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  1. Introducing JCE Online

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-01-01

    One of the many transitions that occurred while moving the Journal editorial offices from Austin to Madison was the unification of the WWW sites of the Journal and JCE Software into JCE Online. Since that time JCE Online has provided several valuable resources to the chemistry education community. With the introduction of JCE Online+ (see below), we have expanded these resources and have plans to expand them even further. We thought that the Journal readership might like to know what is available to them at JCE Online. That's what this new column will do each month. JCE Online is divided into several areas. Each constituent part maintains an area at JCE Online: this Journal, JCE Software, JCE Internet, and JCE Books. There also is an area that lists Chemical Education Happenings and an area that contains information About JCE.

  2. JCE Online 99

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    1999-04-01

    As I write this, JCE Online is in the middle of being redesigned to make it a more usable resource. By the time you read this, the typical online page for articles of this Journal will look like Figure 1. The page has five main features:

    • the page heading with the global menu bar
    • the left-hand navigation bar
    • the page menu bar near the top of the page and repeated near the bottom
    • the main content region in the middle of the page
    • the right-hand column of local navigation links
    The navigation links on each page are divided into global links that take you to the different main areas of JCE Online and local links that are restricted to the current issue of the Journal. Global Navigation Global navigation among the areas of JCE Online is divided into a menu bar across the top of the page and the strip along the left-hand side. The menu bar links go to JCE Online resources that pertain to all the main content areas: the JCE Online Home page, Subscription and Ordering information, the Service and Support area, Contributor information (Authors and Reviewers), and site information. The left-hand navigation bar provides links to each of the content areas of JCE Online: Login, Journal, JCE Software, JCE Internet, ChemEd Today, JCE Books, and About JCE. As you move into one of these content areas the left-hand navigation bar will change to provide links to the various resources within that area. In the case of the Journal, these are links to the current issue, past issues, list of supplemental materials, feature columns, JCE Index, and JCE CD. A feature of the left-hand navigation bar is the floating icon that denotes any access restrictions of the link that the mouse is over. Local Navigation Local navigation is provided by a page menu bar echoed at the top and bottom of the page and by links in the right-hand column. The page menu bar allows you to easily switch among the abstract of the current article, any supplementary materials available

  3. JCE Feature Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    1999-05-01

    The Features area of JCE Online is now readily accessible through a single click from our home page. In the Features area each column is linked to its own home page. These column home pages also have links to them from the online Journal Table of Contents pages or from any article published as part of that feature column. Using these links you can easily find abstracts of additional articles that are related by topic. Of course, JCE Online+ subscribers are then just one click away from the entire article. Finding related articles is easy because each feature column "site" contains links to the online abstracts of all the articles that have appeared in the column. In addition, you can find the mission statement for the column and the email link to the column editor that I mentioned above. At the discretion of its editor, a feature column site may contain additional resources. As an example, the Chemical Information Instructor column edited by Arleen Somerville will have a periodically updated bibliography of resources for teaching and using chemical information. Due to the increase in the number of these resources available on the WWW, it only makes sense to publish this information online so that you can get to these resources with a simple click of the mouse. We expect that there will soon be additional information and resources at several other feature column sites. Following in the footsteps of the Chemical Information Instructor, up-to-date bibliographies and links to related online resources can be made available. We hope to extend the online component of our feature columns with moderated online discussion forums. If you have a suggestion for an online resource you would like to see included, let the feature editor or JCE Online (jceonline@chem.wisc.edu) know about it. JCE Internet Features JCE Internet also has several feature columns: Chemical Education Resource Shelf, Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems, Equipment Buyers Guide, Hal's Picks, Mathcad

  4. JCE Digital Library Grand Opening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The National Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematical Education Digital Library (NSDL), inaugurated in December 2002, is developed to promote science education on a comprehensive scale. The Journal of Chemical, Education (JCE) Digital Library, incorporated into NSDL, contains its own collections of digital resources for chemistry…

  5. Only@JCE Online

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    2001-08-01

    The JCE High School ChemEd Learning Information Center (CLIC) and Buyers Guide continue to be updated with each issue of the print Journal. Every month, links to articles of interest to high school teachers are added to CLIC. Links to all new book and media reviews are added to the Buyers Guide. Additions to the Biographical Snapshots of Famous Women and Minority Chemists (March 2001) and the updated WWW Site Review feature (July 2001) have been previously noted in this column. The Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems feature has a useful, new tool, Chemical Concepts Inventory, that can be used to assess the level of chemistry misconceptions held by students.

  6. National Chemistry Week 2000: JCE Resources in Food Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Erica K.

    2000-10-01

    November brings another National Chemistry Week, and this year's theme is food chemistry. I was asked to collect and evaluate JCE resources for use with this theme, a project that took me deep into past issues of JCE and yielded many treasures. Here we present the results of searches for food chemistry information and activities. While the selected articles are mainly at the high school and college levels, there are some excellent ones for the elementary school level and some that can be adapted for younger students. The focus of all articles is on the chemistry of food itself. Activities that only use food to demonstrate a principle other than food chemistry are not included. Articles that cover household products such as cleansers and pharmaceuticals are also not included. Each article has been characterized as a demonstration, experiment, calculation, activity, or informational item; several fit more than one classification. Also included are keywords and an evaluation as to which levels the article may serve.

  7. General Chemistry Collection for Students (CD-ROM), Abstract of Special Issue 16, 4th Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-07-01

    bookstore. The cost per CD can be quite low when large numbers are ordered (as little as $3 each), making this a cost-effective method of allowing students access to the software they need whenever and wherever they desire. Other JCE Software CDs can also be adopted. Network licenses to distribute the software to your students via your local campus network can also be arranged. Contact us for details on purchasing multiple user licenses. Price and Ordering An order form is inserted in this issue that provides prices and other ordering information. If this card is not available or if you need additional information, contact: JCE Software, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1101 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706-1396; phone; 608/262-5153 or 800/991-5534; fax: 608/265-8094; email: jcesoft@chem.wisc.edu. Table 1. Contents of the General Chemistry Collection, 4th Edition

  8. University Software Ownership and Litigation: A First Examination*

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Arti K.; Allison, John R.; Sampat, Bhaven N.

    2013-01-01

    Software patents and university-owned patents represent two of the most controversial intellectual property developments of the last twenty-five years. Despite this reality, and concerns that universities act as “patent trolls” when they assert software patents in litigation against successful commercializers, no scholar has systematically examined the ownership and litigation of university software patents. In this Article, we present the first such examination. Our empirical research reveals that software patents represent a significant and growing proportion of university patent holdings. Additionally, the most important determinant of the number of software patents a university owns is not its research and development (“R&D”) expenditures (whether computer science-related or otherwise) but, rather, its tendency to seek patents in other areas. In other words, universities appear to take a “one size fits all” approach to patenting their inventions. This one size fits all approach is problematic given the empirical evidence that software is likely to follow a different commercialization path than other types of invention. Thus, it is perhaps not surprising that we see a number of lawsuits in which university software patents have been used not for purposes of fostering commercialization, but instead, to extract rents in apparent holdup litigation. The Article concludes by examining whether this trend is likely to continue in the future, particularly given a 2006 Supreme Court decision that appears to diminish the holdup threat by recognizing the possibility of liability rules in patent suits, as well as recent case law that may call into question certain types of software patents. PMID:23750052

  9. Prospectus 1999

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Jon L.; Gettys, Nancy S.

    1999-01-01

    optimized for delivery via the World Wide Web. If all goes according to plan, two new CCA! volumes will be announced in 1999, and CCA! 1 and CCA! 2 will be updated to take advantage of the latest digital video technology. Chem Pages Chem Pages, Laboratory Techniques, was developed by the New Traditions Curriculum Project at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. It is an HTML-based CD-ROM for Mac OS and Windows that contains lessons and tutorials to prepare introductory chemistry students to work in the laboratory. It includes text, photographs, computer graphics, animations, digital video, and voice narration to introduce students to the laboratory equipment and procedures. Regular Issues Programs that have been accepted for publication as Regular Issues in 1999 include a gas chromatography simulation for Windows 95 by Bruce Armitage, a collection of lessons on torsional rotation for organic chemistry students by Ronald Starkey, and a tutorial on pericyclic reactions, also for organic chemistry, by Albert Lee, C. T. So, and C. L. Chan. We have had many recent submissions and submissions of work in progress. In 1999 we will work with the authors and our peer-reviewers to complete and publish these submissions. Submissions include Multimedia Problems for General Chemistry by David Whisnant, lessons on point groups and crystallography by Margaret Kastner, et al., a mass spectrum simulator by Stephen W. Bigger and Robert A. Craig, a tutorial for introductory chemistry on determining the pH of very dilute acid and base solutions by Paul Mihas and George Papageorgiou, and many others. Also under development by the JCE Software staff are The General Chemistry Collection (instructor's edition) CD-ROM along with an updated student edition. An Invitation In collaboration with JCE Online we plan to make available in 1999 support files for JCE Software. These will include not only troubleshooting tips and technical support notes, but also supporting information such as lessons, specific

  10. University Approaches to Software Copyright and Licensure Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Brian L.

    Issues of copyright policy and software licensure at Drexel University that were developed during the introduction of a new microcomputing program are discussed. Channels for software distribution include: individual purchase of externally-produced software, distribution of internally-developed software, institutional licensure, and "read…

  11. Prospectus 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Jon L.; Gettys, Nancy S.

    2000-01-01

    2000 We have several exciting new issues planned for publication in the coming year. Chemistry Comes Alive! The Chemistry Comes Alive! (CCA!) series continues with additional CD-ROMs for Mac OS and Windows. Each volume in this series contains video and animations of chemical reactions that can be easily incorporated into your own computer-based presentations. Our digital video now uses state-of-the-art compression that yields higher quality video with smaller file sizes and data rates more suited for WWW delivery. Video for Periodic Table Live! 2nd edition, Chemistry Comes Alive! Volumes 3, ChemPages Laboratory, and Multimedia General Chemistry Problems use this new format. We will be releasing updates of CCA! Volumes 1 and 2 to take advantage of this new technology. We are very pleased with the results and think you will be also. The reaction of aluminum with chlorine is included in Chemistry Comes Alive! Volume 3. ChemPages Laboratory ChemPages Laboratory, developed by the New Traditions Curriculum Project at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, is an HTML-based CD-ROM for Mac OS and Windows that contains lessons and tutorials to prepare introductory chemistry students to work in the laboratory. It includes text, photographs, computer graphics, animations, digital video, and voice narration to introduce students to the laboratory equipment and procedures. ChemPages Laboratory teaches introductory chemistry students about laboratory instruments, equipment, and procedures. Versatile Video Video demonstrating the "drinking bird" is included in the Chemistry Comes Alive! video collection. Video from this collection can be incorporated into many other projects. As an example, David Whisnant has used the drinking bird in his Multimedia General Chemistry Problems, where students view the video and are asked to explain why the bird bobs up and down. JCE Software anticipates publication of Multimedia General Chemistry Problems on CD-ROM for Mac OS and Windows in 2000. It will

  12. A University Dilemma: The Use of Third Party-Owned Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hersey, Karen

    1985-01-01

    Reviews specific problems associated with software protection (copyright license, trade secret license), clauses in software license agreements that most frequently cause difficulties, and solutions university administrators and software industry should consider. Topics include confidentiality, restrictive use of modifications, use on single…

  13. Software Auditing: A New Task for U.K. Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Mark

    1997-01-01

    Based on a pilot project at Exeter University (Devon, England) a software audit, comparing number of copies of software installed with number of license agreements, is described. Discussion includes auditing budgets, workstation questionnaires, the scanner program which detects the hardware configuration and staff training, analysis and…

  14. A Practical Software Architecture for Virtual Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiang, Peifeng; Shi, Yuanchun; Qin, Weijun

    2006-01-01

    This article introduces a practical software architecture called CUBES, which focuses on system integration and evolvement for online virtual universities. The key of CUBES is a supporting platform that helps to integrate and evolve heterogeneous educational applications developed by different organizations. Both standardized educational…

  15. Online Resources for High School Teachers--A CLIC Away

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    2000-04-01

    "I'm a high school teacher. I don't have time to sift through all of JCE to find what I need. I don't have enough time as it is!" If you need to find things in a hurry, go to JCE HS CLIC, the JCE High School Chemed Learning Information Center, http://JChemEd.chem.wisc.edu/HS/. You will find good solid, reliable information, and you will find it fast. CLIC is open 24 hours every day, all over the world. What You Will Find at JCE CLIC We know teachers are pressed for time. During the few minutes between classes or at the end of the day, information needs to be found very quickly. Perhaps you are looking for a demo that illustrates electrochemistry using Cu, Mg, orange juice, and a clock; or a student activity on chromatography that is ready to copy and hand out; or a video to illustrate the action of aqua regia on gold, because you can't use aqua regia and can't afford gold. You can find each of these quickly at CLIC. The Journal has always provided lots of articles designed with high school teachers in mind. What the new JCE HS CLIC does is collect the recent materials at one address on JCE Online, making it quicker and easier for you to find them. Information has been gathered from both print and online versions of the Journal, from JCE Software, and from JCE Internet. It is organized as shown at the bottom of the page. Getting Access to Information You have located something that interests you, perhaps a list of tested demonstrations that pertain to consumer chemistry. Now it is time to get it. JCE subscribers (individuals and libraries) can read, download, and print the full versions of the articles as well as all supplemental materials, including student handouts and instructor's notes. You will need the username and password that are on the mailing label that comes with your Journaleach month. JCE HS CLIC home page: http://JChemEd.chem.wisc.edu/HS/ Your Suggestions, Please Our plans for JCE HS CLIC do not end with what you find now. Other resources and features

  16. The role of universities in preparing graduates to use software in the financial services workplace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tickle, Leonie; Kyng, Tim; Wood, Leigh N.

    2014-02-01

    The role of universities in preparing students to use spreadsheet and other technical software in the financial services workplace has been investigated through surveys of university graduates, university academics, and employers. It is found that graduates are less skilled users of software than employers would like, due at least in part to a lack of structured formal training opportunities in the workplace, and a lack of targeted, coherent learning opportunities at university. The widespread and heavy use of software in the workplace means that there is significant potential for productivity gains if universities and employers address these issues.

  17. Software platform virtualization in chemistry research and university teaching.

    PubMed

    Kind, Tobias; Leamy, Tim; Leary, Julie A; Fiehn, Oliver

    2009-11-16

    Modern chemistry laboratories operate with a wide range of software applications under different operating systems, such as Windows, LINUX or Mac OS X. Instead of installing software on different computers it is possible to install those applications on a single computer using Virtual Machine software. Software platform virtualization allows a single guest operating system to execute multiple other operating systems on the same computer. We apply and discuss the use of virtual machines in chemistry research and teaching laboratories. Virtual machines are commonly used for cheminformatics software development and testing. Benchmarking multiple chemistry software packages we have confirmed that the computational speed penalty for using virtual machines is low and around 5% to 10%. Software virtualization in a teaching environment allows faster deployment and easy use of commercial and open source software in hands-on computer teaching labs. Software virtualization in chemistry, mass spectrometry and cheminformatics is needed for software testing and development of software for different operating systems. In order to obtain maximum performance the virtualization software should be multi-core enabled and allow the use of multiprocessor configurations in the virtual machine environment. Server consolidation, by running multiple tasks and operating systems on a single physical machine, can lead to lower maintenance and hardware costs especially in small research labs. The use of virtual machines can prevent software virus infections and security breaches when used as a sandbox system for internet access and software testing. Complex software setups can be created with virtual machines and are easily deployed later to multiple computers for hands-on teaching classes. We discuss the popularity of bioinformatics compared to cheminformatics as well as the missing cheminformatics education at universities worldwide.

  18. The Role of Universities in Preparing Graduates to Use Software in the Financial Services Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tickle, Leonie; Kyng, Tim; Wood, Leigh N.

    2014-01-01

    The role of universities in preparing students to use spreadsheet and other technical software in the financial services workplace has been investigated through surveys of university graduates, university academics, and employers. It is found that graduates are less skilled users of software than employers would like, due at least in part to a…

  19. Software for universal noiseless coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, R. F.; Schlutsmeyer, A. P.

    1981-01-01

    An overview is provided of the universal noiseless coding algorithms as well as their relationship to the now available FORTRAN implementations. It is suggested that readers considering investigating the utility of these algorithms for actual applications should consult both NASA's Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC) and descriptions of coding techniques provided by Rice (1979). Examples of applying these techniques have also been given by Rice (1975, 1979, 1980). Attention is given to reversible preprocessing, general implementation instructions, naming conventions, and calling arguments. A general applicability of the considered algorithms to solving practical problems is obtained because most real data sources can be simply transformed into the required form by appropriate preprocessing.

  20. Software platform virtualization in chemistry research and university teaching

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Modern chemistry laboratories operate with a wide range of software applications under different operating systems, such as Windows, LINUX or Mac OS X. Instead of installing software on different computers it is possible to install those applications on a single computer using Virtual Machine software. Software platform virtualization allows a single guest operating system to execute multiple other operating systems on the same computer. We apply and discuss the use of virtual machines in chemistry research and teaching laboratories. Results Virtual machines are commonly used for cheminformatics software development and testing. Benchmarking multiple chemistry software packages we have confirmed that the computational speed penalty for using virtual machines is low and around 5% to 10%. Software virtualization in a teaching environment allows faster deployment and easy use of commercial and open source software in hands-on computer teaching labs. Conclusion Software virtualization in chemistry, mass spectrometry and cheminformatics is needed for software testing and development of software for different operating systems. In order to obtain maximum performance the virtualization software should be multi-core enabled and allow the use of multiprocessor configurations in the virtual machine environment. Server consolidation, by running multiple tasks and operating systems on a single physical machine, can lead to lower maintenance and hardware costs especially in small research labs. The use of virtual machines can prevent software virus infections and security breaches when used as a sandbox system for internet access and software testing. Complex software setups can be created with virtual machines and are easily deployed later to multiple computers for hands-on teaching classes. We discuss the popularity of bioinformatics compared to cheminformatics as well as the missing cheminformatics education at universities worldwide. PMID:20150997

  1. AWIPS II in the University Community: Unidata's efforts and capabilities of the software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamurthy, Mohan; James, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System, version II (AWIPS II) is a weather forecasting, display and analysis tool that is used by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/National Weather Service (NOAA/NWS) and the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) to ingest analyze and disseminate operational weather data. The AWIPS II software is built on a Service Oriented Architecture, takes advantage of open source software, and its design affords expandability, flexibility, and portability. Since many university meteorology programs are eager to use the same tools used by NWS forecasters, Unidata community interest in AWIPS II is high. The Unidata Program Center (UPC) has worked closely with NCEP staff during AWIPS II development in order to devise a way to make it available to the university. The Unidata AWIPS II software was released in beta form in 2014, and it incorporates a number of key changes to the baseline U. S. National Weather Service release to process and display additional data formats and run all components in a single-server standalone configuration. In addition to making available open-source instances of the software libraries that can be downloaded and run at any university, Unidata has also deployed the data-server side of AWIPS II, known as EDEX, in the Amazon Web Service and Microsoft Azure cloud environments. In this set up, universities receive all of the data from remote cloud instances, while they only have to run the AWIPS II client, known as CAVE, to analyze and visualize the data. In this presentation, we will describe Unidata's AWIPS II efforts, including the capabilities of the software in visualizing many different types of real-time meteorological data and its myriad uses in university and other settings.

  2. Impact of Computer Software on Advertising Media Courses: A Study of 71 Colleges and Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Dennis G.; Vaccaro-Lloyd, Carla

    A study evaluated the impact of microcomputers and software in advertising media courses by surveying media planning instructors in 71 (out of 111) colleges and universities. The survey asked instructors to evaluate textbooks, workbooks, and computer software; to assess the impact of software on the media course; and to compare software users with…

  3. Wizard CD Plus and ProTaper Universal: analysis of apical transportation using new software

    PubMed Central

    GIANNASTASIO, Daiana; da ROSA, Ricardo Abreu; PERES, Bernardo Urbanetto; BARRETO, Mirela Sangoi; DOTTO, Gustavo Nogara; KUGA, Milton Carlos; PEREIRA, Jefferson Ricardo; SÓ, Marcus Vinícius Reis

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study has two aims: 1) to evaluate the apical transportation of the Wizard CD Plus and ProTaper Universal after preparation of simulated root canals; 2) to compare, with Adobe Photoshop, the ability of a new software (Regeemy) in superposing and subtracting images. Material and Methods Twenty five simulated root canals in acrylic-resin blocks (with 20º curvature) underwent cone beam computed tomography before and after preparation with the rotary systems (70 kVp, 4 mA, 10 s and with the 8×8 cm FoV selection). Canals were prepared up to F2 (ProTaper) and 24.04 (Wizard CD Plus) instruments and the working length was established to 15 mm. The tomographic images were imported into iCAT Vision software and CorelDraw for standardization. The superposition of pre- and post-instrumentation images from both systems was performed using Regeemy and Adobe Photoshop. The apical transportation was measured in millimetres using Image J. Five acrylic resin blocks were used to validate the superposition achieved by the software. Student's t-test for independent samples was used to evaluate the apical transportation achieved by the rotary systems using each software individually. Student's t-test for paired samples was used to compare the ability of each software in superposing and subtracting images from one rotary system per time. Results The values obtained with Regeemy and Adobe Photoshop were similar to rotary systems (P>0.05). ProTaper Universal and Wizard CD Plus promoted similar apical transportation regardless of the software used for image's superposition and subtraction (P>0.05). Conclusion Wizard CD Plus and ProTaper Universal promoted little apical transportation. Regeemy consists in a feasible software to superpose and subtract images and appears to be an alternative to Adobe Photoshop. PMID:24212994

  4. Wizard CD Plus and ProTaper Universal: analysis of apical transportation using new software.

    PubMed

    Giannastasio, Daiana; Rosa, Ricardo Abreu da; Peres, Bernardo Urbanetto; Barreto, Mirela Sangoi; Dotto, Gustavo Nogara; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; Só, Marcus Vinícius Reis

    2013-01-01

    This study has two aims: 1) to evaluate the apical transportation of the Wizard CD Plus and ProTaper Universal after preparation of simulated root canals; 2) to compare, with Adobe Photoshop, the ability of a new software (Regeemy) in superposing and subtracting images. Twenty five simulated root canals in acrylic-resin blocks (with 20º curvature) underwent cone beam computed tomography before and after preparation with the rotary systems (70 kVp, 4 mA, 10 s and with the 8×8 cm FoV selection). Canals were prepared up to F2 (ProTaper) and 24.04 (Wizard CD Plus) instruments and the working length was established to 15 mm. The tomographic images were imported into iCAT Vision software and CorelDraw for standardization. The superposition of pre- and post-instrumentation images from both systems was performed using Regeemy and Adobe Photoshop. The apical transportation was measured in millimetres using Image J. Five acrylic resin blocks were used to validate the superposition achieved by the software. Student's t-test for independent samples was used to evaluate the apical transportation achieved by the rotary systems using each software individually. Student's t-test for paired samples was used to compare the ability of each software in superposing and subtracting images from one rotary system per time. The values obtained with Regeemy and Adobe Photoshop were similar to rotary systems (P>0.05). ProTaper Universal and Wizard CD Plus promoted similar apical transportation regardless of the software used for image's superposition and subtraction (P>0.05). Wizard CD Plus and ProTaper Universal promoted little apical transportation. Regeemy consists in a feasible software to superpose and subtract images and appears to be an alternative to Adobe Photoshop.

  5. US Army Research Laboratory and University of Notre Dame Distributed Sensing: Software Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-09-01

    ARL-TN-0847 ● Sep 2017 US Army Research Laboratory US Army Research Laboratory and University of Notre Dame Distributed Sensing...Destroy this report when it is no longer needed. Do not return it to the originator. ARL-TN-0847 ● Sep 2017 US Army Research Laboratory...US Army Research Laboratory and University of Notre Dame Distributed Sensing: Software Overview by Neal Tesny Sensors and Electron Devices

  6. News and Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-07-01

    New Source of Information from Advertisers The Journal has a new feature effective with the June 1999 issue. If you would like additional information about our advertisers or their products, the quickest and easiest way to get it is via JCE Online: go to http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu click on Ad Index This will take you to the list of advertisers, each conveniently linked to their home page. When you do contact our advertisers, be sure to tell them that you saw their ad in the Journal of Chemical Education. This is important to them, and to us. JCE Software Receives Award The Journal recently received notice that JCE Software portion of JCE Online has been selected as a Links2Go Key Resource for the topic of chemistry software. According to Links2Go (www.links2go.com), JCE Software's home page is one of the top fifty most accessed online resources in the area of chemistry software (currently ranked 45). Thanks to all of you who have visited JCE Online and the JCE Software area to make this possible. If you haven't visited the site yet, you can go there directly (http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/JCESoft/index.html ) as well as via our JCE Online home page. You will be greeted with a short video of nitrogen triiodide exploding and be able to get a wealth of information about our latest releases, software, CD-ROMs/Video, student resources, materials for authors and software developers. You can see color graphics from our CD-ROMs, video, and software,... Actually, if you are familiar with our Catalog, this is much better. 1999 Welch Chemistry Prize Richard N. Zare, the Marguerite Blake Wilbur Professor of Natural Science at Stanford University, has been named the 1999 recipient of the Welch Award in Chemistry for his lifetime achievements in physical and analytical chemistry. Zare's interests focus on the development and application of lasers and other novel instruments to explore chemical frontiers, ranging from molecules to chemical processes, from the inside of cells to

  7. Journal of Chemical Education on CD-ROM, 1999

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-12-01

    addresses. If you have Internet access and a WWW browser and email utility, you can go directly to the Web site or prepare to send a message with a single mouse click. Full-text searching of the entire CD enables you to find the articles you want. Price and Ordering An order form is inserted in this issue that provides prices and other ordering information. If this insert is not available or if you need additional information, contact: JCE Software, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1101 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706-1396; phone: 608/262-5153 or 800/991-5534; fax: 608/265-8094; email: jcesoft@chem.wisc.edu. Information about all our publications (including abstracts, descriptions, updates) is available from our World Wide Web site at: http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/JCESoft/. Hardware and Software Requirements Hardware and software requirements for JCE CD 1999 are listed in the table below: Literature Cited 1. Schatz, P. F. Computerized Index, Journal of Chemical Education; J. Chem. Educ. Software 1993, SP 5-M. Schatz, P. F.; Jacobsen, J. J. Computerized Index, Journal of Chemical Education; J. Chem. Educ. Software 1993, SP 5-W.

  8. A Survey of University Students' Behavior, Knowledge, and Opinions Regarding Unauthorized Copies of Computer Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glowacki, Margaret L.; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to determine the nature and extent of unauthorized copying of microcomputer software by university students. The sample consisted of 392 university students ranging in age from 18 to 35. A survey instrument administered to all students contained 20 Likert-type questions designed to gather data on students' behavior,…

  9. The End of Education As We Know It?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, John W.

    2000-10-01

    One of my main goals for JCE is that it should serve our profession by helping organize the human resources of chemical education. One example appears on p 1375. David Whisnant has created a new way to help students tie together concepts from disparate parts of an introductory course: Web-deliverable Multimedia Problems. He was able to draw on work of literally dozens of others who had created videos of chemical reactions, apparatus, and techniques. These were available in JCE Software's Chemistry Comes Alive! series of CD-ROMs--a digital library of videos. Thus JCE was able to mediate development of a new learning aid that might not have been possible for one individual to create. This is but one small step toward the rich learning environment that I envision, but a lot of people developing a lot of new materials can begin to make a real difference. I encourage you to collaborate with JCE to achieve this goal.

    Literature Cited

    1. Lewis, M. Boom Box, The New York Times Magazine, August 13, 2000, p 36.
    2. Russell, A.; Chapman, O.; Wegner, P. J. Chem. Educ. 1998, 75, 578.

  10. Northwestern University Schizophrenia Data and Software Tool (NUSDAST)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Kogan, Alex; Cobia, Derin; Alpert, Kathryn; Kolasny, Anthony; Miller, Michael I.; Marcus, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The schizophrenia research community has invested substantial resources on collecting, managing and sharing large neuroimaging datasets. As part of this effort, our group has collected high resolution magnetic resonance (MR) datasets from individuals with schizophrenia, their non-psychotic siblings, healthy controls and their siblings. This effort has resulted in a growing resource, the Northwestern University Schizophrenia Data and Software Tool (NUSDAST), an NIH-funded data sharing project to stimulate new research. This resource resides on XNAT Central, and it contains neuroimaging (MR scans, landmarks and surface maps for deep subcortical structures, and FreeSurfer cortical parcellation and measurement data), cognitive (cognitive domain scores for crystallized intelligence, working memory, episodic memory, and executive function), clinical (demographic, sibling relationship, SAPS and SANS psychopathology), and genetic (20 polymorphisms) data, collected from more than 450 subjects, most with 2-year longitudinal follow-up. A neuroimaging mapping, analysis and visualization software tool, CAWorks, is also part of this resource. Moreover, in making our existing neuroimaging data along with the associated meta-data and computational tools publically accessible, we have established a web-based information retrieval portal that allows the user to efficiently search the collection. This research-ready dataset meaningfully combines neuroimaging data with other relevant information, and it can be used to help facilitate advancing neuroimaging research. It is our hope that this effort will help to overcome some of the commonly recognized technical barriers in advancing neuroimaging research such as lack of local organization and standard descriptions. PMID:24223551

  11. Northwestern University Schizophrenia Data and Software Tool (NUSDAST).

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Kogan, Alex; Cobia, Derin; Alpert, Kathryn; Kolasny, Anthony; Miller, Michael I; Marcus, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The schizophrenia research community has invested substantial resources on collecting, managing and sharing large neuroimaging datasets. As part of this effort, our group has collected high resolution magnetic resonance (MR) datasets from individuals with schizophrenia, their non-psychotic siblings, healthy controls and their siblings. This effort has resulted in a growing resource, the Northwestern University Schizophrenia Data and Software Tool (NUSDAST), an NIH-funded data sharing project to stimulate new research. This resource resides on XNAT Central, and it contains neuroimaging (MR scans, landmarks and surface maps for deep subcortical structures, and FreeSurfer cortical parcellation and measurement data), cognitive (cognitive domain scores for crystallized intelligence, working memory, episodic memory, and executive function), clinical (demographic, sibling relationship, SAPS and SANS psychopathology), and genetic (20 polymorphisms) data, collected from more than 450 subjects, most with 2-year longitudinal follow-up. A neuroimaging mapping, analysis and visualization software tool, CAWorks, is also part of this resource. Moreover, in making our existing neuroimaging data along with the associated meta-data and computational tools publically accessible, we have established a web-based information retrieval portal that allows the user to efficiently search the collection. This research-ready dataset meaningfully combines neuroimaging data with other relevant information, and it can be used to help facilitate advancing neuroimaging research. It is our hope that this effort will help to overcome some of the commonly recognized technical barriers in advancing neuroimaging research such as lack of local organization and standard descriptions.

  12. Software: University Courses versus Workplace Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liebenberg, Janet; Huisman, Magda; Mentz, Elsa

    2015-01-01

    There is a shortage of software developers with the right skills and knowledge, not only in South Africa but worldwide. Despite reports of gap between industry needs and software education, the gap has mostly been explored in developed countries and in quantitative studies. This paper reports on a mixed methods study of the perceptions of…

  13. Chemistry Comes Alive!, Volume 4: Abstract of Special Issue 25 on CD-ROM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Jerrold J.; Bain, Gordon; Bruce, Kara; Moore, John W.

    2000-06-01

    , lessons, or instructional materials that utilize Chemistry Comes Alive! The movies on this CD-ROM are QuickTime movies. In addition to viewing with a WWW browser, the video can be played directly using QuickTime MoviePlayer. Images from the CD can be easily incorporated into multimedia presentations or lessons. Use of the Bookmark function of the Web browser is a particularly convenient method of organizing material for a lecture or for a student lesson. Remember that an additional license must be purchased before you place video from any CCA! volume on your local WWW server. Images of the reactions of potassium, selected from movies on Reactions of the Elements Acknowledgments Funding for Chemistry Comes Alive! was provided by the National Science Foundation, New Traditions, grant DUE-9455928 and National Science Foundation, Instructional Materials Development grant ESI-9154099. Many individuals made significant contributions to the development of this project. These include Alton Banks, North Carolina State University; Joe March, University of Alabama at Birmingham. Price and Ordering An order form is inserted in this issue that provides prices and other ordering information. If this card is not available or if you need additional information, contact JCE Software, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1101 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706-1396; phone; 608/262-5153 or 800/991-5534; fax: 608/265-8094; email: jcesoft@chem.wisc.edu. Information about all our publications (including abstracts, descriptions, updates) is available from our World Wide Web site. Literature Cited

    1. Jacobsen, J. J.; Moore, J. W. Chemistry Comes Alive! Vol. 1; J. Chem. Educ. Software 1998, SP 18.
    2. Jacobsen, J. J.; Moore, J. W. Chemistry Comes Alive! Vol. 2; J. Chem. Educ. Software 1998, SP 21.
    3. Jacobsen, J. J.; Moore, J. W. Chemistry Comes Alive! Vol. 3; J. Chem. Educ. Software 2000, SP 23.
    4. Banks, A. J.; Holmes, J. L.; Jacobsen, J. J.; Kotz, J. C.; Moore, J. W

    5. Complexity, Systems, and Software

      DTIC Science & Technology

      2014-08-14

      2014 Carnegie Mellon University Complexity, Systems, and Software Software Engineering Institute Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA...this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to Washington Headquarters Services , Directorate for Information...OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 29 OCT 2014 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Complexity, Systems, and Software

    6. Organizational Characteristics and Use of Personal Computer Software by Graduate Students in Makerere University

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Bakkabulindi, Fred Edward K.; Adebanjo, Oyebade Stephen

      2011-01-01

      This paper reports a survey that sought to establish levels of use of PC (personal computer) software by graduate students in Makerere University and to link the same to organizational characteristics, related to a given respondent's "unit", that is school, faculty or institute, namely its ability to absorb change, its ICT (Information…

    7. Captivating Open University Students with Online Literature Search Tutorials Created Using Screen Capture Software

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Wales, Tim; Robertson, Penny

      2008-01-01

      Purpose: The aim of this paper is to share the experiences and challenges faced by the Open University Library (OUL) in using screen capture software to develop online literature search tutorials. Design/methodology/approach: A summary of information literacy support at the OUL is provided as background information to explain the decision to…

    8. Identifying strengths and weaknesses of Quality Management Unit University of Sumatera Utara software using SCAMPI C

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Gunawan, D.; Amalia, A.; Rahmat, R. F.; Muchtar, M. A.; Siregar, I.

      2018-02-01

      Identification of software maturity level is a technique to determine the quality of the software. By identifying the software maturity level, the weaknesses of the software can be observed. As a result, the recommendations might be a reference for future software maintenance and development. This paper discusses the software Capability Level (CL) with case studies on Quality Management Unit (Unit Manajemen Mutu) University of Sumatera Utara (UMM-USU). This research utilized Standard CMMI Appraisal Method for Process Improvement class C (SCAMPI C) model with continuous representation. This model focuses on activities for developing quality products and services. The observation is done in three process areas, such as Project Planning (PP), Project Monitoring and Control (PMC), and Requirements Management (REQM). According to the measurement of software capability level for UMM-USU software, turns out that the capability level for the observed process area is in the range of CL1 and CL2. Planning Project (PP) is the only process area which reaches capability level 2, meanwhile, PMC and REQM are still in CL 1 or in performed level. This research reveals several weaknesses of existing UMM-USU software. Therefore, this study proposes several recommendations for UMM-USU to improve capability level for observed process areas.

    9. Management software for a universal device communication controller: application to monitoring and computerized infusions.

      PubMed

      Coussaert, E J; Cantraine, F R

      1996-11-01

      We designed a virtual device for a local area network observing, operating and connecting devices to a personal computer. To keep the widest field of application, we proceeded by using abstraction and specification rules of software engineering in the design and implementation of the hardware and software for the Infusion Monitor. We specially built a box of hardware to interface multiple medical instruments with different communication protocols to a PC via a single serial port. We called that box the Universal Device Communication Controller (UDCC). The use of the virtual device driver is illustrated by the Infusion Monitor implemented for the anaesthesia and intensive care workstation.

    10. Software Architecture for Big Data Systems

      DTIC Science & Technology

      2014-03-27

      Software Architecture: Trends and New Directions #SEIswArch © 2014 Carnegie Mellon University Software Architecture for Big Data Systems...AND SUBTITLE Software Architecture for Big Data Systems 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...ih - . Software Architecture: Trends and New Directions #SEIswArch © 2014 Carnegie Mellon University WHAT IS BIG DATA ? FROM A SOFTWARE

    11. PDBStat: a universal restraint converter and restraint analysis software package for protein NMR.

      PubMed

      Tejero, Roberto; Snyder, David; Mao, Binchen; Aramini, James M; Montelione, Gaetano T

      2013-08-01

      The heterogeneous array of software tools used in the process of protein NMR structure determination presents organizational challenges in the structure determination and validation processes, and creates a learning curve that limits the broader use of protein NMR in biology. These challenges, including accurate use of data in different data formats required by software carrying out similar tasks, continue to confound the efforts of novices and experts alike. These important issues need to be addressed robustly in order to standardize protein NMR structure determination and validation. PDBStat is a C/C++ computer program originally developed as a universal coordinate and protein NMR restraint converter. Its primary function is to provide a user-friendly tool for interconverting between protein coordinate and protein NMR restraint data formats. It also provides an integrated set of computational methods for protein NMR restraint analysis and structure quality assessment, relabeling of prochiral atoms with correct IUPAC names, as well as multiple methods for analysis of the consistency of atomic positions indicated by their convergence across a protein NMR ensemble. In this paper we provide a detailed description of the PDBStat software, and highlight some of its valuable computational capabilities. As an example, we demonstrate the use of the PDBStat restraint converter for restrained CS-Rosetta structure generation calculations, and compare the resulting protein NMR structure models with those generated from the same NMR restraint data using more traditional structure determination methods. These results demonstrate the value of a universal restraint converter in allowing the use of multiple structure generation methods with the same restraint data for consensus analysis of protein NMR structures and the underlying restraint data.

  1. PDBStat: A Universal Restraint Converter and Restraint Analysis Software Package for Protein NMR

    PubMed Central

    Tejero, Roberto; Snyder, David; Mao, Binchen; Aramini, James M.; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2013-01-01

    The heterogeneous array of software tools used in the process of protein NMR structure determination presents organizational challenges in the structure determination and validation processes, and creates a learning curve that limits the broader use of protein NMR in biology. These challenges, including accurate use of data in different data formats required by software carrying out similar tasks, continue to confound the efforts of novices and experts alike. These important issues need to be addressed robustly in order to standardize protein NMR structure determination and validation. PDBStat is a C/C++ computer program originally developed as a universal coordinate and protein NMR restraint converter. Its primary function is to provide a user-friendly tool for interconverting between protein coordinate and protein NMR restraint data formats. It also provides an integrated set of computational methods for protein NMR restraint analysis and structure quality assessment, relabeling of prochiral atoms with correct IUPAC names, as well as multiple methods for analysis of the consistency of atomic positions indicated by their convergence across a protein NMR ensemble. In this paper we provide a detailed description of the PDBStat software, and highlight some of its valuable computational capabilities. As an example, we demonstrate the use of the PDBStat restraint converter for restrained CS-Rosetta structure generation calculations, and compare the resulting protein NMR structure models with those generated from the same NMR restraint data using more traditional structure determination methods. These results demonstrate the value of a universal restraint converter in allowing the use of multiple structure generation methods with the same restraint data for consensus analysis of protein NMR structures and the underlying restraint data. PMID:23897031

  2. UltraPse: A Universal and Extensible Software Platform for Representing Biological Sequences.

    PubMed

    Du, Pu-Feng; Zhao, Wei; Miao, Yang-Yang; Wei, Le-Yi; Wang, Likun

    2017-11-14

    With the avalanche of biological sequences in public databases, one of the most challenging problems in computational biology is to predict their biological functions and cellular attributes. Most of the existing prediction algorithms can only handle fixed-length numerical vectors. Therefore, it is important to be able to represent biological sequences with various lengths using fixed-length numerical vectors. Although several algorithms, as well as software implementations, have been developed to address this problem, these existing programs can only provide a fixed number of representation modes. Every time a new sequence representation mode is developed, a new program will be needed. In this paper, we propose the UltraPse as a universal software platform for this problem. The function of the UltraPse is not only to generate various existing sequence representation modes, but also to simplify all future programming works in developing novel representation modes. The extensibility of UltraPse is particularly enhanced. It allows the users to define their own representation mode, their own physicochemical properties, or even their own types of biological sequences. Moreover, UltraPse is also the fastest software of its kind. The source code package, as well as the executables for both Linux and Windows platforms, can be downloaded from the GitHub repository.

  3. Perm State University HPC-hardware and software services: capabilities for aircraft engine aeroacoustics problems solving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demenev, A. G.

    2018-02-01

    The present work is devoted to analyze high-performance computing (HPC) infrastructure capabilities for aircraft engine aeroacoustics problems solving at Perm State University. We explore here the ability to develop new computational aeroacoustics methods/solvers for computer-aided engineering (CAE) systems to handle complicated industrial problems of engine noise prediction. Leading aircraft engine engineering company, including “UEC-Aviadvigatel” JSC (our industrial partners in Perm, Russia), require that methods/solvers to optimize geometry of aircraft engine for fan noise reduction. We analysed Perm State University HPC-hardware resources and software services to use efficiently. The performed results demonstrate that Perm State University HPC-infrastructure are mature enough to face out industrial-like problems of development CAE-system with HPC-method and CFD-solvers.

  4. Certified Binaries for Software Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Defense. The Software Engineering Institute is a federally funded research and development center sponsored...by the U.S. Department of Defense. Copyright 2007 Carnegie Mellon University. NO WARRANTY THIS CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY AND SOFTWARE ENGINEERING

  5. Emerging Technologies for Software-Reliant Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-24

    needs • Loose coupling • Global distribution of hardware, software and people • Horizontal integration and convergence • Virtualization...Webinar– February 2011 © 2011 Carnegie Mellon University Global Distribution of Hardware, Software and People Globalization is an essential part of...University Required Software Engineering Emphasis Due to Emerging Technologies (2) Defensive Programming • Security • Auto-adaptation • Globalization

  6. Chemists, Access, Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    2000-06-01

    IP-number access. Current subscriptions can be upgraded to IP-number access at little additional cost. We are pleased to be able to offer to institutions and libraries this convenient mode of access to subscriber only resources at JCE Online. JCE Online Usage Statistics We are continually amazed by the activity at JCE Online. So far, the year 2000 has shown a marked increase. Given the phenomenal overall growth of the Internet, perhaps our surprise is not warranted. However, during the months of January and February 2000, over 38,000 visitors requested over 275,000 pages. This is a monthly increase of over 33% from the October-December 1999 levels. It is good to know that people are visiting, but we would very much like to know what you would most like to see at JCE Online. Please send your suggestions to JCEOnline@chem.wisc.edu. For those who are interested, JCE Online year-to-date statistics are available. Biographical Snapshots of Famous Chemists: Mission Statement Feature Editor: Barbara Burke Chemistry Department, California State Polytechnic University-Pomona, Pomona, CA 91768 phone: 909/869-3664 fax: 909/869-4616 email: baburke@csupomona.edu The primary goal of this JCE Internet column is to provide information about chemists who have made important contributions to chemistry. For each chemist, there is a short biographical "snapshot" that provides basic information about the person's chemical work, gender, ethnicity, and cultural background. Each snapshot includes links to related websites and to a biobibliographic database. The database provides references for the individual and can be searched through key words listed at the end of each snapshot. All students, not just science majors, need to understand science as it really is: an exciting, challenging, human, and creative way of learning about our natural world. Investigating the life experiences of chemists can provide a means for students to gain a more realistic view of chemistry. In addition students

  7. Center for Adaptive Optics | Software

    Science.gov Websites

    Center for Adaptive Optics A University of California Science and Technology Center home Adaptive Optics Software The Center for Adaptive Optics acts as a clearing house for distributing Software to Institutes it gives specialists in Adaptive Optics a place to distribute their software. All software is

  8. Towards Archetypes-Based Software Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piho, Gunnar; Roost, Mart; Perkins, David; Tepandi, Jaak

    We present a framework for the archetypes based engineering of domains, requirements and software (Archetypes-Based Software Development, ABD). An archetype is defined as a primordial object that occurs consistently and universally in business domains and in business software systems. An archetype pattern is a collaboration of archetypes. Archetypes and archetype patterns are used to capture conceptual information into domain specific models that are utilized by ABD. The focus of ABD is on software factories - family-based development artefacts (domain specific languages, patterns, frameworks, tools, micro processes, and others) that can be used to build the family members. We demonstrate the usage of ABD for developing laboratory information management system (LIMS) software for the Clinical and Biomedical Proteomics Group, at the Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Leeds.

  9. Software Development Group. Software Review Center. Microcomputing Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkey, Nadine; Smith, Shirley C.

