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Sample records for jackknifing

  1. Confidence Intervals for Random Forests: The Jackknife and the Infinitesimal Jackknife

    PubMed Central

    Wager, Stefan; Hastie, Trevor; Efron, Bradley

    2014-01-01

    We study the variability of predictions made by bagged learners and random forests, and show how to estimate standard errors for these methods. Our work builds on variance estimates for bagging proposed by Efron (1992, 2013) that are based on the jackknife and the infinitesimal jackknife (IJ). In practice, bagged predictors are computed using a finite number B of bootstrap replicates, and working with a large B can be computationally expensive. Direct applications of jackknife and IJ estimators to bagging require B = Θ(n1.5) bootstrap replicates to converge, where n is the size of the training set. We propose improved versions that only require B = Θ(n) replicates. Moreover, we show that the IJ estimator requires 1.7 times less bootstrap replicates than the jackknife to achieve a given accuracy. Finally, we study the sampling distributions of the jackknife and IJ variance estimates themselves. We illustrate our findings with multiple experiments and simulation studies. PMID:25580094

  2. Testing variance components by two jackknife methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The jacknife method, a resampling technique, has been widely used for statistical tests for years. The pseudo value based jacknife method (defined as pseudo jackknife method) is commonly used to reduce the bias for an estimate; however, sometimes it could result in large variaion for an estmimate a...

  3. The Infinitesimal Jackknife with Exploratory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Guangjian; Preacher, Kristopher J.; Jennrich, Robert I.

    2012-01-01

    The infinitesimal jackknife, a nonparametric method for estimating standard errors, has been used to obtain standard error estimates in covariance structure analysis. In this article, we adapt it for obtaining standard errors for rotated factor loadings and factor correlations in exploratory factor analysis with sample correlation matrices. Both…

  4. Jackknife bias reduction for polychotomous logistic regression.

    PubMed

    Bull, S B; Greenwood, C M; Hauck, W W

    1997-03-15

    Despite theoretical and empirical evidence that the usual MLEs can be misleading in finite samples and some evidence that bias reduced estimates are less biased and more efficient, they have not seen a wide application in practice. One can obtain bias reduced estimates by jackknife methods, with or without full iteration, or by use of higher order terms in a Taylor series expansion of the log-likelihood to approximate asymptotic bias. We provide details of these methods for polychotomous logistic regression with a nominal categorical response. We conducted a Monte Carlo comparison of the jackknife and Taylor series estimates in moderate sample sizes in a general logistic regression setting, to investigate dichotomous and trichotomous responses and a mixture of correlated and uncorrelated binary and normal covariates. We found an approximate two-step jackknife and the Taylor series methods useful when the ratio of the number of observations to the number of parameters is greater than 15, but we cannot recommend the two-step and the fully iterated jackknife estimates when this ratio is less than 20, especially when there are large effects, binary covariates, or multicollinearity in the covariates.

  5. Spurious 99% bootstrap and jackknife support for unsupported clades.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Mark P; Freudenstein, John V

    2011-10-01

    Quantifying branch support using the bootstrap and/or jackknife is generally considered to be an essential component of rigorous parsimony and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses. Previous authors have described how application of the frequency-within-replicates approach to treating multiple equally optimal trees found in a given bootstrap pseudoreplicate can provide apparent support for otherwise unsupported clades. We demonstrate how a similar problem may occur when a non-representative subset of equally optimal trees are held per pseudoreplicate, which we term the undersampling-within-replicates artifact. We illustrate the frequency-within-replicates and undersampling-within-replicates bootstrap and jackknife artifacts using both contrived and empirical examples, demonstrate that the artifacts can occur in both parsimony and likelihood analyses, and show that the artifacts occur in outputs from multiple different phylogenetic-inference programs. Based on our results, we make the following five recommendations, which are particularly relevant to supermatrix analyses, but apply to all phylogenetic analyses. First, when two or more optimal trees are found in a given pseudoreplicate they should be summarized using the strict-consensus rather than frequency-within-replicates approach. Second jackknife resampling should be used rather than bootstrap resampling. Third, multiple tree searches while holding multiple trees per search should be conducted in each pseudoreplicate rather than conducting only a single search and holding only a single tree. Fourth, branches with a minimum possible optimized length of zero should be collapsed within each tree search rather than collapsing branches only if their maximum possible optimized length is zero. Fifth, resampling values should be mapped onto the strict consensus of all optimal trees found rather than simply presenting the ≥ 50% bootstrap or jackknife tree or mapping the resampling values onto a single optimal tree.

  6. Jackknife and bootstrap inferential procedures for censored survival data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Loh Yue; Arasan, Jayanthi; Midi, Habshah; Bakar, Mohd Rizam Abu

    2015-10-01

    Confidence interval is an estimate of a certain parameter. Classical construction of confidence interval based on asymptotic normality (Wald) often produces misleading inferences when dealing with censored data especially in small samples. Alternative techniques allow us to construct the confidence interval estimation without relying on this assumption. In this paper, we compare the performances of the jackknife and several bootstraps confidence interval estimates for the parameters of a log logistic model with censored data and covariate. We investigate their performances at two nominal error probability levels and several levels of censoring proportion. Conclusions were then drawn based on the results of the coverage probability study.

  7. Nonparametric Estimation of Standard Errors in Covariance Analysis Using the Infinitesimal Jackknife

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennrich, Robert I.

    2008-01-01

    The infinitesimal jackknife provides a simple general method for estimating standard errors in covariance structure analysis. Beyond its simplicity and generality what makes the infinitesimal jackknife method attractive is that essentially no assumptions are required to produce consistent standard error estimates, not even the requirement that the…

  8. Anti-jackknife reverse tracking control of articulated vehicles in the presence of actuator saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, H.; Zhu, H.

    2016-10-01

    It is well known that backward motion control of an articulated vehicle is difficult because it is an open loop unstable system and such motion is also dangerous due to 'jackknifing'. In this paper, an anti-jackknife reverse tracking control strategy for autonomous articulated vehicles is proposed based on the combined longitudinal and lateral control scheme. In the proposed lateral-longitudinal control scheme, the major task is to control the reverse heading of the trailer by automatic steering strategies that observe both the anti-jackknife condition and input limitations. The main contribution of this paper is the development of globally asymptotic anti-jackknife stabilising and tracking controls of heading angles with both state and input constraints considered a priori. The proposed control inherently has an anti-windup mechanism that prevents the hitch angle from going beyond any specified critical value to avoid jackknifing, during which time, the steering angle remains at its limit. Stability of the controller is theoretically proven via the Lyapunov argument. Effectiveness of the proposed approach is demonstrated by CarSim and Simulink joint simulations.

  9. A Jackknife Test of Homogeneity of Variance with Paired Replicates Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothstein, Stuart M.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A nonparametric test of dispersion with paired replicates data is described which involves jackknifing logarithmic transformations of the ratio of variance estimates for the pre- and posttreatment populations. Results from a simulation show that the test performs well under the null hypothesis and has good power properties. (Author/JKS)

  10. Use of the Multinomial Jackknife and Bootstrap in Generalized Nonlinear Canonical Correlation Analysis. Research Report 87-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Burg, Eeke; de Leeuw, Jan

    The estimation of mean and standard errors of the eigenvalues and category quantifications in generalized non-linear canonical correlation analysis (OVERALS) is discussed. Starting points are the delta method equations. The jackknife and bootstrap methods are compared for providing finite difference approximations to the derivatives. Examining the…

  11. Regional Seismic Tomography in Brazil and Uncertainty Evaluation Through Jackknife Re- Sampling Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, M. P.; Schimmel, M.; Assumpcao, M.

    2007-05-01

    We used the regional seismic tomography to study the upper mantle beneath SE and Central Brazil. This method is based on the inversion of P- and S-wave relative travel time residuals (VanDecar, 1991) obtained from more than 80 stations in an area of 20 x 20 degrees. The ~11000 P and PKP residuals and ~8000 S, ScS, SKS, and SKKS residuals have been obtained from waveform cross-correlations for up to 12 simultaneous stations. Our results show correlations of seismic anomalies with the main tectonic structures and reveal new anomalies not yet observed in previous works. High velocity anomalies in the western portion of the Sao Francisco Craton support the hypothesis that this craton was part of a major Neoproterozoic plate. Low velocity anomalies beneath the Tocantins Province (mainly fold belts between the Amazon and Sao Francisco cratons) are interpreted as due to lithospheric thinning. Assumpcao et al. (2004) showed a good correlation between intraplate seismicity and low velocity anomalies in this region. The slab of the Nazca Plate is observed as a high velocity anomaly beneath the Parana basin (at 700-1200 km depths). At these depths, large low velocity anomalies appear accompanying the slab. Synthetic tests show that these anomalies are artifacts of the inversion generated by the presence of the slab. We use the Jackknife re-sampling method to evaluate the robustness of the tomographic results with respect to the data. The main advantage is that it is not necessary to assume a particular error distribution, since the model variability is accessed directly from the data variability. The approach is based on a random removal of a small percentage of the data (1%) to generate various new subsets, which are inverted to evaluate the model variability. These local estimates include inherently the highly variable ray coverage and measurement errors and can provide confidence in the interpretation of anomalies. This measure should not be interpreted as the resolution

  12. Using the jackknife for estimation in log link Bernoulli regression models.

    PubMed

    Lipsitz, Stuart R; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M; Arriaga, Alex; Sinha, Debajyoti; Gawande, Atul A

    2015-02-10

    Bernoulli (or binomial) regression using a generalized linear model with a log link function, where the exponentiated regression parameters have interpretation as relative risks, is often more appropriate than logistic regression for prospective studies with common outcomes. In particular, many researchers regard relative risks to be more intuitively interpretable than odds ratios. However, for the log link, when the outcome is very prevalent, the likelihood may not have a unique maximum. To circumvent this problem, a 'COPY method' has been proposed, which is equivalent to creating for each subject an additional observation with the same covariates except the response variable has the outcome values interchanged (1's changed to 0's and 0's changed to 1's). The original response is given weight close to 1, while the new observation is given a positive weight close to 0; this approach always leads to convergence of the maximum likelihood algorithm, except for problems with convergence due to multicollinearity among covariates. Even though this method produces a unique maximum, when the outcome is very prevalent, and/or the sample size is relatively small, the COPY method can yield biased estimates. Here, we propose using the jackknife as a bias-reduction approach for the COPY method. The proposed method is motivated by a study of patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery.

  13. Electromyographic activity of the rectus abdominis during a traditional crunch and the basic jackknife exercise with the Ab Lounge™.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Gail A; Bent-Forsythe, Denise A; Roopchand-Martin, Sharmella C

    2012-06-01

    The use of nontraditional exercise devices such as the Ab Lounge™ has been promoted as being as effective as the traditional abdominal crunch in strengthening the abdominal musculature. Evidence for this is lacking, however. The purpose of this study was to compare the degree of activation of the upper and lower rectus abdominis using electromyography (EMG) during a traditional crunch with the basic jackknife using the Ab Lounge™. Twenty-two subjects (6 men and 16 women) were randomly selected from the student population at the University of the West Indies (Mona Campus). The mean age of the participants was 20.5 ± 1.5 years, height 166.4 ± 6.2 cm, weight 64 ± 10.3 kg, and waist-hip ratio 0.7 ± 0.1. Surface EMG was used to assess the muscle activity from the upper and lower rectus abdominis while each exercise was performed. The EMG data were full-wave rectified and normalized using a mathematical model that was set up in Microsoft Excel for Windows XP. Statistical analysis was performed on the data using a univariate analysis of variance with gender as a covariate. Significance was determined by p < 0.05. The mean EMG data recorded for the upper rectus abdominis was significantly higher with the traditional crunch when compared with the basic jackknife performed on the Ab Lounge™ (F = 4.39, p = 0.04). The traditional crunch produced a higher level of activity in the lower rectus abdominis when compared with the basic jackknife, but this was not statistically significant (F = 0.249, p = 0.62). There was no significant interaction between gender and the effect of the type of exercise on upper and lower rectus abdominis activation. These results suggest that the traditional abdominal crunch is more effective than the basic jackknife is in activating the rectus abdominis musculature.

  14. Morphological characterization via light and electron microscopy of Atlantic jackknife clam (Ensis directus) hemocytes.

    PubMed

    Preziosi, Brian M; Bowden, Timothy J

    2016-05-01

    The Atlantic jackknife clam, Ensis directus, is currently being researched as a potential species for aquaculture operations in Maine. The goal of this study was to describe the hemocytes of this species for the first time and provide a morphological classification scheme. We viewed hemocytes under light microscopy (using Hemacolor, neutral red, and Pappenheim's stains) as well as transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The 2 main types of hemocytes found were granulocytes and hyalinocytes (agranular cells). The granulocytes were subdivided into large and small granulocytes while the hyalinocytes were subdivided into large and small hyalinocytes. The large hemocytes had both a larger diameter and smaller nucleus to cell diameter ratio than their smaller counterparts. A rare cell type, the vesicular cell, was also observed and it possessed many vesicles but few or no granules. Using TEM, granulocytes were found to contain both electron-lucent and electron-dense granules of various sizes. These numerous granules were the only structures that took up the neutral red stain. Hyalinocytes had few of these granules relative to granulocytes. Large hyalinocytes had both various organelles and large vesicles in their abundant cytoplasm while small hyalinocytes had little room for organelles in their scant cytoplasm. Total hemocyte counts averaged 1.96×10(6) cells mL(-1) while differential hemocyte counts averaged 11% for small hyalinocytes, 12% for large hyalinocytes, 59% for small granulocytes, and 18% for large granulocytes. The results of this study provide a starting point for future studies on E. directus immune function. PMID:27015289

  15. Jackknife-corrected parametric bootstrap estimates of growth rates in bivalve mollusks using nearest living relatives.

    PubMed

    Dexter, Troy A; Kowalewski, Michał

    2013-12-01

    Quantitative estimates of growth rates can augment ecological and paleontological applications of body-size data. However, in contrast to body-size estimates, assessing growth rates is often time-consuming, expensive, or unattainable. Here we use an indirect approach, a jackknife-corrected parametric bootstrap, for efficient approximation of growth rates using nearest living relatives with known age-size relationships. The estimate is developed by (1) collecting a sample of published growth rates of closely related species, (2) calculating the average growth curve using those published age-size relationships, (3) resampling iteratively these empirically known growth curves to estimate the standard errors and confidence bands around the average growth curve, and (4) applying the resulting estimate of uncertainty to bracket age-size relationships of the species of interest. This approach was applied to three monophyletic families (Donacidae, Mactridae, and Semelidae) of mollusk bivalves, a group characterized by indeterministic shell growth, but widely used in ecological, paleontological, and geochemical research. The resulting indirect estimates were tested against two previously published geochemical studies and, in both cases, yielded highly congruent age estimates. In addition, a case study in applied fisheries was used to illustrate the potential of the proposed approach for augmenting aquaculture management practices. The resulting estimates of growth rates place body size data in a constrained temporal context and confidence intervals associated with resampling estimates allow for assessing the statistical uncertainty around derived temporal ranges. The indirect approach should allow for improved evaluation of diverse research questions, from sustainability of industrial shellfish harvesting to climatic interpretations of stable isotope proxies extracted from fossil skeletons.

  16. Is It Useful and Safe to Maintain the Sitting Position During Only One Minute before Position Change to the Jack-knife Position?

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soo Young; Park, Jong Cook

    2010-01-01

    Background Conventional spinal saddle block is performed with the patient in a sitting position, keeping the patient sitting for between 3 to 10 min after injection of a drug. This amount of time, however, is long enough to cause prolonged postoperative urinary retention. The trend in this block is to lower the dose of local anesthetics, providing a selective segmental block; however, an optimal dose and method are needed for adequate anesthesia in variable situations. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the question of whether only 1 min of sitting after drug injection would be sufficient and safe for minor anorectal surgery. Methods Two hundred and sixteen patients undergoing minor anorectal surgery under spinal anesthesia remained sitting for 1 min after completion of subarachnoid administration of 1 ml of a 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine solution (5 mg). They were then placed in the jack-knife position. After surgery, analgesia levels were assessed using loss of cold sensation in the supine position. The next day, urination and 11-point numeric rating scale (NRS) for postoperative pain were assessed. Results None of the patients required additional analgesics during surgical manipulation. Postoperative sensory levels were T10 [T8-T12] in patients, and no significant differences were observed between sex (P = 0.857), height (P = 0.065), obesity (P = 0.873), or age (P = 0.138). Urinary retention developed in only 7 patients (3.2%). In this group, NRS was 5.0 ± 2.4 (P = 0.014). Conclusions The one-minute sitting position for spinal saddle block before the jack-knife position is a safe method for use with minor anorectal surgery and can reduce development of postoperative urinary retention. PMID:20830265

  17. The effect of temperature and wing morphology on quantitative genetic variation in the cricket Gryllus firmus, with an appendix examining the statistical properties of the Jackknife-MANOVA method of matrix comparison.

    PubMed

    Bégin, M; Roff, D A; Debat, V

    2004-11-01

    We investigated the effect of temperature and wing morphology on the quantitative genetic variances and covariances of five size-related traits in the sand cricket, Gryllus firmus. Micropterous and macropterous crickets were reared in the laboratory at 24, 28 and 32 degrees C. Quantitative genetic parameters were estimated using a nested full-sib family design, and (co)variance matrices were compared using the T method, Flury hierarchy and Jackknife-manova method. The results revealed that the mean phenotypic value of each trait varied significantly among temperatures and wing morphs, but temperature reaction norms were not similar across all traits. Micropterous individuals were always smaller than macropterous individuals while expressing more phenotypic variation, a finding discussed in terms of canalization and life-history trade-offs. We observed little variation between the matrices of among-family (co)variation corresponding to each combination of temperature and wing morphology, with only one matrix of six differing in structure from the others. The implications of this result are discussed with respect to the prediction of evolutionary trajectories.

  18. The many structural faces of calmodulin: a multitasking molecular jackknife.

    PubMed

    Kursula, Petri

    2014-10-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a highly conserved protein and a crucial calcium sensor in eukaryotes. CaM is a regulator of hundreds of diverse target proteins. A wealth of studies has been carried out on the structure of CaM, both in the unliganded form and in complexes with target proteins and peptides. The outcome of these studies points toward a high propensity to attain various conformational states, depending on the binding partner. The purpose of this review is to provide examples of different conformations of CaM trapped in the crystal state. In addition, comparisons are made to corresponding studies in solution. The different CaM conformations in crystal structures are also compared based on the positions of the metal ions bound to their EF hands, in terms of distances, angles, and pseudo-torsion angles. Possible caveats and artifacts in CaM crystal structures are discussed, as well as the possibilities of trapping biologically relevant CaM conformations in the crystal state.

  19. Evaluating Replicability of Regression Results Using the Jackknife Statistic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoon, Jina

    Contrary to popular opinion, significance testing does not inform the researcher of the likelihood of the replication of results from current research findings. Result replicability has been ignored by researchers because of an overreliance on significance testing. Several alternatives have been offered to provide the researcher with more…

  20. ROCView: prototype software for data collection in jackknife alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, J; Hogg, P; Thompson, S; Manning, D; Szczepura, K

    2012-01-01

    ROCView has been developed as an image display and response capture (IDRC) solution to image display and consistent recording of reader responses in relation to the free-response receiver operating characteristic paradigm. A web-based solution to IDRC for observer response studies allows observations to be completed from any location, assuming that display performance and viewing conditions are consistent with the study being completed. The simplistic functionality of the software allows observations to be completed without supervision. ROCView can display images from multiple modalities, in a randomised order if required. Following registration, observers are prompted to begin their image evaluation. All data are recorded via mouse clicks, one to localise (mark) and one to score confidence (rate) using either an ordinal or continuous rating scale. Up to nine “mark-rating” pairs can be made per image. Unmarked images are given a default score of zero. Upon completion of the study, both true-positive and false-positive reports can be downloaded and adapted for analysis. ROCView has the potential to be a useful tool in the assessment of modality performance difference for a range of imaging methods. PMID:22573294

  1. Assessing numerical dependence in gene expression summaries with the jackknife expression difference.

    PubMed

    Stevens, John R; Nicholas, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Statistical methods to test for differential expression traditionally assume that each gene's expression summaries are independent across arrays. When certain preprocessing methods are used to obtain those summaries, this assumption is not necessarily true. In general, the erroneous assumption of dependence results in a loss of statistical power. We introduce a diagnostic measure of numerical dependence for gene expression summaries from any preprocessing method and discuss the relative performance of several common preprocessing methods with respect to this measure. Some common preprocessing methods introduce non-trivial levels of numerical dependence. The issue of (between-array) dependence has received little if any attention in the literature, and researchers working with gene expression data should not take such properties for granted, or they risk unnecessarily losing statistical power. PMID:22876276

  2. The Examining of Generalization Quantitative Scientific Findings by Using the Jackknife Method: An Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyari, Murat; Buyukozturk, Sener

    2009-01-01

    The outcomes which cannot be generalized are specific for a sample but are unable to be reflected to the rest of the population. The parameters that are reached at the end of the statistics that are scarce in sample arise doubts in the aspect of generalization. In these cases, parameter estimation may not be very stable and outlier values can…

  3. Prone jackknife position is not necessary to achieve a cylindrical abdominoperineal resection: demonstration of the lithotomy position.

    PubMed

    Keller, Deborah S; Lawrence, Justin K; Delaney, Conor P

    2014-02-01

    This video demonstrates a laparoscopic abdominal perineal resection for a fixed 4.8-cm mass involving the posterior and left rectal walls and left puborectalis, 2 cm from the anal verge (see Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/DCR/A127). We detail the steps of the procedure, all completed in lithotomy, including lateral-to-medial dissection; identification and protection of the left ureter and presacral nerves; division of the inferior mesenteric artery; medial-to-lateral dissection, with meeting the previous dissection plane; total mesorectal excision and pelvic dissection; perineal dissection and layered closure; and abdominal inspection and colostomy creation. Total operative time was 181 minutes. The specimen total mesorectal excision was complete with a negative circumferential radial margin (greater than 1 cm). Final pathology was T3N2M0. PMID:24401888

  4. A Fortran IV Program for Estimating Parameters through Multiple Matrix Sampling with Standard Errors of Estimate Approximated by the Jackknife.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoemaker, David M.

    Described and listed herein with concomitant sample input and output is the Fortran IV program which estimates parameters and standard errors of estimate per parameters for parameters estimated through multiple matrix sampling. The specific program is an improved and expanded version of an earlier version. (Author/BJG)

  5. Issues in Predictive Discriminant Analysis: Using and Interpreting the Leave-One-Out Jackknife Method and the Improvement-Over-Change "I" Index Effect Size.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Dae-Yeop

    Prediction of group membership is the goal of predictive discriminant analysis (PDA) and the accuracy of group classification is the focus of PDA. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of how PDA works and how it can be used to answer a variety of research questions. The paper explains what PDA is and why it is important, and it…

  6. Growth estimation of mangrove cockle Anadara tuberculosa (Mollusca: Bivalvia): application and evaluation of length-based methods.

    PubMed

    Flores, Luis A

    2011-03-01

    Growth is one of the key processes in the dynamic of exploited resources, since it provides part of the information required for structured population models. Growth of mangrove cockle, Anadara tuberculosa was estimated through length-based methods (ELEFAN I y NSLCA) and using diverse shell length intervals (SLI). The variability of L(infinity), k and phi prime (phi') estimates and the effect of each sample were quantified by jackknife techniques. Results showed the same L(infinity) estimates from ELEFAN I and NSLCA across each SLI used, and all L(infinity) were within the expected range. On the contrary, k estimates differed between methods. Jackknife estimations uncovered the tendency of ELEFAN I to overestimate k with increases in SLI, and allowed the identification of differences in uncertainty (PE and CV) between both methods. The average values of phi' derived from NSCLA1.5 and length-age sources were similar and corresponded to ranges reported by other authors. Estimates of L(infinity), k and (phi' from NSCLA1.5 were 85.97 mm, 0.124/year and 2.953 with jackknife and 86.36mm de L(infinity), 0.110/year de k and 2.914 de phi' without jackknife, respectively. Based on the observed evidence and according to the biology of the species, NSCLA is suggested to be used with jackknife and a SLI of 1.5 mm as an ad hoc approach to estimate the growth parameters of mangrove cockle.

  7. The use and misuse of statistics in space physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiff, Patricia H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents several statistical techniques most commonly used in space physics, including Fourier analysis, linear correlation, auto- and cross-correlation, power spectral density and superimposed epoch analysis, and presents tests to assess the significance of the results. New techniques such as bootstrapping and jackknifing are presented. When no test of significance is in common usage, a plausible test is suggested.

  8. 49 CFR 178.337-10 - Accident damage protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... flow valve, and check valve must be protected by a shear section or other sacrificial device. The... valves, fittings, pressure relief devices, and other accessories to the tank proper shall be protected in... vehicles or objects, jack-knifing and overturning. In addition, pressure relief valves shall be...

  9. Resampling Methods Revisited: Advancing the Understanding and Applications in Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bai, Haiyan; Pan, Wei

    2008-01-01

    Resampling methods including randomization test, cross-validation, the jackknife and the bootstrap are widely employed in the research areas of natural science, engineering and medicine, but they lack appreciation in educational research. The purpose of the present review is to revisit and highlight the key principles and developments of…

  10. A Demonstration of a Systematic Item-Reduction Approach Using Structural Equation Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larwin, Karen; Harvey, Milton

    2012-01-01

    Establishing model parsimony is an important component of structural equation modeling (SEM). Unfortunately, little attention has been given to developing systematic procedures to accomplish this goal. To this end, the current study introduces an innovative application of the jackknife approach first presented in Rensvold and Cheung (1999). Unlike…

  11. Use of Empirical Estimates of Shrinkage in Multiple Regression: A Caution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kromrey, Jeffrey D.; Hines, Constance V.

    1995-01-01

    The accuracy of four empirical techniques to estimate shrinkage in multiple regression was studied through Monte Carlo simulation. None of the techniques provided unbiased estimates of the population squared multiple correlation coefficient, but the normalized jackknife and bootstrap techniques demonstrated marginally acceptable performance with…

  12. Captain M. A. Ainslie (1869-1951): his observations and telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobberley, M. P.

    2010-02-01

    The astronomical career of one of the BAA's most enthusiastic planetary observers, who contributed observations in the first five decades of the twentieth century, is described. In addition, his pioneering observation of the occultation of a star by Saturn's rings in 1917 is examined and the full story of his unique 'Jack-Knife telescope', designed by Horace Dall, is given.

  13. 46 CFR 160.043-6 - Marking and packing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... permanently and legibly marked on the tang of the blade with the manufacturer's name or with a trade mark of... manufacturer's type or size designation. (b) Instructions for can opener. With each jackknife the manufacturer... of waterproof vinyl resin or polyethylene film not less than 0.004 inch in thickness. The bag...

  14. 46 CFR 160.043-6 - Marking and packing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... permanently and legibly marked on the tang of the blade with the manufacturer's name or with a trade mark of... manufacturer's type or size designation. (b) Instructions for can opener. With each jackknife the manufacturer... of waterproof vinyl resin or polyethylene film not less than 0.004 inch in thickness. The bag...

  15. 46 CFR 160.043-6 - Marking and packing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Marking and packing. 160.043-6 Section 160.043-6 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Jackknife (With Can Opener) for Merchant Vessels § 160.043-6 Marking and packing. (a)...

  16. 46 CFR 160.043-6 - Marking and packing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... permanently and legibly marked on the tang of the blade with the manufacturer's name or with a trade mark of... manufacturer's type or size designation. (b) Instructions for can opener. With each jackknife the manufacturer... of waterproof vinyl resin or polyethylene film not less than 0.004 inch in thickness. The bag...

  17. 46 CFR 160.043-6 - Marking and packing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... permanently and legibly marked on the tang of the blade with the manufacturer's name or with a trade mark of... manufacturer's type or size designation. (b) Instructions for can opener. With each jackknife the manufacturer... of waterproof vinyl resin or polyethylene film not less than 0.004 inch in thickness. The bag...

  18. Possession, Transportation, and Use of Firearms by Older Youth in 4-H Shooting Sports Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, David J.; Williver, S. Todd

    2014-01-01

    Thirty years ago we would think nothing of driving to school with a jackknife in our pocket or rifle in the gun rack. Since then, the practices of possessing, transporting, and using firearms have been limited by laws, rules, and public perception. Despite restrictions on youth, the Youth Handgun Safety Act does afford 4-H shooting sports members…

  19. Life Table and Consumption Capacity of Corn Earworm, Helicoverpa armigera, Fed Asparagus, Asparagus officinalis

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Ratna Kumar; Tuan, Shu-Jen; Chi, Hsin; Tang, Li-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    The life table and consumption rate of Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) reared on asparagus, Asparagus officinalis L. (Asparagales: Asparagaceae) were studied under laboratory conditions to assess their interaction. Development, survival, fecundity, and consumption data were analyzed by the age-stage, two-sex life table. This study indicated that asparagus is a natural host of H. armigera. However, the poor nutritional content in asparagus foliage and the poor fitness of H. armigera that fed on asparagus indicated that asparagus is a suboptimal host in comparison to hybrid sweet corn. The uncertainty associated with life table parameters was estimated by using jackknife and bootstrap techniques, and the results were compared for statistical inference. The intrinsic rate of increase (r), finite rate of increase (λ), net reproductive rate (R0), and mean generation time (T) were estimated by the jackknife technique to be 0.0780 day-1, 1.0811 day-1, 67.4 offspring, and 54.8 days, respectively, while those estimated by the bootstrap technique were 0.0752 day-1, 1.0781 day-1, 68.0 offspring, and 55.3 days, respectively. The net consumption rate of H. armigera, as estimated by the jackknife and bootstrap technique, was 1183.02 and 1132.9 mg per individual, respectively. The frequency distribution of sample means obtained by the jackknife technique failed the normality test, while the bootstrap results fit the normal distribution well. By contrast, the relationship between the mean fecundity and the net reproductive rate, as estimated by the bootstrap technique, was slightly inconsistent with the relationship found by mathematical proof. The application of the jackknife and bootstrap techniques in estimating population parameters requires further examination. PMID:25373181

  20. Life table and consumption capacity of corn earworm, Helicoverpa armigera, fed asparagus, Asparagus officinalis.

    PubMed

    Jha, Ratna Kumar; Tuan, Shu-Jen; Chi, Hsin; Tang, Li-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    The life table and consumption rate of Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) reared on asparagus, Asparagus officinalis L. (Asparagales: Asparagaceae) were studied under laboratory conditions to assess their interaction. Development, survival, fecundity, and consumption data were analyzed by the age-stage, twosex life table. This study indicated that asparagus is a natural host of H. armigera. However, the poor nutritional content in asparagus foliage and the poor fitness of H. armigera that fed on asparagus indicated that asparagus is a suboptimal host in comparison to hybrid sweet corn. The uncertainty associated with life table parameters was estimated by using jackknife and bootstrap techniques, and the results were compared for statistical inference. The intrinsic rate of increase (r), finite rate of increase (λ), net reproductive rate (R0), and mean generation time (T) were estimated by the jackknife technique to be 0.0780 day(-1), 1.0811 day(-1), 67.4 offspring, and 54.8 days, respectively, while those estimated by the bootstrap technique were 0.0752 day(-1), 1.0781 day(-1), 68.0 offspring, and 55.3 days, respectively. The net consumption rate of H. armigera, as estimated by the jackknife and bootstrap technique, was 1183.02 and 1132.9 mg per individual, respectively. The frequency distribution of sample means obtained by the jackknife technique failed the normality test, while the bootstrap results fit the normal distribution well. By contrast, the relationship between the mean fecundity and the net reproductive rate, as estimated by the bootstrap technique, was slightly inconsistent with the relationship found by mathematical proof. The application of the jackknife and bootstrap techniques in estimating population parameters requires further examination. PMID:25373181

  1. Sampling effort and estimates of species richness based on prepositioned area electrofisher samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowen, Z.H.; Freeman, Mary C.

    1998-01-01

    Estimates of species richness based on electrofishing data are commonly used to describe the structure of fish communities. One electrofishing method for sampling riverine fishes that has become popular in the last decade is the prepositioned area electrofisher (PAE). We investigated the relationship between sampling effort and fish species richness at seven sites in the Tallapoosa River system, USA based on 1,400 PAE samples collected during 1994 and 1995. First, we estimated species richness at each site using the first-order jackknife and compared observed values for species richness and jackknife estimates of species richness to estimates based on historical collection data. Second, we used a permutation procedure and nonlinear regression to examine rates of species accumulation. Third, we used regression to predict the number of PAE samples required to collect the jackknife estimate of species richness at each site during 1994 and 1995. We found that jackknife estimates of species richness generally were less than or equal to estimates based on historical collection data. The relationship between PAE electrofishing effort and species richness in the Tallapoosa River was described by a positive asymptotic curve as found in other studies using different electrofishing gears in wadable streams. Results from nonlinear regression analyses indicted that rates of species accumulation were variable among sites and between years. Across sites and years, predictions of sampling effort required to collect jackknife estimates of species richness suggested that doubling sampling effort (to 200 PAEs) would typically increase observed species richness by not more than six species. However, sampling effort beyond about 60 PAE samples typically increased observed species richness by < 10%. We recommend using historical collection data in conjunction with a preliminary sample size of at least 70 PAE samples to evaluate estimates of species richness in medium-sized rivers

  2. Life table and consumption capacity of corn earworm, Helicoverpa armigera, fed asparagus, Asparagus officinalis.

    PubMed

    Jha, Ratna Kumar; Tuan, Shu-Jen; Chi, Hsin; Tang, Li-Cheng

    2014-03-01

    The life table and consumption rate of Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) reared on asparagus, Asparagus officinalis L. (Asparagales: Asparagaceae) were studied under laboratory conditions to assess their interaction. Development, survival, fecundity, and consumption data were analyzed by the age-stage, twosex life table. This study indicated that asparagus is a natural host of H. armigera. However, the poor nutritional content in asparagus foliage and the poor fitness of H. armigera that fed on asparagus indicated that asparagus is a suboptimal host in comparison to hybrid sweet corn. The uncertainty associated with life table parameters was estimated by using jackknife and bootstrap techniques, and the results were compared for statistical inference. The intrinsic rate of increase (r), finite rate of increase (λ), net reproductive rate (R0), and mean generation time (T) were estimated by the jackknife technique to be 0.0780 day(-1), 1.0811 day(-1), 67.4 offspring, and 54.8 days, respectively, while those estimated by the bootstrap technique were 0.0752 day(-1), 1.0781 day(-1), 68.0 offspring, and 55.3 days, respectively. The net consumption rate of H. armigera, as estimated by the jackknife and bootstrap technique, was 1183.02 and 1132.9 mg per individual, respectively. The frequency distribution of sample means obtained by the jackknife technique failed the normality test, while the bootstrap results fit the normal distribution well. By contrast, the relationship between the mean fecundity and the net reproductive rate, as estimated by the bootstrap technique, was slightly inconsistent with the relationship found by mathematical proof. The application of the jackknife and bootstrap techniques in estimating population parameters requires further examination.

  3. [Growth of Octopus maya (Mollusca: Cephalopoda) of the Yucatan coast, Mexico: a long-term analysis].

    PubMed

    Nepita Villanueva, M R; Defeo, O

    2001-03-01

    Growth of the octopus (Octopus maya) off Yucatan (Mexico) was estimated from a long-term study (seven years) by the length-based methods ELEFAN, PROJMAT and SLCA. Some 19,251 octopuses with a range of mantle length between 50 and 240 mm were sampled from commercial landings in 1983-1987, 1989 and 1992. The jackknife technique was applied to deal with uncertainty in growth estimates resulting from chance variations in sampling design. The growth index phi' was used for comparative purposes. Results differed markedly among methods: ELEFAN produced parameter estimates within the range reported in the literature, whereas PROJMAT and SLCA showed problems to converge in an optimum combination of parameters, and tended to underestimate them. Jackknife analysis revealed very low intraannual variability in phi' but high variability among years, especially when applying PROJMAT. No significant differences were found in precision parameters--percent error and coefficient of variation--among methods. Estimates of phi' derived by ELEFAN varied between 4.19 and 5.23 and agreed with those reported in the literature (between 4.25 and 4.91), whereas PROJMAT and SLCA estimates were significantly lower. We suggest the use of ELEFAN, together with jackknife, to estimate growth parameters of Octopus maya. PMID:11795175

  4. Prediction of resource volumes at untested locations using simple local prediction models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Attanasi, E.D.; Coburn, T.C.; Freeman, P.A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper shows how local spatial nonparametric prediction models can be applied to estimate volumes of recoverable gas resources at individual undrilled sites, at multiple sites on a regional scale, and to compute confidence bounds for regional volumes based on the distribution of those estimates. An approach that combines cross-validation, the jackknife, and bootstrap procedures is used to accomplish this task. Simulation experiments show that cross-validation can be applied beneficially to select an appropriate prediction model. The cross-validation procedure worked well for a wide range of different states of nature and levels of information. Jackknife procedures are used to compute individual prediction estimation errors at undrilled locations. The jackknife replicates also are used with a bootstrap resampling procedure to compute confidence bounds for the total volume. The method was applied to data (partitioned into a training set and target set) from the Devonian Antrim Shale continuous-type gas play in the Michigan Basin in Otsego County, Michigan. The analysis showed that the model estimate of total recoverable volumes at prediction sites is within 4 percent of the total observed volume. The model predictions also provide frequency distributions of the cell volumes at the production unit scale. Such distributions are the basis for subsequent economic analyses. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007.

  5. Evaluating species richness: biased ecological inference results from spatial heterogeneity in species detection probabilities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McNew, Lance B.; Handel, Colleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate estimates of species richness are necessary to test predictions of ecological theory and evaluate biodiversity for conservation purposes. However, species richness is difficult to measure in the field because some species will almost always be overlooked due to their cryptic nature or the observer's failure to perceive their cues. Common measures of species richness that assume consistent observability across species are inviting because they may require only single counts of species at survey sites. Single-visit estimation methods ignore spatial and temporal variation in species detection probabilities related to survey or site conditions that may confound estimates of species richness. We used simulated and empirical data to evaluate the bias and precision of raw species counts, the limiting forms of jackknife and Chao estimators, and multi-species occupancy models when estimating species richness to evaluate whether the choice of estimator can affect inferences about the relationships between environmental conditions and community size under variable detection processes. Four simulated scenarios with realistic and variable detection processes were considered. Results of simulations indicated that (1) raw species counts were always biased low, (2) single-visit jackknife and Chao estimators were significantly biased regardless of detection process, (3) multispecies occupancy models were more precise and generally less biased than the jackknife and Chao estimators, and (4) spatial heterogeneity resulting from the effects of a site covariate on species detection probabilities had significant impacts on the inferred relationships between species richness and a spatially explicit environmental condition. For a real dataset of bird observations in northwestern Alaska, the four estimation methods produced different estimates of local species richness, which severely affected inferences about the effects of shrubs on local avian richness. Overall, our results

  6. Evaluating species richness: Biased ecological inference results from spatial heterogeneity in detection probabilities.

    PubMed

    McNew, Lance B; Handel, Colleen M

    2015-09-01

    Accurate estimates of species richness are necessary to test predictions of ecological theory and evaluate biodiversity for conservation purposes. However, species richness is difficult to measure in the field because some species will almost always be overlooked due to their cryptic nature or the observer's failure to perceive their cues. Common measures of species richness that assume consistent observability across species are inviting because they may require only single counts of species at survey sites. Single-visit estimation methods ignore spatial and temporal variation in species detection probabilities related to survey or site conditions that may confound estimates of species richness. We used simulated and empirical data to evaluate the bias and precision of raw species counts, the limiting forms of jackknife and Chao estimators, and multispecies occupancy models when estimating species richness to evaluate whether the choice of estimator can affect inferences about the relationships between environmental conditions and community size under variable detection processes. Four simulated scenarios with realistic and variable detection processes were considered. Results of simulations indicated that (1) raw species counts were always biased low, (2) single-visit jackknife and Chao estimators were significantly biased regardless of detection process, (3) multispecies occupancy models were more precise and generally less biased than the jackknife and Chao estimators, and (4) spatial heterogeneity resulting from the effects of a site covariate on species detection probabilities had significant impacts on the inferred relationships between species richness and a spatially explicit environmental condition. For a real data set of bird observations in northwestern Alaska, USA, the four estimation methods produced different estimates of local species richness, which severely affected inferences about the effects of shrubs on local avian richness. Overall, our

  7. Evaluating species richness: Biased ecological inference results from spatial heterogeneity in detection probabilities.

    PubMed

    McNew, Lance B; Handel, Colleen M

    2015-09-01

    Accurate estimates of species richness are necessary to test predictions of ecological theory and evaluate biodiversity for conservation purposes. However, species richness is difficult to measure in the field because some species will almost always be overlooked due to their cryptic nature or the observer's failure to perceive their cues. Common measures of species richness that assume consistent observability across species are inviting because they may require only single counts of species at survey sites. Single-visit estimation methods ignore spatial and temporal variation in species detection probabilities related to survey or site conditions that may confound estimates of species richness. We used simulated and empirical data to evaluate the bias and precision of raw species counts, the limiting forms of jackknife and Chao estimators, and multispecies occupancy models when estimating species richness to evaluate whether the choice of estimator can affect inferences about the relationships between environmental conditions and community size under variable detection processes. Four simulated scenarios with realistic and variable detection processes were considered. Results of simulations indicated that (1) raw species counts were always biased low, (2) single-visit jackknife and Chao estimators were significantly biased regardless of detection process, (3) multispecies occupancy models were more precise and generally less biased than the jackknife and Chao estimators, and (4) spatial heterogeneity resulting from the effects of a site covariate on species detection probabilities had significant impacts on the inferred relationships between species richness and a spatially explicit environmental condition. For a real data set of bird observations in northwestern Alaska, USA, the four estimation methods produced different estimates of local species richness, which severely affected inferences about the effects of shrubs on local avian richness. Overall, our

  8. On population size estimators in the Poisson mixture model.

    PubMed

    Mao, Chang Xuan; Yang, Nan; Zhong, Jinhua

    2013-09-01

    Estimating population sizes via capture-recapture experiments has enormous applications. The Poisson mixture model can be adopted for those applications with a single list in which individuals appear one or more times. We compare several nonparametric estimators, including the Chao estimator, the Zelterman estimator, two jackknife estimators and the bootstrap estimator. The target parameter of the Chao estimator is a lower bound of the population size. Those of the other four estimators are not lower bounds, and they may produce lower confidence limits for the population size with poor coverage probabilities. A simulation study is reported and two examples are investigated. PMID:23865502

  9. A QSAR model for predicting toxicity (LC50) to rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Tao, S; Xi, Xiaohuan; Xu, Fuliu; Dawson, Richard

    2002-06-01

    A fragment constant method for prediction of toxicity (LC50) to rainbow trout was developed based on the experimental LC50 values of 258 chemicals obtained from the literature. The dataset was randomly divided into a training set and a validation set for purposes of model development and validation. The final model was established using all of the experimental LC50 values by pooling the two sets together. The coefficient of the determination for the final model was 0.9495 with a mean residual of 0.42 log-units. The model's robustness was tested using jackknife tests.

  10. Prediction of protein secondary structure based on residue pair types and conformational states using dynamic programming algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Mehdi; Parto, Sahar; Arab, Shahriar; Ranjbar, Bijan

    2005-06-20

    We have used a statistical approach for protein secondary structure prediction based on information theory and simultaneously taking into consideration pairwise residue types and conformational states. Since the prediction of residue secondary structure by one residue window sliding make ambiguity in state prediction, we used a dynamic programming algorithm to find the path with maximum score. A score system for residue pairs in particular conformations is derived for adjacent neighbors up to ten residue apart in sequence. The three state overall per-residue accuracy, Q3, of this method in a jackknife test with dataset created from PDBSELECT is more than 70%.

  11. Identifying anticancer peptides by using improved hybrid compositions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng-Min; Wang, Xiao-Qian

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is one of the main causes of threats to human life. Identification of anticancer peptides is important for developing effective anticancer drugs. In this paper, we developed an improved predictor to identify the anticancer peptides. The amino acid composition (AAC), the average chemical shifts (acACS) and the reduced amino acid composition (RAAC) were selected to predict the anticancer peptides by using the support vector machine (SVM). The overall prediction accuracy reaches to 93.61% in jackknife test. The results indicated that the combined parameter was helpful to the prediction for anticancer peptides. PMID:27670968

  12. A Critique of `Trees as a Local Climatic Wind Indicator'.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennessey, Joseph P., Jr.

    1980-08-01

    This comment reviews many of the problems associated with using deformed vegetation as an indicator of mean annual wind speed and wind power potential. It critiques the Wade and Hewson (1979) use of a `jackknife technique' to estimate prediction errors for mean annual wind speeds and presents a reanalysis of the data. It is concluded that the available evidence still suggests that wind deformed trees will prove to be unreliable as well as imprecise estimators of either mean annual wind speeds or more complicated quantities such as wind power potential.

  13. On population size estimators in the Poisson mixture model.

    PubMed

    Mao, Chang Xuan; Yang, Nan; Zhong, Jinhua

    2013-09-01

    Estimating population sizes via capture-recapture experiments has enormous applications. The Poisson mixture model can be adopted for those applications with a single list in which individuals appear one or more times. We compare several nonparametric estimators, including the Chao estimator, the Zelterman estimator, two jackknife estimators and the bootstrap estimator. The target parameter of the Chao estimator is a lower bound of the population size. Those of the other four estimators are not lower bounds, and they may produce lower confidence limits for the population size with poor coverage probabilities. A simulation study is reported and two examples are investigated.

  14. The Purley train crash mechanism: injuries and prevention.

    PubMed Central

    Fothergill, N J; Ebbs, S R; Reese, A; Partridge, R J; Mowbray, M; Southcott, R D; Hashemi, K

    1992-01-01

    On the afternoon of Saturday 4th March 1989 two trains, both bound for London Victoria Station, collided. Part of the rear train rolled down a steep railway embankment and jack-knifed against a tree. The mechanism of the crash and the injuries sustained by the 55 victims who were seen in the A&E Department of the Mayday University Hospital are described. Improvements in signalling technology and design of rolling stock which may reduce both the risk of collision and severity of injury in future accidents are discussed. Images Fig. 1 PMID:1388485

  15. MMOD: an R library for the calculation of population differentiation statistics.

    PubMed

    Winter, David J

    2012-11-01

    MMOD is a library for the R programming language that allows the calculation of the population differentiation measures D(est), G″(ST) and φ'(ST). R provides a powerful environment in which to conduct and record population genetic analyses but, at present, no R libraries provide functions for the calculation of these statistics from standard population genetic files. In addition to the calculation of differentiation measures, mmod can produce parametric bootstrap and jackknife samples of data sets for further analysis. By integrating with and complimenting the existing libraries adegenet and pegas, mmod extends the power of R as a population genetic platform. PMID:22883857

  16. Prediction of presynaptic and postsynaptic neurotoxins by the increment of diversity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Li, Qianzhong

    2009-03-01

    Presynaptic and postsynaptic neurotoxins have very important application in basic research and drug design. The successful prediction of neurotoxin is becoming an important task in recent years. In this study, based on the concept of Chou's pseudo-amino acid compositions, an algorithm of increment of diversity (ID) is proposed for predicting presynaptic and postsynaptic neurotoxins. The results of jackknife test show that the accuracies of prediction are 90.23% for presynaptic neurotoxins and 89.40% for postsynaptic neurotoxins. In addition, toxins and non-toxins are also predicted by using this algorithm.

  17. Prediction of Antimicrobial Peptides Based on Sequence Alignment and Support Vector Machine-Pairwise Algorithm Utilizing LZ-Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Shahrudin, Shahriza

    2015-01-01

    This study concerns an attempt to establish a new method for predicting antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) which are important to the immune system. Recently, researchers are interested in designing alternative drugs based on AMPs because they have found that a large number of bacterial strains have become resistant to available antibiotics. However, researchers have encountered obstacles in the AMPs designing process as experiments to extract AMPs from protein sequences are costly and require a long set-up time. Therefore, a computational tool for AMPs prediction is needed to resolve this problem. In this study, an integrated algorithm is newly introduced to predict AMPs by integrating sequence alignment and support vector machine- (SVM-) LZ complexity pairwise algorithm. It was observed that, when all sequences in the training set are used, the sensitivity of the proposed algorithm is 95.28% in jackknife test and 87.59% in independent test, while the sensitivity obtained for jackknife test and independent test is 88.74% and 78.70%, respectively, when only the sequences that has less than 70% similarity are used. Applying the proposed algorithm may allow researchers to effectively predict AMPs from unknown protein peptide sequences with higher sensitivity. PMID:25802839

  18. Estimation of the Time Interval between the Administration of Heroin and the Sampling of Blood in Chronic Inhalers.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Nathalie; Hallet, Claude; Seidel, Laurence; Demaret, Isabelle; Luppens, David; Ansseau, Marc; Rozet, Eric; Albert, Adelin; Hubert, Philippe; Charlier, Corinne

    2015-05-01

    To develop a model for estimating the time delay between last heroin consumption and blood sampling in chronic drug users. Eleven patients, all heroin inhalers undergoing detoxification, were included in the study. Several plasma samples were collected during the detoxification procedure and analyzed for the heroin metabolites 6-acetylmorphine (6AM), morphine (MOR), morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G) and morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G), according to a UHPLC/MSMS method. The general linear mixed model was applied to time-related concentrations and a pragmatic four-step delay estimation approach was proposed based on the simultaneous presence of metabolites in plasma. Validation of the model was carried out using the jackknife technique on the 11 patients, and on a group of 7 test patients. Quadratic equations were derived for all metabolites except 6AM. The interval delay estimation was 2-4 days when only M3G present in plasma, 1-2 days when M6G and M3G were both present, 0-1 day when MOR, M6G and M3G were present and <2 h for all metabolites present. The 'jackknife' correlation between declared and actual estimated delays was 0.90. The overall precision of the delay estimates was 8-9 h. The delay between last heroin consumption and blood sampling in chronic drug users can be satisfactorily predicted from plasma heroin metabolites.

  19. Performance of internal covariance estimators for cosmic shear correlation functions

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, O.; Seitz, S.; Eifler, T. F.; Gruen, D.

    2015-12-31

    Data re-sampling methods such as the delete-one jackknife are a common tool for estimating the covariance of large scale structure probes. In this paper we investigate the concepts of internal covariance estimation in the context of cosmic shear two-point statistics. We demonstrate how to use log-normal simulations of the convergence field and the corresponding shear field to carry out realistic tests of internal covariance estimators and find that most estimators such as jackknife or sub-sample covariance can reach a satisfactory compromise between bias and variance of the estimated covariance. In a forecast for the complete, 5-year DES survey we show that internally estimated covariance matrices can provide a large fraction of the true uncertainties on cosmological parameters in a 2D cosmic shear analysis. The volume inside contours of constant likelihood in the $\\Omega_m$-$\\sigma_8$ plane as measured with internally estimated covariance matrices is on average $\\gtrsim 85\\%$ of the volume derived from the true covariance matrix. The uncertainty on the parameter combination $\\Sigma_8 \\sim \\sigma_8 \\Omega_m^{0.5}$ derived from internally estimated covariances is $\\sim 90\\%$ of the true uncertainty.

  20. Performance of internal covariance estimators for cosmic shear correlation functions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Friedrich, O.; Seitz, S.; Eifler, T. F.; Gruen, D.

    2015-12-31

    Data re-sampling methods such as the delete-one jackknife are a common tool for estimating the covariance of large scale structure probes. In this paper we investigate the concepts of internal covariance estimation in the context of cosmic shear two-point statistics. We demonstrate how to use log-normal simulations of the convergence field and the corresponding shear field to carry out realistic tests of internal covariance estimators and find that most estimators such as jackknife or sub-sample covariance can reach a satisfactory compromise between bias and variance of the estimated covariance. In a forecast for the complete, 5-year DES survey we show that internally estimated covariance matrices can provide a large fraction of the true uncertainties on cosmological parameters in a 2D cosmic shear analysis. The volume inside contours of constant likelihood in themore » $$\\Omega_m$$-$$\\sigma_8$$ plane as measured with internally estimated covariance matrices is on average $$\\gtrsim 85\\%$$ of the volume derived from the true covariance matrix. The uncertainty on the parameter combination $$\\Sigma_8 \\sim \\sigma_8 \\Omega_m^{0.5}$$ derived from internally estimated covariances is $$\\sim 90\\%$$ of the true uncertainty.« less

  1. SoRT2: a tool for sorting genomes and reconstructing phylogenetic trees by reversals, generalized transpositions and translocations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yen-Lin; Huang, Chen-Cheng; Tang, Chuan Yi; Lu, Chin Lung

    2010-07-01

    SoRT(2) is a web server that allows the user to perform genome rearrangement analysis involving reversals, generalized transpositions and translocations (including fusions and fissions), and infer phylogenetic trees of genomes being considered based on their pairwise genome rearrangement distances. It takes as input two or more linear/circular multi-chromosomal gene (or synteny block) orders in FASTA-like format. When the input is two genomes, SoRT(2) will quickly calculate their rearrangement distance, as well as a corresponding optimal scenario by highlighting the genes involved in each rearrangement operation. In the case of multiple genomes, SoRT(2) will also construct phylogenetic trees of these genomes based on a matrix of their pairwise rearrangement distances using distance-based approaches, such as neighbor-joining (NJ), unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) and Fitch-Margoliash (FM) methods. In addition, if the function of computing jackknife support values is selected, SoRT(2) will further perform the jackknife analysis to evaluate statistical reliability of the constructed NJ, UPGMA and FM trees. SoRT(2) is available online at http://bioalgorithm.life.nctu.edu.tw/SORT2/.

  2. Ontogeny of the barley plant as related to mutation expression and detection of pollen mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgdon, A.L.; Marcus, A.H.; Arenaz, P.; Rosichan, J.L.; Bogyo, T.P.; Nilan, R.A.

    1980-05-29

    Clustering of mutant pollen grains in a population of normal pollen due to premeiotic mutational events complicates translating mutation frequencies into rates. Embryo ontogeny in barley will be described and used to illustrate the formation of such mutant clusters. The nature of the statistics for mutation frequency will be described from a study of the reversion frequencies of various waxy mutants in barley. Computer analysis by a jackknife method of the reversion frequencies of a waxy mutant treated with the mutagen sodium azide showed a significantly higher reversion frequency than untreated material. Problems of the computer analysis suggest a better experimental design for pollen mutation experiments. Preliminary work on computer modeling for pollen development and mutation will be described.

  3. Ontogeny of the barley plant as related to mutation expression and detection of pollen mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgdon, A.L.; Marcus, A.H.; Arenaz, P.; Rosichan, J.L.; Bogyo, T.P.; Nilan, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    Clustering of mutant pollen grains in a population of normal pollen due to premeiotic mutational events complicates translating mutation frequencies into rates. Embryo ontogeny in barley will be described and used to illustrate the formation of such mutant clusters. The nature of the statistics for mutation frequency will be described from a study of the reversion frequencies of various waxy mutants in barley. Computer analysis by a ''jackknife'' method of the reversion of a waxy mutant treated with the mutagen sodium azide showed a significantly higher reversion frequency than untreated material. Problems of the computer analysis suggest a better experimental design for pollen mutation experiments. Preliminary work on computer modeling for pollen development and mutation will be described.

  4. Causal Markov random field for brain MR image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Razlighi, Qolamreza R; Orekhov, Aleksey; Laine, Andrew; Stern, Yaakov

    2012-01-01

    We propose a new Bayesian classifier, based on the recently introduced causal Markov random field (MRF) model, Quadrilateral MRF (QMRF). We use a second order inhomogeneous anisotropic QMRF to model the prior and likelihood probabilities in the maximum a posteriori (MAP) classifier, named here as MAP-QMRF. The joint distribution of QMRF is given in terms of the product of two dimensional clique distributions existing in its neighboring structure. 20 manually labeled human brain MR images are used to train and assess the MAP-QMRF classifier using the jackknife validation method. Comparing the results of the proposed classifier and FreeSurfer on the Dice overlap measure shows an average gain of 1.8%. We have performed a power analysis to demonstrate that this increase in segmentation accuracy substantially reduces the number of samples required to detect a 5% change in volume of a brain region.

  5. Avian community response to small-scale habitat disturbance in Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Derleth, E.L.; McAuley, D.G.; Dwyer, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of small clearcuts (1 - 8 ha) on avian communities in the forest of eastern Maine were studied using point counts during spring 1978 - 1981. Surveys were conducted in uncut (control) and clear-cut (treatment) plots in three stand types: conifer, hardwood, and mixed growth. We used a mark-recapture model and its associated jackknife species richness estimator (N), as an indicator of avian community structure. Increases in estimated richness (N) and Shannon - Weaver diversity (H') were noted in the treated hardwood and mixed growth, but not in the conifer stands. Seventeen avian species increased in relative abundance, whereas two species declined. Stand treatment was associated with important changes in bird species composition. Increased habitat patchiness and the creation of forest edge are hypothesized as causes for the greater estimates of richness and diversity.

  6. Estimating contaminant loads in rivers: An application of adjusted maximum likelihood to type 1 censored data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohn, T.A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents an adjusted maximum likelihood estimator (AMLE) that can be used to estimate fluvial transport of contaminants, like phosphorus, that are subject to censoring because of analytical detection limits. The AMLE is a generalization of the widely accepted minimum variance unbiased estimator (MVUE), and Monte Carlo experiments confirm that it shares essentially all of the MVUE's desirable properties, including high efficiency and negligible bias. In particular, the AMLE exhibits substantially less bias than alternative censored-data estimators such as the MLE (Tobit) or the MLE followed by a jackknife. As with the MLE and the MVUE the AMLE comes close to achieving the theoretical Frechet-Crame??r-Rao bounds on its variance. This paper also presents a statistical framework, applicable to both censored and complete data, for understanding and estimating the components of uncertainty associated with load estimates. This can serve to lower the cost and improve the efficiency of both traditional and real-time water quality monitoring.

  7. Improved confidence intervals for the linkage disequilibrium method for estimating effective population size.

    PubMed

    Jones, A T; Ovenden, J R; Wang, Y-G

    2016-10-01

    The linkage disequilibrium method is currently the most widely used single sample estimator of genetic effective population size. The commonly used software packages come with two options, referred to as the parametric and jackknife methods, for computing the associated confidence intervals. However, little is known on the coverage performance of these methods, and the published data suggest there may be some room for improvement. Here, we propose two new methods for generating confidence intervals and compare them with the two in current use through a simulation study. The new confidence interval methods tend to be conservative but outperform the existing methods for generating confidence intervals under certain circumstances, such as those that may be encountered when making estimates using large numbers of single-nucleotide polymorphisms.

  8. A status report on free-response analysis.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, D P

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to summarise recent progress in free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) methodology. These are: (1) jackknife alternative FROC analysis including recent extensions and alternative methods; (2) the search-model simulator that enables validation and objective comparison of different methods of analysing the data; (3) case-based analysis that has the potential of greater clinical relevance than conventional free-response analysis; (4) a method for collectively analysing the multiple lesion types in an image (e.g. microcalcifications, masses and architectural distortions); (5) a method for sample-size estimation for FROC studies; and (6) a method for determining an objective proximity criterion, namely how close must a mark be to a true lesion in order to credit the observer for a true localisation. FROC analysis is being increasingly used to evaluate the imaging systems and understanding of recent progress should help researchers conduct better FROC studies.

  9. A new brachycladiid species (Digenea) from Gervais' beaked whale Mesoplodon europaeus in north-western Atlantic waters.

    PubMed

    Fraija-Fernández, Natalia; Aznar, Francisco J; Raga, Juan A; Gibson, David; Fernández, Mercedes

    2014-09-01

    A new species of the digenean family Brachycladiidae Odhner, 1905 is described from the bile ducts of a Gervais' beaked whale Mesoplodon europaeus Gervais (Ziphiidae) stranded on the North Atlantic coast of Florida. These parasites were assigned to Brachycladium Looss, 1899 and differed from other species of the genus in the relative size of the oral and ventral suckers, the form and size of the eggs and their extremely small body size. A canonical discriminant analysis was used to examine differences between these specimens and the smallest available individuals of B. atlanticum (Abril, Balbuena and Raga, 1991) Gibson, 2005, considered the morphologically closest species. The overall results exhibited significant differences between the two samples and a jack-knife classification showed that 96.2% of the specimens were correctly classified to their group. In view of evidence from morphological data, the specimens from M. europaeus are considered as new to science and are designated as Brachycladium parvulum n. sp.

  10. CAUSAL MARKOV RANDOM FIELD FOR BRAIN MR IMAGE SEGMENTATION

    PubMed Central

    Razlighi, Qolamreza R.; Orekhov, Aleksey; Laine, Andrew; Stern, Yaakov

    2013-01-01

    We propose a new Bayesian classifier, based on the recently introduced causal Markov random field (MRF) model, Quadrilateral MRF (QMRF). We use a second order inhomogeneous anisotropic QMRF to model the prior and likelihood probabilities in the maximum a posteriori (MAP) classifier, named here as MAP-QMRF. The joint distribution of QMRF is given in terms of the product of two dimensional clique distributions existing in its neighboring structure. 20 manually labeled human brain MR images are used to train and assess the MAP-QMRF classifier using the jackknife validation method. Comparing the results of the proposed classifier and FreeSurfer on the Dice overlap measure shows an average gain of 1.8%. We have performed a power analysis to demonstrate that this increase in segmentation accuracy substantially reduces the number of samples required to detect a 5% change in volume of a brain region. PMID:23366607

  11. A Gram-Negative Bacterial Secreted Protein Types Prediction Method Based on PSI-BLAST Profile

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Prediction of secreted protein types based solely on sequence data remains to be a challenging problem. In this study, we extract the long-range correlation information and linear correlation information from position-specific score matrix (PSSM). A total of 6800 features are extracted at 17 different gaps; then, 309 features are selected by a filter feature selection method based on the training set. To verify the performance of our method, jackknife and independent dataset tests are performed on the test set and the reported overall accuracies are 93.60% and 100%, respectively. Comparison of our results with the existing method shows that our method provides the favorable performance for secreted protein type prediction. PMID:27563663

  12. A new brachycladiid species (Digenea) from Gervais' beaked whale Mesoplodon europaeus in north-western Atlantic waters.

    PubMed

    Fraija-Fernández, Natalia; Aznar, Francisco J; Raga, Juan A; Gibson, David; Fernández, Mercedes

    2014-09-01

    A new species of the digenean family Brachycladiidae Odhner, 1905 is described from the bile ducts of a Gervais' beaked whale Mesoplodon europaeus Gervais (Ziphiidae) stranded on the North Atlantic coast of Florida. These parasites were assigned to Brachycladium Looss, 1899 and differed from other species of the genus in the relative size of the oral and ventral suckers, the form and size of the eggs and their extremely small body size. A canonical discriminant analysis was used to examine differences between these specimens and the smallest available individuals of B. atlanticum (Abril, Balbuena and Raga, 1991) Gibson, 2005, considered the morphologically closest species. The overall results exhibited significant differences between the two samples and a jack-knife classification showed that 96.2% of the specimens were correctly classified to their group. In view of evidence from morphological data, the specimens from M. europaeus are considered as new to science and are designated as Brachycladium parvulum n. sp. PMID:25119367

  13. PAI: Predicting adenosine to inosine editing sites by using pseudo nucleotide compositions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Feng, Pengmian; Ding, Hui; Lin, Hao

    2016-01-01

    The adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) editing is the most prevalent kind of RNA editing and involves in many biological processes. Accurate identification of A-to-I editing site is invaluable for better understanding its biological functions. Due to the limitations of experimental methods, in the present study, a support vector machine based-model, called PAI, is proposed to identify A-to-I editing site in D. melanogaster. In this model, RNA sequences are encoded by “pseudo dinucleotide composition” into which six RNA physiochemical properties were incorporated. PAI achieves promising performances in jackknife test and independent dataset test, indicating that it holds very high potential to become a useful tool for identifying A-to-I editing site. For the convenience of experimental scientists, a web-server was constructed for PAI and it is freely accessible at http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/PAI. PMID:27725762

  14. [Sampling effort and floristic atlases: survey completeness of localities and description of knowledge gaps].

    PubMed

    Vallet, Jeanne; Rambaud, Maëlle; Coquel, Loïc; Poncet, Laurent; Hendoux, Frédéric

    2012-12-01

    Floristic atlases have an important input to flora conservation planning even though their data quality varied greatly across countries. This study aimed to assess survey completeness of cells of floristic atlases. Then, a surveying guide is designed to overcome as efficiently as possible sampling biases. A review and analyses on a wide dataset were carried out to select an estimator of the true species richness of surveyed cells. The Jackknife 1, a non-parametric estimator, appeared as the best compromise for regional floristic atlases. The number of records in each cell was used as an estimator of sampling effort. The ratio between the observed species richness and the estimated species richness measures the completeness of inventories in each surveyed cell. Eighteen variables were selected to describe current inventories and design new surveys. These variables highlight locations, periods and species to be given priority in future studies.

  15. Improved confidence intervals for the linkage disequilibrium method for estimating effective population size.

    PubMed

    Jones, A T; Ovenden, J R; Wang, Y-G

    2016-10-01

    The linkage disequilibrium method is currently the most widely used single sample estimator of genetic effective population size. The commonly used software packages come with two options, referred to as the parametric and jackknife methods, for computing the associated confidence intervals. However, little is known on the coverage performance of these methods, and the published data suggest there may be some room for improvement. Here, we propose two new methods for generating confidence intervals and compare them with the two in current use through a simulation study. The new confidence interval methods tend to be conservative but outperform the existing methods for generating confidence intervals under certain circumstances, such as those that may be encountered when making estimates using large numbers of single-nucleotide polymorphisms. PMID:27005004

  16. Linear regression in astronomy. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Eric D.; Babu, Gutti J.

    1992-01-01

    A wide variety of least-squares linear regression procedures used in observational astronomy, particularly investigations of the cosmic distance scale, are presented and discussed. The classes of linear models considered are (1) unweighted regression lines, with bootstrap and jackknife resampling; (2) regression solutions when measurement error, in one or both variables, dominates the scatter; (3) methods to apply a calibration line to new data; (4) truncated regression models, which apply to flux-limited data sets; and (5) censored regression models, which apply when nondetections are present. For the calibration problem we develop two new procedures: a formula for the intercept offset between two parallel data sets, which propagates slope errors from one regression to the other; and a generalization of the Working-Hotelling confidence bands to nonstandard least-squares lines. They can provide improved error analysis for Faber-Jackson, Tully-Fisher, and similar cosmic distance scale relations.

  17. Temporal genetic variability and host sources of Escherichia coli associated with fecal pollution from domesticated animals in the shellfish culture environment of Xiangshan Bay, East China Sea.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ling-Lin; Shuai, Jiang-Bing; Wang, Yanbo; Ma, Hong-Jia; Li, Jian-Rong

    2011-10-01

    This study was conducted to analyze the genetic variability of Escherichia coli from domesticated animal wastes for microbial source tracking (MST) application in fecal contaminated shellfish growing waters of Xiangshan Bay, East China Sea. (GTG)(5) primer was used to generate 1363 fingerprints from E. coli isolated from feces of known 9 domesticated animal sources around this shellfish culture area. Jackknife analysis of the complete (GTG)(5)-PCR DNA fingerprint library indicated that isolates were assigned to the correct source groups with an 84.28% average rate of correct classification. Based on one-year source tracking data, the dominant sources of E. coli were swine, chickens, ducks and cows in this water area. Moreover, annual and spatial changes of E. coli concentrations and host sources may affect the level and distribution of zoonotic pathogen species in waters. Our findings will further contribute to preventing fecal pollution in aquatic environments and quality control of shellfish.

  18. Prediction of Golgi-resident protein types using general form of Chou's pseudo-amino acid compositions: Approaches with minimal redundancy maximal relevance feature selection.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Ya-Sen; Du, Pu-Feng

    2016-08-01

    Recently, several efforts have been made in predicting Golgi-resident proteins. However, it is still a challenging task to identify the type of a Golgi-resident protein. Precise prediction of the type of a Golgi-resident protein plays a key role in understanding its molecular functions in various biological processes. In this paper, we proposed to use a mutual information based feature selection scheme with the general form Chou's pseudo-amino acid compositions to predict the Golgi-resident protein types. The positional specific physicochemical properties were applied in the Chou's pseudo-amino acid compositions. We achieved 91.24% prediction accuracy in a jackknife test with 49 selected features. It has the best performance among all the present predictors. This result indicates that our computational model can be useful in identifying Golgi-resident protein types. PMID:27155042

  19. A new methodology to define homogeneous regions through an entropy based clustering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridolfi, E.; Rianna, M.; Trani, G.; Alfonso, L.; Di Baldassarre, G.; Napolitano, F.; Russo, F.

    2016-10-01

    One of the most crucial steps in flow frequency studies is the definition of Homogenous Regions (HRs), i.e. areas with similar hydrological behavior. This is essential in ungauged catchments, as HR allows information to be transferred from a neighboring river basin. This study proposes a new, entropy-based approach to define HRs, in which regions are defined as homogeneous if their hydrometric stations capture redundant information. The problem is handled through the definition of the Information Transferred Index (ITI) as the ratio between redundant information and the total information provided by pairs of stations. The methodology is compared with a traditional, distance-based clustering method through a Monte Carlo experiment and a jack-knife procedure. Results indicate that the ITI-based method performs well, adding value to current methodologies to define HRs.

  20. Identification of mitochondrial proteins of malaria parasite using analysis of variance.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hui; Li, Dongmei

    2015-02-01

    As a parasitic protozoan, Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) can cause malaria. The mitochondrial proteins of malaria parasite play important roles in the discovery of anti-malarial drug targets. Thus, accurate identification of mitochondrial proteins of malaria parasite is a key step for understanding their functions and finding potential drug targets. In this work, we developed a sequence-based method to identify the mitochondrial proteins of malaria parasite. At first, we extended adjoining dipeptide composition to g-gap dipeptide composition for discretely formulating the protein sequences. Subsequently, the analysis of variance (ANOVA) combined with incremental feature selection (IFS) was used to pick out the optimal features. Finally, the jackknife cross-validation was used to evaluate the performance of the proposed model. Evaluation results showed that the maximum accuracy of 97.1% could be achieved by using 101 optimal 5-gap dipeptides. The comparison with previous methods demonstrated that our method was accurate and efficient.

