making his second. All three are the Expedition Two crew who are replacing Expedition One on the International Space Station. STS-102 is the eighth construction flight to the Station, carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. . The primary delivery system used to resupply and return Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment, Leonardo will deliver up to 10 tons of laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments and supplies for outfitting the newly installed U.S. Laboratory Destiny. Discovery is set to launch March 8 at 6:42 a.m. EST. The 12-day mission is expected to end with a landing at KSC on March 20.

  17. [The "myologie dynamique" by Girolamo Fabrizi da Aquapendente in the scientific language in the Renaissance age (XVI-XVII)].

    PubMed

    Stroppiana, L

    1989-01-01

    Beginning from the XV century, mechanical materialism underwent an evolution in "biological mechanics" within the scientific doctrine. Among the greatest exponents of this new current there were two Italian men, Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) and Girolamo da Acquapendente (1533-1619). By the trend given by Leonardo, the myology, instead of being a static science, took a dynamic meaning and valence. Later, Fabrizi resumed and investigated the subject above all in its less known expression, elaborating an original theory. With Acquapendente, the anatomy lost its merely descriptive pecularity and evolved in analysis of the structure in connection with the function. Moreover, he opposed the syllogism against the mechanic language and the mathematical formulation. A new scientific way will be afterwards characterized by Galileo Galilei in the field of the physics and by Giovanni Alfonso Borrelli in the biology. PMID:11640090

  18. [The "myologie dynamique" by Girolamo Fabrizi da Aquapendente in the scientific language in the Renaissance age (XVI-XVII)].

    PubMed

    Stroppiana, L

    1989-01-01

    Beginning from the XV century, mechanical materialism underwent an evolution in "biological mechanics" within the scientific doctrine. Among the greatest exponents of this new current there were two Italian men, Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) and Girolamo da Acquapendente (1533-1619). By the trend given by Leonardo, the myology, instead of being a static science, took a dynamic meaning and valence. Later, Fabrizi resumed and investigated the subject above all in its less known expression, elaborating an original theory. With Acquapendente, the anatomy lost its merely descriptive pecularity and evolved in analysis of the structure in connection with the function. Moreover, he opposed the syllogism against the mechanic language and the mathematical formulation. A new scientific way will be afterwards characterized by Galileo Galilei in the field of the physics and by Giovanni Alfonso Borrelli in the biology.

  19. Malpighi and the discovery of capillaries.

    PubMed

    Pearce, J M S

    2007-01-01

    Leonardo da Vinci clearly observed and described capillaries. Using the microscope, Marcello Malpighi examined the brain and major organs to demonstrate their finer anatomical features. This led to his discovery in 1661, of capillaries that proved fundamental to our understanding of the vascular system in the brain and cord. He hypothesized that capillaries were the connection between arteries and veins that allowed blood to flow back to the heart in the circulation of the blood, as first asserted by William Harvey.

  20. [Iconography of embryos and fetuses in the treaties of delivery and anatomy from 16th century till 18th century].

    PubMed

    Morel, Marie-France

    2009-01-01

    Leonardo', Eurakius' and Jacob Rueff's carved woods focus attention as they are sketches of foetuses in breech presentation. From the very beginning foetus is a little man made in the image of God in the works of Guillemeau, Mauriceau and Viardel. Later the liking for Baroque made the Putti, embryos with kindly faces created in Padua and Venice. Hunter's treatise finishes this picturesque review. PMID:19852242

  1. A crooked path.

    PubMed

    Long, Pamela O

    2015-04-01

    This is a printed version of Pamela O. Long's talk at the 2014 Society for the History of Technology annual meeting, on the occasion of receiving the Leonardo da Vinci award. It provides a synoptic intellectual autobiography of the author, treating the development of her work on Vitruvianism, ideas concerning contextualism, some of the scholars that have most influenced her work, and her present project on engineering in sixteenth-century Rome. PMID:26005091

  2. Evolution of the paranasal sinuses' anatomy through the ages

    PubMed Central

    Mavrodi, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Previously, anatomists considered paranasal sinuses as a mysterious region of the human skull. Historically, paranasal sinuses were first identified by ancient Egyptians and later, by Greek physicians. After a long period of no remarkable improvement in the understanding of anatomy during the Middle Ages, anatomists of the Renaissance period-Leonardo da Vinci and Vesalius-made their own contribution. Nathaniel Highmore's name is also associated with the anatomy of paranasal sinuses as he was first to describe the maxillary sinus. PMID:24386595

  3. Evolution of the paranasal sinuses' anatomy through the ages.

    PubMed

    Mavrodi, Alexandra; Paraskevas, George

    2013-12-01

    Previously, anatomists considered paranasal sinuses as a mysterious region of the human skull. Historically, paranasal sinuses were first identified by ancient Egyptians and later, by Greek physicians. After a long period of no remarkable improvement in the understanding of anatomy during the Middle Ages, anatomists of the Renaissance period-Leonardo da Vinci and Vesalius-made their own contribution. Nathaniel Highmore's name is also associated with the anatomy of paranasal sinuses as he was first to describe the maxillary sinus. PMID:24386595

  4. STS-105 MPLM is moved into the PCR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Workers on Launch Pad 39A move the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo out of the payload canister into the payload changeout room. The MPLM is the primary payload on mission STS-105 to the International Space Station. The mission includes a crew changeover on the Space Station. Expedition Three will be traveling on Discovery to replace Expedition Two, who will return to Earth on board Discovery. Launch of STS-105 is scheduled for Aug. 9.

  5. Legislation would establish commission to assess marine and coastal resources and develop national ocean policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    During 1998, internationally designated as the year of the ocean, perhaps more people are paying heed to the deep seas now than ever before.Transfixed to the big screen by this year's movie blockbuster, they anticipate when the Titanic will scrape into the iceberg and break apart, shiver when household-name heartthrobs Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet float on the freezing waters, and hum along to the theme sung by Celine Dion.

  6. Computer Studies Of The Isleworth And Louvre Mona Lisas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmus, John F.

    1989-07-01

    One of the most pervasive problems in the scholarship of classical paintings is that of authenticity. Traditionally, the attribution of a work of art rests on the subjective opinion of an art historian bolstered by scientific data pertaining to the types and possibly the ages of the materials of the artwork. To expand the range of technical information that may be applied to the painting authentication problem, the methods of computer image processing (IP) have been employed to compare the techniques in two paintings. One is the Mona Lisa del Gioconda by Leonardo da Vinci. The other is known as the Isleworth Mona Lisa and has also been attributed to Leonardo by a few scholars. Computer IP was used to compare statistical and geometrical features of the two paintings. It emerged that the Isleworth work is not a copy of the Louvre painting but does have numerous similarities in composition and execution. These findings lend support to the theory that the Louvre Mona Lisa may be a portrait of Costanza by Leonardo that had been thought lost.

  7. Raffaello is offloaded from a Beluga super transporter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The second Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) for the International Space Station (ISS), named Raffaello, is moved out of the 'Beluga' Super Transporter at the Shuttle Landing Facility. One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the module measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello will join Leonardo, the first Italian-built MPLM, in the Space Station Processing Facility for testing. NASA, Boeing, the Italian Space Agency and Alenia Aerospazio will provide engineering support.

  8. Raffaello is offloaded from a Beluga super transporter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Workers on cranes circle the 'Beluga' Super Transporter at the Shuttle Landing Facility, ready to help offload the Raffaello, the second Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) for the International Space Station (ISS). One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the module measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello will join Leonardo, the first Italian-built MPLM, in the Space Station Processing Facility for testing. NASA, Boeing, the Italian Space Agency and Alenia Aerospazio will provide engineering support.

  9. Raffaello is offloaded from a Beluga super transporter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Cranes supporting the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello lower it onto a transporter for transfer to the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). At the SSPF the Raffaello will undergo testing, joining the first Italian-built MPLM, Leonardo. One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the Raffaello measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-100 July 27, 2000.

  10. Raffaello is offloaded from a Beluga super transporter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A crane is attached to the Raffaello, the second Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) for the International Space Station (ISS), before offloading the MPLM from the 'Beluga' Super Transporter. One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the module measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello will join Leonardo, the first Italian-built MPLM, in the Space Station Processing Facility for testing. NASA, Boeing, the Italian Space Agency and Alenia Aerospazio will provide engineering support.

  11. The Italian neurological schools of the twentieth century

    PubMed Central

    Bonavita, Vincenzo

    Summary This lecture is not a historical lecture, but rather a journey through the “story” of neurology in Italy from its “prehistoric” beginning in the 19th century. The birth of a neurological school is that magical moment in which a founder attracts disciples: the more capable this founder is of transmitting methodology and allowing his pupils intellectual freedom, the longer his memory will live on. On the basis of this idea, the scientific biography of a few leading Italian neurologists of the 20th century is outlined, starting from Leonardo Bianchi, founder of the Italian Neurological Society in 1907. PMID:21729589

  12. STS-102 crew poses on the FSS at Launch Pad 39B during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-102 Commander James Wetherbee reaches for the release lever for the slidewire basket, used for emergency egress from the orbiter and pad. Behind him is Pilot James Kelly. The crew is at KSC for Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include the emergency training and a simulated launch countdown. STS-102 is the eighth construction flight to the International Space Station, with Space Shuttle Discovery carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. In addition, the Expedition Two crew will be on the mission, to replace Expedition One, who will return to Earth with Discovery. Launch on mission STS-102 is scheduled for March 8.

  13. STS-102 crew gets emergency exit training at Launch Pad 39B during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- During emergency exit training on the Fixed Service Structure of Launch Pad 39B, STS-102 Mission Specialist Paul Richards takes a closer look at the lever that releases a slidewire basket, used for emergency exits from the launch pad, to the landing below. He and the rest of the crew are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include a simulated launch countdown. STS-102 is the eighth construction flight to the International Space Station, with Space Shuttle Discovery carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. Launch on mission STS-102 is scheduled for March 8.

  14. STS-102 crew poses on the FSS at Launch Pad 39B during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Three members of the STS-102 crew hurry to the slidewire baskets for emergency egress training. The crew is at KSC for Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include the emergency training and a simulated launch countdown. STS-102 is the eighth construction flight to the International Space Station, with Space Shuttle Discovery carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. In addition, the Expedition Two crew will be on the mission, to replace Expedition One, who will return to Earth with Discovery. Launch on mission STS-102 is scheduled for March 8.

  15. [The Swedenborg mystery: sanity or insanity?].

    PubMed

    Poirier, Mario

    2003-01-01

    In this article, the author proceeds to a clinical analysis of the Swedenborg phenomenon by examining the extraordinary life of this thinker who had a great influence on the intellectual world and the then rising psychology. The author examines more closely the progression and the colossal contribution of Emmanuel Swedenborg to several scientific fields. Finally, the author raises the issue of a possible psychiatric illness suffered by this individual considered during his time as the Leonardo de Vinci of the North, the Aristotle of Sweden.

  16. Evolution of robots throughout history from Hephaestus to Da Vinci Robot.

    PubMed

    Iavazzo, Christos; Gkegke, Xanthi-Ekaterini D; Iavazzo, Paraskevi-Evangelia; Gkegkes, Ioannis D

    2014-01-01

    Da Vinci robot is increasingly used for operations adding the advantages of robots to the favor of medicine. This is a historical article with the aim to present the evolution of robots in the medical area from the time of ancient myths to Renaissance and finally to the current revolutionary applications. We endeavored to collect several elegant narratives on the topic. The use of imagination could help the reader to find similarities. A trip from the Greek myths of Hephaestus through Aristotle and Leonardo Da Vinci to the robots of Karel Capek and Isaac Asimov and finally the invention of the medical robots is presented.

  17. STS-105 MPLM is moved into the PCR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Workers in the payload changeout room on Launch Pad 39A keep watch as they move the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo out of the payload canister. The MPLM is the primary payload on mission STS-105 to the International Space Station. The mission includes a crew changeover on the Space Station. Expedition Three will be traveling on Discovery to replace Expedition Two, who will return to Earth on board Discovery. Launch of STS-105 is scheduled for Aug. 9.

  18. STS-102 MS Richards is ready to drive an M-113 during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-102 Mission Specialist Paul Richards is ready to drive the M-113 armored carrier, part of emergency egress training at Launch Pad 39B. In the event of an emergency at the pad prior to launch, the M-113 could be used to transport the crew to a nearby bunker or farther. The STS-102 crew is at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also include a simulated launch countdown. STS-102 is the eighth construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. Launch on mission STS-102 is scheduled for March 8

  19. STS-102 MS Thomas is ready to drive an M-113 during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-102 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas climbs into the driver'''s seat of the M-113 armored carrier he will practice driving. In the event of an emergency at the pad prior to launch, the carrier could be used to transport the crew to a nearby bunker or farther. The STS-102 crew is at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also include a simulated launch countdown. STS-102 is the eighth construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. Launch on mission STS-102 is scheduled for March 8

  20. MOLAB, a Mobile Laboratory for In Situ Non-Invasive Studies in Arts and Archaeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunetti, B. G.; Matteini, Mauro; Miliani, C.; Pezzati, L.; Pinna, D.

    Mobile laboratory (MOLAB) is a unique joint collection of portable equipment for non-destructive in situ measurements. MOLAB activities are carried out within the frame of the Eu-ARTECH Integrated Infrastructure Initiative of the sixth F.P. In situ measurement is quite useful because it eliminates any risk connected to moving artworks or other precious objects to a laboratory. MOLAB instruments are accessible to European researchers through a peer-review selection of proposals. Starting from July 2004, MOLAB enabled non-destructive in situ studies of many precious artworks, such as paintings by Perugino, Raphael and Leonardo.

  1. Italy flags scientific shortcomings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartlidge, Edwin

    2008-04-01

    The land that gave us Leonardo da Vinci, Galileo Galilei and Enrico Fermi does not regard science as part of culture, but it must do so if it is to avoid being left behind economically and intellectually. That is the message from a working group of 18 academics, sponsored by the Italian government, to find ways of improving the quantity, quality and public perception of science in the country. The group has now put forward a range of measures to combat what the group's chair, left-wing politician and Siena University law professor Luigi Berlinguer, describes as a "national emergency".

  2. A portable X-ray diffraction apparatus for in situ analyses of masters' paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eveno, Myriam; Duran, Adrian; Castaing, Jacques

    2010-09-01

    It is rare that the analyses of materials in paintings can be carried out by taking micro-samples. Valuable works of art are best studied in situ by non-invasive techniques. For that purpose, a portable X-ray diffraction and fluorescence apparatus has been designed and constructed at the C2RMF. This apparatus has been used for paintings of Rembrandt, Leonardo da Vinci, Van Gogh, Mantegna, etc. Results are given to illustrate the performance of X-ray diffraction, especially when X-ray fluorescence does not bring sufficient information to conclude.

  3. Composition and stratigraphy of the paint layers: investigation on the Madonna dei Fusi by ion beam analysis techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassi, N.

    2005-06-01

    In the framework of the extensive study on the wood painting "Madonna dei fusi" attributed to Leonardo da Vinci, Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) techniques were used at the Florence accelerator laboratory to get information about the elemental composition of the paint layers. After a brief description of the basic principle and the general features of IBA techniques, we will illustrate in detail how the analysis allowed us to characterise the pigments of original and restored areas and the substrate composition, and to obtain information about the stratigraphy of the painting, also providing an estimate of the paint layer thickness.

  4. Being there: The continuing need for human presence in the deep ocean for scientific research and discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryer, P.; Fornari, D.; Perfit, M.; Von Damm, K.; Humphris, S.; Fox, P. J.; Lippsett, L.

    We see with our mind's eye. This poetic phrase attempts to describe a complex set of human interactions by which we take in and process information about the physical world around us. For millennia, scientists and philosophers have relied on our ability to apply the uniquely human traits of perception, cognition, memory and motor action to scientific observations and experiments. "There is no authority higher than the human eye," observed Leonardo Da Vinci, and his statement still holds true; as most field scientists will attest, there is no substitute for direct observation.

  5. Neutron back scattering for the search of the Battle of Anghiari.

    PubMed

    Bom, V R; Cosentino, A; Seracini, M; Rosa, R

    2010-01-01

    The 'Battle of Anghiari' is a wall painting made by Leonardo Da Vinci around 1505. Its present day location is unknown but some indications suggest that the mural might be concealed behind a brick wall. Test measurements are presented demonstrating that neutron back scattering (NBS) can be used to search through the wall for the painting. NBS is a non-destructive technique to establish the presence of the hydrogen contained in the painting materials that were probably used by Da Vinci. PMID:19733089

  6. STS-105 Shuttle Orbiter Discovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This is a view of the Space Shuttle Discovery as it approaches the International Space Station (ISS) during the STS-105 mission. Visible in the payload bay of Discovery are the Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM) Leonardo at right, which stores various supplies and experiments to be transferred into the ISS; at center, the Integrated Cargo Carrier (ICC) which carries the Early Ammonia Servicer (EAS); and two Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) containers at left. Aboard Discovery were the ISS Expedition Three crew, who were to replace the Expedition Two crew that had been living on the ISS for the past five months.

  7. STS-105 ICC is moved to the payload canister for transport to pad 39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- An overhead crane in the Space Station Processing Facility moves the Integrated Cargo Carrier toward the payload canister (right). The ICC holds several payloads for mission STS-105, the Early Ammonia Servicer and two experiment containers. The ICC will join the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo already in the payload canister for transport to Launch Pad 39A where they will be placed in the payload bay of Space Shuttle Discovery. Launch of STS-105 is scheduled for 5:38 p.m. EDT Aug. 9

  8. STS-105 ICC is moved to the payload canister for transport to pad 39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- A crane is attached to the Integrated Cargo Carrier in the Space Station Processing Facility in order to move it to the payload canister. The ICC holds several payloads for mission STS-105, the Early Ammonia Servicer and two experiment containers. The ICC will join the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo in the payload canister for transport to Launch Pad 39A where they will be placed in the payload bay of Space Shuttle Discovery. Launch of STS-105 is scheduled for 5:38 p.m. EDT Aug. 9

  9. STS-105 ICC is moved to the payload canister for transport to pad 39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- An overhead crane in the Space Station Processing Facility lifts the Integrated Cargo Carrier from its workstand to move it to the payload canister. The ICC holds several payloads for mission STS-105, the Early Ammonia Servicer and two experiment containers. The ICC will join the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo in the payload canister for transport to Launch Pad 39A where they will be placed in the payload bay of Space Shuttle Discovery. Launch of STS-105 is scheduled for 5:38 p.m. EDT Aug. 9

  10. STS-105 ICC is moved to the payload canister for transport to pad 39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Integrated Cargo Carrier is lowered into the payload canister in front of the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. The ICC holds several payloads for mission STS-105, the Early Ammonia Servicer and two experiment containers. The canister will transport the MPLM and ICC transport to Launch Pad 39A where they will be placed in the payload bay of Space Shuttle Discovery. Launch of STS-105 is scheduled for 5:38 p.m. EDT Aug. 9

  11. Brain Exploration, Off the Beaten Path.

    PubMed

    2016-07-28

    Model organisms, such as rodents, monkeys, or Drosophila, have driven much of recent research in neuroscience. However, studies in other, more unusual systems have broadened the types of questions that are being asked and have revealed the diverse ways in which species tackle common problems. Cell editor Mirna Kvajo talked with Nachum Ulanovsky, Gilles Laurent, and Anthony Leonardo about their research and how studying bats, reptiles, and dragonflies informs big questions in neuroscience. An annotated excerpt of the conversation appears below, and the full conversation is available with the article online. PAPERCLIP. PMID:27471958

  12. Evolution of robots throughout history from Hephaestus to Da Vinci Robot.

    PubMed

    Iavazzo, Christos; Gkegke, Xanthi-Ekaterini D; Iavazzo, Paraskevi-Evangelia; Gkegkes, Ioannis D

    2014-01-01

    Da Vinci robot is increasingly used for operations adding the advantages of robots to the favor of medicine. This is a historical article with the aim to present the evolution of robots in the medical area from the time of ancient myths to Renaissance and finally to the current revolutionary applications. We endeavored to collect several elegant narratives on the topic. The use of imagination could help the reader to find similarities. A trip from the Greek myths of Hephaestus through Aristotle and Leonardo Da Vinci to the robots of Karel Capek and Isaac Asimov and finally the invention of the medical robots is presented. PMID:25811686

  13. Converting an MPLM to a PMM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, Hector P.

    2010-01-01

    The Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) are pressurized modules for transporting equipment, supplies and experimental devices to and from the International Space Station (ISS). An MPLM is carried in the cargo bay of a Shuttle and attached to the Unity or Harmony modules on the ISS for the duration of a mission, usually about 10 days. From there, supplies are offloaded, and finished experiments and waste are reloaded. The MPLM is then returned to the Space Shuttle payload bay for return to Earth. Three modules were built, Leonardo, Raffaello and Donatello. The modules were provided to NASA under contract by the Italian Space Agency. Each MPLM was built to be on-orbit a maximum of one month at a time. The MPLM Leonardo is being modified to turn it into the Pressurized Multipurpose Module (PMM), which will remain permanently attached to the ISS following the STS- 133 mission. The Space Shuttle is the only vehicle or rocket that has the capacity to carry the MPLM to the ISS. With the planned retirement of the Space Shuttle in 2011, NASA has found another use for the MPLM. With the modifications of the MPLM into a PMM the ISS will have another permanent module as part of the ISS that will be used as a storage module

  14. Unity connecting module moving to new site in SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), Unity (top) is suspended in air as it is moved to a new location (bottom left)in the SSPF. To its left is Leonardo, the Italian-built Multi- Purpose Logistics Module to be launched on STS-100. Above Leonardo, visitors watch through a viewing window, part of the visitors tour at the Center. As the primary payload on mission STS-88, scheduled to launch Dec. 3, 1998, Unity will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module which should already be in orbit at that time. In the SSPF, Unity is undergoing testing such as the Pad Demonstration Test to verify the compatibility of the module with the Space Shuttle, as well as the ability of the astronauts to send and receive commands to Unity from the flight deck of the orbiter, and the common berthing mechanism to which other space station elements will dock. Unity is expected to be ready for installation into the payload canister on Oct. 25, and transported to Launch Pad 39-A on Oct. 27.

  15. A midline sagittal brain view depicted in Da Vinci's "Saint Jerome in the wilderness".

    PubMed

    Valença, M M; Aragão, M de F V Vasco; Castillo, M

    2013-01-01

    It is estimated that around the year 1480 Leonardo da Vinci painted Saint Jerome in the Wilderness, representing the saint during his years of retreat in the Syrian dessert where he lived the life of a hermit. One may interpret Leonardo's Saint Jerome in the Wilderness as St. Jerome practicing self-chastisement with a stone in his right hand, seemingly punching his chest repeatedly. The stone, the lion and a cardinal's hat are conventionally linked to the saint. A skull was also almost always present with the image of the saint symbolically representing penance. With careful analysis of the painting one can identify the skull which is hidden in an arc represented as a lion's tail. The image is of a hemicranium (midline sagittal view) showing the intracranial dura, including the falx and tentorium, and venous system with the sinuses and major deep veins. This may have been the first time when the intracranial sinuses and the major deep venous vessels were illustrated.

  16. STS-97 P6 truss moves to a payload transport canister

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    As it travels across the Space Station Processing Facility, the P6 integrated truss segment passes over the two Italian-built Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules, Leonardo (right) and Raffaello (behind Leonardo). The P6 is being moved to a payload transport canister for transfer to Launch Pad 39B. There it will be placed in Endeavour'''s payload bay for launch on mission STS-97. The P6 comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the Space Station. The Station'''s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a '''blanket''' that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. Launch is scheduled Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST.

  17. Is the geological past a key to the (near) future

    SciTech Connect

    Culotta, E.

    1993-02-12

    Ever since Leonardo da Vinci unearthed beds of fossil marine shells in the Tuscan hills, the record of the past has been challenging conventional theories of climate. Sages of da Vinci's day had a proper explanation for the shells. The clams and snails had drifted into the hills with the waters of the Biblical Flood. But da Vinci didn't think the climatic event chronicled in Genesis could explain the evidence. How, he wondered, could these largely sedentary mollusks have traveled so far in merely 40 days He concluded that the received wisdom was wrong: The marine organisms had lived and died in a vanished sea, just where he found them. But, perhaps fearing papal displeasure, he never published his conclusions.

  18. The Raffaello, a Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, arrives at KSC aboard a Beluga super transporter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    An Airbus Industrie A300-600ST 'Beluga' Super Transporter touches down at the Shuttle Landing Facility to deliver its cargo, the second Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) for the International Space Station (ISS). One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM, named Raffaello, is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the module measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello will join Leonardo, the first Italian-built MPLM, in the Space Station Processing Facility for testing. NASA, Boeing, the Italian Space Agency and Alenia Aerospazio will provide engineering support.

  19. Raffaello is offloaded from a Beluga super transporter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At the Shuttle Landing Facility, the one-piece, upward-hinged main cargo door of the Airbus Industrie A300-600ST 'Beluga' Super Transporter is open to offload its cargo, the second Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) for the International Space Station (ISS). One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM, named Raffaello, is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the module measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello will join Leonardo, the first Italian-built MPLM, in the Space Station Processing Facility for testing. NASA, Boeing, the Italian Space Agency and Alenia Aerospazio will provide engineering support.

  20. The Raffaello, a Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, arrives at KSC aboard a Beluga super transporter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    An Airbus Industrie A300-600ST 'Beluga' Super Transporter is reflected in the rain puddles as it taxis toward the mate/demate tower at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The Beluga is carrying the Raffaello, the second Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) for the International Space Station (ISS). One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the module measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello will join Leonardo, the first Italian-built MPLM, in the Space Station Processing Facility for testing. NASA, Boeing, the Italian Space Agency and Alenia Aerospazio will provide engineering support.

  1. The Raffaello, a Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, arrives at KSC aboard a Beluga super transporter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    An Airbus Industrie A300-600ST 'Beluga' Super Transporter is reflected in the rain puddles as it comes to a stop at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The Beluga is carrying the Raffaello, the second Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) for the International Space Station (ISS). One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the module measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello will join Leonardo, the first Italian-built MPLM, in the Space Station Processing Facility for testing. NASA, Boeing, the Italian Space Agency and Alenia Aerospazio will provide engineering support.

  2. Raffaello is offloaded from a Beluga super transporter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Under clear and cloud-spotted skies at the Shuttle Landing Facility, cranes support the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello after the 'Beluga' Super Transporter (left) has rolled away from it. Raffaello will be transferred to the Space Station Processing Facility for testing, joining the first Italian-built MPLM, Leonardo. One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the module measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-100 July 27, 2000.

  3. Raffaello is offloaded from a Beluga super transporter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At the Shuttle Landing Facility, workers begin offloading the Raffaello, the second Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) for the International Space Station (ISS), from the 'Beluga' Super Transporter that brought it from Italy. One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the module measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello will join Leonardo, the first Italian-built MPLM, in the Space Station Processing Facility for testing. NASA, Boeing, the Italian Space Agency and Alenia Aerospazio will provide engineering support.

  4. The Raffaello, a Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, arrives at KSC aboard a Beluga super transporter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    An Airbus Industrie A300-600ST 'Beluga' Super Transporter lands in the rain at the Shuttle Landing Facility to deliver its cargo, the second Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) for the International Space Station (ISS). One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM, named Raffaello, is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the module measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello will join Leonardo, the first Italian-built MPLM, in the Space Station Processing Facility for testing. NASA, Boeing, the Italian Space Agency and Alenia Aerospazio will provide engineering support.

  5. An Italian Education: IEEE Pulse talks with Riccardo Pietrabissa, president of Italy's National Bioengineering Group, about Italian progress and challenges in biomedical engineering education.

    PubMed

    Pietrabissa, Riccardo; Reynolds, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    From Leonardo da Vinci's designs for ball bearings to the incredible engineering wizardry behind the Ferrari, the inventive, inquisitive, and ingenious spirit of the engineer has always lived--and thrived--in Italy. From education to research to product development, Italy has always been regarded as an engineering leader. But does this apply to biomedical engineering (BME)? Despite many successes, questions loom, as they do at engineering schools worldwide. Concerns such as whether BME programs are providing students with enough focused, practical, hands-on training remain at the forefront, as does the question of whether graduates will be able to find jobs in industry after university studies are over. Here, IEEE Pulse explores these topics with Riccardo Pietrabissa, president of the Gruppo Nazionale di Bioingegneria (National Bioengineering Group) and a full professor in the Department of Chemistry, Materials, and Chemical Engineering at Politecnico di Milano.

  6. [Public health in the XXI century].

    PubMed

    McKee, M; Sassi, F

    1995-01-01

    To understand what will happen in the future one must draw on the experience of those from the past who have tried to predict what is happening now. The paper develops a taxonomy of visionaries of futurologist; the advocates of historical determinism, who come from both the left, such as Marx, and the right, such as Toffler and Fukuyama; the scientist, ranging from Leonardo da Vinci to Arthur C. Clarke, and the pragmatists, who seek to learn from evidence and the experience of others. These will be examined in turn and the frequent failings of the first three will be illustrated. Drawing on experience in a variety of European countries it will be concluded that our best hope is to learn from each other and from empirical evidence. The article will conclude with a review of some of the challenges which are either predictable but being ignored or totally unpredictable.

  7. [Curriculum vitae aortae].

    PubMed

    Solberg, S

    1998-12-10

    The Greek word aorta means lifter. The vessel was so termed because Aristotle, who first described it, assumed that the heart was lifted by/hanging in aorta. Leonardo da Vinci described the detailed anatomy of aorta. During the 17th century our present understanding of the aorta and the circulation of blood took form due to the descriptions given by William Harvey. The first known operation for abdominal aortic aneurysm was performed in London in 1817 by Sir Astley Cooper who ligated the infrarenal aorta above the aneurysm. Puncture with needles and application of electricity were later tried in order to induce thromboses in the aneurysm. In 1948 Albert Einstein was operated with wrapping of his abdominal aneurysm with cellophane. In 1955 he suffered rupture and died after having refused operation. In 1951 the first successful operation for abdominal aortic aneurysm was performed in Paris by Charles Dubost. With slight modifications, the same operative technique is used today.

  8. PSYCHOANALYSIS AND THE ARTS: THE SLIPPERY GROUND OF APPLIED ANALYSIS.

    PubMed

    Abella, Adela

    2016-01-01

    The ways in which today's psychoanalysts approach art closely follow the avenues opened by Freud a hundred years ago. Drawing mainly on Freud's studies on Jensen's Gradiva (1907) and on Leonardo da Vinci (1910a), the author examines the main paradigms he used in discussing artistic activity, including his doubts and hesitations. Present-day approaches to art are then examined via a discussion of the advantages and pitfalls of psychobiography, of the case study, and of textual approaches. The author makes a case for the type of interdisciplinary dialogue in which the goal is to establish a cross-fertilization between psychoanalysis and other fields of knowledge while striving to avoid hypersaturation of a work of art in order to foster expansion of the mind. PMID:26784716

  9. STS-111 M.S. Perrin arrives at KSC for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-111 Mission Specialist Philippe Perrin, with the French Space Agency, smiles on his arrival at KSC aboard a T-38 jet aircraft to prepare for launch. Mission STS-111, known as Utilization Flight 2, is carrying supplies and equipment to the International Space Station. The payload includes the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo, the Mobile Base System, which will be installed on the Mobile Transporter to complete the Canadian Mobile Servicing System, or MSS, and a replacement wrist/roll joint for Canadarm 2. The mechanical arm will then have the capability to 'inchworm' from the U.S. Lab Destiny to the MSS and travel along the truss to work sites. Also on board will be Expedition 5, traveling to the Station on Space Shuttle Endeavour as the replacement crew for Expedition 4, who will return to Earth aboard the orbiter. Launch is scheduled for May 30, 2002.

  10. Soft matter dynamics: Accelerated fluid squeeze-out during slip.

    PubMed

    Hutt, W; Persson, B N J

    2016-03-28

    Using a Leonardo da Vinci experimental setup (constant driving force), we study the dependency of lubricated rubber friction on the time of stationary contact and on the sliding distance. We slide rectangular rubber blocks on smooth polymer surfaces lubricated by glycerol or by a grease. We observe a remarkable effect: during stationary contact the lubricant is only very slowly removed from the rubber-polymer interface, while during slip it is very rapidly removed resulting (for the grease lubricated surface) in complete stop of motion after a short time period, corresponding to a slip distance typically of order only a few times the length of the rubber block in the sliding direction. For an elastically stiff material, poly(methyl methacrylate), we observe the opposite effect: the sliding speed increases with time (acceleration), and the lubricant film thickness appears to increase. We propose an explanation for the observed effect based on transient elastohydrodynamics, which may be relevant also for other soft contacts.

  11. Soft matter dynamics: Accelerated fluid squeeze-out during slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutt, W.; Persson, B. N. J.

    2016-03-01

    Using a Leonardo da Vinci experimental setup (constant driving force), we study the dependency of lubricated rubber friction on the time of stationary contact and on the sliding distance. We slide rectangular rubber blocks on smooth polymer surfaces lubricated by glycerol or by a grease. We observe a remarkable effect: during stationary contact the lubricant is only very slowly removed from the rubber-polymer interface, while during slip it is very rapidly removed resulting (for the grease lubricated surface) in complete stop of motion after a short time period, corresponding to a slip distance typically of order only a few times the length of the rubber block in the sliding direction. For an elastically stiff material, poly(methyl methacrylate), we observe the opposite effect: the sliding speed increases with time (acceleration), and the lubricant film thickness appears to increase. We propose an explanation for the observed effect based on transient elastohydrodynamics, which may be relevant also for other soft contacts.

  12. Self-organized architectures from assorted DNA-framed nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenyan; Halverson, Jonathan; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, Alexei V; Gang, Oleg

    2016-09-01

    The science of self-assembly has undergone a radical shift from asking questions about why individual components self-organize into ordered structures, to manipulating the resultant order. However, the quest for far-reaching nanomanufacturing requires addressing an even more challenging question: how to form nanoparticle (NP) structures with designed architectures without explicitly prescribing particle positions. Here we report an assembly concept in which building instructions are embedded into NPs via DNA frames. The integration of NPs and DNA origami frames enables the fabrication of NPs with designed anisotropic and selective interactions. Using a pre-defined set of different DNA-framed NPs, we show it is possible to design diverse planar architectures, which include periodic structures and shaped meso-objects that spontaneously emerge on mixing of the different topological types of NP. Even objects of non-trivial shapes, such as a nanoscale model of Leonardo da Vinci's Vitruvian Man, can be self-assembled successfully. PMID:27554413

  13. STS-111 Onboard Photo of the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Backdropped against the blackness of space is the International Space Station (ISS), as viewed from the approching Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour, STS-111 mission, in June 2002. Expedition Five replaced Expedition Four crew after remaining a record-setting 196 days in space. Three spacewalks enabled the STS-111 crew to accomplish the delivery and installation of the Mobile Remote Servicer Base System (MBS), an important part of the Station's Mobile Servicing System that allows the robotic arm to travel the length of the Station, which is necessary for future construction tasks; the replacement of a wrist roll joint on the Station's robotic arm, and the task of unloading supplies and science experiments from the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, which made its third trip to the orbital outpost. The STS-111 mission, the 14th Shuttle mission to visit the ISS, was launched on June 5, 2002 and landed June 19, 2002.

  14. STS-111 Mission Insignia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Pictured here is the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour, STS-111 mission insignia. The International Space Station (ISS) recieved a new crew, Expedition Five, replacing Expedition Four after a record-setting 196 days in space, when STS-111 visited in June 2002. Three spacewalks enabled the STS-111 crew to accomplish additional mission objectives: the delivery and installation of a new platform for the ISS robotic arm, the Mobile Base System (MBS) which is an important part of the Station's Mobile Servicing System allowing the robotic arm to travel the length of the Station; the replacement of a wrist roll joint on the Station's robotic arm; and unloading supplies and science experiments from the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, which made its third trip to the orbital outpost. The STS-111 mission, the 14th Shuttle mission to visit the ISS, was launched on June 5, 2002 and landed June 19, 2002.

  15. [Public health in the XXI century].

    PubMed

    McKee, M; Sassi, F

    1995-01-01

    To understand what will happen in the future one must draw on the experience of those from the past who have tried to predict what is happening now. The paper develops a taxonomy of visionaries of futurologist; the advocates of historical determinism, who come from both the left, such as Marx, and the right, such as Toffler and Fukuyama; the scientist, ranging from Leonardo da Vinci to Arthur C. Clarke, and the pragmatists, who seek to learn from evidence and the experience of others. These will be examined in turn and the frequent failings of the first three will be illustrated. Drawing on experience in a variety of European countries it will be concluded that our best hope is to learn from each other and from empirical evidence. The article will conclude with a review of some of the challenges which are either predictable but being ignored or totally unpredictable. PMID:11623489

  16. Highlights of the ecancer/SAC First International Prostate Cancer Symposium, 11–12 March 2016, Buenos Aires, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Villalba, Marcelo Blanco; Bramajo, Marina; Bruno, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The ecancer/SAC First International Prostate Cancer Symposium, held in Buenos Aires, included national, regional, and international experts in the field of prostate cancer. More than 200 professionals from a variety of areas (clinical urologists, pathologists, oncologists, biologists, imaging specialists, radiation therapists, and generalist doctors, among others) attended, and they proposed multidisciplinary management of prostate pathology from the start in concordance with the ideas set forth by the organising committee. A radiotherapy workshop was also held during the symposium, in which new techniques and their possible uses were specifically discussed. In addition to the local doctors, Dr Lilian Faroni (COI Group, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil), Dr Leonardo Carmona (Chilean Head and Neck Institute, Chile), and Dr Anthony Addesa (Jupiter Medical Centre, Florida, USA) also participated in this symposium. PMID:27350786

  17. Cannibalism and contagion: framing syphilis in counter-reformation Italy.

    PubMed

    Eamon, W

    1998-02-01

    The outbreak of syphilis in Europe elicited a variety of responses concerning the disease's origins and cure. In this essay, I examine the theory of the origins of syphilis advanced by the 16th-century Italian surgeon Leonardo Fioravanti. According to Fioravanti, syphilis was not new but had always existed, although it was unknown to the ancients. The syphilis epidemic, he argued, was caused by cannibalism among the French and Italian armies during the siege of Naples in 1494. Fioravanti's strange and novel theory is connected with his view of disease as corruption of the body caused by eating improper foods. His theory of bodily pollution, a metaphor for the corruption of society, coincided with Counter-Reformation concepts about sin and the social order. PMID:11620327

  18. Evolution of the Martian hydrosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, V.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of the hydrological cycle is one of the greatest achievements in the understanding of nature. Leonardo da Vinci seems to have held two concurrent views of the cycle: an external process in which evaporation from ponded areas leads to precipitation and runoff from the land; and an internal process in which subsurface pressures from within the Earth force water upward. Endogenetic hypotheses for valley genesis on Mars maintain the necessary prolonged ground water flows by hydrothermal circulation associated with impact cratering or with volcanism. Ocean formation on Mars was episodic, mostly evidenced by the latest episodes. Coincident cataclysmic flood discharges to the northern plains, probably triggered by Tharsis volcanism, would lead to immense consequences. Potential volumes of ponded water are summarized. The outflow channels have a complex history of flooding events over a prolonged period of planetary history. It is hypothesized that episodic outbursts of concurrent discharge was triggered by planetary scale volcanism. The consequences of such episodes are summarized.

  19. STS-102 crew poses on the FSS at Launch Pad 39B during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- An STS-102 crew member reaches for the release lever for the slidewire basket, used for emergency egress from the orbiter and pad. The crew is at KSC for Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include the emergency training and a simulated launch countdown. On the horizon in the background can be seen the Vehicle Assembly Building. STS-102 is the eighth construction flight to the International Space Station, with Space Shuttle Discovery carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. In addition, the Expedition Two crew will be on the mission, to replace Expedition One, who will return to Earth with Discovery. Launch on mission STS-102 is scheduled for March 8.

  20. Self-organized architectures from assorted DNA-framed nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenyan; Halverson, Jonathan; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, Alexei V; Gang, Oleg

    2016-09-01

    The science of self-assembly has undergone a radical shift from asking questions about why individual components self-organize into ordered structures, to manipulating the resultant order. However, the quest for far-reaching nanomanufacturing requires addressing an even more challenging question: how to form nanoparticle (NP) structures with designed architectures without explicitly prescribing particle positions. Here we report an assembly concept in which building instructions are embedded into NPs via DNA frames. The integration of NPs and DNA origami frames enables the fabrication of NPs with designed anisotropic and selective interactions. Using a pre-defined set of different DNA-framed NPs, we show it is possible to design diverse planar architectures, which include periodic structures and shaped meso-objects that spontaneously emerge on mixing of the different topological types of NP. Even objects of non-trivial shapes, such as a nanoscale model of Leonardo da Vinci's Vitruvian Man, can be self-assembled successfully.

  1. The origin of the vertebrate skeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivar, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    The anatomy of the human and other vertebrates has been well described since the days of Leonardo da Vinci and Vesalius. The causative origin of the configuration of the bones and of their shapes and forms has been addressed over the ensuing centuries by such outstanding investigators as Goethe, Von Baer, Gegenbauer, Wilhelm His and D'Arcy Thompson, who sought to apply mechanical principles to morphogenesis. However, no coherent causative model of morphogenesis has ever been presented. This paper presents a causative model for the origin of the vertebrate skeleton, based on the premise that the body is a mosaic enlargement of self-organized patterns engrained in the membrane of the egg cell. Drawings illustrate the proposed hypothetical origin of membrane patterning and the changes in the hydrostatic equilibrium of the cytoplasm that cause topographical deformations resulting in the vertebrate body form.

  2. Cannibalism and contagion: framing syphilis in counter-reformation Italy.

    PubMed

    Eamon, W

    1998-02-01

    The outbreak of syphilis in Europe elicited a variety of responses concerning the disease's origins and cure. In this essay, I examine the theory of the origins of syphilis advanced by the 16th-century Italian surgeon Leonardo Fioravanti. According to Fioravanti, syphilis was not new but had always existed, although it was unknown to the ancients. The syphilis epidemic, he argued, was caused by cannibalism among the French and Italian armies during the siege of Naples in 1494. Fioravanti's strange and novel theory is connected with his view of disease as corruption of the body caused by eating improper foods. His theory of bodily pollution, a metaphor for the corruption of society, coincided with Counter-Reformation concepts about sin and the social order.