    Two papers describe the roles of the Software Development Group (SDG) and the Software Review Center (SRC) at Drexel University. The first paper covers the primary role of the SDG, which is designed to assist Drexel faculty with the technical design and programming of courseware for the Apple Macintosh microcomputer; the relationship of the SDG…

  10. There Has to Be a Better Way to...

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    1999-12-01

    There Has to Be a Better Way to... Entering into the next millennium, we begin to think about what new advances the future may bring. For JCE subscribers the new millennium brings global access to all of JCE Online, which ushers in several advances in the use of the Journal. I would like to present here some of the "better ways" that JCE Online offers. Find Journal Articles Last month (J. Chem. Educ. 1999, 76, 1599) we presented a step-by-step recipe for finding articles that have been published in the Journal. I think you will agree that searching online for an article is better than looking through multiple volumes of past indices. If the articles you find are available online, then only a mouse click or two is needed to retrieve each one. Store Your Journals: Let JCE Online and JCE CD Do It Is your office getting short of shelf space? You may want to consider moving your collection of the Journal to another location and replace it with a copy of our annual CD or use JCE Online. With easy access from your desktop computer for all articles published in the Journal since September 1996, including all supplementary materials, both JCE Online and JCE CD can replace those more recent volumes and free up some shelf space. One advantage of JCE CD is that, unlike JCE Online, it is still there and accessible even if you let your subscription lapse. Share Dynamic Media Chemistry is very visual. Only relatively recently has technology allowed us to visually present our models for explaining chemical phenomena. Now, with molecular modeling and symbolic algebra tools, we are able to use 3-D graphics and animation to adequately present our models in a very stimulating and revealing manner. We can write thousands of words and produce many stunning figures, but when it comes right down to it, the print medium cannot do an adequate job of publishing articles about many chemical models. Figure Caption: For a better

  11. The Jackson Career Explorer: Correlates With Self-Monitoring and Social Desirability.

    PubMed

    Schermer, Julie Aitken

    2018-01-01

    The Jackson Career Explorer (JCE) is a short form and continuous version of the Jackson Vocational Interest Survey measuring 34 vocational interest dimensions which can be reduced to seven factors (six vocational interest factors and one work style factor). Both the scales and factors were examined for possible significant correlations with social desirability and self-monitoring. Volunteer participants ( N = 779) aged 14 to 92 years completed the JCE, a social desirability scale, and a self-monitoring scale. Social desirability did not correlate significantly with the JCE scales and factors. Self-monitoring was found to correlate significantly with only a few of the JCE dimensions, including the performing arts, dominant leadership, and law scales as well as the business factor. Interestingly, the accountability JCE work style scale, which assesses a preference to work in an environment requiring high levels of honesty, had a significant negative correlation with self-monitoring. These results add to the validity of the JCE and add information to the area of vocational interest assessment.

  12. SOFTWARE ENGINEERING INSTITUTE (SEI)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Software Engineering Institute (SEI) is a federally funded research and development center established in 1984 by the U.S. Department of Defense and operated by Carnegie Mellon University. SEI has a broad charter to provide leadership in the practice of software engineering t...

  13. Computer systems and software engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, Charles W.

    1988-01-01

    The High Technologies Laboratory (HTL) was established in the fall of 1982 at the University of Houston Clear Lake. Research conducted at the High Tech Lab is focused upon computer systems and software engineering. There is a strong emphasis on the interrelationship of these areas of technology and the United States' space program. In Jan. of 1987, NASA Headquarters announced the formation of its first research center dedicated to software engineering. Operated by the High Tech Lab, the Software Engineering Research Center (SERC) was formed at the University of Houston Clear Lake. The High Tech Lab/Software Engineering Research Center promotes cooperative research among government, industry, and academia to advance the edge-of-knowledge and the state-of-the-practice in key topics of computer systems and software engineering which are critical to NASA. The center also recommends appropriate actions, guidelines, standards, and policies to NASA in matters pertinent to the center's research. Results of the research conducted at the High Tech Lab/Software Engineering Research Center have given direction to many decisions made by NASA concerning the Space Station Program.

  14. Final Report. Center for Scalable Application Development Software

    SciTech Connect

    Mellor-Crummey, John

    2014-10-26

    The Center for Scalable Application Development Software (CScADS) was established as a part- nership between Rice University, Argonne National Laboratory, University of California Berkeley, University of Tennessee – Knoxville, and University of Wisconsin – Madison. CScADS pursued an integrated set of activities with the aim of increasing the productivity of DOE computational scientists by catalyzing the development of systems software, libraries, compilers, and tools for leadership computing platforms. Principal Center activities were workshops to engage the research community in the challenges of leadership computing, research and development of open-source software, and work with computational scientists to help them develop codesmore » for leadership computing platforms. This final report summarizes CScADS activities at Rice University in these areas.« less

  15. The Software Engineering Laboratory: An operational software experience factory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basili, Victor R.; Caldiera, Gianluigi; Mcgarry, Frank; Pajerski, Rose; Page, Gerald; Waligora, Sharon

    1992-01-01

    For 15 years, the Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) has been carrying out studies and experiments for the purpose of understanding, assessing, and improving software and software processes within a production software development environment at NASA/GSFC. The SEL comprises three major organizations: (1) NASA/GSFC, Flight Dynamics Division; (2) University of Maryland, Department of Computer Science; and (3) Computer Sciences Corporation, Flight Dynamics Technology Group. These organizations have jointly carried out several hundred software studies, producing hundreds of reports, papers, and documents, all of which describe some aspect of the software engineering technology that was analyzed in the flight dynamics environment at NASA. The studies range from small, controlled experiments (such as analyzing the effectiveness of code reading versus that of functional testing) to large, multiple project studies (such as assessing the impacts of Ada on a production environment). The organization's driving goal is to improve the software process continually, so that sustained improvement may be observed in the resulting products. This paper discusses the SEL as a functioning example of an operational software experience factory and summarizes the characteristics of and major lessons learned from 15 years of SEL operations.

  16. Software Solution Builds Project Consensus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graue, David

    2003-01-01

    Describes the use of Autodesk Revit, a computer software system for design and documentation of buildings, in the planning of the University Center of Chicago, a large residence hall involving the cooperation of DePaul University, Columbia College, and Roosevelt University. (EV)

  17. Software process improvement in the NASA software engineering laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgarry, Frank; Pajerski, Rose; Page, Gerald; Waligora, Sharon; Basili, Victor; Zelkowitz, Marvin

    1994-01-01

    The Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) was established in 1976 for the purpose of studying and measuring software processes with the intent of identifying improvements that could be applied to the production of ground support software within the Flight Dynamics Division (FDD) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The SEL has three member organizations: NASA/GSFC, the University of Maryland, and Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC). The concept of process improvement within the SEL focuses on the continual understanding of both process and product as well as goal-driven experimentation and analysis of process change within a production environment.

  18. Software to Go--And It Goes!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrams, Mary; Kurlychek, Ken

    1989-01-01

    This article describes the Software Evaluation Clearinghouse for Educators of the Hearing Impaired at Gallaudet University (Washington, DC). Software compatible with Apple and IBM hardware is collected, rated by clearinghouse members, and described in a printed catalog. Tips on starting a software lending library are offered. (PB)

  19. Large-scale visualization projects for teaching software engineering.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christoph; Reina, Guido; Burch, Michael; Weiskopf, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The University of Stuttgart's software engineering major complements the traditional computer science major with more practice-oriented education. Two-semester software projects in various application areas offered by the university's different computer science institutes are a successful building block in the curriculum. With this realistic, complex project setting, students experience the practice of software engineering, including software development processes, technologies, and soft skills. In particular, visualization-based projects are popular with students. Such projects offer them the opportunity to gain profound knowledge that would hardly be possible with only regular lectures and homework assignments.

  20. Proceedings of the Thirteenth Annual Software Engineering Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Topics covered in the workshop included studies and experiments conducted in the Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL), a cooperative effort of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, the University of Maryland, and Computer Sciences Corporation; software models; software products; and software tools.

  1. Software Component Technologies and Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batory, Don

    1995-01-01

    In the near future, software systems will be more reconfigurable than hardware. This will be possible through the advent of software component technologies which have been prototyped in universities and research labs. In this paper, we outline the foundations for those technologies and suggest how they might impact software for space applications.

  2. Laval University and Lakehead University Experiments at TREC 2015 Contextual Suggestion Track

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-20

    Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering, Laval University 2 Department of Software Engineering, Lakehead University Abstract—In this...Linear Regression and Lambda Mart perform poorly in this case, be- cause the size of the training data per user is small (less than 50 samples). On the

  3. The Organization of a Computer Software Collection Using an Information Storage and Retrieval Software Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Denise M.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses design, development, and use of a database to provide organization and access to a computer software collection at the University of Hawaii School of Library Studies. Field specifications, samples of report forms, and a description of the physical organization of the software collection are included. (MBR)

  4. Training in software used by practising engineers should be included in university curricula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, A.; Perdigones, A.; García, J. L.

    2009-04-01

    Deally, an engineering education should prepare students, i.e., emerging engineers, to use problem-solving processes that synergistically combine creativity and imagination with rigour and discipline. Recently, pressures on curricula have resulted in the development of software-specific courses, often to the detriment of the understanding of theory [1]. However, it is also true that there is a demand for information technology courses by students other than computer science majors [2]. The emphasis on training engineers may be best placed on answering the needs of industry; indeed, many proposals are now being made to try to reduce the gap between the educational and industrial communities [3]. Training in the use of certain computer programs may be one way of better preparing engineering undergraduates for eventual employment in industry. However, industry's needs in this respect must first be known. The aim of this work was to determine which computer programs are used by practising agricultural engineers with the aim of incorporating training in their use into our department's teaching curriculum. The results showed that 72% of their working hours involved the use computer programs. The software packages most commonly used were Microsoft Office (used by 79% of respondents) and CAD (56%), as well as budgeting (27%), statistical (21%), engineering (15%) and GIS (13%) programs. As a result of this survey our university department opened an additional computer suite in order to provide students practical experience in the use of Microsoft Excel, budgeting and engineering software. The results of this survey underline the importance of computer software training in this and perhaps other fields of engineering. [1] D. J. Moore, and D. R. Voltmer, "Curriculum for an engineering renaissance," IEEE Trans. Educ., vol. 46, pp. 452-455, Nov. 2003. [2] N. Kock, R. Aiken, and C. Sandas, "Using complex IT in specific domains: developing and assessing a course for nonmajors

  5. Writing Electron Dot Structures: Abstract of Issue 9905M

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnell, Kenneth R.

    1999-10-01

    "> Screens from Writing Electron Dot Structures Hardware and Software Requirements Hardware and software requirements for Writing Electron Dot Structures are shown in Table 1. Ordering and Information Journal of Chemical Education Software (or JCE Software) is a publication of the Journal of Chemical Education. There is an order form inserted in this issue that provides prices and other ordering information. If this card is not available or if you need additional information, contact: JCE Software, University of Wisconsin­Madison, 1101 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706-1396; phone; 608/262-5153 or 800/991-5534; fax: 608/265-8094; email: jcesoft@chem.wisc.edu. Information about all of our publications (including abstracts, descriptions, updates) is available from our World Wide Web site at: http://JChemEd.chem.wisc.edu/JCESoft/

  6. Applying Hypertext Structures to Software Documentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, James C.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Describes a prototype system for software documentation management called SLEUTH (Software Literacy Enhancing Usefulness to Humans) being developed at the University of Virginia. Highlights include information retrieval techniques, hypertext links that are installed automatically, a WAIS (Wide Area Information Server) search engine, user…

  7. Summary of SEI Accomplishments for Software Development and Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    and Validation is ollered at Mississippi State University, East Tennessee State University, and the University of Minnesota, Duluth. Software Project...Project final report and helping Hecrcules prepare a presentation for the February AdJaJ[ J (. Work has begun on the final lessons-learned report. 10...and Solutions in the DoD software community. The Technology Applications Functlion prot ides a link between DoD mission-critical 0 000000 appictin J

  8. Control Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Real-Time Innovations, Inc. (RTI) collaborated with Ames Research Center, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Stanford University to leverage NASA research to produce ControlShell software. RTI is the first "graduate" of Ames Research Center's Technology Commercialization Center. The ControlShell system was used extensively on a cooperative project to enhance the capabilities of a Russian-built Marsokhod rover being evaluated for eventual flight to Mars. RTI's ControlShell is complex, real-time command and control software, capable of processing information and controlling mechanical devices. One ControlShell tool is StethoScope. As a real-time data collection and display tool, StethoScope allows a user to see how a program is running without changing its execution. RTI has successfully applied its software savvy in other arenas, such as telecommunications, networking, video editing, semiconductor manufacturing, automobile systems, and medical imaging.

  9. Software Requirements Specification for Lunar IceCube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser-Garbrick, Michael R.

    Lunar IceCube is a 6U satellite that will orbit the moon to measure water volatiles as a function of position, altitude, and time, and measure in its various phases. Lunar IceCube, is a collaboration between Morehead State University, Vermont Technical University, Busek, and NASA. The Software Requirements Specification will serve as contract between the overall team and the developers of the flight software. It will provide a system's overview of the software that will be developed for Lunar IceCube, in that it will detail all of the interconnects and protocols for each subsystem's that Lunar IceCube will utilize. The flight software will be written in SPARK to the fullest extent, due to SPARK's unique ability to make software free of any errors. The LIC flight software does make use of a general purpose, reusable application framework called CubedOS. This framework imposes some structuring requirements on the architecture and design of the flight software, but it does not impose any high level requirements. It will also detail the tools that we will be using for Lunar IceCube, such as why we will be utilizing VxWorks.

  10. A Comparative Study of the Critical Thinking Skills among the Students of Accounting and Software in the Female Technical and Vocational University in the City of Borojerd

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagheri, Mahdi; Nowrozi, Reza Ali

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the critical thinking skills among the students of accounting and software in the female technical and vocational university in the city of Borojerd. This study is a descriptive-comparative research. The statistical population of this study includes the female students of accounting and software in the…

  11. From LPF to eLISA: new approach in payload software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gesa, Ll.; Martin, V.; Conchillo, A.; Ortega, J. A.; Mateos, I.; Torrents, A.; Lopez-Zaragoza, J. P.; Rivas, F.; Lloro, I.; Nofrarias, M.; Sopuerta, CF.

    2017-05-01

    eLISA will be the first observatory in space to explore the Gravitational Universe. It will gather revolutionary information about the dark universe. This implies a robust and reliable embedded control software and hardware working together. With the lessons learnt with the LISA Pathfinder payload software as baseline, we will introduce in this short article the key concepts and new approaches that our group is working on in terms of software: multiprocessor, self-modifying-code strategies, 100% hardware and software monitoring, embedded scripting, Time and Space Partition among others.

  12. Key Considerations of Community, Scalability, Supportability, Security, and Functionality in Selecting Open-Source Software in California Universities as Perceived by Technology Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britton, Todd Alan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the key considerations of community, scalability, supportability, security, and functionality for selecting open-source software in California universities as perceived by technology leaders. Methods: After a review of the cogent literature, the key conceptual framework categories were identified…

  13. Planetarium Software in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persson, J. R.; Eriksson, U.

    2016-01-01

    Students often find astronomy and astrophysics to be most interesting and exciting, but the Universe is difficult to access using only one's eyes or simple equipment available at different educational settings. To open up the Universe and enhance learning astronomy and astrophysics different planetarium software can be used. In this article we…

  14. Software cost/resource modeling: Deep space network software cost estimation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A parametric software cost estimation model prepared for JPL deep space network (DSN) data systems implementation tasks is presented. The resource estimation model incorporates principles and data from a number of existing models, such as those of the General Research Corporation, Doty Associates, IBM (Walston-Felix), Rome Air Force Development Center, University of Maryland, and Rayleigh-Norden-Putnam. The model calibrates task magnitude and difficulty, development environment, and software technology effects through prompted responses to a set of approximately 50 questions. Parameters in the model are adjusted to fit JPL software lifecycle statistics. The estimation model output scales a standard DSN work breakdown structure skeleton, which is then input to a PERT/CPM system, producing a detailed schedule and resource budget for the project being planned.

  15. Torsional Angle Driver (TorAD) System for HyperChem/Excel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starkey, Ronald

    1999-02-01

    1 method, but other methods can be used. The calculation method and the restraint can be specified. · Tor2_180 and Tor2_360 rotate two torsional angles to provide a 3D plot of the resulting total energy surface. Tor2_180 performs a 0 to 180° rotation, in 10° steps, on each of the two torsional angle systems (tor1 and tor2) selected. Tor2_360 will do a -180° to +180° (360° total) rotation of the two torsional angles in 20° steps. Both tor2_180 and tor2_360 provide an x, y, z plot (x = angle 1, y = angle 2, z = energy) and a topo plot (x = angle 1, y = angle 2, z = topo lines and color coding). The molecular mechanics method and the restraint can be specified. Hardware and Software Requirement Hardware and software requirements for Torsional Angle Driver (TorAD) are shown in Table 1. These programs require a version of HyperChem 4.0 or later that supports DDE. Also required is Microsoft Excel 5.0 or higher. HyperChem and Excel are not included with the issue.

    Ordering and Information JCE Software is a publication of the Journal of Chemical Education. There is an order form inserted in this issue that provides prices and other ordering information. If this card is not available or if you need additional information, contact: JCE Software, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1101 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706-1396 phone: 608/262-5153 or 800/991-5534 fax: 608/265-8094; email: jcesoft@chem.wisc.edu Information about all of our publications (including abstracts, descriptions, updates) is available from the JCE Software World Wide Web site.

  16. Software development for teleroentgenogram analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goshkoderov, A. A.; Khlebnikov, N. A.; Obabkov, I. N.; Serkov, K. V.; Gajniyarov, I. M.; Aliev, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    A framework for the analysis and calculation of teleroentgenograms was developed. Software development was carried out in the Department of Children's Dentistry and Orthodontics in Ural State Medical University. The software calculates the teleroentgenogram by the original method which was developed in this medical department. Program allows designing its own methods for calculating the teleroentgenograms by new methods. It is planned to use the technology of machine learning (Neural networks) in the software. This will help to make the process of calculating the teleroentgenograms easier because methodological points will be placed automatically.

  17. MHEC Academic Scheduling Software Survey Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midwestern Higher Education Commission Academic Software Committee Research Bulletin, 1995

    1995-01-01

    This bulletin summarizes the chief quantitative findings of a survey of 264 small and medium sized colleges and universities in the midwest concerning their use of and interest in academic scheduling software. This type of software assists in planning course offerings, assigning instructors and course functions to facilities and time slots, and…

  18. The Relevance of Software Development Education for Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liebenberg, Janet; Huisman, Magda; Mentz, Elsa

    2015-01-01

    Despite a widely-acknowledged shortage of software developers, and reports of a gap between industry needs and software education, the possible gap between students' needs and software development education has not been explored in detail. In their university education, students want to take courses and carry out projects that clearly relate to…

  19. NASA PC software evaluation project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Kuan, Julie C.

    1986-01-01

    The USL NASA PC software evaluation project is intended to provide a structured framework for facilitating the development of quality NASA PC software products. The project will assist NASA PC development staff to understand the characteristics and functions of NASA PC software products. Based on the results of the project teams' evaluations and recommendations, users can judge the reliability, usability, acceptability, maintainability and customizability of all the PC software products. The objective here is to provide initial, high-level specifications and guidelines for NASA PC software evaluation. The primary tasks to be addressed in this project are as follows: to gain a strong understanding of what software evaluation entails and how to organize a structured software evaluation process; to define a structured methodology for conducting the software evaluation process; to develop a set of PC software evaluation criteria and evaluation rating scales; and to conduct PC software evaluations in accordance with the identified methodology. Communication Packages, Network System Software, Graphics Support Software, Environment Management Software, General Utilities. This report represents one of the 72 attachment reports to the University of Southwestern Louisiana's Final Report on NASA Grant NGT-19-010-900. Accordingly, appropriate care should be taken in using this report out of context of the full Final Report.

  20. IUWare and Computing Tools: Indiana University's Approach to Low-Cost Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheehan, Mark C.; Williams, James G.

    1987-01-01

    Describes strategies for providing low-cost microcomputer-based software for classroom use on college campuses. Highlights include descriptions of the software (IUWare and Computing Tools); computing center support; license policies; documentation; promotion; distribution; staff, faculty, and user training; problems; and future plans. (LRW)

  1. Penn State University ground software support for X-ray missions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsley, L. K.; Nousek, J. A.; Corbet, R. H. D.

    1995-03-01

    The X-ray group at Penn State is charged with two software development efforts in support of X-ray satellite missions. As part of the ACIS instrument team for AXAF, the authors are developing part of the ground software to support the instrument's calibration. They are also designing a translation program for Ginga data, to change it from the non-standard FRF format, which closely parallels the original telemetry format, to FITS.

  2. Aircraft Design Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Successful commercialization of the AirCraft SYNThesis (ACSYNT) tool has resulted in the creation of Phoenix Integration, Inc. ACSYNT has been exclusively licensed to the company, an outcome of a seven year, $3 million effort to provide unique software technology to a focused design engineering market. Ames Research Center formulated ACSYNT and in working with the Virginia Polytechnic Institute CAD Laboratory, began to design and code a computer-aided design for ACSYNT. Using a Joint Sponsored Research Agreement, Ames formed an industry-government-university alliance to improve and foster research and development for the software. As a result of the ACSYNT Institute, the software is becoming a predominant tool for aircraft conceptual design. ACSYNT has been successfully applied to high- speed civil transport configuration, subsonic transports, and supersonic fighters.

  3. Software Piracy Detection Model Using Ant Colony Optimization Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astiqah Omar, Nor; Zakuan, Zeti Zuryani Mohd; Saian, Rizauddin

    2017-06-01

    Internet enables information to be accessible anytime and anywhere. This scenario creates an environment whereby information can be easily copied. Easy access to the internet is one of the factors which contribute towards piracy in Malaysia as well as the rest of the world. According to a survey conducted by Compliance Gap BSA Global Software Survey in 2013 on software piracy, found out that 43 percent of the software installed on PCs around the world was not properly licensed, the commercial value of the unlicensed installations worldwide was reported to be 62.7 billion. Piracy can happen anywhere including universities. Malaysia as well as other countries in the world is faced with issues of piracy committed by the students in universities. Piracy in universities concern about acts of stealing intellectual property. It can be in the form of software piracy, music piracy, movies piracy and piracy of intellectual materials such as books, articles and journals. This scenario affected the owner of intellectual property as their property is in jeopardy. This study has developed a classification model for detecting software piracy. The model was developed using a swarm intelligence algorithm called the Ant Colony Optimization algorithm. The data for training was collected by a study conducted in Universiti Teknologi MARA (Perlis). Experimental results show that the model detection accuracy rate is better as compared to J48 algorithm.

  4. Real World Software Engineering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-15

    Corvision Cortex Corporation Daisys S /Cubed, Inc. Design/IDF & CPN Meta Software Corp. 22 EasyCase Professional Evergreen CASE Tools 8522 150th 4th Ave NE...Final RSUoTL 28 Sep 92-31 May 94 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S . FUNDING NUMBERS Real World Software Engineering 6. AUTHOR( S ) Donald Gotterbarn Robert Riser . a...nin• Sm-i t’h 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND AOORESS(ES1 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER East Tennessee State University Department

  5. NASA Software Engineering Benchmarking Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rarick, Heather L.; Godfrey, Sara H.; Kelly, John C.; Crumbley, Robert T.; Wifl, Joel M.

    2013-01-01

    To identify best practices for the improvement of software engineering on projects, NASA's Offices of Chief Engineer (OCE) and Safety and Mission Assurance (OSMA) formed a team led by Heather Rarick and Sally Godfrey to conduct this benchmarking study. The primary goals of the study are to identify best practices that: Improve the management and technical development of software intensive systems; Have a track record of successful deployment by aerospace industries, universities [including research and development (R&D) laboratories], and defense services, as well as NASA's own component Centers; and Identify candidate solutions for NASA's software issues. Beginning in the late fall of 2010, focus topics were chosen and interview questions were developed, based on the NASA top software challenges. Between February 2011 and November 2011, the Benchmark Team interviewed a total of 18 organizations, consisting of five NASA Centers, five industry organizations, four defense services organizations, and four university or university R and D laboratory organizations. A software assurance representative also participated in each of the interviews to focus on assurance and software safety best practices. Interviewees provided a wealth of information on each topic area that included: software policy, software acquisition, software assurance, testing, training, maintaining rigor in small projects, metrics, and use of the Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) framework, as well as a number of special topics that came up in the discussions. NASA's software engineering practices compared favorably with the external organizations in most benchmark areas, but in every topic, there were ways in which NASA could improve its practices. Compared to defense services organizations and some of the industry organizations, one of NASA's notable weaknesses involved communication with contractors regarding its policies and requirements for acquired software. One of NASA's strengths

  6. Terra Harvest software architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humeniuk, Dave; Klawon, Kevin

    2012-06-01

    Under the Terra Harvest Program, the DIA has the objective of developing a universal Controller for the Unattended Ground Sensor (UGS) community. The mission is to define, implement, and thoroughly document an open architecture that universally supports UGS missions, integrating disparate systems, peripherals, etc. The Controller's inherent interoperability with numerous systems enables the integration of both legacy and future UGS System (UGSS) components, while the design's open architecture supports rapid third-party development to ensure operational readiness. The successful accomplishment of these objectives by the program's Phase 3b contractors is demonstrated via integration of the companies' respective plug-'n'-play contributions that include controllers, various peripherals, such as sensors, cameras, etc., and their associated software drivers. In order to independently validate the Terra Harvest architecture, L-3 Nova Engineering, along with its partner, the University of Dayton Research Institute, is developing the Terra Harvest Open Source Environment (THOSE), a Java Virtual Machine (JVM) running on an embedded Linux Operating System. The Use Cases on which the software is developed support the full range of UGS operational scenarios such as remote sensor triggering, image capture, and data exfiltration. The Team is additionally developing an ARM microprocessor-based evaluation platform that is both energy-efficient and operationally flexible. The paper describes the overall THOSE architecture, as well as the design decisions for some of the key software components. Development process for THOSE is discussed as well.

  7. The Validation of a Software Evaluation Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Dorren Rafael

    This study, conducted at six southern universities, analyzed the validity and reliability of a researcher developed instrument designed to evaluate educational software in secondary mathematics. The instrument called the Instrument for Software Evaluation for Educators uses measurement scales, presents a summary section of the evaluation, and…

  8. A College's Liability for Unauthorized Copying of Microcomputer Software by Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gemignani, Michael

    1986-01-01

    Reviews copyright law and "contributory infringement" as it relates to computer software and possible student and staff violation in colleges and universities. Also discusses possibilities of "breach of contract" and "negligence" in computer software use. Provides a series of recommendations for universities and colleges to protect their…

  9. Science and Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelt, C. A.

    2017-12-01

    , ideally maintained by someone in a funded position. Perhaps the biggest challenge is the reality that researches who use software, as opposed to develop software, are more attractive university hires because they are more likely to be "big picture" scientists that publish in the highest profile journals, although sometimes the two go together.

  10. Parallelization of Rocket Engine Simulator Software (PRESS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cezzar, Ruknet

    1997-01-01

    Parallelization of Rocket Engine System Software (PRESS) project is part of a collaborative effort with Southern University at Baton Rouge (SUBR), University of West Florida (UWF), and Jackson State University (JSU). The second-year funding, which supports two graduate students enrolled in our new Master's program in Computer Science at Hampton University and the principal investigator, have been obtained for the period from October 19, 1996 through October 18, 1997. The key part of the interim report was new directions for the second year funding. This came about from discussions during Rocket Engine Numeric Simulator (RENS) project meeting in Pensacola on January 17-18, 1997. At that time, a software agreement between Hampton University and NASA Lewis Research Center had already been concluded. That agreement concerns off-NASA-site experimentation with PUMPDES/TURBDES software. Before this agreement, during the first year of the project, another large-scale FORTRAN-based software, Two-Dimensional Kinetics (TDK), was being used for translation to an object-oriented language and parallelization experiments. However, that package proved to be too complex and lacking sufficient documentation for effective translation effort to the object-oriented C + + source code. The focus, this time with better documented and more manageable PUMPDES/TURBDES package, was still on translation to C + + with design improvements. At the RENS Meeting, however, the new impetus for the RENS projects in general, and PRESS in particular, has shifted in two important ways. One was closer alignment with the work on Numerical Propulsion System Simulator (NPSS) through cooperation and collaboration with LERC ACLU organization. The other was to see whether and how NASA's various rocket design software can be run over local and intra nets without any radical efforts for redesign and translation into object-oriented source code. There were also suggestions that the Fortran based code be

  11. Technology transfer in software engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Peter C.

    1989-01-01

    The University of Houston-Clear Lake is the prime contractor for the AdaNET Research Project under the direction of NASA Johnson Space Center. AdaNET was established to promote the principles of software engineering to the software development industry. AdaNET will contain not only environments and tools, but also concepts, principles, models, standards, guidelines and practices. Initially, AdaNET will serve clients from the U.S. government and private industry who are working in software development. It will seek new clients from those who have not yet adopted the principles and practices of software engineering. Some of the goals of AdaNET are to become known as an objective, authoritative source of new software engineering information and parts, to provide easy access to information and parts, and to keep abreast of innovations in the field.

  12. Software engineering as an engineering discipline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, Glenn B.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this panel is to explore the emerging field of software engineering from a variety of perspectives: university programs; industry training and definition; government development; and technology transfer. In doing this, the panel will address the issues of distinctions among software engineering, computer science, and computer hardware engineering as they relate to the challenges of large, complex systems.

  13. Software Issues at the User Interface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    successful integration of parallel computers into mainstream scientific computing. Clearly a compiler is the most important software tool available to a...Computer Science University of Colorado Boulder, CO 80309 ABSTRACT We review software issues that are critical to the successful integration of parallel...The development of an optimizing compiler of this quality, addressing communicaton instructions as well as computational instructions is a major

  14. Featured Molecules: Sucrose and Vanillin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, William F.; Wildman, Randall J.

    2003-04-01

    The WebWare molecules of the month for April relate to the sense of taste. Apple Fool, the JCE Classroom Activity, mentions sucrose and vanillin and their use as flavorings. Fully manipulable (Chime) versions of these and other molecules are available at Only@JCE Online.

  15. Perceptions of the software skills of graduates by employers in the financial services industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyng, Tim; Tickle, Leonie; Wood, Leigh N.

    2013-12-01

    Software, particularly spreadsheet software, is ubiquitous in the financial services workplace. Yet little is known about the extent to which universities should, and do, prepare graduates for this aspect of the modern workplace. We have investigated this issue through a survey of financial services employers of graduates, the results of which are reported in this paper, as well as surveys of university graduates and academics, reported previously. Financial services employers rate software skills as important, would like their employees to be more highly skilled in the use of such software, and tend to prefer 'on-the-job' training rather than university training for statistical, database and specialized actuarial/financial software. There is a perception among graduates that employers do not provide adequate formal workplace training in the use of technical software.

  16. Software Past, Present, and Future: Views from Government, Industry and Academia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holcomb, Lee; Page, Jerry; Evangelist, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Views from the NASA CIO NASA Software Engineering Workshop on software development from the past, present, and future are presented. The topics include: 1) Software Past; 2) Software Present; 3) NASA's Largest Software Challenges; 4) 8330 Software Projects in Industry Standish Groups 1994 Report; 5) Software Future; 6) Capability Maturity Model (CMM): Software Engineering Institute (SEI) levels; 7) System Engineering Quality Also Part of the Problem; 8) University Environment Trends Will Increase the Problem in Software Engineering; and 9) NASA Software Engineering Goals.

  17. Software Management for the NOνAExperiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, G. S.; Davies, J. P.; C Group; Rebel, B.; Sachdev, K.; Zirnstein, J.

    2015-12-01

    The NOvAsoftware (NOνASoft) is written in C++, and built on the Fermilab Computing Division's art framework that uses ROOT analysis software. NOνASoftmakes use of more than 50 external software packages, is developed by more than 50 developers and is used by more than 100 physicists from over 30 universities and laboratories in 3 continents. The software builds are handled by Fermilab's custom version of Software Release Tools (SRT), a UNIX based software management system for large, collaborative projects that is used by several experiments at Fermilab. The system provides software version control with SVN configured in a client-server mode and is based on the code originally developed by the BaBar collaboration. In this paper, we present efforts towards distributing the NOvA software via the CernVM File System distributed file system. We will also describe our recent work to use a CMake build system and Jenkins, the open source continuous integration system, for NOνASoft.

  18. Emerging Software Development and Acquisition Approaches: Panacea or Villain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-16

    2010 Carnegie Mellon University Emerging Software Development and Acquisition Approaches: Panacea or Villain Software Engineering Institute...aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to Washington Headquarters Services , Directorate for...Emerging Software Development and Acquisition Approaches: Panacea or Villain 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S

  19. Now That I Have It, What Can I Do with It?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    1999-11-01

    All JCE subscribers now have access to all areas of JCE Online. As a reader of the print Journal you may be wondering what benefits JCE Online offers you and how you can reap those benefits. Point your WWW browser at jchemed.chem.wisc.edu, login, and follow along. Keep in mind that the three benefits outlined below are those that directly benefit you as a Journal reader. JCE Online contains many other resources that will benefit you as a chemistry teacher. Find an Article, Any Article The JCE Online feature that I perceive to be most beneficial to Journal readers is the ease and speed of finding articles. Finding a particular Journal article or several related articles is quickly and conveniently accomplished by using JCE Index online. Clicking the JCE Index item in the left-hand navigation bar leads to the JCE Index search page. A vanity search for articles that I authored or co-authored (type "holmes j" into the search text field and press Enter) produces a list of the ten most recent articles. A click on one of the articles and another click on the Full Text (.pdf) button (in the page menu bar near the top of the page below the global menu bar) and I am looking at one of my articles just as it appeared in the Journal. Four clicks, nine keystrokes, and 25 seconds (your time may vary)... not bad! Searching the Journal has never been easier than using the online JCE Index. If you remember which issue of the Journal contains the article you are looking for, then that article is never more than six mouse clicks away from the JCE Online Home Page. Of course, this only applies if we have the article online; full text articles begin with the September 1996 issue. The first click is on the Past Issues item in the left-hand navigation bar. If the article is not in the current volume of the Journal (your memory is much better than mine if you remember farther back) then the next click (click two) is

  20. Chemical Applications of a Programmable Image Acquisition System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogren, Paul J.; Henry, Ian; Fletcher, Steven E. S.; Kelly, Ian

    2003-06-01

    Image analysis is widely used in chemistry, both for rapid qualitative evaluations using techniques such as thin layer chromatography (TLC) and for quantitative purposes such as well-plate measurements of analyte concentrations or fragment-size determinations in gel electrophoresis. This paper describes a programmable system for image acquisition and processing that is currently used in the laboratories of our organic and physical chemistry courses. It has also been used in student research projects in analytical chemistry and biochemistry. The potential range of applications is illustrated by brief presentations of four examples: (1) using well-plate optical transmission data to construct a standard concentration absorbance curve; (2) the quantitative analysis of acetaminophen in Tylenol and acetylsalicylic acid in aspirin using TLC with fluorescence detection; (3) the analysis of electrophoresis gels to determine DNA fragment sizes and amounts; and, (4) using color change to follow reaction kinetics. The supplemental material in JCE Online contains information on two additional examples: deconvolution of overlapping bands in protein gel electrophoresis, and the recovery of data from published images or graphs. The JCE Online material also presents additional information on each example, on the system hardware and software, and on the data analysis methodology.

  1. S-Genius, a universal software platform with versatile inverse problem resolution for scatterometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuard, David; Troscompt, Nicolas; El Kalyoubi, Ismael; Soulan, Sébastien; Besacier, Maxime

    2013-05-01

    S-Genius is a new universal scatterometry platform, which gathers all the LTM-CNRS know-how regarding the rigorous electromagnetic computation and several inverse problem solver solutions. This software platform is built to be a userfriendly, light, swift, accurate, user-oriented scatterometry tool, compatible with any ellipsometric measurements to fit and any types of pattern. It aims to combine a set of inverse problem solver capabilities — via adapted Levenberg- Marquard optimization, Kriging, Neural Network solutions — that greatly improve the reliability and the velocity of the solution determination. Furthermore, as the model solution is mainly vulnerable to materials optical properties, S-Genius may be coupled with an innovative material refractive indices determination. This paper will a little bit more focuses on the modified Levenberg-Marquardt optimization, one of the indirect method solver built up in parallel with the total SGenius software coding by yours truly. This modified Levenberg-Marquardt optimization corresponds to a Newton algorithm with an adapted damping parameter regarding the definition domains of the optimized parameters. Currently, S-Genius is technically ready for scientific collaboration, python-powered, multi-platform (windows/linux/macOS), multi-core, ready for 2D- (infinite features along the direction perpendicular to the incident plane), conical, and 3D-features computation, compatible with all kinds of input data from any possible ellipsometers (angle or wavelength resolved) or reflectometers, and widely used in our laboratory for resist trimming studies, etching features characterization (such as complex stack) or nano-imprint lithography measurements for instance. The work about kriging solver, neural network solver and material refractive indices determination is done (or about to) by other LTM members and about to be integrated on S-Genius platform.

  2. The Online Bioinformatics Resources Collection at the University of Pittsburgh Health Sciences Library System--a one-stop gateway to online bioinformatics databases and software tools.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Bu; Chattopadhyay, Ansuman; Bergen, Phillip; Gadd, Cynthia; Tannery, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    To bridge the gap between the rising information needs of biological and medical researchers and the rapidly growing number of online bioinformatics resources, we have created the Online Bioinformatics Resources Collection (OBRC) at the Health Sciences Library System (HSLS) at the University of Pittsburgh. The OBRC, containing 1542 major online bioinformatics databases and software tools, was constructed using the HSLS content management system built on the Zope Web application server. To enhance the output of search results, we further implemented the Vivísimo Clustering Engine, which automatically organizes the search results into categories created dynamically based on the textual information of the retrieved records. As the largest online collection of its kind and the only one with advanced search results clustering, OBRC is aimed at becoming a one-stop guided information gateway to the major bioinformatics databases and software tools on the Web. OBRC is available at the University of Pittsburgh's HSLS Web site (http://www.hsls.pitt.edu/guides/genetics/obrc).

  3. Software development: A paradigm for the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basili, Victor R.

    1989-01-01

    A new paradigm for software development that treats software development as an experimental activity is presented. It provides built-in mechanisms for learning how to develop software better and reusing previous experience in the forms of knowledge, processes, and products. It uses models and measures to aid in the tasks of characterization, evaluation and motivation. An organization scheme is proposed for separating the project-specific focus from the organization's learning and reuse focuses of software development. The implications of this approach for corporations, research and education are discussed and some research activities currently underway at the University of Maryland that support this approach are presented.

  4. Teaching Reprint File Management: Basic Principles and Software Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Elizabeth H.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a workshop for teaching library users how to manage reprint files which was developed at the University of Southern California Norris Medical Library. Software programs designed for this purpose are suggested, and a sidebar lists software features to consider. (eight references) (MES)

  5. The Jackson Career Explorer: Two Further Validity Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schermer, Julie Aitken

    2012-01-01

    The present report consists of two further validity studies using the Jackson Career Explorer (JCE), a short form and continuous version of the Jackson Vocational Interest Survey, measuring 34 interests. The first study examined the relationships between the JCE and five personality factors, from a sample of 528 individuals. The correlations found…

  6. The Jackson Career Explorer in Relation to the Career Directions Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schermer, Julie Aitken; MacDougall, Robyn

    2011-01-01

    The Jackson Career Explorer (JCE) is a short form and continuous version of the Jackson Vocational Interest Survey (JVIS). The 34 scales of the JCE were investigated in relation to the Career Directions Inventory (CDI). Participants (N = 282) aged 14-57 years were volunteers from local high schools and colleges and completed both measures. The…

  7. Architecture for interoperable software in biology.

    PubMed

    Bare, James Christopher; Baliga, Nitin S

    2014-07-01

    Understanding biological complexity demands a combination of high-throughput data and interdisciplinary skills. One way to bring to bear the necessary combination of data types and expertise is by encapsulating domain knowledge in software and composing that software to create a customized data analysis environment. To this end, simple flexible strategies are needed for interconnecting heterogeneous software tools and enabling data exchange between them. Drawing on our own work and that of others, we present several strategies for interoperability and their consequences, in particular, a set of simple data structures--list, matrix, network, table and tuple--that have proven sufficient to achieve a high degree of interoperability. We provide a few guidelines for the development of future software that will function as part of an interoperable community of software tools for biological data analysis and visualization. © The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press.

  8. Mathcad in the Chemistry Curriculum Symbolic Software in the Chemistry Curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Theresa Julia

    2000-05-01

    molecule worksheet builds on the rich literature for this topic (3). Before analyzing their own spectral data, students practice and learn the concepts and methods of the HCl spectral analysis by using the fundamental and first harmonic vibrational frequencies provided by the authors. This approach has a fundamental pedagogical advantage. Most explanations in laboratory texts are very concise and lack mathematical details required by average students. This Mathcad worksheet acts as a tutor; it guides students through the essential concepts for data reduction and lets them focus on learning important spectroscopic concepts. The Mathcad worksheet is amply annotated. Students who have moderate skill with the software and have learned about regression analysis from the curve-fitting worksheets described in this column will be able to complete and understand their analysis of the IR spectrum of HCl. The three Mathcad worksheets described here stretch the physical chemistry curriculum by presenting important topics in forms that students can use with only moderate Mathcad skills. The documents facilitate learning by giving students opportunities to interact with the material in meaningful ways in addition to using the documents as sources of techniques for building their own data-reduction worksheets. However, working through these Mathcad worksheets is not a trivial task for the average student. Support needs to be provided by the instructor to ease students through more advanced mathematical and Mathcad processes. These worksheets raise the question of how much we can ask diligent students to do in one course and how much time they need to spend to master the essential concepts of that course. The Mathcad documents and associated PDF versions are available at the JCE Internet WWW site. The Mathcad documents require Mathcad version 6.0 or higher and the PDF files require Adobe Acrobat. Every effort has been made to make the documents fully compatible across the various Mathcad

  9. High Assurance Software

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-22

    CONGRESSIONAL ) HIGH ASSURANCE SOFTWARE WILLIAM MAHONEY UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA 10/22/2013 Final Report DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for ...0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing...Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden to

  10. Object-oriented design of medical imaging software.

    PubMed

    Ligier, Y; Ratib, O; Logean, M; Girard, C; Perrier, R; Scherrer, J R

    1994-01-01

    A special software package for interactive display and manipulation of medical images was developed at the University Hospital of Geneva, as part of a hospital wide Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS). This software package, called Osiris, was especially designed to be easily usable and adaptable to the needs of noncomputer-oriented physicians. The Osiris software has been developed to allow the visualization of medical images obtained from any imaging modality. It provides generic manipulation tools, processing tools, and analysis tools more specific to clinical applications. This software, based on an object-oriented paradigm, is portable and extensible. Osiris is available on two different operating systems: the Unix X-11/OSF-Motif based workstations, and the Macintosh family.

  11. Turnitoff: Identifying and Fixing a Hole in Current Plagiarism Detection Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heather, James

    2010-01-01

    In recent times, "plagiarism detection software" has become popular in universities and colleges, in an attempt to stem the tide of plagiarised student coursework. Such software attempts to detect any copied material and identify its source. The most popular such software is Turnitin, a commercial system used by thousands of institutions…

  12. NASA's Software Bank (CLIPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS) is a NASA Johnson Space Center developed software shell for developing expert systems, is used by researchers at Ohio State University to determine solid waste disposal sites to assist in historic preservation. The program has various other applications and has even been included in a widely-used textbook.

  13. Academics' perceptions of the use and relevance of software in quantitative and financial disciplines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyng, Timothy; Tickle, Leonie; Wood, Leigh

    2013-03-01

    Software may be used in university teaching both to enhance student learning of discipline-content knowledge and skills, and to equip students with capabilities that will be useful in their future careers. Although research has indicated that software may be used as an effective way of engaging students and enhancing learning in certain scenarios, relatively little is known about academic practices with regard to the use of software more generally or about the extent to which this software is subsequently used by graduates in the workplace. This article reports on the results of a survey of academics in quantitative and financial disciplines, which is part of a broader study also encompassing recent graduates and employers. Results indicate that a variety of software packages are in widespread use in university programmes in quantitative and financial disciplines. Most surveyed academics believe that the use of software enhances learning and enables students to solve otherwise intractable problems. A majority also rate spreadsheet skills in particular as very important for the employability of graduates. A better understanding of the use of software in university teaching points the way to how curricula can be revised to enhance learning and prepare graduates for professional work.

  14. Experiences with Integrating Simulation into a Software Engineering Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bollin, Andreas; Hochmuller, Elke; Mittermeir, Roland; Samuelis, Ladislav

    2012-01-01

    Software Engineering education must account for a broad spectrum of knowledge and skills software engineers will be required to apply throughout their professional life. Covering all the topics in depth within a university setting is infeasible due to curricular constraints as well as due to the inherent differences between educational…

  15. A Role-Playing Game for a Software Engineering Lab: Developing a Product Line

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuppiroli, Sara; Ciancarini, Paolo; Gabbrielli, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    Software product line development refers to software engineering practices and techniques for creating families of similar software systems from a basic set of reusable components, called shared assets. Teaching how to deal with software product lines in a university lab course is a challenging task, because there are several practical issues that…

  16. Tired of Teaching Software Applications?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippert, Susan K.; Granger, Mary J.