  1. Isotopic and Elemental Composition of Roasted Coffee as a Guide to Authenticity and Origin.

    PubMed

    Carter, James F; Yates, Hans S A; Tinggi, Ujang

    2015-06-24

    This study presents the stable isotopic and elemental compositions of single-origin, roasted coffees available to retail consumers. The δ(13)C, δ(15)N, and δ(18)O compositions were in agreement with those previously reported for green coffee beans. The δ(15)N composition was seen to be related to organic cultivation, reflected in both δ(2)H and δ(18)O compositions. The δ(13)C composition of extracted caffeine differed little from that of the bulk coffee. Stepwise discriminant analysis with jackknife tests, using isotopic and elemental data, provided up to 77% correct classification of regions of production. Samples from Africa and India were readily classified. The wide range in both isotopic and elemental compositions of samples from other regions, specifically Central/South America, resulted in poor discrimination between or within these regions. Simpler X-Y and geo-spatial plots of the isotopic data provided effective visual means to distinguish between coffees from different regions.

  2. Alignment-free microbial phylogenomics under scenarios of sequence divergence, genome rearrangement and lateral genetic transfer

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Guillaume; Chan, Cheong Xin; Ragan, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Alignment-free (AF) approaches have recently been highlighted as alternatives to methods based on multiple sequence alignment in phylogenetic inference. However, the sensitivity of AF methods to genome-scale evolutionary scenarios is little known. Here, using simulated microbial genome data we systematically assess the sensitivity of nine AF methods to three important evolutionary scenarios: sequence divergence, lateral genetic transfer (LGT) and genome rearrangement. Among these, AF methods are most sensitive to the extent of sequence divergence, less sensitive to low and moderate frequencies of LGT, and most robust against genome rearrangement. We describe the application of AF methods to three well-studied empirical genome datasets, and introduce a new application of the jackknife to assess node support. Our results demonstrate that AF phylogenomics is computationally scalable to multi-genome data and can generate biologically meaningful phylogenies and insights into microbial evolution. PMID:27363362

  3. Data analysis in craniofacial biology with special emphasis on longitudinal studies.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, C J

    1993-03-01

    Recommendations are made for strengthening data description and analysis in craniofacial biology. Special emphasis is placed on longitudinal data, and PC programs for accomplishing appropriate analyses in this context are described and made available to interested readers. Some more general recommendations are treated in less detail. These include the effective description of data using stem-and-leaf displays and/or boxplots, the use of decision-analytic methods in the management of patients with dentofacial deformities, and the valid application of certain statistical methods in single-subject studies. Finally, it is conjectured that computer-intensive methods such as randomization tests and jackknifing will play an increasingly prominent role in craniofacial research. PMID:8452829

  4. Prediction of Pork Quality by Fuzzy Support Vector Machine Classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianxi; Yu, Huaizhi; Wang, Jiamin

    Existing objective methods to evaluate pork quality in general do not yield satisfactory results and their applications in meat industry are limited. In this study, fuzzy support vector machine (FSVM) method was developed to evaluate and predict pork quality rapidly and nondestructively. Firstly, the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) was used to eliminate the noise component in original spectrum and the new spectrum was reconstructed. Then, considering the characteristic variables still exist correlation and contain some redundant information, principal component analysis (PCA) was carried out. Lastly, FSVM was developed to differentiate and classify pork samples into different quality grades using the features from PCA. Jackknife tests on the working datasets indicated that the prediction accuracies were higher than other methods.

  5. Bayesian methods of confidence interval construction for the population attributable risk from cross-sectional studies.

    PubMed

    Pirikahu, Sarah; Jones, Geoffrey; Hazelton, Martin L; Heuer, Cord

    2016-08-15

    Population attributable risk measures the public health impact of the removal of a risk factor. To apply this concept to epidemiological data, the calculation of a confidence interval to quantify the uncertainty in the estimate is desirable. However, because perhaps of the confusion surrounding the attributable risk measures, there is no standard confidence interval or variance formula given in the literature. In this paper, we implement a fully Bayesian approach to confidence interval construction of the population attributable risk for cross-sectional studies. We show that, in comparison with a number of standard Frequentist methods for constructing confidence intervals (i.e. delta, jackknife and bootstrap methods), the Bayesian approach is superior in terms of percent coverage in all except a few cases. This paper also explores the effect of the chosen prior on the coverage and provides alternatives for particular situations. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26799685

  6. Construction and bootstrap analysis of DNA fingerprinting-based phylogenetic trees with the freeware program FreeTree: application to trichomonad parasites.

    PubMed

    Hampl, V; Pavlícek, A; Flegr, J

    2001-05-01

    The Win95/98/NT program FreeTree for computation of distance matrices and construction of phylogenetic or phenetic trees on the basis of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), RFLP and allozyme data is presented. In contrast to other similar software, the program FreeTree (available at http://www.natur.cuni.cz/~flegr/programs/freetree or http://ijs.sgmjournals.org/content/vol51/issue3/) can also assess the robustness of the tree topology by bootstrap, jackknife or operational taxonomic unit-jackknife analysis. Moreover, the program can be also used for the analysis of data obtained in several independent experiments performed with non-identical subsets of taxa. The function of the program was demonstrated by an analysis of RAPD data from 42 strains of 10 species of trichomonads. On the phylogenetic tree constructed using FreeTree, the high bootstrap values and short terminal branches for the Tritrichomonas foetus/suis 14-strain branch suggested relatively recent and probably clonal radiation of this species. At the same time, the relatively lower bootstrap values and long terminal branches for the Trichomonas vaginalis 20-strain branch suggested more ancient radiation of this species and the possible existence of genetic recombination (sexual reproduction) in this human pathogen. The low bootstrap values and the star-like topology of the whole Trichomonadidae tree confirm that the RAPD method is not suitable for phylogenetic analysis of protozoa at the level of higher taxa. It is proposed that the repeated bootstrap analysis should be an obligatory part of any RAPD study. It makes it possible to assess the reliability of the tree obtained and to adjust the amount of collected data (the number of random primers) to the amount of phylogenetic signals in the RAPD data of the taxon analysed. The FreeTree program makes such analysis possible. PMID:11411692

  7. Integrating local pastoral knowledge, participatory mapping, and species distribution modeling for risk assessment of invasive rubber vine (Cryptostegia grandiflora) in Ethiopia’s Afar region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luizza, Matthew; Wakie, Tewodros; Evangelista, Paul; Jarnevich, Catherine S.

    2016-01-01

    The threats posed by invasive plants span ecosystems and economies worldwide. Local knowledge of biological invasions has proven beneficial for invasive species research, but to date no work has integrated this knowledge with species distribution modeling for invasion risk assessments. In this study, we integrated pastoral knowledge with Maxent modeling to assess the suitable habitat and potential impacts of invasive Cryptostegia grandiflora Robx. Ex R.Br. (rubber vine) in Ethiopia’s Afar region. We conducted focus groups with seven villages across the Amibara and Awash-Fentale districts. Pastoral knowledge revealed the growing threat of rubber vine, which to date has received limited attention in Ethiopia, and whose presence in Afar was previously unknown to our team. Rubber vine occurrence points were collected in the field with pastoralists and processed in Maxent with MODIS-derived vegetation indices, topographic data, and anthropogenic variables. We tested model fit using a jackknife procedure and validated the final model with an independent occurrence data set collected through participatory mapping activities with pastoralists. A Multivariate Environmental Similarity Surface analysis revealed areas with novel environmental conditions for future targeted surveys. Model performance was evaluated using area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) and showed good fit across the jackknife models (average AUC = 0.80) and the final model (test AUC = 0.96). Our results reveal the growing threat rubber vine poses to Afar, with suitable habitat extending downstream of its current known location in the middle Awash River basin. Local pastoral knowledge provided important context for its rapid expansion due to acute changes in seasonality and habitat alteration, in addition to threats posed to numerous endemic tree species that provide critical provisioning ecosystem services. This work demonstrates the utility of integrating local ecological

  8. Pine Hollow Watershed Project : FY 2000 Projects.

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman County Soil and Water Conservation District

    2001-06-01

    The Pine Hollow Project (1999-010-00) is an on-going watershed restoration effort administered by Sherman County Soil and Water Conservation District and spearheaded by Pine Hollow/Jackknife Watershed Council. The headwaters are located near Shaniko in Wasco County, and the mouth is in Sherman County on the John Day River. Pine Hollow provides more than 20 miles of potential summer steelhead spawning and rearing habitat. The watershed is 92,000 acres. Land use is mostly range, with some dryland grain. There are no water rights on Pine Hollow. Due to shallow soils, the watershed is prone to rapid runoff events which scour out the streambed and the riparian vegetation. This project seeks to improve the quality of upland, riparian and in-stream habitat by restoring the natural hydrologic function of the entire watershed. Project implementation to date has consisted of construction of water/sediment control basins, gradient terraces on croplands, pasture cross-fences, upland water sources, and grass seeding on degraded sites, many of which were crop fields in the early part of the century. The project is expected to continue through about 2007. From March 2000 to June 2001, the Pine Hollow Project built 6 sediment basins, 1 cross-fence, 2 spring developments, 1 well development, 1 solar pump, 50 acres of native range seeding and 1 livestock waterline. FY2000 projects were funded by BPA, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, US Fish and Wildlife Service and landowners. In-kind services were provided by Sherman County Soil and Water Conservation District, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, USDI Bureau of Land Management, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pine Hollow/Jackknife Watershed Council, landowners and Wasco County Soil and Water Conservation District.

  9. Application of Spatial and Closed Capture-Recapture Models on Known Population of the Western Derby Eland (Taurotragus derbianus derbianus) in Senegal.

    PubMed

    Jůnek, Tomáš; Jůnková Vymyslická, Pavla; Hozdecká, Kateřina; Hejcmanová, Pavla

    2015-01-01

    Camera trapping with capture-recapture analyses has provided estimates of the abundances of elusive species over the last two decades. Closed capture-recapture models (CR) based on the recognition of individuals and incorporating natural heterogeneity in capture probabilities are considered robust tools; however, closure assumption is often questionable and the use of an Mh jackknife estimator may fail in estimations of real abundance when the heterogeneity is high and data is sparse. A novel, spatially explicit capture-recapture (SECR) approach based on the location-specific capture histories of individuals overcomes the limitations of closed models. We applied both methods on a closed population of 16 critically endangered Western Derby elands in the fenced 1,060-ha Fathala reserve, Senegal. We analyzed the data from 30 cameras operating during a 66-day sampling period deployed in two densities in grid and line arrays. We captured and identified all 16 individuals in 962 trap-days. Abundances were estimated in the programs CAPTURE (models M0, Mh and Mh Chao) and R, package secr (basic Null and Finite mixture models), and compared with the true population size. We specified 66 days as a threshold in which SECR provides an accurate estimate in all trapping designs within the 7-times divergent density from 0.004 to 0.028 camera trap/ha. Both SECR models showed uniform tendency to overestimate abundance when sampling lasted shorter with no major differences between their outputs. Unlike the closed models, SECR performed well in the line patterns, which indicates promising potential for linear sampling of properly defined habitats of non-territorial and identifiable herbivores in dense wooded savanna conditions. The CR models provided reliable estimates in the grid and we confirmed the advantage of Mh Chao estimator over Mh jackknife when data appeared sparse. We also demonstrated the pooling of trapping occasions with an increase in the capture probabilities

  10. Absence of significant cross-correlation between WMAP and SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Corredoira, M.; Sylos Labini, F.; Betancort-Rijo, J.

    2010-04-01

    Aims: Several authors have claimed to detect a significant cross-correlation between microwave WMAP anisotropies and the SDSS galaxy distribution. We repeat these analyses to determine the different cross-correlation uncertainties caused by re-sampling errors and field-to-field fluctuations. The first type of error concerns overlapping sky regions, while the second type concerns non-overlapping sky regions. Methods: To measure the re-sampling errors, we use bootstrap and jack-knife techniques. For the field-to-field fluctuations, we use three methods: 1) evaluation of the dispersion in the cross-correlation when correlating separated regions of WMAP with the original region of SDSS; 2) use of mock Monte Carlo WMAP maps; 3) a new method (developed in this article), which measures the error as a function of the integral of the product of the self-correlations for each map. Results: The average cross-correlation for b > 30 deg is significantly stronger than the re-sampling errors - both the jack-knife and bootstrap techniques provide similar results - but it is of the order of the field-to-field fluctuations. This is confirmed by the cross-correlation between anisotropies and galaxies in more than the half of the sample being null within re-sampling errors. Conclusions: Re-sampling methods underestimate the errors. Field-to-field fluctuations dominate the detected signals. The ratio of signal to re-sampling errors is larger than unity in a way that strongly depends on the selected sky region. We therefore conclude that there is no evidence yet of a significant detection of the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect. Hence, the value of Ω_Λ ≈ 0.8 obtained by the authors who assumed they were observing the ISW effect would appear to have originated from noise analysis.

  11. PACo: A Novel Procrustes Application to Cophylogenetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Balbuena, Juan Antonio; Míguez-Lozano, Raúl; Blasco-Costa, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    We present Procrustean Approach to Cophylogeny (PACo), a novel statistical tool to test for congruence between phylogenetic trees, or between phylogenetic distance matrices of associated taxa. Unlike previous tests, PACo evaluates the dependence of one phylogeny upon the other. This makes it especially appropriate to test the classical coevolutionary model that assumes that parasites that spend part of their life in or on their hosts track the phylogeny of their hosts. The new method does not require fully resolved phylogenies and allows for multiple host-parasite associations. PACo produces a Procrustes superimposition plot enabling a graphical assessment of the fit of the parasite phylogeny onto the host phylogeny and a goodness-of-fit statistic, whose significance is established by randomization of the host-parasite association data. The contribution of each individual host-parasite association to the global fit is measured by means of jackknife estimation of their respective squared residuals and confidence intervals associated to each host-parasite link. We carried out different simulations to evaluate the performance of PACo in terms of Type I and Type II errors with respect to two similar published tests. In most instances, PACo performed at least as well as the other tests and showed higher overall statistical power. In addition, the jackknife estimation of squared residuals enabled more elaborate validations about the nature of individual links than the ParaFitLink1 test of the program ParaFit. In order to demonstrate how it can be used in real biological situations, we applied PACo to two published studies using a script written in the public-domain statistical software R. PMID:23580325

  12. Application of Spatial and Closed Capture-Recapture Models on Known Population of the Western Derby Eland (Taurotragus derbianus derbianus) in Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Jůnek, Tomáš; Jůnková Vymyslická, Pavla; Hozdecká, Kateřina; Hejcmanová, Pavla

    2015-01-01

    Camera trapping with capture-recapture analyses has provided estimates of the abundances of elusive species over the last two decades. Closed capture-recapture models (CR) based on the recognition of individuals and incorporating natural heterogeneity in capture probabilities are considered robust tools; however, closure assumption is often questionable and the use of an Mh jackknife estimator may fail in estimations of real abundance when the heterogeneity is high and data is sparse. A novel, spatially explicit capture-recapture (SECR) approach based on the location-specific capture histories of individuals overcomes the limitations of closed models. We applied both methods on a closed population of 16 critically endangered Western Derby elands in the fenced 1,060-ha Fathala reserve, Senegal. We analyzed the data from 30 cameras operating during a 66-day sampling period deployed in two densities in grid and line arrays. We captured and identified all 16 individuals in 962 trap-days. Abundances were estimated in the programs CAPTURE (models M0, Mh and Mh Chao) and R, package secr (basic Null and Finite mixture models), and compared with the true population size. We specified 66 days as a threshold in which SECR provides an accurate estimate in all trapping designs within the 7-times divergent density from 0.004 to 0.028 camera trap/ha. Both SECR models showed uniform tendency to overestimate abundance when sampling lasted shorter with no major differences between their outputs. Unlike the closed models, SECR performed well in the line patterns, which indicates promising potential for linear sampling of properly defined habitats of non-territorial and identifiable herbivores in dense wooded savanna conditions. The CR models provided reliable estimates in the grid and we confirmed the advantage of Mh Chao estimator over Mh jackknife when data appeared sparse. We also demonstrated the pooling of trapping occasions with an increase in the capture probabilities

  13. Aftershock Relocation and Shear Wave Splitting in the Yuha Desert Following the 4 April 2010 M7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah Earthquake Kayla A. Kroll (UCR), Elizabeth S. Cochran (USGS), Keith Richards-Dinger (UCR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, K.; Cochran, E. S.; Richards-Dinger, K. B.

    2011-12-01

    Following the 4 April 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake, 8 temporary seismometers were installed in the Yuha Desert region north of the Mexican border. During the deployment period, between 6 April and 14 June 2010, over 4,000 aftershocks, within a 20km by 14km study area in the Yuha Desert, are reported in the SCEDC catalog. We relocate the aftershocks and also determine shallow crustal anisotropy to illuminate the complex fault structure in this region. We compute the double difference hypocenter relocations using hypoDD with both manually picked P and S phase arrivals and waveform cross-correlations. We test three velocity models based on the Imperial Valley profile from the SCEC Community Velocity Model, Version 4 (CVM-S4), including the original profile and the profile with a 10% and 20% velocity reduction in Vp/Vs. We use a jackknife test in which the relocations are recomputed with one of the 13 stations removed in each test to estimate horizontal and vertical relative errors. By comparison with the LSQR errors of hypoDD, we find that scaling the LSQR errors by the jackknife/ LSQR error ratio provides a better error estimate. We find that the Imperial Valley profile with a 10% velocity reduction results in the lowest location errors. The absolute and relative relocation errors were reduced by at least an order of magnitude when compared to the original SCEDC catalog locations. We then use statistical uncertainties in the data to identify simple structures in the cloud of earthquake relocations. This modified collapsing method employs principal component analysis to identify three types of structures that a set of closely located events is most likely associated with: point, line or plane. With this method, collapsed locations provide insight to the poorly understood geologic structures in the Yuha Desert. Additionally, we measure the shallow crustal anisotropy using shear wave splitting techniques. Preliminary visual inspection of the data suggests clear

  14. Hierarchical Bayes estimation of species richness and occupancy in spatially replicated surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kery, M.; Royle, J. Andrew

    2008-01-01

    1. Species richness is the most widely used biodiversity metric, but cannot be observed directly as, typically, some species are overlooked. Imperfect detectability must therefore be accounted for to obtain unbiased species-richness estimates. When richness is assessed at multiple sites, two approaches can be used to estimate species richness: either estimating for each site separately, or pooling all samples. The first approach produces imprecise estimates, while the second loses site-specific information. 2. In contrast, a hierarchical Bayes (HB) multispecies site-occupancy model benefits from the combination of information across sites without losing site-specific information and also yields occupancy estimates for each species. The heart of the model is an estimate of the incompletely observed presence-absence matrix, a centrepiece of biogeography and monitoring studies. We illustrate the model using Swiss breeding bird survey data, and compare its estimates with the widely used jackknife species-richness estimator and raw species counts. 3. Two independent observers each conducted three surveys in 26 1-km(2) quadrats, and detected 27-56 (total 103) species. The average estimated proportion of species detected after three surveys was 0.87 under the HB model. Jackknife estimates were less precise (less repeatable between observers) than raw counts, but HB estimates were as repeatable as raw counts. The combination of information in the HB model thus resulted in species-richness estimates presumably at least as unbiased as previous approaches that correct for detectability, but without costs in precision relative to uncorrected, biased species counts. 4. Total species richness in the entire region sampled was estimated at 113.1 (CI 106-123); species detectability ranged from 0.08 to 0.99, illustrating very heterogeneous species detectability; and species occupancy was 0.06-0.96. Even after six surveys, absolute bias in observed occupancy was estimated at up to 0

  15. RNA-MethylPred: A high-accuracy predictor to identify N6-methyladenosine in RNA.

    PubMed

    Jia, Cang-Zhi; Zhang, Jia-Jia; Gu, Wei-Zhen

    2016-10-01

    N6-methyladenosine (m(6)A) is present ubiquitously in the RNA of living organisms from Escherichia coli to humans. Nonetheless, the exact molecular mechanism of this modification remains unclear. The experimental identification of m(6)A modification is time-consuming and expensive; therefore, bioinformatics tools with high accuracy represent desirable alternatives for the large-scale, rapid identification of N6-methyladenosine sites. In this study, RNA-MethylPred, a new bioinformatics model, was developed by incorporating bi-profile Bayes, dinucleotide composition, and k nearest neighbor (KNN) scores for three feature extractions. RNA-MethylPred yielded a Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.53 in a jackknife test, which was 0.24 higher than that of iRNA-Methyl and 0.13 higher than that of pRNAm-PC. The obvious improvements demonstrated that RNA-MethylPred might be a powerful and complementary tool for further experimental investigation of N6-methyladenosine modification. PMID:27338301

  16. Application of universal kriging for estimation of earthquake ground motion: Statistical significance of results

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, J.R.; Roberts, K.P.

    1989-02-01

    Universal kriging is compared with ordinary kriging for estimation of earthquake ground motion. Ordinary kriging is based on a stationary random function model; universal kriging is based on a nonstationary random function model representing first-order drift. Accuracy of universal kriging is compared with that for ordinary kriging; cross-validation is used as the basis for comparison. Hypothesis testing on these results shows that accuracy obtained using universal kriging is not significantly different from accuracy obtained using ordinary kriging. Test based on normal distribution assumptions are applied to errors measured in the cross-validation procedure; t and F tests reveal no evidence to suggest universal and ordinary kriging are different for estimation of earthquake ground motion. Nonparametric hypothesis tests applied to these errors and jackknife statistics yield the same conclusion: universal and ordinary kriging are not significantly different for this application as determined by a cross-validation procedure. These results are based on application to four independent data sets (four different seismic events).

  17. A Computational Model for Predicting RNase H Domain of Retrovirus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sijia; Zhang, Xinman; Han, Jiuqiang

    2016-01-01

    RNase H (RNH) is a pivotal domain in retrovirus to cleave the DNA-RNA hybrid for continuing retroviral replication. The crucial role indicates that RNH is a promising drug target for therapeutic intervention. However, annotated RNHs in UniProtKB database have still been insufficient for a good understanding of their statistical characteristics so far. In this work, a computational RNH model was proposed to annotate new putative RNHs (np-RNHs) in the retroviruses. It basically predicts RNH domains through recognizing their start and end sites separately with SVM method. The classification accuracy rates are 100%, 99.01% and 97.52% respectively corresponding to jack-knife, 10-fold cross-validation and 5-fold cross-validation test. Subsequently, this model discovered 14,033 np-RNHs after scanning sequences without RNH annotations. All these predicted np-RNHs and annotated RNHs were employed to analyze the length, hydrophobicity and evolutionary relationship of RNH domains. They are all related to retroviral genera, which validates the classification of retroviruses to a certain degree. In the end, a software tool was designed for the application of our prediction model. The software together with datasets involved in this paper can be available for free download at https://sourceforge.net/projects/rhtool/files/?source=navbar. PMID:27574780

  18. RAMPred: identifying the N1-methyladenosine sites in eukaryotic transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Feng, Pengmian; Tang, Hua; Ding, Hui; Lin, Hao

    2016-01-01

    N1-methyladenosine (m1A) is a prominent RNA modification involved in many biological processes. Accurate identification of m1A site is invaluable for better understanding the biological functions of m1A. However, limitations in experimental methods preclude the progress towards the identification of m1A site. As an excellent complement of experimental methods, a support vector machine based-method called RAMPred is proposed to identify m1A sites in H. sapiens, M. musculus and S. cerevisiae genomes for the first time. In this method, RNA sequences are encoded by using nucleotide chemical property and nucleotide compositions. RAMPred achieves promising performances in jackknife tests, cross cell line tests and cross species tests, indicating that RAMPred holds very high potential to become a useful tool for identifying m1A sites. For the convenience of experimental scientists, a web-server based on the proposed model was constructed and could be freely accessible at http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/RAMPred. PMID:27511610

  19. MEASUREMENT OF COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION POWER SPECTRA FROM TWO YEARS OF BICEP DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, H. C.; Barkats, D.; Bock, J. J.; Hristov, V. V.; Jones, W. C.; Kovac, J. M.; Lange, A. E.; Mason, P. V.; Matsumura, T.; Ade, P. A. R.; Battle, J. O.; Dowell, C. D.; Nguyen, H. T.; Bierman, E. M.; Keating, B. G.; Duband, L.; Hivon, E. F.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Kuo, C. L.; Leitch, E. M.

    2010-03-10

    Background Imaging of Cosmic Extragalactic Polarization (BICEP) is a bolometric polarimeter designed to measure the inflationary B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at degree angular scales. During three seasons of observing at the South Pole (2006 through 2008), BICEP mapped {approx}2% of the sky chosen to be uniquely clean of polarized foreground emission. Here, we present initial results derived from a subset of the data acquired during the first two years. We present maps of temperature, Stokes Q and U, E and B modes, and associated angular power spectra. We demonstrate that the polarization data are self-consistent by performing a series of jackknife tests. We study potential systematic errors in detail and show that they are sub-dominant to the statistical errors. We measure the E-mode angular power spectrum with high precision at 21 <= l <= 335, detecting for the first time the peak expected at l {approx} 140. The measured E-mode spectrum is consistent with expectations from a LAMBDACDM model, and the B-mode spectrum is consistent with zero. The tensor-to-scalar ratio derived from the B-mode spectrum is r = 0.02{sup +0.31}{sub -0.26}, or r < 0.72 at 95% confidence, the first meaningful constraint on the inflationary gravitational wave background to come directly from CMB B-mode polarization.

  20. Prediction of subcellular location of apoptosis proteins combining tri-gram encoding based on PSSM and recursive feature elimination.

    PubMed

    Liu, Taigang; Tao, Peiying; Li, Xiaowei; Qin, Yufang; Wang, Chunhua

    2015-02-01

    Knowledge of apoptosis proteins plays an important role in understanding the mechanism of programmed cell death. Obtaining information on subcellular location of apoptosis proteins is very helpful to reveal the apoptosis mechanism and understand the function of apoptosis proteins. Because of the cost in time and labor associated with large-scale wet-bench experiments, computational prediction of apoptosis proteins subcellular location becomes very important and many computational tools have been developed in the recent decades. Existing methods differ in the protein sequence representation techniques and classification algorithms adopted. In this study, we firstly introduce a sequence encoding scheme based on tri-grams computed directly from position-specific score matrices, which incorporates evolution information represented in the PSI-BLAST profile and sequence-order information. Then SVM-RFE algorithm is applied for feature selection and reduced vectors are input to a support vector machine classifier to predict subcellular location of apoptosis proteins. Jackknife tests on three widely used datasets show that our method provides the state-of-the-art performance in comparison with other existing methods.

  1. Patterns of connectivity among populations of a coral reef fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chittaro, P. M.; Hogan, J. D.

    2013-06-01

    Knowledge of the patterns and scale of connectivity among populations is essential for the effective management of species, but our understanding is still poor for marine species. We used otolith microchemistry of newly settled bicolor damselfish ( Stegastes partitus) in the Mesoamerican Reef System (MRS), Western Caribbean, to investigate patterns of connectivity among populations over 2 years. First, we assessed spatial and temporal variability in trace elemental concentrations from the otolith edge to make a `chemical map' of potential source reef(s) in the region. Significant otolith chemical differences were detected at three spatial scales (within-atoll, between-atolls, and region-wide), such that individuals were classified to locations with moderate (52 % jackknife classification) to high (99 %) accuracy. Most sites at Turneffe Atoll, Belize showed significant temporal variability in otolith concentrations on the scale of 1-2 months. Using a maximum likelihood approach, we estimated the natal source of larvae recruiting to reefs across the MRS by comparing `natal' chemical signatures from the otolith of recruits to the `chemical map' of potential source reef(s). Our results indicated that populations at both Turneffe Atoll and Banco Chinchorro supply a substantial amount of individuals to their own reefs (i.e., self-recruitment) and thus emphasize that marine conservation and management in the MRS region would benefit from localized management efforts as well as international cooperation.

  2. The impact of mammographic density and lesion location on detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Mousa, Dana; Ryan, Elaine; Lee, Warwick; Nickson, Carolyn; Pietrzyk, Mariusz; Reed, Warren; Poulos, Ann; Li, Yanpeng; Brennan, Patrick

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the impact of breast density and lesion location on detection. A set of 55 mammographic images (23 abnormal images with 26 lesions and 32 normal images) were examined by 22 expert radiologists. The images were classified by an expert radiologist according to the Synoptic Breast Imaging Report of the National Breast Cancer Centre (NBCC) as having low mammographic density (D1<25% glandular and D2> 25-50% glandular) or high density (D3 51-75% glandular and D4> 75-glandular). The observers freely examined the images and located any malignancy using a 5-point confidence. Performance was defined using the following metrics: sensitivity, location sensitivity, specificity, receiver operating characteristic (ROC Az) curves and jackknife free-response receiver operator characteristics (JAFROC) figures of merit. Significant increases in sensitivity (p= 0.0174) and ROC (p=0.0001) values were noted for the higher density compared with lower density images according to NBCC classification. No differences were seen in radiologists' performance between lesions within or outside the fibroglandular region. In conclusion, analysis of our data suggests that radiologists scored higher using traditional metrics in higher mammographic density images without any improvement in lesion localisation. Lesion location whether within or outside the fibroglandular region appeared to have no impact on detection abilities suggesting that if a masking effect is present the impact is minimal. Eye-tracking analyses are ongoing.

  3. Additional Value of Diffusion-weighted MRI to Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced Hepatic MRI for the Detection of Liver Metastasis: the Difference Depending on the Experience of the Radiologists.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Wataru; Nakamura, Yuko; Higaki, Toru; Tatsugami, Fuminari; Iida, Makoto; Awai, Kazuo

    2015-06-01

    This retrospective study was to investigate whether adding diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI (EOB-MRI) improved the detection of liver metastasis in radiology resident and board-certified radiologist groups. It was approved by our institutional review board. We selected 18 patients with 35 liver metastases and 12 patients without liver tumors. Five board-certified radiologists and 5 radiology residents participated in the observer performance study. Each observer first interpreted T1- and T2-weighted-, plain-, arterial phase-, and hepatobiliary phase images and specified the location of the liver metastases. The software subsequently displayed the DWI images simultaneously and all participants repeated the reading. We used Jackknife alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis to compare the observer performance in detecting liver metastases. The mean values for the area under the curve (AUC) for EOB-MRI without and with DWI were 0.78 ± 0.13 [standard deviation: SD] and 0.87 ± 0.09, respectively, for the radiology residents, and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.045). For the board- certified radiologists these values were 0.92 ± 0.02 and 0.96 ± 0.01, respectively, and the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.092). EOB-MRI with DWI significantly improved the performance of radiology residents in the identification of liver metastases.

  4. Near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy and multivariate calibration techniques applied to modelling the crude protein, fibre and fat content in rapeseed meal.

    PubMed

    Daszykowski, M; Wrobel, M S; Czarnik-Matusewicz, H; Walczak, B

    2008-11-01

    Near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) is often applied when a rapid quantification of major components in feed is required. This technique is preferred over the other analytical techniques due to the relatively few requirements concerning sample preparations, high efficiency and low costs of the analysis. In this study, NIRS was used to control the content of crude protein, fat and fibre in extracted rapeseed meal which was produced in the local industrial crushing plant. For modelling the NIR data, the partial least squares approach (PLS) was used. The satisfactory prediction errors were equal to 1.12, 0.13 and 0.45 (expressed in percentages referring to dry mass) for crude protein, fat and fibre content, respectively. To point out the key spectral regions which are important for modelling, uninformative variable elimination PLS, PLS with jackknife-based variable elimination, PLS with bootstrap-based variable elimination and the orthogonal partial least squares approach were compared for the data studied. They enabled an easier interpretation of the calibration models in terms of absorption bands and led to similar predictions for test samples compared to the initial models.

  5. A Computational Model for Predicting RNase H Domain of Retrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinman; Han, Jiuqiang

    2016-01-01

    RNase H (RNH) is a pivotal domain in retrovirus to cleave the DNA-RNA hybrid for continuing retroviral replication. The crucial role indicates that RNH is a promising drug target for therapeutic intervention. However, annotated RNHs in UniProtKB database have still been insufficient for a good understanding of their statistical characteristics so far. In this work, a computational RNH model was proposed to annotate new putative RNHs (np-RNHs) in the retroviruses. It basically predicts RNH domains through recognizing their start and end sites separately with SVM method. The classification accuracy rates are 100%, 99.01% and 97.52% respectively corresponding to jack-knife, 10-fold cross-validation and 5-fold cross-validation test. Subsequently, this model discovered 14,033 np-RNHs after scanning sequences without RNH annotations. All these predicted np-RNHs and annotated RNHs were employed to analyze the length, hydrophobicity and evolutionary relationship of RNH domains. They are all related to retroviral genera, which validates the classification of retroviruses to a certain degree. In the end, a software tool was designed for the application of our prediction model. The software together with datasets involved in this paper can be available for free download at https://sourceforge.net/projects/rhtool/files/?source=navbar. PMID:27574780

  6. Predicting cancerlectins by the optimal g-gap dipeptides

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hao; Liu, Wei-Xin; He, Jiao; Liu, Xin-Hui; Ding, Hui; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The cancerlectin plays a key role in the process of tumor cell differentiation. Thus, to fully understand the function of cancerlectin is significant because it sheds light on the future direction for the cancer therapy. However, the traditional wet-experimental methods were money- and time-consuming. It is highly desirable to develop an effective and efficient computational tool to identify cancerlectins. In this study, we developed a sequence-based method to discriminate between cancerlectins and non-cancerlectins. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to choose the optimal feature set derived from the g-gap dipeptide composition. The jackknife cross-validated results showed that the proposed method achieved the accuracy of 75.19%, which is superior to other published methods. For the convenience of other researchers, an online web-server CaLecPred was established and can be freely accessed from the website http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/CalecPred. We believe that the CaLecPred is a powerful tool to study cancerlectins and to guide the related experimental validations. PMID:26648527

  7. Mapping the climatic suitable habitat of oriental arborvitae (Platycladus orientalis) for introduction and cultivation at a global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guoqing; Du, Sheng; Wen, Zhongming

    2016-07-01

    Oriental arborvitae (Platycladus orientalis) is an important afforestation and ornamental tree species, which is native in eastern Asian. Therefore, a global suitable habitat map for oriental arborvitae is urgently needed for global promotion and cultivation. Here, the potential habitat and climatic requirements of oriental arborvitae at global scale were simulated using herbariums data and 13 thermal-moisture variables as input data for maximum entropy model (MaxEnt). The simulation performance of MaxEnt is evaluated by ten-fold cross-validation and a jackknife procedure. Results show that the potential habitat and climate envelop of oriental arborvitae can be successfully simulated by MaxEnt at global scale, with a mean test AUC value of 0.93 and mean training AUC value of 0.95. Thermal factors play more important roles than moisture factors in controlling the distribution boundary of oriental arborvitae’s potential ranges. There are about 50 countries suitable for introduction and cultivation of oriental arborvitae with an area of 2.0 × 107 km2, which occupied 13.8% of land area on the earth. This unique study will provide valuable information and insights needed to identify new regions with climatically suitable habitats for cultivation and introduction of oriental arborvitae around the world.

  8. A Direct Comparison of Two Densely Sampled HIV Epidemics: The UK and Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragonnet-Cronin, Manon L.; Shilaih, Mohaned; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Hodcroft, Emma B.; Böni, Jürg; Fearnhill, Esther; Dunn, David; Yerly, Sabine; Klimkait, Thomas; Aubert, Vincent; Yang, Wan-Lin; Brown, Alison E.; Lycett, Samantha J.; Kouyos, Roger; Brown, Andrew J. Leigh

    2016-09-01

    Phylogenetic clustering approaches can elucidate HIV transmission dynamics. Comparisons across countries are essential for evaluating public health policies. Here, we used a standardised approach to compare the UK HIV Drug Resistance Database and the Swiss HIV Cohort Study while maintaining data-protection requirements. Clusters were identified in subtype A1, B and C pol phylogenies. We generated degree distributions for each risk group and compared distributions between countries using Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) tests, Degree Distribution Quantification and Comparison (DDQC) and bootstrapping. We used logistic regression to predict cluster membership based on country, sampling date, risk group, ethnicity and sex. We analysed >8,000 Swiss and >30,000 UK subtype B sequences. At 4.5% genetic distance, the UK was more clustered and MSM and heterosexual degree distributions differed significantly by the KS test. The KS test is sensitive to variation in network scale, and jackknifing the UK MSM dataset to the size of the Swiss dataset removed the difference. Only heterosexuals varied based on the DDQC, due to UK male heterosexuals who clustered exclusively with MSM. Their removal eliminated this difference. In conclusion, the UK and Swiss HIV epidemics have similar underlying dynamics and observed differences in clustering are mainly due to different population sizes.

  9. Analysis and identification of toxin targets by topological properties in protein-protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Wang, Jizhe; Wang, Huiping; Lv, Yingli; Zuo, Yongchun; Jiang, Wei

    2014-05-21

    Proteins do not exert their function in isolation of one another, but interact together in protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. Analysis of topological properties of proteins in the PPI network is very helpful to understand the function of proteins. However, until recently, no one has ever undertaken to investigate toxin targets by topological properties. In this study, for the first time, 12 topological properties are used to investigate the characteristics of toxin targets in the PPI network. Most of the topological properties are found to be statistically discriminative between toxin targets and other proteins, and toxin targets tend to play more important roles in the PPI network. In addition, based on the topological properties and the sequence information, support vector machine (SVM) is used to predict toxin targets. The results obtained by the jackknife test and 10-fold cross validation are encouraging, indicating that SVM is a useful tool for predicting toxin targets, or at least can play complementary roles in relevant areas.

  10. Estimating temporal changes in extreme rainfall in Sicily Region (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaccorso, Brunella; Aronica, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    An intensification of extreme rainfall events have characterized several areas of peninsular and insular Italy since the early 2000s, suggesting an upward ongoing trend likely driven by climate change. In the present study temporal changes in 1-, 3-, 6-, 12- and 24-hour annual maxima rainfall series from more than 200 sites in Sicily region (Italy) are examined. A regional study is performed in order to reduce the uncertainty in change detection related to the limited length of the available records of extreme rainfall series. More specifically, annual maxima series are treated according to a regional flood index - type approach to frequency analysis, by assuming stationarity on a decadal time scale. First a cluster analysis using at-site characteristics is used to determine homogeneous rainfall regions. Then, potential changes in regional L-moment ratios are analyzed using a 10-year moving window. Furthermore, the shapes of regional growth curves, derived by splitting the records into separate decades, are compared. In addition, a jackknife procedure is used to assess uncertainty in the fitted growth curves and to identify significant trends in quantile estimates. Results reveal that, despite L-moment ratios show a general decreasing trend and that growth curves corresponding to the last decade (2000-2009) are usually less steep than the ones of the previous periods, rainfall quantile estimates have increased during the 2000s due to a large increase in regional average median, mainly in Western Sicily.

  11. Identification of Bacterial Cell Wall Lyases via Pseudo Amino Acid Composition

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hua; Li, Wen-Chao; Wu, Hao; Ding, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the abuse of antibiotics, drug resistance of pathogenic bacteria becomes more and more serious. Therefore, it is interesting to develop a more reasonable way to solve this issue. Because they can destroy the bacterial cell structure and then kill the infectious bacterium, the bacterial cell wall lyases are suitable candidates of antibacteria sources. Thus, it is urgent to develop an accurate and efficient computational method to predict the lyases. Based on the consideration, in this paper, a set of objective and rigorous data was collected by searching through the Universal Protein Resource (the UniProt database), whereafter a feature selection technique based on the analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to acquire optimal feature subset. Finally, the support vector machine (SVM) was used to perform prediction. The jackknife cross-validated results showed that the optimal average accuracy of 84.82% was achieved with the sensitivity of 76.47% and the specificity of 93.16%. For the convenience of other scholars, we built a free online server called Lypred. We believe that Lypred will become a practical tool for the research of cell wall lyases and development of antimicrobial agents. PMID:27437396

  12. Instability-based mechanism for body undulations in centipede locomotion.

    PubMed

    Aoi, Shinya; Egi, Yoshimasa; Tsuchiya, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Centipedes have many body segments and legs and they generate body undulations during terrestrial locomotion. Centipede locomotion has the characteristic that body undulations are absent at low speeds but appear at faster speeds; furthermore, their amplitude and wavelength increase with increasing speed. There are conflicting reports regarding whether the muscles along the body axis resist or support these body undulations and the underlying mechanisms responsible for the body undulations remain largely unclear. In the present study, we investigated centipede locomotion dynamics using computer simulation with a body-mechanical model and experiment with a centipede-like robot and then conducted dynamic analysis with a simple model to clarify the mechanism. The results reveal that body undulations in these models occur due to an instability caused by a supercritical Hopf bifurcation. We subsequently compared these results with data obtained using actual centipedes. The model and actual centipedes exhibit similar dynamic properties, despite centipedes being complex, nonlinear dynamic systems. Based on our findings, we propose a possible passive mechanism for body undulations in centipedes, similar to a follower force or jackknife instability. We also discuss the roles of the muscles along the body axis in generating body undulations in terms of our physical model.

  13. Instability-based mechanism for body undulations in centipede locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoi, Shinya; Egi, Yoshimasa; Tsuchiya, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Centipedes have many body segments and legs and they generate body undulations during terrestrial locomotion. Centipede locomotion has the characteristic that body undulations are absent at low speeds but appear at faster speeds; furthermore, their amplitude and wavelength increase with increasing speed. There are conflicting reports regarding whether the muscles along the body axis resist or support these body undulations and the underlying mechanisms responsible for the body undulations remain largely unclear. In the present study, we investigated centipede locomotion dynamics using computer simulation with a body-mechanical model and experiment with a centipede-like robot and then conducted dynamic analysis with a simple model to clarify the mechanism. The results reveal that body undulations in these models occur due to an instability caused by a supercritical Hopf bifurcation. We subsequently compared these results with data obtained using actual centipedes. The model and actual centipedes exhibit similar dynamic properties, despite centipedes being complex, nonlinear dynamic systems. Based on our findings, we propose a possible passive mechanism for body undulations in centipedes, similar to a follower force or jackknife instability. We also discuss the roles of the muscles along the body axis in generating body undulations in terms of our physical model.

  14. Crash involvement of large trucks by configuration: a case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, H S; Jones, I S

    1988-01-01

    For a two-year period, large truck crashes on the interstate system in Washington State were investigated using a case-control method. For each large truck involved in a crash, three trucks were randomly selected for inspection from the traffic stream at the same time and place as the crash but one week later. The effects of truck and driver characteristics on crashes were assessed by comparing their relative frequency among the crash-involved and comparison sample trucks. Double trailer trucks were consistently overinvolved in crashes by a factor of two to three in both single and multiple vehicle crashes. Single unit trucks pulling trailers also were overinvolved. Doubles also had a higher frequency of jackknifing compared to tractor-trailers. The substantial overinvolvement of doubles in crashes was found regardless of driver age, hours of driving, cargo weight, or type of fleet. Younger drivers, long hours of driving, and operating empty trucks were also associated with higher crash involvement. PMID:3354729

  15. Identifying the Types of Ion Channel-Targeted Conotoxins by Incorporating New Properties of Residues into Pseudo Amino Acid Composition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Conotoxins are a kind of neurotoxin which can specifically interact with potassium, sodium type, and calcium channels. They have become potential drug candidates to treat diseases such as chronic pain, epilepsy, and cardiovascular diseases. Thus, correctly identifying the types of ion channel-targeted conotoxins will provide important clue to understand their function and find potential drugs. Based on this consideration, we developed a new computational method to rapidly and accurately predict the types of ion-targeted conotoxins. Three kinds of new properties of residues were proposed to use in pseudo amino acid composition to formulate conotoxins samples. The support vector machine was utilized as classifier. A feature selection technique based on F-score was used to optimize features. Jackknife cross-validated results showed that the overall accuracy of 94.6% was achieved, which is higher than other published results, demonstrating that the proposed method is superior to published methods. Hence the current method may play a complementary role to other existing methods for recognizing the types of ion-target conotoxins. PMID:27631006

  16. Spider diversity (Arachnida: Araneae) in Atlantic Forest areas at Pedra Branca State Park, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-González, Abel; Baptista, Renner L. C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background There has never been any published work about the diversity of spiders in the city of Rio de Janeiro using analytical tools to measure diversity. The only available records for spider communities in nearby areas indicate 308 species in the National Park of Tijuca and 159 species in Marapendi Municipal Park. These numbers are based on a rapid survey and on an one-year survey respectively. New information This study provides a more thorough understanding of how the spider species are distributed at Pedra Branca State Park. We report a total of 14,626 spider specimens recorded from this park, representing 49 families and 373 species or morphospecies, including at least 73 undescribed species. Also, the distribution range of 45 species was expanded, and species accumulation curves estimate that there is a minimum of 388 (Bootstrap) and a maximum of 468 species (Jackknife2) for the sampled areas. These estimates indicates that the spider diversity may be higher than observed. PMID:26929710

  17. Predicting red wolf release success in the southeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Manen, Frank T.; Crawford, Barron A.; Clark, Joseph D.

    2000-01-01

    Although the red wolf (Canis rufus) was once found throughout the southeastern United States, indiscriminate killing and habitat destruction reduced its range to a small section of coastal Texas and Louisiana. Wolves trapped from 1973 to 1980 were taken to establish a captive breeding program that was used to repatriate 2 mainland and 3 island red wolf populations. We collected data from 320 red wolf releases in these areas and classified each as a success or failure based on survival and reproductive criteria, and whether recaptures were necessary to resolve conflicts with humans. We evaluated the relations between release success and conditions at the release sites, characteristics of released wolves, and release procedures. Although <44% of the variation in release success was explained, model performance based on jackknife tests indicated a 72-80% correct prediction rate for the 4 operational models we developed. The models indicated that success was associated with human influences on the landscape and the level of wolf habituation to humans prior to release. We applied the models to 31 prospective areas for wolf repatriation and calculated an index of release success for each area. Decision-makers can use these models to objectively rank prospective release areas and compare strengths and weaknesses of each.

  18. Integrating Map Algebra and Statistical Modeling for Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Monthly Mean Daily Incident Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR) over a Complex Terrain

    PubMed Central

    Evrendilek, Fatih

    2007-01-01

    This study aims at quantifying spatio-temporal dynamics of monthly mean daily incident photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) over a vast and complex terrain such as Turkey. The spatial interpolation method of universal kriging, and the combination of multiple linear regression (MLR) models and map algebra techniques were implemented to generate surface maps of PAR with a grid resolution of 500 × 500 m as a function of five geographical and 14 climatic variables. Performance of the geostatistical and MLR models was compared using mean prediction error (MPE), root-mean-square prediction error (RMSPE), average standard prediction error (ASE), mean standardized prediction error (MSPE), root-mean-square standardized prediction error (RMSSPE), and adjusted coefficient of determination (R2adj.). The best-fit MLR- and universal kriging-generated models of monthly mean daily PAR were validated against an independent 37-year observed dataset of 35 climate stations derived from 160 stations across Turkey by the Jackknifing method. The spatial variability patterns of monthly mean daily incident PAR were more accurately reflected in the surface maps created by the MLR-based models than in those created by the universal kriging method, in particular, for spring (May) and autumn (November). The MLR-based spatial interpolation algorithms of PAR described in this study indicated the significance of the multifactor approach to understanding and mapping spatio-temporal dynamics of PAR for a complex terrain over meso-scales.

  19. Transanal Minimally Invasive Surgery (TAMIS) to Treat Vesicorectal Fistula: A New Approach

    PubMed Central

    Tobias-Machado, Marcos; Mattos, Pablo Aloisio Lima; Reis, Leonardo Oliveira; Juliano, César Augusto Braz; Pompeo, Antonio Carlos Lima

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Vesicorectal fistula is one of the most devastating postoperative complications after radical prostatectomy. Definitive treatment is difficult due to morbidity and recurrence. Despite many options, there is not an unanimous accepted approach. This article aimed to report a new minimally invasive approach as an option to reconstructive surgery. Materials and Methods: We report on Transanal Minimally Invasive Surgery (TAMIS) with miniLap devices for instrumentation in a 65 year old patient presenting with vesicorectal fistula after radical prostatectomy. We used Alexis® device for transanal access and 3, 5 and 11 mm triangulated ports for the procedure. The surgical steps were as follows: cystoscopy and implant of guide wire through fistula; patient at jack-knife position; transanal access; Identification of the fistula; dissection; vesical wall closure; injection of fibrin glue in defect; rectal wall closure. Results: The operative time was 240 minutes, with 120 minutes for reconstruction. No perioperative complications or conversion were observed. Hospital stay was two days and catheters were removed at four weeks. No recurrence was observed. Conclusions: This approach has low morbidity and is feasible. The main difficulties consisted in maintaining luminal dilation, instrumental manipulation and suturing. PMID:26689530

  20. AcalPred: a sequence-based tool for discriminating between acidic and alkaline enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hao; Chen, Wei; Ding, Hui

    2013-01-01

    The structure and activity of enzymes are influenced by pH value of their surroundings. Although many enzymes work well in the pH range from 6 to 8, some specific enzymes have good efficiencies only in acidic (pH<5) or alkaline (pH>9) solution. Studies have demonstrated that the activities of enzymes correlate with their primary sequences. It is crucial to judge enzyme adaptation to acidic or alkaline environment from its amino acid sequence in molecular mechanism clarification and the design of high efficient enzymes. In this study, we developed a sequence-based method to discriminate acidic enzymes from alkaline enzymes. The analysis of variance was used to choose the optimized discriminating features derived from g-gap dipeptide compositions. And support vector machine was utilized to establish the prediction model. In the rigorous jackknife cross-validation, the overall accuracy of 96.7% was achieved. The method can correctly predict 96.3% acidic and 97.1% alkaline enzymes. Through the comparison between the proposed method and previous methods, it is demonstrated that the proposed method is more accurate. On the basis of this proposed method, we have built an online web-server called AcalPred which can be freely accessed from the website (http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/AcalPred). We believe that the AcalPred will become a powerful tool to study enzyme adaptation to acidic or alkaline environment.

  1. Limited sampling hampers "big data" estimation of species richness in a tropical biodiversity hotspot.

    PubMed

    Engemann, Kristine; Enquist, Brian J; Sandel, Brody; Boyle, Brad; Jørgensen, Peter M; Morueta-Holme, Naia; Peet, Robert K; Violle, Cyrille; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2015-02-01

    Macro-scale species richness studies often use museum specimens as their main source of information. However, such datasets are often strongly biased due to variation in sampling effort in space and time. These biases may strongly affect diversity estimates and may, thereby, obstruct solid inference on the underlying diversity drivers, as well as mislead conservation prioritization. In recent years, this has resulted in an increased focus on developing methods to correct for sampling bias. In this study, we use sample-size-correcting methods to examine patterns of tropical plant diversity in Ecuador, one of the most species-rich and climatically heterogeneous biodiversity hotspots. Species richness estimates were calculated based on 205,735 georeferenced specimens of 15,788 species using the Margalef diversity index, the Chao estimator, the second-order Jackknife and Bootstrapping resampling methods, and Hill numbers and rarefaction. Species richness was heavily correlated with sampling effort, and only rarefaction was able to remove this effect, and we recommend this method for estimation of species richness with "big data" collections. PMID:25692000

  2. AcalPred: A Sequence-Based Tool for Discriminating between Acidic and Alkaline Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hao; Chen, Wei; Ding, Hui

    2013-01-01

    The structure and activity of enzymes are influenced by pH value of their surroundings. Although many enzymes work well in the pH range from 6 to 8, some specific enzymes have good efficiencies only in acidic (pH<5) or alkaline (pH>9) solution. Studies have demonstrated that the activities of enzymes correlate with their primary sequences. It is crucial to judge enzyme adaptation to acidic or alkaline environment from its amino acid sequence in molecular mechanism clarification and the design of high efficient enzymes. In this study, we developed a sequence-based method to discriminate acidic enzymes from alkaline enzymes. The analysis of variance was used to choose the optimized discriminating features derived from g-gap dipeptide compositions. And support vector machine was utilized to establish the prediction model. In the rigorous jackknife cross-validation, the overall accuracy of 96.7% was achieved. The method can correctly predict 96.3% acidic and 97.1% alkaline enzymes. Through the comparison between the proposed method and previous methods, it is demonstrated that the proposed method is more accurate. On the basis of this proposed method, we have built an online web-server called AcalPred which can be freely accessed from the website (http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/AcalPred). We believe that the AcalPred will become a powerful tool to study enzyme adaptation to acidic or alkaline environment. PMID:24130738

  3. Different effects of ERβ and TROP2 expression in Chinese patients with early-stage colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yu-Jing; Wang, Guo-Qiang; Lu, Zhen-Hai; Zhang, Lin; Li, Ji-Bin; Wu, Xiao-Jun; Ding, Pei-Rong; Ou, Qing-Jian; Zhang, Mei-Fang; Jiang, Wu; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Wan, De-Sen

    2012-12-01

    Estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) and TROP2 expressed in colon carcinoma and might play an important role there. We explored the relationship of ERβ and TROP2 expression with the prognosis of early-stage colon cancer. ERβ and TROP2 levels were assessed by immunohistochemistry in normal mucosa and tumoral tissues from 220 Chinese patients with T(3)N(0)M(0) (stage IIa) and T(4)N(0)M(0) (stage IIb) colon cancer in the Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, who underwent curative surgical resection between 1995 and 2003. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was applied to analyze the overall survival (OS) data, and the ROC curve, Kaplan-Meier estimate, log rank test, and Jackknife method were used to show the effect of ERβ and TROP2 expression at different stages of cancer. The 5-year survival rates were not significantly different between the patients with stage IIa and stage IIb colon cancer (83 vs. 80 %, respectively). The high expression of ERβ was related to decreasing OS in stage IIa and stage IIb colon cancer, while the high expression of TROP2 was related to decreasing OS in stage IIb colon cancer. The expression of ERβ and TROP2 has tumor-suppressive and tumor-promoting effect in stage IIa and stage IIb colon cancer, respectively.

  4. Predicting the types of J-proteins using clustered amino acids.

    PubMed

    Feng, Pengmian; Lin, Hao; Chen, Wei; Zuo, Yongchun

    2014-01-01

    J-proteins are molecular chaperones and present in a wide variety of organisms from prokaryote to eukaryote. Based on their domain organizations, J-proteins can be classified into 4 types, that is, Type I, Type II, Type III, and Type IV. Different types of J-proteins play distinct roles in influencing cancer properties and cell death. Thus, reliably annotating the types of J-proteins is essential to better understand their molecular functions. In the present work, a support vector machine based method was developed to identify the types of J-proteins using the tripeptide composition of reduced amino acid alphabet. In the jackknife cross-validation, the maximum overall accuracy of 94% was achieved on a stringent benchmark dataset. We also analyzed the amino acid compositions by using analysis of variance and found the distinct distributions of amino acids in each family of the J-proteins. To enhance the value of the practical applications of the proposed model, an online web server was developed and can be freely accessed.

  5. Weighted-support vector machines for predicting membrane protein types based on pseudo-amino acid composition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Yang, Jie; Liu, Guo-Ping; Xu, Zhi-Jie; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2004-06-01

    Membrane proteins are generally classified into the following five types: (1) type I membrane proteins, (2) type II membrane proteins, (3) multipass transmembrane proteins, (4) lipid chain-anchored membrane proteins and (5) GPI-anchored membrane proteins. Prediction of membrane protein types has become one of the growing hot topics in bioinformatics. Currently, we are facing two critical challenges in this area: first, how to take into account the extremely complicated sequence-order effects, and second, how to deal with the highly uneven sizes of the subsets in a training dataset. In this paper, stimulated by the concept of using the pseudo-amino acid composition to incorporate the sequence-order effects, the spectral analysis technique is introduced to represent the statistical sample of a protein. Based on such a framework, the weighted support vector machine (SVM) algorithm is applied. The new approach has remarkable power in dealing with the bias caused by the situation when one subset in the training dataset contains many more samples than the other. The new method is particularly useful when our focus is aimed at proteins belonging to small subsets. The results obtained by the self-consistency test, jackknife test and independent dataset test are encouraging, indicating that the current approach may serve as a powerful complementary tool to other existing methods for predicting the types of membrane proteins.

  6. Nonparametric methods for drought severity estimation at ungauged sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadri, S.; Burn, D. H.

    2012-12-01

    The objective in frequency analysis is, given extreme events such as drought severity or duration, to estimate the relationship between that event and the associated return periods at a catchment. Neural networks and other artificial intelligence approaches in function estimation and regression analysis are relatively new techniques in engineering, providing an attractive alternative to traditional statistical models. There are, however, few applications of neural networks and support vector machines in the area of severity quantile estimation for drought frequency analysis. In this paper, we compare three methods for this task: multiple linear regression, radial basis function neural networks, and least squares support vector regression (LS-SVR). The area selected for this study includes 32 catchments in the Canadian Prairies. From each catchment drought severities are extracted and fitted to a Pearson type III distribution, which act as observed values. For each method-duration pair, we use a jackknife algorithm to produce estimated values at each site. The results from these three approaches are compared and analyzed, and it is found that LS-SVR provides the best quantile estimates and extrapolating capacity.

  7. Using ensemble classifier to identify membrane protein types.

    PubMed

    Shen, H-B; Chou, K-C

    2007-01-01

    Predicting membrane protein type is both an important and challenging topic in current molecular and cellular biology. This is because knowledge of membrane protein type often provides useful clues for determining, or sheds light upon, the function of an uncharacterized membrane protein. With the explosion of newly-found protein sequences in the post-genomic era, it is in a great demand to develop a computational method for fast and reliably identifying the types of membrane proteins according to their primary sequences. In this paper, a novel classifier, the so-called "ensemble classifier", was introduced. It is formed by fusing a set of nearest neighbor (NN) classifiers, each of which is defined in a different pseudo amino acid composition space. The type for a query protein is determined by the outcome of voting among these constituent individual classifiers. It was demonstrated through the self-consistency test, jackknife test, and independent dataset test that the ensemble classifier outperformed other existing classifiers widely used in biological literatures. It is anticipated that the idea of ensemble classifier can also be used to improve the prediction quality in classifying other attributes of proteins according to their sequences.

  8. A multi-label classifier for prediction membrane protein functional types in animal.

    PubMed

    Zou, Hong-Liang

    2014-11-01

    Membrane protein is an important composition of cell membrane. Given a membrane protein sequence, how can we identify its type(s) is very important because the type keeps a close correlation with its functions. According to previous studies, membrane protein can be divided into the following eight types: single-pass type I, single-pass type II, single-pass type III, single-pass type IV, multipass, lipid-anchor, GPI-anchor, peripheral membrane protein. With the avalanche of newly found protein sequences in the post-genomic age, it is urgent to develop an automatic and effective computational method to rapid and reliable prediction of the types of membrane proteins. At present, most of the existing methods were based on the assumption that one membrane protein only belongs to one type. Actually, a membrane protein may simultaneously exist at two or more different functional types. In this study, a new method by hybridizing the pseudo amino acid composition with multi-label algorithm called LIFT (multi-label learning with label-specific features) was proposed to predict the functional types both singleplex and multiplex animal membrane proteins. Experimental result on a stringent benchmark dataset of membrane proteins by jackknife test show that the absolute-true obtained was 0.6342, indicating that our approach is quite promising. It may become a useful high-through tool, or at least play a complementary role to the existing predictors in identifying functional types of membrane proteins.

  9. Discriminating lysosomal membrane protein types using dynamic neural network.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Vijay; Gupta, Dwijendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a dynamic artificial neural network methodology, which classifies the proteins into their classes from their sequences alone: the lysosomal membrane protein classes and the various other membranes protein classes. In this paper, neural networks-based lysosomal-associated membrane protein type prediction system is proposed. Different protein sequence representations are fused to extract the features of a protein sequence, which includes seven feature sets; amino acid (AA) composition, sequence length, hydrophobic group, electronic group, sum of hydrophobicity, R-group, and dipeptide composition. To reduce the dimensionality of the large feature vector, we applied the principal component analysis. The probabilistic neural network, generalized regression neural network, and Elman regression neural network (RNN) are used as classifiers and compared with layer recurrent network (LRN), a dynamic network. The dynamic networks have memory, i.e. its output depends not only on the input but the previous outputs also. Thus, the accuracy of LRN classifier among all other artificial neural networks comes out to be the highest. The overall accuracy of jackknife cross-validation is 93.2% for the data-set. These predicted results suggest that the method can be effectively applied to discriminate lysosomal associated membrane proteins from other membrane proteins (Type-I, Outer membrane proteins, GPI-Anchored) and Globular proteins, and it also indicates that the protein sequence representation can better reflect the core feature of membrane proteins than the classical AA composition.

  10. Improved prediction of subcellular location for apoptosis proteins by the dual-layer support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X-B; Chen, C; Li, Z-C; Zou, X-Y

    2008-08-01

    Apoptosis proteins play an important role in the development and homeostasis of an organism. The accurate prediction of subcellular location for apoptosis proteins is very helpful for understanding the mechanism of apoptosis and their biological functions. However, most of the existing predictive methods are designed by utilizing a single classifier, which would limit the further improvement of their performances. In this paper, a novel predictive method, which is essentially a multi-classifier system, has been proposed by combing a dual-layer support vector machine (SVM) with multiple compositions including amino acid composition (AAC), dipeptide composition (DPC) and amphiphilic pseudo amino acid composition (Am-Pse-AAC). As a demonstration, the predictive performance of our method was evaluated on two datasets of apoptosis proteins, involving the standard dataset ZD98 generated by Zhou and Doctor, and a larger dataset ZW225 generated by Zhang et al. With the jackknife test, the overall accuracies of our method on the two datasets reach 94.90% and 88.44%, respectively. The promising results indicate that our method can be a complementary tool for the prediction of subcellular location.

  11. iCataly-PseAAC: Identification of Enzymes Catalytic Sites Using Sequence Evolution Information with Grey Model GM (2,1).

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xuan; Hui, Meng-Juan; Liu, Zi; Qiu, Wang-Ren

    2015-12-01

    Enzymes play pivotal roles in most of the biological reaction. The catalytic residues of an enzyme are defined as the amino acids which are directly involved in chemical catalysis; the knowledge of these residues is important for understanding enzyme function. Given an enzyme, which residues are the catalytic sites, and which residues are not? This is the first important problem for in-depth understanding the catalytic mechanism and drug development. With the explosive of protein sequences generated during the post-genomic era, it is highly desirable for both basic research and drug design to develop fast and reliable method for identifying the catalytic sites of enzymes according to their sequences. To address this problem, we proposed a new predictor, called iCataly-PseAAC. In the prediction system, the peptide sample was formulated with sequence evolution information via grey system model GM(2,1). It was observed by the rigorous jackknife test and independent dataset test that iCataly-PseAAC was superior to exist predictions though its only use sequence information. As a user-friendly web server, iCataly-PseAAC is freely accessible at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iCataly-PseAAC. A step-by-step guide has been provided on how to use the web server to get the desired results for the convenience of most experimental scientists. PMID:26077845

  12. Validation of the survey of work styles: a profile measure of the type A behaviour pattern.

    PubMed

    Gray, A; Jackson, D N; Howard, J H

    1989-01-01

    The present study compares the Type A classification accuracy of the Jenkins Activity Survey (JAS), The Framingham Type A Scale, and a new Type A behaviour pattern (TABP) measure. The Survey of Work Styles (SWS), a self-report measure of the TABP, was developed using a construct approach to scale construction. It consists of six content scales. Impatience, Anger, Work Involvement, Time Urgency, Job Dissatisfaction and Competitiveness. In addition to the six content scales, a seventh scale, Scale A, is comprised of items empirically selected to relate to the Rosenman Structured Interview. In the present study the SWS was found to be significantly related to both the JAS, and the Framingham Type A Scale in a sample of 163 business managers. Median reliability of the SWS subscales was 0.82, and for the total scale 0.90. Discriminant function analysis using cross validational jackknifing procedures resulted in a classification accuracy of 83% of the Type A managers in relation to the Structured Interview. Classification using the SWS was found to correlate significantly higher with the Structured Interview than did either classification with the JAS or with the Framingham Type A Scale. Modal profile analysis yielded three independent bipolar typal dimensions, indicating that a single dimension or classification of the TABP represents an oversimplification of a complex behaviour pattern. These results support the reconceptualization of the TABP in terms of distinct facets and profile patterns. PMID:2709081

  13. RNA-MethylPred: A high-accuracy predictor to identify N6-methyladenosine in RNA.

    PubMed

    Jia, Cang-Zhi; Zhang, Jia-Jia; Gu, Wei-Zhen

    2016-10-01

    N6-methyladenosine (m(6)A) is present ubiquitously in the RNA of living organisms from Escherichia coli to humans. Nonetheless, the exact molecular mechanism of this modification remains unclear. The experimental identification of m(6)A modification is time-consuming and expensive; therefore, bioinformatics tools with high accuracy represent desirable alternatives for the large-scale, rapid identification of N6-methyladenosine sites. In this study, RNA-MethylPred, a new bioinformatics model, was developed by incorporating bi-profile Bayes, dinucleotide composition, and k nearest neighbor (KNN) scores for three feature extractions. RNA-MethylPred yielded a Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.53 in a jackknife test, which was 0.24 higher than that of iRNA-Methyl and 0.13 higher than that of pRNAm-PC. The obvious improvements demonstrated that RNA-MethylPred might be a powerful and complementary tool for further experimental investigation of N6-methyladenosine modification.

  14. HyspIRI Measurements of Agricultural Systems in California: 2013-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, P. A.; Kruger, E. L.; Singh, A.; Jablonski, A. D.; Kochaver, S.; Serbin, S.

    2015-12-01

    During 2013-2015, NASA collected high-altitude AVIRIS hyperspectral and MASTER thermal infrared imagery across large swaths of California in support of the HyspIRI planning and prototyping activities. During these campaigns, we made extensive measurements of photosynthetic capacity—Vcmax and Jmax—and their temperature sensitivities across a range of sites, crop types and environmental conditions. Our objectives were to characterize the physiological diversity of agricultural vegetation in California and develop generalizable algorithms to map these physiological parameters across several image acquisitions, regardless of crop type and canopy temperatures. We employed AVIRIS imagery to scale and estimate the vegetation parameters and MASTER surface temperature to provide context, since physiology responds exponentially to leaf temperature. We demonstrate a segmentation approach to disentangling leaf and background soil temperature, and then illustrate our retrievals of Vcmax and Jmax during overflight conditions across a large number of the 2013-2015 HyspIRI acquisitions. Our results show >80% repeatability (R2) across split sample jack-knifing, with RMSEs within 15% of the range of our data. The approach was robust across crop types (e.g., grape, almond, pistachio, avocado, pomegranate, oats, peppers, citrus, date palm, alfalfa, melons, beets) and leaf temperatures. A global imaging spectroscopy system such as HyspIRI will offer unprecedented ability to monitor agricultural crop performance under widely varying surface conditions.

  15. Potential geographical distributions of the fruit flies Ceratitis capitata, Ceratitis cosyra, and Ceratitis rosa in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Baini; Ma, Jun; Hu, Xuenan; Liu, Haijun; Zhang, Runjie

    2009-10-01

    There have been relatively few attempts to model the distributions of the fruit flies Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), Ceratitis cosyra (Walker), and Ceratitis rosa Karsch in China, but the geographic distributions of these species are of considerable concern in terms of biosecurity. In this study, two different modeling methods (genetic algorithm for rule-set prediction [GARP] and maximum entropy species distribution modeling [Maxent]) were used to predict the potential distributions of these three fly species in China, by using distribution records and a set of environmental predictor variables. The results showed that Maxent performed well, compared with modeling by GARP, at each test threshold. For all three species, the results predicted by Maxent agreed with the observed distributions in Africa and in other parts of the world. In China, C. capitata seems to have the highest number of favorable habitat areas, relative to C. cosyra and C. rosa, i.e., Yunnan, Guizhou, Guangxi, Guangdong, Hainan, Fujian, Sichuan and Chongqing, whereas C. cosyra has the smallest range of suitable areas, i.e., Yunnan, some parts of Hainan and Sichuan. The suitable areas for C. rosa are mainly restricted to Yunnan, Hainan, southern Guangdong, and a few areas of Sichuan. The indications are that on the whole, Southwest and South China are the areas with the highest risk for establishment from these three fly species. Jackknife tests reveal that environmental variables associated with temperature have the strongest influence on the potential distributions of all three species relative to other variables. PMID:19886442

  16. Tomographic imaging of local earthquake delay times for three-dimensional velocity variation in western Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.M.; Crosson, R.S. )

    1990-04-10

    Tomographic inversion is applied to delay times from local earthquakes to image three dimensional velocity variations in the Puget Sound region of western Washington. The 37,500 square km region is represented by nearly cubic blocks of 5 km per side. P-wave arrival time observations from 4,387 crustal earthquakes, with depths of 0 to 40 km, were used as sources producing 36,865 rays covering the target region. A conjugate gradient method (LSQR) is used to invert the large, sparse system of equations. To diminish the effects of noisy data, the Laplacian is constrained to be zero within horizontal layers, providing smoothing of the model. The resolution is estimated by calculating impulse responses at blocks of interest and estimates of standard errors are calculated by the jackknife statistical procedure. Results of the inversion are correlated with some known geologic features and independent geophysical measurements. High P-wave velocities along the eastern flank of the Olympic Peninsula are interpreted to reflect the subsurface extension of Crescent terrane. Low velocities beneath the Puget Sound further to the east are inferred to reflect thick sediment accumulations. The Crescent terrane appears to extend beneath Puget Sound, consistent with its interpretation as a major accretionary unit. In the southern Puget Sound basin, high velocity anomalies at depths of 10-20 km are interpreted as Crescent terrane and are correlated with a region of low seismicity. Near Mt. Ranier, high velocity anomalies may reflect buried plutons.