  3. STS-102 crew poses on the FSS at Launch Pad 39B during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- At the 195-foot level on the Fixed Service Structure, Launch Pad 39B, members of the STS-102 crew relax after emergency escape training. From left are Mission Specialists Paul Richards, Andrew Thomas and Susan Helms, and Commander James Wetherbee. The crew is at KSC for Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include the emergency training and a simulated launch countdown. STS-102 is the eighth construction flight to the International Space Station, with Space Shuttle Discovery carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. Helms is part of the Expedition Two crew who will be on the mission to replace Expedition One on the International Space Station. Expedition One will return to Earth with Discovery. Launch on mission STS-102 is scheduled for March 8.

  4. STS-102 crew poses for media at Launch Pad 39B during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- After a media briefing at the slidewire basket landing near Launch Pad 39B, the STS-102 crew poses for photographers. From left are Mission Specialists Susan Helms, Yury Usachev and James Voss; Commander James Wetherbee; Mission specialist Paul Richards; Pilot James Kelly; and Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas. The crew is taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include emergency exit training from the pad and a simulated launch countdown. STS-102 is the eighth construction flight to the International Space Station, with Space Shuttle Discovery carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. Voss, Helms and Usachev are the Expedition Two crew who will be the second resident crew on the International Space Station. They will replace Expedition One, who will return to Earth with Discovery. Launch on mission STS-102 is scheduled for March 8.

  5. STS-102 crew poses on the FSS at Launch Pad 39B during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Relaxing after emergency escape training on the 195-foot level of the Fixed Service Structure, Launch Pad 39B, are(left to right) STS-102 Mission Specialists Andrew Thomas and Paul Richards and Commander James Wetherbee. The crew is at KSC for Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include the emergency training and a simulated launch countdown. STS-102 is the eighth construction flight to the International Space Station, with Space Shuttle Discovery carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. Also flying on the mission are the Expedition Two crew, who will replace the Expedition One crew on Space Station. Expedition One will return to Earth with Discovery. Launch on mission STS-102 is scheduled for March 8.

  6. STS-102 MS Helms, Usachev and Voss pose on the FSS at Launch Pad 39B during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-102 Mission Specialists Susan Helms, Yury Usachev and James Voss clasp hands showing their unity as the Expedition Two crew who will be replacing Expedition One on the International Space Station. Behind them can be seen the tops of the solid rocket booster and external tank on Space Shuttle Discovery. The STS-102 crew is at KSC for Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include the emergency training and a simulated launch countdown. STS-102 is the eighth construction flight to the Space Station, with Discovery carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. Expedition One will return to Earth with Discovery. Launch on mission STS-102 is scheduled for March 8.

  7. STS-102 MS Helms, Usachev and Voss pose on the FSS at Launch Pad 39B during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- After emergency escape training on the 195-foot level of the Fixed Service Structure, Launch Pad 39B, STS-102 Mission Specialists Susan Helms, Yury Usachev and James Voss pose for the camera. The three are also the Expedition Two crew who will be replacing Expedition One on the International Space Station. Behind them, at left, can be seen the tops of the solid rocket booster and external tank on Space Shuttle Discovery. The STS-102 crew is at KSC for Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include the emergency training and a simulated launch countdown. STS-102 is the eighth construction flight to the Space Station, with Discovery carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. Expedition One will return to Earth with Discovery. Launch on mission STS-102 is scheduled for March 8.

  8. STS-102 crew poses on the FSS at Launch Pad 39B during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-102 Mission Specialists Yury Usachev (left), Susan Helms (center) and James Voss (right) take time to pose for the camera after emergency escape training on the 195-foot level of the Fixed Service Structure, Launch Pad 39B. They are the Expedition Two crew who will be flying to the International Space Station on mission STS-102 to replace Expedition One. The STS-102 crew is at KSC for Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include the emergency training and a simulated launch countdown. STS-102 is the eighth construction flight to the International Space Station, with Space Shuttle Discovery carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. Expedition One will return to Earth with Discovery. Launch on mission STS-102 is scheduled for March 8.

  9. STS-102 crew poses on the FSS at Launch Pad 39B during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The STS-102 crew poses for a photo on the 215-foot level of the Fixed Service Structure. Behind them is Space Shuttle Discovery. Standing, left to right, are Mission Specialist Susan Helms, Pilot James Kelly, Mission Specialists Andrew Thomas and Paul Richards, Commander James Wetherbee and Mission Specialists Yury Usachev and James Voss. The crew is taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include emergency exit training and a simulated launch countdown. STS-102 is the eighth construction flight to the International Space Station, with Space Shuttle Discovery carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. Voss, Helms and Usachev are the Expedition Two crew who will be the second resident crew on the International Space Station. They will replace Expedition One, who will return to Earth with Discovery. Launch on mission STS-102 is scheduled for March 8.

  10. STS-102 crew poses on the FSS at Launch Pad 39B during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- At the 195-foot level on the Fixed Service Structure, Launch Pad 39B, members of the STS-102 crew relax after emergency escape training. At left is Pilot James Kelly; in the center and right are Mission Specialists Yury Usachev and James Voss. The crew is at KSC for Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include the emergency training and a simulated launch countdown. STS-102 is the eighth construction flight to the International Space Station, with Space Shuttle Discovery carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. Usachev and Voss are part of the Expedition Two crew who will be on the mission to replace Expedition One on the International Space Station. Expedition One will return to Earth with Discovery. Launch on mission STS-102 is scheduled for March 8.

  11. STS-102 crew poses in the White Room at Launch Pad 39B during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The STS-102 crew poses in the White Room outside the orbiter Discovery on Launch Pad 39B. Kneeling in front are Mission Specialists Susan Helms, Yury Usachev and James Voss. Standing behind them are Mission Specialists Paul Richards and Andrew Thomas, Commander James Wetherbee and Pilot James Kelly. The crew is taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include emergency exit training and a simulated launch countdown. STS-102 is the eighth construction flight to the International Space Station, with Space Shuttle Discovery carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. Voss, Helms and Usachev are the Expedition Two crew who will be the second resident crew on the International Space Station. They will replace Expedition One, who will return to Earth with Discovery. Launch on mission STS-102 is scheduled for March 8.

  12. STS-102 crew poses on the FSS at Launch Pad 39B during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-102 Mission Specialists Andrew Thomas (front, left) and Paul Richards take their seats in the slidewire basket, used for emergency egress from the orbiter and pad. Behind them, other crew members climb into their basket. The crew is at KSC for Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include the emergency training and a simulated launch countdown. STS-102 is the eighth construction flight to the International Space Station, with Space Shuttle Discovery carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. In addition, the Expedition Two crew will be on the mission, to replace Expedition One, who will return to Earth with Discovery. Launch on mission STS-102 is scheduled for March 8.

  13. Renaissance Neurosurgery: Italy's Iconic Contributions.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Anil; Khan, Imad Saeed; Apuzzo, Michael L

    2016-03-01

    Various changes in the sociopolitical milieu of Italy led to the increasing tolerance of the study of cadavers in the late Middle Ages. The efforts of Mondino de Liuzzi (1276-1326) and Guido da Vigevano (1280-1349) led to an explosion of cadaver-centric studies in centers such as Bologna, Florence, and Padua during the Renaissance period. Legendary scientists from this era, including Leonardo Da Vinci, Andreas Vesalius, Bartolomeo Eustachio, and Costanzo Varolio, furthered the study of neuroanatomy. The various texts produced during this period not only helped increase the understanding of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology but also led to the formalization of medical education. With increased understanding came new techniques to address various neurosurgical problems from skull fractures to severed peripheral nerves. The present study aims to review the major developments in Italy during the vibrant Renaissance period that led to major progress in the field of neurosurgery.

  14. Geometric and Topological Methods for Quantum Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Alexander; Contreras, Iván.; Reyes-Lega, Andrés. F.

    2013-05-01

    Introduction; 1. A brief introduction to Dirac manifolds Henrique Bursztyn; 2. Differential geometry of holomorphic vector bundles on a curve Florent Schaffhauser; 3. Paths towards an extension of Chern-Weil calculus to a class of infinite dimensional vector bundles Sylvie Paycha; 4. Introduction to Feynman integrals Stefan Weinzierl; 5. Iterated integrals in quantum field theory Francis Brown; 6. Geometric issues in quantum field theory and string theory Luis J. Boya; 7. Geometric aspects of the standard model and the mysteries of matter Florian Scheck; 8. Absence of singular continuous spectrum for some geometric Laplacians Leonardo A. Cano García; 9. Models for formal groupoids Iván Contreras; 10. Elliptic PDEs and smoothness of weakly Einstein metrics of Hölder regularity Andrés Vargas; 11. Regularized traces and the index formula for manifolds with boundary Alexander Cardona and César Del Corral; Index.

  15. Dreaming and Neuroesthetics

    PubMed Central

    Barcaro, Umberto; Paoli, Marco

    2015-01-01

    This paper, which is limited to the art of painting, aims to support the idea that a substantial insertion of concepts and methods drawn on dream psychology and dream neuroscience can contribute to the advancements of Neuroesthetics. The historical and scientific reasons are discussed that have determined the so far poor role played by the dream phenomenon in the developments of Neuroesthetics. In the light of recent advancements in psychophysiological research, a method of analyzing artistic products is proposed that is based on the recognition of precise features proper of the dreaming experience. Four examples are given for application of this method, regarding works by Giorgione, Leonardo da Vinci, Vermeer, and Millais, respectively. PMID:26157373

  16. Self-organized architectures from assorted DNA-framed nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenyan; Halverson, Jonathan; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, Alexei V.; Gang, Oleg

    2016-09-01

    The science of self-assembly has undergone a radical shift from asking questions about why individual components self-organize into ordered structures, to manipulating the resultant order. However, the quest for far-reaching nanomanufacturing requires addressing an even more challenging question: how to form nanoparticle (NP) structures with designed architectures without explicitly prescribing particle positions. Here we report an assembly concept in which building instructions are embedded into NPs via DNA frames. The integration of NPs and DNA origami frames enables the fabrication of NPs with designed anisotropic and selective interactions. Using a pre-defined set of different DNA-framed NPs, we show it is possible to design diverse planar architectures, which include periodic structures and shaped meso-objects that spontaneously emerge on mixing of the different topological types of NP. Even objects of non-trivial shapes, such as a nanoscale model of Leonardo da Vinci's Vitruvian Man, can be self-assembled successfully.

  17. Low Head, Vortex Induced Vibrations River Energy Converter

    SciTech Connect

    Bernitsas, Michael B.; Dritz, Tad

    2006-06-30

    Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy (VIVACE) is a novel, demonstrated approach to extracting energy from water currents. This invention is based on a phenomenon called Vortex Induced Vibrations (VIV), which was first observed by Leonardo da Vinci in 1504AD. He called it ‘Aeolian Tones.’ For decades, engineers have attempted to prevent this type of vibration from damaging structures, such as offshore platforms, nuclear fuel rods, cables, buildings, and bridges. The underlying concept of the VIVACE Converter is the following: Strengthen rather than spoil vortex shedding; enhance rather than suppress VIV; harness rather than mitigate VIV energy. By maximizing and utilizing this unique phenomenon, VIVACE takes this “problem” and successfully transforms it into a valuable resource for mankind.

  18. Importance of Eugenio Beltrami's hydroelectrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Filipponi, G.

    1985-07-01

    As part of a continuing project of bringing the works of Bernhard Riemann and his collaborators directly before the scientific community, we are happy to present translations of two papers by Eugenio Beltrami that were key in the development of hydrodynamics. We have also translated a short portion of Beltrami's attack upon the electrodynamics of James Clerk Maxwell. The first paper develops the work of Hermann Helmholtz (translated in IJFE (Helmholtz 1978)) into a generative treatment of vortices. As the note by Dan Wells in this issue illustrates in connection with his own work, Beltrami's method has proven critical to the treatment of the development of vortices in plasmas, providing a crucial tool for studying what was otherwise dismissed as turbulence. In his introduction to the translations, Dr. Giuseppe Filipponi develops the connection between the discoveries of Beltrami and the Italian tradition of research in hydrodynamics begun by Leonardo da Vinci.

  19. [The Gioconda from the historical and medical perspective (hypotheses of pathology in her painting)].

    PubMed

    Cruz Hermida, J

    2001-01-01

    As a preamble, some historical and biographical brushtrokes of the Gioconda, Leonardo and his painting will be outlined. Following these observations, a series of medical interpretations will be put forth regarding his painting with the aim of analysing possible pathologies related to: the skin, hair, eyes, hands and the reproductive and endocrine systems. We will conclude by observing the famous work The Smile and by extracting a hypothesis on pathologies of various natures such as: neurological, muscular, hypoacusic, asthmatic, psychoneurotic, psychiatric, ethylic, sexual, stress-related, stomatological (bruxismo) and the driving force that lies behind setting off the Stendhal Syndrome: a psychosomatic disorder known to be due to the human being's susceptibility to saturation from having received impressions of great artistic beauty.

  20. [The spread of the plague: A sciento-historiographic review].

    PubMed

    Cuadrada, Coral

    2015-01-01

    There is still uncertainty about the diagnosis and nature of the plague; some scholars have been forced to abandon certainties and be filled with doubts: from believing that the mediaeval Black Plague was, in reality, the bubonic plague (although with unusual characteristics) to stating that there is very little evidence to support a retro-diagnosis. This article looks at this in depth, not only reviewing the historiography but also giving new interpretations which question previous hypotheses through research on images of the time, comparing them to the most recent investigative data. Two primary sources are analysed: Renaissance treaties written by four Italian doctors: Michele Savonarola, Marsilio Ficino, Leonardo Fioravanti and Gioseffo Daciano; and iconography: an illustrated manuscript of the Decameron by Giovanni Boccaccio and a Hebrew Haggadah from the XIVth century. The results are compared to the most recent research on DNA and in micropaleontology.

  1. Renaissance Neurosurgery: Italy's Iconic Contributions.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Anil; Khan, Imad Saeed; Apuzzo, Michael L

    2016-03-01

    Various changes in the sociopolitical milieu of Italy led to the increasing tolerance of the study of cadavers in the late Middle Ages. The efforts of Mondino de Liuzzi (1276-1326) and Guido da Vigevano (1280-1349) led to an explosion of cadaver-centric studies in centers such as Bologna, Florence, and Padua during the Renaissance period. Legendary scientists from this era, including Leonardo Da Vinci, Andreas Vesalius, Bartolomeo Eustachio, and Costanzo Varolio, furthered the study of neuroanatomy. The various texts produced during this period not only helped increase the understanding of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology but also led to the formalization of medical education. With increased understanding came new techniques to address various neurosurgical problems from skull fractures to severed peripheral nerves. The present study aims to review the major developments in Italy during the vibrant Renaissance period that led to major progress in the field of neurosurgery. PMID:26585723

  2. PSYCHOANALYSIS AND THE ARTS: THE SLIPPERY GROUND OF APPLIED ANALYSIS.

    PubMed

    Abella, Adela

    2016-01-01

    The ways in which today's psychoanalysts approach art closely follow the avenues opened by Freud a hundred years ago. Drawing mainly on Freud's studies on Jensen's Gradiva (1907) and on Leonardo da Vinci (1910a), the author examines the main paradigms he used in discussing artistic activity, including his doubts and hesitations. Present-day approaches to art are then examined via a discussion of the advantages and pitfalls of psychobiography, of the case study, and of textual approaches. The author makes a case for the type of interdisciplinary dialogue in which the goal is to establish a cross-fertilization between psychoanalysis and other fields of knowledge while striving to avoid hypersaturation of a work of art in order to foster expansion of the mind.

  3. An Italian Education: IEEE Pulse talks with Riccardo Pietrabissa, president of Italy's National Bioengineering Group, about Italian progress and challenges in biomedical engineering education.

    PubMed

    Pietrabissa, Riccardo; Reynolds, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    From Leonardo da Vinci's designs for ball bearings to the incredible engineering wizardry behind the Ferrari, the inventive, inquisitive, and ingenious spirit of the engineer has always lived--and thrived--in Italy. From education to research to product development, Italy has always been regarded as an engineering leader. But does this apply to biomedical engineering (BME)? Despite many successes, questions loom, as they do at engineering schools worldwide. Concerns such as whether BME programs are providing students with enough focused, practical, hands-on training remain at the forefront, as does the question of whether graduates will be able to find jobs in industry after university studies are over. Here, IEEE Pulse explores these topics with Riccardo Pietrabissa, president of the Gruppo Nazionale di Bioingegneria (National Bioengineering Group) and a full professor in the Department of Chemistry, Materials, and Chemical Engineering at Politecnico di Milano. PMID:26186055

  4. Mona Lisa's smile: a hypothesis based on a new principle of art neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Ambar

    2010-07-01

    The smile on Mona Lisa's face remains enigmatous and a topic of much discussion in art circle over the centuries. In this essay the author proposes a new principle of art neuroscience or the science of aesthetics namely 'dynamism' which artists often employ to impart an illusion of movement in their art works which are essentially static. This illusion is possibly generated through imaginative thinking which involves frontal cortical activation in the viewer's brain coupled with activation of the motion area (area V5/MT) of the viewer's visual cortex. It is suggested that this principle of dynamism is somewhat different from the previously described concept of kinetic art. The author hypothesizes that the great painter Leonardo da Vinci very intelligently painted the angles of the mouth of Mona Lisa's face to evoke this illusion of movement (smile) to increase the aesthetic value of this great work of art.

  5. STS-105 MPLM is moved into the PCR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The payload canister is lifted up the Rotating Service Structure on Launch Pad 39A. At right is Space Shuttle Discovery. Inside the canister are the primary payloads on mission STS-105, the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo and the Integrated Cargo Carrier. The ICC holds several smaller payloads, the Early Ammonia Servicer and two experiment containers. The Early Ammonia Servicer consists of two nitrogen tanks that provide compressed gaseous nitrogen to pressurize the ammonia tank and replenish it in the thermal control subsystems of the Space Station. The ICC and MPLM will be lifted into the payload changeout room and then moved into the Discoverys payload bay. The STS-105 mission includes a crew changeover on the International Space Station. Expedition Three will be traveling on Discovery to replace Expedition Two, who will return to Earth on board Discovery. Launch of STS-105 is scheduled for Aug. 9.

  6. The thread of depression throughout the life and works of Leo Tolstoy.

    PubMed

    Anargyros-Klinger, Annie

    2002-04-01

    Tolstoy, the author of two masterpieces, War and Peace and Anna Karenina, remains a writer of genius. Yet, after writing War and Peace, his existence had been torn apart by a serious depression. This depression, which was melancholic in character, almost destroyed him and, once he had finished Anna Karenina, led him to want to renounce not only sexuality but also literary creation and material possessions. Through examining Tolstoy's life and work, the author tries to uncover the underground paths of this depression, which emerged brutally in the middle of his life, and to understand why his creative genius dried up. Like Leonardo da Vinci, Tolstoy turned away from his artistic work, declaring that 'art is not only useless but even harmful', and thereafter devoted himself to philosophical, political and religious writings. These new sublimations would help him to recover his health.

  7. THE THREAD OF DEPRESSION THROUGHOUT THE LIFE AND WORKS OF LEO TOLSTOY.

    PubMed

    Anargyros-Klinger, Annie

    2002-04-01

    Tolstoy, the author of two masterpieces, War and Peace and Anna Karenina, remains a writer of genius. Yet, after writing War and Peace, his existence had been torn apart by a serious depression. This depression, which was melancholic in character, almost destroyed him and, once he had finished Anna Karenina, led him to want to renounce not only sexuality but also literary creation and material possessions. Through examining Tolstoy's life and work, the author tries to uncover the underground paths of this depression, which emerged brutally in the middle of his life, and to understand why his creative genius dried up. Like Leonardo da Vinci, Tolstoy turned away from his artistic work, declaring that 'art is not only useless but even harmful', and thereafter devoted himself to philosophical, political and religious writings. These new sublimations would help him to recover his health.

  8. STS-102 MS Thomas drives an M-113 during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-102 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas drives an M-113 armored carrier as part of emergency egress training. With him is (left) Capt. George Hoggard, a training officer with SGS Fire Services, and other crew members Commander James Wetherbee, Pilot James Kelly and Mission Specialist Paul Richards (seen behind Thomas, at right). The M-113, in the event of an emergency at the pad prior to launch, could be used to transport the crew to a nearby bunker or farther. The STS-102 crew is at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also include a simulated launch countdown. STS-102 is the eighth construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. Launch on mission STS-102 is scheduled for March 8

  9. STS-102 Commander Wetherbee is ready to drive an M-113 during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-102 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas drives an M-113 armored carrier as part of emergency egress training. With him is (left) Capt. George Hoggard, a training officer with SGS Fire Services, and other crew members Commander James Wetherbee, Pilot James Kelly and Mission Specialist Paul Richards (seen behind Thomas, at right). The M-113, in the event of an emergency at the pad prior to launch, could be used to transport the crew to a nearby bunker or farther. The STS-102 crew is at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also include a simulated launch countdown. STS-102 is the eighth construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. Launch on mission STS-102 is scheduled for March 8

  10. STS-102 Pilot Kelly is ready to drive an M-113 during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-102 Pilot James Kelly gets into the driver'''s seat of an M-113 armored carrier near Launch Pad 39B he will practice driving. In the background is Capt. George Hoggard, a training officer with SGS Fire Services. In the event of an emergency at the pad prior to launch, the carrier could be used to transport the crew to a nearby bunker or farther. The STS-102 crew is at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also include a simulated launch countdown. STS-102 is the eighth construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. Launch on mission STS-102 is scheduled for March 8

  11. STS-102 MS Richards drives an M-113 during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-102 Mission Specialist Paul Richards kicks up dust as he makes a turn while driving the M-113 armored carrier, part of emergency egress training at Launch Pad 39B. Seated alongside (at left) is Capt. George Hoggard, a training officer with SGS Fire Services. In the event of an emergency at the pad prior to launch, the M-113 could be used to transport the crew to a nearby bunker or farther. The STS-102 crew is at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also include a simulated launch countdown. STS-102 is the eighth construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. Launch on mission STS-102 is scheduled for March 8

  12. Mechanics of blood flow.

    PubMed

    Skalak, R; Keller, S R; Secomb, T W

    1981-05-01

    The historical development of the mechanics of blood flow can be traced from ancient times, to Leonardo da Vinci and Leonhard Euler and up to the present times with increasing biological knowledge and mathematical analysis. In the last two decades, quantitative and numerical methods have steadily given more complete and precise understanding. In the arterial system wave propagation computations based on nonlinear one-dimensional modeling have given the best representation of pulse wave propagation. In the veins, the theory of unsteady flow in collapsible tubes has recently been extensively developed. In the last decade, progress has been made in describing the blood flow at junctions, through stenoses, in bends and in capillary blood vessels. The rheological behavior of individual red blood cells has been explored. A working model consists of an elastic membrane filled with viscous fluid. This model forms a basis for understanding the viscous and viscoelastic behavior of blood. PMID:7024641

  13. Highlights of the ecancer/SAC First International Prostate Cancer Symposium, 11-12 March 2016, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Villalba, Marcelo Blanco; Bramajo, Marina; Bruno, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The ecancer/SAC First International Prostate Cancer Symposium, held in Buenos Aires, included national, regional, and international experts in the field of prostate cancer. More than 200 professionals from a variety of areas (clinical urologists, pathologists, oncologists, biologists, imaging specialists, radiation therapists, and generalist doctors, among others) attended, and they proposed multidisciplinary management of prostate pathology from the start in concordance with the ideas set forth by the organising committee. A radiotherapy workshop was also held during the symposium, in which new techniques and their possible uses were specifically discussed. In addition to the local doctors, Dr Lilian Faroni (COI Group, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil), Dr Leonardo Carmona (Chilean Head and Neck Institute, Chile), and Dr Anthony Addesa (Jupiter Medical Centre, Florida, USA) also participated in this symposium. PMID:27350786

  14. A DBTechNet course module on database SQL transactions for VET teachers training and higher education informatics education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dervos, D. A.; Skourlas, C.; Laiho, M.

    2015-02-01

    "DBTech VET Teachers" project is Leonardo da Vinci Multilateral Transfer of Innovation Project co-financed by the European Commission's Lifelong Learning Programme. The aim of the project is to renew the teaching of database technologies in VET (Vocational Education and Training) institutes, on the basis of the current and real needs of ICT industry in Europe. Training of the VET teachers is done with the systems used in working life and they are taught to guide students to learning by verifying. In this framework, a course module on SQL transactions is prepared and offered. In this paper we present and briefly discuss some qualitative/quantitative data collected from its first pilot offering to an international audience in Greece during May-June 2013. The questionnaire/evaluation results, and the types of participants who have attended the course offering, are presented. Conclusions are also presented.

  15. Multiple Autonomous Discrete Event Controllers for Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esposito, Timothy C.

    2003-01-01

    The Multiple Autonomous Discrete Event Controllers for Constellations (MADECC) project is an effort within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center's (NASA/GSFC) Information Systems Division to develop autonomous positioning and attitude control for constellation satellites. It will be accomplished using traditional control theory and advanced coordination algorithms developed by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL). This capability will be demonstrated in the discrete event control test-bed located at JHU/APL. This project will be modeled for the Leonardo constellation mission, but is intended to be adaptable to any constellation mission. To develop a common software architecture. the controllers will only model very high-level responses. For instance, after determining that a maneuver must be made. the MADECC system will output B (Delta)V (velocity change) value. Lower level systems must then decide which thrusters to fire and for how long to achieve that (Delta)V.

  16. STS-102 (Expedition II) crew members at SPACEHAB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., STS-102 Mission Specialist Yuri Usachev, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA), looks at part of the cargo on the Integrated Cargo Carrier. STS-102 is a resupply mission to the International Space Station, transporting the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) with equipment to assist in outfitting the U.S. Lab, which will already be in place. It is also transporting Usachev, and Mission Specialists James Voss and Susan Helms as the second resident crew (designated Expedition crew 2) to the station. The mission will also return to Earth the first expedition crew on ISS: William Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev (RSA) and Yuri Gidzenko (RSA). STS-102 is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 19, 2000.

  17. STS-102 (Expedition II) crew members in SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Inside the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), a technician (right) explains use of the equipment in front of (left) STS-102 Mission Specialists James Voss, Susan Helms and Yuri Usachev, with the Russian Space Agency (RSA). STS-102 is a resupply mission to the International Space Station, transporting the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) with equipment to assist in outfitting the U.S. Lab, which will already be in place. The mission is also transporting Helms, Voss and Usachev as the second resident crew (designated Expedition crew 2) to the station. In exchange, the mission will return to Earth the first expedition crew on ISS: William Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev (RSA) and Yuri Gidzenko (RSA). STS-102 is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 19, 2000.

  18. STS-102 (Expedition II) crew members at SPACEHAB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., members of the STS-102 crew look at part of the equipment on the Integrated Cargo Carrier that will be on their mission. From left are Mission Specialists Susan Helms, James Voss and Yuri Usachev, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA). STS-102 is a resupply mission to the International Space Station, transporting the Leonardo Multi- Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) with equipment to assist in outfitting the U.S. Lab, which will already be in place. The mission is also transporting Helms, Voss and Usachev as the second resident crew (designated Expedition crew 2) to the station. In exchange, the mission will return to Earth the first expedition crew on ISS: William Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev (RSA) and Yuri Gidzenko (RSA). STS-102 is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 19, 2000.

  19. STS-102 (Expedition II) crew members at SPACEHAB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Workers at SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., help members of the STS-102 crew become familiar with the Integrated Cargo Carrier and elements of its cargo for their mission. Starting second from left are Mission Specialists James Voss and Susan Helms and, fourth from left, cosmonaut Yuri Usachev, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA). STS-102 is a resupply mission to the International Space Station, transporting the Leonardo Multi- Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) with equipment to assist in outfitting the U.S. Lab, which will already be in place. It is also transporting Voss, Helms and Usachev as the second resident crew (designated Expedition crew 2) to the station. The mission will also return to Earth the first expedition crew on ISS: William Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev (RSA) and Yuri Gidzenko (RSA). STS-102 is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 19, 2000.

  20. STS-102 (Expedition II) crew members in SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STS-102 crew members at left are briefed by workers (right) in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) on equipment for their mission. From left are Mission Specialists James Voss, Susan Helms and Yuri Usachev, with the Russian Space Agency (RSA). STS-102 is a resupply mission to the International Space Station, transporting the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) with equipment to assist in outfitting the U.S. Lab, which will already be in place. The mission is also transporting Helms, Voss and Usachev as the second resident crew (designated Expedition crew 2) to the station. In exchange, the mission will return to Earth the first expedition crew on ISS: William Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev (RSA) and Yuri Gidzenko (RSA). STS-102 is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 19, 2000.

  1. STS-102 (Expedition II) crew members at SPACEHAB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., members of the STS-102 crew look over the Integrated Cargo Carrier and the Russian crane Strela as part of familiarization activities. Starting second to left are Mission Specialists Susan Helms, cosmonaut Yuri Usachev, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA), and James Voss. STS- 102 is a resupply mission to the International Space Station, transporting the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) with equipment to assist in outfitting the U.S. Lab, which will already be in place. It is also transporting Voss, Helms and Usachev as the second resident crew (designated Expedition crew 2) to the station. The mission will also return to Earth the first expedition crew on ISS: William Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev (RSA) and Yuri Gidzenko (RSA). STS-102 is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 19, 2000.

  2. STS-102 (Expedition II) crew members at SPACEHAB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., members of the STS-102 crew look at part of the cargo for their mission. From left are Mission Specialists James Voss, Susan Helms and Yuri Usachev, with the Russian Space Agency (RSA). STS-102 is a resupply mission to the International Space Station, transporting the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) with equipment to assist in outfitting the U.S. Lab, which will already be in place. The mission is also transporting Helms, Voss and Usachev as the second resident crew (designated Expedition crew 2) to the station. In exchange, the mission will return to Earth the first expedition crew on ISS: William Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev (RSA) and Yuri Gidzenko (RSA). STS-102 is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 19, 2000.

  3. STS-102 (Expedition II) crew members in SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STS-102 Mission Specialists James Voss, Susan Helms and Yuri Usachev, with the Russian Space Agency (RSA), pose in front of the U.S. Lab module, named Destiny, in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). STS-102 is a resupply mission to the International Space Station, transporting the Leonardo Multi- Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) with equipment to assist in outfitting the U.S. Lab, which will already be in place. The mission is also transporting Helms, Voss and Usachev as the second resident crew (designated Expedition crew 2) to the station. In exchange, the mission will return to Earth the first expedition crew on ISS: William Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev (RSA) and Yuri Gidzenko (RSA). STS-102 is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 19, 2000.

  4. STS-102 (Expedition II) crew members at SPACEHAB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., members of the STS-102 crew pose for a photograph with SPACEHAB workers in front of the International Cargo Carrier, which will carry cargo to the International Space Station (ISS). The crew are, left to right, Mission Specialists James Voss, Yuri Usachev, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA), and Susan Helms. STS-102 is a resupply mission to the International Space Station, transporting the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) with equipment to assist in outfitting the U.S. Lab, which will already be in place. The mission is also transporting Helms, Voss and Usachev as the second resident crew (designated Expedition crew 2) to the station. In exchange, the mission will return to Earth the first expedition crew on ISS: William Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev (RSA) and Yuri Gidzenko (RSA). STS-102 is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 19, 2000.

  5. Evaluation Study of Pedagogical Methods and E - Learning Material via Web 2.0 for Hearing Impaired People

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrettaros, John; Argiri, Katerina; Stavrou, Pilios; Hrissagis, Kostas; Drigas, Athanasios

    The primary goal of this paper is to study whether WEB 2.0 tools such as blogs, wikis, social networks and typical hypermedia as well as techniques such as lip - reading, video - sign language and learning activities are appropriate to use for learning purpose for deaf and hard of hearing people. In order to check the extent in which the choices mentioned above are compatible with the features of the specific group and maximize the learning results we designed an empirical study which will be presented below. The study was conducted in the context of SYNERGIA, a project of Leonardo da Vinci of Lifelong Learning Programme, in the section of MULTILATERAL PROJECTS TRANSFER OF INNOVATION, The evaluation was conducted on data that came up through questionnaire analysis.

  6. The colour wheels of art, perception, science and physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harkness, Nick

    2006-06-01

    Colour is not the domain of any one discipline be it art, philosophy, psychology or science. Each discipline has its own colour wheel and this presentation examines the origins and philosophies behind the colour circles of Art, Perception, Science and Physiology (after image) with reference to Aristotle, Robert Boyle, Leonardo da Vinci, Goethe, Ewald Hering and Albert Munsell. The paper analyses and discusses the differences between the four colour wheels using the Natural Colour System® notation as the reference for hue (the position of colours within each of the colour wheels). Examination of the colour wheels shows the dominance of blue in the wheels of art, science and physiology particularly at the expense of green. This paper does not consider the three-dimensionality of colour space its goal was to review the hue of a colour with regard to its position on the respective colour wheels.

  7. The SUPERCOMET 2 Project: Teacher Seminar and Teacher Guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engstrom, V.; Ireson, G.; Latal, H.; Mathelitsch, L.; Michelini, M.; Peeters, W.; Rath, G.

    2008-05-01

    The Leonardo da Vinci pilot projects SUPERCOMET (2001-2004) and SUPERCOMET 2 (2004-2007) developed and tested teacher training materials for active, minds-on learning of electromagnetism and superconductivity at the level of upper secondary school. New multimedia materials for the pupils supported the teacher materials, including a teacher seminar in 4 half-day modules detailing the scientific contents, teaching methods, using ICT in physics teaching and learning, online collaboration and further resources for exploring the selected topics. The aim of these projects were to improve the quality of physics teaching on a European level, involving a combined total of 45 partners in 16 countries, and conducting trials at 67 schools with approx. 230 teachers, 280 trainee teachers and 2200 pupils. New follow-up projects develop hands-on materials for carrying out the activities described in the teacher guide and seminars and additional teacher materials involving modelling, simulations and data logging.

  8. A new view of particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medeiros, João

    2008-11-01

    Long before C P Snow's two cultures, there was only one. Its supreme embodiment was the great Renaissance master Leonardo da Vinci. Da Vinci saw no barriers between art and science (or what was known as natural philosophy back in the 16th century). His journals were filled with sketches, ideas and observations that testify to the polymath nature of Da Vinci's ingenuity. Da Vinci used artistic inspiration as a path to his inventions, and the observation of the natural world as an intrinsically artistic undertaking. He made thousands of blueprints outlining some of the most impressive inventions ever conceptualized - flying machines, bridges, calculators, tanks, solar-power cells. Most were impractical, few every saw the light of day, but all bore the mark of the master's infinite inventive powers.

  9. Vortex flow in nature and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugt, H. J.

    The occurrence and characteristics of vortices in flows are explored comprehensively, including historical observations and representations dated several millenia BC. Attention is given to the development of the scientific concept of vortices, and the basic concepts and kinematics of vortices are reviewed, as are the properties of simple vortices. The genesis and behavior of vorticity is traced through separation, instability, and turbulence. Fluid flow in a rotating system is explored, as are stratification in the ocean and atmosphere, circulations in the atmosphere, ocean, and earth, and the features of single vortices in the atmosphere and oceans. Hurrican formations are investigated, together with extraterrestrial vortices in planetary atmospheres, stars, and galaxies. A plethora of photographs and illustrations is presented, including drawings by Leonardo da Vinci.

  10. 2D imaging and 3D sensing data acquisition and mutual registration for painting conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, Raffaella; Gambino, Maria Chiara; Greco, Marinella; Marras, Luciano; Pampaloni, Enrico M.; Pelagotti, Anna; Pezzati, Luca; Poggi, Pasquale

    2005-01-01

    We describe the application of 2D and 3D data acquisition and mutual registration to the conservation of paintings. RGB color image acquisition, IR and UV fluorescence imaging, together with the more recent hyperspectral imaging (32 bands) are among the most useful techniques in this field. They generally are meant to provide information on the painting materials, on the employed techniques and on the object state of conservation. However, only when the various images are perfectly registered on each other and on the 3D model, no ambiguity is possible and safe conclusions may be drawn. We present the integration of 2D and 3D measurements carried out on two different paintings: "Madonna of the Yarnwinder" by Leonardo da Vinci, and "Portrait of Lionello d'Este", by Pisanello, both painted in the XV century.

  11. Virtual Power Electronics: Novel Software Tools for Design, Modeling and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamar, Janos; Nagy, István; Funato, Hirohito; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Dranga, Octavian; Nishida, Yasuyuki

    The current paper is dedicated to present browser-based multimedia-rich software tools and e-learning curriculum to support the design and modeling process of power electronics circuits and to explain sometimes rather sophisticated phenomena. Two projects will be discussed. The so-called Inetele project is financed by the Leonardo da Vinci program of the European Union (EU). It is a collaborative project between numerous EU universities and institutes to develop state-of-the art curriculum in Electrical Engineering. Another cooperative project with participation of Japanese, European and Australian institutes focuses especially on developing e-learning curriculum, interactive design and modeling tools, furthermore on development of a virtual laboratory. Snapshots from these two projects will be presented.

  12. Identification of vortices in complex flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, P.; Balachandar, S.; Adrian, R. J.

    2007-12-01

    Dating back to Leonardo da Vinci's famous sketches of vortices in turbulent flows, fluid dynamicists for over five centuries have continued to visualize and interpret complex flows in terms of motion of vortices. Nevertheless, much debate surrounds the question of how to unambiguously define vortices in complex flows. This debate has resulted in the availability of many vortex identification criteria---mathematical statements of what constitutes a vortex. Here we review the popularly used local or point- wise vortex identification criteria. Based on local flow kinematics, we describe a unified framework to interpret the similarities and differences in the usage of these criteria. We discuss the limitations on the applicability of these criteria when there is a significant component of vortex interactions. Finally, we provide guidelines for applying these criteria to geophysical flows.

  13. VINCI: the VLT Interferometer commissioning instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kervella, Pierre; Coudé du Foresto, Vincent; Glindemann, Andreas; Hofmann, Reiner

    2000-07-01

    The Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) is a complex system, made of a large number of separated elements. To prepare an early successful operation, it will require a period of extensive testing and verification to ensure that the many devices involved work properly together, and can produce meaningful data. This paper describes the concept chosen for the VLTI commissioning instrument, LEONARDO da VINCI, and details its functionalities. It is a fiber based two-way beam combiner, associated with an artificial star and an alignment verification unit. The technical commissioning of the VLTI is foreseen as a stepwise process: fringes will first be obtained with the commissioning instrument in an autonomous mode (no other parts of the VLTI involved); then the VLTI telescopes and optical trains will be tested in autocollimation; finally fringes will be observed on the sky.

  14. Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, Uriel

    1996-01-01

    Written five centuries after the first studies of Leonardo da Vinci and half a century after A.N. Kolmogorov's first attempt to predict the properties of flow, this textbook presents a modern account of turbulence, one of the greatest challenges in physics. "Fully developed turbulence" is ubiquitous in both cosmic and natural environments, in engineering applications and in everyday life. Elementary presentations of dynamical systems ideas, probabilistic methods (including the theory of large deviations) and fractal geometry make this a self-contained textbook. This is the first book on turbulence to use modern ideas from chaos and symmetry breaking. The book will appeal to first-year graduate students in mathematics, physics, astrophysics, geosciences and engineering, as well as professional scientists and engineers.

  15. Evolution of the Martian hydrosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, V.

    1991-06-01

    The concept of the hydrological cycle is one of the greatest achievements in the understanding of nature. Leonardo da Vinci seems to have held two concurrent views of the cycle: an external process in which evaporation from ponded areas leads to precipitation and runoff from the land; and an internal process in which subsurface pressures from within the Earth force water upward. Endogenetic hypotheses for valley genesis on Mars maintain the necessary prolonged ground water flows by hydrothermal circulation associated with impact cratering or with volcanism. Ocean formation on Mars was episodic, mostly evidenced by the latest episodes. Coincident cataclysmic flood discharges to the northern plains, probably triggered by Tharsis volcanism, would lead to immense consequences. Potential volumes of ponded water are summarized. The outflow channels have a complex history of flooding events over a prolonged period of planetary history. It is hypothesized that episodic outbursts of concurrent discharge was triggered by planetary scale volcanism. The consequences of such episodes are summarized.

  16. 2D imaging and 3D sensing data acquisition and mutual registration for painting conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, Raffaella; Gambino, Maria Chiara; Greco, Marinella; Marras, Luciano; Pampaloni, Enrico M.; Pelagotti, Anna; Pezzati, Luca; Poggi, Pasquale

    2004-12-01

    We describe the application of 2D and 3D data acquisition and mutual registration to the conservation of paintings. RGB color image acquisition, IR and UV fluorescence imaging, together with the more recent hyperspectral imaging (32 bands) are among the most useful techniques in this field. They generally are meant to provide information on the painting materials, on the employed techniques and on the object state of conservation. However, only when the various images are perfectly registered on each other and on the 3D model, no ambiguity is possible and safe conclusions may be drawn. We present the integration of 2D and 3D measurements carried out on two different paintings: "Madonna of the Yarnwinder" by Leonardo da Vinci, and "Portrait of Lionello d'Este", by Pisanello, both painted in the XV century.

  17. Science versus (?) Art: Human Perception of Other Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, William K.

    1998-09-01

    At the time of the Renaissance, science and art were mixed together as a way to understand the human relation to the larger cosmos. Leonardo da Vinci exemplifies this approach. In modern times, the two have become separate, and even antagonistic, ``two cultures." Scientists have increasingly been satisfied to present quantitative measures of phenomena, without ever asking what the measures mean in human terms. Examples include the nature of the lunar surface, asteroid colors and brightness of the Io aurora, as will be discussed. However, in presenting the "big picture" to the public, and even to other working scientists, it is useful to revisit the Renaissance paradigm. Artists are increasingly working with scientists to translate the understanding of other worlds to the public, and this creates many opportunities for education projects in schools, and for careers in public outreach and science journalism.