    Many university business schools have an instructor-led course introducing computer software application packages. This course is often required for all undergraduates and is a prerequisite to other courses, such as accounting, finance, marketing, and operations management. Knowledge and skills gained in this course should enable students not only…

  17. The ESA's Space Trajectory Analysis software suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Guillermo

    The European Space Agency (ESA) initiated in 2005 an internal activity to develop an open source software suite involving university science departments and research institutions all over the world. This project is called the "Space Trajectory Analysis" or STA. This article describes the birth of STA and its present configuration. One of the STA aims is to promote the exchange of technical ideas, and raise knowledge and competence in the areas of applied mathematics, space engineering, and informatics at University level. Conceived as a research and education tool to support the analysis phase of a space mission, STA is able to visualize a wide range of space trajectories. These include among others ascent, re-entry, descent and landing trajectories, orbits around planets and moons, interplanetary trajectories, rendezvous trajectories, etc. The article explains that STA project is an original idea of the Technical Directorate of ESA. It was born in August 2005 to provide a framework in astrodynamics research at University level. As research and education software applicable to Academia, a number of Universities support this development by joining ESA in leading the development. ESA and Universities partnership are expressed in the STA Steering Board. Together with ESA, each University has a chair in the board whose tasks are develop, control, promote, maintain, and expand the software suite. The article describes that STA provides calculations in the fields of spacecraft tracking, attitude analysis, coverage and visibility analysis, orbit determination, position and velocity of solar system bodies, etc. STA implements the concept of "space scenario" composed of Solar system bodies, spacecraft, ground stations, pads, etc. It is able to propagate the orbit of a spacecraft where orbital propagators are included. STA is able to compute communication links between objects of a scenario (coverage, line of sight), and to represent the trajectory computations and

  18. Towards understanding software: 15 years in the SEL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgarry, Frank; Pajerski, Rose

    1990-01-01

    For 15 years, the Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) at GSFC has been carrying out studies and experiments for the purpose of understanding, assessing, and improving software, and software processes within a production software environment. The SEL comprises three major organizations: (1) the GSFC Flight Dynamics Division; (2) the University of Maryland Computer Science Department; and (3) the Computer Sciences Corporation Flight Dynamics Technology Group. These organizations have jointly carried out several hundred software studies, producing hundreds of reports, papers, and documents: all describing some aspect of the software engineering technology that has undergone analysis in the flight dynamics environment. The studies range from small controlled experiments (such as analyzing the effectiveness of code reading versus functional testing) to large, multiple-project studies (such as assessing the impacts of Ada on a production environment). The key findings that NASA feels have laid the foundation for ongoing and future software development and research activities are summarized.

  19. Advanced Chemistry Collection, 2nd Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-11-01

    Software requirements are given in Table 3. Some programs have additional special requirements. Please see the individual program abstracts at JCE Online or the documentation included on the CD-ROM for more specific information. Table 3. General software requirements for the Advanced Chemistry Collection.

    ComputerSystemOther Software(Required by one or more programs)
    Mac OS compatibleSystem 7.6.1 or higherAcrobat Reader (included)Mathcad; Mathematica;MacMolecule2; QuickTime 4; HyperCard Player
    Windows CompatibleWindows 2000, 98, 95, NT 4Acrobat Reader (included)Mathcad; Mathematica;PCMolecule2; QuickTime 4;HyperChem; Excel

    Literature Cited

    1. General Chemistry Collection, 5th ed.; J. Chem. Educ. Software, 2001, SP16.
    2. Advanced Chemistry Collection; J. Chem. Educ. Software, 2001, SP28.

  20. The Issue of (Software) Plagiarism: A Student View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chuda, D.; Navrat, P.; Kovacova, B.; Humay, P.

    2012-01-01

    The issue of plagiarism is discussed in the context of university education in disciplines related to computing. The focus is therefore mainly on software plagiarism. First, however, a case is made for the claim that the most important reason that plagiarism cannot be tolerated lies in the essence of the concept of a university as it is rooted in…

  1. The TAME Project: Towards improvement-oriented software environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basili, Victor R.; Rombach, H. Dieter

    1988-01-01

    Experience from a dozen years of analyzing software engineering processes and products is summarized as a set of software engineering and measurement principles that argue for software engineering process models that integrate sound planning and analysis into the construction process. In the TAME (Tailoring A Measurement Environment) project at the University of Maryland, such an improvement-oriented software engineering process model was developed that uses the goal/question/metric paradigm to integrate the constructive and analytic aspects of software development. The model provides a mechanism for formalizing the characterization and planning tasks, controlling and improving projects based on quantitative analysis, learning in a deeper and more systematic way about the software process and product, and feeding the appropriate experience back into the current and future projects. The TAME system is an instantiation of the TAME software engineering process model as an ISEE (integrated software engineering environment). The first in a series of TAME system prototypes has been developed. An assessment of experience with this first limited prototype is presented including a reassessment of its initial architecture.

  2. Web accessibility and open source software.

    PubMed

    Obrenović, Zeljko

    2009-07-01

    A Web browser provides a uniform user interface to different types of information. Making this interface universally accessible and more interactive is a long-term goal still far from being achieved. Universally accessible browsers require novel interaction modalities and additional functionalities, for which existing browsers tend to provide only partial solutions. Although functionality for Web accessibility can be found as open source and free software components, their reuse and integration is complex because they were developed in diverse implementation environments, following standards and conventions incompatible with the Web. To address these problems, we have started several activities that aim at exploiting the potential of open-source software for Web accessibility. The first of these activities is the development of Adaptable Multi-Interface COmmunicator (AMICO):WEB, an infrastructure that facilitates efficient reuse and integration of open source software components into the Web environment. The main contribution of AMICO:WEB is in enabling the syntactic and semantic interoperability between Web extension mechanisms and a variety of integration mechanisms used by open source and free software components. Its design is based on our experiences in solving practical problems where we have used open source components to improve accessibility of rich media Web applications. The second of our activities involves improving education, where we have used our platform to teach students how to build advanced accessibility solutions from diverse open-source software. We are also partially involved in the recently started Eclipse projects called Accessibility Tools Framework (ACTF), the aim of which is development of extensible infrastructure, upon which developers can build a variety of utilities that help to evaluate and enhance the accessibility of applications and content for people with disabilities. In this article we briefly report on these activities.

  3. Developing Computer Software for Use in the Speech/Comunications Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krauss, Beatrice J.

    Appropriate software can turn the microcomputer from the dumb box into a teaching tool. One resource for finding appropriate software is the organization Edunet. It allows the user to access the mainframe of 18 major universities and has developed a communications network with 130 colleges. It also handles billing, does periodic software…

  4. Designing Computerized Provider Order Entry Software in Iran: The Nurses' and Physicians' Viewpoints.

    PubMed

    Khammarnia, Mohammad; Sharifian, Roxana; Zand, Farid; Keshtkaran, Ali; Barati, Omid

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to identify the functional requirements of computerized provider order entry software and design this software in Iran. This study was conducted using review documentation, interview, and focus group discussions in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, as the medical pole in Iran, in 2013-2015. The study sample consisted of physicians (n = 12) and nurses (n = 2) in the largest hospital in the southern part of Iran and information technology experts (n = 5) in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Functional requirements of the computerized provider order entry system were examined in three phases. Finally, the functional requirements were distributed in four levels, and accordingly, the computerized provider order entry software was designed. The software had seven main dimensions: (1) data entry, (2) drug interaction management system, (3) warning system, (4) treatment services, (5) ability to write in software, (6) reporting from all sections of the software, and (7) technical capabilities of the software. The nurses and physicians emphasized quick access to the computerized provider order entry software, order prescription section, and applicability of the software. The software had some items that had not been mentioned in other studies. Ultimately, the software was designed by a company specializing in hospital information systems in Iran. This study was the first specific investigation of computerized provider order entry software design in Iran. Based on the results, it is suggested that this software be implemented in hospitals.

  5. Universal Noiseless Coding Subroutines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlutsmeyer, A. P.; Rice, R. F.

    1986-01-01

    Software package consists of FORTRAN subroutines that perform universal noiseless coding and decoding of integer and binary data strings. Purpose of this type of coding to achieve data compression in sense that coded data represents original data perfectly (noiselessly) while taking fewer bits to do so. Routines universal because they apply to virtually any "real-world" data source.

  6. Campus-Based Practices for Promoting Student Success: Software Solutions. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Aaron S.; Reinert, Leah; Reis, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Colleges and universities are increasingly adopting various software solutions to raise degree completion rates and lower costs (Ferguson, 2012; Vendituoli, 2014; Yanosky, 2014). Student success software, also known as Integrated Planning and Advising Services (IPAS), appears to be in high demand among both students and faculty (Dahlstrom &…

  7. Universal programming interface with concurrent access

    SciTech Connect

    Alferov, Oleg

    2004-10-07

    There exist a number of devices with a positioning nature of operation, such as mechanical linear stages, temperature controllers, or filterwheels with discrete state, and most of them have different programming interfaces. The Universal Positioner software suggests the way to handle all of them is with a single approach, whereby a particular hardware driver is created from the template and by translating the actual commands used by the hardware to and from the universal programming interface. The software contains the universal API module itself, the demo simulation of hardware, and the front-end programs to help developers write their own softwaremore » drivers along with example drivers for actual hardware controllers. The software allows user application programs to call devices simultaneously without race conditions (multitasking and concurrent access). The template suggested in this package permits developers to integrate various devices easily into their applications using the same API. The drivers can be stacked; i.e., they can call each other via the same interface.« less

  8. Incorporating Computer-Aided Software in the Undergraduate Chemical Engineering Core Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alnaizy, Raafat; Abdel-Jabbar, Nabil; Ibrahim, Taleb H.; Husseini, Ghaleb A.

    2014-01-01

    Introductions of computer-aided software and simulators are implemented during the sophomore-year of the chemical engineering (ChE) curriculum at the American University of Sharjah (AUS). Our faculty concurs that software integration within the curriculum is beneficial to our students, as evidenced by the positive feedback received from industry…

  9. Copyright Law as It Applies to Computer Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gemignani, Michael

    1989-01-01

    Discusses copyright laws applied to computer software for professors, students, and institutions. Concepts including infringement, contributory infringement, first sale doctrine, and licenses are considered. A sample university policy statement to avoid liability is presented. (YP)

  10. Final Technical Report - Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Sussman, Alan

    2014-10-21

    This is a final technical report for the University of Maryland work in the SciDAC Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS). The Maryland work focused on software tools for coupling parallel software components built using the Common Component Architecture (CCA) APIs. Those tools are based on the Maryland InterComm software framework that has been used in multiple computational science applications to build large-scale simulations of complex physical systems that employ multiple separately developed codes.

  11. Swarming Robot Design, Construction and Software Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolleis, Karl A.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper is presented an overview of the hardware design, construction overview, software design and software implementation for a small, low-cost robot to be used for swarming robot development. In addition to the work done on the robot, a full simulation of the robotic system was developed using Robot Operating System (ROS) and its associated simulation. The eventual use of the robots will be exploration of evolving behaviors via genetic algorithms and builds on the work done at the University of New Mexico Biological Computation Lab.

  12. Academic and Non-Profit Accessibility to Commercial Remote Sensing Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, A. S.; Farr, B.

    2013-12-01

    Remote Sensing as a topic of teaching and research at the university and college level continues to increase. As more data is made freely available and software becomes easier to use, more and more academic and non-profits institutions are turning to remote sensing to solve their tough and large spatial scale problems. Exelis Visual Information Solutions (VIS) has been supporting teaching and research endeavors for over 30 years with a special emphasis over the last 5 years with scientifically proven software and accessible training materials. The Exelis VIS academic program extends to US and Canadian 2 year and 4 year colleges and universities with tools for analyzing aerial and satellite multispectral and hyperspectral imagery, airborne LiDAR and Synthetic Aperture Radar. The Exelis VIS academic programs, using the ENVI Platform, enables labs and classrooms to be outfitted with software and makes software accessible to students. The ENVI software provides students hands on experience with remote sensing software, an easy teaching platform for professors and allows researchers scientifically vetted software they can trust. Training materials are provided at no additional cost and can either serve as a basis for course curriculum development or self paced learning. Non-profit organizations like The Nature Conservancy (TNC) and CGIAR have deployed ENVI and IDL enterprise wide licensing allowing researchers all over the world to have cost effective access COTS software for their research. Exelis VIS has also contributed licenses to the NASA DEVELOP program. Exelis VIS is committed to supporting the academic and NGO community with affordable enterprise licensing, access to training materials, and technical expertise to help researchers tackle today's Earth and Planetary science big data challenges.

  13. Using "Blueprint Photography by the Cyanotype Process"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Editorial Staff, Jce

    2008-05-01

    Do you want to try the cyanotype process with your students? That's easy to do! Start with JCE Classroom Activity #19, "Blueprint Photography by the Cyanotype Process", by Glen D. Lawrence and Stuart Fishelson ( JCE , 1999 , 76 , 1216A-1216B ). In this ready-to-use activity, students create their own cyanotype paper and use it to make blueprint photographs in the sunlight. It's a great way to connect chemistry with art.

  14. [Software-based visualization of patient flow at a university eye clinic].

    PubMed

    Greb, O; Abou Moulig, W; Hufendiek, K; Junker, B; Framme, C

    2017-03-01

    This article presents a method for visualization and navigation of patient flow in outpatient eye clinics with a high level of complexity. A network-based software solution was developed targeting long-term process optimization by structural analysis and temporal coordination of process navigation. Each examination unit receives a separate waiting list of patients in which the patient flow for every patient is recorded in a timeline. Time periods and points in time can be executed by mouse clicks and the desired diagnostic procedure can be entered. Recent progress in any of these diagnostic requests, as well as a variety of information on patient progress are collated and drawn into the corresponding timeline which can be viewed by any of the personnel involved. The software called TimeElement has been successfully tested in the practical implemenation for several months. As an example the patient flow regarding time stamps of defined events for intravitreous injections on 250 patients was recorded and an average attendance time of 169.71 min was found, whereby the time was also automatically recorded for each individual stage. Recording of patient flow data is a fundamental component of patient flow management, waiting time reduction, patient flow navigation with time and coordination in particular regarding timeline-based visualization for each individual patient. Long-term changes in process management can be planned and evaluated by comparing patient flow data. As using the software itself causes structural changes within the organization, a questionnaire is being planned for appraisal by the personnel involved.

  15. New Software to Help EFL Students Self-Correct Their Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawley, Jim

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development of web-based software at a university in Spain to help students of EFL self-correct their free-form writing. The software makes use of an eighty-million-word corpus of English known to be correct as a normative corpus for error correction purposes. It was discovered that bigrams (two-word combinations of words)…

  16. BCTC for Windows: Abstract of Issue 9903W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whisnant, David M.; McCormick, James A.

    1999-05-01

    BCTC for Windows was originally published by JCE Software in 1992 (1) in Series B for PC-compatible (MS-DOS) computers. JCE Software is now re-releasing BCTC for Windows as issue 9903W to make it more accessible to Windows users-especially those running Windows 95 and Windows 98-while we continue to phase out Series B (DOS) issues. Aside from a new Windows-compatible installation program, BCTC is unchanged. BCTC is an environmental simulation modeled after the dioxin controversy (2). In the simulation, students are involved in the investigation of a suspected carcinogen called BCTC, which has been found in a river below a chemical plant and above the water supply of a nearby city. The students have the options of taking water samples, analyzing the water (for BCTC, oxygen, metals, and pesticides), determining LD50s in an animal lab, visiting a library, making economic analyses, and conferring with colleagues, all using the computer. In the Classroom BCTC gives students experience with science in the context of a larger social and political problem. It can serve as the basis for a scientific report, class discussion, or a role-playing exercise (3). Because it requires no previous laboratory experience, this simulation can be used by students in middle and high school science classes, or in college courses for non-science majors. It also has been used in introductory chemistry courses for science majors. One of the intentions of BCTC is to involve students in an exercise (2) that closely approximates what scientists do. The realistic pictures, many of them captured with a video camera, create an atmosphere that furthers this goal. BCTC also reflects the comments of teachers who have used the program (4) and accounts of dioxin research (5). Screen from BCTC showing location of the entry of the effluent in the river, the city, and the city water supply.

    Acknowledgments Support for this project

  17. 1942

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Kathryn R.

    1999-08-01

    Since The Journal's inception in 1924, almost every issue has contained at least one article relating to the history of chemistry. But JCE should not be overlooked as a source for social and political history. At no time did the Journal better serve as a mirror of society than during the World War II era. This month's look at the past focusses on volume 19 (1942), which illustrates the response of the entire nation, especially colleges and universities, to the attack on Pearl Harbor.

  18. Simulation Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Various NASA Small Business Innovation Research grants from Marshall Space Flight Center, Langley Research Center and Ames Research Center were used to develop the 'kernel' of COMCO's modeling and simulation software, the PHLEX finite element code. NASA needed it to model designs of flight vehicles; one of many customized commercial applications is UNISIM, a PHLEX-based code for analyzing underground flows in oil reservoirs for Texaco, Inc. COMCO's products simulate a computational mechanics problem, estimate the solution's error and produce the optimal hp-adapted mesh for the accuracy the user chooses. The system is also used as a research or training tool in universities and in mechanical design in industrial corporations.

  19. Pericyclic Reactions: FMO Approach-Abstract of Issue 9904M

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Albert W. M.; So, C. T.; Chan, C. L.; Wu, Y. K.

    1999-05-01

    previous protocols (3) on the Apple II computer, we designed Pericyclic Reactions: FMO Approach using Macromedia Director (4) to teach the two most important pericyclic reactions: electrocyclic addition and cycloaddition. Pericyclic Reactions: FMO Approach can be used in intermediate or advanced organic chemistry courses. Literature Cited 1. Woodward, R. B.; Hoffmann, R. The Conservation of Orbital Symmetry; Academic: New York, 1971. 2. Fukui, K. Tetrahedron Lett. 1965, 2009, 2427. 3. Lee, A. W. M. Educ. Chem. 1988, 122. 4. Macromedia Director, version 4.0.3; Macromedia, Inc.: San Francisco, 1994. Keywords Lecture Aid; Computer Room; Organic; Pericyclic Reactions; Molecular Orbitals Hardware and Software Requirements for Pericyclic Reactions: FMO Approach

    Ordering and Information Journal of Chemical Education Software (often called JCE Software) is a publication of the Journal of Chemical Education. There is an Order Form inserted in this issue that provides prices and other ordering information. If this card is not available or if you need additional information, contact: JCE Software, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1101 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706-1396; phone: 608/262-5153 or 800/991-5534; fax: 608/265-8094; email: jcesoft@chem.wisc.edu. Information about all our publications (including abstracts, descriptions, updates) is available from our World Wide Web site: http://JChemEd.chem.wisc.edu/JCESoft/

  20. Metrics of Software Quality.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    Systems: A Raytheon Project History", RADC-TR-77-188, Final Technical Report, June 1977. 4. IBM Federal Systems Division, "Statistical Prediction of...147, June 1979. 4. W. D. Brooks, R. W. Motley, "Analysis of Discrete Software Reliability Models", IBM Corp., RADC-TR-80-84, RADC, New York, April 1980...J. C. King of IBM (Reference 9) and Lori A. Clark (Reference 10) of the University of Massachusetts. Programs, so exercised must be augmented so they

  1. NASA's Software Bank (NETS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NETS (A Neural Network Development Tool) is a software system for mimicking the human brain. It is used in a University of Arkansas project in pattern matching of chemical systems. If successful, chemists would be able to identify mixtures of compounds without long and costly separation procedures. Using NETS, the group has trained the computer to recognize pattern relationships in a known compound and associate the results to an unknown compound. The research appears to be promising.

  2. Software Program: Software Management Guidebook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this NASA Software Management Guidebook is twofold. First, this document defines the core products and activities required of NASA software projects. It defines life-cycle models and activity-related methods but acknowledges that no single life-cycle model is appropriate for all NASA software projects. It also acknowledges that the appropriate method for accomplishing a required activity depends on characteristics of the software project. Second, this guidebook provides specific guidance to software project managers and team leaders in selecting appropriate life cycles and methods to develop a tailored plan for a software engineering project.

  3. The business process management software for successful quality management and organization: A case study from the University of Split School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Sapunar, Damir; Grković, Ivica; Lukšić, Davor; Marušić, Matko

    2016-05-01

    Our aim was to describe a comprehensive model of internal quality management (QM) at a medical school founded on the business process analysis (BPA) software tool. BPA software tool was used as the core element for description of all working processes in our medical school, and subsequently the system served as the comprehensive model of internal QM. The quality management system at the University of Split School of Medicine included the documentation and analysis of all business processes within the School. The analysis revealed 80 weak points related to one or several business processes. A precise analysis of medical school business processes allows identification of unfinished, unclear and inadequate points in these processes, and subsequently the respective improvements and increase of the QM level and ultimately a rationalization of the institution's work. Our approach offers a potential reference model for development of common QM framework allowing a continuous quality control, i.e. the adjustments and adaptation to contemporary educational needs of medical students. Copyright © 2016 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  4. Development of N-version software samples for an experiment in software fault tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauterbach, L.

    1987-01-01

    The report documents the task planning and software development phases of an effort to obtain twenty versions of code independently designed and developed from a common specification. These versions were created for use in future experiments in software fault tolerance, in continuation of the experimental series underway at the Systems Validation Methods Branch (SVMB) at NASA Langley Research Center. The 20 versions were developed under controlled conditions at four U.S. universities, by 20 teams of two researchers each. The versions process raw data from a modified Redundant Strapped Down Inertial Measurement Unit (RSDIMU). The specifications, and over 200 questions submitted by the developers concerning the specifications, are included as appendices to this report. Design documents, and design and code walkthrough reports for each version, were also obtained in this task for use in future studies.

  5. EDRMS for Academic Records Management: A Design Study in a Malaysian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miah, Shah Jahan; Samsudin, Ahmad Zam Hariro

    2017-01-01

    Higher education institutes such as universities suffer from a range of issues in managing their academic records and relevant digital contents. Many universities nowadays use specific software applications for their effective mechanism in records management. The effective provision of enterprises records management (ERM) software for managing…

  6. Support for Different Roles in Software Engineering Master's Thesis Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Host, M.; Feldt, R.; Luders, F.

    2010-01-01

    Like many engineering programs in Europe, the final part of most Swedish software engineering programs is a longer project in which the students write a Master's thesis. These projects are often conducted in cooperation between a university and industry, and the students often have two supervisors, one at the university and one in industry. In…

  7. Gaining Control and Predictability of Software-Intensive Systems Development and Sustainment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-04

    implementation of the baselines, audits , and technical reviews within an overarching systems engineering process (SEP; Defense Acquisition University...warfighters’ needs. This management and metrics effort supplements and supports the system’s technical development through the baselines, audits and...other areas that could be researched and added into the nine-tier model. Areas including software metrics, quality assurance , software-oriented

  8. Software analysis handbook: Software complexity analysis and software reliability estimation and prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Alice T.; Gunn, Todd; Pham, Tuan; Ricaldi, Ron

    1994-01-01

    This handbook documents the three software analysis processes the Space Station Software Analysis team uses to assess space station software, including their backgrounds, theories, tools, and analysis procedures. Potential applications of these analysis results are also presented. The first section describes how software complexity analysis provides quantitative information on code, such as code structure and risk areas, throughout the software life cycle. Software complexity analysis allows an analyst to understand the software structure, identify critical software components, assess risk areas within a software system, identify testing deficiencies, and recommend program improvements. Performing this type of analysis during the early design phases of software development can positively affect the process, and may prevent later, much larger, difficulties. The second section describes how software reliability estimation and prediction analysis, or software reliability, provides a quantitative means to measure the probability of failure-free operation of a computer program, and describes the two tools used by JSC to determine failure rates and design tradeoffs between reliability, costs, performance, and schedule.

  9. Using Internet-Based Automated Software to Process GPS Data at Michigan Tech University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crook, A.; Diehl, J. F.

    2003-12-01

    The Michigan Tech University GPS monument was made operational in October of 2002. The monument, which consists of a concrete pillar extending approximately 10 feet below the surface and protrudes 5 feet above ground, is located at the Houghton County Memorial Airport (47.171803° N, 88.498361° W). The primary purpose of the monument is to measure the velocity of the North American Plate at this location. A Trimble 4000ssi geodetic receiver with a Trimble Zephyr antenna is used to collect GPS data. The data are sent to a PC where they are processed using Auto-GIPSY, an internet-based GPS processing utility, which makes it possible to process GPS data, via email, without having knowledge of how the software works. Two Perl scripts were written to facilitate automation and to simplify processing of the GPS data even further. Twelve months of GPS data were processed, using Auto-GIPSY, which produced a velocity of -24 +/- 5 mm/yr and -4 +/- 6 mm/yr for the X and Y components respectively with an azimuth of 261° with respect to the ITRF2000. This calculated result compares well with the NNR-NUVEL1A velocity of -17 mm/yr and -1 mm/yr for the X and Y components respectively with an azimuth of 267° . The results from an alternative online processing service, the Scripps Coordinate Update Tool (SCOUT) that uses GAMIT, will also be presented as a comparative method.

  10. Improving Security in Software Acquisition and Runtime Integration With Data Retention Specifications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-30

    Data Retention Specifications Daniel Smullen, Research Assistant, Carnegie Mellon University Travis Breaux, Assistant Professor, Carnegie Mellon... Carnegie Mellon University Travis Breaux, Assistant Professor, Carnegie Mellon University Cybersecurity Figure of Merit CAPT Brian Erickson, USN, SPAWAR...Integration With Data Retention Specifications Daniel Smullen—is a Research Assistant enrolled in the software engineering PhD program at Carnegie Mellon

  11. ETICS: the international software engineering service for the grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meglio, A. D.; Bégin, M.-E.; Couvares, P.; Ronchieri, E.; Takacs, E.

    2008-07-01

    The ETICS system is a distributed software configuration, build and test system designed to fulfil the needs of improving the quality, reliability and interoperability of distributed software in general and grid software in particular. The ETICS project is a consortium of five partners (CERN, INFN, Engineering Ingegneria Informatica, 4D Soft and the University of Wisconsin-Madison). The ETICS service consists of a build and test job execution system based on the Metronome software and an integrated set of web services and software engineering tools to design, maintain and control build and test scenarios. The ETICS system allows taking into account complex dependencies among applications and middleware components and provides a rich environment to perform static and dynamic analysis of the software and execute deployment, system and interoperability tests. This paper gives an overview of the system architecture and functionality set and then describes how the EC-funded EGEE, DILIGENT and OMII-Europe projects are using the software engineering services to build, validate and distribute their software. Finally a number of significant use and test cases will be described to show how ETICS can be used in particular to perform interoperability tests of grid middleware using the grid itself.

  12. The Use of the Software MATLAB To Improve Chemical Engineering Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damatto, T.; Maegava, L. M.; Filho, R. Maciel

    In all the Brazilian Universities involved with the project "Prodenge-Reenge", the main objective is to improve teaching and learning procedures for the engineering disciplines. The Chemical Engineering College of Campinas State University focused its effort on the use of engineering softwares. The work developed by this project has…

  13. Bibliographic Management Software Seminars: Funding and Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Marcia

    This paper contains the grant proposal and final report for a project conducted by the California State University at Northridge library to demonstrate online database searching and introduce the use of bibliographic management software to faculty and graduate students. Day-long, discipline-oriented seminars were planned to increase the…

  14. Extensive Evaluation of Using a Game Project in a Software Architecture Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Alf Inge

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an extensive evaluation of introducing a game project to a software architecture course. In this project, university students have to construct and design a type of software architecture, evaluate the architecture, implement an application based on the architecture, and test this implementation. In previous years, the domain…

  15. A Requirements Analysis Model for Selection of Personal Computer (PC) software in Air Force Organizations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    Institute of Technology Air University In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science in Systems Management Dexter R... management system software Diag/Prob Diagnosis and problem solving or problem finding GR Graphics software Int/Transp Interoperability and...language software Plan/D.S. Planning and decision support or decision making PM Program management software SC Systems for Command, Control, Communications

  16. Information Systems and Software Engineering Research and Education in Oulu until the 1990s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oinas-Kukkonen, Henry; Kerola, Pentti; Oinas-Kukkonen, Harri; Similä, Jouni; Pulli, Petri

    This paper discusses the internationalization of software business in the Oulu region. Despite its small size, the region grew rapidly and very successfully into a global information and communication technology business center. The University of Oulu, which was the northern most university in the world at the time of its establishment (1958) had a strong emphasis on engineering since its very beginning. Research on electronics was carried out since the early 1960s. Later, when the Department of Information Processing Science was founded in 1969, research on information systems and later also on software engineering was carried out. This paper discusses the role of the information systems and software engineering research for the business growth of the region. Special emphasis is put on understanding the role of system-theoretical and software development expertise for transferring research knowledge into practice.

  17. The Effective Use of Professional Software in an Undergraduate Mining Engineering Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kecojevic, Vladislav; Bise, Christopher; Haight, Joel

    2005-01-01

    The use of professional software is an integral part of a student's education in the mining engineering curriculum at The Pennsylvania State University. Even though mining engineering represents a limited market across U.S. educational institutions, the goal still exists for using this type of software to enrich the learning environment with…

  18. Some Methods of Applied Numerical Analysis to 3d Facial Reconstruction Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roşu, Şerban; Ianeş, Emilia; Roşu, Doina

    2010-09-01

    This paper deals with the collective work performed by medical doctors from the University Of Medicine and Pharmacy Timisoara and engineers from the Politechnical Institute Timisoara in the effort to create the first Romanian 3d reconstruction software based on CT or MRI scans and to test the created software in clinical practice.

  19. AIDA: An Integrated Authoring Environment for Educational Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendes, Antonio Jose; Mendes, Teresa

    1996-01-01

    Describes an integrated authoring environment, AIDA ("Ambiente Integrado de Desenvolvimento de Aplicacoes educacionais"), that was developed at the University of Coimbra (Portugal) for educational software. Highlights include the design module, a prototyping tool that allows for multimedia, simulations, and modularity; execution module;…

  20. Learning Teamwork Skills in University Programming Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sancho-Thomas, Pilar; Fuentes-Fernandez, Ruben; Fernandez-Manjon, Baltasar

    2009-01-01

    University courses about computer programming usually seek to provide students not only with technical knowledge, but also with the skills required to work in real-life software projects. Nowadays, the development of software applications requires the coordinated efforts of the members of one or more teams. Therefore, it is important for software…

  1. Linking to the Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, John W.

    1999-09-01

    When I began subscribing to this Journal, I was an undergraduate chemistry major. One of my professors suggested that I should read JCE because I had expressed interest in both chemistry and teaching. I did so, and I have never regretted subscribing. To me the Journal seemed an incredible bargain. It cost less than a textbook and brought a similar quantity of information each yearand that information was often presented in a more interesting fashion than I was used to in textbooks. As we move into a new millennium, it is useful to reflect on what a current undergraduate with interests in chemistry and teaching might expect of this Journal. How should the Journal develop over the next decades to serve that student most effectively? Younger readers are often more attuned to computers and information technology than are their elders. They expecteven demanda format that recognizes and adapts to the advantages and opportunities presented by such new media. This is a good thing, because by adapting to these readers' interests, this Journal can continue to grow with the times, serving all of us better. During the past decade it has become clear that the print medium can deliver only a fraction of the broad range of information that you or I could use effectively to help students learn. Chemistry content and learning aids are no longer limited to what can be printed on paper, and even what can be printed is often more useful in electronic format. My goal for this Journal is to make use of various ways to deliver information, capitalizing on the strengths of each, but also accommodating the experience and interests of a broad range of readers. We recognize that no single medium is best for all our content or all our clientele, and we are working toward a seamless integration of everything our authors contribute to JCE. We want you to be able to find what interests you, obtain and peruse it in an appropriate format, and use it effectively with students. I like to get

  2. Does the Adoption of Plagiarism-Detection Software in Higher Education Reduce Plagiarism?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youmans, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    In two studies, students at California State University, Northridge wrote papers that were checked for plagiarism using plagiarism-detection software. In the first study, half of the students in two classes were randomly selected and told by the professor that their term papers would be scanned for plagiarism using the software. Students in the…

  3. Factors Influencing University Drop Out Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araque, Francisco; Roldan, Concepcion; Salguero, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    This paper develops personalized models for different university degrees to obtain the risk of each student abandoning his degree and analyzes the profile for undergraduates that abandon the degree. In this study three faculties located in Granada, South of Spain, were involved. In Software Engineering three university degrees with 10,844…

  4. Which factors affect software projects maintenance cost more?

    PubMed

    Dehaghani, Sayed Mehdi Hejazi; Hajrahimi, Nafiseh

    2013-03-01

    The software industry has had significant progress in recent years. The entire life of software includes two phases: production and maintenance. Software maintenance cost is increasingly growing and estimates showed that about 90% of software life cost is related to its maintenance phase. Extraction and considering the factors affecting the software maintenance cost help to estimate the cost and reduce it by controlling the factors. In this study, the factors affecting software maintenance cost were determined then were ranked based on their priority and after that effective ways to reduce the maintenance costs were presented. This paper is a research study. 15 software related to health care centers information systems in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences and hospitals function were studied in the years 2010 to 2011. Among Medical software maintenance team members, 40 were selected as sample. After interviews with experts in this field, factors affecting maintenance cost were determined. In order to prioritize the factors derived by AHP, at first, measurement criteria (factors found) were appointed by members of the maintenance team and eventually were prioritized with the help of EC software. Based on the results of this study, 32 factors were obtained which were classified in six groups. "Project" was ranked the most effective feature in maintenance cost with the highest priority. By taking into account some major elements like careful feasibility of IT projects, full documentation and accompany the designers in the maintenance phase good results can be achieved to reduce maintenance costs and increase longevity of the software.

  5. Fabrication and properties of multifilamentary MgB 2 wires by in-situ powder-in-tube process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q. Y.; Jiao, G. F.; Liu, G. Q.; Xiong, X. M.; Yan, S. C.; Zhang, P. X.; Sulpice, A.; Mossang, E.; Feng, Y.; Yan, G.

    2010-11-01

    We have fabricated the long TiC-doped MgB2 wires with 6 filaments by in-situ powder-in-tube method using Nb as the barrier and copper as the stabilizer. To improve the strength of wires, the Nb-core was used as the central filament. The transport engineering critical current density (Jce) of the samples sintered at different temperature were measured, which reaches 2.5 × 104 A/cm2 at 4.2 K, 5 T. 100 m MgB2 wires with different diameter were wound into coils and the transport critical current (Ic) of the coil were measured at 30 K in self-field. The Jce value 100 m coil achieves 1.1 × 104 A/cm2 in 1.2 mm wire. The reasons leading to the enhancement of high field Jce were discussed. The results show a good potential to fabricate high performance MgB2 wires and tapes at ambient pressure on an industrial scale.

  6. Globus Quick Start Guide. Globus Software Version 1.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Globus Project is a community effort, led by Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Southern California's Information Sciences Institute. Globus is developing the basic software infrastructure for computations that integrate geographically distributed computational and information resources.

  7. Performance testing of 3D point cloud software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela-González, M.; González-Jorge, H.; Riveiro, B.; Arias, P.

    2013-10-01

    LiDAR systems are being used widely in recent years for many applications in the engineering field: civil engineering, cultural heritage, mining, industry and environmental engineering. One of the most important limitations of this technology is the large computational requirements involved in data processing, especially for large mobile LiDAR datasets. Several software solutions for data managing are available in the market, including open source suites, however, users often unknown methodologies to verify their performance properly. In this work a methodology for LiDAR software performance testing is presented and four different suites are studied: QT Modeler, VR Mesh, AutoCAD 3D Civil and the Point Cloud Library running in software developed at the University of Vigo (SITEGI). The software based on the Point Cloud Library shows better results in the loading time of the point clouds and CPU usage. However, it is not as strong as commercial suites in working set and commit size tests.

  8. The making of the mechanical universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blinn, James

    1989-01-01

    The Mechanical Universe project required the production of over 550 different animated scenes, totaling about 7 and 1/2 hours of screen time. The project required the use of a wide range of techniques and motivated the development of several different software packages. A documentation is presented of many aspects of the project, encompassing artistic design issues, scientific simulations, software engineering, and video engineering.

  9. Antiplagiarism Software Takes on the Honor Code

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasley, Paula

    2008-01-01

    Among the 100-odd colleges with academic honor codes, plagiarism-detection services raise a knotty problem: Is software compatible with a system based on trust? The answer frequently devolves to the size and culture of the university. Colleges with traditional student-run honor codes tend to "forefront" trust, emphasizing it above all else. This…

  10. Computer Aided Learning of Mathematics: Software Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yushau, B.; Bokhari, M. A.; Wessels, D. C. J.

    2004-01-01

    Computer Aided Learning of Mathematics (CALM) has been in use for some time in the Prep-Year Mathematics Program at King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals. Different kinds of software (both locally designed and imported) have been used in the quest of optimizing the recitation/problem session hour of the mathematics classes. This paper…

  11. Wrangling Software: Computing Professionals and the Interpretation of Software Ownership in the University Computing Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleveland, Lara L.

    2011-01-01

    This project explores the way information about law is transformed into organizational policies and practices. Existing literature emphasizes the state and organized professional groups as primary interpreters of the law and as creators of legal implementation strategies in the organizational setting. This case study of university responses to…

  12. Proceedings of the Twenty-Fourth Annual Software Engineering Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    On December 1 and 2, the Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL), a consortium composed of NASA/Goddard, the University of Maryland, and CSC, held the 24th Software Engineering Workshop (SEW), the last of the millennium. Approximately 240 people attended the 2-day workshop. Day 1 was composed of four sessions: International Influence of the Software Engineering Laboratory; Object Oriented Testing and Reading; Software Process Improvement; and Space Software. For the first session, three internationally known software process experts discussed the influence of the SEL with respect to software engineering research. In the Space Software session, prominent representatives from three different NASA sites- GSFC's Marti Szczur, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Rick Doyle, and the Ames Research Center IV&V Facility's Lou Blazy- discussed the future of space software in their respective centers. At the end of the first day, the SEW sponsored a reception at the GSFC Visitors' Center. Day 2 also provided four sessions: Using the Experience Factory; A panel discussion entitled "Software Past, Present, and Future: Views from Government, Industry, and Academia"; Inspections; and COTS. The day started with an excellent talk by CSC's Frank McGarry on "Attaining Level 5 in CMM Process Maturity." Session 2, the panel discussion on software, featured NASA Chief Information Officer Lee Holcomb (Government), our own Jerry Page (Industry), and Mike Evangelist of the National Science Foundation (Academia). Each presented his perspective on the most important developments in software in the past 10 years, in the present, and in the future.

  13. Software implementation of the SKIPSM paradigm under PIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hack, Ralf; Waltz, Frederick M.; Batchelor, Bruce G.

    1997-09-01

    SKIPSM (separated-kernel image processing using finite state machines) is a technique for implementing large-kernel binary- morphology operators and many other operations. While earlier papers on SKIPSM concentrated mainly on implementations using pipelined hardware, there is considerable scope for achieving major speed improvements in software systems. Using identical control software, one-pass binary erosion and dilation structuring elements (SEs) ranging from the trivial (3 by 3) to the gigantic (51 by 51, or even larger), are readily available. Processing speed is independent of the size of the SE, making the SKIPSM approach practical for work with very large SEs on ordinary desktop computers. PIP (prolog image processing) is an interactive machine vision prototyping environment developed at the University of Wales Cardiff. It consists of a large number of image processing operators embedded within the standard AI language Prolog. This paper describes the SKIPSM implementation of binary morphology operators within PIP. A large set of binary erosion and dilation operations (circles, squares, diamonds, octagons, etc.) is available to the user through a command-line driven dialogue, via pull-down menus, or incorporated into standard (Prolog) programs. Little has been done thus far to optimize speed on this first software implementation of SKIPSM. Nevertheless, the results are impressive. The paper describes sample applications and presents timing figures. Readers have the opportunity to try out these operations on demonstration software written by the University of Wales, or via their WWW home page at http://bruce.cs.cf.ac.uk/bruce/index.html .

  14. Desktop Publishing: Probable Effects on University Extension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misanchuk, Earl R.

    Desktop publishing (DTP) could potentially become a powerful, relatively inexpensive tool for use in university extension activities. This paper describes and explains the characteristics of DTP and examines its effects on university extension. In addition, it outlines the kind of hardware, software, and skills needed and costs; describes new…

  15. Software engineering and data management for automated payload experiment tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddux, Gary A.; Provancha, Anna; Chattam, David

    1994-01-01

    The Microgravity Projects Office identified a need to develop a software package that will lead experiment developers through the development planning process, obtain necessary information, establish an electronic data exchange avenue, and allow easier manipulation/reformatting of the collected information. An MS-DOS compatible software package called the Automated Payload Experiment Tool (APET) has been developed and delivered. The objective of this task is to expand on the results of the APET work previously performed by University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) and provide versions of the software in a Macintosh and Windows compatible format. Appendix 1 science requirements document (SRD) Users Manual is attached.

  16. Software Simplifies the Sharing of Numerical Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    To ease the sharing of climate models with university students, Goddard Space Flight Center awarded SBIR funding to Reston, Virginia-based Parabon Computation Inc., a company that specializes in cloud computing. The firm developed a software program capable of running climate models over the Internet, and also created an online environment for people to collaborate on developing such models.

  17. CrossTalk: The Journal of Defense Software Engineering. Volume 20, Number 6, June 2007

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    California. He has co-authored the book Software Cost Estimation With COCOMO II with Barry Boehm and others. Clark helped define the COCOMO II model...Software Engineering at the University of Southern California. She worked with Barry Boehm and Chris Abts to develop and calibrate a cost-estimation...2003/02/ schorsch.html>. 2. See “Software Engineering, A Practitioners Approach” by Roger Pressman for a good description of coupling, cohesion

  18. Agile Software Teams: How They Engage with Systems Engineering on DoD Acquisition Programs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    under Contract No. FA8721-05-C-0003 with Carnegie Mellon University for the operation of the Software Engineer- ing Institute, a federally funded...issues that would preclude or limit the use of Agile methods within the DoD” [Broadus 2013]. As operational tempos increase and programs fight to...environment in which it operates . This makes software different from other disciplines that have toleranc- es, generally resulting in software engineering

  19. SIGKit: a New Data-based Software for Learning Introductory Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Kruse, S.; George, O.; Esmaeili, S.; Papadimitrios, K. S.; Bank, C. G.; Cadmus, A.; Kenneally, N.; Patton, K.; Brusher, J.

    2016-12-01

    Students of diverse academic backgrounds take introductory geophysics courses to learn the theory of a variety of measurement and analysis methods with the expectation to be able to apply their basic knowledge to real data. Ideally, such data is collected in field courses and also used in lecture-based courses because they provide a critical context for better learning and understanding of geophysical methods. Each method requires a separate software package for the data processing steps, and the complexity and variety of professional software makes the path through data processing to data interpretation a strenuous learning process for students and a challenging teaching task for instructors. SIGKit (Student Investigation of Geophysics Toolkit) being developed as a collaboration between the University of South Florida, the University of Toronto, and MathWorks intends to address these shortcomings by showing the most essential processing steps and allowing students to visualize the underlying physics of the various methods. It is based on MATLAB software and offered as an easy-to-use graphical user interface and packaged so it can run as an executable in the classroom and the field even on computers without MATLAB licenses. An evaluation of the software based on student feedback from focus-group interviews and think-aloud observations helps drive its development and refinement. The toolkit provides a logical gateway into the more sophisticated and costly software students will encounter later in their training and careers by combining essential visualization, modeling, processing, and analysis steps for seismic, GPR, magnetics, gravity, resistivity, and electromagnetic data.

  20. Proposed software system for atomic-structure calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, C.F.

    1981-07-01

    Atomic structure calculations are understood well enough that, at a routine level, an atomic structure software package can be developed. At the Atomic Physics Conference in Riga, 1978 L.V. Chernysheva and M.Y. Amusia of Leningrad University, presented a paper on Software for Atomic Calculations. Their system, called ATOM is based on the Hartree-Fock approximation and correlation is included within the framework of RPAE. Energy level calculations, transition probabilities, photo-ionization cross-sections, electron scattering cross-sections are some of the physical properties that can be evaluated by their system. The MCHF method, together with CI techniques and the Breit-Pauli approximation also provides amore » sound theoretical basis for atomic structure calculations.« less

  1. Office Computer Software: A Comprehensive Review of Software Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Secretary, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Describes types of software including system software, application software, spreadsheets, accounting software, graphics packages, desktop publishing software, database, desktop and personal information management software, project and records management software, groupware, and shareware. (JOW)

  2. PLUME-FEATHER, Referencing and Finding Software for Research and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bénassy, O.; Caron, C.; Ferret-Canape, C.; Cheylus, A.; Courcelle, E.; Dantec, C.; Dayre, P.; Dostes, T.; Durand, A.; Facq, A.; Gambini, G.; Geahchan, E.; Helft, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Ingarao, M.; Joly, P.; Kieffer, J.; Larré, J.-M.; Libes, M.; Morris, F.; Parmentier, H.; Pérochon, L.; Porte, O.; Romier, G.; Rousse, D.; Tournoy, R.; Valeins, H.

    2014-06-01

    PLUME-FEATHER is a non-profit project created to Promote economicaL, Useful and Maintained softwarEFor theHigher Education And THE Research communities. The site references software, mainly Free/Libre Open Source Software (FLOSS) from French universities and national research organisations, (CNRS, INRA...), laboratories or departments as well as other FLOSS software used and evaluated by users within these institutions. Each software is represented by a reference card, which describes origin, aim, installation, cost (if applicable) and user experience from the point of view of an academic user for academic users. Presently over 1000 programs are referenced on PLUME by more than 900 contributors. Although the server is maintained by a French institution, it is open to international contributions in the academic domain. All contained and validated contents are visible to anonymous public, whereas (presently more than 2000) registered users can contribute, starting with comments on single software reference cards up to help with the organisation and presentation of the referenced software products. The project has been presented to the HEP community in 2012 for the first time [1]. This is an update of the status and a call for (further) contributions.

