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Sample records for jean pascal ollivry

  1. Pascal's Triangle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, Patricia Shea

    2003-01-01

    Notes that Montessori classrooms provide children with the opportunity to explore and discover mathematics. Describes the introduction to Pascal's Triangle as a suggested opportunity to connect young children to deep mathematical truths. Provides teachers with materials requirements, and notes ideas on what can be acquired from the problem, the…

  2. PASCAL vs BASIC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mundie, David A.

    1978-01-01

    A comparison between PASCAL and BASIC as general purpose microprocessor languages rates PASCAL above BASIC in such points as program structure, data types, structuring methods, control structures, procedures and functions, and ease in learning. (CMV)

  3. BASIC Beats PASCAL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ever, Jacob

    1981-01-01

    Features of two versions of the BASIC programing language are compared with the features of the PASCAL programing language. The application chosen for comparison was a word processor. The conclusion was that PASCAL had the best language features, but BASIC had better systems capabilities. (MP)

  4. PASCAL/48 reference manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, J. C.; Hamm, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    PASCAL/48 is a programming language for the Intel MCS-48 series of microcomputers. In particular, it can be used with the Intel 8748. It is designed to allow the programmer to control most of the instructions being generated and the allocation of storage. The language can be used instead of ASSEMBLY language in most applications while allowing the user the necessary degree of control over hardware resources. Although it is called PASCAL/48, the language differs in many ways from PASCAL. The program structure and statements of the two languages are similar, but the expression mechanism and data types are different. The PASCAL/48 cross-compiler is written in PASCAL and runs on the CDC CYBER NOS system. It generates object code in Intel hexadecimal format that can be used to program the MCS-48 series of microcomputers. This reference manual defines the language, describes the predeclared procedures, lists error messages, illustrates use, and includes language syntax diagrams.

  5. Programming Pascal's Triangle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curley, Walter

    1974-01-01

    After a brief discussion of Pascal's triangle and description of four methods of hand construction, the author provides FORTRAN and BASIC programs for computer construction based on recursive definition. (SD)

  6. Parallel Pascal - An extended Pascal for parallel computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, A. P.

    1984-01-01

    Parallel Pascal is an extended version of the conventional serial Pascal programming language which includes a convenient syntax for specifying array operations. It is upward compatible with standard Pascal and involves only a small number of carefully chosen new features. Parallel Pascal was developed to reduce the semantic gap between standard Pascal and a large range of highly parallel computers. Two important design goals of Parallel Pascal were efficiency and portability. Portability is particularly difficult to achieve since different parallel computers frequently have very different capabilities.

  7. Beyond Pascal's Triangle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minor, Darrell P.

    2005-01-01

    In "Beyond Pascals Triangle" the author demonstrates ways of using "Pascallike" triangles to expand polynomials raised to powers in a fairly quick and easy fashion. The recursive method could easily be implemented within a spreadsheet, or simply by using paper and pencil. An explanation of why the method works follows the several examples that are…

  8. Pascal's Infinite Set of Triangles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skurnick, Ronald

    2005-01-01

    Pascal's Triangle is, without question, the most well-known triangular array of numbers in all of mathematics. A well-known algorithm for constructing Pascal's Triangle is based on the following two observations. The outer edges of the triangle consist of all 1's. Each number not lying on the outer edges is the sum of the two numbers above it in…

  9. Visual experiences of Blaise Pascal.

    PubMed

    Paciaroni, Maurizio

    2010-01-01

    The writings of Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), mathematician, physicist, and theologian, are often thought of as an ideal example of classical French prose. In fact, Pascal's scientific contributions include the principle of hydrostatics, known as Pascal's Law. In mathematics, he helped develop the probability theory and also made significant contributions to the realization of infinite series and the geometry of curves. He is also considered one of the most important French philosophers principally due to his book entitled 'Pensées'. Pascal had a religious conversion in the 1650s and following this he devoted himself more to religion than science. There is evidence that Pascal suffered from visual migraines with recurring headaches, episodes of blindness in half of his visual field, zigzag, fortification spectra, and other visual hallucinations. It is believed that the migraine aura experiences might have acted as a source of inspiration for Pascal's philosophical reflections. Pascal's sudden religious conversion, probably the most decisive moment in Pascal's personal life, during the night of the 23rd to 24th of November 1654, was accompanied by a lighted vision which he interpreted as fire which brought him the total conviction of God's 'reality and presence'. This experience may have been based on the effects of a migraine aura attack. In fact, this spiritual experience led him to dedicate the rest of his life to religious and philosophical interests.

  10. Visual experiences of Blaise Pascal.

    PubMed

    Paciaroni, Maurizio

    2010-01-01

    The writings of Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), mathematician, physicist, and theologian, are often thought of as an ideal example of classical French prose. In fact, Pascal's scientific contributions include the principle of hydrostatics, known as Pascal's Law. In mathematics, he helped develop the probability theory and also made significant contributions to the realization of infinite series and the geometry of curves. He is also considered one of the most important French philosophers principally due to his book entitled 'Pensées'. Pascal had a religious conversion in the 1650s and following this he devoted himself more to religion than science. There is evidence that Pascal suffered from visual migraines with recurring headaches, episodes of blindness in half of his visual field, zigzag, fortification spectra, and other visual hallucinations. It is believed that the migraine aura experiences might have acted as a source of inspiration for Pascal's philosophical reflections. Pascal's sudden religious conversion, probably the most decisive moment in Pascal's personal life, during the night of the 23rd to 24th of November 1654, was accompanied by a lighted vision which he interpreted as fire which brought him the total conviction of God's 'reality and presence'. This experience may have been based on the effects of a migraine aura attack. In fact, this spiritual experience led him to dedicate the rest of his life to religious and philosophical interests. PMID:20375529

  11. Cohen's weighted kappa with Turbo Pascal (FORTRAN).

    PubMed

    Reed, J F; Reed, J J

    1992-07-01

    A microcomputer based Turbo Pascal and FORTRAN program for Cohen's weighted kappa (kappa w) is given. Three clinical applications for kappa w are also presented. A typical data file, the Pascal and FORTRAN program listing and corresponding output are given.

  12. Complete Genome of Bacillus megaterium Podophage Pascal.

    PubMed

    Snowden, Jeffery D; Vega Gonzalez, Alexander E; Maroun, Justin W; Hernandez, Adriana C; Kuty Everett, Gabriel F

    2015-01-29

    Podophage Pascal infects Bacillus megaterium, a commonly used model organism in biochemical research and an important industrial-scale protein production system. Here, we report the sequenced and annotated genome of Pascal and describe its prominent features. Bacteriophages such as Pascal may be valuable tools for research and industry.

  13. A Virus in Turbo Pascal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teleky, Heidi Ann; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Addresses why the authors feel it is not inappropriate to teach about viruses in the how-to, hands-on fashion. Identifies the special features of Turbo Pascal that have to be used for the creation of an effective virus. Defines virus, derives its structure, and from this structure is derived the implemented virus. (PR)

  14. Dice Tossing and Pascal's Triangle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neff, John D.

    1982-01-01

    Pascal's Triangle is examined within the context of providing a partial model for the outcomes of dice throws. Several issues are addressed regarding the nature of the pattern. Discussion leads to the development of a general formula for six-sided dice. Modifications for other than six sides are noted. (MP)

  15. The Pascal Mars Scout Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haberle, R. M.; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Except for Earth, Mars is the planet most amenable to surface-based climate studies. Its surface is accessible, and the kind of observations that are needed, such as meteorological measurements from a long-lived global network, are readily achievable. Weather controls the movement of dust, the exchange of water between the surface and atmosphere, and the cycling of CO2 between the poles. We know there is a weather signal, we know how to measure it, and we know how to interpret it. Pascal seeks to understand the long-term global behavior of near-surface weather systems on Mars, how they interact with its surface, and, therefore, how they control its climate system. To achieve this, Pascal delivers 18 Science Stations to the surface of the planet that operate for three Mars years (5.6 Earth years). The network has stations operating in the tropics, midlatitudes, and polar regions of both hemispheres. During entry, descent, and landing, each Pascal probe acquires deceleration measurements to determine thermal structure, and descent images to characterize local terrain. On the surface, each Science Station takes daily measurements of pressure, opacity, temperature, wind speed, and water vapor concentration and monthly panoramic images of the landing environment. These data will characterize the planet's climate system and how atmosphere-surface interactions control it. The Pascal mission is named after 17th century French Scientist, Blaise Pascal, who pioneered measurements of atmospheric pressure. Pressure is the most critical measurement because it records the "heartbeat" of the planet's general circulation and climate system.

  16. Searching the PASCAL database - A user's perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jack, Robert F.

    1989-01-01

    The operation of PASCAL, a bibliographic data base covering broad subject areas in science and technology, is discussed. The data base includes information from about 1973 to the present, including topics in engineering, chemistry, physics, earth science, environmental science, biology, psychology, and medicine. Data from 1986 to the present may be searched using DIALOG. The procedures and classification codes for searching PASCAL are presented. Examples of citations retrieved from the data base are given and suggestions are made concerning when to use PASCAL.

  17. [Blaise Pascal and his visual experiences].

    PubMed

    Paciaroni, Maurizio

    2011-12-01

    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662) the mathematician, physicist, and theologian, is often considered as an example of classical French prose. Pascal's primary scientific contribution was the principle of hydrostatics, known as Pascal's Law. Furthermore, he is also regarded as one of the most important French philosophers, principally due to his publication: "Pensées". There is documentation affirming that Pascal suffered from visual migraines with recurring headaches, episodes of blindness in half of his visual field, zigzag, fortification spectra, and other visual hallucinations. It has been hypothesised that these migraine aura experiences acted as a source of inspiration for Pascal's philosophical reflections. Pascal's sudden religious conversion, probably the most decisive moment in Pascal's personal life, during the night of the 23rd to 24th of November 1654, was accompanied by a lighted vision which he interpreted as fire convincing him of God's "reality and presence". This experience may have been triggered by the effects of a migraine aura attack. This spiritual epiphany led him to dedicate the rest of his life to religious and philosophical interests.

  18. [Blaise Pascal and his visual experiences].

    PubMed

    Paciaroni, Maurizio

    2011-12-01

    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662) the mathematician, physicist, and theologian, is often considered as an example of classical French prose. Pascal's primary scientific contribution was the principle of hydrostatics, known as Pascal's Law. Furthermore, he is also regarded as one of the most important French philosophers, principally due to his publication: "Pensées". There is documentation affirming that Pascal suffered from visual migraines with recurring headaches, episodes of blindness in half of his visual field, zigzag, fortification spectra, and other visual hallucinations. It has been hypothesised that these migraine aura experiences acted as a source of inspiration for Pascal's philosophical reflections. Pascal's sudden religious conversion, probably the most decisive moment in Pascal's personal life, during the night of the 23rd to 24th of November 1654, was accompanied by a lighted vision which he interpreted as fire convincing him of God's "reality and presence". This experience may have been triggered by the effects of a migraine aura attack. This spiritual epiphany led him to dedicate the rest of his life to religious and philosophical interests. PMID:22258195

  19. About Pascal's tetrahedron with hypercomplex entries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, C.; Falcão, M. I.; Malonek, H. R.

    2013-10-01

    It is evident, that the properties of monogenic polynomials in (n + 1)-real variables significantly depend on the generators e1,e2,...,en of the underlying 2n-dimensional Clifford algebra Cℓ0,n over R and their interactions under multiplication. The case of n = 3 is studied through the consideration of Pascal's tetrahedron with hypercomplex entries as special case of the general Pascal simplex for arbitrary n, which represents a useful geometric arrangement of all possible products. The different layers Lk of Pascal's tetrahedron (or pyramid) are built by ordered symmetric products contained in the trinomial expansion of (e1+e2+e3)k,k = 0,1,....

  20. Pascal's Triangle: 100% of the Numbers Are Even!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhindi, Nayan; McMenamin, Justin

    2010-01-01

    Pascal's triangle is an arrangement of the binomial coefficients in a triangle. Each number inside Pascal's triangle is calculated by adding the two numbers above it. When all the odd integers in Pascal's triangle are highlighted (black) and the remaining evens are left blank (white), one of many patterns in Pascal's triangle is displayed. By…

  1. See-Saw Jeans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Charlotte D.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the following case: Pete Wilmington, Vice President of Sales for See-Saw Jeans for Kids, has wrapped up a deal with Wal-Mart to carry See-Saw Jeans for Kids in all Wal-Mart stores on a trial basis for the next year. See-Saw Jeans for Kids is a clothing manufacturer with sales of $41 million, but the Wal-Mart account has the…

  2. Pascal's law and the death of Cromwell.

    PubMed

    Felts, J H

    1991-01-01

    Oliver Cromwell, Lord Protector of the British Isles, probably died of the complications of recurrent urinary tract infection and obstruction, not of a 'bastard tertian ague' as claimed soon after his death. Blaise Pascal, a pioneer in hydraulics and a contemporary of Cromwell, shortly thereafter accurately reported course and historical consequence of his death, an event which seems at least partly attributable to the effects of Pascal's law on the Protector's kidneys.

  3. Multitasking-Pascal extensions solve concurrency problems

    SciTech Connect

    Mackie, P.H.

    1982-09-29

    To avoid deadlock (one process waiting for a resource than another process can't release) and indefinite postponement (one process being continually denied a resource request) in a multitasking-system application, it is possible to use a high-level development language with built-in concurrency handlers. Parallel Pascal is one such language; it extends standard Pascal via special task synchronizers: a new data type called signal, new system procedures called wait and send and a Boolean function termed awaited. To understand the language's use the author examines the problems it helps solve.

  4. Sir James Jeans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, E. A.

    2013-09-01

    Memoir by S. C. Roberts; 1. Merchant Taylor's and Cambridge; 2. Princeton, 1905-9; 3. Return to England. The Adams Prize essay, 1909-19; 4. Secretary of the Royal Society, 1919-29; 5. Popular exposition, 1929-30; 6. Later years, 1931-46; 7. Science in Jeans's boyhood; 8. The partition of energy; 9. Rotating fluid masses; 10. Star clusters; 11. The equilibrium of the stars; 12. Jeans and philosophy; Bibliography; Index.

  5. Who's Pascal and Why Is He Messing Up My Curriculum?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slesnick, Twila

    1983-01-01

    A recent College Board decision means that Pascal will soon replace BASIC as the primary language of computer students (and their teachers) nationwide. This Pascal primer will help individuals become familiar with how the language works. (Author)

  6. A Command of PASCAL Will Help Kids Control Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    dePillis, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    Argues against using prepared computer programs for school instruction and proposes PASCAL as the most instructionally apt choice for a first computer language. Includes tips on resources for teacher training and textbooks in PASCAL. (JW)

  7. Fibonacci-like sequences and generalized Pascal's triangles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincenzi, G.; Siani, S.

    2014-05-01

    The properties pertaining to diagonals of generalized Pascal's triangles are studied. Combinatorial relationships between Fibonacci-like sequences and Fibonacci sequence itself are determined, using the sequence of diagonals of generalized Pascal's triangle.

  8. Teaching Pascal's Triangle from a Computer Science Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skurnick, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    Pascal's Triangle is named for the seventeenth-century French philosopher and mathematician Blaise Pascal (the same person for whom the computer programming language is named). Students are generally introduced to Pascal's Triangle in an algebra or precalculus class in which the Binomial Theorem is presented. This article, presents a new method…

  9. OMSI Pascal-1 for ROM applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sander, J.E.

    1981-04-27

    A technique is described for developing code in the OMSI Pascal-1 programming language which will execute successfully in read-only memory (ROM). Along with the capability of executing Pascal code in ROM, the technique also provides one with the advantage of being able to write stand-alone, microcomputer-based software in a high-level language. The information in this report is based on the author's experience with a microcomputer-based system developed for the Nuclear Test Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This system, known as the Downhole Monitor Acquisition Unit (DHMAU) System, executes OMSI Pascal-1 code residing in erasable programmable read-only memory (EPROM). The DHMAU System is a data acquisition system which controls and monitors Electronic Pinex (El Pinex) cameras used in nuclear test experiments. The software is written in OSMI Pascal-1 V1.2C, and is compiled and linked under the DEC RT-11 operating system. This software, a simple operating system in itself, executes in a stand-alone configuration. The hardware consists of a DEC LSI-11/23 processor, 16K of ROM, 16K of core memory, and a DEC VT100 terminal. The system is designed to operate in a field environment at the Nevada Test site and to provide critical event-related information. Appended to the report are the text and illustrations prepared by the author for slide presentation of the salient features of the described technique.

  10. Combinatorics Connections: Playoff Series and Pascal's Triangle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litwiller, Bonnie H.; Duncan, David R.

    1992-01-01

    Applies Pascal's Triangle to determine the number of ways in which a given team can win a playoff series of differing lengths. Presents the solutions for one-, three-, five-, seven-, and nine-game series, and extends the solution to the general case for any series. (MDH)

  11. Application of Pascal Principle in Earth Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samimi Namin, M.

    2009-12-01

    The Pascal experiment is interpreted and the chamber is roughly defined. Pascal experiment in relation to Pascal principle compared with a chamber in the earth crust. It is conclude that: 1: The pressure (P) inside the Pascal's cylinder is the combination of two pressure; the external pressure (P1) and the hydraulic pressure (P2). Pc=P1+P2 The direction of the force is from top to bottom. In the case of the chamber the pressure is Pch=P1-P2 and its positive direction is regarded to be from bottom to top. P1 is the external pressure, and is the maximum pressure applied to chamber .The external pressure creates a constant internal pressure throughout the chamber .The magnitude of the constant pressure is based on the litho static pressure of the bottom of the chamber; because it is the maximum pressure that the chamber is connected. P1=ρ1gH+ρ2gh Where H is the overburden thickness, h is the highness of the chamber, ρ1 is the density of the overburden and ρ2 is density of country rock. The hydrostatic pressure within the chamber is P2=ρ3gh. Also ρ3 is the density of the chamber. So the pressure inside the chamber would be: Pch=P1-P2 then Pch=ρ1gH+(ρ2-ρ3)gh. The equation above means that, the chamber pressure equals to the overburden pressure plus Archimedes pressure. 2: The word squeezing which is a vulgar word has an important physical meaning that is ((Pascal principle driving movement)).In another word, almost all movements, related to chambers, within the earth are a squeezing event which's, driving force is the steady constant pressure mentioned above. Any change in this pressure depends on the rupturing of the chamber and the behavior of the movement of the chamber matter. 3: If we provide a safety valve on piston of the Pascal's cylinder and increase the load we see the safety valve bursts and the matter inside the cylinder squeeze out .The pressure is from top to bottom but the movement is from bottom to top. The direction of force has changed 180

  12. PASCAL LR(1) Parser Generator System

    1988-05-04

    LRSYS is a complete LR(1) parser generator system written entirely in a portable subset of Pascal. The system, LRSYS, includes a grammar analyzer program (LR) which reads a context-free (BNF) grammar as input and produces LR(1) parsing tables as output, a lexical analyzer generator (LEX) which reads regular expressions created by the REG process as input and produces lexical tables as output, and various parser skeletons that get merged with the tables to produce completemore » parsers (SMAKE). Current parser skeletons include Pascal, FORTRAN 77, and C. Other language skeletons can easily be added to the system. LRSYS is based on the LR program.« less

  13. Jean Brossel 1918 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagnac, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    The contributions of Jean Brossel to atomic physics, in particular to radiofrequency spectroscopy coupled with optical transitions, are presented. His part in the origins of the method, and in its ramifications over a half century in the Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris, are described. A list of publications and the curriculum vitae of Brossel are appended.

  14. Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, C.

    2003-03-01

    This paper gives a short account of some key elements in the life of Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier (1768-1830), specifically his relation to Napoleon Bonaparte. The mathematical approach to Fourier series and the original scepticism by French mathematicians are briefly illustrated.

  15. [Doctor Pascal Rougon. An imaginary predecessor].

    PubMed

    Malinas, Y; Malinas, C

    1993-06-01

    Through the Rougon-Macquart series and the cases described in the last volume (Le Docteur Pascal, 1893), clinical analysis of the 58 characters identifies only seven neurotics and six alcoholics (only three of whom were Rougon-Macquart by birth). All the other illness described are unrelated to hysteria in the family. It remains true, however, that Zola's interpretation of hereditary degeneracy follows that of contemporary medical teaching, as witnessed by the genealogics published by Charcot in 1893. Through the voice of Dr. Pascal, however, Zola does challenge the concepts of heredity advanced by his medical advisors: he envisages the concepts of dominance and recessiveness without devising any general scheme for the transmission of hereditary characteristics, but eight years before Vries he advanced the idea of mutations, which he interprets as accidents occurring at the beginning of the ovum's development. When faced by the lack of success of his opotherapy of degenerative diseases, Pascal initiates trials versus a placebo and puts forward a highly coherent theory of what we would now call the placebo effect. It appears, therefore, that contrary to the opinion of most commentators, Emile Zola was in fact capable of a remarkable subtleness when he ventured into medicine. Through Dr Pascal Rougon, and notwithstanding the mockery of Flaubert, Goncourt and France (and of many others), he was a brilliant trail-blazer in the fields of genetics and therapeutics. Six years later he was to strike again with Dr Boutan, who invented what we now know as the prophylactic care of mothers and children (Fécondité, 1898). PMID:8351463

  16. Jean Comandon Neuroscientist.

    PubMed

    Lorusso, Lorenzo; Lefebvre, Thierry; de Pastre, Béatrice

    2016-01-01

    The microbiologist Jean Comandon is famous for his studies on the movement of the syphilis bacteria as differentiated in various forms by ultramicroscope. He was also a pioneer on the technical application of the microcinematography in laboratory research. His collaboration with clinicians and surgeons in the study of various pathological disorders is little known. From 1918 to the 1920s, he collaborated with such neurologists as André Thomas, Jean Athanase Sicard, and others in the study of various neurological disorders by using cinematography as a scientific tool for understanding the clinical and pathological mechanisms of diseases. These collaborations allowed him to be involved in the beginnings of the French cinematography industry, especially with Charles Pathé who established a small film studio laboratory in Vincennes where a multidisciplinary group improved the application of cinematography in clinical medical practice. PMID:26684425

  17. Jean Comandon Neuroscientist.

    PubMed

    Lorusso, Lorenzo; Lefebvre, Thierry; de Pastre, Béatrice

    2016-01-01

    The microbiologist Jean Comandon is famous for his studies on the movement of the syphilis bacteria as differentiated in various forms by ultramicroscope. He was also a pioneer on the technical application of the microcinematography in laboratory research. His collaboration with clinicians and surgeons in the study of various pathological disorders is little known. From 1918 to the 1920s, he collaborated with such neurologists as André Thomas, Jean Athanase Sicard, and others in the study of various neurological disorders by using cinematography as a scientific tool for understanding the clinical and pathological mechanisms of diseases. These collaborations allowed him to be involved in the beginnings of the French cinematography industry, especially with Charles Pathé who established a small film studio laboratory in Vincennes where a multidisciplinary group improved the application of cinematography in clinical medical practice.

  18. Tribonacci-like sequences and generalized Pascal's pyramids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anatriello, Giuseppina; Vincenzi, Giovanni

    2014-11-01

    A well-known result of Feinberg and Shannon states that the tribonacci sequence can be detected by the so-called Pascal's pyramid. Here we will show that any tribonacci-like sequence can be obtained by the diagonals of the Feinberg's triangle associated to a suitable generalized Pascal's pyramid. The results also extend similar properties of Fibonacci-like sequences.

  19. What Do You Find? Students Investigating Patterns in Pascal's Triangle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obara, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, students used problem-solving skills to investigate what patterns exist in the Pascal triangle and incorporated technology using Geometer's Sketchpad (GSP) in the process. Students came up with patterns such as natural numbers, triangular numbers, and Fibonacci numbers. Although the patterns inherent in Pascal's triangle may seem…

  20. Developing Formulas by Skipping Rows in Pascal's Triangle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buonpastore, Robert J.; Osler, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    A table showing the first thirteen rows of Pascal's triangle, where the rows are, as usual numbered from 0 to 12 is presented. The entries in the table are called binomial coefficients. In this note, the authors systematically delete rows from Pascal's triangle and, by trial and error, try to find a formula that allows them to add new rows to the…

  1. Pascal's wager and the hanging of crepe.

    PubMed

    Siegler, M

    1975-10-23

    Hanging of crepe refers to one type of strategy employed by physicians in communicating prognoses to families of critically ill patients. This approach offers the bleakest, most pessimistic prediction of the patient's outcome, presumably in an effort to lessen the family's suffering if the patient dies of his illness. Certain similarities exist between this technic and that used by Pascal, the 17th-century philosopher, in formulating his wager on the belief in God, in that both attempt to develop "no-lose" strategies, in which chances for "winning" are maximized. A detailed analysis of these strategies indicates that neither is truly "no-lose," and that both contain inherent disadvantages. Prognostication, an alternative approach to physician-family communication, appears to be strategically and morally superior to the hanging-of-crepe strategy.

  2. A Pascal-like triangle from finding power sums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhibo

    2014-08-01

    A Pascal-like triangle is constructed so that power sums can be conveniently obtained by college (or high school) students with no need for memorizing complicated formulas or performing difficult calculations.

  3. Pascal's triangle and other number triangles in Clifford analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaz, G.; Falcão, M. I.; Malonek, H. R.

    2012-09-01

    The recent introduction of generalized Appell sequences in the framework of Clifford Analysis solved an open question about a suitable construction of power-like monogenic polynomials as generalizations of the integer powers of a complex variable. The deep connection between Appell sequences and Pascal's triangle called also attention to other number triangles and, at the same time, to the construction of generalized Pascal matrices. Both aspects are considered in this communication.