  18. The Shape of a Ponytail and the Statistical Physics of Hair Fiber Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Raymond E.; Warren, Patrick B.; Ball, Robin C.

    2012-02-01

    From Leonardo to the Brothers Grimm our fascination with hair has endured in art and science. Yet, a quantitative understanding of the shapes of a hair bundles has been lacking. Here we combine experiment and theory to propose an answer to the most basic question: What is the shape of a ponytail? A model for the shape of hair bundles is developed from the perspective of statistical physics, treating individual fibers as elastic filaments with random intrinsic curvatures. The combined effects of bending elasticity, gravity, and bundle compressibility are recast as a differential equation for the envelope of a bundle, in which the compressibility enters through an ``equation of state.'' From this, we identify the balance of forces in various regions of the ponytail, extract the equation of state from analysis of ponytail shapes, and relate the observed pressure to the measured random curvatures of individual hairs.

  19. Enhancing nurse mobility in Europe: a case for language skills.

    PubMed

    Ludvigsen, C

    1997-04-01

    The recognition of professional qualifications in all European Union (EU) member states for nurses is covered by both sectoral and general systems directives, yet in reality, few nurses take up their rights as European citizens to live and work in another EU country. One of the main reasons for this is a lack of linguistic skills. This article argues that the nursing profession should be taking a more active role in enabling nurses to move freely around Europe by encouraging language acquisition. It is argued that there are political, social, economic, professional and individual reasons why this should be so. The author gives a brief account of a pilot project which is currently under way to help improve (albeit in a small way) this situation. The project, which has been granted financial support of 100,000 ECU from the European Commission's new training programme, Leonardo da Vinci, will create a multimedia language pack in four languages aimed specifically at nurses.

  20. The thread of depression throughout the life and works of Leo Tolstoy.

    PubMed

    Anargyros-Klinger, Annie

    2002-04-01

    Tolstoy, the author of two masterpieces, War and Peace and Anna Karenina, remains a writer of genius. Yet, after writing War and Peace, his existence had been torn apart by a serious depression. This depression, which was melancholic in character, almost destroyed him and, once he had finished Anna Karenina, led him to want to renounce not only sexuality but also literary creation and material possessions. Through examining Tolstoy's life and work, the author tries to uncover the underground paths of this depression, which emerged brutally in the middle of his life, and to understand why his creative genius dried up. Like Leonardo da Vinci, Tolstoy turned away from his artistic work, declaring that 'art is not only useless but even harmful', and thereafter devoted himself to philosophical, political and religious writings. These new sublimations would help him to recover his health. PMID:12040704

  1. Moon-Struck: Artists Rediscover Nature And Observe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Olson, Roberta J. M.

    We discuss rare early depictions of the Moon by artists who actually observed Earth's nearest neighbor rather than relying on stylized formulas. The earliest, from the 14th and 15th centuries, reveal that revolutionary advances in both pre-telescopic astronomy and naturalistic painting could go hand-in-hand. This link suggests that when painters observed the world, their definition of world could also include the heavens and the Moon. Many of the artists we discuss - e.g., Pietro Lorenzetti, Giotto, and Jan Van Eyck - actually studied the Moon, incorporating their studies into several works. We also consider the star map on the dome over the altar in the Old Sacristy of San Lorenzo, Florence (c. 1442), whose likely advisor was Toscanelli. In addition, we examine representations by artists who painted for Popes Julius II and Leo X - Raphael and Sebastiano del Piombo, both of whom were influenced by individuals at the papal court, such as the astronomer, painter, and cartographer Johann (Giovanni) Ruysch and Leonardo da Vinci. We also discuss Leonardo's pre-telescopic notes and lunar drawings as they impacted on art and science in Florence, where Galileo would study perspective and chiaroscuro. Galileo's representations of the Moon (engraved in his Sidereus Nuncius, 1610) are noted, together with those by Harriot and Galileo's friend, the painter Cigoli. During the 17th century, the Moon's features were telescopically mapped by astronomers with repercussions in art, e.g., paintings by Donati Creti and Raimondo Manzini as well as Adam Elsheimer. Ending with a consideration of the 19th-century artists/astronomers John Russell and John Brett and early lunar photography, we demonstrate that artistic and scientific visual acuity belonged to the burgeoning empiricism of the 14th, 15th, and 16th centuries that eventually yielded modern observational astronomy.

  2. Brain ‘imaging’ in the Renaissance

    PubMed Central

    Paluzzi, Alessandro; Belli, Antonio; Bain, Peter; Viva, Laura

    2007-01-01

    During the Renaissance, a period of ‘rebirth’ for humanities and science, new knowledge and speculation began to emerge about the function of the human body, replacing ancient religious and philosophical dogma. The brain must have been a fascinating mystery to a Renaissance artist, but some speculation existed at that time on the function of its parts. Here we show how revived interest in anatomy and life sciences may have influenced the figurative work of Italian and Flemish masters, such as Rafael, Michelangelo and David. We present a historical perspective on the artists and the period in which they lived, their fascination for human anatomy and its symbolic use in their art. Prior to the 16th century, knowledge of the brain was limited and influenced in a dogmatic way by the teachings of Galen1 who, as we now know, conducted his anatomical studies not on humans but on animals.2 Nemesus, Bishop of Emesa, in around the year 400 was one of the first to attribute mental faculties to the brain, specifically to the ventricles. He identified two anterior (lateral) ventricles, to which he assigned perception, a middle ventricle responsible for cognition and a posterior ventricle for memory.2,3 After a long period of stasis in the Middle Ages, Renaissance scholars realized the importance of making direct observations on dissected cadavers. Between 1504 and 1507, Leonardo da Vinci conducted experiments to reveal the anatomy of the ventricular system in the brain. He injected hot wax through a tube thrust into the ventricular cavities of an ox and then scraped the overlying brain off, thus obtaining, in a simple but ingenious way, an accurate cast of the ventricles.2,4 Leonardo shared the belief promoted by scholarly Christians that the ventricles were the abode of rational soul. We have several examples of hidden symbolism in Renaissance paintings, but the influence of phrenology and this rudimentary knowledge of neuroanatomy on artists of that period is under

  3. Brain 'imaging' in the Renaissance.

    PubMed

    Paluzzi, Alessandro; Belli, Antonio; Bain, Peter; Viva, Laura

    2007-12-01

    During the Renaissance, a period of 'rebirth' for humanities and science, new knowledge and speculation began to emerge about the function of the human body, replacing ancient religious and philosophical dogma. The brain must have been a fascinating mystery to a Renaissance artist, but some speculation existed at that time on the function of its parts. Here we show how revived interest in anatomy and life sciences may have influenced the figurative work of Italian and Flemish masters, such as Rafael, Michelangelo and David. We present a historical perspective on the artists and the period in which they lived, their fascination for human anatomy and its symbolic use in their art. Prior to the 16th century, knowledge of the brain was limited and influenced in a dogmatic way by the teachings of Galen(1) who, as we now know, conducted his anatomical studies not on humans but on animals.(2) Nemesus, Bishop of Emesa, in around the year 400 was one of the first to attribute mental faculties to the brain, specifically to the ventricles. He identified two anterior (lateral) ventricles, to which he assigned perception, a middle ventricle responsible for cognition and a posterior ventricle for memory.(2,3) After a long period of stasis in the Middle Ages, Renaissance scholars realized the importance of making direct observations on dissected cadavers. Between 1504 and 1507, Leonardo da Vinci conducted experiments to reveal the anatomy of the ventricular system in the brain. He injected hot wax through a tube thrust into the ventricular cavities of an ox and then scraped the overlying brain off, thus obtaining, in a simple but ingenious way, an accurate cast of the ventricles.(2,4) Leonardo shared the belief promoted by scholarly Christians that the ventricles were the abode of rational soul. We have several examples of hidden symbolism in Renaissance paintings, but the influence of phrenology and this rudimentary knowledge of neuroanatomy on artists of that period is under

  4. Forensic applications of 14C at CIRCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzaioli, F.; Fiumano, V.; Capano, M.; Passariello, I.; Cesare, N. De.; Terrasi, F.

    2011-12-01

    The decreasing trend of the radiocarbon pulse produced during the atmospheric tests of nuclear weapons (bomb-carbon) coupled with high sensitivity accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements, drastically increased the precision of radiocarbon age determinations since the second part of the sixties, allowing the application of radiocarbon AMS to a wide range of studies previously not directly involving conventional radiocarbon dating (i.e. food authenticity, forensic, biochemistry). In the framework of authenticity evaluation of artworks, high precision radiocarbon ( 14C) AMS measurements (Δ R/ R < 0.3%) reduce the conventional uncertainty of the dating to few decades, allowing precise age estimation of materials containing carbon (C). The Centre for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental heritage (CIRCE) during its activity on AMS 14C dating achieved high precision measurements opening the opportunity to these kinds of applications. This paper presents the main results obtained from radiocarbon measurements on a set of bone samples analyzed for the determination of the post-mortem interval in the framework of an unsolved case investigated by the Rome prosecutor office. The chronological characterization of the wooden support of the "Acerenza portrait" is also presented with the aim to evaluate its age and to further investigate the possibility to attribute this artwork to Leonardo da Vinci. Bomb- 14C dating on the lipid and collagen fractions of bones allows the evaluation of the year of the death of the individuals by means of ad hoc calibration data sheet with the typical few years precision and difference between collagen apparent age and the year of death appeared in agreement with the age of one individual estimated by dating of tooth collagen. Conventional radiocarbon dating on both wood and wood extracted cellulose leads to an estimation of the portrait wood board age (2σ) of 1459-1524 AD (57% relative probability), 1571-1631 AD interval (42

  5. Interlake production established using quantitative hydrocarbon well-log analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lancaster, J.; Atkinson, A.

    1988-07-01

    Production was established in a new pay zone of the basal Interlake Formation adjacent to production in Midway field in Williams County, North Dakota. Hydrocarbon saturation, which was computed using hydrocarbon well-log (mud-log) data, and computed permeability encouraged the operator to run casing and test this zone. By use of drilling rig parameters, drilling mud properties, hydrocarbon-show data from the mud log, drilled rock and porosity descriptions, and wireline log porosity, this new technique computes oil saturation (percent of porosity) and permeability to the invading filtrate, using the Darcy equation. The Leonardo Fee well was drilled to test the Devonian Duperow, the Silurian upper Interlake, and the Ordovician Red River. The upper two objectives were penetrated downdip from Midway production and there were no hydrocarbon shows. It was determined that the Red River was tight, based on sample examination by well site personnel. The basal Interlake, however, liberated hydrocarbon shows that were analyzed by this new technology. The results of this evaluation accurately predicted this well would be a commercial success when placed in production. Where geophysical log analysis might be questionable, this new evaluation technique may provide answers to anticipated oil saturation and producibility. The encouraging results of hydrocarbon saturation and permeability, produced by this technique, may be largely responsible for the well being in production today.

  6. Initialization of Formation Flying Using Primer Vector Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mailhe, Laurie; Schiff, Conrad; Folta, David

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we extend primer vector analysis to formation flying. Optimization of the classical rendezvous or free-time transfer problem between two orbits using primer vector theory has been extensively studied for one spacecraft. However, an increasing number of missions are now considering flying a set of spacecraft in close formation. Missions such as the Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) and Leonardo-BRDF (Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function) need to determine strategies to transfer each spacecraft from the common launch orbit to their respective operational orbit. In addition, all the spacecraft must synchronize their states so that they achieve the same desired formation geometry over each orbit. This periodicity requirement imposes constraints on the boundary conditions that can be used for the primer vector algorithm. In this work we explore the impact of the periodicity requirement in optimizing each spacecraft transfer trajectory using primer vector theory. We first present our adaptation of primer vector theory to formation flying. Using this method, we then compute the AV budget for each spacecraft subject to different formation endpoint constraints.

  7. Chapter 12: the anatomical foundations of clinical neurology.

    PubMed

    Bentivoglio, Marina; Mazzarello, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    The chapter provides an itinerary of knowledge on nervous system anatomy as one of the pillars of clinical neurology. The journey starts from the Renaissance explosion on the approach to the human body, its functions and its diseases, dealing with the seminal contributions of Leonardo da Vinci and Vesalius. The itinerary proceeds through the contributions of the 17th century, especially by Thomas Willis and the pioneering investigations of Marcello Malpighi and Antony van Leeuwenhoek, and onto the 18th century. The itinerary thus leads to the progress from gross anatomy to the microscopic investigation of the nervous system in the 19th century: the reticular theories, the revolution of the neural doctrine and their protagonists (Camillo Golgi and Santiago Ramón y Cajal), which initiated the modern era of the neurosciences. The chapter also includes sections on the contributions of developmental neuroanatomy to neurology, on the history of tract tracing, and on the cytoarchitecture of the cerebral cortex. The never-ending story of the anatomical foundations of clinical neurology continues to evolve at the dawn of the 21st century, including knowledge that guides deep brain stimulation, and novel approaches to the anatomy of the living brain based on rapidly developing neuroimaging technology.

  8. Art, anatomy, and medicine: Is there a place for art in medical education?

    PubMed

    Bell, Lawrence T O; Evans, Darrell J R

    2014-01-01

    For many years art, anatomy and medicine have shared a close relationship, as demonstrated by Leonardo da Vinci's anatomical drawings and Andreas Vesalius' groundbreaking illustrated anatomical textbook from the 16th century. However, in the modern day, can art truly play an important role in medical education? Studies have suggested that art can be utilized to teach observational skills in medical students, a skill that is integral to patient examination but seldom taught directly within medical curricula. This article is a subjective survey that evaluates a student selected component (SSC) that explored the uses of art in medicine and investigates student perception on the relationship between the two. It also investigates whether these medical students believe that art can play a role in medical education, and more specifically whether analyzing art can play a role in developing observational skills in clinicians. An "Art in Medicine" 8-week course was delivered to first year medical students at Brighton and Sussex Medical School. The use of art to improve observational skills was a core theme throughout. Feedback from the students suggests that they believe a strong association between art and medicine exists. It also showed a strong perception that art could play a role in medical education, and more specifically through analyzing art to positively develop clinical observational skills. The results of this subjective study, together with those from research from elsewhere, suggest that an art-based approach to teaching observational skills may be worth serious consideration for inclusion in medical and other healthcare curricula.

  9. On-Line Learning Modules For Waste Treatment, Waste Disposal and Waste Recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Callaghan, Paul; Soos, Lubomir; Brokes, Peter

    2011-12-01

    This contribution is devoted to the development of an advanced vocational education and training system for professionals working in (or intending to enter) the waste management industry realized through the Leonardo project WASTRE. The consortium of the Project WASTRE includes 3 well known Technical Universities in Central Europe (TU Vienna, CVUT Prague and STU Bratislava). The project implements new didactical tools from projects EDUET, ELEVATE, RESNET and MENUET developed by MultiMedia SunShine, headed by Prof. Paul Callaghan for this education and training system. This system will be tested within courses organized by at least 3 institutions of vocational education and training: the Technical and vocational secondary school Tlmace, CHEWCON Humenne and the Union of Chambers of Craftsmen and Tradesmen of ESKISEHIR. The faculty of Mechanical Engineering (FME) of STU will coordinate the project WASTRE and will participate in the preparation of e-learning materials, organization of the courses and in the design of syllabuses, curricula, assessment and evaluation methods for the courses, the testing of developed learning materials, evaluating experiences from a pilot course and developing the e-learning materials according to the needs of end-users.

  10. Scanning thermal probe microscope method for the determination of thermal diffusivity of nanocomposite thin films.

    PubMed

    Varandani, Deepak; Agarwal, Khushboo; Brugger, Juergen; Mehta, Bodh Raj

    2016-08-01

    A commercial scanning thermal microscope has been upgraded to facilitate its use in estimating the radial thermal diffusivity of thin films close to room temperature. The modified setup includes a microcontroller driven microhotplate coupled with a Bluetooth module for wireless control. The microcontroller board (Arduino Leonardo) is used to generate a bias of suitable voltage amplitude and pulse duration which is applied across the microhotplate contact pads. A corresponding heat pulse from the Pt heating element (1 mm(2)) embedded within the microhotplate is delivered to the lower surface of the thin film (25 mm(2)) deposited over it. The large difference in the dimensions of the heating source and the thin film surface causes heat to flow radially outwards on the top surface of the latter. The decay of this radial heat wave as it flows outwards is recorded by the scanning thermal microscope in terms of temperature-time (T-t) profiles at varying positions around the central heating zone. A fitting procedure is suggested to extract the thermal diffusivity value from the array of T-t profiles. The efficacy of the above setup has been established by evaluating the thermal diffusivities of Bi2Te3 and Bi2Te3:Si thin film samples. Further, with only minor alterations in design the capabilities of the above setup can be extended to estimate the axial thermal diffusivity and specific heat of thin films, as a function of temperature. PMID:27587146

  11. Diversity-Generating Retroelements

    PubMed Central

    Medhekar, Bob; Miller, Jeff F

    2009-01-01

    Summary Parasite adaptation to dynamic host characteristics is a recurrent theme in biology. Diversity-generating retroelements (DGRs) are a newly discovered family of genetic elements that function to diversify DNA sequences and the proteins they encode. The prototype DGR was identified in a temperate bacteriophage, BPP-1, on the basis of its ability to generate variability in a gene that specifies tropism for receptor molecules on host Bordetella species. Tropism switching is a template-dependent, reverse transcriptase mediated process that introduces nucleotide substitutions at defined locations within a target gene. This cassette-based mechanism is theoretically capable of generating trillions of different amino acid sequences in a distal tail fiber protein, providing a vast repertoire of potential ligand-receptor interactions. Variable residues are displayed in the context of a specialized C-type lectin fold, which has evolved a unique solution for balancing protein diversity against structural stability. Homologous DGRs have been identified in the chromosomes of diverse bacterial species. These unique genetic elements have the potential to confer powerful selective advantages to their hosts, and their ability to generate novel binding specificities and dynamic antimicrobial agents suggests numerous applications. “Human subtlety will never devise an invention more beautiful, more simple or more direct than does Nature, because in her inventions, nothing is lacking and nothing is superfluous.”- Leonardo da Vinci (1452–1519) PMID:17703991

  12. [From the medieval hospitals hospices to modern National public Health Institutes].

    PubMed

    de Micheli, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Since the most ancient times, hospital constructions and progresses in the clinical practice advanced pari passu. We can find exampless of this statement in Greek regions as well as in Greek citie overseas. Thus, during the renaissance, great figures ot that time converged in Italy: The genius Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) and Leon Battista Alberti (1404-1472), a humanist and innovator of architecture. Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475-1564) and his contemporany artists performed anatomical dissection to perfect their art by studying the human body. Anatomical studies flourished at the University of Padua, driven by the Flemish Master. Based on the rigorous study of the anatomical substrate, the studies on the function of the already known organic structures excelled in the xvii century. That century started with the revelation of the major blood circulation by the British physician William Harvey, alumni of the University of Padua, and continued with the description of the minior or pulmonary circulation by ancient or contemporany authors and of the peripheral connections between the arterial and the venous system (Marcelo Malpighi, 1661). All these researchers, and others, were membres of the University of Padua, were the beneficial influence of the teachings of Galileo persisted. In the following centuries, together with the embryological and normal anatomy, the pathological anatomy, systematized by G.B. Morgani, became the cornerstone of the clinical practice. The model of the ancient hospitals evolved to ward the National Institutes of Health in Mexico fostered by Dr. Ignacio Chávez. PMID:25862293

  13. [From the medieval hospitals hospices to modern National public Health Institutes].

    PubMed

    de Micheli, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Since the most ancient times, hospital constructions and progresses in the clinical practice advanced pari passu. We can find exampless of this statement in Greek regions as well as in Greek citie overseas. Thus, during the renaissance, great figures ot that time converged in Italy: The genius Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) and Leon Battista Alberti (1404-1472), a humanist and innovator of architecture. Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475-1564) and his contemporany artists performed anatomical dissection to perfect their art by studying the human body. Anatomical studies flourished at the University of Padua, driven by the Flemish Master. Based on the rigorous study of the anatomical substrate, the studies on the function of the already known organic structures excelled in the xvii century. That century started with the revelation of the major blood circulation by the British physician William Harvey, alumni of the University of Padua, and continued with the description of the minior or pulmonary circulation by ancient or contemporany authors and of the peripheral connections between the arterial and the venous system (Marcelo Malpighi, 1661). All these researchers, and others, were membres of the University of Padua, were the beneficial influence of the teachings of Galileo persisted. In the following centuries, together with the embryological and normal anatomy, the pathological anatomy, systematized by G.B. Morgani, became the cornerstone of the clinical practice. The model of the ancient hospitals evolved to ward the National Institutes of Health in Mexico fostered by Dr. Ignacio Chávez.

  14. Historical vignettes of the thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Lydiatt, Daniel D; Bucher, Gregory S

    2011-01-01

    Although "glands" in the neck corresponding to the thyroid were known for thousands of years, they were mainly considered pathological when encountered. Recognition of the thyroid gland as an anatomical and physiological entity required human dissection, which began in earnest in the 16th century. Leonardo Da Vinci is generally credited as the first to draw the thyroid gland as an anatomical organ. The drawings were subsequently "lost" to medicine for nearly 260 years. The drawings were probably of a nonhuman specimen. Da Vinci vowed to produce an anatomical atlas, but it was never completed. Michelangelo Buonarroti promised to complete drawings for the anatomical work of Realdus Columbus, De Re Anatomica, but these were also never completed. Andreas Vesalius established the thyroid gland as an anatomical organ with his description and drawings in the Fabrica. The thyroid was still depicted in a nonhuman form during this time. The copper etchings of Bartholomew Eustachius made in the 1560s were obviously of humans, but were not actually published until 1714 with a description by Johannes Maria Lancisius. These etchings also depicted some interesting anatomy, which we describe. The Adenographia by Thomas Wharton in 1656 named the thyroid gland for the first time and more fully described it. The book also attempted to assign a function to the gland. The thyroid gland's interesting history thus touches a number of famous men from diverse backgrounds.

  15. STS-111 crew breakfast before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-111 crew gather for the traditional pre-launch meal before the second launch attempt aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour. Seated left to right are Mission Specialists Franklin Chang-Diaz and Philippe Perrin (CNES); the Expedition 5 crew cosmonauts Sergei Treschev (RSA) and Valeri Korzun (RSA) and astronaut Peggy Whitson; Pilot Paul Lockhart and Commander Kenneth Cockrell. In front of them is the traditional cake. This mission marks the 14th Shuttle flight to the International Space Station and the third Shuttle mission this year. Mission STS-111 is the 18th flight of Endeavour and the 110th flight overall in NASA's Space Shuttle program. On mission STS-111, astronauts will deliver the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, the Mobile Base System (MBS), and the Expedition Five crew to the Space Station. During the seven days Endeavour will be docked to the Station, three spacewalks will be performed dedicated to installing MBS and the replacement wrist-roll joint on the Station's Canadarm2 robotic arm. Liftoff is scheduled for 5:22 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A.

  16. [Penicher: an manuscript addendum to his pharmacopoeia of 1695 on the copy of Pharmacy College Library].

    PubMed

    Bonnemain, Bruno

    2016-03-01

    Penicher's pharmacopeia (1695) was part of the Library of the "College de Pharmacie". The inventory of this Library was done in 1780 and is kept by the Library of the BIU Santé, Paris-Descartes University in Paris that digitized it recently. This copy contains handwritten texts that complete the original edition. The first main addition, at the beginning of the document, is three recipes of drugs, in Latin, one of them being well known at the early 18th century, the vulnerary balm of Leonardo Fioraventi (1517-1588), that is also known as Fioraventi's alcoholate. This product will still be present in the French Codex until 1949. The Penicher' book also includes, at the end, three handwritten pages in French which represent the equipment of apothecaries. These drawings are very close to the ones of Charas' Pharmacopeia. One can think that these additions are from the second part of the 18th century, but before the gift of the pharmacopeia to the College de Pharmacie by Fourcy en 1765. The author is unknown but he is probably one of the predecessor of Fourcy in Pharmacie de l'Ours (Bear's pharmacy). This gift done by Fourcy when joining the Community of Parisians pharmacists did not prevent the fact that Fourcy was sentenced by his colleagues pharmacists, a few years later, for the sales of "Chinese specialties" that someone called Jean-Daniel Smith, a physician installed in Paris, asked him to prepare.

  17. Art + technology in optics educational outreach programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silberman, Donn M.

    2007-09-01

    In the modern era, art and technology have been at opposite ends of the spectrum of human study. Artists tend to be non-technical and technologists tend not to be artistic. While this is a broad generalization, it is rare to find an artist teaching science or an engineer teaching art. However, if we think back several centuries, it was very common for great artists to be at the forefront of technology. The prime example being the great Leonardo Di Vinci. Over the past several years, the optics educational outreach programs of the Optics Institute of Southern California (OISC) have incorporated using art and artists to help teach optics and related science. The original use of this was with material from the General Atomics Education Foundation, Color My World, which has been used in a number of settings. Recently, the OISC has partnered with the UC Irvine Beall Center for Art + Technology to provide Family Day Event presentations that use the themes of current Art + Technology exhibits to help attendees learn and understand more about the fundamental science through the art. The two main concepts here are that artists are using science and technology as the basis for their art, also sometimes making some social statements; and the technologists are using the art to make the science more accessible and interesting to the general pubic. This paper weaves a path from the original OISC uses of art to the recent work at UC Irvine.

  18. Scanning thermal probe microscope method for the determination of thermal diffusivity of nanocomposite thin films.

    PubMed

    Varandani, Deepak; Agarwal, Khushboo; Brugger, Juergen; Mehta, Bodh Raj

    2016-08-01

    A commercial scanning thermal microscope has been upgraded to facilitate its use in estimating the radial thermal diffusivity of thin films close to room temperature. The modified setup includes a microcontroller driven microhotplate coupled with a Bluetooth module for wireless control. The microcontroller board (Arduino Leonardo) is used to generate a bias of suitable voltage amplitude and pulse duration which is applied across the microhotplate contact pads. A corresponding heat pulse from the Pt heating element (1 mm(2)) embedded within the microhotplate is delivered to the lower surface of the thin film (25 mm(2)) deposited over it. The large difference in the dimensions of the heating source and the thin film surface causes heat to flow radially outwards on the top surface of the latter. The decay of this radial heat wave as it flows outwards is recorded by the scanning thermal microscope in terms of temperature-time (T-t) profiles at varying positions around the central heating zone. A fitting procedure is suggested to extract the thermal diffusivity value from the array of T-t profiles. The efficacy of the above setup has been established by evaluating the thermal diffusivities of Bi2Te3 and Bi2Te3:Si thin film samples. Further, with only minor alterations in design the capabilities of the above setup can be extended to estimate the axial thermal diffusivity and specific heat of thin films, as a function of temperature.

  19. Evaluation of blocking performance in ensemble seasonal integrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casado, M. J.; Doblas-Reyes, F. J.; Pastor, M. A.

    2003-04-01

    EVALUATION OF BLOCKING PERFOMANCE IN ENSEMBLE SEASONAL INTEGRATIONS M. J. Casado (1), F. J. Doblas-Reyes (2), A. Pastor (1) (1) I Instituto Nacional de Meteorología, c/Leonardo Prieto Castro,8,28071 ,Madrid,Spain, mjcasado@inm.es (2) ECMWF, Shinfield Park,RG2 9AX, Reading, UK, f.doblas-reyes@ecmwf.int Climate models have shown a robust inability to reliably predict blocking onset and frequency. This systematic error has been evaluated using multi-model ensemble seasonal integrations carried out in the framework of the Prediction Of climate Variations On Seasonal and interanual Timescales (PROVOST) project and compared to a blocking features assessment of the NCEP re-analyses. The PROVOST GCMs are able to adequately reproduce the spatial NCEP teleconnection patterns over the Northern Hemisphere, being notorious the great spatial correlation coefficient with some of the corresponding NCEP patterns. In spite of that, the different models show a consistent underestimation of blocking frequency which may impact on the ability to predict the seasonal amplitude of the leading modes of variability over the Northern Hemisphere.

  20. Space Station and Shuttle Payloads: Rack Insertion Device Pneumatic Assembly Setup and Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conde, Nathan

    2007-01-01

    As part of my KSC summer internship, I was given the very cool task of writing a test preparation sheet (TPS). A TPS is a set of instructions for certain procedures or tasks, and serves as the documentation for the tasks. TPSs guide task leaders and technicians throughout the work procedures, safely, informing them of what steps will be hazardous, what precautions must be taken, and what to do in the case of an accident or emergency. I was placed in Boeing's Resupply & Return Division (R&R). R&R is responsible for sending up food and supplies to the International Space Station (ISS) with the use of three Italian Multi Purpose Logistics Modules - Leonardo, Donatello, and Raffaello. The supplies are loaded into Resupply Stowage Racks (RSRs) or Resupply Stowage Platforms (RSPs) (though, both are usually referred to as racks), depending on their size and shape. These racks are loaded into the modules with the help of a specialized crane known as the Rack Insertion Device (RID). The RID rests on four pneumatic air jacks, these allow for an operator to raise or lower the RID. The pneumatic air system supplies the air jacks with the necessary air pressure required to lift the RID.

  1. [Evolution of knowledge on blood and its movement. 1st Part. Integration of circulatory doctrine. Iatrophysics of blood].

    PubMed

    de Micheli, Alfredo; Izaguirre-Avila, Raúl

    2004-01-01

    Under the light of the evolution of human knowledge, we present a short historic outline of the integrating steps of the blood circulation doctrine and its components, a starting point for ulterior studies on the function of blood in the economy of an organism. The different steps of the process leading to the integration and diffusion of the blood circulation doctrine are described. These go from the first descriptions of the heart structures by authors of the ancient world to the careful anatomical observations of Renaissance scientists, such as Leonardo da Vinci. Towards the middle of the sixteenth century, the first well-known descriptions of pulmonary circulation were made independently by Miguel Servet and Realdo Colombo. Later, William Harvey, based on the experimental quantitative method according to Galileo's thought, described and studied systemic circulation. The vicissitudes encountered by the circulation doctrine are also disclosed. At the beginning, this concept was rejected by the traditional milieu--such as the Sorbonne of Paris--, but was accepted by the young and innovative researchers in both England and Continental Europe. In the second half of the seventeenth century and the first half of the eighteenth, the blood circulation doctrine was finally accepted and spread throughout Europe and the American continent. Furthermore, this doctrine inspired the medical practice of intravenous injections and blood transfusions. Its evolution, as generally occurs in the evolution of scientific thinking, allowed to reject some believes deeply rooted in the doctrine's constituent structure, i.e., the Renaissance spell of circularity.

  2. STS-111 Liftoff From Launch Pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour, the STS-111 mission was launched on June 5, 2002 at 5:22 pm EDT from Kennedy's launch pad. On board were the STS-111 and Expedition Five crew members. Astronauts Kenneth D. Cockrell, commander; Paul S. Lockhart, pilot, and mission specialists Franklin R. Chang-Diaz and Philippe Perrin were the STS-111 crew members. Expedition Five crew members included Cosmonaut Valeri G. Korzun, commander, Astronaut Peggy A. Whitson and Cosmonaut Sergei Y. Treschev, flight engineers. Three space walks enabled the STS-111 crew to accomplish mission objectives: the delivery and installation of a new platform for the ISS robotic arm, the Mobile Base System (MBS) which is an important part of the Station's Mobile Servicing System allowing the robotic arm to travel the length of the Station; the replacement of a wrist roll joint on the Station's robotic arm; and unloading supplies and science experiments from the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, which made its third trip to the orbital outpost. Landing on June 19, 2002, the 14-day STS-111 mission was the 14th Shuttle mission to visit the ISS.

  3. Mobile Remote Base System (MBS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Backdropped against the blackness of space and the Earth's horizon, the Mobile Remote Base System (MBS) is moved by the Canadarm2 for installation on the International Space Station (ISS). Delivered by the STS-111 mission aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour in June 2002, the MBS is an important part of the Station's Mobile Servicing System allowing the robotic arm to travel the length of the Station, which is neccessary for future construction tasks. In addition, STS-111 delivered a new crew, Expedition Five, replacing Expedition Four after remaining a record-setting 196 days in space. Three spacewalks enabled the STS-111 crew to accomplish the delivery and installation of the MBS to the Mobile Transporter on the S0 (S-zero) truss, the replacement of a wrist roll joint on the Station's robotic arm, and the task of unloading supplies and science experiments from the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, which made its third trip to the orbital outpost. The STS-111 mission, the 14th Shuttle mission to visit the ISS, was launched on June 5, 2002 and landed June 19, 2002.

  4. Endeavor Approaches Docking Port of ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Pictured here is the forward docking port on the International Space Station's (ISS) Destiny Laboratory as seen by one of the STS-111 crewmembers from the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour just prior to docking. In June 2002, STS-111 provided the Space Station with a new crew, Expedition Five, replacing Expedition Four after remaining a record-setting 196 days in space. Three spacewalks enabled the STS-111 crew to accomplish additional mission objectives: the delivery and installation of a new platform for the ISS robotic arm, the Mobile Base System (MBS) which is an important part of the Station's Mobile Servicing System allowing the robotic arm to travel the length of the Station; the replacement of a wrist roll joint on the Station's robotic arm; and unloading supplies and science experiments form the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, which made its third trip to the orbital outpost. The STS-111 mission, the 14th Shuttle mission to visit the ISS, was launched on June 5, 2002 and landed June 19, 2002.

  5. STS-111 Exrtravehicular Activity (EVA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-111 Mission Specialists Franklin R. Chang-Diaz (left) and representing the French Space Agency (CNES), Philippe Perrin (right) work on the Mobile Remote Servicer Base System (MBS) on the International Space Station (ISS). The boxes in front of the spacewalkers are the Remote Power Control Modules (RPCM) and partially visible in the background is the S0 (S-zero) truss, to which the MBS was installed. Delivered in June 2002 by the STS-111 mission aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, the MBS is an important part of the Station's Mobile Servicing System allowing the robotic arm to travel the length of the Station which is neccessary for future construction tasks. In addition, STS-111 delivered a new crew, Expedition Five, replacing Expedition Four after remaining a record-setting 196 days in space. Three spacewalks enabled the STS-111 crew to accomplish the delivery and installation of the MBS to the Mobile Transporter on the S0 (S-zero) truss, the replacement of a wrist roll joint on the Station's robotic arm, and the task of unloading supplies and science experiments from the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, which made its third trip to the orbital outpost. The STS-111 mission, the 14th Shuttle mission to visit the ISS, was launched on June 5, 2002 and landed June 19, 2002.

  6. STS-111 Flight Day 3 Highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-06-01

    On Flight Day 3 of STS-111, the crew of Endeavour (Kenneth Cockrell, Commander; Paul Lockhart, Pilot; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Mission Specialist; Philippe Perrin, Mission Specialist) and the Expedition 5 crew (Valery Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitson, Flight Engineer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer), begin their final approach towards the International Space Station (ISS). From cameras aboard the ISS, live video of Endeavour is shown as it approaches the station. The Orbiter is maneuvered slowly to a position for docking, and cameras from multiple angles show this process. As it is maneuvered, there are clear views of its payload bay, which includes the Leonardo MultiPurpose Logistics Module (MPLM) and the Mobile Base System (MBS), both of which will be installed on the ISS during this mission. In the final stages of the docking procedure there is close-up footage of Endeavour meeting the ISS's Pressurized Mating Adapter 2 on the Destiny Laboratory Module. Inside the ISS, the Expedition 4 crew (Yury Onufrienko, Commander; Daniel Bursch, Flight Engineer; Carl Walz, Flight Engineer), which will be replaced by the Expedition 5 crew, prepares for final docking. Crew members are shown transferring equipment from the Endeavour to the ISS, prior to a replay of the mating of the two crafts. In the replay, the hatch is shown being opened and the two newly arrived crews are greeted with excitement by Expedition 4 crewmembers. The video closes with footage of the Quest airlock used for EVA (extravehicular activity) egress, and the Canadarm 2 robotic arm.

  7. Atoms.inp Archive: Crystallographic Data from GSECARS

    DOE Data Explorer

    Newville, Matthew

    The Atoms.inp Archive is a collection of crystallographic data for use in XAFS analysis. The crystallographic data is stored as atoms.inp files, which contain all the information necessary to describe the crystal, and can be used by the program ATOMS to generate feff.inp files. These files can then be used by the FEFF program [See http://leonardo.phys.washington.edu/feff/] to calculate a theoretical XAFS spectrum for the crystal. This archive exists because it can take a considerable amount of time to locate a suitable reference for a model structure to use for making theoretical XAFS standards. Even then, references sometimes give non-standard or incomplete crystallographic notation that ATOMS has difficulty interpreting. All of this means that getting a reliable atoms.inp file can take quite a bit of effort. It is hoped that this collection of well-documented and well-tested atoms.inp files will eliminate much of the work in creating theoretical XAFS standards from FEFF. [Taken from http://cars9.uchicago.edu/~newville/adb/]. The collection currently has more than 200 crystal structures, 2748 data files, and it continues to expand. The collection is related to the UWXAFS Project [http://depts.washington.edu/uwxafs/] and to the work of the Consortium for Advanced Radiation Sources (CARS). After searching the Archive, a user may also choose to run the web version of ATOMS software.

  8. (Finite) statistical size effects on compressive strength

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Jérôme; Girard, Lucas; Gimbert, Florent; Amitrano, David; Vandembroucq, Damien

    2014-01-01

    The larger structures are, the lower their mechanical strength. Already discussed by Leonardo da Vinci and Edmé Mariotte several centuries ago, size effects on strength remain of crucial importance in modern engineering for the elaboration of safety regulations in structural design or the extrapolation of laboratory results to geophysical field scales. Under tensile loading, statistical size effects are traditionally modeled with a weakest-link approach. One of its prominent results is a prediction of vanishing strength at large scales that can be quantified in the framework of extreme value statistics. Despite a frequent use outside its range of validity, this approach remains the dominant tool in the field of statistical size effects. Here we focus on compressive failure, which concerns a wide range of geophysical and geotechnical situations. We show on historical and recent experimental data that weakest-link predictions are not obeyed. In particular, the mechanical strength saturates at a nonzero value toward large scales. Accounting explicitly for the elastic interactions between defects during the damage process, we build a formal analogy of compressive failure with the depinning transition of an elastic manifold. This critical transition interpretation naturally entails finite-size scaling laws for the mean strength and its associated variability. Theoretical predictions are in remarkable agreement with measurements reported for various materials such as rocks, ice, coal, or concrete. This formalism, which can also be extended to the flowing instability of granular media under multiaxial compression, has important practical consequences for future design rules. PMID:24733930

  9. Anatomy, technology, art, and culture: toward a realistic perspective of the brain.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Daniel D; Feindel, William; Goodrich, James T; Dagi, T Forcht; Prestigiacomo, Charles J; Preul, Mark C

    2009-09-01

    In the 15th century, brain illustration began to change from a schematic system that involved scant objective rendering of the brain, to accurate depictions based on anatomical dissections that demanded significant artistic talent. Notable examples of this innovation are the drawings of Leonardo da Vinci (1498-1504), Andreas Vesalius' association with the bottega of Titian to produce the drawings of Vesalius' De humani corporis fabrica (1543), and Christopher Wren's illustrations for Thomas Willis' Cerebri Anatome (1664). These works appeared during the Renaissance and Age of Enlightenment, when advances in brain imaging, or really brain rendering, reflected not only the abilities and dedications of the artists, but also the influences of important cultural and scientific factors. Anatomy and human dissection became popular social phenomena as well as scholarly pursuits, linked with the world of the fine arts. The working philosophy of these artists involved active participation in both anatomical study and illustration, and the belief that their discoveries of the natural world could best be communicated by rendering them in objective form (that is, with realistic perspective). From their studies emerged the beginning of contemporary brain imaging. In this article, the authors examine how the brain began to be imaged in realism within a cultural and scientific milieu that witnessed the emergence of anatomical dissection, the geometry of linear perspective, and the closer confluence of art and science.

  10. Large-scale cold water dispersant effectiveness experiments with Alaskan crude oils and Corexit 9500 and 9527 dispersants.

    PubMed

    Belore, Randy C; Trudel, Ken; Mullin, Joseph V; Guarino, Alan

    2009-01-01

    There continues to be reluctance in some jurisdictions to use chemical dispersants as a viable countermeasure for accidental oil spills. One argument used by some opponents to dispersant use is that "chemical dispersants do not work effectively in cold water". To address this issue, the U.S. Minerals Management Service (MMS) funded and conducted two series of large-scale dispersant experiments in very cold water at Ohmsett - The National Oil Spill Response Test Facility, located in Leonardo, New Jersey in February-March 2006 and January-March 2007. Alaska North Slope, Endicott, Northstar and Pt. McIntyre crude oils and Corexit 9500 and Corexit 9527 dispersants were used in the two test series. The crude oils were tested both when fresh and after weathering. Results demonstrated that both Corexit 9500 and Corexit 9527 dispersants were 85-99% effective in dispersing the fresh and weathered crude oils tested at cold temperatures. The MMS expects that results from these test series will assist government regulators and responders in making science based decisions on the use of dispersants as a response tool for oil spills in the Arctic. PMID:19007943

  11. A short history of the soil science discipline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brevik, E. C.; Hartemink, A. E.

    2012-04-01

    Since people have cultivated the land they have generated and created knowledge about its soil. By the 4th century most civilizations around had various levels of soil knowledge and that includes irrigation, the use of terraces to control soil erosion, methods to maintain and improve soil fertility. The early soil knowledge was largely empirical and based on observations. Many famous scientists, for example, Francis Bacon, Robert Boyle, Charles Darwin, and Leonardo da Vinci worked on soil issues. Soil science became a true science in the 19th century with the development of genetic soil science, lead by the Russian Vasilii V. Dokuchaev. In the beginning soil science had strong ties to both geology and agriculture but in the 20th century, soil science is now being applied in residential development, the planning of highways, building foundations, septic systems, wildlife management, environmental management, and many other applications. The discipline is maturing and soil science plays a crucial role in many of the current issues that confront the world like climate change, water scarcity, biodiversity and environmental degradation.