  3. Teaching Radiology Physics Interactively with Scientific Notebook Software.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Michael L; Amini, Behrang

    2018-06-01

    The goal of this study is to demonstrate how the teaching of radiology physics can be enhanced with the use of interactive scientific notebook software. We used the scientific notebook software known as Project Jupyter, which is free, open-source, and available for the Macintosh, Windows, and Linux operating systems. We have created a scientific notebook that demonstrates multiple interactive teaching modules we have written for our residents using the Jupyter notebook system. Scientific notebook software allows educators to create teaching modules in a form that combines text, graphics, images, data, interactive calculations, and image analysis within a single document. These notebooks can be used to build interactive teaching modules, which can help explain complex topics in imaging physics to residents. Copyright © 2018 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Software Library: A Reusable Software Issue.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    On reverse aide it neceeary aid Identify by block number) Software Library; Program Library; Reusability; Generator 20 ABSTRACT (Cmlnue on revere... Software Library. A particular example of the Software Library, the Program Library, is described as a prototype of a reusable library. A hierarchical... programming libraries are described. Finally, non code products in the Software Library are discussed. Accesson Fo NTIS R~jS DrrC TA Availability Codes 0

  5. Development of New Generation of Multibody System Computer Software

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-12

    DEVELOPMENT OF NEW GENERATION OF MULTIBODY SYSTEM COMPUTER SOFTWARE Ahmed A. Shabana University of Illinois at Chicago Paramsothy Jayakumar ...Paramsothy Jayakumar ; Michael Letherwood 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES

  6. A new software-based architecture for quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Nan; Song, FangMin; Li, Xiangdong

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we study a reliable architecture of a quantum computer and a new instruction set and machine language for the architecture, which can improve the performance and reduce the cost of the quantum computing. We also try to address some key issues in detail in the software-driven universal quantum computers.

  7. Product-oriented Software Certification Process for Software Synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Stacy; Fischer, Bernd; Denney, Ewen; Schumann, Johann; Richardson, Julian; Oh, Phil

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to propose a product-oriented software certification process to facilitate use of software synthesis and formal methods. Why is such a process needed? Currently, software is tested until deemed bug-free rather than proving that certain software properties exist. This approach has worked well in most cases, but unfortunately, deaths still occur due to software failure. Using formal methods (techniques from logic and discrete mathematics like set theory, automata theory and formal logic as opposed to continuous mathematics like calculus) and software synthesis, it is possible to reduce this risk by proving certain software properties. Additionally, software synthesis makes it possible to automate some phases of the traditional software development life cycle resulting in a more streamlined and accurate development process.

  8. One library's experience with review and selection of chat software for reference.

    PubMed

    Behm, Leslie M

    2003-01-01

    When Michigan State University (MSU) Libraries decided to make the foray into virtual reference, the first thing that needed to be done was to decide on the software to use. This article discusses the process used including the items considered essential (deal-breakers) for software to make the first cut, what other features needed to be included, and what features would be useful but were not critical. A literature review of some useful current articles on virtual reference is included. The vendor and software ultimately selected was not one of the original vendors; how MSU Libraries was able to evaluate and select Docutek is presented. A matrix for software comparison is included in the appendix.

  9. Perceptions of the Software Skills of Graduates by Employers in the Financial Services Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyng, Tim; Tickle, Leonie; Wood, Leigh N.

    2013-01-01

    Software, particularly spreadsheet software, is ubiquitous in the financial services workplace. Yet little is known about the extent to which universities should, and do, prepare graduates for this aspect of the modern workplace. We have investigated this issue through a survey of financial services employers of graduates, the results of which are…

  10. A University-Wide ePortfolio Initiative at Federation University Australia: Software Analysis, Test-to-Production, and Evaluation Phases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hains-Wesson, Rachael; Wakeling, Lara; Aldred, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an ePortfolio implementation strategy at Federation University Australia, Victoria (formerly the University of Ballarat). The authors combined a personal and practical viewpoint to elicit pitfalls, challenges, and recommendations for improvement. The paper is divided into three main areas in order to outline the experiments…

  11. A process improvement model for software verification and validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, John; Sabolish, George

    1994-01-01

    We describe ongoing work at the NASA Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) Facility to establish a process improvement model for software verification and validation (V&V) organizations. This model, similar to those used by some software development organizations, uses measurement-based techniques to identify problem areas and introduce incremental improvements. We seek to replicate this model for organizations involved in V&V on large-scale software development projects such as EOS and space station. At the IV&V Facility, a university research group and V&V contractors are working together to collect metrics across projects in order to determine the effectiveness of V&V and improve its application. Since V&V processes are intimately tied to development processes, this paper also examines the repercussions for development organizations in large-scale efforts.

  12. Developing Avionics Hardware and Software for Rocket Engine Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aberg, Bryce Robert

    2014-01-01

    My summer was spent working as an intern at Kennedy Space Center in the Propulsion Avionics Branch of the NASA Engineering Directorate Avionics Division. The work that I was involved with was part of Rocket University's Project Neo, a small scale liquid rocket engine test bed. I began by learning about the layout of Neo in order to more fully understand what was required of me. I then developed software in LabView to gather and scale data from two flowmeters and integrated that code into the main control software. Next, I developed more LabView code to control an igniter circuit and integrated that into the main software, as well. Throughout the internship, I performed work that mechanics and technicians would do in order to maintain and assemble the engine.

  13. A process improvement model for software verification and validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, John; Sabolish, George

    1994-01-01

    We describe ongoing work at the NASA Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) Facility to establish a process improvement model for software verification and validation (V&V) organizations. This model, similar to those used by some software development organizations, uses measurement-based techniques to identify problem areas and introduce incremental improvements. We seek to replicate this model for organizations involved in V&V on large-scale software development projects such as EOS and Space Station. At the IV&V Facility, a university research group and V&V contractors are working together to collect metrics across projects in order to determine the effectiveness of V&V and improve its application. Since V&V processes are intimately tied to development processes, this paper also examines the repercussions for development organizations in large-scale efforts.

  14. Comparison Campaign of VLBI Data Analysis Software - First Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plank, Lucia; Bohm, Johannes; Schuh, Harald

    2010-01-01

    During the development of the Vienna VLBI Software VieVS at the Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics at Vienna University of Technology, a special comparison setup was developed with the goal of easily finding links between deviations of results achieved with different software packages and certain parameters of the observation. The object of comparison is the computed time delay, a value calculated for each observation including all relevant models and corrections that need to be applied in geodetic VLBI analysis. Besides investigating the effects of the various models on the total delay, results of comparisons between VieVS and Occam 6.1 are shown. Using the same methods, a Comparison Campaign of VLBI data analysis software called DeDeCC is about to be launched within the IVS soon.

  15. Academics' Perceptions of the Use and Relevance of Software in Quantitative and Financial Disciplines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyng, Timothy; Tickle, Leonie; Wood, Leigh

    2013-01-01

    Software may be used in university teaching both to enhance student learning of discipline-content knowledge and skills, and to equip students with capabilities that will be useful in their future careers. Although research has indicated that software may be used as an effective way of engaging students and enhancing learning in certain scenarios,…

  16. The Use of Flexible, Interactive, Situation-Focused Software for the E-Learning of Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farnsworth, Ralph Edward

    This paper discusses the classroom, home, and distance use of new, flexible, interactive, application-oriented software known as Active Learning Suite. The actual use of the software, not just a controlled experiment, is reported on. Designed for the e-learning of university mathematics, the program was developed by a joint U.S.-Russia team and…

  17. Software Defined Radio with Parallelized Software Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, Greg

    2013-01-01

    This software implements software-defined radio procession over multicore, multi-CPU systems in a way that maximizes the use of CPU resources in the system. The software treats each processing step in either a communications or navigation modulator or demodulator system as an independent, threaded block. Each threaded block is defined with a programmable number of input or output buffers; these buffers are implemented using POSIX pipes. In addition, each threaded block is assigned a unique thread upon block installation. A modulator or demodulator system is built by assembly of the threaded blocks into a flow graph, which assembles the processing blocks to accomplish the desired signal processing. This software architecture allows the software to scale effortlessly between single CPU/single-core computers or multi-CPU/multi-core computers without recompilation. NASA spaceflight and ground communications systems currently rely exclusively on ASICs or FPGAs. This software allows low- and medium-bandwidth (100 bps to approx.50 Mbps) software defined radios to be designed and implemented solely in C/C++ software, while lowering development costs and facilitating reuse and extensibility.

  18. Software Defined Radio with Parallelized Software Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, Greg

    2013-01-01

    This software implements software-defined radio procession over multi-core, multi-CPU systems in a way that maximizes the use of CPU resources in the system. The software treats each processing step in either a communications or navigation modulator or demodulator system as an independent, threaded block. Each threaded block is defined with a programmable number of input or output buffers; these buffers are implemented using POSIX pipes. In addition, each threaded block is assigned a unique thread upon block installation. A modulator or demodulator system is built by assembly of the threaded blocks into a flow graph, which assembles the processing blocks to accomplish the desired signal processing. This software architecture allows the software to scale effortlessly between single CPU/single-core computers or multi-CPU/multi-core computers without recompilation. NASA spaceflight and ground communications systems currently rely exclusively on ASICs or FPGAs. This software allows low- and medium-bandwidth (100 bps to .50 Mbps) software defined radios to be designed and implemented solely in C/C++ software, while lowering development costs and facilitating reuse and extensibility.

  19. Cross-National Attitudes and Perceptions Concerning Software Piracy: A Comparative Study of Students from the United States and China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawlinson, David R.; Lupton, Robert A.

    2007-01-01

    Students' attitudes and perceptions regarding the use of unlicensed software are important to educators and businesses. Students have a proven propensity to pirate software and other intellectual property. By understanding how attitudes and perceptions toward software piracy differ among university students in a cross-national context, educators…

  20. Common Database Interface for Heterogeneous Software Engineering Tools.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    SUB-GROUP Database Management Systems ;Programming(Comuters); 1e 05 Computer Files;Information Transfer;Interfaces; 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse...Air Force Institute of Technology Air University In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science in Information Systems ...Literature ..... 8 System 690 Configuration ......... 8 Database Functionis ............ 14 Software Engineering Environments ... 14 Data Manager

  1. BASKET on-board software library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luntzer, Armin; Ottensamer, Roland; Kerschbaum, Franz

    2014-07-01

    The University of Vienna is a provider of on-board data processing software with focus on data compression, such as used on board the highly successful Herschel/PACS instrument, as well as in the small BRITE-Constellation fleet of cube-sats. Current contributions are made to CHEOPS, SAFARI and PLATO. The effort was taken to review the various functions developed for Herschel and provide a consolidated software library to facilitate the work for future missions. This library is a shopping basket of algorithms. Its contents are separated into four classes: auxiliary functions (e.g. circular buffers), preprocessing functions (e.g. for calibration), lossless data compression (arithmetic or Rice coding) and lossy reduction steps (ramp fitting etc.). The "BASKET" has all functionality that is needed to create an on-board data processing chain. All sources are written in C, supplemented by optimized versions in assembly, targeting popular CPU architectures for space applications. BASKET is open source and constantly growing

  2. The relationships between software publications and software systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogg, David W.

    2017-01-01

    When we build software systems or software tools for astronomy, we sometimes do and sometimes don't also write and publish standard scientific papers about those software systems. I will discuss the pros and cons of writing such publications. There are impacts of writing such papers immediately (they can affect the design and structure of the software project itself), in the short term (they can promote adoption and legitimize the software), in the medium term (they can provide a platform for all the literature's mechanisms for citation, criticism, and reuse), and in the long term (they can preserve ideas that are embodied in the software, possibly on timescales much longer than the lifetime of any software context). I will argue that as important as pure software contributions are to astronomy—and I am both a preacher and a practitioner—software contributions are even more valuable when they are associated with traditional scientific publications. There are exceptions and complexities of course, which I will discuss.

  3. Cloud Computing E-Communication Services in the University Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babin, Ron; Halilovic, Branka

    2017-01-01

    The use of cloud computing services has grown dramatically in post-secondary institutions in the last decade. In particular, universities have been attracted to the low-cost and flexibility of acquiring cloud software services from Google, Microsoft and others, to implement e-mail, calendar and document management and other basic office software.…

  4. BioContainers: an open-source and community-driven framework for software standardization.

    PubMed

    da Veiga Leprevost, Felipe; Grüning, Björn A; Alves Aflitos, Saulo; Röst, Hannes L; Uszkoreit, Julian; Barsnes, Harald; Vaudel, Marc; Moreno, Pablo; Gatto, Laurent; Weber, Jonas; Bai, Mingze; Jimenez, Rafael C; Sachsenberg, Timo; Pfeuffer, Julianus; Vera Alvarez, Roberto; Griss, Johannes; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I; Perez-Riverol, Yasset

    2017-08-15

    BioContainers (biocontainers.pro) is an open-source and community-driven framework which provides platform independent executable environments for bioinformatics software. BioContainers allows labs of all sizes to easily install bioinformatics software, maintain multiple versions of the same software and combine tools into powerful analysis pipelines. BioContainers is based on popular open-source projects Docker and rkt frameworks, that allow software to be installed and executed under an isolated and controlled environment. Also, it provides infrastructure and basic guidelines to create, manage and distribute bioinformatics containers with a special focus on omics technologies. These containers can be integrated into more comprehensive bioinformatics pipelines and different architectures (local desktop, cloud environments or HPC clusters). The software is freely available at github.com/BioContainers/. yperez@ebi.ac.uk. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  5. Interactive Spreadsheets in JCE Webware

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, William F.; Fedosky, Edward W.

    2005-01-01

    A description of the Microsoft Excel spreadsheet simulation, Anharmonicity.xls that can be used to smoothly and continuously switch a plotted function and its quadratic approximation is presented. It can be used in a classroom demonstration or incorporated into a student-centered computer-laboratory exercise to examine the qualitative behavior of…

  6. Cosmic Deuterium and Social Networking Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, J. M.; Suer, T.-A.; Lubowich, D. A.; Glaisyer, T.

    2006-08-01

    For the education of newcomers to a scientific field and for the convenience of students and workers in the field, it is helpful to have all the basic scientific papers gathered. For the study of deuterium in the Universe, in 2004-5 we set up http://www.cosmicdeuterium.info with clickable links to all the historic and basic papers in the field and to many of the current papers. Cosmic deuterium is especially important because all deuterium in the Universe was formed in the epoch of nucleosynthesis in the first 1000 seconds after the Big Bang, so study of its relative abundance (D:H~1:100,000) gives us information about those first minutes of the Universe's life. Thus the understanding of cosmic deuterium is one of the pillars of modern cosmology, joining the cosmic expansion, the 3 degree cosmic background radiation, and the ripples in that background radiation. Studies of deuterium are also important for understanding Galactic chemical evolution, astrochemistry, interstellar processes, and planetary formation. Some papers had to be scanned while others are available at the Astrophysical Data System, adswww.harvard.edu, or to publishers' Websites. By 2006, social networking software (http:tinyurl.com/ zx5hk) had advanced with popular sites like facebook.com and MySpace.com; the Astrophysical Data System had even set up MyADS. Social tagging software sites like http://del.icio.us have made it easy to share sets of links to papers already available online. We have set up http://del.icio.us/deuterium to provide links to many of the papers on cosmicdeuterium.info, furthering previous del.icio.us work on /eclipses and /plutocharon. It is easy for the site owner to add links to a del.icio.us site; it takes merely clicking on a button on the browser screen once the site is opened and the desired link is viewed in a browser. Categorizing different topics by keywords allows subsets to be easily displayed. The opportunity to expose knowledge and build an ecosystem of web

  7. Nuclear Data Online Services at Peking University

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, T.S.; Guo, Z.Y.; Ye, W.G.

    2005-05-24

    The Institute of Heavy Ion Physics at Peking University has developed a new nuclear data online services software package. Through the web site (http://ndos.nst.pku.edu.cn), it offers online access to main relational nuclear databases: five evaluated neutron libraries (BROND, CENDL, ENDF, JEF, JENDL), the ENSDF library, the EXFOR library, the IAEA photonuclear library and the charged particle data of the FENDL library. This software allows the comparison and graphic representations of the different data sets. The computer programs of this package are based on the Linux implementation of PHP and the MySQL software.

  8. Nuclear Data Online Services at Peking University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, T. S.; Guo, Z. Y.; Ye, W. G.; Liu, W. L.; Liu, T. J.; Liu, C. X.; Chen, J. X.; Tang, G. Y.; Shi, Z. M.; Huang, X. L.; Chen, J. E.

    2005-05-01

    The Institute of Heavy Ion Physics at Peking University has developed a new nuclear data online services software package. Through the web site (http://ndos.nst.pku.edu.cn), it offers online access to main relational nuclear databases: five evaluated neutron libraries (BROND, CENDL, ENDF, JEF, JENDL), the ENSDF library, the EXFOR library, the IAEA photonuclear library and the charged particle data of the FENDL library. This software allows the comparison and graphic representations of the different data sets. The computer programs of this package are based on the Linux implementation of PHP and the MySQL software.

  9. Software Engineering Program: Software Process Improvement Guidebook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide experience-based guidance in implementing a software process improvement program in any NASA software development or maintenance community. This guidebook details how to define, operate, and implement a working software process improvement program. It describes the concept of the software process improvement program and its basic organizational components. It then describes the structure, organization, and operation of the software process improvement program, illustrating all these concepts with specific NASA examples. The information presented in the document is derived from the experiences of several NASA software organizations, including the SEL, the SEAL, and the SORCE. Their experiences reflect many of the elements of software process improvement within NASA. This guidebook presents lessons learned in a form usable by anyone considering establishing a software process improvement program within his or her own environment. This guidebook attempts to balance general and detailed information. It provides material general enough to be usable by NASA organizations whose characteristics do not directly match those of the sources of the information and models presented herein. It also keeps the ideas sufficiently close to the sources of the practical experiences that have generated the models and information.

  10. PandASoft: Open Source Instructional Laboratory Administration Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, P. L.; Braasch, P.; Synkova, Y. N.

    2004-12-01

    PandASoft (Physics and Astronomy Software) is software for organizing and archiving a department's teaching resources and materials. An easy to use, secure interface allows faculty and staff to explore equipment inventories, see what laboratory experiments are available, find handouts, and track what has been used in different classes in the past. Divided into five sections: classes, equipment, laboratories, links, and media, its database cross links materials, allowing users to see what labs are used with which classes, what media and equipment are used with which labs, or simply what equipment is lurking in which room. Written in PHP and MySQL, this software can be installed on any UNIX / Linux platform, including Macintosh OS X. It is designed to allow users to easily customize the headers, footers and colors to blend with existing sites - no programming experience required. While initial data input is labor intensive, the system will save time later by allowing users to quickly answer questions related to what is in inventory, where it is located, how many are in stock, and where online they can learn more. It will also provide a central location for storing PDFs of handouts, and links to applets and cool sites at other universities. PandASoft comes with over 100 links to online resources pre-installed. We would like to thank Dr. Wolfgang Rueckner and the Harvard University Science Center for providing computers and resources for this project.

  11. Telescience at the University of California, Berkeley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, S.; Marchant, W. T.; Kaplan, G. C.; Dobson, C. A.; Jernigan, J. G.; Lampton, M. L.; Malina, R. F.

    1989-01-01

    The University of California at Berkeley (UCB) is a member of a university consortium involved in telescience testbed activities under the sponsorship of NASA. Our Telescience Testbed Project consists of three experiments using flight hardware being developed for the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer project at UCB's Space Sciences Laboratory. The first one is a teleoperation experiment investigating remote instrument control using a computer network such as the Internet. The second experiment is an effort to develop a system for operation of a network of remote workstations allowing coordinated software development, evaluation, and use by widely dispersed groups. The final experiment concerns simulation as a method to facilitate the concurrent development of instrument hardware and support software. We describe our progress in these areas.

  12. Especially for High School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, J. Emory

    2000-05-01

    JCE Classroom Activity: #27. How Does Your Garden Grow? Investigating the "Magic Salt Crystal Garden", edited by Nancy S. Gettys and Erica K. Jacobsen, p 624A. Some Articles of Interest photos by Jerrold J. Jacobsen and Nancy S. Gettys This month's issue covers a wide variety of topics, from historical notes to the latest software from JCE. Gas burners are such familiar items in the laboratory that little thought is given to their development. An interesting article by Kathryn Williams (pp 558-559) explains how these humble devices came into being, beginning with Robert Bunsen's invention in 1857, through their adaptation in the United States in the 1930s to burn natural gas. Bunsen, in collaboration with Gustav Kirchhoff, used his invention in constructing an emission spectrometer that could be used in chemical analysis. A drawing of the instrument appears in the Williams article. The spectrometer is described in more detail in an article titled "A Brief History of Atomic Emission Spectrochemical Analysis, 1666-1950". Author Richard Jarrell traces the history of this important and lasting method of analysis from Isaac Newton's discovery of the visible spectrum to the development of the powerful analytical instruments that were in use in the 1950s. For readers who have a deeper interest in atomic emission spectroscopy, Jarrell's article is the first of five that are based on a symposium conducted in 1999 (pp 573-607). Visualizing the structure of ionic crystals is the topic of articles by Keenan Dungey (pp 618-619), Bruce Mattson (pp 622-623), and J. Kamenícek and M. Melichárek (pp 623-624). The ionic crystal theme is also carried out in JCE Classroom Activity #27 (pp 624A-B) and a demonstration on the preparation of sodium iodide, written by Zelek Herman (pp 619-621). Together, the five articles provide an interesting combination of ideas for investigating and describing both the macroscopic and the submicroscopic views of ionic crystals. Is It the "Write" Time

  13. Sunderland Software City: An Innovative Approach to Knowledge Exchange in the North East of England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Lynne; Irons, Alastair; MacIntyre, John; Sellers, Charles; Smith, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a collaborative initiative within the North East of England which aims to grow and sustain a software industry, based on the strengths of regional players, including in particular the local university. The project Sunderland Software City has the ambitious aim of developing the people, the infrastructure and the business and…

  14. Workflow for high-content, individual cell quantification of fluorescent markers from universal microscope data, supported by open source software.

    PubMed

    Stockwell, Simon R; Mittnacht, Sibylle

    2014-12-16

    Advances in understanding the control mechanisms governing the behavior of cells in adherent mammalian tissue culture models are becoming increasingly dependent on modes of single-cell analysis. Methods which deliver composite data reflecting the mean values of biomarkers from cell populations risk losing subpopulation dynamics that reflect the heterogeneity of the studied biological system. In keeping with this, traditional approaches are being replaced by, or supported with, more sophisticated forms of cellular assay developed to allow assessment by high-content microscopy. These assays potentially generate large numbers of images of fluorescent biomarkers, which enabled by accompanying proprietary software packages, allows for multi-parametric measurements per cell. However, the relatively high capital costs and overspecialization of many of these devices have prevented their accessibility to many investigators. Described here is a universally applicable workflow for the quantification of multiple fluorescent marker intensities from specific subcellular regions of individual cells suitable for use with images from most fluorescent microscopes. Key to this workflow is the implementation of the freely available Cell Profiler software(1) to distinguish individual cells in these images, segment them into defined subcellular regions and deliver fluorescence marker intensity values specific to these regions. The extraction of individual cell intensity values from image data is the central purpose of this workflow and will be illustrated with the analysis of control data from a siRNA screen for G1 checkpoint regulators in adherent human cells. However, the workflow presented here can be applied to analysis of data from other means of cell perturbation (e.g., compound screens) and other forms of fluorescence based cellular markers and thus should be useful for a wide range of laboratories.

  15. Security Verification Techniques Applied to PatchLink COTS Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilliam, David P.; Powell, John D.; Bishop, Matt; Andrew, Chris; Jog, Sameer

    2006-01-01

    Verification of the security of software artifacts is a challenging task. An integrated approach that combines verification techniques can increase the confidence in the security of software artifacts. Such an approach has been developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the University of California at Davis (UC Davis). Two security verification instruments were developed and then piloted on PatchLink's UNIX Agent, a Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) software product, to assess the value of the instruments and the approach. The two instruments are the Flexible Modeling Framework (FMF) -- a model-based verification instrument (JPL), and a Property-Based Tester (UC Davis). Security properties were formally specified for the COTS artifact and then verified using these instruments. The results were then reviewed to determine the effectiveness of the approach and the security of the COTS product.

  16. Mission design software development at the University of Texas at Austin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowler, Wallace T.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the development process, the contents, the update process, and the various uses of a space mission planning FORTRAN subroutine library. This document is written by graduate (and undergraduate) students at the University of Texas at Austin and is used by students in several courses, primarily design courses. The library has been made available to faculty and students at several schools and was provided to students at the 1991 International Space University in Toulouse, France. This paper describes the mission library, its creation, its checking, its update procedure, and the teaching philosophy and procedures involved in its use.

  17. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-08-01

    years of Journal issues, available all the time with responses within seconds.

    ·Supplementary materials that are important to only a limited number of our subscribers; materials that augment laboratory experiments are a good example.

    ·Supplementary videos, such as the videos, still images, and excerpts from interviews with nuclear chemists that give fuller meaning to the Viewpoints article "Chemistry of the Heaviest Elements- One Atom at a Time" referred to below.

    ·Internet feature columns are more effective in a dynamic medium. Two that are in place are Mathcad in the Chemistry Curriculum (edited by Theresa Zielinski) and Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems (edited by William Robinson and Susan Nurrenbern).

    ·Buyers Guides have their content updated often and link to other useful sites. There is one for books and software and another for supplies and equipment. Elements Added to Periodic Table Two new transuranic elements have been added to the list in the Viewpoints article "Chemistry of the Heaviest ElementsOne Atom at a Time" by Darleane C. Hoffman and Diana M. Lee (JCE, 1999, 76, 331). The new elements have atomic numbers 118 and 116. The path to the discovery of these elements was predicted by Robert Smolanczuk, a young Polish theorist whose calculations led him to conclude that a lead-krypton collision technique could produce element 118, which then decays to element 116. Others questioned his results, but Hoffman invited him to join the team at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and a decision was made to try out his ideas. The result was almost complete verification of Smolanczuk's calculations. The experimental team was headed by Kenneth E. Gregorich; Darleane Hoffman is one of 15 codiscoverers of element 118. Awards Willard Gibbs Medal Lawrence F. Dahl of the University of Wisconsin-Madison is the recipient of 1999 Willard Gibbs Medal, the highest award of the

  18. Virtual immunology: software for teaching basic immunology.

    PubMed

    Berçot, Filipe Faria; Fidalgo-Neto, Antônio Augusto; Lopes, Renato Matos; Faggioni, Thais; Alves, Luiz Anastácio

    2013-01-01

    As immunology continues to evolve, many educational methods have found difficulty in conveying the degree of complexity inherent in its basic principles. Today, the teaching-learning process in such areas has been improved with tools such as educational software. This article introduces "Virtual Immunology," a software program available free of charge in Portuguese and English, which can be used by teachers and students in physiology, immunology, and cellular biology classes. We discuss the development of the initial two modules: "Organs and Lymphoid Tissues" and "Inflammation" and the use of interactive activities to provide microscopic and macroscopic understanding in immunology. Students, both graduate and undergraduate, were questioned along with university level professors about the quality of the software and intuitiveness of use, facility of navigation, and aesthetic organization using a Likert scale. An overwhelmingly satisfactory result was obtained with both students and immunology teachers. Programs such as "Virtual Immunology" are offering more interactive, multimedia approaches to complex scientific principles that increase student motivation, interest, and comprehension. © 2013 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  19. The University of Stuttgart IKE/University of Arizona student research program

    SciTech Connect

    Seale, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    The University of Stuttgart's Institut fuer Kernenergetik und Energiesysteme (IKE) and the University of Arizona have had a joint program in which graduate students from the IKE spend 1 yr on the University of Arizona campus. This program started in 1982 largely as the result of an initiative begun by K.H. Hoecker, then director of IKE. Since 1985, Alfred Voss has been director and the program has continued without interruption. Under the program, the Deutscher Akademisher Austauschdienst, a government agency of the Federal Republic of Germany has funded scholarships for students from IKE, which provide support for 1 yr duringmore » which they attend the University of Arizona as visiting student scholars and engage in a research project under the direction of one of our faculty, which satisfies a part of the requirements for the Ingenieur-Diplom Fachrichtung Maschinenbau. The students get credit for their research from the University of Stuttgart. The topics have a broad range and include software development, artificial intelligence, radiation transport, and energy management studies.« less

  20. Especially for High School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, J. Emory

    2000-01-01

    Classroom Activity #23 (pp 40A-40B) and in an article by Robert Goldsmith (p 41). The 1999 Nobel Prize in chemistry and the research that led to the awards are discussed in an article beginning on p 14. An account of the 1998 winners appeared in last January's issue (5), providing the basis for another convenient resource file. Water droplets on a surface of Magic Sand. For many students electrochemistry is among the least favorite of the topics included in first- or second-year high school chemistry - despite the many interesting applications that students encounter every day. There are many reasons why students find the topic difficult, but misconceptions about current flow seem to present the largest obstacle to developing a conceptual understanding of electrochemical processes. Two university faculty members and a high school teacher, Huddle, White, and Rogers, have developed a teaching model to help students confront and overcome their misconceptions (pp 104-110). They have conducted studies of the impact of the model's use on student learning in both high school and introductory college chemistry courses. Particularly encouraging were the learning gains made by students with weak academic backgrounds. An action research project focused on student perspectives of small-group learning is described by Towns, Kreke, and Fields (pp 111-119). Although the project involved upper-division undergraduate university students, action research can be useful to any chemistry teacher who wishes to systematically examine and improve instructional methods and strategies. This article may be especially interesting to readers who frequently employ small-group learning techniques in their classroom. Advances in the technology of multimedia delivery are having an impact on the format in which new JCE Software releases are available. In particular, CD-ROM and Internet browsers are becoming increasingly important as the medium and method of access respectively. To better understand what is

  1. Software Engineering and Its Application to Avionics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    34Automated Software Development Methodolgy (ASDM): An Architecture of a Knowledge-Based Expert System," Masters Thesis , Florida Atlantic University, Boca...operating system provides the control semnrim and aplication services within the miltiproossur system. Them processes timt aks up the application sofhwae...as a high-value target may no longer be occupied by the time the film is processed and analyzed. With the high mobility of today’s enemy forces

  2. ISEES: an institute for sustainable software to accelerate environmental science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M. B.; Schildhauer, M.; Fox, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    Software is essential to the full science lifecycle, spanning data acquisition, processing, quality assessment, data integration, analysis, modeling, and visualization. Software runs our meteorological sensor systems, our data loggers, and our ocean gliders. Every aspect of science is impacted by, and improved by, software. Scientific advances ranging from modeling climate change to the sequencing of the human genome have been rendered possible in the last few decades due to the massive improvements in the capabilities of computers to process data through software. This pivotal role of software in science is broadly acknowledged, while simultaneously being systematically undervalued through minimal investments in maintenance and innovation. As a community, we need to embrace the creation, use, and maintenance of software within science, and address problems such as code complexity, openness,reproducibility, and accessibility. We also need to fully develop new skills and practices in software engineering as a core competency in our earth science disciplines, starting with undergraduate and graduate education and extending into university and agency professional positions. The Institute for Sustainable Earth and Environmental Software (ISEES) is being envisioned as a community-driven activity that can facilitate and galvanize activites around scientific software in an analogous way to synthesis centers such as NCEAS and NESCent that have stimulated massive advances in ecology and evolution. We will describe the results of six workshops (Science Drivers, Software Lifecycles, Software Components, Workforce Development and Training, Sustainability and Governance, and Community Engagement) that have been held in 2013 to envision such an institute. We will present community recommendations from these workshops and our strategic vision for how ISEES will address the technical issues in the software lifecycle, sustainability of the whole software ecosystem, and the critical

  3. Software and package applicating for network meta-analysis: A usage-based comparative study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chang; Niu, Yuming; Wu, Junyi; Gu, Huiyun; Zhang, Chao

    2017-12-21

    To compare and analyze the characteristics and functions of software applications for network meta-analysis (NMA). PubMed, EMbase, The Cochrane Library, the official websites of Bayesian inference Using Gibbs Sampling (BUGS), Stata and R, and Google were searched to collect the software and packages for performing NMA; software and packages published up to March 2016 were included. After collecting the software, packages, and their user guides, we used the software and packages to calculate a typical example. All characteristics, functions, and computed results were compared and analyzed. Ten types of software were included, including programming and non-programming software. They were developed mainly based on Bayesian or frequentist theory. Most types of software have the characteristics of easy operation, easy mastery, exact calculation, or excellent graphing. However, there was no single software that performed accurate calculations with superior graphing; this could only be achieved through the combination of two or more types of software. This study suggests that the user should choose the appropriate software according to personal programming basis, operational habits, and financial ability. Then, the choice of the combination of BUGS and R (or Stata) software to perform the NMA is considered. © 2017 Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  4. Wildlife software: procedures for publication of computer software

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Samuel, M.D.

    1990-01-01

    Computers and computer software have become an integral part of the practice of wildlife science. Computers now play an important role in teaching, research, and management applications. Because of the specialized nature of wildlife problems, specific computer software is usually required to address a given problem (e.g., home range analysis). This type of software is not usually available from commercial vendors and therefore must be developed by those wildlife professionals with particular skill in computer programming. Current journal publication practices generally prevent a detailed description of computer software associated with new techniques. In addition, peer review of journal articles does not usually include a review of associated computer software. Thus, many wildlife professionals are usually unaware of computer software that would meet their needs or of major improvements in software they commonly use. Indeed most users of wildlife software learn of new programs or important changes only by word of mouth.

  5. Repository-Based Software Engineering Program: Working Program Management Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Repository-Based Software Engineering Program (RBSE) is a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) sponsored program dedicated to introducing and supporting common, effective approaches to software engineering practices. The process of conceiving, designing, building, and maintaining software systems by using existing software assets that are stored in a specialized operational reuse library or repository, accessible to system designers, is the foundation of the program. In addition to operating a software repository, RBSE promotes (1) software engineering technology transfer, (2) academic and instructional support of reuse programs, (3) the use of common software engineering standards and practices, (4) software reuse technology research, and (5) interoperability between reuse libraries. This Program Management Plan (PMP) is intended to communicate program goals and objectives, describe major work areas, and define a management report and control process. This process will assist the Program Manager, University of Houston at Clear Lake (UHCL) in tracking work progress and describing major program activities to NASA management. The goal of this PMP is to make managing the RBSE program a relatively easy process that improves the work of all team members. The PMP describes work areas addressed and work efforts being accomplished by the program; however, it is not intended as a complete description of the program. Its focus is on providing management tools and management processes for monitoring, evaluating, and administering the program; and it includes schedules for charting milestones and deliveries of program products. The PMP was developed by soliciting and obtaining guidance from appropriate program participants, analyzing program management guidance, and reviewing related program management documents.

  6. The Software Jungle: To Guide or Not To Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stigleman, Sue E.

    This report describes a project which evaluated five IBM and Macintosh bibliographic formatting software programs--ProCite, Sci-Mate, Reference Manager, Notebook II, and Bibliography--and which was conducted by the Health Sciences Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill at the request of the campus microcomputer support center.…

  7. Uncovering Student Values for Hiring in the Software Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinn, Donald; Vandegrift, Tammy

    2008-01-01

    This article provides an analysis of student responses to an exercise used in a computer ethics and a software engineering course to raise awareness of issues related to hiring, including issues of professional responsibility and diversity. Students from two different universities were asked to evaluate four candidates for two positions in a…

  8. Software Engineering Laboratory Ada performance study: Results and implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Eric W.; Stark, Michael E.

    1992-01-01

    The SEL is an organization sponsored by NASA/GSFC to investigate the effectiveness of software engineering technologies applied to the development of applications software. The SEL was created in 1977 and has three organizational members: NASA/GSFC, Systems Development Branch; The University of Maryland, Computer Sciences Department; and Computer Sciences Corporation, Systems Development Operation. The goals of the SEL are as follows: (1) to understand the software development process in the GSFC environments; (2) to measure the effect of various methodologies, tools, and models on this process; and (3) to identify and then to apply successful development practices. The activities, findings, and recommendations of the SEL are recorded in the Software Engineering Laboratory Series, a continuing series of reports that include the Ada Performance Study Report. This paper describes the background of Ada in the Flight Dynamics Division (FDD), the objectives and scope of the Ada Performance Study, the measurement approach used, the performance tests performed, the major test results, and the implications for future FDD Ada development efforts.

  9. Expert System Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS) is a software shell for developing expert systems is designed to allow research and development of artificial intelligence on conventional computers. Originally developed by Johnson Space Center, it enables highly efficient pattern matching. A collection of conditions and actions to be taken if the conditions are met is built into a rule network. Additional pertinent facts are matched to the rule network. Using the program, E.I. DuPont de Nemours & Co. is monitoring chemical production machines; California Polytechnic State University is investigating artificial intelligence in computer aided design; Mentor Graphics has built a new Circuit Synthesis system, and Brooke and Brooke, a law firm, can determine which facts from a file are most important.

  10. Nuclear and Particle Physics Simulations: The Consortium of Upper-Level Physics Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, Roberta; Moloney, Michael J.; Philpott, John; Rothberg, Joseph

    1995-06-01

    The Consortium for Upper Level Physics Software (CUPS) has developed a comprehensive series of Nine Book/Software packages that Wiley will publish in FY `95 and `96. CUPS is an international group of 27 physicists, all with extensive backgrounds in the research, teaching, and development of instructional software. The project is being supported by the National Science Foundation (PHY-9014548), and it has received other support from the IBM Corp., Apple Computer Corp., and George Mason University. The Simulations being developed are: Astrophysics, Classical Mechanics, Electricity & Magnetism, Modern Physics, Nuclear and Particle Physics, Quantum Mechanics, Solid State, Thermal and Statistical, and Wave and Optics.

  11. Space Flight Software Development Software for Intelligent System Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Luis C.; Crumbley, Tim

    2004-01-01

    The slide presentation examines the Marshall Space Flight Center Flight Software Branch, including software development projects, mission critical space flight software development, software technical insight, advanced software development technologies, and continuous improvement in the software development processes and methods.

  12. Software Verification of Orion Cockpit Displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, M. A. Rafe; Garcia, Samuel; Prado, Matthew; Hossain, Sadad; Souris, Matthew; Morin, Lee

    2017-01-01

    NASA's latest spacecraft Orion is in the development process of taking humans deeper into space. Orion is equipped with three main displays to monitor and control the spacecraft. To ensure the software behind the glass displays operates without faults, rigorous testing is needed. To conduct such testing, the Rapid Prototyping Lab at NASA's Johnson Space Center along with the University of Texas at Tyler employed a software verification tool, EggPlant Functional by TestPlant. It is an image based test automation tool that allows users to create scripts to verify the functionality within a program. A set of edge key framework and Common EggPlant Functions were developed to enable creation of scripts in an efficient fashion. This framework standardized the way to code and to simulate user inputs in the verification process. Moreover, the Common EggPlant Functions can be used repeatedly in verification of different displays.

  13. Software attribute visualization for high integrity software

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, G.M.

    1998-03-01

    This report documents a prototype tool developed to investigate the use of visualization and virtual reality technologies for improving software surety confidence. The tool is utilized within the execution phase of the software life cycle. It provides a capability to monitor an executing program against prespecified requirements constraints provided in a program written in the requirements specification language SAGE. The resulting Software Attribute Visual Analysis Tool (SAVAnT) also provides a technique to assess the completeness of a software specification.

  14. Software cost/resource modeling: Software quality tradeoff measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawler, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    A conceptual framework for treating software quality from a total system perspective is developed. Examples are given to show how system quality objectives may be allocated to hardware and software; to illustrate trades among quality factors, both hardware and software, to achieve system performance objectives; and to illustrate the impact of certain design choices on software functionality.

  15. NASA/USRA University advanced design program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lembeck, Michael F.; Prussing, John

    1989-01-01

    The participation of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in the NASA/USRA University Advanced Design Program for the 1988 to 1989 academic year is reviewed. The University's design project was the Logistics Resupply and Emergency Crew Return System for Space Station Freedom. Sixty-one students divided into eight groups, participated in the spring 1989 semester. A presentation prepared by three students and a graduate teaching assistant for the program's summer conference summarized the project results. Teamed with the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the University received support in the form of remote telecon lectures, reference material, and previously acquired applications software. In addition, a graduate teaching assistant was awarded a summer 1989 internship at MSFC.

  16. Flight simulation software at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norlin, Ken A.

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center has developed a versatile simulation software package that is applicable to a broad range of fixed-wing aircraft. This package has evolved in support of a variety of flight research programs. The structure is designed to be flexible enough for use in batch-mode, real-time pilot-in-the-loop, and flight hardware-in-the-loop simulation. Current simulations operate on UNIX-based platforms and are coded with a FORTRAN shell and C support routines. This paper discusses the features of the simulation software design and some basic model development techniques. The key capabilities that have been included in the simulation are described. The NASA Dryden simulation software is in use at other NASA centers, within industry, and at several universities. The straightforward but flexible design of this well-validated package makes it especially useful in an engineering environment.

  17. Graphical Technique to Support the Teaching/Learning Process of Software Process Reference Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa-Curiel, Ismael Edrein; Rodríguez-Jacobo, Josefina; Fernández-Zepeda, José Alberto

    In this paper, we propose a set of diagrams to visualize software process reference models (PRM). The diagrams, called dimods, are the combination of some visual and process modeling techniques such as rich pictures, mind maps, IDEF and RAD diagrams. We show the use of this technique by designing a set of dimods for the Mexican Software Industry Process Model (MoProSoft). Additionally, we perform an evaluation of the usefulness of dimods. The result of the evaluation shows that dimods may be a support tool that facilitates the understanding, memorization, and learning of software PRMs in both, software development organizations and universities. The results also show that dimods may have advantages over the traditional description methods for these types of models.

  18. Software system safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uber, James G.

    1988-01-01

    Software itself is not hazardous, but since software and hardware share common interfaces there is an opportunity for software to create hazards. Further, these software systems are complex, and proven methods for the design, analysis, and measurement of software safety are not yet available. Some past software failures, future NASA software trends, software engineering methods, and tools and techniques for various software safety analyses are reviewed. Recommendations to NASA are made based on this review.

  19. For operation of the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmon, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    During the month of June, the Survey Research Center (SRC) at the University of Georgia designed new benefits questionnaires for computer software management and information center (COSMIC). As a test of their utility, these questionnaires are now used in the benefits identification process.

  20. Especially for High School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emory Howell, J.

    1999-11-01

    many of our readers. The High School/College Interface Luncheon was part of the very rich day-long High School Program at the New Orleans ACS Meeting. Shown here (from left) are Glenn Crosby, the luncheon speaker; Lillie Tucker-Akin, the High School Day program chair; and Fred Johnson, Assistant Superintendent of Shelby County (TN) schools and Immediate Past President of NSTA. The recipient of the James Bryant Conant Award in High School Chemistry Teaching is Frank G. Cardulla, who taught for many years at Niles North High School, Skokie, Illinois. His extensive record of service to fellow teachers includes editing the JCE "View from My Classroom" feature for several years and writing several articles, as well as his recent appointment to the JCE Board of Publication. The recipient of the George C. Pimentel Award in Chemical Education is Jerry A. Bell of the American Chemical Society in Washington, DC. An author of numerous articles appearing in JCE and a member of the JCE Board of Publication for several years, he currently serves as Board Chair. The 16th Biennial Conference on Chemical Education Readers who attended the 15th BCCE in Waterloo, Ontario, know that much of the programming at these conferences is of interest to high school teachers. Many work shops, papers, and demonstrations are presented by high school teachers. There are many other outstanding papers and posters, plenary speakers, and exciting demonstrations. The 16th BCCE will be held at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, July 30-August 3, 2000. Among the high school teachers already scheduled to present workshops at the 16th BCCE are George Hague, Lynn Hershey, and Jack Randall, and there will be many more before the program is completed. The High School Chemistry Program Chair is Tim Graham, Roosevelt High School (MI). The Organizing Committee is seeking the assistance of local sections of the American Chemical Society

  1. Changes and challenges in the Software Engineering Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pajerski, Rose

    1994-01-01

    Since 1976, the Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) has been dedicated to understanding and improving the way in which one NASA organization, the Flight Dynamics Division (FDD), develops, maintains, and manages complex flight dynamics systems. The SEL is composed of three member organizations: NASA/GSFC, the University of Maryland, and Computer Sciences Corporation. During the past 18 years, the SEL's overall goal has remained the same: to improve the FDD's software products and processes in a measured manner. This requires that each development and maintenance effort be viewed, in part, as a SEL experiment which examines a specific technology or builds a model of interest for use on subsequent efforts. The SEL has undertaken many technology studies while developing operational support systems for numerous NASA spacecraft missions.

  2. Avoidable Software Procurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    software license, software usage, ELA, Software as a Service , SaaS , Software Asset...PaaS Platform as a Service SaaS Software as a Service SAM Software Asset Management SMS System Management Server SEWP Solutions for Enterprise Wide...delivery of full Cloud Services , we will see the transition of the Cloud Computing service model from Iaas to SaaS , or Software as a Service . Software

  3. Parallelization of Rocket Engine Simulator Software (P.R.E.S.S.)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cezzar, Ruknet

    1999-01-01

    Parallelization of Rocket Engine System Software (PRESS) project is part of a collaborative effort with Southern University at Baton Rouge (SUBR), University of West Florida (UWF), and Jackson State University (JSU). The project has started on October 19, 1995, and after a three-year period corresponding to project phases and fiscal-year funding by NASA Lewis Research Center (now Glenn Research Center), has ended on October 18, 1998. The one-year no-cost extension period was granted on June 7, 1998, until October 19, 1999. The aim of this one year no-cost extension period was to carry out further research to complete the work and lay the groundwork for subsequent research in the area of aerospace engine design optimization software tools. The previous progress for the research has been reported in great detail in respective interim and final research progress reports, seven of them, in all. While the purpose of this report is to be a final summary and an valuative view of the entire work since the first year funding, the following is a quick recap of the most important sections of the interim report dated April 30, 1999.