  17. Transient neurologic syndrome after spinal anesthesia with epidural steroid treatment

    PubMed Central

    Cöcelli, L. Pirbudak; Erkutlu, Ibrahim; Karakurum, Gunhan; Avci, Neslihan; Gül, Rauf; Öner, Ünsal

    2009-01-01

    Background: Transient neurologic syndrome (TNS) is a rare complication of spinal and epidural anesthesia. It is defined as paradoxic postoperative back pain radiating to the lower extremities with no neurologic deficits. Because it is a self-limited disease, the treatment is usually symptomatic and consists of NSAIDs and injections of a neuromuscular-blocking drug at the trigger points. The syndrome may be resistant to this treatment regimen and may last for several months, resulting in a long convalescence. Case summary: A 63-year-old Turkish woman (height, 165 cm; weight, 71 kg) underwent hemorrhoidectomy in the jackknife position using spinal anesthesia. No adverse events occurred during puncture or surgery or in the immediate postoperative recovery period. Recovery from the sensory and motor block was normal. Twenty-four hours after surgery, lower limb and plantar pain developed with no sensory or motor deficit. Neurologic examination revealed normal motor and sensory function. Electroneuromyography showed partial denervation potential of muscles innervated by the left sciatic nerve. The symptoms were suggestive of TNS. Combination oral NSAID treatment with amitriptyline (25 mg/d) and gabapentin (1200 mg/d) was initiated. Because the pain still persisted 6 weeks after surgery, epidural steroid injection with triamcinolone acetate (80 mg) with isotonic saline was administered, resulting in definite pain relief (visual analog scale score = 0). Conclusions: Epidural steroid treatment was effective in this patient with TNS resistant to treatment with NSAIDs, amitriptyline, and gabapentin. Future studies are needed to evaluate this treatment. PMID:24683240

  18. Predicting metabolic pathways of small molecules and enzymes based on interaction information of chemicals and proteins.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu-Fei; Chen, Lei; Cai, Yu-Dong; Feng, Kai-Yan; Huang, Tao; Jiang, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic pathway analysis, one of the most important fields in biochemistry, is pivotal to understanding the maintenance and modulation of the functions of an organism. Good comprehension of metabolic pathways is critical to understanding the mechanisms of some fundamental biological processes. Given a small molecule or an enzyme, how may one identify the metabolic pathways in which it may participate? Answering such a question is a first important step in understanding a metabolic pathway system. By utilizing the information provided by chemical-chemical interactions, chemical-protein interactions, and protein-protein interactions, a novel method was proposed by which to allocate small molecules and enzymes to 11 major classes of metabolic pathways. A benchmark dataset consisting of 3,348 small molecules and 654 enzymes of yeast was constructed to test the method. It was observed that the first order prediction accuracy evaluated by the jackknife test was 79.56% in identifying the small molecules and enzymes in a benchmark dataset. Our method may become a useful vehicle in predicting the metabolic pathways of small molecules and enzymes, providing a basis for some further analysis of the pathway systems.

  19. Angiosperm phylogeny based on matK sequence information.

    PubMed

    Hilu, Khidir W; Borsch, Thomas; Müller, Kai; Soltis, Douglas E; Soltis, Pamela S; Savolainen, Vincent; Chase, Mark W; Powell, Martyn P; Alice, Lawrence A; Evans, Rodger; Sauquet, Hervé; Neinhuis, Christoph; Slotta, Tracey A B; Rohwer, Jens G; Campbell, Christopher S; Chatrou, Lars W

    2003-12-01

    Plastid matK gene sequences for 374 genera representing all angiosperm orders and 12 genera of gymnosperms were analyzed using parsimony (MP) and Bayesian inference (BI) approaches. Traditionally, slowly evolving genomic regions have been preferred for deep-level phylogenetic inference in angiosperms. The matK gene evolves approximately three times faster than the widely used plastid genes rbcL and atpB. The MP and BI trees are highly congruent. The robustness of the strict consensus tree supercedes all individual gene analyses and is comparable only to multigene-based phylogenies. Of the 385 nodes resolved, 79% are supported by high jackknife values, averaging 88%. Amborella is sister to the remaining angiosperms, followed by a grade of Nymphaeaceae and Austrobaileyales. Bayesian inference resolves Amborella + Nymphaeaceae as sister to the rest, but with weak (0.42) posterior probability. The MP analysis shows a trichotomy sister to the Austrobaileyales representing eumagnoliids, monocots + Chloranthales, and Ceratophyllum + eudicots. The matK gene produces the highest internal support yet for basal eudicots and, within core eudicots, resolves a crown group comprising Berberidopsidaceae/Aextoxicaceae, Santalales, and Caryophyllales + asterids. Moreover, matK sequences provide good resolution within many angiosperm orders. Combined analyses of matK and other rapidly evolving DNA regions with available multigene data sets have strong potential to enhance resolution and internal support in deep level angiosperm phylogenetics and provide additional insights into angiosperm evolution.

  20. New method to compute Rcomplete enables maximum likelihood refinement for small datasets

    PubMed Central

    Luebben, Jens; Gruene, Tim

    2015-01-01

    The crystallographic reliability index Rcomplete is based on a method proposed more than two decades ago. Because its calculation is computationally expensive its use did not spread into the crystallographic community in favor of the cross-validation method known as Rfree. The importance of Rfree has grown beyond a pure validation tool. However, its application requires a sufficiently large dataset. In this work we assess the reliability of Rcomplete and we compare it with k-fold cross-validation, bootstrapping, and jackknifing. As opposed to proper cross-validation as realized with Rfree, Rcomplete relies on a method of reducing bias from the structural model. We compare two different methods reducing model bias and question the widely spread notion that random parameter shifts are required for this purpose. We show that Rcomplete has as little statistical bias as Rfree with the benefit of a much smaller variance. Because the calculation of Rcomplete is based on the entire dataset instead of a small subset, it allows the estimation of maximum likelihood parameters even for small datasets. Rcomplete enables maximum likelihood-based refinement to be extended to virtually all areas of crystallographic structure determination including high-pressure studies, neutron diffraction studies, and datasets from free electron lasers. PMID:26150515

  1. Improving N(6)-methyladenosine site prediction with heuristic selection of nucleotide physical-chemical properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming; Sun, Jia-Wei; Liu, Zi; Ren, Ming-Wu; Shen, Hong-Bin; Yu, Dong-Jun

    2016-09-01

    N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A) is one of the most common and abundant post-transcriptional RNA modifications found in viruses and most eukaryotes. m(6)A plays an essential role in many vital biological processes to regulate gene expression. Because of its widespread distribution across the genomes, the identification of m(6)A sites from RNA sequences is of significant importance for better understanding the regulatory mechanism of m(6)A. Although progress has been achieved in m(6)A site prediction, challenges remain. This article aims to further improve the performance of m(6)A site prediction by introducing a new heuristic nucleotide physical-chemical property selection (HPCS) algorithm. The proposed HPCS algorithm can effectively extract an optimized subset of nucleotide physical-chemical properties under the prescribed feature representation for encoding an RNA sequence into a feature vector. We demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed HPCS algorithm under different feature representations, including pseudo dinucleotide composition (PseDNC), auto-covariance (AC), and cross-covariance (CC). Based on the proposed HPCS algorithm, we implemented an m(6)A site predictor, called M6A-HPCS, which is freely available at http://csbio.njust.edu.cn/bioinf/M6A-HPCS. Experimental results over rigorous jackknife tests on benchmark datasets demonstrated that the proposed M6A-HPCS achieves higher success rates and outperforms existing state-of-the-art sequence-based m(6)A site predictors. PMID:27293216

  2. Analysis of bifurcation and stability for a tractor semi-trailer in planar motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Nenggen; Shi, Xiaobo; Zhang, Yipeng; Chen, Wen

    2014-12-01

    This paper is intended for bifurcation analysis of a nonlinear tractor semi-trailer vehicle model in planar motion and for investigating its stability under constant running conditions. Bifurcation analysis shows that bifurcation diagrams of a tractor semi-trailer are quite different from those of a single-unit vehicle. Some instability phenomena of the vehicle system such as jackknifing, sideslip, and spinning are explained by correlating them with the behaviour in the neighbourhood of unstable fixed points based on analysis of eigenvectors, phase trajectories, and status of lateral tyre force saturation. It is also found that yaw planar instability of a tractor semi-trailer is caused by lateral tyre force saturation of the tractor's rear axles and/or the trailer's axles. Moreover, the stability region in the state space is demarcated, and a stability index for evaluating size of the stability region in a feasible domain is proposed. Yaw stability under constant driving conditions is analysed by using the proposed stability index.

  3. Driver assistance system for passive multi-trailer vehicles with haptic steering limitations on the leading unit.

    PubMed

    Morales, Jesús; Mandow, Anthony; Martínez, Jorge L; Reina, Antonio J; García-Cerezo, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Driving vehicles with one or more passive trailers has difficulties in both forward and backward motion due to inter-unit collisions, jackknife, and lack of visibility. Consequently, advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) for multi-trailer combinations can be beneficial to accident avoidance as well as to driver comfort. The ADAS proposed in this paper aims to prevent unsafe steering commands by means of a haptic handwheel. Furthermore, when driving in reverse, the steering-wheel and pedals can be used as if the vehicle was driven from the back of the last trailer with visual aid from a rear-view camera. This solution, which can be implemented in drive-by-wire vehicles with hitch angle sensors, profits from two methods previously developed by the authors: safe steering by applying a curvature limitation to the leading unit, and a virtual tractor concept for backward motion that includes the complex case of set-point propagation through on-axle hitches. The paper addresses system requirements and provides implementation details to tele-operate two different off- and on-axle combinations of a tracked mobile robot pulling and pushing two dissimilar trailers. PMID:23552102

  4. Analysis of Secondary Outcomes in Nested Case-Control Study Designs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ryung S.; Kaplan, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    One of the main perceived advantages of using a case-cohort design compared to a nested case-control design in an epidemiologic study is the ability to evaluate with the same subcohort outcomes other than the primary outcome of interest. In this paper, we show that valid inferences about secondary outcomes can also be achieved in nested case-control studies by using the inclusion probability weighting method originally proposed by Samuelsen (1997) in combination with an approximate jackknife standard error that can be computed using existing software. Simulation studies demonstrate that when the sample size is sufficient, this approach yields valid type 1 error and coverage rates for the analysis of secondary outcomes in nested case-control designs. Interestingly, the statistical power of the nested case-control design was comparable to that of the case-cohort design when the primary and secondary outcomes were positively correlated. The proposed method is illustrated with data from a cohort in Cardiovascular Health Study to study the association of C-reactive protein levels and the incidence of congestive heart failure. PMID:24919979

  5. Stagewise pseudo-value regression for time-varying effects on the cumulative incidence.

    PubMed

    Zöller, Daniela; Schmidtmann, Irene; Weinmann, Arndt; Gerds, Thomas A; Binder, Harald

    2016-03-30

    In a competing risks setting, the cumulative incidence of an event of interest describes the absolute risk for this event as a function of time. For regression analysis, one can either choose to model all competing events by separate cause-specific hazard models or directly model the association between covariates and the cumulative incidence of one of the events. With a suitable link function, direct regression models allow for a straightforward interpretation of covariate effects on the cumulative incidence. In practice, where data can be right-censored, these regression models are implemented using a pseudo-value approach. For a grid of time points, the possibly unobserved binary event status is replaced by a jackknife pseudo-value based on the Aalen-Johansen method. We combine a stagewise regression technique with the pseudo-value approach to provide variable selection while allowing for time-varying effects. This is implemented by coupling variable selection between the grid times, but determining estimates separately. The effect estimates are regularized to also allow for model fitting with a low to moderate number of observations. This technique is illustrated in an application using clinical cancer registry data from hepatocellular carcinoma patients. The results are contrasted with traditional hazard-based modeling. In addition to a more straightforward interpretation, when using the proposed technique, the identification of time-varying effect patterns on the cumulative incidence is seen to be feasible with a moderate number of observations.

  6. Land use and soil contamination with Toxoplasma gondii oocysts in urban areas.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Wang, Hongbin; Wang, Huan; Qin, Hongyu; Xiao, Jianhua

    2016-10-15

    Because soil contaminated with Toxoplasma gondii oocysts is increasingly recognized as a major source of infection for humans, in this study, we investigated the spatial pattern of soil contamination with T. gondii oocysts in urban area of northeastern Mainland China. From April 2014 to May 2015, more than 9000 soil samples were collected. Detection of T. gondii oocysts was performed applying real-time quantitative PCR. Sensitivity was improved by analyzing four replicates for each sampling point. T. gondii was detected in 30.3% of all samples. Subsequently, a maximum entropy model was used to evaluate the effect of land use and intrinsic soil properties on the risk of contamination with oocysts. Jackknife analysis revealed that the likelihood for positive results is significantly enhanced in soil originating from foci of human habitation, wood land and grass land. Furthermore, soil temperature and humidity significantly influence the probability of contamination with T. gondii oocysts. Our findings indicate that land use may affect distribution of T. gondii oocysts in urban areas.

  7. Regression Analysis Of Zernike Polynomials Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grey, Louis D.

    1989-01-01

    In an earlier paper entitled "Regression Analysis of Zernike Polynomials, Proceedings of SPIE, Vol. 18, pp. 392-398, the least squares fitting process of Zernike polynomials was examined from the point of view of linear statistical regression theory. Among the topics discussed were measures for determining how good the fit was, tests for the underlying assumptions of normality and constant variance, the treatment of outliers, the analysis of residuals and the computation of confidence intervals for the coefficients. The present paper is a continuation of the earlier paper and concerns applications of relatively new advances in certain areas of statistical theory made possible by the advent of the high speed computer. Among these are: 1. Jackknife - A technique for improving the accuracy of any statistical estimate. 2. Bootstrap - Increasing the accuracy of an estimate by generating new samples of data from some given set. 3. Cross-validation - The division of a data set into two halves, the first half of which is used to fit the model and the second half to see how well the fitted model predicts the data. The exposition is mainly by examples.

  8. Predicting cancerlectins by the optimal g-gap dipeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hao; Liu, Wei-Xin; He, Jiao; Liu, Xin-Hui; Ding, Hui; Chen, Wei

    2015-12-01

    The cancerlectin plays a key role in the process of tumor cell differentiation. Thus, to fully understand the function of cancerlectin is significant because it sheds light on the future direction for the cancer therapy. However, the traditional wet-experimental methods were money- and time-consuming. It is highly desirable to develop an effective and efficient computational tool to identify cancerlectins. In this study, we developed a sequence-based method to discriminate between cancerlectins and non-cancerlectins. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to choose the optimal feature set derived from the g-gap dipeptide composition. The jackknife cross-validated results showed that the proposed method achieved the accuracy of 75.19%, which is superior to other published methods. For the convenience of other researchers, an online web-server CaLecPred was established and can be freely accessed from the website http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/CalecPred. We believe that the CaLecPred is a powerful tool to study cancerlectins and to guide the related experimental validations.

  9. iNuc-STNC: a sequence-based predictor for identification of nucleosome positioning in genomes by extending the concept of SAAC and Chou's PseAAC.

    PubMed

    Tahir, Muhammad; Hayat, Maqsood

    2016-07-19

    The nucleosome is the fundamental unit of eukaryotic chromatin, which participates in regulating different cellular processes. Owing to the huge exploration of new DNA primary sequences, it is indispensable to develop an automated model. However, identification of novel protein sequences using conventional methods is difficult or sometimes impossible because of vague motifs and the intricate structure of DNA. In this regard, an effective and high throughput automated model "iNuc-STNC" has been proposed in order to identify accurately and reliably nucleosome positioning in genomes. In this proposed model, DNA sequences are expressed into three distinct feature extraction strategies containing dinucleotide composition, trinucleotide composition and split trinucleotide composition (STNC). Various statistical models were utilized as learner hypotheses. Jackknife test was employed to evaluate the success rates of the proposed model. The experiential results expressed that SVM, in combination with STNC, has obtained an outstanding performance on all benchmark datasets. The predicted outcomes of the proposed model "iNuc-STNC" is higher than current state of the art methods in the literature so far. It is ascertained that the "iNuc-STNC" model will provide a rudimentary framework for the pharmaceutical industry in the development of drug design. PMID:27271822

  10. Identification of Secretory Proteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using Pseudo Amino Acid Composition.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huan; Tang, Hua; Chen, Xin-Xin; Zhang, Chang-Jian; Zhu, Pan-Pan; Ding, Hui; Chen, Wei; Lin, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis is killing millions of lives every year and on the blacklist of the most appalling public health problems. Recent findings suggest that secretory protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis may serve the purpose of developing specific vaccines and drugs due to their antigenicity. Responding to global infectious disease, we focused on the identification of secretory proteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A novel method called MycoSec was designed by incorporating g-gap dipeptide compositions into pseudo amino acid composition. Analysis of variance-based technique was applied in the process of feature selection and a total of 374 optimal features were obtained and used for constructing the final predicting model. In the jackknife test, MycoSec yielded a good performance with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.93, demonstrating that the proposed system is powerful and robust. For user's convenience, the web server MycoSec was established and an obliging manual on how to use it was provided for getting around any trouble unnecessary. PMID:27597968

  11. Identification of Bacterial Cell Wall Lyases via Pseudo Amino Acid Composition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin-Xin; Tang, Hua; Li, Wen-Chao; Wu, Hao; Chen, Wei; Ding, Hui; Lin, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the abuse of antibiotics, drug resistance of pathogenic bacteria becomes more and more serious. Therefore, it is interesting to develop a more reasonable way to solve this issue. Because they can destroy the bacterial cell structure and then kill the infectious bacterium, the bacterial cell wall lyases are suitable candidates of antibacteria sources. Thus, it is urgent to develop an accurate and efficient computational method to predict the lyases. Based on the consideration, in this paper, a set of objective and rigorous data was collected by searching through the Universal Protein Resource (the UniProt database), whereafter a feature selection technique based on the analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to acquire optimal feature subset. Finally, the support vector machine (SVM) was used to perform prediction. The jackknife cross-validated results showed that the optimal average accuracy of 84.82% was achieved with the sensitivity of 76.47% and the specificity of 93.16%. For the convenience of other scholars, we built a free online server called Lypred. We believe that Lypred will become a practical tool for the research of cell wall lyases and development of antimicrobial agents. PMID:27437396

  12. Estimation of ROC Curve with Complex Survey Data

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Wenliang; Li, Zhaohai; Graubard, Barry I.

    2015-01-01

    The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve can be utilized to evaluate the performance of diagnostic tests. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) is a widely used summary index for comparing multiple ROC curves. Both parametric and nonparametric methods have been developed to estimate and compare the AUCs. However, these methods are usually only applicable to data collected from simple random samples and not surveys and epidemiologic studies that use complex sample designs such as stratified and/or multistage cluster sampling with sample weighting. Such complex samples can inflate variances from intracluster correlation and alter the expectations of test statistics due to the use of sample weights that account for differential sampling rates. In this paper, we modify the nonparametric method to incorporate sampling weights to estimate the AUC, and employ leaving-one-out jackknife methods along with the balanced repeated replication method to account for the effects of the complex sampling in the variance estimation of our proposed estimators of the AUC. The finite sample properties of our methods are evaluated using simulations, and our methods are illustrated by comparing the estimated AUC for predicting overweight/obesity using different measures of body weight and adiposity among sampled children and adults in the US Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. PMID:25546290

  13. Using near-infrared overtone regions to determine biodiesel content and adulteration of diesel/biodiesel blends with vegetable oils.

    PubMed

    de Vasconcelos, Fernanda Vera Cruz; de Souza, Paulo Fernandes Barbosa; Pimentel, Maria Fernanda; Pontes, Márcio José Coelho; Pereira, Claudete Fernandes

    2012-02-24

    This work evaluates the use of near-infrared (NIR) overtone regions to determine biodiesel content, as well potential adulteration with vegetable oil, in diesel/biodiesel blends. For this purpose, NIR spectra (12,000-6300 cm(-1)) were obtained using three different optical path lengths: 10 mm, 20 mm and 50 mm. Two strategies of regression with variable selection were evaluated: partial least squares (PLS) with significant regression coefficients selected by Jack-Knife algorithm (PLS/JK) and multiple linear regression (MLR) with wavenumber selection by successive projections algorithm (MLR/SPA). For comparison, the results obtained by using PLS full-spectrum models are also presented. In addition, the performance of models using NIR (1.0 mm optical path length, 9000-4000 cm(-1)) and MIR (UATR - universal attenuated total reflectance, 4000-650 cm(-1)) spectral regions was also investigated. The results demonstrated the potential of overtone regions with MLR/SPA regression strategy to determine biodiesel content in diesel/biodiesel blends, considering the possible presence of raw oil as a contaminant. This strategy is simple, fast and uses a fewer number of spectral variables. Considering this, the overtone regions can be useful to develop low cost instruments for quality control of diesel/biodiesel blends, considering the lower cost of optical components for this spectral region.

  14. A Direct Comparison of Two Densely Sampled HIV Epidemics: The UK and Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Ragonnet-Cronin, Manon L.; Shilaih, Mohaned; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Hodcroft, Emma B.; Böni, Jürg; Fearnhill, Esther; Dunn, David; Yerly, Sabine; Klimkait, Thomas; Aubert, Vincent; Yang, Wan-Lin; Brown, Alison E.; Lycett, Samantha J.; Kouyos, Roger; Brown, Andrew J. Leigh

    2016-01-01

    Phylogenetic clustering approaches can elucidate HIV transmission dynamics. Comparisons across countries are essential for evaluating public health policies. Here, we used a standardised approach to compare the UK HIV Drug Resistance Database and the Swiss HIV Cohort Study while maintaining data-protection requirements. Clusters were identified in subtype A1, B and C pol phylogenies. We generated degree distributions for each risk group and compared distributions between countries using Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) tests, Degree Distribution Quantification and Comparison (DDQC) and bootstrapping. We used logistic regression to predict cluster membership based on country, sampling date, risk group, ethnicity and sex. We analysed >8,000 Swiss and >30,000 UK subtype B sequences. At 4.5% genetic distance, the UK was more clustered and MSM and heterosexual degree distributions differed significantly by the KS test. The KS test is sensitive to variation in network scale, and jackknifing the UK MSM dataset to the size of the Swiss dataset removed the difference. Only heterosexuals varied based on the DDQC, due to UK male heterosexuals who clustered exclusively with MSM. Their removal eliminated this difference. In conclusion, the UK and Swiss HIV epidemics have similar underlying dynamics and observed differences in clustering are mainly due to different population sizes. PMID:27642070

  15. Evaluation of residual cellularity and proliferation on preoperatively treated breast cancer: a comparison between image analysis and light microscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Corletto, V; Verderio, P; Giardini, R; Cipriani, S; Di Palma, S; Rilke, F

    1998-01-01

    Histopathology has been suggested as a reliable method for tumour reduction evaluation of preoperatively treated breast cancer. Immunocytochemistry can be used to enhance the visibility of residual tumour cellularity and in the evaluation of its proliferative activity. We compared Image Analysis (IA) with Light Microscopy Analysis (LMA) on sections of breast carcinomas treated with preoperative chemo- or chemo/radiotherapy in the evaluation of the Neoplastic Cell Density (NCD) (69 cases) and the Proliferation Index (PI) (35 cases). NCD was expressed as the immunoreactive area to cytokeratin over the total original neoplastic area and PI was expressed as the number of immunostained tumoural nuclei with MIB 1 MoAb over the total of tumoural nuclei. The intraobserver agreement and that between IA and LMA for both indices were estimated by the common (kappa(w)) and the jackknife weighted kappa statistic (kappa(w)). The extent of agreement of each considered category was also assessed by means of the category-specific kappa statistics (kappa(cs)). The intraobserver agreement within LMA for NCD and PI and that between IA and LMA for PI were both satisfactory. Upon evaluation of the NCD, the agreement between IA and LMA showed unsatisfactory results, especially when the ratio between the residual tumour cells and the background was critical.

  16. Evaluation of Residual Cellularity and Proliferation on Preoperatively Treated Breast Cancer: A Comparison between Image Analysis and Light Microscopy Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Corletto, Valentina; Verderio, Paolo; Giardini, Roberto; Cipriani, Sonia; Di Palma, Silvana; Rilke, Franco

    1998-01-01

    Histopathology has been suggested as a reliable method for tumour reduction evaluation of preoperatively treated breast cancer. Immunocytochemistry can be used to enhance the visibility of residual tumour cellularity and in the evaluation of its proliferative activity. We compared Image Analysis (IA) with Light Microscopy Analysis (LMA) on sections of breast carcinomas treated with preoperative chemo‐ or chemo/radiotherapy in the evaluation of the Neoplastic Cell Density (NCD) (69 cases) and the Proliferation Index (PI) (35 cases). NCD was expressed as the immunoreactive area to cytokeratin over the total original neoplastic area and PI was expressed as the number of immunostained tumoural nuclei with MIB1 MoAb over the total of tumoural nuclei. The intraobserver agreement and that between IA and LMA for both indices were estimated by the common (Kw) and the jackknife weighted kappa statistic (K~w). The extent of agreement of each considered category was also assessed by means of the category‐specific kappa statistics (Kcs). The intraobserver agreement within LMA for NCD and PI and that between IA and LMA for PI were both satisfactory. Upon evaluation of the NCD, the agreement between IA and LMA showed unsatisfactory results, especially when the ratio between the residual tumour cells and the background was critical. PMID:9692682

  17. Constructing large-scale genetic maps using an evolutionary strategy algorithm.

    PubMed Central

    Mester, D; Ronin, Y; Minkov, D; Nevo, E; Korol, A

    2003-01-01

    This article is devoted to the problem of ordering in linkage groups with many dozens or even hundreds of markers. The ordering problem belongs to the field of discrete optimization on a set of all possible orders, amounting to n!/2 for n loci; hence it is considered an NP-hard problem. Several authors attempted to employ the methods developed in the well-known traveling salesman problem (TSP) for multilocus ordering, using the assumption that for a set of linked loci the true order will be the one that minimizes the total length of the linkage group. A novel, fast, and reliable algorithm developed for the TSP and based on evolution-strategy discrete optimization was applied in this study for multilocus ordering on the basis of pairwise recombination frequencies. The quality of derived maps under various complications (dominant vs. codominant markers, marker misclassification, negative and positive interference, and missing data) was analyzed using simulated data with approximately 50-400 markers. High performance of the employed algorithm allows systematic treatment of the problem of verification of the obtained multilocus orders on the basis of computing-intensive bootstrap and/or jackknife approaches for detecting and removing questionable marker scores, thereby stabilizing the resulting maps. Parallel calculation technology can easily be adopted for further acceleration of the proposed algorithm. Real data analysis (on maize chromosome 1 with 230 markers) is provided to illustrate the proposed methodology. PMID:14704202

  18. Effect of host plants on developmental time and life table parameters of Carposina sasakii (Lepidoptera: Carposinidae) under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Lei, Xihong; Li, Dingxu; Li, Zheng; Zalom, Frank G; Gao, Lingwang; Shen, Zuorui

    2012-04-01

    Studies were designed to examine the effects of host plants (apricot, Prunus armeniaca L.; plum, Prunus salicina L.; peach, Prunus persica L.; jujube, Zizyphus jujuba Will.; apple, Malus domestica Mill.; and pear, Pyrus sorotina Will) on the development and life table parameters of the peach fruit moth, Carposina sasakii Matsumura (Lepidoptera: Carposinidae) under laboratory conditions. Peach fruit moth developed faster (12.48 d) and had the highest preimaginal survival rate (50.54%) on plum compared with the other host plants. Adult longevity was significantly longer on jujube for both female and male moths. Adult females from larvae reared on jujube and peach laid significantly greater numbers of eggs (214.50 and 197.94 eggs per female, respectively) compared with those reared on the other four host plants. Life-table parameters were calculated for each host plant and compared by jackknife procedures. The intrinsic rate of natural increase (r(m)) was significantly greatest on plum (0.1294 eggs per female per d), followed by jujube and apricot (0.1201 and 0.1128 eggs per female per d), respectively. Implications of the various measures of population performance are discussed.

  19. Identifying the Types of Ion Channel-Targeted Conotoxins by Incorporating New Properties of Residues into Pseudo Amino Acid Composition.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yun; Zheng, Yufei; Tang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Conotoxins are a kind of neurotoxin which can specifically interact with potassium, sodium type, and calcium channels. They have become potential drug candidates to treat diseases such as chronic pain, epilepsy, and cardiovascular diseases. Thus, correctly identifying the types of ion channel-targeted conotoxins will provide important clue to understand their function and find potential drugs. Based on this consideration, we developed a new computational method to rapidly and accurately predict the types of ion-targeted conotoxins. Three kinds of new properties of residues were proposed to use in pseudo amino acid composition to formulate conotoxins samples. The support vector machine was utilized as classifier. A feature selection technique based on F-score was used to optimize features. Jackknife cross-validated results showed that the overall accuracy of 94.6% was achieved, which is higher than other published results, demonstrating that the proposed method is superior to published methods. Hence the current method may play a complementary role to other existing methods for recognizing the types of ion-target conotoxins. PMID:27631006

  20. Microfluidic co-culture platform to quantify chemotaxis of primary stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tatárová, Z; Abbuehl, J P; Maerkl, S; Huelsken, J

    2016-05-21

    Functional analysis of primary tissue-specific stem cells is hampered by their rarity. Here we describe a greatly miniaturized microfluidic device for the multiplexed, quantitative analysis of the chemotactic properties of primary, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). The device was integrated within a fully customized platform that both increased the viability of stem cells ex vivo and simplified manipulation during multidimensional acquisition. Since primary stem cells can be isolated only in limited number, we optimized the design for efficient cell trapping from low volume and low concentration cell suspensions. Using nanoliter volumes and automated microfluidic controls for pulsed medium supply, our platform is able to create stable gradients of chemoattractant secreted from mammalian producer cells within the device, as was visualized by a secreted NeonGreen fluorescent reporter. The design was functionally validated by a CXCL/CXCR ligand/receptor combination resulting in preferential migration of primary, non-passaged MSC. Stable gradient formation prolonged assay duration and resulted in enhanced response rates for slowly migrating stem cells. Time-lapse video microscopy facilitated determining a number of migratory properties based on single cell analysis. Jackknife-resampling revealed that our assay requires only 120 cells to obtain statistically significant results, enabling new approaches in the research on rare primary stem cells. Compartmentalization of the device not only facilitated such quantitative measurements but will also permit future, high-throughput functional screens. PMID:27137768

  1. Identification of Secretory Proteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using Pseudo Amino Acid Composition

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huan; Tang, Hua; Chen, Xin-Xin; Zhang, Chang-Jian; Zhu, Pan-Pan; Ding, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis is killing millions of lives every year and on the blacklist of the most appalling public health problems. Recent findings suggest that secretory protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis may serve the purpose of developing specific vaccines and drugs due to their antigenicity. Responding to global infectious disease, we focused on the identification of secretory proteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A novel method called MycoSec was designed by incorporating g-gap dipeptide compositions into pseudo amino acid composition. Analysis of variance-based technique was applied in the process of feature selection and a total of 374 optimal features were obtained and used for constructing the final predicting model. In the jackknife test, MycoSec yielded a good performance with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.93, demonstrating that the proposed system is powerful and robust. For user's convenience, the web server MycoSec was established and an obliging manual on how to use it was provided for getting around any trouble unnecessary. PMID:27597968

  2. Identifying the Types of Ion Channel-Targeted Conotoxins by Incorporating New Properties of Residues into Pseudo Amino Acid Composition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Conotoxins are a kind of neurotoxin which can specifically interact with potassium, sodium type, and calcium channels. They have become potential drug candidates to treat diseases such as chronic pain, epilepsy, and cardiovascular diseases. Thus, correctly identifying the types of ion channel-targeted conotoxins will provide important clue to understand their function and find potential drugs. Based on this consideration, we developed a new computational method to rapidly and accurately predict the types of ion-targeted conotoxins. Three kinds of new properties of residues were proposed to use in pseudo amino acid composition to formulate conotoxins samples. The support vector machine was utilized as classifier. A feature selection technique based on F-score was used to optimize features. Jackknife cross-validated results showed that the overall accuracy of 94.6% was achieved, which is higher than other published results, demonstrating that the proposed method is superior to published methods. Hence the current method may play a complementary role to other existing methods for recognizing the types of ion-target conotoxins.

  3. Identification of Secretory Proteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using Pseudo Amino Acid Composition

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huan; Tang, Hua; Chen, Xin-Xin; Zhang, Chang-Jian; Zhu, Pan-Pan; Ding, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis is killing millions of lives every year and on the blacklist of the most appalling public health problems. Recent findings suggest that secretory protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis may serve the purpose of developing specific vaccines and drugs due to their antigenicity. Responding to global infectious disease, we focused on the identification of secretory proteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A novel method called MycoSec was designed by incorporating g-gap dipeptide compositions into pseudo amino acid composition. Analysis of variance-based technique was applied in the process of feature selection and a total of 374 optimal features were obtained and used for constructing the final predicting model. In the jackknife test, MycoSec yielded a good performance with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.93, demonstrating that the proposed system is powerful and robust. For user's convenience, the web server MycoSec was established and an obliging manual on how to use it was provided for getting around any trouble unnecessary.

  4. Can horizontally oriented breast tomosynthesis image volumes or the use of a systematic search strategy improve interpretation? An eye tracking and free response human observer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lång, Kristina; Zackrisson, Sophia; Holmqvist, Kenneth; Nyström, Marcus; Andersson, Ingvar; Förnvik, Daniel; Tingberg, Anders; Timberg, Pontus

    2011-03-01

    Our aim was to evaluate if there is a benefit in diagnostic accuracy and efficiency of viewing breast tomosynthesis (BT) image volumes presented horizontally oriented, but also to evaluate the use of a systematic search strategy where the breast is divided, and analyzed consecutively, into two sections. These image presentations were compared to regular vertical image presentation. All methods were investigated using viewing procedures consisting of free scroll volume browsing, and a combination of initial cine loops at three different frame rates (9, 14, 25 fps) terminated upon request followed by free scroll volume browsing if needed. Fifty-five normal BT image volumes in MLO view were collected. In these, simulated lesions (20 masses and 20 clusters of microcalcifications) were randomly inserted, creating four unique image sets for each procedure. Four readers interpreted the cases in a random order. Their task was to locate the lesions, mark and assign a five level confidence scale. The diagnostic accuracy was analyzed using Jackknife Free Receiver Operating Characteristics (JAFROC). Time efficiency and visual search behavior were also investigated using eye tracking. Results indicate there was no statistically significant difference in JAFROC FOM between the different image presentations, although visual search was more time efficient when viewing horizontally oriented image volumes in medium cine loops.

  5. Optimizing viewing procedures of breast tomosynthesis image volumes using eye tracking combined with a free response human observer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lång, Kristina; Zackrisson, Sophia; Holmqvist, Kenneth; Nystrom, Marcus; Andersson, Ingvar; Förnvik, Daniel; Tingberg, Anders; Timberg, Pontus

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate four different viewing procedures as part of improving viewing conditions of breast tomosynthesis (BT) image volumes. The procedures consisted of free scroll volume browsing, and a combination of initial cine loops at three different frame rates (9, 14 and 25 fps) terminated upon request followed by free scroll volume browsing. Fifty-five normal BT image volumes in MLO view were collected. In these, simulated lesions (20 masses and 20 clusters of microcalcifications) were randomly inserted, creating four unique image sets for each procedure. Four readers interpreted the cases in a random order. Their task was to locate a lesion, mark and assign a five level confidence scale. The diagnostic accuracy was analyzed using Jackknife Free Receiver Operating Characteristics (JAFROC). Time efficiency and visual search behavior were also investigated using eye tracking. The results indicate that there was no statistically significant difference in JAFROC FOM between the different viewing procedures, however the medium cine loop speed seemed to be the preferred viewing procedure in terms of total analyze time and dwell time.

  6. Does image reduction affect the diagnostic accuracy of digital mammograms?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takane, Yumi; Kawasumi, Yusuke; Horie, Tsunemitsu; Ishibashi, Tadashi

    2013-03-01

    We aimed to evaluate the influence of image reduction using a bi-cubic interpolation method on the accuracy of detection of clustered microcalcifications (MCLs) and masses on digital mammograms. Digital mammograms (n=194) of 97 subjects were selected retrospectively, comprising 47 patients with clustered MCLs or masses and 52 controls. Images were acquired in the craniocaudal view by phase-contrast mammography (PCM). Original PCM images comprised 25-μm pixels. The reduced images converted from the originals by bi-cubic interpolation were of 50-μm pixel size. Five observers independently interpreted all images, and rated their confidence concerning the presence of lesions on a continuous 0-100 scale. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed using the jackknife method and LABMRMC program. Differences in areas under the curve (AUC) values based on 95% confidence intervals were evaluated. The average AUC values for detection of masses were 0.8435 and 0.8646 for the original and reduced images, respectively. The difference between the average AUC values was not statistically significant (p=0.5855). Average AUC values for clustered MCLs detection were 0.9273 and 0.9574 for the original and reduced images, respectively. This difference was not statistically significant (p=0.1949). Detection of masses and clustered MCLs on digital mammograms was unaffected by bi-cubic interpolation image reduction.

  7. Identifying 2'-O-methylationation sites by integrating nucleotide chemical properties and nucleotide compositions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Feng, Pengmian; Tang, Hua; Ding, Hui; Lin, Hao

    2016-06-01

    2'-O-methylationation is an important post-transcriptional modification and plays important roles in many biological processes. Although experimental technologies have been proposed to detect 2'-O-methylationation sites, they are cost-ineffective. As complements to experimental techniques, computational methods will facilitate the identification of 2'-O-methylationation sites. In the present study, we proposed a support vector machine-based method to identify 2'-O-methylationation sites. In this method, RNA sequences were formulated by nucleotide chemical properties and nucleotide compositions. In the jackknife cross-validation test, the proposed method obtained an accuracy of 95.58% for identifying 2'-O-methylationation sites in the human genome. Moreover, the model was also validated by identifying 2'-O-methylation sites in the Mus musculus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomes, and the obtained accuracies are also satisfactory. These results indicate that the proposed method will become a useful tool for the research on 2'-O-methylation.

  8. Cosmic shear measurements with Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Becker, M. R.

    2016-07-06

    Here, we present measurements of weak gravitational lensing cosmic shear two-point statistics using Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data. We demonstrate that our results are robust to the choice of shear measurement pipeline, either ngmix or im3shape, and robust to the choice of two-point statistic, including both real and Fourier-space statistics. Our results pass a suite of null tests including tests for B-mode contamination and direct tests for any dependence of the two-point functions on a set of 16 observing conditions and galaxy properties, such as seeing, airmass, galaxy color, galaxy magnitude, etc. We use a large suite of simulationsmore » to compute the covariance matrix of the cosmic shear measurements and assign statistical significance to our null tests. We find that our covariance matrix is consistent with the halo model prediction, indicating that it has the appropriate level of halo sample variance. We also compare the same jackknife procedure applied to the data and the simulations in order to search for additional sources of noise not captured by the simulations. We find no statistically significant extra sources of noise in the data. The overall detection significance with tomography for our highest source density catalog is 9.7σ. Cosmological constraints from the measurements in this work are presented in a companion paper.« less

  9. Coupling SWAT and ANN models for enhanced daily streamflow prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noori, Navideh; Kalin, Latif

    2016-02-01

    To improve daily flow prediction in unmonitored watersheds a hybrid model was developed by combining a quasi-distributed watershed model and artificial neural network (ANN). Daily streamflow data from 29 nearby watersheds in and around the city of Atlanta, Southeastern United States, with leave-one-site-out jackknifing technique were used to build the flow predictive models during warm and cool seasons. Daily streamflow was first simulated with the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and then the SWAT simulated baseflow and stormflow were used as inputs to ANN. Out of the total 29 test watersheds, 62% and 83% of them had Nash-Sutcliffe values above 0.50 during the cool and warm seasons, respectively (considered good or better). As the percent forest cover or the size of test watershed increased, the performances of the models gradually decreased during both warm and cool seasons. This indicates that the developed models work better in urbanized watersheds. In addition, SWAT and SWAT Calibration Uncertainty Procedure (SWAT-CUP) program were run separately for each station to compare the flow prediction accuracy of the hybrid approach to SWAT. Only 31% of the sites during the calibration and 34% of validation runs had ENASH values ⩾0.50. This study showed that coupling ANN with semi-distributed models can lead to improved daily streamflow predictions in ungauged watersheds.

  10. Mapping the climatic suitable habitat of oriental arborvitae (Platycladus orientalis) for introduction and cultivation at a global scale

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guoqing; Du, Sheng; Wen, Zhongming

    2016-01-01

    Oriental arborvitae (Platycladus orientalis) is an important afforestation and ornamental tree species, which is native in eastern Asian. Therefore, a global suitable habitat map for oriental arborvitae is urgently needed for global promotion and cultivation. Here, the potential habitat and climatic requirements of oriental arborvitae at global scale were simulated using herbariums data and 13 thermal-moisture variables as input data for maximum entropy model (MaxEnt). The simulation performance of MaxEnt is evaluated by ten-fold cross-validation and a jackknife procedure. Results show that the potential habitat and climate envelop of oriental arborvitae can be successfully simulated by MaxEnt at global scale, with a mean test AUC value of 0.93 and mean training AUC value of 0.95. Thermal factors play more important roles than moisture factors in controlling the distribution boundary of oriental arborvitae’s potential ranges. There are about 50 countries suitable for introduction and cultivation of oriental arborvitae with an area of 2.0 × 107 km2, which occupied 13.8% of land area on the earth. This unique study will provide valuable information and insights needed to identify new regions with climatically suitable habitats for cultivation and introduction of oriental arborvitae around the world. PMID:27443221

  11. COMDYN: Software to study the dynamics of animal communities using a capture-recapture approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hines, J.E.; Boulinier, T.; Nichols, J.D.; Sauer, J.R.; Pollock, K.H.

    1999-01-01

    COMDYN is a set of programs developed for estimation of parameters associated with community dynamics using count data from two locations or time periods. It is Internet-based, allowing remote users either to input their own data, or to use data from the North American Breeding Bird Survey for analysis. COMDYN allows probability of detection to vary among species and among locations and time periods. The basic estimator for species richness underlying all estimators is the jackknife estimator proposed by Burnham and Overton. Estimators are presented for quantities associated with temporal change in species richness, including rate of change in species richness over time, local extinction probability, local species turnover and number of local colonizing species. Estimators are also presented for quantities associated with spatial variation in species richness, including relative richness at two locations and proportion of species present in one location that are also present at a second location. Application of the estimators to species richness estimation has been previously described and justified. The potential applications of these programs are discussed.

  12. Classifying Multifunctional Enzymes by Incorporating Three Different Models into Chou's General Pseudo Amino Acid Composition.

    PubMed

    Zou, Hong-Liang; Xiao, Xuan

    2016-08-01

    With the avalanche of the newly found protein sequences in the post-genomic epoch, there is an increasing trend for annotating a number of newly discovered enzyme sequences. Among the various proteins, enzyme was considered as the one of the largest kind of proteins. It takes part in most of the biochemical reactions and plays a key role in metabolic pathways. Multifunctional enzyme is enzyme that plays multiple physiological roles. Given a multifunctional enzyme sequence, how can we identify its class? Especially, how can we deal with the multi-classes problem since an enzyme may simultaneously belong to two or more functional classes? To address these problems, which are obviously very important both to basic research and drug development, a multi-label classifier was developed via three different prediction models with multi-label K-nearest algorithm. Experimental results obtained on a stringent benchmark dataset of enzymes by jackknife cross-validation test show that the predicting results were exciting, indicating that the current method could be an effective and promising high throughput method in the enzyme research. We hope it could play an important complementary role to the existing predictors in identifying the classes of enzymes. PMID:27113936

  13. Distinguishing centrarchid genera by use of lateral line scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, N.M.; Rabeni, C.F.; Stanovick, J.S.

    2007-01-01

    Predator-prey relations involving fishes are often evaluated using scales remaining in gut contents or feces. While several reliable keys help identify North American freshwater fish scales to the family level, none attempt to separate the family Centrarchidae to the genus level. Centrarchidae is of particular concern in the midwestern United States because it contains several popular sport fishes, such as smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu, largemouth bass M. salmoides, and rock bass Ambloplites rupestris, as well as less-sought-after species of sunfishes Lepomis spp. and crappies Pomoxis spp. Differentiating sport fish from non-sport fish has important management implications. Morphological characteristics of lateral line scales (n = 1,581) from known centrarchid fishes were analyzed. The variability of measurements within and between genera was examined to select variables that were the most useful in further classifying unknown centrarchid scales. A linear discriminant analysis model was developed using 10 variables. Based on this model, 84.4% of Ambloplites scales, 81.2% of Lepomis scales, and 86.6% of Micropterus scales were classified correctly using a jackknife procedure. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2007.

  14. Computer aided morphometry of the neonatal fetal alcohol syndrome face

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chik, Lawrence; Sokol, Robert J.; Martier, Susan S.

    1993-09-01

    Facial dysmorphology related to Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) has been studied from neonatal snapshots with computer-aided imaging tools by looking at facial landmarks and silhouettes. Statistical methods were used to characterize FAS-related midfacial hypoplasia by using standardized landmark coordinates of frontal and profile snapshots. Additional analyses were performed by tracing a segment of the facial silhouettes from the profile snapshots. In spite of inherent distortions due to the coordinate standardization procedure, controlled for race, three significant facial landmark coordinates accounted for 30.6% of the explained variance of FAS. Residualized for race, eight points along the silhouettes were shown to be significant in explaining 45.8% of the outcome variance. Combining the landmark coordinates and silhouettes points, 57% of the outcome variance was explained. Finally, including birthweight with landmark coordinates and silhouettes, 63% of the outcome variance was explained, with a jackknifed sensitivity of 95% (19/20) and a specificity of 92.9% (52/56).

  15. Stock structure of Lake Baikal omul as determined by whole-body morphology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bronte, Charles R.; Fleischer, G.W.; Maistrenko, S.G.; Pronin, N.M.

    1999-01-01

    In Lake Baikal, three morphotypes of omul Coregonus autumnalis migratorius are recognized; the littoral, pelagic, and deep-water forms. Morphotype assignment is difficult, and similar to that encountered in pelagic and deep-water coregonines in the Laurentian Great Lakes. Principal component analysis revealed separation of all three morphotypes based on caudal peduncle length and depth, length and depth of the body between the dorsal and anal fin, and distance between the pectoral and the pelvic fins. Strong negative loadings were associated with head measurements. Omul of the same morphotype captured at different locations were classified to location of capture using step-wise discriminant function analysis. Jackknife correct classifications ranged from 43 to 78% for littoral omul from five locations, and 45–86% for pelagic omul from four locations. Patterns of location misclassification of littoral omul suggested that the sub-population structure, hence stock affinity, may be influenced by movements and intermixing of individuals among areas that are joined bathymetrically. Pelagic omul were more distinguishable by site and may support a previous hypothesis of a spawning-based rather than a foraging-based sub-population structure. Omul morphotypes may reflect adaptations to both ecological and local environmental conditions, and may have a genetic basis.

  16. Discriminant power of combined cerebrospinal fluid tau protein and of the soluble interleukin-6 receptor complex in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hampel, H; Teipel, S J; Padberg, F; Haslinger, A; Riemenschneider, M; Schwarz, M J; Kötter, H U; Scheloske, M; Buch, K; Stübner, S; Dukoff, R; Lasser, R; Müller, N; Sunderland, T; Rapoport, S I; Möller, H J

    1999-03-27

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) still can only be definitively diagnosed with certainty by examination of brain tissue. There is a great need for a noninvasive, sensitive and specific in vivo test for AD. We combined cerebrospinal fluid analyses of tau protein (levels were significantly increased in AD patients [p=0.0001]), a putative marker of neuronal degeneration, with components of the soluble interleukin-6 receptor complex (sIL-6RC: IL-6, soluble IL-6 receptor and soluble gp130), putative markers of neuroregulatory and inflammatory processes in the brain. A stepwise multivariate discriminant analysis revealed that tau protein and soluble gp130 (levels were significantly reduced in AD subjects [p=0.007]), the affinity converting and signal-transducing receptor of neuropoietic cytokines, maximized separation between the investigated groups. The discriminant function predicted 23 of 25 clinically diagnosed AD patients (sensitivity 92%) with mild to moderate dementia correctly as having AD. Furthermore, 17 of 19 physically and cognitively healthy age-matched control subjects (specificity 90%) were accurately distinguished by this test. Later predicting with the jackknife procedure each case in turn through the remaining patient group, the discriminant function remained stable. Our data suggest that multivariate discriminant analysis of combined CSF tau protein and sIL-6RC components may add more certainty to the diagnosis of AD, however, the method will need to be extended to an independent group of patients, comparisons and control subjects to assess the true applicability.

  17. Identification of bacteriophage virion proteins by the ANOVA feature selection and analysis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hui; Feng, Peng-Mian; Chen, Wei; Lin, Hao

    2014-08-01

    The bacteriophage virion proteins play extremely important roles in the fate of host bacterial cells. Accurate identification of bacteriophage virion proteins is very important for understanding their functions and clarifying the lysis mechanism of bacterial cells. In this study, a new sequence-based method was developed to identify phage virion proteins. In the new method, the protein sequences were initially formulated by the g-gap dipeptide compositions. Subsequently, the analysis of variance (ANOVA) with incremental feature selection (IFS) was used to search for the optimal feature set. It was observed that, in jackknife cross-validation, the optimal feature set including 160 optimized features can produce the maximum accuracy of 85.02%. By performing feature analysis, we found that the correlation between two amino acids with one gap was more important than other correlations for phage virion protein prediction and that some of the 1-gap dipeptides were important and mainly contributed to the virion protein prediction. This analysis will provide novel insights into the function of phage virion proteins. On the basis of the proposed method, an online web-server, PVPred, was established and can be freely accessed from the website (http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/PVPred). We believe that the PVPred will become a powerful tool to study phage virion proteins and to guide the related experimental validations.

  18. Limited sampling hampers "big data" estimation of species richness in a tropical biodiversity hotspot.

    PubMed

    Engemann, Kristine; Enquist, Brian J; Sandel, Brody; Boyle, Brad; Jørgensen, Peter M; Morueta-Holme, Naia; Peet, Robert K; Violle, Cyrille; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2015-02-01

    Macro-scale species richness studies often use museum specimens as their main source of information. However, such datasets are often strongly biased due to variation in sampling effort in space and time. These biases may strongly affect diversity estimates and may, thereby, obstruct solid inference on the underlying diversity drivers, as well as mislead conservation prioritization. In recent years, this has resulted in an increased focus on developing methods to correct for sampling bias. In this study, we use sample-size-correcting methods to examine patterns of tropical plant diversity in Ecuador, one of the most species-rich and climatically heterogeneous biodiversity hotspots. Species richness estimates were calculated based on 205,735 georeferenced specimens of 15,788 species using the Margalef diversity index, the Chao estimator, the second-order Jackknife and Bootstrapping resampling methods, and Hill numbers and rarefaction. Species richness was heavily correlated with sampling effort, and only rarefaction was able to remove this effect, and we recommend this method for estimation of species richness with "big data" collections.

  19. Identifying 2'-O-methylationation sites by integrating nucleotide chemical properties and nucleotide compositions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Feng, Pengmian; Tang, Hua; Ding, Hui; Lin, Hao

    2016-06-01

    2'-O-methylationation is an important post-transcriptional modification and plays important roles in many biological processes. Although experimental technologies have been proposed to detect 2'-O-methylationation sites, they are cost-ineffective. As complements to experimental techniques, computational methods will facilitate the identification of 2'-O-methylationation sites. In the present study, we proposed a support vector machine-based method to identify 2'-O-methylationation sites. In this method, RNA sequences were formulated by nucleotide chemical properties and nucleotide compositions. In the jackknife cross-validation test, the proposed method obtained an accuracy of 95.58% for identifying 2'-O-methylationation sites in the human genome. Moreover, the model was also validated by identifying 2'-O-methylation sites in the Mus musculus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomes, and the obtained accuracies are also satisfactory. These results indicate that the proposed method will become a useful tool for the research on 2'-O-methylation. PMID:27191866

  20. Prediction of subcellular location of apoptosis proteins combining tri-gram encoding based on PSSM and recursive feature elimination.

    PubMed

    Liu, Taigang; Tao, Peiying; Li, Xiaowei; Qin, Yufang; Wang, Chunhua

    2015-02-01

    Knowledge of apoptosis proteins plays an important role in understanding the mechanism of programmed cell death. Obtaining information on subcellular location of apoptosis proteins is very helpful to reveal the apoptosis mechanism and understand the function of apoptosis proteins. Because of the cost in time and labor associated with large-scale wet-bench experiments, computational prediction of apoptosis proteins subcellular location becomes very important and many computational tools have been developed in the recent decades. Existing methods differ in the protein sequence representation techniques and classification algorithms adopted. In this study, we firstly introduce a sequence encoding scheme based on tri-grams computed directly from position-specific score matrices, which incorporates evolution information represented in the PSI-BLAST profile and sequence-order information. Then SVM-RFE algorithm is applied for feature selection and reduced vectors are input to a support vector machine classifier to predict subcellular location of apoptosis proteins. Jackknife tests on three widely used datasets show that our method provides the state-of-the-art performance in comparison with other existing methods. PMID:25463695

  1. Age-stage, two-sex life table of Brontispa longissima (Gestro) (Coleoptera: Hispidae) feeding on four palm plant varieties.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tao; Lin, Yu-Ying; Jin, Qi-An; Wen, Hai-Bo; Peng, Zheng-Qiang

    2012-10-01

    The life history of Brontispa longissima (Gestro) (Coleoptera: Hispidae), reared under laboratory conditions on leaves of coconut (Cocos nucifera L.), royal palm [Roystonea regia (Kunth) O.F.Cook], bottle palm [Hyophorbe lagenicaulis (L. Bailey) H.E.Moore], and fishtail palm (Caryota ochlandra Hance) was analyzed using age-stage, two-sex life table. Means and standard errors of population growth parameters were calculated using the jackknife method. Moreover, survival rate and fecundity data were applied to project the population for revealing the different stage structure. The mean intrinsic rates of population growth when reared on each respective leaf type were 0.032, 0.031, 0.019, and 0.044. Individuals reared on C. nucifera achieved the highest net reproduction rate at 114.5 offspring per female. The mean generation times of B. longissima ranged from 93.2 d (reared on C. ochlandrai) to 161.5 d (reared on H. lagenicaulis). Projections from survival rate and fecundity data indicated that B. longissima populations can row considerably faster on C. ochlandra than on the other three host plants. The results validate the two-stage life history approach taken, providing an essential tool for developing and testing future control strategies. PMID:23068179

  2. Adjusting for unmeasured confounding due to either of two crossed factors with a logistic regression model.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Brumback, Babette A; Weppelmann, Thomas A; Morris, J Glenn; Ali, Afsar

    2016-08-15

    Motivated by an investigation of the effect of surface water temperature on the presence of Vibrio cholerae in water samples collected from different fixed surface water monitoring sites in Haiti in different months, we investigated methods to adjust for unmeasured confounding due to either of the two crossed factors site and month. In the process, we extended previous methods that adjust for unmeasured confounding due to one nesting factor (such as site, which nests the water samples from different months) to the case of two crossed factors. First, we developed a conditional pseudolikelihood estimator that eliminates fixed effects for the levels of each of the crossed factors from the estimating equation. Using the theory of U-Statistics for independent but non-identically distributed vectors, we show that our estimator is consistent and asymptotically normal, but that its variance depends on the nuisance parameters and thus cannot be easily estimated. Consequently, we apply our estimator in conjunction with a permutation test, and we investigate use of the pigeonhole bootstrap and the jackknife for constructing confidence intervals. We also incorporate our estimator into a diagnostic test for a logistic mixed model with crossed random effects and no unmeasured confounding. For comparison, we investigate between-within models extended to two crossed factors. These generalized linear mixed models include covariate means for each level of each factor in order to adjust for the unmeasured confounding. We conduct simulation studies, and we apply the methods to the Haitian data. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26892025

  3. Bacterial community structure and soil properties of a subarctic tundra soil in Council, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye Min; Jung, Ji Young; Yergeau, Etienne; Hwang, Chung Yeon; Hinzman, Larry; Nam, Sungjin; Hong, Soon Gyu; Kim, Ok-Sun; Chun, Jongsik; Lee, Yoo Kyung

    2014-08-01

    The subarctic region is highly responsive and vulnerable to climate change. Understanding the structure of subarctic soil microbial communities is essential for predicting the response of the subarctic soil environment to climate change. To determine the composition of the bacterial community and its relationship with soil properties, we investigated the bacterial community structure and properties of surface soil from the moist acidic tussock tundra in Council, Alaska. We collected 70 soil samples with 25-m intervals between sampling points from 0-10 cm to 10-20 cm depths. The bacterial community was analyzed by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, and the following soil properties were analyzed: soil moisture content (MC), pH, total carbon (TC), total nitrogen (TN), and inorganic nitrogen (NH4+ and NO3-). The community compositions of the two different depths showed that Alphaproteobacteria decreased with soil depth. Among the soil properties measured, soil pH was the most significant factor correlating with bacterial community in both upper and lower-layer soils. Bacterial community similarity based on jackknifed unweighted unifrac distance showed greater similarity across horizontal layers than through the vertical depth. This study showed that soil depth and pH were the most important soil properties determining bacterial community structure of the subarctic tundra soil in Council, Alaska.

  4. Non-coding RNA identification based on topology secondary structure and reading frame in organelle genome level.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cheng-Yan; Li, Qian-Zhong; Feng, Zhen-Xing

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNA (ncRNA) genes make transcripts as same as the encoding genes, and ncRNAs directly function as RNAs rather than serve as blueprints for proteins. As the function of ncRNA is closely related to organelle genomes, it is desirable to explore ncRNA function by confirming its provenance. In this paper, the topology secondary structure, motif and the triplets under three reading frames are considered as parameters of ncRNAs. A method of SVM combining the increment of diversity (ID) algorithm is applied to construct the classifier. When the method is applied to the ncRNA dataset less than 80% sequence identity, the overall accuracies reach 95.57%, 96.40% in the five-fold cross-validation and the jackknife test, respectively. Further, for the independent testing dataset, the average prediction success rate of our method achieved 93.24%. The higher predictive success rates indicate that our method is very helpful for distinguishing ncRNAs from various organelle genomes. PMID:26697761

  5. iDPF-PseRAAAC: A Web-Server for Identifying the Defensin Peptide Family and Subfamily Using Pseudo Reduced Amino Acid Alphabet Composition.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Yongchun; Lv, Yang; Wei, Zhuying; Yang, Lei; Li, Guangpeng; Fan, Guoliang

    2015-01-01

    Defensins as one of the most abundant classes of antimicrobial peptides are an essential part of the innate immunity that has evolved in most living organisms from lower organisms to humans. To identify specific defensins as interesting antifungal leads, in this study, we constructed a more rigorous benchmark dataset and the iDPF-PseRAAAC server was developed to predict the defensin family and subfamily. Using reduced dipeptide compositions were used, the overall accuracy of proposed method increased to 95.10% for the defensin family, and 98.39% for the vertebrate subfamily, which is higher than the accuracy from other methods. The jackknife test shows that more than 4% improvement was obtained comparing with the previous method. A free online server was further established for the convenience of most experimental scientists at http://wlxy.imu.edu.cn/college/biostation/fuwu/iDPF-PseRAAAC/index.asp. A friendly guide is provided to describe how to use the web server. We anticipate that iDPF-PseRAAAC may become a useful high-throughput tool for both basic research and drug design. PMID:26713618

  6. BICEP2 / Keck Array V: Measurements of B-mode polarization at degree angular scales and 150 GHz by the Keck Array

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ade, P. A. R.; Ahmed, Z.; Aikin, R. W.; Alexander, K. D.; Barkats, D.; Benton, S. J.; Bischoff, C. A.; Bock, J. J.; Brevik, J. A.; Buder, I.; et al

    2015-09-29

    Here, the Keck Array is a system of cosmic microwave background polarimeters, each similar to the Bicep2 experiment. In this paper we report results from the 2012 to 2013 observing seasons, during which the Keck Array consisted of five receivers all operating in the same (150 GHz) frequency band and observing field as Bicep2. We again find an excess of B-mode power over the lensed-ΛCDM expectation of >5σ in the range 30 < ℓ < 150 and confirm that this is not due to systematics using jackknife tests and simulations based on detailed calibration measurements. In map difference and spectralmore » difference tests these new data are shown to be consistent with Bicep2. Finally, we combine the maps from the two experiments to produce final Q and U maps which have a depth of 57 nK deg (3.4 μK arcmin) over an effective area of 400 deg2 for an equivalent survey weight of 250,000 μK–2. The final BB band powers have noise uncertainty a factor of 2.3 times better than the previous results, and a significance of detection of excess power of >6σ.« less

  7. Predicting the Potential Distribution of Polygala tenuifolia Willd. under Climate Change in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Zhao, Yao; Pei, Lin; Zhao, Jiancheng

    2016-01-01

    Global warming has created opportunities and challenges for the survival and development of species. Determining how climate change may impact multiple ecosystem levels and lead to various species adaptations is necessary for both biodiversity conservation and sustainable biological resource utilization. In this study, we employed Maxent to predict changes in the habitat range and altitude of Polygala tenuifolia Willd. under current and future climate scenarios in China. Four representative concentration pathways (RCP2.6, RCP4.5, RCP6.0, and RCP8.5) were modeled for two time periods (2050 and 2070). The model inputs included 732 presence points and nine sets of environmental variables under the current conditions and the four RCPs in 2050 and 2070. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) was used to evaluate model performance. All of the AUCs were greater than 0.80, thereby placing these models in the “very good” category. Using a jackknife analysis, the precipitation in the warmest quarter, annual mean temperature, and altitude were found to be the top three variables that affect the range of P. tenuifolia. Additionally, we found that the predicted highly suitable habitat was in reasonable agreement with its actual distribution. Furthermore, the highly suitable habitat area was slowly reduced over time. PMID:27661983

  8. Effect of CAD on radiologists' detection of lung nodules on thoracic CT scans: observer performance study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahiner, Berkman; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Shi, Jiazheng; Cascade, Philip N.; Kazerooni, Ella A.; Zhou, Chuan; Wei, Jun; Chughtai, Aamer R.; Poopat, Chad; Song, Thomas; Nojkova, Jadranka S.; Frank, Luba; Attili, Anil

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) on radiologists' performance for the detection of lung nodules on thoracic CT scans. Our computer system was designed using an independent training set of 94 CT scans in our laboratory. The data set for the observer performance study consisted of 48 CT scans. Twenty scans were collected from patient files at the University of Michigan, and 28 scans by the Lung Imaging Database Consortium (LIDC). All scans were read by multiple experienced thoracic radiologists to determine the true nodule locations, defined as any region identified by one or more expert radiologists as containing a nodule larger than 3 mm in diameter. Eighteen CT examinations were nodule-free, while the remaining 30 CT examinations contained a total of 73 nodules having a median size of 5.5 mm (range 3.0-36.4 mm). Four other study radiologists read the CT scans first without and then with CAD, and provided likelihood of nodule ratings for suspicious regions. Two of the study radiologists were fellowship trained in cardiothoracic radiology, and two were cardiothoracic radiology fellows. Freeresponse receiver-operating characteristic (FROC) curves were used to compare the two reading conditions. The computer system had a sensitivity of 79% (58/73) with an average of 4.9 marks per normal scan (88/18). Jackknife alternative FROC (JAFROC) analysis indicated that the improvement with CAD was statistically significant (p=0.03).

  9. Analysis of computer-aided detection techniques and signal characteristics for clustered microcalcifications on digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samala, Ravi K.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Helvie, Mark A.

    2016-10-01

    With IRB approval, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) images of human subjects were collected using a GE GEN2 DBT prototype system. Corresponding digital mammograms (DMs) of the same subjects were collected retrospectively from patient files. The data set contained a total of 237 views of DBT and equal number of DM views from 120 human subjects, each included 163 views with microcalcification clusters (MCs) and 74 views without MCs. The data set was separated into training and independent test sets. The pre-processing, object prescreening and segmentation, false positive reduction and clustering strategies for MC detection by three computer-aided detection (CADe) systems designed for DM, DBT, and a planar projection image generated from DBT were analyzed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves based on features extracted from microcalcifications and free-response ROC (FROC) curves based on scores from MCs were used to quantify the performance of the systems. Jackknife FROC (JAFROC) and non-parametric analysis methods were used to determine the statistical difference between the FROC curves. The difference between the CADDM and CADDBT systems when the false positive rate was estimated from cases without MCs did not reach statistical significance. The study indicates that the large search space in DBT may not be a limiting factor for CADe to achieve similar performance as that observed in DM.

  10. Driver Assistance System for Passive Multi-Trailer Vehicles with Haptic Steering Limitations on the Leading Unit

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Jesús; Mandow, Anthony; Martínez, Jorge L.; Reina, Antonio J.; García-Cerezo, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Driving vehicles with one or more passive trailers has difficulties in both forward and backward motion due to inter-unit collisions, jackknife, and lack of visibility. Consequently, advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) for multi-trailer combinations can be beneficial to accident avoidance as well as to driver comfort. The ADAS proposed in this paper aims to prevent unsafe steering commands by means of a haptic handwheel. Furthermore, when driving in reverse, the steering-wheel and pedals can be used as if the vehicle was driven from the back of the last trailer with visual aid from a rear-view camera. This solution, which can be implemented in drive-by-wire vehicles with hitch angle sensors, profits from two methods previously developed by the authors: safe steering by applying a curvature limitation to the leading unit, and a virtual tractor concept for backward motion that includes the complex case of set-point propagation through on-axle hitches. The paper addresses system requirements and provides implementation details to tele-operate two different off- and on-axle combinations of a tracked mobile robot pulling and pushing two dissimilar trailers. PMID:23552102

  11. Radiological technologists' performance for the detection of malignant microcalcifications in digital mammograms without and with a computer-aided detection system.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie; Takamori, Miho; Uchiyama, Yoshikazu; Shiraishi, Junji

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic performance of radiological technologists (RTs) in the detection of malignant microcalcifications and to evaluate how much computer-aided detection (CADe) improved their performances compared with those by expert breast radiologists (BRs). Six board-certified breast RTs and four board-certified BRs participated in a free-response receiver operating characteristic observer study. The dataset consisted of 75 cases (25 malignant, 25 benign, and 25 normal cases) of digital mammograms, selected from the digital database for screening mammography provided by the University of South Florida. Average figure of merit (FOM) of the RTs' performances was statistically analyzed using jack-knife free-response receiver operating characteristic and compared with that of expert BRs. The detection performance of RTs was significantly improved by using CADe; average sensitivity was increased from 46.7% to 56.7%, with a decrease in the average number of false positives per case from 0.19 to 0.13. Detection accuracy of an average FOM was improved from 0.680 to 0.816 ([Formula: see text]) and the difference in FOMs between RTs and radiologists failed to reach statistical significance. RTs' performances for the identification of malignant microcalcifications on digital mammography were sufficiently high and comparable to those of radiologists by using CADe. PMID:26158109

  12. Cosmic shear measurements with Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, M. R.; Troxel, M. A.; MacCrann, N.; Krause, E.; Eifler, T. F.; Friedrich, O.; Nicola, A.; Refregier, A.; Amara, A.; Bacon, D.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bonnett, C.; Bridle, S. L.; Busha, M. T.; Chang, C.; Dodelson, S.; Erickson, B.; Evrard, A. E.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gruen, D.; Hartley, W.; Jain, B.; Jarvis, M.; Kacprzak, T.; Kirk, D.; Kravtsov, A.; Leistedt, B.; Peiris, H. V.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sabiu, C.; Sánchez, C.; Seo, H.; Sheldon, E.; Wechsler, R. H.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Armstrong, R.; Banerji, M.; Bauer, A. H.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Fausti Neto, A.; Fernandez, E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Dark Energy Survey Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    We present measurements of weak gravitational lensing cosmic shear two-point statistics using Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data. We demonstrate that our results are robust to the choice of shear measurement pipeline, either ngmix or im3shape, and robust to the choice of two-point statistic, including both real and Fourier-space statistics. Our results pass a suite of null tests including tests for B-mode contamination and direct tests for any dependence of the two-point functions on a set of 16 observing conditions and galaxy properties, such as seeing, airmass, galaxy color, galaxy magnitude, etc. We furthermore use a large suite of simulations to compute the covariance matrix of the cosmic shear measurements and assign statistical significance to our null tests. We find that our covariance matrix is consistent with the halo model prediction, indicating that it has the appropriate level of halo sample variance. We compare the same jackknife procedure applied to the data and the simulations in order to search for additional sources of noise not captured by the simulations. We find no statistically significant extra sources of noise in the data. The overall detection significance with tomography for our highest source density catalog is 9.7 σ . Cosmological constraints from the measurements in this work are presented in a companion paper [DES et al., Phys. Rev. D 94, 022001 (2016).].

  13. Control System Design of Multitrailer Using Neurocontrollers with Recessive Gene Structure by Step-up GA Training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyuna, Ayaki; Kinjo, Hiroshi; Kurata, Koji; Yamamoto, Tetsuhiko

    In a previous study, we proposed a step-up training method for the multitrailer truck control system using neurocontrollers (NCs) evolved by a genetic algorithm (GA) and showed its efficiency. However, the method does not enable the training of NCs for a five-trailer connected truck system. In this paper, we present a new version of the step-up training method that enables the training of NCs for a five-trailer connected truck system. The proposed method is as follows: First, NCs are trained only to avoid the “jackknife phenomenon". Second, NCs are trained for minimizing squared errors starting from easy initial configurations. Finally, NCs are trained for minimizing the squared errors starting from more difficult initial configurations. The difficulty of training steps increases gradually. To improve training performance, we applied a recessive gene model to network weight coding and genetic operations. In this study, we applied the recessive gene model to the classic exclusive-or (XOR) training problem and showed its convergence performance. The GA training of NCs with the recessive gene model maintains diversity in the population and avoids evolutionary stagnation. Simulation shows that NCs with the recessive gene model and the proposed step-up training method are useful in the controller design of the multitrailer system.

  14. Assessing long-term pH change in an Australian river catchment using monitoring and palaeolimnological data.

    PubMed

    Tibby, John; Reid, Michael A; Fluin, Jennie; Hart, Barry T; Kershaw, A Peter

    2003-08-01

    Reviews of stream monitoring data suggest that there has been significant acidification (>1.0 pH unit at some sites) of Victorian streamwaters over the past 3 decades. To assess whether these declines are within the range of natural variability, we developed a diatom model for inferring past pH and applied it to a ca. 3500-yr diatom record from a flood plain lake, Callemondah 1 Billabong, on the Goulburn River, which has among the most substantial observed pH declines. The model has a jackkniffed r2 between diatom inferred and measured pH of 0.77 and a root mean square error of prediction of 0.35 pH units. In the pre-European period, pH was stable (range 6.5-6.7) for approximately 3000 yr. Since European settlement around 160 yr ago, diatom-inferred billabong pH has increased significantly by >0.5 units. We hypothesize that this increase in pH is related to processes associated with land clearance (e.g., increased base cation load and decreased organic acid load). There is no evidence of the recent monitored declines in the Callemondah record, which may indicate that that flood plain lakes and the main stream are experiencing divergent pH trends or that the temporal resolution in the billabong sediment record is insufficient to register recent declines.