  12. Searching for the Origin through Central Nervous System: A Review and Thought which Related to Microgravity, Evolution, Big Bang Theory and Universes, Soul and Brainwaves, Greater Limbic System and Seat of the Soul.

    PubMed

    Idris, Zamzuri

    2014-07-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) serves buoyancy. The buoyancy thought to play crucial role in many aspects of the central nervous system (CNS). Weightlessness is produced mainly by the CSF. This manuscript is purposely made to discuss its significance which thought contributing towards an ideal environment for the CNS to develop and function normally. The idea of microgravity environment for the CNS is supported not only by the weightlessness concept of the brain, but also the noted anatomical position of the CNS. The CNS is positioned in bowing position (at main cephalic flexure) which is nearly similar to an astronaut in a microgravity chamber, fetus in the amniotic fluid at early gestation, and animals and plants in the ocean or on the land. Therefore, this microgravity position can bring us closer to the concept of origin. The hypothesis on 'the origin' based on the microgravity were explored and their similarities were identified including the brainwaves and soul. Subsequently a review on soul was made. Interestingly, an idea from Leonardo da Vinci seems in agreement with the notion of seat of the soul at the greater limbic system which has a distinctive feature of "from God back to God".

  13. Chapter 19: visual images and neurological illustration.

    PubMed

    Ione, Amy

    2010-01-01

    This chapter examines the importance of visual materials for studying the brain in health and in disease. Surveying historical representations, this research confirms that images of the brain's form and function have long served as teaching tools and as historical reference points for neurological events. The research is divided into five sections: the first section, Early History to Printing Technology considers prehistoric and ancient imagery, pre-Renaissance thinking about the brain, and the impact of printing and printmaking on neurological research. The second section, Renaissance Illustration, focuses on Leonardo da Vinci, Andreas Vesalius, and other contributors who produced images of the brain as dissection restrictions eased. The third section, which turns to Early Modern and Modern Illustration, highlights the work of Thomas Willis, Charles Bell, and other scientists (throughout the 19th century) who demonstrated the value of a visual component within brain studies. The fourth section presents examples of Neurologically-Descriptive Illustrations, with the final section considering Historical Illustration and Contemporary Research. PMID:19892122

  14. Historical vignettes of the thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Lydiatt, Daniel D; Bucher, Gregory S

    2011-01-01

    Although "glands" in the neck corresponding to the thyroid were known for thousands of years, they were mainly considered pathological when encountered. Recognition of the thyroid gland as an anatomical and physiological entity required human dissection, which began in earnest in the 16th century. Leonardo Da Vinci is generally credited as the first to draw the thyroid gland as an anatomical organ. The drawings were subsequently "lost" to medicine for nearly 260 years. The drawings were probably of a nonhuman specimen. Da Vinci vowed to produce an anatomical atlas, but it was never completed. Michelangelo Buonarroti promised to complete drawings for the anatomical work of Realdus Columbus, De Re Anatomica, but these were also never completed. Andreas Vesalius established the thyroid gland as an anatomical organ with his description and drawings in the Fabrica. The thyroid was still depicted in a nonhuman form during this time. The copper etchings of Bartholomew Eustachius made in the 1560s were obviously of humans, but were not actually published until 1714 with a description by Johannes Maria Lancisius. These etchings also depicted some interesting anatomy, which we describe. The Adenographia by Thomas Wharton in 1656 named the thyroid gland for the first time and more fully described it. The book also attempted to assign a function to the gland. The thyroid gland's interesting history thus touches a number of famous men from diverse backgrounds. PMID:21120907

  15. Anatomy, technology, art, and culture: toward a realistic perspective of the brain.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Daniel D; Feindel, William; Goodrich, James T; Dagi, T Forcht; Prestigiacomo, Charles J; Preul, Mark C

    2009-09-01

    In the 15th century, brain illustration began to change from a schematic system that involved scant objective rendering of the brain, to accurate depictions based on anatomical dissections that demanded significant artistic talent. Notable examples of this innovation are the drawings of Leonardo da Vinci (1498-1504), Andreas Vesalius' association with the bottega of Titian to produce the drawings of Vesalius' De humani corporis fabrica (1543), and Christopher Wren's illustrations for Thomas Willis' Cerebri Anatome (1664). These works appeared during the Renaissance and Age of Enlightenment, when advances in brain imaging, or really brain rendering, reflected not only the abilities and dedications of the artists, but also the influences of important cultural and scientific factors. Anatomy and human dissection became popular social phenomena as well as scholarly pursuits, linked with the world of the fine arts. The working philosophy of these artists involved active participation in both anatomical study and illustration, and the belief that their discoveries of the natural world could best be communicated by rendering them in objective form (that is, with realistic perspective). From their studies emerged the beginning of contemporary brain imaging. In this article, the authors examine how the brain began to be imaged in realism within a cultural and scientific milieu that witnessed the emergence of anatomical dissection, the geometry of linear perspective, and the closer confluence of art and science. PMID:19722816

  16. Art, anatomy, and medicine: Is there a place for art in medical education?

    PubMed

    Bell, Lawrence T O; Evans, Darrell J R

    2014-01-01

    For many years art, anatomy and medicine have shared a close relationship, as demonstrated by Leonardo da Vinci's anatomical drawings and Andreas Vesalius' groundbreaking illustrated anatomical textbook from the 16th century. However, in the modern day, can art truly play an important role in medical education? Studies have suggested that art can be utilized to teach observational skills in medical students, a skill that is integral to patient examination but seldom taught directly within medical curricula. This article is a subjective survey that evaluates a student selected component (SSC) that explored the uses of art in medicine and investigates student perception on the relationship between the two. It also investigates whether these medical students believe that art can play a role in medical education, and more specifically whether analyzing art can play a role in developing observational skills in clinicians. An "Art in Medicine" 8-week course was delivered to first year medical students at Brighton and Sussex Medical School. The use of art to improve observational skills was a core theme throughout. Feedback from the students suggests that they believe a strong association between art and medicine exists. It also showed a strong perception that art could play a role in medical education, and more specifically through analyzing art to positively develop clinical observational skills. The results of this subjective study, together with those from research from elsewhere, suggest that an art-based approach to teaching observational skills may be worth serious consideration for inclusion in medical and other healthcare curricula. PMID:24421251

  17. Solar panels for the International Space Station are uncrated and moved in the SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility, the overhead crane slowly moves solar panels intended for the International Space Station (ISS). The panels are the first set of U.S.-provided solar arrays and batteries for ISS, scheduled to be part of mission STS-97 in December 1999. The mission, fifth in the U.S. flights for construction of ISS, will build and enhance the capabilities of the Space Station. It will deliver the solar panels as well as radiators to provide cooling. The Shuttle will spend 5 days docked to the station, which at that time will be staffed by the first station crew. Two space walks will be conducted to complete assembly operations while the arrays are attached and unfurled. A communications system for voice and telemetry also will be installed. At the left of the crane and panels is the Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM), the Leonardo A reusable logistics carrier, the MPLM is scheduled to be launched on Space Shuttle Mission STS-100, targeted for April 2000.

  18. The Renaissance or the cuckoo clock.

    PubMed

    Pines, Jonathon; Hagan, Iain

    2011-12-27

    '…in Italy, for thirty years under the Borgias, they had warfare, terror, murder and bloodshed, but they produced Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci and the Renaissance. In Switzerland, they had brotherly love, they had five hundred years of democracy and peace-and what did that produce? The cuckoo clock'. Orson Welles as Harry Lime: The Third Man. Orson Welles might have been a little unfair on the Swiss, after all cuckoo clocks were developed in the Schwartzwald, but, more importantly, Swiss democracy gives remarkably stable government with considerable decision-making at the local level. The alternative is the battling city-states of Renaissance Italy: culturally rich but chaotic at a higher level of organization. As our understanding of the cell cycle improves, it appears that the cell is organized more along the lines of Switzerland than Renaissance Italy, and one major challenge is to determine how local decisions are made and coordinated to produce the robust cell cycle mechanisms that we observe in the cell as a whole.

  19. Characterization of azimuthal and radial velocity fields induced by rotors in flows with a low Reynolds number.

    PubMed

    Köhler, J; Friedrich, J; Ostendorf, A; Gurevich, E L

    2016-02-01

    We theoretically and experimentally investigate the flow field that emerges from a rodlike microrotor rotating about its center in a nonaxisymmetric manner. A simple theoretical model is proposed that uses a superposition of two rotlets as a fundamental solution to the Stokes equation. The predictions of this model are compared to measurements of the azimuthal and radial microfluidic velocity field components that are induced by a rotor composed of fused microscopic spheres. The rotor is driven magnetically and the fluid flow is measured with the help of a probe particle fixed by an optical tweezer. We find considerable deviations of the mere azimuthal flow pattern induced by a single rotating sphere as it has been reported by Di Leonardo et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 134502 (2006)]. Notably, the presence of a radial velocity component that manifests itself by an oscillation of the probe particle with twice the rotor frequency is observed. These findings open up a way to discuss possible radial transport in microfluidic devices.

  20. Agent Based Software for the Autonomous Control of Formation Flying Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    How, Jonathan P.; Campbell, Mark; Dennehy, Neil (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Distributed satellite systems is an enabling technology for many future NASA/DoD earth and space science missions, such as MMS, MAXIM, Leonardo, and LISA [1, 2, 3]. While formation flying offers significant science benefits, to reduce the operating costs for these missions it will be essential that these multiple vehicles effectively act as a single spacecraft by performing coordinated observations. Autonomous guidance, navigation, and control as part of a coordinated fleet-autonomy is a key technology that will help accomplish this complex goal. This is no small task, as most current space missions require significant input from the ground for even relatively simple decisions such as thruster burns. Work for the NMP DS1 mission focused on the development of the New Millennium Remote Agent (NMRA) architecture for autonomous spacecraft control systems. NMRA integrates traditional real-time monitoring and control with components for constraint-based planning, robust multi-threaded execution, and model-based diagnosis and reconfiguration. The complexity of using an autonomous approach for space flight software was evident when most of its capabilities were stripped off prior to launch (although more capability was uplinked subsequently, and the resulting demonstration was very successful).

  1. Identification of lapis-lazuli pigments in paint layers by PIGE measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassi, N.; Migliori, A.; Mandò, P. A.; Calvo del Castillo, H.

    2004-06-01

    Lapis-lazuli is a semi-precious stone used in the past to produce a blue pigment. Its main component is lazurite, 3Na 2O·3Al 2O 3·6SiO 2·2Na 2S. The possibility of using PIXE to identify this pigment in canvas and wood painting is severely limited by the strong absorption of low-energy X-rays in the protective varnish and - when, as typical, the pigment is mixed with lead white - by the overlapping of Pb M lines with S K α. In this work we discuss the possibility of identifying lapis-lazuli by detecting sodium with PIGE. PIXE and PIGE measurements have been performed on samples containing lapis-lazuli mixed to lead white in different percentage, covered with polymeric foils to simulate the presence of varnish. At a percentage of lapis-lazuli below 50%, Na X-rays are hardly detectable even with the thinner foil; on the contrary the characteristic γ-rays are clearly detected down to about 1%. A first application has been successfully performed on the "Madonna dei fusi" by Leonardo da Vinci, in the framework of an extensive scientific investigation on the painting techniques used by the Renaissance genius.

  2. Characterization of azimuthal and radial velocity fields induced by rotors in flows with a low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, J.; Friedrich, J.; Ostendorf, A.; Gurevich, E. L.

    2016-02-01

    We theoretically and experimentally investigate the flow field that emerges from a rodlike microrotor rotating about its center in a nonaxisymmetric manner. A simple theoretical model is proposed that uses a superposition of two rotlets as a fundamental solution to the Stokes equation. The predictions of this model are compared to measurements of the azimuthal and radial microfluidic velocity field components that are induced by a rotor composed of fused microscopic spheres. The rotor is driven magnetically and the fluid flow is measured with the help of a probe particle fixed by an optical tweezer. We find considerable deviations of the mere azimuthal flow pattern induced by a single rotating sphere as it has been reported by Di Leonardo et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 134502 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.134502]. Notably, the presence of a radial velocity component that manifests itself by an oscillation of the probe particle with twice the rotor frequency is observed. These findings open up a way to discuss possible radial transport in microfluidic devices.

  3. Human heart by art.

    PubMed

    Tamir, Abraham

    2012-11-01

    Heart is of great importance in maintaining the life of the body. Enough to stop working for a few minutes to cause death, and hence the great importance in physiology, medicine, and research. This fact was already emphasized in the Bible in the Book of Proverbs, chapter 4 verse 23: "Keep your heart with all diligence, for out of it is the wellspring of life." Art was able to demonstrate the heart from various aspects; realistically, as done by Leonardo de Vinci who demonstrated the halves of the heart and its blood vessels. Symbolically, as a source of life, the heart was demonstrated by the artist Mrs. Erlondeiel, as a caricature by Salvador Dali, as an open heart by Sawaya, etc. Finally, it should be emphasized that different demonstrations of the human heart by many artworks make this most important organ of our body (that cannot be seen from outside) more familiar and clearer to us. And this is the purpose of this article-to demonstrate the heart through a large number of artworks of different kinds.

  4. [Root architecture of two desert plants in central Hexi Corridor of Northwest China].

    PubMed

    Shan, Li-Shan; Li, Yi; Ren, Wei; Su, Shi-Ping; Dong, Qiu-Lian; Geng, Dong-Mei

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the root systems of desert plant species Reaumuria soongorica and Nitraria tangutorum in the central Hexi Corridor of Northwest China were excavated by shovel, and the characteristics of the plant root architecture were analyzed by using topology and fractal theory. The root topological indices of the two desert plants were small, and the root branching patterns were herringbone-like. The roots of the two desert plants had obvious fractal characteristics, with the fractal dimension of R. soongorica and N. tangutorum being (1.18 +/- 0.04) and (1.36 +/- 0.06), respectively. The root fractal dimension and fractal abundance were significantly positively correlated with the root average link length. The root average link lengths of the two plants were long, which enlarged the plants' effective nutrition space, and thus, made the plants adapt to the dry and infertile soil environment. The sums of the root cross-sectional areas before and after the root bifurcation of the two desert plants were equal, which verified the principle of Leonardo da Vinci. A total of 17 parameters of root architecture were analyzed by the principal component analysis. The parameters of root topological structure, numbers of root links, stepwise branching ratio, and root diameter could well present the root architecture characteristics of the two desert plants.

  5. [History of robotics: from Archytas of Tarentum until da Vinci robot. (Part I)].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Martín, F M; Millán Rodríguez, F; Salvador Bayarri, J; Palou Redorta, J; Rodríguez Escovar, F; Esquena Fernández, S; Villavicencio Mavrich, H

    2007-02-01

    Robotic surgery is the newst technologic option in urology. To understand how new robots work is interesting to know their history. The desire to design machines imitating humans continued for more than 4000 years. There are references to King-su Tse (clasic China) making up automaton at 500 a. C. Archytas of Tarentum (at around 400 a.C.) is considered the father of mechanical engineering, and one of the occidental robotics classic referents. Heron of Alexandria, Hsieh-Fec, Al-Jazari, Roger Bacon, Juanelo Turriano, Leonardo da Vinci, Vaucanson o von Kempelen were robot inventors in the middle age, renaissance and classicism. At the XIXth century, automaton production underwent a peak and all engineering branches suffered a great development. At 1942 Asimov published the three robotics laws, based on mechanics, electronics and informatics advances. At XXth century robots able to do very complex self governing works were developed, like da Vinci Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical Inc, Sunnyvale, CA, USA), a very sophisticated robot to assist surgeons.

  6. [History of robotics: from archytas of tarentum until Da Vinci robot. (Part II)].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martín, F M; Jiménez Schlegl, P; Millán Rodríguez, F; Salvador-Bayarri, J; Monllau Font, V; Palou Redorta, J; Villavicencio Mavrich, H

    2007-03-01

    Robotic surgery is a reality. In order to to understand how new robots work is interesting to know the history of ancient (see part i) and modern robotics. The desire to design automatic machines imitating humans continued for more than 4000 years. Archytas of Tarentum (at around 400 a.C.), Heron of Alexandria, Hsieh-Fec, Al-Jazari, Bacon, Turriano, Leonardo da Vinci, Vaucanson o von Kempelen were robot inventors. At 1942 Asimov published the three robotics laws. Mechanics, electronics and informatics advances at XXth century developed robots to be able to do very complex self governing works. At 1985 the robot PUMA 560 was employed to introduce a needle inside the brain. Later on, they were designed surgical robots like World First, Robodoc, Gaspar o Acrobot, Zeus, AESOP, Probot o PAKI-RCP. At 2000 the FDA approved the da Vinci Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical Inc, Sunnyvale, CA, USA), a very sophisticated robot to assist surgeons. Currently urological procedures like prostatectomy, cystectomy and nephrectomy are performed with the da Vinci, so urology has become a very suitable speciality to robotic surgery.

  7. Rise characteristics of gas bubbles in a 2D rectangular column: VOF simulations vs experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, R.; Baten, J.M. van

    1999-10-01

    About five centuries ago, Leonardo da Vinci described the sinuous motion of gas bubbles rising in water. The authors have attempted to simulate the rise trajectories of bubbles of 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 12, and 20 mm in diameter rising in a 2D rectangular column filled with water. The simulations were carried out using the volume-of-fluid (VOF) technique developed by Hirt and Nichols (J. Computational Physics, 39, 201--225 (1981)). To solve the Navier-Stokes equations of motion the authors used a commercial solver, CFX 4.1c of AEA Technology, UK. They developed their own bubble-tracking algorithm to capture sinuous bubble motions. The 4 and 5 mm bubbles show large lateral motions observed by Da Vinci. The 7, 8 and 9 mm bubble behave like jellyfish. The 12 mm bubble flaps its wings like a bird. The extent of lateral motion of the bubbles decreases with increasing bubble size. Bubbles larger than 20 mm in size assume a spherical cap form and simulations of the rise characteristics match experiments exactly. VOF simulations are powerful tools for a priori determination of the morphology and rise characteristics of bubbles rising in a liquid. Bubble-bubble interactions are also properly modeled by the VOF technique.

  8. [Penicher: an manuscript addendum to his pharmacopoeia of 1695 on the copy of Pharmacy College Library].

    PubMed

    Bonnemain, Bruno

    2016-03-01

    Penicher's pharmacopeia (1695) was part of the Library of the "College de Pharmacie". The inventory of this Library was done in 1780 and is kept by the Library of the BIU Santé, Paris-Descartes University in Paris that digitized it recently. This copy contains handwritten texts that complete the original edition. The first main addition, at the beginning of the document, is three recipes of drugs, in Latin, one of them being well known at the early 18th century, the vulnerary balm of Leonardo Fioraventi (1517-1588), that is also known as Fioraventi's alcoholate. This product will still be present in the French Codex until 1949. The Penicher' book also includes, at the end, three handwritten pages in French which represent the equipment of apothecaries. These drawings are very close to the ones of Charas' Pharmacopeia. One can think that these additions are from the second part of the 18th century, but before the gift of the pharmacopeia to the College de Pharmacie by Fourcy en 1765. The author is unknown but he is probably one of the predecessor of Fourcy in Pharmacie de l'Ours (Bear's pharmacy). This gift done by Fourcy when joining the Community of Parisians pharmacists did not prevent the fact that Fourcy was sentenced by his colleagues pharmacists, a few years later, for the sales of "Chinese specialties" that someone called Jean-Daniel Smith, a physician installed in Paris, asked him to prepare. PMID:27281932

  9. STS-111 Flight Day 8 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On Flight Day 8 of STS-111 (Space Shuttle Endeavour crew includes: Kenneth Cockrell, Commander; Paul Lockhart, Pilot; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Mission Specialist; Philippe Perrin, Mission Specialist; International Space Station (ISS) Expedition 5 crew includes Valery Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitson, Flight Engineer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer; ISS Expedition 4 crew includes: Yury Onufrienko, Commander; Daniel Bursch, Flight Engineer; Carl Walz, Flight Engineer), the Leonardo Multi Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) is shown from the outside of the ISS. The MPLM, used to transport goods to the station for the Expedition 5 crew, and to return goods used by the Expedition 4 crew, is being loaded and unloaded by crewmembers. Live video from within the Destiny Laboratory Module shows Whitson and Chang-Diaz. They have just completed the second of three reboosts planned for this mission, in each of which the station will gain an additional statutory mile in altitude. Following this there is an interview conducted by ground-based reporters with some members from each of the three crews, answering various questions on their respective missions including sleeping in space and conducting experiments. Video of Earth and space tools precedes a second interview much like the first, but with the crews in their entirety. Topics discussed include the feelings of Bursch and Walz on their breaking the US record for continual days spent in space. The video ends with footage of the Southern California coastline.

  10. STS-111 Flight Day 8 Highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-06-01

    On Flight Day 8 of STS-111 (Space Shuttle Endeavour crew includes: Kenneth Cockrell, Commander; Paul Lockhart, Pilot; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Mission Specialist; Philippe Perrin, Mission Specialist; International Space Station (ISS) Expedition 5 crew includes Valery Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitson, Flight Engineer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer; ISS Expedition 4 crew includes: Yury Onufrienko, Commander; Daniel Bursch, Flight Engineer; Carl Walz, Flight Engineer), the Leonardo Multi Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) is shown from the outside of the ISS. The MPLM, used to transport goods to the station for the Expedition 5 crew, and to return goods used by the Expedition 4 crew, is being loaded and unloaded by crewmembers. Live video from within the Destiny Laboratory Module shows Whitson and Chang-Diaz. They have just completed the second of three reboosts planned for this mission, in each of which the station will gain an additional statutory mile in altitude. Following this there is an interview conducted by ground-based reporters with some members from each of the three crews, answering various questions on their respective missions including sleeping in space and conducting experiments. Video of Earth and space tools precedes a second interview much like the first, but with the crews in their entirety. Topics discussed include the feelings of Bursch and Walz on their breaking the US record for continual days spent in space. The video ends with footage of the Southern California coastline.

  11. Static and dynamic force/moment measurements in the Eidetics water tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, Carlos J.; Malcolm, Gerald N.

    1994-01-01

    Water tunnels have been utilized in one form or another to explore fluid mechanics and aerodynamics phenomena since the days of Leonardo da Vinci. Water tunnel testing is attractive because of the relatively low cost and quick turn-around time to perform flow visualization experiments and evaluate the results. The principal limitation of a water tunnel is that the low flow speed, which provides for detailed visualization, also results in very small hydrodynamic (aerodynamic) forces on the model, which, in the past, have proven to be difficult to measure accurately. However, the advent of semi-conductor strain gage technology and devices associated with data acquisition such as low-noise amplifiers, electronic filters, and digital recording have made accurate measurements of very low strain levels feasible. The principal objective of this research effort was to develop a multi-component strain gage balance to measure forces and moments on models tested in flow visualization water tunnels. A balance was designed that allows measuring normal and side forces, and pitching, yawing and rolling moments (no axial force). The balance mounts internally in the model and is used in a manner typical of wind tunnel balances. The key differences between a water tunnel balance and a wind tunnel balance are the requirement for very high sensitivity since the loads are very low (typical normal force is 0.2 lbs), the need for water proofing the gage elements, and the small size required to fit into typical water tunnel models.

  12. The Responders’ Gender Stereotypes Modulate the Strategic Decision-Making of Proposers Playing the Ultimatum Game

    PubMed Central

    Fabre, Eve F.; Causse, Mickael; Pesciarelli, Francesca; Cacciari, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Despite the wealth of studies investigating factors affecting decisions, not much is known about the impact of stereotypical beliefs on strategic economic decision-making. In the present study, we used the ultimatum game paradigm to investigate how participants playing as proposer modulate their strategic economic behavior, according to their game counterparts’ stereotypical identity (i.e., responders). The latter were introduced to the participants using occupational role nouns stereotypically marked with gender paired with feminine or masculine proper names (e.g., linguist-Anna; economist-David; economist-Cristina; linguist-Leonardo). When playing with male-stereotyped responders, proposers quickly applied the equity rule, behaving fairly, while they adopted a strategic behavior with responders characterized by female stereotypes. They were also longer to make their offers to female than to male responders but both kinds of responders received comparable offers, suggesting a greater cognitive effort to treat females as equally as males. The present study explicitly demonstrates that gender stereotypical information affect strategic economic decision-making and highlights a possible evolution of gender discrimination into a more insidious discrimination toward individuals with female characteristics. PMID:26834684

  13. Enhanced oil spill detection sensors in low-light environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allik, Toomas H.; Ramboyong, Len; Roberts, Mark; Walters, Mark; Soyka, Thomas J.; Dixon, Roberta; Cho, Jay

    2016-05-01

    Although advances have been made in oil spill remote detection, many electro-optic sensors do not provide real-time images, do not work well under degraded visual environments, nor provide a measure of extreme oil thickness in marine environments. A joint program now exists between BSEE and NVESD that addresses these capability gaps in remote sensing of oil spills. Laboratory experiments, calibration techniques, and field tests were performed at Fort Belvoir, Virginia; Santa Barbara, California; and the Ohmsett Test Facility in Leonardo, New Jersey. Weathered crude oils were studied spectroscopically and characterized with LWIR, and low-light-level visible/NIR, and SWIR cameras. We designed and fabricated an oil emulsion thickness calibration cell for spectroscopic analysis and ground truth, field measurements. Digital night vision cameras provided real-time, wide-dynamic-range imagery, and were able to detect and recognize oil from full sun to partial moon light. The LWIR camera provided quantitative oil analysis (identification) for >1 mm thick crude oils both day and night. Two filtered, co-registered, SWIR cameras were used to determine whether oil thickness could be measured in real time. Spectroscopic results revealed that oil emulsions vary with location and weathered state and some oils (e.g., ANS and Santa Barbara seeps) do not show the spectral rich features from archived Deep Water Horizon hyperspectral data. Multi-sensor imagery collected during the 2015 USCG Airborne Oil Spill Remote Sensing and Reporting Exercise and the design of a compact, multiband imager are discussed.

  14. [From lens to retina. The historical survey on the search of the receptive part of the eye].

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, Andrzej; Witczak, Włodzimierz

    2008-01-01

    In the historical context, theories of vision reflected gradual recognition of human anatomy, physiology and histology, including also the development of optics. Ancient Greeks and Romans believed that the lens is the part of the eye responsible for light reception. It was followed by misconception of the central localization of the lens within the eye. This approach outlasted until the 16th century. Then, due to such scholars as Leonardo da Vinci, Felix Platter, Hieronymus Fabricius d'Aquapendente, Johannes Kepler and Christopher Schemer, the previous concepts concerning the role of the lens were gradually questioned, and finally its role was limited to light refraction and focusing the light beam to the bottom of the eye. In the 17th century appeared a controversy concerning the two membranes--retina and choroidea--and question which one of them is responsible for the reception of light. Finally, it was only at the onset of the 19th century when the true function of retina was confirmed.

  15. Scanning thermal probe microscope method for the determination of thermal diffusivity of nanocomposite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varandani, Deepak; Agarwal, Khushboo; Brugger, Juergen; Mehta, Bodh Raj

    2016-08-01

    A commercial scanning thermal microscope has been upgraded to facilitate its use in estimating the radial thermal diffusivity of thin films close to room temperature. The modified setup includes a microcontroller driven microhotplate coupled with a Bluetooth module for wireless control. The microcontroller board (Arduino Leonardo) is used to generate a bias of suitable voltage amplitude and pulse duration which is applied across the microhotplate contact pads. A corresponding heat pulse from the Pt heating element (1 mm2) embedded within the microhotplate is delivered to the lower surface of the thin film (25 mm2) deposited over it. The large difference in the dimensions of the heating source and the thin film surface causes heat to flow radially outwards on the top surface of the latter. The decay of this radial heat wave as it flows outwards is recorded by the scanning thermal microscope in terms of temperature-time (T-t) profiles at varying positions around the central heating zone. A fitting procedure is suggested to extract the thermal diffusivity value from the array of T-t profiles. The efficacy of the above setup has been established by evaluating the thermal diffusivities of Bi2Te3 and Bi2Te3:Si thin film samples. Further, with only minor alterations in design the capabilities of the above setup can be extended to estimate the axial thermal diffusivity and specific heat of thin films, as a function of temperature.

  16. [The National Royal Academy of Medicine and the Civil War (1936-1939)].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Granjel, Luis

    2006-01-01

    The Civil war (1936-1939) caused the most serious crisis in the history of the National Royal Academy of Medicine. The Government of the Republic ordered its dissolution in September 1936, and they proposed the creation of a higher organization, "The National Institute of Culture", whose main aim was to join all the Academies that had become sections and that were rigidly controlled by the political power; the course of the war sotpped this project being carried out. In the army-dominated Spain there was a similar process; the "Institute of Spain" (January, 1938) was created and it joined the National Academies although each of them did not lose its own personality. The Academy of Medicine was established in San Sebastian until 1939, and was managed by Enrique Suñer, with the collaboration of Leonardo de la Peña and Santiago Carro; the three of them were named by the Ministry of National Education. The dispersion of the members of the Academy, who had abandoned Madrid, did not allow the Academy to develop its traditional scientific activity, which was not restored until the activity was re-established in Madrid in the summer of 1939.

  17. STS-105 MPLM is moved into the PCR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Just before sunrise the payload canister arrives at Launch Pad 39A. In the background is Space Shuttle Discovery, waiting to launch on mission STS-105. Inside the canister are the primary payloads on the mission, the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo and the Integrated Cargo Carrier. The ICC holds several smaller payloads, the Early Ammonia Servicer and two experiment containers. The Early Ammonia Servicer consists of two nitrogen tanks that provide compressed gaseous nitrogen to pressurize the ammonia tank and replenish it in the thermal control subsystems of the Space Station. The ICC and MPLM will be lifted into the payload changeout room on the Rotation Service Structure where they will be moved into the Discoverys payload bay. The STS-105 mission includes a crew changeover on the International Space Station. Expedition Three will be traveling on Discovery to replace Expedition Two, who will return to Earth on board Discovery. Launch of STS-105 is scheduled for Aug. 9.

  18. From Pergamon to Army Base Hospital No. 5: the history and significance of the galea aponeurotica in the evolution of neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Connor, David E; Chittiboina, Prashant; Nanda, Anil

    2014-08-01

    The authors trace the etymology and historical significance of galea or epicranial aponeurosis. In ancient Greece, galea referred to a helmet worn by soldiers, typically made of animal hide or leather. Throughout antiquity, physicians referred to all soft tissue between the skin and the skull as panniculus, a standard established by Galen of Pergamon. A manual of surgery in the Middle Ages referred to the entire scalp as a "great panicle that is called pericranium." During the early Renaissance, Leonardo da Vinci famously and stylistically analogized the dissection of the cranium with the peeling of an onion. Not until 1724 would the tendinous sheath connecting the frontalis and occipitalis muscles be defined as "Galea tendinosa cranii." By 1741, the convention of referring to the galea as an aponeurosis was well established. Harvey Cushing's wartime experiences at Army Base Hospital No. 5 reinforced the surgical significance of the galea. Operative mortality was significantly diminished due to "closure of the wounds with buried sutures in the galea." This operative nuance was then passed from teacher to pupil and has now become one of the tenets of modern neurosurgical practice. PMID:24926652

  19. [Max Brödel (1870-1941): his life and contribution to the development of modern surgery].

    PubMed

    Wolff, M; Radwan, H

    1997-08-01

    Max Brödel (1870-1941), from Leipzig, Germany, is often referred to in the USA as the father of modern medical illustration and mentioned in the same breath as Leonardo da Vinci or Andreas Vesal. After a classical formal art education in Leipzig he worked in Carl Ludwig's laboratory of physiology and anatomy, where he came in contact with American physicians. In 1894, the anatomist F.P. Mall convinced him to work for the recently inaugurated Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, where he collaborated with world-famous surgeons such as H.A. Kelly, W.S. Halsted, and H. Cushing. His illustrations were characterized by meticulous observation, both realistic and explanatory intention, technical superiority, and artistic merit. In 1911 he established the first "Department of Art as applied to Medicine". Here, he proved to be an innovative artist, a creative scientist, and an inspiring and skillful instructor. By the time of Brödel's retirement in 1939, 160 students had graduated as medical illustrators. His pupils spread his principles and style throughout the USA and Canada, and several similar academic programs for medical illustration have been founded in these countries.

  20. MORICE--new technology for mechanical oil recovery in ice infested waters.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Hans V; Mullin, Joseph V

    2003-01-01

    Mechanical oil recovery in ice infested waters (MORICE) was initiated in 1995 to develop technology for the recovery of oil spills in ice. It has been a multinational effort involving Norwegian, Canadian, American and German organizations and researchers. Through a stepwise approach with the development organized in six separate phases, laboratory tests and field experiments have been conducted to study various ideas and concepts, and to refine the ideas that were considered to have the best potential for removing oil in ice. Put together in one unit, these concepts included ice processing equipment and two alternative oil recovery units installed on a work platform. In January 2002, the final oil and ice testing with MORICE concepts was conducted at the Ohmsett test facility in Leonardo, New Jersey. The unit has been referred to as a harbor version to indicate the size and operating conditions, but the concepts could be scaled up to increase the capacity of oil and ice processing. For heavier ice conditions it would also be necessary to increase the overall strength. PMID:12899889

  1. [Evolution of knowledge on blood and its movement. 1st Part. Integration of circulatory doctrine. Iatrophysics of blood].

    PubMed

    de Micheli, Alfredo; Izaguirre-Avila, Raúl

    2004-01-01

    Under the light of the evolution of human knowledge, we present a short historic outline of the integrating steps of the blood circulation doctrine and its components, a starting point for ulterior studies on the function of blood in the economy of an organism. The different steps of the process leading to the integration and diffusion of the blood circulation doctrine are described. These go from the first descriptions of the heart structures by authors of the ancient world to the careful anatomical observations of Renaissance scientists, such as Leonardo da Vinci. Towards the middle of the sixteenth century, the first well-known descriptions of pulmonary circulation were made independently by Miguel Servet and Realdo Colombo. Later, William Harvey, based on the experimental quantitative method according to Galileo's thought, described and studied systemic circulation. The vicissitudes encountered by the circulation doctrine are also disclosed. At the beginning, this concept was rejected by the traditional milieu--such as the Sorbonne of Paris--, but was accepted by the young and innovative researchers in both England and Continental Europe. In the second half of the seventeenth century and the first half of the eighteenth, the blood circulation doctrine was finally accepted and spread throughout Europe and the American continent. Furthermore, this doctrine inspired the medical practice of intravenous injections and blood transfusions. Its evolution, as generally occurs in the evolution of scientific thinking, allowed to reject some believes deeply rooted in the doctrine's constituent structure, i.e., the Renaissance spell of circularity. PMID:15791915

  2. Searching for the Origin through Central Nervous System: A Review and Thought which Related to Microgravity, Evolution, Big Bang Theory and Universes, Soul and Brainwaves, Greater Limbic System and Seat of the Soul.

    PubMed

    Idris, Zamzuri

    2014-07-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) serves buoyancy. The buoyancy thought to play crucial role in many aspects of the central nervous system (CNS). Weightlessness is produced mainly by the CSF. This manuscript is purposely made to discuss its significance which thought contributing towards an ideal environment for the CNS to develop and function normally. The idea of microgravity environment for the CNS is supported not only by the weightlessness concept of the brain, but also the noted anatomical position of the CNS. The CNS is positioned in bowing position (at main cephalic flexure) which is nearly similar to an astronaut in a microgravity chamber, fetus in the amniotic fluid at early gestation, and animals and plants in the ocean or on the land. Therefore, this microgravity position can bring us closer to the concept of origin. The hypothesis on 'the origin' based on the microgravity were explored and their similarities were identified including the brainwaves and soul. Subsequently a review on soul was made. Interestingly, an idea from Leonardo da Vinci seems in agreement with the notion of seat of the soul at the greater limbic system which has a distinctive feature of "from God back to God". PMID:25977615

  3. STS-111 crew exits O&C building on way to LC-39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-111 and Expedition 5 crews hurry from the Operations and Checkout Building for a second launch attempt aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour. From front to back are Pilot Paul Lockhart and Commander Kenneth Cockrell; astronaut Peggy Whitson; Expedition 5 Commander Valeri Korzun (RSA) and cosmonaut Sergei Treschev (RSA); and Mission Specialists Philippe Perrin (CNES) and Franklin Chang-Diaz. This mission marks the 14th Shuttle flight to the Space Station and the third Shuttle mission this year. Mission STS-111 is the 18th flight of Endeavour and the 110th flight overall in NASA's Space Shuttle program. On mission STS-111, astronauts will deliver the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, the Mobile Base System (MBS), and the Expedition Five crew to the Space Station. During the seven days Endeavour will be docked to the Station, three spacewalks will be performed dedicated to installing MBS and the replacement wrist-roll joint on the Station's Canadarm2 robotic arm. Endeavour will also carry the Expedition 5 crew, who will replace Expedition 4 on board the Station. Expedition 4 crew members will return to Earth with the STS-111 crew. Liftoff is scheduled for 5:22 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A.

  4. STS-111 crew exits the O&C Building before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The STS-111 and Expedition 5 crews eagerly exit from the Operations and Checkout Building for launch aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour. It is the second launch attempt in six days. From front to back are Pilot Paul Lockhart and Commander Kenneth Cockrell; astronaut Peggy Whitson; Expedition 5 Commander Valeri Korzun (RSA) and cosmonaut Sergei Treschev (RSA); and Mission Specialists Philippe Perrin (CNES) and Franklin Chang-Diaz. This mission marks the 14th Shuttle flight to the Space Station and the third Shuttle mission this year. Mission STS-111 is the 18th flight of Endeavour and the 110th flight overall in NASA's Space Shuttle program. On mission STS-111, astronauts will deliver the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, the Mobile Base System (MBS), and the Expedition Five crew to the Space Station. During the seven days Endeavour will be docked to the Station, three spacewalks will be performed dedicated to installing MBS and the replacement wrist-roll joint on the Station's Canadarm2 robotic arm. Endeavour will also carry the Expedition 5 crew, who will replace Expedition 4 on board the Station. Expedition 4 crew members will return to Earth with the STS-111 crew. Liftoff is scheduled for 5:22 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A.

  5. Multilayers quantitative X-ray fluorescence analysis applied to easel paintings.

    PubMed

    de Viguerie, Laurence; Sole, V Armando; Walter, Philippe

    2009-12-01

    X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) allows a rapid and simple determination of the elemental composition of a material. As a non-destructive tool, it has been extensively used for analysis in art and archaeology since the early 1970s. Whereas it is commonly used for qualitative analysis, recent efforts have been made to develop quantitative treatment even with portable systems. However, the interpretation of the results obtained with this technique can turn out to be problematic in the case of layered structures such as easel paintings. The use of differential X-ray attenuation enables modelling of the various layers: indeed, the absorption of X-rays through different layers will result in modification of intensity ratio between the different characteristic lines. This work focuses on the possibility to use XRF with the fundamental parameters method to reconstruct the composition and thickness of the layers. This method was tested on several multilayers standards and gives a maximum error of 15% for thicknesses and errors of 10% for concentrations. On a painting test sample that was rather inhomogeneous, the XRF analysis provides an average value. This method was applied in situ to estimate the thickness of the layers a painting from Marco d'Oggiono, pupil of Leonardo da Vinci.

  6. Volumic visual perception: principally novel concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Valery

    1996-01-01

    The general concept of volumic view (VV) as a universal property of space is introduced. VV exists in every point of the universe where electromagnetic (EM) waves can reach and a point or a quasi-point receiver (detector) of EM waves can be placed. Classification of receivers is given for the first time. They are classified into three main categories: biological, man-made non-biological, and mathematically specified hypothetical receivers. The principally novel concept of volumic perception is introduced. It differs chiefly from the traditional concept which traces back to Euclid and pre-Euclidean times and much later to Leonardo da Vinci and Giovanni Battista della Porta's discoveries and practical stereoscopy as introduced by C. Wheatstone. The basic idea of novel concept is that humans and animals acquire volumic visual data flows in series rather than in parallel. In this case the brain is free from extremely sophisticated real time parallel processing of two volumic visual data flows in order to combine them. Such procedure seems hardly probable even for humans who are unable to combine two primitive static stereoscopic images in one quicker than in a few seconds. Some people are unable to perform this procedure at all.

  7. Adhesion-dependent negative friction coefficient on chemically modified graphite at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zhao; Smolyanitsky, Alex; Li, Qunyang; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Cannara, Rachel J.

    2012-12-01

    From the early tribological studies of Leonardo da Vinci to Amontons’ law, friction has been shown to increase with increasing normal load. This trend continues to hold at the nanoscale, where friction can vary nonlinearly with normal load. Here we present nanoscale friction force microscopy (FFM) experiments for a nanoscale probe tip sliding on a chemically modified graphite surface in an atomic force microscope (AFM). Our results demonstrate that, when adhesion between the AFM tip and surface is enhanced relative to the exfoliation energy of graphite, friction can increase as the load decreases under tip retraction. This leads to the emergence of an effectively negative coefficient of friction in the low-load regime. We show that the magnitude of this coefficient depends on the ratio of tip-sample adhesion to the exfoliation energy of graphite. Through both atomistic- and continuum-based simulations, we attribute this unusual phenomenon to a reversible partial delamination of the topmost atomic layers, which then mimic few- to single-layer graphene. Lifting of these layers with the AFM tip leads to greater deformability of the surface with decreasing applied load. This discovery suggests that the lamellar nature of graphite yields nanoscale tribological properties outside the predictive capacity of existing continuum mechanical models.

  8. The characterisation of blood rotation in a human heart chamber based on statistical analysis of vorticity maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Kelvin K. L.; Kelso, Richard M.; Worthley, Stephen G.; Sanders, Prashanthan; Mazumdar, Jagannath; Abbott, Derek

    2008-12-01

    Modelling of non-stationary cardiac structures is complicated by the complexity of their intrinsic and extrinsic motion. The first known study of haemodynamics due to the beating of heart was made by Leonardo Da Vinci, giving the idea of fluid-solid interaction by describing how vortices develop during cardiac structural interaction with the blood. Heart morphology affects in changes of cardio dynamics during the systolic and diastolic phrases. In a chamber of the heart, vortices are discovered to exist as the result of the unique morphological changes of the cardiac chamber wall by using flow-imaging techniques such as phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging. The first part of this paper attempts to quantify vortex characteristics by means of calculating vorticity numerically and devising two dimensional vortical flow maps. The technique relies on determining the properties of vorticity using a statistical quantification of the flow maps and comparison of these quantities based on different scenarios. As the characteristics of our vorticity maps vary depending on the phase of a cardiac cycle, there is a need for robust quantification method to analyse vorticity. In the second part of the paper, the approach is then utilised for examining vortices within the human right atrium. Our study has shown that a proper quantification of vorticity for the flow field can indicate the strength and number of vortices within a heart chamber.