  4. Interview With Jean Laplanche.

    PubMed

    Laplanche, Jean; Danon, Gisèle; Lauru, Didier

    2015-10-01

    The starting point for this interview with Jean Laplanche is a question regarding the place of infantile sexuality within psychoanalysis today. Laplanche begins by underscoring the audaciousness of Freud's characterization of infantile sexuality and the significance of the expansion of the field of "the sexual" that this characterization entails. He goes on to outline his celebrated "general theory of seduction." In doing so he explains key terms associated with it, such as the "enigmatic message" and the "fundamental anthropological situation," and clarifies how the theory seeks to account for sexuality in the expanded sense. In particular, Laplanche stresses the intersubjective origins of "drive" sexuality in infancy, its chaotic evolution, its unique economic mode of functioning, and its subsequent conflict with innate "instinctual" sexual impulses that surge forth at puberty. He also positions the general theory of seduction in relation to the important advances made by attachment theory in the field of the adult-child relationship. Throughout the interview, the discussion touches on social contexts, and at points Laplanche outlines positions on topical concerns connected to education, media, and the law, and the importance of rethinking certain psychoanalytic paradigms in an age of new family structures that do not correspond to the nuclear unit. PMID:26485488

  5. Interview With Jean Laplanche.

    PubMed

    Laplanche, Jean; Danon, Gisèle; Lauru, Didier

    2015-10-01

    The starting point for this interview with Jean Laplanche is a question regarding the place of infantile sexuality within psychoanalysis today. Laplanche begins by underscoring the audaciousness of Freud's characterization of infantile sexuality and the significance of the expansion of the field of "the sexual" that this characterization entails. He goes on to outline his celebrated "general theory of seduction." In doing so he explains key terms associated with it, such as the "enigmatic message" and the "fundamental anthropological situation," and clarifies how the theory seeks to account for sexuality in the expanded sense. In particular, Laplanche stresses the intersubjective origins of "drive" sexuality in infancy, its chaotic evolution, its unique economic mode of functioning, and its subsequent conflict with innate "instinctual" sexual impulses that surge forth at puberty. He also positions the general theory of seduction in relation to the important advances made by attachment theory in the field of the adult-child relationship. Throughout the interview, the discussion touches on social contexts, and at points Laplanche outlines positions on topical concerns connected to education, media, and the law, and the importance of rethinking certain psychoanalytic paradigms in an age of new family structures that do not correspond to the nuclear unit.

  6. Vector Pascal: a computer programming language for the FPS-164 array processor

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, T.R.

    1987-01-01

    Support for vector operations in computer programming languages is analyzed to determine if programs employing such operations run faster. The programming language Vector Pascal is defined and compared to Fortran 8X and Actus. Vector Pascal contains definitions for matrix and vector operations and the Vector Pascal compiler translates vector expressions. The Vector Pascal compiler executes on an IBM Personal Computer AT and produces code for a Floating Point Systems FPS-164 Scientific Computer. The standard benchmark LINPACK, which solves systems of linear equations, is transcribed from Fortran to Standard Pascal and Vector Pascal. The Vector Pascal version of LINPACK exploits vector operations defined in the language. The speedup of the Vector Pascal version of LINPACK over the Standard Pascal version is presented.

  7. The Pascal Discovery Mission: A Mars Climate Network Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberle, R. M.; Catling, D. C.; Chassefiere, E.; Forget, F.; Hourdin, F.; Leovy, C. B.; Magalhaes, J.; Mihalov, J.; Pommereau, J. P.; Murphy, J. R.

    2000-07-01

    The climate of Mars is a major focus of Mars exploration. With the loss of MCO, however, it remains uncertain how it will be achieved. We argue that a truly dedicated climate mission to Mars should have both orbital and landed components, and that these should operate simultaneously for at least 1 Mars year if not longer. Pascal is a Discovery mission that emphasizes the landed component. Its principal goal is to establish a network of 24 small weather stations on the surface of Mars that will operate for 2 Mars years, with an extended mission option for an additional 8 Mars years bringing the total mission lifetime up to 10 Mars years. The stations will collect hourly measurements of pressure, temperature, and optical depth. After delivering the probes to Mars, Pascal's carrier spacecraft will go into an elliptical orbit which will serve as a relay for the landers, and a platform for synoptic imaging. These simultaneous measurements from the surface and from orbit will allow us to characterize the planet's general circulation and its interaction with the dust, water, and CO2 cycles. During entry, descent, and landing, each of Pascal's 24 probes will also measure the temperature structure of the atmosphere and acquire images of the surface. These data will allow us to determine the global structure of the atmosphere between 15 and 130 km, and characterize the local terrain to help interpret the landed data. The descent images are part of Pascal's outreach program, as the probe camera system will be developed by faculty-supervised student project. The intent is to generate enthusiasm for the Pascal mission by directly involving students. Pascal will be launched on a Delta II-7925 in August of 2005. A type I trajectory will deliver Pascal to Mars in January of 2006. On approach, the three-axis stabilized carrier spacecraft will spring deploy the Pascal probes in 4 separate salvo's of 6 each. Global coverage is achieved with small time-of-arrival adjustments in

  8. The Pascal Discovery Mission: A Mars Climate Network Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haberle, Robert M.; Catling, D. C.; Chassefiere, E.; Forget, F.; Hourdin, F.; Leovy, C. B.; Magalhaes, J.; Mihalov, J.; Pommereau, J. P.; Murphy, J. R.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The climate of Mars is a major focus of Mars exploration. With the loss of MCO, however, it remains uncertain how it will be achieved. We argue that a truly dedicated climate mission to Mars should have both orbital and landed components, and that these should operate simultaneously for at least I Mars year if not longer. Pascal is Discovery mission that emphasizes the landed component. Its principal goal is to establish a network of 24 small weather stations on the surface of Mars that will operate for 2 Mars years, with an extended mission option for an additional 8 Mars years bringing the total mission lifetime up to 10 Mars years. The stations will collect hourly measurements of pressure, temperature, and optical depth. After delivering the probes to Mars, Pascal's carrier spacecraft will go into an elliptical orbit which will serve as a relay for the landers, and a platform for synoptic imaging. These simultaneous measurements from the surface and from orbit will allow us to characterize the planet's general circulation and its interaction with the dust, water, and CO2 cycles. During entry, descent, and landing, each of Pascal's 24 probes will also measure the temperature structure of the atmosphere and acquire images of the surface. These data will allow us to determine the global structure of the atmosphere between 15 and 130 km, and characterize the local terrain to help interpret the landed data. The descent images are part of Pascal's outreach program, as the probe camera system will be developed by faculty-supervised student project. The intent is to generate enthusiasm for the Pascal mission by directly involving students. Pascal will be launched on a Delta 11-7925 in August of 2005. A type I trajectory will deliver Pascal to Mars in January of 2006. On approach, the three-axis stabilized carrier spacecraft will spring deploy the Pascal probes in 4 separate salvo's of 6 each. Global coverage is achieved with small time-of-arrival adjustments in between

  9. The Pascal Discovery Mission: A Mars Climate Network Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haberle, R. M.; Catling, D. C.; Chassefiere, E.; Forget, F.; Hourdin, F.; Leovy, C. B.; Magalhaes, J.; Mihalov, J.; Pommereau, J. P.; Murphy, J. R.

    2000-01-01

    The climate of Mars is a major focus of Mars exploration. With the loss of MCO, however, it remains uncertain how it will be achieved. We argue that a truly dedicated climate mission to Mars should have both orbital and landed components, and that these should operate simultaneously for at least 1 Mars year if not longer. Pascal is a Discovery mission that emphasizes the landed component. Its principal goal is to establish a network of 24 small weather stations on the surface of Mars that will operate for 2 Mars years, with an extended mission option for an additional 8 Mars years bringing the total mission lifetime up to 10 Mars years. The stations will collect hourly measurements of pressure, temperature, and optical depth. After delivering the probes to Mars, Pascal's carrier spacecraft will go into an elliptical orbit which will serve as a relay for the landers, and a platform for synoptic imaging. These simultaneous measurements from the surface and from orbit will allow us to characterize the planet's general circulation and its interaction with the dust, water, and CO2 cycles. During entry, descent, and landing, each of Pascal's 24 probes will also measure the temperature structure of the atmosphere and acquire images of the surface. These data will allow us to determine the global structure of the atmosphere between 15 and 130 km, and characterize the local terrain to help interpret the landed data. The descent images are part of Pascal's outreach program, as the probe camera system will be developed by faculty-supervised student project. The intent is to generate enthusiasm for the Pascal mission by directly involving students. Pascal will be launched on a Delta II-7925 in August of 2005. A type I trajectory will deliver Pascal to Mars in January of 2006. On approach, the three-axis stabilized carrier spacecraft will spring deploy the Pascal probes in 4 separate salvo's of 6 each. Global coverage is achieved with small time-of-arrival adjustments in

  10. A Pedagogical Look at Jeans' Density Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Kwang-Hua W.

    2007-01-01

    We illustrate the derivations of Jeans' criteria for the gravitational instabilities in a static homogeneous Newtonian system for pedagogical objectives. The critical Jeans density surface is presented in terms of dimensionless sound speeds and (characteristic) length scales. (Contains 1 figure.)

  11. Adolescent Attitudes Toward Designer Jeans: Further Evidence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennon, Sharron J.

    1986-01-01

    Used classical conditioning theory of learning to predict attitudes of junior high students toward spending for designer jeans. Found that students were likely to say that in comparison to the nondesigner jeans, they would spend more for the designer jeans, select them more often as gifts, and purchase them more often for themselves. (Author/ABB)

  12. Energy Distributions in Small Populations: Pascal versus Boltzmann

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kugel, Roger W.; Weiner, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    The theoretical distributions of a limited amount of energy among small numbers of particles with discrete, evenly-spaced quantum levels are examined systematically. The average populations of energy states reveal the pattern of Pascal's triangle. An exact formula for the probability that a particle will be in any given energy state is derived.…

  13. Pascal: The New Word in High School Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitter, Gary; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Argues that trends in upper elementary and higher education computer science programs should lead to programming as focus of high school computer curriculum, and reviews philosophies supporting teaching of programming. Advantages and disadvantages of using Pascal and other languages are discussed and compared. Teacher information sources on Pascal…

  14. Advanced Placement Computer Science with Pascal. Volume 2. Experimental Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY.

    This curriculum guide presents 100 lessons for an advanced placement course on programming in Pascal. Some of the topics covered include arrays, sorting, strings, sets, records, computers in society, files, stacks, queues, linked lists, binary trees, searching, hashing, and chaining. Performance objectives, vocabulary, motivation, aim,…

  15. Turtlegraphics: A Comparison of Logo and Turbo Pascal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanLengen, Craig A.

    1989-01-01

    The integrated compiler of the Turbo Pascal environment allows the execution of a completed program independent of the developed environment and with greater execution speed, in comparison with LOGO. Conversion table of turtle-graphic commands for the two languages is presented. (Author/YP)

  16. Applications of Pascal's Triangle for Middle School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, William L.

    This unit is designed to acquaint middle school students with Pascal's Triangle. The unit is intended to be completed in small groups with a minimum of teacher direction. Students complete the activities by using manipulatives, calculators and computers and then report the results to the teacher and the class. The activities include: (1) patterns…

  17. Why does the Jeans Swindle work?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falco, M.; Hansen, S. H.; Wojtak, R.; Mamon, G. A.

    2013-04-01

    When measuring the mass profile of any given cosmological structure through internal kinematics, the distant background density is always ignored. This trick is often referred to as the `Jeans Swindle'. Without this trick a divergent term from the background density renders the mass profile undefined; however, this trick has no formal justification. We show that when one includes the expansion of the Universe in the Jeans equation, a term appears which exactly cancels the divergent term from the background. We thereby establish a formal justification for using the Jeans Swindle.

  18. Pascal: Solutions to Projects. Dissemination Packet--Summer 1989: Booklet #5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwell, Raymond N.

    This booklet is the fifth in a series of nine from the Teacher Training Institute at Hofstra University (New York) and contains the instructor's and several participants' course project solutions for both Pascal programing courses within the institute. Included in this booklet are Pascal programs utilized with the following project topics: (1)…

  19. Advanced Placement Computer Science (with Pascal). Teacher's Guide. Volume 1. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farkouh, Alice; And Others

    The purpose of this guide is to give teachers and supervisors a working knowledge of various approaches to enhancing pupil learning about computer science, particularly through the use of Pascal. It contains instructional units dealing with: (1) computer components; (2) computer languages; (3) compilers; (4) essential features of a Pascal program;…

  20. PASCAL Data Base File Description and Indexing Rules in Chemistry, Biology and Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaillardin, R.; And Others

    This report on the multidisciplinary PASCAL database describes the files and the indexing rules for chemistry, biology, and medicine. PASCAL deals with all aspects of chemistry within two subfiles whose combined yearly growth is about 100,000 references. The Biopascal file, organized in the two subfiles of Plant Science and Biology and Medicine,…

  1. Tribonacci-Like Sequences and Generalized Pascal's Pyramids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anatriello, Giuseppina; Vincenzi, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    A well-known result of Feinberg and Shannon states that the tribonacci sequence can be detected by the so-called "Pascal's pyramid." Here we will show that any tribonacci-like sequence can be obtained by the diagonals of the "Feinberg's triangle" associated to a suitable "generalized Pascal's pyramid."…

  2. The language parallel Pascal and other aspects of the massively parallel processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, A. P.; Bruner, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    A high level language for the Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) was designed. This language, called Parallel Pascal, is described in detail. A description of the language design, a description of the intermediate language, Parallel P-Code, and details for the MPP implementation are included. Formal descriptions of Parallel Pascal and Parallel P-Code are given. A compiler was developed which converts programs in Parallel Pascal into the intermediate Parallel P-Code language. The code generator to complete the compiler for the MPP is being developed independently. A Parallel Pascal to Pascal translator was also developed. The architecture design for a VLSI version of the MPP was completed with a description of fault tolerant interconnection networks. The memory arrangement aspects of the MPP are discussed and a survey of other high level languages is given.

  3. Milliwatt radioisotope power supply for the PASCAL Mars surface stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Daniel T.; Murbach, Marcus S.

    2001-02-01

    A milliwatt power supply is being developed based on the 1 watt Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Unit (RHU), which has already been used to provide heating alone on numerous spacecraft. In the past year the power supply has been integrated into the design of the proposed PASCAL Mars Network Mission, which is intended to place 24 surface climate monitoring stations on Mars. The PASCAL Mars mission calls for the individual surface stations to be transported together in one spacecraft on a trajectory direct from launch to orbit around Mars. From orbit around Mars each surface station will be deployed on a SCRAMP (slotted compression ramp) probe and, after aerodynamic and parachute deceleration, land at a preselected location on the planet. During descent sounding data and still images will be accumulated, and, once on the surface, the station will take measurements of pressure, temperature and overhead atmospheric optical depth for a period of 10 Mars years (18.8 Earth years). Power for periodic data acquisition and transmission to orbital then to Earth relay will come from a bank of ultracapacitors which will be continuously recharged by the radioisotope power supply. This electronic system has been designed and a breadboard built. In the ultimate design the electronics will be arrayed on the exterior surface of the radioisotope power supply in order to take advantage of the reject heat. This assembly in turn is packaged within the SCRAMP, and that assembly comprises the surface station. An electrically heated but otherwise prototypical power supply was operated in combination with the surface station breadboard system, which included the ultracapacitors. Other issues addressed in this work have been the capability of the generator to withstand the mechanical shock of the landing on Mars and the effectiveness of the generator's multi-foil vacuum thermal insulation. .

  4. Jeans stability in collisional quantum dusty magnetoplasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jamil, M.; Asif, M.; Mir, Zahid; Salimullah, M.

    2014-09-15

    Jeans instability is examined in detail in uniform dusty magnetoplasmas taking care of collisional and non-zero finite thermal effects in addition to the quantum characteristics arising through the Bohm potential and the Fermi degenerate pressure using the quantum hydrodynamic model of plasmas. It is found that the presence of the dust-lower-hybrid wave, collisional effects of plasma species, thermal effects of electrons, and the quantum mechanical effects of electrons have significance over the Jeans instability. Here, we have pointed out a new class of dissipative instability in quantum plasma regime.

  5. Comparison of PASCAL and FORTRAN for solving problems in the physical sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, V. R.

    1981-01-01

    The paper compares PASCAL and FORTRAN for problem solving in the physical sciences, due to requests NASA has received to make PASCAL available on the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulator (scheduled to be operational in 1986). PASCAL disadvantages include the lack of scientific utility procedures equivalent to the IBM scientific subroutine package or the IMSL package which are available in FORTRAN. Advantages include a well-organized, easy to read and maintain writing code, range checking to prevent errors, and a broad selection of data types. It is concluded that FORTRAN may be the better language, although ADA (patterned after PASCAL) may surpass FORTRAN due to its ability to add complex and vector math, and the specify the precision and range of variables.

  6. A Pascal program for weighted least squares regression on a microcomputer.

    PubMed

    Tyson, H; Henderson, H; McKenna, M

    1982-10-01

    Weighted least-squares regression has been programmed in Pascal for a microcomputer. A double precision Pascal compiler and the Motorola 6809 assembler produce a fast machine-code program occupying 22,000 bytes of memory when appended to the Pascal run-time module. Large data sets fit in the remaining memory. A regression with 72 observations and 24 parameters runs in 7 min, excluding optional print out of large matrices. The maximum dimensions of the design matrix, X, can be altered by modifying two Pascal constants. Minor changes to the Pascal source program will make it compatible with other Pascal compilers. The program optionally orthogonalises the X matrix to detect linearly-dependent columns in X, and/or generate orthogonal parameter estimates. After orthogonalizing X and fitting the model, the parameter estimates for the original X can be retrieved by the program. Regressions on a repeatedly reduced model are performed through elimination of columns in X until the minimum adequate model is obtained. PMID:6897216

  7. Avoiding the Negative: Blue Jeans Baseball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maggard, Bob

    1978-01-01

    Blue Jeans Baseball, for eight- to twelve-year old children, is based on the concept that everyone plays. No coaches are allowed; everyone bats once per inning; defensive players rotate positions. These and other rules reduce the emphasis on competition and increase the emphasis on skill development. (MJB)

  8. Jean Tague-Sutcliffe on Measuring Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fricke, Martin

    1998-01-01

    Jean Tague-Sutcliffe's book "Measuring Information" offers a theory to permit the measurement of information services by means of the user-centered notion of the subjective information associated with the interaction between a user and a record on an occasion. Some suggestions are made to improve the theory's foundations. (Author/AEF)

  9. Jean Piaget's Debt to John Dewey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Jean Piaget became a veritable institution unto himself in education and psychology, largely as the result of his developmental-stage theory advanced over the second quarter of the twentieth century. Not until Piaget was 73 did he make mention of John Dewey's work at Dewey's laboratory school, founded in 1894 at the University of Chicago. But here…

  10. PAS-cal: a Generic Recombinant Peptide Calibration Standard for Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breibeck, Joscha; Serafin, Adam; Reichert, Andreas; Maier, Stefan; Küster, Bernhard; Skerra, Arne

    2014-08-01

    We describe the design, preparation, and mass-spectrometric characterization of a new recombinant peptide calibration standard with uniform biophysical and ionization characteristics for mass spectrometry. "PAS-cal" is an artificial polypeptide concatamer of peptide cassettes with varying lengths, each composed of the three small, chemically stable amino acids Pro, Ala, and Ser, which are interspersed by Arg residues to allow site-specific cleavage with trypsin. PAS-cal is expressed at high yields in Escherichia coli as a Small Ubiquitin-like MOdifier (SUMO) fusion protein, which is easily purified and allows isolation of the PAS-cal moiety after SUMO protease cleavage. Upon subsequent in situ treatment with trypsin, the PAS-cal polypeptide yields a set of four defined homogeneous peptides in the range from 2 to 8 kDa with equal mass spacing. ESI-MS analysis revealed a conveniently interpretable raw spectrum, which after deconvolution resulted in a very simple pattern of four peaks with similar ionization signals. MALDI-MS analysis of a PAS-cal peptide mixture comprising both the intact polypeptide and its tryptic fragments revealed not only the four standard peptides but also the singly and doubly charged states of the intact concatamer as well as di- and trimeric adduct ion species between the peptides, thus augmenting the observable m/z range. The advantageous properties of PAS-cal are most likely a result of the strongly hydrophilic and conformationally disordered PEG-like properties of the PAS sequences. Therefore, PAS-cal offers an inexpensive and versatile recombinant peptide calibration standard for mass spectrometry in protein/peptide bioanalytics and proteomics research, the composition of which may be further adapted to fit individual needs.

  11. [Jean Fernel and the humanist spirit].

    PubMed

    Cordier, Jean-François

    2011-06-01

    Jean Fernel (1497-1558) embodied the humanist spirit of the Renaissance. He studied philosophy (especially Aristotle), astrology, arithmetic, mathematics and Latin literature before devoting his life to medicine. He conducted a comprehensive synthesis of the medical system of Galen, and invented the terms "physiology" and "pathology". His taste for teaching, his extensive clinical practice, his benevolent attitude to the sick, and his consideration for individuals and for human nature all contribute to Jean Fernel's image as a humanist. He was the most famous physician of his time, although his work relying on philosophy and galenic dogmatism eventually became obsolete. Forgotten for half a millennium, this distant precursor of holistic medicine is worthy of renewed interest. PMID:22530525

  12. Venus 1882 and Jean-Charles Houzeau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, C.

    2009-06-01

    This paper focuses on one particular type of telescope - the heliometer - designed for solving one specific basic problem in astronomy: the scale factor of the solar system. One very special instrument of this type was the ``heliometer with unequal focal lengths'' designed by the Belgian astronomer Jean-Charles Houzeau for the 1882 transit of Venus. We also draw attention to the most interesting personality of Houzeau, and to his social engagement that went much beyond his work as a scientist.

  13. Jean-Martin Charcot. 1825 to 1893.

    PubMed

    Clanet, M

    2008-06-01

    During the 31 years of his working life, Jean-Martin Charcot built up an exceptional career in Salpétrière hospital, and was a pioneer in different fields. He developed an organized teaching and research centre, contributed to increase the medical knowledge with a systematic use of physiology and pathology besides a rigorous clinical analysis, he founded geriatry and neurology and finally tried to create a scientific psychological approach for hysteria.

  14. French psychiatry and the new woman: the case of Dr Constance Pascal, 1877-1937.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Felicia

    2006-06-01

    This article traces the connections between the public career and private life of Constance Pascal (1877-1937), the first woman psychiatrist in France, in the social context of the Belle Epoque. Pascal, of Romanian origin, attained professional success at the cost of suppressing her personal life. Best known for her work on dementia praecox, she researched the social as well as the biological causes of mental illness. She founded one of the first 'medical-pedagogic' institutes in France. Her monograph, Chagrins d'amour et psychoses (1935) reflects her wide cultural interests. Until recently, Pascal has been neglected by historians of psychiatry and of French women's history. Her life exemplified many of the conflicts experienced by women entering hitherto all-male professions.

  15. Constance Pascal's Chagrins d'amour et psychoses (1935): a French psychiatrist's views on psychoanalysis.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Felicia

    2015-03-01

    In 1935 Constance Pascal (1877-1937), France's first woman psychiatrist, published Chagrins d'amour et psychoses (The Sorrows of Love and Psychosis). My analysis of her monograph will consider: her major article leading up to Chagrins; Pascal's debts to her predecessors, particularly Morel and Kretschmer; her relationship to the French psychoanalytic movement; her co-option of psychoanalysis as a tool in her own therapeutic work with patients in the state psychiatric system; and her social/cultural interpretations of her woman patients. The literary and philosophic aspects of her work are emphasized as well as her contribution to French psychiatry.

  16. Implementing the UCSD PASCAL system on the MODCOMP computer. [deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, T.

    1980-01-01

    The implementation of an interactive software development system (UCSD PASCAL) on the MODCOMP computer is discussed. The development of an interpreter for the MODCOMP II and the MODCOMP IV computers, written in MODCOMP II assembly language, is described. The complete Pascal programming system was run successfully on a MODCOMP II and MODCOMP IV under both the MAX II/III and MAX IV operating systems. The source code for an 8080 microcomputer version of the interpreter was used as the design for the MODCOMP interpreter. A mapping of the functions within the 8080 interpreter into MODCOMP II assembly language was the method used to code the interpreter.

  17. Periumbilical allergic contact dermatitis: blue jeans or belt buckles?

    PubMed

    Byer, Tara T; Morrell, Dean S

    2004-01-01

    Nickel is the most ubiquitous contact allergen among children and adolescents. Metal blue jeans buttons and belts have been noted to cause nickel dermatitis around the umbilicus. For these children, traditional teaching is strict avoidance of all pants with metal snaps/buttons, particularly blue jeans. In this study we tested 90 pairs of blue jeans and 47 belts for nickel using the dimethylglyoxime spot test. Only 10% of blue jeans tested positive, while 53% of belts tested positive. Furthermore, 10 pairs of nickel-negative blue jeans remained negative after 10 washings. Overall we found no resistance to testing in clothing stores. From these results, we recommend that patients with allergic contact dermatitis secondary to nickel need not strictly avoid blue jeans and metal belt buckles. Rather, families should be encouraged to use the dimethylglyoxime spot test to test these items for nickel prior to purchase.

  18. Low energy ghosts and the Jeans' instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gümrükçüoǧlu, A. Emir; Mukohyama, Shinji; Sotiriou, Thomas P.

    2016-09-01

    We show that a massless canonical scalar field minimally coupled to general relativity can become a tachyonic ghost at low energies around a background in which the scalar's gradient is spacelike. By performing a canonical transformation we demonstrate that this low energy ghost can be recast, at the level of the action, in a form of a fluid that undergoes a Jeans-like instability affecting only modes with large wavelength. This illustrates that low energy tachyonic ghosts do not lead to a catastrophic quantum vacuum instability, unlike the usual high-energy ghost degrees of freedom.

