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Sample records for jaamu kaili jaamu

  1. Siliceous spicules in a vauxiid sponge (Demospongia) from the Kaili Biota(Cambrian Stage 5), Guizhou, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.-L.; Zhao, Y.-L.; Babcock, L. E.; Peng, J.

    2017-02-01

    Fossils of the sponge Angulosuspongia sinensis from calcareous mudstones of the middle and upper part of the Kaili Formation (Cambrian Stage 5) in the Jianhe area of Guizhou province, South China, exhibit an apparently reticulate pattern, characteristic of the Vauxiidae. Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectrometry (EDS) and Raman spectroscopy analysis indicate the presence of silica in the skeletal elements of these fossils, suggesting that this taxon possessed a skeleton comprised of spicules. This is the first confirmation of siliceous skeletal elements in fossils of the family Vauxiidae, and it lends support to the hypothesis that some early demosponges possessed biomineralized siliceous skeletons, which were subsequently lost and replaced by spongin later in the evolutionary history of this lineage. The new materials provide critical insight into the phylogeny and evolution of biomineralization in the Demosopongiae.

  2. Siliceous spicules in a vauxiid sponge (Demospongia) from the Kaili Biota(Cambrian Stage 5), Guizhou, South China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, X.-L.; Zhao, Y.-L.; Babcock, L. E.; Peng, J.

    2017-01-01

    Fossils of the sponge Angulosuspongia sinensis from calcareous mudstones of the middle and upper part of the Kaili Formation (Cambrian Stage 5) in the Jianhe area of Guizhou province, South China, exhibit an apparently reticulate pattern, characteristic of the Vauxiidae. Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectrometry (EDS) and Raman spectroscopy analysis indicate the presence of silica in the skeletal elements of these fossils, suggesting that this taxon possessed a skeleton comprised of spicules. This is the first confirmation of siliceous skeletal elements in fossils of the family Vauxiidae, and it lends support to the hypothesis that some early demosponges possessed biomineralized siliceous skeletons, which were subsequently lost and replaced by spongin later in the evolutionary history of this lineage. The new materials provide critical insight into the phylogeny and evolution of biomineralization in the Demosopongiae. PMID:28220860

  3. Oil-source correlation for the paleo-reservoir in the Majiang area and remnant reservoir in the Kaili area, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yunxin; Liao, Yuhong; Wu, Liangliang; Geng, Ansong

    2011-05-01

    There are different viewpoints on the oil-source correlation of the Majiang paleo-reservoir and the neighbouring Kaili remnant reservoir in the Southern Guizhou Depression of China. Three potential source rocks in this depression could be inferred: the Lower-Cambrian marine mudstone, Lower-Silurian shale and Lower-Permian mudstone. Most of the potential source rocks are of high maturity. The solid bitumens and oil seepages in the Southern Guizhou Depression suffered severe secondary alterations, such as thermal degradation and biodegradation. The solid bitumens of the Majiang paleo-reservoir are also of high maturity. The oil seepages and soft bitumen of the Kaili remnant reservoir were severely biodegraded. All these secondary alterations may obscure oil-source correlations by routine biomarkers. Thus, it is very important to select appropriate biomarker parameters for the oil-source correlation. In this work, biomarkers resistant to thermal degradation and biodegradation and the data of organic carbon isotopic compositions were used for the correlation. The δ 13C values of n-alkanes in asphaltene pyrolysates were also used to make oil-oil and oil-source correlations between severely biodegraded oils. The results indicate that the Lower-Cambrian marine mudstones are the main source for the Ordovician-Silurian (O-S) solid bitumens of the Majiang area and the Ordovician-Silurian oil seepages and soft bitumens of the Kaili area. Remnant reservoir in the eastern Kaili area might have been charged at least twice by the oil generated from the Lower-Cambrian marine source rocks.