  9. Landslide Monitoring and Cultural Heritage At Risk: The Case Study of San Miniato Hill In Florence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, G.; Casagli, N.; Delmonaco, G.; Fanti, R.; Focardi, P.; Margottini, C.

    San Miniato (known also as Monte alle Croci or Mons Florentinus) is the most fa- mous hill bordering the southern side of the historic center of Florence. Included in the SColli FiorentiniT (Florentine hills) overlooking the monuments and artworks of Flo- & cedil;rence, San Miniato provides a wonderful view of the city. The hillside has always been affected by slope instability phenomena, with periodical reactivations documented in several historic records. Most of the monuments and artworks located on the hill are cracked and fissured and have required restoration works in various circumstances in the centuries after their construction. The first documented studies on the stability of the hill were carried out by Leonardo da Vinci in the XV century and subsequently by various commissions appointed for the restoration works. During the XX century the hill was many times monitored with geotechnical instrumentation and some investiga- tions are still in progress today. This work concerns a review of these historical studies on slope instability and the interpretation of past and present monitoring results. An analytical review of the existing data is a necessary condition for the proposal of a reliable hypothesis concerning the slope instability characterization. This is made dif- ficult by the pluri-centenary urbanization of the entire hill which has led to the almost complete obliteration of the evidence of past movements and by the relevant presence of an invaluable artistic and cultural heritage.

  10. General theory of frictional heating with application to rubber friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortunato, G.; Ciaravola, V.; Furno, A.; Lorenz, B.; Persson, B. N. J.

    2015-05-01

    The energy dissipation in the contact regions between solids in sliding contact can result in high local temperatures which may strongly effect friction and wear. This is the case for rubber sliding on road surfaces at speeds above 1 mm s-1. We derive equations which describe the frictional heating for solids with arbitrary thermal properties. The theory is applied to rubber friction on road surfaces and we take into account that the frictional energy is partly produced inside the rubber due to the internal friction of rubber and in a thin (nanometer) interfacial layer at the rubber-road contact region. The heat transfer between the rubber and the road surface is described by a heat transfer coefficient which depends on the sliding speed. Numerical results are presented and compared to experimental data. We find that frictional heating results in a kinetic friction force which depends on the orientation of the sliding block, thus violating one of the two basic Leonardo da Vinci ‘laws’ of friction.

  11. A mathematical model for the thrust force generated by a flapping elastic wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Alexander E.; Sumbatyan, Mezhlum A.

    2012-11-01

    The physical nature of the thrust force generated by flapping wings is of a long-time interest of many researchers. The idea of the thrust effect came from the observation of birds' flight. Apparently, Leonardo da Vinci was first who tried to explain the mechanism of the flapping wing trust, for possible engineering applications. Nevertheless, the fundamental basics of a theoretical study of wing oscillations were laid only near the beginning of the 20th century. The thrust effect of the flapping wing was explained by Knoller in 1909 and Betz in 1912, independently. The principal problem in this theory is to define an optimal deformation law which provides the flapping wing to work with highest efficiency. In the present paper we study a rectangular elastic wing of finite span as a propulsion device. We propose an analytical approach, to study harmonic oscillations of a thin elastic rectangular wing at zero attack angle in a flow of inviscid incompressible fluid. The problem is reduced to an integro-differential equation, in frames of the "plane sections" hypothesis.

  12. OCT for Examination of Artwork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Targowski, Piotr; Iwanicka, Magdalena; Rouba, Bogumiła J.; Frosinini, Cecilia

    In this chapter the application of OCT to examination of objects of cultural heritage is given. The knowledge about the structure of the object of art is necessary both for inventory purposes and planning/monitoring of conservation-restoration treatments. Due to its noninvasiveness OCT is well suited for such applications. The major limitation is in the lack of transparency of certain structures. Specific requirements, advantages and limitations of use of the OCT technique in this area are discussed first. Then the overview of applications to easel paintings, historic glass, and craftsmanship is given, followed by two examples of monitoring the laser ablation with OCT: very local in case of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), and more general in case of laser ablation of the varnish layer. Then the examples of application of OCT to examination of paintings are given: investigation of deterioration of the varnish layer in the "Adoration of the Magi" by Leonardo da Vinci (Uffizi, Italy), imaging of overpaintings on two 17th and 18th c. oil paintings on canvas, and visualization of specific case of retouching located between two layers of varnish in the "Madonna with Yarnwinder" (attributed to L. da Vinci, private property).

  13. Controlled Chemical Patterns with ThermoChemical NanoLithography (TCNL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Keith; Giordano, Anthony; Wang, Debin; Kodali, Vamsi; King, W. P.; Marder, S. R.; Riedo, E.; Curtis, J. E.

    2012-02-01

    Many research areas, both fundamental and applied, rely upon the ability to organize non-trivial assemblies of molecules on surfaces. In this work, we introduce a significant extension of ThermoChemical NanoLithography (TCNL), a high throughput chemical patterning technique that uses temperature-driven chemical reactions localized near the tip of a thermal cantilever. By combining a chemical kinetics based model with experiments, we have developed a protocol for varying the concentration of surface bound molecules. The result is an unprecedented ability to fabricate extremely complex patterns comprised of varying chemical concentrations, as demonstrated by sinusoidal patterns of amine groups with varying pitches (˜5-15 μm) and the replication of Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa with dimensions of ˜30 x 40 μm^2. Programmed control of the chemical reaction rate should have widespread applications for a technique which has already been shown to nanopattern various substrates including graphene nanowires, piezoelectric crystals, and optoelectronic materials.

  14. Radar images analysis for scattering surfaces characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazza, Enrico

    1998-10-01

    According to the different problems and techniques related to the detection and recognition of airplanes and vehicles moving on the Airport surface, the present work mainly deals with the processing of images gathered by a high-resolution radar sensor. The radar images used to test the investigated algorithms are relative to sequence of images obtained in some field experiments carried out by the Electronic Engineering Department of the University of Florence. The radar is the Ka band radar operating in the'Leonardo da Vinci' Airport in Fiumicino (Rome). The images obtained from the radar scan converter are digitized and putted in x, y, (pixel) co- ordinates. For a correct matching of the images, these are corrected in true geometrical co-ordinates (meters) on the basis of fixed points on an airport map. Correlating the airplane 2-D multipoint template with actual radar images, the value of the signal in the points involved in the template can be extracted. Results for a lot of observation show a typical response for the main section of the fuselage and the wings. For the fuselage, the back-scattered echo is low at the prow, became larger near the center on the aircraft and than it decrease again toward the tail. For the wings the signal is growing with a pretty regular slope from the fuselage to the tips, where the signal is the strongest.

  15. Historical Scientific Models and Theories as Resources for Learning and Teaching: The Case of Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besson, Ugo

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a history of research and theories on sliding friction between solids. This history is divided into four phases: from Leonardo da Vinci to Coulomb and the establishment of classical laws of friction; the theories of lubrication and the Tomlinson's theory of friction (1850-1930); the theories of wear, the Bowden and Tabor's synthesis and the birth of Tribology (1930-1980); nanotribology, friction at the atomic scale, and new fields of research (after 1980). Attention is given to recent research, so giving the sense of a topic that is still alive and currently an object of interest, with interpretative controversies. The development of explanatory and visual models is especially stressed, in connection with students' common ideas and with didactic purposes. The history shows that many models proposed in the past have been modified but not abandoned, so that here the scientific evolution has worked more by adding than by eliminating. The last sections discuss problems and proposals on teaching friction and the possible uses in teaching of models, images and theories found in history. Concerning the role of the history in science teaching, the case of friction has particular features, because some recent developments are unknown to most teachers and many results, also not very recent, contrast with the laws usually proposed in textbooks. Here history can supply a number of models, examples and experiments which can constitute useful resources to improve student understanding, joining together objectives of cultural value and of better scientific knowledge.

  16. A Selenological History of Lunar Poetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Chamier-Waite, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    The Moon. Centuries of human inquiry have engaged this mysterious object. The Moon embodies history, philosophy, cosmology, and passions; the nature of love, persecution, and our capacity for the sublime. This review considers a body of research on lunar poetics done for a series of artworks by the author. It will look at a few select writings that have profoundly influenced our epistemological, ontological, and poetic knowledge of the universe with the Moon as a central theme. Centered in the early seventeenth century at the time of Kepler and Galileo, this query follows the tendrils of lunar influences in both the sciences and literature that emanate from these two figures, forwards and backwards in time. Science, politics, theology, and the arts intertwine in this investigation. The works reviewed link the philosophy of Aristotle and the poetry of Lucian of Samosata to findings by Leonardo Da Vinci, Copernicus, Jules Verne, and others. The chosen philosophers have been selected because of their significant contributions to selenology and lunar poetics, and each of the figures reviewed have the honor of a namesake crater upon the Moon.

  17. Searching for the Origin through Central Nervous System: A Review and Thought which Related to Microgravity, Evolution, Big Bang Theory and Universes, Soul and Brainwaves, Greater Limbic System and Seat of the Soul

    PubMed Central

    IDRIS, Zamzuri

    2014-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) serves buoyancy. The buoyancy thought to play crucial role in many aspects of the central nervous system (CNS). Weightlessness is produced mainly by the CSF. This manuscript is purposely made to discuss its significance which thought contributing towards an ideal environment for the CNS to develop and function normally. The idea of microgravity environment for the CNS is supported not only by the weightlessness concept of the brain, but also the noted anatomical position of the CNS. The CNS is positioned in bowing position (at main cephalic flexure) which is nearly similar to an astronaut in a microgravity chamber, fetus in the amniotic fluid at early gestation, and animals and plants in the ocean or on the land. Therefore, this microgravity position can bring us closer to the concept of origin. The hypothesis on ‘the origin’ based on the microgravity were explored and their similarities were identified including the brainwaves and soul. Subsequently a review on soul was made. Interestingly, an idea from Leonardo da Vinci seems in agreement with the notion of seat of the soul at the greater limbic system which has a distinctive feature of “from God back to God”. PMID:25977615

  18. Large-scale cold water dispersant effectiveness experiments with Alaskan crude oils and Corexit 9500 and 9527 dispersants.

    PubMed

    Belore, Randy C; Trudel, Ken; Mullin, Joseph V; Guarino, Alan

    2009-01-01

    There continues to be reluctance in some jurisdictions to use chemical dispersants as a viable countermeasure for accidental oil spills. One argument used by some opponents to dispersant use is that "chemical dispersants do not work effectively in cold water". To address this issue, the U.S. Minerals Management Service (MMS) funded and conducted two series of large-scale dispersant experiments in very cold water at Ohmsett - The National Oil Spill Response Test Facility, located in Leonardo, New Jersey in February-March 2006 and January-March 2007. Alaska North Slope, Endicott, Northstar and Pt. McIntyre crude oils and Corexit 9500 and Corexit 9527 dispersants were used in the two test series. The crude oils were tested both when fresh and after weathering. Results demonstrated that both Corexit 9500 and Corexit 9527 dispersants were 85-99% effective in dispersing the fresh and weathered crude oils tested at cold temperatures. The MMS expects that results from these test series will assist government regulators and responders in making science based decisions on the use of dispersants as a response tool for oil spills in the Arctic.

  19. Neurological caricatures since the 15th century.

    PubMed

    Lorusso, Lorenzo

    2008-01-01

    During the Renaissance, different artists began to draw medical illustrations from various viewpoints. Leonardo da Vinci was among those who sought to portray the emotional as well as the physical qualities of man. Other European artists described caricatural aspects of medical activities. In Northern Europe, Albrecht Durer, Hieronymus Bosch, and Pieter Brueghel were also famous for drawing caricatures. Later English artists, notably William Hogarth, Thomas Rowlandson, James Gillray, and the Cruikshanks, satirized life in general and the medical profession in particular. In Spain, Francisco Goya's works became increasingly macabre and satirical following his own mysterious illness and, in France, Honore Daumier used satire and humor to expose medical quackery. Also physicians such as Charles Bell and Jean-Martin Charcot were talented caricaturists. Their own personal artistic styles reflected their approach and gave a different "image" of neurology. Caricatures were popular portraits of developments in science and medicine and were frequently used whenever scientific language was too difficult to disseminate, in particular in the field of neurology.

  20. Newtons Universum. Materialien zur Geschichte des Kraftbegriffes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mit einem Vorwort von E. Seibold und einer Einführung von W. Neuser. This book is a selection of 15 articles published in the journal "Spektrum der Wissenschaft". The original English versions of the papers were first published in "Scientific American". Contents: 1. Impetustheorie und Intuition in der Physik (M. McCloskey). 2. Mittelalterliche Ursprünge der industriellen Revolution (T. S. Reynolds). 3. Leonardo da Vincis Beiträge zur theoretischen Mechanik (V. Foley, W. Soedel). 4. Nikolaus Kopernikus und Tycho Brahe (O. Gingerich). 5. Keplers Entdeckung der ersten beiden Planetengesetze (C. Wilson). 6. Galileis Entdeckung des Fallgesetzes (S. Drake). 7. Galileis Beobachtung des Neptun (S. Drake, C. T. Kowal). 8. Galileo Galilei und der Schatten des Giordano Bruno (L. S. Lerner, E. A. Gosselin). 9. Der Fall Galilei (O. Gingerich). 10. Newtons Apfel und Galileis "Dialog" (S. Drake). 11. Newtons Gravitationsgesetz - aus Formeln wird eine Idee (I. B. Cohen). 12. Christopher Wren: Astronom und Architekt (H. Dorn, R. Mark). 13. Atomismus und Kräfte in der Geschichte (L. Holliday). 14. Ein Elitezirkel vor 200 Jahren: Die Lunar Society von Birmingham (L. Ritchie-Calder). 15. Sadi Carnot: Technik und Theorie der Dampfmaschine (S. S. Wilson).

  1. Mid-infrared thermal imaging for an effective mapping of surface materials and sub-surface detachments in mural paintings: integration of thermography and thermal quasi-reflectography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daffara, C.; Parisotto, S.; Mariotti, P. I.

    2015-06-01

    Cultural Heritage is discovering how precious is thermal analysis as a tool to improve the restoration, thanks to its ability to inspect hidden details. In this work a novel dual mode imaging approach, based on the integration of thermography and thermal quasi-reflectography (TQR) in the mid-IR is demonstrated for an effective mapping of surface materials and of sub-surface detachments in mural painting. The tool was validated through a unique application: the "Monocromo" by Leonardo da Vinci in Italy. The dual mode acquisition provided two spatially aligned dataset: the TQR image and the thermal sequence. Main steps of the workflow included: 1) TQR analysis to map surface features and 2) to estimate the emissivity; 3) projection of the TQR frame on reference orthophoto and TQR mosaicking; 4) thermography analysis to map detachments; 5) use TQR to solve spatial referencing and mosaicking for the thermal-processed frames. Referencing of thermal images in the visible is a difficult aspect of the thermography technique that the dual mode approach allows to solve in effective way. We finally obtained the TQR and the thermal maps spatially referenced to the mural painting, thus providing the restorer a valuable tool for the restoration of the detachments.

  2. Nanosecond Neutron Analysis for the search of the lost Leonardo’s masterpiece, the Battle of Anghiari

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, A. V.; Gorshkov, I. Yu.; Evsenin, A. V.; Osetrov, O. I.; Vakhtin, D. N.; Cosentino, A.; Seracini, M.

    2009-12-01

    Between 1505 and 1506 Leonardo Da Vinci painted his masterpiece, the Battle of Anghiari, in Palazzo Vecchio's Hall of 500 in Florence. The unfinished mural remained visible until 1563, when architect Giorgio Vasari undertook a renovation of the Hall and all traces of the Battle of Anghiari were lost. However, scholarly interpretation and scientific evidence suggest that the mural could be on the eastern wall, hidden behind a brick wall built in 1563 by Vasari. This paper discusses the possibility of using NNA/APT (Nanosecond Neutron Analysis/Associated Particle Technique) to establish the presence of the masterpiece by identifying behind the Vasari's wall chemical elements from the gesso preparation layer of the mural and possibly from its pigments. This paper reports on the experiments run with a simple NNA/APT system and the Monte Carlo simulations that have been carried out in order to outline the experimental setup of an advanced NNA/APT able to detect and locate the tiny amount of gesso and pigments.

  3. General theory of frictional heating with application to rubber friction.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, G; Ciaravola, V; Furno, A; Lorenz, B; Persson, B N J

    2015-05-01

    The energy dissipation in the contact regions between solids in sliding contact can result in high local temperatures which may strongly effect friction and wear. This is the case for rubber sliding on road surfaces at speeds above 1 mm s(-1). We derive equations which describe the frictional heating for solids with arbitrary thermal properties. The theory is applied to rubber friction on road surfaces and we take into account that the frictional energy is partly produced inside the rubber due to the internal friction of rubber and in a thin (nanometer) interfacial layer at the rubber-road contact region. The heat transfer between the rubber and the road surface is described by a heat transfer coefficient which depends on the sliding speed. Numerical results are presented and compared to experimental data. We find that frictional heating results in a kinetic friction force which depends on the orientation of the sliding block, thus violating one of the two basic Leonardo da Vinci 'laws' of friction.

  4. Signing off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-09-01

    Physics Related Aptitude Test As the teacher shortage bites anyone with a degree in science expects to walk into a school and be received, with open arms, as a physics teacher. Are they really suitable? To help you decide Signing Off provides the following invaluable psychometric test. Extensively researched and, for single users only, it comes completely free to Physics Education subscribers! (Copies of this Physics Related Aptitude Test are available to credit-card customers from prat@realripoff.com priced #35 per client, 125 dollars to US customers.) This invaluable psychometric test has been extensively researched. Your first lesson of the new school year introduces the study of electricity. Do you: A Use the notes prepared by your predecessor. B Find a video on electricity and play it to the class. C Arrange a series of exciting practical demonstrations to stimulate the young inquiring mind. D Let the children design and make their own circuits to light flashlight bulbs. Your 14-year-olds have completed a written test on heat and energy. Do you: A Mark correct only the work of students who have written their names neatly at the top LEFT HAND corner, as required. B Only set multiple choice tests, so that the computer can mark them for you. C Mark carefully by hand, explaining in detail to each student exactly how and why they have made errors and adding encouraging comments with lots of praise. D Give out correct sets of answers and allow students to mark their own work. There is a staff social. Do you: A Ask for a definition of the term 'social'. B Ask for a web-based version. C Determine to go, so that you can discuss setting up cross-curricular links with colleagues. D Join the organizing committee. Who do you admire most? A Sir Isaac Newton. B Bill Gates. C Leonardo da Vinci. D Leonardo di Caprio. You are required to teach biology class. Your response is: A Denial. B To ask for an appropriate computer simulation. C To attend a specialized course for biology

  5. STS-102 Photo-op/Suit-up/Depart O&C/Launch Discovery On Orbit/Landing/Crew Egress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The spacecrews of STS-102 and the Expedition 1 and 2 crews of the International Space Station (ISS) are seen in this video, which presents an overview of their activities. The crew consists of Commander Jim Wetherbee, Pilot James Kelly, and Mission Specialists Andrew Thomas, and Paul Richards. The sections of the video include: Photo-op, Suit-up, Depart O&C, Ingress, Launch with Playbacks, On-orbit, Landing with Playbacks, and Crew Egress & Departs. The prelaunch activities are explained by two narrators, and the crew members are assisted in the White Room just before boarding the Space Shuttle Discovery. Isolated views of the shuttle's launch include: VAB, PAD-B, DLTR-3, UCS-23 Tracker, PATRICK IGOR, UCS-10 Tracker, Grandstand, Tower-1, OTV-160, OTV-170, OTV-171, and On-board Camera. The video shows two extravehicular activities (EVAs) to perform work on the ISS, one by astronauts Helms and Voss from Expedition 2, and another by Richards and Thomas. The attachment of the Leonardo Multipurpose Logistics Module, a temporary resupply module, is shown in a series of still images. The on-orbit footage also includes a view of the Nile River, and a crew exhange ceremony between Expedition 1 (Commander Yuri Gidzenko, Flight Engineer Sergei Krikalev) and Expedition 2 (Commander Yury Usachev, Flight Engineers James Voss, Susan Helms). Isolated views of the landing at Kennedy Space Center include: North Runway Camera, VAB, Tower-1, Mid-field, Midfield IR, Tower-2, and UCS-12 IR. The Crew Transfer Vehicle (CTV) for unloading the astronauts is shown, administrators greet the crew upon landing, and Commander Wetherbee gives a briefing.

  6. Applying Rules of the Code of Conduct to the First Crews on Board the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, Sgrosso G.

    2002-01-01

    Three years after the launch of the first Russian module Zarya, the Space Station is now operational, being made up of a central block, to which the various pressurised modules where the astronauts live and work during their stay on board are connected, of a first linking and docking node, "Unity", of the first of the four research labs, the American module"Destiny", and of the Russian module "Zvezda" with control and living functions. During these first years of the Station, the astronauts live in the service module Zvezda. The fourth crew has been positioned in the Station, carrying out maintenance and control operations of the Station itself, scientific experiments and space walks. The paper intends to analyse the rules of the code of conduct, agreed upon by all Partners, in accordance with art. 11 of the IGA. Together with the standards of conduct, applicable to all crew members, the paper will focus on the exercise of the Commander's authority, the chain of command on orbit and the relationship with the Flight Director on ground. In order to transport goods and experiments, some Multi-Purpose Logistic Modules have already been used (Leonardo, Donatello, Raffaello), transported to the Space Shuttle Station at times together with the new Station crew. Attention will be placed on the flight rules which should be issued, in such cases, in order to regulate the relationship between the ISS Commander, the ETOV (Earth to Orbit Vehicle) Commander and the Rescue Vehicle Commander. Jurisdiction over the astronauts, during the time spent in activities outside the vehicle - which are becoming more and more frequent in order to control the functionality and docking of the modules - is a new question to be solved. Finally, the paper will cover the questions concerning jurisdiction, responsibility and relationship with the crew in view of the transportation and subsequent presence in the Station of "space tourists".

  7. STS-111 Mission Highlights Resource Tape. Part 1 of 4; Flight Days 1 - 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This video, Part 1 of 4, shows the activities of the STS-111 crew (Kenneth Cockrell, Commander; Paul Lockhart, Pilot; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Phillipe Perrin, Mission Specialists) during flight days 1 through 4. Also shown are the incoming Expedition 5 (Valeri Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitson, NASA ISS Science Officer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer) and outgoing Expedition 4 (Yuri Onufriyenko, Commander; Carl Walz, Daniel Bursch, Flight Engineers) crews of the ISS (International Space Station). The activities from other flight days can be seen on 'STS-111 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 2 of 4 (internal ID 2002139469), 'STS-111 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 3 of 4 (internal ID 2002139468), and 'STS-111 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 4 of 4 (internal ID 2002139474). The primary activity of flight day 1 is the launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour. The crew is seen before the launch at a meal and suit-up, and some pre-flight procedures are shown. Perrin holds a sign with a personalized message. The astronauts communicate with Mission Control extensively after launch, and an inside view of the shuttle cabin is shown. The replays of the launch include close-ups of the nozzles at liftoff, and the fall of the solid rocket boosters and the external fuel tank. Flight day 2 shows footage of mainland Asia at night, and daytime views of the eastern United States and Lake Michigan. Flight day three shows the Endeavour orbiter approaching and docking with the ISS. After the night docking, the crews exchange greetings, and a view of the Nile river and Egypt at night is shown. On flight day 4, the MPLM (Multi-Purpose Logistics Module) Leonardo was temporarily transferred from Endeavour's payload bay to the ISS.

  8. History of respiratory mechanics prior to World War II.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2012-01-01

    The history of respiratory mechanics is reviewed over a period of some 2,500 years from the ancient Greeks to World War II. A cardinal early figure was Galen (130-199 AD) who made remarkably perceptive statements on the diaphragm and the anatomy of the phrenic nerves. The polymath Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) contributed observations on pulmonary mechanics including the pleural space and bronchial airflow that still make good reading. Vesalius (1514-1564) produced magnificent illustrations of the lung, ribcage, and diaphragm. In the 17th century, the Oxford School including Boyle, Hooke, Lower, and Mayow were responsible for many contributions on mechanical functions including the intercostal muscles and the pleura. Hales (1677-1761) calculated the size and surface area of the alveoli, the time spent by the blood in the pulmonary capillaries, and intrathoracic pressures. Poiseuille (1799-1869) carried out classical studies of fluid mechanics including one of the first demonstrations of flow limitation in collapsible vessels. The culmination of the pre-World War II period was the outstanding contributions of Rohrer (1888-1926) and his two Swiss countrymen, Wirz (1896-1978) and von Neergaard (1887-1947). Rohrer developed the first comprehensive, quantitative treatment of respiratory mechanics in the space of 10 years including an analysis of flow in airways, and the pressure-volume behavior of the respiratory system. von Neergaard performed landmark studies on the effects of surface tension on pressure-volume behavior. Progress over the 2,500 years was slow and erratic at times, but by 1940 the stage was set for the spectacular developments of the next 70 years.

  9. Physics and medicine: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Keevil, Stephen F

    2012-04-21

    Nowadays, the term medical physics usually refers to the work of physicists employed in hospitals, who are concerned mainly with medical applications of radiation, diagnostic imaging, and clinical measurement. This involvement in clinical work began barely 100 years ago, but the relation between physics and medicine has a much longer history. In this report, I have traced this history from the earliest recorded period, when physical agents such as heat and light began to be used to diagnose and treat disease. Later, great polymaths such as Leonardo da Vinci and Alhazen used physical principles to begin the quest to understand the function of the body. After the scientific revolution in the 17th century, early medical physicists developed a purely mechanistic approach to physiology, whereas others applied ideas derived from physics in an effort to comprehend the nature of life itself. These early investigations led directly to the development of specialties such as electrophysiology, biomechanics, and ophthalmology. Physics-based medical technology developed rapidly during the 19th century, but it was the revolutionary discoveries about radiation and radioactivity at the end of the century that ushered in a new era of radiation-based medical diagnosis and treatment, thereby giving rise to the modern medical physics profession. Subsequent developments in imaging in particular have revolutionised the practice of medicine. We now stand on the brink of a new revolution in post-genomic personalised medicine, with physics-based techniques again at the forefront. As before, these techniques are often the unpredictable fruits of earlier investment in basic physics research.

  10. [The relations between music and medicine in history and present].

    PubMed

    Gasenzer, E R; Neugebauer, E A M

    2011-12-01

    Since the ancient world relations exist between music and medicine. In the prehistoric music, dance, rhythm and religious practice were important parts of shamanism and early medical procedures. Important philosophers of the classic period already began with the scientific research of musical and medical questions. During the middle age convents conserved ancient knowledge. They offered medical care and taught the ancient knowledge of medicine, arts and music. The Gregorian choral was created. Traditions of popular believe expressed the relations between music and medicine. The Renaissance became the great époque of art, music and science. Leonardo da Vinci and Andreas Vesalius presented a new style of artistic working and scientific knowledge. Also the basics of western music, like tonality was developed. With the separation of scientific subjects in natural sciences and humanities, the relationships between music and medicine fall into oblivion. During the classic and romantic era music and art were important parts of cultural live of the well educated society. With the development of neurology, psychiatry and psychoanalysis more physicians and scientists were interested in musical questions. Questions about the role of music in human behavior and the ancient method to use music in medical treatment became popular. In the early 20th century the music therapy was developed. Today the effects of music to the human brain are investigated with radionuclear methods. A lot of investigations showed the effect of music and music performance to humans. Music plays an important part in psychotherapy, therapeutic pedagogy and medical care, the importance of music and music therapy increases. In the 80ies of the 20th century the performing arts medicine was developed, which asks for the medical problems of performing musicians. PMID:22169917

  11. ['A sad and painful heart'--Andreas Vesalius as cardiologist].

    PubMed

    Haneveld, G T

    1993-01-01

    One needs courage to dissociate oneself from ideas maintained for ages and put forward by authorities. How laborious this process has been for Vesalius concerning the heart, is obvious when we compare the information of an eye-witness with both editions of the De Humani Corporis Fabrica (1543 and 1555). He must have come hesitantly to the conclusion that the views on the permeability of the septum cordis, as they were supported by Galen, Mondino and Johann Winther, a professor at Louvain, could not be defended. However, they had been essential in the considerations about the blood-flow. Although Vesalius demonstrated by vivisection-experiments that a relation exists between the pulse and the heart contractions, he was not an experimenting cardiophysiologist. In this respect, he stood far behind his contemporary Leonardo da Vinci, who made experiments on heart ntractions and the bloodstream along the heart valves. Vesalius was an anatomist! And a morphologist! But he was also a physician. In this respect, he also was interested in the pathological aspects of anatomy. So he recalled in, his last book, Anatomicarum Gabrielis Fallopii Observationum Examen (1564) some cardiologically interesting patients, a.o. the courtier van Immerseel, with a very unequal pulse and "a sad and painful heart" (tristi in corde, sensu doloreve), by whom a heart abnormality was found post mortem, that in modern terms we could call "an old heart infarction with thrombus formation." According to Schenk von Grafenberg, Vesalius was dreaming of a big book about anatomo-pathology, but alas, he never wrote it. Undoubtedly he would have trusted more his eyes and less Galen: "non solum ex Galenis testimonio, sed etiam oculis ipsis perspexeris". PMID:8209581

  12. 1/48-scale model of an F-18 aircraft in Flow Visualization Facility (FVF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This short movie clip shows a plastic 1/48-scale model of an F-18 aircraft inside the 'Water Tunnel' more formally known as the NASA Dryden Flow Visualization Facility. Water is pumped through the tunnel in the direction of normal airflow over the aircraft; then, colored dyes are pumped through tubes with needle valves. The dyes flow back along the airframe and over the airfoils highlighting their aerodynamic characteristics. The aircraft can also be moved through its pitch axis to observe airflow disruptions while simulating actual flight at high angles of attack. The Water Tunnel at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA, became operational in 1983 when Dryden was a Flight Research Facility under the management of the Ames Research Center in Mountain View, CA. As a medium for visualizing fluid flow, water has played a significant role. Its use dates back to Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), the Renaissance Italian engineer, architect, painter, and sculptor. In more recent times, water tunnels have assisted the study of complex flows and flow-field interactions on aircraft shapes that generate strong vortex flows. Flow visualization in water tunnels assists in determining the strength of vortices, their location, and possible methods of controlling them. The design of the Dryden Water Tunnel imitated that of the Northrop Corporation's tunnel in Hawthorne, CA. Called the Flow Visualization Facility, the Dryden tunnel was built to assist researchers in understanding the aerodynamics of aircraft configured in such a way that they create strong vortex flows, particularly at high angles of attack. The tunnel provides results that compare well with data from aircraft in actual flight in another fluid-air. Other uses of the tunnel have included study of how such flight hardware as antennas, probes, pylons, parachutes, and experimental fixtures affect airflow. The facility has also been helpful in finding the best locations for emitting smoke from flight vehicles

  13. 1/48-scale model of an F-18 aircraft in Flow Visualization Facility (FVF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    This image shows a plastic 1/48-scale model of an F-18 aircraft inside the 'Water Tunnel' more formally known as the NASA Dryden Flow Visualization Facility. Water is pumped through the tunnel in the direction of normal airflow over the aircraft; then, colored dyes are pumped through tubes with needle valves. The dyes flow back along the airframe and over the airfoils highlighting their aerodynamic characteristics. The aircraft can also be moved through its pitch axis to observe airflow disruptions while simulating actual flight at high angles of attack. The Water Tunnel at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA, became operational in 1983 when Dryden was a Flight Research Facility under the management of the Ames Research Center in Mountain View, CA. As a medium for visualizing fluid flow, water has played a significant role. Its use dates back to Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), the Renaissance Italian engineer, architect, painter, and sculptor. In more recent times, water tunnels have assisted the study of complex flows and flow-field interactions on aircraft shapes that generate strong vortex flows. Flow visualization in water tunnels assists in determining the strength of vortices, their location, and possible methods of controlling them. The design of the Dryden Water Tunnel imitated that of the Northrop Corporation's tunnel in Hawthorne, CA. Called the Flow Visualization Facility, the Dryden tunnel was built to assist researchers in understanding the aerodynamics of aircraft configured in such a way that they create strong vortex flows, particularly at high angles of attack. The tunnel provides results that compare well with data from aircraft in actual flight in another fluid-air. Other uses of the tunnel have included study of how such flight hardware as antennas, probes, pylons, parachutes, and experimental fixtures affect airflow. The facility has also been helpful in finding the best locations for emitting smoke from flight vehicles for flow

  14. Evaluation of the e-Learning material developed by EMERALD and EMIT for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Victoria; Tabakov, Slavik

    2005-09-01

    Two Leonardo projects, EMERALD and EMIT, have developed in a partnershipof university and hospital departments (the consortia) e-Learning materials in X-ray diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine, radiotherapy, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging for medical physics graduates and other healthcare professionals. These e-Learning materials are described in a separate paper in this issue. To assess the effectiveness and relevance of the e-Learning material, a series of evaluations by student users groups plus experts in medical physics education and training were undertaken. The students, with backgrounds in physics and clinical ultrasound, reviewed the e-Learning material using an evaluation form developed by the consortia. The student feedback was favourable with students commenting that their level of knowledge had increased having completed the tasks. Areas identified for development were a reduction in text volume and an increase in the time allowed for completion of some tasks. The feedback from the experts was positive with an overall appreciation of the value of the learning material as a resource for students in medical physics field across Europe and identified other disciplines in which the access to the learning material could be useful contribution to their learning. Suggestions made for improvements ranged from grading the tasks into basic and advanced topics to increasing the interactive nature of the material. These early evaluation of the e-Learning material look promising and provide a framework for further developments in the field. Insight into users and providers views is important if developers are to provide relevant and worthwhile educational learning opportunities.

  15. Italy: An Open Air Museum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzorusso, Ann

    2016-04-01

    Imagine if you could see the River Styx, bathe in the Fountain of Youth, collect water which enhances fertility, wear a gem that heals bodily ailments, understand how our health is affected by geomagnetic fields, venture close to the flames of Hell on Earth and much, much, more. Know something? These things exist - on Earth - today - in Italy and you can visit them because Italy is an open air museum. Ann C. Pizzorusso, in her recent book, reveals how Italy's geology has affected its art, literature, architecture, religion, medicine and just about everything else. She explores the geologic birth of the land, describing the formation of the Alps and Apennines, romantic bays of Tuscany and Lazio, volcanoes of the south and Caribbean-like beaches of Puglia. But that's not all, from the first pages of this visually stunning book, the reader has the impression of being in an art museum, where one can wander from page to page to satisfy one's curiosity-- guided from time to time by the Etruscan priests, Virgil, Dante, Goethe or Leonardo da Vinci himself. Pizzorusso stitches together widely diverse topics - such as gemology, folk remedies, grottoes, painting, literature, physics and religion - using geology as a thread. Quoting everyone from Pliny the Elder to NASA physicist Friedemann Freund, the work is solidly backed scholarship that reads as easily as a summer novel. Wonderfully illustrated with many photos licensed from Italian museums, HRH Elizabeth II and the Ministero Beni Culturali the book highlights the best works in Italian museums and those outside in the "open air museums." This approach can be used in any other country in the world and can be used for cultural tourism (a tour following the book has been organized for cultural and university groups), an ideal way of linking museums to the surrounding landscape.

  16. Latest update of tests and improvements to US Coast Guard viscous oil pumping system.

    PubMed

    Drieu, Michael D; Nourse, Peter C; MacKay, Ronald; Cooper, David A; Hvidbak, Flemming

    2003-01-01

    Over the past nine years, the US Coast Guard has incorporated the prevention through people (PTP) philosophy as a "human factors" approach to learn how maritime operations can be regulated safer and be more efficient by evaluating training, management policies, operational procedures, and establishing partnerships with the maritime industry. One of the key elements of applying a PTP approach is identifying and incorporating lessons learned from major marine casualties and pollution incidents. Since 1997, the US Coast Guard National Strike Force has responded to three major oil spills involving foreign freight vessels grounding, which included the removal of highly viscous oil using various lightering equipment and systems. An informal workgroup consisting of the US Coast Guard, US Navy Supervisor of Salvage (NAVSUPSALV), and various representatives from oil pollution clean-up companies met at the following facilities: the Chevron Asphalt Facility in Edmonds, WA (September 1999), the Oil and Hazardous Materials Simulated Environmental Test Tank (OHMSETT) testing facility in Leonardo, New Jersey (November 1999 and March 2000), the Alaska Clean Seas (ACS) warehouse annex in Prudhoe Bay, AK (October 2000), and Cenac Towing Company facility in Houma, LA (May 2002). The group shared ideas and techniques, and tested different pumps and hose lengths with viscous oil. It was during the early tests that the first quantitative results showed just how efficient lubricated transport of heavy oil product could be, and broadened the knowledge of such methods to the entire industry. Although this technology had existed for many years in the oil production and handling industry, its use had never been investigated in a laboratory setting with regard to salvage response lightering systems.

  17. A Physically-Based and Distributed Tool for Modeling the Hydrological and Mechanical Processes of Shallow Landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnone, E.; Noto, L. V.; Dialynas, Y. G.; Caracciolo, D.; Bras, R. L.

    2015-12-01

    This work presents the capabilities of a model, i.e. the tRIBS-VEGGIE-Landslide, in two different versions, i.e. developed within a probabilistic framework and coupled with a root cohesion module. The probabilistic model treats geotechnical and soil retention curve parameters as random variables across the basin and estimates theoretical probability distributions of slope stability and the associated "factor of safety" commonly used to describe the occurrence of shallow landslides. The derived distributions are used to obtain the spatio-temporal dynamics of probability of failure, conditioned on soil moisture dynamics at each watershed location. The framework has been tested in the Luquillo Experimental Forest (Puerto Rico) where shallow landslides are common. In particular, the methodology was used to evaluate how the spatial and temporal patterns of precipitation, whose variability is significant over the basin, affect the distribution of probability of failure. Another version of the model accounts for the additional cohesion exerted by vegetation roots. The approach is to use the Fiber Bundle Model (FBM) framework that allows for the evaluation of the root strength as a function of the stress-strain relationships of bundles of fibers. The model requires the knowledge of the root architecture to evaluate the additional reinforcement from each root diameter class. The root architecture is represented with a branching topology model based on Leonardo's rule. The methodology has been tested on a simple case study to explore the role of both hydrological and mechanical root effects. Results demonstrate that the effects of root water uptake can at times be more significant than the mechanical reinforcement; and that the additional resistance provided by roots depends heavily on the vegetation root structure and length.

  18. Evaluation of the e-Learning material developed by EMERALD and EMIT for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Victoria; Tabakov, Slavik

    2005-09-01

    Two Leonardo projects, EMERALD and EMIT, have developed in a partnershipof university and hospital departments (the consortia) e-Learning materials in X-ray diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine, radiotherapy, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging for medical physics graduates and other healthcare professionals. These e-Learning materials are described in a separate paper in this issue. To assess the effectiveness and relevance of the e-Learning material, a series of evaluations by student users groups plus experts in medical physics education and training were undertaken. The students, with backgrounds in physics and clinical ultrasound, reviewed the e-Learning material using an evaluation form developed by the consortia. The student feedback was favourable with students commenting that their level of knowledge had increased having completed the tasks. Areas identified for development were a reduction in text volume and an increase in the time allowed for completion of some tasks. The feedback from the experts was positive with an overall appreciation of the value of the learning material as a resource for students in medical physics field across Europe and identified other disciplines in which the access to the learning material could be useful contribution to their learning. Suggestions made for improvements ranged from grading the tasks into basic and advanced topics to increasing the interactive nature of the material. These early evaluation of the e-Learning material look promising and provide a framework for further developments in the field. Insight into users and providers views is important if developers are to provide relevant and worthwhile educational learning opportunities. PMID:16087384

  19. Analysis of triterpenoids and phytosterols in vegetables by thin-layer chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Naumoska, Katerina; Vovk, Irena

    2015-02-13

    Three TLC methods were used for an initial screening of some common plant triterpenoids and phytosterols in cuticular wax extracts of different vegetables (zucchini, eggplant, tomato, red pepper, mangold, spinach, lettuce, white-colored radicchio di Castelfranco, raddichio Leonardo, white cabbage, red cabbage and savoy cabbage). The preliminary experiments showed that the studied vegetables are potential sources of triterpenoids and phytosterols. To identify the compounds present in the extracts with high certainty, the first TLC-MS(2) method was developed for the analysis of eight triterpenoids (lupeol, α-amyrin, β-amyrin, cycloartenol, cycloartenol acetate, lupeol acetate, lupenone and friedelin) and two phytosterols (β-sitosterol and stigmasterol). This method takes the advantages of: (1) a satisfactory separation of the target compounds; (2) their differentiation according to the band colors; and (3) the potential of their discrimination by the acquired first-order mass (MS) and product ion (MS(2)) spectra. Since the closely eluting compounds have complex and similar MS(2) spectra, distinguishing between them was possible by the proposed characteristic ions. Using a custom-built mass spectral library, the head to tail MS(2) spectra comparison of sample test solution zones and standard aided the compound identification. In addition to the molecular mass information, the developed atmospheric pressure chemical ionization method (APCI) in positive ion mode provided structural information, regarding the presence of functional group in the molecule. This approach resulted in many positively assigned compounds in the investigated vegetable waxes, from which more than a half are reported for the first time. PMID:25597891

  20. Unifying constructal theory of tree roots, canopies and forests.

    PubMed

    Bejan, A; Lorente, S; Lee, J

    2008-10-01

    Here, we show that the most basic features of tree and forest architecture can be put on a unifying theoretical basis, which is provided by the constructal law. Key is the integrative approach to understanding the emergence of "designedness" in nature. Trees and forests are viewed as integral components (along with dendritic river basins, aerodynamic raindrops, and atmospheric and oceanic circulation) of the much greater global architecture that facilitates the cyclical flow of water in nature (Fig. 1) and the flow of stresses between wind and ground. Theoretical features derived in this paper are: the tapered shape of the root and longitudinally uniform diameter and density of internal flow tubes, the near-conical shape of tree trunks and branches, the proportionality between tree length and wood mass raised to 1/3, the proportionality between total water mass flow rate and tree length, the proportionality between the tree flow conductance and the tree length scale raised to a power between 1 and 2, the existence of forest floor plans that maximize ground-air flow access, the proportionality between the length scale of the tree and its rank raised to a power between -1 and -1/2, and the inverse proportionality between the tree size and number of trees of the same size. This paper further shows that there exists an optimal ratio of leaf volume divided by total tree volume, trees of the same size must have a larger wood volume fraction in windy climates, and larger trees must pack more wood per unit of tree volume than smaller trees. Comparisons with empirical correlations and formulas based on ad hoc models are provided. This theory predicts classical notions such as Leonardo's rule, Huber's rule, Zipf's distribution, and the Fibonacci sequence. The difference between modeling (description) and theory (prediction) is brought into evidence.