  19. PASCAL Data Base: File Description and On Line Access on ESA/IRS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelissier, Denise

    This report describes the PASCAL database, a machine readable version of the French abstract journal Bulletin Signaletique, which allows use of the file for (1) batch and online retrieval of information, (2) selective dissemination of information, and (3) publishing of the 50 sections of Bulletin Signaletique. The system, which covers nine…

  20. Some Half-Row Sums from Pascal's Triangle via Laplace Transforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dence, Thomas P.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents some identities on the sum of the entries in the first half of a row in Pascal's triangle. The results were discovered while the author was working on a problem involving Laplace transforms, which are used in proving of the identities.

  1. Effects of Pascal and FORTRAN Programming on the Problem-Solving Abilities of College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Won Sik; Repman, Judi

    1993-01-01

    Describes a study that was conducted to determine whether learning to program a computer in Pascal or FORTRAN improved problem-solving skills of college students when compared to a control group and to determine which programing language was more effective in the development of problem-solving abilities. (26 references) (LRW)

  2. The Jean Gutierrez spider mite collection.

    PubMed

    Migeon, Alain

    2015-01-01

    The family Tetranychidae (spider mites) currently comprises 1,275 species and represents one of the most important agricultural pest families among the Acari with approximately one hundred pest species, ten of which considered major pests. The dataset presented in this document includes all the identified spider mites composing the Jean Gutierrez Collection hosted at the CBGP (Montferrier-sur-Lez, France), gathered from 1963 to 1999 during his career at the Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD). It consists of 5,262 specimens corresponding to 1,564 occurrences (combination species/host plant/date/location) of 175 species. Most specimens were collected in Madagascar and other islands of the Western Indian Ocean, New Caledonia and other islands of the South Pacific and Papuasia. The dataset constitutes today the most important one available on Tetranychidae worldwide.

  3. A multiple-scale Pascal polynomial for 2D Stokes and inverse Cauchy-Stokes problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chein-Shan; Young, D. L.

    2016-05-01

    The polynomial expansion method is a useful tool for solving both the direct and inverse Stokes problems, which together with the pointwise collocation technique is easy to derive the algebraic equations for satisfying the Stokes differential equations and the specified boundary conditions. In this paper we propose two novel numerical algorithms, based on a third-first order system and a third-third order system, to solve the direct and the inverse Cauchy problems in Stokes flows by developing a multiple-scale Pascal polynomial method, of which the scales are determined a priori by the collocation points. To assess the performance through numerical experiments, we find that the multiple-scale Pascal polynomial expansion method (MSPEM) is accurate and stable against large noise.

  4. The Pascal Triangle of a Discrete Image: Definition, Properties and Application to Shape Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutin, Mireille; Huang, Shanshan

    2013-04-01

    We define the Pascal triangle of a discrete (gray scale) image as a pyramidal arrangement of complex-valued moments and we explore its geometric significance. In particular, we show that the entries of row k of this triangle correspond to the Fourier series coefficients of the moment of order k of the Radon transform of the image. Group actions on the plane can be naturally prolonged onto the entries of the Pascal triangle. We study the prolongation of some common group actions, such as rotations and reflections, and we propose simple tests for detecting equivalences and self-equivalences under these group actions. The motivating application of this work is the problem of characterizing the geometry of objects on images, for example by detecting approximate symmetries.

  5. Pascal (Yang Hui) triangles and power laws in the logistic map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velarde, Carlos; Robledo, Alberto

    2015-04-01

    We point out the joint occurrence of Pascal triangle patterns and power-law scaling in the standard logistic map, or more generally, in unimodal maps. It is known that these features are present in its two types of bifurcation cascades: period and chaotic-band doubling of attractors. Approximate Pascal triangles are exhibited by the sets of lengths of supercycle diameters and by the sets of widths of opening bands. Additionally, power-law scaling manifests along periodic attractor supercycle positions and chaotic band splitting points. Consequently, the attractor at the mutual accumulation point of the doubling cascades, the onset of chaos, displays both Gaussian and power-law distributions. Their combined existence implies both ordinary and exceptional statistical-mechanical descriptions of dynamical properties.

  6. [Elaboration of the psychosomatic phenomenon: observations on the biography of Blaise Pascal].

    PubMed

    Stephanos, S; Auhagen, U

    1977-01-01

    The paper aims to take a closer look at some of the problems surrounding the 'psychosomatic phenomenon'. The origin, development and effects of the phenomenon, as well as the way in which one individual managed to overcome it, are illustrated in the example of the French philosopher and physicist, Blaise Pascal. The authors hold the view that the psychosomatic phenomenon is rooted in disturbances in the early identification processes of the infant. Somatic symptoms flare up whenever the individual, in a phase of disorganization, becomes dominated by his psychosomatic phenomenon. If, however, the person concerned has the ability to go through with the suffering involved in experiencing and elaborating these early defects, thus giving them a psychic dimension, he may be able to overcome them and in this way even attain to creativity. The genius Pascal is an extreme example of one who had this ability and so gained access to his own truth, which he found in God.

  7. Pascal's wager: combining continuous glucose monitoring and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion.

    PubMed

    Kerr, David; Olateju, Tolu

    2010-06-01

    Pascal's Wager is a suggestion posed by the French Philosopher, Blaise Pascal, that even though the existence of God cannot be determined through reason, a person should wager that God exists because he or she has everything to gain and nothing to lose. In the area of consideration here, the optimum experimental trial of the combined use of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and real-time continuous glucose monitoring in free-living individuals with type 1 diabetes providing rock-solid evidence of clinical benefit has not been performed. Nevertheless, there is considerable enthusiasm for combining the technologies among healthcare professionals, patients, and manufacturers based on the belief that this approach to diabetes care must be beneficial beyond the available evidence (i.e., reason).

  8. 'Robert Schumann's mental illnesses. (Genius and madness)', by Mlle Dr Pascal (1908a): Introduction and translation by Felicia Gordon.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Felicia

    2015-09-01

    Dr Constance Pascal's study of Robert Schumann's mental illnesses, dating from the early years of the twentieth century, reflects contemporary theories on the relations between gifted individuals and mental illness: the genius vs. madness debate. Pascal's reading of Schumann's musical career, in conjunction with his mental profile, offers a sympathetic and nuanced overview of the composer and a critical perspective on extant theories of his illness. PMID:26254133

  9. 'Robert Schumann's mental illnesses. (Genius and madness)', by Mlle Dr Pascal (1908a): Introduction and translation by Felicia Gordon.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Felicia

    2015-09-01

    Dr Constance Pascal's study of Robert Schumann's mental illnesses, dating from the early years of the twentieth century, reflects contemporary theories on the relations between gifted individuals and mental illness: the genius vs. madness debate. Pascal's reading of Schumann's musical career, in conjunction with his mental profile, offers a sympathetic and nuanced overview of the composer and a critical perspective on extant theories of his illness.

  10. Comparison of laser iridotomy using short duration 532-nm Nd: YAG laser (PASCAL) vs conventional laser in dark irides

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hye Jin; Park, Hae-Young; Kim, Su-Young

    2015-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the outcome of laser iridotomy using 532-nm Nd: YAG laser (PASCAL) with short pulse duration and Nd: YAG laser compared to conventional combined laser iridotomy. METHODS Retrospective, nonrandomized, comparative case series. Forty-five eyes of 34 patients underwent laser iridotomy. Twenty-two eyes underwent iridotomy using short duration PASCAL and Nd: YAG laser, and 23 eyes underwent iridotomy using conventional combined laser method. The average settings of PASCAL were 60 µm and 700-900 mW with a short duration of 0.01s to reduce the total applied energy. The conventional laser was 50 µm and 700-900 mW for 0.1s. After photocoagulation with these laser, the Nd: YAG laser was added in each group. Endothelial cell counts of pre-iridotomy and 2mo after iridotomy were measured and compared. RESULTS All eyes completed iridotomy successfully. The total energy used in the PASCAL group was 1.85±1.17 J. Compared to conventional laser 13.25±1.67 J, the energy used was very small due to the short exposure time of PASCAL. Endothelial cell counts were reduced by 0.88% in the PASCAL group and 6.72% in the conventional laser group (P=0.044). The change in corneal endothelial cell counts before and after iridotomy was significant in conventional combined laser iridotomy group (P=0.004). CONCLUSION Combined PASCAL and Nd:YAG laser iridotomy is an effective and safe technique in the dark brown irides of Asians. Furthermore, the short duration of exposure in PASCAL offers the advantages of reducing the total energy used and minimizing the corneal damage. PMID:25938042

  11. Pascal's Wager, infective endocarditis and the "no-lose" philosophy in medicine.

    PubMed

    Shaw, D; Conway, D I

    2010-01-01

    Doctors and dentists have traditionally used antibiotic prophylaxis in certain patient groups in order to prevent infective endocarditis (IE). New guidelines, however, suggest that the risk to patients from using antibiotics is higher than the risk from IE. This paper analyses the relative risks of prescribing and not prescribing antibiotic prophylaxis against the background of Pascal's Wager, the infamous assertion that it is better to believe in God regardless of evidence, because of the prospective benefits should He exist. Many doctors seem to believe the parallel proposition that it is better to prescribe antibiotics, regardless of evidence, because of the prospective benefit conferred upon the patient. This has been called the "no lose philosophy" in medicine: better safe than sorry, even if the evidence inconveniently suggests that following this mantra is potentially more likely to result in sorry than safe. It transpires that, just as Pascal's Wager fails to convince because of a lack of evidence to support it and the costs incurred by trying to believe, so the "belts and braces" approach of prescribing antibiotic prophylaxis is unjustifiable given the actual evidence of potential risk and benefit to the patient. Ultimately, there is no no-lose if your clinical decisions, like Pascal's Wager, are based on faith rather than evidence.

  12. Serous retinal detachment following panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) using Pattern Scan Laser (PASCAL) photocoagulator

    PubMed Central

    Azar, Georges; Wolff, Benjamin; Cornut, Pierre-Loïc; Mauget-Faÿsse, Martine

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To report a case of serous retinal detachment after Pattern Scan Laser (PASCAL) treatment in a diabetic woman. Methods: A 34-year-old diabetic woman presented with florid diabetic retinopathy after a miscarriage during the 20th week of pregnancy. Her Best Corrected Visual Acuity (BCVA) was 20/40 right eye (OD) and 20/30 left eye (OS). Fundus exam showed multiple microaneurysms, large blot hemorrhages and venous dilation both eyes (OU). Fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA) revealed large areas of capillary nonperfusion and panretinal neovascularisation in all quadrants OU. Macular Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography scan (SD-OCT) did not show any foveal thickening. Panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) was immediately performed OU during the same day. Results: Two days after PASCAL treatment, her BCVA decreased to 20/80 OU and worsened to Count Fingers (CF) during the following days. Fundus exam revealed an extensive serous retinal detachment confirmed on SD-OCT. 2 sub-conjunctival injections of 0.1 ml Betamethasone were done OU. One month later, BCVA improved to 20/30 and SD-OCT confirmed regression of retinal detachment. Conclusions: PASCAL is considered to be a safe treatment, but one has to be aware of its potential side effects. It has to be used with caution in pregnant women.

  13. A hardware implementation of the discrete Pascal transform for image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Thomas J.; Aburdene, Maurice F.

    2006-02-01

    The discrete Pascal transform is a polynomial transform with applications in pattern recognition, digital filtering, and digital image processing. It already has been shown that the Pascal transform matrix can be decomposed into a product of binary matrices. Such a factorization leads to a fast and efficient hardware implementation without the use of multipliers, which consume large amounts of hardware. We recently developed a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) implementation to compute the Pascal transform. Our goal was to demonstrate the computational efficiency of the transform while keeping hardware requirements at a minimum. Images are uploaded into memory from a remote computer prior to processing, and the transform coefficients can be offloaded from the FPGA board for analysis. Design techniques like as-soon-as-possible scheduling and adder sharing allowed us to develop a fast and efficient system. An eight-point, one-dimensional transform completes in 13 clock cycles and requires only four adders. An 8x8 two-dimensional transform completes in 240 cycles and requires only a top-level controller in addition to the one-dimensional transform hardware. Finally, through minor modifications to the controller, the transform operations can be pipelined to achieve 100% utilization of the four adders, allowing one eight-point transform to complete every seven clock cycles.

  14. Jean Piaget et sa Recherche: Search and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Elspeth M.

    1981-01-01

    The early influences on and development of Jean Piaget's thinking from which crystallized the ideas forming the foundation of his subsequent work are discussed. The influences noted are personal, intellectual, and professional. (MSE)

  15. Jean-Baptiste Charcot, the French Antarctic expedition and scurvy.

    PubMed

    Teive, Hélio Afonso Ghizoni; Germiniani, Francisco Manoel Branco; Munhoz, Renato Puppi

    2014-07-01

    During the second expedition to the South Pole, Commander Jean-Baptiste Charcot and some members of the crew of "Pourquoi Pas?" developed symptoms suggestive of scurvy. The clinical picture was totally reversed after dietary changes. PMID:25054991

  16. Jean-Baptiste Charcot, the French Antarctic expedition and scurvy.

    PubMed

    Teive, Hélio Afonso Ghizoni; Germiniani, Francisco Manoel Branco; Munhoz, Renato Puppi

    2014-07-01

    During the second expedition to the South Pole, Commander Jean-Baptiste Charcot and some members of the crew of "Pourquoi Pas?" developed symptoms suggestive of scurvy. The clinical picture was totally reversed after dietary changes.

  17. Jeans instability criterion from the viewpoint of Kaniadakis' statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, Everton M. C.; Ananias Neto, Jorge; Barboza, Edesio M., Jr.; Nunes, Rafael C.

    2016-06-01

    In this letter we have derived the Jeans length in the context of the Kaniadakis statistics. We have compared this result with the Jeans length already obtained in the nonextensive Tsallis statistics (Jiulin D., Phys. Lett. A, 320 (2004) 347) and we discussed the main differences between these two models. We have also obtained the κ-sound velocity. Finally, we have applied the results obtained here to analyze an astrophysical system.

  18. From blue jeans to blue genes.

    PubMed

    Boon, Laurence M; Vikkula, Miikka

    2009-03-01

    Cutaneous venous anomalies are common. They are blue and vary in size, number, and location and account for most consultations at specialized interdisciplinary clinics for vascular anomalies. Venous lesions are clinically important because they cause pain, dysfunction, destruction of adjacent tissues, and esthetic concern. Only resection and sclerotherapy are helpful, although not always curative. Understanding etiopathogenesis could help design animal models and develop novel therapeutic approaches. John B. Mulliken, MD, envisioned a project to uncover the genetic basis of an inherited form of venous malformation in a large New England family. Recruitment of 2 young fellows resulted in a collaborative project that unraveled the searched-for gene and its mutation. This was an opening for a new era in vascular anomalies. Two blue genes' mutations were discovered, which account for most, if not all, of the inherited forms of venous anomalies, but other genes as well, for rheologically diverse lesions. Differential diagnosis and management has improved, and animal models are being made. This was achieved through the help of Dr Mulliken, who inspired 2 young investigators in blue jeans to find 2 blue genes.

  19. [Jean-Martin Charcot in German neurology].

    PubMed

    Lehmann, H C; Hartung, H-P; Kieseier, B C

    2004-02-01

    Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893), well known as the founder of modern neurology, was the most celebrated neurologist in the nineteenth century. His international success stemmed not only from mastery descriptions of various neurological disorders but also from his many contacts with scientists all over the world. The aim of this article is to review Charcot's ambivalent relationship to German neuropsychiatry of the time and to examine the German reception of his personality and work. Wilhelm Erb, Ludwig Hirt, Ernst von Leyden, Max Nonne, Adolph Strümpell, and other German physicians cultivated -to varying degrees - professional contacts with Charcot and, based on the fascination of his personality and significance of his work, were long and intensively influenced by the Salpêtrière school. The extent of their admiration became apparent in 1882 by the award of an honorary doctorate to Charcot by the University of Würzburg. Along with increasingly severe criticism of Charcot's research on hysteria and hypnosis, most German neuropsychiatrists became estranged, without neglecting his importance to the development of neurology in Germany.

  20. Jean-Martin Charcot and his legacy.

    PubMed

    Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893) rightly is considered the father of both modern neurology and psychiatry in France and much beyond. While he never was interested in mental disease and what was called 'alienism' at the time, his career at La Salpêtrière Hospital over 30 years was mainly marked by the development of a huge group of students which focused on the study and management of hysteria. When Charcot took office at the beginning of 1862, hysteria was a 'no-man's land', medically speaking, since neither the alienists nor the internists had much interest in this condition. At La Salpêtrière, these chronic patients were largely left to themselves before Désiré Bourneville, one of Charcot's first students, convinced his chief to care for them. Subsequently, the studies of Charcot with Paul Richer, Joseph Babinski, Georges Gilles de la Tourette, Paul Sollier, Pierre Janet, and many others allowed the condition to be addressed in detail. During his stay with Charcot in 1885-1866, Sigmund Freud, a young neuropathologist at the time, became fascinated by hysteria, an interest which probably was the main start of his interest in psychology. Charcot emphasized the concept of mental factors in hysteria, along with that of a 'dynamic' lesion, which accounted for the lack of neuropathological findings in the patients. While his ideas on hysteria and hypnotism were criticized after his death even by former pupils, such as Babinski, recent findings from functional studies using magnetic resonance imaging show how accurate and often visionary Charcot's thinking was in this field.

  1. BRDF characterization of solar diffuser for JPSS J1 using PASCAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgai, Vijay; Johnson, Lindsay; Moskun, Eric M.

    2014-10-01

    The Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is a key sensor on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite as well as the upcoming Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). VIIRS collects Earth radiometric and imagery data in 22 spectral bands from 0.4 to 12.5 μm. Radiometric calibration of the reflective bands in the 0.4 to 2.5 μm wavelength range is performed by measuring sunlight reflectance from Spectralon®. Reflected sun light is directly proportional to the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) of the Spectralon®. This paper presents the BRDF measurements of the Spectralon® for JPSS-1 VIIIRS in the 0.4 - 1,63 μm wavelength using PASCAL (Polarization And Scatter Characterization Analysis of Lambertian materials) with an uncertainty better than 0.8%. PASCAL makes absolute measurements of BRDF in an analogous fashion to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Spectral Tri-function Automated Reflectance Reflectometer (STARR) facility. BRDF is calculated on the basis of the measured incident power, reflected power and geometric factors thus eliminating the need for a standard. The detector rotates about the sample in the plane defined by the source beam and the azimuth rotation of the sample. Unique additional features of this instrument include the ability to vary the sample elevation and roll / clock the sample about its normal thus allowing BRDF measurements in the as use geometry. A description of PASCAL, validation and the BRDF results of the Solar Diffuser are presented. Part dependent non-uniformity of Spectralon® was also observed.

  2. The Jeans Modeling of the Milky Way Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samurovic, S.; Lalovic, A.

    2012-12-01

    In this work we investigate the predictions of Newtonian dynamics and the MOND theory related to the Milky Way galaxy using the Jeans equation. We used the measurements of the radial velocities of the blue horizontal branch (BHB) halo stars to test the predictions of Newtonian gravity and to also extend our study to different MOND models, taking orbital anisotropies that we calculate into account. The halo stars of the Galaxy were used as a tracer of the Galaxy's gravitational potential. The Jeans equation was calculated for both the Newtonian and the MOND approaches. We assumed spherical symmetry and calculated the Jeans equation by taking orbital anisotropies into account. Circular velocities for both approaches were also analyzed. We solved the Jeans equation in spherical approximation and confirm that the Newtonian model without dark matter cannot fit the observed velocity dispersion profile and that the truncated flat model with dark matter can provide a good fit to the observed velocity dispersion. For the MOND models, from the Jeans modeling we found that three models ("simple", "standard" and Zhao, 2007) can provide a fit to the data without significant anisotropies whereas the "toy" model needs anisotropies to obtain the same result.

  3. Pascal's Snowshoes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akcay, Behiye

    2004-01-01

    The chief purpose of this activity is to strengthen students' understanding of concepts of floatation such as surface area and pressure (weight per unit area) via snowshoes. Students brainstorm, make predictions, perform calculations, and practice communication skills through interviewing elders and experts. This activity lets students see the…

  4. Qualitative novelty in seventeenth-century science: Hydrostatics from Stevin to Pascal.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Alan F

    2015-06-01

    Two works on hydrostatics, by Simon Stevin in 1586 and by Blaise Pascal in 1654, are analysed and compared. The contrast between the two serves to highlight aspects of the qualitative novelty involved in changes within science in the first half of the seventeenth century. Stevin attempted to derive his theory from unproblematic postulates drawn from common sense but failed to achieve his goal insofar as he needed to incorporate assumptions involved in his engineering practice but not sanctioned by his postulates. Pascal's theory went beyond common sense by introducing a novel concept, pressure. Theoretical reflection on novel experiments was involved in the construction of the new concept and experiment also provided important evidence for the theory that deployed it. The new experimental reasoning was qualitatively different from the Euclidean style of reasoning adopted by Stevin. The fact that a conceptualization of a technical sense of pressure adequate for hydrostatics was far from obvious is evident from the work of those, such as Galileo and Descartes, who did not make significant moves in that direction. PMID:26227226

  5. Qualitative novelty in seventeenth-century science: Hydrostatics from Stevin to Pascal.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Alan F

    2015-06-01

    Two works on hydrostatics, by Simon Stevin in 1586 and by Blaise Pascal in 1654, are analysed and compared. The contrast between the two serves to highlight aspects of the qualitative novelty involved in changes within science in the first half of the seventeenth century. Stevin attempted to derive his theory from unproblematic postulates drawn from common sense but failed to achieve his goal insofar as he needed to incorporate assumptions involved in his engineering practice but not sanctioned by his postulates. Pascal's theory went beyond common sense by introducing a novel concept, pressure. Theoretical reflection on novel experiments was involved in the construction of the new concept and experiment also provided important evidence for the theory that deployed it. The new experimental reasoning was qualitatively different from the Euclidean style of reasoning adopted by Stevin. The fact that a conceptualization of a technical sense of pressure adequate for hydrostatics was far from obvious is evident from the work of those, such as Galileo and Descartes, who did not make significant moves in that direction.

  6. Successful use of intravitreal bevacizumab and pascal laser photocoagulation in the management of adult Coats' disease.

    PubMed

    Raoof, Naz; Quhill, Fahd

    2013-01-01

    Traditional methods of managing exudative retinal detachment secondary to Coats' disease have been associated with varying degrees of success. We describe a case of a 34 year-old male who presented with a sub-total exudative retinal detachment of the right eye that encroached upon the macula, associated with a vasoproliferative tumor secondary to Coats' disease. The patient under-went successful treatment with two intravitreal injections of bevacizumab (Avastin, Genetech Inc., San Francisco, CA, USA) combined with targeted laser photocoagulation with a 532 nm Pascal laser (Topcon Corp., Tokyo, Japan). The visual acuity improved 5 days after the second intravitreal injection from 6/18 to 6/5, with no residual macular edema and complete regression of the vasoproliferative tumor. The improvement in visual acuity was maintained at 12 months post-treatment. We believe this is the first case report describing the successful use of Pascal laser photocoagulation with intravitreal bevacizumab in the treatment of Coats' disease. Our aim was to defer laser treatment until 'near total' retinal reattachment and regression of the vasoproliferative tumor was achieved. There are, however, reports of vitreous fibrosis in patients with Coats' disease treated with intravitreal bevacizumab. This suggests further long-term follow-up studies are required in patients treated with this approach.

  7. [Comment on “The Haskell Norm”] About Pascal and the unit of viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lliboutry, Louis A.

    I cannot leave unchallenged the assertion that Blaise (not Blasé) Pascal “was a nice man who essentially just used Torricelli's equipment to measure pressure.” I must answer the question of "What in Blasé's background qualified him for the viscosity honor?” (Eos, July 30,1996, p. 291).Blaise Pascal, who was borm in 1623, was a genius indeed. In 1653, 34 years before Newton's Principia, he laid the foundations of hydrostatics. When he was 12 years old, he mastered, again by himself, Euclid's geometry up to the 32nd proposition. At 16, he wrote a fine essay on conics. At 19, he devised and constructed the first mechanical computer in the world. At 29, in addition to his work on fluids, he helped Pierre Fermat set up probability theory and differential calculus. He was also a mystic and a great Christian thinker who wrote outstanding thoughts that were discovered after he died at the early age of 39.

  8. Does Pattern Scan Laser (PASCAL) photocoagulation really induce less VEGF expression in murine retina than conventional laser treatment?

    PubMed

    Konac, Ece; Sonmez, Kenan; Bahcelioglu, Meltem; Kaplanoglu, Gulnur Take; Varol, Nuray; Sarac, Gulce Naz; Ozcan, P Yasin

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the differences in the mRNA and protein expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in murine retina between mice subjected to conventional laser (AG) and those subjected to Pattern Scan Laser (PASCAL) system. Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to one of three groups: Group 1 (G1) receiving retinal scatter laser photocoagulation using with AG photocoagulator (n=16), Group 2 (G2) receiving retinal scatter laser photocoagulation using with PASCAL (n=16) and Group 3 (G3) served as an untreated control group (n=6). Molecular and morphological analyses of VEGF were performed on days 1, 2 and 5 by ELISA, real-time PCR and immuno-histochemical analysis. In samples which underwent AG (G1), when compared with the control group (G3), VEGF mRNA level increased 2.4 folds on day 2, whereas it decreased on day 5 (p□0.001). In samples which underwent PASCAL (G2), on the other hand, VEGF mRNA level increased 1.8 folds on day 1 and 2.2 folds on day 5 when compared with the control group (G3). In samples which underwent AG (G1), when compared with the control group (G3), VEGF protein level increased significantly on day 2, whereas it decreased on day 5 (p□0.001). In group G2, the VEGF levels in the sensory retina significantly increased as compared to control groups at both 2 and 5 days after laser photocoagulation using PASCAL laser (p=0.012, both time points). The peak expressions of VEGF protein in samples which underwent PASCAL and conventional laser were found on day 5 and day 2 respectively. In retinas of PASCAL-treated mice, VEGF immunoreactivity gradually increased during the 5-day follow-up. However, in argon laser group, the strongest VEGF immunoreactivity was detected on day 2, then started to decrease on day 5. In summary, the expression of VEGF protein and mRNA gradually increase during a 5-day follow-up period in PASCAL-treated mouse eyes, whereas in AG group they reach their peak levels on the second day of follow-up and

  9. Jeans instability of rotating magnetized quantum plasma: Influence of radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, H.; Pensia, R. K.