  4. Using "Facebook" to Improve Communication in Undergraduate Software Development Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charlton, Terence; Devlin, Marie; Drummond, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    As part of the CETL ALiC initiative (Centre of Excellence in Teaching and Learning: Active Learning in Computing), undergraduate computing science students at Newcastle and Durham universities participated in a cross-site team software development project. To ensure we offer adequate resources to support this collaboration, we conducted an…

  5. Microsoft Excel Software Usage for Teaching Science and Engineering Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Gurmukh; Siddiqui, Khalid

    2009-01-01

    In this article, our main objective is to present the use of Microsoft Software Excel 2007/2003 for teaching college and university level curriculum in science and engineering. In particular, we discuss two interesting and fascinating examples of interactive applications of Microsoft Excel targeted for undergraduate students in: 1) computational…

  6. After Losing Users in Catalogs, Libraries Find Better Search Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parry, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Traditional online library catalogs do not tend to order search results by ranked relevance, and they can befuddle users with clunky interfaces. However, that's changing because of two technology trends. First, a growing number of universities are shelling out serious money for sophisticated software that makes exploring their collections more…

  7. Transitions in Classroom Technology: Instructor Implementation of Classroom Management Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, David; Chung, Christina; Sun, Jerry Chih-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    The authors look at how business instructor needs are fulfilled by classroom management software (CMS), such as Moodle, and why instructors are sometimes slow to implement it. Instructors at different universities provided both qualitative and quantitative responses regarding their use of CMS. The results indicate that the top needs fulfilled by…

  8. The Alignment of Software Testing Skills of IS Students with Industry Practices--A South African Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Elsje; Zadirov, Alexander; Feinberg, Sean; Jayakody, Ruwanga

    2004-01-01

    Software testing is a crucial component in the development of good quality systems in industry. For this reason it was considered important to investigate the extent to which the Information Systems (IS) syllabus at the University of Cape Town (UCT) was aligned with accepted software testing practices in South Africa. For students to be effective…

  9. Teaching CAD at the University: Specifically Written or Commercial Software?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Ramon Rubio; Quiros, Javier Suarez; Santos, Ramon Gallego; Penin, Pedro I. Alvarez

    2007-01-01

    At most universities throughout the world Computer Aided Design is taught using commercial programs more suitable for business and industry than for teaching. This led us to write our own design program (GIcad) starting from the best-known standards on the market, but always avoiding unnecessary commands in the first steps of the learning process.…

  10. Parallelization of Rocket Engine System Software (Press)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cezzar, Ruknet

    1996-01-01

    The main goal is to assess parallelization requirements for the Rocket Engine Numeric Simulator (RENS) project which, aside from gathering information on liquid-propelled rocket engines and setting forth requirements, involve a large FORTRAN based package at NASA Lewis Research Center and TDK software developed by SUBR/UWF. The ultimate aim is to develop, test, integrate, and suitably deploy a family of software packages on various aspects and facets of rocket engines using liquid-propellants. At present, all project efforts by the funding agency, NASA Lewis Research Center, and the HBCU participants are disseminated over the internet using world wide web home pages. Considering obviously expensive methods of actual field trails, the benefits of software simulators are potentially enormous. When realized, these benefits will be analogous to those provided by numerous CAD/CAM packages and flight-training simulators. According to the overall task assignments, Hampton University's role is to collect all available software, place them in a common format, assess and evaluate, define interfaces, and provide integration. Most importantly, the HU's mission is to see to it that the real-time performance is assured. This involves source code translations, porting, and distribution. The porting will be done in two phases: First, place all software on Cray XMP platform using FORTRAN. After testing and evaluation on the Cray X-MP, the code will be translated to C + + and ported to the parallel nCUBE platform. At present, we are evaluating another option of distributed processing over local area networks using Sun NFS, Ethernet, TCP/IP. Considering the heterogeneous nature of the present software (e.g., first started as an expert system using LISP machines) which now involve FORTRAN code, the effort is expected to be quite challenging.

  11. Secure software practices among Malaysian software practitioners: An exploratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Shafinah Farvin Packeer; Baharom, Fauziah; Deraman, Aziz; Yahya, Jamaiah; Mohd, Haslina

    2016-08-01

    Secure software practices is increasingly gaining much importance among software practitioners and researchers due to the rise of computer crimes in the software industry. It has become as one of the determinant factors for producing high quality software. Even though its importance has been revealed, its current practice in the software industry is still scarce, particularly in Malaysia. Thus, an exploratory study is conducted among software practitioners in Malaysia to study their experiences and practices in the real-world projects. This paper discusses the findings from the study, which involved 93 software practitioners. Structured questionnaire is utilized for data collection purpose whilst statistical methods such as frequency, mean, and cross tabulation are used for data analysis. Outcomes from this study reveal that software practitioners are becoming increasingly aware on the importance of secure software practices, however, they lack of appropriate implementation, which could affect the quality of produced software.

  12. Software For Computing Reliability Of Other Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikora, Allen; Antczak, Thomas M.; Lyu, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Computer Aided Software Reliability Estimation (CASRE) computer program developed for use in measuring reliability of other software. Easier for non-specialists in reliability to use than many other currently available programs developed for same purpose. CASRE incorporates mathematical modeling capabilities of public-domain Statistical Modeling and Estimation of Reliability Functions for Software (SMERFS) computer program and runs in Windows software environment. Provides menu-driven command interface; enabling and disabling of menu options guides user through (1) selection of set of failure data, (2) execution of mathematical model, and (3) analysis of results from model. Written in C language.

  13. Software Design Improvements. Part 1; Software Benefits and Limitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lalli, Vincent R.; Packard, Michael H.; Ziemianski, Tom

    1997-01-01

    Computer hardware and associated software have been used for many years to process accounting information, to analyze test data and to perform engineering analysis. Now computers and software also control everything from automobiles to washing machines and the number and type of applications are growing at an exponential rate. The size of individual program has shown similar growth. Furthermore, software and hardware are used to monitor and/or control potentially dangerous products and safety-critical systems. These uses include everything from airplanes and braking systems to medical devices and nuclear plants. The question is: how can this hardware and software be made more reliable? Also, how can software quality be improved? What methodology needs to be provided on large and small software products to improve the design and how can software be verified?

  14. Impact of Agile Software Development Model on Software Maintainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gawali, Ajay R.

    2012-01-01

    Software maintenance and support costs account for up to 60% of the overall software life cycle cost and often burdens tightly budgeted information technology (IT) organizations. Agile software development approach delivers business value early, but implications on software maintainability are still unknown. The purpose of this quantitative study…

  15. A Database Practicum for Teaching Database Administration and Software Development at Regis University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    This research paper compares a database practicum at the Regis University College for Professional Studies (CPS) with technology oriented practicums at other universities. Successful andragogy for technology courses can motivate students to develop a genuine interest in the subject, share their knowledge with peers and can inspire students to…

  16. The software and algorithms for hyperspectral data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyrayeva, Anhelina; Martinov, Anton; Ivanov, Victor; Katkovsky, Leonid

    2017-04-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing technique is widely used for collecting and processing -information about the Earth's surface objects. Hyperspectral data are combined to form a three-dimensional (x, y, λ) data cube. Department of Aerospace Research of the Institute of Applied Physical Problems of the Belarusian State University presents a general model of the software for hyperspectral image data analysis and processing. The software runs in Windows XP/7/8/8.1/10 environment on any personal computer. This complex has been has been written in C++ language using QT framework and OpenGL for graphical data visualization. The software has flexible structure that consists of a set of independent plugins. Each plugin was compiled as Qt Plugin and represents Windows Dynamic library (dll). Plugins can be categorized in terms of data reading types, data visualization (3D, 2D, 1D) and data processing The software has various in-built functions for statistical and mathematical analysis, signal processing functions like direct smoothing function for moving average, Savitzky-Golay smoothing technique, RGB correction, histogram transformation, and atmospheric correction. The software provides two author's engineering techniques for the solution of atmospheric correction problem: iteration method of refinement of spectral albedo's parameters using Libradtran and analytical least square method. The main advantages of these methods are high rate of processing (several minutes for 1 GB data) and low relative error in albedo retrieval (less than 15%). Also, the software supports work with spectral libraries, region of interest (ROI) selection, spectral analysis such as cluster-type image classification and automatic hypercube spectrum comparison by similarity criterion with similar ones from spectral libraries, and vice versa. The software deals with different kinds of spectral information in order to identify and distinguish spectrally unique materials. Also, the following advantages

  17. Application of Plagiarism Screening Software in the Chemical Engineering Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Matthew E.; Bullard, Lisa G.

    2014-01-01

    Plagiarism is an area of increasing concern for written ChE assignments, such as laboratory and design reports, due to ease of access to text and other materials via the internet. This study examines the application of plagiarism screening software to four courses in a university chemical engineering curriculum. The effectiveness of plagiarism…

  18. C4 Software Technology Reference Guide - A Prototype.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-01-10

    domain analysis methods include • Feature-oriented domain analysis ( FODA ) (see pg. 185), a domain analysis method based upon identifying the... Analysis ( FODA ) Feasibility Study (CMU/SEI-90-TR-21, ADA 235785). Pittsburgh, PA: Software En- gineering Institute, Carnegie Mellon University, 1990. 178...domain analysis ( FODA ) (see pg. 185), in which a feature is a user-visible aspect or char- acteristic of the domain [Kang 90].) The features in a system

  19. Open University Environmental Education and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackmore, Christine

    1996-01-01

    Describes the approach to environmental education courses at Open University. Includes broad course content, team teaching approach, and philosophy of reorienting education towards sustainable development. Course material for open learning includes self-contained study packs as well as course texts, video, audio, and computer software. Nonformal…

  20. Software security checklist for the software life cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilliam, D. P.; Wolfe, T. L.; Sherif, J. S.

    2002-01-01

    A formal approach to security in the software life cycle is essential to protect corporate resources. However, little thought has been given to this aspect of software development. Due to its criticality, security should be integrated as a formal approach in the software life cycle.

  1. Software Epistemology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    in-vitro decision to incubate a startup, Lexumo [7], which is developing a commercial Software as a Service ( SaaS ) vulnerability assessment...LTS Label Transition System MUSE Mining and Understanding Software Enclaves RTEMS Real-Time Executive for Multi-processor Systems SaaS Software ...as a Service SSA Static Single Assignment SWE Software Epistemology UD/DU Def-Use/Use-Def Chains (Dataflow Graph)

  2. Digital Image Correlation from Commercial to FOS Software: a Mature Technique for Full-Field Displacement Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belloni, V.; Ravanelli, R.; Nascetti, A.; Di Rita, M.; Mattei, D.; Crespi, M.

    2018-05-01

    In the last few decades, there has been a growing interest in studying non-contact methods for full-field displacement and strain measurement. Among such techniques, Digital Image Correlation (DIC) has received particular attention, thanks to its ability to provide these information by comparing digital images of a sample surface before and after deformation. The method is now commonly adopted in the field of civil, mechanical and aerospace engineering and different companies and some research groups implemented 2D and 3D DIC software. In this work a review on DIC software status is given at first. Moreover, a free and open source 2D DIC software is presented, named py2DIC and developed in Python at the Geodesy and Geomatics Division of DICEA of the University of Rome "La Sapienza"; its potentialities were evaluated by processing the images captured during tensile tests performed in the Structural Engineering Lab of the University of Rome "La Sapienza" and comparing them to those obtained using the commercial software Vic-2D developed by Correlated Solutions Inc, USA. The agreement of these results at one hundredth of millimetre level demonstrate the possibility to use this open source software as a valuable 2D DIC tool to measure full-field displacements on the investigated sample surface.

  3. THE VALIDITY OF USING ROC SOFTWARE FOR ANALYSING VISUAL GRADING CHARACTERISTICS DATA: AN INVESTIGATION BASED ON THE NOVEL SOFTWARE VGC ANALYZER.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Jonny; Månsson, Lars Gunnar; Båth, Magnus

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the present work was to investigate the validity of using single-reader-adapted receiver operating characteristics (ROC) software for analysis of visual grading characteristics (VGC) data. VGC data from four published VGC studies on optimisation of X-ray examinations, previously analysed using ROCFIT, were reanalysed using a recently developed software dedicated to VGC analysis (VGC Analyzer), and the outcomes [the mean and 95 % confidence interval (CI) of the area under the VGC curve (AUCVGC) and the p-value] were compared. The studies included both paired and non-paired data and were reanalysed both for the fixed-reader and the random-reader situations. The results showed good agreement between the softwares for the mean AUCVGC For non-paired data, wider CIs were obtained with VGC Analyzer than previously reported, whereas for paired data, the previously reported CIs were similar or even broader. Similar observations were made for the p-values. The results indicate that the use of single-reader-adapted ROC software such as ROCFIT for analysing non-paired VGC data may lead to an increased risk of committing Type I errors, especially in the random-reader situation. On the other hand, the use of ROC software for analysis of paired VGC data may lead to an increased risk of committing Type II errors, especially in the fixed-reader situation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Computer software.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, L E

    1986-10-01

    Software is the component in a computer system that permits the hardware to perform the various functions that a computer system is capable of doing. The history of software and its development can be traced to the early nineteenth century. All computer systems are designed to utilize the "stored program concept" as first developed by Charles Babbage in the 1850s. The concept was lost until the mid-1940s, when modern computers made their appearance. Today, because of the complex and myriad tasks that a computer system can perform, there has been a differentiation of types of software. There is software designed to perform specific business applications. There is software that controls the overall operation of a computer system. And there is software that is designed to carry out specialized tasks. Regardless of types, software is the most critical component of any computer system. Without it, all one has is a collection of circuits, transistors, and silicone chips.

  5. End-to-end observatory software modeling using domain specific languages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filgueira, José M.; Bec, Matthieu; Liu, Ning; Peng, Chien; Soto, José

    2014-07-01

    The Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) is a 25-meter extremely large telescope that is being built by an international consortium of universities and research institutions. Its software and control system is being developed using a set of Domain Specific Languages (DSL) that supports a model driven development methodology integrated with an Agile management process. This approach promotes the use of standardized models that capture the component architecture of the system, that facilitate the construction of technical specifications in a uniform way, that facilitate communication between developers and domain experts and that provide a framework to ensure the successful integration of the software subsystems developed by the GMT partner institutions.

  6. Issues in Defining Software Architectures in a GIS Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Jesus; Alvorado, Lori

    1997-01-01

    The primary mission of the Pan-American Center for Earth and Environmental Studies (PACES) is to advance the research areas that are relevant to NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program. One of the activities at PACES is the establishment of a repository for geographical, geological and environmental information that covers various regions of Mexico and the southwest region of the U.S. and that is acquired from NASA and other sources through remote sensing, ground studies or paper-based maps. The center will be providing access of this information to other government entities in the U.S. and Mexico, and research groups from universities, national laboratories and industry. Geographical Information Systems(GIS) provide the means to manage, manipulate, analyze and display geographically referenced information that will be managed by PACES. Excellent off-the-shelf software exists for a complete GIS as well as software for storing and managing spatial databases, processing images, networking and viewing maps with layered information. This allows the user flexibility in combining systems to create a GIS or to mix these software packages with custom-built application programs. Software architectural languages provide the ability to specify the computational components and interactions among these components, an important topic in the domain of GIS because of the need to integrate numerous software packages. This paper discusses the characteristics that architectural languages address with respect to the issues relating to the data that must be communicated between software systems and components when systems interact. The paper presents a background on GIS in section 2. Section 3 gives an overview of software architecture and architectural languages. Section 4 suggests issues that may be of concern when defining the software architecture of a GIS. The last section discusses the future research effort and finishes with a summary.

  7. University students' notebook computer use.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Karen; Johnson, Peter; Dennerlein, Jack; Peterson, Denise; Kaufman, Justin; Gold, Joshua; Williams, Sarah; Richmond, Nancy; Karban, Stephanie; Firn, Emily; Ansong, Elizabeth; Hudak, Sarah; Tung, Katherine; Hall, Victoria; Pencina, Karol; Pencina, Michael

    2009-05-01

    Recent evidence suggests that university students are self-reporting experiencing musculoskeletal discomfort with computer use similar to levels reported by adult workers. The objective of this study was to determine how university students use notebook computers and to determine what ergonomic strategies might be effective in reducing self-reported musculoskeletal discomfort in this population. Two hundred and eighty-nine university students randomly assigned to one of three towers by the university's Office of Housing participated in this study. The results of this investigation showed a significant reduction in self-reported notebook computer-related discomfort from pre- and post-survey in participants who received notebook computer accessories and in those who received accessories and participatory ergonomics training. A significant increase in post-survey rest breaks was seen. There was a significant correlation between self-reported computer usage and the amount measured using computer usage software (odometer). More research is needed however to determine the most effective ergonomics intervention for university students.

  8. Conceptual Tutoring Software for Promoting Deep Learning: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stott, Angela; Hattingh, Annemarie

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a case study of the use of conceptual tutoring software to promote deep learning of the scientific concept of density among 50 final year pre-service student teachers in a natural sciences course in a South African university. Individually-paced electronic tutoring is potentially an effective way of meeting the students' varied…

  9. CrossTalk: The Journal of Defense Software Engineering. Volume 26, Number 4

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    quality of most software explode into the broader consciousness . This awareness came thanks to the coincidence of the rise of universal Internet...facilitates the accomplishment of stage 4, Continuous Improvement. A quantum advance for project management is readily avail- able through the

  10. An experimental evaluation of software redundancy as a strategy for improving reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckhardt, Dave E., Jr.; Caglayan, Alper K.; Knight, John C.; Lee, Larry D.; Mcallister, David F.; Vouk, Mladen A.; Kelly, John P. J.

    1990-01-01

    The strategy of using multiple versions of independently developed software as a means to tolerate residual software design faults is suggested by the success of hardware redundancy for tolerating hardware failures. Although, as generally accepted, the independence of hardware failures resulting from physical wearout can lead to substantial increases in reliability for redundant hardware structures, a similar conclusion is not immediate for software. The degree to which design faults are manifested as independent failures determines the effectiveness of redundancy as a method for improving software reliability. Interest in multi-version software centers on whether it provides an adequate measure of increased reliability to warrant its use in critical applications. The effectiveness of multi-version software is studied by comparing estimates of the failure probabilities of these systems with the failure probabilities of single versions. The estimates are obtained under a model of dependent failures and compared with estimates obtained when failures are assumed to be independent. The experimental results are based on twenty versions of an aerospace application developed and certified by sixty programmers from four universities. Descriptions of the application, development and certification processes, and operational evaluation are given together with an analysis of the twenty versions.

  11. Kennesaw State University Classroom Technology Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHaney, Jane; Wallace, Deborah; Taylor, Beverley

    The purpose of the Kennesaw State University (KSU) Coca Cola/Board of Regents Classroom Technology Initiative was to develop preservice and inservice teachers' expertise in educational technology such as computers, presentation software, and multimedia and to teach educators to apply those skills to content instruction. Project goals were to…

  12. Software engineering laboratory series: Annotated bibliography of software engineering laboratory literature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morusiewicz, Linda; Valett, Jon

    1992-01-01

    This document is an annotated bibliography of technical papers, documents, and memorandums produced by or related to the Software Engineering Laboratory. More than 100 publications are summarized. These publications cover many areas of software engineering and range from research reports to software documentation. This document has been updated and reorganized substantially since the original version (SEL-82-006, November 1982). All materials have been grouped into eight general subject areas for easy reference: (1) the Software Engineering Laboratory; (2) the Software Engineering Laboratory: Software Development Documents; (3) Software Tools; (4) Software Models; (5) Software Measurement; (6) Technology Evaluations; (7) Ada Technology; and (8) Data Collection. This document contains an index of these publications classified by individual author.

  13. Software Engineering Guidebook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John; Wenneson, Greg

    1993-01-01

    The Software Engineering Guidebook describes SEPG (Software Engineering Process Group) supported processes and techniques for engineering quality software in NASA environments. Three process models are supported: structured, object-oriented, and evolutionary rapid-prototyping. The guidebook covers software life-cycles, engineering, assurance, and configuration management. The guidebook is written for managers and engineers who manage, develop, enhance, and/or maintain software under the Computer Software Services Contract.

  14. Redshift Measurement and Spectral Classification for eBoss Galaxies with the Redmonster Software

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, Timothy A.; Bolton, Adam S.; Dawson, Kyle S.

    “Cosmological redshift surveys” are experiments conducted with astronomical telescopes, imagers, and spectrographs, which map the three-dimensional structure of the universe on the largest scales. These maps are delineated by the positions of galaxies, quasars, and intergalactic hydrogen clouds. When interpreted in the context of Einstein’s theory of gravity, these maps can be used to infer the nature of the contents of the universe, including the mysterious “dark energy” that is driving the expansion of the universe to accelerate. While the directional positions of galaxies and other objects can be measured directly in images of the sky, the third dimension ofmore » their position (i.e., their distance from the Earth and the Milky Way Galaxy) must be measured by spectrographs that distribute their light as a function of frequency, enabling a measurement of their cosmological Doppler shift (or “redshift”), which serves as an observable proxy for distance. The largest cosmological redshift surveys, such as the “eBOSS” experiment of the fourth Sloan Digital Sky Survey, collect spectroscopic data for hundreds of thousands to millions of galaxies. Future experiments such as the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument will in turn collect tens of millions of spectra. To be feasible, redshift measurement methods in datasets of this scale must be made with automated software. This paper describes the algorithms, astrophysical templates, and implementation of a new redshift measurement software package that is optimized to run on large numbers of spectra with relatively low signal-to-noise ratio, typical of the most ambitious current and future cosmological redshift surveys. The software is demonstrated on spectroscopic data from the eBOSS survey, with performance that meets the scientific requirements of that experiment. The software is implemented in a general framework that will allow application to spectra from the DESI project in the future.« less

  15. Redshift Measurement and Spectral Classification for eBoss Galaxies with the Redmonster Software

    DOE PAGES

    Hutchinson, Timothy A.; Bolton, Adam S.; Dawson, Kyle S.; ...

    2016-12-02

    “Cosmological redshift surveys” are experiments conducted with astronomical telescopes, imagers, and spectrographs, which map the three-dimensional structure of the universe on the largest scales. These maps are delineated by the positions of galaxies, quasars, and intergalactic hydrogen clouds. When interpreted in the context of Einstein’s theory of gravity, these maps can be used to infer the nature of the contents of the universe, including the mysterious “dark energy” that is driving the expansion of the universe to accelerate. While the directional positions of galaxies and other objects can be measured directly in images of the sky, the third dimension ofmore » their position (i.e., their distance from the Earth and the Milky Way Galaxy) must be measured by spectrographs that distribute their light as a function of frequency, enabling a measurement of their cosmological Doppler shift (or “redshift”), which serves as an observable proxy for distance. The largest cosmological redshift surveys, such as the “eBOSS” experiment of the fourth Sloan Digital Sky Survey, collect spectroscopic data for hundreds of thousands to millions of galaxies. Future experiments such as the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument will in turn collect tens of millions of spectra. To be feasible, redshift measurement methods in datasets of this scale must be made with automated software. This paper describes the algorithms, astrophysical templates, and implementation of a new redshift measurement software package that is optimized to run on large numbers of spectra with relatively low signal-to-noise ratio, typical of the most ambitious current and future cosmological redshift surveys. The software is demonstrated on spectroscopic data from the eBOSS survey, with performance that meets the scientific requirements of that experiment. The software is implemented in a general framework that will allow application to spectra from the DESI project in the future.« less

  16. Computer-Aided Software Engineering - An approach to real-time software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Carrie K.; Turkovich, John J.

    1989-01-01

    A new software engineering discipline is Computer-Aided Software Engineering (CASE), a technology aimed at automating the software development process. This paper explores the development of CASE technology, particularly in the area of real-time/scientific/engineering software, and a history of CASE is given. The proposed software development environment for the Advanced Launch System (ALS CASE) is described as an example of an advanced software development system for real-time/scientific/engineering (RT/SE) software. The Automated Programming Subsystem of ALS CASE automatically generates executable code and corresponding documentation from a suitably formatted specification of the software requirements. Software requirements are interactively specified in the form of engineering block diagrams. Several demonstrations of the Automated Programming Subsystem are discussed.

  17. Autonomous robot software development using simple software components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Thomas M.; Chung, Chan-Jin

    2004-10-01

    Developing software to control a sophisticated lane-following, obstacle-avoiding, autonomous robot can be demanding and beyond the capabilities of novice programmers - but it doesn"t have to be. A creative software design utilizing only basic image processing and a little algebra, has been employed to control the LTU-AISSIG autonomous robot - a contestant in the 2004 Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition (IGVC). This paper presents a software design equivalent to that used during the IGVC, but with much of the complexity removed. The result is an autonomous robot software design, that is robust, reliable, and can be implemented by programmers with a limited understanding of image processing. This design provides a solid basis for further work in autonomous robot software, as well as an interesting and achievable robotics project for students.

  18. The Impact of Social Software in Product Design Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurn, Karl

    2012-01-01

    It is difficult to ignore the impact that Web 2.0 and the subsequent social software revolution has had on society in general, and young people in particular. Information is exchanged and interpreted extremely quickly and in ways that were not imagined 10 years ago. Universities are struggling to keep up with this new technology, with outdated…

  19. NASA software documentation standard software engineering program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Software Documentation Standard (hereinafter referred to as Standard) can be applied to the documentation of all NASA software. This Standard is limited to documentation format and content requirements. It does not mandate specific management, engineering, or assurance standards or techniques. This Standard defines the format and content of documentation for software acquisition, development, and sustaining engineering. Format requirements address where information shall be recorded and content requirements address what information shall be recorded. This Standard provides a framework to allow consistency of documentation across NASA and visibility into the completeness of project documentation. This basic framework consists of four major sections (or volumes). The Management Plan contains all planning and business aspects of a software project, including engineering and assurance planning. The Product Specification contains all technical engineering information, including software requirements and design. The Assurance and Test Procedures contains all technical assurance information, including Test, Quality Assurance (QA), and Verification and Validation (V&V). The Management, Engineering, and Assurance Reports is the library and/or listing of all project reports.

  20. 48 CFR 227.7202 - Commercial computer software and commercial computer software documentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... software and commercial computer software documentation. 227.7202 Section 227.7202 Federal Acquisition... REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Rights in Computer Software and Computer Software Documentation 227.7202 Commercial computer software and commercial computer software documentation. ...

  1. 48 CFR 227.7203 - Noncommercial computer software and noncommercial computer software documentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... software and noncommercial computer software documentation. 227.7203 Section 227.7203 Federal Acquisition... REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Rights in Computer Software and Computer Software Documentation 227.7203 Noncommercial computer software and noncommercial computer software documentation. ...

  2. 48 CFR 227.7203 - Noncommercial computer software and noncommercial computer software documentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... software and noncommercial computer software documentation. 227.7203 Section 227.7203 Federal Acquisition... REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Rights in Computer Software and Computer Software Documentation 227.7203 Noncommercial computer software and noncommercial computer software documentation. ...

  3. 48 CFR 227.7203 - Noncommercial computer software and noncommercial computer software documentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... software and noncommercial computer software documentation. 227.7203 Section 227.7203 Federal Acquisition... REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Rights in Computer Software and Computer Software Documentation 227.7203 Noncommercial computer software and noncommercial computer software documentation. ...

  4. 48 CFR 227.7202 - Commercial computer software and commercial computer software documentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... software and commercial computer software documentation. 227.7202 Section 227.7202 Federal Acquisition... REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Rights in Computer Software and Computer Software Documentation 227.7202 Commercial computer software and commercial computer software documentation. ...

  5. 48 CFR 227.7203 - Noncommercial computer software and noncommercial computer software documentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... software and noncommercial computer software documentation. 227.7203 Section 227.7203 Federal Acquisition... REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Rights in Computer Software and Computer Software Documentation 227.7203 Noncommercial computer software and noncommercial computer software documentation. ...

  6. 48 CFR 227.7202 - Commercial computer software and commercial computer software documentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... software and commercial computer software documentation. 227.7202 Section 227.7202 Federal Acquisition... REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Rights in Computer Software and Computer Software Documentation 227.7202 Commercial computer software and commercial computer software documentation. ...

  7. 48 CFR 227.7202 - Commercial computer software and commercial computer software documentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... software and commercial computer software documentation. 227.7202 Section 227.7202 Federal Acquisition... REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Rights in Computer Software and Computer Software Documentation 227.7202 Commercial computer software and commercial computer software documentation. ...

  8. 48 CFR 227.7202 - Commercial computer software and commercial computer software documentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... software and commercial computer software documentation. 227.7202 Section 227.7202 Federal Acquisition... REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Rights in Computer Software and Computer Software Documentation 227.7202 Commercial computer software and commercial computer software documentation. ...

  9. 48 CFR 227.7203 - Noncommercial computer software and noncommercial computer software documentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... software and noncommercial computer software documentation. 227.7203 Section 227.7203 Federal Acquisition... REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Rights in Computer Software and Computer Software Documentation 227.7203 Noncommercial computer software and noncommercial computer software documentation. ...

  10. Investigation of the current requirements engineering practices among software developers at the Universiti Utara Malaysia Information Technology (UUMIT) centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Azham; Mkpojiogu, Emmanuel O. C.; Abdullah, Inam

    2016-08-01

    Requirements Engineering (RE) is a systemic and integrated process of eliciting, elaborating, negotiating, validating and managing of the requirements of a system in a software development project. UUM has been supported by various systems developed and maintained by the UUM Information Technology (UUMIT) Centre. The aim of this study was to assess the current requirements engineering practices at UUMIT. The main problem that prompted this research is the lack of studies that support software development activities at the UUMIT. The study is geared at helping UUMIT produce quality but time and cost saving software products by implementing cutting edge and state of the art requirements engineering practices. Also, the study contributes to UUM by identifying the activities needed for software development so that the management will be able to allocate budget to provide adequate and precise training for the software developers. Three variables were investigated: Requirement Description, Requirements Development (comprising: Requirements Elicitation, Requirements Analysis and Negotiation, Requirements Validation), and Requirement Management. The results from the study showed that the current practice of requirement engineering in UUMIT is encouraging, but still need further development and improvement because a few RE practices were seldom practiced.

  11. Software archeology: a case study in software quality assurance and design

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, John M; Lloyd, Jane A; Turner, Cameron J

    2009-01-01

    Ideally, quality is designed into software, just as quality is designed into hardware. However, when dealing with legacy systems, demonstrating that the software meets required quality standards may be difficult to achieve. As the need to demonstrate the quality of existing software was recognized at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), an effort was initiated to uncover and demonstrate that legacy software met the required quality standards. This effort led to the development of a reverse engineering approach referred to as software archaeology. This paper documents the software archaeology approaches used at LANL to document legacy software systems. A case studymore » for the Robotic Integrated Packaging System (RIPS) software is included.« less

  12. Medical universities educational and research online services: benchmarking universities' website towards e-government.

    PubMed

    Farzandipour, Mehrdad; Meidani, Zahra

    2014-06-01

    Websites as one of the initial steps towards an e-government adoption do facilitate delivery of online and customer-oriented services. In this study we intended to investigate the role of the websites of medical universities in providing educational and research services following the E-government maturity model in the Iranian universities. This descriptive and cross- sectional study was conducted through content analysis and benchmarking the websites in 2012. The research population included the entire medical university website (37). Delivery of educational and research services through these university websites including information, interaction, transaction, and Integration were investigated using a checklist. The data were then analyzed by means of descriptive statistics and using SPSS software. Level of educational and research services by websites of the medical universities type I and II was evaluated medium as 1.99 and 1.89, respectively. All the universities gained a mean score of 1 out of 3 in terms of integration of educational and research services. Results of the study indicated that Iranian universities have passed information and interaction stages, but they have not made much progress in transaction and integration stages. Failure to adapt to e-government in Iranian medical universities in which limiting factors such as users' e-literacy, access to the internet and ICT infrastructure are not so crucial as in other organizations, suggest that e-government realization goes beyond technical challenges.

  13. Stanford university medical media and information technologies hosts open source surgical simulation workshop.

    PubMed

    Cornelius, Craig W; Heinrichs, Leroy; Youngblood, Patricia; Dev, Parvati

    2007-01-01

    Stanford University Medical Media and Information Technologies's technical workshop "Prototyping of Surgical Simulators using Open Source Simulation Software" was held in August 2006 at Stanford University. The objectives, program, and topics covered are presented in this short report.

  14. Science Underlying 2008 Nobel Prizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Bernadette A.

    2009-01-01

    JCE offers a wealth of materials for teaching and learning chemistry that you can explore online. In the list below, Bernadette Caldwell of the Editorial Staff suggests additional resources that are available through JCE for teaching the science behind some of the 2008 Nobel Prizes . Discovering and Applying the Chemistry of GFP The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein, GFP to three scientists: Osamu Shimomura, Martin Chalfie, and Roger Y. Tsien. These scientists led the field in discovering and introducing a fluorescing protein from jellyfish into cells and genes under study, which allows researchers to witness biochemistry in action. Now tags are available that emit light in different colors, revealing myriad biological processes and their interactions simultaneously. Identifying HPV and HIV, HIV's Replication Cycle, and HIV Virus-Host Interactions The Nobel Assembly at Karolinska Institutet awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology for their discovery of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to two scientists: Françoise Barré-Sinoussi and Luc Montagnier; and for his discovery of human papilloma viruses [HPV] causing cervical cancer to one scientist, Harald zur Hausen. Diseases caused by these infectious agents significantly affect global health. While isolating and studying the virus, researchers discovered HIV is an uncommon retrovirus that infects humans and relies on the host to make its viral DNA, infecting and killing the host's white blood cells, ultimately destroying the immune systems of infected humans. Related Resources at JCE Online The Journal has published articles relating to GFP specifically, and more generally to fluorescing compounds applied to biochemistry. The Journal has also published an article and a video on protease inhibition—a strategy to suppress HIV's biological processes. With the video clips, an accompanying guide

  15. A Probabilistic Software System Attribute Acceptance Paradigm for COTS Software Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, A. Terry

    2005-01-01

    Standard software requirement formats are written from top-down perspectives only, that is, from an ideal notion of a client s needs. Despite the exactness of the standard format, software and system errors in designed systems have abounded. Bad and inadequate requirements have resulted in cost overruns, schedule slips and lost profitability. Commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) software components are even more troublesome than designed systems because they are often provided as is and subsequently delivered with unsubstantiated validation of described capabilities. For COTS software, there needs to be a way to express the client s software needs in a consistent and formal manner using software system attributes derived from software quality standards. Additionally, the format needs to be amenable to software evaluation processes that integrate observable evidence garnered from historical data. This paper presents a paradigm that effectively bridges the gap between what a client desires (top-down) and what has been demonstrated (bottom-up) for COTS software evaluation. The paradigm addresses the specification of needs before the software evaluation is performed and can be used to increase the shared understanding between clients and software evaluators about what is required and what is technically possible.

  16. Using a Self-Administered Visual Basic Software Tool To Teach Psychological Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strang, Harold R.; Sullivan, Amie K.; Schoeny, Zahrl G.

    2002-01-01

    Introduces LearningLinks, a Visual Basic software tool that allows teachers to create individualized learning modules that use constructivist and behavioral learning principles. Describes field testing of undergraduates at the University of Virginia that tested a module designed to improve understanding of the psychological concepts of…

  17. Software safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leveson, Nancy

    1987-01-01

    Software safety and its relationship to other qualities are discussed. It is shown that standard reliability and fault tolerance techniques will not solve the safety problem for the present. A new attitude requires: looking at what you do NOT want software to do along with what you want it to do; and assuming things will go wrong. New procedures and changes to entire software development process are necessary: special software safety analysis techniques are needed; and design techniques, especially eliminating complexity, can be very helpful.

  18. Software Engineering Laboratory Series: Collected Software Engineering Papers. Volume 15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) is an organization sponsored by NASA/GSFC and created to investigate the effectiveness of software engineering technologies when applied to the development of application software. The activities, findings, and recommendations of the SEL are recorded in the Software Engineering Laboratory Series, a continuing series of reports that includes this document.

  19. Software Engineering Laboratory Series: Collected Software Engineering Papers. Volume 14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) is an organization sponsored by NASA/GSFC and created to investigate the effectiveness of software engineering technologies when applied to the development of application software. The activities, findings, and recommendations of the SEL are recorded in the Software Engineering Laboratory Series, a continuing series of reports that includes this document.

  20. Software Engineering Laboratory Series: Collected Software Engineering Papers. Volume 13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) is an organization sponsored by NASA/GSFC and created to investigate the effectiveness of software engineering technologies when applied to the development of application software. The activities, findings, and recommendations of the SEL are recorded in the Software Engineering Laboratory Series, a continuing series of reports that includes this document.

  1. Flight Software Development for the CHEOPS Instrument with the CORDET Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cechticky, V.; Ottensamer, R.; Pasetti, A.

    2015-09-01

    CHEOPS is an ESA S-class mission dedicated to the precise measurement of radii of already known exoplanets using ultra-high precision photometry. The instrument flight software controlling the instrument and handling the science data is developed by the University of Vienna using the CORDET Framework offered by P&P Software GmbH. The CORDET Framework provides a generic software infrastructure for PUS-based applications. This paper describes how the framework is used for the CHEOPS application software to provide a consistent solution for to the communication and control services, event handling and FDIR procedures. This approach is innovative in four respects: (a) it is a true third-party reuse; (b) re-use is done at specification, validation and code level; (c) the re-usable assets and their qualification data package are entirely open-source; (d) re-use is based on call-back with the application developer providing functions which are called by the reusable architecture. File names missing from here on out (I tried to mimic the files names from before.)

  2. Configurable software for satellite graphics

    SciTech Connect

    Hartzman, P D

    An important goal in interactive computer graphics is to provide users with both quick system responses for basic graphics functions and enough computing power for complex calculations. One solution is to have a distributed graphics system in which a minicomputer and a powerful large computer share the work. The most versatile type of distributed system is an intelligent satellite system in which the minicomputer is programmable by the application user and can do most of the work while the large remote machine is used for difficult computations. At New York University, the hardware was configured from available equipment. The levelmore » of system intelligence resulted almost completely from software development. Unlike previous work with intelligent satellites, the resulting system had system control centered in the satellite. It also had the ability to reconfigure software during realtime operation. The design of the system was done at a very high level using set theoretic language. The specification clearly illustrated processor boundaries and interfaces. The high-level specification also produced a compact, machine-independent virtual graphics data structure for picture representation. The software was written in a systems implementation language; thus, only one set of programs was needed for both machines. A user can program both machines in a single language. Tests of the system with an application program indicate that is has very high potential. A major result of this work is the demonstration that a gigantic investment in new hardware is not necessary for computing facilities interested in graphics.« less

  3. Automatic AVHRR image navigation software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, Dan; Emery, William

    1992-01-01

    This is the final report describing the work done on the project entitled Automatic AVHRR Image Navigation Software funded through NASA-Washington, award NAGW-3224, Account 153-7529. At the onset of this project, we had developed image navigation software capable of producing geo-registered images from AVHRR data. The registrations were highly accurate but required a priori knowledge of the spacecraft's axes alignment deviations, commonly known as attitude. The three angles needed to describe the attitude are called roll, pitch, and yaw, and are the components of the deviations in the along scan, along track and about center directions. The inclusion of the attitude corrections in the navigation software results in highly accurate georegistrations, however, the computation of the angles is very tedious and involves human interpretation for several steps. The technique also requires easily identifiable ground features which may not be available due to cloud cover or for ocean data. The current project was motivated by the need for a navigation system which was automatic and did not require human intervention or ground control points. The first step in creating such a system must be the ability to parameterize the spacecraft's attitude. The immediate goal of this project was to study the attitude fluctuations and determine if they displayed any systematic behavior which could be modeled or parameterized. We chose a period in 1991-1992 to study the attitude of the NOAA 11 spacecraft using data from the Tiros receiving station at the Colorado Center for Astrodynamic Research (CCAR) at the University of Colorado.

  4. A LabVIEW® based generic CT scanner control software platform.

    PubMed

    Dierick, M; Van Loo, D; Masschaele, B; Boone, M; Van Hoorebeke, L

    2010-01-01

    UGCT, the Centre for X-ray tomography at Ghent University (Belgium) does research on X-ray tomography and its applications. This includes the development and construction of state-of-the-art CT scanners for scientific research. Because these scanners are built for very different purposes they differ considerably in their physical implementations. However, they all share common principle functionality. In this context a generic software platform was developed using LabVIEW® in order to provide the same interface and functionality on all scanners. This article describes the concept and features of this software, and its potential for tomography in a research setting. The core concept is to rigorously separate the abstract operation of a CT scanner from its actual physical configuration. This separation is achieved by implementing a sender-listener architecture. The advantages are that the resulting software platform is generic, scalable, highly efficient, easy to develop and to extend, and that it can be deployed on future scanners with minimal effort.

  5. Software assurance standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This standard specifies the software assurance program for the provider of software. It also delineates the assurance activities for the provider and the assurance data that are to be furnished by the provider to the acquirer. In any software development effort, the provider is the entity or individual that actually designs, develops, and implements the software product, while the acquirer is the entity or individual who specifies the requirements and accepts the resulting products. This standard specifies at a high level an overall software assurance program for software developed for and by NASA. Assurance includes the disciplines of quality assurance, quality engineering, verification and validation, nonconformance reporting and corrective action, safety assurance, and security assurance. The application of these disciplines during a software development life cycle is called software assurance. Subsequent lower-level standards will specify the specific processes within these disciplines.

  6. A universal six-joint robot controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bihn, D. G.; Hsia, T. C.

    1987-01-01

    A general purpose six-axis robotic manipulator controller was designed and implemented to serve as a research tool for the investigation of the practical and theoretical aspects of various control strategies in robotics. A 80286-based Intel System 310 running the Xenix operating servo software as well as the higher level software (e.g., kinematics and path planning) were employed. A Multibus compatible interface board was designed and constructed to handle I/O signals from the robot manipulator's joint motors. From the design point of view, the universal controller is capable of driving robot manipulators equipped with D.C. joint motors and position optical encoders. To test its functionality, the controller is connected to the joint motor D.C. power amplifier of a PUMA 560 arm bypassing completely the manufacturer-supplied Unimation controller. A controller algorithm consisting of local PD control laws was written and installed into the Xenix operating system. Additional software drivers were implemented to allow application programs access to the interface board. All software was written in the C language.

  7. Proprietary software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marnock, M. J.

    1971-01-01

    The protection of intellectual property by a patent, a copyright, or trade secrets is reviewed. The present and future use of computers and software are discussed, along with the governmental uses of software. The popularity of contractual agreements for sale or lease of computer programs and software services is also summarized.

  8. PINT, A Modern Software Package for Pulsar Timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jing; Ransom, Scott M.; Demorest, Paul; Ray, Paul S.; Stovall, Kevin; Jenet, Fredrick; Ellis, Justin; van Haasteren, Rutger; Bachetti, Matteo; NANOGrav PINT developer team

    2018-01-01

    Pulsar timing, first developed decades ago, has provided an extremely wide range of knowledge about our universe. It has been responsible for many important discoveries, such as the discovery of the first exoplanet and the orbital period decay of double neutron star systems. Currently pulsar timing is the leading technique for detecting low frequency (about 10^-9 Hertz) gravitational waves (GW) using an array of pulsars as the detectors. To achieve this goal, high precision pulsar timing data, at about nanoseconds level, is required. Most high precision pulsar timing data are analyzed using the widely adopted software TEMPO/TEMPO2. But for a robust and believable GW detection, it is important to have independent software that can cross-check the result. In this poster we present the new generation pulsar timing software PINT. This package will provide a robust system to cross check high-precision timing results, completely independent of TEMPO and TEMPO2. In addition, PINT is designed to be a package that is easy to extend and modify, through use of flexible code architecture and a modern programming language, Python, with modern technology and libraries.

  9. PEOPLE IN PHYSICS: Interview with Scott Durow, Software Engineer, Oxford

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Conducted by Paul

    1998-05-01

    Scott Durow was educated at Bootham School, York. He studied Physics, Mathematics and Chemistry to A-level and went on to Nottingham University to read Medical Physics. After graduating from Nottingham he embarked on his present career as a Software Engineer based in Oxford. He is a musician in his spare time, as a member of a band and playing the French horn.

  10. Distance Education at Memorial University of Newfoundland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keough, Erin

    This presentation describes the distance education program at Memorial University (Newfoundland), which operates the Telemedicine Centre, including an audiographic, teleconference network that uses a combination of hardware and software to turn an MS DOS computer into an interactive long distance blackboard. Topics covered by the presentation…

  11. SeisFlows-Flexible waveform inversion software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modrak, Ryan T.; Borisov, Dmitry; Lefebvre, Matthieu; Tromp, Jeroen

    2018-06-01

    SeisFlows is an open source Python package that provides a customizable waveform inversion workflow and framework for research in oil and gas exploration, earthquake tomography, medical imaging, and other areas. New methods can be rapidly prototyped in SeisFlows by inheriting from default inversion or migration classes, and code can be tested on 2D examples before application to more expensive 3D problems. Wave simulations must be performed using an external software package such as SPECFEM3D. The ability to interface with external solvers lends flexibility, and the choice of SPECFEM3D as a default option provides optional GPU acceleration and other useful capabilities. Through support for massively parallel solvers and interfaces for high-performance computing (HPC) systems, inversions with thousands of seismic traces and billions of model parameters can be performed. So far, SeisFlows has run on clusters managed by the Department of Defense, Chevron Corp., Total S.A., Princeton University, and the University of Alaska, Fairbanks.