  1. United States Human Access to Space, Exploration of the Moon and Preparation for Mars Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhatigan, Jennifer L.

    2009-01-01

    In the past, men like Leonardo da Vinci and Jules Verne imagined the future and envisioned fantastic inventions such as winged flying machines, submarines, and parachutes, and posited human adventures like transoceanic flight and journeys to the Moon. Today, many of their ideas are reality and form the basis for our modern world. While individual visionaries like da Vinci and Verne are remembered for the accuracy of their predictions, today entire nations are involved in the process of envisioning and defining the future development of mankind, both on and beyond the Earth itself. Recently, Russian, European, and Chinese teams have all announced plans for developing their own next generation human space vehicles. The Chinese have announced their intention to conduct human lunar exploration, and have flown three crewed space missions since 2003, including a flight with three crew members to test their extravehicular (spacewalking) capabilities in September 2008. Very soon, the prestige, economic development, scientific discovery, and strategic security advantage historically associated with leadership in space exploration and exploitation may no longer be the undisputed province of the United States. Much like the sponsors of the seafaring explorers of da Vinci's age, we are motivated by the opportunity to obtain new knowledge and new resources for the growth and development of our own civilization. NASA's new Constellation Program, established in 2005, is tasked with maintaining the United States leadership in space, exploring the Moon, creating a sustained human lunar presence, and eventually extending human operations to Mars and beyond. Through 2008, the Constellation Program developed a full set of detailed program requirements and is now completing the preliminary design phase for the new Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle, and the associated infrastructure necessary for humans to explore the Moon. Component testing is well

  2. [The relations between music and medicine in history and present].

    PubMed

    Gasenzer, E R; Neugebauer, E A M

    2011-12-01

    Since the ancient world relations exist between music and medicine. In the prehistoric music, dance, rhythm and religious practice were important parts of shamanism and early medical procedures. Important philosophers of the classic period already began with the scientific research of musical and medical questions. During the middle age convents conserved ancient knowledge. They offered medical care and taught the ancient knowledge of medicine, arts and music. The Gregorian choral was created. Traditions of popular believe expressed the relations between music and medicine. The Renaissance became the great époque of art, music and science. Leonardo da Vinci and Andreas Vesalius presented a new style of artistic working and scientific knowledge. Also the basics of western music, like tonality was developed. With the separation of scientific subjects in natural sciences and humanities, the relationships between music and medicine fall into oblivion. During the classic and romantic era music and art were important parts of cultural live of the well educated society. With the development of neurology, psychiatry and psychoanalysis more physicians and scientists were interested in musical questions. Questions about the role of music in human behavior and the ancient method to use music in medical treatment became popular. In the early 20th century the music therapy was developed. Today the effects of music to the human brain are investigated with radionuclear methods. A lot of investigations showed the effect of music and music performance to humans. Music plays an important part in psychotherapy, therapeutic pedagogy and medical care, the importance of music and music therapy increases. In the 80ies of the 20th century the performing arts medicine was developed, which asks for the medical problems of performing musicians.

  3. Latest update of tests and improvements to US Coast Guard viscous oil pumping system.

    PubMed

    Drieu, Michael D; Nourse, Peter C; MacKay, Ronald; Cooper, David A; Hvidbak, Flemming

    2003-01-01

    Over the past nine years, the US Coast Guard has incorporated the prevention through people (PTP) philosophy as a "human factors" approach to learn how maritime operations can be regulated safer and be more efficient by evaluating training, management policies, operational procedures, and establishing partnerships with the maritime industry. One of the key elements of applying a PTP approach is identifying and incorporating lessons learned from major marine casualties and pollution incidents. Since 1997, the US Coast Guard National Strike Force has responded to three major oil spills involving foreign freight vessels grounding, which included the removal of highly viscous oil using various lightering equipment and systems. An informal workgroup consisting of the US Coast Guard, US Navy Supervisor of Salvage (NAVSUPSALV), and various representatives from oil pollution clean-up companies met at the following facilities: the Chevron Asphalt Facility in Edmonds, WA (September 1999), the Oil and Hazardous Materials Simulated Environmental Test Tank (OHMSETT) testing facility in Leonardo, New Jersey (November 1999 and March 2000), the Alaska Clean Seas (ACS) warehouse annex in Prudhoe Bay, AK (October 2000), and Cenac Towing Company facility in Houma, LA (May 2002). The group shared ideas and techniques, and tested different pumps and hose lengths with viscous oil. It was during the early tests that the first quantitative results showed just how efficient lubricated transport of heavy oil product could be, and broadened the knowledge of such methods to the entire industry. Although this technology had existed for many years in the oil production and handling industry, its use had never been investigated in a laboratory setting with regard to salvage response lightering systems. PMID:12899890

  4. STS-40 Mission Insignia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The STS-40 patch makes a contemporary statement focusing on human beings living and working in space. Against a background of the universe, seven silver stars, interspersed about the orbital path of Columbia, represent the seven crew members. The orbiter's flight path forms a double-helix, designed to represent the DNA molecule common to all living creatures. In the words of a crew spokesman, ...(the helix) affirms the ceaseless expansion of human life and American involvement in space while simultaneously emphasizing the medical and biological studies to which this flight is dedicated. Above Columbia, the phrase Spacelab Life Sciences 1 defines both the Shuttle mission and its payload. Leonardo Da Vinci's Vitruvian man, silhouetted against the blue darkness of the heavens, is in the upper center portion of the patch. With one foot on Earth and arms extended to touch Shuttle's orbit, the crew feels, he serves as a powerful embodiment of the extension of human inquiry from the boundaries of Earth to the limitless laboratory of space. Sturdily poised amid the stars, he serves to link scentists on Earth to the scientists in space asserting the harmony of efforts which produce meaningful scientific spaceflight missions. A brilliant red and yellow Earth limb (center) links Earth to space as it radiates from a native American symbol for the sun. At the frontier of space, the traditional symbol for the sun vividly links America's past to America's future, the crew states. Beneath the orbiting Shuttle, darkness of night rests peacefully over the United States. Drawn by artist Sean Collins, the STS 40 Space Shuttle patch was designed by the crewmembers for the flight.

  5. Development of a versatile XRF scanner for the elemental imaging of paintworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravaud, E.; Pichon, L.; Laval, E.; Gonzalez, V.; Eveno, M.; Calligaro, T.

    2016-01-01

    Scanning XRF is a powerful elemental imaging technique introduced at the synchrotron that has recently been transposed to laboratory. The growing interest in this technique stems from its ability to collect images reflecting pigment distribution within large areas on artworks by means of their elemental signature. In that sense, scanning XRF appears highly complementary to standard imaging techniques (Visible, UV, IR photography and X-ray radiography). The versatile XRF scanner presented here has been designed and built at the C2RMF in response to specific constraints: transportability, cost-effectiveness and ability to scan large areas within a single working day. The instrument is based on a standard X-ray generator with sub-millimetre collimated beam and a SDD-based spectrometer to collected X-ray spectra. The instrument head is scanned in front of the painting by means of motorised movements to cover an area up to 300 × 300 mm2 with a resolution of 0.5 mm (600 × 600 pixels). The 15-kg head is mounted on a stable photo stand for rapid positioning on paintworks and maintains a free side-access for safety; it can also be attached to a lighter tripod for field measurements. Alignment is achieved with a laser pointer and a micro-camera. With a scanning speed of 5 mm/s and 0.1 s/point, elemental maps are collected in 10 h, i.e. a working day. The X-ray spectra of all pixels are rapidly processed using an open source program to derive elemental maps. To illustrate the capabilities of this instrument, this contribution presents the results obtained on the Belle Ferronnière painted by Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) and conserved in the Musée du Louvre, prior to its restoration at the C2RMF.

  6. The TRIPOD e-learning Platform for the Training of Earthquake Safety Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppari, S.; Di Pasquale, G.; Goretti, A.; Papa, F.; Papa, S.; Paoli, G.; Pizza, A. G.; Severino, M.

    2008-07-01

    The paper summarizes the results of the in progress EU Project titled TRIPOD (Training Civil Engineers on Post-Earthquake Safety Assessment of Damaged Buildings), funded under the Leonardo Da Vinci program. The main theme of the project is the development of a methodology and a learning platform for the training of technicians involved in post-earthquake building safety inspections. In the event of a catastrophic earthquake, emergency building inspections constitute a major undertaking with severe social impact. Given the inevitable chaotic conditions and the urgent need of a great number of specialized individuals to carry out inspections, past experience indicates that inspection teams are often formed in an adhoc manner, under stressful conditions, at a varying levels of technical expertise and experience, sometime impairing the reliability and consistency of the inspection results. Furthermore each Country has its own building damage and safety assessment methodology, developed according to its experience, laws, building technology and seismicity. This holds also for the partners participating to the project (Greece, Italy, Turkey, Cyprus), that all come from seismically sensitive Mediterranean countries. The project aims at alleviating the above shortcomings by designing and developing a training methodology and e-platform, forming a complete training program targeted at inspection engineers, specialized personnel and civil protection agencies. The e-learning platform will provide flexible and friendly authoring mechanisms, self-teaching and assessment capabilities, course and trainee management, etc. Courses will be also made available as stand-alone multimedia applications on CD and in the form of a complete pocket handbook. Moreover the project will offer the possibility of upgrading different experiences and practices: a first step towards the harmonization of methodologies and tools of different Countries sharing similar problems. Finally, through wide

  7. EDITORIAL: The 14th International Symposium on Flow Visualization, ISFV14 The 14th International Symposium on Flow Visualization, ISFV14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung Chun; Lee, Sang Joon

    2011-06-01

    The 14th International Symposium on Flow Visualization (ISFV14) was held in Daegu, Korea, on 21-24 June 2010. There were 304 participants from 17 countries. The state of the art in many aspects of flow visualization was presented and discussed, and a total of 243 papers from 19 countries were presented. Two special lectures and four invited lectures, 48 paper sessions and one poster session were held in five session rooms and in a lobby over four days. Among the paper sessions, those on 'biological flows', 'micro/nano fluidics', 'PIV/PTV' and 'compressible and sonic flows' received great attention from the participants of ISFV14. Special events included presentations of 'The Asanuma Award' and 'The Leonardo Da Vinci Award' to prominent contributors. Awards for photos and movies were given to three scientists for their excellence in flow visualizations. Sixteen papers were selected by the Scientific Committee of ISFV14. After the standard peer review process of this journal, six papers were finally accepted for publication. We wish to thank the editors of MST for making it possible to publish this special feature from ISFV14. We also thank the authors for their careful and insightful work and cooperation in the preparation of revised papers. It will be our pleasure if readers appreciate the hot topics in flow visualization research as a result of this special feature. We also hope that the progress in flow visualization will create new research fields. The 15th International Symposium on Flow Visualization will be held in Minsk, Belarus in 2012. We would like to express sincere thanks to the staff at IOP Publishing for their kind support.

  8. Ramification of Channel Networks Incised by Groundwater Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, R. S.; Seybold, H. F.; Petroff, A. P.; Devauchelle, O.; Rothman, D.

    2011-12-01

    The geometry of channel networks has been a source of fascination since at least Leonardo da Vinci's time. Yet a comprehensive understanding of ramification---the mechanism of branching by which a stream network acquires its geometric complexity---remains elusive. To investigate the mechanisms of ramification and network growth, we consider channel growth driven by groundwater flow as a model system, analogous to a medical scientist's laboratory rat. We test our theoretical predictions through analysis of a particularly compelling example found on the Florida Panhandle north of Bristol. As our ultimate goal is to understand ramification and growth dynamics of the entire network, we build a computational model based on the following growth hypothesis: Channels grow in the direction that captures the maximum water flux. When there are two such directions, tips bifurcate. The direction of growth can be determined from the expansion of the ground water field around each tip, where each coefficient in this expansion has a physical interpretation. The first coefficient in the expansion determines the ground water discharge, leading to a straight growth of the channel. The second term describes the asymmetry in the water field leading to a bending of the stream in the direction of maximal water flux. The ratio between the first and the third coefficient determines a critical distance rc over which the tip feels inhomogeneities in the ground water table. This initiates then the splitting of the tip. In order to test our growth hypothesis and to determine rc, we grow the Florida network backward. At each time step we calculate the solution of the ground water field and determine the appropriate expansion coefficients around each tip. Comparing this simulation result to the predicted values provides us with a stringent measure for rc and the significance of our growth hypothesis.

  9. [Virgin olive oil. From legend to scientific knowledge of the nutraceutical aspects].

    PubMed

    Caramia, G

    2006-01-01

    Proper nutrition has been considered the basis of good health since ancient times. Hippocrates (460-377 BC), father of modern medicine in the western world, claimed that "good health implies an awareness of the powers of natural or processed foods", the Salernitan School (eleventh-twelfth centuries) maintained that "the doctor must observe what food consists of, how much, and when it must be eaten", while Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) believed that "a man's life depends on what he eats". We know that lipids are important in nutrition and extra-virgin olive oil plays a predominant role in this field, recognised for its high levels of monounsaturated fatty acids. An example of a "nutraceutic" or "functional" food right from infancy, it is one of the best medicaments for delaying aging, and is also a good source of phytochemicals including polyphenolic compounds, squalene, alpha-tocopherol, carotenoid that may contribute to its overall therapeutic characteristics. An integral ingredient of the Mediterranean diet, extra-virgin olive oil has always been considered a middle road between food and medicine and there is growing evidence that its health benefits include reduction of coronary heart disease risk factor, prevention of several types of cancer, and the modification of immune and inflammatory responses. The origins of the olive tree date back to the Eneolithical era, or Copper Age, in the sixth millennium BC. Having first appeared in Italy during the Bronze Age, the fruit and oil of the olive tree were widely used in nutrition, medicine, art, literature, and daily life during the Etruscan and Roman civilisations, and throughout the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Mysteriously entwined with our own history, the olive tree has a human shape, strong, resilient, tenacious, filled with fruit, but also wounded, suffering and moving. Well-grounded reasons exist for considering olive oil the best nutritional gift we can offer ourselves as it preserves good health, improves

  10. Entropy, recycling and macroeconomics of water resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakatsanis, Georgios; Mamassis, Nikos; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris

    2014-05-01

    We propose a macroeconomic model for water quantity and quality supply multipliers derived by water recycling (Karakatsanis et al. 2013). Macroeconomic models that incorporate natural resource conservation have become increasingly important (European Commission et al. 2012). In addition, as an estimated 80% of globally used freshwater is not reused (United Nations 2012), under increasing population trends, water recycling becomes a solution of high priority. Recycling of water resources creates two major conservation effects: (1) conservation of water in reservoirs and aquifers and (2) conservation of ecosystem carrying capacity due to wastewater flux reduction. Statistical distribution properties of the recycling efficiencies -on both water quantity and quality- for each sector are of vital economic importance. Uncertainty and complexity of water reuse in sectors are statistically quantified by entropy. High entropy of recycling efficiency values signifies greater efficiency dispersion; which -in turn- may indicate the need for additional infrastructure for the statistical distribution's both shifting and concentration towards higher efficiencies that lead to higher supply multipliers. Keywords: Entropy, water recycling, water supply multipliers, conservation, recycling efficiencies, macroeconomics References 1. European Commission (EC), Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), International Monetary Fund (IMF), Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), United Nations (UN) and World Bank (2012), System of Environmental and Economic Accounting (SEEA) Central Framework (White cover publication), United Nations Statistics Division 2. Karakatsanis, G., N. Mamassis, D. Koutsoyiannis and A. Efstratiades (2013), Entropy and reliability of water use via a statistical approach of scarcity, 5th EGU Leonardo Conference - Hydrofractals 2013 - STAHY '13, Kos Island, Greece, European Geosciences Union, International Association of Hydrological Sciences

  11. Selections from 2015: Mixing in Two Stars that Touch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-12-01

    Editors Note:In these last two weeks of 2015, well be looking at a few selections from among the most-downloaded paperspublished in AAS journals this year. The usual posting schedule will resume after the AAS winter meeting.Discovery of the Massive Overcontact Binary VFTS 352: Evidence for Enhanced Internal MixingPublished October2015Main takeaway:A team led by Leonardo Almeida (Johns Hopkins University and University of So Paulo, Brazil) discovered the binary star system VFTS 352 in the Large Magellanic Cloud. This pair of O-type stars is an overcontact binary the two stars are orbiting each other so closely that theyre actually touching each other.Why its interesting:Snapshots of VFTS 352 at a few orbital phases, the systems light curves, and its radial velocity curves. [Almeida et al. 2015]We know little about the overcontact stage that occurs whentwo massive stars coalesce primarily because its typically short-lived, so we have few observations of stars in this stage. VFTS 352 is the most massive and earliest spectral type overcontact system known to date. Its especially interesting because the observations suggest that the strong tidal forces in this systemmay have caused enhanced internal mixing between the stars centers and envelopes. These stars interiors may therefore be much more homogenous than is typical.What to expect:Ultimately, this pair of stars will likely share one of two fates. In the classical scenario, theyll expand and eventually merge to produce a single rapidly rotating, massive star. If their internal mixing is large enough, however, they could remain compact rather than expanding. In that case, they would progress to the end of their main-sequence lifetimes without ever merging, potentially evolving to become a black-hole binary system.CitationL. A. Almeida et al 2015 ApJ 812 102. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/812/2/102

  12. The TRIPOD e-learning Platform for the Training of Earthquake Safety Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Coppari, S.; Di Pasquale, G.; Goretti, A.; Papa, F.; Papa, S.; Paoli, G.; Pizza, A. G.; Severino, M.

    2008-07-08

    The paper summarizes the results of the in progress EU Project titled TRIPOD (Training Civil Engineers on Post-Earthquake Safety Assessment of Damaged Buildings), funded under the Leonardo Da Vinci program. The main theme of the project is the development of a methodology and a learning platform for the training of technicians involved in post-earthquake building safety inspections. In the event of a catastrophic earthquake, emergency building inspections constitute a major undertaking with severe social impact. Given the inevitable chaotic conditions and the urgent need of a great number of specialized individuals to carry out inspections, past experience indicates that inspection teams are often formed in an adhoc manner, under stressful conditions, at a varying levels of technical expertise and experience, sometime impairing the reliability and consistency of the inspection results. Furthermore each Country has its own building damage and safety assessment methodology, developed according to its experience, laws, building technology and seismicity. This holds also for the partners participating to the project (Greece, Italy, Turkey, Cyprus), that all come from seismically sensitive Mediterranean countries. The project aims at alleviating the above shortcomings by designing and developing a training methodology and e-platform, forming a complete training program targeted at inspection engineers, specialized personnel and civil protection agencies. The e-learning platform will provide flexible and friendly authoring mechanisms, self-teaching and assessment capabilities, course and trainee management, etc. Courses will be also made available as stand-alone multimedia applications on CD and in the form of a complete pocket handbook. Moreover the project will offer the possibility of upgrading different experiences and practices: a first step towards the harmonization of methodologies and tools of different Countries sharing similar problems. Finally, through wide

  13. ['A sad and painful heart'--Andreas Vesalius as cardiologist].

    PubMed

    Haneveld, G T

    1993-01-01

    One needs courage to dissociate oneself from ideas maintained for ages and put forward by authorities. How laborious this process has been for Vesalius concerning the heart, is obvious when we compare the information of an eye-witness with both editions of the De Humani Corporis Fabrica (1543 and 1555). He must have come hesitantly to the conclusion that the views on the permeability of the septum cordis, as they were supported by Galen, Mondino and Johann Winther, a professor at Louvain, could not be defended. However, they had been essential in the considerations about the blood-flow. Although Vesalius demonstrated by vivisection-experiments that a relation exists between the pulse and the heart contractions, he was not an experimenting cardiophysiologist. In this respect, he stood far behind his contemporary Leonardo da Vinci, who made experiments on heart ntractions and the bloodstream along the heart valves. Vesalius was an anatomist! And a morphologist! But he was also a physician. In this respect, he also was interested in the pathological aspects of anatomy. So he recalled in, his last book, Anatomicarum Gabrielis Fallopii Observationum Examen (1564) some cardiologically interesting patients, a.o. the courtier van Immerseel, with a very unequal pulse and "a sad and painful heart" (tristi in corde, sensu doloreve), by whom a heart abnormality was found post mortem, that in modern terms we could call "an old heart infarction with thrombus formation." According to Schenk von Grafenberg, Vesalius was dreaming of a big book about anatomo-pathology, but alas, he never wrote it. Undoubtedly he would have trusted more his eyes and less Galen: "non solum ex Galenis testimonio, sed etiam oculis ipsis perspexeris".

  14. The CaSSIS imaging system: optical performance overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambicorti, L.; Piazza, D.; Pommerol, A.; Roloff, V.; Gerber, M.; Ziethe, R.; El-Maarry, M. R.; Weigel, T.; Johnson, M.; Vernani, D.; Pelo, E.; Da Deppo, V.; Cremonese, G.; Ficai Veltroni, I.; Thomas, N.

    2016-07-01

    The Colour and Stereo Surface Imaging System (CaSSIS) is the high-resolution scientific imager on board the European Space Agency's (ESA) ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) which was launched on 14th March 2016 to Mars. CaSSIS will observe the Martian surface from an altitude of 400 km with an optical system based on a modified TMA telescope (Three Mirrors Anastigmatic configuration) with a 4th powered folding mirror. The camera EPD (Entrance Pupil Diameter) is 135 mm, and the expected focal length is 880 mm, giving an F# 6.5 in the wavelength range of 400- 1100 nm with a distortion designed to be less than 2%. CaSSIS will operate in a "push-frame" mode with a monolithic Filter Strip Assembly (FSA) produced by Optics Balzers Jena GmbH selecting 4 colour bands and integrated on the focal plane by Leonardo-Finmeccanica SpA (under TAS-I responsibility). The detector is a spare of the Simbio-Sys detector of the Italian Space Agency (ASI), developed by Raytheon Vision Systems. It is a 2kx2k hybrid Si-PIN array with a 10 μm pixel pitch. A scale of 4.6 m/px from the nominal orbit is foreseen to produce frames of 9.4 km × 47 km on the Martian surface. The University of Bern was in charge of the full instrument integration as well as the characterization of the focal plane and calibration of the entire instrument. The paper will present an overview of the CaSSIS telescope and FPA optical performance. The preliminary results of on-ground calibration and the first commissioning campaign (April 2016) will be described.

  15. Computer analysis of lighting style in fine art: steps towards inter-artist studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stork, David G.

    2011-03-01

    Stylometry in visual art-the mathematical description of artists' styles - has been based on a number of properties of works, such as color, brush stroke shape, visual texture, and measures of contours' curvatures. We introduce the concept of quantitative measures of lighting, such as statistical descriptions of spatial coherence, diuseness, and so forth, as properties of artistic style. Some artists of the high Renaissance, such as Leonardo, worked from nature and strove to render illumination "faithfully" photorealists, such as Richard Estes, worked from photographs and duplicated the "physics based" lighting accurately. As such, each had dierent motivations, methodologies, stagings, and "accuracies" in rendering lighting clues. Perceptual studies show that observers are poor judges of properties of lighting in photographs such as consistency (and thus by extension in paintings as well); computer methods such as rigorous cast-shadow analysis, occluding-contour analysis and spherical harmonic based estimation of light fields can be quite accurate. For this reasons, computer lighting analysis can provide a new tools for art historical studies. We review lighting analysis in paintings such as Vermeer's Girl with a pearl earring, de la Tour's Christ in the carpenter's studio, Caravaggio's Magdalen with the smoking flame and Calling of St. Matthew) and extend our corpus to works where lighting coherence is of interest to art historians, such as Caravaggio's Adoration of the Shepherds or Nativity (1609) in the Capuchin church of Santa Maria degli Angeli. Our measure of lighting coherence may help reveal the working methods of some artists and in diachronic studies of individual artists. We speculate on artists and art historical questions that may ultimately profit from future renements to these new computational tools.

  16. ["Golden proportion" and its application to calculate dentition].

    PubMed

    Vadachkoriia, N R; Gumberidze, N Sh; Mandzhavidze, N A

    2007-01-01

    Within an evolutionary process, the nature has created the standard of aesthetics - a "gold proportion" on the basis of which, the parts of human body, to be more exact, teeth and denture correspond to each other and to own parts by the size, which is the ideal precondition for ideal appearance. The charming smile serves as the proof, that teeth in denture are located by a principle of "gold proportion". A "gold proportion" is the corner stone of beauty and it can be applied with success in stomatology. Proportion is the certain ratio between parts, and proportional means a proper correlation of parts among themselves. It is reputed, that knowledge about "gold proportion" Pythagor has got from products of the Egyptian and Babylon scientists. And this is true, proportions of cult constructions, bas-relieves, pyramids in Giza, home appliances and ornaments from Tutanhamon tomb testify, that under their creation the Egyptian masters were guided by a principle of "gold proportion". The facade of ancient Greek temple Parthenon is built by a principle of "gold proportion". During archeological digs of this temple the compasses which sculptors and architects of an ancient world used has been found. The "gold proportion" is mentioned in the work which has reached us "Beginning" the author is the scientist of antique epoch Euclid. In 1509, in Venice the book of Luka Pacholi the "Divine proportion" has been published, its illustration is attributed to Leonardo de Vinci. This work has been recognized as a "Hymn of a gold proportion". In 1885 the German researcher professor Zeising published his work - "Aesthetic researches". When Zeising has received numerical values of piece length, he saw that they coincided with figures of some numerical sequence, which was offered by the great Italian mathematician of Middle Ages Fibonacci (or Leonardo Pisano). In his composition the "Abacus Book" Leonardo Fibonacci showed aforesaid sequence of numbers, by means of which he has explained

  17. ["Golden proportion" and its application to calculate dentition].

    PubMed

    Vadachkoriia, N R; Gumberidze, N Sh; Mandzhavidze, N A

    2007-01-01

    Within an evolutionary process, the nature has created the standard of aesthetics - a "gold proportion" on the basis of which, the parts of human body, to be more exact, teeth and denture correspond to each other and to own parts by the size, which is the ideal precondition for ideal appearance. The charming smile serves as the proof, that teeth in denture are located by a principle of "gold proportion". A "gold proportion" is the corner stone of beauty and it can be applied with success in stomatology. Proportion is the certain ratio between parts, and proportional means a proper correlation of parts among themselves. It is reputed, that knowledge about "gold proportion" Pythagor has got from products of the Egyptian and Babylon scientists. And this is true, proportions of cult constructions, bas-relieves, pyramids in Giza, home appliances and ornaments from Tutanhamon tomb testify, that under their creation the Egyptian masters were guided by a principle of "gold proportion". The facade of ancient Greek temple Parthenon is built by a principle of "gold proportion". During archeological digs of this temple the compasses which sculptors and architects of an ancient world used has been found. The "gold proportion" is mentioned in the work which has reached us "Beginning" the author is the scientist of antique epoch Euclid. In 1509, in Venice the book of Luka Pacholi the "Divine proportion" has been published, its illustration is attributed to Leonardo de Vinci. This work has been recognized as a "Hymn of a gold proportion". In 1885 the German researcher professor Zeising published his work - "Aesthetic researches". When Zeising has received numerical values of piece length, he saw that they coincided with figures of some numerical sequence, which was offered by the great Italian mathematician of Middle Ages Fibonacci (or Leonardo Pisano). In his composition the "Abacus Book" Leonardo Fibonacci showed aforesaid sequence of numbers, by means of which he has explained

  18. Electron cyclotron emission imaging and applications in magnetic fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobias, Benjamin John

    Energy production through the burning of fossil fuels is an unsustainable practice. Exponentially increasing energy consumption and dwindling natural resources ensure that coal and gas fueled power plants will someday be a thing of the past. However, even before fuel reserves are depleted, our planet may well succumb to disastrous side effects, namely the build up of carbon emissions in the environment triggering world-wide climate change and the countless industrial spills of pollutants that continue to this day. Many alternatives are currently being developed, but none has so much promise as fusion nuclear energy, the energy of the sun. The confinement of hot plasma at temperatures in excess of 100 million Kelvin by a carefully arranged magnetic field for the realization of a self-sustaining fusion power plant requires new technologies and improved understanding of fundamental physical phenomena. Imaging of electron cyclotron radiation lends insight into the spatial and temporal behavior of electron temperature fluctuations and instabilities, providing a powerful diagnostic for investigations into basic plasma physics and nuclear fusion reactor operation. This dissertation presents the design and implementation of a new generation of Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) diagnostics on toroidal magnetic fusion confinement devices, or tokamaks, around the world. The underlying physics of cyclotron radiation in fusion plasmas is reviewed, and a thorough discussion of millimeter wave imaging techniques and heterodyne radiometry in ECEI follows. The imaging of turbulence and fluid flows has evolved over half a millennium since Leonardo da Vinci's first sketches of cascading water, and applications for ECEI in fusion research are broad ranging. Two areas of physical investigation are discussed in this dissertation: the identification of poloidal shearing in Alfven eigenmode structures predicted by hybrid gyrofluid-magnetohydrodynamic (gyrofluid-MHD) modeling, and

  19. Specialist English as a foreign language for European public health: evaluation of competencies and needs among Polish and Lithuanian students.

    PubMed

    Sumskas, Linas; Czabanowska, Katarzyna; Bruneviciūte, Raimonda; Kregzdyte, Rima; Krikstaponyte, Zita; Ziomkiewicz, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Foreign languages are becoming an essential prerequisite for a successful carrier among all professions including public health professionals in many countries. The expanding role of English as a mode of communication allows for university graduates to project and to seek their career in English-speaking countries. The present study was carried out in the framework of EU Leonardo da Vinci project "Specialist English as a foreign language for European public health." The study aimed to get a deeper insight how the English language is perceived as a foreign language, by Polish and Lithuanian public health students, what is level of their language competence, which level of English proficiency they expect to use in future. MATERIAL AND METHODS. A total of 246 respondents completed the special questionnaires in autumn semester in 2005. A questionnaire form was developed by the international project team. For evaluation of English competences, the Language Passport (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages of Council of Europe) was applied. RESULTS. Current self-rated proficiency of the English language was at the same level for Lithuanian (3.47+/-1.14) and Polish (3.31+/-0.83) respondents (P>0.05). Majority of respondents (88.6% of Lithuanian and 87.8% of Polish) reported using the English language for their current studies. Respondents reported a significant increase in necessity for higher level of English proficiency in future: mean scores provided by respondents changed from B1 level to B2 level. Respondents gave priority to less formal and practice-based interactive English teaching methods (going abroad, contacts with native speakers) in comparison with theory-oriented methods of learning (self-studying, Internet courses). CONCLUSIONS. Similar levels of English language in all five areas of language skills were established in Polish and Lithuanian university students. Respondents gave more priorities to less formal and practice-based interactive

  20. Determinants of musculoskeletal frailty and the risk of falls in old age.

    PubMed

    Runge, M; Hunter, G

    2006-01-01

    Neuromuscular parameters that describe locomotion are indispensable variables for the diagnosis and treatment of frailty, fall risk and osteoporosis. A scientifically-based standardized locomotor assessment should be an essential part of medical examinations in research and clinical practice. There has been no previous consensus regarding which test procedures should be included in a locomotor assessment. The goal of this article is to provide a rationale for the selection of appropriate locomotor tests in a comprehensive locomotor assessment for elderly patients. We propose that a locomotor assessment should comprise the parameters that have been proven predictive for both falls and impending disability. The parameters should be measured in the standard units of physics. Therefore, we propose the following tests for a standardized locomotor assessment: (1) Self-selected gait velocity as the single best measure of general locomotor status and a good predictor of age-related adverse events; (2) Chair rise test (timed 5 chair rises) which measures power on vertical movement and the hip surrounding muscles as the most important neuromuscular risk factor for falls and fall-related fractures; (3) Tandem standing and tandem walking to measure postural capacity (balance) to the side; (4) Timed up and go test as a global screening procedure; (5) Clinical gait analysis with special focus on regularity; and (6) At least on a research level, movement must be measured referring to the terms of physics by mechanography. Mechanography (Leonardo force plate system, Novotec Pforzheim, Germany) records the time course of ground reaction forces, velocity of the vertical movements of the center of mass and power during unrestricted physiological movements. In the mechanogram the eccentric and concentric phases of movements can be differentiated and the storage of energy in the elastic elements of the body can be examined. The kinetics of human movement is explained by mechanograms of

  1. Favourite movie stars, their tobacco use in contemporary movies, and its association with adolescent smoking

    PubMed Central

    Tickle, J.; Sargent, J.; Dalton, M.; Beach, M.; Heatherton, T.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess the relation between adolescents' favourite movie stars, the portrayal of tobacco use by those stars in contemporary motion pictures, and adolescent smoking.
DESIGN AND SETTING—632 students (sixth to 12th grade, ages 10-19 years) from five rural New England public schools completed a voluntary, self administered survey in October 1996. The survey assessed tobacco use, other variables associated with adolescent smoking, and favourite movie star. In addition, tobacco use by 43 selected movie stars was measured in films between 1994 and 1996.
OUTCOME MEASURES—Students were categorised into an ordinal five point index (tobacco status) based on their smoking behaviour and their smoking susceptibility: non-susceptible never smokers, susceptible never smokers, non-current experimenters, current experimenters, and smokers. We determined the adjusted cumulative odds of having advanced smoking status based on the amount of on-screen tobacco use by their favourite film star.
RESULTS—Of the 43 stars, 65% used tobacco at least once, and 42% portrayed smoking as an essential character trait in one or more films. Stars who smoked more than twice in a film were considered smokers. For adolescents whose favourite stars smoked in only one film, the odds of being higher on the smoking index was 0.78 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.53 to 1.15). For adolescents whose favourite stars smoked in two films, the odds of being higher on the smoking index was 1.5 (95% CI 1.01 to 2.32). For adolescents whose favourite stars smoked in three or more films (Leonardo DiCaprio, Sharon Stone, John Travolta), the odds of being higher on the smoking index was 3.1 (95% CI 1.34 to 7.12). Among never smokers (n = 281), those who chose stars who were smokers in three or more films were much more likely to have favourable attitudes toward smoking (adjusted odds ratio 16.2, 95% CI 2.3 to 112).
CONCLUSIONS—Adolescents who choose movie stars who use tobacco

  2. [Colors and their meaning in culture and psychology--a historical outline and contemporary status of color vision theories].

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, Andrzej; Lewicka, Romana; Torlińska, Teresa; Stelcer, Bogusław

    2008-01-01

    The mechanism of color perception has intrigued scholars from antiquity. However, the understanding of this phenomena only came with the recognition of the nature of light and visual perception. Ancient concepts, present in science until the Renaissance, were based more on philosophical considerations and theoretical speculations than on anatomical studies and a matter-of-fact assessment of physiological functions of the visual system. From antiquity to 17th century scientific approach to the concept of vision was dominated by two theories: intromission and extramission (emanation). Intromission theory, propagated by Alhazen (lbn al.-Haythama), Vitello, John Peckham, Roger Bacon and Leonardo da Vinci, assumed that the light was transmitted from the observed object perpendicularly to the transparent eye structures. Johannes Kepler was the first scholar to propose that the retina was the receptive part of the eye. In the first half of the 17th century, Kepler's groundbreaking optical achievements and anatomical discoveries of many other scientists cast new light on the understanding of the role of different eye structures, finally wiping out the intromission theory. A further major achievement contributing to the recognition of the true nature of colors was a theory presented by Newton in 1688. He argued that they were colored rays, and not white light, that were composed of homogenous and pure light. It was, however, not until the 19th century when two modern theories of color appeared, i.e. a trichromatic theory mostly associated with the names of Young and Hemlholtz, and an opponent colors theory of Hering. In the 20th century, the two theories--previously assumed as contradictory--were joined into the zone theories of color vision. Colors have their cultural and social meanings, as far as a very individual and personal interpretation. In the former function they are used to illustrate some cultural and sociological phenomena; in the latter, they are helpful in

  3. [The thyroid gland in Anothomia Mundini (1316)].

    PubMed

    Lamberg, B A

    2001-01-01

    Andreas Vesalius described the human thyroid lobes very distinctly in his De humani corporis fabrica in 1543 calling them glandulae laryngis. Before him Leonardo da Vinci had depicted the human thyroid gland in his anatomical drawings. The first publication which could be called a textbook of human anatomy, because it was used as the basis for cathedral teaching in human anatomy for about two centuries, was the Anothomia of Mundinus Liucius, Mondino de'Liuzzi, published in 1316. In the chapter on the blood vessels of the neck he describes two glands, which he calls amigdalae, situated under the longitudinal muscles and below the larynx. Their function should be 1) to wet the trachea; 2) to fill the grove below the larynx because the neck was broader above due to the large larynx but much slender below because of the narrower trachea. And 3): they should function as a shield for the deep arteries and veins. Later anatomists at the beginning of the 15th and the 16th century, like Achillini, Massa and Zerbus, all used the text of Mundinus but obviously they tried to locate the glands of Mundinus to the tonsils apparently only because he used the denomination amigdalae. Berengario da Carpi, however, who was a much experienced anatomist, published a large treatise Commentaria super Anothomia Mundini in which he confirms the location of the glands of Mundini below the larynx. Obviously the two glands in the neck Mundinus mentions are the two thyroid lobes. According to his description they cannot be the tonsils because 1) of their location below the larynx, and 2) their function of adequating the appearance of the neck and 3) shielding, at least to some extent, the deep vessels in the neck. Before Mundini there is no similar description of the anatomy of the human neck in the literature, so what he describes must he based upon his own experience. Furthermore, he did the autopsies himself and did not use the assistance of a prosector as the professors after him used to do

  4. Innovation in engineering education through computer assisted learning and virtual university model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raicu, A.; Raicu, G.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents the most important aspects of innovation in Engineering Education using Computer Assisted Learning. The authors propose to increase the quality of Engineering Education programs of study at European standards. The use of computer assisted learning methodologies in all studies is becoming an important resource in Higher Education. We intend to improve the concept of e-Learning using virtual terminals, online support and assisting special training through live seminars and interactive labs to develop a virtual university model. We intend to encourage computer assisted learning and innovation as sources of competitive advantage, to permit vision and learning analysis, identifies new sources of technology and ideas. Our work is based on our university datasets collected during last fifteen years using several e-Learning systems. In Constanta Maritime University (CMU), using eLearning and Knowledge Management Services (KMS) is very important and we apply it effectively to achieve strategic objectives, such as collaboration, sharing and good practice. We have experience in this field since 2000 year using Moodle as KMS in our university. The term KMS can be associated to Open Source Software, Open Standards, Open Protocols and Open Knowledge licenses, initiatives and policies. In CMU Virtual Campus we have today over 12500 active users. Another experience of the authors is the implementation of MariTrainer Wiki educational platform based on Dokeos and DekiWiki under MARICOMP and MEP Leonardo da Vinci Project. We'll also present in this paper a case study under EU funded project POSDRU, where the authors implemented other educational platform in Technological High Schools from Romania used over 1000 teachers. Based on large datasets the study tries to improve the concept of e-Learning teaching using the revolutionary technologies. The new concept present in this paper is that the teaching and learning will be interactive and live. The new and modern

  5. Seismic microzoning projects and their implementation in Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, M.; Cano, V.; Olbrich, F.; Vallee, M.; Morales, C.; Arreaza, A.; Mendes, K.; Klarica, S.; Alvarez Gomez, J.; Aray, J.; Vielma, J.; Pombo, A.; Diaz, J.; Grupo de trabajo

    2013-05-01

    analysis. Further members of the "Grupo de trabajo: Investigaciones aplicadas a la gestion integral del riesgo en espacios urbanos" are: Oscar Andrés López, Milgreya Cerrada, Rafael Torres, Oscar Ramírez, Elieser Sanzonetti, José Heredia, Jaime Avendaño, Fernando Mazuera, Luis Molina, Alexi Suárez, Víctor Rocabado, Mónica Paolini, Luis Yegres, Leonardo Alvarado, Herbert Rendón, Luz Rodríguez, Jorge González.