    2015-07-31

    The effect of radiative heat-loss function and rotation on the Jeans instability of quantum plasma is investigated. The basic set of equations for this problem is constructed by considering quantum magnetohydrodynamic (QMHD) model. Using normal mode analysis, the general dispersion relation is obtained. This dispersion relation is studied in both, longitudinal and transverse direction of propagations. In both case of longitudinal and transverse direction of propagation, the Jeans instability criterion is modified due to presence of radiative heat-loss function and quantum correction.

  10. Kinetic theory of Jeans instability of a dusty plasma.

    PubMed

    Pandey, B P; Lakhina, G S; Krishan, V

    1999-12-01

    A kinetic theory of the Jeans instability of a dusty plasma has been developed in the present work. The effect of grain charge fluctuations due to the attachment of electrons and ions to the grain surface has been considered in the framework of Krook's collisional model. We demonstrate that the grain charge fluctuations alter the growth rate of the gravitational collapse of the dusty plasma. The Jeans length has been derived under limiting cases, and its dependence on the attachment frequency is shown. In the absence of gravity, we see that the damping rate of the dust acoustic mode is proportional to the electron-dust collision frequency. PMID:11970688

  11. Jeans instability with exchange effects in quantum dusty magnetoplasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jamil, M.; Rasheed, A.; Rozina, Ch.; Jung, Y.-D.; Salimullah, M.

    2015-08-15

    Jeans instability is examined in magnetized quantum dusty plasmas using the quantum hydrodynamic model. The quantum effects are considered via exchange-correlation potential, recoil effect, and Fermi degenerate pressure, in addition to thermal effects of plasma species. It is found that the electron exchange and correlation potential have significant effects over the threshold value of wave vector and Jeans instability. The presence of electron exchange and correlation effect shortens the time of dust sound that comparatively stabilizes the self gravitational collapse. The results at quantum scale are helpful in understanding the collapse of the self-gravitating dusty plasma systems.

  12. Charcot's son, commander Jean-Baptiste Charcot: from neurology to "Pourquoi Pas?".

    PubMed

    Teive, Hélio A G; Munhoz, Renato P; Simões, Jefferson C

    2012-04-01

    Charcot name became very famous around the world, firstly because of the work of Professor Jean-Martin Charcot, the founder of Clinical Neurology, and, secondly, because of his son, Jean-Baptiste, the world famous maritime explorer.

  13. "Dancing Cannot Start Too Soon": Spiritual Education in the Thought of Jean Paul Friedrich Richter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pridmore, John

    2004-01-01

    Johann Paul Friedrich Richter (1763-1825) adopted the pen-name "Jean Paul" in honour of Jean Jaques Rousseau. His "Levana or the doctrine of education" ("Levana oder Erziehlehre") was once a standard text and required reading in teacher education. Outside Germany the name of Jean Paul is now little known and the seminal educational text for which…

  14. Telematics, Narrative and Poetry: The Parole in Jeans Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trentin, Guglielmo

    1999-01-01

    Explains "Parole in Jeans", a computer-based project developed to promote literature and foster collaborative poetry and story writing in lower secondary schools in Italy, Topics include network-based collaborative production; integration of literary writing and network communication; email; and the organizational model for the online course that…

  15. In Touch with Kids: A Conversation with Jean Marzollo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spodek, Bernard; Barrera, Rosalinda B.; Harris, Violet J.

    2002-01-01

    Interviews Jean Marzollo about her past, present, and future work in children's literature. Notes that her body of writing (more than 100 books of prose and poetry for young readers) transcends the boundaries of genre and disciplines, and is infused with a strong emphasis on rhyme and rhythm intended to capture the ears and minds of emergent and…

  16. Cocteau on the Film; Conversations with Jean Cocteau.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraigneau, Andre, Ed.

    This book is the text of an interview with the French film-maker, Jean Cocteau. It is the corrected edition, with a new introduction by George Amberg, of the English translation of the early 1950 conversation in French. Cocteau discusses the aesthetics, creative aspects, and production processes of his own films and films in general. His approach…

  17. Jean-martin charcot pathologist, neurologist, psychiatrist and physician.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sanjay

    2012-10-01

    Jean-Martin Charcot is known as father of modern neurology. Before him, neurology was only limited to select disorders like chorea. His contributions were not limited to neurology only, as he was instrumental in many new developments in the field of pathology, psychiatry, and internal medicine. Even after 100 years, Charcot`s clinical methods remain the pillar of modern neurology.

  18. Jean-Martin Charcot Pathologist, Neurologist, Psychiatrist and Physician

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    Jean-Martin Charcot is known as father of modern neurology. Before him, neurology was only limited to select disorders like chorea. His contributions were not limited to neurology only, as he was instrumental in many new developments in the field of pathology, psychiatry, and internal medicine. Even after 100 years, Charcot`s clinical methods remain the pillar of modern neurology. PMID:23349597

  19. Karl Popper and Jean Piaget: A Rationale for Constructivism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlow, Steve; Cummings, Rhoda; Aberasturi, Suzanne M.

    2006-01-01

    The current faddish use of the term constructivism has taken on as many different definitions as the number of people attempting to define it. This essay clarifies the meaning of constructivism through an examination of Karl Popper's and Jean Piaget's theories. The authors provide a rationale for the use of Popper's paradigm of "Three Worlds" and…

  20. Reflections on Piaget. Proceedings of the Jean Piaget Memorial Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broughton, John M., Ed.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Sessions of and presentations given at a memorial conference, held in honor of Jean Piaget, are reported. The conference was sponsored by the Developmental Psychology Program at Teachers College, Columbia University, on November 14, 1980. Sixteen scholars from the fields of psychology, philosophy, and education participated. (CJ)

  1. Conceptual Development: Piaget's Legacy. Jean Piaget Symposium Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scholnick, Ellin K., Ed.; Nelson, Katherine, Ed.; Gelman, Susan A., Ed.; Miller, Patricia H., Ed.

    Based on the papers presented at the 1996 Symposium of the Jean Piaget Society and highlighting the extent to which Piaget's ideas have served to scaffold contemporary thinking about every aspect of conceptual development, this volume examines the nature of conceptual development, its foundations, and the sources of its novelties. The chapters…

  2. The Genetic Psychologies of James Mark Baldwin and Jean Piaget.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahan, Emily D.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the ideas proposed by James Mark Baldwin which anticipated much of Jean Piaget's work. The goals, genetic approach, and epistemological assumptions underlying Piaget's inquiry into cognitive development found explicit statement in Baldwin's work. Discusses Baldwin's current importance for psychology. (Author/CB)

  3. Jean Piaget: An Introduction and Reader's Guide for Children's Librarians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getts, Marilyn; Giacoma, Pete

    1981-01-01

    Introduces children's librarians to the theories of cognitive growth in children formulated by Jean Piaget. An annotated bibliography of three primary and 16 secondary references is provided to promote insight and to reinforce commitment to children's services. Five references are listed. (RAA)

  4. Hannah Arendt & Jean Baudrillard: Pedagogy in the Consumer Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Trevor

    2006-01-01

    This paper considers the place of education within our "consumers' society", beginning with Hannah Arendt's account of the rise of consumerism to a position of political dominance and the resulting eclipse of public life. Connections are then made between Arendt's account of this rise and Jean Baudrillard's account of the postmodern proliferation…

  5. Wise, Holistic Thinking: An Interview with Jean Sunde Peterson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henshon, Suzanna E.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Jean Sunde Peterson, professor and director of school-counselor preparation in the Department of Educational Studies at Purdue University. She is a licensed mental health counselor and a national certified counselor, planning to return to clinical work with gifted children and adolescents and their families…

  6. Whimsical Imagery: An Interview with Jean Nunez Donegan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Harriet

    2001-01-01

    Presents an interview with Jean Nunez Donegan focusing on: her career as an artist; her experiences with teaching art at the secondary and college levels; her process for creating art; and her development as an artist. Includes directions for creating a branch with leaves and bamboo using clay. (CMK)

  7. Transfer Function of Multi-Stage Active Filters: A Solution Based on Pascal's Triangle and a General Expression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levesque, Luc

    2012-01-01

    A method is proposed to simplify analytical computations of the transfer function for electrical circuit filters, which are made from repetitive identical stages. A method based on the construction of Pascal's triangle is introduced and then a general solution from two initial conditions is provided for the repetitive identical stage. The present…

  8. A Response to Louise Pascale, "Dispelling the Myth of the Non-Singer: Embracing Two Aesthetics for Singing"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Maya

    2005-01-01

    In her paper, Louise Pascale encouraged a redefinition of the word "singer" and suggested ways to make it apply to a broader spectrum of people. The problem with the current definition, she believes, is that it is outdated and needs to be changed in order to better embrace the ideals of current society. Maya Hoover, responds by saying that in…

  9. The Effect of Classic and Web Based Educational Application, Applied for Turbo Pascal Lesson, on Student Success Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bintas, Jale; Barut, Asim

    2008-01-01

    The aim of research is to compare difference between tenth class students and determine their level of success about classic and web based educational applications of Turbo Pascal lesson. This research was applied to 10 A and 10 TLB students of Izmir Karsikaya Anatolian Technical and industrial high school computer department in second term of…

  10. THERMALLY DRIVEN ATMOSPHERIC ESCAPE: TRANSITION FROM HYDRODYNAMIC TO JEANS ESCAPE

    SciTech Connect

    Volkov, Alexey N.; Johnson, Robert E.; Tucker, Orenthal J.; Erwin, Justin T.

    2011-03-10

    Thermally driven escape from planetary atmospheres changes in nature from an organized outflow (hydrodynamic escape) to escape on a molecule-by-molecule basis (Jeans escape) with increasing Jeans parameter, {lambda}, the ratio of the gravitational to thermal energy of the atmospheric molecules. This change is described here for the first time using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. When heating is predominantly below the lower boundary of the simulation region, R{sub 0}, and well below the exobase of a single-component atmosphere, the nature of the escape process changes over a surprisingly narrow range of Jeans parameters, {lambda}{sub 0}, evaluated at R{sub 0}. For an atomic gas, the transition occurs over {lambda}{sub 0} {approx} 2-3, where the lower bound, {lambda}{sub 0} {approx} 2.1, corresponds to the upper limit for isentropic, supersonic outflow. For {lambda}{sub 0} > 3 escape occurs on a molecule-by-molecule basis and we show that, contrary to earlier suggestions, for {lambda}{sub 0} > {approx}6 the escape rate does not deviate significantly from the familiar Jeans rate. In a gas composed of diatomic molecules, the transition shifts to {lambda}{sub 0} {approx} 2.4-3.6 and at {lambda}{sub 0} > {approx}4 the escape rate increases a few tens of percent over that for the monatomic gas. Scaling by the Jeans parameter and the Knudsen number, these results can be applied to thermally induced escape of the major species from solar and extrasolar planets.

  11. Moissanite anvil cell design for giga-pascal nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Thomas; Herzig, Tobias; Haase, Jürgen

    2014-04-01

    A new design of a non-magnetic high-pressure anvil cell for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments at Giga-Pascal pressures is presented, which uses a micro-coil inside the pressurized region for high-sensitivity NMR. The comparably small cell has a length of 22 mm and a diameter of 18 mm, so it can be used with most NMR magnets. The performance of the cell is demonstrated with external-force vs. internal-pressure experiments, and the cell is shown to perform well at pressures up to 23.5 GPa using 800 μm 6H-SiC large cone Boehler-type anvils. 1H, 23Na, 27Al, 69Ga, and 71Ga NMR test measurements are presented, which show a resolution of better than 4.5 ppm, and an almost maximum possible signal-to-noise ratio.

  12. Moissanite anvil cell design for giga-pascal nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Thomas; Herzig, Tobias; Haase, Jürgen

    2014-04-15

    A new design of a non-magnetic high-pressure anvil cell for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments at Giga-Pascal pressures is presented, which uses a micro-coil inside the pressurized region for high-sensitivity NMR. The comparably small cell has a length of 22 mm and a diameter of 18 mm, so it can be used with most NMR magnets. The performance of the cell is demonstrated with external-force vs. internal-pressure experiments, and the cell is shown to perform well at pressures up to 23.5 GPa using 800 μm 6H-SiC large cone Boehler-type anvils. {sup 1}H, {sup 23}Na, {sup 27}Al, {sup 69}Ga, and {sup 71}Ga NMR test measurements are presented, which show a resolution of better than 4.5 ppm, and an almost maximum possible signal-to-noise ratio.

  13. First light from student Pascal Keller, Eschenbach/Switzerland on 6-8 June 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monstein, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Pascal Keller, a student during his exams for general qualification for university entrance, recently set up a Long Wavelength Array (LWA) antenna and a Callisto system to observe solar radio burst activity in his back yard (figure 1) in Eschenbach, Switzerland. The antenna, spectrometer and software were provided on loan by Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zurich. On the first observation day he observed his 1st light, a type II solar radio burst and some type III bursts. His aim is now to compare this LWA observation with others from the e-Callisto network, which is composed of different antenna types and different antenna sizes as well different locations worldwide. His first four observations on 6 and 8 June 2014 are presented in figures 2 to 5 and associated tables 1 to 4.

  14. Moissanite anvil cell design for Giga-Pascal nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Meier, Thomas; Herzig, Tobias; Haase, Jürgen

    2014-04-01

    A new design of a non-magnetic high-pressure anvil cell for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments at Giga-Pascal pressures is presented, which uses a micro-coil inside the pressurized region for high-sensitivity NMR. The comparably small cell has a length of 22 mm and a diameter of 18 mm, so it can be used with most NMR magnets. The performance of the cell is demonstrated with external-force vs. internal-pressure experiments, and the cell is shown to perform well at pressures up to 23.5 GPa using 800 μm 6H-SiC large cone Boehler-type anvils. (1)H, (23)Na, (27)Al, (69)Ga, and (71)Ga NMR test measurements are presented, which show a resolution of better than 4.5 ppm, and an almost maximum possible signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:24784622

  15. The organization of clinical trials for oncology at IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori "Fondazione G. Pascale" Napoli and the impact of the OECI accreditation process.

    PubMed

    De Feo, Gianfranco; D'Ambrosio, Francesca; Palmieri, Giada; Perrone, Francesco; Ciliberto, Gennaro

    2015-01-01

    The Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico (IRCCS) Istituto Nazionale Tumori "Fondazione G. Pascale" (INT-Pascale) is the largest Clinical Care and Research Cancer Center in Southern Italy. The mission is prevention, diagnosis, and care of cancer and innovative research in oncology. In 2013, INT-Pascale joined the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI) accreditation and classification project along with other Italian IRCCS cancer centers. One of the major OECI requirements that a cancer center must fulfill in order to achieve and maintain OECI certification is a strong emphasis in translational and clinical research: increasing the number of patients enrolled in clinical trials, establishing easily accessible databases for operators, and informing all possible stakeholders, including patients. A characterizing theme of INT-Pascale is a strong commitment to clinical experimental studies. In the 2007-2014 period, 440 clinical trials were activated at INT-Pascale; in this period, the number of clinical trials and observational studies has had an increment achieving in 2014, respectively, the share of 60 clinical trials and 35 observational studies activated. Optimization of clinical trials management and dissemination of the clinical research culture at INT-Pascale are main objectives to be achieved through several actions and procedures being implemented as a component of the OECI improvement plan. Participation in the OECI program has represented an important challenge to improve quality and processes related to promoting, prioritizing, and monitoring clinical trials at INT-Pascale.

  16. Nickel dermatitis provoked by buttons in blue jeans.

    PubMed

    Brandrup, F; Larsen, F S

    1979-05-01

    A total of 79 nickel-sensitive patients (65 women, 14 men) were examined with regard to a present or past eczema corresponding to contact with metallic buttons in blue jeans; 63% of the women and 64% of the men had or had had eczema of this kind. Among 40% of the women below 30 years this was the primary site of manifestation. The seriousness of this sensitivity is illustrated by the fact that two-thirds of the nickel sensitive patients with button dermatitis had or had had eczema of the hands. The conclusion is that blue jean buttons should be made of a material which does not contain nickel, for instance zinc alloys which are presently used for some metallic buttons, or they should be designed in such a way that the button does not directly contact the skin.

  17. Jeans self gravitational instability of strongly coupled quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Prerana; Chhajlani, R. K.

    2014-07-15

    The Jeans self-gravitational instability is studied for quantum plasma composed of weakly coupled degenerate electron fluid and non-degenerate strongly coupled ion fluid. The formulation for such system is done on the basis of two fluid theory. The dynamics of weakly coupled degenerate electron fluid is governed by inertialess momentum equation. The quantum forces associated with the quantum diffraction effects and the quantum statistical effects act on the degenerate electron fluid. The strong correlation effects of ion are embedded in generalized viscoelastic momentum equation including the viscoelasticity and shear viscosities of ion fluid. The general dispersion relation is obtained using the normal mode analysis technique for the two regimes of propagation, i.e., hydrodynamic and kinetic regimes. The Jeans condition of self-gravitational instability is also obtained for both regimes, in the hydrodynamic regime it is observed to be affected by the ion plasma oscillations and quantum parameter while in the kinetic regime in addition to ion plasma oscillations and quantum parameter, it is also affected by the ion velocity which is modified by the viscosity generated compressional effects. The Jeans critical wave number and corresponding critical mass are also obtained for strongly coupled quantum plasma for both regimes.

  18. Evaluation of maritime object detection methods for full motion video applications using the PASCAL VOC Challenge framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaszewski, Martin; Parameswaran, Shibin; Hallenborg, Eric; Bagnall, Bryan

    2015-03-01

    We present an initial target detection performance evaluation system for the RAPid Image Exploitation Resource (RAPIER) Full Motion Video (RFMV) maritime target tracking software. We test and evaluate four statistical target detection methods using 30 Hz full motion video from aerial platforms. Using appropriate algorithm performance criteria inspired by the PASCAL Visual Object Classes (VOC) Challenge, we address the tradeoffs between detection fidelity and computational speed/throughput.

  19. Modified Jeans instability in Lorentzian dusty self-gravitating plasmas with Lennard-Jones potential

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Y. Z. Chen, H. Liu, S. Q.

    2014-11-15

    The Jeans instability in self-gravitating plasma with Kappa distributed dust grains is investigated basing on assumption that the mutual interaction among dust grains is governed by Lennard-Jones potential. It is shown that the presence of additional suprathermal particles has significant effects on the range of unstable modes and growth rate of Jeans instability. Compared with Maxwellian scenario, suprathermality stabilized the Jeans instability.

  20. Jean Piaget: Images of a life and his factory.

    PubMed

    Burman, Jeremy Trevelyan

    2012-08-01

    In this article, I use a new book about Jean Piaget to introduce a new historical method: examining "psychological factories." I also discuss some of the ways that "Great Men" are presented in the literature, as well as opportunities for new projects if one approaches the history of the discipline differently and examines the conditions that made that greatness possible. To that end, the article includes many details about Piaget that have never before been discussed in English. Attention is drawn, in particular, to Piaget's collaborators: the hundreds of workers at his factory in Geneva, many of whom were women. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Jean Piaget: Images of a life and his factory.

    PubMed

    Burman, Jeremy Trevelyan

    2012-08-01

    In this article, I use a new book about Jean Piaget to introduce a new historical method: examining "psychological factories." I also discuss some of the ways that "Great Men" are presented in the literature, as well as opportunities for new projects if one approaches the history of the discipline differently and examines the conditions that made that greatness possible. To that end, the article includes many details about Piaget that have never before been discussed in English. Attention is drawn, in particular, to Piaget's collaborators: the hundreds of workers at his factory in Geneva, many of whom were women. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:23397918

  2. Physical interpretation of Jeans instability in quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2014-08-15

    In this paper, we use the quantum hydrodynamics and its hydrostatic limit to investigate the newly posed problem of Jeans instability in quantum plasmas from a different point of view in connection with the well-known Chandrasekhar mass-limit on highly collapsed degenerate stellar configurations. It is shown that the hydrodynamic stability of a spherically symmetric uniform quantum plasma with a given fixed mass is achieved by increase in its mass-density or decrease in the radius under the action of gravity. It is also remarked that for masses beyond the limiting Jeans-mass, the plasma becomes completely unstable and the gravitational collapse would proceed forever. This limiting mass is found to depend strongly on the composition of the quantum plasma and the atomic-number of the constituent ions, where it is observed that heavier elements rather destabilize the quantum plasma hydrodynamically. It is also shown that the Chandrasekhar mass-limit for white dwarf stars can be directly obtained from the hydrostatic limit of our model.

  3. Jeans analysis of Bok globules in {\\varvec{f(R)}} gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainio, Jaakko; Vilja, Iiro

    2016-10-01

    We examine the effects of f( R) gravity on Jeans analysis of collapsing dust clouds. We provide a method for testing modified gravity models by their effects on star formation as the presence of f(R) gravity is found to modify the limit for collapse. In this analysis we add perturbations to a de Sitter background. As the standard Einstein-Hilbert Lagrangian is modified, new types of dynamics emerge. Depending on the characteristics of a chosen f( R) model, the appearance of new limits is possible. The physicality of these limits is further examined. We find the asymptotic Jeans masses for f( R) theories compared to standard Jeans mass. Through this ratio, the effects of the f( R) modified Jeans mass for viable theories are examined in molecular clouds. Bok globules have a mass range comparable to Jeans masses in question and are therefore used for comparing different f( R) models. Viable theories are found to assist in star formation.

  4. New source and process apportionment method using a three-dimensional chemical transport model: Process, Age, and Source region Chasing ALgorithm (PASCAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, H.; Koike, M.

    2012-08-01

    We have developed a new source and process apportionment method, the Process, Age, and Source region Chasing ALgorithm (PASCAL), and implemented it in a three-dimensional chemical transport model, the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. By adding new variables (tagged species), PASCAL traces 1) the source region of emissions (source apportionment), 2) the age of individual species (elapsed time from emissions), 3) net and gross production and loss amounts from individual physical and chemical processes during transport (Lagrangian way), and 4) local production and loss rates at individual grid cells (Eulerian way) for primary and secondary aerosols and their precursor gases. The main advantage of PASCAL is the third one, which can trace accumulated production and loss amounts of individual processes during transport from source regions to each grid cell (Lagrangian type of integration) for both gross (production and loss) and net (gross production - loss) concentrations. Currently the method is applied for mixing ratios of CO and SO2 and mass concentrations of black carbon and sulfate aerosols. This algorithm is not impacted by the non-linearity of chemical reactions and is computationally efficient. CMAQ/PASCAL model calculations were conducted over the East Asian region to test its performance. The overall validity of PASCAL calculations is confirmed for all species, periods, altitudes, and regions. This algorithm will be a useful tool in evaluating source regions as well as formation and loss processes of aerosols in the atmosphere in order to make effective strategies for emissions reduction.

  5. Transcultural nursing: a perspective derived from Jean-Paul Sartre.

    PubMed

    Rajan, M F

    1995-09-01

    Transcultural nursing care is a well-established theoretical framework. This theory, developed by Madeleine Leininger, can have an impact on clinical practice, academic preparation and nursing research. The heightened interest in applying transcultural care and the increased need to espouse this framework have been triggered by constant population changes. This paper defines transcultural nursing care and expands its definition further by comparing and contrasting it with Jean-Paul Sartre's existentialist perspective. The two modes of existence as defined by Sartre are closely examined. Concrete examples are offered as cultural phenomena and the components of a cultural assessment are discussed and applied. The philosophical thesis is approached from a transcultural nursing perspective and existentialism is shown to serve as a foundation for transcultural nursing. The advantages and disadvantages of transcultural nursing practice and the preparation of transcultural nurses are finally addressed.

  6. STS-86 Mission Specialist Jean-Loup Chretien at TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-86 Mission Specialist Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES, participates in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities at Launch Pad 39A. This will be his third spaceflight, but first on the Space Shuttle. He flew twice as a research-cosmonaut on Russian missions. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. During the docking, STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will transfer to the orbiting Russian station and become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since the last docking mission, STS-84, in May. Launch of Mission STS-86 aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis is targeted for Sept. 25.

  7. [Albert-Jean-Louis Brun, pharmacist of Geneva and vulcanologist].

    PubMed

    Chaigneau, M

    1996-01-01

    Albert-Jean-Louis Brun (1851-1929), was chemist of the University of Bern (Switzerland) and "licencié ès sciences" of the University of Sorbonne (France). In Paris he was a faithful follower of Charles Friedel. In Coutance (Genève), where he was working in his own chemistry, he realised all his researchs. After a trip to Stromboli in 1901, he studied the volcanic phenomena as a chemist, as a mineralogist and as a geophysicist. His researchs brought him till the mediterranean volcanos--Vesuve, Etna, Santorin--, till Java and Krakatoa, then Canarian islands, and the lava lake of Kilauea, etc. The results of his works are collected in a big book called "Recherches sur l'exhalaison volcanique": he presents a theory which was the subject of a polemic with the professor Henri Gautier of the professor Henri Gautier of the Faculty of Pharmacy of Paris. PMID:11624861

  8. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: early contributions of Jean-Martin Charcot.