  12. Using software metrics and software reliability models to attain acceptable quality software for flight and ground support software for avionic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Stella

    1992-01-01

    This paper is concerned with methods of measuring and developing quality software. Reliable flight and ground support software is a highly important factor in the successful operation of the space shuttle program. Reliability is probably the most important of the characteristics inherent in the concept of 'software quality'. It is the probability of failure free operation of a computer program for a specified time and environment.

  13. A Student Experiment Method for Learning the Basics of Embedded Software Technologies Including Hardware/Software Co-design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kambe, Hidetoshi; Mitsui, Hiroyasu; Endo, Satoshi; Koizumi, Hisao

    The applications of embedded system technologies have spread widely in various products, such as home appliances, cellular phones, automobiles, industrial machines and so on. Due to intensified competition, embedded software has expanded its role in realizing sophisticated functions, and new development methods like a hardware/software (HW/SW) co-design for uniting HW and SW development have been researched. The shortfall of embedded SW engineers was estimated to be approximately 99,000 in the year 2006, in Japan. Embedded SW engineers should understand HW technologies and system architecture design as well as SW technologies. However, a few universities offer this kind of education systematically. We propose a student experiment method for learning the basics of embedded system development, which includes a set of experiments for developing embedded SW, developing embedded HW and experiencing HW/SW co-design. The co-design experiment helps students learn about the basics of embedded system architecture design and the flow of designing actual HW and SW modules. We developed these experiments and evaluated them.

  14. The University of Michigan's Computer-Aided Engineering Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkins, D. E.; Olsen, Leslie A.

    1986-01-01

    Presents an overview of the Computer-Aided Engineering Network (CAEN) of the University of Michigan. Describes its arrangement of workstations, communication networks, and servers. Outlines the factors considered in hardware and software decision making. Reviews the program's impact on students. (ML)

  15. The art and science of cancer education and evaluation: toward facilitating improved patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lenora; Ousley, Anita; Swarz, Jeffrey; Bingham, Raymond J; Erickson, J Bianca; Ellis, Steven; Moody, Terra

    2011-03-01

    Cancer education is a constantly evolving field, as science continues to advance both our understanding of cancer and its effects on patients, families, and communities. Moving discoveries to practice expeditiously is paramount to impacting cancer outcomes. The continuing education of cancer care professionals throughout their practice life is vital to facilitating the adoption of therapeutic innovations. Meanwhile, more general educational programs serve to keep cancer patients, their families, and the public informed of the latest findings in cancer research. The National Cancer Institute conducted an assessment of the current knowledge base for cancer education which involved two literature reviews, one of the general literature of the evaluation of medical and health education efforts, and the other of the preceding 5 years of the Journal of Cancer Education (JCE). These reviews explored a wide range of educational models and methodologies. In general, those that were most effective used multiple methodologies, interactive techniques, and multiple exposures over time. Less than one third of the articles in the JCE reported on a cancer education or communication product, and of these, only 70% had been evaluated for effectiveness. Recommendations to improve the evaluation of cancer education and the educational focus of the JCE are provided.

  16. Self-Study with Language Learning Software in the Workplace: What Happens?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielson, Katharine B.

    2011-01-01

    Many language training software packages are intended for self-study and marketed as complete language learning solutions; however, little is known about how well they work or under what conditions they should be used. This article reports on a research study conducted at the University of Maryland Center for Advanced Study of Language that…

  17. Software verification plan for GCS. [guidance and control software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dent, Leslie A.; Shagnea, Anita M.; Hayhurst, Kelly J.

    1990-01-01

    This verification plan is written as part of an experiment designed to study the fundamental characteristics of the software failure process. The experiment will be conducted using several implementations of software that were produced according to industry-standard guidelines, namely the Radio Technical Commission for Aeronautics RTCA/DO-178A guidelines, Software Consideration in Airborne Systems and Equipment Certification, for the development of flight software. This plan fulfills the DO-178A requirements for providing instructions on the testing of each implementation of software. The plan details the verification activities to be performed at each phase in the development process, contains a step by step description of the testing procedures, and discusses all of the tools used throughout the verification process.

  18. Universities Report More Licensing Income but Fewer Start-Ups in 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenstyk, Goldie

    2007-01-01

    According to a survey conducted by the Association of University Technology Managers, at least two dozen universities each earned more than $10-million from their licensing of rights to new drugs, software, and other inventions in the 2005 fiscal year. The number of institutions creating large numbers of spinoff companies based on their…

  19. Payload software technology: Software technology development plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Programmatic requirements for the advancement of software technology are identified for meeting the space flight requirements in the 1980 to 1990 time period. The development items are described, and software technology item derivation worksheets are presented along with the cost/time/priority assessments.

  20. JCE Resources for Chemistry and Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Erica K.

    2001-01-01

    Includes an annotated bibliography of articles featured in this journal on art, dyes, glass, pottery and ceramics, interdisciplinary courses in art and chemistry, light and color, metalwork, and music. (YDS)

  1. Healthcare software assurance.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jason G; Pauley, Keith A

    2006-01-01

    Software assurance is a rigorous, lifecycle phase-independent set of activities which ensure completeness, safety, and reliability of software processes and products. This is accomplished by guaranteeing conformance to all requirements, standards, procedures, and regulations. These assurance processes are even more important when coupled with healthcare software systems, embedded software in medical instrumentation, and other healthcare-oriented life-critical systems. The current Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulatory requirements and guidance documentation do not address certain aspects of complete software assurance activities. In addition, the FDA's software oversight processes require enhancement to include increasingly complex healthcare systems such as Hospital Information Systems (HIS). The importance of complete software assurance is introduced, current regulatory requirements and guidance discussed, and the necessity for enhancements to the current processes shall be highlighted.

  2. Healthcare Software Assurance

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Jason G.; Pauley, Keith A.

    2006-01-01

    Software assurance is a rigorous, lifecycle phase-independent set of activities which ensure completeness, safety, and reliability of software processes and products. This is accomplished by guaranteeing conformance to all requirements, standards, procedures, and regulations. These assurance processes are even more important when coupled with healthcare software systems, embedded software in medical instrumentation, and other healthcare-oriented life-critical systems. The current Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulatory requirements and guidance documentation do not address certain aspects of complete software assurance activities. In addition, the FDA’s software oversight processes require enhancement to include increasingly complex healthcare systems such as Hospital Information Systems (HIS). The importance of complete software assurance is introduced, current regulatory requirements and guidance discussed, and the necessity for enhancements to the current processes shall be highlighted. PMID:17238324

  3. Building a virtual ligand screening pipeline using free software: a survey.

    PubMed

    Glaab, Enrico

    2016-03-01

    Virtual screening, the search for bioactive compounds via computational methods, provides a wide range of opportunities to speed up drug development and reduce the associated risks and costs. While virtual screening is already a standard practice in pharmaceutical companies, its applications in preclinical academic research still remain under-exploited, in spite of an increasing availability of dedicated free databases and software tools. In this survey, an overview of recent developments in this field is presented, focusing on free software and data repositories for screening as alternatives to their commercial counterparts, and outlining how available resources can be interlinked into a comprehensive virtual screening pipeline using typical academic computing facilities. Finally, to facilitate the set-up of corresponding pipelines, a downloadable software system is provided, using platform virtualization to integrate pre-installed screening tools and scripts for reproducible application across different operating systems. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  4. Analytical exploration of the thermodynamic potentials by using symbolic computation software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hantsaridou, Anastasia P.; Polatoglou, Hariton M.

    2005-09-01

    Thermodynamics is a very general theory, based on fundamental symmetries. It generalizes classical mechanics and incorporates theoretical concepts such as field and field equations. Although all these ingredients are of the highest importance for a scientist, they are not given the attention they perhaps deserve in most undergraduate courses. Nowadays, powerful computers in conjunction with equally powerful software can ease the exploration of the crucial ideas of thermodynamics. The purpose of the present work is to show how the utilization of symbolic computation software can lead to a complementary understanding of thermodynamics. The method was applied to first and second year physics students in the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Greece) during the 2002-2003 academic year. The results indicate that symbolic computation software is appropriate not only for enhancing the teaching of the fundamental principles in thermodynamics and their applications, but also for increasing students' motivation for learning.

  5. Framework for Small-Scale Experiments in Software Engineering: Guidance and Control Software Project: Software Engineering Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayhurst, Kelly J.

    1998-01-01

    Software is becoming increasingly significant in today's critical avionics systems. To achieve safe, reliable software, government regulatory agencies such as the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the Department of Defense mandate the use of certain software development methods. However, little scientific evidence exists to show a correlation between software development methods and product quality. Given this lack of evidence, a series of experiments has been conducted to understand why and how software fails. The Guidance and Control Software (GCS) project is the latest in this series. The GCS project is a case study of the Requirements and Technical Concepts for Aviation RTCA/DO-178B guidelines, Software Considerations in Airborne Systems and Equipment Certification. All civil transport airframe and equipment vendors are expected to comply with these guidelines in building systems to be certified by the FAA for use in commercial aircraft. For the case study, two implementations of a guidance and control application were developed to comply with the DO-178B guidelines for Level A (critical) software. The development included the requirements, design, coding, verification, configuration management, and quality assurance processes. This paper discusses the details of the GCS project and presents the results of the case study.

  6. Statistical Software Engineering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-04-13

    multiversion software subject to coincident errors. IEEE Trans. Software Eng. SE-11:1511-1517. Eckhardt, D.E., A.K Caglayan, J.C. Knight, L.D. Lee, D.F...J.C. and N.G. Leveson. 1986. Experimental evaluation of the assumption of independence in multiversion software. IEEE Trans. Software

  7. PsyToolkit: a software package for programming psychological experiments using Linux.

    PubMed

    Stoet, Gijsbert

    2010-11-01

    PsyToolkit is a set of software tools for programming psychological experiments on Linux computers. Given that PsyToolkit is freely available under the Gnu Public License, open source, and designed such that it can easily be modified and extended for individual needs, it is suitable not only for technically oriented Linux users, but also for students, researchers on small budgets, and universities in developing countries. The software includes a high-level scripting language, a library for the programming language C, and a questionnaire presenter. The software easily integrates with other open source tools, such as the statistical software package R. PsyToolkit is designed to work with external hardware (including IoLab and Cedrus response keyboards and two common digital input/output boards) and to support millisecond timing precision. Four in-depth examples explain the basic functionality of PsyToolkit. Example 1 demonstrates a stimulus-response compatibility experiment. Example 2 demonstrates a novel mouse-controlled visual search experiment. Example 3 shows how to control light emitting diodes using PsyToolkit, and Example 4 shows how to build a light-detection sensor. The last two examples explain the electronic hardware setup such that they can even be used with other software packages.

  8. A survey on the effectiveness of using GeoGebra software towards lecturers' conceptual knowledge and procedural mathematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan Salleh, Masturah; Sulaiman, Hajar

    2013-04-01

    The use of technology in the teaching of mathematics at the university level has long been introduced; but many among the lecturers, especially those that have taught for many years, still opt for a traditional teaching method, that is, by lecture talk. One reason is that lecturers themselves were not exposed to the technologies available and how it can assist in the teaching and learning procedures (T&L) in mathematics. GeoGebra is a mathematical software which is open and free and has just recently been introduced in Malaysia. Compared with the software Cabri Geometry and Geometer's Sketchpad (GSP), which only focus on geometry, GeoGebra is able to connect geometry, algebra and numerical representation. Realizing this, the researchers have conducted a study to expose the university lecturers on the use of GeoGebra in T&L. The researchers chose to do the research on mathematics lecturers at the Department of Computer Science and Mathematics (JSKM), Universiti Teknologi Mara (UiTM), Penang. The objective of this study is to determine whether an exposure to GeoGebra software can affect the conceptual knowledge and procedural teaching of mathematics at the university level. This study is a combination of descriptive and qualitative. One session was conducted in an open workshop for all the 45 lecturers. From that total, four people were selected as a sample. The sample was selected by using a simple random sampling method. This study used materials in the form of modules during the workshop. In terms of conceptual knowledge, the results showed that the GeoGebra software is appropriate, relevant and highly effective for in-depth understanding of the selected topics. While the procedural aspects of teaching, it can be one of the teaching aids and considerably facilitate the lecturers.

  9. Universal Number Library

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, G. Scott

    This floating-point arithmetic library contains a software implementation of Universal Numbers (unums) as described by John Gustafson [1]. The unum format is a superset of IEEE 754 floating point with several advantages. Computing with unums provides more accurate answers without rounding errors, underflow or overflow. In contrast to fixed-sized IEEE numbers, a variable number of bits can be used to encode unums. This all allows number with only a few significant digits or with a small dynamic range to be represented more compactly.

  10. Reverse Engineering and Software Products Reuse to Teach Collaborative Web Portals: A Case Study with Final-Year Computer Science Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medina-Dominguez, Fuensanta; Sanchez-Segura, Maria-Isabel; Mora-Soto, Arturo; Amescua, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The development of collaborative Web applications does not follow a software engineering methodology. This is because when university students study Web applications in general, and collaborative Web portals in particular, they are not being trained in the use of software engineering techniques to develop collaborative Web portals. This paper…

  11. Commercial Literacy Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balajthy, Ernest

    1997-01-01

    Presents the first year's results of a continuing project to monitor the availability of software of relevance for literacy education purposes. Concludes there is an enormous amount of software available for use by teachers of reading and literacy--whereas drill-and-practice software is the largest category of software available, large numbers of…

  12. [Confirming the Utility of RAISUS Antifungal Susceptibility Testing by New-Software].

    PubMed

    Ono, Tomoko; Suematsu, Hiroyuki; Sawamura, Haruki; Yamagishi, Yuka; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2017-08-15

    Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) methods for susceptibility tests of yeast are used in Japan. On the other hand, the methods have some disadvantage; 1) reading at 24 and 48 h, 2) using unclear scale, approximately 50% inhibition, to determine MICs, 3) calculating trailing growth and paradoxical effects. These makes it difficult to test the susuceptibility for yeasts. Old software of RAISUS, Ver. 6.0 series, resolved problem 1) and 2) but did not resolve problem 3). Recently, new software of RAISUS, Ver. 7.0 series, resolved problem 3). We confirmed that using the new software made it clear whether all these issue were settled or not. Eighty-four Candida isolated from Aichi Medical University was used in this study. We compared the MICs obtained by using RAISUS antifungal susceptibility testing of yeasts RSMY1, RSMY1, with those obtained by using ASTY. The concordance rates (±four-fold of MICs) between the MICs obtained by using ASTY and RSMY1 with the new software were more than 90%, except for miconazole (MCZ). The rate of MCZ was low, but MICs obtained by using CLSI methods and Yeast-like Fungus DP 'EIKEN' methods, E-DP, showed equivalent MICs of RSMY1 using the new software. The frequency of skip effects on RSMY1 using the new software markedly decreased relative to RSMY1 using the old software. In case of showing trailing growth, the new software of RAISUS made it possible to choice the correct MICs and to put up the sign of trailing growth on the result screen. New software of RAISUS enhances its usability and the accuracy of MICs. Using automatic instrument to determine MICs is useful to obtain objective results easily.

  13. Software Configuration Management Guidebook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The growth in cost and importance of software to NASA has caused NASA to address the improvement of software development across the agency. One of the products of this program is a series of guidebooks that define a NASA concept of the assurance processes which are used in software development. The Software Assurance Guidebook, SMAP-GB-A201, issued in September, 1989, provides an overall picture of the concepts and practices of NASA in software assurance. Lower level guidebooks focus on specific activities that fall within the software assurance discipline, and provide more detailed information for the manager and/or practitioner. This is the Software Configuration Management Guidebook which describes software configuration management in a way that is compatible with practices in industry and at NASA Centers. Software configuration management is a key software development process, and is essential for doing software assurance.

  14. Final Scientific/Technical Report for "Enabling Exascale Hardware and Software Design through Scalable System Virtualization"

    SciTech Connect

    Dinda, Peter August

    2015-03-17

    This report describes the activities, findings, and products of the Northwestern University component of the "Enabling Exascale Hardware and Software Design through Scalable System Virtualization" project. The purpose of this project has been to extend the state of the art of systems software for high-end computing (HEC) platforms, and to use systems software to better enable the evaluation of potential future HEC platforms, for example exascale platforms. Such platforms, and their systems software, have the goal of providing scientific computation at new scales, thus enabling new research in the physical sciences and engineering. Over time, the innovations in systems softwaremore » for such platforms also become applicable to more widely used computing clusters, data centers, and clouds. This was a five-institution project, centered on the Palacios virtual machine monitor (VMM) systems software, a project begun at Northwestern, and originally developed in a previous collaboration between Northwestern University and the University of New Mexico. In this project, Northwestern (including via our subcontract to the University of Pittsburgh) contributed to the continued development of Palacios, along with other team members. We took the leadership role in (1) continued extension of support for emerging Intel and AMD hardware, (2) integration and performance enhancement of overlay networking, (3) connectivity with architectural simulation, (4) binary translation, and (5) support for modern Non-Uniform Memory Access (NUMA) hosts and guests. We also took a supporting role in support for specialized hardware for I/O virtualization, profiling, configurability, and integration with configuration tools. The efforts we led (1-5) were largely successful and executed as expected, with code and papers resulting from them. The project demonstrated the feasibility of a virtualization layer for HEC computing, similar to such layers for cloud or datacenter computing. For effort (3

  15. Software Quality Assurance Metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McRae, Kalindra A.

    2004-01-01

    Software Quality Assurance (SQA) is a planned and systematic set of activities that ensures conformance of software life cycle processes and products conform to requirements, standards and procedures. In software development, software quality means meeting requirements and a degree of excellence and refinement of a project or product. Software Quality is a set of attributes of a software product by which its quality is described and evaluated. The set of attributes includes functionality, reliability, usability, efficiency, maintainability, and portability. Software Metrics help us understand the technical process that is used to develop a product. The process is measured to improve it and the product is measured to increase quality throughout the life cycle of software. Software Metrics are measurements of the quality of software. Software is measured to indicate the quality of the product, to assess the productivity of the people who produce the product, to assess the benefits derived from new software engineering methods and tools, to form a baseline for estimation, and to help justify requests for new tools or additional training. Any part of the software development can be measured. If Software Metrics are implemented in software development, it can save time, money, and allow the organization to identify the caused of defects which have the greatest effect on software development. The summer of 2004, I worked with Cynthia Calhoun and Frank Robinson in the Software Assurance/Risk Management department. My task was to research and collect, compile, and analyze SQA Metrics that have been used in other projects that are not currently being used by the SA team and report them to the Software Assurance team to see if any metrics can be implemented in their software assurance life cycle process.

  16. T-LECS: The Control Software System for MOIRCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, T.; Omata, K.; Konishi, M.; Ichikawa, T.; Suzuki, R.; Tokoku, C.; Katsuno, Y.; Nishimura, T.

    2006-07-01

    MOIRCS (Multi-Object Infrared Camera and Spectrograph) is a new instrument for the Subaru Telescope. We present the system design of the control software system for MOIRCS, named T-LECS (Tohoku University - Layered Electronic Control System). T-LECS is a PC-Linux based network distributed system. Two PCs equipped with the focal plane array system operate two HAWAII2 detectors, respectively, and another PC is used for user interfaces and a database server. Moreover, these PCs control various devices for observations distributed on a TCP/IP network. T-LECS has three interfaces; interfaces to the devices and two user interfaces. One of the user interfaces is to the integrated observation control system (Subaru Observation Software System) for observers, and another one provides the system developers the direct access to the devices of MOIRCS. In order to help the communication between these interfaces, we employ an SQL database system.

  17. Software Quality Perceptions of Stakeholders Involved in the Software Development Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padmanabhan, Priya

    2013-01-01

    Software quality is one of the primary determinants of project management success. Stakeholders involved in software development widely agree that quality is important (Barney and Wohlin 2009). However, they may differ on what constitutes software quality, and which of its attributes are more important than others. Although, software quality…

  18. Software Reliability Analysis of NASA Space Flight Software: A Practical Experience

    PubMed Central

    Sukhwani, Harish; Alonso, Javier; Trivedi, Kishor S.; Mcginnis, Issac

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present the software reliability analysis of the flight software of a recently launched space mission. For our analysis, we use the defect reports collected during the flight software development. We find that this software was developed in multiple releases, each release spanning across all software life-cycle phases. We also find that the software releases were developed and tested for four different hardware platforms, spanning from off-the-shelf or emulation hardware to actual flight hardware. For releases that exhibit reliability growth or decay, we fit Software Reliability Growth Models (SRGM); otherwise we fit a distribution function. We find that most releases exhibit reliability growth, with Log-Logistic (NHPP) and S-Shaped (NHPP) as the best-fit SRGMs. For the releases that experience reliability decay, we investigate the causes for the same. We find that such releases were the first software releases to be tested on a new hardware platform, and hence they encountered major hardware integration issues. Also such releases seem to have been developed under time pressure in order to start testing on the new hardware platform sooner. Such releases exhibit poor reliability growth, and hence exhibit high predicted failure rate. Other problems include hardware specification changes and delivery delays from vendors. Thus, our analysis provides critical insights and inputs to the management to improve the software development process. As NASA has moved towards a product line engineering for its flight software development, software for future space missions will be developed in a similar manner and hence the analysis results for this mission can be considered as a baseline for future flight software missions. PMID:29278255

  19. Software Reliability Analysis of NASA Space Flight Software: A Practical Experience.

    PubMed

    Sukhwani, Harish; Alonso, Javier; Trivedi, Kishor S; Mcginnis, Issac

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present the software reliability analysis of the flight software of a recently launched space mission. For our analysis, we use the defect reports collected during the flight software development. We find that this software was developed in multiple releases, each release spanning across all software life-cycle phases. We also find that the software releases were developed and tested for four different hardware platforms, spanning from off-the-shelf or emulation hardware to actual flight hardware. For releases that exhibit reliability growth or decay, we fit Software Reliability Growth Models (SRGM); otherwise we fit a distribution function. We find that most releases exhibit reliability growth, with Log-Logistic (NHPP) and S-Shaped (NHPP) as the best-fit SRGMs. For the releases that experience reliability decay, we investigate the causes for the same. We find that such releases were the first software releases to be tested on a new hardware platform, and hence they encountered major hardware integration issues. Also such releases seem to have been developed under time pressure in order to start testing on the new hardware platform sooner. Such releases exhibit poor reliability growth, and hence exhibit high predicted failure rate. Other problems include hardware specification changes and delivery delays from vendors. Thus, our analysis provides critical insights and inputs to the management to improve the software development process. As NASA has moved towards a product line engineering for its flight software development, software for future space missions will be developed in a similar manner and hence the analysis results for this mission can be considered as a baseline for future flight software missions.

  20. Managing Variation in Services in a Software Product Line Context

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    Oriented Domain Analysis ( FODA ) Feasibility Study (CMU/SEI-90-TR-021, ADA235785). Software Engineering Institute, Carnegie Mellon University, 1990...the systems in the product line, and a plan for building the systems. Product line scope and product line analysis define the boundaries and...systems, as well as expected ways in which they may vary. Product line analysis applies established modeling techniques to engineer the common and

  1. Training Plan. Central Archive for Reusable Defense Software (CARDS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-29

    Modeling Software Reuse Technology: Feature Oriented Domain Analysis ( FODA ). SEI, Carnegie Mellon University, May 1992. 8. Component Provider’s...events to the services of the domain. 4. Feature Oriented Domain Analysis ( FODA ) [COHEN92] The FODA method produces feature models. Feature models provide...Architecture FODA Feature-Oriented Domain Analysis GOTS Government-Off-The-Shelf Pap A-49 STARS-VC-B003/001/00 29 imaty 1994 MS Master of Science NEC

  2. Space Station Software Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voigt, S. (Editor); Beskenis, S. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    Issues in the development of software for the Space Station are discussed. Software acquisition and management, software development environment, standards, information system support for software developers, and a future software advisory board are addressed.

  3. Agile Software Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biju, Soly Mathew

    2008-01-01

    Many software development firms are now adopting the agile software development method. This method involves the customer at every level of software development, thus reducing the impact of change in the requirement at a later stage. In this article, the principles of the agile method for software development are explored and there is a focus on…

  4. Especially for High School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, J. Emory

    1999-05-01

    assigned as a take-home activity. JCE Classroom Activity #15, "Liver and Onions: DNA Extraction from Animal and Plant Tissues" (p 400A, March 1999) also integrates chemical and biological concepts. The JCE Software videotape HIV-1 Protease: An Enzyme at Work is another useful resource. It can be used in any classroom where kinetics, catalysis, proteins, or enzymes are discussed. Information about JCE Software products can be found in recent issues of the Journal or by accessing JCE Online (http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu). Because most high school students complete at least one year of biology before enrolling in chemistry, developing the connections between biology and chemistry can be especially productive. Connections between chemistry and biology often seem to be more real to students than do many of the phenomena we cite as applications. For example, students often are not able to make the connection between the excitation of electrons to produce electromagnetic radiation and anything that is personally relevant. The light given off by sodium or mercury vapor lights provides a common example of relating atomic emission to a useful process, but many students do not seem to find that particularly interesting. The need to make a connection between biology and chemistry becomes especially meaningful to students when the chemical change occurs within the human body. As an example, the interaction of emitted electromagnetic radiation with human cells to cause well-tanned skin seems more relevant to a greater number of students than the color of lights in a parking lot. This issue contains an article that describes a useful application of light to kill cancer cells through use of photosensitizers (p 592). The process of photodynamic therapy (PDT) provides another example that could help students make a connection between the emission of electromagnetic radiation and the challenge of killing cancer cells without harming healthy cells. Certainly this example is not a magic

  5. Enterprise Systems (ES) Software in Business School Curriculum--Evaluation of Design and Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seethamraju, Ravi

    2007-01-01

    Considering the increasing importance of enterprise systems in business, and their pedagogical value in demonstrating business process orientation and concepts of integration, several universities have incorporated popular enterprise system (ES) software products such as SAP R/3 into their business school curricula. This paper describes an attempt…

  6. Payload software technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A software analysis was performed of known STS sortie payload elements and their associated experiments. This provided basic data for STS payload software characteristics and sizes. A set of technology drivers was identified based on a survey of future technology needs and an assessment of current software technology. The results will be used to evolve a planned approach to software technology development. The purpose of this plan is to ensure that software technology is advanced at a pace and a depth sufficient to fulfill the identified future needs.

  7. A parallel and sensitive software tool for methylation analysis on multicore platforms.

    PubMed

    Tárraga, Joaquín; Pérez, Mariano; Orduña, Juan M; Duato, José; Medina, Ignacio; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2015-10-01

    DNA methylation analysis suffers from very long processing time, as the advent of Next-Generation Sequencers has shifted the bottleneck of genomic studies from the sequencers that obtain the DNA samples to the software that performs the analysis of these samples. The existing software for methylation analysis does not seem to scale efficiently neither with the size of the dataset nor with the length of the reads to be analyzed. As it is expected that the sequencers will provide longer and longer reads in the near future, efficient and scalable methylation software should be developed. We present a new software tool, called HPG-Methyl, which efficiently maps bisulphite sequencing reads on DNA, analyzing DNA methylation. The strategy used by this software consists of leveraging the speed of the Burrows-Wheeler Transform to map a large number of DNA fragments (reads) rapidly, as well as the accuracy of the Smith-Waterman algorithm, which is exclusively employed to deal with the most ambiguous and shortest reads. Experimental results on platforms with Intel multicore processors show that HPG-Methyl significantly outperforms in both execution time and sensitivity state-of-the-art software such as Bismark, BS-Seeker or BSMAP, particularly for long bisulphite reads. Software in the form of C libraries and functions, together with instructions to compile and execute this software. Available by sftp to anonymous@clariano.uv.es (password 'anonymous'). juan.orduna@uv.es or jdopazo@cipf.es. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Physician use of updated anti-virus software in a tertiary Nigerian hospital.

    PubMed

    Laabes, E P; Nyango, D D; Ayedima, M M; Ladep, N G

    2010-01-01

    While physicians are becoming increasingly dependent on computers and the internet, highly lethal malware continue to be loaded into cyberspace. We sought to assess the proportion of physicians with updated anti-virus software in Jos University Teaching Hospital Nigeria and to determine perceived barriers to getting updates. We used a pre-tested semi-structured self-administered questionnaire to conduct a cross-sectional survey among 118 physicians. The mean age (+/- SD) of subjects was 34 (+/- 4) years, with 94 male and 24 female physicians. Forty-two (36.5%) of 115 physicians with anti-virus software used an updated program (95% Cl: 27, 45). The top-three antivirus software were: McAfee 40 (33.9%), AVG 37 (31.4%) and Norton 17 (14.4%). Common infections were: Trojan horse 22 (29.7%), Brontok worm 8 (10.8%), and Ravmonlog.exe 5 (6.8%). Internet browsing with a firewall was an independent determinant for use of updated anti-virus software [OR 4.3, 95% CI, 1.86, 10.02; P < 0.001]. Busy schedule, 40 (33.9%) and lack of credit card 39 (33.1%) were perceived barriers to updating antivirus software. The use of regularly updated anti-virus software is sub-optimal among physicians implying vulnerability to computer viruses. Physicians should be careful with flash drives and should avoid being victims of the raging arms race between malware producers and anti-virus software developers.

  9. Measurement of the area of venous ulcers using two software programs 1

    PubMed Central

    Eberhardt, Thaís Dresch; de Lima, Suzinara Beatriz Soares; Lopes, Luis Felipe Dias; Borges, Eline de Lima; Weiller, Teresinha Heck; da Fonseca, Graziele Gorete Portella

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to compare the measurement area of venous ulcers using AutoCAD(r) and Image Tool software. Method: this was an assessment of reproducibility tests conducted in a angiology clinic of a university hospital. Data were collected from 21 patients with venous ulcers, in the period from March to July of 2015, using a collection form and photograph of wounds. Five nurses (evaluators) of the hospital skin wound study group participated. The wounds were measured using both software programs. Data were analyzed using intraclass correlation coefficient, concordance correlation coefficient and Bland-Altman analysis. The study met the ethical aspects in accordance with current legislation. Results: the size of ulcers varied widely, however, without significant difference between the measurements; an excellent intraclass and concordance correlation was found between both software programs, which seem to be more accurate when measuring a wound area >10 cm². Conclusion: the use of both software programs is appropriate for measurement of venous ulcers, appearing to be more accurate when used to measure a wound area > 10 cm². PMID:27992028

  10. The Elements of an Effective Software Development Plan - Software Development Process Guidebook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-11

    standards and practices required for all XMPL software development. This SDP implements the <corporate> Standard Software Process (SSP). as tailored...Developing and integrating reusable software products • Approach to managing COTS/Reuse software implementation • COTS/Reuse software selection...final selection and submit to change board for approval MAINTENANCE Monitor current products for obsolescence or end of support Track new

  11. Report: Scientific Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Stuart A.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses various aspects of scientific software, including evaluation and selection of commercial software products; program exchanges, catalogs, and other information sources; major data analysis packages; statistics and chemometrics software; and artificial intelligence. (JN)

  12. Distributed Energy Resource Optimization Using a Software as Service (SaaS) Approach at the University of California, Davis Campus

    SciTech Connect

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Donadee, Jon

    2011-02-06

    Together with OSIsoft LLC as its private sector partner and matching sponsor, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) won an FY09 Technology Commercialization Fund (TCF) grant from the U.S. Department of Energy. The goal of the project is to commercialize Berkeley Lab's optimizing program, the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM) using a software as a service (SaaS) model with OSIsoft as its first non-scientific user. OSIsoft could in turn provide optimization capability to its software clients. In this way, energy efficiency and/or carbon minimizing strategies could be made readily available to commercial and industrial facilities. Specialized versionsmore » of DER-CAM dedicated to solving OSIsoft's customer problems have been set up on a server at Berkeley Lab. The objective of DER-CAM is to minimize the cost of technology adoption and operation or carbon emissions, or combinations thereof. DER-CAM determines which technologies should be installed and operated based on specific site load, price information, and performance data for available equipment options. An established user of OSIsoft's PI software suite, the University of California, Davis (UCD), was selected as a demonstration site for this project. UCD's participation in the project is driven by its motivation to reduce its carbon emissions. The campus currently buys electricity economically through the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA). The campus does not therefore face compelling cost incentives to improve the efficiency of its operations, but is nonetheless motivated to lower the carbon footprint of its buildings. Berkeley Lab attempted to demonstrate a scenario wherein UCD is forced to purchase electricity on a standard time-of-use tariff from Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E), which is a concern to Facilities staff. Additionally, DER-CAM has been set up to consider the variability of carbon emissions throughout the day and seasons. Two distinct

  13. Problem-Solving Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    CBR Express software solves problems by adapting sorted solutions to new problems specified by a user. It is applicable to a wide range of situations. The technology was originally developed by Inference Corporation for Johnson Space Center's Advanced Software Development Workstation. The project focused on the reuse of software designs, and Inference used CBR as part of the ACCESS prototype software. The commercial CBR Express is used as a "help desk" for customer support, enabling reuse of existing information when necessary. It has been adopted by several companies, among them American Airlines, which uses it to solve reservation system software problems.

  14. Implementation of Task-Tracking Software for Clinical IT Management.

    PubMed

    Purohit, Anne-Maria; Brutscheck, Clemens; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich; Ganslandt, Thomas; Schneider, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Often in clinical IT departments, many different methods and IT systems are used for task-tracking and project organization. Based on managers' personal preferences and knowledge about project management methods, tools differ from team to team and even from employee to employee. This causes communication problems, especially when tasks need to be done in cooperation with different teams. Monitoring tasks and resources becomes impossible: there are no defined deliverables, which prevents reliable deadlines. Because of these problems, we implemented task-tracking software which is now in use across all seven teams at the University Hospital Erlangen. Over a period of seven months, a working group defined types of tasks (project, routine task, etc.), workflows, and views to monitor the tasks of the 7 divisions, 20 teams and 340 different IT services. The software has been in use since December 2016.

  15. Software Formal Inspections Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This Software Formal Inspections Standard (hereinafter referred to as Standard) is applicable to NASA software. This Standard defines the requirements that shall be fulfilled by the software formal inspections process whenever this process is specified for NASA software. The objective of this Standard is to define the requirements for a process that inspects software products to detect and eliminate defects as early as possible in the software life cycle. The process also provides for the collection and analysis of inspection data to improve the inspection process as well as the quality of the software.

  16. Defense AT&L Magazine: A Publication of the Defense Acquisition University. Volume 34, Number 3, DAU 184

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    developed a partnership with the Defense Acquisition University to in- tegrate DISA’s systems engineering processes, software , and network...in place, with processes being implemented: deployment management; systems engineering ; software engineering ; configuration man- agement; test and...CSS systems engineering is a transition partner with Carnegie Mellon University’s Software Engineering Insti- tute and its work on the capability

  17. A Quantitative Study of Global Software Development Teams, Requirements, and Software Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Linda L.

    2016-01-01

    The study explored the relationship between global software development teams, effective software requirements, and stakeholders' perception of successful software development projects within the field of information technology management. It examined the critical relationship between Global Software Development (GSD) teams creating effective…

  18. The Development and Evaluation of a Software Prototype for Computer-Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lilley, M.; Barker, T.; Britton, C.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents ongoing research at the University of Hertfordshire on the use of computer-adaptive tests (CATs) in Higher Education. A software prototype based on Item Response Theory has been developed and is described here. This application was designed to estimate the level of proficiency in English for those students whose first language…

  19. A Systematic Software, Firmware, and Hardware Codesign Methodology for Digital Signal Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    possible mappings ...................................................60 Table 25. Possible optimal leaf -nodes... size weight and power UAV unmanned aerial vehicle UHF ultra-high frequency UML universal modeling language Verilog verify logic VHDL VHSIC...optimal leaf -nodes to some design patterns for embedded system design. Software and hardware partitioning is a very difficult challenge in the field of

  20. FITS Liberator: Image processing software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindberg Christensen, Lars; Nielsen, Lars Holm; Nielsen, Kaspar K.; Johansen, Teis; Hurt, Robert; de Martin, David

    2012-06-01

    The ESA/ESO/NASA FITS Liberator makes it possible to process and edit astronomical science data in the FITS format to produce stunning images of the universe. Formerly a plugin for Adobe Photoshop, the current version of FITS Liberator is a stand-alone application and no longer requires Photoshop. This image processing software makes it possible to create color images using raw observations from a range of telescopes; the FITS Liberator continues to support the FITS and PDS formats, preferred by astronomers and planetary scientists respectively, which enables data to be processed from a wide range of telescopes and planetary probes, including ESO's Very Large Telescope, the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, ESA's XMM-Newton Telescope and Cassini-Huygens or Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

  1. Software Assurance Competency Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    COTS) software , and software as a service ( SaaS ). L2: Define and analyze risks in the acquisition of contracted software , COTS software , and SaaS ...2010a]: Application of technologies and processes to achieve a required level of confidence that software systems and services function in the...

  2. Introduction to SNPP/VIIRS Flood Mapping Software Version 1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Sun, D.; Goldberg, M.; Sjoberg, W.; Santek, D.; Hoffman, J.

    2017-12-01

    Near real-time satellite-derived flood maps are invaluable to river forecasters and decision-makers for disaster monitoring and relief efforts. With support from the JPSS (Joint Polar Satellite System) Proving Ground and Risk Reduction (PGRR) Program, flood detection software has been developed using Suomi-NPP/VIIRS (Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership/Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite) imagery to automatically generate near real-time flood maps for National Weather Service (NWS) River Forecast Centers (RFC) in the USA. The software, which is called VIIRS NOAA GMU Flood Version 1.0 (hereafter referred to as VNG Flood V1.0), consists of a series of algorithms that include water detection, cloud shadow removal, terrain shadow removal, minor flood detection, water fraction retrieval, and floodwater determination. The software is designed for flood detection in any land region between 80°S and 80°N, and it has been running routinely with direct broadcast SNPP/VIIRS data at the Space Science and Engineering Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW/SSEC) and the Geographic Information Network of Alaska at the University of Alaska-Fairbanks (UAF/GINA) since 2014. Near real-time flood maps are distributed via the Unidata Local Data Manager (LDM), reviewed by river forecasters in AWIPS-II (the second generation of the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System) and applied in flood operations. Initial feedback from operational forecasters on the product accuracy and performance has been largely positive. The software capability has also been extended to areas outside of the USA via a case-driven mode to detect major floods all over the world. Offline validation efforts include the visual inspection of over 10,000 VIIRS false-color composite images, an inter-comparison with MODIS automatic flood products and a quantitative evaluation using Landsat imagery. The steady performance from the 3-year routine process and the promising validation results

  3. Multiplex primer prediction software for divergent targets

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Shea N.; Hiddessen, Amy L.; Williams, Peter L.; Hara, Christine; Wagner, Mark C.; Colston, Bill W.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a Multiplex Primer Prediction (MPP) algorithm to build multiplex compatible primer sets to amplify all members of large, diverse and unalignable sets of target sequences. The MPP algorithm is scalable to larger target sets than other available software, and it does not require a multiple sequence alignment. We applied it to questions in viral detection, and demonstrated that there are no universally conserved priming sequences among viruses and that it could require an unfeasibly large number of primers (∼3700 18-mers or ∼2000 10-mers) to generate amplicons from all sequenced viruses. We then designed primer sets separately for each viral family, and for several diverse species such as foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) segments of influenza A virus, Norwalk virus, and HIV-1. We empirically demonstrated the application of the software with a multiplex set of 16 short (10 nt) primers designed to amplify the Poxviridae family to produce a specific amplicon from vaccinia virus. PMID:19759213

  4. Software for Optimizing Quality Assurance of Other Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, Martin; Cornford, Steven; Menzies, Tim

    2004-01-01

    Software assurance is the planned and systematic set of activities that ensures that software processes and products conform to requirements, standards, and procedures. Examples of such activities are the following: code inspections, unit tests, design reviews, performance analyses, construction of traceability matrices, etc. In practice, software development projects have only limited resources (e.g., schedule, budget, and availability of personnel) to cover the entire development effort, of which assurance is but a part. Projects must therefore select judiciously from among the possible assurance activities. At its heart, this can be viewed as an optimization problem; namely, to determine the allocation of limited resources (time, money, and personnel) to minimize risk or, alternatively, to minimize the resources needed to reduce risk to an acceptable level. The end result of the work reported here is a means to optimize quality-assurance processes used in developing software.

  5. Software engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fridge, Ernest M., III; Hiott, Jim; Golej, Jim; Plumb, Allan

    1993-01-01

    Today's software systems generally use obsolete technology, are not integrated properly with other software systems, and are difficult and costly to maintain. The discipline of reverse engineering is becoming prominent as organizations try to move their systems up to more modern and maintainable technology in a cost effective manner. The Johnson Space Center (JSC) created a significant set of tools to develop and maintain FORTRAN and C code during development of the space shuttle. This tool set forms the basis for an integrated environment to reengineer existing code into modern software engineering structures which are then easier and less costly to maintain and which allow a fairly straightforward translation into other target languages. The environment will support these structures and practices even in areas where the language definition and compilers do not enforce good software engineering. The knowledge and data captured using the reverse engineering tools is passed to standard forward engineering tools to redesign or perform major upgrades to software systems in a much more cost effective manner than using older technologies. The latest release of the environment was in Feb. 1992.

  6. 48 CFR 227.7203-15 - Subcontractor rights in computer software or computer software documentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... computer software or computer software documentation. 227.7203-15 Section 227.7203-15 Federal Acquisition... REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Rights in Computer Software and Computer Software Documentation 227.7203-15 Subcontractor rights in computer software or computer software documentation. (a...

  7. 48 CFR 227.7203-15 - Subcontractor rights in computer software or computer software documentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... computer software or computer software documentation. 227.7203-15 Section 227.7203-15 Federal Acquisition... REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Rights in Computer Software and Computer Software Documentation 227.7203-15 Subcontractor rights in computer software or computer software documentation. (a...

  8. 48 CFR 227.7203-15 - Subcontractor rights in computer software or computer software documentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... computer software or computer software documentation. 227.7203-15 Section 227.7203-15 Federal Acquisition... REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Rights in Computer Software and Computer Software Documentation 227.7203-15 Subcontractor rights in computer software or computer software documentation. (a...

  9. 48 CFR 227.7203-15 - Subcontractor rights in computer software or computer software documentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... computer software or computer software documentation. 227.7203-15 Section 227.7203-15 Federal Acquisition... REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Rights in Computer Software and Computer Software Documentation 227.7203-15 Subcontractor rights in computer software or computer software documentation. (a...

  10. 48 CFR 227.7203-15 - Subcontractor rights in computer software or computer software documentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... computer software or computer software documentation. 227.7203-15 Section 227.7203-15 Federal Acquisition... REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Rights in Computer Software and Computer Software Documentation 227.7203-15 Subcontractor rights in computer software or computer software documentation. (a...

  11. News & Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-09-01

    Unification of Journal Options Beginning in 2000, the Journal subscription form will get much simpler and your Journal subscription will bring you even more than previously. Below is an outline of how the new system will work for individuals. Subscriptions for Individuals

    • Beginning September 1, 1999, all Journal print subscriptionscurrent, continuing, new, and renewalwill bring you monthly print issues and give you full access to JCE Online+everything that we have online.
    • If you don't want paper copy of your issue, there is a No-Print Optionwe donate your print copy to our Teacher Workshop Program and you have full access to everything online.
    • If you do want both paper and online but don't want to keep back issuessaving storage spaceyou can purchase JCE CD each year.
    A chart illustrating this new system appears below. It lists all subscription choices for individuals in the U. S., for ACS Student Affiliates, and for non-U.S. individuals. Other Subscription Rates There are now two types of subscriptions for libraries. These are described under New IP-Address Option for Libraries, below. For information about Promotional (larger quantities for workshops, classes, etc.) or Gift Subscription Award Certificate rates, contact the Journal (jce@chem.wisc.edu); 1-800-991-5534 (U.S.) or 608/262-5153. Extensions for Current JCE Online Subscribers At present there are more than 1,000 subscribers to JCE Online+: we think of these as our technological pioneers. These subscribers will have their subscriptions automatically extended according to the scheme below.

    Online Subscription Expires

    JCE Subscriptions Extended By

    Sept. 1, 1999 - Feb. 29, 2000
  12. ATLAS software configuration and build tool optimisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybkin, Grigory; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    ATLAS software code base is over 6 million lines organised in about 2000 packages. It makes use of some 100 external software packages, is developed by more than 400 developers and used by more than 2500 physicists from over 200 universities and laboratories in 6 continents. To meet the challenge of configuration and building of this software, the Configuration Management Tool (CMT) is used. CMT expects each package to describe its build targets, build and environment setup parameters, dependencies on other packages in a text file called requirements, and each project (group of packages) to describe its policies and dependencies on other projects in a text project file. Based on the effective set of configuration parameters read from the requirements files of dependent packages and project files, CMT commands build the packages, generate the environment for their use, or query the packages. The main focus was on build time performance that was optimised within several approaches: reduction of the number of reads of requirements files that are now read once per package by a CMT build command that generates cached requirements files for subsequent CMT build commands; introduction of more fine-grained build parallelism at package task level, i.e., dependent applications and libraries are compiled in parallel; code optimisation of CMT commands used for build; introduction of package level build parallelism, i. e., parallelise the build of independent packages. By default, CMT launches NUMBER-OF-PROCESSORS build commands in parallel. The other focus was on CMT commands optimisation in general that made them approximately 2 times faster. CMT can generate a cached requirements file for the environment setup command, which is especially useful for deployment on distributed file systems like AFS or CERN VMFS. The use of parallelism, caching and code optimisation significantly-by several times-reduced software build time, environment setup time, increased the efficiency of

  13. Software simulators for the evaluation of socio-personal competence for certification of qualifications of university graduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guseva, A. I.; Kireev, V. S.; Silenko, A. N.; Tikhomirov, G. V.; Sheina, E. A.