  6. Building a Community for Art and Geoscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, S. C.; Ellins, K. K.

    2014-12-01

    Several new avenues are in place for building and supporting a community of people interested in the art and geoscience connections. Although sessions advocating for art in teaching geoscience have been scattered through geoscience professional meetings for several decades, there is now a sustained presence of artists and geoscientists with their research and projects at the annual meeting of the American Geophysical Union. In 2011, 13 abstracts were submitted and, in 2013, 20 talks and posters were presented at the annual meeting. Participants have requested more ways to connect with each other as well as advocate for this movement of art and science to others. Several words can describe new initiatives to do this: Social, Collaborative, Connected, Informed, Networked, and Included. Social activities of informal dinners, lunches, and happy hour for interested people in the past year have provided opportunity for presenters at AGU to spend time getting to know one another. This has resulted in at least two new collaborative projects. The nascent Bella Roca and more established Geology in Art websites and their associated blogs at www.bellaroca.org and http://geologyinart.blogspot.com, respectively are dedicated to highlighting the work of artists inspired by the geosciences, connecting people and informing the community of exhibits and opportunities for collaboration. Bella Roca with its social media of Facebook (Bella Roca) and Twitter (@BellRocaGeo), is a direct outgrowth of the recent 2012 and 2013 AGU sessions and, hopefully, can be grown and sustained for this community. Articles in professional journals will also help inform the broader geoscience community of the benefit of engaging with artists and designers for both improved science knowledge and communication. Organizations such as Leonardo, the International Society for the Arts, Sciences and Technology, the Art Science Gallery in Austin, Texas also promote networking among artists and scientists with

  7. 2012 Aspen Winter Conferences on High Energy and Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, John; Olivier, Dore; Fox, Patrick; Furic, Ivan; Halkiadakis, Eva; Schmidt, Fabian; Senatore, Leonardo; Smith, Kendrick M; Whiteson, Daniel

    2012-05-01

    from other institutions and countries or due to incipient collaborations. In addition, Shamit Kachru of Stanford University gave a public lecture titled The Small (and Large) Scale Structure of Space-Time.There were 237 members of the general public in attendance. Before the lecture, 65 people attended the physics cafe to discuss the current topic with Matthew Kleban (New York University) and Chao-Lin Kuo (Stanford University). This workshop was organized by Olivier Dore (Jet Propulsion Lab), Fabian Schmidt (Caltech), Leonardo Senatore (Stanford University), and Kendrick Smith (Princeton University).

  8. Modeling the hydrological and mechanical effect of roots in shallow landslide analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnone, Elisa; Caracciolo, Domenico; Noto, Leonardo V.; Preti, Federico; Bras, Rafael L.

    2015-04-01

    The additional cohesion exercised by vegetation roots (cr) provides an important contribution to the slope stability. This study proposes a methodology for estimating the cr term in a hillslope landslide analysis within a coupled ecohydrological-stability model. The coupled model simulates the spatial distribution and temporal dynamics of the Factor of Safety (FS) as a function of soil moisture dynamics, by taking into account the hydrological effects of vegetation through the root water uptaking. The additional mechanical root cohesion is estimated in a Fiber Bundle Model framework that allows for the evaluation of the root strength as a function of stress-strain relationships of populations of fibers. The use of such a model requires the knowledge of the root architecture to evaluate the additional reinforcement from each root diameter class. The root architecture is reproduced by fitting a probability density function to the distribution of the number of roots with depth, within a branching topology scheme based on the Leonardo's rule that gives an estimation of the root diameters. The methodology has been tested in a simple synthetic hillslope with different configurations of vegetation types, i.e. tree and shrubs, and soil types, i.e. clay and loam. Parameters of the topological model have been calibrated through observed depth profiles of root number, diameters and area of two species representative of the two considered vegetation types. Preliminary results demonstrated the high flexibility of the topological model here used, with consistent and promising outcoms in terms of root cohesion, significantly lower than values obtained with the more popular Wu/Waldron model. The simple case study highlighted the importance of both the root mechanical resistance and the root interactions with the main eco-hydrological processes. The hydrological effect of roots can be more significant than the mechanical one, especially for tree species on clayey soils. The root

  9. Lessons learned from near-fault recordings of the Emilia, 2012 seismic sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masi, Angelo; Mucciarelli, Marco; Chiauzzi, Leonardo; Gallipoli, Maria Rosaria; Stabile, Tony; Lizza, Carmine; Vignola, Luigi

    2013-04-01

    Lessons learned from near-fault recordings of the Emilia, 2012 seismic sequence Marco Mucciarelli (CNR-OGS, Trieste, Italy) Leonardo Chiauzzi, Angelo Masi (Basilicata University, Potenza, Italy) Maria Rosaria Gallipoli, Tony Stabile (IMAA-CNR, Tito Scalo, Italy) Carmine Lizza, Luigi Vignola (Mallet s.r.l., Marsicovetere, Italy) The Emilia 2012 seismic sequence provided a wealth of strong motion data, both from permanent and temporary network. The accelerometric station closest to epicentre is managed by the RAN network and it is located in the town of Mirandola (Code MRN), just close to the faults that generated the two main earthquakes of the sequence that are the M=5.9 and M=5.8, occurred on May 20 and 29 respectively. At same site of the MRN-RAN station, after the event occurred on May, 20 2012, a temporary accelerometric station was installed (code CNR) just 5 meters away. While the MRN-RAN station is inside a small building (electric substation) the CNR station was installed in free-field. After the mainshock, the site was also well characterised from the geophysical and geotechnical stand point with surface and down-hole surveys, and laboratory dynamic test on undisturbed samples. The analysis of the recordings, also compared with code provisions, provided several useful insights: 1) while the geological setting is apparently 1-D, there is a strong difference between horizontal components, not only for the mainshock but also for lesser quakes (magnitude down to below 2) thus ruling out a source effect; 2) the mismatch with the spectra provided by the Italian seismic code is due mainly to a poor performance of Vs30-based classification for deep soil site like the ones in the Po Valley rather than to PSHA estimates of hazard on rock conditions; 3) the influence of the housing of the RAN station is clearly visible at high frequency, the only portion of the spectra where the to station show different spectra ordinates; 4) integral parameters like Housner

  10. Comparative Analysis of Uninhibited and Constrained Avian Wing Aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Jordan A.

    The flight of birds has intrigued and motivated man for many years. Bird flight served as the primary inspiration of flying machines developed by Leonardo Da Vinci, Otto Lilienthal, and even the Wright brothers. Avian flight has once again drawn the attention of the scientific community as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) are not only becoming more popular, but smaller. Birds are once again influencing the designs of aircraft. Small UAVs operating within flight conditions and low Reynolds numbers common to birds are not yet capable of the high levels of control and agility that birds display with ease. Many researchers believe the potential to improve small UAV performance can be obtained by applying features common to birds such as feathers and flapping flight to small UAVs. Although the effects of feathers on a wing have received some attention, the effects of localized transient feather motion and surface geometry on the flight performance of a wing have been largely overlooked. In this research, the effects of freely moving feathers on a preserved red tailed hawk wing were studied. A series of experiments were conducted to measure the aerodynamic forces on a hawk wing with varying levels of feather movement permitted. Angle of attack and air speed were varied within the natural flight envelope of the hawk. Subsequent identical tests were performed with the feather motion constrained through the use of externally-applied surface treatments. Additional tests involved the study of an absolutely fixed geometry mold-and-cast wing model of the original bird wing. Final tests were also performed after applying surface coatings to the cast wing. High speed videos taken during tests revealed the extent of the feather movement between wing models. Images of the microscopic surface structure of each wing model were analyzed to establish variations in surface geometry between models. Recorded aerodynamic forces were then compared to the known feather motion and surface

  11. Modeling Flight: The Role of Dynamically Scaled Free-Flight Models in Support of NASA's Aerospace Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    community, Leonardo da Vinci, George Cayley, and the Wright brothers are examples of early aviation pioneers who frequently used models during their scientific efforts to understand and develop flying machines. Progress in the technology associated with model testing in worldwide applications has firmly established model aircraft as a key element in new aerospace research and development programs. Models are now routinely used in many applications and roles, including aerodynamic data gathering in wind tunnel investigations for the analysis of full-scale aircraft designs, proof-of-concept demonstrators for radical aeronautical concepts, and problem-solving exercises for vehicles already in production. The most critical contributions of aerospace models are to provide confidence and risk reduction for new designs and to enhance the safety and efficiency of existing configurations.

  12. [Colors and their meaning in culture and psychology--a historical outline and contemporary status of color vision theories].

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, Andrzej; Lewicka, Romana; Torlińska, Teresa; Stelcer, Bogusław

    2008-01-01

    The mechanism of color perception has intrigued scholars from antiquity. However, the understanding of this phenomena only came with the recognition of the nature of light and visual perception. Ancient concepts, present in science until the Renaissance, were based more on philosophical considerations and theoretical speculations than on anatomical studies and a matter-of-fact assessment of physiological functions of the visual system. From antiquity to 17th century scientific approach to the concept of vision was dominated by two theories: intromission and extramission (emanation). Intromission theory, propagated by Alhazen (lbn al.-Haythama), Vitello, John Peckham, Roger Bacon and Leonardo da Vinci, assumed that the light was transmitted from the observed object perpendicularly to the transparent eye structures. Johannes Kepler was the first scholar to propose that the retina was the receptive part of the eye. In the first half of the 17th century, Kepler's groundbreaking optical achievements and anatomical discoveries of many other scientists cast new light on the understanding of the role of different eye structures, finally wiping out the intromission theory. A further major achievement contributing to the recognition of the true nature of colors was a theory presented by Newton in 1688. He argued that they were colored rays, and not white light, that were composed of homogenous and pure light. It was, however, not until the 19th century when two modern theories of color appeared, i.e. a trichromatic theory mostly associated with the names of Young and Hemlholtz, and an opponent colors theory of Hering. In the 20th century, the two theories--previously assumed as contradictory--were joined into the zone theories of color vision. Colors have their cultural and social meanings, as far as a very individual and personal interpretation. In the former function they are used to illustrate some cultural and sociological phenomena; in the latter, they are helpful in

  13. Specialist English as a foreign language for European public health: evaluation of competencies and needs among Polish and Lithuanian students.

    PubMed

    Sumskas, Linas; Czabanowska, Katarzyna; Bruneviciūte, Raimonda; Kregzdyte, Rima; Krikstaponyte, Zita; Ziomkiewicz, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Foreign languages are becoming an essential prerequisite for a successful carrier among all professions including public health professionals in many countries. The expanding role of English as a mode of communication allows for university graduates to project and to seek their career in English-speaking countries. The present study was carried out in the framework of EU Leonardo da Vinci project "Specialist English as a foreign language for European public health." The study aimed to get a deeper insight how the English language is perceived as a foreign language, by Polish and Lithuanian public health students, what is level of their language competence, which level of English proficiency they expect to use in future. MATERIAL AND METHODS. A total of 246 respondents completed the special questionnaires in autumn semester in 2005. A questionnaire form was developed by the international project team. For evaluation of English competences, the Language Passport (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages of Council of Europe) was applied. RESULTS. Current self-rated proficiency of the English language was at the same level for Lithuanian (3.47+/-1.14) and Polish (3.31+/-0.83) respondents (P>0.05). Majority of respondents (88.6% of Lithuanian and 87.8% of Polish) reported using the English language for their current studies. Respondents reported a significant increase in necessity for higher level of English proficiency in future: mean scores provided by respondents changed from B1 level to B2 level. Respondents gave priority to less formal and practice-based interactive English teaching methods (going abroad, contacts with native speakers) in comparison with theory-oriented methods of learning (self-studying, Internet courses). CONCLUSIONS. Similar levels of English language in all five areas of language skills were established in Polish and Lithuanian university students. Respondents gave more priorities to less formal and practice-based interactive

  14. PREFACE: Fourteenth International Symposium on Laser-Aided Plasma Diagnostics (LAPD14)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giudicotti, L.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2010-04-01

    Akazaki of Kyushu University, who was the first Chairman of LAPD from 1983 through 1989. The Akazaki lecture of LAPD14 was given by John Sheffield, who presented his work for the new edition of his worldwide known book Plasma Scattering of Electromagnetic Radiation. The site of LAPD14 was chosen for its comfortable environment and the superb location: Castelbrando is an ancient castle whose origin goes back to the Roman age, a fortress built to watch over one of the ancient routes crossing the Alps. Completely restored 10 years ago it is now a high class resort for business meetings and residential holidays, with conference and meeting rooms, restaurants, shops, spa and a beauty farm. The quality of the location and the quietness and beauty of the surroundings made Castelbrando an ideal site for LAPD14 and contributed to the success of the Symposium. I hope that this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series will serve as a valuable record of the Symposium to all workers in the field. On behalf of the Local Organizing Committee, I would like to thank all participants for their contributions to this Symposium. I also acknowledge all members of the international scientific committee and Professor Francesco Gnesotto, director of Consorzio RFX, for their support and cooperation. Leonardo Giudicotti (Chairman of the Local Organizer Commitee) Conference photograph INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE: A. J. H. Donné, FOM-Institute voor Plasmafysica, The Netherlands (Chairman) U. Czarnetzki, Ruhr University, Bochum, Germany B. Graham, The Queen's University, Belfast, UK G. Hebner, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, USA K. Kawahata, National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan N. C. Luhmann, Jr., University of California, Davis, USA S. Sasaki, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan H. Soltwisch, Ruhr University, Bochum, Germany P. P. Woskov, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA FORMER LAPD CHAIRMEN: M. Akazaki (1983 - 1989) D. E. Evans (1989 - 1993) H. F

  15. Peering into a Star Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-09-01

    Beautiful images of astronomical objects often contain a lot of scientifically interesting information - PR Photo 24a/00 , shown above, is a fine example of this old maxime. It provides a deep and unsually wide look into a giant star forming region in the Milky Way. It is known as Messier 17 (M 17) , or the Omega, Swan, Horseshoe, or Lobster Nebula , because of its characteristic shape when photographed in visible light. It is located at a distance of approx. 5000 light-years (1.6 kpc), and is seen in the southern constellation of Sagittarius (The Archer), near the main plane of the Milky Way. This impressive image was obtained by astronomers Leonardo Testi (Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory, Florence, Italy; p.t. Visiting Scientist at ESO-Chile) and Leonardo Vanzi (ESO-Chile) with the SOFI multi-mode instrument at the ESO 3.6-m New Technology Telescope (NTT) at the La Silla observatory. The observations were made in the course of a research project that is aimed at the detection and study of the formation of massive stars, by means of near-infrared direct and spectral exposures with this instrument. The new data offer a unique combination of a wide field-of-view, high sensitivity and excellent image quality. The goal of these particular observations was to identify massive stars that are in the act of formation in this area and to record their infrared spectra for a detailed physical study of these rather rare objects. The formation of massive stars It is now well established that the formation of stars in our galaxy, the Milky Way system, predominantly takes place in Giant Molecular Clouds . However, while low-mass stars are common and relatively easy to find in such clouds, it is much more difficult to find massive stars while they are in the very early stage of their evolution. This is because massive stars are comparatively rare and pass through the different evolutionary phases much faster than low-mass and solar-like stars. They are usually found within

  16. Gneisses (Serizzi and Beole) of the Verbano-Cusio-Ossola district (Piedmont, Northern Italy): possible candidates for the designation of "Global Heritage Stone province"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonella Dino, Giovanna; Borghi, Alessandro; Cavallo, Alessandro; Primavori, Piero

    2016-04-01

    opening of the Naviglio Grande channel (a Leonardo da Vinci's project) connecting the Ticino river to Milano. However, during the Roman Empire, these stones were already exploited and exported, as testified by the ancient Roman road, visible near the village of Beura. In general, Beola and Serizzo gneisses have also been used for ornamental purposes and for the construction of churches, palaces and monuments, widely documented in many towns and villages of the Ossola Valley (San Gaudenzio church, Montecrestese bell-tower, rural villages, Domodossola city center, etc…) and in the north of Italy (Milano and Torino). The trade of these stones, which characterized (and still characterize) the VCO territory, was affected by the recent economic crisis in the national and international market, so that in the recent years lot of quarries, even if active, are not productive. Due to the global economy situation and the strong competition with other countries (China, India,…), the risk of a collapse in the serizzi and beole production is tangible. The present contribution aim at evidencing the history and peculiarity of these materials, their importance in local culture, and the necessity not to obliterate less famous, but culturally important, stone materials.

  17. Astronomers Gain Important Insight on How Massive Stars Form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-09-01

    around the star all at the same time," Beltran said. "In fact, that's exactly what we saw in G24 A1. It's the first time all three types of motion have been seen in a single young massive star," she added. The scientists traced motions in gas around the young star by studying radio waves emitted by ammonia molecules at a frequency near 23 GHz. The Doppler shift in the frequency of the radio waves gave them the information on the motions of the gas. This technique allowed them to detect gas falling inward toward a large "doughnut," or torus, surrounding the disk presumed to be orbiting the young star. "Our detection of gas falling inward toward the star is an important milestone," Beltran said. The infall of the gas is consistent with the idea of material accreting onto the star in a non-spherical manner, such as in a disk. This supports that idea, which is one of several proposed ways for massive stars to accumulate their great bulk. Others include collisions of smaller stars. "Our findings suggest that the disk model is a plausible way to make stars up to 20 times the mass of the Sun. We'll continue to study G24 A1 and other objects to improve our understanding," Beltran said. Beltran worked with Riccardo Cesaroni and Leonardo Testi of the Astrophysical Observatory of Arcetri of INAF in Firenze, Italy, Claudio Codella and Luca Olmi of the Institute of Radioastronomy of INAF in Firenze, Italy, and Ray Furuya of the Japanese Subaru Telescope in Hawaii. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  18. Quantitative comparisons of analogue models of brittle wedge dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreurs, Guido

    2010-05-01

    , models accommodated initial shortening by a forward- and a backward-verging thrust. Further shortening was taken up by in-sequence formation of forward-verging thrusts. In all experiments, boundary stresses created significant drag of structures along the sidewalls. We therefore compared the surface slope and the location, dip angle and spacing of thrusts in sections through the central part of the model. All models show very similar cross-sectional evolutions demonstrating reproducibility of first-order experimental observations. Nevertheless, there are significant along-strike variations of structures in map view highlighting the limits of interpretations of analogue model results. These variations may be related to the human factor, differences in model width and/or differences in laboratory temperature and especially humidity affecting the mechanical properties of the granular materials. GeoMod2008 Analogue Team: Susanne Buiter, Caroline Burberry, Jean-Paul Callot, Cristian Cavozzi, Mariano Cerca, Ernesto Cristallini, Alexander Cruden, Jian-Hong Chen, Leonardo Cruz, Jean-Marc Daniel, Victor H. Garcia, Caroline Gomes, Céline Grall, Cecilia Guzmán, Triyani Nur Hidayah, George Hilley, Chia-Yu Lu, Matthias Klinkmüller, Hemin Koyi, Jenny Macauley, Bertrand Maillot, Catherine Meriaux, Faramarz Nilfouroushan, Chang-Chih Pan, Daniel Pillot, Rodrigo Portillo, Matthias Rosenau, Wouter P. Schellart, Roy Schlische, Andy Take, Bruno Vendeville, Matteo Vettori, M. Vergnaud, Shih-Hsien Wang, Martha Withjack, Daniel Yagupsky, Yasuhiro Yamada

  19. The Imitation of Nature.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyman, John

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Metaphor and analogy are the scaffolding of science. Kepler's theory of the retinal picture could not have been built without the analogy between an eye and a camera obscura, and, two hundred and fifty years later, Charles Darwin devoted most of the first chapter of The origin of Species to discussion of pigeon fanciers. Unlike Darwin, Kepler was bewitched by his own imagination and was led to wonder "how this image or picture is joined to the visual faculty, which is situated in the retina and in the (optic) nerve, and whether it is placed within the hollows of the brain, before the soul or tribunal of the visual faculty, or whether the visual faculty, like a magistrate sent by the soul from the administrative chamber of the brain, descends into the optic nerve or retina to meet this image, as though to a lower court" (Kepler, pp. 151-2). The theory of the retinal image answered the crucial question of medieval optics: the scaffolding had served its purpose and should have been dismantled. Instead, Kepler mistook it for a part of the building: what he construed as a scientific problem was nothing more than the extension of a metaphor. As a result, and in spite of his remarkable achievement, he left the theory of vision in a state of confusion. I intend to show that Descartes revolutionized visual theory by manipulating the pair of analogies which had dominated visual theory since its inception and by advancing a theory of depiction which has since become orthodox. Advocates of the first analogy suggest that seeing the world is rather like seeing pictures of it; Kepler's analogy between the eye and a camera obscura, which was anticipated by Leonardo de Vinci, was a variation on this theme. Advocates of the second analogy compare vision to the use of a walking-stick: the air transmits an impression of a visible object to the eye rather as a walking-stick enables us to find our way

  20. The Dora-Maira Unit (Italian Cottian Alps): a reservoir of ornamental stones locally and worldwide employed since Roman age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, Alessandro; Cadoppi, Paola; Antonella Dino, Giovanna

    2015-04-01

    marbles, the so called "Rocca Bianca marble" have to be quoted. It has been extensively exploited from the 17th century up to 2003, in two different quarries at an altitude of ca. 2000 m a.s.l. in the Germanasca Valley and the Varaita Valley (Brossasco Marble variety). As regards to Mesozoic carbonate cover, the Foresto and Chianocco white dolomitic marbles have to be cited. They were exploited in the lower Susa Valley and were employed since Roman age (eg. for the construction of the Arch of Augustus at Susa, dating to 9 BC). They were also used during the Renaissance for the façade of the Turin Cathedral. Finally, it must be highlighted the Bargiolina quartzite variety belonging to the Palaeozoic basement: it was known from XVI century (Leonardo Da Vinci wrote about the beauty and the high quality of this material), and was widely employed for historical baroque buildings (palaces and churches). The high number of exploited ornamental and building stones, used over the centuries in local and worldwide historical buildings and infrastructures, allow to think the Dora-Maira Unit as a source of Global Heritage Stones and therefore it could be considered as a Global Heritage Stone Province.

  1. La physique des bulles de champagne Une première approche des processus physico-chimiques liés à l'effervescence des vins de Champagne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liger-Belair, G.

    2002-07-01

    People have long been fascinated by bubbles and foams dynamics, and since the pioneering work of Leonardo da Vinci in the early 16th century, this subject has generated a huge bibliography. However, only very recently, much interest was devoted to bubbles in Champagne wines. Small bubbles rising through the liquid, as well as a bubble ring (the so-called collar) at the periphery of a flute poured with champagne are the hallmark of this traditionally festive wine, and even there is no scientific evidence yet to connect the quality of a champagne with its effervescence, people nevertheless often make a connection between them. Therefore, since the last few years, a better understanding of the numerous parameters involved in the bubbling process has become an important stake in the champagne research area. Otherwise, in addition to these strictly enological reasons, we also feel that the area of bubble dynamics could benefit from the simple but close observation of a glass poured with champagne. In this study, our first results concerning the close observation of the three main steps of a champagne bubble's life are presented, that is, the bubble nucleation on tiny particles stuck on the glass wall (Chap. 2), the bubble ascent through the liquid (Chap. 3), and the bursting of bubbles at the free surface, which constitutes the most intriguing and visually appealing step (Chap. 4). Our results were obtained in real consuming conditions, that is, in a classical crystal flute poured with a standard commercial champagne wine. Champagne bubble nucleation proved to be a fantastic everyday example to illustrate the non-classical heterogeneous bubble nucleation process in a weakly supersaturated liquid. Contrary to a generally accepted idea, nucleation sites are not located on irregularities of the glass itself. Most of nucleation sites are located on tiny hollow and roughly cylindrical exogenous fibres coming from the surrounding air or remaining from the wiping process

  2. Inquiry, play, and problem solving in a process learning environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thwaits, Anne Y.

    What is the nature of art/science collaborations in museums? How do art objects and activities contribute to the successes of science centers? Based on the premise that art exhibitions and art-based activities engage museum visitors in different ways than do strictly factual, information-based displays, I address these questions in a case study that examines the roles of visual art and artists in the Exploratorium, a museum that has influenced exhibit design and professional practice in many of the hands-on science centers in the United States and around the world. The marriage of art and science in education is not a new idea---Leonardo da Vinci and other early polymaths surely understood how their various endeavors informed one another, and some 20th century educators understood the value of the arts and creativity in the learning and practice of other disciplines. When, in 2010, the National Science Teachers Association added an A to the federal government's ubiquitous STEM initiative and turned it into STEAM, art educators nationwide took notice. With a heightened interest in the integration of and collaboration between disciplines comes an increased need for models of best practice for educators and educational institutions. With the intention to understand the nature of such collaborations and the potential they hold, I undertook this study. I made three site visits to the Exploratorium, where I took photos, recorded notes in a journal, interacted with exhibits, and observed museum visitors. I collected other data by examining the institution's website, press releases, annual reports, and fact sheets; and by reading popular and scholarly articles written by museum staff members and by independent journalists. I quickly realized that the Exploratorium was not created in the way than most museums are, and the history of its founding and the ideals of its founder illuminate what was then and continues now to be different about this museum from most others in the

  3. EDITORIAL: World Year of Physics 2005 Focus on Photoemission and Electronic Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-04-01

    Around the year 1500, Leonardo da Vinci designed the first mechanical calculator connecting a number of toothed wheels for simple adding operations. Since then, mechanical systems have become a major part of the later industrial revolutions with an abundance of machines in our everyday lives. Only with the advent of semiconductor electronics, however, did microstructuring techniques become available to realize mechanical systems with dimensions below 100 microns. With most recent structure sizes now reaching the limit of a few nanometres, suspended nanostructures that couple mechanical with electronic motion have been constructed. Moreover, novel lithographic techniques have enabled the investigation of transport across hybrid structures such as. suspended carbon nanotubes or flexible molecular bridges connected to mesoscopic leads. In this invited focus issue of New Journal of Physics some of the leading experts in the field of nano-electromechanical systems (NEMS) describe the latest status and trends, from both an experimental and a theoretical perspective. A multitude of applications for NEMS are now within reach, ranging from high-frequency filters and switches in signal processing circuits, to ultra-sensitive sensors. In particular the development of mass sensors and scanning probe microscopy will be spurred by nano-mechanical systems. Considering that mechanical resonance frequencies of 1 GHz and more have already been achieved, these devices will be extremely sensitive and will offer high data acquisition rates. On a fundamental level NEMS enable the investigation of electron-phonon coupling in the absolute limit via, for example, single electrons interacting with single (quantized) phonons, the study of single electrons being shuttled via mechanical motion, and the manipulation of single molecules with nano-mechanical tweezers. The future for NEMS research looks certain to be exciting - we can expect it to help us build detectors of virtually any kind

  4. Vortex-based spatiotemporal characterization of nonlinear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Gregory A.

    Although the ubiquity of vortices in nature has been recognized by artists for over seven centuries, it was the work of artist and scientist Leonardo da Vinci that provided the monumental transition from an aesthetic form to a scientific tool. DaVinci used vortices to describe the motions he observed in air currents, flowing water and blood flow in the human heart. Five centuries later, the Navier-Stokes equations allow us to recreate the swirling motions of fluid observed in nature. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations have provided a lens through which to study the role of vortices in a wide variety of modern day applications. The research summarized below represents an effort to look through this lens and bring into focus the practical use of vortices in describing nonlinear flows. Vortex-based spatiotemporal characterizations are obtained using two specific mathematical tools: vortex core lines (VCL) and proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). By applying these tools, we find that vortices continue to provide new insights in the realm of biofluids, urban flows and the phase space of dynamical systems. The insights we have gained are described in this thesis. Our primary focus is on biofluids. Specifically, we seek to gain new insights into the connection between vortices and vascular diseases in order to provide more effective methods for clinical diagnosis and treatment. We highlight several applications in which VCL and POD are used to characterize the flow conditions in a heart pump, identify stenosis in carotid arteries and validate numerical models against PIV-based experimental data. Next, we quantify the spatial complexity and temporal stability of hemodynamics generated by a database of 210 patient-specific aneurysm geometries. Visual classifications of the hemodynamics are compared to the automated, quantitative classifications. The quantities characterizing the hemodynamics are then compared to clinical data to determine conditions that are

  5. Davinciite, Na12K3Ca6Fe{3/2+}Zr3(Si26O73OH)Cl2, a New K,Na-Ordered mineral of the eudialyte group from the Khibiny Alkaline Pluton, Kola Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomyakov, A. P.; Nechelyustov, G. N.; Rastsvetaeva, R. K.; Rozenberg, K. A.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a description of a new zirconosilicate of the eudialyte group, which was named davinciite in honor of Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), a famous Italian scientist, painter, sculptor and architect. The new mineral has been found in hyperagpaitic pegmatite at the Rasvumchorr Mountain, Khibiny Pluton, Kola Peninsula, as relict inclusions, up to 1-2 mm in size in a rastsvetaevite matrix. It is associated with nepheline, sodalite, potassium feldspar, delhayelite, aegirine, shcherbakovite, villiaumite, nitrite, nacaphite, rasvumite, and djerfisherite. Davinciite is dark lavender and transparent, with a vitreous luster and white streak. The new mineral is brittle, with conchoidal fracture; the Mohs' hardness is 5. No indications of cleavage or parting were observed. The measured density is 2.82(2) g/cm3 (volumetric method); the calculated density is 2.848 g/cm3. Davinciite is optically uniaxial, positive; ω = 1.603(2), ɛ = 1.605(2). It is nonpleochroic and nonfluorescent in UV light. The new mineral slowly breaks down and gelates in 50% HCl and HNO3. It is trigonal, space group R3m. The unit-cell dimensions are a = 14.2956(2), c = 30.0228(5) Å, V=5313.6(2) Å3. The strongest reflections in the X-ray powder diffraction pattern [ d, Å ( I, %) ( hkl)] are as follows: 2.981(100)(315), 2.860(96)(404), 4.309(66)(205), 3.207(63)(208), 6.415(54)(104), 3.162(43)(217). The chemical composition (electron microprobe, H2O calculated from X-ray diffraction data) is as follows, wt %: 12.69 Na2O, 3.53 K2O, 11.02 CaO, 0.98 SrO, 0.15 BaO, 5.33 FeO, 0.37 MnO, 0.07 Al2O3, 51.20 SiO2, 0.39 TiO2, 11.33 ZrO2, 0.21HfO2, 0.09 Nb2O5, 1.89 Cl, 0.93H2O, -O = Cl2 0.43; total is 99.75. The empirical formula calculated on the basis of Si + Al + Zr + Hf + Ti + Nb = 29 ( Z = 3) is (Na1l.75Sr0.29Ba0.03)Σ12.07(K2.28Na0.72)Σ3Ca5.99(Fe2.26Mn0.16)Σ2.42(Zr2.80Ti0.15Hf0.03Nb0.02) Σ3(Si1.96Al0.04)Σ2[Si3O9]2 [Si9O27]2[(OH)1.42O0.58]Σ2[Cl1.62(H2O)0.38]Σ2 · 0.48H2O. The simplified

  6. Space Sciences and Idealism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, M.

    Erwin Schrodinger suggested that " Scientific knowledge forms part of the idealistic background of human life", which exalted man from a nude and savage state to true humanity [Science and Humanism, Cambridge, 1961, p9]. Modern space sciences an space exploration are a brilliant demonstration of the validity of Schrodinger's thesis on Idealism. Moreover, Schrodingers thesis could be considered also as a basic principle for the New Educational Space Philosophical Project "TIMAEUS"."TIMAEUS" is not only an attempt to to start a new dialogue between Science, the Humanities and Religion; but also it is an origin of the cultural innovations of our so strange of globilisation. TIMAEUS, thus, can reveal Idealism as something more fundamental , more refined, more developed than is now accepted by the scientific community and the piblic. TIMAEUS has a significant cultural agenda, connected with the high orbital performance of the synthetic arts, combining a knowledge of the truly spiritual as well as the universal. In particular, classical ballet as a synthetic art can be a new and powerful perfector and re-creator of the real human, real idealistic, real complex culture in orbit. As is well known, Carlo Blasis, the most important dance theorist of the 19t h .century, made probably the first attempts to use the scientific ideas of Leonardo da Vinci and Isaac Newton for the understanding of the gravitational nature of balance and allegro in ballet. In particular Blasis's idea of the limited use of the legs in classical dance realised by the gifted pupils of Enrico Cecchetti - M.Fokine, A.Pavlova and V.Nijinsky, with thinkable purity and elegance of style. V.Nijinsky in his remarkable animation of the dance of two dimensional creatures of a Euclidean flat world (L'Apres Midi d'un Faune,1912) discovered that true classical dance has some gravitational limits. For example, Nijinsky's Faunes and Nymphs mut use running on the heels (In accordance with "Partitura" 1916); they

  7. Geoethics disgraced by Copernicus in its desperate act of covering up for the IPCC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mörner, Nils-Axel

    2014-05-01

    All my life I have put observational facts in the centre. This is what Leonardo da Vinci called "to read the book of mother Earth". For a geologist this is very natural because this is the core of the geological profession. The IPCC, on the other hand, put all credits on models and scenarios. One of its founders and its first president, Bert Bolin, at a debate in the Geophysical Society of Sweden in 2001, admitted (quotation): "you can order whatever scenario you wish". With this as a background, we can put a recent action by Copernicus at a test with respect to geoethics and normal decency. The idea that the planetary motions affect and control the solar variability is old, but in the stage of an unproven hypothesis. In recent years major advancements have occurred and in 2013, it seemed that time was ripe for a major, multi-authored, reinvestigation. Therefore, a Special Issue of Pattern Recognition in Physics was devoted to: "Pattern in solar variability, their planetary origin and terrestrial impacts". The volume includes 12 separate research papers and General Conclusions, co-authored by 19 prominent scientists. Indeed, they agreed that the driving factor of solar variability must emerge from the planetary beat on the Sun, and by that its emission of luminosity and Solar Wind both factors of which affect the Earth-Moon system. This may be held as a benchmark event in our understanding of the planetary-solar-terrestrial interaction. Furthermore, they noted two implications of this: partly that the old hypothesis was now lifted to a firm theory, maybe even a new paradigm, and partly that we are on our way into a new grand solar minimum which "sheds serious doubts on the issue of a continued, even accelerated, warming as claimed by the IPCC". "We were alarmed by the second implication", Martin Rasmussen, VD of Copernicus, stated, and took the unbelievable decision immediately to close down the entire journal. This happened on January 17 without any discussion

  8. Linking geological Heritage Conservation to Education and Research at the University of Bucharest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrasanu, A.

    2012-04-01

    MSc curriculum or intensive courses in geoconservation to form professionals able to provide a holistic view of nature and to work for promotion of geoscience, raise public awareness, educate decision-makers (Andrasanu, 2005, Corte Bacci, 2008, Brihlla, 2009, Zouros and Mckeever, 2009) University of Bucharest developed research and educational projects (Erasmus, Leonardo da Vinci) both for geological heritage conservation in the frame of ProGEO and also in fostering geoparks development in Romania. The paper presents geoeducation as part of the geoconservation activities, and the role teaching staff and students are playing in curriculum design, research and educational activities, sustained or developed by University of Bucharest. Three examples were selected to be detailed: (i) a new MSc program Applied Geo-biology in natural and cultural heritage conservation; (ii) Geoconservation as a case study in the frame of the European Virtual Seminar in Sustainable Development (http://www.openuniversiteit.nl), and (iii) Geosciences as part of outdoor learning activities in the frame of the international project In and Out (http://www.viauc.com).

  9. ESO and Chile: 10 Years of Productive Scientific Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-06-01

    ESO and the Government of Chile launched today the book "10 Years Exploring the Universe", written by the beneficiaries of the ESO-Chile Joint Committee. This annual fund provides grants for individual Chilean scientists, research infrastructures, scientific congresses, workshops for science teachers and astronomy outreach programmes for the public. In a ceremony held in Santiago on 19 June 2006, the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere (ESO) and the Chilean Ministry of Foreign Affairs marked the 10th Anniversary of the Supplementary Agreement, which granted to Chilean astronomers up to 10 percent of the total observing time on ESO telescopes. This agreement also established an annual fund for the development of astronomy, managed by the so-called "ESO-Chile Joint Committee". ESO PR Photo 21/06 ESO PR Photo 21/06 Ten Years ESO-Chile Agreement Ceremony The celebration event was hosted by ESO Director General, Dr. Catherine Cesarsky, and the Director of Special Policy for the Chilean Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Ambassador Luis Winter. "ESO's commitment is, and always will be, to promote astronomy and scientific knowledge in the country hosting our observatories", said ESO Director General, Dr. Catherine Cesarsky. "We hope Chile and Europe will continue with great achievements in this fascinating joint adventure, the exploration of the universe." On behalf of the Government of Chile, Ambassador Luis Winter outlined the historical importance of the Supplementary Agreement, ratified by the Chilean Congress in 1996. "Such is the magnitude of ESO-Chile Joint Committee that, only in 2005, this annual fund represented 8 percent of all financing sources for Chilean astronomy, including those from Government and universities", Ambassador Winter said. The ESO Representative and Head of Science in Chile, Dr. Felix Mirabel, and the appointed Chilean astronomer for the ESO-Chile Joint Committee, Dr. Leonardo Bronfman, also took part in the

  10. Near-zero emissions combustor system for syngas and biofuels

    SciTech Connect

    Yongho, Kim; Rosocha, Louis

    2010-01-01

    A multi-institutional plasma combustion team was awarded a research project from the DOE/NNSA GIPP (Global Initiative for Prolifereation Prevention) office. The Institute of High Current Electronics (Tomsk, Russia); Leonardo Technologies, Inc. (an American-based industrial partner), in conjunction with the Los Alamos National Laboratory are participating in the project to develop novel plasma assisted combustion technologies. The purpose of this project is to develop prototypes of marketable systems for more stable and cleaner combustion of syngas/biofuels and to demonstrate that this technology can be used for a variety of combustion applications - with a major focus on contemporary gas turbines. In this paper, an overview of the project, along with descriptions of the plasma-based combustors and associated power supplies will be presented. Worldwide, it is recognized that a variety of combustion fuels will be required to meet the needs for supplying gas-turbine engines (electricity generation, propulsion), internal combustion engines (propulsion, transportation), and burners (heat and electricity generation) in the 21st Century. Biofuels and biofuel blends have already been applied to these needs, but experience difficulties in modifications to combustion processes and combustor design and the need for flame stabilization techniques to address current and future environmental and energy-efficiency challenges. In addition, municipal solid waste (MSW) has shown promise as a feedstock for heat and/or electricity-generating plants. However, current combustion techniques that use such fuels have problems with achieving environmentally-acceptable air/exhaust emissions and can also benefit from increased combustion efficiency. This project involves a novel technology (a form of plasma-assisted combustion) that can address the above issues. Plasma-assisted combustion (PAC) is a growing field that is receiving worldwide attention at present. The project is focused on

  11. Preface: SQM2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barish, Kenneth; Zhong Huang, Huan; Kapusta, Joseph; Odyniec, Grazyna; Rafelski, Johann; Whitten, Charles A., Jr.

    2006-12-01

    served as conference coordinator. She and her crew organized all the conference activities and she has been essential for the success of the conference. Staff members from UCLA, Vahe Ghazikhanian, Stephen Trentalange, Mauro Leonardo, Josephine Morrell, Friedel Adler, Tuyet-Hong Truong-Ung, Leticia Cabeza, Karin Nachtigal, Martin Simon, Dylan Thein, Lingyu Xu and Craig Reaves, and graduate students Jingguo Ma, Johan Gonzalez, Xiaoyan Lin, Priscilla Kurnadi and David Staszak, also provided essential support for the conference. We wish to thank Tony Chan, Dean of Physical Sciences at UCLA, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory and the UCLA Department of Physics and Astronomy for financial support of the conference. Their sponsorship allowed many graduate students and junior physicists to attend the conference. We also thank the SQM2006 International Advisory Committee for their valuable input to the scientific programme and conference arrangement.

  12. AAS 228: Day 2 morning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    extremely data-rich. The Galaxy Zoo project also suggests the promising prospect of synergizing the help from citizen scientists and machine learning in analyzing extremely large datasets.Extrasolar Planets: Atmospheres (by Leonardo dos Santos)Antonija Oklopi (Caltech) explains that Raman scattering of light, which works similarly to Rayleigh scattering (the process that makes Earths sky blue), can be used in the future to study the atmospheres of exoplanets. Her work is to create model spectra containing these features, from which we can learn about the presence and altitude of atmospheric clouds. Dr. Carl Melis (University of California, San Diego) studies the inner composition of exoplanets by looking at their remnants after they are destroyed by a dying star. His most recent work suggests that there is a differentiated pollution (from the core and the crust of a planet) in the disk orbiting of a white dwarf star. Samuel Grunblatt (University of Hawaii) introduces us to the main subject of his thesis: a hot-Jupiter observed by Keplers K2 mission transiting an evolved, red giant star. They used some pretty tricky data analysis in order to filter out the noise intrinsic to this type of star.Grunblatt shows the K2 transit before and after removal of granulation effects.Avi Shporer (JPL) asks the question: why are hot Jupiters so large? His research aims to study the correlation between stellar irradiation and planetary radius, and in order to have a more complete picture, they need to detect more gas giants on lower stellar irradiation regions. This idea gave rise to LCOGT K2 Warm Jupiter project, which recently discovered a brown dwarf in a long-period orbit around a Sun-like star. Paul Mason (New Mexico State University) proposes that the Milky Way is evolving to a more habitable galaxy, due to the expansion of the universe, the processing of heavier material inside stars, and the general decrease of ionizing radiation.Evolution of Galaxies (by Ben Cook)Tuesday mornings

  13. Unravelling the Mystery of Massive Star Birth - All Stars are Born the Same Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-07-01

    of a screw on the International Space Station, or more than ten times the resolution possible with current visible-light telescopes in space. With this unique capability, complemented by observations done with another of ESO's telescopes, the 3.58-metre New Technology Telescope at La Silla, Kraus and colleagues were able to detect a disc around IRAS 13481-6124. "This is the first time we could image the inner regions of the disc around a massive young star", says Kraus. "Our observations show that formation works the same for all stars, regardless of mass." The astronomers conclude that the system is about 60 000 years old, and that the star has reached its final mass. Because of the intense light of the star - 30 000 times more luminous than our Sun - the disc will soon start to evaporate. The flared disc extends to about 130 times the Earth-Sun distance - or 130 astronomical units (AU) - and has a mass similar to that of the star, roughly twenty times the Sun. In addition, the inner parts of the disc are shown to be devoid of dust. "Further observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), currently being constructed in Chile, could provide much information on these inner parts, and allow us to better understand how baby massive stars became heavy," concludes Kraus. More information This research was presented in a paper to appear in this week issue of Nature ("A hot compact dust disk around a massive young stellar object", by S. Kraus et al.). The team is composed of Stefan Kraus (University of Michigan, USA), Karl-Heinz Hofmann, Karl M. Menten, Dieter Schertl, Gerd Weigelt, Friedrich Wyrowski, and Anthony Meilland (Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Bonn, Germany),Karine Perraut (Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Grenoble, France), Romain Petrov and Sylvie Robbe-Dubois (Université de Nice Sophia-Antipolis/CNRS/Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, France), Peter Schilke (Universität zu Köln, Germany), and Leonardo Testi (ESO).