    PubMed

    Goetz, C G

    2000-03-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is historically an important entity because its manifestations involve distinct signs that can be correlated with gray and white matter lesions at specific sites within the central nervous system. Working at the end of the nineteenth century, the celebrated neurologist, Jean-Martin Charcot, used this disorder as a prototypic example of the power of his research method, termed "méthode anatomoclinique." Using clinical cases and autopsy material, he showed how anatomical lesions in the nervous system could be accurately determined by the presence of carefully analyzed clinical signs. Charcot's work on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis brought together neurological entities formerly considered as disparate disorders, primary amyotrophy and primary lateral sclerosis. In addition, these studies contributed to the understanding of spinal cord and brain stem anatomy and the organization of the normal nervous system. Because of Charcot's fundamental contributions, the eponym "Charcot's disease" has been used internationally in association with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  9. The early evolution of Jean Piaget's clinical method.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Susan Jean

    2005-11-01

    This article analyzes the early evolution of Jean Piaget's renowned "clinical method" in order to investigate the method's strikingly original and generative character. Throughout his 1st decade in the field, Piaget frequently discussed and justified the many different approaches to data collection he used. Analysis of his methodological progression during this period reveals that Piaget's determination to access the genuine convictions of children eventually led him to combine 3 distinct traditions in which he had been trained-naturalistic observation, psychometrics, and the psychiatric clinical examination. It was in this amalgam, first evident in his 4th text, that Piaget discovered the clinical dynamic that would drive the classic experiments for which he is most well known.

  10. The early evolution of Jean Piaget's clinical method.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Susan Jean

    2005-11-01

    This article analyzes the early evolution of Jean Piaget's renowned "clinical method" in order to investigate the method's strikingly original and generative character. Throughout his 1st decade in the field, Piaget frequently discussed and justified the many different approaches to data collection he used. Analysis of his methodological progression during this period reveals that Piaget's determination to access the genuine convictions of children eventually led him to combine 3 distinct traditions in which he had been trained-naturalistic observation, psychometrics, and the psychiatric clinical examination. It was in this amalgam, first evident in his 4th text, that Piaget discovered the clinical dynamic that would drive the classic experiments for which he is most well known. PMID:17152748

  11. [Pierre Bayen rediscovers the Essays of Jean Rey].

    PubMed

    Lafont, Olivier

    2014-10-01

    Jean Rey, a physician from The Bugue, a little town near Bergerac, published, in 1630, a book entitled "Essays" in which he explained the increase of the mass of lead, when it was strongly heated, by the fixation of a part of the air. This revolutionary publication was not received by the European scientists, because the Father Mersenne, "the secretary of learned Europe", was not able to repeat his experiments. Between 1774 and 1775, Pierre Bayen, who was a military apothecary, published his Works concerning the "precipitate per se", for us HgO, showing that when this compound was destroyed by heating, it produced a gas, and that the mass of this gas and the mass of the mercury obtained were equal to the mass of the "precipitate per se". He concluded that the phlogiston theory was contradictory with the results of the experiments. When, later on, Lavoisier published his important article on the increase of the mass of steal when it was heated in the air, he "forgot" to cite the Works of Bayen. In January 1775, Pierre Bayen published a letter in which he mentioned that he had discovered an exemplar of Jean Rey's book and explained that this physician of the 17th century had supposed the explanation that had been proved by Lavoisier. Nicolas Gobet then published a new edition of the "Essays" in 1777, but this new edition became itself quite rare. An inscription pencilled on the book kept by the British Museum pretends that all the exemplars Lavoisier could find were destroyed. It is not rigorous to conclude on a single document, especially when it is not signed, but it is sufficient to induce doubt.

  12. [Pierre Bayen rediscovers the Essays of Jean Rey].

    PubMed

    Lafont, Olivier

    2014-10-01

    Jean Rey, a physician from The Bugue, a little town near Bergerac, published, in 1630, a book entitled "Essays" in which he explained the increase of the mass of lead, when it was strongly heated, by the fixation of a part of the air. This revolutionary publication was not received by the European scientists, because the Father Mersenne, "the secretary of learned Europe", was not able to repeat his experiments. Between 1774 and 1775, Pierre Bayen, who was a military apothecary, published his Works concerning the "precipitate per se", for us HgO, showing that when this compound was destroyed by heating, it produced a gas, and that the mass of this gas and the mass of the mercury obtained were equal to the mass of the "precipitate per se". He concluded that the phlogiston theory was contradictory with the results of the experiments. When, later on, Lavoisier published his important article on the increase of the mass of steal when it was heated in the air, he "forgot" to cite the Works of Bayen. In January 1775, Pierre Bayen published a letter in which he mentioned that he had discovered an exemplar of Jean Rey's book and explained that this physician of the 17th century had supposed the explanation that had been proved by Lavoisier. Nicolas Gobet then published a new edition of the "Essays" in 1777, but this new edition became itself quite rare. An inscription pencilled on the book kept by the British Museum pretends that all the exemplars Lavoisier could find were destroyed. It is not rigorous to conclude on a single document, especially when it is not signed, but it is sufficient to induce doubt. PMID:25671980

  13. The effect of spin induced magnetization on Jeans instability of viscous and resistive quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Prerana; Chhajlani, R. K.

    2014-03-15

    The effect of spin induced magnetization and electrical resistivity incorporating the viscosity of the medium is examined on the Jeans instability of quantum magnetoplasma. Formulation of the system is done by using the quantum magnetohydrodynamic model. The analysis of the problem is carried out by normal mode analysis theory. The general dispersion relation is derived from set of perturbed equations to analyse the growth rate and condition of self-gravitational Jeans instability. To discuss the influence of resistivity, magnetization, and viscosity parameters on Jeans instability, the general dispersion relation is reduced for both transverse and longitudinal mode of propagations. In the case of transverse propagation, the gravitating mode is found to be affected by the viscosity, magnetization, resistivity, and magnetic field strength whereas Jeans criterion of instability is modified by the magnetization and quantum parameter. In the longitudinal mode of propagation, the gravitating mode is found to be modified due to the viscosity and quantum correction in which the Jeans condition of instability is influenced only by quantum parameter. The other non-gravitating Alfven mode in this direction is affected by finite electrical resistivity, spin induced magnetization, and viscosity. The numerical study for the growth rate of Jeans instability is carried out for both in the transverse and longitudinal direction of propagation to the magnetic field. The effect of various parameters on the growth rate of Jeans instability in quantum plasma is analysed.

  14. Jeans instability of magnetized quantum plasma: Effect of viscosity, rotation and finite Larmor radius corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Shweta Sharma, Prerana; Chhajlani, R. K.

    2015-07-31

    The Jeans instability of self-gravitating quantum plasma is examined considering the effects of viscosity, finite Larmor radius (FLR) corrections and rotation. The analysis is done by normal mode analysis theory with the help of relevant linearized perturbation equations of the problem. The general dispersion relation is obtained using the quantum magneto hydrodynamic model. The modified condition of Jeans instability is obtained and the numerical calculations have been performed to show the effects of various parameters on the growth rate of Jeans instability.

  15. [Fatal diseases and "imaginary" suffering. "Hypochondria" and "consumption" in the correspondence between Jean Paul and Johann Bernhard Hermann, with a perspective on Jean Paul's literature and aesthetics].

    PubMed

    Meier, Monika

    2007-01-01

    The German writerJean Paul (Johann Paul Friedrich Richter, 1763-1825) and his friendJohann Bernhard Hermann (1761-1790) became acquainted with the thoughts of late Enlightenment at the University of Leipzig. They particularly appreciated the anthropology of Ernst Platner, who taught philosophy and aesthetics as well as medicine. Their confidential correspondence contains reflections on their respective situation and well being. Both write about feeling ill and label their illness "hypochondria". In the course of the correspondence Jean Paul's understanding of hypochondria evolves from an illness of the entrails as he follows Hermann, who supports the modern concept of hypochondria as an illness of the nerves. Two important themes from this correspondence recur in Jean Paul's novels and tales: firstly, his way of expressing comfort is related to his aesthetics, and secondly, the satirical way of portraying at least certain aspects of illness as imaginary reappears in his first successful novel "The Invisible Lodge" (1793).

  16. Interbeing and Mindfulness: A Bridge to Understanding Jean Watson's Theory of Human Caring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sitzman, Kathleen L.

    2002-01-01

    Explains and compares Thich Naht Hanh's concept of interbeing and mindfulness and Jean Watson's theory of human caring. Describes the application of mindful practices to holistic nursing and nursing education. (Contains 12 references.) (SK)

  17. In memory of Jean-François Stéphan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchet, René

    2016-01-01

    This thematic issue of Comptes rendus Geoscience has been assembled to honor the memory of our late colleague and friend Jean-François Stéphan, whose remarkable scientific and community-directed activity has left a deep imprint on both the French and the International Earth Science communities. This volume brings together contributions of colleagues of Jean-François who were also close friends. Naturally, tectonics is the common theme of these contributions. Some of the papers presented here focus on tectonic questions and/or regions Jean-François worked on during his career; other papers present studies Jean-François motivated or encouraged in one way or another. Taken together, the papers of this thematic issue take the reader on a beautiful trip, from past to current tectonics.

  18. Jean-Baptiste Belley-Mars: The Obscure Life, the Authentic Legacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fikes, Robert Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Describes how Jean-Baptiste Belley-Mars, a former slave, influenced Haitian history through his role in arguing for the abolition of slavery in the French colonies at the 1794 Paris National Convention. (MJL)

  19. Use of monitors in Pascal on the Lemur: a tutorial on the barrier, self-scheduling FOR-loop, and askfor monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Clausing, J.A.; Hagstrom, R.T.; Lusk, E.L.; Overbeek, R.A.

    1984-07-01

    A set of macro libraries has been developed that allows programmers to write portable Pascal code for multiprocessors. This document presents, in tutorial form, the macros used to implement three common synchronization patterns: self-scheduling FOR-loops, barrier synchronization, and the askfor monitor.

  20. Ivan Djaja (Jean Giaja) and the Belgrade School of Physiology.

    PubMed

    Andjus, P R; Stojilkovic, S S; Cvijic, G

    2011-01-01

    The founder of physiology studies in the Balkans and the pioneer of research on hypothermia, Ivan Djaja (Jean Giaja) was born 1884 in L'Havre. Giaja gained his PhD at the Sorbonne in 1909. In 1910 he established the first Chair of Physiology in the Balkans and organized the first Serbian Institute for Physiology at the School of Philosophy of the University of Belgrade. He led this Institute for more than 40 subsequent years. His most notable papers were in the field of thermoregulation and bioenergetics. Djaja became member of the Serbian and Croatian academies of science and doctor honoris causa of Sorbonne. In 1952 for the seminal work on the behavior of deep cooled warm blooded animals he became associate member of the National Medical Academy in Paris. In 1955 the French Academy of Sciences elected him as associate member in place of deceased Sir Alexander Fleming. Djaja died in 1957 during a congress held in his honor. He left more than 200 scientific and other papers and the golden DaVincian credo "Nulla dies sine experimento". His legacy was continued by several generations of researchers, the most prominent among them being Stefan Gelineo, Radoslav Andjus and Vojislav Petrović.

  1. [Jean-Paul Marat: physician, scientist and revolutionary].

    PubMed

    Cerda L, Jaime

    2010-01-01

    Physician, scientist and revolutionary are the biographical aspects that had better summarize the life of Jean-Paul Marat (1743-1793). Due to the role that he played during the French Revolution, his work as a physician and scientist, prior to the events of l789, was forgotten. Marat made important contributions in the area of optics and electricity reflected in numerous publications, as well as translating Newton's Opticks (1787). Well known for his radical and aggressive ideas, his political vocation led him to embrace the revolutionary cause after the events of the Bastille. His figure was not indifferent to his contemporaries; although considered a hero by the poorest citizens, aristocrats and bourgeois considered him a cruel extremist. During the last years of his life, he suffered a cutaneous disease, the diagnosis of which is still a matter of controversy. Proposed diagnoses include eczema, seborrheic dermatitis, scabies and dermatitis herpetica, among others. Marat was assassinated by Charlotte Corday in 1793, becoming a martyr for some segments of the society that worshiped his memory. He was a man with a complex and curious personality whose figure and legacy are still a matter of discussion.

  2. [Baron Dominique-Jean Larrey: the founder of urological traumatology].

    PubMed

    Hatzinger, M; Ameijenda, C; Lent, V; Sohn, M

    2012-12-01

    Dominique-Jean Larrey (1766-1842) was Surgeon-in-Chief of the Grande Army under Napoleon Bonaparte (1769-1821) and personal physician of the Emperor. Against the opposition of the traditionalists he introduced the "ambulances volantes", the so-called flying ambulances. The aim was the medical treatment of the injured soldiers immediately on the battlefield. This revolutionary treatment led to a benefit not only for the own soldiers, but also for the wounded enemies. His innovation in the field of immediate assistance of wounded persons, together with Larreys' outstanding medical competence, saved thousands of soldiers lives on the battlefield of the Napoleonic wars. His memories concerning the military campaigns, have been even up to the 20th century one of the standard works of modern military surgery. He had as well great interest in urolological injuries of the urinary system and their conservative and operative care. Up to these days, his work shows a surprising actuality and perfect anatomic understanding. In a time without anaesthetics, antibiotics and under primitive circumstances, Larrey and his collegues accomplished surgical feats. Larreys flying ambulances were copied by many different countries. The American Mobile Army Surgical Hospital (M.A.S.H) is clearly based on his thoughts and ideals. In our opinion he is the father of the modern war surgery as well the urological traumatology. PMID:23254353

  3. [Jean Martin Charcot and his controversial research on hysteria].

    PubMed

    von Plessen, K

    1996-12-10

    Jean Martin Charcot (1825-1893) is known as the founder of neurology in France and was one of the most versatile medical researchers of his times. At the climax of his career in the Salpêtrière in Paris he began to study the phenomenon of hysteria. Hysterical symptoms were very common in the late nineteenth century in Europe and were looked upon as a challenge to medical science. By means of accurate observation, Charcot managed to describe the distinct features of hysteria. The disease became an accepted medical entity and patients were less often regarded as simulators. Charcot presumed that the disease had a physical cause, and tried to prove this by means of patho-anatomical studies and later by experiment, with help of hypnosis. Charcot's despotic personality, the extraordinary circumstances at the Salpêtrière and the hysteric patients formed a fascinating setting that gives exemplary insight into the non-linear progress of medical science.

  4. [Jean-Martin Charcot, his time and Kinnosuke Miura].

    PubMed

    Aki, M

    1993-12-01

    Jean-Martin Charcot died unexpectedly on August 16, 1893, just 100 years ago. As a young physician, he worked in pathology and medicine under Rayer for nine years, and wrote on diseases of the heart, lungs and kidneys, on rheumatism and gout. In 1862, he was appointed as medical superintendent to the Hospice de la Salpêtrière. This institution contained a population of over 5000 persons, affected with every kind of chronic maladies, particularly with diseases of the nervous system. As a clinician, he could begin to observe, examine and describe with his excellent master Duchenne de Boulogne. And as an anatomo-pathologist in his association with his colleague Vulpian, he devoted himself to compare the pathological findings with clinical records, to bring order into this chaos. During the 8-year period from 1862 to 1870, Charcot made many discoveries that made firm basis for neurology as one new specialty in medicine. The first beautiful fruit of their effort was the clinico-pathological identification of "Disseminated Sclerosis", clearly differentiated from "Paralysis agitans" of which first reported by Parkinson 1817. He succeeded Vulpian to the chair of pathological anatomy in 1872. The sequential decrement of the shift may be a reason why the disease is self-limited.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Jean-Martin Charcot: neurologist by avocation, nephrologist by yearning.

    PubMed

    Eknoyan, Garabed

    2011-01-01

    In an age of medical advances and specialization, Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893) helped found the discipline of neurology and in 1882 was appointed the first Professor of Diseases of the Nervous System in France. As an investigator with broad interests and vast knowledge, Charcot contributed to several other disciplines. An early mentor and dominant figure in Charcot's formative years was Pierre Rayer (1793-1867), famous for his seminal contributions to the study of the kidney, who gifted to Charcot his passion for clinical pathological correlations and likely a yearning for the study of kidney diseases. Famous for the clarity and incisiveness of his formal teaching presentations, Charcot lectured on the kidney at the Faculty of Medicine in Paris in 1877. Translated into English and published as a book titled Lectures on Bright's Disease, those lectures became widely accessible and quoted in the literature through the 1940s. In addition, at a time when he was already concentrating on the study of neurological disorders, Charcot maintained his life-long interest in the kidney and published original studies on the pathological changes of the kidney in gout and experimental lead poisoning, as well as supporting a study of hysterical ischuria by his students.

  6. 50 years of space science (Jean Dominique Cassini Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, Roger-Maurice

    2013-04-01

    The launch of Sputnik-1 triggered my fascination for space at the age of 20. The past 50 years have allowed me to study the Sun with sounding rockets and satellites, revealing the complexity of our star, contributing to the understanding of its physics, and offering surprising manifestations of its behavior and of its effects on Earth. Building instruments for space astronomy, managing teams of space scientists and engineers, led me to become the science director of the European space agency between 1983 and 2001 where I formulated and managed the Horizon 2000 program, which led Europe to occupy the front row of world space science. The Jean Dominique Cassini Medal Lecture offers me an opportunity, to describe the most spectacular achievements of this long-term plan and to outline some basic principles for reaching success, including the essential role of international cooperation with shared partnership. The Lecture also identifies key problems and controversial issues that space astronomy and exploration will face in the 21st century.

  7. [Baron Dominique-Jean Larrey: the founder of urological traumatology].

    PubMed

    Hatzinger, M; Ameijenda, C; Lent, V; Sohn, M

    2012-12-01

    Dominique-Jean Larrey (1766-1842) was Surgeon-in-Chief of the Grande Army under Napoleon Bonaparte (1769-1821) and personal physician of the Emperor. Against the opposition of the traditionalists he introduced the "ambulances volantes", the so-called flying ambulances. The aim was the medical treatment of the injured soldiers immediately on the battlefield. This revolutionary treatment led to a benefit not only for the own soldiers, but also for the wounded enemies. His innovation in the field of immediate assistance of wounded persons, together with Larreys' outstanding medical competence, saved thousands of soldiers lives on the battlefield of the Napoleonic wars. His memories concerning the military campaigns, have been even up to the 20th century one of the standard works of modern military surgery. He had as well great interest in urolological injuries of the urinary system and their conservative and operative care. Up to these days, his work shows a surprising actuality and perfect anatomic understanding. In a time without anaesthetics, antibiotics and under primitive circumstances, Larrey and his collegues accomplished surgical feats. Larreys flying ambulances were copied by many different countries. The American Mobile Army Surgical Hospital (M.A.S.H) is clearly based on his thoughts and ideals. In our opinion he is the father of the modern war surgery as well the urological traumatology.

  8. BOOK REVIEW: Jean-Charles Houzeau et son temps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, C.; Verhas, P.

    2002-12-01

    This is a wonderful book. It describes the life and work of Belgian astronomer Jean-Charles Houzeau (1820-1888) and, as the last three words of the title indicate, it has a broader focus including the social, industrial and scientific context of the second part of the 19th century. This is set in a very broad international social context including social revolutions in Belgium and France, and the abolition of slavery in the United States. The biography clearly shows that this hard-working man was driven by science and justice, by individualism and generosity, by humor and sentiment. The book is divided in four parts, each part is placed in its own historical context. The first part "The apprentice, the master and his disciples" describes Houzeau's childhood and young years, his early scientific career at the Observatory in Brussels, and his relationship with Adolphe Quetelet. The evolution of this relationship is very well documented: the turbulent revolutionary Houzeau versus cool, moderated and diplomatic royalist Quetelet, the observer versus the mathematician theorist. But both were very dedicated teachers: Quetelet established public courses and after the Revolution of 1830 he contributed to the foundation of the University of Brussels; Houzeau was the peripatetic teacher wherever place he was, also after his return to Belgium. The second part is "The politician" and deals with Houzeau's political ideas and revolutionary attitudes and their consequences. His revolutionary ideas, though, were not confined to politics only: he also severely criticised the paucity of high-precision observations collected at the Royal Observatory in his days. Because he participated at revolutionary meetings, Houzeau was fired from his position at the Observatory by the Minister of Interior Affairs Charles Rogier. Thus started his peripathetic life, covering observational work in astronomy, geography, geodesy and natural sciences in many places in Belgium and abroad. The third

  9. [Jean-Martin Charcot and his student, Kinnosuke Miura].

    PubMed

    Miura, Y

    1993-12-01

    Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893) was professor and chairman of the neurological clinic at La Salpêtrière, Paris (1882-1893). His student, Doctor Kinnosuke Miura (1864-1950) (my father) graduated in 1887 from Tokyo University. After two years' training under Prof. Erwin von Bälz in Tokyo, he obtained an opportunity to go abroad as a private doctor of Prince Arisugawa. He stayed in Paris during a period of 1889-1890. In these days, he had a chance to get acquaintance with Charcot. When his duty to the Prince was over, he could join the Charcot's clinic during 1891-1892. As he was deeply impressed by Charcot's neurology, after his return to Japan, he organized the Japanese Society of Neurology in 1902 with his colleague, Prof. Shuzo Kure. In the late 1930s, when I was a student at Faculty of Medicine, Tokyo University, my father told me very often how Maître Charcot studied carefully neurological symptoms; how he observed patients every day, at least during two weeks until he presented the patients before the students on every Tuesday at the amphitheatre of La Salpestrière; how Charcot had keen eye at autopsy, etc. He emphasized the importance of anatomo-pathologic examination besides careful clinical observation. Even after the death of Charcot, he continued a good relationships with Charcot's successors, especially with Pierre Marie and Emile Achard. On May 25, 1925, he celebrated a centenary anniversary of Charcot's birthday in Tokyo.

  10. Did Jean-Martin Charcot contribute to stroke?

    PubMed

    Bogousslavsky, Julien; Paciaroni, Maurizio

    2010-01-01

    Stroke was never identified as a significant, autonomous field of activity of the emerging school of neurology at La Salpêtrière, which developed after the appointment of Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893) during the last days of 1861. However, stroke was already present in Charcot's first paper (1851), which dealt with a case of multiple organ cardiac embolism, including middle cerebral artery infarction, at a time when the studies of Rudolf Virchow on thromboembolism were unknown in France. A few years later, Charcot made a still up-to-date description of vascular intermittent claudication, which had only been reported in the horse. In the 1860s, Charcot and his pupils presented several major works dealing with cerebrovascular disease, including famous studies on miliary aneurysms in cerebral hemorrhage. This work was done with Charles Bouchard, at the time Charcot's 'interne', but who would become one of his 'political' opponents 2 decades later, when in 1892, as president of the 'agrégation' jury, he rejected the professorship application of 4 protégés of Charcot, including Joseph Babinski and Georges Gilles de la Tourette. Further work on cerebrovascular disease by Charcot included histological studies of brain 'softening', paraneoplastic cerebral arterial occlusion and consequences of stroke (e.g. arthropathies, vegetative changes, contractures and abnormal movements). Brain localization, one of Charcot's major neurological topics, was also largely based on stroke case studies. Charcot's work on stroke remains poorly recognized, but it demonstrates his unique skills in stimulating scientific work in younger colleagues, many of whom subsequently became major figures of neurology and psychiatry.

  11. The Jeans modeling of the Milky Way galaxy: implications of the kinematics of the stellar halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samurović, S.; Lalović, A.

    2011-07-01

    Aims: We investigate the predictions of Newtonian dynamics and the MOND theory related to the Milky Way galaxy using the Jeans equation. Methods: We used the measurements of the radial velocities of the blue horizontal branch (BHB) halo stars to test the predictions of Newtonian gravity and to also extend our study to different MOND models, taking orbital anisotropies that we calculate into account. Results: The halo stars of the Galaxy were used as a tracer of the Galaxy's gravitational potential. The Jeans equation was calculated for both the Newtonian and the MOND approaches. We assumed spherical symmetry and calculated the Jeans equation by taking orbital anisotropies into account. Circular velocities for both approaches were also analyzed. Conclusions: We solved the Jeans equation in spherical approximation and confirm that the Newtonian model without dark matter cannot fit the observed velocity dispersion profile and that the truncated flat model with dark matter can provide a good fit to the observed velocity dispersion. For the MOND models, from the Jeans modeling and the models of the circular velocity curves, we found that two models can provide a fit to the data without significant anisotropies whereas two other tested models need various anisotropies to obtain the same result.

  12. EAARL Topography - Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Segura, Martha; Yates, Xan

    2008-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived first surface (FS) and bare earth (BE) topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL; the National Park Service (NPS), Gulf Coast Network, Lafayette, LA; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve in Louisiana, acquired on September 22, 2006. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for submeter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a Lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system

  13. BOOK REVIEW: Jean-Charles Houzeau et son temps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, C.; Verhas, P.

    2002-12-01

    This is a wonderful book. It describes the life and work of Belgian astronomer Jean-Charles Houzeau (1820-1888) and, as the last three words of the title indicate, it has a broader focus including the social, industrial and scientific context of the second part of the 19th century. This is set in a very broad international social context including social revolutions in Belgium and France, and the abolition of slavery in the United States. The biography clearly shows that this hard-working man was driven by science and justice, by individualism and generosity, by humor and sentiment. The book is divided in four parts, each part is placed in its own historical context. The first part "The apprentice, the master and his disciples" describes Houzeau's childhood and young years, his early scientific career at the Observatory in Brussels, and his relationship with Adolphe Quetelet. The evolution of this relationship is very well documented: the turbulent revolutionary Houzeau versus cool, moderated and diplomatic royalist Quetelet, the observer versus the mathematician theorist. But both were very dedicated teachers: Quetelet established public courses and after the Revolution of 1830 he contributed to the foundation of the University of Brussels; Houzeau was the peripatetic teacher wherever place he was, also after his return to Belgium. The second part is "The politician" and deals with Houzeau's political ideas and revolutionary attitudes and their consequences. His revolutionary ideas, though, were not confined to politics only: he also severely criticised the paucity of high-precision observations collected at the Royal Observatory in his days. Because he participated at revolutionary meetings, Houzeau was fired from his position at the Observatory by the Minister of Interior Affairs Charles Rogier. Thus started his peripathetic life, covering observational work in astronomy, geography, geodesy and natural sciences in many places in Belgium and abroad. The third

  14. Design jeans for recycling: a supply chain case study in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van Bommel, Harrie; Goorhuis, Maarten

    2014-11-01

    Because the insight is raising that waste prevention needs an integral product chain approach, a product chain project was awarded with an International Solid Waste Association grant. The project decided to focus on jeans because of the large environmental impacts of cotton and the low recycling rates. The project used an open innovative approach by involving many actors from the different phases of the chain and included student and applied researchers. In a 'design jeans for recycling' students' workshop, prototypes of jeans that are easier to recycle have been developed. Integrating the new generation from different disciplines in the project proved to be very successful. The results show that an open innovation process can lead to very creative ideas and that lessons learned from this project could be used to develop new chain projects for other products. An important condition is that key actors are willing to cooperate in an open innovation approach.