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses the issues associated with the use of software simulators for the evaluation of competences for certification of qualifications of employees of the nuclear industry. This study was conducted for the expert and methodical center of assessment and certification of qualifications of specialists in the nuclear industry, based on the National nuclear innovation consortium. The goal of this study is to build a model for assessing the socio-personal competence and its realization in the form of a software simulator. The study was conducted among a large number of senior students MEPhI - future managers, IT professionals, and nuclear physicists. As a result of the survey five classes of students have been allocated differently performing case studies, and for and for different areas of training recommendations on the use of various educational technologies have been made.

  14. Model-based software for simulating ultrasonic pulse/echo inspections of metal components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, Chien-Ping; Margetan, Frank J.; Taylor, Jared L.; McKillip, Matthew; Engle, Brady J.; Roberts, Ronald A.; Barnard, Daniel J.

    2017-02-01

    Under the sponsorship of the National Science Foundation's Industry/University Cooperative Research Center at Iowa State University, an effort was initiated in 2015 to repackage existing research-grade software into user friendly tools for the rapid estimation of signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for ultrasonic inspections of metals. The software combines: (1) a Python-based graphical user interface for specifying an inspection scenario and displaying results; and (2) a Fortran-based engine for computing defect signals and backscattered grain noise characteristics. The later makes use the Thompson-Gray Model for the response from an internal defect and the Independent Scatterer Model for backscattered grain noise. This paper provides an overview of the ongoing modeling effort with emphasis on recent developments. These include: treatment of angle-beam inspections, implementation of distance-amplitude corrections, changes in the generation of "invented" calibration signals, efforts to simulate ultrasonic C-scans; and experimental testing of model predictions. The simulation software can now treat both normal and oblique-incidence immersion inspections of curved metal components having equiaxed microstructures in which the grain size varies with depth. Both longitudinal and shear-wave inspections are treated. The model transducer can either be planar, spherically-focused, or bi-cylindrically-focused. A calibration (or reference) signal is required and is used to deduce the measurement system efficiency function. This can be "invented" by the software using center frequency and bandwidth information specified by the user, or, alternatively, a measured calibration signal can be used. Defect types include flat-bottomed-hole reference reflectors, and spherical pores and inclusions. Simulation outputs include estimated defect signal amplitudes, root-mean-squared grain noise amplitudes, and S/N as functions of the depth of the defect within the metal component. At any particular

  15. 48 CFR 227.7203-2 - Acquisition of noncommercial computer software and computer software documentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... noncommercial computer software and computer software documentation. 227.7203-2 Section 227.7203-2 Federal... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Rights in Computer Software and Computer Software Documentation 227.7203-2 Acquisition of noncommercial computer software and computer software documentation. (a...

  16. 48 CFR 227.7203-2 - Acquisition of noncommercial computer software and computer software documentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... noncommercial computer software and computer software documentation. 227.7203-2 Section 227.7203-2 Federal... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Rights in Computer Software and Computer Software Documentation 227.7203-2 Acquisition of noncommercial computer software and computer software documentation. (a...

  17. 48 CFR 227.7203-2 - Acquisition of noncommercial computer software and computer software documentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... noncommercial computer software and computer software documentation. 227.7203-2 Section 227.7203-2 Federal... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Rights in Computer Software and Computer Software Documentation 227.7203-2 Acquisition of noncommercial computer software and computer software documentation. (a...

  18. 48 CFR 227.7203-2 - Acquisition of noncommercial computer software and computer software documentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... noncommercial computer software and computer software documentation. 227.7203-2 Section 227.7203-2 Federal... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Rights in Computer Software and Computer Software Documentation 227.7203-2 Acquisition of noncommercial computer software and computer software documentation. (a...

  19. 48 CFR 227.7203-2 - Acquisition of noncommercial computer software and computer software documentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... noncommercial computer software and computer software documentation. 227.7203-2 Section 227.7203-2 Federal... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Rights in Computer Software and Computer Software Documentation 227.7203-2 Acquisition of noncommercial computer software and computer software documentation. (a...

  20. Software To Go: A Catalog of Software Available for Loan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurlychek, Ken, Comp.

    This catalog lists the holdings of the Software To Go software lending library and clearinghouse for programs and agencies serving students or clients who are deaf or hard of hearing. An introduction describes the clearinghouse and its collection of software, much of it commercial and copyrighted material, for Apple, Macintosh, and IBM (MS-DOS)…

    1. Wolf Testing: Open Source Testing Software

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Braasch, P.; Gay, P. L.

      2004-12-01

      Wolf Testing is software for easily creating and editing exams. Wolf Testing allows the user to create an exam from a database of questions, view it on screen, and easily print it along with the corresponding answer guide. The questions can be multiple choice, short answer, long answer, or true and false varieties. This software can be accessed securely from any location, allowing the user to easily create exams from home. New questions, which can include associated pictures, can be added through a web-interface. After adding in questions, they can be edited, deleted, or duplicated into multiple versions. Long-term test creation is simplified, as you are able to quickly see what questions you have asked in the past and insert them, with or without editing, into future tests. All tests are archived in the database. Written in PHP and MySQL, this software can be installed on any UNIX / Linux platform, including Macintosh OS X. The secure interface keeps students out, and allows you to decide who can create tests and who can edit information already in the database. Tests can be output as either html with pictures or rich text without pictures, and there are plans to add PDF and MS Word formats as well. We would like to thank Dr. Wolfgang Rueckner and the Harvard University Science Center for providing incentive to start this project, computers and resources to complete this project, and inspiration for the project's name. We would also like to thank Dr. Ronald Newburgh for his assistance in beta testing.

    2. Collaborative Production of Learning Objects on French Literary Works Using the LOC Software

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Penman, Christine

      2015-01-01

      This case study situates the collaborative design of learning objects (interactive online learning material) using the LOC (Learning Object Creator) software in the context of language activities external to the core learning activities of language students at a UK university. It describes the creative and pedagogical processes leading to the…

    3. Software Metrics

      DTIC Science & Technology

      1988-12-01

      software development scene is often charac- c. SPQR Model-Jones terized by: * schedule and cost estimates that are gross-d. COPMO-Thebaut ly inaccurate, SEI...time c. SPQR Model-Jones (in seconds) is simply derived from E by dividing T. Capers Jones has developed a software cost by the Stroud number, S...estimation model called the Software Produc- T=E/S tivity, Quality, and Reliability ( SPQR ) model. The basic approach is similar to that of Boehm’s The value

    4. Software Smarts

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      1998-01-01

      Under an SBIR (Small Business Innovative Research) contract with Johnson Space Center, Knowledge Based Systems Inc. (KBSI) developed an intelligent software environment for modeling and analyzing mission planning activities, simulating behavior, and, using a unique constraint propagation mechanism, updating plans with each change in mission planning activities. KBSI developed this technology into a commercial product, PROJECTLINK, a two-way bridge between PROSIm, KBSI's process modeling and simulation software and leading project management software like Microsoft Project and Primavera's SureTrak Project Manager.

    5. Software and hardware infrastructure for research in electrophysiology

      PubMed Central

      Mouček, Roman; Ježek, Petr; Vařeka, Lukáš; Řondík, Tomáš; Brůha, Petr; Papež, Václav; Mautner, Pavel; Novotný, Jiří; Prokop, Tomáš; Štěbeták, Jan

      2014-01-01

      As in other areas of experimental science, operation of electrophysiological laboratory, design and performance of electrophysiological experiments, collection, storage and sharing of experimental data and metadata, analysis and interpretation of these data, and publication of results are time consuming activities. If these activities are well organized and supported by a suitable infrastructure, work efficiency of researchers increases significantly. This article deals with the main concepts, design, and development of software and hardware infrastructure for research in electrophysiology. The described infrastructure has been primarily developed for the needs of neuroinformatics laboratory at the University of West Bohemia, the Czech Republic. However, from the beginning it has been also designed and developed to be open and applicable in laboratories that do similar research. After introducing the laboratory and the whole architectural concept the individual parts of the infrastructure are described. The central element of the software infrastructure is a web-based portal that enables community researchers to store, share, download and search data and metadata from electrophysiological experiments. The data model, domain ontology and usage of semantic web languages and technologies are described. Current data publication policy used in the portal is briefly introduced. The registration of the portal within Neuroscience Information Framework is described. Then the methods used for processing of electrophysiological signals are presented. The specific modifications of these methods introduced by laboratory researches are summarized; the methods are organized into a laboratory workflow. Other parts of the software infrastructure include mobile and offline solutions for data/metadata storing and a hardware stimulator communicating with an EEG amplifier and recording software. PMID:24639646

    6. Software and hardware infrastructure for research in electrophysiology.

      PubMed

      Mouček, Roman; Ježek, Petr; Vařeka, Lukáš; Rondík, Tomáš; Brůha, Petr; Papež, Václav; Mautner, Pavel; Novotný, Jiří; Prokop, Tomáš; Stěbeták, Jan

      2014-01-01

      As in other areas of experimental science, operation of electrophysiological laboratory, design and performance of electrophysiological experiments, collection, storage and sharing of experimental data and metadata, analysis and interpretation of these data, and publication of results are time consuming activities. If these activities are well organized and supported by a suitable infrastructure, work efficiency of researchers increases significantly. This article deals with the main concepts, design, and development of software and hardware infrastructure for research in electrophysiology. The described infrastructure has been primarily developed for the needs of neuroinformatics laboratory at the University of West Bohemia, the Czech Republic. However, from the beginning it has been also designed and developed to be open and applicable in laboratories that do similar research. After introducing the laboratory and the whole architectural concept the individual parts of the infrastructure are described. The central element of the software infrastructure is a web-based portal that enables community researchers to store, share, download and search data and metadata from electrophysiological experiments. The data model, domain ontology and usage of semantic web languages and technologies are described. Current data publication policy used in the portal is briefly introduced. The registration of the portal within Neuroscience Information Framework is described. Then the methods used for processing of electrophysiological signals are presented. The specific modifications of these methods introduced by laboratory researches are summarized; the methods are organized into a laboratory workflow. Other parts of the software infrastructure include mobile and offline solutions for data/metadata storing and a hardware stimulator communicating with an EEG amplifier and recording software.

    7. Software Management Metrics

      DTIC Science & Technology

      1988-05-01

      obtained from Dr. Barry Boehm’s Software 5650, Contract No. F19628-86-C-O001, Engineering Economics [1] and from T. J. ESD/MITRE Software Center Acquisition...of References 1. Boehm, Barry W., SoJtware Engineering 3. Halstead, M. H., Elements of SoJhtare Economics, Englewood Cliffs, New Science, New York...1983, pp. 639-648. 35 35 - Bibliography Beizer, B., Software System Testing and Pressman , Roger S., Software Engineering:QualtyO Assurance, New York: Van

    8. Organic Xenobiotics

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Coleman, William F.

      2005-02-01

      Fully manipulable (Chime) versions of these molecules appear below. These and other molecules are available at Only@ JCE Online . Figure 1. Atrazine molecule. Interactive Chime-based structure (top); static structure graphic (bottom).

    9. Computer Software Configuration Item-Specific Flight Software Image Transfer Script Generator

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Bolen, Kenny; Greenlaw, Ronald

      2010-01-01

      A K-shell UNIX script enables the International Space Station (ISS) Flight Control Team (FCT) operators in NASA s Mission Control Center (MCC) in Houston to transfer an entire or partial computer software configuration item (CSCI) from a flight software compact disk (CD) to the onboard Portable Computer System (PCS). The tool is designed to read the content stored on a flight software CD and generate individual CSCI transfer scripts that are capable of transferring the flight software content in a given subdirectory on the CD to the scratch directory on the PCS. The flight control team can then transfer the flight software from the PCS scratch directory to the Electronically Erasable Programmable Read Only Memory (EEPROM) of an ISS Multiplexer/ Demultiplexer (MDM) via the Indirect File Transfer capability. The individual CSCI scripts and the CSCI Specific Flight Software Image Transfer Script Generator (CFITSG), when executed a second time, will remove all components from their original execution. The tool will identify errors in the transfer process and create logs of the transferred software for the purposes of configuration management.

    10. Software Engineering Improvement Plan

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      2006-01-01

      In performance of this task order, bd Systems personnel provided support to the Flight Software Branch and the Software Working Group through multiple tasks related to software engineering improvement and to activities of the independent Technical Authority (iTA) Discipline Technical Warrant Holder (DTWH) for software engineering. To ensure that the products, comments, and recommendations complied with customer requirements and the statement of work, bd Systems personnel maintained close coordination with the customer. These personnel performed work in areas such as update of agency requirements and directives database, software effort estimation, software problem reports, a web-based process asset library, miscellaneous documentation review, software system requirements, issue tracking software survey, systems engineering NPR, and project-related reviews. This report contains a summary of the work performed and the accomplishments in each of these areas.

    11. A MATLAB Library for Rapid Prototyping of Wireless Communications Algorithms with the Universal Software Radio Peripheral (USRP) Radio Family

      DTIC Science & Technology

      2013-06-01

      Radio is a software development toolkit that provides signal processing blocks to drive the SDR. GNU Radio has many strong points – it is actively...maintained with a large user base, new capabilities are constantly being added, and compiled C code is fast for many real-time applications such as...programming interface (API) makes learning the architecture a daunting task, even for the experienced software developer. This requirement poses many

    12. Space Station Software Recommendations

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Voigt, S. (Editor)

      1985-01-01

      Four panels of invited experts and NASA representatives focused on the following topics: software management, software development environment, languages, and software standards. Each panel deliberated in private, held two open sessions with audience participation, and developed recommendations for the NASA Space Station Program. The major thrusts of the recommendations were as follows: (1) The software management plan should establish policies, responsibilities, and decision points for software acquisition; (2) NASA should furnish a uniform modular software support environment and require its use for all space station software acquired (or developed); (3) The language Ada should be selected for space station software, and NASA should begin to address issues related to the effective use of Ada; and (4) The space station software standards should be selected (based upon existing standards where possible), and an organization should be identified to promulgate and enforce them. These and related recommendations are described in detail in the conference proceedings.

    13. Caltrans WeatherShare Phase II System: An Application of Systems and Software Engineering Process to Project Development

      DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

      2009-08-25

      In cooperation with the California Department of Transportation, Montana State University's Western Transportation Institute has developed the WeatherShare Phase II system by applying Systems Engineering and Software Engineering processes. The system...

    14. MCdevelop - a universal framework for Stochastic Simulations

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Slawinska, M.; Jadach, S.

      2011-03-01

      We present MCdevelop, a universal computer framework for developing and exploiting the wide class of Stochastic Simulations (SS) software. This powerful universal SS software development tool has been derived from a series of scientific projects for precision calculations in high energy physics (HEP), which feature a wide range of functionality in the SS software needed for advanced precision Quantum Field Theory calculations for the past LEP experiments and for the ongoing LHC experiments at CERN, Geneva. MCdevelop is a "spin-off" product of HEP to be exploited in other areas, while it will still serve to develop new SS software for HEP experiments. Typically SS involve independent generation of large sets of random "events", often requiring considerable CPU power. Since SS jobs usually do not share memory it makes them easy to parallelize. The efficient development, testing and running in parallel SS software requires a convenient framework to develop software source code, deploy and monitor batch jobs, merge and analyse results from multiple parallel jobs, even before the production runs are terminated. Throughout the years of development of stochastic simulations for HEP, a sophisticated framework featuring all the above mentioned functionality has been implemented. MCdevelop represents its latest version, written mostly in C++ (GNU compiler gcc). It uses Autotools to build binaries (optionally managed within the KDevelop 3.5.3 Integrated Development Environment (IDE)). It uses the open-source ROOT package for histogramming, graphics and the mechanism of persistency for the C++ objects. MCdevelop helps to run multiple parallel jobs on any computer cluster with NQS-type batch system. Program summaryProgram title:MCdevelop Catalogue identifier: AEHW_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEHW_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http

    15. NASA's Software Safety Standard

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Ramsay, Christopher M.

      2007-01-01

      NASA relies more and more on software to control, monitor, and verify its safety critical systems, facilities and operations. Since the 1960's there has hardly been a spacecraft launched that does not have a computer on board that will provide command and control services. There have been recent incidents where software has played a role in high-profile mission failures and hazardous incidents. For example, the Mars Orbiter, Mars Polar Lander, the DART (Demonstration of Autonomous Rendezvous Technology), and MER (Mars Exploration Rover) Spirit anomalies were all caused or contributed to by software. The Mission Control Centers for the Shuttle, ISS, and unmanned programs are highly dependant on software for data displays, analysis, and mission planning. Despite this growing dependence on software control and monitoring, there has been little to no consistent application of software safety practices and methodology to NASA's projects with safety critical software. Meanwhile, academia and private industry have been stepping forward with procedures and standards for safety critical systems and software, for example Dr. Nancy Leveson's book Safeware: System Safety and Computers. The NASA Software Safety Standard, originally published in 1997, was widely ignored due to its complexity and poor organization. It also focused on concepts rather than definite procedural requirements organized around a software project lifecycle. Led by NASA Headquarters Office of Safety and Mission Assurance, the NASA Software Safety Standard has recently undergone a significant update. This new standard provides the procedures and guidelines for evaluating a project for safety criticality and then lays out the minimum project lifecycle requirements to assure the software is created, operated, and maintained in the safest possible manner. This update of the standard clearly delineates the minimum set of software safety requirements for a project without detailing the implementation for those

    16. Parallels in Computer-Aided Design Framework and Software Development Environment Efforts.

      DTIC Science & Technology

      1992-05-01

      de - sign kits, and tool and design management frameworks. Also, books about software engineer- ing environments [Long 91] and electronic design...tool integration [Zarrella 90], and agreement upon a universal de - sign automation framework, such as the CAD Framework Initiative (CFI) [Malasky 91...ments: identification, control, status accounting, and audit and review. The paper by Dart ex- tracts 15 CM concepts from existing SDEs and tools

    17. Software Vulnerability Taxonomy Consolidation

      SciTech Connect

      Polepeddi, Sriram S.

      2004-12-07

      In today's environment, computers and networks are increasing exposed to a number of software vulnerabilities. Information about these vulnerabilities is collected and disseminated via various large publicly available databases such as BugTraq, OSVDB and ICAT. Each of these databases, individually, do not cover all aspects of a vulnerability and lack a standard format among them, making it difficult for end-users to easily compare various vulnerabilities. A central database of vulnerabilities has not been available until today for a number of reasons, such as the non-uniform methods by which current vulnerability database providers receive information, disagreement over which features of amore » particular vulnerability are important and how best to present them, and the non-utility of the information presented in many databases. The goal of this software vulnerability taxonomy consolidation project is to address the need for a universally accepted vulnerability taxonomy that classifies vulnerabilities in an unambiguous manner. A consolidated vulnerability database (CVDB) was implemented that coalesces and organizes vulnerability data from disparate data sources. Based on the work done in this paper, there is strong evidence that a consolidated taxonomy encompassing and organizing all relevant data can be achieved. However, three primary obstacles remain: lack of referencing a common ''primary key'', un-structured and free-form descriptions of necessary vulnerability data, and lack of data on all aspects of a vulnerability. This work has only considered data that can be unambiguously extracted from various data sources by straightforward parsers. It is felt that even with the use of more advanced, information mining tools, which can wade through the sea of unstructured vulnerability data, this current integration methodology would still provide repeatable, unambiguous, and exhaustive results. Though the goal of coalescing all available data, which would be of use

    18. Software Architecture Evolution

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Barnes, Jeffrey M.

      2013-01-01

      Many software systems eventually undergo changes to their basic architectural structure. Such changes may be prompted by new feature requests, new quality attribute requirements, changing technology, or other reasons. Whatever the causes, architecture evolution is commonplace in real-world software projects. Today's software architects, however,…

    19. Software Engineering Laboratory Series: Proceedings of the Twentieth Annual Software Engineering Workshop

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      1995-01-01

      The Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) is an organization sponsored by NASA/GSFC and created to investigate the effectiveness of software engineering technologies when applied to the development of application software. The activities, findings, and recommendations of the SEL are recorded in the Software Engineering Laboratory Series, a continuing series of reports that includes this document.

    20. The SIFT hardware/software systems. Volume 2: Software listings

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Palumbo, Daniel L.

      1985-01-01

      This document contains software listings of the SIFT operating system and application software. The software is coded for the most part in a variant of the Pascal language, Pascal*. Pascal* is a cross-compiler running on the VAX and Eclipse computers. The output of Pascal* is BDX-390 assembler code. When necessary, modules are written directly in BDX-390 assembler code. The listings in this document supplement the description of the SIFT system found in Volume 1 of this report, A Detailed Description.

    1. Strategic Planning towards a World-Class University

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Usoh, E. J.; Ratu, D.; Manongko, A.; Taroreh, J.; Preston, G.

      2018-02-01

      Strategic planning with a focus on world-class university status is an option that cannot be avoided by universities today to survive and succeed in competition as a provider of higher education. The objective of this research is to obtain exploratory research results on the strategic plans of universities that are prepared to generate world-class university status. This research utilised exploratory qualitative research method and data was collected by in-depth interviews method. Interview transcripts were analyzed by using thematic content analysis through NVivo software analysis and manual systems. The main finding of interview shows that most interviewees agreed that UNIMA has been engaged in strategic planning. Contribution from faculties and schools are acknowledged and inform the planning process. However, a new model of strategic planning should be adopted by UNIMA due to the shift towards a “corporate university”. The finding results from documents, literature review and interview were the addition of world-class university characteristics and features to current strategic planning of UNIMA and how to upgrade by considering to use the characteristics and features towards world-class university.

    2. [Development and practice evaluation of blood acid-base imbalance analysis software].

      PubMed

      Chen, Bo; Huang, Haiying; Zhou, Qiang; Peng, Shan; Jia, Hongyu; Ji, Tianxing

      2014-11-01

      To develop a blood gas, acid-base imbalance analysis computer software to diagnose systematically, rapidly, accurately and automatically determine acid-base imbalance type, and evaluate the clinical application. Using VBA programming language, a computer aided diagnostic software for the judgment of acid-base balance was developed. The clinical data of 220 patients admitted to the Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University were retrospectively analyzed. The arterial blood gas [pH value, HCO(3)(-), arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO₂)] and electrolytes included data (Na⁺ and Cl⁻) were collected. Data were entered into the software for acid-base imbalances judgment. At the same time the data generation was calculated manually by H-H compensation formula for determining the type of acid-base imbalance. The consistency of judgment results from software and manual calculation was evaluated, and the judgment time of two methods was compared. The clinical diagnosis of the types of acid-base imbalance for the 220 patients: 65 cases were normal, 90 cases with simple type, mixed type in 41 cases, and triplex type in 24 cases. The accuracy of the judgment results of the normal and triplex types from computer software compared with which were calculated manually was 100%, the accuracy of the simple type judgment was 98.9% and 78.0% for the mixed type, and the total accuracy was 95.5%. The Kappa value of judgment result from software and manual judgment was 0.935, P=0.000. It was demonstrated that the consistency was very good. The time for software to determine acid-base imbalances was significantly shorter than the manual judgment (seconds:18.14 ± 3.80 vs. 43.79 ± 23.86, t=7.466, P=0.000), so the method of software was much faster than the manual method. Software judgment can replace manual judgment with the characteristics of rapid, accurate and convenient, can improve work efficiency and quality of clinical doctors and has great

    3. Medical teleconference about thoracic surgery using free Internet software.

      PubMed

      Obuchi, Toshiro; Shiono, Hiroyuki; Shimada, Junichi; Kaga, Kichizo; Kurihara, Masatoshi; Iwasaki, Akinori

      2011-11-01

      Surgical teleconferences using advanced academic networks are becoming common; however, reports regarding Internet teleconferencing using free software packages such as Skype, USTREAM, and Dropbox are very rare. Teleconferences concerning mainly surgical techniques were held five times between Fukuoka University Hospital and other institutions from April to September 2010. These teleconferences used Skype and USTREAM as videophones to establish communication. Both PowerPoint presentations and surgical videos were made. These presentation files were previously sent to all stations via mail, e-mail, or Dropbox, and shared. A slide-show was simultaneously performed following the presenter's cue in each station. All teleconferences were successfully completed, even though there were minor instances of the Skype link being broken for unknown reasons during the telecommunication. Internet surgical teleconferences using ordinary software are therefore considered to be sufficiently feasible. This method will become more convenient and common as the Internet environments advance.

    4. Computing and software

      USGS Publications Warehouse

      White, Gary C.; Hines, J.E.

      2004-01-01

      The reality is that the statistical methods used for analysis of data depend upon the availability of software. Analysis of marked animal data is no different than the rest of the statistical field. The methods used for analysis are those that are available in reliable software packages. Thus, the critical importance of having reliable, up–to–date software available to biologists is obvious. Statisticians have continued to develop more robust models, ever expanding the suite of potential analysis methodsavailable. But without software to implement these newer methods, they will languish in the abstract, and not be applied to the problems deserving them.In the Computers and Software Session, two new software packages are described, a comparison of implementation of methods for the estimation of nest survival is provided, and a more speculative paper about how the next generation of software might be structured is presented.Rotella et al. (2004) compare nest survival estimation with different software packages: SAS logistic regression, SAS non–linear mixed models, and Program MARK. Nests are assumed to be visited at various, possibly infrequent, intervals. All of the approaches described compute nest survival with the same likelihood, and require that the age of the nest is known to account for nests that eventually hatch. However, each approach offers advantages and disadvantages, explored by Rotella et al. (2004).Efford et al. (2004) present a new software package called DENSITY. The package computes population abundance and density from trapping arrays and other detection methods with a new and unique approach. DENSITY represents the first major addition to the analysis of trapping arrays in 20 years.Barker & White (2004) discuss how existing software such as Program MARK require that each new model’s likelihood must be programmed specifically for that model. They wishfully think that future software might allow the user to combine pieces of likelihood

    5. Status and Plans for the Vienna VLBI and Satellite Software (VieVS 3.0)

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Gruber, Jakob; Böhm, Johannes; Böhm, Sigrid; Girdiuk, Anastasiia; Hellerschmied, Andreas; Hofmeister, Armin; Krásná, Hana; Kwak, Younghee; Landskron, Daniel; Madzak, Matthias; Mayer, David; McCallum, Jamie; Plank, Lucia; Schartner, Matthias; Shabala, Stas; Teke, Kamil; Sun, Jing

      2017-04-01

      The Vienna VLBI and Satellite Software (VieVS) is a geodetic analysis software developed and maintained at Technische Universität Wien (TU Wien) with contributions from groups all over the world. It is used for both academic purposes in university courses as well as for providing Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) analysis results to the geodetic community. Written in a modular structure in Matlab, VieVS offers easy access to the source code and the possibility to adapt the programs for particular purposes. The new version 3.0, released in early 2017, includes several new features, e.g., improved scheduling capabilities for observing quasars and satellites. This poster gives an overview of all VLBI-related activities in Vienna and provides an outlook to future plans concerning the Vienna VLBI and Satellite Software (VieVS).

    6. Impact of Technology on the University of Miami.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Little, Robert O.; Temares, M. Lewis

      As part of a long-range information systems planning effort at the University of Miami, the impact of technology on the organization was assessed. The assessment covered hardware, office automation, systems and database software, and communications. The trends in computer hardware point toward continued decreasing size and cost, placing computer…

    7. Reciprocal Cost Allocation and Decision Making for Universities.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Metzger, Lawrence M.

      1994-01-01

      Examines the use of the reciprocal method as an alternative to more conventional methods of university service department cost allocation. This method can be used with software that is readily available and with already known data. Reciprocal cost allocation will provide appropriate allocation values for financial reporting and data for university…

    8. FMT (Flight Software Memory Tracker) For Cassini Spacecraft-Software Engineering Using JAVA

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Kan, Edwin P.; Uffelman, Hal; Wax, Allan H.

      1997-01-01

      The software engineering design of the Flight Software Memory Tracker (FMT) Tool is discussed in this paper. FMT is a ground analysis software set, consisting of utilities and procedures, designed to track the flight software, i.e., images of memory load and updatable parameters of the computers on-board Cassini spacecraft. FMT is implemented in Java.

    9. Software requirements: Guidance and control software development specification

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Withers, B. Edward; Rich, Don C.; Lowman, Douglas S.; Buckland, R. C.

      1990-01-01

      The software requirements for an implementation of Guidance and Control Software (GCS) are specified. The purpose of the GCS is to provide guidance and engine control to a planetary landing vehicle during its terminal descent onto a planetary surface and to communicate sensory information about that vehicle and its descent to some receiving device. The specification was developed using the structured analysis for real time system specification methodology by Hatley and Pirbhai and was based on a simulation program used to study the probability of success of the 1976 Viking Lander missions to Mars. Three versions of GCS are being generated for use in software error studies.

    10. NASA's Software Safety Standard

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Ramsay, Christopher M.

      2005-01-01

      NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) relies more and more on software to control, monitor, and verify its safety critical systems, facilities and operations. Since the 1960's there has hardly been a spacecraft (manned or unmanned) launched that did not have a computer on board that provided vital command and control services. Despite this growing dependence on software control and monitoring, there has been no consistent application of software safety practices and methodology to NASA's projects with safety critical software. Led by the NASA Headquarters Office of Safety and Mission Assurance, the NASA Software Safety Standard (STD-18l9.13B) has recently undergone a significant update in an attempt to provide that consistency. This paper will discuss the key features of the new NASA Software Safety Standard. It will start with a brief history of the use and development of software in safety critical applications at NASA. It will then give a brief overview of the NASA Software Working Group and the approach it took to revise the software engineering process across the Agency.

    11. Adopting Open Source Software to Address Software Risks during the Scientific Data Life Cycle

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Vinay, S.; Downs, R. R.

      2012-12-01

      Software enables the creation, management, storage, distribution, discovery, and use of scientific data throughout the data lifecycle. However, the capabilities offered by software also present risks for the stewardship of scientific data, since future access to digital data is dependent on the use of software. From operating systems to applications for analyzing data, the dependence of data on software presents challenges for the stewardship of scientific data. Adopting open source software provides opportunities to address some of the proprietary risks of data dependence on software. For example, in some cases, open source software can be deployed to avoid licensing restrictions for using, modifying, and transferring proprietary software. The availability of the source code of open source software also enables the inclusion of modifications, which may be contributed by various community members who are addressing similar issues. Likewise, an active community that is maintaining open source software can be a valuable source of help, providing an opportunity to collaborate to address common issues facing adopters. As part of the effort to meet the challenges of software dependence for scientific data stewardship, risks from software dependence have been identified that exist during various times of the data lifecycle. The identification of these risks should enable the development of plans for mitigating software dependencies, where applicable, using open source software, and to improve understanding of software dependency risks for scientific data and how they can be reduced during the data life cycle.

    12. NanoDesign: Concepts and Software for a Nanotechnology Based on Functionalized Fullerenes

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Globus, Al; Jaffe, Richard; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

      1996-01-01

      Eric Drexler has proposed a hypothetical nanotechnology based on diamond and investigated the properties of such molecular systems. While attractive, diamonoid nanotechnology is not physically accessible with straightforward extensions of current laboratory techniques. We propose a nanotechnology based on functionalized fullerenes and investigate carbon nanotube based gears with teeth added via a benzyne reaction known to occur with C60. The gears are single-walled carbon nanotubes with appended coenzyme groups for teeth. Fullerenes are in widespread laboratory use and can be functionalized in many ways. Companion papers computationally demonstrate the properties of these gears (they appear to work) and the accessibility of the benzyne/nanotube reaction. This paper describes the molecular design techniques and rationale as well as the software that implements these design techniques. The software is a set of persistent C++ objects controlled by TCL command scripts. The c++/tcl interface is automatically generated by a software system called tcl_c++ developed by the author and described here. The objects keep track of different portions of the molecular machinery to allow different simulation techniques and boundary conditions to be applied as appropriate. This capability has been required to demonstrate (computationally) our gear's feasibility. A new distributed software architecture featuring a WWW universal client, CORBA distributed objects, and agent software is under consideration. The software architecture is intended to eventually enable a widely disbursed group to develop complex simulated molecular machines.

    13. Happy software developers solve problems better: psychological measurements in empirical software engineering

      PubMed Central

      Wang, Xiaofeng; Abrahamsson, Pekka

      2014-01-01

      For more than thirty years, it has been claimed that a way to improve software developers’ productivity and software quality is to focus on people and to provide incentives to make developers satisfied and happy. This claim has rarely been verified in software engineering research, which faces an additional challenge in comparison to more traditional engineering fields: software development is an intellectual activity and is dominated by often-neglected human factors (called human aspects in software engineering research). Among the many skills required for software development, developers must possess high analytical problem-solving skills and creativity for the software construction process. According to psychology research, affective states—emotions and moods—deeply influence the cognitive processing abilities and performance of workers, including creativity and analytical problem solving. Nonetheless, little research has investigated the correlation between the affective states, creativity, and analytical problem-solving performance of programmers. This article echoes the call to employ psychological measurements in software engineering research. We report a study with 42 participants to investigate the relationship between the affective states, creativity, and analytical problem-solving skills of software developers. The results offer support for the claim that happy developers are indeed better problem solvers in terms of their analytical abilities. The following contributions are made by this study: (1) providing a better understanding of the impact of affective states on the creativity and analytical problem-solving capacities of developers, (2) introducing and validating psychological measurements, theories, and concepts of affective states, creativity, and analytical-problem-solving skills in empirical software engineering, and (3) raising the need for studying the human factors of software engineering by employing a multidisciplinary viewpoint

    14. Happy software developers solve problems better: psychological measurements in empirical software engineering.

      PubMed

      Graziotin, Daniel; Wang, Xiaofeng; Abrahamsson, Pekka

      2014-01-01

      For more than thirty years, it has been claimed that a way to improve software developers' productivity and software quality is to focus on people and to provide incentives to make developers satisfied and happy. This claim has rarely been verified in software engineering research, which faces an additional challenge in comparison to more traditional engineering fields: software development is an intellectual activity and is dominated by often-neglected human factors (called human aspects in software engineering research). Among the many skills required for software development, developers must possess high analytical problem-solving skills and creativity for the software construction process. According to psychology research, affective states-emotions and moods-deeply influence the cognitive processing abilities and performance of workers, including creativity and analytical problem solving. Nonetheless, little research has investigated the correlation between the affective states, creativity, and analytical problem-solving performance of programmers. This article echoes the call to employ psychological measurements in software engineering research. We report a study with 42 participants to investigate the relationship between the affective states, creativity, and analytical problem-solving skills of software developers. The results offer support for the claim that happy developers are indeed better problem solvers in terms of their analytical abilities. The following contributions are made by this study: (1) providing a better understanding of the impact of affective states on the creativity and analytical problem-solving capacities of developers, (2) introducing and validating psychological measurements, theories, and concepts of affective states, creativity, and analytical-problem-solving skills in empirical software engineering, and (3) raising the need for studying the human factors of software engineering by employing a multidisciplinary viewpoint.

    15. Software Engineering Education Directory

      DTIC Science & Technology

      1990-04-01

      and Engineering (CMSC 735) Codes: GPEV2 * Textiooks: IEEE Tutoria on Models and Metrics for Software Management and Engameeing by Basi, Victor R...Software Engineering (Comp 227) Codes: GPRY5 Textbooks: IEEE Tutoria on Software Design Techniques by Freeman, Peter and Wasserman, Anthony 1. Software

    16. Finding Helpful Software Reviews.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Kruse, Ted, Comp.

      1987-01-01

      Provides a list of evaluation services currently producing critical reviews of educational software. Includes information about The Apple K-12 Curriculum Software Reference, The Educational Software Preview, The Educational Software Selector, MicroSIFT, and Only The Best: The Discriminating Guide for Preschool-Grade 12. (TW)

    17. Software Reuse Issues

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Voigt, Susan J. (Editor); Smith, Kathryn A. (Editor)

      1989-01-01

      NASA Langley Research Center sponsored a Workshop on NASA Research in Software Reuse on November 17-18, 1988 in Melbourne, Florida, hosted by Software Productivity Solutions, Inc. Participants came from four NASA centers and headquarters, eight NASA contractor companies, and three research institutes. Presentations were made on software reuse research at the four NASA centers; on Eli, the reusable software synthesis system designed and currently under development by SPS; on Space Station Freedom plans for reuse; and on other reuse research projects. This publication summarizes the presentations made and the issues discussed during the workshop.

    18. Portable image-manipulation software: what is the extra development cost?

      PubMed

      Ligier, Y; Ratib, O; Funk, M; Perrier, R; Girard, C; Logean, M

      1992-08-01

      A hospital-wide picture archiving and communication system (PACS) project is currently under development at the University Hospital of Geneva. The visualization and manipulation of images provided by different imaging modalities constitutes one of the most challenging component of a PACS. It was necessary to provide this visualization software on a number of types of workstations because of the varying requirements imposed by the range of clinical uses it must serve. The user interface must be the same, independent of the underlying workstation. In addition to a standard set of image-manipulation and processing tools, there is a need for more specific clinical tools that can be easily adapted to specific medical requirements. To achieve this goal, it was elected to develop a modular and portable software called OSIRIS. This software is available on two different operating systems (the UNIX standard X-11/OSF-Motif based workstations and the Macintosh family) and can be easily ported to other systems. The extra effort required to design such software in a modular and portable way was worthwhile because it resulted in a platform that can be easily expanded and adapted to a variety of specific clinical applications. Its portability allows users to benefit from the rapidly evolving workstation technology and to adapt the performance to suit their needs.

    19. Real Time with the Librarian: Using Web Conferencing Software to Connect to Distance Students

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Riedel, Tom; Betty, Paul

      2013-01-01

      A pilot program to provide real-time library webcasts to Regis University distance students using Adobe Connect software was initiated in fall of 2011. Previously, most interaction between librarians and online students had been accomplished by asynchronous discussion threads in the Learning Management System. Library webcasts were offered in…

    20. Self-assembling software generator

      DOEpatents

      Bouchard, Ann M [Albuquerque, NM; Osbourn, Gordon C [Albuquerque, NM

      2011-11-25

      A technique to generate an executable task includes inspecting a task specification data structure to determine what software entities are to be generated to create the executable task, inspecting the task specification data structure to determine how the software entities will be linked after generating the software entities, inspecting the task specification data structure to determine logic to be executed by the software entities, and generating the software entities to create the executable task.

    1. Software development predictors, error analysis, reliability models and software metric analysis

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Basili, Victor

      1983-01-01

      The use of dynamic characteristics as predictors for software development was studied. It was found that there are some significant factors that could be useful as predictors. From a study on software errors and complexity, it was shown that meaningful results can be obtained which allow insight into software traits and the environment in which it is developed. Reliability models were studied. The research included the field of program testing because the validity of some reliability models depends on the answers to some unanswered questions about testing. In studying software metrics, data collected from seven software engineering laboratory (FORTRAN) projects were examined and three effort reporting accuracy checks were applied to demonstrate the need to validate a data base. Results are discussed.

    2. Comparison of a Gross Anatomy Laboratory to Online Anatomy Software for Teaching Anatomy

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Mathiowetz, Virgil; Yu, Chih-Huang; Quake-Rapp, Cindee

      2016-01-01

      This study was designed to assess the grades, self-perceived learning, and satisfaction between occupational therapy students who used a gross anatomy laboratory versus online anatomy software (AnatomyTV) as tools to learn anatomy at a large public university and a satellite campus in the mid-western United States. The goal was to determine if…

    3. Evidence synthesis software.

      PubMed

      Park, Sophie Elizabeth; Thomas, James

      2018-06-07

      It can be challenging to decide which evidence synthesis software to choose when doing a systematic review. This article discusses some of the important questions to consider in relation to the chosen method and synthesis approach. Software can support researchers in a range of ways. Here, a range of review conditions and software solutions. For example, facilitating contemporaneous collaboration across time and geographical space; in-built bias assessment tools; and line-by-line coding for qualitative textual analysis. EPPI-Reviewer is a review software for research synthesis managed by the EPPI-centre, UCL Institute of Education. EPPI-Reviewer has text mining automation technologies. Version 5 supports data sharing and re-use across the systematic review community. Open source software will soon be released. EPPI-Centre will continue to offer the software as a cloud-based service. The software is offered via a subscription with a one-month (extendible) trial available and volume discounts for 'site licences'. It is free to use for Cochrane and Campbell reviews. The next EPPI-Reviewer version is being built in collaboration with National Institute for Health and Care Excellence using 'surveillance' of newly published research to support 'living' iterative reviews. This is achieved using a combination of machine learning and traditional information retrieval technologies to identify the type of research each new publication describes and determine its relevance for a particular review, domain or guideline. While the amount of available knowledge and research is constantly increasing, the ways in which software can support the focus and relevance of data identification are also developing fast. Software advances are maximising the opportunities for the production of relevant and timely reviews. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise

    4. Strengthening Software Authentication with the ROSE Software Suite

      SciTech Connect

      White, G

      2006-06-15

      Many recent nonproliferation and arms control software projects include a software authentication regime. These include U.S. Government-sponsored projects both in the United States and in the Russian Federation (RF). This trend toward requiring software authentication is only accelerating. Demonstrating assurance that software performs as expected without hidden ''backdoors'' is crucial to a project's success. In this context, ''authentication'' is defined as determining that a software package performs only its intended purpose and performs said purpose correctly and reliably over the planned duration of an agreement. In addition to visual inspections by knowledgeable computer scientists, automated tools are needed to highlightmore » suspicious code constructs, both to aid visual inspection and to guide program development. While many commercial tools are available for portions of the authentication task, they are proprietary and not extensible. An open-source, extensible tool can be customized to the unique needs of each project (projects can have both common and custom rules to detect flaws and security holes). Any such extensible tool has to be based on a complete language compiler. ROSE is precisely such a compiler infrastructure developed within the Department of Energy (DOE) and targeted at the optimization of scientific applications and user-defined libraries within large-scale applications (typically applications of a million lines of code). ROSE is a robust, source-to-source analysis and optimization infrastructure currently addressing large, million-line DOE applications in C and C++ (handling the full C, C99, C++ languages and with current collaborations to support Fortran90). We propose to extend ROSE to address a number of security-specific requirements, and apply it to software authentication for nonproliferation and arms control projects.« less

    5. NASA software specification and evaluation system: Software verification/validation techniques

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      1977-01-01

      NASA software requirement specifications were used in the development of a system for validating and verifying computer programs. The software specification and evaluation system (SSES) provides for the effective and efficient specification, implementation, and testing of computer software programs. The system as implemented will produce structured FORTRAN or ANSI FORTRAN programs, but the principles upon which SSES is designed allow it to be easily adapted to other high order languages.

    6. Software Design Improvements. Part 2; Software Quality and the Design and Inspection Process

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Lalli, Vincent R.; Packard, Michael H.; Ziemianski, Tom

      1997-01-01

      The application of assurance engineering techniques improves the duration of failure-free performance of software. The totality of features and characteristics of a software product are what determine its ability to satisfy customer needs. Software in safety-critical systems is very important to NASA. We follow the System Safety Working Groups definition for system safety software as: 'The optimization of system safety in the design, development, use and maintenance of software and its integration with safety-critical systems in an operational environment. 'If it is not safe, say so' has become our motto. This paper goes over methods that have been used by NASA to make software design improvements by focusing on software quality and the design and inspection process.

    7. Software component quality evaluation

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Clough, A. J.

      1991-01-01

      The paper describes a software inspection process that can be used to evaluate the quality of software components. Quality criteria, process application, independent testing of the process and proposed associated tool support are covered. Early results indicate that this technique is well suited for assessing software component quality in a standardized fashion. With automated machine assistance to facilitate both the evaluation and selection of software components, such a technique should promote effective reuse of software components.