  14. Realistic modeling of seismic input for megacities and large urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panza, G. F.; Unesco/Iugs/Igcp Project 414 Team

    2003-04-01

    , supply a particularly powerful tool for the prevention aspects of Civil Defense. We present a selection of the main results obtained for the cities of Algiers, Beijing, Bucharest, Cairo, Debrecen, Delhi, Naples, Rome, Russe, Santiago de Cuba, Sofia, Thessaloniki and Zagreb. The UNESCO/IUGS/IGCP PROJECT 414 team members are: Giuliano F. Panza (1,2) (Chairman), Leonardo Alvarez (3), Abdelkrim Aoudia (1,2), Abdelhakim Ayadi (4), Hadj Benhallou (4,5), Djillali Benouar (6), Zoltan Bus (7), Yun-Tai Chen (8), Carmen Cioflan (9), Zhifeng Ding (8), Attia El-Sayed (10), Julio Garcia (3), Bartolomeo Garofalo (11), Alexander Gorshkov (12), Katalin Gribovszki (13), Assia Harbi (4), Panagiotis Hatzidimitriou (14), Marijan Herak (15), Mihaela Kouteva (16), Igor Kuznetzov (12), Ivan Lokmer (15), Said Maouche (4), Gheorghe Marmureanu (9), Margarita Matova (16), Maddalena Natale (11), Concettina Nunziata (11), Imtiyaz Parvez (17,1), Ivanka Paskaleva (16), Ramon Pico (18), Mircea Radulian (9), Fabio Romanelli (2), Alexander Soloviev (12), Peter Suhadolc (2), Gyõzõ Szeidovitz (7), Petros Triantafyllidis (14), Franco Vaccari (2,19). (1) The Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics, SAND Group, Mirarmar, Trieste, Italy. (2) Department of Earth Sciences, University of Trieste, Via E. Weiss 1, 34127 Trieste, Italy. (3) Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Sismologicas, Cuba. (4) Centre de Recherche en Astronomie, Astrophysique et Geophysique, BP. 63, Bouzaréah, Alger, Algérie. (5) Faculté des Sciences de la Terre de l'Aménagment du Territoire et de la Géographie, USTHB, Alger, Algérie. (6) University of Algiers (USTHB), Civil Engineering Dpt., Alger, Algeria. (7) Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Seismological Observatory of GGRI, H-1112 Budapest, Meredek u. 18, Hungary. (8) Institute of Geophysics, China Seismological Bureau, Beijing, 100081, China. (9) National Institute for Earth Physics, Calugareni 12, P.O.Box: MG 2, 76900 Bucharest-Magurele, Romania. (10) Department of

  15. AAS 228: Day 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note: Lastweek we were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Here is a final post aboutselectedevents on the last day of the meeting, written by authors fromastrobites.com, a grad-student collaborative project with which we recently announced a new partnership! Starting in July,keep an eye out for astrobites postsat AAS Nova in between Highlights(i.e., on Tuesdays and Thursdays).Were excited to be working together to bring you more recent astronomy research from AAS journals!Extrasolar Planets: Detection (by Leonardo dos Santos)Thursdays first session on exoplanets was about detecting these distant worlds, and the opening talk was given by Robert Siverd (Las Cumbres Observatory). He describes the NRES, a network of spectrographs that will look for exoplanets using the radial velocity method. One of the coolest aspects of this instrument is that it will feature an on the fly scheduling system that will perform observations as efficiently as possible. The spectrograph is still being tested, but a unit will be deployed at CTIO later this year.@lcogt contracted by @NASA_TESS for follow up of their candidates. #aas228 Jessie Christiansen (@aussiastronomer) June 16, 2016Measuring the depths of transits and eclipses in Spitzer has been problematic in the past, since the Spitzer instrument IRAC (InfraRed Array Camera) has a non-uniform response in its detectors pixels. But, as reported by James Ingalls (Spitzer Science Center, Caltech), observers are circumventing this issue by using what they call the staring mode (avoiding large pointing jumps) and an algorithm to pick sweet spot pixels. Moreover, the results from the IRAC Data Challenge are helping to better understand its behavior. Giuseppe Morello (University College London), on the other hand, explained how his research group gets rid of instrumental effects from IRAC using machine learning. This method removes systematics from exoplanet transit data no matter if the noise source is from an instrument or

  16. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-11-01

    Mohab Abou ZeidInstitut des Hautes Études Scientifiques, Bures-sur-Yvette Ido AdamMax-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik (AEI), Potsdam Henrik AdorfLeibniz Universität Hannover Mohammad Ali-AkbariIPM, Tehran Antonio Amariti Università di Milano-Bicocca Nicola Ambrosetti Université de Neuchâtel Martin Ammon Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Christopher AndreyÉcole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) Laura AndrianopoliPolitecnico di Torino David AndriotLPTHE, Université UPMC Paris VI Carlo Angelantonj Università di Torino Pantelis ApostolopoulosUniversitat de les Illes Balears, Palma Gleb ArutyunovInstitute for Theoretical Physics, Utrecht University Davide AstolfiUniversità di Perugia Spyros AvramisUniversité de Neuchâtel Mirela BabalicChalmers University, Göteborg Foday BahDigicom Ioannis Bakas University of Patras Igor BandosUniversidad de Valencia Jose L F BarbonIFTE UAM/CSIC Madrid Till BargheerMax-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik (AEI), Potsdam Marco Baumgartl Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich James BedfordImperial College London Raphael BenichouLaboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Supérieure, Paris Francesco Benini SISSA, Trieste Eric Bergshoeff Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen Alice BernamontiVrije Universiteit, Brussel Julia BernardLaboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Supérieure, Paris Adel Bilal Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Supérieure, Paris Marco Billo' Università di Torino Matthias Blau Université de Neuchâtel Guillaume BossardAlbert-Einstein-Institut, Golm Leonardo BriziÉcole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) Johannes BroedelLeibniz Universität Hannover (AEI) Tom BrownQueen Mary, University of London Ilka BrunnerEidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich Erling BrynjolfssonUniversity of Iceland Dmitri BykovSteklov Institute, Moscow and Trinity College, Dublin Joan CampsUniversitat de Barcelona

  17. AAS 228: Day 3 morning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Plenary Session 2015 Newton Lacy Pierce Prize Lecture: The Elephant in the Room: Effects of Distant, Massive Companions on Planetary System Architectures (by Leonardo dos Santos)The first session on Wednesday at 228th AAS Meeting was the Newton Lacy Pierce Prize Lecture by Heather Knutson (California Institute of Technology). This talk featured a broad range of research efforts on exoplanets, with the main focus on how we study the composition of their atmospheres, and how multi-body interactions carve the structure of the planetary systems we observe.One of her first points is the well-known idea that the Solar System is an oddball, compared to the exoplanet systems we have found so far: most of these systems contain hot Jupiters and mini-Neptunes at very close-in orbits around their host stars. Moreover, even when studying their transmission spectra, it is difficult to know the exact composition of their atmospheres.Knutson: it is difficult to constrain atmospheric composition of exoplanets (H-poor or H-rich+clouds?) #aas228pic.twitter.com/LdyN4o9RC7 astrobites (@astrobites) June 15, 2016The main proposal on how these systems formed is the migration scenario. In order to validate this idea, Dr. Knutson and her group The Friends of Hot Jupiters study systems with close-in gas giants and their frequency of binary companions, which are supposed to be the main culprits causing gas-giant migration. They found that approximately half of the observed systems have long-distance companions, providing strong validation of the migration scenario. Moreover, Dr. Knutson speculates that wide binaries have more

  18. IN MY OPINION: Is Physics debatable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Ken

    2000-01-01

    : communications, transport, energy, geophysics and climatology, just for starters. The idea will not be to deliver arcane knowledge about how things work, or even the wonderful physics that underpins them, but how these developments are this very minute affecting everyday living. And I guess that quite a lot of the developments were made and are just now being made by real people: alive, young(ish), and not necessarily male, white or bearded. But we could live with beards. Reference [1] For example, see Gould S J 1999 Leonardo's Mountain of Clams and the Diet of Worms (Vintage) It is also worth getting some help from Patrick Fullick and Mary Ratcliffe's book Teaching Ethical Aspects of Science (Bassett Press, 1996)

  19. A Brown Dwarf Joins the Jet-Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-05-01

    astronomers had to rely on the power of the VLT because the observed emission is extremely faint and only UVES on the VLT could provide both the sensitivity and the spectral resolution they required. "Discoveries like these are purely reliant on excellent telescopes and instruments, such as the VLT," says Whelan. "Our result also highlights the incredible level of quality which is available today to astronomers: the first telescopes built by Galileo were used to observe the moons of Jupiter. Today, the largest ground-based telescopes can be used to observe a Jupiter size object at a distance of 200 light-years and find it has outflows!" Using the same technique and the same telescope, the team had previously discovered outflows in another young brown dwarf. The new discovery sets a record for the lowest mass object in which jets are seen [2]. Outflows are ubiquitous in the Universe, as they are observed rushing away from the active nuclei of galaxies - AGNs - but also emerging from young stars. The present observations show they even arise in still lower mass objects. The outflow mechanism is thus very robust over an enormous range of masses, from several tens of millions of solar mass (for AGNs) down to a few tens of Jupiter masses (for brown dwarfs). More Information These results were reported in a Letter to the Editor in the Astrophysical Journal (vol. 659, p. L45): "Discovery of a Bipolar Outflow from 2MASSW J1207334-393254 a 24 MJup Brown Dwarf", by E.T. Whelan et al. The team is composed of Emma Whelan and Tom Ray (Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, Ireland), Ray Jayawardhana (University of Toronto, Canada), Francesca Bacciotti, Antonella Natta and Sofia Randich (Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Italy), Leonardo Testi (ESO), and Subu Mohanty (Harvard-Smithsonian CfA, USA).

  20. Preliminary results of a multi-scale structural analisys in an analogue carbonate reservoir (Hyblean Plateau, Sicily, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cilona, Antonino; Agosta, Fabrizio; Criscenti, Alessandro; Dipasquale, Mario; Giunta, Giuseppe; Napoli, Giuseppe; Occhipinti, Rosario; Renda, Pietro; Tondi, Emanuele

    2010-05-01

    With the aim of studying the multi-scale fault architecture and permeability in hydrocarbon-rich porous carbonate rocks, we are currently involved in a project focused on the structural analysis of fractured and faulted platform-to-ramp carbonates cropping out in the Hyblean Plateau (Sicily, Italy). The Hyblean Plateau is part of the Maghrebian foreland and forms the northern portion of the African plate. The plateau is a NE-oriented structural high crosscut by a large-scale N10°-20°E oriented strike-slip fault system, named Scicli-Ragusa, which was affected by right-lateral kinematics during the Upper Miocene-Lower Pliocene. Some authors documented a recent activity of the Scicli-Ragusa fault system, during the Quaternary, characterized by left-lateral kinematics. The portion of the Hyblean Plateau crosscut by this fault system represents an excellent example of an outcropping analogue of a fractured carbonate reservoir. By taking advantage of the several oil shows located along the Scicli-Ragusa fault system, we combine stratigraphic-structural analyses, both at outcrop and microscopic scales, to assess the structural control exerted by faults and fractures on hydrocarbon migration and storage. The field work focused on the geological mapping, at 1:10.000 scale, on detailed stratigraphic characterization of the outcropping layered carbonates (Ragusa Fm.) and on traditional faults and fractures analysis. Sample collection was also performed in order to conduct, in the laboratory, optical microscope and image analyses. The Oligo-Miocenic Ragusa Fm. is comprised of two main members: i) the lower Leonardo Member, which is characterised by well-cemented carbonate packstones intercalated with marl-rich levels; ii) the upper Irminio Member, characterised by an alternation of well-cemented and poorly-cemented grainstones/packstones. According to both orientations and kinematics, we grouped the fault segments of the Scicli-Ragusa fault system into three major sets: (i

  1. Closing the Loop for ALMA - Three antennas working in unison open new bright year for revolutionary observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-01-01

    The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) has passed a key milestone crucial for the high quality images that will be the trademark of this revolutionary new tool for astronomy. Astronomers and engineers have, for the first time, successfully linked three of the observatory's antennas at the 5000-metre elevation observing site in northern Chile. Having three antennas observing in unison paves the way for precise images of the cool Universe at unprecedented resolution, by providing the missing link to correct errors that arise when only two antennas are used. On 20 November 2009 the third antenna for the ALMA observatory was successfully installed at the Array Operations Site, the observatory's "high site" on the Chajnantor plateau, at an altitude of 5000 metres in the Chilean Andes. Later, after a series of technical tests, astronomers and engineers observed the first signals from an astronomical source making use of all three 12-metre diameter antennas linked together, and are now working around the clock to establish the stability and readiness of the system. "The first signal using just two ALMA antennas, observed in October, can be compared to a baby's first babblings," says Leonardo Testi, the European Project Scientist for ALMA at ESO. "Observing with a third antenna represents the moment when the baby says its very first, meaningful word - not yet a full sentence, but overwhelmingly exciting! The linking of three antennas is indeed the first actual step towards our goal of achieving precise and sharp images at submillimetre wavelengths." The successful linking of the antenna trio was a key test of the full electronic and software system now being installed at ALMA, and its success anticipates the future capabilities of the observatory. When complete, ALMA will have at least 66 high-tech antennas operating together as an "interferometer", working as a single, huge telescope probing the sky in the millimetre and submillimetre wavelengths of light

  2. Applications of zeta functions and other spectral functions in mathematics and physics: a special issue in honour of Stuart Dowker's 75th birthday Applications of zeta functions and other spectral functions in mathematics and physics: a special issue in honour of Stuart Dowker's 75th birthday

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowker, Fay; Elizalde, Emilio; Kirsten, Klaus

    2012-09-01

    went to Birmingham in 1958, where his supervisor was Leonardo Castillejo, best known from the Castillejo-Dalitz-Dyson-ambiguity see [2]. His thesis involved stripping theory, and on this topic he wrote his first ever publication [3]. Takeaways from that time were that sometimes one simply has to do what one is told, and even more importantly, sometimes one has to get on with a calculation and 'just roll through it'. It was also around that period that Stuart started to learn quantum field theory properly following the developments of Feynman. After his PhD, it was Peierls who helped him to find a position at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia in 1961, which he accepted before he received an offer from CERN. In retrospect, this was probably fortunate as it is where he met his wife, Pwu Yih, to whom he has been married for nearly 50 years. Scientifically he remained somewhat isolated there and spent much of his time learning more about quantum field theory, for example by reading Bogoliubov and Shirkov [4]. His entry point for general relativity was Eddington's The Mathematical Theory of Relativity [5], which together with the works of Julian Schwinger and Bryce de Witt were the most influential ones at that time. A shift of focus to questions in quantum field theory in curved space time took place. After his stay in Philadelphia, in 1963, helped by connections between Abe Klein and Brian Flowers, he went to the University of Manchester, where he remains to this day. This period was only briefly interrupted by a sabbatical in 1978 to 1979 at Austin following an invitation by Bryce de Witt. Looking back, it seems there were two major driving forces or principles that determined much of Stuart's selection of research projects. One of them is the method of images, about which he says: '...it intrigued me that one problem (charge + plane) could be got from another (just charge) by geometrical reasoning plus uniqueness. Thomson's book [6] took this further

  3. Stellar Clusters Forming in the Blue Dwarf Galaxy NGC 5253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-11-01

    . It may well be very similar to the progenitors in the early Universe of the old globular clusters we now observe in large galaxies like the Milky Way. In this sense, NGC 5253 provides us with a direct view towards our own beginnings. Note [1] The group consists of Giovanni Cresci (University of Florence, Italy), Leonardo Vanzi (ESO-Chile) and Marc Sauvage (CEA/DSN/DAPNIA, Saclay, France). More details about the present investigation is available in a research paper ("The Star Cluster population of NGC 5253" by G. Cresci et al.) to appear soon in the leading research journal Astronomy & Astrophysics (a preprint is available as astro-ph/0411486).

  4. a Passage to the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-11-01

    a concluding Press Conference , during which the outcome of this unique event will be summarized by the participants and the organisers: Monday, November 20, 1995, 15:30 pm, at the ESO Headquarters, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching, Germany List of National First-Prize Winners Belgium: Mr. Freddy Allemeersch (Teacher), Mr. Pieter De Ceuninck, Mr. Jeroen Staelens (Onze-Lieve-Vrouwecollege, Brugge) Denmark: Mr. Joern C. Olsen, Mr. Henrik Struckmann, Mr. Uffe A. Hansen, Mr. Mogens Winther (Teacher) (Soenderborg Amtsgymnasium) Finland: Mr. Reima Eresmaa, Ms. Laura Elina Nykyri, Ms. Reetamaija Janhonen (Cygnaeues-Lukeo, Jyvaeskylae and Jyvaeskylaen Lyseon Lukeo) France: Mr. Rene Cavaroz (Teacher), Mr. Vincent Hardy, Mr. Antoine Lesuffleur (Lycee Chartier, Bayeux) Germany: Ms. Dorothee Barth, Mr. Walter Czech (Teacher), Mr. Uwe Kranz, Ms. Karin Wieland (Immanuel-Kant-Gymnasium, Leinfelden-Echterdingen, Baden-Wuerttemberg) Greece: Ms. Agni Ioannidi, Ms. Elena Katifori, Mr. Vassilis Samiotis, Mr. Vassillos Tzotzes (Teacher) (Second Varvakelo Experimental Lyceum, Athens) Ireland: Mr. Declan Maccuarta (Teacher), Mr. Colm Mcloughlin (St. Peter's College, Wexford, Co. Wexford) Italy: Mr. Pasquale Ciarletta, Ms. Francesca D'elia, Ms. Ada Fortugna (Teacher), Mr. Alfredo Pudano (Liceo Scientifico `Leonardo da Vinci', Reggio Calabria) The Netherlands: Mr. Alex De Beer, Mr. Klaas Huijbregts, Mr. Ruud Nellen (Norbertuscollege, Rosendaal) Spain: Mr. Aritz Atela Aio, Mr. Julen Sarasola Manich (Teacher), Mr. Jon Huertas Rodriquez (Txorierri Batxilergoko Institua, Derio Bizkaia) Sweden: Mr. Rahman Amanullah, Mr. Kjell L. Bonander (Teacher), Mr. Tomas Oppelstrup, Ms. Christin Wiedemann (Saltsjoebadens Samskola, Saltsjoebaden) United Kingdom: Mr. Michael Ching, Dr. Richard Field (Teacher) (Oundle School, Peterborough) National Committees Further information about the national contests may be obtained from the National Committees: Belgium: Dr. C. Sterken, Vrije Universiteit

  5. AAS 228: Day 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note: Lastweek we were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Here is a final post aboutselectedevents on the last day of the meeting, written by authors fromastrobites.com, a grad-student collaborative project with which we recently announced a new partnership! Starting in July,keep an eye out for astrobites postsat AAS Nova in between Highlights(i.e., on Tuesdays and Thursdays).Were excited to be working together to bring you more recent astronomy research from AAS journals!Extrasolar Planets: Detection (by Leonardo dos Santos)Thursdays first session on exoplanets was about detecting these distant worlds, and the opening talk was given by Robert Siverd (Las Cumbres Observatory). He describes the NRES, a network of spectrographs that will look for exoplanets using the radial velocity method. One of the coolest aspects of this instrument is that it will feature an on the fly scheduling system that will perform observations as efficiently as possible. The spectrograph is still being tested, but a unit will be deployed at CTIO later this year.@lcogt contracted by @NASA_TESS for follow up of their candidates. #aas228 Jessie Christiansen (@aussiastronomer) June 16, 2016Measuring the depths of transits and eclipses in Spitzer has been problematic in the past, since the Spitzer instrument IRAC (InfraRed Array Camera) has a non-uniform response in its detectors pixels. But, as reported by James Ingalls (Spitzer Science Center, Caltech), observers are circumventing this issue by using what they call the staring mode (avoiding large pointing jumps) and an algorithm to pick sweet spot pixels. Moreover, the results from the IRAC Data Challenge are helping to better understand its behavior. Giuseppe Morello (University College London), on the other hand, explained how his research group gets rid of instrumental effects from IRAC using machine learning. This method removes systematics from exoplanet transit data no matter if the noise source is from an instrument or

  6. Astronomer's new guide to the galaxy: largest map of cold dust revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-07-01

    visible from the APEX site on Chajnantor, as well as combining it with infrared observations to be made by the ESA Herschel Space Observatory. We look forward to new discoveries made with these maps, which will also serve as a guide for future observations with ALMA", said Leonardo Testi from ESO, who is a member of the ATLASGAL team and the European Project Scientist for the ALMA project. Note [1] The map was constructed from individual APEX observations in radiation at 870 µm (0.87 mm) wavelength. More information: The ATLASGAL observations are presented in a paper by Frederic Schuller et al., ATLASGAL -- The APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy at 870 µm, published in Astronomy & Astrophysics. ATLASGAL is a collaboration between the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy, the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, ESO, and the University of Chile. LABOCA (Large APEX Bolometer Camera), one of APEX's major instruments, is the world's largest bolometer camera (a "thermometer camera", or thermal camera that measures and maps the tiny changes in temperature that occur when sub-millimetre wavelength light falls on its absorbing surface; see ESO 35/07). LABOCA's large field of view and high sensitivity make it an invaluable tool for imaging the "cold Universe". LABOCA was built by the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy. The Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope is a 12-metre telescope, located at 5100 m altitude on the arid plateau of Chajnantor in the Chilean Andes. APEX operates at millimetre and submillimetre wavelengths. This wavelength range is a relatively unexplored frontier in astronomy, requiring advanced detectors and an extremely high and dry observatory site, such as Chajnantor. APEX, the largest submillimetre-wave telescope operating in the southern hemisphere, is a collaboration between the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy, the Onsala Space Observatory and ESO. Operation of APEX at Chajnantor is entrusted to ESO. APEX is a

  7. 8th Argentinean Bioengineering Society Conference (SABI 2011) and 7th Clinical Engineering Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschino, Gustavo Javier; Ballarin, Virginia L.

    2011-12-01

    Juan ¬- CONICET Bioing Luciano Gentile Universidad Favaloro Mg María Eugenia Gómez Universidad Nacional de San Juan Dr Claudio González Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Mg Esteban González Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Dra Mariela A Gonzalez Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata - CONICET Dr Juan Pablo Graffigna Universidad Nacional de San Juan Dra Myriam Herrera Universidad Nacional de Tucumán - CONICET Dr Roberto Hidalgo Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Dr Roberto Isoardi Fundación Escuela de Medicina Nuclear de Mendoza - CNEA Dra Susana Jerez Universidad Nacional de Tucumán Dr Eric Laciar Universidad Nacional de San Juan - CONICET Bioing Roberto Leonarduzzi Universidad Nacional de Entre Ríos Mg Norberto Lerendegui Instituto Tecnológico de Buenos Aires Dra Natalia López Universidad Nacional de San Juan - CONICET Dra Rossana Madrid Universidad Nacional de Tucuman - CONICET Ing Florencia Montini Ballarin Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata - CONICET Dra Emilce Moler Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Dr Jorge Castiñieira Moreira Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Dr Silvia Murialdo Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata - CIC Dr Juan Manuel Olivera Universidad Nacional de Tucumán Dra Lucia Isabel Passoni Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Dr Juan Ignacio Pastore Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata - CONICET Dra María Elisa Pérez Universidad Nacional de San Juan Mg Franco M Pessana Universidad Favaloro Dr Julio Politti Universidad Nacional de Tucumán Dr Marcelo Risk Universidad Nacional de Buenos Aires - CONICET Ing Raúl Rivera Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Mg Luis Rocha Universidad Nacional de Tucumán - SIPROSA Dra Silvia Rodrigo Universidad Nacional de San Juan Dra Viviana Rotger Universidad Nacional de Tucumán Dr Leonardo Rufiner Universidad Nacional de Entre Rios - CONICET Dra Estela Ruiz Universidad Nacional de Tucumán Dr Martín Santiago Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires Dra

  8. AAS 228: Day 3 morning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Plenary Session 2015 Newton Lacy Pierce Prize Lecture: The Elephant in the Room: Effects of Distant, Massive Companions on Planetary System Architectures (by Leonardo dos Santos)The first session on Wednesday at 228th AAS Meeting was the Newton Lacy Pierce Prize Lecture by Heather Knutson (California Institute of Technology). This talk featured a broad range of research efforts on exoplanets, with the main focus on how we study the composition of their atmospheres, and how multi-body interactions carve the structure of the planetary systems we observe.One of her first points is the well-known idea that the Solar System is an oddball, compared to the exoplanet systems we have found so far: most of these systems contain hot Jupiters and mini-Neptunes at very close-in orbits around their host stars. Moreover, even when studying their transmission spectra, it is difficult to know the exact composition of their atmospheres.Knutson: it is difficult to constrain atmospheric composition of exoplanets (H-poor or H-rich+clouds?) #aas228pic.twitter.com/LdyN4o9RC7 astrobites (@astrobites) June 15, 2016The main proposal on how these systems formed is the migration scenario. In order to validate this idea, Dr. Knutson and her group The Friends of Hot Jupiters study systems with close-in gas giants and their frequency of binary companions, which are supposed to be the main culprits causing gas-giant migration. They found that approximately half of the observed systems have long-distance companions, providing strong validation of the migration scenario. Moreover, Dr. Knutson speculates that wide binaries have more

  9. AAS 228: Day 1 afternoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    is less likely to see, and vice versa. Angela Berti detected the signal of galactic conformity all the way to redshift z=1, an effect that makes galaxies more likely to be found around neighbors that are very similar (in terms of color or shape) than different kinds. Georgiana Ogrean closed the session by showing a merger between two galaxies that is not producing a strong shock front. 112: Astronomy Education for All: The 2017 Eclipse, Accessibility and NASA (by Meredith Rawls)This afternoon session kicked off with an advertisement for US-based astronomers favorite upcoming event: the 2017 Solar Eclipse. Jay Pasachoff reviewed plans for the August 21, 2017 event and pointed us to resources about choosing the best viewing site and what to expect on the momentous day. We also heard from Denise Smith, Jim Manning, and Daniel McIntosh about various NASA-funded efforts for education and outreach in the classroom and beyond. A sampling of NASA education and outreach resources compiled over several years, presented by Jim Manning #aas228 pic.twitter.com/T41gdHFoDv Meredith Rawls (@merrdiff) June 13, 2016The other two talks from this session focused on the newly-formed AAS Working Group for Accessibility and Disability and what the astronomical community can do to cultivate a more accessible culture. Speakers Jackie Monkiewicz and Lauren Gilbert described how and why inaccessibility is driving people away from the field: by requiring people with disabilities to disclose those disabilities, by maintaining inaccessible buildings and observatories, by acting inappropriately when accommodations are requested, and by not working well in advance of a course or event to anticipate the needs of people with disabilities. To learn more about what you can do to make astronomy accessible, and what efforts are already underway (including right here at AAS 228), see these resources compiled by AstroBetter.Press Conference: From Molecules to Galaxies (by Leonardo dos Santos

  10. PREFACE: Fourth Meeting on Constrained Dynamics and Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadoni, Mariano; Cavaglia, Marco; Nelson, Jeanette E.

    2006-04-01

    Cagliari, Italy) Roberto De Pietri (Università di Parma, Italy) Giuseppe De Risi (Università di Bari, Italy) Hans-Thomas Elze (Univ. Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil) Alessandro Fabbri (Università di Bologna, Italy) Sergey Fadeev (VNIIMS, Moscow, Russia) Serena Fagnocchi (Università di Bologna, Italy) Sara Farese (Universidad de Valencia, Spain) Alessandra Feo (Università di Parma, Italy) Dario Francia (Università di Roma Tor Vergata, Italy) Francesco Fucito (Università di Roma Tor Vergata, Italy) Dmitri Fursaev (JINR, Dubna, Russia) Daniel Galehouse (University of Akron, Ohio, USA) Remo Garattini (Università di Bergamo, Italy) Florian Girelli (Perimeter Institute, Waterloo, Canada) Luca Griguolo (Università di Parma, Italy) Daniel Grumiller (Universität Leipzig, Germany) Shinichi Horata (Hayama Center of Advanced Research, Japan) Giorgio Immirzi (Università di Perugia, Italy) Roman Jackiw (MIT, Cambridge, USA) Matyas Karadi (DAMTP, University of Cambridge, UK) Mikhail Katanaev (Steklov Mathematical Institute, Moscow, Russia) Claus Kiefer (Universität Koln, Germany) John Klauder (University of Florida, Gainesville, USA) Pavel Klepac (Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic) Jen-Chi Lee (National Chiao-Tung University, Taiwan) Carlos Leiva (Universidad de Tarapacá, Arica, Chile) Stefano Liberati (SISSA/ISAS, Trieste, Italy) Jorma Louko (University of Nottingham, UK) Luca Lusanna (INFN, Sezione di Firenze, Italy) Roy Maartens (University of Portsmouth, UK) Fotini Markopoulou (Perimeter Institute, Waterloo, Canada) Annalisa Marzuoli (Università di Pavia, Italy) Evangelos Melas (QMW, University of London, UK) Maurizio Melis (Università di Cagliary, Italy) Vitaly Melnikov (VNIIMS, Moscow, Russia) Guillermo A. Mena Marugan (CSIC, Madrid, Spain) Pietro Menotti (Università di Pisa, Italy) Salvatore Mignemi (Università di Cagliari, Italy) Aleksandar Mikovic (Universidade Lusófona, Lisboa, Portugal) Leonardo Modesto (Université de la Mediterranée, Marseille

  11. AAS 228: Day 2 morning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    extremely data-rich. The Galaxy Zoo project also suggests the promising prospect of synergizing the help from citizen scientists and machine learning in analyzing extremely large datasets.Extrasolar Planets: Atmospheres (by Leonardo dos Santos)Antonija Oklopi (Caltech) explains that Raman scattering of light, which works similarly to Rayleigh scattering (the process that makes Earths sky blue), can be used in the future to study the atmospheres of exoplanets. Her work is to create model spectra containing these features, from which we can learn about the presence and altitude of atmospheric clouds. Dr. Carl Melis (University of California, San Diego) studies the inner composition of exoplanets by looking at their remnants after they are destroyed by a dying star. His most recent work suggests that there is a differentiated pollution (from the core and the crust of a planet) in the disk orbiting of a white dwarf star. Samuel Grunblatt (University of Hawaii) introduces us to the main subject of his thesis: a hot-Jupiter observed by Keplers K2 mission transiting an evolved, red giant star. They used some pretty tricky data analysis in order to filter out the noise intrinsic to this type of star.Grunblatt shows the K2 transit before and after removal of granulation effects.Avi Shporer (JPL) asks the question: why are hot Jupiters so large? His research aims to study the correlation between stellar irradiation and planetary radius, and in order to have a more complete picture, they need to detect more gas giants on lower stellar irradiation regions. This idea gave rise to LCOGT K2 Warm Jupiter project, which recently discovered a brown dwarf in a long-period orbit around a Sun-like star. Paul Mason (New Mexico State University) proposes that the Milky Way is evolving to a more habitable galaxy, due to the expansion of the universe, the processing of heavier material inside stars, and the general decrease of ionizing radiation.Evolution of Galaxies (by Ben Cook)Tuesday mornings

  12. Nucléation, ascension et éclatement d'une bulle de champagne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liger-Belair, G.

    2006-03-01

    People have long been fascinated by bubbles and foams dynamics, and since the pioneering work of Leonardo da Vinci in the early 16th century, this subject has generated a huge bibliography. However, only quite recently, much interest was devoted to bubbles in Champagne wines and carbonated beverages. Since the time of the benedictine monk dom Pierre Perignon (1638-1715), champagne is the wine of celebration. This fame is largely linked to the elegance of its effervescence and foaming properties. In this book, the latest results about the chemical physics behind the bubbling properties of Champagne and sparkling wines are collected and fully illustrated. The first chapter is devoted to the history of champagne and to a presentation of the tools of the physical chemistry of interfaces needed for a whole comprehension of the book. Then, the three main steps of a fleeting champagne bubble's life are presented in chronological order, that is, the bubble nucleation on the glass wall (Chap.2), the bubble ascent and growth through the liquid matrix (Chap.3), and the bursting of bubbles at the liquid surface (Chap.4), which constitutes the most intriguing, functional, and visually appealing step. L'objectif général de ce travail consacré à l'étude des processus physicochimiques liés à l'effervescence des vins de Champagne était de décortiquer les différentes étapes de la vie d'une bulle de champagne en conditions réelles de consommation, dans une flûte. Nous résumons ci-après les principaux résultats obtenus pour chacune des étapes de la vie de la bulle, depuis sa naissance sur les parois d'une flûte, jusqu'à son éclatement en surface. Nucléation À l'aide d'une caméra rapide munie d'un objectif de microscope, nous avons pu mettre à mal une idée largement répandue. Ce ne sont pas les anfractuosités de la surface du verre ou de la flûte qui sont responsable de la nucléation hétérogène des bulles, mais des particules adsorbées sur les parois du

  13. The Dark Side of Nature: the Crime was Almost Perfect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-12-01

    Astrofisico di Arcetri, Italy), Guido Chincarini (INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera & Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Italy), Nino Panagia (Space Telescope Science Institute, USA), Gianpiero Tagliaferri, Dino Fugazza, Sergio Campana, Stefano Covino, and Paolo D'Avanzo (INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Italy), Daniele Malesani (SISSA/ISAS, Italy and Dark Cosmology Centre, Copenhagen), Vincenzo Testa, L. Angelo Antonelli, Silvia Piranomonte, and Luigi Stella (INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Italy), Vanessa Mangano (INAF/IASF Palermo, Italy), Kevin Hurley (University of California, Berkeley, USA), I. Felix Mirabel (ESO), and Leonardo J. Pellizza (Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio). The Danish-led team is composed of Johan P. U. Fynbo, Darach Watson, Christina C. Thöne, Tamara M. Davis, Jens Hjorth, José Mará Castro Cerón, Brian L. Jensen, Maximilian D. Stritzinger, and Dong Xu (Dark Cosmology Centre, University of Copenhagen, Denmark), Jesper Sollerman (Dark Cosmology Centre and Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, Sweden), Uffe G. Jørgensen, Tobias C. Hinse, and Kristian G. Woller (Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen), Joshua S. Bloom, Daniel Kocevski, Daniel Perley (Department of Astronomy, University of California at Berkeley, USA), Páll Jakobsson (Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, UK), John F. Graham and Andrew S. Fruchter (Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, USA), David Bersier (Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, UK), Lisa Kewley (University of Hawaii, Institute of Astronomy, USA), Arnaud Cassan and Marta Zub (Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Germany), Suzanne Foley (School of Physics, University College Dublin, Ireland), Javier Gorosabel (Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, Granada, Spain), Keith D. Horne (SUPA Physics/Astronomy, University of St Andrews, Scotland, UK), Sylvio

  14. Applications of zeta functions and other spectral functions in mathematics and physics: a special issue in honour of Stuart Dowker's 75th birthday Applications of zeta functions and other spectral functions in mathematics and physics: a special issue in honour of Stuart Dowker's 75th birthday

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowker, Fay; Elizalde, Emilio; Kirsten, Klaus

    2012-09-01

    went to Birmingham in 1958, where his supervisor was Leonardo Castillejo, best known from the Castillejo-Dalitz-Dyson-ambiguity see [2]. His thesis involved stripping theory, and on this topic he wrote his first ever publication [3]. Takeaways from that time were that sometimes one simply has to do what one is told, and even more importantly, sometimes one has to get on with a calculation and 'just roll through it'. It was also around that period that Stuart started to learn quantum field theory properly following the developments of Feynman. After his PhD, it was Peierls who helped him to find a position at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia in 1961, which he accepted before he received an offer from CERN. In retrospect, this was probably fortunate as it is where he met his wife, Pwu Yih, to whom he has been married for nearly 50 years. Scientifically he remained somewhat isolated there and spent much of his time learning more about quantum field theory, for example by reading Bogoliubov and Shirkov [4]. His entry point for general relativity was Eddington's The Mathematical Theory of Relativity [5], which together with the works of Julian Schwinger and Bryce de Witt were the most influential ones at that time. A shift of focus to questions in quantum field theory in curved space time took place. After his stay in Philadelphia, in 1963, helped by connections between Abe Klein and Brian Flowers, he went to the University of Manchester, where he remains to this day. This period was only briefly interrupted by a sabbatical in 1978 to 1979 at Austin following an invitation by Bryce de Witt. Looking back, it seems there were two major driving forces or principles that determined much of Stuart's selection of research projects. One of them is the method of images, about which he says: '...it intrigued me that one problem (charge + plane) could be got from another (just charge) by geometrical reasoning plus uniqueness. Thomson's book [6] took this further

  15. La physique des bulles de champagne Une première approche des processus physico-chimiques liés à l'effervescence des vins de Champagne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liger-Belair, G.

    2002-07-01

    People have long been fascinated by bubbles and foams dynamics, and since the pioneering work of Leonardo da Vinci in the early 16th century, this subject has generated a huge bibliography. However, only very recently, much interest was devoted to bubbles in Champagne wines. Small bubbles rising through the liquid, as well as a bubble ring (the so-called collar) at the periphery of a flute poured with champagne are the hallmark of this traditionally festive wine, and even there is no scientific evidence yet to connect the quality of a champagne with its effervescence, people nevertheless often make a connection between them. Therefore, since the last few years, a better understanding of the numerous parameters involved in the bubbling process has become an important stake in the champagne research area. Otherwise, in addition to these strictly enological reasons, we also feel that the area of bubble dynamics could benefit from the simple but close observation of a glass poured with champagne. In this study, our first results concerning the close observation of the three main steps of a champagne bubble's life are presented, that is, the bubble nucleation on tiny particles stuck on the glass wall (Chap. 2), the bubble ascent through the liquid (Chap. 3), and the bursting of bubbles at the free surface, which constitutes the most intriguing and visually appealing step (Chap. 4). Our results were obtained in real consuming conditions, that is, in a classical crystal flute poured with a standard commercial champagne wine. Champagne bubble nucleation proved to be a fantastic everyday example to illustrate the non-classical heterogeneous bubble nucleation process in a weakly supersaturated liquid. Contrary to a generally accepted idea, nucleation sites are not located on irregularities of the glass itself. Most of nucleation sites are located on tiny hollow and roughly cylindrical exogenous fibres coming from the surrounding air or remaining from the wiping process

  16. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-11-01

    Mohab Abou ZeidInstitut des Hautes Études Scientifiques, Bures-sur-Yvette Ido AdamMax-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik (AEI), Potsdam Henrik AdorfLeibniz Universität Hannover Mohammad Ali-AkbariIPM, Tehran Antonio Amariti Università di Milano-Bicocca Nicola Ambrosetti Université de Neuchâtel Martin Ammon Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Christopher AndreyÉcole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) Laura AndrianopoliPolitecnico di Torino David AndriotLPTHE, Université UPMC Paris VI Carlo Angelantonj Università di Torino Pantelis ApostolopoulosUniversitat de les Illes Balears, Palma Gleb ArutyunovInstitute for Theoretical Physics, Utrecht University Davide AstolfiUniversità di Perugia Spyros AvramisUniversité de Neuchâtel Mirela BabalicChalmers University, Göteborg Foday BahDigicom Ioannis Bakas University of Patras Igor BandosUniversidad de Valencia Jose L F BarbonIFTE UAM/CSIC Madrid Till BargheerMax-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik (AEI), Potsdam Marco Baumgartl Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich James BedfordImperial College London Raphael BenichouLaboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Supérieure, Paris Francesco Benini SISSA, Trieste Eric Bergshoeff Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen Alice BernamontiVrije Universiteit, Brussel Julia BernardLaboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Supérieure, Paris Adel Bilal Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Supérieure, Paris Marco Billo' Università di Torino Matthias Blau Université de Neuchâtel Guillaume BossardAlbert-Einstein-Institut, Golm Leonardo BriziÉcole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) Johannes BroedelLeibniz Universität Hannover (AEI) Tom BrownQueen Mary, University of London Ilka BrunnerEidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich Erling BrynjolfssonUniversity of Iceland Dmitri BykovSteklov Institute, Moscow and Trinity College, Dublin Joan CampsUniversitat de Barcelona

  17. Young Astronomers' Observe with ESO Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-11-01

    somewhat similar to the Earth, but it is too cold for life as we know it, and because of its comparatively small size, the atmospheric pressure is very low. It would in principle be possible to detect the outermost planet with the HST, if the distance to this planetary system was less than about 30 light-years. Ireland: Mr. Declan MacCuarta (Teacher), Mr. Colm McLoughlin (St. Peter's College, Wexford, Co. Wexford) The nearest star, Alpha Centauri, is a double star and a hypothetical planetary system around the A-component, a solar-type star, is studied in some detail. The presence of the companion star makes some planetary orbits unstable. In this project, 4 planets are placed within 2 AU (300 million km) of the central star; 3 of these are terrestrial (no. 3 is Earth-like) and the outermost is a small gaseous planet. Cometary orbits may be very complex in this gravitatinal field. A planetary system like the one described may be barely observable with the Hubble Space Telescope, and only if one of the planets passes in front of the star (an `occultation') and its light diminishes accordingly. Italy: Mr. Pasquale Ciarletta, Ms. Francesca D'elia, Ms. Ada Fortugna (Teacher), Mr. Alfredo Pudano (Liceo Scientifico `Leonardo da Vinci', Reggio Calabria) This group built a spectrograph from scratch, with a grating and all the usual optical parts. They were able to calibrate the solar spectrum with the help of standard lamps and in this way, they observed several prominent, solar absorption lines. Among them were the H-alpha line at 6562 A, the sodium D-lines at 5890--96 And the magnesium triplet near 5175 A. These observations were made with the eye and also with the photographic recording technique. They were planning to observe the spectra of some stars also, but in the end time was too short and they had to hurry to send in the report. The Netherlands: Mr. Alex De Beer, Mr. KlAs Huijbregts, Mr. Ruud Nellen (Norbertuscollege, RosendAl) This team has designed their own planetary