  15. Design jeans for recycling: a supply chain case study in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van Bommel, Harrie; Goorhuis, Maarten

    2014-11-01

    Because the insight is raising that waste prevention needs an integral product chain approach, a product chain project was awarded with an International Solid Waste Association grant. The project decided to focus on jeans because of the large environmental impacts of cotton and the low recycling rates. The project used an open innovative approach by involving many actors from the different phases of the chain and included student and applied researchers. In a 'design jeans for recycling' students' workshop, prototypes of jeans that are easier to recycle have been developed. Integrating the new generation from different disciplines in the project proved to be very successful. The results show that an open innovation process can lead to very creative ideas and that lessons learned from this project could be used to develop new chain projects for other products. An important condition is that key actors are willing to cooperate in an open innovation approach. PMID:25245293

  16. Secondary instability of Jeans mode in a gravitating fluid with uniform rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, Nikhil

    2011-06-15

    An axisymmetric rotating gas in a gravitational field is examined for its stability to two dimensional disturbances with first azimuthal mode. It is shown that a quasi-equilibrium is established when pressure and Coriolis force act against primary Jeans instability. A linear perturbation on this inhomogeneous equilibrium gives rise to secondary instability, which grows differently from homogeneous case. A stationary phase integral method demonstrates that the instability grows algebraically due to the free energy associated with the axisymmetric equilibrium. This secondary Jeans instability may have some bearing with the structure formations in the universe.

  17. A League of Willing Workers: The Impact of Northern Philanthropy, Virginia Estelle Randolph and the Jeanes Teachers in Early Twentieth-Century Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pincham, Linda B.

    2005-01-01

    The Jeanes Fund helped solve the rural school problem and recognized the work of Virginia Randolph whose philosophy and teaching techniques were adopted by the Jeanes teachers. The work of Virginia Randolph and the Jeanes teachers is detailed and how their contributions throughout the South earned accolades for local school and community…

  18. Probes into the Actuality of Fantasy: Jean Epstein's "La Chute de la Maison Usher."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpole, Charles H.

    "La Chute de la Maison Usher" is a film adaptation by Jean Epstein of two stories by Edgar Allan Poe, "The Fall of the House of Usher" and "The Oval Portrait." This film was typical of Epstein's artistic preoccupation with the ambivalence of reality as expressed in fantasy or surrealism, in qualities of movement, and in the vagaries of seeing and…

  19. Rhetoric in Group Action: A Theory of Social Movements from Jean-Paul Sartre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warnick, Barbara

    The implications of a social movement theory advanced by Jean-Paul Sartre in his "Critique of Dialectical Reason" is examined in this paper. The paper notes that unlike sociologists and rhetoricians who have stressed the psychology of movement adherents, the reasons for movement formation, or the movement's interaction with power agents, Sartre…

  20. Resisting a Discourse of Mastery: A Conversation with Jean-Francois Lyotard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Gary A.

    1995-01-01

    Presents an interview with Jean-Francois Lyotard, which provides insight into many concerns, including his views on culture, feminism, postmodernism, and writing. Explains Lyotard's belief that philosophy and inquiry ought to pursue perpetual questions as opposed to "answers" or mastery of a subject. (TB)

  1. A Portrait of the Teacher as Friend and Artist: The Example of Jean-Jacques Rousseau

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwan, Hunter

    2011-01-01

    The following is a reflection on the possibility of teaching by example, and especially as the idea of teaching by example is developed in the work of Jean-Jacques Rousseau. My thesis is that Rousseau created a literary version of himself in his writings as an embodiment of his philosophy, rather in the same way and with the same purpose that…

  2. Jean Vigo's "Zéro De Conduite" and the Spaces of Revolt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanobbergen, Bruno; Grosvenor, Ian; Simon, Frank

    2014-01-01

    In this article we will contribute to the contemporary theoretical debate about film by considering, from a history-of-education perspective, the film "Zéro de conduite" by Jean Vigo (1905--1934). This film is classified under the umbrella of "poetic realism": a product of "cinéma de gauche" and an avant-gardist,…

  3. [Jean Chièze (1898-1975), medical engraver and illustrator].

    PubMed

    Bouday, Etienne

    2010-01-01

    As an imaginative and sensitive woodcutter Jean Chièze illustrated more than 130 books and realised many draws, paintings and lithographs and about 2000 engravings. He took part in some editions about Rabelais, Hippocrates, Galen and Ambroise Paré.

  4. A Return to Love in William James and Jean-Luc Marion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rocha, Samuel

    2009-01-01

    In this essay Samuel Rocha primarily addresses, and challenges, the modern conception of reason and the lowly place of intuition, feeling, and love in what has become traditional philosophy and education. Drawing upon the rich thought of William James and Jean-Luc Marion, Rocha introduces the reader to a certain harmony between their ideas, most…

  5. Can You Hear Me Now? Jean-Jacques Rousseau on Listening Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laverty, Megan J.

    2011-01-01

    In this essay Megan J. Laverty argues that Jean-Jacques Rousseau's conception of humane communication and his proposal for teaching it have implications for our understanding of the role of listening in education. She develops this argument through a close reading of Rousseau's most substantial work on education, "Emile: Or, On Education". Laverty…

  6. The Autodidact in Defense of Himself: Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Knut Hamsun.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buttry, Dolores

    1980-01-01

    Describes Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Knut Hamsun as self-educated men who never ceased to warn of the evils of formal education. Quoting from their works, considers their feelings toward education as revealed in Rousseau's "Emile," with its description of ideal education, and in the ill effects of education on Hamsun's characters. (AYC)

  7. Jean-Jacques Rousseau among the Footnotes: Mapping Interdisciplinary Research in Social Science Citation Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herubel, Jean-Pierre V. M.; Buchanan, Anne L.

    1994-01-01

    Examination of citations indexed in Social Science Citation Index (SSCI) reveals salient patterns which can be helpful in determining interdisciplinarity and/or disciplinarity. Collection development efforts can be enhanced by examination of citation patterns of published research related to a classical social science author such as Jean-Jacques…

  8. Jean-Martin Charcot's Role in the 19th Century Study of Music Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Julene K.; Lorch, Marjorie; Nicolas, Serge; Graziano, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-93) was a well-known French neurologist. Although he is widely recognized for his discovery of several neurological disorders and his research into aphasia, Charcot's ideas about how the brain processes music are less well known. Charcot discussed the music abilities of several patients in the context of his "Friday…

  9. The Enunciation of the Subject: Sharing Jean-Luc Nancy's Singular Plural in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    This article seeks to explore the implications of Jean-Luc Nancy's reading of the subject for educational philosophy by connecting his re-interpretation of Descartes to his later thinking on what he names the ontological singular plural. Nancy's re-imagining of the Cogito coalesces around the figure of the mouth ("la bouche") through…

  10. A Biographic Comparison Tracing the Origin of Their Ideas of Jean Piaget and Lev Vygotsky.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pass, Susan

    This paper compares the early life, background, and education of Jean Piaget and Lev Vygotsky. It makes the case that an adaptation of the curve developed by C. Quigley can be used to trace the motivations of both Piaget and Vygotsky in creating their respective theories. The analysis also reveals the adversity that each man faced. Although they…

  11. A Biographic Comparison Tracing the Similarities in the Lives of Jean Piaget and Lev Vygotsky.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pass, Susan

    This paper focuses on similarities in the lives of Jean Piaget and Lev Vygotsky to enlighten study of their pedagogies and to provide some information for current classroom techniques. Neither man had a great deal to say about his early life, although Piaget published an autobiography. A number of primary sources were used to construct the…

  12. Jean Piaget and Rudolf Steiner: Stages of Child Development and Implications for Pedagogy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginsburg, Iona H.

    1982-01-01

    The views of Jean Piaget and Rudolf Steiner concerning children's stages of development are compared and related to present-day instructional practices used in the Waldorf schools, which employ Steiner's ideas. Educational principles and practices used at the elementary school level are discussed. (PP)

  13. Manufactured Memory, Altered Belief and Self Report Mirage: The Alleged False Memory of Jean Piaget Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leavitt, Frank

    1999-01-01

    It is argued that a Jean Piaget anecdote about an alleged memory implanted in a young child leading to both a visual and semantic memory that persists despite disconfirming evidence is entirely different than the recovered memory debate, which is about the alleged introduction of memories to grown adults. (CR)

  14. Looking for Marx: A Review of "Marx and Education" by Jean Anyon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banfield, Grant

    2011-01-01

    "Marx and Education" is the second and latest volume in the new "Routledge Key Ideas in Education Series". The series is intended to offer readers concise introductions to specific sub-field developments in the field of educational scholarship. For their "Marx and Education" volume, Greg Dimitriadis and Bob Lingard invited Jean Anyon to illuminate…

  15. An Interview with Mark Ahlness and Jean Carmody about the Earth Day Groceries Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strangman, Nicole

    2002-01-01

    Outlines an interview with Mark Ahlness, a third-grade teacher at Arbor Heights Elementary School in Seattle, Washington, and Jean Carmody, an art teacher at two elementary schools in Cranston, Rhode Island. Describes their collaborative project called the Earth Day Groceries Project. Explains that in this Internet project, students decorate…

  16. Il transito di Mercurio osservato da Jean Gambart il 5 maggio 1832: analisi ed eliometria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    2016-05-01

    Jean Gambart (1800-1836) observed the transit of Mercury in 1832 with a Dollond refractor of 67 mm at 100x under optimal meteo conditions and 1" of seeing. The contact times reported on Astron. Nach. 10, 259 (1832) are used to find the solar diameter -0.13'' lower than its standard value.

  17. Astronaut Jean-Francois Clervoy in white room on launch pad 39B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    In the white room at Launch Pad 39B, STS-66 mission specialist Jean-Francois Clervoy is assisted with his partial pressure launch/entry suit by close-out crew members Travis Thompson and Danny Wyatt (background) before entering the Space Shuttle Atlantis for its November 3 launch.

  18. The Semantics of Cross-Examination: A Case Study of the Jean Harris Trial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuetz, Janice

    Use of communication theory in an analysis of the court proceedings of the Jean Harris murder trial suggests that Harris contributed to her conviction with her inconsistent use of language and her refusal to remain in low-profile. Harris' defense attorney attempted to portray her as an upstanding, well-bred member of the community, and as a…

  19. Baron Dominique-Jean Larrey (1766-1842): founder of military surgery and trauma care.

    PubMed

    Karamanou, M; Rosenberg, T; Liakakos, T; Androutsos, G

    2011-01-01

    Dominique-Jean Larrey was a distinguished surgeon in chief of Napoleon's army and a faithful servant of the Empire. His surgical skills and inventions, his absolute attachment and devotion to his profession, his humanitarian spirit and courage entitled him as one of history's greatest military surgeons. PMID:21520773

  20. The Role of Trustworthiness in Teaching: An Examination of "The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the role that trustworthiness plays in the ability of teachers to function as moral role models. Through exploration of Muriel Spark's novel, "The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie," I explain some of the central features of trustworthiness as a moral virtue and suggest how these features are critical…

  1. Ensaio de Pedagogia Comparada: Jean Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778) X Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) (Essay on Compared Pedagogy: Jean Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778) X Immanuel Kant (1724-1804).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontanella, Francisco Cock

    2000-01-01

    Finds that, although the thought of Jean Jacques Rousseau is frequently cited as an influence on Immanuel Kant, this has no basis regarding pedagogical influence. Compares the "Projecto" and "Emilio" of Rousseau with Kant's "Pedagogia." (BT)

  2. [Care work in the health sector based on the psychodynamics of work and the care perspective: An interview with Pascale Molinier].

    PubMed

    Wlosko, Miriam; Ros, Cecilia

    2015-09-01

    This interview with Pascale Molinier was carried out in Buenos Aires in October 2014, in the context of activities organized by the Health and Work Program at the Department of Community Health of the Universidad Nacional de Lanús, Argentina. The interview explores the relationship between work and subjectivation, examining the role of work in the structuring of the psyche, in the dynamics of pleasure and suffering, and in the construction of gender identities. "Feminized" work - that of nurses, caregivers and maids, among others - is examined from a "care" perspective, analyzing its intrinsic invisibility and impossibility of being quantified and measured, which makes it a challenge to management-based logic.

  3. Two Schemes of Intellectual Development: A Comparison of Development as Defined by William Perry and Jean Piaget.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Bruce; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A comparison of the theories of Jean Piaget and William Perry (using individual interviews with college students) shows that the two theories outline different and independent processes for assessing intellectual development. (JN)

  4. The pursuit of being in the life and thought of Jean-Paul Sartre.

    PubMed

    Atwood, G E

    1983-01-01

    This paper has examined the relationship between the life and the thought of Jean-Paul Sartre. The central themes of Sartre's personal existence are shown to revolve around a struggle for self-definition and self-formation, rooted in the empathic failures of significant others during his formative years. It is argued that Sartre's experience of this struggle is mirrored and symbolized by the dialectic of being and nothingness which constitutes the central preoccupation of his philosophy.

  5. Analytical solutions to the mass-anisotropy degeneracy with higher order Jeans analysis: a general method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Thomas; Fairbairn, Malcolm

    2013-07-01

    The Jeans analysis is often used to infer the total density of a system by relating the velocity moments of an observable tracer population to the underlying gravitational potential. This technique has recently been applied in the search for dark matter (DM) in objects such as dwarf spheroidal galaxies where the presence of DM is inferred via stellar velocities. A precise account of the density is needed to constrain the expected gamma-ray flux from DM self-annihilation and to distinguish between cold and warm DM models. Unfortunately, the traditional method of fitting the second-order Jeans equation to the tracer dispersion suffers from an unbreakable degeneracy of solutions due to the unknown velocity anisotropy of the projected system. To tackle this degeneracy, one can appeal to higher moments of the Jeans equation. By introducing an analogue to the Binney anisotropy parameter at fourth order, β' we create a framework that encompasses all solutions to the fourth-order Jeans equations rather than the restricted range imposed by the separable augmented density. The condition β' = f(β) ensures that the degeneracy is lifted and we interpret the separable augmented density system as the order-independent case β' = β. For a generic choice of β', we present the line-of-sight projection of the fourth moment and how it could be incorporated into a joint likelihood analysis of the dispersion and kurtosis. The framework is then extended to all orders such that constraints may be placed to ensure a physically positive distribution function. Having presented the mathematical framework, we then use it to make preliminary analyses of simulated dwarf spheroidal data leading to interesting results which strongly motivate further study.

  6. Jean Falcon (1491-1541), a great surgeon and anatomist of the 16th century.

    PubMed

    Tsoucalas, Gregory; Karamanou, Marianna; Piagkou, Maria; Skandalakis, Panagiotis; Androutsos, George

    2013-01-01

    Jean Falcon, an Aragon native, became a famous surgeon at the Faculty of Montpellier. He was a Royal physician, wealthy enough to live a luxurious life and treat influential patients. His lectures were legendary, and his works gave him fame among the surgeons' class. Of all his manuscripts stands the "Guidon", which became an anatomical surgeons' handbook, worthy of reference from the scientific community for centuries.

  7. d'Alembert, Jean-Baptiste Le Rond (1717-83)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    French mathematician, born in Paris. A foundling, he was named after the place where he was left, the church of St Jean Baptiste de Rond. He published d'Alembert's principle (the principle that the action of a force produces an equal and opposite reaction in the mass that it is accelerating) in Traité de Dynamique (1743), which was a new interpretation of Newton's dynamics. He used his new formul...

  8. Profiles of international archives: Les archives Jean Piaget, University of Geneva, Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Burman, Jeremy Trevelyan

    2013-05-01

    This research report provides a look behind closed doors at the Jean Piaget Archives in Geneva, Switzerland. It situates the potential visitor, contextualizes the Archives in its own history, and then describes what scholars can expect to find. New details about Piaget's views on Equal Rights and Equal Pay are also provided, including a look at how they affected the women who worked his factory (esp. Bärbel Inhelder). (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Jean Piaget's experiences on the couch: some clues to a mystery.

    PubMed

    Schepeler, E M

    1993-04-01

    This paper is an attempt to reconstruct the historical, institutional, and personal circumstances leading to and surrounding Jean Piaget's psychoanalysis with Sabina Spielrein. It appears that the young Piaget's interest in psychoanalysis largely emanated from his long-standing problems with his mother. It is suggested that Piaget's lifelong tendency to intellectualise his own emotional experiences may relate to the near omission of affective factors in his psychological theories.

  10. Jean Piaget's experiences on the couch: some clues to a mystery.

    PubMed

    Schepeler, E M

    1993-04-01

    This paper is an attempt to reconstruct the historical, institutional, and personal circumstances leading to and surrounding Jean Piaget's psychoanalysis with Sabina Spielrein. It appears that the young Piaget's interest in psychoanalysis largely emanated from his long-standing problems with his mother. It is suggested that Piaget's lifelong tendency to intellectualise his own emotional experiences may relate to the near omission of affective factors in his psychological theories. PMID:8491531

  11. Profiles of international archives: Les archives Jean Piaget, University of Geneva, Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Burman, Jeremy Trevelyan

    2013-05-01

    This research report provides a look behind closed doors at the Jean Piaget Archives in Geneva, Switzerland. It situates the potential visitor, contextualizes the Archives in its own history, and then describes what scholars can expect to find. New details about Piaget's views on Equal Rights and Equal Pay are also provided, including a look at how they affected the women who worked his factory (esp. Bärbel Inhelder). (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:23544355

  12. Rediscovering Pascal's Mystic Hexagon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Augros, Michael

    2012-01-01

    While the path to mathematical discovery is often intuitive and not simply reducible to the application of a method, neither is it in most cases entirely haphazard. Certain kinds of questions and certain ways of looking at things tend to produce new and interesting results. To illustrate, this paper tells a story of how someone might discover…

  13. The effect of suspended particles on Jean's criterion for gravitational instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollkind, David J.; Yates, Kemble R.

    1990-07-01

    The effect that the proper inclusion of suspended particles has on Jeans' criterion for the self-gravitational instability of an unbounded nonrotating adiabatic gas cloud is examined by formulating the appropriate model system, introducing particular physically plausible equations of state and constitutive relations, performing a linear stability analysis of a uniformly expanding exact solution to these governing equations, and exploiting the fact that there exists a natural small material parameter for this problem given by N1/n sub 1, the ratio of the initial number density for the particles to that for the gas. The main result of this investigation is the derivation of an altered criterion which can substantially reduce Jeans' original critical wavelength for instability. It is then shown that the existing discrepancy between Jeans' theoretical prediction using and actual observational data relevant to the Andromeda nebula M31 can be accounted for by this new criterion of assuming suspended particles of a reasonable grain size and distribution to be present.

  14. Simulation of the passive condensation cooling tank of the PASCAL test facility using the component thermal-hydraulic analysis code CUPID

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, H. K.; Lee, S. J.; Kang, K. H.; Yoon, H. Y.

    2012-07-01

    For the analysis of transient two-phase flows in nuclear reactor components, a three-dimensional thermal hydraulics code, named CUPID, has been being developed. In the present study, the CUPID code was applied for the simulation of the PASCAL (PAFS Condensing Heat Removal Assessment Loop) test facility constructed with an aim of validating the cooling and operational performance of the PAFS (Passive Auxiliary Feedwater System). The PAFS is one of the advanced safety features adopted in the APR+ (Advanced Power Reactor +), which is intended to completely replace the conventional active auxiliary feedwater system. This paper presents the preliminary simulation results of the PASCAL facility performed with the CUPID code in order to verify its applicability to the thermal-hydraulic phenomena inside the system. A standalone calculation for the passive condensation cooling tank was performed by imposing a heat source boundary condition and the transient thermal-hydraulic behaviors inside the system, such as the water level, temperature and velocity, were qualitatively investigated. The simulation results verified that the natural circulation and boiling phenomena in the water pool can be well reproduced by the CUPID code. (authors)

  15. Dissociative identity disorder: a feminist approach to inpatient treatment using Jean Baker Miller's Relational Model.

    PubMed

    Riggs, S R; Bright, M A

    1997-08-01

    Women diagnosed with Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) may experience episodic crises characterized by intense states of disconnection from self and others. Crises which result in potential harm to self/others may require inpatient treatment. With economic emphasis on shorter lengths of stay, a treatment program or model which focuses on the DID patient's sense of connectedness to self and others can enhance treatment efforts during brief inpatient hospitalizations. The Relational Model of Jean Baker Miller uses mutuality and empowerment within the therapeutic relationship and inpatient mileu to move the patient beyond therapeutic impasse/crisis toward a state of greater connectedness to self and others.

  16. Sentenced in sorrow: the role of asylum in the Jean Gianini murder defence.

    PubMed

    Gelb, S A

    1997-06-01

    This paper describes the role played by the notion of asylum in the legal battle over confessed murderer Jean Gianini's mental competence and commitment. Gianini was a 16 year old who murdered his former teacher in a small upstate New York town in 1914. His trial was the first in the US to employ the Binet-Simon intelligence test as a defence and featured a clash of expert witnesses whose credibility was based upon their residence and work in asylums. The verdict of 'not guilty due to criminal imbecility' was due to the defence team's successful portrayal of the asylum as a punishing prison from which the defendant would never be released.

  17. Fertility in couples heterozygous for the tyrosinemia gene in Saguenay Lac-St-Jean.

    PubMed

    De Braekeleer, M; Lamarre, V; Scriver, C R; Larochelle, J; Bouchard, G

    1990-01-01

    A case-control study of 84 couples from Saguenay-Lac-St-Jean, jointly heterozygous for the tyrosinemia gene, was done to determine whether the birth of an homozygous child affected their fertility rates. The mean number of children born to tyrosinemia and control couples between 1940 and 1986 was not different (p greater than 0.05). The knowledge that tyrosinemia was an autosomal recessive disorder, with risk of recurrence in these families, did not appear to modify reproductive behaviour. Fertility fell significantly in both the tyrosinemia and control families in the period of observation. This change reflects the decline in fertility of French Canadians in general during this period.

  18. Jean-Martin Charcot's contributions to the interface between neurology and psychiatry.

    PubMed

    White, M B

    1997-08-01

    Although much has been written about Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893) as a neurologist and his commitment to the hysterics of the Salpêtrière, his influence on modern psychiatric thought has been misunderstood. His contributions range from the diagnosis and understanding of certain aspects of hysteria, which influenced psychoanalysis, to insights into the psychopathology of trauma that foreshadow modern concepts of post-traumatic stress disorder and somatoform disorders. This article reviews these aspects in the context of his contributions as a founder of modern neurology, neuropathology and proponent of the anatomo-clinical approach.

  19. Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893). The man behind the joint disease.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Lee J

    2002-01-01

    Jean-Martin Charcot was one of the most celebrated French physicians of the 19th century. A masterful teacher and a captivating lecturer, Charcot created the foundations of neurology as an independent discipline, and transformed the Salpêtrière hospital, in Paris, into one of the world's greatest teaching centers for clinical neurologic research. His name is attached to the distinct pathologic entity, Charcot's joint disease, that he so meticulously described. This article reviews the highlights of Charcot's career and his clinicoanatomic studies of patients with tabetic arthropathies.

  20. A comparison between John Dewey's theory of inquiry and Jean Piaget's genetic analysis of intelligence.

    PubMed

    Seltzer, E

    1977-06-01

    This article compares John Dewey's theory of inquiry with Jean Piaget's analysis of the mechanisms implied in the increase of knowledge. The sources for this paper are Dewey's studies on logic and the theory of inquiry and Piaget's historical-critical and psychogenetic investigations. Three major conclusions result from the comparison: first, there are significant convergences between the two theories; second, Piaget's developmental analysis makes explicit what is programmatic in Dewey's investigations; and, finally, Piaget is incorrect in characterizing Dewey's pragmatism as a method that does not meet the criteria of intelligent activity.

  1. [Jean-Louis-Paul Denucé (1824-1889): A forgotten pioneer of plastic surgery].

    PubMed

    Marck, K W; Martin, D

    2016-02-01

    The authors propose to define as main characterization of plastic reconstructive surgery the conceptual thinking that leads to a rational choice of an operative treatment. Conceptual thinking in plastic surgery started halfway the nineteenth century with the first schematic representations of the operative procedures available at that time, in which Von Ammon and Baumgarten, Szymanowski and Denucé played a prominent role. These four authors and their works are presented with special attention for the less known of them, Jean-Paul Denucé, surgeon in Bordeaux.

  2. Payload specialist Jean-Jacques Favier, representing the French Space Agency (CNES), and astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-78 ONBOARD VIEW --- Payload specialist Jean-Jacques Favier, representing the French Space Agency (CNES), and astronaut Kevin R. Kregel, pilot, perform a successful Inflight Maintenance (IFM) on the Bubble Drop Particle Unit (BDPU). The IFM technique was performed initially on the ground at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) by alternate payload specialist Pedro Duque of the European Space Agency (ESA), with the procedure being recorded on video and uplinked to the crew of the Space Shuttle Columbia to aid in the repair.