  15. Heritable changes in regional cortical thickness with age.

    PubMed

    Chouinard-Decorte, Francois; McKay, D Reese; Reid, Andrew; Khundrakpam, Budhachandra; Zhao, Lu; Karama, Sherif; Rioux, Pierre; Sprooten, Emma; Knowles, Emma; Kent, Jack W; Curran, Joanne E; Göring, Harald H H; Dyer, Thomas D; Olvera, Rene L; Kochunov, Peter; Duggirala, Ravi; Fox, Peter T; Almasy, Laura; Blangero, John; Bellec, Pierre; Evans, Alan C; Glahn, David C

    2014-06-01

    It is now well established that regional indices of brain structure such as cortical thickness, surface area or grey matter volume exhibit spatially variable patterns of heritability. However, a recent study found these patterns to change with age during development, a result supported by gene expression studies. Changes in heritability have not been investigated in adulthood so far and could have important implications in the study of heritability and genetic correlations in the brain as well as in the discovery of specific genes explaining them. Herein, we tested for genotype by age (G ×A) interactions, an extension of genotype by environment interactions, through adulthood and healthy aging in 902 subjects from the Genetics of Brain Structure (GOBS) study. A "jackknife" based method for the analysis of stable cortical thickness clusters (JASC) and scale selection is also introduced. Although additive genetic variance remained constant throughout adulthood, we found evidence for incomplete pleiotropy across age in the cortical thickness of paralimbic and parieto-temporal areas. This suggests that different genetic factors account for cortical thickness heritability at different ages in these regions. PMID:24752552

  16. Additional Value of Diffusion-weighted MRI to Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced Hepatic MRI for the Detection of Liver Metastasis: the Difference Depending on the Experience of the Radiologists.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Wataru; Nakamura, Yuko; Higaki, Toru; Tatsugami, Fuminari; Iida, Makoto; Awai, Kazuo

    2015-06-01

    This retrospective study was to investigate whether adding diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI (EOB-MRI) improved the detection of liver metastasis in radiology resident and board-certified radiologist groups. It was approved by our institutional review board. We selected 18 patients with 35 liver metastases and 12 patients without liver tumors. Five board-certified radiologists and 5 radiology residents participated in the observer performance study. Each observer first interpreted T1- and T2-weighted-, plain-, arterial phase-, and hepatobiliary phase images and specified the location of the liver metastases. The software subsequently displayed the DWI images simultaneously and all participants repeated the reading. We used Jackknife alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis to compare the observer performance in detecting liver metastases. The mean values for the area under the curve (AUC) for EOB-MRI without and with DWI were 0.78 ± 0.13 [standard deviation: SD] and 0.87 ± 0.09, respectively, for the radiology residents, and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.045). For the board- certified radiologists these values were 0.92 ± 0.02 and 0.96 ± 0.01, respectively, and the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.092). EOB-MRI with DWI significantly improved the performance of radiology residents in the identification of liver metastases. PMID:26211220

  17. Limited sampling hampers “big data” estimation of species richness in a tropical biodiversity hotspot

    PubMed Central

    Engemann, Kristine; Enquist, Brian J; Sandel, Brody; Boyle, Brad; Jørgensen, Peter M; Morueta-Holme, Naia; Peet, Robert K; Violle, Cyrille; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2015-01-01

    Macro-scale species richness studies often use museum specimens as their main source of information. However, such datasets are often strongly biased due to variation in sampling effort in space and time. These biases may strongly affect diversity estimates and may, thereby, obstruct solid inference on the underlying diversity drivers, as well as mislead conservation prioritization. In recent years, this has resulted in an increased focus on developing methods to correct for sampling bias. In this study, we use sample-size-correcting methods to examine patterns of tropical plant diversity in Ecuador, one of the most species-rich and climatically heterogeneous biodiversity hotspots. Species richness estimates were calculated based on 205,735 georeferenced specimens of 15,788 species using the Margalef diversity index, the Chao estimator, the second-order Jackknife and Bootstrapping resampling methods, and Hill numbers and rarefaction. Species richness was heavily correlated with sampling effort, and only rarefaction was able to remove this effect, and we recommend this method for estimation of species richness with “big data” collections. PMID:25692000

  18. Variables influencing the presence of subyearling fall Chinook salmon in shoreline habitats of the Hanford Reach, Columbia River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tiffan, K.F.; Clark, L.O.; Garland, R.D.; Rondorf, D.W.

    2006-01-01

    Little information currently exists on habitat use by subyearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha rearing in large, main-stem habitats. We collected habitat use information on subyearlings in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River during May 1994 and April-May 1995 using point abundance electrofishing. We analyzed measures of physical habitat using logistic regression to predict fish presence and absence in shoreline habitats. The difference between water temperature at the point of sampling and in the main river channel was the most important variable for predicting the presence and absence of subyearlings. Mean water velocities of 45 cm/s or less and habitats with low lateral bank slopes were also associated with a greater likelihood of subyearling presence. Intermediate-sized gravel and cobble substrates were significant predictors of fish presence, but small (<32-mm) and boulder-sized (>256-mm) substrates were not. Our rearing model was accurate at predicting fish presence and absence using jackknifing (80% correct) and classification of observations from an independent data set (76% correct). The habitat requirements of fall Chinook salmon in the Hanford Reach are similar to those reported for juvenile Chinook salmon in smaller systems but are met in functionally different ways in a large river.

  19. A highly accurate protein structural class prediction approach using auto cross covariance transformation and recursive feature elimination.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaowei; Liu, Taigang; Tao, Peiying; Wang, Chunhua; Chen, Lanming

    2015-12-01

    Structural class characterizes the overall folding type of a protein or its domain. Many methods have been proposed to improve the prediction accuracy of protein structural class in recent years, but it is still a challenge for the low-similarity sequences. In this study, we introduce a feature extraction technique based on auto cross covariance (ACC) transformation of position-specific score matrix (PSSM) to represent a protein sequence. Then support vector machine-recursive feature elimination (SVM-RFE) is adopted to select top K features according to their importance and these features are input to a support vector machine (SVM) to conduct the prediction. Performance evaluation of the proposed method is performed using the jackknife test on three low-similarity datasets, i.e., D640, 1189 and 25PDB. By means of this method, the overall accuracies of 97.2%, 96.2%, and 93.3% are achieved on these three datasets, which are higher than those of most existing methods. This suggests that the proposed method could serve as a very cost-effective tool for predicting protein structural class especially for low-similarity datasets.

  20. North American Tropical Cyclone Landfall and SST: A Statistical Model Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Timothy; Yonekura, Emmi

    2013-01-01

    A statistical-stochastic model of the complete life cycle of North Atlantic (NA) tropical cyclones (TCs) is used to examine the relationship between climate and landfall rates along the North American Atlantic and Gulf Coasts. The model draws on archived data of TCs throughout the North Atlantic to estimate landfall rates at high geographic resolution as a function of the ENSO state and one of two different measures of sea surface temperature (SST): 1) SST averaged over the NA subtropics and the hurricane season and 2) this SST relative to the seasonal global subtropical mean SST (termed relSST). Here, the authors focus on SST by holding ENSO to a neutral state. Jackknife uncertainty tests are employed to test the significance of SST and relSST landfall relationships. There are more TC and major hurricane landfalls overall in warm years than cold, using either SST or relSST, primarily due to a basinwide increase in the number of storms. The signal along the coast, however, is complex. Some regions have large and significant sensitivity (e.g., an approximate doubling of annual major hurricane landfall probability on Texas from -2 to +2 standard deviations in relSST), while other regions have no significant sensitivity (e.g., the U.S. mid-Atlantic and Northeast coasts). This geographic structure is due to both shifts in the regions of primary TC genesis and shifts in TC propagation.

  1. Improved Statistical Processing for Common Conversion Point Stacked Receiver Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, G. M.; Collins, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    The interpretation of teleseismic receiver functions is typically limited by poor constraints on the uncertainty of amplitudes of converted phases. In continental regions these problems are overcome by stacking large amounts of data. In oceanic regions, however, data quality is notoriously noisy and the number of events are limited by significantly shorter station deployment times. In order to obtain maximum value from a data set, it is necessary to have estimates of uncertainty. Here we combine a common-conversion point stacking technique with multiple-taper correlation RF estimates that allow frequency domain weighting. We then compute jackknife uncertainties to estimate local uncertainties in RF amplitude. We apply this technique to a continental station in Arabia (RAYN) as a benchmark, and also to the ocean island station at Raratonga, Cook Islands (RAR). The structure we recover matches previous crustal studies at both stations, and provides new interpretations of conversions in the upper mantle. At single stations, this technique works well to resolve crust and mantle structure up to a depth of 100 km. Geographical dispersion of raypaths at larger depths decreases the number of events per bin, and therefore increases the uncertainty in converted amplitude. We therefore propose that this method will be well suited to the analysis of data from seismic arrays.

  2. Use of statistical evaluation of antigen profiles in differential diagnosis between colonic and ovarian adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Henzen-Logmans, S C; Schipper, N W; Poels, L G; Stolk, K; Kenemans, P; Meyer, C J

    1988-01-01

    A study was carried out to determine whether it was possible to classify colonic and ovarian adenocarcinomas by their antigen profile. Colonic and ovarian adenocarcinomas were immunostained with a panel of antibodies which have a limited specificity for colon (parlam-4, 19.9, anti-secretory component) and ovary (OV-TL3 and OC125) and the most discriminatory antibodies were selected by stepwise linear discriminant analysis. For frozen material OV-TL3 and OC125 were the best classifying antibodies. Although OC125 had better discriminative power, for paraffin wax embedded material parlam-4 was selected as the best classifying antibody. OC125 had no additional effect on the classification of a tumour. These antibodies were subsequently tested on an independent test set of primary and metastatic adenocarcinomas of colonic and ovarian origin. When ovarian posterior probabilities of less than 0.1 and greater than 0.9 were selected as cut off points for a positive identification of colonic or ovarian origin (jackknifed classification method), no adenocarcinoma was incorrectly identified as ovarian carcinoma in frozen material. The same trend was noticed for paraffin wax embedded material. Statistical analysis of antigen profiles can be helpful in defining the colonic or ovarian origin of an adenocarcinoma when routine microscopy does not yield a definitive result. PMID:3384998

  3. A Direct Comparison of Two Densely Sampled HIV Epidemics: The UK and Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Ragonnet-Cronin, Manon L; Shilaih, Mohaned; Günthard, Huldrych F; Hodcroft, Emma B; Böni, Jürg; Fearnhill, Esther; Dunn, David; Yerly, Sabine; Klimkait, Thomas; Aubert, Vincent; Yang, Wan-Lin; Brown, Alison E; Lycett, Samantha J; Kouyos, Roger; Brown, Andrew J Leigh

    2016-01-01

    Phylogenetic clustering approaches can elucidate HIV transmission dynamics. Comparisons across countries are essential for evaluating public health policies. Here, we used a standardised approach to compare the UK HIV Drug Resistance Database and the Swiss HIV Cohort Study while maintaining data-protection requirements. Clusters were identified in subtype A1, B and C pol phylogenies. We generated degree distributions for each risk group and compared distributions between countries using Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) tests, Degree Distribution Quantification and Comparison (DDQC) and bootstrapping. We used logistic regression to predict cluster membership based on country, sampling date, risk group, ethnicity and sex. We analysed >8,000 Swiss and >30,000 UK subtype B sequences. At 4.5% genetic distance, the UK was more clustered and MSM and heterosexual degree distributions differed significantly by the KS test. The KS test is sensitive to variation in network scale, and jackknifing the UK MSM dataset to the size of the Swiss dataset removed the difference. Only heterosexuals varied based on the DDQC, due to UK male heterosexuals who clustered exclusively with MSM. Their removal eliminated this difference. In conclusion, the UK and Swiss HIV epidemics have similar underlying dynamics and observed differences in clustering are mainly due to different population sizes. PMID:27642070

  4. Molecular phylogeny of the Haplosporidia based on two independent gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Reece, Kimberly S; Siddall, Mark E; Stokes, Nancy A; Burreson, Eugene M

    2004-10-01

    The phylogenetic position of the Haplosporidia has confounded taxonomists for more than a century because of the unique morphology of these parasites. We collected DNA sequence data for small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA and actin genes from haplosporidians and other protists for conducting molecular phylogenetic analyses to help elucidate relationships of taxa within the group, as well as placement of this group among Eukaryota. Analyses were conducted using DNA sequence data from more than 100 eukaryotic taxa with various combinations of data sets including nucleotide sequence data for each gene separately and combined, as well as SSU ribosomal DNA data combined with translated actin amino acids. In almost all analyses, the Haplosporidia was sister to the Cercozoa with moderate bootstrap and jackknife support. Analysis with actin amino acid sequences alone grouped haplosporidians with the foraminiferans and cercozoans. The haplosporidians Minchinia and Urosporidium were found to be monophyletic, whereas Haplosporidium was paraphyletic. "Microcell" parasites, Bonamia spp. and Mikrocytos roughleyi, were sister to Minchinia, the most derived genus, with Haplosporidium falling between the "microcells" and the more basal Urosporidium. Two recently discovered parasites, one from abalone in New Zealand and another from spot prawns in British Columbia, fell at the base of the Haplosporidia with very strong support, indicating a taxonomic affinity to this group.

  5. Isotopic and Elemental Composition of Roasted Coffee as a Guide to Authenticity and Origin.

    PubMed

    Carter, James F; Yates, Hans S A; Tinggi, Ujang

    2015-06-24

    This study presents the stable isotopic and elemental compositions of single-origin, roasted coffees available to retail consumers. The δ(13)C, δ(15)N, and δ(18)O compositions were in agreement with those previously reported for green coffee beans. The δ(15)N composition was seen to be related to organic cultivation, reflected in both δ(2)H and δ(18)O compositions. The δ(13)C composition of extracted caffeine differed little from that of the bulk coffee. Stepwise discriminant analysis with jackknife tests, using isotopic and elemental data, provided up to 77% correct classification of regions of production. Samples from Africa and India were readily classified. The wide range in both isotopic and elemental compositions of samples from other regions, specifically Central/South America, resulted in poor discrimination between or within these regions. Simpler X-Y and geo-spatial plots of the isotopic data provided effective visual means to distinguish between coffees from different regions. PMID:26001050

  6. Increased binding of 5-HT1A receptors in a dissociative amnesic patient after the recovery process.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Soichiro; Yasuno, Fumihiko; Inoue, Makoto; Kosaka, Jun; Kiuchi, Kuniaki; Matsuoka, Kiwamu; Kishimoto, Toshifumi; Suhara, Tetsuya

    2014-10-30

    Dissociative amnesia is characterized by an inability to retrieve information already saved in memories. 5-HT has some role in neural regulatory control and may be related to the recovery from dissociative amnesia. To examine the role of 5-HT1A receptors in the recovery from dissociative amnesia, we performed two positron emission tomography (PET) scans on a 30-year-old patient of dissociative amnesia using [(11)C]WAY-100635, the first at amnesic state, and the second at the time he had recovered. Exploratory voxel-based analysis (VBA) was performed using SPM software. 5-HT1A BPND images were compared between the patient at amnesic and recovery states and healthy subjects (14 males, mean age 29.8 ± 6.45) with Jack-knife analysis. 5-HT1A receptor bindings of the patient at the recovery state were significantly higher than those of healthy subjects in the right superior and middle frontal cortex, left inferior frontal and orbitofrontal cortex and bilateral inferior temporal cortex. The increase in BPND values of recovery state was beyond 10% of those of amnesia state in these regions except in the right superior frontal cortex. We considered that neural regulatory control by the increase of 5-HT1A receptors in cortical regions played a role in the recovery from dissociative amnesia.

  7. The potential distribution of Phlebotomus papatasi (Diptera: Psychodidae) in Libya based on ecological niche model.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Dayem, M S; Annajar, B B; Hanafi, H A; Obenauer, P J

    2012-05-01

    The increased cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis vectored by Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli) in Libya have driven considerable effort to develop a predictive model for the potential geographical distribution of this disease. We collected adult P. papatasi from 17 sites in Musrata and Yefern regions of Libya using four different attraction traps. Our trap results and literature records describing the distribution of P. papatasi were incorporated into a MaxEnt algorithm prediction model that used 22 environmental variables. The model showed a high performance (AUC = 0.992 and 0.990 for training and test data, respectively). High suitability for P. papatasi was predicted to be largely confined to the coast at altitudes <600 m. Regions south of 300 degrees N latitude were calculated as unsuitable for this species. Jackknife analysis identified precipitation as having the most significant predictive power, while temperature and elevation variables were less influential. The National Leishmaniasis Control Program in Libya may find this information useful in their efforts to control zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis. Existing records are strongly biased toward a few geographical regions, and therefore, further sand fly collections are warranted that should include documentation of such factors as soil texture and humidity, land cover, and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data to increase the model's predictive power.

  8. RAMPred: identifying the N(1)-methyladenosine sites in eukaryotic transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Feng, Pengmian; Tang, Hua; Ding, Hui; Lin, Hao

    2016-01-01

    N(1)-methyladenosine (m(1)A) is a prominent RNA modification involved in many biological processes. Accurate identification of m(1)A site is invaluable for better understanding the biological functions of m(1)A. However, limitations in experimental methods preclude the progress towards the identification of m(1)A site. As an excellent complement of experimental methods, a support vector machine based-method called RAMPred is proposed to identify m(1)A sites in H. sapiens, M. musculus and S. cerevisiae genomes for the first time. In this method, RNA sequences are encoded by using nucleotide chemical property and nucleotide compositions. RAMPred achieves promising performances in jackknife tests, cross cell line tests and cross species tests, indicating that RAMPred holds very high potential to become a useful tool for identifying m(1)A sites. For the convenience of experimental scientists, a web-server based on the proposed model was constructed and could be freely accessible at http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/RAMPred. PMID:27511610

  9. Assessing long-term pH change in an Australian river catchment using monitoring and palaeolimnological data.

    PubMed

    Tibby, John; Reid, Michael A; Fluin, Jennie; Hart, Barry T; Kershaw, A Peter

    2003-08-01

    Reviews of stream monitoring data suggest that there has been significant acidification (>1.0 pH unit at some sites) of Victorian streamwaters over the past 3 decades. To assess whether these declines are within the range of natural variability, we developed a diatom model for inferring past pH and applied it to a ca. 3500-yr diatom record from a flood plain lake, Callemondah 1 Billabong, on the Goulburn River, which has among the most substantial observed pH declines. The model has a jackkniffed r2 between diatom inferred and measured pH of 0.77 and a root mean square error of prediction of 0.35 pH units. In the pre-European period, pH was stable (range 6.5-6.7) for approximately 3000 yr. Since European settlement around 160 yr ago, diatom-inferred billabong pH has increased significantly by >0.5 units. We hypothesize that this increase in pH is related to processes associated with land clearance (e.g., increased base cation load and decreased organic acid load). There is no evidence of the recent monitored declines in the Callemondah record, which may indicate that that flood plain lakes and the main stream are experiencing divergent pH trends or that the temporal resolution in the billabong sediment record is insufficient to register recent declines. PMID:12966966

  10. Concomitant repair of stress urinary incontinence with proximal urethrovaginal fistula: Our experience

    PubMed Central

    Chodisetti, Subbarao; Boddepalli, Yogesh; Kota, Malakonda Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Proximal urethrovaginal fistula (UVF) located close to the bladder neck may cause extensive sphincter damage and is usually associated with continuous incontinence, which may mask the associated stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Simultaneous correction of SUI avoids a second surgery for SUI, which needs dissection in ischemic fields and carries a high risk of failure. The aim of this study is to describe our technique of concomitant repair of SUI with proximal UVF and our results. Methods: Between July 2010 and August 2014, 14 patients underwent UVF repair in Jackknife position by the interposition of a Martius flap and simultaneous correction of SUI by modified McGuire pubovaginal autologous fascial sling. The procedure was carried out a minimum of 3 months of presentation and after detailed preoperative evaluation. Results: After a mean follow-up of 28 months, all 14 patients were continent. None of the patients developed recurrence of the UVF. Two patients presented with retention immediately after catheter removal and clean intermittent catheterization training was given to both of them. Two patients became pregnant during the follow-up period and were advised cesarean section near term. Conclusions: Repair of proximal UVF and correction of SUI can be performed in the same session to avoid the operation in an ischemic field. PMID:27555683

  11. Visual search for tropical web spiders: the influence of plot length, sampling effort, and phase of the day on species richness.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Leite, C M; Rocha, P L B

    2012-12-01

    Empirical studies using visual search methods to investigate spider communities were conducted with different sampling protocols, including a variety of plot sizes, sampling efforts, and diurnal periods for sampling. We sampled 11 plots ranging in size from 5 by 10 m to 5 by 60 m. In each plot, we computed the total number of species detected every 10 min during 1 hr during the daytime and during the nighttime (0630 hours to 1100 hours, both a.m. and p.m.). We measured the influence of time effort on the measurement of species richness by comparing the curves produced by sample-based rarefaction and species richness estimation (first-order jackknife). We used a general linear model with repeated measures to assess whether the phase of the day during which sampling occurred and the differences in the plot lengths influenced the number of species observed and the number of species estimated. To measure the differences in species composition between the phases of the day, we used a multiresponse permutation procedure and a graphical representation based on nonmetric multidimensional scaling. After 50 min of sampling, we noted a decreased rate of species accumulation and a tendency of the estimated richness curves to reach an asymptote. We did not detect an effect of plot size on the number of species sampled. However, differences in observed species richness and species composition were found between phases of the day. Based on these results, we propose guidelines for visual search for tropical web spiders.

  12. Evaluation of marked-recapture for estimating striped skunk abundance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenwood, R.J.; Sargeant, A.B.; Johnson, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    The mark-recapture method for estimating striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis) abundance was evaluated by systematically livetrapping a radio-equipped population on a 31.4-km2 study area in North Dakota during late April of 1977 and 1978. The study population was 10 females and 13 males in 1977 and 20 females and 8 males in 1978. Skunks were almost exclusively nocturnal. Males traveled greater nightly distances than females (3.3 vs. 2.6 km, P < 0.05) and had larger home ranges (308 vs. 242 ha) although not significantly so. Increased windchill reduced night-time activity. The population was demographically but not geographically closed. Frequency of capture was positively correlated with time skunks spent on the study area. Little variation in capture probabilities was found among trap-nights. Skunks exhibited neither trap-proneness nor shyness. Capture rates in 1977 were higher for males than for females; the reverse occurred in 1978. Variation in individual capture rates was indicated among males in 1977 and among females in 1978. Ten estimators produced generally similar results, but all underestimated true population size. Underestimation was a function of the number of untrapped skunks, primarily those that spent limited time on the study area. The jackknife method produced the best estimates of skunk abundance.

  13. Predicting the potential geographic distribution of cotton mealybug Phenacoccus solenopsis in India based on MAXENT ecological niche model.

    PubMed

    Fand, Babasaheb B; Kumar, Mahesh; Kamble, Ankush L

    2014-09-01

    Mealybug, Phenacoccus solenopsis Tinsley has recently emerged as a serious insect pest of cotton in India. This study demonstrates the use of Maxent algorithm for modeling the potential geographic distribution of P. solenopsis in India with presence-only data. Predictions were made based on the analysis of the relationship between 111 occurrence records for P. solenopsis and the corresponding current and future climate data defined on the study area. The climate data from worldclim database for current (1950-2000) and future (SRES A2 emission scenario for 2050) conditions were used. DIVA-GIS, an open source software for conducting spatial analysis was used for mapping the predictions from Maxent. The algorithm provided reasonable estimates of the species range indicating better discrimination of suitable and unsuitable areas for its occurrence in India under both present and future climatic conditions. The fit for the model as measured by AUC was high, with value of 0.930 for the training data and 0.895 for the test data, indicating the high level of discriminatory power for the Maxent. A Jackknife test for variable importance indicated that mean temperature of coldest quarter with highest gain value was the most important environmental variable determining the potential geographic distribution of P. solenopsis. The approaches used for delineating the ecological niche and prediction of potential geographic distribution are described briefly. Possible applications and limitations of the present modeling approach in future research and as a decision making tool in integrated pest management are discussed.

  14. iPro54-PseKNC: a sequence-based predictor for identifying sigma-54 promoters in prokaryote with pseudo k-tuple nucleotide composition

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hao; Deng, En-Ze; Ding, Hui; Chen, Wei; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2014-01-01

    The σ54 promoters are unique in prokaryotic genome and responsible for transcripting carbon and nitrogen-related genes. With the avalanche of genome sequences generated in the postgenomic age, it is highly desired to develop automated methods for rapidly and effectively identifying the σ54 promoters. Here, a predictor called ‘iPro54-PseKNC’ was developed. In the predictor, the samples of DNA sequences were formulated by a novel feature vector called ‘pseudo k-tuple nucleotide composition’, which was further optimized by the incremental feature selection procedure. The performance of iPro54-PseKNC was examined by the rigorous jackknife cross-validation tests on a stringent benchmark data set. As a user-friendly web-server, iPro54-PseKNC is freely accessible at http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/iPro54-PseKNC. For the convenience of the vast majority of experimental scientists, a step-by-step protocol guide was provided on how to use the web-server to get the desired results without the need to follow the complicated mathematics that were presented in this paper just for its integrity. Meanwhile, we also discovered through an in-depth statistical analysis that the distribution of distances between the transcription start sites and the translation initiation sites were governed by the gamma distribution, which may provide a fundamental physical principle for studying the σ54 promoters. PMID:25361964

  15. Landslide occurrences and recurrence intervals of heavy rainfalls in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, H.; Uchida, T.; Matsuyama, H.; Korup, O.

    2015-12-01

    Dealing with predicted increases in extreme weather conditions due to climate change requires robust knowledge about controls on rainfall-triggered landslides. This study developed the probable rainfall database from weather radar data, and analyzed the potential correlation between the landslide magnitude-frequency and the recurrence interval of the heavy rainfall across Japan. We analyzed 4,744 rainfall-induced landslides (Saito et al., 2014, Geology), 1 to 72 h rainfalls, and soil water index (SWI). We then estimated recurrence intervals for these rainfall parameters using a Gumbel distribution with jackknife fitting. Results showed that the recurrence intervals of rainfall events which caused landslides (<10^3 m^3) were less than 10 yr across Japan. The recurrence intervals increased with increases in landslide volumes. With regard to the landslides larger than 10^5 m^3, recurrence intervals of the rainfall events were more than 100 yr. These results suggest that recurrence intervals of heavy rainfalls are important for assessing regional landslide hazard in Japan.

  16. BICEP2 / Keck Array V: Measurements of B-mode polarization at degree angular scales and 150 GHz by the Keck Array

    SciTech Connect

    Ade, P. A. R.; Ahmed, Z.; Aikin, R. W.; Alexander, K. D.; Barkats, D.; Benton, S. J.; Bischoff, C. A.; Bock, J. J.; Brevik, J. A.; Buder, I.; Bullock, E.; Buza, V.; Connors, J.; Crill, B. P.; Dowell, C. D.; Dvorkin, C.; Duband, L.; Filippini, J. P.; Fliescher, S.; Golwala, S. R.; Halpern, M.; Harrison, S.; Hasselfield, M.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hilton, G. C.; Hristov, V. V.; Hui, H.; Irwin, K. D.; Karkare, K. S.; Kaufman, J. P.; Keating, B. G.; Kefeli, S.; Kernasovskiy, S. A.; Kovac, J. M.; Kuo, C. L.; Leitch, E. M.; Lueker, M.; Mason, P.; Megerian, K. G.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nguyen, H. T.; O’Brient, R.; Ogburn IV, R. W.; Orlando, A.; Pryke, C.; Reintsema, C. D.; Richter, S.; Schwarz, R.; Sheehy, C. D.; Staniszewski, Z. K.; Sudiwala, R. V.; Teply, G. P.; Thompson, K. L.; Tolan, J. E.; Turner, A. D.; Vieregg, A. G.; Weber, A. C.; Willmert, J.; Wong, C. L.; Yoon, K. W.

    2015-09-29

    Here, the Keck Array is a system of cosmic microwave background polarimeters, each similar to the Bicep2 experiment. In this paper we report results from the 2012 to 2013 observing seasons, during which the Keck Array consisted of five receivers all operating in the same (150 GHz) frequency band and observing field as Bicep2. We again find an excess of B-mode power over the lensed-ΛCDM expectation of >5σ in the range 30 < ℓ < 150 and confirm that this is not due to systematics using jackknife tests and simulations based on detailed calibration measurements. In map difference and spectral difference tests these new data are shown to be consistent with Bicep2. Finally, we combine the maps from the two experiments to produce final Q and U maps which have a depth of 57 nK deg (3.4 μK arcmin) over an effective area of 400 deg2 for an equivalent survey weight of 250,000 μK–2. The final BB band powers have noise uncertainty a factor of 2.3 times better than the previous results, and a significance of detection of excess power of >6σ.

  17. Mapping the climatic suitable habitat of oriental arborvitae (Platycladus orientalis) for introduction and cultivation at a global scale.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoqing; Du, Sheng; Wen, Zhongming

    2016-01-01

    Oriental arborvitae (Platycladus orientalis) is an important afforestation and ornamental tree species, which is native in eastern Asian. Therefore, a global suitable habitat map for oriental arborvitae is urgently needed for global promotion and cultivation. Here, the potential habitat and climatic requirements of oriental arborvitae at global scale were simulated using herbariums data and 13 thermal-moisture variables as input data for maximum entropy model (MaxEnt). The simulation performance of MaxEnt is evaluated by ten-fold cross-validation and a jackknife procedure. Results show that the potential habitat and climate envelop of oriental arborvitae can be successfully simulated by MaxEnt at global scale, with a mean test AUC value of 0.93 and mean training AUC value of 0.95. Thermal factors play more important roles than moisture factors in controlling the distribution boundary of oriental arborvitae's potential ranges. There are about 50 countries suitable for introduction and cultivation of oriental arborvitae with an area of 2.0 × 10(7) km(2), which occupied 13.8% of land area on the earth. This unique study will provide valuable information and insights needed to identify new regions with climatically suitable habitats for cultivation and introduction of oriental arborvitae around the world. PMID:27443221

  18. Radiological technologists’ performance for the detection of malignant microcalcifications in digital mammograms without and with a computer-aided detection system

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Rie; Takamori, Miho; Uchiyama, Yoshikazu; Shiraishi, Junji

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic performance of radiological technologists (RTs) in the detection of malignant microcalcifications and to evaluate how much computer-aided detection (CADe) improved their performances compared with those by expert breast radiologists (BRs). Six board-certified breast RTs and four board-certified BRs participated in a free-response receiver operating characteristic observer study. The dataset consisted of 75 cases (25 malignant, 25 benign, and 25 normal cases) of digital mammograms, selected from the digital database for screening mammography provided by the University of South Florida. Average figure of merit (FOM) of the RTs’ performances was statistically analyzed using jack-knife free-response receiver operating characteristic and compared with that of expert BRs. The detection performance of RTs was significantly improved by using CADe; average sensitivity was increased from 46.7% to 56.7%, with a decrease in the average number of false positives per case from 0.19 to 0.13. Detection accuracy of an average FOM was improved from 0.680 to 0.816 (p=0.001) and the difference in FOMs between RTs and radiologists failed to reach statistical significance. RTs’ performances for the identification of malignant microcalcifications on digital mammography were sufficiently high and comparable to those of radiologists by using CADe. PMID:26158109

  19. Estimation of local extreme suspended sediment concentrations in California Rivers.

    PubMed

    Tramblay, Yves; Saint-Hilaire, André; Ouarda, Taha B M J; Moatar, Florentina; Hecht, Barry

    2010-09-01

    The total amount of suspended sediment load carried by a stream during a year is usually transported during one or several extreme events related to high river flow and intense rainfall, leading to very high suspended sediment concentrations (SSCs). In this study quantiles of SSC derived from annual maximums and the 99th percentile of SSC series are considered to be estimated locally in a site-specific approach using regional information. Analyses of relationships between physiographic characteristics and the selected indicators were undertaken using the localities of 5-km radius draining of each sampling site. Multiple regression models were built to test the regional estimation for these indicators of suspended sediment transport. To assess the accuracy of the estimates, a Jack-Knife re-sampling procedure was used to compute the relative bias and root mean square error of the models. Results show that for the 19 stations considered in California, the extreme SSCs can be estimated with 40-60% uncertainty, depending on the presence of flow regulation in the basin. This modelling approach is likely to prove functional in other Mediterranean climate watersheds since they appear useful in California, where geologic, climatic, physiographic, and land-use conditions are highly variable. PMID:20570317

  20. Trophic ecology of largemouth bass and northern pike in allopatric and sympatric assemblages in northern boreal lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soupir, Craig A.; Brown, Michael L.; Kallemeyn, Larry W.

    2000-01-01

    Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and northern pike (Esox lucius) are top predators in the food chain in most aquatic environments that they occupy; however, limited information exists on species interactions in the northern reaches of largemouth bass distribution. We investigated the seasonal food habits of allopatric and sympatric assemblages of largemouth bass and northern pike in six interior lakes within Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota. Percentages of empty stomachs were variable for largemouth bass (38-54%) and northern pike (34.7-66.7%). Fishes (mainly yellow perch, Perca flavescens) comprised greater than 60% (mean percent mass, MPM) of the northern pike diet during all seasons in both allopatric and sympatric assemblages. Aquatic insects (primarily Odonata and Hemiptera) were important in the diets of largemouth bass in all communities (0.0-79.7 MPM). Although largemouth bass were observed in the diet of northern pike, largemouth bass apparently did not prey on northern pike. Seasonal differences were observed in the proportion of aquatic insects (P = 0.010) and fishes (P = 0.023) in the diets of northern pike and largemouth bass. Based on three food categories, jackknifed classifications correctly classified 77 and 92% of northern pike and largemouth bass values, respectively. Percent resource overlap values were biologically significant (greater than 60%) during at least one season in each sympatric assemblage, suggesting some diet overlap.

  1. Improvement of Source Number Estimation Method for Single Channel Signal

    PubMed Central

    Du, Bolun; He, Yunze

    2016-01-01

    Source number estimation methods for single channel signal have been investigated and the improvements for each method are suggested in this work. Firstly, the single channel data is converted to multi-channel form by delay process. Then, algorithms used in the array signal processing, such as Gerschgorin’s disk estimation (GDE) and minimum description length (MDL), are introduced to estimate the source number of the received signal. The previous results have shown that the MDL based on information theoretic criteria (ITC) obtains a superior performance than GDE at low SNR. However it has no ability to handle the signals containing colored noise. On the contrary, the GDE method can eliminate the influence of colored noise. Nevertheless, its performance at low SNR is not satisfactory. In order to solve these problems and contradictions, the work makes remarkable improvements on these two methods on account of the above consideration. A diagonal loading technique is employed to ameliorate the MDL method and a jackknife technique is referenced to optimize the data covariance matrix in order to improve the performance of the GDE method. The results of simulation have illustrated that the performance of original methods have been promoted largely. PMID:27736959

  2. PSSP-RFE: Accurate Prediction of Protein Structural Class by Recursive Feature Extraction from PSI-BLAST Profile, Physical-Chemical Property and Functional Annotations

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Sanjiu; Zhang, Yuan; Luo, Zhong; Yang, Hua; Zhou, Yue; Zheng, Xiaoqi

    2014-01-01

    Protein structure prediction is critical to functional annotation of the massively accumulated biological sequences, which prompts an imperative need for the development of high-throughput technologies. As a first and key step in protein structure prediction, protein structural class prediction becomes an increasingly challenging task. Amongst most homological-based approaches, the accuracies of protein structural class prediction are sufficiently high for high similarity datasets, but still far from being satisfactory for low similarity datasets, i.e., below 40% in pairwise sequence similarity. Therefore, we present a novel method for accurate and reliable protein structural class prediction for both high and low similarity datasets. This method is based on Support Vector Machine (SVM) in conjunction with integrated features from position-specific score matrix (PSSM), PROFEAT and Gene Ontology (GO). A feature selection approach, SVM-RFE, is also used to rank the integrated feature vectors through recursively removing the feature with the lowest ranking score. The definitive top features selected by SVM-RFE are input into the SVM engines to predict the structural class of a query protein. To validate our method, jackknife tests were applied to seven widely used benchmark datasets, reaching overall accuracies between 84.61% and 99.79%, which are significantly higher than those achieved by state-of-the-art tools. These results suggest that our method could serve as an accurate and cost-effective alternative to existing methods in protein structural classification, especially for low similarity datasets. PMID:24675610

  3. Application of species richness estimators for the assessment of fungal diversity.

    PubMed

    Unterseher, Martin; Schnittler, Martin; Dormann, Carsten; Sickert, Andreas

    2008-05-01

    Species richness and distribution patterns of wood-inhabiting fungi and mycetozoans (slime moulds) were investigated in the canopy of a Central European temperate mixed deciduous forest. Species richness was described with diversity indices and species-accumulation curves. Nonmetrical multidimensional scaling was used to assess fungal species composition on different tree species. Different species richness estimators were used to extrapolate species richness beyond our own data. The reliability of the abundance-based coverage estimator, Chao, Jackknife and other estimators of species richness was evaluated for mycological surveys. While the species-accumulation curve of mycetozoans came close to saturation, that of wood-inhabiting fungi was continuously rising. The Chao 2 richness estimator was considered most appropriate to predict the number of species at the investigation site if sampling were continued. Gray's predictor of species richness should be used if statements of the number of species in larger areas are required. Multivariate analysis revealed the importance of different tree species for the conservation and maintenance of fungal diversity within forests, because each tree species possessed a characteristic fungal community. The described mathematical approaches of estimating species richness possess great potential to address fungal diversity on a regional, national, and global scale. PMID:18355274

  4. Stability and Uncertainty of Full Moment Tensor Solutions for M < 3.5 Induced Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, O. S.; Dreger, D. S.

    2014-12-01

    The increase in earthquakes associated with industrial activities has created a need to investigate and characterize the source physics of induced seismicity. Many techniques and approaches are available to determine representative source parameters of these events. For M > 3.5 events, high quality seismic data from regional networks can be used to provide reasonable estimates of moment tensor solutions. In this investigation we explore various techniques and datasets to constrain full moment tensor solutions of M < 3.5 induced events, expanding upon the approach developed by Guilhem et al., 2014. Small magnitude events recorded by local seismic networks can yield good quality data with distinct body wave and converted phases depending upon the velocity structure and frequency range. Generating synthetic seismograms or Green's functions to accurately model these high frequency phases can be challenging. To investigate the variability associated with the choice of Green's functions, we test available codes to see how well they capture body wave phases. Other stability and uncertainty measures include the F-test, Jackknife test, residual bootstrap, and Network Sensitivity Solution, (Ford et al., 2009; Ford et al., 2010). Additional datasets to constrain the full moment tensor solution include P-wave first motions and amplitude ratios.

  5. Technical note: comparing von Luschan skin color tiles and modern spectrophotometry for measuring human skin pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Swiatoniowski, Anna K; Quillen, Ellen E; Shriver, Mark D; Jablonski, Nina G

    2013-06-01

    Prior to the introduction of reflectance spectrophotometry into anthropological field research during the 1950s, human skin color was most commonly classified by visual skin color matching using the von Luschan tiles, a set of 36 standardized, opaque glass tiles arranged in a chromatic scale. Our goal was to establish a conversion formula between the tile-based color matching method and modern reflectance spectrophotometry to make historical and contemporary data comparable. Skin pigmentation measurements were taken on the forehead, inner upper arms, and backs of the hands using both the tiles and a spectrophotometer on 246 participants showing a broad range of skin pigmentation. From these data, a second-order polynomial conversion formula was derived by jackknife analysis to estimate melanin index (M-index) based on tile values. This conversion formula provides a means for comparing modern data to von Luschan tile measurements recorded in historical reports. This is particularly important for populations now extinct, extirpated, or admixed for which tile-based measures of skin pigmentation are the only data available.

  6. Application of species richness estimators for the assessment of fungal diversity.

    PubMed

    Unterseher, Martin; Schnittler, Martin; Dormann, Carsten; Sickert, Andreas

    2008-05-01

    Species richness and distribution patterns of wood-inhabiting fungi and mycetozoans (slime moulds) were investigated in the canopy of a Central European temperate mixed deciduous forest. Species richness was described with diversity indices and species-accumulation curves. Nonmetrical multidimensional scaling was used to assess fungal species composition on different tree species. Different species richness estimators were used to extrapolate species richness beyond our own data. The reliability of the abundance-based coverage estimator, Chao, Jackknife and other estimators of species richness was evaluated for mycological surveys. While the species-accumulation curve of mycetozoans came close to saturation, that of wood-inhabiting fungi was continuously rising. The Chao 2 richness estimator was considered most appropriate to predict the number of species at the investigation site if sampling were continued. Gray's predictor of species richness should be used if statements of the number of species in larger areas are required. Multivariate analysis revealed the importance of different tree species for the conservation and maintenance of fungal diversity within forests, because each tree species possessed a characteristic fungal community. The described mathematical approaches of estimating species richness possess great potential to address fungal diversity on a regional, national, and global scale.

  7. Exploratory Structural Equation Modeling of Resting-state fMRI: applicability of group models to individual subjects

    PubMed Central

    James, G. Andrew; Kelley, Mary E.; Craddock, R. Cameron; Holtzheimer, Paul E.; Dunlop, Boadie; Nemeroff, Charles; Mayberg, Helen S.; Hu, Xiaoping P.

    2009-01-01

    The extension of group-level connectivity methods to individual subjects remains a hurdle for statistical analyses of neuroimaging data. Previous group analyses of positron emission tomography data in clinically depressed patients, for example, have shown that resting-state connectivity prior to therapy predicts how patients eventually respond to pharmacological and cognitive-behavioral therapy. Such applications would be considerably more informative for clinical decision making if these connectivity methods could be extended into the individual subject domain. To test such an extension, 46 treatment-naïve depressed patients were enrolled in an fMRI study to model baseline resting-state functional connectivity. Resting-state fMRI scans were acquired and submitted to exploratory structural equation modeling (SEM) to derive the optimal group connectivity model. Jackknife and split sample tests confirm that group model was highly reproducible, and path weights were consistent across the best five group models. When this model was applied to data from individual subjects, 85% of patients fit the group model. Histogram analysis of individual subjects’ paths indicate that some paths are better representative of group membership. These results suggest that exploratory SEM is a viable technique for neuroimaging connectivity analyses of individual subjects’ resting-state fMRI data. PMID:19162206

  8. iCataly-PseAAC: Identification of Enzymes Catalytic Sites Using Sequence Evolution Information with Grey Model GM (2,1).

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xuan; Hui, Meng-Juan; Liu, Zi; Qiu, Wang-Ren

    2015-12-01

    Enzymes play pivotal roles in most of the biological reaction. The catalytic residues of an enzyme are defined as the amino acids which are directly involved in chemical catalysis; the knowledge of these residues is important for understanding enzyme function. Given an enzyme, which residues are the catalytic sites, and which residues are not? This is the first important problem for in-depth understanding the catalytic mechanism and drug development. With the explosive of protein sequences generated during the post-genomic era, it is highly desirable for both basic research and drug design to develop fast and reliable method for identifying the catalytic sites of enzymes according to their sequences. To address this problem, we proposed a new predictor, called iCataly-PseAAC. In the prediction system, the peptide sample was formulated with sequence evolution information via grey system model GM(2,1). It was observed by the rigorous jackknife test and independent dataset test that iCataly-PseAAC was superior to exist predictions though its only use sequence information. As a user-friendly web server, iCataly-PseAAC is freely accessible at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iCataly-PseAAC. A step-by-step guide has been provided on how to use the web server to get the desired results for the convenience of most experimental scientists.

  9. Impact of climate change on communities: revealing species' contribution.

    PubMed

    Davey, Catherine M; Devictor, Vincent; Jonzén, Niclas; Lindström, Ake; Smith, Henrik G

    2013-05-01

    1. Although climate is known to play an important role in structuring biological communities, high-resolution analyses of recent climatic impacts on multiple components of diversity are still sparse. Additionally, there is a lack of knowledge about which species drive community response to environmental change. 2. We used a long-term breeding bird data set that encompasses a large latitudinal and altitudinal range to model the effect of temperature on spatial and temporal patterns in alpha and beta diversity. We also established a novel framework for identifying species-specific contributions to these macroecological patterns, hence combining two different approaches for identifying climatic impacts. 3. Alpha diversity increased over time, whilst beta diversity declined; both diversity metrics showed a significant relationship with recent temperature anomalies. By partitioning beta diversity, we showed that the decline was predominately driven by changes in species turnover rather than nestedness suggesting a process of replacement by more common species. 4. Using jackknife analyses we identified how individual species influenced the modelled relationships of diversity with temperature and time. Influential species tended to be habitat generalists with moderate to large distributions. 5. We demonstrate that different facets of avian diversity can respond rapidly to temperature anomalies and as a result have undergone significant changes in the last decade. In general, it appears that warming temperatures are driving compositional homogenization of temperate bird communities via range expansion of common generalist species.

  10. Statistics and frequency-domain moveout for multiple-taper receiver functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Levin, V.

    2016-10-01

    The multiple-taper correlation (MTC) algorithm for the estimation of teleseismic receiver functions (RFs) has desirable statistical properties. This paper presents several adaptations to the MTC algorithm that exploit its frequency-domain uncertainty estimates to generate stable RFs that include moveout corrections for deeper interfaces. Narrow-band frequency averaging implicit in spectral cross-correlation restricts the MTC-based RF estimates to resolve Ps converted phases only at short delay times, appropriate to the upper 100 km of Earth's lithosphere. The Ps conversions from deeper interfaces can be reconstructed by the MTC algorithm in two ways. Event cross-correlation computes a cross-correlation of single-taper spectrum estimates for a cluster of events rather than for a set of eigenspectrum estimates of a single P coda. To extend the reach of the algorithm, pre-stack moveout corrections in the frequency domain preserves the formal uncertainties of the RF estimates, which are used to weight RF stacks. Moving-window migration retains the multiple-taper approach, but cross-correlates the P-polarized motion with time-delayed SH and SV motion to focus on a Ps phase of interest. The frequency-domain uncertainties of bin-averaged RFs do not translate directly into the time domain. A jackknife over data records in each bin stack offers uncertainty estimates in the time domain while preserving uncertainty weighting in the frequency-domain RF stack.

  11. Benthic macroinvertebrate community in the Sinos river drainage basin, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barros, M P; Gayeski, L M; Tundisi, J G

    2016-06-27

    Aquatic macroinvertebrate fauna is a relevant component of limnic continental aquatic ecosystems, playing an important role in several processes with relevant biocomplexity. The present study characterized the benthic macroinvertebrate fauna found in three hydric bodies in the Sinos river drainage basin regarding community structure. Sample was collected from January to December 2013 in three locations in the basin: the city of Caraá (29 °45'45.5"S/50°19'37.3"W), the city of Rolante (29°38'34.4"S/50°32'33.2"W) and the city of Igrejinha (29°36'10.84"S/50°48'49.3"W). Abiotic components (pH, dissolved oxygen and temperature) were registered and collected samples were identified up to family type. Average annual pH, dissolved oxygen and temperature were similar in all locations. A total of 26,170 samples were collected. Class Insecta (Arthropods) represented 85.5% of total sample. Platyhelmintes, Mollusca and Annelida samples were also registered. A total of 57 families were identified for the drainage basin and estimators (Chao-1, Chao-2 and jackknife 2) estimated richness varying from 60 to 72 families. PMID:27355982

  12. A novel approach to predict active sites of enzyme molecules.

    PubMed

    Chou, Kuo-Chen; Cai, Yu-dong

    2004-04-01

    Enzymes are critical in many cellular signaling cascades. With many enzyme structures being solved, there is an increasing need to develop an automated method for identifying their active sites. However, given the atomic coordinates of an enzyme molecule, how can we predict its active site? This is a vitally important problem because the core of an enzyme molecule is its active site from the viewpoints of both pure scientific research and industrial application. In this article, a topological entity was introduced to characterize the enzymatic active site. Based on such a concept, the covariant discriminant algorithm was formulated for identifying the active site. As a paradigm, the serine hydrolase family was demonstrated. The overall success rate by jackknife test for a data set of 88 enzyme molecules was 99.92%, and that for a data set of 50 independent enzyme molecules was 99.91%. Meanwhile, it was shown through an example that the prediction algorithm can also be used to find any typographic error of a PDB file in annotating the constituent amino acids of catalytic triad and to suggest a possible correction. The very high success rates are due to the introduction of a covariance matrix in the prediction algorithm that makes allowance for taking into account the coupling effects among the key constituent atoms of active site. It is anticipated that the novel approach is quite promising and may become a useful high throughput tool in enzymology, proteomics, and structural bioinformatics. PMID:14997541

  13. Construction of Abdominal Probabilistic Atlases and Their Value in Segmentation of Normal Organs in Abdominal CT Scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyunjin; Hero, Alfred; Bland, Peyton; Kessler, Marc; Seo, Jongbum; Meyer, Charles

    A good abdominal probabilistic atlas can provide important information to guide segmentation and registration applications in the abdomen. Here we build and test probabilistic atlases using 24 abdominal CT scans with available expert manual segmentations. Atlases are built by picking a target and mapping other training scans onto that target and then summing the results into one probabilistic atlas. We improve our previous abdominal atlas by 1) choosing a least biased target as determined by a statistical tool, i.e. multidimensional scaling operating on bending energy, 2) using a better set of control points to model the deformation, and 3) using higher information content CT scans with visible internal liver structures. One atlas is built in the least biased target space and two atlases are built in other target spaces for performance comparisons. The value of an atlas is assessed based on the resulting segmentations; whichever atlas yields the best segmentation performance is considered the better atlas. We consider two segmentation methods of abdominal volumes after registration with the probabilistic atlas: 1) simple segmentation by atlas thresholding and 2) application of a Bayesian maximum a posteriori method. Using jackknifing we measure the atlas-augmented segmentation performance with respect to manual expert segmentation and show that the atlas built in the least biased target space yields better segmentation performance than atlases built in other target spaces.

  14. iDPF-PseRAAAC: A Web-Server for Identifying the Defensin Peptide Family and Subfamily Using Pseudo Reduced Amino Acid Alphabet Composition

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Yongchun; Lv, Yang; Wei, Zhuying; Yang, Lei; Li, Guangpeng; Fan, Guoliang

    2015-01-01

    Defensins as one of the most abundant classes of antimicrobial peptides are an essential part of the innate immunity that has evolved in most living organisms from lower organisms to humans. To identify specific defensins as interesting antifungal leads, in this study, we constructed a more rigorous benchmark dataset and the iDPF-PseRAAAC server was developed to predict the defensin family and subfamily. Using reduced dipeptide compositions were used, the overall accuracy of proposed method increased to 95.10% for the defensin family, and 98.39% for the vertebrate subfamily, which is higher than the accuracy from other methods. The jackknife test shows that more than 4% improvement was obtained comparing with the previous method. A free online server was further established for the convenience of most experimental scientists at http://wlxy.imu.edu.cn/college/biostation/fuwu/iDPF-PseRAAAC/index.asp. A friendly guide is provided to describe how to use the web server. We anticipate that iDPF-PseRAAAC may become a useful high-throughput tool for both basic research and drug design. PMID:26713618

  15. Human DNA Ligase III Recognizes DNA Ends by Dynamic Switching between Two DNA-Bound States

    SciTech Connect

    Cotner-Gohara, Elizabeth; Kim, In-Kwon; Hammel, Michal; Tainer, John A.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Ellenberger, Tom

    2010-09-13

    Human DNA ligase III has essential functions in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA replication and repair and contains a PARP-like zinc finger (ZnF) that increases the extent of DNA nick joining and intermolecular DNA ligation, yet the bases for ligase III specificity and structural variation among human ligases are not understood. Here combined crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering results reveal dynamic switching between two nick-binding components of ligase III: the ZnF-DNA binding domain (DBD) forms a crescent-shaped surface used for DNA end recognition which switches to a ring formed by the nucleotidyl transferase (NTase) and OB-fold (OBD) domains for catalysis. Structural and mutational analyses indicate that high flexibility and distinct DNA binding domain features in ligase III assist both nick sensing and the transition from nick sensing by the ZnF to nick joining by the catalytic core. The collective results support a 'jackknife model' in which the ZnF loads ligase III onto nicked DNA and conformational changes deliver DNA into the active site. This work has implications for the biological specificity of DNA ligases and functions of PARP-like zinc fingers.

  16. DephosSite: a machine learning approach for discovering phosphotase-specific dephosphorylation sites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Yan, Renxiang; Song, Jiangning

    2016-01-01

    Protein dephosphorylation, which is an inverse process of phosphorylation, plays a crucial role in a myriad of cellular processes, including mitotic cycle, proliferation, differentiation, and cell growth. Compared with tyrosine kinase substrate and phosphorylation site prediction, there is a paucity of studies focusing on computational methods of predicting protein tyrosine phosphatase substrates and dephosphorylation sites. In this work, we developed two elegant models for predicting the substrate dephosphorylation sites of three specific phosphatases, namely, PTP1B, SHP-1, and SHP-2. The first predictor is called MGPS-DEPHOS, which is modified from the GPS (Group-based Prediction System) algorithm with an interpretable capability. The second predictor is called CKSAAP-DEPHOS, which is built through the combination of support vector machine (SVM) and the composition of k-spaced amino acid pairs (CKSAAP) encoding scheme. Benchmarking experiments using jackknife cross validation and 30 repeats of 5-fold cross validation tests show that MGPS-DEPHOS and CKSAAP-DEPHOS achieved AUC values of 0.921, 0.914 and 0.912, for predicting dephosphorylation sites of the three phosphatases PTP1B, SHP-1, and SHP-2, respectively. Both methods outperformed the previously developed kNN-DEPHOS algorithm. In addition, a web server implementing our algorithms is publicly available at http://genomics.fzu.edu.cn/dephossite/ for the research community.

  17. Gneg-mPLoc: a top-down strategy to enhance the quality of predicting subcellular localization of Gram-negative bacterial proteins.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong-Bin; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2010-05-21

    By incorporating the information of gene ontology, functional domain, and sequential evolution, a new predictor called Gneg-mPLoc was developed. It can be used to identify Gram-negative bacterial proteins among the following eight locations: (1) cytoplasm, (2) extracellular, (3) fimbrium, (4) flagellum, (5) inner membrane, (6) nucleoid, (7) outer membrane, and (8) periplasm. It can also be used to deal with the case when a query protein may simultaneously exist in more than one location. Compared with the original predictor called Gneg-PLoc, the new predictor is much more powerful and flexible. For a newly constructed stringent benchmark dataset in which none of proteins included has >or=25% pairwise sequence identity to any other in a same subset (location), the overall jackknife success rate achieved by Gneg-mPLoc was 85.5%, which was more than 14% higher than the corresponding rate by the Gneg-PLoc. As a user friendly web-server, Gneg-mPLoc is freely accessible at http://www.csbio.sjtu.edu.cn/bioinf/Gneg-multi/.

  18. Gpos-mPLoc: a top-down approach to improve the quality of predicting subcellular localization of Gram-positive bacterial proteins.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong-Bin; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a new predictor called "Gpos-mPLoc", is developed for identifying the subcellular localization of Gram positive bacterial proteins by fusing the information of gene ontology, as well as the functional domain information and sequential evolution information. Compared with the old Gpos-PLoc, the new predictor is much more powerful and flexible. Particularly, it also has the capacity to deal with multiple-location proteins as indicated by the character "m" in front of "PLoc" of its name. For a newly-constructed stringent benchmark dataset in which none of included proteins has > 25% pairwise sequence identity to any other in a same subset (location), the overall jackknife success rate achieved by Gpos-mPLoc was 82.2%, which was about 10% higher than the corresponding rate by the Gpos-PLoc. As a user friendly web-server, Gpos-mPLoc is freely accessible at http://www.csbio.sjtu.edu.cn/bioinf/Gpos-multi/.

  19. PSCL: predicting protein subcellular localization based on optimal functional domains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Hu, Le-Le; Shi, Xiao-He; Dong, Ying-Song; Li, Hai-Peng; Wen, Tie-Qiao

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that protein subcellular localizations are closely related to their functions. Although many computational methods and tools are available from Internet, it is still necessary to develop new algorithms in this filed to gain a better understanding of the complex mechanism of plant subcellular localization. Here, we provide a new web server named PSCL for plant protein subcellular localization prediction by employing optimized functional domains. After feature optimization, 848 optimal functional domains from InterPro were obtained to represent each protein. By calculating the distances to each of the seven categories, PSCL showing the possibilities of a protein located into each of those categories in ascending order. Toward our dataset, PSCL achieved a first-order predicted accuracy of 75.7% by jackknife test. Gene Ontology enrichment analysis showing that catalytic activity, cellular process and metabolic process are strongly correlated with the localization of plant proteins. Finally, PSCL, a Linux Operate System based web interface for the predictor was designed and is accessible for public use at http://pscl.biosino.org/.

  20. iMem-Seq: A Multi-label Learning Classifier for Predicting Membrane Proteins Types.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xuan; Zou, Hong-Liang; Lin, Wei-Zhong

    2015-08-01

    Predicting membrane protein type is a challenging problem, particularly when the query proteins may simultaneously have two or more different types. Most of the existing methods can only be used to deal with the single-label proteins. Actually, multiple-label proteins should not be ignored because they usually bear some special functions worthy of in-depth studies. By introducing the "multi-labeled learning" and hybridizing evolution information through Grey-PSSM, a novel predictor called iMem-Seq is developed that can be used to deal with the systems containing both single and multiple types of membrane proteins. As a demonstration, the jackknife cross-validation was performed with iMem-Seq on a benchmark dataset of membrane proteins classified into the eight types, where some proteins belong to two or there types, but none has ≥25% pairwise sequence identity to any other in a same subset. It was demonstrated via the rigorous cross-validations that the new predictor remarkably outperformed all its counterparts. As a user-friendly web-server, iMem-Seq is freely accessible to the public at the website http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iMem-Seq .

  1. Adolescent Ecstasy and other drug use in the National Survey of Parents and Youth: the role of sensation-seeking, parental monitoring and peer’s drug use

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Silvia S.; Storr, Carla L.; Alexandre, Pierre K.; Chilcoat, Howard D.

    2008-01-01

    The association between high sensation-seeking, close friends’ drug use and low parental monitoring with Ecstasy (MDMA) use in adolescence was examined in a sample of US household-dwelling adolescents aged 12–18 years (N=5,049). We also tested whether associations were of stronger magnitude than associations between these correlates and marijuana or alcohol/tobacco use in adolescence. Data from Round 2 of the National Survey of Parents and Youth (NSPY) Restricted Use Files (RUF) was analyzed via Jackknife weighted multinomial logistic regression models. High sensation-seekers were more likely to be ecstasy, marijuana, and alcohol/tobacco users, respectively, as compared to low sensation-seekers. High sensation-seeking and close friends’ drug use were more strongly associated with ecstasy as compared to marijuana and alcohol/tobacco use. Low parental monitoring was associated with marijuana use and alcohol/tobacco use and there was a trend for it to be associated with ecstasy use. Ecstasy use is strongly associated with peer drug use and more modestly associated with high sensation-seeking. School prevention programs should target high-sensation-seeking adolescents and also encourage them to affiliate with non-drug using peers. PMID:18355973

  2. Identification of New Candidate Genes and Chemicals Related to Esophageal Cancer Using a Hybrid Interaction Network of Chemicals and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Junbao; Li, Li-Peng; He, Yi-Chun; Gao, Ru-Jian; Cai, Yu-Dong; Jiang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a serious disease responsible for many deaths every year in both developed and developing countries. One reason is that the mechanisms underlying most types of cancer are still mysterious, creating a great block for the design of effective treatments. In this study, we attempted to clarify the mechanism underlying esophageal cancer by searching for novel genes and chemicals. To this end, we constructed a hybrid network containing both proteins and chemicals, and generalized an existing computational method previously used to identify disease genes to identify new candidate genes and chemicals simultaneously. Based on jackknife test, our generalized method outperforms or at least performs at the same level as those obtained by a widely used method - the Random Walk with Restart (RWR). The analysis results of the final obtained genes and chemicals demonstrated that they highly shared gene ontology (GO) terms and KEGG pathways with direct and indirect associations with esophageal cancer. In addition, we also discussed the likelihood of selected candidate genes and chemicals being novel genes and chemicals related to esophageal cancer. PMID:26058041

  3. Prediction of space sickness in astronauts from preflight fluid, electrolyte, and cardiovascular variables and Weightless Environmental Training Facility (WETF) training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simanonok, K.; Mosely, E.; Charles, J.

    1992-01-01

    Nine preflight variables related to fluid, electrolyte, and cardiovascular status from 64 first-time Shuttle crewmembers were differentially weighted by discrimination analysis to predict the incidence and severity of each crewmember's space sickness as rated by NASA flight surgeons. The nine variables are serum uric acid, red cell count, environmental temperature at the launch site, serum phosphate, urine osmolality, serum thyroxine, sitting systolic blood pressure, calculated blood volume, and serum chloride. Using two methods of cross-validation on the original samples (jackknife and a stratefied random subsample), these variables enable the prediction of space sickness incidence (NONE or SICK) with 80 percent sickness and space severity (NONE, MILD, MODERATE, of SEVERE) with 59 percent success by one method of cross-validation and 67 percent by another method. Addition of a tenth variable, hours spent in the Weightlessness Environment Training Facility (WETF) did not improve the prediction of space sickness incidences but did improve the prediction of space sickness severity to 66 percent success by the first method of cross-validation of original samples and to 71 percent by the second method. Results to date suggest the presence of predisposing physiologic factors to space sickness that implicate fluid shift etiology. The data also suggest that prior exposure to fluid shift during WETF training may produce some circulatory pre-adaption to fluid shifts in weightlessness that results in a reduction of space sickness severity.

  4. Roselliniella revealed as an overlooked genus of Hypocreales, with the description of a second species on parmelioid lichens.

    PubMed

    Hawksworth, D L; Millanes, A M; Wedin, M

    2010-06-01

    Based on newly obtained 28S rDNA sequences from Roselliniella atlantica and R. euparmeliicola sp. nov., the genus Roselliniella has to be placed in Hypocreales and not in Sordariales; however, the family placement could not be resolved from the sequences obtained. The mature ascospores are single-celled and brown, but young ascospores are hyaline and sometimes have a median septum. The new species occurs on a Parmelia s.str. species in China, and differs in 24 nucleotide substitution positions in the nu-LSU rDNA region and ascospore size from R. atlantica. In this case, small variations in ascospore sizes and shape prove to be phylogenetically and taxonomically informative. The two species occur in the same clade with 95 % jack-knife support. Roselliniella atlantica occurs on Xanthoparmelia and Melanohalea species in Europe, whereas R. euparmeliicola was found on the species of Parmelia s.str. DNA was successfully recovered from a dried specimen of R. atlantica collected in 1992. Two unidentified fungi were also recovered from the Chinese specimen, and these belong to Sordariomycetidae and Dothideomycetes; whether these two are additional fungi living endolichenically in the lichen host, saprobes, or contaminants could not be ascertained.

  5. Driver assistance system for passive multi-trailer vehicles with haptic steering limitations on the leading unit.

    PubMed

    Morales, Jesús; Mandow, Anthony; Martínez, Jorge L; Reina, Antonio J; García-Cerezo, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Driving vehicles with one or more passive trailers has difficulties in both forward and backward motion due to inter-unit collisions, jackknife, and lack of visibility. Consequently, advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) for multi-trailer combinations can be beneficial to accident avoidance as well as to driver comfort. The ADAS proposed in this paper aims to prevent unsafe steering commands by means of a haptic handwheel. Furthermore, when driving in reverse, the steering-wheel and pedals can be used as if the vehicle was driven from the back of the last trailer with visual aid from a rear-view camera. This solution, which can be implemented in drive-by-wire vehicles with hitch angle sensors, profits from two methods previously developed by the authors: safe steering by applying a curvature limitation to the leading unit, and a virtual tractor concept for backward motion that includes the complex case of set-point propagation through on-axle hitches. The paper addresses system requirements and provides implementation details to tele-operate two different off- and on-axle combinations of a tracked mobile robot pulling and pushing two dissimilar trailers.

  6. Exercise testing after myocardial infarction: relative values of the low level predischarge and the postdischarge exercise test.

    PubMed

    Senaratne, M P; Hsu, L A; Rossall, R E; Kappagoda, C T

    1988-12-01

    This study was undertaken to compare the relative values of the low level predischarge exercise test and the postdischarge (6 weeks) symptom-limited test in 518 consecutive patients admitted with an acute myocardial infarction. Of the patients who did not develop significant ST segment depression or angina during the predischarge test, the symptom-limited test also remained negative in 91.5 and 91.9% of the patients, respectively. Similar results were obtained with ST segment elevation and the systolic blood pressure response during the two exercise tests with only 2.1 and 11.4% changing from normal to abnormal, respectively. Discriminant function analysis was done to predict the occurrence of coronary events (unstable angina, reinfarction, cardiac failure, cardiac death) with use of the data from the exercise tests together with other clinical and investigational data. The jackknife method correctly classified 71.9 and 71.4% of the patients with the data from the predischarge exercise test and symptom-limited test, respectively. Combining the data from the two tests improved the overall predictive accuracy to only 75.0%. It is concluded that the routine performance of a symptom-limited test 6 to 8 weeks after infarction does not reveal any significant additional information in those patients who have undergone a predischarge low level exercise test. Thus the 6 to 8 week test should be restricted to selected patients after myocardial infarction.

  7. The Effects of Topography on Shortwave solar radiation modelling: The JGrass-NewAge System way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abera, Wuletawu; Formetta, Giuseppe; Rigon, Riccardo

    2013-04-01

    The NewAGE-SwRB and NewAGE-DEC-MOD's are the two components of JGrass-NewAge hydrological modeling system to estimate the shortwave incident radiation. Shortwave solar radiation at the land surface is influenced by topographic parameters such as slope, aspect, altitude, and skyview factor, hence, detail analyses and discussions on their effect is the way to improve the modeling approach. The NewAGE-SwRB accounts for slope, aspect, shadow and the topographical information of the sites to estimate the cloudless irradiance. The first part of the paper is on the topographic parameter analysis using Udig GIS spatial toolbox, which is integrated in JGrass-NewAge system, and indicates the effect of each topographic parameters on the shortwave radiation. A statistical study on station topographic geometry (slope, aspect, altitude and Sky-view factor) and correlation of pairs of measurements of station analyzed to get closer look at the impact of rugged topography. The jackknife correlation coefficients has been used to analyze the estimate bias between shortwave radiations in different topographic geometric position, thereby helping to develop generalized linear models to explain the impacts of those topographic features. In addition to the NewAGE-SwRB accounts for the topographical parameters, there are three (an estimation of the visibility extent(V), the single-scattering albedo fraction of incident energy scattered to total attenuation by aerosols (Wo), and fraction of forward scattering to total scattering (Fs )) parameter needed to run the NewAGE-DEC-MOD's component. Sufficient knowledge regarding the magnitude and spatial distribution of the these parameters are very crucial. In this paper, the particle swarm NewAge component of the NewAge System used for automatic calibration of NewAGE-DEC-MOD's parameters for each stations based on different optimization and objective functions. Finally, the estimated parameters for all measurements station are interpolated in

  8. A limited sampling strategy for tacrolimus in renal transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Binu S; Fleming, Denise H; Jeyaseelan, Visalakshi; Chandy, Sujith J; Annapandian, V M; Subbanna, P K; John, George T

    2008-01-01

    AIMS To develop and validate limited sampling strategy (LSS) equations to estimate area under the curve (AUC0–12) in renal transplant patients. METHODS Twenty-nine renal transplant patients (3–6 months post transplant) who were at steady state with respect to tacrolimus kinetics were included in this study. The blood samples starting with the predose (trough) and collected at fixed time points for 12 h were analysed by microparticle enzyme immunoassay. Linear regression analysis estimated the correlations of tacrolimus concentrations at different sampling time points with the total measured AUC0–12. By applying multiple stepwise linear regression analysis, LSS equations with acceptable correlation coefficients (R2), bias and precision were identified. The predictive performance of these models was validated by the jackknife technique. RESULTS Three models were identified, all with R2 ≥ 0.907. Two point models included one with trough (C0) and 1.5 h postdose (C1.5), another with trough and 4 h postdose. Increasing the number of sampling time points to more than two increased R2 marginally (0.951 to 0.990). After jackknife validation, the two sampling time point (trough and 1.5 h postdose) model accurately predicted AUC0–12. Regression coefficient R2 = 0.951, intraclass correlation = 0.976, bias [95% confidence interval (CI)] 0.53% (−2.63, 3.69) and precision (95% CI) 6.35% (4.36, 8.35). CONCLUSION The two-point LSS equation [AUC0–12 = 19.16 + (6.75.C0) + (3.33.C1.5)] can be used as a predictable and accurate measure of AUC0–12 in stable renal transplant patients prescribed prednisolone and mycophenolate. WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THE SUBJECTTacrolimus trough concentration is being currently used for dose individualization.Limited sampling strategies (LSS) have been developed and validated for renal transplant patients.Earlier literature has suggested that measurement of tacrolimus AUC is more reliable than trough with respect to both rejection and

  9. [Seasonal evaluation of mammal species richness and abundance in the "Mário Viana" municipal reserve, Mato Grosso, Brasil].