  4. Silicified egg clusters from a Middle Cambrian Burgess Shale type deposit, Guizhou, south China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jih-Pai; Scott, Andrew C.; Li, Chia-Wei; Wu, Hung-Jen; Ausich, William I.; Zhao, Yuan-Long; Hwu, Yeu-Kuang

    2006-12-01

    Although knowledge of Cambrian fossil eggs and/or embryos has increased dramatically, embryos were previously unknown in siliciclastic settings of coeval strata. Here we report for the first time egg clusters in a fine-grained siliciclastic matrix from the Middle Cambrian Kaili Formation lagerstätte (513 501 Ma), south China. Some were imaged under synchrotron radiation. These spheroids are preferentially preserved as microcrystalline quartz and interpreted as marine invertebrate fossil eggs based on patterns of spheroid arrangement, shape, and analogues of fossil and modern invertebrate eggs. Embryos with cleavage cells are evident in at least one cluster. Detailed element analyses show that eggs are primarily preserved as solid silica replacement, and there is a calcite layer covering the eggs replacing the original organic layer. Silicification of intact invertebrate egg clusters is reported here as a new mode of preservation associated with a Burgess Shale type deposit.

  5. Lower Cambrian polychaete from China sheds light on early annelid evolution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianni; Ou, Qiang; Han, Jian; Li, Jinshu; Wu, Yichen; Jiao, Guoxiang; He, Tongjiang

    2015-06-01

    We herein report a fossilized polychaete annelid, Guanshanchaeta felicia gen. et sp. nov., from the Lower Cambrian Guanshan Biota (Cambrian Series 2, stage 4). The new taxon has a generalized polychaete morphology, with biramous parapodia (most of which preserve the evidence of chaetae), an inferred prostomium bearing a pair of appendages, and a bifid pygidium. G. felicia is the first unequivocal annelid reported from the Lower Cambrian of China. It represents one of the oldest annelids among those from other early Paleozoic Lagerstätten including Sirius Passet from Greenland (Vinther et al., Nature 451: 185-188, 2011) and Emu Bay from Kangaroo island (Parry et al., Palaeontology 57: 1091-1103, 2014), and adds to our increasing roll of present-day animal phyla recognized in the early Cambrian Guanshan Biota. This finding expands the panorama of the Cambrian 'explosion' exemplified by the Guanshan Biota, suggesting the presence of many more fossil annelids in the Chengjiang Lagerstätte and the Kaili Biota. In addition, this new taxon increases our knowledge of early polychaete morphology, which suggests that polychaete annelids considerably diversified in the Cambrian.

  6. Lower Cambrian polychaete from China sheds light on early annelid evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianni; Ou, Qiang; Han, Jian; Li, Jinshu; Wu, Yichen; Jiao, Guoxiang; He, Tongjiang

    2015-06-01

    We herein report a fossilized polychaete annelid, Guanshanchaeta felicia gen. et sp. nov., from the Lower Cambrian Guanshan Biota (Cambrian Series 2, stage 4). The new taxon has a generalized polychaete morphology, with biramous parapodia (most of which preserve the evidence of chaetae), an inferred prostomium bearing a pair of appendages, and a bifid pygidium. G. felicia is the first unequivocal annelid reported from the Lower Cambrian of China. It represents one of the oldest annelids among those from other early Paleozoic Lagerstätten including Sirius Passet from Greenland (Vinther et al., Nature 451: 185-188, 2008) and Emu Bay from Kangaroo island (Parry et al., Palaeontology 57: 1091-1103, 2014), and adds to our increasing roll of present-day animal phyla recognized in the early Cambrian Guanshan Biota. This finding expands the panorama of the Cambrian `explosion' exemplified by the Guanshan Biota, suggesting the presence of many more fossil annelids in the Chengjiang Lagerstätte and the Kaili Biota. In addition, this new taxon increases our knowledge of early polychaete morphology, which suggests that polychaete annelids considerably diversified in the Cambrian.