  3. [Jean-Jacques Lefrère: A miscarried ambition for blood safety in francophone Africa].

    PubMed

    Tayou Tagny, C; Laperche, S; Murphy, E

    2016-02-01

    The announcement of the death of Professor Jean-Jacques Lefrère caused considerable emotion and surprise within the francophone Africa blood transfusion research network. The group was created in 2007 in Paris. Each member that works within this group wanted to pay their last respects through dedicated publication for a brilliant researcher and writer. The tribute describes the creation of the group, its goals, its operations, its achievements and the prospects of its activities while emphasizing the essential role that Professor Lefrère played within the group. PMID:26762688

  4. A comparison between John Dewey's theory of inquiry and Jean Piaget's genetic analysis of intelligence.

    PubMed

    Seltzer, E

    1977-06-01

    This article compares John Dewey's theory of inquiry with Jean Piaget's analysis of the mechanisms implied in the increase of knowledge. The sources for this paper are Dewey's studies on logic and the theory of inquiry and Piaget's historical-critical and psychogenetic investigations. Three major conclusions result from the comparison: first, there are significant convergences between the two theories; second, Piaget's developmental analysis makes explicit what is programmatic in Dewey's investigations; and, finally, Piaget is incorrect in characterizing Dewey's pragmatism as a method that does not meet the criteria of intelligent activity. PMID:328823

  5. Seduction and the vicissitudes of translation: the work of Jean Laplanche.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, John

    2007-10-01

    This paper aims to analyze Jean Laplanche's revision of Freudian metapsychology, which emerged from a critical return to Freud's officially abandoned seduction theory of 1895-1897. Where Freud gradually replaced the model of traumatic seduction with a theory of infantile sexuality and its drives, Laplanche articulates both trauma and sexual drive in a new theory of primal seduction, the fundamental anthropological situation in which human subjectivity is formed. The author concludes by considering Laplanche's modeling of the psychoanalytic situation and his reformulation of transference in relation to mourning and sublimation within the framework of the general theory of seduction.

  6. Pressure in the Landau-Ginzburg functional: Pascal's law, nucleation in fluid mixtures, a meanfield theory of amphiphilic action, and interface wetting in glassy liquids.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ho Yin; Lubchenko, Vassiliy

    2015-09-28

    We set up the problem of finding the transition state for phase nucleation in multi-component fluid mixtures, within the Landau-Ginzburg density functional. We establish an expression for the coordinate-dependent local pressure that applies to mixtures, arbitrary geometries, and certain non-equilibrium configurations. The expression allows one to explicitly evaluate the pressure in spherical geometry, à la van der Waals. Pascal's law is recovered within the Landau-Ginzburg density functional theory, formally analogously to how conservation of energy is recovered in the Lagrangian formulation of mechanics. We establish proper boundary conditions for certain singular functional forms of the bulk free energy density that allow one to obtain droplet solutions with thick walls in essentially closed form. The hydrodynamic modes responsible for mixing near the interface are explicitly identified in the treatment; the composition at the interface is found to depend only weakly on the droplet size. Next we develop a Landau-Ginzburg treatment of the effects of amphiphiles on the surface tension; the amphiphilic action is seen as a violation of Pascal's law. We explicitly obtain the binding potential for the detergent at the interface and the dependence of the down-renormalization of the surface tension on the activity of the detergent. Finally, we argue that the renormalization of the activation barrier for escape from long-lived structures in glassy liquids can be viewed as an action of uniformly seeded, randomly oriented amphiphilic molecules on the interface separating two dissimilar aperiodic structures. This renormalization is also considered as a "wetting" of the interface. The resulting conclusions are consistent with the random first order transition theory.

  7. High-Sensitivity Nuclear Magnetic Resonance at Giga-Pascal Pressures: A New Tool for Probing Electronic and Chemical Properties of Condensed Matter under Extreme Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Thomas; Haase, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is one of the most important techniques for the study of condensed matter systems, their chemical structure, and their electronic properties. The application of high pressure enables one to synthesize new materials, but the response of known materials to high pressure is a very useful tool for studying their electronic structure and developing theories. For example, high-pressure synthesis might be at the origin of life; and understanding the behavior of small molecules under extreme pressure will tell us more about fundamental processes in our universe. It is no wonder that there has always been great interest in having NMR available at high pressures. Unfortunately, the desired pressures are often well into the Giga-Pascal (GPa) range and require special anvil cell devices where only very small, secluded volumes are available. This has restricted the use of NMR almost entirely in the past, and only recently, a new approach to high-sensitivity GPa NMR, which has a resonating micro-coil inside the sample chamber, was put forward. This approach enables us to achieve high sensitivity with experiments that bring the power of NMR to Giga-Pascal pressure condensed matter research. First applications, the detection of a topological electronic transition in ordinary aluminum metal and the closing of the pseudo-gap in high-temperature superconductivity, show the power of such an approach. Meanwhile, the range of achievable pressures was increased tremendously with a new generation of anvil cells (up to 10.1 GPa), that fit standard-bore NMR magnets. This approach might become a new, important tool for the investigation of many condensed matter systems, in chemistry, geochemistry, and in physics, since we can now watch structural changes with the eyes of a very versatile probe. PMID:25350694

  8. Pressure in the Landau-Ginzburg functional: Pascal's law, nucleation in fluid mixtures, a meanfield theory of amphiphilic action, and interface wetting in glassy liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Ho Yin; Lubchenko, Vassiliy

    2015-09-01

    We set up the problem of finding the transition state for phase nucleation in multi-component fluid mixtures, within the Landau-Ginzburg density functional. We establish an expression for the coordinate-dependent local pressure that applies to mixtures, arbitrary geometries, and certain non-equilibrium configurations. The expression allows one to explicitly evaluate the pressure in spherical geometry, à la van der Waals. Pascal's law is recovered within the Landau-Ginzburg density functional theory, formally analogously to how conservation of energy is recovered in the Lagrangian formulation of mechanics. We establish proper boundary conditions for certain singular functional forms of the bulk free energy density that allow one to obtain droplet solutions with thick walls in essentially closed form. The hydrodynamic modes responsible for mixing near the interface are explicitly identified in the treatment; the composition at the interface is found to depend only weakly on the droplet size. Next we develop a Landau-Ginzburg treatment of the effects of amphiphiles on the surface tension; the amphiphilic action is seen as a violation of Pascal's law. We explicitly obtain the binding potential for the detergent at the interface and the dependence of the down-renormalization of the surface tension on the activity of the detergent. Finally, we argue that the renormalization of the activation barrier for escape from long-lived structures in glassy liquids can be viewed as an action of uniformly seeded, randomly oriented amphiphilic molecules on the interface separating two dissimilar aperiodic structures. This renormalization is also considered as a "wetting" of the interface. The resulting conclusions are consistent with the random first order transition theory.

  9. High-sensitivity nuclear magnetic resonance at Giga-Pascal pressures: a new tool for probing electronic and chemical properties of condensed matter under extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Meier, Thomas; Haase, Jürgen

    2014-10-10

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is one of the most important techniques for the study of condensed matter systems, their chemical structure, and their electronic properties. The application of high pressure enables one to synthesize new materials, but the response of known materials to high pressure is a very useful tool for studying their electronic structure and developing theories. For example, high-pressure synthesis might be at the origin of life; and understanding the behavior of small molecules under extreme pressure will tell us more about fundamental processes in our universe. It is no wonder that there has always been great interest in having NMR available at high pressures. Unfortunately, the desired pressures are often well into the Giga-Pascal (GPa) range and require special anvil cell devices where only very small, secluded volumes are available. This has restricted the use of NMR almost entirely in the past, and only recently, a new approach to high-sensitivity GPa NMR, which has a resonating micro-coil inside the sample chamber, was put forward. This approach enables us to achieve high sensitivity with experiments that bring the power of NMR to Giga-Pascal pressure condensed matter research. First applications, the detection of a topological electronic transition in ordinary aluminum metal and the closing of the pseudo-gap in high-temperature superconductivity, show the power of such an approach. Meanwhile, the range of achievable pressures was increased tremendously with a new generation of anvil cells (up to 10.1 GPa), that fit standard-bore NMR magnets. This approach might become a new, important tool for the investigation of many condensed matter systems, in chemistry, geochemistry, and in physics, since we can now watch structural changes with the eyes of a very versatile probe.

  10. Pressure in the Landau-Ginzburg functional: Pascal's law, nucleation in fluid mixtures, a meanfield theory of amphiphilic action, and interface wetting in glassy liquids.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ho Yin; Lubchenko, Vassiliy

    2015-09-28

    We set up the problem of finding the transition state for phase nucleation in multi-component fluid mixtures, within the Landau-Ginzburg density functional. We establish an expression for the coordinate-dependent local pressure that applies to mixtures, arbitrary geometries, and certain non-equilibrium configurations. The expression allows one to explicitly evaluate the pressure in spherical geometry, à la van der Waals. Pascal's law is recovered within the Landau-Ginzburg density functional theory, formally analogously to how conservation of energy is recovered in the Lagrangian formulation of mechanics. We establish proper boundary conditions for certain singular functional forms of the bulk free energy density that allow one to obtain droplet solutions with thick walls in essentially closed form. The hydrodynamic modes responsible for mixing near the interface are explicitly identified in the treatment; the composition at the interface is found to depend only weakly on the droplet size. Next we develop a Landau-Ginzburg treatment of the effects of amphiphiles on the surface tension; the amphiphilic action is seen as a violation of Pascal's law. We explicitly obtain the binding potential for the detergent at the interface and the dependence of the down-renormalization of the surface tension on the activity of the detergent. Finally, we argue that the renormalization of the activation barrier for escape from long-lived structures in glassy liquids can be viewed as an action of uniformly seeded, randomly oriented amphiphilic molecules on the interface separating two dissimilar aperiodic structures. This renormalization is also considered as a "wetting" of the interface. The resulting conclusions are consistent with the random first order transition theory. PMID:26429019

  11. High-sensitivity nuclear magnetic resonance at Giga-Pascal pressures: a new tool for probing electronic and chemical properties of condensed matter under extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Meier, Thomas; Haase, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is one of the most important techniques for the study of condensed matter systems, their chemical structure, and their electronic properties. The application of high pressure enables one to synthesize new materials, but the response of known materials to high pressure is a very useful tool for studying their electronic structure and developing theories. For example, high-pressure synthesis might be at the origin of life; and understanding the behavior of small molecules under extreme pressure will tell us more about fundamental processes in our universe. It is no wonder that there has always been great interest in having NMR available at high pressures. Unfortunately, the desired pressures are often well into the Giga-Pascal (GPa) range and require special anvil cell devices where only very small, secluded volumes are available. This has restricted the use of NMR almost entirely in the past, and only recently, a new approach to high-sensitivity GPa NMR, which has a resonating micro-coil inside the sample chamber, was put forward. This approach enables us to achieve high sensitivity with experiments that bring the power of NMR to Giga-Pascal pressure condensed matter research. First applications, the detection of a topological electronic transition in ordinary aluminum metal and the closing of the pseudo-gap in high-temperature superconductivity, show the power of such an approach. Meanwhile, the range of achievable pressures was increased tremendously with a new generation of anvil cells (up to 10.1 GPa), that fit standard-bore NMR magnets. This approach might become a new, important tool for the investigation of many condensed matter systems, in chemistry, geochemistry, and in physics, since we can now watch structural changes with the eyes of a very versatile probe. PMID:25350694

  12. A Comparison of Workers Employed in Hazardous Jobs in Terms of Job Satisfaction, Perceived Job Risk and Stress: Turkish Jean Sandblasting Workers, Dock Workers, Factory Workers and Miners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunal, Ayda Buyuksahin; Sunal, Onur; Yasin, Fatma

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare job satisfaction, perception of job risk, stress symptoms and vulnerability to stress of miners, dock workers, jean sandblasting workers and factory workers. A job satisfaction scale and stress audit scale were applied to 220 workers. Results revealed that dock and jean sandblasting workers perceived their…

  13. The Influence of Their Notions of Humanism on the Drama of Jean-Paul Sartre and Bertolt Brecht.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zivanovic, Judith

    The distinctive philosophies of Bertolt Brecht and Jean-Paul Sartre concerning man's existence directly influence their attitudes toward character, action, and the total drama. Both playwrights reveal that drama is an inseparable and reciprocal molding of content and form. The relationship between their ideas and their expressions of them is so…

  14. Richard Avedon's "In the American West" and Jean-Paul Sartre: An Existential Approach to Art and Value.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubiel, Richard M.

    1989-01-01

    Examines Richard Avedon's photographic exhibit "In the American West" both as a work of art and as an important link to contemporary philosophical thought, particularly that of Jean-Paul Sartre, through its depiction of the human condition. Notes that the exhibit used as a teaching resource engages students in questions concerning art and value.…

  15. From Paris to Lyon, and from simple to complex liquids: a view on Jean-Pierre Hansen's contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrat, Jean-Louis; Biben, Thierry; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2015-09-01

    We present a short perspective on some of the contributions made by Jean-Pierre Hansen to our theoretical understanding of soft matter static structure and dynamics, using the tools developed for simple liquids within the rigorous framework of statistical physics.

  16. Psychology and Schooling: The Impact of Susan Isaacs and Jean Piaget on 1960s Science Education Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Jody S.

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on the tensions between two psychological frameworks in the negotiation of teaching practices, curriculum, and ideas about what constitutes childhood: (1) the theories of Jean Piaget focused on behavior at different developmental stages; or (2) the Susan Isaacs research that took a general view of children's intellectual capabilities. (CMK)

  17. Elementary Teachers' Application of Jean Piaget's Theories of Cognitive Development during Social Studies Curriculum Debates in Arizona

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinde, Elizabeth R.; Perry, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    In this article we explore educators' use of Jean Piaget's theories concerning cognitive development to refute proposed social studies standards in Arizona. We describe the work of Piaget as well as the National Association for the Education of Young Children's developmentally appropriate practices as they apply to primary-grade children's…

  18. Jean-Jacques Rousseau on Adult Education and Revolution. Paradigma of Radical, Pedagogical Thought. 2nd Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dame, Frederick William

    This book explores Jean-Jacques Rousseau's educational philosophy, as expressed in his key works, and applies that philosophy to adult education and revolution. The titles and topics of the book's seven chapters are as follows: (1) "L'Invitation: Raison d'Etre" (prelude, statement, significance, the process, assumptions and limitations); (2) "Le…

  19. Rayleigh-Jeans Condensation of Pumped Magnons in Thin-Film Ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rückriegel, Andreas; Kopietz, Peter

    2015-10-01

    We show that the formation of a magnon condensate in thin ferromagnetic films can be explained within the framework of a classical stochastic non-Markovian Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation where the properties of the random magnetic field and the dissipation are determined by the underlying phonon dynamics. We have numerically solved this equation for a tangentially magnetized yttrium-iron garnet film in the presence of a parallel parametric pumping field. We obtain a complete description of all stages of the nonequilibrium time evolution of the magnon gas which is in excellent agreement with experiments. Our calculation proves that the experimentally observed condensation of magnons in yttrium-iron garnet at room temperature is a purely classical phenomenon which should be called Rayleigh-Jeans rather than Bose-Einstein condensation.

  20. [The caring of family members in the intensive care units from the Jean Watson perspective].

    PubMed

    Vázquez Calatayud, M; Eseverri Azcoiti, M C

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a brief reflection on the caring of families in the Intensive Care Units. To address this issue, Jean Watson, one of the most important theoreticians on nursing of our days, has been taken as a reference. Watson was chosen because it is possible to understand perfectly the need to contemplate the family within the holistic care of critical patients from his theory. Thus, it is proposed to carry out an investigation that studies the care of the family members of the critical patient based on the idea of Watson's caring theory. To understand this approach, the theory of caring is analyzed and evaluated according to the guide produced by McEwen in 2007.

  1. [Embracing Jean Watson's theory of Human Caring through a reflective practice within a clinical situation].

    PubMed

    Cara, Chantal; O'Reilly, Louise

    2008-12-01

    Essentially based on humanistic values of respect, collaboration, and uniqueness rather than on objectification, control, and categorization of the person cared-for, a professional's practice rooted in caring is aimed at helping individuals and their families, which can only be carried out through respect for human dignity. If we are to consider caring as the core of nursing, nurses will undoubtedly have to make a conscious effort to preserve human caring within their clinical practice (Cara, 2004b; O'Reilly, 2008, Watson, 2002). However, to support this endeavour, caring theories, such as the one proposed by Jean Watson, are essential. Inspired by Cara's (2003) continuing education paper, this reflection paper takes a pragmatic approach to promote the understanding of key elements involved in Watson's caring theory through a process of reflective practice within a rehabilitation clinical situation.

  2. The practice of nurses caring for families of pediatric inpatients in light of Jean Watson.

    PubMed

    Santos, Maiara Rodrigues Dos; Bousso, Regina Szylit; Vendramim, Patrícia; Baliza, Michelle Freire; Misko, Maira Deguer; Silva, Lucía

    2014-08-01

    Objective To know the facilities and the difficulties of nurses in caring practice of hospitalized children's families in the light of Jean Watson's Theory of Human Caring. Method It was used the descriptive qualitative approach. The data collection was conducted in three stages: presentation of theoretical content; engagement with families in the light of Watson's theory; and semi-structured interview with 12 pediatric nurses. The interviews were analysed using inductive thematic analysis, being possible to form three themes: Recognizing a framework for care; Considering the institutional context; and Challenges in family's relationship. Results The theory favored reflections about self, about the institutions and about nurses' relationship with the family of the child, normalized by a consciousness toward caring attitudes. Conclusion In this process, it is imperative that nurses recognize the philosophical-theoretical foundations of care to attend the child's family in hospital.

  3. Modification of the Jeans and Toomre instability criteria for astrophysical fractal objects within nonextensive statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnichenko, A. V.; Marov, M. Ya.

    2016-07-01

    Within the formalism of Tsallis nonextensive statistics designed to describe the behavior of anomalous systems, systems with a strong gravitational interaction between their individual parts and the fractal nature of phase space, we have obtained linearized equations for the oscillations of a rigidly rotating disk by taking into account dissipative effects and give a derivation of the dispersion equation in the WKB approximation. Based on the previously derived modified Navier—Stokes hydrodynamic equations (the so-called equations of q-hydrodynamics), we have analyzed the axisymmetric oscillations of an astrophysical, differentially rotating gas—dust cosmic object and obtained modified Jeans and Toomre gravitational instability criteria for disks with a fractal phase-space structure.

  4. Jean-Jacques Rousseau's copy of Albrecht von Haller's Historia stirpium indigenarum Helvetiae inchoata (1768).

    PubMed

    Cook, A

    2003-04-01

    Jean-Jacques Rousseau sold his botanical texts to Daniel Malthus (father of Thomas Malthus) about 1775. Two of these are now in the Old Library, Jesus College, Cambridge, but all the rest have long been thought lost. However, a copy of Albrecht von Haller's Historia stirpium indigenarum Helvetiae inchoata (1768) in the Lindley Library, Royal Horticultural Society, London, bears Rousseau's name and seems to have been annotated by him. The volume contains the bookplate of Jane Dalton, a cousin to whom Malthus willed "all[his] Botanical Books in which the name of Rousseau is written". Haller was well-known to Rousseau, who while in exile in the Swiss Jura (1763-1765), studied under one of Haller's collaborators, Abraham Gagnebin. Rousseau cited Haller's entry 762 when describing a species of Seseli to the Duchess of Portland.

  5. Jean-Louis Brachet (1789-1858). A forgotten contributor to early 19th century neurology.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, O

    2015-10-01

    Specialists of the history of hysteria know the name of Jean-Louis Brachet (1789-1858), but few realise the influence of this physician and surgeon from Lyon, a city in the southeastern part of France. Not only a clinician, he was also a neurophysiology researcher in the early 19th century. Along with his descriptions of meningoencephalitis, including hydrocephalus and meningoencephalitis, he elucidated the functioning of the vegetative nervous system and described its activity during emotional states. He also helped describe the different forms of epilepsy and sought to understand their aetiologies, working at the same time as the better-known Louis-Florentin Calmeil (1798-1895). We present a biography of this forgotten physician, a prolific writer, keen clinical observer and staunch devotee of a rigorous scientific approach.

  6. Visual art in the neurologic career of Jean-Martin Charcot.

    PubMed

    Goetz, C G

    1991-04-01

    Jean-Martin Charcot, the world's first chaired professor of neurology, incorporated visual art into his daily practice of neurology. Art served as scientific documentation and was a pivotal tool in the development and dissemination of Charcot's clinicoanatomic method. Although Charcot drew extensively in clinical and laboratory studies, very few of these visual documents have ever been published or are currently available for public study. Charcot was central to the incorporation of medical photographs into the study of neurologic disease and relied heavily on visual material in his capacity as an international teacher. Art also misguided Charcot's career when he relied heavily on artwork in his attempt to convince critics that disorders seen at the Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, France, were independent of his suggestive influence.

  7. [Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893): a physician with multiple facets].

    PubMed

    Lellouch, Alain

    2013-12-01

    This work is registered in the year (2013) commemorating the 120 years since Jean-Martin Charcot's (1825-1893) death. Presently, the event takes place during 2013, in France, in Paris, at Hôpital de la Salpêtrière where Charcot practiced as medical chief of l'Hospice de la Vieillesse-Femmes, from 1862 until he died in 1893. The aim of the research is to show, from various examples and sources (printed and handwritten: fonds d'archives Charcot de la Salpêtrière) how talented Charcot was as a clinician, pathologist and microscopist, researcher and experimenter, teacher, artist, designer, cartoonist, polyglot and traveller), how varied his medical career was and how innovative his scientific method was. All this permitted Charcot to make an impressive number of medical discoveries in various fields which are today known as geriatrics and rheumatology, internal medicine, cardiology, neurology, psychiatry and paranormal processes.

  8. Neurologist or psychiatrist? The public and private domains of Jean-Martin Charcot.

    PubMed

    Gelfand, T

    2000-01-01

    The emergence of neurology as an autonomous, prestigious field in late-nineteenth-century Paris is well known. Less appreciated is the role that neurologists played vis-à-vis the cognate older field of psychiatry. Taking Jean-Martin Charcot, the most influential neurologist of his time, as a test case, this paper contrasts his attitudes and practice in the public setting of teaching and hospital work with his private practice. A staunch defender of a clear distinction between his field and psychiatry, Charcot's private practice displayed more flexibility. Treating hysteria and neurasthenia created a middle ground of nervous diseases for him to cultivate. Unpublished case histories and other materials, especially from the Charcot library, support the conception of neurologists as active agents in constituting a new psychological medicine.

  9. Errors from Rayleigh-Jeans approximation in satellite microwave radiometer calibration systems.

    PubMed

    Weng, Fuzhong; Zou, Xiaolei

    2013-01-20

    The advanced technology microwave sounder (ATMS) onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite is a total power radiometer and scans across the track within a range of ±52.77° from nadir. It has 22 channels and measures the microwave radiation at either quasi-vertical or quasi-horizontal polarization from the Earth's atmosphere. The ATMS sensor data record algorithm employed a commonly used two-point calibration equation that derives the earth-view brightness temperature directly from the counts and temperatures of warm target and cold space, and the earth-scene count. This equation is only valid under Rayleigh-Jeans (RJ) approximation. Impacts of RJ approximation on ATMS calibration biases are evaluated in this study. It is shown that the RJ approximation used in ATMS radiometric calibration results in errors on the order of 1-2 K. The error is also scene count dependent and increases with frequency.

  10. Nutrient status of the lowbush blueberry, Lac-Saint-Jean area, Quebec, Canada. [Vaccinium angustifolium

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, A.R.; Gagnon, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    The lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium Ait.) is an important commercial crop of the Lac-Saint-Jean area (Quebec, Canada). The major blueberry fields are located on sandy soils relatively poor in available mineral nutrients. The nutrients originate from a thin organic layer found on the top of these sandy soils. The leaf mineral contents (N, P, K, Mg, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn and B) were measured in five blueberry fields during 1984 and 1985. Soil pH and soil available P, K, and Mg were also assessed. The results show that the leaf mineral contents are generally adequate. However, K and Zn might be occasionally deficient when compared to the actual established standards. The available Mg in soil was significantly correlated with the leaf Mg concentration. The data also suggest that the influence of the pH following the burn pruning seems to influence the nutrition of this species.

  11. The Hawthorne experiments and the introduction of Jean Piaget in American industrial psychology, 1929-1932.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Yeh

    2002-05-01

    The Hawthorne interview program between 1929 and 1932 was one of the most significant industrial studies in the United States. The Hawthorne researchers applied Jean Piaget's clinical method in their extensive interviews with tens of thousands of workers. Chiefly responsible for the program's methodology was Elton Mayo, an Australian who saw interviewing as a means to promote social cooperation. Previous discussions of the Hawthorne experiments have ignored the influence of Piaget in the social sciences. This article provides an account of Mayo's and the Hawthorne researchers' efforts to fuse Piaget's innovation with burgeoning American industrial psychology. The endeavor was not an isolated event but rather drew on the theories and practice of Janet-Piaget psychology, on the support of the Laura Spelman Rockefeller Memorial Foundation, and on the discourse among social scientists about Piaget's work.

  12. Climates as commodities: Jean Pierre Purry and the modelling of the best climate on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankovic, Vladimir

    The paper looks at how an early eighteenth-century climatological model of the 'best climate' on Earth became a platform for political, economic, and demographic action of extraordinary significance for the colonization of new commodity environments. It analyzes the science used by an early modern business adventurer to model 'climate' as an economic tool informing imperial governance and exploitation of local resources. Jean Pierre Purry's construction of 'model climate' portrayed North Carolina's township at Yamassee River as an ideal environment geared toward mercantilist principles of trade but also as a model community based on skilled labor and optimal climatic capital. His climatological analysis was a purposeful act of policy making based on a science of colonial expansion similar to more recent calls at economic modelling of future climate impact.