    PubMed

    Rocha, Ednaldo Cândido; Silva, Elias; Martins, Sebastião Venâncio; Barreto, Francisco Cândido Cardoso

    2006-09-01

    We evaluated seasonal species presence and richness, and abundance of medium and large sized mammalian terrestrial fauna in the "Mário Viana" Municipal Biological Reserve, Nova Xavantina, Mato Grosso, Brazil. During 2001, two monthly visits were made to an established transect, 2,820 m in length. Records of 22 mammal species were obtained and individual footprint sequences quantified for seasonal calculation of species richness and relative abundance index (x footprints/km traveled). All 22 species occurred during the rainy season, but only 18 during the dry season. Pseudalopex vetulus (Lund, 1842) (hoary fox), Eira barbara (Linnaeus, 1758) (tayra), Puma concolor (Linnaeus, 1771) (cougar) and Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris (Linnaeus, 1766) (capybara) were only registered during the rainy season. The species diversity estimated using the Jackknife procedure in the dry season (19.83, CI = 2.73) was smaller than in the rainy season (25.67, CI = 3.43). Among the 18 species common in the two seasons, only four presented significantly different abundance indexes: Dasypus novemcinctus Linnaeus, 1758 (nine-banded armadillo), Euphractus sexcinctus (Linnaeus, 1758) (six-banded armadillo), Dasyprocta azarae Lichtenstein, 1823 (Azara's Agouti) and Tapirus terrestris (Linnaeus, 1758) (tapir). On the other hand, Priodontes maximus (Kerr, 1792) (giant armadillo) and Leopardus pardalis (Linnaeus, 1758) (ocelot) had identical abundance index over the two seasons. Distribution of species abundance in the sampled area followed the expected pattern for communities in equilibrium, especially in the rainy season, suggesting that the environment still maintains good characteristics for mammal conservation. The present study shows that the reserve, although only 470 ha in size, plays an important role for conservation of mastofauna of the area as a refuge in an environment full of anthropic influence (mainly cattle breeding in exotic pasture). PMID:18491629

  10. Combining pseudo dinucleotide composition with the Z curve method to improve the accuracy of predicting DNA elements: a case study in recombination spots.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chuan; Yuan, Ya-Zhou; Zhang, Fa-Zhan; Hua, Hong-Li; Ye, Yuan-Nong; Labena, Abraham Alemayehu; Lin, Hao; Chen, Wei; Guo, Feng-Biao

    2016-08-16

    Pseudo dinucleotide composition (PseDNC) and Z curve showed excellent performance in the classification issues of nucleotide sequences in bioinformatics. Inspired by the principle of Z curve theory, we improved PseDNC to give the phase-specific PseDNC (psPseDNC). In this study, we used the prediction of recombination spots as a case to illustrate the capability of psPseDNC and also PseDNC fused with Z curve theory based on a novel machine learning method named large margin distribution machine (LDM). We verified that combining the two widely used approaches could generate better performance compared to only using PseDNC with a support vector machine based (SVM-based) model. The best Mathew's correlation coefficient (MCC) achieved by our LDM-based model was 0.7037 through the rigorous jackknife test and improved by ∼6.6%, ∼3.2%, and ∼2.4% compared with three previous studies. Similarly, the accuracy was improved by 3.2% compared with our previous iRSpot-PseDNC web server through an independent data test. These results demonstrate that the joint use of PseDNC and Z curve enhances performance and can extract more information from a biological sequence. To facilitate research in this area, we constructed a user-friendly web server for predicting hot/cold spots, HcsPredictor, which can be freely accessed from . In summary, we provided a united algorithm by integrating Z curve with PseDNC. We hope this united algorithm could be extended to other classification issues in DNA elements.

  11. Classification of Birds and Bats Using Flight Tracks

    SciTech Connect

    Cullinan, Valerie I.; Matzner, Shari; Duberstein, Corey A.

    2015-05-01

    Classification of birds and bats that use areas targeted for offshore wind farm development and the inference of their behavior is essential to evaluating the potential effects of development. The current approach to assessing the number and distribution of birds at sea involves transect surveys using trained individuals in boats or airplanes or using high-resolution imagery. These approaches are costly and have safety concerns. Based on a limited annotated library extracted from a single-camera thermal video, we provide a framework for building models that classify birds and bats and their associated behaviors. As an example, we developed a discriminant model for theoretical flight paths and applied it to data (N = 64 tracks) extracted from 5-min video clips. The agreement between model- and observer-classified path types was initially only 41%, but it increased to 73% when small-scale jitter was censored and path types were combined. Classification of 46 tracks of bats, swallows, gulls, and terns on average was 82% accurate, based on a jackknife cross-validation. Model classification of bats and terns (N = 4 and 2, respectively) was 94% and 91% correct, respectively; however, the variance associated with the tracks from these targets is poorly estimated. Model classification of gulls and swallows (N ≥ 18) was on average 73% and 85% correct, respectively. The models developed here should be considered preliminary because they are based on a small data set both in terms of the numbers of species and the identified flight tracks. Future classification models would be greatly improved by including a measure of distance between the camera and the target.

  12. Aboveground biomass and leaf area index (LAI) mapping for Niassa Reserve, northern Mozambique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Natasha S.; Saatchi, Sassan S.; Shugart, Herman H.; Washington-Allen, Robert A.

    2008-09-01

    Estimations of biomass are critical in miombo woodlands because they represent the primary source of goods and services for over 80% of the population in southern Africa. This study was carried out in Niassa Reserve, northern Mozambique. The main objectives were first to estimate woody biomass and Leaf Area Index (LAI) using remotely sensed data [RADARSAT (C-band, λ = 5.7-cm)] and Landsat ETM+ derived Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Simple Ratio (SR) calibrated by field measurements and, second to determine, at both landscape and plot scales, the environmental controls (precipitation, woody cover density, fire and elephants) of biomass and LAI. A land-cover map (72% overall accuracy) was derived from the June 2004 ETM+ mosaic. Field biomass and LAI were correlated with RADARSAT backscatter (rbiomass = 0.65, rLAI = 0.57, p < 0.0001) from July 2004, NDVI (rbiomass = 0.30, rLAI = 0.35; p < 0.0001) and SR (rbiomass = 0.36, rLAI = 0.40, p < 0.0001). A jackknife stepwise regression technique was used to develop the best predictive models for biomass (biomass = -5.19 + 0.074 * radarsat + 1.56 * SR, r2 = 0.55) and LAI (LAI = -0.66 + 0.01 * radarsat + 0.22 * SR, r2 = 0.45). Biomass and LAI maps were produced with an estimated peak of 18 kg m-2 and 2.80 m2 m-2, respectively. On the landscape-scale, both biomass and LAI were strongly determined by mean annual precipitation (F = 13.91, p = 0.0002). On the plot spatial scale, woody biomass was significantly determined by fire frequency, and LAI by vegetation type.

  13. Morphometric convergence and molecular divergence: the taxonomic status and evolutionary history of Gymnura crebripunctata and Gymnura marmorata in the eastern Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Smith, W D; Bizzarro, J J; Richards, V P; Nielsen, J; Márquez-Flarías, F; Shivji, M S

    2009-09-01

    To clarify the taxonomic status of Gymnura crebripunctata and Gymnura marmorata, the extent of morphological and nucleotide variation between these nominal species was examined using multivariate morphological and mitochondrial DNA comparisons of the same characters with congeneric species. Discriminant analysis of 21 morphometric variables from four species (G. crebripunctata, G. marmorata, Gymnura micrura and Gymnura poecilura) successfully distinguished species groupings. Classification success of eastern Pacific species improved further when specimens were grouped by species and sex. Discriminant analysis of size-corrected data generated species assignments that were consistently accurate in separating the two species (100% jackknifed assignment success). Nasal curtain length was identified as the character which contributed the most to discrimination of the two species. Sexual dimorphism was evident in several characters that have previously been relied upon to distinguish G. crebripunctata from G. marmorata. A previously unreported feature, the absence of a tail spine in G. crebripunctata, provides an improved method of field identification between these species. Phylogenetic and genetic distance analyses based on 698 base pairs of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene indicate that G. crebripunctata and G. marmorata form highly divergent lineages, supporting their validity as distinct species. The closely related batoid Aetoplatea zonura clustered within the Gymnura clade, indicating that it may not represent a valid genus. Strong population structuring (overall Phi(ST) = 0.81, P < 0.01) was evident between G. marmorata from the Pacific coast of the Baja California peninsula and the Gulf of California, supporting the designation of distinct management units in these regions. PMID:20738578

  14. Efficacy of digital breast tomosynthesis for breast cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alakhras, M.; Mello-Thoms, C.; Rickard, M.; Bourne, R.; Brennan, P. C.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To compare the diagnostic performance of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) in combination with digital mammography (DM) with that of digital mammography alone. Materials and Methods: Twenty six experienced radiologists who specialized in breast imaging read 50 cases (27 cancers and 23 non-cancer cases) of patients who underwent DM and DBT. Both exams included the craniocaudal (CC) and mediolateral oblique (MLO) views. Histopathologic examination established truth in all lesions. Each case was interpreted in two modes, once with DM alone followed by DM+DBT, and the observers were asked to mark the location of any lesions, if present, and give it a score based on a five-category assessment by the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists (RANZCR). The diagnostic performance of DM compared with that of DM+DBT was evaluated in terms of the difference between areas under receiver-operating characteristic curves (AUCs), Jackknife free-response receiver operator characteristics (JAFROC) figure-of-merit, sensitivity, location sensitivity and specificity. Results: Average AUC and JAFROC for DM versus DM+DBT was significantly different (AUCs 0.690 vs 0.781, p=< 0.0001), (JAFROC 0.618 vs. 0.732, p=< 0.0001) respectively. In addition, the use of DM+DBT resulted in an improvement in sensitivity (0.629 vs. 0.701, p=0.0011), location sensitivity (0.548 vs. 0.690, p=< 0.0001) and specificity (0.656 vs. 0.758, p=0.0015) when compared to DM alone. Conclusion: Adding DBT to the standard DM significantly improved radiologists' performance in terms of AUCs, JAFROC figure of merit, sensitivity, location sensitivity and specificity values.

  15. Experience in reading digital images may decrease observer accuracy in mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawashdeh, Mohammad A.; Lewis, Sarah J.; Lee, Warwick; Mello-Thoms, Claudia; Reed, Warren M.; McEntee, Mark; Tapia, Kriscia; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2015-03-01

    Rationale and Objectives: To identify parameters linked to higher levels of performance in screening mammography. In particular we explored whether experience in reading digital cases enhances radiologists' performance. Methods: A total of 60 cases were presented to the readers, of which 20 contained cancers and 40 showed no abnormality. Each case comprised of four images and 129 breast readers participated in the study. Each reader was asked to identify and locate any malignancies using a 1-5 confidence scale. All images were displayed using 5MP monitors, supported by radiology workstations with full image manipulation capabilities. A jack-knife free-response receiver operating characteristic, figure of merit (JAFROC, FOM) methodology was employed to assess reader performance. Details were obtained from each reader regarding their experience, qualifications and breast reading activities. Spearman and Mann Whitney U techniques were used for statistical analysis. Results: Higher performance was positively related to numbers of years professionally qualified (r= 0.18; P<0.05), number of years reading breast images (r= 0.24; P<0.01), number of mammography images read per year (r= 0.28; P<0.001) and number of hours reading mammographic images per week (r= 0.19; P<0.04). Unexpectedly, higher performance was inversely linked to previous experience with digital images (r= - 0.17; p<0.05) and further analysis, demonstrated that this finding was due to changes in specificity. Conclusion: This study suggests suggestion that readers with experience in digital images reporting may exhibit a reduced ability to correctly identify normal appearances requires further investigation. Higher performance is linked to number of cases read per year.

  16. Non-parametric frequency analysis of extreme values for integrated disaster management considering probable maximum events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takara, K. T.

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes a non-parametric frequency analysis method for hydrological extreme-value samples with a size larger than 100, verifying the estimation accuracy with a computer intensive statistics (CIS) resampling such as the bootstrap. Probable maximum values are also incorporated into the analysis for extreme events larger than a design level of flood control. Traditional parametric frequency analysis methods of extreme values include the following steps: Step 1: Collecting and checking extreme-value data; Step 2: Enumerating probability distributions that would be fitted well to the data; Step 3: Parameter estimation; Step 4: Testing goodness of fit; Step 5: Checking the variability of quantile (T-year event) estimates by the jackknife resampling method; and Step_6: Selection of the best distribution (final model). The non-parametric method (NPM) proposed here can skip Steps 2, 3, 4 and 6. Comparing traditional parameter methods (PM) with the NPM, this paper shows that PM often underestimates 100-year quantiles for annual maximum rainfall samples with records of more than 100 years. Overestimation examples are also demonstrated. The bootstrap resampling can do bias correction for the NPM and can also give the estimation accuracy as the bootstrap standard error. This NPM has advantages to avoid various difficulties in above-mentioned steps in the traditional PM. Probable maximum events are also incorporated into the NPM as an upper bound of the hydrological variable. Probable maximum precipitation (PMP) and probable maximum flood (PMF) can be a new parameter value combined with the NPM. An idea how to incorporate these values into frequency analysis is proposed for better management of disasters that exceed the design level. The idea stimulates more integrated approach by geoscientists and statisticians as well as encourages practitioners to consider the worst cases of disasters in their disaster management planning and practices.

  17. Historical shoreline mapping (II): application of the Digital Shoreline Mapping and Analysis Systems (DSMS/DSAS) to shoreline change mapping in Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thieler, E. Robert; Danforth, William W.

    1994-01-01

    A new, state-of-the-art method for mapping historical shorelines from maps and aerial photographs, the Digital Shoreline Mapping System (DSMS), has been developed. The DSMS is a freely available, public domain software package that meets the cartographic and photogrammetric requirements of precise coastal mapping, and provides a means to quantify and analyze different sources of error in the mapping process. The DSMS is also capable of resolving imperfections in aerial photography that commonly are assumed to be nonexistent. The DSMS utilizes commonly available computer hardware and software, and permits the entire shoreline mapping process to be executed rapidly by a single person in a small lab. The DSMS generates output shoreline position data that are compatible with a variety of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). A second suite of programs, the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) has been developed to calculate shoreline rates-of-change from a series of shoreline data residing in a GIS. Four rate-of-change statistics are calculated simultaneously (end-point rate, average of rates, linear regression and jackknife) at a user-specified interval along the shoreline using a measurement baseline approach. An example of DSMS and DSAS application using historical maps and air photos of Punta Uvero, Puerto Rico provides a basis for assessing the errors associated with the source materials as well as the accuracy of computed shoreline positions and erosion rates. The maps and photos used here represent a common situation in shoreline mapping: marginal-quality source materials. The maps and photos are near the usable upper limit of scale and accuracy, yet the shoreline positions are still accurate ±9.25 m when all sources of error are considered. This level of accuracy yields a resolution of ±0.51 m/yr for shoreline rates-of-change in this example, and is sufficient to identify the short-term trend (36 years) of shoreline change in the study area.

  18. Comparing halo bias from abundance and clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, K.; Bel, J.; Gaztañaga, E.

    2015-06-01

    We model the abundance of haloes in the ˜(3 Gpc h-1)3 volume of the MICE Grand Challenge simulation by fitting the universal mass function with an improved Jackknife error covariance estimator that matches theory predictions. We present unifying relations between different fitting models and new predictions for linear (b1) and non-linear (c2 and c3) halo clustering bias. Different mass function fits show strong variations in their performance when including the low mass range (Mh ≲ 3 × 1012 M⊙ h-1) in the analysis. Together with fits from the literature, we find an overall variation in the amplitudes of around 10 per cent in the low mass and up to 50 per cent in the high mass (galaxy cluster) range (Mh > 1014 M⊙ h-1). These variations propagate into a 10 per cent change in b1 predictions and a 50 per cent change in c2 or c3. Despite these strong variations, we find universal relations between b1 and c2 or c3 for which we provide simple fits. Excluding low-mass haloes, different models fitted with reasonable goodness in this analysis, show per cent level agreement in their b1 predictions, but are systematically 5-10 per cent lower than the bias directly measured with two-point halo-mass clustering. This result confirms previous findings derived from smaller volumes (and smaller masses). Inaccuracies in the bias predictions lead to 5-10 per cent errors in growth measurements. They also affect any halo occupation distribution fitting or (cluster) mass calibration from clustering measurements.

  19. Evaluation of 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing using two next-generation sequencing technologies for phylogenetic analysis of the rumen bacterial community in steers.

    PubMed

    Myer, Phillip R; Kim, MinSeok; Freetly, Harvey C; Smith, Timothy P L

    2016-08-01

    Next generation sequencing technologies have vastly changed the approach of sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene for studies in microbial ecology. Three distinct technologies are available for large-scale 16S sequencing. All three are subject to biases introduced by sequencing error rates, amplification primer selection, and read length, which can affect the apparent microbial community. In this study, we compared short read 16S rRNA variable regions, V1-V3, with that of near-full length 16S regions, V1-V8, using highly diverse steer rumen microbial communities, in order to examine the impact of technology selection on phylogenetic profiles. Short paired-end reads from the Illumina MiSeq platform were used to generate V1-V3 sequence, while long "circular consensus" reads from the Pacific Biosciences RSII instrument were used to generate V1-V8 data. The two platforms revealed similar microbial operational taxonomic units (OTUs), as well as similar species richness, Good's coverage, and Shannon diversity metrics. However, the V1-V8 amplified ruminal community resulted in significant increases in several orders of taxa, such as phyla Proteobacteria and Verrucomicrobia (P < 0.05). Taxonomic classification accuracy was also greater in the near full-length read. UniFrac distance matrices using jackknifed UPGMA clustering also noted differences between the communities. These data support the consensus that longer reads result in a finer phylogenetic resolution that may not be achieved by shorter 16S rRNA gene fragments. Our work on the cattle rumen bacterial community demonstrates that utilizing near full-length 16S reads may be useful in conducting a more thorough study, or for developing a niche-specific database to use in analyzing data from shorter read technologies when budgetary constraints preclude use of near-full length 16S sequencing. PMID:27282101

  20. Development of Pneumatic Aerodynamic Devices to Improve the Performance, Economics, and Safety of Heavy Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Robert J. Englar

    2000-06-19

    Under contract to the DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies, the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) is developing and evaluating pneumatic (blown) aerodynamic devices to improve the performance, economics, stability and safety of operation of Heavy Vehicles. The objective of this program is to apply the pneumatic aerodynamic aircraft technology previously developed and flight-tested by GTRI personnel to the design of an efficient blown tractor-trailer configuration. Recent experimental results obtained by GTRI using blowing have shown drag reductions of 35% on a streamlined automobile wind-tunnel model. Also measured were lift or down-load increases of 100-150% and the ability to control aerodynamic moments about all 3 axes without any moving control surfaces. Similar drag reductions yielded by blowing on bluff afterbody trailers in current US trucking fleet operations are anticipated to reduce yearly fuel consumption by more than 1.2 billion gallons, while even further reduction is possible using pneumatic lift to reduce tire rolling resistance. Conversely, increased drag and down force generated instantaneously by blowing can greatly increase braking characteristics and control in wet/icy weather due to effective ''weight'' increases on the tires. Safety is also enhanced by controlling side loads and moments caused on these Heavy Vehicles by winds, gusts and other vehicles passing. This may also help to eliminate the jack-knifing problem if caused by extreme wind side loads on the trailer. Lastly, reduction of the turbulent wake behind the trailer can reduce splash and spray patterns and rough air being experienced by following vehicles. To be presented by GTRI in this paper will be results developed during the early portion of this effort, including a preliminary systems study, CFD prediction of the blown flowfields, and design of the baseline conventional tractor-trailer model and the pneumatic wind-tunnel model.

  1. PhyPA: Phylogenetic method with pairwise sequence alignment outperforms likelihood methods in phylogenetics involving highly diverged sequences.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xuhua

    2016-09-01

    While pairwise sequence alignment (PSA) by dynamic programming is guaranteed to generate one of the optimal alignments, multiple sequence alignment (MSA) of highly divergent sequences often results in poorly aligned sequences, plaguing all subsequent phylogenetic analysis. One way to avoid this problem is to use only PSA to reconstruct phylogenetic trees, which can only be done with distance-based methods. I compared the accuracy of this new computational approach (named PhyPA for phylogenetics by pairwise alignment) against the maximum likelihood method using MSA (the ML+MSA approach), based on nucleotide, amino acid and codon sequences simulated with different topologies and tree lengths. I present a surprising discovery that the fast PhyPA method consistently outperforms the slow ML+MSA approach for highly diverged sequences even when all optimization options were turned on for the ML+MSA approach. Only when sequences are not highly diverged (i.e., when a reliable MSA can be obtained) does the ML+MSA approach outperforms PhyPA. The true topologies are always recovered by ML with the true alignment from the simulation. However, with MSA derived from alignment programs such as MAFFT or MUSCLE, the recovered topology consistently has higher likelihood than that for the true topology. Thus, the failure to recover the true topology by the ML+MSA is not because of insufficient search of tree space, but by the distortion of phylogenetic signal by MSA methods. I have implemented in DAMBE PhyPA and two approaches making use of multi-gene data sets to derive phylogenetic support for subtrees equivalent to resampling techniques such as bootstrapping and jackknifing.

  2. Nestedness in centipede (Chilopoda) assemblages on continental islands (Aegean, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simaiakis, Stylianos Michail; Martínez-Morales, Miguel Angel

    2010-05-01

    In natural ecosystems, species assemblages among isolated ecological communities such as continental islands often show a nested pattern in which biotas of sites with low species richness are non-random subsets of biotas of richer sites. The distribution of centipede (Chilopoda) species in the central and south Aegean archipelago was tested for nestedness. To achieve this aim we used distribution data for 53 species collected on 24 continental Aegean islands (Kyklades and Dodekanisa). Based on the first-order jackknife estimator, most of islands were comprehensively surveyed. In order to quantify nestedness, we used the nestedness temperature calculator (NTC) as well as the nestedness metric based on overlap and decreasing Fill (NODF). NTC indicated that data exhibited a high degree of nestedness in the central and south Aegean island complexes. As far as the Kyklades and Dodekanisa are concerned, NTC showed less nested centipede structures than the 24 islands. Likewise, NODF revealed a significant degree of nestedness in central and south Aegean islands. It also showed that biotas matrices without singletons were more nested than the complete ones (Aegean, Kyklades and Dodekanisa). The two commonest centipede taxa (lithobiomorphs and geophilomorphs) contributed differently to centipede assemblages. In the Kyklades and Dodekanisa, geophilomorphs did not show a reliable nested arrangement unlike lithobiomorphs. In relation to the entire data set, nestedness was positively associated with the degree of isolation. In the Kyklades altitudinal range best explained nestedness patterns, while in Dodekanisa habitat heterogeneity proved to be more important for the centipede communities. Island area does not seem to be a significant explanatory variable. Some of our results from the Kyklades were critically compared with those for terrestrial isopod and land snail nested assemblages from the same geographical area. The complex geological and palaeogeographical history of

  3. Phylogenetic diversity and ecological pattern of ammonia-oxidizing archaea in the surface sediments of the western Pacific.

    PubMed

    Cao, Huiluo; Hong, Yiguo; Li, Meng; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2011-11-01

    The phylogenetic diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) was surveyed in the surface sediments from the northern part of the South China Sea (SCS). The distribution pattern of AOA in the western Pacific was discussed through comparing the SCS with other areas in the western Pacific including Changjiang Estuary and the adjacent East China Sea where high input of anthropogenic nitrogen was evident, the tropical West Pacific Continental Margins close to the Philippines, the deep-sea methane seep sediments in the Okhotsk Sea, the cold deep sea of Northeastern Japan Sea, and the hydrothermal field in the Southern Okinawa Trough. These various environments provide a wide spectrum of physical and chemical conditions for a better understanding of the distribution pattern and diversities of AOA in the western Pacific. Under these different conditions, the distinct community composition between shallow and deep-sea sediments was clearly delineated based on the UniFrac PCoA and Jackknife Environmental Cluster analyses. Phylogenetic analyses showed that a few ammonia-oxidizing archaeal subclades in the marine water column/sediment clade and endemic lineages were indicative phylotypes for some environments. Higher phylogenetic diversity was observed in the Philippines while lower diversity in the hydrothermal vent habitat. Water depth and possibly with other environmental factors could be the main driving forces to shape the phylogenetic diversity of AOA observed, not only in the SCS but also in the whole western Pacific. The multivariate regression tree analysis also supported this observation consistently. Moreover, the functions of current and other climate factors were also discussed in comparison of phylogenetic diversity. The information collectively provides important insights into the ecophysiological requirements of uncultured ammonia-oxidizing archaeal lineages in the western Pacific Ocean. PMID:21748268

  4. Predicting protein subnuclear location with optimized evidence-theoretic K-nearest classifier and pseudo amino acid composition

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Hongbin; Chou Kuochen . E-mail: kchou@san.rr.com

    2005-11-25

    The nucleus is the brain of eukaryotic cells that guides the life processes of the cell by issuing key instructions. For in-depth understanding of the biochemical process of the nucleus, the knowledge of localization of nuclear proteins is very important. With the avalanche of protein sequences generated in the post-genomic era, it is highly desired to develop an automated method for fast annotating the subnuclear locations for numerous newly found nuclear protein sequences so as to be able to timely utilize them for basic research and drug discovery. In view of this, a novel approach is developed for predicting the protein subnuclear location. It is featured by introducing a powerful classifier, the optimized evidence-theoretic K-nearest classifier, and using the pseudo amino acid composition [K.C. Chou, PROTEINS: Structure, Function, and Genetics, 43 (2001) 246], which can incorporate a considerable amount of sequence-order effects, to represent protein samples. As a demonstration, identifications were performed for 370 nuclear proteins among the following 9 subnuclear locations: (1) Cajal body, (2) chromatin, (3) heterochromatin, (4) nuclear diffuse, (5) nuclear pore, (6) nuclear speckle, (7) nucleolus, (8) PcG body, and (9) PML body. The overall success rates thus obtained by both the re-substitution test and jackknife cross-validation test are significantly higher than those by existing classifiers on the same working dataset. It is anticipated that the powerful approach may also become a useful high throughput vehicle to bridge the huge gap occurring in the post-genomic era between the number of gene sequences in databases and the number of gene products that have been functionally characterized. The OET-KNN classifier will be available at www.pami.sjtu.edu.cn/people/hbshen.

  5. Nuc-PLoc: a new web-server for predicting protein subnuclear localization by fusing PseAA composition and PsePSSM.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong-Bin; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2007-11-01

    The life processes of an eukaryotic cell are guided by its nucleus. In addition to the genetic material, the cellular nucleus contains many proteins located at its different compartments, called subnuclear locations. Information of their localization in a nucleus is indispensable for the in-depth study of system biology because, in addition to helping determine their functions, it can provide illuminative insights of how and in what kind of microenvironments these subnuclear proteins are interacting with each other and with other molecules. Facing the deluge of protein sequences generated in the post-genomic age, we are challenged to develop an automated method for fast and effectively annotating the subnuclear locations of numerous newly found nuclear protein sequences. In view of this, a new classifier, called Nuc-PLoc, has been developed that can be used to identify nuclear proteins among the following nine subnuclear locations: (1) chromatin, (2) heterochromatin, (3) nuclear envelope, (4) nuclear matrix, (5) nuclear pore complex, (6) nuclear speckle, (7) nucleolus, (8) nucleoplasm and (9) nuclear promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) body. Nuc-PLoc is featured by an ensemble classifier formed by fusing the evolution information of a protein and its pseudo-amino acid composition. The overall jackknife cross-validation accuracy obtained by Nuc-PLoc is significantly higher than those by the existing methods on the same benchmark data set through the same testing procedure. As a user-friendly web-server, Nuc-PLoc is freely accessible to the public at http://chou.med.harvard.edu/bioinf/Nuc-PLoc.

  6. PhyPA: Phylogenetic method with pairwise sequence alignment outperforms likelihood methods in phylogenetics involving highly diverged sequences.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xuhua

    2016-09-01

    While pairwise sequence alignment (PSA) by dynamic programming is guaranteed to generate one of the optimal alignments, multiple sequence alignment (MSA) of highly divergent sequences often results in poorly aligned sequences, plaguing all subsequent phylogenetic analysis. One way to avoid this problem is to use only PSA to reconstruct phylogenetic trees, which can only be done with distance-based methods. I compared the accuracy of this new computational approach (named PhyPA for phylogenetics by pairwise alignment) against the maximum likelihood method using MSA (the ML+MSA approach), based on nucleotide, amino acid and codon sequences simulated with different topologies and tree lengths. I present a surprising discovery that the fast PhyPA method consistently outperforms the slow ML+MSA approach for highly diverged sequences even when all optimization options were turned on for the ML+MSA approach. Only when sequences are not highly diverged (i.e., when a reliable MSA can be obtained) does the ML+MSA approach outperforms PhyPA. The true topologies are always recovered by ML with the true alignment from the simulation. However, with MSA derived from alignment programs such as MAFFT or MUSCLE, the recovered topology consistently has higher likelihood than that for the true topology. Thus, the failure to recover the true topology by the ML+MSA is not because of insufficient search of tree space, but by the distortion of phylogenetic signal by MSA methods. I have implemented in DAMBE PhyPA and two approaches making use of multi-gene data sets to derive phylogenetic support for subtrees equivalent to resampling techniques such as bootstrapping and jackknifing. PMID:27377322

  7. High-resolution taxonomic profiling of the subgingival microbiome for biomarker discovery and periodontitis diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Szafranski, Szymon P; Wos-Oxley, Melissa L; Vilchez-Vargas, Ramiro; Jáuregui, Ruy; Plumeier, Iris; Klawonn, Frank; Tomasch, Jürgen; Meisinger, Christa; Kühnisch, Jan; Sztajer, Helena; Pieper, Dietmar H; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    2015-02-01

    The oral microbiome plays a key role for caries, periodontitis, and systemic diseases. A method for rapid, high-resolution, robust taxonomic profiling of subgingival bacterial communities for early detection of periodontitis biomarkers would therefore be a useful tool for individualized medicine. Here, we used Illumina sequencing of the V1-V2 and V5-V6 hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene. A sample stratification pipeline was developed in a pilot study of 19 individuals, 9 of whom had been diagnosed with chronic periodontitis. Five hundred twenty-three operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were obtained from the V1-V2 region and 432 from the V5-V6 region. Key periodontal pathogens like Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia could be identified at the species level with both primer sets. Principal coordinate analysis identified two outliers that were consistently independent of the hypervariable region and method of DNA extraction used. The linear discriminant analysis (LDA) effect size algorithm (LEfSe) identified 80 OTU-level biomarkers of periodontitis and 17 of health. Health- and periodontitis-related clusters of OTUs were identified using a connectivity analysis, and the results confirmed previous studies with several thousands of samples. A machine learning algorithm was developed which was trained on all but one sample and then predicted the diagnosis of the left-out sample (jackknife method). Using a combination of the 10 best biomarkers, 15 of 17 samples were correctly diagnosed. Training the algorithm on time-resolved community profiles might provide a highly sensitive tool to detect the onset of periodontitis.

  8. Making Mosquito Taxonomy Useful: A Stable Classification of Tribe Aedini that Balances Utility with Current Knowledge of Evolutionary Relationships.

    PubMed

    Wilkerson, Richard C; Linton, Yvonne-Marie; Fonseca, Dina M; Schultz, Ted R; Price, Dana C; Strickman, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    The tribe Aedini (Family Culicidae) contains approximately one-quarter of the known species of mosquitoes, including vectors of deadly or debilitating disease agents. This tribe contains the genus Aedes, which is one of the three most familiar genera of mosquitoes. During the past decade, Aedini has been the focus of a series of extensive morphology-based phylogenetic studies published by Reinert, Harbach, and Kitching (RH&K). Those authors created 74 new, elevated or resurrected genera from what had been the single genus Aedes, almost tripling the number of genera in the entire family Culicidae. The proposed classification is based on subjective assessments of the "number and nature of the characters that support the branches" subtending particular monophyletic groups in the results of cladistic analyses of a large set of morphological characters of representative species. To gauge the stability of RH&K's generic groupings we reanalyzed their data with unweighted parsimony jackknife and maximum-parsimony analyses, with and without ordering 14 of the characters as in RH&K. We found that their phylogeny was largely weakly supported and their taxonomic rankings failed priority and other useful taxon-naming criteria. Consequently, we propose simplified aedine generic designations that 1) restore a classification system that is useful for the operational community; 2) enhance the ability of taxonomists to accurately place new species into genera; 3) maintain the progress toward a natural classification based on monophyletic groups of species; and 4) correct the current classification system that is subject to instability as new species are described and existing species more thoroughly defined. We do not challenge the phylogenetic hypotheses generated by the above-mentioned series of morphological studies. However, we reduce the ranks of the genera and subgenera of RH&K to subgenera or informal species groups, respectively, to preserve stability as new data become

  9. Predicting radiologists' true and false positive decisions in reading mammograms by using gaze parameters and image-based features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandomkar, Ziba; Tay, Kevin; Ryder, Will; Brennan, Patrick C.; Mello-Thoms, Claudia

    2016-03-01

    Radiologists' gaze-related parameters combined with image-based features were utilized to classify suspicious mammographic areas ultimately scored as True Positives (TP) and False Positives (FP). Eight breast radiologists read 120 two-view digital mammograms of which 59 had biopsy proven cancer. Eye tracking data was collected and nearby fixations were clustered together. Suspicious areas on mammograms were independently identified based on thresholding an intensity saliency map followed by automatic segmentation and pruning steps. For each radiologist reported area, radiologist's fixation clusters in the area, as well as neighboring suspicious areas within 2.5° of the center of fixation, were found. A 45-dimensional feature vector containing gaze parameters of the corresponding cluster along with image-based characteristics was constructed. Gaze parameters included total number of fixations in the cluster, dwell time, time to hit the cluster for the first time, maximum number of consecutive fixations, and saccade magnitude of the first fixation in the cluster. Image-based features consisted of intensity, shape, and texture descriptors extracted from the region around the suspicious area, its surrounding tissue, and the entire breast. For each radiologist, a userspecific Support Vector Machine (SVM) model was built to classify the reported areas as TPs or FPs. Leave-one-out cross validation was utilized to avoid over-fitting. A feature selection step was embedded in the SVM training procedure by allowing radial basis function kernels to have 45 scaling factors. The proposed method was compared with the radiologists' performance using the jackknife alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic (JAFROC). The JAFROC figure of merit increased significantly for six radiologists.

  10. Evaluation of Limiting Climatic Factors and Simulation of a Climatically Suitable Habitat for Chinese Sea Buckthorn

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guoqing; Du, Sheng; Guo, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Chinese sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides subsp. sinensis) has considerable economic potential and plays an important role in reclamation and soil and water conservation. For scientific cultivation of this species across China, we identified the key climatic factors and explored climatically suitable habitat in order to maximize survival of Chinese sea buckthorn using MaxEnt and GIS tools, based on 98 occurrence records from herbarium and publications and 13 climatic factors from Bioclim, Holdridge life zone and Kria' index variables. Our simulation showed that the MaxEnt model performance was significantly better than random, with an average test AUC value of 0.93 with 10-fold cross validation. A jackknife test and the regularized gain change, which were applied to the training algorithm, showed that precipitation of the driest month (PDM), annual precipitation (AP), coldness index (CI) and annual range of temperature (ART) were the most influential climatic factors in limiting the distribution of Chinese sea buckthorn, which explained 70.1% of the variation. The predicted map showed that the core of climatically suitable habitat was distributed from the southwest to northwest of Gansu, Ningxia, Shaanxi and Shanxi provinces, where the most influential climate variables were PDM of 1.0–7.0 mm, AP of 344.0–1089.0 mm, CI of -47.7–0.0°C, and ART of 26.1–45.0°C. We conclude that the distribution patterns of Chinese sea buckthorn are related to the northwest winter monsoon, the southwest summer monsoon and the southeast summer monsoon systems in China. PMID:26177033

  11. An improved Greengenes taxonomy with explicit ranks for ecological and evolutionary analyses of bacteria and archaea.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Daniel; Price, Morgan N; Goodrich, Julia; Nawrocki, Eric P; DeSantis, Todd Z; Probst, Alexander; Andersen, Gary L; Knight, Rob; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2012-03-01

    Reference phylogenies are crucial for providing a taxonomic framework for interpretation of marker gene and metagenomic surveys, which continue to reveal novel species at a remarkable rate. Greengenes is a dedicated full-length 16S rRNA gene database that provides users with a curated taxonomy based on de novo tree inference. We developed a 'taxonomy to tree' approach for transferring group names from an existing taxonomy to a tree topology, and used it to apply the Greengenes, National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) and cyanoDB (Cyanobacteria only) taxonomies to a de novo tree comprising 408,315 sequences. We also incorporated explicit rank information provided by the NCBI taxonomy to group names (by prefixing rank designations) for better user orientation and classification consistency. The resulting merged taxonomy improved the classification of 75% of the sequences by one or more ranks relative to the original NCBI taxonomy with the most pronounced improvements occurring in under-classified environmental sequences. We also assessed candidate phyla (divisions) currently defined by NCBI and present recommendations for consolidation of 34 redundantly named groups. All intermediate results from the pipeline, which includes tree inference, jackknifing and transfer of a donor taxonomy to a recipient tree (tax2tree) are available for download. The improved Greengenes taxonomy should provide important infrastructure for a wide range of megasequencing projects studying ecosystems on scales ranging from our own bodies (the Human Microbiome Project) to the entire planet (the Earth Microbiome Project). The implementation of the software can be obtained from http://sourceforge.net/projects/tax2tree/.

  12. Making Mosquito Taxonomy Useful: A Stable Classification of Tribe Aedini that Balances Utility with Current Knowledge of Evolutionary Relationships.

    PubMed

    Wilkerson, Richard C; Linton, Yvonne-Marie; Fonseca, Dina M; Schultz, Ted R; Price, Dana C; Strickman, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    The tribe Aedini (Family Culicidae) contains approximately one-quarter of the known species of mosquitoes, including vectors of deadly or debilitating disease agents. This tribe contains the genus Aedes, which is one of the three most familiar genera of mosquitoes. During the past decade, Aedini has been the focus of a series of extensive morphology-based phylogenetic studies published by Reinert, Harbach, and Kitching (RH&K). Those authors created 74 new, elevated or resurrected genera from what had been the single genus Aedes, almost tripling the number of genera in the entire family Culicidae. The proposed classification is based on subjective assessments of the "number and nature of the characters that support the branches" subtending particular monophyletic groups in the results of cladistic analyses of a large set of morphological characters of representative species. To gauge the stability of RH&K's generic groupings we reanalyzed their data with unweighted parsimony jackknife and maximum-parsimony analyses, with and without ordering 14 of the characters as in RH&K. We found that their phylogeny was largely weakly supported and their taxonomic rankings failed priority and other useful taxon-naming criteria. Consequently, we propose simplified aedine generic designations that 1) restore a classification system that is useful for the operational community; 2) enhance the ability of taxonomists to accurately place new species into genera; 3) maintain the progress toward a natural classification based on monophyletic groups of species; and 4) correct the current classification system that is subject to instability as new species are described and existing species more thoroughly defined. We do not challenge the phylogenetic hypotheses generated by the above-mentioned series of morphological studies. However, we reduce the ranks of the genera and subgenera of RH&K to subgenera or informal species groups, respectively, to preserve stability as new data become

  13. Rapid field identification of subjects involved in firearm-related crimes based on electroanalysis coupled with advanced chemometric data treatment.

    PubMed

    Cetó, Xavier; O'Mahony, Aoife M; Samek, Izabela A; Windmiller, Joshua R; del Valle, Manel; Wang, Joseph

    2012-12-01

    We demonstrate a novel system for the detection and discrimination of varying levels of exposure to gunshot residue from subjects in various control scenarios. Our aim is to address the key challenge of minimizing the false positive identification of individuals suspected of discharging a firearm. The chemometric treatment of voltammetric data from different controls using Canonical Variate Analysis (CVA) provides several distinct clusters for each scenario examined. Multiple samples were taken from subjects in controlled tests such as secondary contact with gunshot residue (GSR), loading a firearm, and postdischarge of a firearm. These controls were examined at both bare carbon and gold-modified screen-printed electrodes using different sampling methods: the 'swipe' method with integrated sampling and electroanalysis and a more traditional acid-assisted q-tip swabbing method. The electroanalytical fingerprint of each sample was examined using square-wave voltammetry; the resulting data were preprocessed with Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), followed by CVA treatment. High levels of discrimination were thus achieved in each case over 3 classes of samples (reflecting different levels of involvement), achieving maximum accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity values of 100% employing the leave-one-out validation method. Further validation with the 'jack-knife' technique was performed, and the resulting values were in good agreement with the former method. Additionally, samples from subjects in daily contact with relevant metallic constituents were analyzed to assess possible false positives. This system may serve as a potential method for a portable, field-deployable system aimed at rapidly identifying a subject who has loaded or discharged a firearm to verify involvement in a crime, hence providing law enforcement personnel with an invaluable forensic tool in the field.

  14. Personal and Network Dynamics in Performance of Knowledge Workers: A Study of Australian Breast Radiologists

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli Taba, Seyedamir; Hossain, Liaquat; Heard, Robert; Brennan, Patrick; Lee, Warwick; Lewis, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Materials and Methods In this paper, we propose a theoretical model based upon previous studies about personal and social network dynamics of job performance. We provide empirical support for this model using real-world data within the context of the Australian radiology profession. An examination of radiologists’ professional network topology through structural-positional and relational dimensions and radiologists’ personal characteristics in terms of knowledge, experience and self-esteem is provided. Thirty one breast imaging radiologists completed a purpose designed questionnaire regarding their network characteristics and personal attributes. These radiologists also independently read a test set of 60 mammographic cases: 20 cases with cancer and 40 normal cases. A Jackknife free response operating characteristic (JAFROC) method was used to measure the performance of the radiologists’ in detecting breast cancers. Results Correlational analyses showed that reader performance was positively correlated with the social network variables of degree centrality and effective size, but negatively correlated with constraint and hierarchy. For personal characteristics, the number of mammograms read per year and self-esteem (self-evaluation) positively correlated with reader performance. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis indicated that the combination of number of mammograms read per year and network’s effective size, hierarchy and tie strength was the best fitting model, explaining 63.4% of the variance in reader performance. The results from this study indicate the positive relationship between reading high volumes of cases by radiologists and expertise development, but also strongly emphasise the association between effective social/professional interactions and informal knowledge sharing with high performance. PMID:26918644

  15. External Quality Assessment (EQA) program for the preanalytical and analytical immunohistochemical determination of HER2 in breast cancer: an experience on a regional scale

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background An External Quality Assessment (EQA) program was developed to investigate the state of the art of HER2 immunohistochemical determination in breast cancer (BC) in 16 Pathology Departments in the Lazio Region (Italy). This program was implemented through two specific steps to evaluate HER2 staining (step 1) and interpretation (step 2) reproducibility among participants. Methods The management activities of this EQA program were assigned to the Coordinating Center (CC), the Revising Centers (RCs) and the Participating Centers (PCs). In step 1, 4 BC sections, selected by RCs, were stained by each PC using their own procedures. In step 2, each PC interpreted HER2 score in 10 BC sections stained by the CC. The concordance pattern was evaluated by using the kappa category-specific statistic and/or the weighted kappa statistic with the corresponding 95% Jackknife confidence interval. Results In step 1, a substantial/almost perfect agreement was reached between the PCs for scores 0 and 3+ whereas a moderate and fair agreement was observed for scores 1+ and 2+, respectively. In step 2, a fully satisfactory agreement was observed for 6 out of the 16 PCs and a quite satisfactory agreement was obtained for the remaining 10 PCs. Conclusions Our findings highlight that in the whole HER2 evaluation process the two intermediate categories, scores 1+ and 2+, are less reproducible than scores 0 and 3+. These findings are relevant in clinical practice where the choice of treatment is based on HER2 positivity, suggesting the need to share evaluation procedures within laboratories and implement educational programs. PMID:23965490

  16. Ngram time series model to predict activity type and energy cost from wrist, hip and ankle accelerometers: implications of age.

    PubMed

    Strath, Scott J; Kate, Rohit J; Keenan, Kevin G; Welch, Whitney A; Swartz, Ann M

    2015-11-01

    To develop and test time series single site and multi-site placement models, we used wrist, hip and ankle processed accelerometer data to estimate energy cost and type of physical activity in adults. Ninety-nine subjects in three age groups (18-39, 40-64, 65 +  years) performed 11 activities while wearing three triaxial accelereometers: one each on the non-dominant wrist, hip, and ankle. During each activity net oxygen cost (METs) was assessed. The time series of accelerometer signals were represented in terms of uniformly discretized values called bins. Support Vector Machine was used for activity classification with bins and every pair of bins used as features. Bagged decision tree regression was used for net metabolic cost prediction. To evaluate model performance we employed the jackknife leave-one-out cross validation method. Single accelerometer and multi-accelerometer site model estimates across and within age group revealed similar accuracy, with a bias range of -0.03 to 0.01 METs, bias percent of -0.8 to 0.3%, and a rMSE range of 0.81-1.04 METs. Multi-site accelerometer location models improved activity type classification over single site location models from a low of 69.3% to a maximum of 92.8% accuracy. For each accelerometer site location model, or combined site location model, percent accuracy classification decreased as a function of age group, or when young age groups models were generalized to older age groups. Specific age group models on average performed better than when all age groups were combined. A time series computation show promising results for predicting energy cost and activity type. Differences in prediction across age group, a lack of generalizability across age groups, and that age group specific models perform better than when all ages are combined needs to be considered as analytic calibration procedures to detect energy cost and type are further developed. PMID:26449155

  17. Robust Estimation of Precipitation Extremes from Short-Period Regional Climate Downscales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apling, D.; Darmenova, K.; Higgins, G. J.

    2011-12-01

    The US Southwest is likely to experience significant changes in precipitation patterns in coming decades as a result of regional climate change. One serious issue is to better understand extreme precipitation events, which affect infrastructure planning, and human life and safety management. Extreme precipitation events are characterized by the maximum expectation of accumulated precipitation over a short time period, which has a long-period return over some number of years; e.g., the 100-year return of daily precipitation. These measures are statistics drawn from Extreme Value Theory, and can be challenging to accurately and reliably estimate for short data sets. Regional Climate Models (RCM) are often run for shorter decadal periods, both to economize on computational expense, and to characterize specific decadal time bands. In each case, one needs robust statistical estimation algorithms to accurately and reliably retrieve the precipitation recurrence statistics. To produce these important decision-aiding products, we added several processes to an otherwise conventional Peaks Over Threshold technique operating on the combined grid-scale and cumuliform precipitation outputs from our 12 kilometer Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) downscale of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis fields for the ten year period of 2000-2009 over the Southwest US. These processes included interleaved sub-year intermediate aggregations, correlated sample corrections, distributional tail feature extraction, and trimmed set tail fitting with jackknife error estimation. The process resulted in estimated 100-year return 24-hour accumulated precipitation expectations with accompanying error bounds, which compare well to established historical precipitation statistics.

  18. Reliability of information-based integration of EEG and fMRI data: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Assecondi, Sara; Ostwald, Dirk; Bagshaw, Andrew P

    2015-02-01

    Most studies involving simultaneous electroencephalographic (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data rely on the first-order, affine-linear correlation of EEG and fMRI features within the framework of the general linear model. An alternative is the use of information-based measures such as mutual information and entropy, which can also detect higher-order correlations present in the data. The estimate of information-theoretic quantities might be influenced by several parameters, such as the numerosity of the sample, the amount of correlation between variables, and the discretization (or binning) strategy of choice. While these issues have been investigated for invasive neurophysiological data and a number of bias-correction estimates have been developed, there has been no attempt to systematically examine the accuracy of information estimates for the multivariate distributions arising in the context of EEG-fMRI recordings. This is especially important given the differences between electrophysiological and EEG-fMRI recordings. In this study, we drew random samples from simulated bivariate and trivariate distributions, mimicking the statistical properties of EEG-fMRI data. We compared the estimated information shared by simulated random variables with its numerical value and found that the interaction between the binning strategy and the estimation method influences the accuracy of the estimate. Conditional on the simulation assumptions, we found that the equipopulated binning strategy yields the best and most consistent results across distributions and bias correction methods. We also found that within bias correction techniques, the asymptotically debiased (TPMC), the jackknife debiased (JD), and the best upper bound (BUB) approach give similar results, and those are consistent across distributions.

  19. Multiscale finite-frequency Rayleigh wave tomography of the Kaapvaal craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevrot, S.; Zhao, L.

    2007-04-01

    We have measured phase delays of fundamental-mode Rayleigh waves for 12 events recorded by the Southern Africa Seismic Experiment at frequencies between 0.005 and 0.035 Hz. A novel multiscale finite-frequency tomographic method based on wavelet decomposition of 3-D sensitivity kernels for the phase of Rayleigh waves is used to map the shear velocities in the upper mantle beneath southern Africa. The kernels are computed by summing coupled normal modes over a very fine grid surrounding the seismic array. To estimate and minimize the biases in the model resulting from structures outside the tomographic grid, a jackknife inversion method is implemented. The contribution of heterogeneities outside the target volume is significant, but produces artefacts in the tomographic model that are easily identified and discarded before interpretation. With structures on length scales as short as 100 km retrieved beneath the array, the deep structure of the Kaapvaal craton is revealed with unprecedented detail. Outside the array, the corresponding resolution is 200 km. High velocity cratonic roots are confined to the Archean craton, and extend to depths of at least 250 km. Confirming earlier surface structural studies, we recognize two distinct units in the Kaapvaal craton. The eastern Witwatersrand block and the western Kimberley block are separated by a major near-vertical translithospheric boundary which coincides with the Colesberg Lineament. Lower than average velocities south and east of the Kaapvaal craton reveal extensive metasomatism and heating of the lithosphere, probably related to the Karoo magmatic event and to the opening of the South Atlantic Ocean.

  20. Prediction of the conformation and geometry of loops in globular proteins: testing ArchDB, a structural classification of loops.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Fuentes, Narcis; Querol, Enrique; Aviles, Francesc X; Sternberg, Michael J E; Oliva, Baldomero

    2005-09-01

    In protein structure prediction, a central problem is defining the structure of a loop connecting 2 secondary structures. This problem frequently occurs in homology modeling, fold recognition, and in several strategies in ab initio structure prediction. In our previous work, we developed a classification database of structural motifs, ArchDB. The database contains 12,665 clustered loops in 451 structural classes with information about phi-psi angles in the loops and 1492 structural subclasses with the relative locations of the bracing secondary structures. Here we evaluate the extent to which sequence information in the loop database can be used to predict loop structure. Two sequence profiles were used, a HMM profile and a PSSM derived from PSI-BLAST. A jack-knife test was made removing homologous loops using SCOP superfamily definition and predicting afterwards against recalculated profiles that only take into account the sequence information. Two scenarios were considered: (1) prediction of structural class with application in comparative modeling and (2) prediction of structural subclass with application in fold recognition and ab initio. For the first scenario, structural class prediction was made directly over loops with X-ray secondary structure assignment, and if we consider the top 20 classes out of 451 possible classes, the best accuracy of prediction is 78.5%. In the second scenario, structural subclass prediction was made over loops using PSI-PRED (Jones, J Mol Biol 1999;292:195-202) secondary structure prediction to define loop boundaries, and if we take into account the top 20 subclasses out of 1492, the best accuracy is 46.7%. Accuracy of loop prediction was also evaluated by means of RMSD calculations. PMID:16021623

  1. Evaluation of Limiting Climatic Factors and Simulation of a Climatically Suitable Habitat for Chinese Sea Buckthorn.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoqing; Du, Sheng; Guo, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Chinese sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides subsp. sinensis) has considerable economic potential and plays an important role in reclamation and soil and water conservation. For scientific cultivation of this species across China, we identified the key climatic factors and explored climatically suitable habitat in order to maximize survival of Chinese sea buckthorn using MaxEnt and GIS tools, based on 98 occurrence records from herbarium and publications and 13 climatic factors from Bioclim, Holdridge life zone and Kria' index variables. Our simulation showed that the MaxEnt model performance was significantly better than random, with an average test AUC value of 0.93 with 10-fold cross validation. A jackknife test and the regularized gain change, which were applied to the training algorithm, showed that precipitation of the driest month (PDM), annual precipitation (AP), coldness index (CI) and annual range of temperature (ART) were the most influential climatic factors in limiting the distribution of Chinese sea buckthorn, which explained 70.1% of the variation. The predicted map showed that the core of climatically suitable habitat was distributed from the southwest to northwest of Gansu, Ningxia, Shaanxi and Shanxi provinces, where the most influential climate variables were PDM of 1.0-7.0 mm, AP of 344.0-1089.0 mm, CI of -47.7-0.0°C, and ART of 26.1-45.0°C. We conclude that the distribution patterns of Chinese sea buckthorn are related to the northwest winter monsoon, the southwest summer monsoon and the southeast summer monsoon systems in China. PMID:26177033

  2. Dose reduction and its influence on diagnostic accuracy and radiation risk in digital mammography: an observer performance study using an anthropomorphic breast phantom

    PubMed Central

    Svahn, Tony; Hemdal, Bengt; Ruschin, Mark; Chakraborty, Dev P; Andersson, Ingvar; Tingberg, Anders; Mattsson, Sören

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of dose reduction on diagnostic accuracy and radiation risk in digital mammography. Simulated masses and microcalcifications were positioned in an anthropomorphic breast phantom. Thirty digital images, 14 with lesions, 16 without, were acquired of the phantom using a Mammomat Novation (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) at each of three dose levels. These corresponded to 100%, 50% and 30% of the normally used average glandular dose (AGD; 1.3 mGy for a standard breast). Eight observers interpreted the 90 unprocessed images in a free-response study and the data was analyzed with the jackknife free-response receiver operating characteristic (JAFROC) method. Observer performance was assessed using the JAFROC figure of merit (FOM). The benefit of radiation risk reduction was estimated based on several risk models. There was no statistically significant difference in performance, as described by the FOM, between the 100% and the 50% dose levels. However, the FOMs for both the 100% and the 50% dose were significantly different from the corresponding quantity for the 30% dose level (F-statistic = 4.95, p-value = 0.01). A dose reduction of 50% would result in 3-9 fewer breast cancer fatalities per 100,000 women undergoing annual screening from the age of 40 to 49 years. The results of the study indicate a possibility of reducing the dose to the breast to half of the dose level currently used. This has to be confirmed in clinical studies and possible differences depending on lesion type should be further examined. PMID:17704316

  3. A multi-scale study of Orthoptera species richness and human population size controlling for sampling effort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantarello, Elena; Steck, Claude E.; Fontana, Paolo; Fontaneto, Diego; Marini, Lorenzo; Pautasso, Marco

    2010-03-01

    Recent large-scale studies have shown that biodiversity-rich regions also tend to be densely populated areas. The most obvious explanation is that biodiversity and human beings tend to match the distribution of energy availability, environmental stability and/or habitat heterogeneity. However, the species-people correlation can also be an artefact, as more populated regions could show more species because of a more thorough sampling. Few studies have tested this sampling bias hypothesis. Using a newly collated dataset, we studied whether Orthoptera species richness is related to human population size in Italy’s regions (average area 15,000 km2) and provinces (2,900 km2). As expected, the observed number of species increases significantly with increasing human population size for both grain sizes, although the proportion of variance explained is minimal at the provincial level. However, variations in observed Orthoptera species richness are primarily associated with the available number of records, which is in turn well correlated with human population size (at least at the regional level). Estimated Orthoptera species richness (Chao2 and Jackknife) also increases with human population size both for regions and provinces. Both for regions and provinces, this increase is not significant when controlling for variation in area and number of records. Our study confirms the hypothesis that broad-scale human population-biodiversity correlations can in some cases be artefactual. More systematic sampling of less studied taxa such as invertebrates is necessary to ascertain whether biogeographical patterns persist when sampling effort is kept constant or included in models.

  4. Effect of herbicide combinations on Bt-maize rhizobacterial diversity.

    PubMed

    Valverde, José R; Marín, Silvia; Mellado, Rafael P

    2014-11-28

    Reports of herbicide resistance events are proliferating worldwide, leading to new cultivation strategies using combinations of pre-emergence and post-emergence herbicides. We analyzed the impact during a one-year cultivation cycle of several herbicide combinations on the rhizobacterial community of glyphosate-tolerant Bt-maize and compared them to those of the untreated or glyphosate-treated soils. Samples were analyzed using pyrosequencing of the V6 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene. The sequences obtained were subjected to taxonomic, taxonomy-independent, and phylogeny-based diversity studies, followed by a statistical analysis using principal components analysis and hierarchical clustering with jackknife statistical validation. The resilience of the microbial communities was analyzed by comparing their relative composition at the end of the cultivation cycle. The bacterial communites from soil subjected to a combined treatment with mesotrione plus s-metolachlor followed by glyphosate were not statistically different from those treated with glyphosate or the untreated ones. The use of acetochlor plus terbuthylazine followed by glyphosate, and the use of aclonifen plus isoxaflutole followed by mesotrione clearly affected the resilience of their corresponding bacterial communities. The treatment with pethoxamid followed by glyphosate resulted in an intermediate effect. The use of glyphosate alone seems to be the less aggressive one for bacterial communities. Should a combined treatment be needed, the combination of mesotrione and s-metolachlor shows the next best final resilience. Our results show the relevance of comparative rhizobacterial community studies when novel combined herbicide treatments are deemed necessary to control weed growth.. PMID:25394507

  5. MemType-2L: a web server for predicting membrane proteins and their types by incorporating evolution information through Pse-PSSM.

    PubMed

    Chou, Kuo-Chen; Shen, Hong-Bin

    2007-08-24

    Given an uncharacterized protein sequence, how can we identify whether it is a membrane protein or not? If it is, which membrane protein type it belongs to? These questions are important because they are closely relevant to the biological function of the query protein and to its interaction process with other molecules in a biological system. Particularly, with the avalanche of protein sequences generated in the Post-Genomic Age and the relatively much slower progress in using biochemical experiments to determine their functions, it is highly desired to develop an automated method that can be used to help address these questions. In this study, a 2-layer predictor, called MemType-2L, has been developed: the 1st layer prediction engine is to identify a query protein as membrane or non-membrane; if it is a membrane protein, the process will be automatically continued with the 2nd-layer prediction engine to further identify its type among the following eight categories: (1) type I, (2) type II, (3) type III, (4) type IV, (5) multipass, (6) lipid-chain-anchored, (7) GPI-anchored, and (8) peripheral. MemType-2L is featured by incorporating the evolution information through representing the protein samples with the Pse-PSSM (Pseudo Position-Specific Score Matrix) vectors, and by containing an ensemble classifier formed by fusing many powerful individual OET-KNN (Optimized Evidence-Theoretic K-Nearest Neighbor) classifiers. The success rates obtained by MemType-2L on a new-constructed stringent dataset by both the jackknife test and the independent dataset test are quite high, indicating that MemType-2L may become a very useful high throughput tool. As a Web server, MemType-2L is freely accessible to the public at http://chou.med.harvard.edu/bioinf/MemType.

  6. QuatIdent: a web server for identifying protein quaternary structural attribute by fusing functional domain and sequential evolution information.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong-Bin; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2009-03-01

    Many proteins exist in vivo as oligomers with various different quaternary structural attributes rather than as single individual chains. They are the structural bases of various marvelous biological functions such as cooperative effects, allosteric mechanism, and ion-channel gating. Therefore, with the avalanche of protein sequences generated in the postgenomic era, it is very important for both basic research and drug discovery to identify their quaternary structural attributes in a timely manner. In view of this, a powerful ensemble identifier, called QuatIdent, is developed by fusing the functional domain and sequential evolution information. QuatIdent is a 2-layer predictor. The 1st layer is for identifying a query protein as belonging to which one of the following 10 main quaternary structural attributes: (1) monomer, (2) dimer, (3) trimer, (4) tetramer, (5) pentamer, (6) hexamer, (7) heptamer, (8) octamer, (9) decamer, and (10) dodecamer. If the result thus obtained turns out to be anything but monomer, the process will be automatically continued to further identify it as belonging to a homo-oligomer or hetero-oligomer. The overall success rate by QuatIdent for the 1st layer identification was 71.1% and that for the 2nd layer ranged from 84 to 96%. These rates were derived by the jackknife cross-validation tests on the stringent benchmark data sets where none of proteins has > or =60% pairwise sequence identity to any other in a same subset. QuatIdent is freely accessible to the public as a web server via the site at http://www.csbio.sjtu.edu.cn/bioinf/Quaternary/ , by which one can get the desired 2-level results for a query protein sequence in around 25 seconds. The longer the sequence is, the more time that is needed.

  7. Differentiation of fecal Escherichia coli from human, livestock, and poultry sources by rep-PCR DNA fingerprinting on the shellfish culture area of East China Sea.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hong-Jia; Fu, Ling-Lin; Li, Jian-Rong

    2011-05-01

    The rep-PCR DNA fingerprinting performed with REP, BOX A1R, and (GTG)(5) primers was investigated as a way to differentiate between human, livestock, and poultry sources of fecal pollution on the area of Xiangshan Bay, East China Sea. Of the three methods, the BOX-PCR DNA fingerprints analyzed by jack-knife algorithm were revealed high rate of correct classification (RCC) with 91.30, 80.39, 89.39, 86.14, 93.24, 87.72, and 89.28% of human, cattle, swine, chicken, duck, sheep, and goose E. coli isolates classified into the correct host source, respectively. The average rate of correct classification (ARCC) of REP-, BOX-, and (GTG)(5)-PCR patterns was 79.88, 88.21, and 86.39%, respectively. Although the highest amount of bands in (GTG)(5)-PCR fingerprints could be observed, the discriminatory efficacy of BOX-PCR was superior to both REP- and (GTG)(5)-PCR. Moreover, the similarity of 459 isolates originated from shellfish and growing water was compared with fecal-obtained strains. The results showed that 92.4 and 96.2% E. coli strains isolated from midstream and downstream shellfish samples, respectively, had a ≥ 80% similarity with corresponding strains isolated from fecal samples. It was indicated that E. coli in feces could spread from human sewage or domestic farms to the surrounding shellfish culture water, and potentially affect the quality of shellfish. This work suggests that rep-PCR fingerprinting can be a promising genotypic tool applied in the shellfish growing water management on East China Sea for source identification of fecal pollution.

  8. Climate change in our backyards: the reshuffling of North America's winter bird communities.

    PubMed

    Princé, Karine; Zuckerberg, Benjamin

    2015-02-01

    Much of the recent changes in North American climate have occurred during the winter months, and as result, overwintering birds represent important sentinels of anthropogenic climate change. While there is mounting evidence that bird populations are responding to a warming climate (e.g., poleward shifts) questions remain as to whether these species-specific responses are resulting in community-wide changes. Here, we test the hypothesis that a changing winter climate should favor the formation of winter bird communities dominated by warm-adapted species. To do this, we quantified changes in community composition using a functional index--the Community Temperature Index (CTI)--which measures the balance between low- and high-temperature dwelling species in a community. Using data from Project FeederWatch, an international citizen science program, we quantified spatiotemporal changes in winter bird communities (n = 38 bird species) across eastern North America and tested the influence of changes in winter minimum temperature over a 22-year period. We implemented a jackknife analysis to identify those species most influential in driving changes at the community level and the population dynamics (e.g., extinction or colonization) responsible for these community changes. Since 1990, we found that the winter bird community structure has changed with communities increasingly composed of warm-adapted species. This reshuffling of winter bird communities was strongest in southerly latitudes and driven primarily by local increases in abundance and regional patterns of colonization by southerly birds. CTI tracked patterns of changing winter temperature at different temporal scales ranging from 1 to 35 years. We conclude that a shifting winter climate has provided an opportunity for smaller, southerly distributed species to colonize new regions and promote the formation of unique winter bird assemblages throughout eastern North America.

  9. Estimation of sex from the anthropometric ear measurements of a Sudanese population.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Altayeb Abdalla; Omer, Nosyba

    2015-09-01

    The external ear and its prints have multifaceted roles in medico-legal practice, e.g., identification and facial reconstruction. Furthermore, its norms are essential in the diagnosis of congenital anomalies and the design of hearing aids. Body part dimensions vary in different ethnic groups, so the most accurate statistical estimations of biological attributes are developed using population-specific standards. Sudan lacks comprehensive data about ear norms; moreover, there is a universal rarity in assessing the possibility of sex estimation from ear dimensions using robust statistical techniques. Therefore, this study attempts to establish data for normal adult Sudanese Arabs, assessing the existence of asymmetry and developing a population-specific equation for sex estimation. The study sample comprised 200 healthy Sudanese Arab volunteers (100 males and 100 females) in the age range of 18-30years. The physiognomic ear length and width, lobule length and width, and conchal length and width measurements were obtained by direct anthropometry, using a digital sliding caliper. Moreover, indices and asymmetry were assessed. Data were analyzed using basic descriptive statistics and discriminant function analyses employing jackknife validations of classification results. All linear dimensions used were sexually dimorphic except lobular lengths. Some of the variables and indices show asymmetry. Ear dimensions showed cross-validated sex classification accuracy ranging between 60.5% and 72%. Hence, the ear measurements cannot be used as an effective tool in the estimation of sex. However, in the absence of other more reliable means, it still can be considered a supportive trait in sex estimation. Further, asymmetry should be considered in identification from the ear measurements.

  10. Ammonia- and methane-oxidizing microorganisms in high-altitude wetland sediments and adjacent agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuyin; Shan, Jingwen; Zhang, Jingxu; Zhang, Xiaoling; Xie, Shuguang; Liu, Yong

    2014-12-01

    Ammonia oxidation is known to be carried out by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA), while methanotrophs (methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB)) play an important role in mitigating methane emissions from the environment. However, the difference of AOA, AOB, and MOB distribution in wetland sediment and adjacent upland soil remains unclear. The present study investigated the abundances and community structures of AOA, AOB, and MOB in sediments of a high-altitude freshwater wetland in Yunnan Province (China) and adjacent agricultural soils. Variations of AOA, AOB, and MOB community sizes and structures were found in water lily-vegetated and Acorus calamus-vegetated sediments and agricultural soils (unflooded rice soil, cabbage soil, and garlic soil and flooded rice soil). AOB community size was higher than AOA in agricultural soils and lily-vegetated sediment, but lower in A. calamus-vegetated sediment. MOB showed a much higher abundance than AOA and AOB. Flooded rice soil had the largest AOA, AOB, and MOB community sizes. Principal coordinate analyses and Jackknife Environment Clusters analyses suggested that unflooded and flooded rice soils had relatively similar AOA, AOB, and MOB structures. Cabbage soil and A. calamus-vegetated sediment had relatively similar AOA and AOB structures, but their MOB structures showed a large difference. Nitrososphaera-like microorganisms were the predominant AOA species in garlic soil but were present with a low abundance in unflooded rice soil and cabbage soil. Nitrosospira-like AOB were dominant in wetland sediments and agricultural soils. Type I MOB Methylocaldum and type II MOB Methylocystis were dominant in wetland sediments and agricultural soils. Moreover, Pearson's correlation analysis indicated that AOA Shannon diversity was positively correlated with the ratio of organic carbon to nitrogen (p < 0.05). This work could provide some new insights toward ammonia and methane oxidation in soil and wetland sediment

  11. A software system for the simulation of chest lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, John T.; McEntee, Mark; Barrett, Saoirse; Evanoff, Michael; Manning, David; Brennan, Patrick

    2007-03-01

    We report on the development of a novel software tool for the simulation of chest lesions. This software tool was developed for use in our study to attain optimal ambient lighting conditions for chest radiology. This study involved 61 consultant radiologists from the American Board of Radiology. Because of its success, we intend to use the same tool for future studies. The software has two main functions: the simulation of lesions and retrieval of information for ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristic) and JAFROC (Jack-Knife Free Response ROC) analysis. The simulation layer operates by randomly selecting an image from a bank of reportedly normal chest x-rays. A random location is then generated for each lesion, which is checked against a reference lung-map. If the location is within the lung fields, as derived from the lung-map, a lesion is superimposed. Lesions are also randomly selected from a bank of manually created chest lesion images. A blending algorithm determines which are the best intensity levels for the lesion to sit naturally within the chest x-ray. The same software was used to run a study for all 61 radiologists. A sequence of images is displayed in random order. Half of these images had simulated lesions, ranging from subtle to obvious, and half of the images were normal. The operator then selects locations where he/she thinks lesions exist and grades the lesion accordingly. We have found that this software was very effective in this study and intend to use the same principles for future studies.

  12. Combining pseudo dinucleotide composition with the Z curve method to improve the accuracy of predicting DNA elements: a case study in recombination spots.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chuan; Yuan, Ya-Zhou; Zhang, Fa-Zhan; Hua, Hong-Li; Ye, Yuan-Nong; Labena, Abraham Alemayehu; Lin, Hao; Chen, Wei; Guo, Feng-Biao

    2016-08-16

    Pseudo dinucleotide composition (PseDNC) and Z curve showed excellent performance in the classification issues of nucleotide sequences in bioinformatics. Inspired by the principle of Z curve theory, we improved PseDNC to give the phase-specific PseDNC (psPseDNC). In this study, we used the prediction of recombination spots as a case to illustrate the capability of psPseDNC and also PseDNC fused with Z curve theory based on a novel machine learning method named large margin distribution machine (LDM). We verified that combining the two widely used approaches could generate better performance compared to only using PseDNC with a support vector machine based (SVM-based) model. The best Mathew's correlation coefficient (MCC) achieved by our LDM-based model was 0.7037 through the rigorous jackknife test and improved by ∼6.6%, ∼3.2%, and ∼2.4% compared with three previous studies. Similarly, the accuracy was improved by 3.2% compared with our previous iRSpot-PseDNC web server through an independent data test. These results demonstrate that the joint use of PseDNC and Z curve enhances performance and can extract more information from a biological sequence. To facilitate research in this area, we constructed a user-friendly web server for predicting hot/cold spots, HcsPredictor, which can be freely accessed from . In summary, we provided a united algorithm by integrating Z curve with PseDNC. We hope this united algorithm could be extended to other classification issues in DNA elements. PMID:27410247

  13. [Forest lighting fire forecasting for Daxing'anling Mountains based on MAXENT model].

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu; Shi, Ming-Chang; Peng, Huan; Zhu, Pei-Lin; Liu, Si-Lin; Wu, Shi-Lei; He, Cheng; Chen, Feng

    2014-04-01

    Daxing'anling Mountains is one of the areas with the highest occurrence of forest lighting fire in Heilongjiang Province, and developing a lightning fire forecast model to accurately predict the forest fires in this area is of importance. Based on the data of forest lightning fires and environment variables, the MAXENT model was used to predict the lightning fire in Daxing' anling region. Firstly, we studied the collinear diagnostic of each environment variable, evaluated the importance of the environmental variables using training gain and the Jackknife method, and then evaluated the prediction accuracy of the MAXENT model using the max Kappa value and the AUC value. The results showed that the variance inflation factor (VIF) values of lightning energy and neutralized charge were 5.012 and 6.230, respectively. They were collinear with the other variables, so the model could not be used for training. Daily rainfall, the number of cloud-to-ground lightning, and current intensity of cloud-to-ground lightning were the three most important factors affecting the lightning fires in the forest, while the daily average wind speed and the slope was of less importance. With the increase of the proportion of test data, the max Kappa and AUC values were increased. The max Kappa values were above 0.75 and the average value was 0.772, while all of the AUC values were above 0.5 and the average value was 0. 859. With a moderate level of prediction accuracy being achieved, the MAXENT model could be used to predict forest lightning fire in Daxing'anling Mountains. PMID:25011305

  14. DNA hybridization evidence for the principal lineages of hummingbirds (Aves:Trochilidae).

    PubMed

    Bleiweiss, R; Kirsch, J A; Matheus, J C

    1997-03-01

    The spectacular evolutionary radiation of hummingbirds (Trochilidae) has served as a model system for many biological studies. To begin to provide a historical context for these investigations, we generated a complete matrix of DNA hybridization distances among 26 hummingbirds and an outgroup swift (Chaetura pelagica) to determine the principal hummingbird lineages. FITCH topologies estimated from symmetrized delta TmH-C values and subjected to various validation methods (bootstrapping, weighted jackknifing, branch length significance) indicated a fundamental split between hermit (Eutoxeres aquila, Threnetes ruckeri; Phaethornithinae) and nonhermit (Trochilinae) hummingbirds, and provided strong support for six principal nonhermit clades with the following branching order: (1) a predominantly lowland group comprising caribs (Eulampis holosericeus) and relatives (Androdon aequatorialis and Heliothryx barroti) with violet-ears (Colibri coruscans) and relatives (Doryfera ludovicae); (2) an Andean-associated clade of highly polytypic taxa (Eriocnemis, Heliodoxa, and Coeligena); (3) a second endemic Andean clade (Oreotrochilus chimborazo, Aglaiocercus coelestis, and Lesbia victoriae) paired with thorntails (Popelairia conversii); (4) emeralds and relatives (Chlorostilbon mellisugus, Amazilia tzacatl, Thalurania colombica, Orthorhyncus cristatus and Campylopterus villaviscensio); (5) mountain-gems (Lampornis clemenciae and Eugenes fulgens); and (6) tiny bee-like forms (Archilochus colubris, Myrtis fanny, Acestrura mulsant, and Philodice mitchellii). Corresponding analyses on a matrix of unsymmetrized delta values gave similar support for these relationships except that the branching order of the two Andean clades (2, 3 above) was unresolved. In general, subsidiary relationships were consistent and well supported by both matrices, sometimes revealing surprising associations between forms that differ dramatically in plumage and bill morphology. Our results also reveal some

  15. Does more sequence data improve estimates of galliform phylogeny? Analyses of a rapid radiation using a complete data matrix

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Edward L.