    8. Advertising in This Issue

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      2001-09-01

      To see a list of advertisers from the three most recent issues of JCE, go to the Ad Index. This will take you to the list of advertisers, each conveniently linked to their home page. To get advertising information via mail, fax, or email, refer to the top portion of the Readers Service Card inserted in the print issue. Whatever method of communication you use, be sure to mention to advertisers that you saw their ad in the Journal of Chemical Education. To view a list of the companies that advertised in this issue of JCE, click here. Advertising Representative McNeill Group, Inc. 301 Oxford Valley Road, Suite 804 Yardley, PA 19067 phone: 215/321-9662 or 800/275-5084 fax: 215/321-9636; email: jchemed@mcneill-group.com

    9. Advertising in This Issue

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      2000-12-01

      To see a list of advertisers from the three most recent issues of JCE, go to the HTML Ad Index. This will take you to the list of advertisers, each conveniently linked to their home page. To get advertising information via mail, fax, or email, refer to the top portion of the Readers Service Card inserted in the print issue. Whatever method of communication you use, be sure to mention to advertisers that you saw their ad in the Journal of Chemical Education. To view a list of the companies that advertised in this issue of JCE, click here. Advertising Representative McNeill Group, Inc. 301 Oxford Valley Road, Suite 804 Yardley, PA 19067 phone: 215/321-9662 or 800/275-5084 fax: 215/321-9636; email: jchemed@mcneill-group.com

    10. Advertising in This Issue

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      2001-02-01

      To see a list of advertisers from the three most recent issues of JCE, go to the Ad Index. This will take you to the list of advertisers, each conveniently linked to their home page. To get advertising information via mail, fax, or email, refer to the top portion of the Readers Service Card inserted in the print issue. Whatever method of communication you use, be sure to mention to advertisers that you saw their ad in the Journal of Chemical Education. To view a list of the companies that advertised in this issue of JCE, click here. Advertising Representative McNeill Group, Inc. 301 Oxford Valley Road, Suite 804 Yardley, PA 19067 phone: 215/321-9662 or 800/275-5084 fax: 215/321-9636; email: jchemed@mcneill-group.com

    11. Advertising in This Issue

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      2000-04-01

      To see a list of advertisers from the three most recent issues of JCE, go to the HTML Ad Index. This will take you to the list of advertisers, each conveniently linked to their home page. To get advertising information via mail, fax, or email, refer to the top portion of the Readers Service Card inserted in the print issue. Whatever method of communication you use, be sure to mention to advertisers that you saw their ad in the Journal of Chemical Education. To view a list of the companies that advertised in this issue of JCE, click here. Advertising Representative McNeill Group, Inc. 301 Oxford Valley Road, Suite 804 Yardley, PA 19067 phone: 215/321-9662 or 800/275-5084 fax: 215/321-9636; email: jchemed@mcneill-group.com

    12. Advertising in This Issue

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      2001-05-01

      To see a list of advertisers from the three most recent issues of JCE, go to the Ad Index. This will take you to the list of advertisers, each conveniently linked to their home page. To get advertising information via mail, fax, or email, refer to the top portion of the Readers Service Card inserted in the print issue. Whatever method of communication you use, be sure to mention to advertisers that you saw their ad in the Journal of Chemical Education. To view a list of the companies that advertised in this issue of JCE, click here. Advertising Representative McNeill Group, Inc. 301 Oxford Valley Road, Suite 804 Yardley, PA 19067 phone: 215/321-9662 or 800/275-5084 fax: 215/321-9636; email: jchemed@mcneill-group.com

    13. Advertising in This Issue

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      2000-02-01

      To see a list of advertisers from the three most recent issues of JCE, go to the HTML Ad Index. This will take you to the list of advertisers, each conveniently linked to their home page. To get advertising information via mail, fax, or email, refer to the top portion of the Readers Service Card inserted in the print issue. Whatever method of communication you use, be sure to mention to advertisers that you saw their ad in the Journal of Chemical Education. To view a list of the companies that advertised in this issue of JCE, click here. Advertising Representative McNeill Group, Inc. 301 Oxford Valley Road, Suite 804 Yardley, PA 19067 phone: 215/321-9662 or 800/275-5084 fax: 215/321-9636; email: jchemed@mcneill-group.com

    14. Advertising in This Issue

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      2001-04-01

      To see a list of advertisers from the three most recent issues of JCE, go to the Ad Index. This will take you to the list of advertisers, each conveniently linked to their home page. To get advertising information via mail, fax, or email, refer to the top portion of the Readers Service Card inserted in the print issue. Whatever method of communication you use, be sure to mention to advertisers that you saw their ad in the Journal of Chemical Education. To view a list of the companies that advertised in this issue of JCE, click here. Advertising Representative McNeill Group, Inc. 301 Oxford Valley Road, Suite 804 Yardley, PA 19067 phone: 215/321-9662 or 800/275-5084 fax: 215/321-9636; email: jchemed@mcneill-group.com

    15. Advertising in This Issue

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      2000-10-01

      To see a list of advertisers from the three most recent issues of JCE, go to the HTML Ad Index. This will take you to the list of advertisers, each conveniently linked to their home page. To get advertising information via mail, fax, or email, refer to the top portion of the Readers Service Card inserted in the print issue. Whatever method of communication you use, be sure to mention to advertisers that you saw their ad in the Journal of Chemical Education. To view a list of the companies that advertised in this issue of JCE, click here. Advertising Representative McNeill Group, Inc. 301 Oxford Valley Road, Suite 804 Yardley, PA 19067 phone: 215/321-9662 or 800/275-5084 fax: 215/321-9636; email: jchemed@mcneill-group.com

    16. Advertising in This Issue

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      2001-07-01

      To see a list of advertisers from the three most recent issues of JCE, go to the Ad Index. This will take you to the list of advertisers, each conveniently linked to their home page. To get advertising information via mail, fax, or email, refer to the top portion of the Readers Service Card inserted in the print issue. Whatever method of communication you use, be sure to mention to advertisers that you saw their ad in the Journal of Chemical Education. To view a list of the companies that advertised in this issue of JCE, click here. Advertising Representative McNeill Group, Inc. 301 Oxford Valley Road, Suite 804 Yardley, PA 19067 phone: 215/321-9662 or 800/275-5084 fax: 215/321-9636; email: jchemed@mcneill-group.com

    17. Advertising in This Issue

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      2000-09-01

      To see a list of advertisers from the three most recent issues of JCE, go to the HTML Ad Index. This will take you to the list of advertisers, each conveniently linked to their home page. To get advertising information via mail, fax, or email, refer to the top portion of the Readers Service Card inserted in the print issue. Whatever method of communication you use, be sure to mention to advertisers that you saw their ad in the Journal of Chemical Education. To view a list of the companies that advertised in this issue of JCE, click here. Advertising Representative McNeill Group, Inc. 301 Oxford Valley Road, Suite 804 Yardley, PA 19067 phone: 215/321-9662 or 800/275-5084 fax: 215/321-9636; email: jchemed@mcneill-group.com

    18. Advertising in This Issue

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      2000-07-01

      To see a list of advertisers from the three most recent issues of JCE, go to the HTML Ad Index. This will take you to the list of advertisers, each conveniently linked to their home page. To get advertising information via mail, fax, or email, refer to the top portion of the Readers Service Card inserted in the print issue. Whatever method of communication you use, be sure to mention to advertisers that you saw their ad in the Journal of Chemical Education. To view a list of the companies that advertised in this issue of JCE, click here. Advertising Representative McNeill Group, Inc. 301 Oxford Valley Road, Suite 804 Yardley, PA 19067 phone: 215/321-9662 or 800/275-5084 fax: 215/321-9636; email: jchemed@mcneill-group.com

    19. 48 CFR 227.7202-3 - Rights in commercial computer software or commercial computer software documentation.

      Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

      2010-10-01

      ... computer software or commercial computer software documentation. 227.7202-3 Section 227.7202-3 Federal... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Rights in Computer Software and Computer Software Documentation 227.7202-3 Rights in commercial computer software or commercial computer software documentation...

    20. 48 CFR 227.7202-3 - Rights in commercial computer software or commercial computer software documentation.

      Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

      2011-10-01

      ... computer software or commercial computer software documentation. 227.7202-3 Section 227.7202-3 Federal... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Rights in Computer Software and Computer Software Documentation 227.7202-3 Rights in commercial computer software or commercial computer software documentation...

    1. 48 CFR 227.7202-3 - Rights in commercial computer software or commercial computer software documentation.

      Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

      2013-10-01

      ... computer software or commercial computer software documentation. 227.7202-3 Section 227.7202-3 Federal... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Rights in Computer Software and Computer Software Documentation 227.7202-3 Rights in commercial computer software or commercial computer software documentation...

    2. 48 CFR 227.7202-3 - Rights in commercial computer software or commercial computer software documentation.

      Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

      2014-10-01

      ... computer software or commercial computer software documentation. 227.7202-3 Section 227.7202-3 Federal... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Rights in Computer Software and Computer Software Documentation 227.7202-3 Rights in commercial computer software or commercial computer software documentation...

    3. 48 CFR 227.7202-3 - Rights in commercial computer software or commercial computer software documentation.

      Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

      2012-10-01

      ... computer software or commercial computer software documentation. 227.7202-3 Section 227.7202-3 Federal... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Rights in Computer Software and Computer Software Documentation 227.7202-3 Rights in commercial computer software or commercial computer software documentation...

    4. Software Reviews.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Wulfson, Stephen

      1988-01-01

      Presents reviews of six computer software programs for teaching science. Provides the publisher, grade level, cost, and descriptions of software, including: (1) "Recycling Logic"; (2) "Introduction to Biochemistry"; (3) "Food for Thought"; (4) "Watts in a Home"; (5) "Geology in Action"; and (6)…

    5. Software testing

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Price-Whelan, Adrian M.

      2016-01-01

      Now more than ever, scientific results are dependent on sophisticated software and analysis. Why should we trust code written by others? How do you ensure your own code produces sensible results? How do you make sure it continues to do so as you update, modify, and add functionality? Software testing is an integral part of code validation and writing tests should be a requirement for any software project. I will talk about Python-based tools that make managing and running tests much easier and explore some statistics for projects hosted on GitHub that contain tests.

    6. Vienna VLBI and Satellite Software (VieVS) for Geodesy and Astrometry

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Böhm, Johannes; Böhm, Sigrid; Boisits, Janina; Girdiuk, Anastasiia; Gruber, Jakob; Hellerschmied, Andreas; Krásná, Hana; Landskron, Daniel; Madzak, Matthias; Mayer, David; McCallum, Jamie; McCallum, Lucia; Schartner, Matthias; Teke, Kamil

      2018-04-01

      The Vienna VLBI and Satellite Software (VieVS) is state-of-the-art Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) analysis software for geodesy and astrometry. VieVS has been developed at Technische Universität Wien (TU Wien) since 2008, where it is used for research purposes and for teaching space geodetic techniques. In the past decade, it has been successfully applied on Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations for the determination of celestial and terrestrial reference frames as well as for the estimation of celestial pole offsets, universal Time (UT1-UTC), and polar motion based on least-squares adjustment. Furthermore, VieVS is equipped with tools for scheduling and simulating VLBI observations to extragalactic radio sources as well as to satellites and spacecraft, features which proved to be very useful for a variety of applications. VieVS is now available as version 3.0 and we do provide the software to all interested persons and institutions. A wiki with more information about VieVS is available at http://vievswiki.geo.tuwien.ac.at/.

    7. Status and plans for the future of the Vienna VLBI Software

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Madzak, Matthias; Böhm, Johannes; Böhm, Sigrid; Girdiuk, Anastasiia; Hellerschmied, Andreas; Hofmeister, Armin; Krasna, Hana; Kwak, Younghee; Landskron, Daniel; Mayer, David; McCallum, Jamie; Plank, Lucia; Schönberger, Caroline; Shabala, Stanislav; Sun, Jing; Teke, Kamil

      2016-04-01

      The Vienna VLBI Software (VieVS) is a VLBI analysis software developed and maintained at Technische Universität Wien (TU Wien) since 2008 with contributions from groups all over the world. It is used for both academic purposes in university courses as well as for providing VLBI analysis results to the geodetic community. Written in a modular structure in Matlab, VieVS offers easy access to the source code and the possibility to adapt the programs for particular purposes. The new version 2.3, released in December 2015, includes several new parameters to be estimated in the global solution, such as tidal ERP variation coefficients. The graphical user interface was slightly modified for an improved user functionality and, e.g., the possibility of deriving baseline length repeatabilities. The scheduling of satellite observations was refined, the simulator newly includes the effect of source structure which can also be corrected for in the analysis. This poster gives an overview of all VLBI-related activities in Vienna and provides an outlook to future plans concerning the Vienna VLBI Software.

    8. A New Approach to Developing Interactive Software Modules Through Graduate Education

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Sanders, Nathan E.; Faesi, Chris; Goodman, Alyssa A.

      2014-06-01

      Educational technology has attained significant importance as a mechanism for supporting experiential learning of science concepts. However, the growth of this mechanism is limited by the significant time and technical expertise needed to develop such products, particularly in specialized fields of science. We sought to test whether interactive, educational, online software modules can be developed effectively by students as a curriculum component of an advanced science course. We discuss a set of 15 such modules developed by Harvard University graduate students to demonstrate various concepts related to astronomy and physics. Their successful development of these modules demonstrates that online software tools for education and outreach on specialized topics can be produced while simultaneously fulfilling project-based learning objectives. We describe a set of technologies suitable for module development and present in detail four examples of modules developed by the students. We offer recommendations for incorporating educational software development within a graduate curriculum and conclude by discussing the relevance of this novel approach to new online learning environments like edX.

    9. Software reengineering

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Fridge, Ernest M., III

      1991-01-01

      Today's software systems generally use obsolete technology, are not integrated properly with other software systems, and are difficult and costly to maintain. The discipline of reverse engineering is becoming prominent as organizations try to move their systems up to more modern and maintainable technology in a cost effective manner. JSC created a significant set of tools to develop and maintain FORTRAN and C code during development of the Space Shuttle. This tool set forms the basis for an integrated environment to re-engineer existing code into modern software engineering structures which are then easier and less costly to maintain and which allow a fairly straightforward translation into other target languages. The environment will support these structures and practices even in areas where the language definition and compilers do not enforce good software engineering. The knowledge and data captured using the reverse engineering tools is passed to standard forward engineering tools to redesign or perform major upgrades to software systems in a much more cost effective manner than using older technologies. A beta vision of the environment was released in Mar. 1991. The commercial potential for such re-engineering tools is very great. CASE TRENDS magazine reported it to be the primary concern of over four hundred of the top MIS executives.

    10. Customer Relationship Management: A Case Study from a Metropolitan Campus of a Regional University

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Pember, Edward R.; Owens, Alison; Yaghi, Shazhi

      2014-01-01

      This paper investigates the users and uses of a centralised customer relationship management (CRM) system at a regional Australian university to improve the understanding of the staff experience of interacting with this customised technology. How and why the software is used by a cross section of university departments is explored through…

    11. DMPL: Programming and Verifying Distributed Mixed Synchrony and Mixed Critical Software

      DTIC Science & Technology

      2016-06-16

      ference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, pages 1495–1502, Chicago, IL, September 2014. IEEE Computer Society. [21] MADARA website . http://sourceforge.net...4.6 DMPL program for 5- robot reconnaissance example 19 Figure 5.1 Generated C++ code for example DMPL program. In practice, local vari- ables (lines...examples of collision avoidance in multi- robot systems. CMU/SEI-2016-TR-005 | SOFTWARE ENGINEERING INSTITUTE | Carnegie Mellon University vii

    12. Third-Party Software's Trust Quagmire.

      PubMed

      Voas, J; Hurlburt, G

      2015-12-01

      Current software development has trended toward the idea of integrating independent software sub-functions to create more complete software systems. Software sub-functions are often not homegrown - instead they are developed by unknown 3 rd party organizations and reside in software marketplaces owned or controlled by others. Such software sub-functions carry plausible concern in terms of quality, origins, functionality, security, interoperability, to name a few. This article surveys key technical difficulties in confidently building systems from acquired software sub-functions by calling out the principle software supply chain actors.

    13. Dtest Testing Software

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Jain, Abhinandan; Cameron, Jonathan M.; Myint, Steven

      2013-01-01

      This software runs a suite of arbitrary software tests spanning various software languages and types of tests (unit level, system level, or file comparison tests). The dtest utility can be set to automate periodic testing of large suites of software, as well as running individual tests. It supports distributing multiple tests over multiple CPU cores, if available. The dtest tool is a utility program (written in Python) that scans through a directory (and its subdirectories) and finds all directories that match a certain pattern and then executes any tests in that directory as described in simple configuration files.

    14. Conducting a Trial of Web Conferencing Software: Why, How, and Perceptions from the Coalface

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Reushle, Shirley; Loch, Birgit

      2008-01-01

      This paper reports on the trial of web conferencing software conducted at a regional Australian university with a significant distance population. The paper shares preliminary findings, the views of participants and recommendations for future activity. To design and conduct the trial, an action research method was chosen because it is…

    15. A Software Defined Radio Based Airplane Communication Navigation Simulation System

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      He, L.; Zhong, H. T.; Song, D.

      2018-01-01

      Radio communication and navigation system plays important role in ensuring the safety of civil airplane in flight. Function and performance should be tested before these systems are installed on-board. Conventionally, a set of transmitter and receiver are needed for each system, thus all the equipment occupy a lot of space and are high cost. In this paper, software defined radio technology is applied to design a common hardware communication and navigation ground simulation system, which can host multiple airplane systems with different operating frequency, such as HF, VHF, VOR, ILS, ADF, etc. We use a broadband analog frontend hardware platform, universal software radio peripheral (USRP), to transmit/receive signal of different frequency band. Software is compiled by LabVIEW on computer, which interfaces with USRP through Ethernet, and is responsible for communication and navigation signal processing and system control. An integrated testing system is established to perform functional test and performance verification of the simulation signal, which demonstrate the feasibility of our design. The system is a low-cost and common hardware platform for multiple airplane systems, which provide helpful reference for integrated avionics design.

    16. CmapTools: A Software Environment for Knowledge Modeling and Sharing

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Canas, Alberto J.

      2004-01-01

      In an ongoing collaborative effort between a group of NASA Ames scientists and researchers at the Institute for Human and Machine Cognition (IHMC) of the University of West Florida, a new version of CmapTools has been developed that enable scientists to construct knowledge models of their domain of expertise, share them with other scientists, make them available to anybody on the Internet with access to a Web browser, and peer-review other scientists models. These software tools have been successfully used at NASA to build a large-scale multimedia on Mars and in knowledge model on Habitability Assessment. The new version of the software places emphasis on greater usability for experts constructing their own knowledge models, and support for the creation of large knowledge models with large number of supporting resources in the forms of images, videos, web pages, and other media. Additionally, the software currently allows scientists to cooperate with each other in the construction, sharing and criticizing of knowledge models. Scientists collaborating from remote distances, for example researchers at the Astrobiology Institute, can concurrently manipulate the knowledge models they are viewing without having to do this at a special videoconferencing facility.

    17. NASA's Approach to Software Assurance

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Wetherholt, Martha

      2015-01-01

      NASA defines software assurance as: the planned and systematic set of activities that ensure conformance of software life cycle processes and products to requirements, standards, and procedures via quality, safety, reliability, and independent verification and validation. NASA's implementation of this approach to the quality, safety, reliability, security and verification and validation of software is brought together in one discipline, software assurance. Organizationally, NASA has software assurance at each NASA center, a Software Assurance Manager at NASA Headquarters, a Software Assurance Technical Fellow (currently the same person as the SA Manager), and an Independent Verification and Validation Organization with its own facility. An umbrella risk mitigation strategy for safety and mission success assurance of NASA's software, software assurance covers a wide area and is better structured to address the dynamic changes in how software is developed, used, and managed, as well as it's increasingly complex functionality. Being flexible, risk based, and prepared for challenges in software at NASA is essential, especially as much of our software is unique for each mission.

    18. Cloud Computing for the Grid: GridControl: A Software Platform to Support the Smart Grid

      SciTech Connect

      None

      GENI Project: Cornell University is creating a new software platform for grid operators called GridControl that will utilize cloud computing to more efficiently control the grid. In a cloud computing system, there are minimal hardware and software demands on users. The user can tap into a network of computers that is housed elsewhere (the cloud) and the network runs computer applications for the user. The user only needs interface software to access all of the cloud’s data resources, which can be as simple as a web browser. Cloud computing can reduce costs, facilitate innovation through sharing, empower users, and improvemore » the overall reliability of a dispersed system. Cornell’s GridControl will focus on 4 elements: delivering the state of the grid to users quickly and reliably; building networked, scalable grid-control software; tailoring services to emerging smart grid uses; and simulating smart grid behavior under various conditions.« less

    19. Sustaining Software-Intensive Systems

      DTIC Science & Technology

      2006-05-01

      2.2 Multi- Service Operational Test and Evaluation .......................................4 2.3 Stable Software Baseline...or equivalent document • completed Multi- Service Operational Test and Evaluation (MOT&E) for the potential production software package (or OT&E if...not multi- service ) • stable software production baseline • complete and current software documentation • Authority to Operate (ATO) for an

    20. Center for Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)

      SciTech Connect

      Kostadin, Damevski

      A resounding success of the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program is that high-performance computational science is now universally recognized as a critical aspect of scientific discovery [71], complementing both theoretical and experimental research. As scientific communities prepare to exploit unprecedented computing capabilities of emerging leadership-class machines for multi-model simulations at the extreme scale [72], it is more important than ever to address the technical and social challenges of geographically distributed teams that combine expertise in domain science, applied mathematics, and computer science to build robust and flexible codes that can incorporate changes over time. The Center for Technologymore » for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)1 tackles these these issues by exploiting component-based software development to facilitate collaborative high-performance scientific computing.« less

    1. Dataset on spatial distribution and location of universities in Nigeria.

      PubMed

      Adeyemi, G A; Edeki, S O

      2018-06-01

      Access to quality educational system, and the location of educational institutions are of great importance for future prospect of youth in any nation. These in return, have great effects on the economy growth and development of any country. Thus, the dataset contained in this article examines and explains the spatial distribution of universities in the Nigeria system of education. Data from the university commission, Nigeria, as at December 2017 are used. These include all the 40 federal universities, 44 states universities, and 69 private universities making a total of 153 universities in the Nigerian system of education. The data analysis is via the Geographic Information System (GIS) software. The dataset contained in this article will be of immense assistance to the national educational policy makers, parents, and potential students as regards smart and reliable decision making academically.

    2. Statistical modelling of software reliability

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Miller, Douglas R.

      1991-01-01

      During the six-month period from 1 April 1991 to 30 September 1991 the following research papers in statistical modeling of software reliability appeared: (1) A Nonparametric Software Reliability Growth Model; (2) On the Use and the Performance of Software Reliability Growth Models; (3) Research and Development Issues in Software Reliability Engineering; (4) Special Issues on Software; and (5) Software Reliability and Safety.

    3. Low-cost digital image processing at the University of Oklahoma

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Harrington, J. A., Jr.

      1981-01-01

      Computer assisted instruction in remote sensing at the University of Oklahoma involves two separate approaches and is dependent upon initial preprocessing of a LANDSAT computer compatible tape using software developed for an IBM 370/158 computer. In-house generated preprocessing algorithms permits students or researchers to select a subset of a LANDSAT scene for subsequent analysis using either general purpose statistical packages or color graphic image processing software developed for Apple II microcomputers. Procedures for preprocessing the data and image analysis using either of the two approaches for low-cost LANDSAT data processing are described.

    4. Software Engineering Laboratory Series: Proceedings of the Twenty-First Annual Software Engineering Workshop

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      1996-01-01

      The Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) is an organization sponsored by NASA/GSFC and created to investigate the effectiveness of software engineering technologies when applied to the development of application software. The activities, findings, and recommendations of the SEL are recorded in the Software Engineering Laboratory Series, a continuing series of reports that includes this document.

    5. Software Engineering Laboratory Series: Proceedings of the Twenty-Second Annual Software Engineering Workshop

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      1997-01-01

      The Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) is an organization sponsored by NASA/GSFC and created to investigate the effectiveness of software engineering technologies when applied to the development of application software. The activities, findings, and recommendations of the SEL are recorded in the Software Engineering Laboratory Series, a continuing series of reports that includes this document.

    6. Educational Software Acquisition for Microcomputers.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Erikson, Warren; Turban, Efraim

      1985-01-01

      Examination of issues involved in acquiring appropriate microcomputer software for higher education focuses on the following points: developing your own software; finding commercially available software; using published evaluations; pre-purchase testing; customizing and adapting commercial software; post-purchase testing; and software use. A…

    7. The One Universal Graph — a free and open graph database

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Ng, Liang S.; Champion, Corbin

      2016-02-01

      Recent developments in graph database mostly are huge projects involving big organizations, big operations and big capital, as the name Big Data attests. We proposed the concept of One Universal Graph (OUG) which states that all observable and known objects and concepts (physical, conceptual or digitally represented) can be connected with only one single graph; furthermore the OUG can be implemented with a very simple text file format with free software, capable of being executed on Android or smaller devices. As such the One Universal Graph Data Exchange (GOUDEX) modules can potentially be installed on hundreds of millions of Android devices and Intel compatible computers shipped annually. Coupled with its open nature and ability to connect to existing leading search engines and databases currently in operation, GOUDEX has the potential to become the largest and a better interface for users and programmers to interact with the data on the Internet. With a Web User Interface for users to use and program in native Linux environment, Free Crowdware implemented in GOUDEX can help inexperienced users learn programming with better organized documentation for free software, and is able to manage programmer's contribution down to a single line of code or a single variable in software projects. It can become the first practically realizable “Internet brain” on which a global artificial intelligence system can be implemented. Being practically free and open, One Universal Graph can have significant applications in robotics, artificial intelligence as well as social networks.

    8. Monte Carlo Methodology Serves Up a Software Success

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      2003-01-01

      Widely used for the modeling of gas flows through the computation of the motion and collisions of representative molecules, the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method has become the gold standard for producing research and engineering predictions in the field of rarefied gas dynamics. Direct Simulation Monte Carlo was first introduced in the early 1960s by Dr. Graeme Bird, a professor at the University of Sydney, Australia. It has since proved to be a valuable tool to the aerospace and defense industries in providing design and operational support data, as well as flight data analysis. In 2002, NASA brought to the forefront a software product that maintains the same basic physics formulation of Dr. Bird's method, but provides effective modeling of complex, three-dimensional, real vehicle simulations and parallel processing capabilities to handle additional computational requirements, especially in areas where computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is not applicable. NASA's Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Analysis Code (DAC) software package is now considered the Agency s premier high-fidelity simulation tool for predicting vehicle aerodynamics and aerothermodynamic environments in rarified, or low-density, gas flows.

    9. Use of Student Experiments for Teaching Embedded Software Development Including HW/SW Co-Design

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Mitsui, H.; Kambe, H.; Koizumi, H.

      2009-01-01

      Embedded systems have been applied widely, not only to consumer products and industrial machines, but also to new applications such as ubiquitous or sensor networking. The increasing role of software (SW) in embedded system development has caused a great demand for embedded SW engineers, and university education for embedded SW engineering has…

    10. Microcomputer software development facilities

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Gorman, J. S.; Mathiasen, C.

      1980-01-01

      A more efficient and cost effective method for developing microcomputer software is to utilize a host computer with high-speed peripheral support. Application programs such as cross assemblers, loaders, and simulators are implemented in the host computer for each of the microcomputers for which software development is a requirement. The host computer is configured to operate in a time share mode for multiusers. The remote terminals, printers, and down loading capabilities provided are based on user requirements. With this configuration a user, either local or remote, can use the host computer for microcomputer software development. Once the software is developed (through the code and modular debug stage) it can be downloaded to the development system or emulator in a test area where hardware/software integration functions can proceed. The microcomputer software program sources reside in the host computer and can be edited, assembled, loaded, and then downloaded as required until the software development project has been completed.

    11. Software Measurement Guidebook

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      1995-01-01

      This Software Measurement Guidebook is based on the extensive experience of several organizations that have each developed and applied significant measurement programs over a period of at least 10 years. The lessons derived from those experiences reflect not only successes but also failures. By applying those lessons, an organization can minimize, or at least reduce, the time, effort, and frustration of introducing a software measurement program. The Software Measurement Guidebook is aimed at helping organizations to begin or improve a measurement program. It does not provide guidance for the extensive application of specific measures (such as how to estimate software cost or analyze software complexity) other than by providing examples to clarify points. It does contain advice for establishing and using an effective software measurement program and for understanding some of the key lessons that other organizations have learned. Some of that advice will appear counterintuitive, but it is all based on actual experience. Although all of the information presented in this guidebook is derived from specific experiences of mature measurement programs, the reader must keep in mind that the characteristics of every organization are unique. Some degree of measurement is critical for all software development and maintenance organizations, and most of the key rules captured in this report will be generally applicable. Nevertheless, each organization must strive to understand its own environment so that the measurement program can be tailored to suit its characteristics and needs.

    12. The repository-based software engineering program: Redefining AdaNET as a mainstream NASA source

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      1993-01-01

      The Repository-based Software Engineering Program (RBSE) is described to inform and update senior NASA managers about the program. Background and historical perspective on software reuse and RBSE for NASA managers who may not be familiar with these topics are provided. The paper draws upon and updates information from the RBSE Concept Document, baselined by NASA Headquarters, Johnson Space Center, and the University of Houston - Clear Lake in April 1992. Several of NASA's software problems and what RBSE is now doing to address those problems are described. Also, next steps to be taken to derive greater benefit from this Congressionally-mandated program are provided. The section on next steps describes the need to work closely with other NASA software quality, technology transfer, and reuse activities and focuses on goals and objectives relative to this need. RBSE's role within NASA is addressed; however, there is also the potential for systematic transfer of technology outside of NASA in later stages of the RBSE program. This technology transfer is discussed briefly.

    13. MOST-visualization: software for producing automated textbook-style maps of genome-scale metabolic networks.

      PubMed

      Kelley, James J; Maor, Shay; Kim, Min Kyung; Lane, Anatoliy; Lun, Desmond S

      2017-08-15

      Visualization of metabolites, reactions and pathways in genome-scale metabolic networks (GEMs) can assist in understanding cellular metabolism. Three attributes are desirable in software used for visualizing GEMs: (i) automation, since GEMs can be quite large; (ii) production of understandable maps that provide ease in identification of pathways, reactions and metabolites; and (iii) visualization of the entire network to show how pathways are interconnected. No software currently exists for visualizing GEMs that satisfies all three characteristics, but MOST-Visualization, an extension of the software package MOST (Metabolic Optimization and Simulation Tool), satisfies (i), and by using a pre-drawn overview map of metabolism based on the Roche map satisfies (ii) and comes close to satisfying (iii). MOST is distributed for free on the GNU General Public License. The software and full documentation are available at http://most.ccib.rutgers.edu/. dslun@rutgers.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

    14. Managing configuration software of ground software applications with glueware

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Larsen, B.; Herrera, R.; Sesplaukis, T.; Cheng, L.; Sarrel, M.

      2003-01-01

      This paper reports on a simple, low-cost effort to streamline the configuration of the uplink software tools. Even though the existing ground system consisted of JPL and custom Cassini software rather than COTS, we chose a glueware approach--reintegrating with wrappers and bridges and adding minimal new functionality.

    15. SLS Flight Software Testing: Using a Modified Agile Software Testing Approach

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Bolton, Albanie T.

      2016-01-01

      NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) is an advanced launch vehicle for a new era of exploration beyond earth's orbit (BEO). The world's most powerful rocket, SLS, will launch crews of up to four astronauts in the agency's Orion spacecraft on missions to explore multiple deep-space destinations. Boeing is developing the SLS core stage, including the avionics that will control vehicle during flight. The core stage will be built at NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF) in New Orleans, LA using state-of-the-art manufacturing equipment. At the same time, the rocket's avionics computer software is being developed here at Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL. At Marshall, the Flight and Ground Software division provides comprehensive engineering expertise for development of flight and ground software. Within that division, the Software Systems Engineering Branch's test and verification (T&V) team uses an agile test approach in testing and verification of software. The agile software test method opens the door for regular short sprint release cycles. The idea or basic premise behind the concept of agile software development and testing is that it is iterative and developed incrementally. Agile testing has an iterative development methodology where requirements and solutions evolve through collaboration between cross-functional teams. With testing and development done incrementally, this allows for increased features and enhanced value for releases. This value can be seen throughout the T&V team processes that are documented in various work instructions within the branch. The T&V team produces procedural test results at a higher rate, resolves issues found in software with designers at an earlier stage versus at a later release, and team members gain increased knowledge of the system architecture by interfacing with designers. SLS Flight Software teams want to continue uncovering better ways of developing software in an efficient and project beneficial manner

    16. 48 CFR 227.7203-16 - Providing computer software or computer software documentation to foreign governments, foreign...

      Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

      2011-10-01

      ... software or computer software documentation to foreign governments, foreign contractors, or international... Rights in Computer Software and Computer Software Documentation 227.7203-16 Providing computer software or computer software documentation to foreign governments, foreign contractors, or international...

    17. 48 CFR 227.7203-16 - Providing computer software or computer software documentation to foreign governments, foreign...

      Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

      2013-10-01

      ... software or computer software documentation to foreign governments, foreign contractors, or international... Rights in Computer Software and Computer Software Documentation 227.7203-16 Providing computer software or computer software documentation to foreign governments, foreign contractors, or international...

    18. 48 CFR 227.7203-16 - Providing computer software or computer software documentation to foreign governments, foreign...

      Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

      2012-10-01

      ... software or computer software documentation to foreign governments, foreign contractors, or international... Rights in Computer Software and Computer Software Documentation 227.7203-16 Providing computer software or computer software documentation to foreign governments, foreign contractors, or international...

    19. 48 CFR 227.7203-16 - Providing computer software or computer software documentation to foreign governments, foreign...

      Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

      2014-10-01

      ... software or computer software documentation to foreign governments, foreign contractors, or international... Rights in Computer Software and Computer Software Documentation 227.7203-16 Providing computer software or computer software documentation to foreign governments, foreign contractors, or international...

    20. 48 CFR 227.7203-16 - Providing computer software or computer software documentation to foreign governments, foreign...

      Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

      2010-10-01

      ... software or computer software documentation to foreign governments, foreign contractors, or international... Rights in Computer Software and Computer Software Documentation 227.7203-16 Providing computer software or computer software documentation to foreign governments, foreign contractors, or international...

    1. 48 CFR 252.227-7014 - Rights in noncommercial computer software and noncommercial computer software documentation.

      Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

      2013-10-01

      ... computer software and noncommercial computer software documentation. 252.227-7014 Section 252.227-7014... Rights in noncommercial computer software and noncommercial computer software documentation. As prescribed in 227.7203-6(a)(1), use the following clause. Rights in Noncommercial Computer Software and...

    2. 48 CFR 252.227-7014 - Rights in noncommercial computer software and noncommercial computer software documentation.

      Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

      2012-10-01

      ... computer software and noncommercial computer software documentation. 252.227-7014 Section 252.227-7014... Rights in noncommercial computer software and noncommercial computer software documentation. As prescribed in 227.7203-6(a)(1), use the following clause. Rights in Noncommercial Computer Software and...

    3. 48 CFR 252.227-7014 - Rights in noncommercial computer software and noncommercial computer software documentation.

      Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

      2014-10-01

      ... computer software and noncommercial computer software documentation. 252.227-7014 Section 252.227-7014... Rights in noncommercial computer software and noncommercial computer software documentation. As prescribed in 227.7203-6(a)(1), use the following clause. Rights in Noncommercial Computer Software and...

    4. 48 CFR 252.227-7014 - Rights in noncommercial computer software and noncommercial computer software documentation.

      Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

      2011-10-01

      ... computer software and noncommercial computer software documentation. 252.227-7014 Section 252.227-7014... Rights in noncommercial computer software and noncommercial computer software documentation. As prescribed in 227.7203-6(a)(1), use the following clause. Rights in Noncommercial Computer Software and...

    5. 48 CFR 252.227-7014 - Rights in noncommercial computer software and noncommercial computer software documentation.

      Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

      2010-10-01

      ... computer software and noncommercial computer software documentation. 252.227-7014 Section 252.227-7014... Rights in noncommercial computer software and noncommercial computer software documentation. As prescribed in 227.7203-6(a)(1), use the following clause. Rights in Noncommercial Computer Software and...

    6. Self-assembled software and method of overriding software execution

      DOEpatents

      Bouchard, Ann M.; Osbourn, Gordon C.

      2013-01-08

      A computer-implemented software self-assembled system and method for providing an external override and monitoring capability to dynamically self-assembling software containing machines that self-assemble execution sequences and data structures. The method provides an external override machine that can be introduced into a system of self-assembling machines while the machines are executing such that the functionality of the executing software can be changed or paused without stopping the code execution and modifying the existing code. Additionally, a monitoring machine can be introduced without stopping code execution that can monitor specified code execution functions by designated machines and communicate the status to an output device.

    7. Software Repository

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Merwarth, P., D.

      1983-01-01

      The Common Software Module Repository (CSMR) is computerized library system with high product and service visibility to potential users. Online capabilities of system allow both librarian and user to interact with library. Librarian is responsible for maintaining information in CSMR library. User searches library to locate software modules that meet his or her current needs.

    8. Software Reliability 2002

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Wallace, Dolores R.

      2003-01-01

      In FY01 we learned that hardware reliability models need substantial changes to account for differences in software, thus making software reliability measurements more effective, accurate, and easier to apply. These reliability models are generally based on familiar distributions or parametric methods. An obvious question is 'What new statistical and probability models can be developed using non-parametric and distribution-free methods instead of the traditional parametric method?" Two approaches to software reliability engineering appear somewhat promising. The first study, begin in FY01, is based in hardware reliability, a very well established science that has many aspects that can be applied to software. This research effort has investigated mathematical aspects of hardware reliability and has identified those applicable to software. Currently the research effort is applying and testing these approaches to software reliability measurement, These parametric models require much project data that may be difficult to apply and interpret. Projects at GSFC are often complex in both technology and schedules. Assessing and estimating reliability of the final system is extremely difficult when various subsystems are tested and completed long before others. Parametric and distribution free techniques may offer a new and accurate way of modeling failure time and other project data to provide earlier and more accurate estimates of system reliability.

    9. Guidance and Control Software,

      DTIC Science & Technology

      1980-05-01

      commitments of function, cost, and schedule . The phrase "software engineering" was intended to contrast with the phrase "computer science" the latter aims...the software problems of cost, delivery schedule , and quality were gradually being recognized at the highest management levels. Thus, in a project... schedule dates. Although the analysis of software problems indicated that the entire software development process (figure 1) needed new methods, only

    10. Software Engineering Improvement Activities/Plan

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      2003-01-01

      bd Systems personnel accomplished the technical responsibilities for this reporting period, as planned. A close working relationship was maintained with personnel of the MSFC Avionics Department Software Group (ED14). Work accomplishments included development, evaluation, and enhancement of a software cost model, performing literature search and evaluation of software tools available for code analysis and requirements analysis, and participating in other relevant software engineering activities. Monthly reports were submitted. This support was provided to the Flight Software Group/ED 1 4 in accomplishing the software engineering improvement engineering activities of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Software Engineering Improvement Plan.

    11. Software Quality Assurance Audits Guidebooks

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      1990-01-01

      The growth in cost and importance of software to NASA has caused NASA to address the improvement of software development across the agency. One of the products of this program is a series of guidebooks that define a NASA concept of the assurance processes that are used in software development. The Software Assurance Guidebook, NASA-GB-A201, issued in September, 1989, provides an overall picture of the NASA concepts and practices in software assurance. Second level guidebooks focus on specific activities that fall within the software assurance discipline, and provide more detailed information for the manager and/or practitioner. This is the second level Software Quality Assurance Audits Guidebook that describes software quality assurance audits in a way that is compatible with practices at NASA Centers.

    12. Software engineering methodologies and tools

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Wilcox, Lawrence M.

      1993-01-01

      Over the years many engineering disciplines have developed, including chemical, electronic, etc. Common to all engineering disciplines is the use of rigor, models, metrics, and predefined methodologies. Recently, a new engineering discipline has appeared on the scene, called software engineering. For over thirty years computer software has been developed and the track record has not been good. Software development projects often miss schedules, are over budget, do not give the user what is wanted, and produce defects. One estimate is there are one to three defects per 1000 lines of deployed code. More and more systems are requiring larger and more complex software for support. As this requirement grows, the software development problems grow exponentially. It is believed that software quality can be improved by applying engineering principles. Another compelling reason to bring the engineering disciplines to software development is productivity. It has been estimated that productivity of producing software has only increased one to two percent a year in the last thirty years. Ironically, the computer and its software have contributed significantly to the industry-wide productivity, but computer professionals have done a poor job of using the computer to do their job. Engineering disciplines and methodologies are now emerging supported by software tools that address the problems of software development. This paper addresses some of the current software engineering methodologies as a backdrop for the general evaluation of computer assisted software engineering (CASE) tools from actual installation of and experimentation with some specific tools.

    13. Selecting Software for Libraries.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Beiser, Karl

      1993-01-01

      Discusses resources and strategies that libraries can use to evaluate competing database management software for purchase. Needs assessments, types of software available, features of good software, evaluation aids, shareware, and marketing and product trends are covered. (KRN)

    14. Modeling the Evolution of a Science Project in Software-Reliant System Acquisition Programs

      DTIC Science & Technology

      2013-07-24

      might: • Limit worker burnout • Perform better regarding schedule 10 Software Technology Conference April 10, 2013 © 2013 Carnegie Mellon...University The Evolution of a Science Project Key Preliminary Findings -3 The tipping point contributes to the “90% Done” Syndrome Percentage...worker burnout - SP User Satisfaction SP increasing satisfaction indicated satisfaction + + B3 Moderating User Satisfaction overage switch demand switch

    15. Assuring Software Reliability

      DTIC Science & Technology

      2014-08-01

      technologies and processes to achieve a required level of confidence that software systems and services function in the intended manner. 1.3 Security Example...that took three high-voltage lines out of service and a software fail- ure (a race condition3) that disabled the computing service that notified the... service had failed. Instead of analyzing the details of the alarm server failure, the reviewers asked why the following software assurance claim had

    16. Statistical modeling of software reliability

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Miller, Douglas R.

      1992-01-01

      This working paper discusses the statistical simulation part of a controlled software development experiment being conducted under the direction of the System Validation Methods Branch, Information Systems Division, NASA Langley Research Center. The experiment uses guidance and control software (GCS) aboard a fictitious planetary landing spacecraft: real-time control software operating on a transient mission. Software execution is simulated to study the statistical aspects of reliability and other failure characteristics of the software during development, testing, and random usage. Quantification of software reliability is a major goal. Various reliability concepts are discussed. Experiments are described for performing simulations and collecting appropriate simulated software performance and failure data. This data is then used to make statistical inferences about the quality of the software development and verification processes as well as inferences about the reliability of software versions and reliability growth under random testing and debugging.

    17. ACTS: from ATLAS software towards a common track reconstruction software

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Gumpert, C.; Salzburger, A.; Kiehn, M.; Hrdinka, J.; Calace, N.; ATLAS Collaboration

      2017-10-01

      Reconstruction of charged particles’ trajectories is a crucial task for most particle physics experiments. The high instantaneous luminosity achieved at the LHC leads to a high number of proton-proton collisions per bunch crossing, which has put the track reconstruction software of the LHC experiments through a thorough test. Preserving track reconstruction performance under increasingly difficult experimental conditions, while keeping the usage of computational resources at a reasonable level, is an inherent problem for many HEP experiments. Exploiting concurrent algorithms and using multivariate techniques for track identification are the primary strategies to achieve that goal. Starting from current ATLAS software, the ACTS project aims to encapsulate track reconstruction software into a generic, framework- and experiment-independent software package. It provides a set of high-level algorithms and data structures for performing track reconstruction tasks as well as fast track simulation. The software is developed with special emphasis on thread-safety to support parallel execution of the code and data structures are optimised for vectorisation to speed up linear algebra operations. The implementation is agnostic to the details of the detection technologies and magnetic field configuration which makes it applicable to many different experiments.

    18. Buying in to bioinformatics: an introduction to commercial sequence analysis software.

      PubMed

      Smith, David Roy

      2015-07-01

      Advancements in high-throughput nucleotide sequencing techniques have brought with them state-of-the-art bioinformatics programs and software packages. Given the importance of molecular sequence data in contemporary life science research, these software suites are becoming an essential component of many labs and classrooms, and as such are frequently designed for non-computer specialists and marketed as one-stop bioinformatics toolkits. Although beautifully designed and powerful, user-friendly bioinformatics packages can be expensive and, as more arrive on the market each year, it can be difficult for researchers, teachers and students to choose the right software for their needs, especially if they do not have a bioinformatics background. This review highlights some of the currently available and most popular commercial bioinformatics packages, discussing their prices, usability, features and suitability for teaching. Although several commercial bioinformatics programs are arguably overpriced and overhyped, many are well designed, sophisticated and, in my opinion, worth the investment. If you are just beginning your foray into molecular sequence analysis or an experienced genomicist, I encourage you to explore proprietary software bundles. They have the potential to streamline your research, increase your productivity, energize your classroom and, if anything, add a bit of zest to the often dry detached world of bioinformatics. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

    19. Software Fault Tolerance: A Tutorial

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo

      2000-01-01

      Because of our present inability to produce error-free software, software fault tolerance is and will continue to be an important consideration in software systems. The root cause of software design errors is the complexity of the systems. Compounding the problems in building correct software is the difficulty in assessing the correctness of software for highly complex systems. After a brief overview of the software development processes, we note how hard-to-detect design faults are likely to be introduced during development and how software faults tend to be state-dependent and activated by particular input sequences. Although component reliability is an important quality measure for system level analysis, software reliability is hard to characterize and the use of post-verification reliability estimates remains a controversial issue. For some applications software safety is more important than reliability, and fault tolerance techniques used in those applications are aimed at preventing catastrophes. Single version software fault tolerance techniques discussed include system structuring and closure, atomic actions, inline fault detection, exception handling, and others. Multiversion techniques are based on the assumption that software built differently should fail differently and thus, if one of the redundant versions fails, it is expected that at least one of the other versions will provide an acceptable output. Recovery blocks, N-version programming, and other multiversion techniques are reviewed.

    20. Dose Estimating Application Software Modification: Additional Function of a Size-Specific Effective Dose Calculator and Auto Exposure Control.

      PubMed

      Kobayashi, Masanao; Asada, Yasuki; Matsubara, Kosuke; Suzuki, Shouichi; Matsunaga, Yuta; Haba, Tomonobu; Kawaguchi, Ai; Daioku, Tomihiko; Toyama, Hiroshi; Kato, Ryoichi

      2017-05-01

      Adequate dose management during computed tomography is important. In the present study, the dosimetric application software ImPACT was added to a functional calculator of the size-specific dose estimate and was part of the scan settings for the auto exposure control (AEC) technique. This study aimed to assess the practicality and accuracy of the modified ImPACT software for dose estimation. We compared the conversion factors identified by the software with the values reported by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 204, and we noted similar results. Moreover, doses were calculated with the AEC technique and a fixed-tube current of 200 mA for the chest-pelvis region. The modified ImPACT software could estimate each organ dose, which was based on the modulated tube current. The ability to perform beneficial modifications indicates the flexibility of the ImPACT software. The ImPACT software can be further modified for estimation of other doses. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.