    2014-01-01

    The resolution of rapid evolutionary radiations or “bushes” in the tree of life has been one of the most difficult and interesting problems in phylogenetics. The avian order Galliformes appears to have undergone several rapid radiations that have limited the resolution of prior studies and obscured the position of taxa important both agriculturally and as model systems (chicken, turkey, Japanese quail). Here we present analyses of a multi-locus data matrix comprising over 15,000 sites, primarily from nuclear introns but also including three mitochondrial regions, from 46 galliform taxa with all gene regions sampled for all taxa. The increased sampling of unlinked nuclear genes provided strong bootstrap support for all but a small number of relationships. Coalescent-based methods to combine individual gene trees and analyses of datasets that are independent of published data indicated that this well-supported topology is likely to reflect the galliform species tree. The inclusion or exclusion of mitochondrial data had a limited impact upon analyses upon analyses using either concatenated data or multispecies coalescent methods. Some of the key phylogenetic findings include support for a second major clade within the core phasianids that includes the chicken and Japanese quail and clarification of the phylogenetic relationships of turkey. Jackknifed datasets suggested that there is an advantage to sampling many independent regions across the genome rather than obtaining long sequences for a small number of loci, possibly reflecting the differences among gene trees that differ due to incomplete lineage sorting. Despite the novel insights we obtained using this increased sampling of gene regions, some nodes remain unresolved, likely due to periods of rapid diversification. Resolving these remaining groups will likely require sequencing a very large number of gene regions, but our analyses now appear to support a robust backbone for this order. PMID:24795852

  16. Importance of surrounding residues for protein stability of partially buried mutations.

    PubMed

    Gromiha, M M; Oobatake, M; Kono, H; Uedaira, H; Sarai, A

    2000-10-01

    For understanding the factors influencing protein stability, we have analyzed the relationship between changes in protein stability caused by partially buried mutations and changes in 48 physico-chemical, energetic and conformational properties of amino acid residues. Multiple regression equations were derived to predict the stability of protein mutants and the efficiency of the method has been verified with both back-check and jack-knife tests. We observed a good agreement between experimental and computed stabilities. Further, we have analyzed the effect of sequence window length from 1 to 12 residues on each side of the mutated residue to include the sequence information for predicting protein stability and we found that the preferred window length for obtaining the highest correlation is different for each secondary structure; the preferred window length for helical, strand and coil mutations are, respectively, 0, 9 and 4 residues on both sides of the mutant residues. However, all the secondary structures have significant correlation for a window length of one residue on each side of the mutant position, implying the role of short-range interactions. Extraction of surrounding residue information for various distances (3 to 20A) around the mutant position showed the highest correlation at 8A, 6A and 7A, respectively, for mutations in helical, strand and coil segments. Overall, the information about the surrounding residues within the sphere of 7 to 8A, may explain better the stability in all subsets of partially buried mutations implying that this distance is sufficient to accommodate the residues influenced by major intramolecular interactions for the stability of protein structures. PMID:11089649

  17. Estimation of sex from the anthropometric ear measurements of a Sudanese population.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Altayeb Abdalla; Omer, Nosyba

    2015-09-01

    The external ear and its prints have multifaceted roles in medico-legal practice, e.g., identification and facial reconstruction. Furthermore, its norms are essential in the diagnosis of congenital anomalies and the design of hearing aids. Body part dimensions vary in different ethnic groups, so the most accurate statistical estimations of biological attributes are developed using population-specific standards. Sudan lacks comprehensive data about ear norms; moreover, there is a universal rarity in assessing the possibility of sex estimation from ear dimensions using robust statistical techniques. Therefore, this study attempts to establish data for normal adult Sudanese Arabs, assessing the existence of asymmetry and developing a population-specific equation for sex estimation. The study sample comprised 200 healthy Sudanese Arab volunteers (100 males and 100 females) in the age range of 18-30years. The physiognomic ear length and width, lobule length and width, and conchal length and width measurements were obtained by direct anthropometry, using a digital sliding caliper. Moreover, indices and asymmetry were assessed. Data were analyzed using basic descriptive statistics and discriminant function analyses employing jackknife validations of classification results. All linear dimensions used were sexually dimorphic except lobular lengths. Some of the variables and indices show asymmetry. Ear dimensions showed cross-validated sex classification accuracy ranging between 60.5% and 72%. Hence, the ear measurements cannot be used as an effective tool in the estimation of sex. However, in the absence of other more reliable means, it still can be considered a supportive trait in sex estimation. Further, asymmetry should be considered in identification from the ear measurements. PMID:25813757

  18. Morphometric analysis of pelvic sexual dimorphism in a contemporary Western Australian population.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Daniel; Cardini, Andrea; Flavel, Ambika; Marks, Murray K

    2014-09-01

    Requisite to routine casework involving unidentified skeletal remains is the formulation of an accurate biological profile, including sex estimation. Choice of method(s) is invariably related to preservation and by association, available bones. It is vital that the method applied affords statistical quantification of accuracy rates and predictive confidence so that evidentiary requirements for legal submission are satisfied. Achieving the latter necessitates the application of contemporary population-specific standards. This study examines skeletal pelvic dimorphism in contemporary Western Australian individuals to quantify the accuracy of using pelvic measurements to estimate sex and to formulate a series of morphometric standards. The sample comprises pelvic multi-slice computer tomography (MSCT) scans from 200 male and 200 female adults. Following 3D rendering, the 3D coordinates of 24 landmarks are acquired using OsiriX® (v.4.1.1) with 12 inter-landmark linear measurements and two angles acquired using MorphDb. Measurements are analysed using basic descriptive statistics and discriminant functions analyses employing jackknife validation of classification results. All except two linear measurements are dimorphic with sex differences explaining up to 65 % of sample variance. Transverse pelvic outlet and subpubic angle contribute most significantly to sex discrimination with accuracy rates between 100 % (complete pelvis-10 variables) and 81.2 % (ischial length). This study represents the initial forensic research into pelvic sexual dimorphism in a Western Australian population. Given these methods, we conclude that this highly dimorphic bone can be used to classify sex with a high degree of expected accuracy. PMID:24789357

  19. An Ancient Origin for the Enigmatic Flat-Headed Frogs (Bombinatoridae: Barbourula) from the Islands of Southeast Asia

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, David C.; Bickford, David P.; Diesmos, Arvin C.; Iskandar, Djoko T.; Brown, Rafe M.

    2010-01-01

    Background The complex history of Southeast Asian islands has long been of interest to biogeographers. Dispersal and vicariance events in the Pleistocene have received the most attention, though recent studies suggest a potentially more ancient history to components of the terrestrial fauna. Among this fauna is the enigmatic archaeobatrachian frog genus Barbourula, which only occurs on the islands of Borneo and Palawan. We utilize this lineage to gain unique insight into the temporal history of lineage diversification in Southeast Asian islands. Methodology/Principal Findings Using mitochondrial and nuclear genetic data, multiple fossil calibration points, and likelihood and Bayesian methods, we estimate phylogenetic relationships and divergence times for Barbourula. We determine the sensitivity of focal divergence times to specific calibration points by jackknife approach in which each calibration point is excluded from analysis. We find that relevant divergence time estimates are robust to the exclusion of specific calibration points. Barbourula is recovered as a monophyletic lineage nested within a monophyletic Costata. Barbourula diverged from its sister taxon Bombina in the Paleogene and the two species of Barbourula diverged in the Late Miocene. Conclusions/Significance The divergences within Barbourula and between it and Bombina are surprisingly old and represent the oldest estimates for a cladogenetic event resulting in living taxa endemic to Southeast Asian islands. Moreover, these divergence time estimates are consistent with a new biogeographic scenario: the Palawan Ark Hypothesis. We suggest that components of Palawan's terrestrial fauna might have “rafted” on emergent portions of the North Palawan Block during its migration from the Asian mainland to its present-day position near Borneo. Further, dispersal from Palawan to Borneo (rather than Borneo to Palawan) may explain the current day disjunct distribution of this ancient lineage. PMID:20711504

  20. Historical extension of operational NDVI products for livestock insurance in Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrieling, Anton; Meroni, Michele; Shee, Apurba; Mude, Andrew G.; Woodard, Joshua; de Bie, C. A. J. M. (Kees); Rembold, Felix

    2014-05-01

    Droughts induce livestock losses that severely affect Kenyan pastoralists. Recent index insurance schemes have the potential of being a viable tool for insuring pastoralists against drought-related risk. Such schemes require as input a forage scarcity (or drought) index that can be reliably updated in near real-time, and that strongly relates to livestock mortality. Generally, a long record (>25 years) of the index is needed to correctly estimate mortality risk and calculate the related insurance premium. Data from current operational satellites used for large-scale vegetation monitoring span over a maximum of 15 years, a time period that is considered insufficient for accurate premium computation. This study examines how operational NDVI datasets compare to, and could be combined with the non-operational recently constructed 30-year GIMMS AVHRR record (1981-2011) to provide a near-real time drought index with a long term archive for the arid lands of Kenya. We compared six freely available, near-real time NDVI products: five from MODIS and one from SPOT-VEGETATION. Prior to comparison, all datasets were averaged in time for the two vegetative seasons in Kenya, and aggregated spatially at the administrative division level at which the insurance is offered. The feasibility of extending the resulting aggregated drought indices back in time was assessed using jackknifed R2 statistics (leave-one-year-out) for the overlapping period 2002-2011. We found that division-specific models were more effective than a global model for linking the division-level temporal variability of the index between NDVI products. Based on our results, good scope exists for historically extending the aggregated drought index, thus providing a longer operational record for insurance purposes. We showed that this extension may have large effects on the calculated insurance premium. Finally, we discuss several possible improvements to the drought index.

  1. Phylogenetic diversity and ecological pattern of ammonia-oxidizing archaea in the surface sediments of the western Pacific.

    PubMed

    Cao, Huiluo; Hong, Yiguo; Li, Meng; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2011-11-01

    The phylogenetic diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) was surveyed in the surface sediments from the northern part of the South China Sea (SCS). The distribution pattern of AOA in the western Pacific was discussed through comparing the SCS with other areas in the western Pacific including Changjiang Estuary and the adjacent East China Sea where high input of anthropogenic nitrogen was evident, the tropical West Pacific Continental Margins close to the Philippines, the deep-sea methane seep sediments in the Okhotsk Sea, the cold deep sea of Northeastern Japan Sea, and the hydrothermal field in the Southern Okinawa Trough. These various environments provide a wide spectrum of physical and chemical conditions for a better understanding of the distribution pattern and diversities of AOA in the western Pacific. Under these different conditions, the distinct community composition between shallow and deep-sea sediments was clearly delineated based on the UniFrac PCoA and Jackknife Environmental Cluster analyses. Phylogenetic analyses showed that a few ammonia-oxidizing archaeal subclades in the marine water column/sediment clade and endemic lineages were indicative phylotypes for some environments. Higher phylogenetic diversity was observed in the Philippines while lower diversity in the hydrothermal vent habitat. Water depth and possibly with other environmental factors could be the main driving forces to shape the phylogenetic diversity of AOA observed, not only in the SCS but also in the whole western Pacific. The multivariate regression tree analysis also supported this observation consistently. Moreover, the functions of current and other climate factors were also discussed in comparison of phylogenetic diversity. The information collectively provides important insights into the ecophysiological requirements of uncultured ammonia-oxidizing archaeal lineages in the western Pacific Ocean.

  2. The osmotic tolerance of boar spermatozoa and its usefulness as sperm quality parameter.

    PubMed

    Yeste, Marc; Briz, Mailo; Pinart, Elisabeth; Sancho, Sílvia; Bussalleu, Eva; Bonet, Sergi

    2010-06-01

    Predicting the fertility outcome of ejaculates is very important in the field of porcine reproduction. The aims of this study were to determine the effects of different osmotic treatments on boar spermatozoa and to correlate them with fertility and prolificacy, assessed as non-return rates within 60 days (NRR(60d)) of the first inseminations, and litter size (LS), respectively. Sperm samples (n=100) from one hundred healthy Piétrain boars were used to assess 48 treatments combining different osmolalities (ranged between 100 and 4000 mOsm kg(-1)), different compounds used to prepare anisotonic solutions, and two different modalities: return and non-return to isotonic conditions. Sperm quality was evaluated before and after applying the treatments on the basis of analyses of sperm viability, motility, morphology and percentages of acrosome-intact spermatozoa. Statistical analyses were performed using a one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's test, linear regression analyses (Pearson correlation and multiple regression) and Jackknife cross-validation. Although three conventional parameters: sperm viability, sperm morphology and the percentages of acrosome-intact spermatozoa were significantly correlated with NRR(60d) and with LS, their respective osmotic tolerance parameters (defined for each parameter and treatment regarding with negative control) presented a higher Pearson coefficient with both fertility and prolificacy in three treatments (150 mOsm kg(-1) with non-return to isotonic conditions, 200 mOsm kg(-1) with return and 500 mOsm kg(-1) using sodium citrate and non-return to isotonic conditions). We conclude that osmotic resistance in sperm viability, sperm morphology and acrosome-intactness in the treatments mentioned above could be assessed along with classical parameters to better predict the fertilising ability of a given ejaculate.

  3. Demographic history and rare allele sharing among human populations.

    PubMed

    Gravel, Simon; Henn, Brenna M; Gutenkunst, Ryan N; Indap, Amit R; Marth, Gabor T; Clark, Andrew G; Yu, Fuli; Gibbs, Richard A; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2011-07-19

    High-throughput sequencing technology enables population-level surveys of human genomic variation. Here, we examine the joint allele frequency distributions across continental human populations and present an approach for combining complementary aspects of whole-genome, low-coverage data and targeted high-coverage data. We apply this approach to data generated by the pilot phase of the Thousand Genomes Project, including whole-genome 2-4× coverage data for 179 samples from HapMap European, Asian, and African panels as well as high-coverage target sequencing of the exons of 800 genes from 697 individuals in seven populations. We use the site frequency spectra obtained from these data to infer demographic parameters for an Out-of-Africa model for populations of African, European, and Asian descent and to predict, by a jackknife-based approach, the amount of genetic diversity that will be discovered as sample sizes are increased. We predict that the number of discovered nonsynonymous coding variants will reach 100,000 in each population after ∼1,000 sequenced chromosomes per population, whereas ∼2,500 chromosomes will be needed for the same number of synonymous variants. Beyond this point, the number of segregating sites in the European and Asian panel populations is expected to overcome that of the African panel because of faster recent population growth. Overall, we find that the majority of human genomic variable sites are rare and exhibit little sharing among diverged populations. Our results emphasize that replication of disease association for specific rare genetic variants across diverged populations must overcome both reduced statistical power because of rarity and higher population divergence.

  4. Housefly Population Density Correlates with Shigellosis among Children in Mirzapur, Bangladesh: A Time Series Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Farag, Tamer H.; Faruque, Abu S.; Wu, Yukun; Das, Sumon K.; Hossain, Anowar; Ahmed, Shahnawaz; Ahmed, Dilruba; Nasrin, Dilruba; Kotloff, Karen L.; Panchilangam, Sandra; Nataro, James P.; Cohen, Dani; Blackwelder, William C.; Levine, Myron M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Shigella infections are a public health problem in developing and transitional countries because of high transmissibility, severity of clinical disease, widespread antibiotic resistance and lack of a licensed vaccine. Whereas Shigellae are known to be transmitted primarily by direct fecal-oral contact and less commonly by contaminated food and water, the role of the housefly Musca domestica as a mechanical vector of transmission is less appreciated. We sought to assess the contribution of houseflies to Shigella-associated moderate-to-severe diarrhea (MSD) among children less than five years old in Mirzapur, Bangladesh, a site where shigellosis is hyperendemic, and to model the potential impact of a housefly control intervention. Methods Stool samples from 843 children presenting to Kumudini Hospital during 2009–2010 with new episodes of MSD (diarrhea accompanied by dehydration, dysentery or hospitalization) were analyzed. Housefly density was measured twice weekly in six randomly selected sentinel households. Poisson time series regression was performed and autoregression-adjusted attributable fractions (AFs) were calculated using the Bruzzi method, with standard errors via jackknife procedure. Findings Dramatic springtime peaks in housefly density in 2009 and 2010 were followed one to two months later by peaks of Shigella-associated MSD among toddlers and pre-school children. Poisson time series regression showed that housefly density was associated with Shigella cases at three lags (six weeks) (Incidence Rate Ratio = 1.39 [95% CI: 1.23 to 1.58] for each log increase in fly count), an association that was not confounded by ambient air temperature. Autocorrelation-adjusted AF calculations showed that a housefly control intervention could have prevented approximately 37% of the Shigella cases over the study period. Interpretation Houseflies may play an important role in the seasonal transmission of Shigella in some developing country ecologies

  5. Using breast radiographers' reports as a second opinion for radiologists' readings of microcalcifications in digital mammography

    PubMed Central

    Takamori, M; Uchiyama, Y; Nishikawa, R M; Shiraishi, J

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate a practical method for incorporating radiographers' reports with radiologists' readings of digital mammograms. Methods: This simulation study was conducted using data from a free-response receiver operating characteristic observer study obtained with 75 cases (25 malignant, 25 benign and 25 normal cases) of digital mammograms. Each of the rating scores obtained by six breast radiographers was utilized as a second opinion for four radiologists' readings with the radiographers' reports. A logical “OR” operation with various criteria settings was simulated for deciding an appropriate method to select a radiographer's report in all combinations of radiologists and radiographers. The average figure of merit (FOM) of the radiologists' performances was statistically analysed using a jackknife procedure (JAFROC) to verify the clinical utility of using radiographers' reports. Results: Potential improvement of the average FOM of the radiologists' performances for identifying malignant microcalcifications could be expected when using radiographers' reports as a second opinion. When the threshold value of 2.6 in Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS®) assessment was applied to adopt/reject a radiographer's report, FOMs of radiologists' performances were further improved. Conclusion: When using breast radiographers' reports as a second opinion, radiologists' performances potentially improved when reading digital mammograms. It could be anticipated that radiologists' performances were improved further by setting a threshold value on the BI-RADS assessment provided by the radiographers. Advances in knowledge: For the effective use of a radiographer's report as a second opinion, radiographers' rating scores and its criteria setting for adoption/rejection would be necessary. PMID:25536443

  6. Comparative analysis of different retrieval methods for mapping grassland leaf area index using airborne imaging spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atzberger, Clement; Darvishzadeh, Roshanak; Immitzer, Markus; Schlerf, Martin; Skidmore, Andrew; le Maire, Guerric

    2015-12-01

    Fine scale maps of vegetation biophysical variables are useful status indicators for monitoring and managing national parks and endangered habitats. Here, we assess in a comparative way four different retrieval methods for estimating leaf area index (LAI) in grassland: two radiative transfer model (RTM) inversion methods (one based on look-up-tables (LUT) and one based on predictive equations) and two statistical modelling methods (one partly, the other entirely based on in situ data). For prediction, spectral data were used that had been acquired over Majella National Park in Italy by the airborne hyperspectral HyMap instrument. To assess the performance of the four investigated models, the normalized root mean squared error (nRMSE) and coefficient of determination (R2) between estimates and in situ LAI measurements are reported (n = 41). Using a jackknife approach, we also quantified the accuracy and robustness of empirical models as a function of the size of the available calibration data set. The results of the study demonstrate that the LUT-based RTM inversion yields higher accuracies for LAI estimation (R2 = 0.91, nRMSE = 0.18) as compared to RTM inversions based on predictive equations (R2 = 0.79, nRMSE = 0.38). The two statistical methods yield accuracies similar to the LUT method. However, as expected, the accuracy and robustness of the statistical models decrease when the size of the calibration database is reduced to fewer samples. The results of this study are of interest for the remote sensing community developing improved inversion schemes for spaceborne hyperspectral sensors applicable to different vegetation types. The examples provided in this paper may also serve as illustrations for the drawbacks and advantages of physical and empirical models.

  7. Combined triaxial accelerometry and heart rate telemetry for the physiological characterization of Latin dance in non-professional adults.

    PubMed

    Domene, Pablo A; Easton, Chris

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to value calibrate, cross-validate, and determine the reliability of a combined triaxial accelerometry and heart rate telemetry technique for characterizing the physiological and physical activity parameters of Latin dance. Twenty-two non-professional adult Latin dancers attended two laboratory-based dance trials each. After familiarization and a standardized warm-up, a multi-stage (3 x 5-minute) incremental (based on song tempo) Afro-Cuban salsa choreography was performed while following a video displayed on a projection screen. Data were collected with a portable indirect calorimeter, a heart rate telemeter, and wrist-, hip-, and ankle-mounted ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometers. Prediction equations for energy expenditure and step count were value calibrated using forced entry multiple regression and cross-validated using a delete-one jackknife approach with additional Bland-Altman analysis. The average dance intensity reached 6.09 ± 0.96 kcal/kg/h and demanded 45.9 ± 11.3% of the heart rate reserve. Predictive ability of the derived models was satisfactory, where R(2) = 0.80; SEE = 0.44 kcal/kg/h and R(2) = 0.74; SEE = 3 step/min for energy expenditure and step count, respectively. Dependent t-tests indicated no differences between predicted and measured values for both energy expenditure (t65 = -0.25, p = 0.80) and step count (t65 = -0.89, p = 0.38). The 95% limits of agreement for energy expenditure and step count were -0.98 to 0.95 kcal/kg/h and -7 to 7 step/min, respectively. Latin dance to salsa music elicits physiological responses representative of moderate to vigorous physical activity, and a wrist-worn accelerometer with simultaneous heart rate measurement constitutes a valid and reliable technique for the prediction of energy expenditure and step count during Latin dance.

  8. Dose dependence of mass and microcalcification detection in digital mammography: Free response human observer studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ruschin, Mark; Timberg, Pontus; Ba ring th, Magnus; Hemdal, Bengt; Svahn, Tony; Saunders, Rob S.; Samei, Ehsan; Andersson, Ingvar; Mattsson, Soeren; Chakraborty, Dev P.; Tingberg, Anders

    2007-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of dose reduction in digital mammography on the detection of two lesion types--malignant masses and clusters of microcalcifications. Two free-response observer studies were performed--one for each lesion type. Ninety screening images were retrospectively selected; each image was originally acquired under automatic exposure conditions, corresponding to an average glandular dose of 1.3 mGy for a standard breast (50 mm compressed breast thickness with 50% glandularity). For each study, one to three simulated lesions were added to each of 40 images (abnormals) while 50 were kept without lesions (normals). Two levels of simulated system noise were added to the images yielding two new image sets, corresponding to simulated dose levels of 50% and 30% of the original images (100%). The manufacturer's standard display processing was subsequently applied to all images. Four radiologists experienced in mammography evaluated the images by searching for lesions and marking and assigning confidence levels to suspicious regions. The search data were analyzed using jackknife free-response (JAFROC) methodology. For the detection of masses, the mean figure-of-merit (FOM) averaged over all readers was 0.74, 0.71, and 0.68 corresponding to dose levels of 100%, 50%, and 30%, respectively. These values were not statistically different from each other (F=1.67, p=0.19) but showed a decreasing trend. In contrast, in the microcalcification study the mean FOM was 0.93, 0.67, and 0.38 for the same dose levels and these values were all significantly different from each other (F=109.84, p<0.0001). The results indicate that lowering the present dose level by a factor of two compromised the detection of microcalcifications but had a weaker effect on mass detection.

  9. Detectability of simulated interstitial pneumonia on chest radiographs: comparison between irradiation side sampling indirect flat-panel detector and computed radiography

    PubMed Central

    Yabuuchi, H; Kairada, A; Tanaka, N; Morishita, J; Akasaka, T; Matsuo, Y; Kamitani, T; Yamasaki, Y; Nagao, M; Sasaki, M

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare the detectability of simulated interstitial pneumonia on chest radiographs between an irradiation side sampling indirect flat-panel detector (ISS-FPD) and computed radiography (CR). Methods: Simulated interstitial pneumonia findings (ground-glass opacity, reticular opacity and honeycomb lung) were superimposed on an anthropomorphic chest phantom. Chest radiographs were acquired under three exposure levels (4.0, 3.2 and 2.0 mAs) with an ISS-FPD and with CR. 5 thoracic radiologists evaluated 72 images for the presence or absence of a lesion over each of 6 areas. A total of 1296 observations were analysed in a receiver–operating characteristic analysis. A jackknife method was used for the statistical analysis. Results: The areas under the curves (AUCs) for the detection of simulated honeycomb lung obtained with the ISS-FPD were significantly larger than those obtained with CR at all exposure conditions. For the detection of simulated ground-glass opacity and reticular opacity, there were no significant differences between the two systems. In addition, the AUCs for the detectability of simulated honeycomb lung obtained with the ISS-FPD at all exposure levels were significantly larger than those obtained with CR at 4 mAs. Conclusion: The ISS-FPD was superior to CR for the detection of simulated honeycomb lung. Provided that the chosen model is representative of interstitial pneumonia, the use of an ISS-FPD might reduce a patient's exposure dose during the detection of interstitial pneumonia. Advances in knowledge: The ISS-FPD has shown its advantage compared with CR in the detection of honeycombing, one sign of interstitial pneumonia. PMID:24874767

  10. A hybrid method for prediction and repositioning of drug Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Lu, Jing; Zhang, Ning; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2014-04-01

    In the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification system, therapeutic drugs are divided into 14 main classes according to the organ or system on which they act and their chemical, pharmacological and therapeutic properties. This system, recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO), provides a global standard for classifying medical substances and serves as a tool for international drug utilization research to improve quality of drug use. In view of this, it is necessary to develop effective computational prediction methods to identify the ATC-class of a given drug, which thereby could facilitate further analysis of this system. In this study, we initiated an attempt to develop a prediction method and to gain insights from it by utilizing ontology information of drug compounds. Since only about one-fourth of drugs in the ATC classification system have ontology information, a hybrid prediction method combining the ontology information, chemical interaction information and chemical structure information of drug compounds was proposed for the prediction of drug ATC-classes. As a result, by using the Jackknife test, the 1st prediction accuracies for identifying the 14 main ATC-classes in the training dataset, the internal validation dataset and the external validation dataset were 75.90%, 75.70% and 66.36%, respectively. Analysis of some samples with false-positive predictions in the internal and external validation datasets indicated that some of them may even have a relationship with the false-positive predicted ATC-class, suggesting novel uses of these drugs. It was conceivable that the proposed method could be used as an efficient tool to identify ATC-classes of novel drugs or to discover novel uses of known drugs.

  11. A comparison of ROC inferred from FROC and conventional ROC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEntee, Mark F.; Littlefair, Stephen; Pietrzyk, Mariusz W.

    2014-03-01

    This study aims to determine whether receiver operating characteristic (ROC) scores inferred from free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) were equivalent to conventional ROC scores for the same readers and cases. Forty-five examining radiologists of the American Board of Radiology independently reviewed 47 PA chest radiographs under at least two conditions. Thirty-seven cases had abnormal findings and 10 cases had normal findings. Half the readers were asked to first locate any visualized lung nodules, mark them and assign a level of confidence [the FROC mark-rating pair] and second give an overall to the entire image on the same scale [the ROC score]. The second half of readers gave the ROC rating first followed by the FROC mark-rating pairs. A normal image was represented with number 1 and malignant lesions with numbers 2-5. A jackknife free-response receiver operating characteristic (JAFROC), and inferred ROC (infROC) was calculated from the mark-rating pairs using JAFROC V4.1 software. ROC based on the overall rating of the image calculated using DBM MRMC software, which was also used to compare infROC and ROC AUCs treating the methods as modalities. Pearson's correlations coefficient and linear regression were used to examine their relationship using SPSS, version 21.0; (SPSS, Chicago, IL). The results of this study showed no significant difference between the ROC and Inferred ROC AUCs (p≤0.25). While Pearson's correlation coefficient was 0.7 (p≤0.01). Inter-reader correlation calculated from Obuchowski- Rockette covariance's ranged from 0.43-0.86 while intra-reader agreement was greater than previously reported ranging from 0.68-0.82.

  12. A comparison of Australian and USA radiologists' performance in detection of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleiman, Wasfi I.; Georgian-Smith, Dianne; Evanoff, Michael G.; Lewis, Sarah; McEntee, Mark F.

    2014-03-01

    The aim of current work was to compare the performance of radiologists that read a higher number of cases to those that read a lower number, as well as examine the effect of number of years of experience on performance. This study compares Australian and USA radiologist with differing levels of experience when reading mammograms. Thirty mammographic cases were presented to 41 radiologists, 21 from Australia and 20 from the USA. Readers were asked to locate and visualize cancer and assign a mark-rating pair with confidence levels from 1 to 5. A jackknife free-response receiver operating characteristic (JAFROC), inferred receiver operating characteristic (ROC), sensitivity, specificity and location sensitivity were calculated. A Mann-Whitney test was used to compare the performance of Australian and USA radiologists using SPSS software. The results showed that the USA radiologists sampled had more years of experience (p≤0.01) but read less mammograms per year (p≤0.03). Significantly higher sensitivity and location sensitivity (p≤ 0.001) were found for the Australia radiologists when experience and the number of mammograms read per year were taken into account. There were no differences between the two countries in overall performance measured by JAFROC and inferred ROC. For the most experienced radiologists within the Australian sample experienced ROC and location sensitivity were higher when compared to the least experienced. The increased number of years experience of the USA radiologists did not result in an increase in any performance metrics. The number of cases per year is a better predictor of improved diagnostic performance.

  13. Metric optimisation for analogue forecasting by simulated annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bliefernicht, J.; Bárdossy, A.

    2009-04-01

    It is well known that weather patterns tend to recur from time to time. This property of the atmosphere is used by analogue forecasting techniques. They have a long history in weather forecasting and there are many applications predicting hydrological variables at the local scale for different lead times. The basic idea of the technique is to identify past weather situations which are similar (analogue) to the predicted one and to take the local conditions of the analogues as forecast. But the forecast performance of the analogue method depends on user-defined criteria like the choice of the distance function and the size of the predictor domain. In this study we propose a new methodology of optimising both criteria by minimising the forecast error with simulated annealing. The performance of the methodology is demonstrated for the probability forecast of daily areal precipitation. It is compared with a traditional analogue forecasting algorithm, which is used operational as an element of a hydrological forecasting system. The study is performed for several meso-scale catchments located in the Rhine basin in Germany. The methodology is validated by a jack-knife method in a perfect prognosis framework for a period of 48 years (1958-2005). The predictor variables are derived from the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data set. The Brier skill score and the economic value are determined to evaluate the forecast skill and value of the technique. In this presentation we will present the concept of the optimisation algorithm and the outcome of the comparison. It will be also demonstrated how a decision maker should apply a probability forecast to maximise the economic benefit from it.

  14. Probabilistic forecast of daily areal precipitation focusing on extreme events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bliefernicht, J.; Bárdossy, A.

    2007-04-01

    A dynamical downscaling scheme is usually used to provide a short range flood forecasting system with high-resolved precipitation fields. Unfortunately, a single forecast of this scheme has a high uncertainty concerning intensity and location especially during extreme events. Alternatively, statistical downscaling techniques like the analogue method can be used which can supply a probabilistic forecasts. However, the performance of the analogue method is affected by the similarity criterion, which is used to identify similar weather situations. To investigate this issue in this work, three different similarity measures are tested: the euclidean distance (1), the Pearson correlation (2) and a combination of both measures (3). The predictor variables are geopotential height at 1000 and 700 hPa-level and specific humidity fluxes at 700 hPa-level derived from the NCEP/NCAR-reanalysis project. The study is performed for three mesoscale catchments located in the Rhine basin in Germany. It is validated by a jackknife method for a period of 44 years (1958-2001). The ranked probability skill score, the Brier Skill score, the Heidke skill score and the confidence interval of the Cramer association coefficient are calculated to evaluate the system for extreme events. The results show that the combined similarity measure yields the best results in predicting extreme events. However, the confidence interval of the Cramer coefficient indicates that this improvement is only significant compared to the Pearson correlation but not for the euclidean distance. Furthermore, the performance of the presented forecasting system is very low during the summer and new predictors have to be tested to overcome this problem.

  15. Food selection among Atlantic Coast seaducks in relation to historic food habits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, M.C.; Osenton, P.C.; Wells-Berlin, A. M.; Kidwell, D.M.

    2005-01-01

    Food selection among Atlantic Coast seaducks during 1999-2005 was determined from hunter-killed ducks and compared to data from historic food habits file (1885-1985) for major migrational and wintering areas in the Atlantic Flyway. Food selection was determined by analyses of the gullet (esophagus and proventriculus) and gizzard of 860 ducks and summarized by aggregate percent for each species. When sample size was adequate comparisons were made among age and sex groupings and also among local sites in major habitat areas. Common eiders in Maine and the Canadian Maritimes fed predominantly (53%) on the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis). Scoters in Massachusetts, Maine, and the Canadian Maritimes fed predominantly on the blue mussel (46%), Atlantic jackknife clam (Ensis directus; 19%), and Atlantic surf clam (Spisula solidissima; 15%), whereas scoters in the Chesapeake Bay fed predominantly on hooked mussel (Ischadium recurvum; 42%), the stout razor clam (Tagelus plebeius; 22%), and dwarf surf clam (Mulinia lateralis; 15%). The amethyst gem clam (Gemma gemma) was the predominant food (45%) of long-tailed ducks in Chesapeake Bay. Buffleheads and common goldeneyes fed on a mixed diet of mollusks and soft bodied invertebrates (amphipods, isopods and polychaetes). No major differences were noticed between the sexes in regard to food selection in any of the wintering areas. Comparisons to historic food habits in all areas failed to detect major differences. However, several invertebrate species recorded in historic samples were not found in current samples and two invasive species (Atlantic Rangia, Rangia cuneata and green crab, Carcinas maenas) were recorded in modem samples, but not in historic samples. Benthic sampling in areas where seaducks were collected showed a close correlation between consumption and availability. Each seaduck species appears to fill a unique niche in regard to feeding ecology, although there is much overlap of prey species selected. Understanding

  16. iDNA-Prot: identification of DNA binding proteins using random forest with grey model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Zhong; Fang, Jian-An; Xiao, Xuan; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2011-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins play crucial roles in various cellular processes. Developing high throughput tools for rapidly and effectively identifying DNA-binding proteins is one of the major challenges in the field of genome annotation. Although many efforts have been made in this regard, further effort is needed to enhance the prediction power. By incorporating the features into the general form of pseudo amino acid composition that were extracted from protein sequences via the "grey model" and by adopting the random forest operation engine, we proposed a new predictor, called iDNA-Prot, for identifying uncharacterized proteins as DNA-binding proteins or non-DNA binding proteins based on their amino acid sequences information alone. The overall success rate by iDNA-Prot was 83.96% that was obtained via jackknife tests on a newly constructed stringent benchmark dataset in which none of the proteins included has ≥25% pairwise sequence identity to any other in a same subset. In addition to achieving high success rate, the computational time for iDNA-Prot is remarkably shorter in comparison with the relevant existing predictors. Hence it is anticipated that iDNA-Prot may become a useful high throughput tool for large-scale analysis of DNA-binding proteins. As a user-friendly web-server, iDNA-Prot is freely accessible to the public at the web-site on http://icpr.jci.edu.cn/bioinfo/iDNA-Prot or http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iDNA-Prot. Moreover, for the convenience of the vast majority of experimental scientists, a step-by-step guide is provided on how to use the web-server to get the desired results. PMID:21935457

  17. Predicting Secretory Proteins of Malaria Parasite by Incorporating Sequence Evolution Information into Pseudo Amino Acid Composition via Grey System Model

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Zhong; Fang, Jian-An; Xiao, Xuan; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2012-01-01

    The malaria disease has become a cause of poverty and a major hindrance to economic development. The culprit of the disease is the parasite, which secretes an array of proteins within the host erythrocyte to facilitate its own survival. Accordingly, the secretory proteins of malaria parasite have become a logical target for drug design against malaria. Unfortunately, with the increasing resistance to the drugs thus developed, the situation has become more complicated. To cope with the drug resistance problem, one strategy is to timely identify the secreted proteins by malaria parasite, which can serve as potential drug targets. However, it is both expensive and time-consuming to identify the secretory proteins of malaria parasite by experiments alone. To expedite the process for developing effective drugs against malaria, a computational predictor called “iSMP-Grey” was developed that can be used to identify the secretory proteins of malaria parasite based on the protein sequence information alone. During the prediction process a protein sample was formulated with a 60D (dimensional) feature vector formed by incorporating the sequence evolution information into the general form of PseAAC (pseudo amino acid composition) via a grey system model, which is particularly useful for solving complicated problems that are lack of sufficient information or need to process uncertain information. It was observed by the jackknife test that iSMP-Grey achieved an overall success rate of 94.8%, remarkably higher than those by the existing predictors in this area. As a user-friendly web-server, iSMP-Grey is freely accessible to the public at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iSMP-Grey. Moreover, for the convenience of most experimental scientists, a step-by-step guide is provided on how to use the web-server to get the desired results without the need to follow the complicated mathematical equations involved in this paper. PMID:23189138

  18. Benthic macrofauna habitat associations in Willapa Bay, Washington, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Steven P.; Cole, Faith A.

    2007-02-01

    Estuary-wide benthic macrofauna-habitat associations in Willapa Bay, Washington, United States, were determined for 4 habitats (eelgrass [ Zostera marina], Atlantic cordgrass [ Spartina alterniflora], mud shrimp [ Upogebia pugettensis], ghost shrimp [ Neotrypaea californiensis]) in 1996 and 7 habitats (eelgrass, Atlantic cordgrass, mud shrimp, ghost shrimp, oyster [ Crassostrea gigas], bare mud/sand, subtidal) in 1998. Most benthic macrofaunal species inhabited multiple habitats; however, 2 dominants, a fanworm, Manayunkia aestuarina, in Spartina, and a sand dollar, Dendraster excentricus, in subtidal, were rare or absent in all other habitats. Benthic macrofaunal Bray-Curtis similarity varied among all habitats except eelgrass and oyster. There were significant differences among habitats within- and between-years on several of the following ecological indicators: mean number of species ( S), abundance ( A), biomass ( B), abundance of deposit (AD), suspension (AS), and facultative (AF) feeders, Swartz's index (SI), Brillouin's index ( H), and jackknife estimates of habitat species richness (HSR). In the 4 habitats sampled in both years, A was about 2.5× greater in 1996 (a La Niña year) than 1998 (a strong El Niño year) yet relative values of S, A, B, AD, AS, SI, and H among the habitats were not significantly different, indicating strong benthic macrofauna-habitat associations despite considerable climatic and environmental variability. In general, the rank order of habitats on indicators associated with high diversity and productivity (high S, A, B, SI, H, HSR) was eelgrass = oyster ≥ Atlantic cordgrass ≥ mud shrimp ≥ bare mud/sand ≥ ghost shrimp = subtidal. Vegetation, burrowing shrimp, and oyster density and sediment %silt + clay and %total organic carbon were generally poor, temporally inconsistent predictors of ecological indicator variability within habitats. The benthic macrofauna-habitat associations in this study can be used to help identify

  19. Child Mortality Estimation: Appropriate Time Periods for Child Mortality Estimates from Full Birth Histories

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Jon; Liu, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Background Child mortality estimates from complete birth histories from Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) surveys and similar surveys are a chief source of data used to track Millennium Development Goal 4, which aims for a reduction of under-five mortality by two-thirds between 1990 and 2015. Based on the expected sample sizes when the DHS program commenced, the estimates are usually based on 5-y time periods. Recent surveys have had larger sample sizes than early surveys, and here we aimed to explore the benefits of using shorter time periods than 5 y for estimation. We also explore the benefit of changing the estimation procedure from being based on years before the survey, i.e., measured with reference to the date of the interview for each woman, to being based on calendar years. Methods and Findings Jackknife variance estimation was used to calculate standard errors for 207 DHS surveys in order to explore to what extent the large samples in recent surveys can be used to produce estimates based on 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-y periods. We also recalculated the estimates for the surveys into calendar-year-based estimates. We demonstrate that estimation for 1-y periods is indeed possible for many recent surveys. Conclusions The reduction in bias achieved using 1-y periods and calendar-year-based estimation is worthwhile in some cases. In particular, it allows tracking of the effects of particular events such as droughts, epidemics, or conflict on child mortality in a way not possible with previous estimation procedures. Recommendations to use estimation for short time periods when possible and to use calendar-year-based estimation were adopted in the United Nations 2011 estimates of child mortality. PMID:22952435

  20. Effect of host plants on developmental time and life table parameters of Amphitetranychus viennensis (Acari: Tetranychidae).

    PubMed

    Kafil, Maryam; Allahyari, Hossein; Saboori, Alireza

    2007-01-01

    The effect of host plant species including black cherry (Prunus serotina cv. Irani), cherry (Prunus avium cv. siahe Mashhad) and apple (Malus domestica cv. shafi Abadi) was studied on biological parameters of Amphitetranychus viennensis (Zacher) in the laboratory at 25 +/- 1 degrees C, 70 +/- 10% RH and 16L: 8D photoperiod. Duration of each life stage, longevity, reproduction rate, the intrinsic rate of natural increase (rm), net reproductive rate (R0), mean generation time (T), doubling time (DT), and finite rate of increase (lambda) of the hawthorn spider mite on the three host plants were calculated. Differences in fertility life table parameters of the spider mite among host plants were analyzed using pseudo-values, which were produced by jackknife re-sampling. The results indicated that black cherry might be the most suitable plant for hawthorn spider mite due to the shorter developmental period (10.6 days), longer adult longevity (25.5 days), higher reproduction (65.6 eggs), and intrinsic rate of natural increase (0.194 females/female/day). Cherry was the least suitable host plant. To determine the effect of host shifts, the mite was transferred from black cherry onto cherry and apple. In the first generation after shifting to apple, the developmental period, reproduction and life table parameters were negatively influenced. However, population growth parameters in the first generation on cherry were actually better than after three generations on this new host. This underscores the relevance of the mites' recent breeding history for life table studies. PMID:17710558

  1. Climate change in our backyards: the reshuffling of North America's winter bird communities.

    PubMed

    Princé, Karine; Zuckerberg, Benjamin

    2015-02-01

    Much of the recent changes in North American climate have occurred during the winter months, and as result, overwintering birds represent important sentinels of anthropogenic climate change. While there is mounting evidence that bird populations are responding to a warming climate (e.g., poleward shifts) questions remain as to whether these species-specific responses are resulting in community-wide changes. Here, we test the hypothesis that a changing winter climate should favor the formation of winter bird communities dominated by warm-adapted species. To do this, we quantified changes in community composition using a functional index--the Community Temperature Index (CTI)--which measures the balance between low- and high-temperature dwelling species in a community. Using data from Project FeederWatch, an international citizen science program, we quantified spatiotemporal changes in winter bird communities (n = 38 bird species) across eastern North America and tested the influence of changes in winter minimum temperature over a 22-year period. We implemented a jackknife analysis to identify those species most influential in driving changes at the community level and the population dynamics (e.g., extinction or colonization) responsible for these community changes. Since 1990, we found that the winter bird community structure has changed with communities increasingly composed of warm-adapted species. This reshuffling of winter bird communities was strongest in southerly latitudes and driven primarily by local increases in abundance and regional patterns of colonization by southerly birds. CTI tracked patterns of changing winter temperature at different temporal scales ranging from 1 to 35 years. We conclude that a shifting winter climate has provided an opportunity for smaller, southerly distributed species to colonize new regions and promote the formation of unique winter bird assemblages throughout eastern North America. PMID:25322929

  2. DNA hybridization evidence for the principal lineages of hummingbirds (Aves:Trochilidae).

    PubMed

    Bleiweiss, R; Kirsch, J A; Matheus, J C

    1997-03-01

    The spectacular evolutionary radiation of hummingbirds (Trochilidae) has served as a model system for many biological studies. To begin to provide a historical context for these investigations, we generated a complete matrix of DNA hybridization distances among 26 hummingbirds and an outgroup swift (Chaetura pelagica) to determine the principal hummingbird lineages. FITCH topologies estimated from symmetrized delta TmH-C values and subjected to various validation methods (bootstrapping, weighted jackknifing, branch length significance) indicated a fundamental split between hermit (Eutoxeres aquila, Threnetes ruckeri; Phaethornithinae) and nonhermit (Trochilinae) hummingbirds, and provided strong support for six principal nonhermit clades with the following branching order: (1) a predominantly lowland group comprising caribs (Eulampis holosericeus) and relatives (Androdon aequatorialis and Heliothryx barroti) with violet-ears (Colibri coruscans) and relatives (Doryfera ludovicae); (2) an Andean-associated clade of highly polytypic taxa (Eriocnemis, Heliodoxa, and Coeligena); (3) a second endemic Andean clade (Oreotrochilus chimborazo, Aglaiocercus coelestis, and Lesbia victoriae) paired with thorntails (Popelairia conversii); (4) emeralds and relatives (Chlorostilbon mellisugus, Amazilia tzacatl, Thalurania colombica, Orthorhyncus cristatus and Campylopterus villaviscensio); (5) mountain-gems (Lampornis clemenciae and Eugenes fulgens); and (6) tiny bee-like forms (Archilochus colubris, Myrtis fanny, Acestrura mulsant, and Philodice mitchellii). Corresponding analyses on a matrix of unsymmetrized delta values gave similar support for these relationships except that the branching order of the two Andean clades (2, 3 above) was unresolved. In general, subsidiary relationships were consistent and well supported by both matrices, sometimes revealing surprising associations between forms that differ dramatically in plumage and bill morphology. Our results also reveal some

  3. A hybrid orographic plus statistical model for downscaling daily precipitation in Northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pandey, G.R.; Cayan, D.R.; Dettinger, M.D.; Georgakakos, K.P.

    2000-01-01

    A hybrid (physical-statistical) scheme is developed to resolve the finescale distribution of daily precipitation over complex terrain. The scheme generates precipitation by combining information from the upper-air conditions and from sparsely distributed station measurements; thus, it proceeds in two steps. First, an initial estimate of the precipitation is made using a simplified orographic precipitation model. It is a steady-state, multilayer, and two-dimensional model following the concepts of Rhea. The model is driven by the 2.5?? ?? 2.5?? gridded National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-National Centers for Environmental Prediction upper-air profiles, and its parameters are tuned using the observed precipitation structure of the region. Precipitation is generated assuming a forced lifting of the air parcels as they cross the mountain barrier following a straight trajectory. Second, the precipitation is adjusted using errors between derived precipitation and observations from nearby sites. The study area covers the northern half of California, including coastal mountains, central valley, and the Sierra Nevada. The model is run for a 5-km rendition of terrain for days of January-March over the period of 1988-95. A jackknife analysis demonstrates the validity of the approach. The spatial and temporal distributions of the simulated precipitation field agree well with the observed precipitation. Further, a mapping of model performance indices (correlation coefficients, model bias, root-mean-square error, and threat scores) from an array of stations from the region indicates that the model performs satisfactorily in resolving daily precipitation at 5-km resolution.

  4. Absolute and relative locations of earthquakes at Mount St. Helens, Washington, using continuous data: implications for magmatic processes: Chapter 4 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thelen, Weston A.; Crosson, Robert S.; Creager, Kenneth C.; Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    This study uses a combination of absolute and relative locations from earthquake multiplets to investigate the seismicity associated with the eruptive sequence at Mount St. Helens between September 23, 2004, and November 20, 2004. Multiplets, a prominent feature of seismicity during this time period, occurred as volcano-tectonic, hybrid, and low-frequency earthquakes spanning a large range of magnitudes and lifespans. Absolute locations were improved through the use of a new one-dimensional velocity model with excellent shallow constraints on P-wave velocities. We used jackknife tests to minimize possible biases in absolute and relative locations resulting from station outages and changing station configurations. In this paper, we show that earthquake hypocenters shallowed before the October 1 explosion along a north-dipping structure under the 1980-86 dome. Relative relocations of multiplets during the initial seismic unrest and ensuing eruption showed rather small source volumes before the October 1 explosion and larger tabular source volumes after October 5. All multiplets possess absolute locations very close to each other. However, the highly dissimilar waveforms displayed by each of the multiplets analyzed suggest that different sources and mechanisms were present within a very small source volume. We suggest that multiplets were related to pressurization of the conduit system that produced a stationary source that was highly stable over long time periods. On the basis of their response to explosions occurring in October 2004, earthquakes not associated with multiplets also appeared to be pressure dependent. The pressure source for these earthquakes appeared, however, to be different from the pressure source of the multiplets.

  5. Modelling temperature, photoperiod and vernalization responses of Brunonia australis (Goodeniaceae) and Calandrinia sp. (Portulacaceae) to predict flowering time

    PubMed Central

    Cave, Robyn L.; Hammer, Graeme L.; McLean, Greg; Birch, Colin J.; Erwin, John E.; Johnston, Margaret E.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Crop models for herbaceous ornamental species typically include functions for temperature and photoperiod responses, but very few incorporate vernalization, which is a requirement of many traditional crops. This study investigated the development of floriculture crop models, which describe temperature responses, plus photoperiod or vernalization requirements, using Australian native ephemerals Brunonia australis and Calandrinia sp. Methods A novel approach involved the use of a field crop modelling tool, DEVEL2. This optimization program estimates the parameters of selected functions within the development rate models using an iterative process that minimizes sum of squares residual between estimated and observed days for the phenological event. Parameter profiling and jack-knifing are included in DEVEL2 to remove bias from parameter estimates and introduce rigour into the parameter selection process. Key Results Development rate of B. australis from planting to first visible floral bud (VFB) was predicted using a multiplicative approach with a curvilinear function to describe temperature responses and a broken linear function to explain photoperiod responses. A similar model was used to describe the development rate of Calandrinia sp., except the photoperiod function was replaced with an exponential vernalization function, which explained a facultative cold requirement and included a coefficient for determining the vernalization ceiling temperature. Temperature was the main environmental factor influencing development rate for VFB to anthesis of both species and was predicted using a linear model. Conclusions The phenology models for B. australis and Calandrinia sp. described development rate from planting to VFB and from VFB to anthesis in response to temperature and photoperiod or vernalization and may assist modelling efforts of other herbaceous ornamental plants. In addition to crop management, the vernalization function could be used to

  6. Testate Amoebae as Paleohydrological Proxies in the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, T.; Booth, R.; Bernhardt, C. E.; Willard, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    The largest wetland restoration effort ever attempted, the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP), is currently underway in the Florida Everglades, and a critical goal of CERP is reestablishment of the pre-drainage (pre-AD 1880) hydrology. Paleoecological research in the greater Everglades ecosystem is underway to reconstruct past water levels and variability throughout the system, providing a basis for restoration targets. Testate amoebae, a group of unicellular organisms that form decay-resistant tests, have been successfully used in northern-latitude bogs to reconstruct past wetland hydrology; however, their application in other peatland types, particularly at lower latitudes, has not been well studied. We assessed the potential use of testate amoebae as tools to reconstruct the past hydrology of the Everglades. Modern surface samples were collected from the Everglades National Park and Water Conservation Areas, across a water table gradient that included four vegetation types (tree island interior, tree island edge, sawgrass transition, slough). Community composition was quantified and compared to environmental conditions (water table, pH, vegetation) using ordination and gradient-analysis approaches. Results of nonmetric multidimensional scaling revealed that the most important pattern of community change, representing about 30% of the variance in the dataset, was related to water-table depth (r2=0.32). Jackknifed cross-validation of a transfer function for water table depth, based on a simple weighted average model, indicated the potential for testate amoebae in studies of past Everglades hydrology (RMSEP = 9 cm, r2=0.47). Although the performance of the transfer function was not as good as those from northern-latitude bogs, our results suggest that testate amoebae could be could be a valuable tool in paleohydrological studies of the Everglades, particularly when used with other hydrological proxies (e.g., pollen, plant macrofossils, diatoms).

  7. iGPCR-drug: a web server for predicting interaction between GPCRs and drugs in cellular networking.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xuan; Min, Jian-Liang; Wang, Pu; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Involved in many diseases such as cancer, diabetes, neurodegenerative, inflammatory and respiratory disorders, G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are among the most frequent targets of therapeutic drugs. It is time-consuming and expensive to determine whether a drug and a GPCR are to interact with each other in a cellular network purely by means of experimental techniques. Although some computational methods were developed in this regard based on the knowledge of the 3D (dimensional) structure of protein, unfortunately their usage is quite limited because the 3D structures for most GPCRs are still unknown. To overcome the situation, a sequence-based classifier, called "iGPCR-drug", was developed to predict the interactions between GPCRs and drugs in cellular networking. In the predictor, the drug compound is formulated by a 2D (dimensional) fingerprint via a 256D vector, GPCR by the PseAAC (pseudo amino acid composition) generated with the grey model theory, and the prediction engine is operated by the fuzzy K-nearest neighbour algorithm. Moreover, a user-friendly web-server for iGPCR-drug was established at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iGPCR-Drug/. For the convenience of most experimental scientists, a step-by-step guide is provided on how to use the web-server to get the desired results without the need to follow the complicated math equations presented in this paper just for its integrity. The overall success rate achieved by iGPCR-drug via the jackknife test was 85.5%, which is remarkably higher than the rate by the existing peer method developed in 2010 although no web server was ever established for it. It is anticipated that iGPCR-Drug may become a useful high throughput tool for both basic research and drug development, and that the approach presented here can also be extended to study other drug - target interaction networks.

  8. Demographic history and rare allele sharing among human populations

    PubMed Central

    Gravel, Simon; Henn, Brenna M.; Gutenkunst, Ryan N.; Indap, Amit R.; Marth, Gabor T.; Clark, Andrew G.; Yu, Fuli; Gibbs, Richard A.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Altshuler, David L.; Durbin, Richard M.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Bentley, David R.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Clark, Andrew G.; Collins, Francis S.; De La Vega, Francisco M.; Donnelly, Peter; Egholm, Michael; Flicek, Paul; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Knoppers, Bartha M.; Lander, Eric S.; Lehrach, Hans; Mardis, Elaine R.; McVean, Gil A.; Nickerson, Debbie A.; Peltonen, Leena; Schafer, Alan J.; Sherry, Stephen T.; Wang, Jun; Wilson, Richard K.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Deiros, David; Metzker, Mike; Muzny, Donna; Reid, Jeff; Wheeler, David; Wang, Jun; Li, Jingxiang; Jian, Min; Li, Guoqing; Li, Ruiqiang; Liang, Huiqing; Tian, Geng; Wang, Bo; Wang, Jian; Wang, Wei; Yang, Huanming; Zhang, Xiuqing; Zheng, Huisong; Lander, Eric S.; Altshuler, David L.; Ambrogio, Lauren; Bloom, Toby; Cibulskis, Kristian; Fennell, Tim J.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Jaffe, David B.; Shefler, Erica; Sougnez, Carrie L.; Bentley, David R.; Gormley, Niall; Humphray, Sean; Kingsbury, Zoya; Koko-Gonzales, Paula; Stone, Jennifer; McKernan, Kevin J.; Costa, Gina L.; Ichikawa, Jeffry K.; Lee, Clarence C.; Sudbrak, Ralf; Lehrach, Hans; Borodina, Tatiana A.; Dahl, Andreas; Davydov, Alexey N.; Marquardt, Peter; Mertes, Florian; Nietfeld, Wilfiried; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schreiber, Stefan; Soldatov, Aleksey V.; Timmermann, Bernd; Tolzmann, Marius; Egholm, Michael; Affourtit, Jason; Ashworth, Dana; Attiya, Said; Bachorski, Melissa; Buglione, Eli; Burke, Adam; Caprio, Amanda; Celone, Christopher; Clark, Shauna; Conners, David; Desany, Brian; Gu, Lisa; Guccione, Lorri; Kao, Kalvin; Kebbel, Andrew; Knowlton, Jennifer; Labrecque, Matthew; McDade, Louise; Mealmaker, Craig; Minderman, Melissa; Nawrocki, Anne; Niazi, Faheem; Pareja, Kristen; Ramenani, Ravi; Riches, David; Song, Wanmin; Turcotte, Cynthia; Wang, Shally; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Dooling, David; Fulton, Lucinda; Fulton, Robert; Weinstock, George; Durbin, Richard M.; Burton, John; Carter, David M.; Churcher, Carol; Coffey, Alison; Cox, Anthony; Palotie, Aarno; Quail, Michael; Skelly, Tom; Stalker, James; Swerdlow, Harold P.; Turner, Daniel; De Witte, Anniek; Giles, Shane; Gibbs, Richard A.; Wheeler, David; Bainbridge, Matthew; Challis, Danny; Sabo, Aniko; Yu, Fuli; Yu, Jin; Wang, Jun; Fang, Xiaodong; Guo, Xiaosen; Li, Ruiqiang; Li, Yingrui; Luo, Ruibang; Tai, Shuaishuai; Wu, Honglong; Zheng, Hancheng; Zheng, Xiaole; Zhou, Yan; Li, Guoqing; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming; Marth, Gabor T.; Garrison, Erik P.; Huang, Weichun; Indap, Amit; Kural, Deniz; Lee, Wan-Ping; Leong, Wen Fung; Quinlan, Aaron R.; Stewart, Chip; Stromberg, Michael P.; Ward, Alistair N.; Wu, Jiantao; Lee, Charles; Mills, Ryan E.; Shi, Xinghua; Daly, Mark J.; DePristo, Mark A.; Altshuler, David L.; Ball, Aaron D.; Banks, Eric; Bloom, Toby; Browning, Brian L.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Fennell, Tim J.; Garimella, Kiran V.; Grossman, Sharon R.; Handsaker, Robert E.; Hanna, Matt; Hartl, Chris; Jaffe, David B.; Kernytsky, Andrew M.; Korn, Joshua M.; Li, Heng; Maguire, Jared R.; McCarroll, Steven A.; McKenna, Aaron; Nemesh, James C.; Philippakis, Anthony A.; Poplin, Ryan E.; Price, Alkes; Rivas, Manuel A.; Sabeti, Pardis C.; Schaffner, Stephen F.; Shefler, Erica; Shlyakhter, Ilya A.; Cooper, David N.; Ball, Edward V.; Mort, Matthew; Phillips, Andrew D.; Stenson, Peter D.; Sebat, Jonathan; Makarov, Vladimir; Ye, Kenny; Yoon, Seungtai C.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Clark, Andrew G.; Boyko, Adam; Degenhardt, Jeremiah; Gravel, Simon; Gutenkunst, Ryan N.; Kaganovich, Mark; Keinan, Alon; Lacroute, Phil; Ma, Xin; Reynolds, Andy; Clarke, Laura; Flicek, Paul; Cunningham, Fiona; Herrero, Javier; Keenen, Stephen; Kulesha, Eugene; Leinonen, Rasko; McLaren, William M.; Radhakrishnan, Rajesh; Smith, Richard E.; Zalunin, Vadim; Zheng-Bradley, Xiangqun; Korbel, Jan O.; Stütz, Adrian M.; Humphray, Sean; Bauer, Markus; Cheetham, R. Keira; Cox, Tony; Eberle, Michael; James, Terena; Kahn, Scott; Murray, Lisa; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Ye, Kai; De La Vega, Francisco M.; Fu, Yutao; Hyland, Fiona C. L.; Manning, Jonathan M.; McLaughlin, Stephen F.; Peckham, Heather E.; Sakarya, Onur; Sun, Yongming A.; Tsung, Eric F.; Batzer, Mark A.; Konkel, Miriam K.; Walker, Jerilyn A.; Sudbrak, Ralf; Albrecht, Marcus W.; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav S.; Herwig, Ralf; Parkhomchuk, Dimitri V.; Sherry, Stephen T.; Agarwala, Richa; Khouri, Hoda M.; Morgulis, Aleksandr O.; Paschall, Justin E.; Phan, Lon D.; Rotmistrovsky, Kirill E.; Sanders, Robert D.; Shumway, Martin F.; Xiao, Chunlin; McVean, Gil A.; Auton, Adam; Iqbal, Zamin; Lunter, Gerton; Marchini, Jonathan L.; Moutsianas, Loukas; Myers, Simon; Tumian, Afidalina; Desany, Brian; Knight, James; Winer, Roger; Craig, David W.; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Steve M.; Christoforides, Alexis; Kurdoglu, Ahmet A.; Pearson, John V.; Sinari, Shripad A.; Tembe, Waibhav D.; Haussler, David; Hinrichs, Angie S.; Katzman, Sol J.; Kern, Andrew; Kuhn, Robert M.; Przeworski, Molly; Hernandez, Ryan D.; Howie, Bryan; Kelley, Joanna L.; Melton, S. Cord; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Li, Yun; Anderson, Paul; Blackwell, Tom; Chen, Wei; Cookson, William O.; Ding, Jun; Kang, Hyun Min; Lathrop, Mark; Liang, Liming; Moffatt, Miriam F.; Scheet, Paul; Sidore, Carlo; Snyder, Matthew; Zhan, Xiaowei; Zöllner, Sebastian; Awadalla, Philip; Casals, Ferran; Idaghdour, Youssef; Keebler, John; Stone, Eric A.; Zilversmit, Martine; Jorde, Lynn; Xing, Jinchuan; Eichler, Evan E.; Aksay, Gozde; Alkan, Can; Hajirasouliha, Iman; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Sahinalp, S. Cenk; Sudmant, Peter H.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Chen, Ken; Chinwalla, Asif; Ding, Li; Koboldt, Daniel C.; McLellan, Mike D.; Dooling, David; Weinstock, George; Wallis, John W.; Wendl, Michael C.; Zhang, Qunyuan; Durbin, Richard M.; Albers, Cornelis A.; Ayub, Qasim; Balasubramaniam, Senduran; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Carter, David M.; Chen, Yuan; Conrad, Donald F.; Danecek, Petr; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Hu, Min; Huang, Ni; Hurles, Matt E.; Jin, Hanjun; Jostins, Luke; Keane, Thomas M.; Le, Si Quang; Lindsay, Sarah; Long, Quan; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Parts, Leopold; Stalker, James; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Walter, Klaudia; Zhang, Yujun; Gerstein, Mark B.; Snyder, Michael; Abyzov, Alexej; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; Bjornson, Robert; Du, Jiang; Grubert, Fabian; Habegger, Lukas; Haraksingh, Rajini; Jee, Justin; Khurana, Ekta; Lam, Hugo Y. K.; Leng, Jing; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Urban, Alexander E.; Zhang, Zhengdong; Li, Yingrui; Luo, Ruibang; Marth, Gabor T.; Garrison, Erik P.; Kural, Deniz; Quinlan, Aaron R.; Stewart, Chip; Stromberg, Michael P.; Ward, Alistair N.; Wu, Jiantao; Lee, Charles; Mills, Ryan E.; Shi, Xinghua; McCarroll, Steven A.; Banks, Eric; DePristo, Mark A.; Handsaker, Robert E.; Hartl, Chris; Korn, Joshua M.; Li, Heng; Nemesh, James C.; Sebat, Jonathan; Makarov, Vladimir; Ye, Kenny; Yoon, Seungtai C.; Degenhardt, Jeremiah; Kaganovich, Mark; Clarke, Laura; Smith, Richard E.; Zheng-Bradley, Xiangqun; Korbel, Jan O.; Humphray, Sean; Cheetham, R. Keira; Eberle, Michael; Kahn, Scott; Murray, Lisa; Ye, Kai; De La Vega, Francisco M.; Fu, Yutao; Peckham, Heather E.; Sun, Yongming A.; Batzer, Mark A.; Konkel, Miriam K.; Walker, Jerilyn A.; Xiao, Chunlin; Iqbal, Zamin; Desany, Brian; Blackwell, Tom; Snyder, Matthew; Xing, Jinchuan; Eichler, Evan E.; Aksay, Gozde; Alkan, Can; Hajirasouliha, Iman; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Chen, Ken; Chinwalla, Asif; Ding, Li; McLellan, Mike D.; Wallis, John W.; Hurles, Matt E.; Conrad, Donald F.; Walter, Klaudia; Zhang, Yujun; Gerstein, Mark B.; Snyder, Michael; Abyzov, Alexej; Du, Jiang; Grubert, Fabian; Haraksingh, Rajini; Jee, Justin; Khurana, Ekta; Lam, Hugo Y. K.; Leng, Jing; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Urban, Alexander E.; Zhang, Zhengdong; Gibbs, Richard A.; Bainbridge, Matthew; Challis, Danny; Coafra, Cristian; Dinh, Huyen; Kovar, Christie; Lee, Sandy; Muzny, Donna; Nazareth, Lynne; Reid, Jeff; Sabo, Aniko; Yu, Fuli; Yu, Jin; Marth, Gabor T.; Garrison, Erik P.; Indap, Amit; Leong, Wen Fung; Quinlan, Aaron R.; Stewart, Chip; Ward, Alistair N.; Wu, Jiantao; Cibulskis, Kristian; Fennell, Tim J.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Garimella, Kiran V.; Hartl, Chris; Shefler, Erica; Sougnez, Carrie L.; Wilkinson, Jane; Clark, Andrew G.; Gravel, Simon; Grubert, Fabian; Clarke, Laura; Flicek, Paul; Smith, Richard E.; Zheng-Bradley, Xiangqun; Sherry, Stephen T.; Khouri, Hoda M.; Paschall, Justin E.; Shumway, Martin F.; Xiao, Chunlin; McVean, Gil A.; Katzman, Sol J.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Blackwell, Tom; Mardis, Elaine R.; Dooling, David; Fulton, Lucinda; Fulton, Robert; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Durbin, Richard M.; Balasubramaniam, Senduran; Coffey, Allison; Keane, Thomas M.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Palotie, Aarno; Scott, Carol; Stalker, James; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Gerstein, Mark B.; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Knoppers, Bartha M.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Gharani, Neda; Gibbs, Richard A.; Jorde, Lynn; Kaye, Jane S.; Kent, Alastair; Li, Taosha; McGuire, Amy L.; McVean, Gil A.; Ossorio, Pilar N.; Rotimi, Charles N.; Su, Yeyang; Toji, Lorraine H.; TylerSmith, Chris; Brooks, Lisa D.; Felsenfeld, Adam L.; McEwen, Jean E.; Abdallah, Assya; Juenger, Christopher R.; Clemm, Nicholas C.; Collins, Francis S.; Duncanson, Audrey; Green, Eric D.; Guyer, Mark S.; Peterson, Jane L.; Schafer, Alan J.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Altshuler, David L.; Auton, Adam; Brooks, Lisa D.; Durbin, Richard M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Hurles, Matt E.; McVean, Gil A.

    2011-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing technology enables population-level surveys of human genomic variation. Here, we examine the joint allele frequency distributions across continental human populations and present an approach for combining complementary aspects of whole-genome, low-coverage data and targeted high-coverage data. We apply this approach to data generated by the pilot phase of the Thousand Genomes Project, including whole-genome 2–4× coverage data for 179 samples from HapMap European, Asian, and African panels as well as high-coverage target sequencing of the exons of 800 genes from 697 individuals in seven populations. We use the site frequency spectra obtained from these data to infer demographic parameters for an Out-of-Africa model for populations of African, European, and Asian descent and to predict, by a jackknife-based approach, the amount of genetic diversity that will be discovered as sample sizes are increased. We predict that the number of discovered nonsynonymous coding variants will reach 100,000 in each population after ∼1,000 sequenced chromosomes per population, whereas ∼2,500 chromosomes will be needed for the same number of synonymous variants. Beyond this point, the number of segregating sites in the European and Asian panel populations is expected to overcome that of the African panel because of faster recent population growth. Overall, we find that the majority of human genomic variable sites are rare and exhibit little sharing among diverged populations. Our results emphasize that replication of disease association for specific rare genetic variants across diverged populations must overcome both reduced statistical power because of rarity and higher population divergence. PMID:21730125

  9. Making Mosquito Taxonomy Useful: A Stable Classification of Tribe Aedini that Balances Utility with Current Knowledge of Evolutionary Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Wilkerson, Richard C.; Linton, Yvonne-Marie; Fonseca, Dina M.; Schultz, Ted R.; Price, Dana C.; Strickman, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    The tribe Aedini (Family Culicidae) contains approximately one-quarter of the known species of mosquitoes, including vectors of deadly or debilitating disease agents. This tribe contains the genus Aedes, which is one of the three most familiar genera of mosquitoes. During the past decade, Aedini has been the focus of a series of extensive morphology-based phylogenetic studies published by Reinert, Harbach, and Kitching (RH&K). Those authors created 74 new, elevated or resurrected genera from what had been the single genus Aedes, almost tripling the number of genera in the entire family Culicidae. The proposed classification is based on subjective assessments of the “number and nature of the characters that support the branches” subtending particular monophyletic groups in the results of cladistic analyses of a large set of morphological characters of representative species. To gauge the stability of RH&K’s generic groupings we reanalyzed their data with unweighted parsimony jackknife and maximum-parsimony analyses, with and without ordering 14 of the characters as in RH&K. We found that their phylogeny was largely weakly supported and their taxonomic rankings failed priority and other useful taxon-naming criteria. Consequently, we propose simplified aedine generic designations that 1) restore a classification system that is useful for the operational community; 2) enhance the ability of taxonomists to accurately place new species into genera; 3) maintain the progress toward a natural classification based on monophyletic groups of species; and 4) correct the current classification system that is subject to instability as new species are described and existing species more thoroughly defined. We do not challenge the phylogenetic hypotheses generated by the above-mentioned series of morphological studies. However, we reduce the ranks of the genera and subgenera of RH&K to subgenera or informal species groups, respectively, to preserve stability as new data

  10. Life history dependent morphometric variation in stream-dwelling Atlantic salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Letcher, B.H.

    2003-01-01

    The time course of morphometric variation among life histories for stream-dwelling Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) parr (age-0+ to age-2+) was analyzed. Possible life histories were combinations of parr maturity status in the autumn (mature or immature) and age at outmigration (smolt at age-2+ or later age). Actual life histories expressed with enough fish for analysis in the 1997 cohort were immature/age-2+ smolt, mature/age-2 +smolt, and mature/age-2+ non-smolt. Tagged fish were assigned to one of the three life histories and digital pictures from the field were analyzed using landmark-based geometric morphometrics. Results indicated that successful grouping of fish according to life history varied with fish age, but that fish could be grouped before the actual expression of the life histories. By March (age-1+), fish were successfully grouped using a descriptive discriminant function and successful assignment ranged from 84 to 97% for the remainder of stream residence. A jackknife of the discriminant function revealed an average life history prediction success of 67% from age-1+ summer to smolting. Low sample numbers for one of the life histories may have limited prediction success. A MANOVA on the shape descriptors (relative warps) also indicated significant differences in shape among life histories from age-1+ summer through to smolting. Across all samples, shape varied significantly with size. Within samples, shape did not vary significantly with size for samples from December (age-0+) to May (age-1+). During the age-1+ summer however, shape varied significantly with size, but the relationship between shape and size was not different among life histories. In the autumn (age-1+) and winter (age-2+), life history differences explained a significant portion of the change in shape with size. Life history dependent morphometric variation may be useful to indicate the timing of early expressions of life history variation and as a tool to explore temporal and

  11. [Seasonal evaluation of mammal species richness and abundance in the "Mário Viana" municipal reserve, Mato Grosso, Brasil].

    PubMed

    Rocha, Ednaldo Cândido; Silva, Elias; Martins, Sebastião Venâncio; Barreto, Francisco Cândido Cardoso

    2006-09-01

    We evaluated seasonal species presence and richness, and abundance of medium and large sized mammalian terrestrial fauna in the "Mário Viana" Municipal Biological Reserve, Nova Xavantina, Mato Grosso, Brazil. During 2001, two monthly visits were made to an established transect, 2,820 m in length. Records of 22 mammal species were obtained and individual footprint sequences quantified for seasonal calculation of species richness and relative abundance index (x footprints/km traveled). All 22 species occurred during the rainy season, but only 18 during the dry season. Pseudalopex vetulus (Lund, 1842) (hoary fox), Eira barbara (Linnaeus, 1758) (tayra), Puma concolor (Linnaeus, 1771) (cougar) and Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris (Linnaeus, 1766) (capybara) were only registered during the rainy season. The species diversity estimated using the Jackknife procedure in the dry season (19.83, CI = 2.73) was smaller than in the rainy season (25.67, CI = 3.43). Among the 18 species common in the two seasons, only four presented significantly different abundance indexes: Dasypus novemcinctus Linnaeus, 1758 (nine-banded armadillo), Euphractus sexcinctus (Linnaeus, 1758) (six-banded armadillo), Dasyprocta azarae Lichtenstein, 1823 (Azara's Agouti) and Tapirus terrestris (Linnaeus, 1758) (tapir). On the other hand, Priodontes maximus (Kerr, 1792) (giant armadillo) and Leopardus pardalis (Linnaeus, 1758) (ocelot) had identical abundance index over the two seasons. Distribution of species abundance in the sampled area followed the expected pattern for communities in equilibrium, especially in the rainy season, suggesting that the environment still maintains good characteristics for mammal conservation. The present study shows that the reserve, although only 470 ha in size, plays an important role for conservation of mastofauna of the area as a refuge in an environment full of anthropic influence (mainly cattle breeding in exotic pasture).

  12. Analysis and prediction of RNA-binding residues using sequence, evolutionary conservation, and predicted secondary structure and solvent accessibility.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tuo; Zhang, Hua; Chen, Ke; Ruan, Jishou; Shen, Shiyi; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2010-11-01

    Identification and prediction of RNA-binding residues (RBRs) provides valuable insights into the mechanisms of protein-RNA interactions. We analyzed the contributions of a wide range of factors including amino acid sequence, evolutionary conservation, secondary structure and solvent accessibility, to the prediction/characterization of RBRs. Five feature sets were designed and feature selection was performed to find and investigate relevant features. We demonstrate that (1) interactions with positively charged amino acids Arg and Lys are preferred by the egatively charged nucleotides; (2) Gly provides flexibility for the RNA binding sites; (3) Glu with negatively charged side chain and several hydrophobic residues such as Leu, Val, Ala and Phe are disfavored in the RNA-binding sites; (4) coil residues, especially in long segments, are more flexible (than other secondary structures) and more likely to interact with RNA; (5) helical residues are more rigid and consequently they are less likely to bind RNA; and (6) residues partially exposed to the solvent are more likely to form RNA-binding sites. We introduce a novel sequence-based predictor of RBRs, RBRpred, which utilizes the selected features. RBRpred is comprehensively tested on three datasets with varied atom distance cutoffs by performing both five-fold cross validation and jackknife tests and achieves Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.51, 0.48 and 0.42, respectively. The quality is comparable to or better than that for state-of-the-art predictors that apply the distancebased cutoff definition. We show that the most important factor for RBRs prediction is evolutionary conservation, followed by the amino acid sequence, predicted secondary structure and predicted solvent accessibility. We also investigate the impact of using native vs. predicted secondary structure and solvent accessibility. The predictions are sufficient for the RBR prediction and the knowledge of the actual solvent accessibility

  13. Geology of the Cooper Ridge NE Quadrangle, Sweetwater County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roehler, Henry W.

    1979-01-01

    The Cooper Ridge NE 7?-minute quadrangle is 18 miles southeast of Rock Springs, Wyo., on the east flank of the Rock Springs uplift. Upper Cretaceous rocks composing the Rock Springs Formation, Ericson Sandstone, Almond Formation, Lewis Shale, Fox Hills Sandstone, and Lance Formation, Paleocene rocks composing the Fort Union Formation, and Eocene rocks composing the Wasatch Formation are exposed and dip 5?-8? southeast. Outcrops are unfaulted and generally homoclinal, but a minor cross-trending fold, the Jackknife Spring anticline, plunges southeastward and interrupts the northeast strike of beds. Older rocks in the subsurface are faulted and folded, especially near the Brady oil and gas field. Coal beds are present in the Almond, Lance, and Fort Union Formations. Coal resources are estimated to be more than 762 million short tons in 16 beds more than 2.5 feet thick, under less than 3,000 ft of overburden. Nearly 166 million tons are under less than 200 ft of overburden and are recoverable by strip mining. Unknown quantities of oil and gas are present in the Cretaceous Rock Springs, Blair, and Dakota Formations, Jurassic sandstone (Entrada Sandstone of drillers), Jurassic(?) and Triassic(?) Nugget Sandstone, Permian Park City Formation, and Pennsylvanian and Permian Weber Sandstone at the Brady field, part of which is in the southeast corner of the quadrangle, and in the Dakota Sandstone at the Prenalta Corp. Bluewater 33-32 well near the northern edge of the quadrangle. Other minerals include uranium in the Almond Formation and titanium in the Rock Springs Formation.

  14. Asymmetric constriction of dividing Escherichia coli cells induced by expression of a fusion between two min proteins.

    PubMed

    Rowlett, Veronica Wells; Margolin, William

    2014-06-01

    The Min system, consisting of MinC, MinD, and MinE, plays an important role in localizing the Escherichia coli cell division machinery to midcell by preventing FtsZ ring (Z ring) formation at cell poles. MinC has two domains, MinCn and MinCc, which both bind to FtsZ and act synergistically to inhibit FtsZ polymerization. Binary fission of E. coli usually proceeds symmetrically, with daughter cells at roughly 180° to each other. In contrast, we discovered that overproduction of an artificial MinCc-MinD fusion protein in the absence of other Min proteins induced frequent and dramatic jackknife-like bending of cells at division septa, with cell constriction predominantly on the outside of the bend. Mutations in the fusion known to disrupt MinCc-FtsZ, MinCc-MinD, or MinD-membrane interactions largely suppressed bending division. Imaging of FtsZ-green fluorescent protein (GFP) showed no obvious asymmetric localization of FtsZ during MinCc-MinD overproduction, suggesting that a downstream activity of the Z ring was inhibited asymmetrically. Consistent with this, MinCc-MinD fusions localized predominantly to segments of the Z ring at the inside of developing cell bends, while FtsA (but not ZipA) tended to localize to the outside. As FtsA is required for ring constriction, we propose that this asymmetric localization pattern blocks constriction of the inside of the septal ring while permitting continued constriction of the outside portion. PMID:24682325

  15. Asymmetric Constriction of Dividing Escherichia coli Cells Induced by Expression of a Fusion between Two Min Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rowlett, Veronica Wells

    2014-01-01

    The Min system, consisting of MinC, MinD, and MinE, plays an important role in localizing the Escherichia coli cell division machinery to midcell by preventing FtsZ ring (Z ring) formation at cell poles. MinC has two domains, MinCn and MinCc, which both bind to FtsZ and act synergistically to inhibit FtsZ polymerization. Binary fission of E. coli usually proceeds symmetrically, with daughter cells at roughly 180° to each other. In contrast, we discovered that overproduction of an artificial MinCc-MinD fusion protein in the absence of other Min proteins induced frequent and dramatic jackknife-like bending of cells at division septa, with cell constriction predominantly on the outside of the bend. Mutations in the fusion known to disrupt MinCc-FtsZ, MinCc-MinD, or MinD-membrane interactions largely suppressed bending division. Imaging of FtsZ-green fluorescent protein (GFP) showed no obvious asymmetric localization of FtsZ during MinCc-MinD overproduction, suggesting that a downstream activity of the Z ring was inhibited asymmetrically. Consistent with this, MinCc-MinD fusions localized predominantly to segments of the Z ring at the inside of developing cell bends, while FtsA (but not ZipA) tended to localize to the outside. As FtsA is required for ring constriction, we propose that this asymmetric localization pattern blocks constriction of the inside of the septal ring while permitting continued constriction of the outside portion. PMID:24682325

  16. Spatial variation in otolith chemistry of Lutjanus apodus at Turneffe Atoll, Belize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chittaro, P. M.; Usseglio, P.; Fryer, B. J.; Sale, P. F.

    2006-05-01

    Lutjanus apodus (Schoolmaster) were collected from several mangroves and coral reefs at Turneffe Atoll, Belize, in order to investigate whether elemental concentrations from the otolith edge could be used as a means to identify the habitat (mangrove or coral reef) and site (9 mangrove sites and 6 reef sites) from which they were collected. Results of a two factor nested MANOVA (sites nested within habitat) indicated significant differences in elemental concentrations between habitats (i.e., mangrove versus reef) as well as among sites. When separate Linear Discriminant Function Analyses (LDFA) were used to assess whether the spatial variability in otolith chemistry was sufficient to differentiate individuals to their respective habitats or sites, the results indicated that fish were classified (jackknife procedure) with a moderate to poor degree of accuracy (i.e., on average, 67% and 40% of the individuals were correctly classified to the habitat and site from which they were collected, respectively). Using a partial Mantel test we did not find a significant correlation between the differences in otolith elemental concentrations between sites and the distance between sites, while controlling the effect of habitat type (mangrove or reef). This suggests that for mangrove and reef sites at Turneffe Atoll, Belize, the overlap in terms of L. apodus otolith elemental concentrations is too high for investigations of fish movement. Finally, by comparing previously published Haemulon flavolineatum otolith chemistry to that of L. apodus we assessed whether these species showed similar habitat and/or site specific patterns in their otolith chemistry. Although both species were collected from the same sites our results indicated little similarity in their elemental concentrations, thus suggesting that habitat and site elemental signatures are species specific.

  17. Understanding Spatial and Temporal Variations of Arctic Circulation Using Oxygen Isotopes of Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, L.; Kopans-Johnson, C. R.; LeGrande, A. N.; Kelly, S.

    2015-12-01

    The isotopic ratio of 18O to 16O in seawater (2005ppm in ocean water is defined as 𝛿18Oseawater≡0 permil or 0‰) is a fundamental ocean tracer due to its distinct linear relationship with salinity(𝛿18O -S) from regional inland freshwater sources. As opposed to salinity alone, 𝛿18O distinguishes river runoff from sea-ice melt and traces ocean circulation pathways from coastal to open waters and surface to deep waters. Observations from the past 60 years of 𝛿18O seawater were compiled into a database by Schimdt et al. (1999), and subsequently used to calculate a 3-dimensional 1°x1° 𝛿18O global gridded dataset by LeGrande and Schmidt (2006). Although the Schmidt et al. (1999) Global Seawater Oxygen-18 Database (𝛿18Oobs) contains 25,514 measurements used to calculate the global gridded dataset, LeGrande and Schmidt (2006) point out that, "data coverage varies greatly from region to region," with seasonal variability creating biases in areas where sea ice is present. Python Pandas is used to automate the addition of 2,942 records to the Schmidt et al. (1999) Global Seawater Oxygen-18 Database (𝛿18Oobs), and examine the spatial and temporal distributions of 18O in the Arctic Ocean. 10 initial water masses are defined using spatial and temporal trends, clusters of observations, and Arctic surface circulation. Jackknife slope analysis of water mass 𝛿18O -S is used to determine anomalous data points and regional hydrology, resulting in 4 distinct Arctic water masses. These techniques are used to improve the gridded 𝛿18Oseawater dataset by distinguishing unique water masses, and accounting for seasonal variability of complex high latitude areas.

  18. iLoc-Gpos: a multi-layer classifier for predicting the subcellular localization of singleplex and multiplex Gram-positive bacterial proteins.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhi-Cheng; Xiao, Xuan; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2012-01-01

    By introducing the "multi-layer scale", as well as hybridizing the information of gene ontology and the sequential evolution information, a novel predictor, called iLoc-Gpos, has been developed for predicting the subcellular localization of Gram positive bacterial proteins with both single-location and multiple-location sites. For facilitating comparison, the same stringent benchmark dataset used to estimate the accuracy of Gpos-mPLoc was adopted to demonstrate the power of iLoc-Gpos. The dataset contains 519 Gram-positive bacterial proteins classified into the following four subcellular locations: (1) cell membrane, (2) cell wall, (3) cytoplasm, and (4) extracell; none of proteins included has ≥25% pairwise sequence identity to any other in a same subset (subcellular location). The overall success rate by jackknife test on such a stringent benchmark dataset by iLoc-Gpos was over 93%, which is about 11% higher than that by GposmPLoc. As a user-friendly web-server, iLoc-Gpos is freely accessible to the public at http://icpr.jci.edu.cn/bioinfo/iLoc- Gpos or http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iLoc-Gpos. Meanwhile, a step-by-step guide is provided on how to use the web-server to get the desired results. Furthermore, for the user � s convenience, the iLoc-Gpos web-server also has the function to accept the batch job submission, which is not available in the existing version of Gpos-mPLoc web-server.

  19. Predicting secretory proteins of malaria parasite by incorporating sequence evolution information into pseudo amino acid composition via grey system model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Zhong; Fang, Jian-An; Xiao, Xuan; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2012-01-01

    The malaria disease has become a cause of poverty and a major hindrance to economic development. The culprit of the disease is the parasite, which secretes an array of proteins within the host erythrocyte to facilitate its own survival. Accordingly, the secretory proteins of malaria parasite have become a logical target for drug design against malaria. Unfortunately, with the increasing resistance to the drugs thus developed, the situation has become more complicated. To cope with the drug resistance problem, one strategy is to timely identify the secreted proteins by malaria parasite, which can serve as potential drug targets. However, it is both expensive and time-consuming to identify the secretory proteins of malaria parasite by experiments alone. To expedite the process for developing effective drugs against malaria, a computational predictor called "iSMP-Grey" was developed that can be used to identify the secretory proteins of malaria parasite based on the protein sequence information alone. During the prediction process a protein sample was formulated with a 60D (dimensional) feature vector formed by incorporating the sequence evolution information into the general form of PseAAC (pseudo amino acid composition) via a grey system model, which is particularly useful for solving complicated problems that are lack of sufficient information or need to process uncertain information. It was observed by the jackknife test that iSMP-Grey achieved an overall success rate of 94.8%, remarkably higher than those by the existing predictors in this area. As a user-friendly web-server, iSMP-Grey is freely accessible to the public at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iSMP-Grey. Moreover, for the convenience of most experimental scientists, a step-by-step guide is provided on how to use the web-server to get the desired results without the need to follow the complicated mathematical equations involved in this paper.

  20. Do adolescent Ecstasy users have different attitudes towards drugs when compared to Marijuana users?

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Silvia S.; Storr, Carla L.; Alexandre, Pierre K.; Chilcoat, Howard D.

    2008-01-01

    Background Perceived risk and attitudes about the consequences of drug use, perceptions of others expectations and self-efficacy influence the intent to try drugs and continue drug use once use has started. We examine associations between adolescents’ attitudes and beliefs towards ecstasy use; because most ecstasy users have a history of marijuana use, we estimate the association for three groups of adolescents: non-marijuana/ecstasy users, marijuana users (used marijuana at least once but never used ecstasy) and ecstasy users (used ecstasy at least once). Methods Data from 5,049 adolescents aged 12–18 years old who had complete weighted data information in Round 2 of the Restricted Use Files (RUF) of the National Survey of Parents and Youth (NSPY). Data were analyzed using jackknife weighted multinomial logistic regression models. Results Adolescent marijuana and ecstasy users were more likely to approve of marijuana and ecstasy use as compared to non-drug using youth. Adolescent marijuana and ecstasy users were more likely to have close friends who approved of ecstasy as compared to non-drug using youth. The magnitudes of these two associations were stronger for ecstasy use than for marijuana use in the final adjusted model. Our final adjusted model shows that approval of marijuana and ecstasy use was more strongly associated with marijuana and ecstasy use in adolescence than perceived risk in using both drugs. Conclusion Information about the risks and consequences of ecstasy use need to be presented to adolescents in order to attempt to reduce adolescents’ approval of ecstasy use as well as ecstasy experimentation. PMID:18068314

  1. Environmental, dietary, demographic, and activity variables associated with biomarkers of exposure for benzene and lead.

    PubMed

    Roy, A; Georgopoulos, P G; Ouyang, M; Freeman, N; Lioy, P J

    2003-11-01

    Classification and regression tree methods represent a potentially powerful means of identifying patterns in exposure data that may otherwise be overlooked. Here, regression tree models are developed to identify associations between blood concentrations of benzene and lead and over 300 variables of disparate type (numerical and categorical), often with observations that are missing or below the quantitation limit. Benzene and lead are selected from among all the environmental agents measured in the NHEXAS Region V study because they are ubiquitous, and they serve as paradigms for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and heavy metals, two classes of environmental agents that have very different properties. Two sets of regression models were developed. In the first set, only environmental and dietary measurements were employed as predictor variables, while in the second set these were supplemented with demographic and time-activity data. In both sets of regression models, the predictor variables were regressed on the blood concentrations of the environmental agents. Jack-knife cross-validation was employed to detect overfitting of the models to the data. Blood concentrations of benzene were found to be associated with: (a) indoor air concentrations of benzene; (b) the duration of time spent indoors with someone who was smoking; and (c) the number of cigarettes smoked by the subject. All these associations suggest that tobacco smoke is a major source of exposure to benzene. Blood concentrations of lead were found to be associated with: (a) house dust concentrations of lead; (b) the duration of time spent working in a closed workshop; and (c) the year in which the subject moved into the residence. An unexpected finding was that the regression trees identified time-activity data as better predictors of the blood concentrations than the measurements in environmental and dietary media.

  2. [Forest lighting fire forecasting for Daxing'anling Mountains based on MAXENT model].

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu; Shi, Ming-Chang; Peng, Huan; Zhu, Pei-Lin; Liu, Si-Lin; Wu, Shi-Lei; He, Cheng; Chen, Feng

    2014-04-01

    Daxing'anling Mountains is one of the areas with the highest occurrence of forest lighting fire in Heilongjiang Province, and developing a lightning fire forecast model to accurately predict the forest fires in this area is of importance. Based on the data of forest lightning fires and environment variables, the MAXENT model was used to predict the lightning fire in Daxing' anling region. Firstly, we studied the collinear diagnostic of each environment variable, evaluated the importance of the environmental variables using training gain and the Jackknife method, and then evaluated the prediction accuracy of the MAXENT model using the max Kappa value and the AUC value. The results showed that the variance inflation factor (VIF) values of lightning energy and neutralized charge were 5.012 and 6.230, respectively. They were collinear with the other variables, so the model could not be used for training. Daily rainfall, the number of cloud-to-ground lightning, and current intensity of cloud-to-ground lightning were the three most important factors affecting the lightning fires in the forest, while the daily average wind speed and the slope was of less importance. With the increase of the proportion of test data, the max Kappa and AUC values were increased. The max Kappa values were above 0.75 and the average value was 0.772, while all of the AUC values were above 0.5 and the average value was 0. 859. With a moderate level of prediction accuracy being achieved, the MAXENT model could be used to predict forest lightning fire in Daxing'anling Mountains.

  3. Grid search modeling of receiver functions: Implications for crustal structure in the Middle East and North Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Sandvol, E.; Seber, D.; Calvert, A.; Barazangi, M.

    1998-11-01

    A grid search is used to estimate average crustal thickness and shear wave velocity structure beneath 12 three-component broadband seismic stations in the Middle East, North Africa, and nearby regions. The crustal thickness in these regions is found to vary from a minimum of 8.0{plus_minus}1.5&hthinsp;km in East Africa (Afar) region to possibly a maximum of 64{plus_minus}4.8&hthinsp;km in the lesser Caucasus. Stations located within the stable African platform indicate a crustal thickness of about 40 km. Teleseismic three-component waveform data produced by 165 earthquakes are used to create receiver function stacks for each station. Using a grid search, we have solved for the optimal and most simple shear velocity models beneath all 12 stations. Unlike other techniques (linearized least squares or forward modeling), the grid search methodology guarantees that we solve for the global minimum within our defined model parameter space. Using the grid search, we also qualitatively estimate the least number of layers required to model the observed receiver functions{close_quote} major seismic phases (e.g., PS{sub Moho}). A jackknife error estimation method is used to test the stability of our receiver function inversions for all 12 stations in the region that had recorded a sufficient number of high-quality broadband teleseismic waveforms. Five of the 12 estimates of crustal thicknesses are consistent with what is known of crustal structure from prior geophysical work. Furthermore, the remaining seven estimates of crustal structure are in regions for which previously there were few or no data about crustal thickness. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

  4. Caries-preventive Effect of Supervised Toothbrushing and Sealants.

    PubMed

    Hilgert, L A; Leal, S C; Mulder, J; Creugers, N H J; Frencken, J E

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of 3 caries-preventive measures on high- and low-caries risk occlusal surfaces of first permanent molars over 3 y. This cluster-randomized controlled clinical trial covered 242 schoolchildren, 6 to 7 y old, from low socioeconomic areas. At baseline, caries risk was assessed at the tooth surface level, through a combination of ICDAS II (International Caries Detection and Assessment System) and fissure depth codes. High-caries risk occlusal surfaces were treated according to daily supervised toothbrushing (STB) at school and 2 sealants: composite resin (CR) and atraumatic restorative treatment-high-viscosity glass-ionomer cement (ART-GIC). Low-caries risk occlusal surfaces received STB or no intervention. Evaluations were performed after 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 y. A cavitated dentine carious lesion was considered a failure. Data were analyzed according to the proportional hazard rate regression model with frailty correction, Wald test, analysis of variance, and t test, according to the jackknife procedure for calculating standard errors. The cumulative survival rates of cavitated dentine carious lesion-free, high-caries risk occlusal surfaces were 95.6%, 91.4%, and 90.2% for STB, CR, and ART-GIC, respectively, over 3 y, which were not statistically significantly different. For low-caries risk occlusal surfaces, no statistically significant difference was observed between the cumulative survival rate of the STB group (94.8%) and the no-intervention group (92.1%) over 3 y. There was neither a difference among STB, CR, and ART-GIC on school premises in preventing cavitated dentine carious lesions in high-caries risk occlusal surfaces of first permanent molars nor a difference between STB and no intervention for low-caries risk occlusal surfaces of first permanent molars over 3 y.

  5. Lower-extremity strength profiles and gender-based classification of basketball players ages 9-22 years.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Patricia A; Vardaxis, Vassilios G

    2009-03-01

    Despite an increase in women sports participants and recognition of gender differences in injury patterns (e.g., knee), few normative strength data exist beyond hamstrings and quadriceps measures. This study had 2 purposes: to assess the lower-extremity strength of women (W) and men (M) basketball players who were 9-22 years old, and to determine which strength measures most correctly classify the gender of 12- to 22-year-old athletes. Fifty basketball players (26 W, 24 M) without ligamentous or meniscal injury performed concentric isokinetic testing of bilateral hip, knee, and ankle musculature. We identified maximal peak torques for the hip (flexors, extensors, abductors, adductors), knee (flexors and extensors), and ankle (plantar flexors and dorsiflexors), and we formed periarticular (hip, knee, and ankle), antigravity, and total leg strength composite measures. We calculated mean and 95% confidence intervals. With body mass-height normalization, most age and gender differences were small. Mean values were typically higher for older vs. younger players and for men vs. women players. Mean values were often lower for girls 12-13 years vs. those 9-10 years. In the age group of 16-22 years, men had stronger knee flexors, hip flexors, plantar flexors, and total leg strength than women. Men who were 16-22 years old had stronger knee flexors and hip flexors than did younger men and women players. Based on discriminant function, knee strength measures did not adequately classify gender. Instead, total leg strength measures had correct gender classifications of 74 and 69% (jackknifed) with significant multivariate tests (p = 0.025). For researchers and practitioners, these results support strength assessment and training of the whole lower extremity, not just knee musculature. Limited strength differences between girls 9-10 years old and those 12-13 years old suggest that the peripubertal period is an important time to target strength development.

  6. Digital Mapping of Soil Salinity and Crop Yield across a Coastal Agricultural Landscape Using Repeated Electromagnetic Induction (EMI) Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Rongjiang; Yang, Jingsong; Wu, Danhua; Xie, Wenping; Gao, Peng; Jin, Wenhui

    2016-01-01

    Reliable and real-time information on soil and crop properties is important for the development of management practices in accordance with the requirements of a specific soil and crop within individual field units. This is particularly the case in salt-affected agricultural landscape where managing the spatial variability of soil salinity is essential to minimize salinization and maximize crop output. The primary objectives were to use linear mixed-effects model for soil salinity and crop yield calibration with horizontal and vertical electromagnetic induction (EMI) measurements as ancillary data, to characterize the spatial distribution of soil salinity and crop yield and to verify the accuracy of spatial estimation. Horizontal and vertical EMI (type EM38) measurements at 252 locations were made during each survey, and root zone soil samples and crop samples at 64 sampling sites were collected. This work was periodically conducted on eight dates from June 2012 to May 2013 in a coastal salt-affected mud farmland. Multiple linear regression (MLR) and restricted maximum likelihood (REML) were applied to calibrate root zone soil salinity (ECe) and crop annual output (CAO) using ancillary data, and spatial distribution of soil ECe and CAO was generated using digital soil mapping (DSM) and the precision of spatial estimation was examined using the collected meteorological and groundwater data. Results indicated that a reduced model with EMh as a predictor was satisfactory for root zone ECe calibration, whereas a full model with both EMh and EMv as predictors met the requirement of CAO calibration. The obtained distribution maps of ECe showed consistency with those of EMI measurements at the corresponding time, and the spatial distribution of CAO generated from ancillary data showed agreement with that derived from raw crop data. Statistics of jackknifing procedure confirmed that the spatial estimation of ECe and CAO exhibited reliability and high accuracy. A general

  7. A Deep Search for Extended Radio Continuum Emission from Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies: Implications for Particle Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spekkens, Kristine; Mason, Brian S.; Aguirre, James E.; Nhan, Bang

    2013-08-01

    We present deep radio observations of four nearby dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies, designed to detect extended synchrotron emission resulting from weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter annihilations in their halos. Models by Colafrancesco et al. (CPU07) predict the existence of angularly large, smoothly distributed radio halos in such systems, which stem from electron and positron annihilation products spiraling in a turbulent magnetic field. We map a total of 40.5 deg2 around the Draco, Ursa Major II, Coma Berenices, and Willman 1 dSphs with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) at 1.4 GHz to detect this annihilation signature, greatly reducing discrete-source confusion using the NVSS catalog. We achieve a sensitivity of σsub <~ 7 mJy beam-1 in our discrete source-subtracted maps, implying that the NVSS is highly effective at removing background sources from GBT maps. For Draco we obtained approximately concurrent Very Large Array observations to quantify the variability of the discrete source background, and find it to have a negligible effect on our results. We construct radial surface brightness profiles from each of the subtracted maps, and jackknife the data to quantify the significance of the features therein. At the ~10' resolution of our observations, foregrounds contribute a standard deviation of 1.8 mJy beam-1 <= σast <= 5.7 mJy beam-1 to our high-latitude maps, with the emission in Draco and Coma dominated by foregrounds. On the other hand, we find no significant emission in the Ursa Major II and Willman 1 fields, and explore the implications of non-detections in these fields for particle dark matter using the fiducial models of CPU07. For a WIMP mass M χ = 100 GeV annihilating into b\\bar{b} final states and B = 1 μG, upper limits on the annihilation cross-section for Ursa Major II and Willman I are log (langσvrangχ, cm3 s-1) <~ -25 for the preferred set of charged particle propagation parameters adopted by CPU07; this is comparable to

  8. Digital Mapping of Soil Salinity and Crop Yield across a Coastal Agricultural Landscape Using Repeated Electromagnetic Induction (EMI) Surveys.

    PubMed

    Yao, Rongjiang; Yang, Jingsong; Wu, Danhua; Xie, Wenping; Gao, Peng; Jin, Wenhui

    2016-01-01

    Reliable and real-time information on soil and crop properties is important for the development of management practices in accordance with the requirements of a specific soil and crop within individual field units. This is particularly the case in salt-affected agricultural landscape where managing the spatial variability of soil salinity is essential to minimize salinization and maximize crop output. The primary objectives were to use linear mixed-effects model for soil salinity and crop yield calibration with horizontal and vertical electromagnetic induction (EMI) measurements as ancillary data, to characterize the spatial distribution of soil salinity and crop yield and to verify the accuracy of spatial estimation. Horizontal and vertical EMI (type EM38) measurements at 252 locations were made during each survey, and root zone soil samples and crop samples at 64 sampling sites were collected. This work was periodically conducted on eight dates from June 2012 to May 2013 in a coastal salt-affected mud farmland. Multiple linear regression (MLR) and restricted maximum likelihood (REML) were applied to calibrate root zone soil salinity (ECe) and crop annual output (CAO) using ancillary data, and spatial distribution of soil ECe and CAO was generated using digital soil mapping (DSM) and the precision of spatial estimation was examined using the collected meteorological and groundwater data. Results indicated that a reduced model with EMh as a predictor was satisfactory for root zone ECe calibration, whereas a full model with both EMh and EMv as predictors met the requirement of CAO calibration. The obtained distribution maps of ECe showed consistency with those of EMI measurements at the corresponding time, and the spatial distribution of CAO generated from ancillary data showed agreement with that derived from raw crop data. Statistics of jackknifing procedure confirmed that the spatial estimation of ECe and CAO exhibited reliability and high accuracy. A general

  9. Stock assessment of fishery target species in Lake Koka, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Tesfaye, Gashaw; Wolff, Matthias

    2015-09-01

    Effective management is essential for small-scale fisheries to continue providing food and livelihoods for households, particularly in developing countries where other options are often limited. Studies on the population dynamics and stock assessment on fishery target species are thus imperative to sustain their fisheries and the benefits for the society. In Lake Koka (Ethiopia), very little is known about the vital population parameters and exploitation status of the fishery target species: tilapia Oreochromis niloticus, common carp Cyprinus carpio and catfish Clarias gariepinus. Our study, therefore, aimed at determining the vital population parameters and assessing the status of these target species in Lake Koka using length frequency data collected quarterly from commercial catches from 2007-2012. A total of 20,097 fish specimens (distributed as 7,933 tilapia, 6,025 catfish and 6,139 common carp) were measured for the analysis. Von Bertalarffy growth parameters and their confidence intervals were determined from modal progression analysis using ELEFAN I and applying the jackknife technique. Mortality parameters were determined from length-converted catch curves and empirical models. The exploitation status of these target species were then assessed by computing exploitation rates (E) from mortality parameters as well as from size indicators i.e., assessing the size distribution of fish catches relative to the size at maturity (Lm), the size that provides maximum cohort biomass (Lopt) and the abundance of mega-spawners. The mean value of growth parameters L∞, K and the growth performance index ø' were 44.5 cm, 0.41/year and 2.90 for O. niloticus, 74.1 cm, 0.28/year and 3.19 for C. carpio and 121.9 cm, 0.16/year and 3.36 for C. gariepinus, respectively. The 95 % confidence intervals of the estimates were also computed. Total mortality (Z) estimates were 1.47, 0.83 and 0.72/year for O. niloticus, C. carpio and C. gariepinus, respectively. Our study suggest that

  10. Presence-only approach to assess landslide triggering-thickness susceptibility. A test for the Mili catchment (North-Eastern Sicily, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Luigi; Fubelli, Giandomenico; Amato, Gabriele; Bonasera, Mauro; Hochschild, Volker; Rotigliano, Edoardo

    2015-04-01

    thicknesses. In addition, the role of each predictor within the whole modelling procedure was assessed by applying Jackknife tests. These analyses focussed on evaluating the variation of AUC values across replicates comparing single variable models with models based on the full set of predictors iteratively deprived of one covariate. As a result, relevant differences among main contributors between the two considered classes were also quantitatively derived and geomorphologically interpreted. This work can be considered as an example for creating specific landslide susceptibility maps to be used in master planning in order to establish proportional countermeasures to different activation mechanisms. Keywords: statistical analysis, shallow landslide, landslide susceptibility, triggering factors, presence-only approach

  11. From Gaged to Ungaged- Predicting Long-term Environmental Flows, and Ecosystems Responses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, A.; Adams, S. K.; Stein, E. D.; Mazor, R.; Bledsoe, B. P.

    2015-12-01

    Modern management needs, such as water supply, quality, and ecosystem protection place numerous demands on instream flows. Many regions are interested in developing numeric flow criteria as a way of ensuring maintenance of flow patterns that protect biological resources while meeting other demands. Developing flow criteria requires the capacity to generate reliable time series of the daily flow at any stream reach of interest and to relate flow patterns to biological indicators of stream health. Most stream reaches are not gaged, and it is impractical to develop detailed models for all reaches where flow alteration needs to be evaluated. We present a novel mechanistic approach to efficiently predict flows and flow alteration at all ungaged stream locations within a region of interest. We used an "ensemble approach" whereby a series of regionally representative models were developed and calibrated. New sites of interest are assigned to one of the ensemble models based on similarity of catchment properties. For southern California, we selected 43 gaged sites representing the range of geomorphology, and watershed characteristics of streams in the region. For each gaged site, we developed a hydrologic model (HEC-HMS) to predict daily flows for a period representing dry, wet and normal precipitation. The final goal is to relate flow alterations to ecological responses, the models were calibrated to three separate performance metrics that reflect conditions important for instream biological communities- proportion of low flow days, flashiness and Nash Sutcliffe efficiency for overall model performance. We cross-validated the models using a "jack-knife" approach. Models were assigned to novel 840 bioassessment sites based on the results of a Random Forest model that identified catchment properties that most affected the runoff patterns. Daily flow data for existing and "reference conditions" was simulated for a 23-year period for current and reference (undeveloped

  12. A Designed Experiments Approach to Optimizing MALDI-TOF MS Spectrum Processing Parameters Enhances Detection of Antibiotic Resistance in Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Penny, Christian; Grothendick, Beau; Zhang, Lin; Borror, Connie M.; Barbano, Duane; Cornelius, Angela J.; Gilpin, Brent J.; Fagerquist, Clifton K.; Zaragoza, William J.; Jay-Russell, Michele T.; Lastovica, Albert J.; Ragimbeau, Catherine; Cauchie, Henry-Michel; Sandrin, Todd R.

    2016-01-01

    MALDI-TOF MS has been utilized as a reliable and rapid tool for microbial fingerprinting at the genus and species levels. Recently, there has been keen interest in using MALDI-TOF MS beyond the genus and species levels to rapidly identify antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria. The purpose of this study was to enhance strain level resolution for Campylobacter jejuni through the optimization of spectrum processing parameters using a series of designed experiments. A collection of 172 strains of C. jejuni were collected from Luxembourg, New Zealand, North America, and South Africa, consisting of four groups of antibiotic resistant isolates. The groups included: (1) 65 strains resistant to cefoperazone (2) 26 resistant to cefoperazone and beta-lactams (3) 5 strains resistant to cefoperazone, beta-lactams, and tetracycline, and (4) 76 strains resistant to cefoperazone, teicoplanin, amphotericin, B and cephalothin. Initially, a model set of 16 strains (three biological replicates and three technical replicates per isolate, yielding a total of 144 spectra) of C. jejuni was subjected to each designed experiment to enhance detection of antibiotic resistance. The most optimal parameters were applied to the larger collection of 172 isolates (two biological replicates and three technical replicates per isolate, yielding a total of 1,031 spectra). We observed an increase in antibiotic resistance detection whenever either a curve based similarity coefficient (Pearson or ranked Pearson) was applied rather than a peak based (Dice) and/or the optimized preprocessing parameters were applied. Increases in antimicrobial resistance detection were scored using the jackknife maximum similarity technique following cluster analysis. From the first four groups of antibiotic resistant isolates, the optimized preprocessing parameters increased detection respective to the aforementioned groups by: (1) 5% (2) 9% (3) 10%, and (4) 2%. An additional second categorization was created from the

  13. Program package for multicanonical simulations of U(1) lattice gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazavov, Alexei; Berg, Bernd A.

    2009-11-01

    factors. Reweighting to physical values using logarithmic coding and calculating jackknife error bars. Running time: The prepared tests runs took up to 74 minutes to execute on a 2 GHz PC.

  14. Effect of reconstruction methods and x-ray tube current–time product on nodule detection in an anthropomorphic thorax phantom: A crossed-modality JAFROC observer study

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, J. D.; Chakraborty, D. P.; Szczepura, K.; Tootell, A. K.; Vamvakas, I.; Manning, D. J.; Hogg, P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate nodule detection in an anthropomorphic chest phantom in computed tomography (CT) images reconstructed with adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D (AIDR3D) and filtered back projection (FBP) over a range of tube current–time product (mAs). Methods: Two phantoms were used in this study: (i) an anthropomorphic chest phantom was loaded with spherical simulated nodules of 5, 8, 10, and 12 mm in diameter and +100, −630, and −800 Hounsfield units electron density; this would generate CT images for the observer study; (ii) a whole-body dosimetry verification phantom was used to ultimately estimate effective dose and risk according to the model of the BEIR VII committee. Both phantoms were scanned over a mAs range (10, 20, 30, and 40), while all other acquisition parameters remained constant. Images were reconstructed with both AIDR3D and FBP. For the observer study, 34 normal cases (no nodules) and 34 abnormal cases (containing 1–3 nodules, mean 1.35 ± 0.54) were chosen. Eleven observers evaluated images from all mAs and reconstruction methods under the free-response paradigm. A crossed-modality jackknife alternative free-response operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis method was developed for data analysis, averaging data over the two factors influencing nodule detection in this study: mAs and image reconstruction (AIDR3D or FBP). A Bonferroni correction was applied and the threshold for declaring significance was set at 0.025 to maintain the overall probability of Type I error at α = 0.05. Contrast-to-noise (CNR) was also measured for all nodules and evaluated by a linear least squares analysis. Results: For random-reader fixed-case crossed-modality JAFROC analysis, there was no significant difference in nodule detection between AIDR3D and FBP when data were averaged over mAs [F(1, 10) = 0.08, p = 0.789]. However, when data were averaged over reconstruction methods, a significant difference was seen between multiple pairs of mAs settings

  15. Evaluation of clinical image processing algorithms used in digital mammography.

    PubMed

    Zanca, Federica; Jacobs, Jurgen; Van Ongeval, Chantal; Claus, Filip; Celis, Valerie; Geniets, Catherine; Provost, Veerle; Pauwels, Herman; Marchal, Guy; Bosmans, Hilde

    2009-03-01

    Screening is the only proven approach to reduce the mortality of breast cancer, but significant numbers of breast cancers remain undetected even when all quality assurance guidelines are implemented. With the increasing adoption of digital mammography systems, image processing may be a key factor in the imaging chain. Although to our knowledge statistically significant effects of manufacturer-recommended image processings have not been previously demonstrated, the subjective experience of our radiologists, that the apparent image quality can vary considerably between different algorithms, motivated this study. This article addresses the impact of five such algorithms on the detection of clusters of microcalcifications. A database of unprocessed (raw) images of 200 normal digital mammograms, acquired with the Siemens Novation DR, was collected retrospectively. Realistic simulated microcalcification clusters were inserted in half of the unprocessed images. All unprocessed images were subsequently processed with five manufacturer-recommended image processing algorithms (Agfa Musica 1, IMS Raffaello Mammo 1.2, Sectra Mamea AB Sigmoid, Siemens OPVIEW v2, and Siemens OPVIEW v1). Four breast imaging radiologists were asked to locate and score the clusters in each image on a five point rating scale. The free-response data were analyzed by the jackknife free-response receiver operating characteristic (JAFROC) method and, for comparison, also with the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) method. JAFROC analysis revealed highly significant differences between the image processings (F = 8.51, p < 0.0001), suggesting that image processing strongly impacts the detectability of clusters. Siemens OPVIEW2 and Siemens OPVIEW1 yielded the highest and lowest performances, respectively. ROC analysis of the data also revealed significant differences between the processing but at lower significance (F = 3.47, p = 0.0305) than JAFROC. Both statistical analysis methods revealed that the

  16. Amplitude-dependent station magnitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radzyner, Yael; Ben Horin, Yochai; Steinberg, David M.

    2016-04-01

    Magnitude, a concept first presented by Gutenberg and Richter, adjusts measurements of ground motion for epicentral distance and source depth. Following this principle, the IDC defines the j'th station body wave magnitude for event i as mb(stai,j) = log 10(Aj,i/Tj,i) + V C(Δj,i,hi) , where VC is the Veith-Clawson (VC) correction to compensate for the epicentral distance of the station and the depth of the source. The network magnitude is calculated as the average of station magnitudes. The IDC magnitude estimation is used for event characterization and discrimination and it should be as accurate as possible. Ideally, the network magnitude should be close in value to the station magnitudes. In reality, it is observed that the residuals range between -1 and 1 mu or ±25% of a given mb(neti) value. We show that the residual, mb(neti) -mb(staj,i), depends linearly on log 10(Aj,i/Tj,i), and we correct for this dependence using the following procedure: Calculate a "jackknifed" network magnitude, mbj,n(neti), i.e. an average over all participating stations except station n. Using all measurements at station n, calculate the parameters an, bn of the linear fit of the residual mbj,n(neti) - mb(stan,i to log 10(An,i/Tn,i). For each event i at station n calculate the new station magnitude mbnew(stan,i) = (an + 1)log(An,i/Tn,i) + V C(Δn,i,hi) + bn Calculate the new network magnitude: mbnew(neti) = 1N- ∑ n=1nmbnew(stan,i) The procedure was used on more than two million station-event pairs. Correcting for the station-specific dependence on log amplitude reduces the residuals by roughly a third. We have calculated the spread of the distributions, and compared the original values and those for the corrected magnitudes. The spread is the ratio between the variance of the network magnitudes, and the variance of the residual. Calculations show an increase in the ratio of the variance, meaning that the correction process presented in this document did not lead to loss of variance

  17. Estimating the spatial distribution of evapotranspiration using the water balance model WAVE and fine spatial resolution airborne remote sensing images from the DAIS-sensor: Experimental set-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstraeten, W. W.; Veroustraete, F.; Feyen, J.

    2003-04-01

    -simulations of the water balance model WAVE on some specific locations (derived from Price, 1990 and Bastiaanssen et al., 1998) and; (2) determining the spatial input parameters of WAVE in order to simulate the spatial patterns of evapotranspiration (based on D'Urso); the Split-Data, Split-Window, Jack-knife, and cross-correlation techniques will take care of the temporal and spatial validation of the results.

  18. Revised and annotated checklist of aquatic and semi-aquatic Heteroptera of Hungary with comments on biodiversity patterns.

    PubMed

    Boda, Pál; Bozóki, Tamás; Vásárhelyi, Tamás; Bakonyi, Gábor; Várbíró, Gábor

    2015-01-01

    A basic knowledge of regional faunas is necessary to follow the changes in macroinvertebrate communities caused by environmental influences and climatic trends in the future. We collected all the available data on water bugs in Hungary using an inventory method, a UTM grid based database was built, and Jackknife richness estimates and species accumulation curves were calculated. Fauna compositions were compared among Central-European states. As a result, an updated and annotated checklist for Hungary is provided, containing 58 species in 21 genera and 12 families. A total 66.8% of the total UTM 10 × 10 km squares in Hungary possess faunistic data for water bugs. The species number in grid cells numbered from 0 to 42, and their diversity patterns showed heterogeneity. The estimated species number of 58 is equal to the actual number of species known from the country. The asymptotic shape of the accumulative species curve predicts that additional sampling efforts will not increase the number of species currently known from Hungary. These results suggest that the number of species in the country was estimated correctly and that the species accumulation curve levels off at an asymptotic value. Thus a considerable increase in species richness is not expected in the future. Even with the species composition changing the chance of species turn-over does exist. Overall, 36.7% of the European water bug species were found in Hungary. The differences in faunal composition between Hungary and its surrounding countries were caused by the rare or unique species, whereas 33 species are common in the faunas of the eight countries. Species richness does show a correlation with latitude, and similar species compositions were observed in the countries along the same latitude. The species list and the UTM-based database are now up-to-date for Hungary, and it will provide a basis for future studies of distributional and biodiversity patterns, biogeography, relative abundance and

  19. One year survival of ART and conventional restorations in patients with disability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Providing restorative treatment for persons with disability may be challenging and has been related to the patient’s ability to cope with the anxiety engendered by treatment and to cooperate fully with the demands of the clinical situation. The aim of the present study was to assess the survival rate of ART restorations compared to conventional restorations in people with disability referred for special care dentistry. Methods Three treatment protocols were distinguished: ART (hand instruments/high-viscosity glass-ionomer); conventional restorative treatment (rotary instrumentation/resin composite) in the clinic (CRT/clinic) and under general anaesthesia (CRT/GA). Patients were referred for restorative care to a special care centre and treated by one of two specialists. Patients and/or their caregivers were provided with written and verbal information regarding the proposed techniques, and selected the type of treatment they were to receive. Treatment was provided as selected but if this option proved clinically unfeasible one of the alternative techniques was subsequently proposed. Evaluation of restoration survival was performed by two independent trained and calibrated examiners using established ART restoration assessment codes at 6 months and 12 months. The Proportional Hazard model with frailty corrections was applied to calculate survival estimates over a one year period. Results 66 patients (13.6 ± 7.8 years) with 16 different medical disorders participated. CRT/clinic proved feasible for 5 patients (7.5%), the ART approach for 47 patients (71.2%), and 14 patients received CRT/GA (21.2%). In all, 298 dentine carious lesions were restored in primary and permanent teeth, 182 (ART), 21 (CRT/clinic) and 95 (CRT/GA). The 1-year survival rates and jackknife standard error of ART and CRT restorations were 97.8 ± 1.0% and 90.5 ± 3.2%, respectively (p = 0.01). Conclusions These short-term results indicate that ART appears to be an

  20. Population attributable fractions of farm vector tick (Rhipicephalus appendiculatus) presence on Theileria parva infection seroprevalence under endemic instability.

    PubMed

    Gachohi, J M; Kitala, P M; Ngumi, P N; Skilton, R A; Bett, B

    2013-02-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the impact of Rhipicephalus appendiculatus tick presence (exposure variable) on Theileria parva infection seroprevalence (outcome variable) in a group of cattle belonging to a farm using population attributable fractions (PAF). The analyses were based on a representative sample of 80 traditional smallholder mixed farms. The farms were selected by first stratifying the population administratively and implementing a multistage random sampling in Mbeere district in Kenya. The PAFs were estimated using the stratified, Bruzzi, and sequential partitioned PAF approaches. A secondary objective was, thus, to evaluate the impact of the approaches on the PAF estimates. The stratified and Bruzzi approaches estimated proportion of T. parva infection cases directly attributable to the exposure after controlling for confounding by agro-ecological zone (AEZ). The sequential partitioned PAF approach estimated a PAF associated with exposure after adjusting for any effect that the AEZ may have had by influencing the prevalence of the exposure. All analyses were carried out at the farm level where a farm was classified as infested if the tick was found on cattle on a farm, and infected if at least one animal on a farm was positive for T. parva antibodies. Variance estimation for PAFs was implemented using 'delete-a-group' jackknife re-sampling method. The stratified PAF (26.7% [95% CI: 9.0%, 44.4%]) and Bruzzi PAF (26.4% [95% CI: 9.6%, 43.2%]) were consistent in estimating a relatively low impact of farm vector tick presence with a relatively high level of uncertainty. The partitioned PAF (15.5% [95% CI: 1.5%, 29.6%]) suggested that part of the impacts estimated using the stratified PAF and Bruzzi approaches was driven by AEZ effects. Overall, the results suggested that under endemic instability in Mbeere district, (1) presence of R. appendiculatus was not a good indicator of T. parva infection occurrence on a farm; (2) ecological

  1. Spatial downscaling and mapping of daily precipitation and air temperature using daily station data and monthly mean maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flint, A. L.; Flint, L. E.; Stern, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate maps of daily weather variables are an essential component of hydrologic and ecologic modeling. Here we present a four-step method that uses daily station data and transient monthly maps of precipitation and air temperature. This method uses the monthly maps to help interpolate between stations for more accurate production of daily maps at any spatial resolution. The first step analyzes the quality of the each station's data using a discrepancy analysis that compares statistics derived from a statistical jack-knifing approach with a time-series evaluation of discrepancies generated for each station. Although several methods could be used for the second step of producing initial maps, such as kriging, splines, etc., we used a gradient plus inverse distance squared method that was developed to produce accurate climate maps for sparse data regions with widely separated and few climate stations, far fewer than would be needed for techniques such as kriging. The gradient plus inverse distance squared method uses local gradients in the climate parameters, easting, northing, and elevation, to adjust the inverse distance squared estimates for local gradients such as lapse rates, inversions, or rain shadows at scales of 10's of meters to kilometers. The third step is to downscale World Wide Web (web) based transient monthly data, such as Precipitation-Elevation Regression on Independent Slope Method (PRISM) for the US (4 km or 800 m maps) or Climate Research Unit (CRU 3.1) data sets (40 km for global applications) to the scale of the daily data's digital elevation model. In the final step the downscaled transient monthly maps are used to adjust the daily time-series mapped data (~30 maps/month) for each month. These adjustments are used to scale daily maps so that summing them for precipitation or averaging them for temperature would more accurately reproduce the variability in selected monthly maps. This method allows for individual days to have maxima or minima

  2. Establishing macroecological trait datasets: digitalization, extrapolation, and validation of diet preferences in terrestrial mammals worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Kissling, Wilm Daniel; Dalby, Lars; Fløjgaard, Camilla; Lenoir, Jonathan; Sandel, Brody; Sandom, Christopher; Trøjelsgaard, Kristian; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2014-01-01

    Ecological trait data are essential for understanding the broad-scale distribution of biodiversity and its response to global change. For animals, diet represents a fundamental aspect of species’ evolutionary adaptations, ecological and functional roles, and trophic interactions. However, the importance of diet for macroevolutionary and macroecological dynamics remains little explored, partly because of the lack of comprehensive trait datasets. We compiled and evaluated a comprehensive global dataset of diet preferences of mammals (“MammalDIET”). Diet information was digitized from two global and cladewide data sources and errors of data entry by multiple data recorders were assessed. We then developed a hierarchical extrapolation procedure to fill-in diet information for species with missing information. Missing data were extrapolated with information from other taxonomic levels (genus, other species within the same genus, or family) and this extrapolation was subsequently validated both internally (with a jack-knife approach applied to the compiled species-level diet data) and externally (using independent species-level diet information from a comprehensive continentwide data source). Finally, we grouped mammal species into trophic levels and dietary guilds, and their species richness as well as their proportion of total richness were mapped at a global scale for those diet categories with good validation results. The success rate of correctly digitizing data was 94%, indicating that the consistency in data entry among multiple recorders was high. Data sources provided species-level diet information for a total of 2033 species (38% of all 5364 terrestrial mammal species, based on the IUCN taxonomy). For the remaining 3331 species, diet information was mostly extrapolated from genus-level diet information (48% of all terrestrial mammal species), and only rarely from other species within the same genus (6%) or from family level (8%). Internal and external

  3. GalNAc-transferase specificity prediction based on feature selection method.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lin; Niu, Bing; Zhao, Jun; Liu, Liang; Lu, Wen-Cong; Liu, Xiao-Jun; Li, Yi-Xue; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2009-02-01

    GalNAc-transferase can catalyze the biosynthesis of O-linked oligosaccharides. The specificity of GalNAc-transferase is composed of nine amino acid residues denoted by R4, R3, R2, R1, R0, R1', R2', R3', R4'. To predict whether the reducing monosaccharide will be covalently linked to the central residue R0(Ser or Thr), a new method based on feature selection has been proposed in our work. 277 nonapeptides from reference [Chou KC. A sequence-coupled vector-projection model for predicting the specificity of GalNAc-transferase. Protein Sci 1995;4:1365-83] are chosen for training set. Each nonapeptide is represented by hundreds of amino acid properties collected by Amino Acid Index database (http://www.genome.jp/aaindex) and transformed into a numeric vector with 4554 features. The Maximum Relevance Minimum Redundancy (mRMR) method combining with Incremental Feature Selection (IFS) and Feature Forward Selection (FFS) are then applied for feature selection. Nearest Neighbor Algorithm (NNA) is used to build prediction models. The optimal model contains 54 features and its correct rate tested by Jackknife cross-validation test reaches 91.34%. Final feature analysis indicates that amino acid residues at position R3' play the most important role in the recognition of GalNAc-transferase specificity, which were confirmed by the experiments [Elhammer AP, Poorman RA, Brown E, Maggiora LL, Hoogerheide JG, Kezdy FJ. The specificity of UDP-GalNAc:polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase as inferred from a database of in vivo substrates and from the in vitro glycosylation of proteins and peptides. J Biol Chem 1993;268:10029-38; O'Connell BC, Hagen FK, Tabak LA. The influence of flanking sequence on the O-glycosylation of threonine in vitro. J Biol Chem 1992;267:25010-8; Yoshida A, Suzuki M, Ikenaga H, Takeuchi M. Discovery of the shortest sequence motif for high level mucin-type O-glycosylation. J Biol Chem 1997;272:16884-8]. Our method can be used as a tool for predicting O

  4. Stock assessment of fishery target species in Lake Koka, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Tesfaye, Gashaw; Wolff, Matthias

    2015-09-01

    Effective management is essential for small-scale fisheries to continue providing food and livelihoods for households, particularly in developing countries where other options are often limited. Studies on the population dynamics and stock assessment on fishery target species are thus imperative to sustain their fisheries and the benefits for the society. In Lake Koka (Ethiopia), very little is known about the vital population parameters and exploitation status of the fishery target species: tilapia Oreochromis niloticus, common carp Cyprinus carpio and catfish Clarias gariepinus. Our study, therefore, aimed at determining the vital population parameters and assessing the status of these target species in Lake Koka using length frequency data collected quarterly from commercial catches from 2007-2012. A total of 20,097 fish specimens (distributed as 7,933 tilapia, 6,025 catfish and 6,139 common carp) were measured for the analysis. Von Bertalarffy growth parameters and their confidence intervals were determined from modal progression analysis using ELEFAN I and applying the jackknife technique. Mortality parameters were determined from length-converted catch curves and empirical models. The exploitation status of these target species were then assessed by computing exploitation rates (E) from mortality parameters as well as from size indicators i.e., assessing the size distribution of fish catches relative to the size at maturity (Lm), the size that provides maximum cohort biomass (Lopt) and the abundance of mega-spawners. The mean value of growth parameters L∞, K and the growth performance index ø' were 44.5 cm, 0.41/year and 2.90 for O. niloticus, 74.1 cm, 0.28/year and 3.19 for C. carpio and 121.9 cm, 0.16/year and 3.36 for C. gariepinus, respectively. The 95 % confidence intervals of the estimates were also computed. Total mortality (Z) estimates were 1.47, 0.83 and 0.72/year for O. niloticus, C. carpio and C. gariepinus, respectively. Our study suggest that

  5. Revised and annotated checklist of aquatic and semi-aquatic Heteroptera of Hungary with comments on biodiversity patterns

    PubMed Central

    Boda, Pál; Bozóki, Tamás; Vásárhelyi, Tamás; Bakonyi, Gábor; Várbíró, Gábor

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A basic knowledge of regional faunas is necessary to follow the changes in macroinvertebrate communities caused by environmental influences and climatic trends in the future. We collected all the available data on water bugs in Hungary using an inventory method, a UTM grid based database was built, and Jackknife richness estimates and species accumulation curves were calculated. Fauna compositions were compared among Central-European states. As a result, an updated and annotated checklist for Hungary is provided, containing 58 species in 21 genera and 12 families. A total 66.8% of the total UTM 10 × 10 km squares in Hungary possess faunistic data for water bugs. The species number in grid cells numbered from 0 to 42, and their diversity patterns showed heterogeneity. The estimated species number of 58 is equal to the actual number of species known from the country. The asymptotic shape of the accumulative species curve predicts that additional sampling efforts will not increase the number of species currently known from Hungary. These results suggest that the number of species in the country was estimated correctly and that the species accumulation curve levels off at an asymptotic value. Thus a considerable increase in species richness is not expected in the future. Even with the species composition changing the chance of species turn-over does exist. Overall, 36.7% of the European water bug species were found in Hungary. The differences in faunal composition between Hungary and its surrounding countries were caused by the rare or unique species, whereas 33 species are common in the faunas of the eight countries. Species richness does show a correlation with latitude, and similar species compositions were observed in the countries along the same latitude. The species list and the UTM-based database are now up-to-date for Hungary, and it will provide a basis for future studies of distributional and biodiversity patterns, biogeography, relative abundance

  6. Using Chironomid-Based Transfer Function and Stable Isotopes for Reconstructing Past Climate in South Eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, J.; Shulmeister, J.; Woodward, C.

    2014-12-01

    A transfer-function based on chironomids was created to reconstruct past summer temperatures from a training set comprised of 33 south eastern Australian lakes. Statistical analyses show that mean February temperature (MFT) is the most robust and independent variable explaining chironomid species variability. The best MFT transfer function was a partial least squares (PLS) model with a coefficient of determination (r2Jackknifed) of 0.69, a root mean squared error of prediction (RMSEP) of 2.33˚C, and maximum bias of 2.15°C. The transfer function was tested by applying it to a Late Glacial to Holocene record from Blue Lake, New South Wales using published data. The reconstruction displays an overall pattern very similar to the Milankovitch driven summer insolation curve for 30°S and to the chironomid based summer temperature reconstruction from Eagle Tarn, Tasmania (Rees and Cwynar 2010) suggesting that the model is robust. The transfer function was also applied to reconstruct the Last Glacial Maxium (LGM) summer temperature from Welsby Lagoon, North Stradbroke Island (Queensland). Preliminary results show a c. 4.2~8.6˚C of cooling in summer temperatures during the LGM from south east Australia. Stable oxygen and deuterium isotope composition (δ18O and δD) of the chitnous subfossil head capsules from Australian chironomids were also measured to explore the opportunity developing them as an independent temperature proxy. This is the first application of this technique in the Southern Hemisphere. The modern range of chironomid δ18O values were measured based on the same 33 lakes sampled for the transfer function. For these lakes, head capsules of single genera were picked to avoid complications from 'vital effects'. The relationship of chironomid δ18O to modern lake temperatures has been investigated. Deuterium (δD) on the head capsules has been measured concurrently and the relationship to climate and environment will be explored based on the latest available

  7. Prices, infrastructure, household characteristics and child height.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D; Strauss, J

    1992-10-01

    A Brazilian household survey, ENDEF, in 1974-75 and the 1974 Informacoes Basicas Municipais (IBM) provided data for the analysis of the impact of community services and infrastructure and household characteristics on the logarithm of child height, standardized for age and gender. The sample was comprised of 36,974 children stratified by residential location, the child's age, and the educational level of the mother. Variance and covariance matrices were estimated with the jackknife developed by Efron (1982). Household characteristics included the logarithm of per capita expenditure as a measure of household resource availability, income, and parental education. Community characteristics were local market price indices for 6 food groups (dairy products, beans, cereals, meat, fish, and sugar), level of urbanization, buildings with sewage, water, and electricity connections per capita, per capita number of buildings, and population density. Health services were measured as per capita number of hospitals and clinics and doctors and nurses, and the number of beds are hospital. Educational services include a measure of student teacher ratios, elementary school class size, and per capita number of teachers living in the community. the results show that expenditure had a positive, significant effect on the height of children 2 years and older. Expenditure was a significant determinant for literate and illiterate mothers, and not well educated mothers. The impact of maternal education was largest on the length of babies and declined with the age of the child. Father's education had not impact of length of babies. The effect of parents' education was complementary. The effect of father's education was largest when mothers had some education. Better educated parents had healthier children. Maternal rather than paternal height had an impact of the length of a baby. In the community models, prices had a significant effect on child height, in both urban and rural areas, in all

  8. Complex Faulting within the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshon, H. R.; Powell, C. A.; Magnani, M.; Bisrat, S. T.

    2010-12-01

    anomalously low P wave velocities. Swarm activity along the southern portion of the Reelfoot fault and near the northern portion of the Reelfoot fault terminus may be related to fault intersections within this complicated transpressional system. Recent reflection data of the upper 1 km imaged along the Mississippi River indicate that both the north termini of the Reelfoot and Axial faults are characterized by splay faulting, while at depth microseismicity is planar. Absolute and relative error will be assessed by computing locations within two 3D P and S wave velocity models of the study area, using finite difference and pseudo-bending ray tracing approaches, and jack-knife approaches to test dependence on network geometry.

  9. A regional high-resolution carbon flux inversion of North America for 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuh, A. E.; Denning, A. S.; Corbin, K. D.; Baker, I. T.; Uliasz, M.; Parazoo, N.; Andrews, A. E.; Worthy, D. E. J.

    2009-11-01

    Resolving the discrepancies between NEE estimates based upon (1) ground studies and (2) atmospheric inversion results, demands increasingly sophisticated techniques. In this paper we present a high-resolution inversion based upon a regional meteorology model (RAMS) and an underlying biosphere (SiB3) model, both running on an identical 40 km grid over most of North America. Previous papers have utilized inversion regions formed by collapsing biome-similar grid cells into large aggregated regions. The effect of this is that the NEE correction imposed on forested regions on the east coast of the United States might be the same as that imposed on forests on the west coast of the United States while, in reality, there likely exist subtle differences in the two areas, both natural and anthropogenic. Our current inversion framework utilizes a combination of previously employed inversion techniques while allowing carbon flux corrections to be biome independent. Temporally and spatially high-resolution results utilizing biome-independent corrections provide insight into carbon dynamics in North America. In particular, we analyze hourly CO2 mixing ratio data from a sparse network of eight towers in North America for 2004. A prior estimate of carbon fluxes due to gross primary productivity (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (ER) is constructed from the SiB3 biosphere model on a 40 km grid. A combination of transport from the RAMS and the parameterized chemical transport model (PCTM) models is used to forge a connection between upwind biosphere fluxes and downwind observed CO2 mixing ratio data. A Kalman filter procedure is used to estimate weekly corrections to biosphere fluxes based upon observed CO2. RMSE-weighted annual NEE estimates, over an ensemble of potential inversion parameter sets, show a mean estimate 0.57 Pg/yr sink in North America. We perform the inversion with two independently derived boundary inflow conditions and calculate jackknife-based statistics to test

  10. A regional high-resolution carbon flux inversion of North America for 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuh, A. E.; Denning, A. S.; Corbin, K. D.; Baker, I. T.; Uliasz, M.; Parazoo, N.; Andrews, A. E.; Worthy, D. E. J.

    2010-05-01

    . We perform the inversion with two independently derived boundary inflow conditions and calculate jackknife-based statistics to test the robustness of the model results. We then compare final results to estimates obtained from the CarbonTracker inversion system and at the Southern Great Plains flux site. Results are promising, showing the ability to correct carbon fluxes from the biosphere models over annual and seasonal time scales, as well as over the different GPP and ER components. Additionally, the correlation of an estimated sink of carbon in the South Central United States with regional anomalously high precipitation in an area of managed agricultural and forest lands provides interesting hypotheses for future work.

  11. Observer Performance in the Detection and Classification of Malignant Hepatic Nodules and Masses with CT Image-Space Denoising and Iterative Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lifeng; Li, Zhoubo; Manduca, Armando; Blezek, Daniel J.; Hough, David M.; Venkatesh, Sudhakar K.; Brickner, Gregory C.; Cernigliaro, Joseph C.; Hara, Amy K.; Fidler, Jeff L.; Lake, David S.; Shiung, Maria; Lewis, David; Leng, Shuai; Augustine, Kurt E.; Carter, Rickey E.; Holmes, David R.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine if lower-dose computed tomographic (CT) scans obtained with adaptive image-based noise reduction (adaptive nonlocal means [ANLM]) or iterative reconstruction (sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction [SAFIRE]) result in reduced observer performance in the detection of malignant hepatic nodules and masses compared with routine-dose scans obtained with filtered back projection (FBP). Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board and was compliant with HIPAA. Informed consent was obtained from patients for the retrospective use of medical records for research purposes. CT projection data from 33 abdominal and 27 liver or pancreas CT examinations were collected (median volume CT dose index, 13.8 and 24.0 mGy, respectively). Hepatic malignancy was defined by progression or regression or with histopathologic findings. Lower-dose data were created by using a validated noise insertion method (10.4 mGy for abdominal CT and 14.6 mGy for liver or pancreas CT) and images reconstructed with FBP, ANLM, and SAFIRE. Four readers evaluated routine-dose FBP images and all lower-dose images, circumscribing liver lesions and selecting diagnosis. The jackknife free-response receiver operating characteristic figure of merit (FOM) was calculated on a per–malignant nodule or per-mass basis. Noninferiority was defined by the lower limit of the 95% confidence interval (CI) of the difference between lower-dose and routine-dose FOMs being less than −0.10. Results Twenty-nine patients had 62 malignant hepatic nodules and masses. Estimated FOM differences between lower-dose FBP and lower-dose ANLM versus routine-dose FBP were noninferior (difference: −0.041 [95% CI: −0.090, 0.009] and −0.003 [95% CI: −0.052, 0.047], respectively). In patients with dedicated liver scans, lower-dose ANLM images were noninferior (difference: +0.015 [95% CI: −0.077, 0.106]), whereas lower-dose FBP images were not (difference −0.049 [95% CI:

  12. Detection of prostate cancer by integration of line-scan diffusion, T2-mapping and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging; a multichannel statistical classifier.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ian; Wells, William; Mulkern, Robert V; Haker, Steven; Zhang, Jianqing; Zou, Kelly H; Maier, Stephan E; Tempany, Clare M C

    2003-09-01

    A multichannel statistical classifier for detecting prostate cancer was developed and validated by combining information from three different magnetic resonance (MR) methodologies: T2-weighted, T2-mapping, and line scan diffusion imaging (LSDI). From these MR sequences, four different sets of image intensities were obtained: T2-weighted (T2W) from T2-weighted imaging, Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) from LSDI, and proton density (PD) and T2 (T2 Map) from T2-mapping imaging. Manually segmented tumor labels from a radiologist, which were validated by biopsy results, served as tumor "ground truth." Textural features were extracted from the images using co-occurrence matrix (CM) and discrete cosine transform (DCT). Anatomical location of voxels was described by a cylindrical coordinate system. A statistical jack-knife approach was used to evaluate our classifiers. Single-channel maximum likelihood (ML) classifiers were based on 1 of the 4 basic image intensities. Our multichannel classifiers: support vector machine (SVM) and Fisher linear discriminant (FLD), utilized five different sets of derived features. Each classifier generated a summary statistical map that indicated tumor likelihood in the peripheral zone (PZ) of the prostate gland. To assess classifier accuracy, the average areas under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves over all subjects were compared. Our best FLD classifier achieved an average ROC area of 0.839(+/-0.064), and our best SVM classifier achieved an average ROC area of 0.761(+/-0.043). The T2W ML classifier, our best single-channel classifier, only achieved an average ROC area of 0.599(+/-0.146). Compared to the best single-channel ML classifier, our best multichannel FLD and SVM classifiers have statistically superior ROC performance (P=0.0003 and 0.0017, respectively) from pairwise two-sided t-test. By integrating the information from multiple images and capturing the textural and anatomical features in tumor areas, summary

  13. Reproducibility and optimization of in vivo human diffusion-weighted MRS of the corpus callosum at 3T and 7T

    PubMed Central

    Branzoli, Francesca; Webb, Andrew; Sati, Pascal; Reich, Daniel S.; Ronen, Itamar

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted MRS (DWS) of brain metabolites enables the study of cell-specific alterations in tissue microstructure by probing the diffusion of intracellular metabolites. In particular, the diffusion properties of neuronal N-acetylaspartate (NAA), typically co-measured with N-acetylaspartyl glutamate (NAAG) (NAA + NAAG = tNAA), have been shown to be sensitive to intraneuronal/axonal damage in pathologies such as stroke and multiple sclerosis. Lacking, so far, are empirical assessments of the reproducibility of DWS measures across time and subjects, as well as a systematic investigation of the optimal acquisition parameters for DWS experiments, both of which are sorely needed for clinical applications of the method. In this study, we acquired comprehensive single-volume DWS datasets of the human corpus callosum at 3T and 7T. We investigated the inter- and intra-subject variability of empirical and modeled diffusion properties of tNAA [Davg(tNAA) and Dmodel(tNAA), respectively]. Subsequently, we used a jackknife-like resampling approach to explore the variance of these properties in partial data subsets reflecting different total scan durations. The coefficients of variation (CV) and repeatability coefficients (CR) for Davg(tNAA) and Dmodel(tNAA) were calculated for both 3T and 7T, with overall lower variability in the 7T results. Although this work is limited to the estimation of the diffusion properties in the corpus callosum, we show that a careful choice of diffusion-weighting conditions at both field strengths allows the accurate measurement of tNAA diffusion properties in clinically relevant experimental time. Based on the resampling results, we suggest optimized acquisition schemes of 13-min duration at 3T and 10-min duration at 7T, whilst retaining low variability (CV ≈ 8%) for the tNAA diffusion measures. Power calculations for the estimation of Dmodel(tNAA) and Davg(tNAA) based on the suggested schemes show that less than 21 subjects per group are

  14. Classification of G-protein coupled receptors at four levels.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qing-Bin; Wang, Zheng-Zhi

    2006-11-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are transmembrane proteins which via G-proteins initiate some of the important signaling pathways in a cell and are involved in various physiological processes. Thus, computational prediction and classification of GPCRs can supply significant information for the development of novel drugs in pharmaceutical industry. In this paper, a nearest neighbor method has been introduced to discriminate GPCRs from non-GPCRs and subsequently classify GPCRs at four levels on the basis of amino acid composition and dipeptide composition of proteins. Its performance is evaluated on a non-redundant dataset consisted of 1406 GPCRs for six families and 1406 globular proteins using the jackknife test. The present method based on amino acid composition achieved an overall accuracy of 96.4% and Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.930 for correctly picking out the GPCRs from globular proteins. The overall accuracy and MCC were further enhanced to 99.8% and 0.996 by dipeptide composition-based method. On the other hand, the present method has successfully classified 1406 GPCRs into six families with an overall accuracy of 89.6 and 98.8% using amino acid composition and dipeptide composition, respectively. For the subfamily prediction of 1181 GPCRs of rhodopsin-like family, the present method achieved an overall accuracy of 76.7 and 94.5% based on the amino acid composition and dipeptide composition, respectively. Finally, GPCRs belonging to the amine subfamily and olfactory subfamily of rhodopsin-like family were further analyzed at the type level. The overall accuracy of dipeptide composition-based method for the classification of amine type and olfactory type of GPCRs reached 94.5 and 86.9%, respectively, while the overall accuracy of amino acid composition-based method was very low for both subfamilies. In comparison with existing methods in the literature, the present method also displayed great competitiveness. These results demonstrate

  15. Tests for intact and collapsed magnetofossil chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egli, R.

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, new techniques for the detection of magnetofossils have been proposed, based on their unique first-order reversal curves (FORC) and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) signatures. These signatures are related to the non-interacting (FORC) and strongly uniaxial anisotropy (FMR) of isolated chains of magnetic particles. However, little is known about the fate of these signatures in sediments where magnetosome chains collapsed during early diagenetic processes. Due to the impossibility of observing the particle arrangement in-situ, the structure of collapsed chains can only be inferred from TEM images of magnetic extracts and from first-principles consideration on the mechanical stability of magnetosome chains once the biological material around them is dissolved. The magnetic properties of double chains, produced by some strains of cocci, are also not known. According to these considerations, four main magnetofossil structures were taken into consideration: (1) isolated, linear chains, (2) double, half-staggered chains, where the gaps of one chain face the magnetosomes in the other chain, (3) double chains with side-to-side magnetosomes, which might result from a "jackknife" type of collapse of a single, long chain, and (4) zig-zag collapsed chains of elongated crystals, where the magnetosome long axes are perpendicular to the chain axis. The collapsed structures might be relevant in sediments where magnetofossils carry a significant part of the remanent magnetization, because chain collapse tends to cancel the original natural remanent magnetization. Detailed models for the hysteretic and anhysteretic properties of structures (1-4) have been calculated by taking realistic distributions of magnetosome size, elongation, and spacing into account, as inferred from a number of published TEM observations. Model calculations took a total of >2 years continuous running time on two computers in an effort to obtain realistic results, which are shown here for the

  16. Computer-aided mass detection in mammography: False positive reduction via gray-scale invariant ranklet texture features

    SciTech Connect

    Masotti, Matteo; Lanconelli, Nico; Campanini, Renato

    2009-02-15

    when compared to the previous one. Specifically, at 60%, 65%, and 70% per-mammogram sensitivity, the new CAD system achieves 0.50, 0.68, and 0.92 FP marks per mammogram, whereas at 70%, 75%, and 80% per-case sensitivity it achieves 0.37, 0.48, and 0.71 FP marks per mammogram, respectively. Conversely, at the same sensitivities, the previous CAD system reached 0.71, 0.87, and 1.15 FP marks per mammogram, and 0.57, 0.73, and 0.92 FPs per mammogram. Also, statistical significance of the difference between the two per-mammogram and per-case FROC curves is demonstrated by the p-value<0.001 returned by jackknife FROC analysis performed on the two CAD systems.

  17. Detection of B-mode polarization at degree angular scales by BICEP2.

    PubMed

    Ade, P A R; Aikin, R W; Barkats, D; Benton, S J; Bischoff, C A; Bock, J J; Brevik, J A; Buder, I; Bullock, E; Dowell, C D; Duband, L; Filippini, J P; Fliescher, S; Golwala, S R; Halpern, M; Hasselfield, M; Hildebrandt, S R; Hilton, G C; Hristov, V V; Irwin, K D; Karkare, K S; Kaufman, J P; Keating, B G; Kernasovskiy, S A; Kovac, J M; Kuo, C L; Leitch, E M; Lueker, M; Mason, P; Netterfield, C B; Nguyen, H T; O'Brient, R; Ogburn, R W; Orlando, A; Pryke, C; Reintsema, C D; Richter, S; Schwarz, R; Sheehy, C D; Staniszewski, Z K; Sudiwala, R V; Teply, G P; Tolan, J E; Turner, A D; Vieregg, A G; Wong, C L; Yoon, K W

    2014-06-20

    We report results from the BICEP2 experiment, a cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarimeter specifically designed to search for the signal of inflationary gravitational waves in the B-mode power spectrum around ℓ∼80. The telescope comprised a 26 cm aperture all-cold refracting optical system equipped with a focal plane of 512 antenna coupled transition edge sensor 150 GHz bolometers each with temperature sensitivity of ≈300  μK(CMB)√s. BICEP2 observed from the South Pole for three seasons from 2010 to 2012. A low-foreground region of sky with an effective area of 380 square deg was observed to a depth of 87 nK deg in Stokes Q and U. In this paper we describe the observations, data reduction, maps, simulations, and results. We find an excess of B-mode power over the base lensed-ΛCDM expectation in the range 30 < ℓ < 150, inconsistent with the null hypothesis at a significance of >5σ. Through jackknife tests and simulations based on detailed calibration measurements we show that systematic contamination is much smaller than the observed excess. Cross correlating against WMAP 23 GHz maps we find that Galactic synchrotron makes a negligible contribution to the observed signal. We also examine a number of available models of polarized dust emission and find that at their default parameter values they predict power ∼(5-10)× smaller than the observed excess signal (with no significant cross-correlation with our maps). However, these models are not sufficiently constrained by external public data to exclude the possibility of dust emission bright enough to explain the entire excess signal. Cross correlating BICEP2 against 100 GHz maps from the BICEP1 experiment, the excess signal is confirmed with 3σ significance and its spectral index is found to be consistent with that of the CMB, disfavoring dust at 1.7σ. The observed B-mode power spectrum is well fit by a lensed-ΛCDM+tensor theoretical model with tensor-to-scalar ratio r = 0

  18. Landslide triggering-thickness susceptibility, a simple proxy for landslide hazard? A test in the Mili catchment (North-Eastern Sicily, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Luigi; Fubelli, Giandomenico; Amato, Gabriele; Bonasera, Mauro; Mai, Martin

    2016-04-01

    This study implements a landslide triggering-thickness susceptibility approach in order to investigate the landslide scenario in the catchment of Mili, this being located in the north-easternmost sector of Sicily (Italy). From a detailed geomorphological campaign, thicknesses of mobilised materials at the triggering zone of each mass movement were collected and subsequently used as a dependent variable to be analysed in the framework of spatial predictive models. The adopted modelling methodology consisted of a presence-only learning algorithm which differently from classic presence-absence methods does not rely on stable conditions in order to derive functional relationships between dependent and independent variables. The dependent was pre-processed by reclassifying the crown thickness spectrum into a binary condition expressing thick (values equal or greater than 1m) and thin (values less than 1m) landslide crown classes. The explanatory variables were selected to express triggering-thickness dependency at different scales, these being in close proximity to the triggering point through primary and secondary attributes from a 2m-cell side Lidar HRDEM, at a medium scale through vegetation indexes from multispectral satellite images (ASTER) and a coarser scale through a geological, land use and tectonic maps. The choice of a presence-only approach allowed to effectively discriminate between the two types of landslide thicknesses at the triggering zone, producing excellent prediction skills associated with relatively low variances across a set of 50 randomly generated replicates. In addition, the role of each predictor was assessed for the two considered classes as relevant differences arose in terms of their contribution to the final models. In this regard, predictor importance, Jack-knife tests and response curves were used to assess the reliability of the models together with their geomorphological reasonability. This work attempts to capitalize on fieldwork data

  19. Predicting Neuroinflammation in Morphine Tolerance for Tolerance Therapy from Immunostaining Images of Rat Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shinn-Long; Chang, Fang-Lin; Ho, Shinn-Ying; Charoenkwan, Phasit; Wang, Kuan-Wei; Huang, Hui-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Long-term morphine treatment leads to tolerance which attenuates analgesic effect and hampers clinical utilization. Recent studies have sought to reveal the mechanism of opioid receptors and neuroinflammation by observing morphological changes of cells in the rat spinal cord. This work proposes a high-content screening (HCS) based computational method, HCS-Morph, for predicting neuroinflammation in morphine tolerance to facilitate the development of tolerance therapy using immunostaining images for astrocytes, microglia, and neurons in the spinal cord. HCS-Morph first extracts numerous HCS-based features of cellular phenotypes. Next, an inheritable bi-objective genetic algorithm is used to identify a minimal set of features by maximizing the prediction accuracy of neuroinflammation. Finally, a mathematic model using a support vector machine with the identified features is established to predict drug-treated images to assess the effects of tolerance therapy. The dataset consists of 15 saline controls (1 μl/h), 15 morphine-tolerant rats (15 μg/h), and 10 rats receiving a co-infusion of morphine (15 μg/h) and gabapentin (15 μg/h, Sigma). The three individual models of astrocytes, microglia, and neurons for predicting neuroinflammation yielded respective Jackknife test accuracies of 96.67%, 90.00%, and 86.67% on the 30 rats, and respective independent test accuracies of 100%, 90%, and 60% on the 10 co-infused rats. The experimental results suggest that neuroinflammation activity expresses more predominantly in astrocytes and microglia than in neuron cells. The set of features for predicting neuroinflammation from images of astrocytes comprises mean cell intensity, total cell area, and second-order geometric moment (relating to cell distribution), relevant to cell communication, cell extension, and cell migration, respectively. The present investigation provides the first evidence for the role of gabapentin in the attenuation of morphine tolerance from phenotypic

  20. Computer-aided detection of clustered microcalcifications in multiscale bilateral filtering regularized reconstructed digital breast tomosynthesis volume

    PubMed Central

    Samala, Ravi K.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Lu, Yao; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Wei, Jun; Sahiner, Berkman; Helvie, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Develop a computer-aided detection (CADe) system for clustered microcalcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) volume enhanced with multiscale bilateral filtering (MSBF) regularization. Methods: With Institutional Review Board approval and written informed consent, two-view DBT of 154 breasts, of which 116 had biopsy-proven microcalcification (MC) clusters and 38 were free of MCs, was imaged with a General Electric GEN2 prototype DBT system. The DBT volumes were reconstructed with MSBF-regularized simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) that was designed to enhance MCs and reduce background noise while preserving the quality of other tissue structures. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of MCs was further improved with enhancement-modulated calcification response (EMCR) preprocessing, which combined multiscale Hessian response to enhance MCs by shape and bandpass filtering to remove the low-frequency structured background. MC candidates were then located in the EMCR volume using iterative thresholding and segmented by adaptive region growing. Two sets of potential MC objects, cluster centroid objects and MC seed objects, were generated and the CNR of each object was calculated. The number of candidates in each set was controlled based on the breast volume. Dynamic clustering around the centroid objects grouped the MC candidates to form clusters. Adaptive criteria were designed to reduce false positive (FP) clusters based on the size, CNR values and the number of MCs in the cluster, cluster shape, and cluster based maximum intensity projection. Free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) and jackknife alternative FROC (JAFROC) analyses were used to assess the performance and compare with that of a previous study. Results: Unpaired two-tailed t-test showed a significant increase (p < 0.0001) in the ratio of CNRs for MCs with and without MSBF regularization compared to similar ratios for FPs. For view-based detection, a

  1. Frequency-dependent Lg Q within the continental United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erickson, D.; McNamara, D.E.; Benz, H.M.

    2004-01-01

    Frequency-dependent crustal attenuation (1/Q) is determined for seven distinct physiographic/tectonic regions of the continental United States using high-quality Lg waveforms recorded on broadband stations in the frequency band 0.5 to 16 Hz. Lg attenuation is determined from time-domain amplitude measurements in one-octave frequency bands centered on the frequencies 0.75, 1.0, 3.0, 6.0, and 12.0 Hz. Modeling errors are determined using a delete-j jackknife resampling technique. The frequency-dependent quality factor is modeled in the form of Q = Q0 fη. Regions were initially selected based on tectonic provinces but were eventually limited and adjusted to maximize ray path coverage in each area. Earthquake data was recorded on several different networks and constrained to events occurring within the crust (<40 km depth) and at least mb 3.5 in size. A singular value decomposition inversion technique was applied to the data to simultaneously solve for source and receiver terms along with Q for each region at specific frequencies. The lowest crustal Q was observed in northern and southern California where Q is described by the functions Q = 152(±37)f0.72(±0.16) and Q = 105(±26)f0.67(±0.16), respectively. The Basin and Range Province, Pacific Northwest, and Rocky Mountain states also display lower Q and a strong frequency dependence characterized by the functions Q = 200(±40)f0.68(±0.12), Q = 152(±49)f0.76(±0.18), and Q = 166(±37)f0.61(±0.14), respectively. In contrast, in the central and northeast United States Q functions are Q = 640(±225)f0.344(±0.22) and Q = 650(±143)f0.36(±0.14), respectively, show a high crustal Q and a weaker frequency dependence. These results improve upon previous Lg modeling by subdividing the United States into smaller, distinct tectonic regions and using significantly more data that provide improved constraints on frequency-dependent attenuation and errors. A detailed attenuation map of the continental United States can

  2. The relative roles of types of extracurricular activity on smoking and drinking initiation among tweens

    PubMed Central

    Adachi-Mejia, Anna M.; Gibson Chambers, Jennifer J.; Li, Zhigang; Sargent, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Youth involvement in extracurricular activities may help prevent smoking and drinking initiation. However, the relative roles of types of extracurricular activity on these risks are unclear. Therefore, we examined the association between substance use and participation in team sports with a coach, other sports without a coach, music, school clubs, and other clubs in a nationally representative sample of US tweens. Methods We conducted telephone surveys with 6,522 U.S. students (ages 10-14) in 2003. We asked participants if they had ever tried smoking or drinking and about their participation in extracurricular activities. We used sample weighting to produce response estimates that were representative of the population of adolescents aged 10-14 years at the time of data collection. Logistic regression models that adjusted for appropriate sampling weights using Jackknife variance estimation tested associations with trying smoking and drinking, controlling for sociodemographics, child and parent characteristics, friend/sibling/parent substance use, and media use. Results A little over half of the students reported participating in team sports with a coach (55.5%) and without a coach (55.4%) a few times per week or more. Most had minimal to no participation in school clubs (74.2%), however most reported being involved in other clubs (85.8%). A little less than half participated in music, choir, dance, and/or band lessons. Over half of participants involved in religious activity did those activities a few times per week or more. In the multiple regression analysis, team sport participation with a coach was the only extracurricular activity associated with lower risk of trying smoking (adjusted OR = 0.68, 95% C.I. 0.49, 0.96) compared to none or minimal participation. Participating in other clubs was the only extracurricular activity associated with lower risk of trying drinking (adjusted OR = 0.56, 95% C.I. 0.32, 0.99) compared to none or minimal participation

  3. PRIMUS: Galaxy clustering as a function of luminosity and color at 0.2 < z < 1

    SciTech Connect

    Skibba, Ramin A.; Smith, M. Stephen M.; Coil, Alison L.; Mendez, Alexander J.; Moustakas, John; Aird, James; Blanton, Michael R.; Bray, Aaron D.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Cool, Richard J.; Wong, Kenneth C.; Zhu, Guangtun

    2014-04-01

    We present measurements of the luminosity and color-dependence of galaxy clustering at 0.2 < z < 1.0 in the Prism Multi-object Survey. We quantify the clustering with the redshift-space and projected two-point correlation functions, ξ(r{sub p} , π) and w{sub p} (r{sub p} ), using volume-limited samples constructed from a parent sample of over ∼130, 000 galaxies with robust redshifts in seven independent fields covering 9 deg{sup 2} of sky. We quantify how the scale-dependent clustering amplitude increases with increasing luminosity and redder color, with relatively small errors over large volumes. We find that red galaxies have stronger small-scale (0.1 Mpc h {sup –1} < r{sub p} < 1 Mpc h {sup –1}) clustering and steeper correlation functions compared to blue galaxies, as well as a strong color dependent clustering within the red sequence alone. We interpret our measured clustering trends in terms of galaxy bias and obtain values of b {sub gal} ≈ 0.9-2.5, quantifying how galaxies are biased tracers of dark matter depending on their luminosity and color. We also interpret the color dependence with mock catalogs, and find that the clustering of blue galaxies is nearly constant with color, while redder galaxies have stronger clustering in the one-halo term due to a higher satellite galaxy fraction. In addition, we measure the evolution of the clustering strength and bias, and we do not detect statistically significant departures from passive evolution. We argue that the luminosity- and color-environment (or halo mass) relations of galaxies have not significantly evolved since z ∼ 1. Finally, using jackknife subsampling methods, we find that sampling fluctuations are important and that the COSMOS field is generally an outlier, due to having more overdense structures than other fields; we find that 'cosmic variance' can be a significant source of uncertainty for high-redshift clustering measurements.

  4. Evaluation of clinical image processing algorithms used in digital mammography.

    PubMed

    Zanca, Federica; Jacobs, Jurgen; Van Ongeval, Chantal; Claus, Filip; Celis, Valerie; Geniets, Catherine; Provost, Veerle; Pauwels, Herman; Marchal, Guy; Bosmans, Hilde

    2009-03-01

    Screening is the only proven approach to reduce the mortality of breast cancer, but significant numbers of breast cancers remain undetected even when all quality assurance guidelines are implemented. With the increasing adoption of digital mammography systems, image processing may be a key factor in the imaging chain. Although to our knowledge statistically significant effects of manufacturer-recommended image processings have not been previously demonstrated, the subjective experience of our radiologists, that the apparent image quality can vary considerably between different algorithms, motivated this study. This article addresses the impact of five such algorithms on the detection of clusters of microcalcifications. A database of unprocessed (raw) images of 200 normal digital mammograms, acquired with the Siemens Novation DR, was collected retrospectively. Realistic simulated microcalcification clusters were inserted in half of the unprocessed images. All unprocessed images were subsequently processed with five manufacturer-recommended image processing algorithms (Agfa Musica 1, IMS Raffaello Mammo 1.2, Sectra Mamea AB Sigmoid, Siemens OPVIEW v2, and Siemens OPVIEW v1). Four breast imaging radiologists were asked to locate and score the clusters in each image on a five point rating scale. The free-response data were analyzed by the jackknife free-response receiver operating characteristic (JAFROC) method and, for comparison, also with the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) method. JAFROC analysis revealed highly significant differences between the image processings (F = 8.51, p < 0.0001), suggesting that image processing strongly impacts the detectability of clusters. Siemens OPVIEW2 and Siemens OPVIEW1 yielded the highest and lowest performances, respectively. ROC analysis of the data also revealed significant differences between the processing but at lower significance (F = 3.47, p = 0.0305) than JAFROC. Both statistical analysis methods revealed that the

  5. BLAST: CORRELATIONS IN THE COSMIC FAR-INFRARED BACKGROUND AT 250, 350, AND 500 mum REVEAL CLUSTERING OF STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Viero, Marco P.; Martin, Peter G.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Mauskopf, Philip; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Pascale, Enzo; Bock, James J.; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen; Devlin, Mark J.; Klein, Jeff; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Hughes, David H.; MacTavish, Carrie J.; Negrello, Mattia; Olmi, Luca

    2009-12-20

    We detect correlations in the cosmic far-infrared background due to the clustering of star-forming galaxies in observations made with the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope, at 250, 350, and 500 mum. We perform jackknife and other tests to confirm the reality of the signal. The measured correlations are well fitted by a power law over scales of 5'-25', with DELTAI/I = 15.1% +- 1.7%. We adopt a specific model for submillimeter sources in which the contribution to clustering comes from sources in the redshift ranges 1.3 <= z <= 2.2, 1.5 <= z <= 2.7, and 1.7 <= z <= 3.2, at 250, 350, and 500 mum, respectively. With these distributions, our measurement of the power spectrum, P(k{sub t}heta), corresponds to linear bias parameters, b = 3.8 +- 0.6, 3.9 +- 0.6, and 4.4 +- 0.7, respectively. We further interpret the results in terms of the halo model, and find that at the smaller scales, the simplest halo model fails to fit our results. One way to improve the fit is to increase the radius at which dark matter halos are artificially truncated in the model, which is equivalent to having some star-forming galaxies at z >= 1 located in the outskirts of groups and clusters. In the context of this model, we find a minimum halo mass required to host a galaxy is log(M{sub min}/M{sub sun}) = 11.5{sup +0.4}{sub -0.1}, and we derive effective biases b{sub eff} = 2.2 +- 0.2, 2.4 +- 0.2, and 2.6 +- 0.2, and effective masses log(M{sub eff}/M{sub odot})=12.9+-0.3, 12.8 +- 0.2, and 12.7 +- 0.2, at 250, 350 and 500 mum, corresponding to spatial correlation lengths of r{sub 0} = 4.9, 5.0, and 5.2+-0.7 h{sup -1}Mpc, respectively. Finally, we discuss implications for clustering measurement strategies with Herschel and Planck.

  6. Prices, infrastructure, household characteristics and child height.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D; Strauss, J

    1992-10-01

    A Brazilian household survey, ENDEF, in 1974-75 and the 1974 Informacoes Basicas Municipais (IBM) provided data for the analysis of the impact of community services and infrastructure and household characteristics on the logarithm of child height, standardized for age and gender. The sample was comprised of 36,974 children stratified by residential location, the child's age, and the educational level of the mother. Variance and covariance matrices were estimated with the jackknife developed by Efron (1982). Household characteristics included the logarithm of per capita expenditure as a measure of household resource availability, income, and parental education. Community characteristics were local market price indices for 6 food groups (dairy products, beans, cereals, meat, fish, and sugar), level of urbanization, buildings with sewage, water, and electricity connections per capita, per capita number of buildings, and population density. Health services were measured as per capita number of hospitals and clinics and doctors and nurses, and the number of beds are hospital. Educational services include a measure of student teacher ratios, elementary school class size, and per capita number of teachers living in the community. the results show that expenditure had a positive, significant effect on the height of children 2 years and older. Expenditure was a significant determinant for literate and illiterate mothers, and not well educated mothers. The impact of maternal education was largest on the length of babies and declined with the age of the child. Father's education had not impact of length of babies. The effect of parents' education was complementary. The effect of father's education was largest when mothers had some education. Better educated parents had healthier children. Maternal rather than paternal height had an impact of the length of a baby. In the community models, prices had a significant effect on child height, in both urban and rural areas, in all

  7. Tumor classification using phylogenetic methods on expression data.

    PubMed

    Desper, Richard; Khan, Javed; Schäffer, Alejandro A

    2004-06-21

    Tumor classification is a well-studied problem in the field of bioinformatics. Developments in the field of DNA chip design have now made it possible to measure the expression levels of thousands of genes in sample tissue from healthy cell lines or tumors. A number of studies have examined the problems of tumor classification: class discovery, the problem of defining a number of classes of tumors using the data from a DNA chip, and class prediction, the problem of accurately classifying an unknown tumor, given expression data from the unknown tumor and from a learning set. The current work has applied phylogenetic methods to both problems. To solve the class discovery problem, we impose a metric on a set of tumors as a function of their gene expression levels, and impose a tree structure on this metric, using standard tree fitting methods borrowed from the field of phylogenetics. Phylogenetic methods provide a simple way of imposing a clear hierarchical relationship on the data, with branch lengths in the classification tree representing the degree of separation witnessed. We tested our method for class discovery on two data sets: a data set of 87 tissues, comprised mostly of small, round, blue-cell tumors (SRBCTs), and a data set of 22 breast tumors. We fit the 87 samples of the first set to a classification tree, which neatly separated into four major clusters corresponding exactly to the four groups of tumors, namely neuroblastomas, rhabdomyosarcomas, Burkitt's lymphomas, and the Ewing's family of tumors. The classification tree built using the breast cancer data separated tumors with BRCA1 mutations from those with BRCA2 mutations, with sporadic tumors separated from both groups and from each other. We also demonstrate the flexibility of the class discovery method with regard to standard resampling methodology such as jackknifing and noise perturbation. To solve the class prediction problem, we built a classification tree on the learning set, and then sought

  8. Spatial Distribution of Sand Fly Vectors and Eco-Epidemiology of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Transmission in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Ferro, Cristina; López, Marla; Fuya, Patricia; Lugo, Ligia; Cordovez, Juan Manuel; González, Camila

    2015-01-01

    Background Leishmania is transmitted by Phlebotominae insects that maintain the enzootic cycle by circulating between sylvatic and domestic mammals; humans enter the cycles as accidental hosts due to the vector’s search for blood source. In Colombia, leishmaniasis is an endemic disease and 95% of all cases are cutaneous (CL), these cases have been reported in several regions of the country where the intervention of sylvatic areas by the introduction of agriculture seem to have an impact on the rearrangement of new transmission cycles. Our study aimed to update vector species distribution in the country and to analyze the relationship between vectors’ distribution, climate, land use and CL prevalence. Methods A database with geographic information was assembled, and ecological niche modeling was performed to explore the potential distribution of each of the 21 species of medical importance in Colombia, using thirteen bioclimatic variables, three topographic and three principal components derived from NDVI. Binary models for each species were obtained and related to both land use coverage, and a CL prevalence map with available epidemiological data. Finally, maps of species potential distribution were summed to define potential species richness in the country. Results In total, 673 single records were obtained with Lutzomyia gomezi, Lutzomyia longipalpis, Psychodopygus panamensis, Psathyromyia shannoni and Pintomyia evansi the species with the highest number of records. Eighteen species had significant models, considering the area under the curve and the jackknife results: L. gomezi and P. panamensis had the widest potential distribution. All sand fly species except for Nyssomyia antunesi are mainly distributed in regions with rates of prevalence between 0.33 to 101.35 cases per 100,000 inhabitants and 76% of collection data points fall into transformed ecosystems. Discussion Distribution ranges of sand flies with medical importance in Colombia correspond

  9. Modelling and mapping the local distribution of representative species on the Le Danois Bank, El Cachucho Marine Protected Area (Cantabrian Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Alegre, Ana; Sánchez, Francisco; Gómez-Ballesteros, María; Hinz, Hilmar; Serrano, Alberto; Parra, Santiago

    2014-08-01

    The management and protection of potentially vulnerable species and habitats require the availability of detailed spatial data. However, such data are often not readily available in particular areas that are challenging for sampling by traditional sampling techniques, for example seamounts. Within this study habitat modelling techniques were used to create predictive maps of six species of conservation concern for the Le Danois Bank (El Cachucho Marine Protected Area in the South of the Bay of Biscay). The study used data from ECOMARG multidisciplinary surveys that aimed to create a representative picture of the physical and biological composition of the area. Classical fishing gear (otter trawl and beam trawl) was used to sample benthic communities that inhabit sedimentary areas, and non-destructive visual sampling techniques (ROV and photogrammetric sled) were used to determine the presence of epibenthic macrofauna in complex and vulnerable habitats. Multibeam echosounder data, high-resolution seismic profiles (TOPAS system) and geological data from box-corer were used to characterize the benthic terrain. ArcGIS software was used to produce high-resolution maps (75×75 m2) of such variables in the entire area. The Maximum Entropy (MAXENT) technique was used to process these data and create Habitat Suitability maps for six species of special conservation interest. The model used seven environmental variables (depth, rugosity, aspect, slope, Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) in fine and broad scale and morphosedimentary characteristics) to identify the most suitable habitats for such species and indicates which environmental factors determine their distribution. The six species models performed highly significantly better than random (p<0.0001; Mann-Whitney test) when Area Under the Curve (AUC) values were tested. This indicates that the environmental variables chosen are relevant to distinguish the distribution of these species. The Jackknife test estimated depth

  10. Are the orbital poles of binary stars in the solar neighbourhood anisotropically distributed?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agati, J.-L.; Bonneau, D.; Jorissen, A.; Soulié, E.; Udry, S.; Verhas, P.; Dommanget, J.

    2015-02-01

    We test whether or not the orbital poles of the systems in the solar neighbourhood are isotropically distributed on the celestial sphere. The problem is plagued by the ambiguity on the position of the ascending node. Of the 95 systems closer than 18 pc from the Sun with an orbit in the 6th Catalogue of Orbits of Visual Binaries, the pole ambiguity could be resolved for 51 systems using radial velocity collected in the literature and CORAVEL database or acquired with the HERMES/Mercator spectrograph. For several systems, we can correct the erroneous nodes in the 6th Catalogue of Orbits and obtain new combined spectroscopic/astrometric orbits for seven systems [WDS 01083+5455Aa,Ab; 01418+4237AB; 02278+0426AB (SB2); 09006+4147AB (SB2); 16413+3136AB; 17121+4540AB; 18070+3034AB]. We used of spherical statistics to test for possible anisotropy. After ordering the binary systems by increasing distance from the Sun, we computed the false-alarm probability for subsamples of increasing sizes, from N = 1 up to the full sample of 51 systems. Rayleigh-Watson and Beran tests deliver a false-alarm probability of 0.5% for the 20 systems closer than 8.1 pc. To evaluate the robustness of this conclusion, we used a jackknife approach, for which we repeated this procedure after removing one system at a time from the full sample. The false-alarm probability was then found to vary between 1.5% and 0.1%, depending on which system is removed. The reality of the deviation from isotropy can thus not be assessed with certainty at this stage, because only so few systems are available, despite our efforts to increase the sample. However, when considering the full sample of 51 systems, the concentration of poles toward the Galactic position l = 46.0°, b = 37°, as observed in the 8.1 pc sphere, totally vanishes (the Rayleigh-Watson false-alarm probability then rises to 18%). Tables 1-3 and Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org† Deceased October 1, 2014.

  11. Revised and annotated checklist of aquatic and semi-aquatic Heteroptera of Hungary with comments on biodiversity patterns.

    PubMed

    Boda, Pál; Bozóki, Tamás; Vásárhelyi, Tamás; Bakonyi, Gábor; Várbíró, Gábor

    2015-01-01

    A basic knowledge of regional faunas is necessary to follow the changes in macroinvertebrate communities caused by environmental influences and climatic trends in the future. We collected all the available data on water bugs in Hungary using an inventory method, a UTM grid based database was built, and Jackknife richness estimates and species accumulation curves were calculated. Fauna compositions were compared among Central-European states. As a result, an updated and annotated checklist for Hungary is provided, containing 58 species in 21 genera and 12 families. A total 66.8% of the total UTM 10 × 10 km squares in Hungary possess faunistic data for water bugs. The species number in grid cells numbered from 0 to 42, and their diversity patterns showed heterogeneity. The estimated species number of 58 is equal to the actual number of species known from the country. The asymptotic shape of the accumulative species curve predicts that additional sampling efforts will not increase the number of species currently known from Hungary. These results suggest that the number of species in the country was estimated correctly and that the species accumulation curve levels off at an asymptotic value. Thus a considerable increase in species richness is not expected in the future. Even with the species composition changing the chance of species turn-over does exist. Overall, 36.7% of the European water bug species were found in Hungary. The differences in faunal composition between Hungary and its surrounding countries were caused by the rare or unique species, whereas 33 species are common in the faunas of the eight countries. Species richness does show a correlation with latitude, and similar species compositions were observed in the countries along the same latitude. The species list and the UTM-based database are now up-to-date for Hungary, and it will provide a basis for future studies of distributional and biodiversity patterns, biogeography, relative abundance and

  12. Warfarin Anticoagulant Therapy: A Southern Italy Pharmacogenetics-Based Dosing Model

    PubMed Central

    Mazzaccara, Cristina; Conti, Valeria; Liguori, Rosario; Simeon, Vittorio; Toriello, Mario; Severini, Angelo; Perricone, Corrado; Meccariello, Alfonso; Meccariello, Pasquale; Vitale, Dino Franco; Filippelli, Amelia; Sacchetti, Lucia

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aim Warfarin is the most frequently prescribed anticoagulant worldwide. However, warfarin therapy is associated with a high risk of bleeding and thromboembolic events because of a large interindividual dose-response variability. We investigated the effect of genetic and non genetic factors on warfarin dosage in a South Italian population in the attempt to setup an algorithm easily applicable in the clinical practice. Materials and Methods A total of 266 patients from Southern Italy affected by cardiovascular diseases were enrolled and their clinical and anamnestic data recorded. All patients were genotyped for CYP2C9*2,*3, CYP4F2*3, VKORC1 -1639 G>A by the TaqMan assay and for variants VKORC1 1173 C>T and VKORC1 3730 G>A by denaturing high performance liquid chromatography and direct sequencing. The effect of genetic and not genetic factors on warfarin dose variability was tested by multiple linear regression analysis, and an algorithm based on our data was established and then validated by the Jackknife procedure. Results Warfarin dose variability was influenced, in decreasing order, by VKORC1-1639 G>A (29.7%), CYP2C9*3 (11.8%), age (8.5%), CYP2C9*2 (3.5%), gender (2.0%) and lastly CYP4F2*3 (1.7%); VKORC1 1173 C>T and VKORC1 3730 G>A exerted a slight effect (<1% each). Taken together, these factors accounted for 58.4% of the warfarin dose variability in our population. Data obtained with our algorithm significantly correlated with those predicted by the two online algorithms: Warfarin dosing and Pharmgkb (p<0.001; R2 = 0.805 and p<0.001; R2 = 0.773, respectively). Conclusions Our algorithm, which is based on six polymorphisms, age and gender, is user-friendly and its application in clinical practice could improve the personalized management of patients undergoing warfarin therapy. PMID:23990957

  13. Subspace Dimensionality: A Tool for Automated QC in Seismic Array Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, C. A.; Stead, R. J.; Begnaud, M. L.

    2013-12-01

    identifying bad array elements through a jackknifing process to isolate the anomalous channels, so that an automated analysis system might discard them prior to FK analysis and beamforming on events of interest.

  14. Diagnosing Lung Nodules on Oncologic MR/PET Imaging: Comparison of Fast T1-Weighted Sequences and Influence of Image Acquisition in Inspiration and Expiration Breath-Hold

    PubMed Central

    Schwenzer, Nina F.; Seith, Ferdinand; Gatidis, Sergios; Brendle, Cornelia; Schmidt, Holger; Pfannenberg, Christina A.; laFougère, Christian; Nikolaou, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    Objective First, to investigate the diagnostic performance of fast T1-weighted sequences for lung nodule evaluation in oncologic magnetic resonance (MR)/positron emission tomography (PET). Second, to evaluate the influence of image acquisition in inspiration and expiration breath-hold on diagnostic performance. Materials and Methods The study was approved by the local Institutional Review Board. PET/CT and MR/PET of 44 cancer patients were evaluated by 2 readers. PET/CT included lung computed tomography (CT) scans in inspiration and expiration (CTin, CTex). MR/PET included Dixon sequence for attenuation correction and fast T1-weighted volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) sequences (volume interpolated breath-hold examination acquired in inspiration [VIBEin], volume interpolated breath-hold examination acquired in expiration [VIBEex]). Diagnostic performance was analyzed for lesion-, lobe-, and size-dependence. Diagnostic confidence was evaluated (4-point Likert-scale; 1 = high). Jackknife alternative free-response receiver-operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis was performed. Results Seventy-six pulmonary lesions were evaluated. Lesion-based detection rates were: CTex, 77.6%; VIBEin, 53.3%; VIBEex, 51.3%; and Dixon, 22.4%. Lobe-based detection rates were: CTex, 89.6%; VIBEin, 58.3%; VIBEex, 60.4%; and Dixon, 31.3%. In contrast to CT, inspiration versus expiration did not alter diagnostic performance in VIBE sequences. Diagnostic confidence was best for VIBEin and CTex and decreased in VIBEex and Dixon (1.2 ± 0.6; 1.2 ± 0.7; 1.5 ± 0.9; 1.7 ± 1.1, respectively). The JAFROC figure-of-merit of Dixon was significantly lower. All patients with malignant lesions were identified by CTex, VIBEin, and VIBEex, while 3 patients were false-negative in Dixon. Conclusion Fast T1-weighted VIBE sequences allow for identification of patients with malignant pulmonary lesions. The Dixon sequence is not recommended for lung nodule evaluation in oncologic MR

  15. iCDI-PseFpt: identify the channel-drug interaction in cellular networking with PseAAC and molecular fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xuan; Min, Jian-Liang; Wang, Pu; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2013-11-21

    Many crucial functions in life, such as heartbeat, sensory transduction and central nervous system response, are controlled by cell signalings via various ion channels. Therefore, ion channels have become an excellent drug target, and study of ion channel-drug interaction networks is an important topic for drug development. However, it is both time-consuming and costly to determine whether a drug and a protein ion channel are interacting with each other in a cellular network by means of experimental techniques. Although some computational methods were developed in this regard based on the knowledge of the 3D (three-dimensional) structure of protein, unfortunately their usage is quite limited because the 3D structures for most protein ion channels are still unknown. With the avalanche of protein sequences generated in the post-genomic age, it is highly desirable to develop the sequence-based computational method to address this problem. To take up the challenge, we developed a new predictor called iCDI-PseFpt, in which the protein ion-channel sample is formulated by the PseAAC (pseudo amino acid composition) generated with the gray model theory, the drug compound by the 2D molecular fingerprint, and the operation engine is the fuzzy K-nearest neighbor algorithm. The overall success rate achieved by iCDI-PseFpt via the jackknife cross-validation was 87.27%, which is remarkably higher than that by any of the existing predictors in this area. As a user-friendly web-server, iCDI-PseFpt is freely accessible to the public at the website http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iCDI-PseFpt/. Furthermore, for the convenience of most experimental scientists, a step-by-step guide is provided on how to use the web-server to get the desired results without the need to follow the complicated math equations presented in the paper just for its integrity. It has not escaped our notice that the current approach can also be used to study other drug-target interaction networks.

  16. A Designed Experiments Approach to Optimizing MALDI-TOF MS Spectrum Processing Parameters Enhances Detection of Antibiotic Resistance in Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Penny, Christian; Grothendick, Beau; Zhang, Lin; Borror, Connie M; Barbano, Duane; Cornelius, Angela J; Gilpin, Brent J; Fagerquist, Clifton K; Zaragoza, William J; Jay-Russell, Michele T; Lastovica, Albert J; Ragimbeau, Catherine; Cauchie, Henry-Michel; Sandrin, Todd R

    2016-01-01

    MALDI-TOF MS has been utilized as a reliable and rapid tool for microbial fingerprinting at the genus and species levels. Recently, there has been keen interest in using MALDI-TOF MS beyond the genus and species levels to rapidly identify antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria. The purpose of this study was to enhance strain level resolution for Campylobacter jejuni through the optimization of spectrum processing parameters using a series of designed experiments. A collection of 172 strains of C. jejuni were collected from Luxembourg, New Zealand, North America, and South Africa, consisting of four groups of antibiotic resistant isolates. The groups included: (1) 65 strains resistant to cefoperazone (2) 26 resistant to cefoperazone and beta-lactams (3) 5 strains resistant to cefoperazone, beta-lactams, and tetracycline, and (4) 76 strains resistant to cefoperazone, teicoplanin, amphotericin, B and cephalothin. Initially, a model set of 16 strains (three biological replicates and three technical replicates per isolate, yielding a total of 144 spectra) of C. jejuni was subjected to each designed experiment to enhance detection of antibiotic resistance. The most optimal parameters were applied to the larger collection of 172 isolates (two biological replicates and three technical replicates per isolate, yielding a total of 1,031 spectra). We observed an increase in antibiotic resistance detection whenever either a curve based similarity coefficient (Pearson or ranked Pearson) was applied rather than a peak based (Dice) and/or the optimized preprocessing parameters were applied. Increases in antimicrobial resistance detection were scored using the jackknife maximum similarity technique following cluster analysis. From the first four groups of antibiotic resistant isolates, the optimized preprocessing parameters increased detection respective to the aforementioned groups by: (1) 5% (2) 9% (3) 10%, and (4) 2%. An additional second categorization was created from the

  17. NR-2L: a two-level predictor for identifying nuclear receptor subfamilies based on sequence-derived features.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pu; Xiao, Xuan; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are one of the most abundant classes of transcriptional regulators in animals. They regulate diverse functions, such as homeostasis, reproduction, development and metabolism. Therefore, NRs are a very important target for drug development. Nuclear receptors form a superfamily of phylogenetically related proteins and have been subdivided into different subfamilies due to their domain diversity. In this study, a two-level predictor, called NR-2L, was developed that can be used to identify a query protein as a nuclear receptor or not based on its sequence information alone; if it is, the prediction will be automatically continued to further identify it among the following seven subfamilies: (1) thyroid hormone like (NR1), (2) HNF4-like (NR2), (3) estrogen like, (4) nerve growth factor IB-like (NR4), (5) fushi tarazu-F1 like (NR5), (6) germ cell nuclear factor like (NR6), and (7) knirps like (NR0). The identification was made by the Fuzzy K nearest neighbor (FK-NN) classifier based on the pseudo amino acid composition formed by incorporating various physicochemical and statistical features derived from the protein sequences, such as amino acid composition, dipeptide composition, complexity factor, and low-frequency Fourier spectrum components. As a demonstration, it was shown through some benchmark datasets derived from the NucleaRDB and UniProt with low redundancy that the overall success rates achieved by the jackknife test were about 93% and 89% in the first and second level, respectively. The high success rates indicate that the novel two-level predictor can be a useful vehicle for identifying NRs and their subfamilies. As a user-friendly web server, NR-2L is freely accessible at either http://icpr.jci.edu.cn/bioinfo/NR2L or http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/NR2L. Each job submitted to NR-2L can contain up to 500 query protein sequences and be finished in less than 2 minutes. The less the number of query proteins is, the shorter the time will

  18. Digital Mapping of Soil Salinity and Crop Yield across a Coastal Agricultural Landscape Using Repeated Electromagnetic Induction (EMI) Surveys.

    PubMed

    Yao, Rongjiang; Yang, Jingsong; Wu, Danhua; Xie, Wenping; Gao, Peng; Jin, Wenhui

    2016-01-01

    Reliable and real-time information on soil and crop properties is important for the development of management practices in accordance with the requirements of a specific soil and crop within individual field units. This is particularly the case in salt-affected agricultural landscape where managing the spatial variability of soil salinity is essential to minimize salinization and maximize crop output. The primary objectives were to use linear mixed-effects model for soil salinity and crop yield calibration with horizontal and vertical electromagnetic induction (EMI) measurements as ancillary data, to characterize the spatial distribution of soil salinity and crop yield and to verify the accuracy of spatial estimation. Horizontal and vertical EMI (type EM38) measurements at 252 locations were made during each survey, and root zone soil samples and crop samples at 64 sampling sites were collected. This work was periodically conducted on eight dates from June 2012 to May 2013 in a coastal salt-affected mud farmland. Multiple linear regression (MLR) and restricted maximum likelihood (REML) were applied to calibrate root zone soil salinity (ECe) and crop annual output (CAO) using ancillary data, and spatial distribution of soil ECe and CAO was generated using digital soil mapping (DSM) and the precision of spatial estimation was examined using the collected meteorological and groundwater data. Results indicated that a reduced model with EMh as a predictor was satisfactory for root zone ECe calibration, whereas a full model with both EMh and EMv as predictors met the requirement of CAO calibration. The obtained distribution maps of ECe showed consistency with those of EMI measurements at the corresponding time, and the spatial distribution of CAO generated from ancillary data showed agreement with that derived from raw crop data. Statistics of jackknifing procedure confirmed that the spatial estimation of ECe and CAO exhibited reliability and high accuracy. A general

  19. Computer-aided detection of clustered microcalcifications in multiscale bilateral filtering regularized reconstructed digital breast tomosynthesis volume

    SciTech Connect

    Samala, Ravi K. Chan, Heang-Ping; Lu, Yao; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Wei, Jun; Helvie, Mark A.; Sahiner, Berkman

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Develop a computer-aided detection (CADe) system for clustered microcalcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) volume enhanced with multiscale bilateral filtering (MSBF) regularization. Methods: With Institutional Review Board approval and written informed consent, two-view DBT of 154 breasts, of which 116 had biopsy-proven microcalcification (MC) clusters and 38 were free of MCs, was imaged with a General Electric GEN2 prototype DBT system. The DBT volumes were reconstructed with MSBF-regularized simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) that was designed to enhance MCs and reduce background noise while preserving the quality of other tissue structures. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of MCs was further improved with enhancement-modulated calcification response (EMCR) preprocessing, which combined multiscale Hessian response to enhance MCs by shape and bandpass filtering to remove the low-frequency structured background. MC candidates were then located in the EMCR volume using iterative thresholding and segmented by adaptive region growing. Two sets of potential MC objects, cluster centroid objects and MC seed objects, were generated and the CNR of each object was calculated. The number of candidates in each set was controlled based on the breast volume. Dynamic clustering around the centroid objects grouped the MC candidates to form clusters. Adaptive criteria were designed to reduce false positive (FP) clusters based on the size, CNR values and the number of MCs in the cluster, cluster shape, and cluster based maximum intensity projection. Free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) and jackknife alternative FROC (JAFROC) analyses were used to assess the performance and compare with that of a previous study. Results: Unpaired two-tailedt-test showed a significant increase (p < 0.0001) in the ratio of CNRs for MCs with and without MSBF regularization compared to similar ratios for FPs. For view-based detection, a

  20. The Bolocam Lockman Hole millimeter-wave galaxy survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, G. T.

    2006-06-01

    This work presents results of a new deep (s 1.1mm ~= 1.4 mJy beam -1 ) 1.1 mm submillimeter galaxy survey using Bolocam, a millimeter-wavelength bolometer array camera designed for mapping large fields at fast scan rates, without chopping. A map, galaxy candidate list, and derived number counts are presented. The data were reduced using a custom software pipeline to remove correlated sky and instrument noise via a principal component analysis. Extensive simulations and jackknife tests were performed to confirm the robustness of our source candidates and estimate the effects of false detections, bias, and completeness. In total, 17 source candidates were detected at a significance > 3.0 s, with six expected false detections. From both our observed number counts and a fluctuation analysis, we estimate the underlying differential number count distribution of submillimeter galaxies and find it to be in general agreement with previous surveys. This work also presents 350 mm photometry of all 17 galaxy candidates detected in the Lockman Hole survey. Nine of the Bolocam galaxy candidates were detected at 350 mm and two new candidates were serendipitously detected at 350 mm (bringing the total in the literature detected in this way to three). Five of the galaxies have published spectroscopic redshifts, enabling investigation of the implied temperature ranges and a comparison of photometric redshift techniques. Because l = 350 mm lies near the spectral energy distribution peak for z [approximate] 2.5 thermally emitting galaxies, luminosities can be measured without extrapolating to the peak from detection wavelengths of l >= 850 mm. Characteristically, the galaxy luminosities lie in the range 1.0--1.2 × 10 13 [Special characters omitted.] , with dust temperatures in the range of 40 K to 70 K, depending on the choice of spectral index and wavelength of unit optical depth. The implied dust masses are 3--5 × 10 8 [Special characters omitted.] . We find that the far

  1. Diagnostic Performance on Low Dose Computed Tomography For Acute Appendicitis Among Attending and Resident Radiologists

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chih-Chen; Wong, Yon-Cheong; Wu, Cheng-Hsien; Chen, Huan-Wu; Wang, Li-Jen; Lee, Yu-Hsien; Wu, Patricia Wanping; Irama, Wiwan; Chen, Wei Yuan; Chang, Chee-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) techniques can reduce exposure to radiation. Several previous studies have shown that radiation dose reduction in LDCT does not decrease the diagnostic performance for appendicitis among attending radiologists. But, the LDCT diagnostic performance for acute appendicitis in radiology residents with variable training levels has not been well discussed. Objectives To compare inter-observer and intra-observer differences of diagnostic performance on non-enhanced LDCT (NE-LDCT) and contrast-enhanced standard dose CT (CE-SDCT) for acute appendicitis among attending and resident radiologists. Patients and Methods This retrospective study included 101 patients with suspected acute appendicitis who underwent NE-LDCT and CE-SDCT. The CT examinations were interpreted and recorded on a five-point scale independently by three attending radiologists and three residents with 4, 1 and 1 years of training. Diagnostic performance for acute appendicitis of all readers on both examinations was represented by area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Inter-observer and intra-observer AUC values were compared using Jackknife FROC software on both modalities. The diagnostic accuracy of each reader on NE-LDCT was compared with body mass index (BMI) subgroups and noise using independent T test. Results Diagnostic performances for acute appendicitis were not statistically different for attending radiologists at both examinations. Better performance was noted on the CE-SDCT with a borderline significant difference (P = 0.05) for senior radiology resident. No statistical difference of AUC values was observed between attending radiologists and fourth year resident on both examinations. Statistically significant differences of AUC values were observed between attending radiologists and first year residents (P = 0.001 ~ 0.018) on NE-LDCT. Diagnostic accuracies of acute appendicitis on NE-LDCT for each reader were not significantly

  2. A Designed Experiments Approach to Optimizing MALDI-TOF MS Spectrum Processing Parameters Enhances Detection of Antibiotic Resistance in Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Penny, Christian; Grothendick, Beau; Zhang, Lin; Borror, Connie M; Barbano, Duane; Cornelius, Angela J; Gilpin, Brent J; Fagerquist, Clifton K; Zaragoza, William J; Jay-Russell, Michele T; Lastovica, Albert J; Ragimbeau, Catherine; Cauchie, Henry-Michel; Sandrin, Todd R

    2016-01-01

    MALDI-TOF MS has been utilized as a reliable and rapid tool for microbial fingerprinting at the genus and species levels. Recently, there has been keen interest in using MALDI-TOF MS beyond the genus and species levels to rapidly identify antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria. The purpose of this study was to enhance strain level resolution for Campylobacter jejuni through the optimization of spectrum processing parameters using a series of designed experiments. A collection of 172 strains of C. jejuni were collected from Luxembourg, New Zealand, North America, and South Africa, consisting of four groups of antibiotic resistant isolates. The groups included: (1) 65 strains resistant to cefoperazone (2) 26 resistant to cefoperazone and beta-lactams (3) 5 strains resistant to cefoperazone, beta-lactams, and tetracycline, and (4) 76 strains resistant to cefoperazone, teicoplanin, amphotericin, B and cephalothin. Initially, a model set of 16 strains (three biological replicates and three technical replicates per isolate, yielding a total of 144 spectra) of C. jejuni was subjected to each designed experiment to enhance detection of antibiotic resistance. The most optimal parameters were applied to the larger collection of 172 isolates (two biological replicates and three technical replicates per isolate, yielding a total of 1,031 spectra). We observed an increase in antibiotic resistance detection whenever either a curve based similarity coefficient (Pearson or ranked Pearson) was applied rather than a peak based (Dice) and/or the optimized preprocessing parameters were applied. Increases in antimicrobial resistance detection were scored using the jackknife maximum similarity technique following cluster analysis. From the first four groups of antibiotic resistant isolates, the optimized preprocessing parameters increased detection respective to the aforementioned groups by: (1) 5% (2) 9% (3) 10%, and (4) 2%. An additional second categorization was created from the

  3. Evaluation of Projection Methods to Predict Wetlands Area Sizes: the Wetlands Inventory of the United States (sample Date Correction, Land Classification)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrazas-Gonzalez, Gerardo H.

    This research concerns different methods that can be applied for projection of wetlands areas at selected times. A method described by Frayer (1987) for a stratified random sampling design. The method was developed by W. E. Frayer in collaboration with D. C. Bowden and can be used in surveys where the sampling units have been measured at two different times, tsb1 and tsb2. A change matrix giving the amount of each wetland type at time tsb1 that is in each of the wetland types at time tsb2 is obtained for each sampling unit. Projections are based on a mean annual stratum matrix of changes. Methods of evaluating the reliability of FBSB projections have not been given previously. One objective of this project is to provide variance estimators for the FBSB projection method using jackknife and bootstrap techniques. Direct analytic techniques appear to require an unrealistic amount of time to develop given the complexity of the estimator. Interest in projections at an arbitrary time led to a more general description of the stratum basis estimator to include t < tsb1 and t between tsb1 and tsb2. Variations in the measurement times tsb1 and tsb2 among sampling units within stratum and other considerations including the complexity of the stratum basis estimator, motivated the use of simpler estimators. Two classes of methods for making projections are given. The first class of estimators are functions of summed estimated change matrices while the second class of estimators are functions of products of normalized estimated change matrices. Estimators within each of the classes are further differentiated by whether the changes matrices are on annual or observed time period (tsb2-tsb1) basis. The projections procedures address two different objectives. One objective is the estimation of the total of wetlands areas at a given time. The other objective is to estimate the amount of change among wetland types between 2 given times. All the methods can be used for both objectives

  4. Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Monitoring with AMSU-A: Estimation of Maximum Sustained Wind Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Roy; Braswell, William D.; Goodman, H. Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The first Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit temperature sounder (AMSU-A) was launched on the NOAA-15 satellite on 13 May 1998. The AMSU-A's higher spatial and radiometric resolutions provide more useful information on the strength of the middle and upper tropospheric warm cores associated with tropical cyclones than have previous microwave temperature sounders. The gradient wind relationship suggests that the temperature gradient near the core of tropical cyclones increases nonlinearly with wind speed. We recast the gradient wind equation to include AMSU-A derived variables. Stepwise regression is used to determine which of these variables is most closely related to maximum sustained winds (V(sub max)). The satellite variables investigated include the radially averaged gradients at two spatial resolutions of AMSU-A channels 1 through 10 T(sub b) data (delta(sub r)T(sub b)), the squares of these gradients, a channel 15 based scattering index (SI-89), and area averaged T(sub b). Calculations of Tb and delta(sub r)T(sub b) from mesoscale model simulations of Andrew reveal the effects of the AMSU spatial sampling on the cyclone warm core presentation. Stepwise regression of 66 AMSU-A terms against National Hurricane Center (NHC) V(sub max) estimates from the 1998 and 1999 Atlantic hurricane season confirms the existence of a nonlinear relationship between wind speed and radially averaged temperature gradients near the cyclone warm core. Of six regression terms, four are dominated by temperature information, and two are interpreted as correcting for hydrometeor contamination. Jackknifed regressions were performed to estimate the algorithm performance on independent data. For the 82 cases that had in situ measurements of V(sub max), the average error standard deviation was 4.7 m/s. For 108 cases without in situ wind data, the average error standard deviation was 7.5 m/s. Operational considerations, including the detection of weak cyclones and false alarm reduction are

  5. A multi-label classifier for predicting the subcellular localization of gram-negative bacterial proteins with both single and multiple sites.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xuan; Wu, Zhi-Cheng; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2011-01-01

    Prediction of protein subcellular localization is a challenging problem, particularly when the system concerned contains both singleplex and multiplex proteins. In this paper, by introducing the "multi-label scale" and hybridizing the information of gene ontology with the sequential evolution information, a novel predictor called iLoc-Gneg is developed for predicting the subcellular localization of gram-positive bacterial proteins with both single-location and multiple-location sites. For facilitating comparison, the same stringent benchmark dataset used to estimate the accuracy of Gneg-mPLoc was adopted to demonstrate the power of iLoc-Gneg. The dataset contains 1,392 gram-negative bacterial proteins classified into the following eight locations: (1) cytoplasm, (2) extracellular, (3) fimbrium, (4) flagellum, (5) inner membrane, (6) nucleoid, (7) outer membrane, and (8) periplasm. Of the 1,392 proteins, 1,328 are each with only one subcellular location and the other 64 are each with two subcellular locations, but none of the proteins included has pairwise sequence identity to any other in a same subset (subcellular location). It was observed that the overall success rate by jackknife test on such a stringent benchmark dataset by iLoc-Gneg was over 91%, which is about 6% higher than that by Gneg-mPLoc. As a user-friendly web-server, iLoc-Gneg is freely accessible to the public at http://icpr.jci.edu.cn/bioinfo/iLoc-Gneg. Meanwhile, a step-by-step guide is provided on how to use the web-server to get the desired results. Furthermore, for the user's convenience, the iLoc-Gneg web-server also has the function to accept the batch job submission, which is not available in the existing version of Gneg-mPLoc web-server. It is anticipated that iLoc-Gneg may become a useful high throughput tool for Molecular Cell Biology, Proteomics, System Biology, and Drug Development.

  6. iRSpot-PseDNC: identify recombination spots with pseudo dinucleotide composition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Feng, Peng-Mian; Lin, Hao; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2013-04-01

    Meiotic recombination is an important biological process. As a main driving force of evolution, recombination provides natural new combinations of genetic variations. Rather than randomly occurring across a genome, meiotic recombination takes place in some genomic regions (the so-called 'hotspots') with higher frequencies, and in the other regions (the so-called 'coldspots') with lower frequencies. Therefore, the information of the hotspots and coldspots would provide useful insights for in-depth studying of the mechanism of recombination and the genome evolution process as well. So far, the recombination regions have been mainly determined by experiments, which are both expensive and time-consuming. With the avalanche of genome sequences generated in the postgenomic age, it is highly desired to develop automated methods for rapidly and effectively identifying the recombination regions. In this study, a predictor, called 'iRSpot-PseDNC', was developed for identifying the recombination hotspots and coldspots. In the new predictor, the samples of DNA sequences are formulated by a novel feature vector, the so-called 'pseudo dinucleotide composition' (PseDNC), into which six local DNA structural properties, i.e. three angular parameters (twist, tilt and roll) and three translational parameters (shift, slide and rise), are incorporated. It was observed by the rigorous jackknife test that the overall success rate achieved by iRSpot-PseDNC was >82% in identifying recombination spots in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, indicating the new predictor is promising or at least may become a complementary tool to the existing methods in this area. Although the benchmark data set used to train and test the current method was from S. cerevisiae, the basic approaches can also be extended to deal with all the other genomes. Particularly, it has not escaped our notice that the PseDNC approach can be also used to study many other DNA-related problems. As a user-friendly web-server, i

  7. Power Laws for Heavy-Tailed Distributions: Modeling Allele and Haplotype Diversity for the National Marrow Donor Program

    PubMed Central

    Gragert, Loren; Maiers, Martin; Chatterjee, Ansu; Albrecht, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Measures of allele and haplotype diversity, which are fundamental properties in population genetics, often follow heavy tailed distributions. These measures are of particular interest in the field of hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Donor/Recipient suitability for HSCT is determined by Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) similarity. Match predictions rely upon a precise description of HLA diversity, yet classical estimates are inaccurate given the heavy-tailed nature of the distribution. This directly affects HSCT matching and diversity measures in broader fields such as species richness. We, therefore, have developed a power-law based estimator to measure allele and haplotype diversity that accommodates heavy tails using the concepts of regular variation and occupancy distributions. Application of our estimator to 6.59 million donors in the Be The Match Registry revealed that haplotypes follow a heavy tail distribution across all ethnicities: for example, 44.65% of the European American haplotypes are represented by only 1 individual. Indeed, our discovery rate of all U.S. European American haplotypes is estimated at 23.45% based upon sampling 3.97% of the population, leaving a large number of unobserved haplotypes. Population coverage, however, is much higher at 99.4% given that 90% of European Americans carry one of the 4.5% most frequent haplotypes. Alleles were found to be less diverse suggesting the current registry represents most alleles in the population. Thus, for HSCT registries, haplotype discovery will remain high with continued recruitment to a very deep level of sampling, but population coverage will not. Finally, we compared the convergence of our power-law versus classical diversity estimators such as Capture recapture, Chao, ACE and Jackknife methods. When fit to the haplotype data, our estimator displayed favorable properties in terms of convergence (with respect to sampling depth) and accuracy (with respect to diversity estimates). This

  8. First high resolution P wave velocity structure beneath Tenerife Island, (Canary Islands, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Yeguas, Araceli; Ivan, Koulakov; Ibañez Jesus, M.; Valenti, Sallarès.

    2010-05-01

    and accuracy tests were carried out to quantify the reliability of the final velocity models. Checkerboard tests show that the well-resolved are located up to 6-8 km depth. Also we carried out synthetic tests in which we successfully reproduce single anomalies observed in the velocity models. Especially we have study carefully the low velocity anomalies found in the NW and SE, which have been recovered successfully. The jack-knife technique have been used and our results are stable if we remove the 50% of the data for different stations, but if we reject all the data for some stations, the velocity models can change. These tests assure the uniqueness of the first 3D velocity model that characterizes the internal structure of the Tenerife Island. As main conclusions of our work we can remark: a) This is the first 3-D velocity image of the area; b) we have observed low velocity anomalies near to surface that could be associated to the presence of magma, water reservoirs and volcanic landslides; c) high velocity anomalies could be related to ancient volcanic episodes or basement structures; d) our results could help to resolve many questions relate to the evolution of the volcanic system, as the presence or not of big landslides, calderic explosions or others; e) this image is a very important tool to improve the knowledge of the volcanic hazard, and therefore volcanic risk. We would like to highlight the importance of take into account the risk of eruption in other areas besides Pico Teide-Las Cañadas system.

  9. Source mechanisms of the 2000 earthquake swarm in the West Bohemia/Vogtland region (Central Europe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horálek, Josef; Šílený, Jan

    2013-08-01

    An earthquake swarm of magnitudes up to ML = 3.2 occurred in the region of West Bohemia/Vogtland (border area between Czech Republic and Germany) in autumn 2000. This swarm consisted of nine episodic phases and lasted 4 months. We retrieved source mechanisms of 102 earthquakes with magnitudes between ML = 1.6 and 3.2 applying inversion of the peak amplitudes of direct P and SH waves, which were determined from ground motion seismograms. The investigated events cover the whole swarm activity in both time and space. We use data from permanent stations of seismic network WEBNET and from temporal stations, which were deployed in the epicentral area during the swarm; the number of stations varied from 7 to 18. The unconstrained moment tensor (MT) expression of the mechanism, which describes a general system of dipoles, that is both double-couple (DC) and non-DC sources, was applied. MTs of each earthquake were estimated by inversion of three different sets of data: P-wave amplitudes only, P- and SH-wave amplitudes and P-wave amplitudes along with the SH-wave amplitudes from a priori selected four `base' WEBNET stations, the respective MT solutions are nearly identical for each event investigated. The resultant mechanisms of all events are dominantly DCs with only insignificant non-DC components mostly not exceeding 10 per cent. We checked reliability of the MTs in jackknife trials eliminating some data; we simulated the mislocation of hypocentre or contaminated the P- and SH-wave amplitudes by accidental errors. These tests proved stable and well constrained MT solutions. The massive dominance of the DC in all investigated events implies that the 2000 swarm consisted of a large number of pure shears along a fault plane. The focal mechanisms indicate both oblique-normal and oblique-thrust faulting, however, the oblique-normal faulting prevails. The predominant strikes and dips of the oblique-normal events fit well the geometry of the main fault plane Nový Kostel (NK

  10. Implementing the national AIGA flash flood warning system in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Organde, Didier; Javelle, Pierre; Demargne, Julie; Arnaud, Patrick; Caseri, Angelica; Fine, Jean-Alain; de Saint Aubin, Céline

    2015-04-01

    The French national hydro-meteorological and flood forecasting centre (SCHAPI) aims to implement a national flash flood warning system to improve flood alerts for small-to-medium (up to 1000 km2) ungauged basins. This system is based on the AIGA method, co-developed by IRSTEA these last 10 years. The method, initially set up for the Mediterranean area, is based on a simple event-based hourly hydrologic distributed model run every 15 minutes (Javelle et al. 2014). The hydrologic model ingests operational radar-gauge rainfall grids from Météo-France at a 1-km² resolution to produce discharges for successive outlets along the river network. Discharges are then compared to regionalized flood quantiles of given return periods and warnings (expressed as the range of the return period estimated in real-time) are provided on a river network map. The main interest of the method is to provide forecasters and emergency services with a synthetic view in real time of the ongoing flood situation, information that is especially critical in ungauged flood prone areas. In its enhanced national version, the hourly event-based distributed model is coupled to a continuous daily rainfall-runoff model which provides baseflow and a soil moisture index (for each 1-km² pixel) at the beginning of the hourly simulation. The rainfall-runoff models were calibrated on a selection of 700 French hydrometric stations with Météo-France radar-gauge reanalysis dataset for the 2002-2006 period. To estimate model parameters for ungauged basins, the 2 hydrologic models were regionalised by testing both regressions (using different catchment attributes, such as catchment area, soil type, and climate characteristic) and spatial proximity techniques (transposing parameters from neighbouring donor catchments), as well as different homogeneous hydrological areas. The most valuable regionalisation method was determined for each model through jack-knife cross-validation. The system performance was then

  11. SIFlore, a dataset of geographical distribution of vascular plants covering five centuries of knowledge in France: Results of a collaborative project coordinated by the Federation of the National Botanical Conservatories

    PubMed Central

    Just, Anaïs; Gourvil, Johan; Millet, Jérôme; Boullet, Vincent; Milon, Thomas; Mandon, Isabelle; Dutrève, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    the websites of the National Inventory of Natural Heritage (http://www.inpn.fr) and the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (http://www.gbif.fr). SIFlore is regularly updated with additional data records. It is also planned to expand the scope of the dataset to include information about taxon biology, phenology, ecology, chorology, frequency, conservation status and seed banks. A map showing an estimation of the dataset completeness (based on Jackknife 1 estimator) is presented and included as a numerical appendix. Purpose: SIFlore aims to make the data of the flora of France available at the national level for conservation, policy management and scientific research. Such a dataset will provide enough information to allow for macro-ecological reviews of species distribution patterns and, coupled with climatic or topographic datasets, the identification of determinants of these patterns. This dataset can be considered as the primary indicator of the current state of knowledge of flora distribution across France. At a policy level, and in the context of global warming, this should promote the adoption of new measures aiming to improve and intensify flora conservation and surveys. PMID:26491386

  12. Optimized multiple quantum MAS lineshape simulations in solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouwer, William J.; Davis, Michael C.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2009-10-01

    /Linux Operating system: UNIX/Linux Has the code been vectorised or parallelized?: Yes RAM: Example: (1597 powder angles) × (200 Samples) × (81 F2 frequency pts) × (31 F1 frequency points) = 3.5M, SMP AMD opteron Classification: 2.3 External routines: OCTAVE ( http://www.gnu.org/software/octave/), GNU Scientific Library ( http://www.gnu.org/software/gsl/), OPENMP ( http://openmp.org/wp/) Nature of problem: The optimal simulation and modeling of multiple quantum magic angle spinning NMR spectra, for general systems, especially those with mild to significant disorder. The approach outlined and implemented in C and OCTAVE also produces model parameter error estimates. Solution method: A model for each distinct chemical site is first proposed, for the individual contribution of crystallite orientations to the spectrum. This model is averaged over all powder angles [1], as well as the (stochastic) parameters; isotropic chemical shift and quadrupole coupling constant. The latter is accomplished via sampling from a bi-variate Gaussian distribution, using the Box-Muller algorithm to transform Sobol (quasi) random numbers [2]. A simulated annealing optimization is performed, and finally the non-linear jackknife [3] is applied in developing model parameter error estimates. Additional comments: The distribution contains a script, mqmasOpt.m, which runs in the OCTAVE language workspace. Running time: Example: (1597 powder angles) × (200 Samples) × (81 F2 frequency pts) × (31 F1 frequency points) = 58.35 seconds, SMP AMD opteron. References:S.K. Zaremba, Annali di Matematica Pura ed Applicata 73 (1966) 293. H. Niederreiter, Random Number Generation and Quasi-Monte Carlo Methods, SIAM, 1992. T. Fox, D. Hinkley, K. Larntz, Technometrics 22 (1980) 29.

  13. The Muenster Red Sky Survey: Large-scale structures in the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungruhe, R.; Seitter, W. C.; Duerbeck, H. W.

    2003-01-01

    %, the corrections are above 0.2 mag.The iteration procedure for the indirect adjustment of single platesmay cause a magnitude gradient in north-south or east-west direction. Investigations of the magnitude differences between photographic and CCD magnitudes versus right ascension and declination show no significant gradients.In order to generate a complete catalogue of galaxies and stars, all double or multiple objects that occur in overlap regions have to be excluded. After the merging of all single plates (including half of the overlap regions), both catalogues contain 5.5 million galaxies and 20.2 million stars. The completeness of the catalogues was investigated from the comparison of counts of stars and galaxies with simulations. The limit of completenessis at magnitude18.3 for galaxies, and at 18.8 for stars. In the case of galaxies, a clear deficit is seen for galaxies down to magitude 16 in comparison with the simulation. Neither by taking into account galaxy evolution, nor by changes in the cosmological parameters, an adjustment of the simulation to the catalogue counts was possible. These results and those of others support the assumption that we are dealing with a real galaxy deficit. The determined slope of 0.66 of the galaxy counts is, within the limits of accuracy, in agreement with the measured values of other authors. No comparable star counts are available. The N-point angular correlation function were determined from various sub-catalogues consisting of 9, 25, 63, 121 and 152 fields as well asfor limiting magnitudes from magnitudes 15.0 to 19.0. The computation of chance distributions was carried out for galaxy counts in cells with side borders from 25''to 28.4''. Averaged correlation functions and their coefficients were determined by means of factorial moments. The delete-d jackknife procedure was applied for the error estimate, with 200 replications per subcatalogue. The 2-point angular correlation function shows a linear trend in logarithmic plots