  13. [Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893): a physician with multiple facets].

    PubMed

    Lellouch, Alain

    2013-12-01

    This work is registered in the year (2013) commemorating the 120 years since Jean-Martin Charcot's (1825-1893) death. Presently, the event takes place during 2013, in France, in Paris, at Hôpital de la Salpêtrière where Charcot practiced as medical chief of l'Hospice de la Vieillesse-Femmes, from 1862 until he died in 1893. The aim of the research is to show, from various examples and sources (printed and handwritten: fonds d'archives Charcot de la Salpêtrière) how talented Charcot was as a clinician, pathologist and microscopist, researcher and experimenter, teacher, artist, designer, cartoonist, polyglot and traveller), how varied his medical career was and how innovative his scientific method was. All this permitted Charcot to make an impressive number of medical discoveries in various fields which are today known as geriatrics and rheumatology, internal medicine, cardiology, neurology, psychiatry and paranormal processes. PMID:26035927

  14. Payload specialist Jean-Jacques Favier, representing the French Space Agency (CNES), prepares a

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-78 ONBOARD VIEW --- Payload specialist Jean-Jacques Favier, representing the French Space Agency (CNES), prepares a sample for the Advanced Gradient Heating Facility (AGHF) while wearing instruments that measure upper body movement. The Torso Rotation Experiment (TRE) complements other vestibular studies that measure differences in the way human beings react physically to their surroundings in microgravity. This is a typical Life and Microgravity Spacelab (LMS-1) mission scene, with several experiments being performed. Astronaut Susan J. Helms, payload commander, assists Favier in the AGHF preparations. Astronaut Richard M. Linnehan (bottom right), mission specialist, tests his muscle response with the Handgrip Dynamometer. Astronaut Thomas T. (Tom) Henricks (far background), mission commander, offers assistance.

  15. The Hawthorne experiments and the introduction of Jean Piaget in American industrial psychology, 1929-1932.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Yeh

    2002-05-01

    The Hawthorne interview program between 1929 and 1932 was one of the most significant industrial studies in the United States. The Hawthorne researchers applied Jean Piaget's clinical method in their extensive interviews with tens of thousands of workers. Chiefly responsible for the program's methodology was Elton Mayo, an Australian who saw interviewing as a means to promote social cooperation. Previous discussions of the Hawthorne experiments have ignored the influence of Piaget in the social sciences. This article provides an account of Mayo's and the Hawthorne researchers' efforts to fuse Piaget's innovation with burgeoning American industrial psychology. The endeavor was not an isolated event but rather drew on the theories and practice of Janet-Piaget psychology, on the support of the Laura Spelman Rockefeller Memorial Foundation, and on the discourse among social scientists about Piaget's work. PMID:12096759

  16. [The body and the medical knowledge in the eighteenth century: an interview with Jean Abreu].

    PubMed

    Quadros, Lucas Samuel; Gelape, Vinícius Paulo; Rosa, Maria Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The history of science is a growing and well-recognized area in Brazil, however, medicine during the colonial period is not well covered by research. Aiming to address this subject, this interview was carried out with Professor Jean Luiz Neves Abreu, an important researcher of the history of medicine during the Luso-Brazilian Empire of the eighteenth century. By speaking of his personal career, his academic experience and his involvement with the subject, Professor Abreu clarifies theoretical and methodological aspects related to the history of health sciences. He highlights the potential of medical texts and manuals as a source and discusses means of accessibility and different sources that can allow new themes and objects to be reconsidered in this area of research.

  17. [Jean-Jacques Rosseau the vitalist. The moralization of medical hygiene between diet and ethical food].

    PubMed

    Menin, Marco

    2012-01-01

    The historiographical prejudice that sees in Jean-Jacques Rousseau an implacable opponent of scientific knowledge has long prevented an objective evaluation of the important influence that medical thought exerted over his philosophy. The aim of this paper is to show not only Rousseau's familiarity with the most important expressions of eighteenth-century medical literature, but also his willingness to incorporate some medical suggestions in his philosophical and literary production. In the first part of this article, I try to show how Rousseau's sensibility theory presupposes precise medical ideals, related to Montpellier School of vitalism. In the second part, I stress how Rousseau's philosophy of alimentation (which has clear anthropological and political implications) can be regarded as a genuine application of an ambition typical of vitalism: to use medical hygiene, also and above all, for moral purpose.

  18. Rayleigh-Jeans Condensation of Pumped Magnons in Thin-Film Ferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Rückriegel, Andreas; Kopietz, Peter

    2015-10-01

    We show that the formation of a magnon condensate in thin ferromagnetic films can be explained within the framework of a classical stochastic non-Markovian Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation where the properties of the random magnetic field and the dissipation are determined by the underlying phonon dynamics. We have numerically solved this equation for a tangentially magnetized yttrium-iron garnet film in the presence of a parallel parametric pumping field. We obtain a complete description of all stages of the nonequilibrium time evolution of the magnon gas which is in excellent agreement with experiments. Our calculation proves that the experimentally observed condensation of magnons in yttrium-iron garnet at room temperature is a purely classical phenomenon which should be called Rayleigh-Jeans rather than Bose-Einstein condensation. PMID:26550749

  19. [Jean-Jacques Rosseau the vitalist. The moralization of medical hygiene between diet and ethical food].

    PubMed

    Menin, Marco

    2012-01-01

    The historiographical prejudice that sees in Jean-Jacques Rousseau an implacable opponent of scientific knowledge has long prevented an objective evaluation of the important influence that medical thought exerted over his philosophy. The aim of this paper is to show not only Rousseau's familiarity with the most important expressions of eighteenth-century medical literature, but also his willingness to incorporate some medical suggestions in his philosophical and literary production. In the first part of this article, I try to show how Rousseau's sensibility theory presupposes precise medical ideals, related to Montpellier School of vitalism. In the second part, I stress how Rousseau's philosophy of alimentation (which has clear anthropological and political implications) can be regarded as a genuine application of an ambition typical of vitalism: to use medical hygiene, also and above all, for moral purpose. PMID:23035396

  20. A NEW METHOD TO DIRECTLY MEASURE THE JEANS SCALE OF THE INTERGALACTIC MEDIUM USING CLOSE QUASAR PAIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Rorai, Alberto; Hennawi, Joseph F.; White, Martin

    2013-10-01

    Although the baryons in the intergalactic medium (IGM) trace dark matter fluctuations on megaparsec scales, on smaller scales ∼100 kpc, fluctuations are suppressed because the finite temperature gas is pressure supported against gravity, analogous to the classical Jeans argument. This Jeans filtering scale, which quantifies the small-scale structure of the IGM, has fundamental cosmological implications. First, it provides a thermal record of heat injected by ultraviolet photons during cosmic reionization events, and thus constrains the thermal and reionization history of the universe. Second, the Jeans scale determines the clumpiness of the IGM, a critical ingredient in models of cosmic reionization. Third, it sets the minimum mass scale for gravitational collapse from the IGM, and hence plays a pivotal role in galaxy formation. Unfortunately, it is extremely challenging to measure the Jeans scale via the standard technique of analyzing purely longitudinal Lyα forest spectra, because the thermal Doppler broadening of absorption lines along the line-of-sight, is highly degenerate with Jeans smoothing. In this work, we show that the Jeans filtering scale can be directly measured by characterizing the coherence of correlated Lyα forest absorption in close quasar pairs, with separations small enough ∼100 kpc to resolve it. We present a novel technique for this purpose, based on the probability density function (PDF) of phase angle differences of homologous longitudinal Fourier modes in close quasar pair spectra. A Bayesian formalism is introduced based on the phase angle PDF, and Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques are used to characterize the precision of a hypothetical Jeans scale measurement, and explore degeneracies with other thermal parameters governing the IGM. A semi-analytical model of the Lyα forest is used to generate a large grid (500) of thermal models from a dark matter only simulation. Our full parameter study indicates that a realistic sample of

  1. Human rights assessment in Parc Jean Marie Vincent, Port-au-Prince, Haiti.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Kimberly A; Ivers, Louise C

    2010-01-01

    Months after a 7.0 magnitude earthquake hit Port-au-Prince, Haiti, over one million remain homeless and living in spontaneous internally displaced person (IDP) camps. Billions of dollars from aid organizations and government agencies have been pledged toward the relief effort, yet many basic human needs, including food, shelter, and sanitation, continue to be unmet. The Sphere Project, "Humanitarian Charter and Minimum Standards in Disaster Response," identifies the minimum standards to be attained in disaster response. From a human rights perspective and utilizing key indicators from the Sphere Project as benchmarks, this article reports on an assessment of the living conditions approximately 12 weeks after the earthquake in Parc Jean Marie Vincent, a spontaneous IDP camp in Port-au-Prince. A stratified random sample of households in the camp, proportionate to the number of families living in each sector, was selected. Interview questions were designed to serve as "key indicators" for the Sphere Project minimum standards. A total of 486 interviews were completed, representing approximately 5% of households in each of the five sectors of the camp. Our assessment identified the relative achievements and shortcomings in the provision of relief services in Parc Jean Marie Vincent. At the time of this survey, the Sphere Project minimum standards for access to health care and quantity of water per person per day were being met. Food, shelter, sanitation, and security were below minimum accepted standard and of major concern. The formal assessment reported here was completed by September 2010, and is necessarily limited to conditions in Haiti before the cholera outbreak in October.

  2. Birth of modern psychiatry and the death of alienism: the legacy of Jean-Martin Charcot.

    PubMed

    Bogousslavsky, Julien; Moulin, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    At the time of Jean-Martin Charcot, Paris--the main center for studies on the nervous system and its disorders--was home to critical exchanges between the developing discipline of neurology and psychiatry. Contrary to the commonly held view, and in spite of an established tradition concerning mental diseases, emerging neurology had a much stronger influence on psychiatry ('alienism') than the reverse. This was largely due to the school built up by Jean-Martin Charcot himself, which was organized around the study and management of hysteria. Although Charcot always claimed to be uninterested in mental medicine, he stimulated the development of an original scientific approach to nervous system conditions, based on Claude Bernard's method, along with structured academic teaching. Conversely, alienism paradoxically remained stuck in organicism, after Antoine Bayle's report in 1822 of 'arachnitis' as the substratum of general paresis of the insane. Contrary to alienism, the young neurological school was capable of self-criticism, and progressively highlighted mental factors in hysteria. This led to the paradox that neurologists were active in a disease with no organic cerebral lesion, while alienists were postulating brain lesions in all mental disorders. Pushed by Charcot, the academic evolution led to the launch of a faculty chair of mental and brain diseases in 1875, which was taken over for nearly half a century by his direct pupils Benjamin Ball, Alix Joffroy and Gilbert Ballet, who held the position until 1916, supporting the development of modern psychiatry in general hospitals, while alienism progressively disappeared at the turn of the century.

  3. Jeans Analysis of the Galactic Thick Disk and the Local Dark Matter Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Salcedo, F. J.; Flynn, Chris; de Diego, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamical estimates of the mass surface density at the solar radius can be made up to a height of 4 kpc using thick disk stars as tracers of the potential. We investigate why different Jeans estimators of the local surface density lead to puzzling and conflicting results. Using the Jeans equations, we compute the vertical (Fz) and radial (FR) components of the gravitational force, as well as Γ(z), which is defined as {{Γ }}\\equiv \\partial {V}{{c}}2/\\partial R, with {V}{{c}}2\\equiv -R{F}R. If we assume that the thick disk does not flare and that all the components of the velocity dispersion tensor of the thick disk have a uniform radial scalelength of 3.5 kpc, Γ takes implausibly large negative values when using the currently available kinematical data of the thick disk. This implies that the input parameters or the model assumptions must be revised. We have explored, using a simulated thick disk, the impact of the assumption that the scalelengths of the density and velocity dispersions do not depend on the vertical height z above the midplane. In the absence of any information about how these scale radii depend on z, we define a different strategy. By using a parameterized Galactic potential, we find that acceptable fits to Fz, FR, and Γ are obtained for a flaring thick disk and a spherical dark matter (DM) halo with a local density ≳0.0064 M⊙ pc-3. Disk-like DM distributions may be also compatible with the current data of the thick disk. A precise measurement of Γ at the midplane could be very useful for discriminating between models.

  4. [Jean-Baptiste Vincent Laborde (1830-1903), forgotten neurologist and neurophysiologist].

    PubMed

    Poirier, Jacques

    2015-03-01

    Jean-Baptiste Vincent Laborde (1830-1903), native of Buzet, in Gascony, undertook his medical studies in Paris and was nominated "externe" (1854) then "interne" (1858) of Paris hospitals. His main "patrons" were Alfred Velpeau (1795-1867), Auguste Nélaton (1807-1873), Jean-Baptiste Bouillaud (1796-1881), Pierre-Olive Rayer (1793-1867), Joseph-François Malgaigne (1806-1865), Pierre Carl Edouard Potain (1825-1901), Ernest Charles Lasègue (1816-1883) and Léon Rostan (1790-1866). In 1864 he defended his thesis on the essential paralysis of childhood. He then worked in the physiology laboratory of Professor Jules Auguste Beclard (1818-1887), and became "chef des travaux" of physiology at the Paris faculty of medicine. In 1890, he was nominated to the chair of Biological anthropology at the Paris school of anthropology. His main works focused on the rhythmic tractions of the tongue in cases of apparent death, the understanding of the etiology of brain softening he attributed to vascular occlusions by atheroma and the discovery of connections between the cranial nuclei of common (III) and external (VI) oculomotor nerves and the struggle against the use of ceruse, against tuberculosis and especially against alcoholism. In addition, he made a career in journalism: since 1874 he had been the founder, director and editor-in-chief of the weekly newspaper The Medical Tribune, whose aim was to "combine to a fair extent, science and progress with the practice of medicine." Finally, Laborde was a convinced Republican, a friend of Léon Gambetta's (1838-1882). For him, democracy was the "ideal of civilized nations" and he showed deep hatred for the "Commune of Paris". Finally, he was a determined free thinker, who ran the Society for mutual autopsy for a while and who was attached to civil funerals and cremation. PMID:25786426

  5. [Forgotten great men of medicine--Baron Dominique Jean Larrey (1766-1842)].

    PubMed

    Gajić, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    BIOGRAPHY: Baron Dominique Jean Larrev was a French army surgeon who rose to become a surgeon-in-chief of Napoleon's Grande Armée. Many advances in the field of surgery have been attributed to him: he was one of the first to amputate at the hip-joint (1812); he pioneered the use of maggots to prevent infection in wounds; he gave the first description of a trench foot, and originated the first aid to combatants by getting stretcher-bearers to take wounded men immediately from the battlefield. EDUCATION AND CAREER: Larrey studied medicine in Paris and spent a short time in the navy before resuming his studies at the Parisian College de Chirurgie. He joined the army in 1792 and spent the rest of his active life there, taking part in 60 battles and 400 other engagements, having been wounded three times. During this time, he initiated the modern method of army surgery, field hospitals and the system of army ambulance corps. After seeing the speed with which the carriages of the French flying artillery manoeuvred across the battlefields. Larrey adapted them as Flying Ambulances for rapid transport of the wounded and staffed them with trained crews of drivers, corpsmen and litter-bearers. Larrey also increased the mobility and improved the organization of field hospitals, effectively creating a forerunner of the modern MASH (Mobile Army Surgical Hospital) units. He was made a baron in 1809. He remained loyal to Napoleon even after his abdication in 1814, and followed him on his final campaign (the hundred days). At Waterloo, he was captured and sentenced to death; however, he was saved by the personal intervention of the Prussian commander Blücher. Many historians put him in the line with chemist Antoine Lavoisier and doctors Joseph Guillotin and Jean Paul Marat. PMID:21548278

  6. [Forgotten great men of medicine--Baron Dominique Jean Larrey (1766-1842)].

    PubMed

    Gajić, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    BIOGRAPHY: Baron Dominique Jean Larrev was a French army surgeon who rose to become a surgeon-in-chief of Napoleon's Grande Armée. Many advances in the field of surgery have been attributed to him: he was one of the first to amputate at the hip-joint (1812); he pioneered the use of maggots to prevent infection in wounds; he gave the first description of a trench foot, and originated the first aid to combatants by getting stretcher-bearers to take wounded men immediately from the battlefield. EDUCATION AND CAREER: Larrey studied medicine in Paris and spent a short time in the navy before resuming his studies at the Parisian College de Chirurgie. He joined the army in 1792 and spent the rest of his active life there, taking part in 60 battles and 400 other engagements, having been wounded three times. During this time, he initiated the modern method of army surgery, field hospitals and the system of army ambulance corps. After seeing the speed with which the carriages of the French flying artillery manoeuvred across the battlefields. Larrey adapted them as Flying Ambulances for rapid transport of the wounded and staffed them with trained crews of drivers, corpsmen and litter-bearers. Larrey also increased the mobility and improved the organization of field hospitals, effectively creating a forerunner of the modern MASH (Mobile Army Surgical Hospital) units. He was made a baron in 1809. He remained loyal to Napoleon even after his abdication in 1814, and followed him on his final campaign (the hundred days). At Waterloo, he was captured and sentenced to death; however, he was saved by the personal intervention of the Prussian commander Blücher. Many historians put him in the line with chemist Antoine Lavoisier and doctors Joseph Guillotin and Jean Paul Marat.

  7. HUMAN RIGHTS ASSESSMENT IN PARC JEAN MARIE VINCENT, PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Kimberly A.; Ivers, Louise C.

    2014-01-01

    Months after a 7.0 magnitude earthquake hit Port-au-Prince, Haiti, over one million remain homeless and living in spontaneous internally displaced person (IDP) camps. Billions of dollars from aid organizations and government agencies have been pledged toward the relief effort, yet many basic human needs, including food, shelter, and sanitation, continue to be unmet. The Sphere Project, “Humanitarian Charter and Minimum Standards in Disaster Response,” identifies the minimum standards to be attained in disaster response. From a human rights perspective and utilizing key indicators from the Sphere Project as benchmarks, this article reports on an assessment of the living conditions approximately 12 weeks after the earthquake in Parc Jean Marie Vincent, a spontaneous IDP camp in Port-au-Prince. A stratified random sample of households in the camp, proportionate to the number of families living in each sector, was selected. Interview questions were designed to serve as “key indicators” for the Sphere Project minimum standards. A total of 486 interviews were completed, representing approximately 5% of households in each of the five sectors of the camp. Our assessment identified the relative achievements and shortcomings in the provision of relief services in Parc Jean Marie Vincent. At the time of this survey, the Sphere Project minimum standards for access to health care and quantity of water per person per day were being met. Food, shelter, sanitation, and security were below minimum accepted standard and of major concern. The formal assessment reported here was completed by September 2010, and is necessarily limited to conditions in Haiti before the cholera outbreak in October. PMID:21178190

  8. First seismic survey of Lake Saint-Jean (Québec, Canada): sedimentary record of the last deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nutz, Alexis; Schuster, Mathieu; Ghienne, Jean-François; Raphaël, Certain; Nicolas, Robin; Claude, Roquin; Frédéric, Bouchette; Cousineau Pierre, A.

    2015-04-01

    The general post-glacial evolution of the Lake Saint-Jean region (Canada/Québec) was, until now, only known from onshore studies (outcrops and geomorphology). Because this lake corresponds to sediment depocentre since the area is ice free (latest Pleistocene and the entire Holocene), a comprehensive sedimentary archive could be expected from this area. As a consequence, the offshore archives of Lake Saint-Jean leave a basic, but crucial, question: can the transition from glacial to post-glacial periods be deciphered? The stratigraphy of the last deglacial sequence is investigated in Lake Saint-Jean (Québec, Canada) from 300 km of echo-sounder 2D seismic profiles. The sedimentary archive of this basin is documented from the Late Pleistocene Laurentidian ice-front recession to the present-day situation. Ten seismic units have been identified that reflect spatio-temporal variations in depositional processes characterizing different periods of the Lake Saint-Jean basin evolution. During the postglacial marine flooding, a high deposition rate of mud settling, from proglacial glacimarine and then prodeltaic plumes in the Laflamme Gulf, produced an extensive, up to 50 m thick mud sheet draping the isostatically depressed marine basin floor. Subsequently, closing of the water body due to glacio-isostatic rebound that occurred at 8.5 cal. ka BP and ice-sheet retreat outside the Saint-Jean catchment at 7.5 cal. ka BP drastically modify the hydrodynamics and sedimentation. Hyperpycnal flows appeared because fresh lake water replaced dense marine water. River sediments were transferred towards the deeper part of the lake into river-related confined lobes. The water body is also marked by the onset of a wind-driven internal circulation associating wave-related hydrodynamics and bottom currents with sedimentary features including shoreface deposits, sediment drifts, a sedimentary shelf and important erosional surfaces. The Lake Saint-Jean reveals important diversity and

  9. The origin of the initial mass function and its dependence on the mean Jeans mass in molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bate, Matthew R.; Bonnell, Ian A.

    2005-02-01

    We investigate the dependence of stellar properties on the mean thermal Jeans mass in molecular clouds. We compare the results from the two largest hydrodynamical simulations of star formation to resolve the fragmentation process down to the opacity limit, the first of which was reported by Bate, Bonnell & Bromm. The initial conditions of the two calculations are identical except for the radii of the clouds, which are chosen so that the mean densities and mean thermal Jeans masses of the clouds differ by factors of 9 and 3, respectively. We find that the denser cloud, with the lower mean thermal Jeans mass, produces a higher proportion of brown dwarfs and has a lower characteristic (median) mass of the stars and brown dwarfs. This dependence of the initial mass function (IMF) on the density of the cloud may explain the observation that the Taurus star-forming region appears to be deficient in brown dwarfs when compared with the Orion Trapezium cluster. The new calculation also produces wide binaries (separations >20 au), one of which is a wide binary brown dwarf system. Based on the hydrodynamical calculations, we develop a simple accretion/ejection model for the origin of the IMF. In the model, all stars and brown dwarfs begin with the same mass (set by the opacity limit for fragmentation) and grow in mass until their accretion is terminated stochastically by their ejection from the cloud through dynamically interactions. The model predicts that the main variation of the IMF in different star-forming environments should be in the location of the peak (due to variations in the mean thermal Jeans mass of the cloud) and in the substellar regime. However, the slope of the IMF at high masses may depend on the dispersion in the accretion rates of protostars.

  10. "I would eagerly leave Neuchâtel ..." A 1912 letter by Jean Piaget with an introduction and notes.

    PubMed

    Vidal, F

    1986-01-01

    A 1912 letter from fifteen-year-old Jean Piaget (1896-1980) to the director of the Museum of Natural History of Geneva illustrates Piaget's precocious integration into a community of professional naturalists, and reveals his hitherto unknown plan to study medicine. It is not certain whether he actually intended to realize that plan. An essential biographical fact, however, is that he finally left natural history by turning to philosophy rather than to medicine.

  11. Two schemes of intellectual development: A comparison of development as defined by william perry and jean piaget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Bruce; Donovan, Michael P.; Kelsey, Linda J.; Paterson, John; Statkiewicz, Walter; Allen, Robert D.

    The theories of Jean Piaget and William Perry provide two different theories of intellectual development with several similiarities, but also with critical differences. In this study a comparison was made to determine whether the two theories describe operation of the same mental structures or two fundamentally different aspects of intellectual development. The results, based upon individual interviews of all participants, indicate that the two theories outline different and independent processes for assessing intellectual development.

  12. "I would eagerly leave Neuchâtel ..." A 1912 letter by Jean Piaget with an introduction and notes.

    PubMed

    Vidal, F

    1986-01-01

    A 1912 letter from fifteen-year-old Jean Piaget (1896-1980) to the director of the Museum of Natural History of Geneva illustrates Piaget's precocious integration into a community of professional naturalists, and reveals his hitherto unknown plan to study medicine. It is not certain whether he actually intended to realize that plan. An essential biographical fact, however, is that he finally left natural history by turning to philosophy rather than to medicine. PMID:11608771

  13. Jeans instability of partially-ionized self-gravitating viscous plasma with Hall effect FLR corrections and porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaothekar, Sachin; Soni, Ghanshyam D.; Prajapati, R. P.; Chhajlani, Rajendra K.

    2016-06-01

    The problem of Jeans gravitational instability and radiative instability is investigated for partially ionized self-gravitating plasma which has connection in astrophysical condensations and formation of objects. A general dispersion relation has been derived with the help of relevant linearized perturbation equations, using the normal mode analysis method. Effects of FLR corrections, radiative heat-loss function and collisions with neutrals on the Jeans criterion of self-gravitational instability of the system are discussed. The conditions of instability are derived for a temperature-dependent and density-dependent heat-loss function with thermal conductivity and FLR corrections for some special case. The stability of the system is discussed by using Routh-Hurwitz's criterion. Numerical calculations have been performed to discuss the dependence of the growth rate of the Jeans gravitational instability on the various physical parameters. The FLR corrections, viscosity, porosity, magnetic field, and neutral collision have stabilizing influence while finite electrical resistivity and permeability have a destabilizing influence on the growth rate of the gravitational instability. Our results are helpful for understanding the formation of dense molecular clouds.

  14. Health monitoring of the Saint-Jean bridge of Bordeaux, France using fiber Bragg grating extensometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magne, Sylvain; Boussoir, Jonathan; Rougeault, Stephane; Marty-Dewynter, Veronique; Ferdinand, Pierre; Bureau, Lionel

    2003-07-01

    Most civil engineering structures have been built in the 50's and 60's and reach similar level of degradation accelerated by loading conditions and corrosion. In Europe, National Authorities and the European Commission promote Health Monitoring concepts, instrumentation of existing structures and help in the design of new durable structures of higher performance. In this context, the CEA-List has achieved a non-exclusive industrial transfer of its Bragg grating sensing technology for civil engineering applications to Hydrolog (French SME), supported by the European Community and the french ministry of Industry. In order to check the reliability and user-friendliness of this instrumentation, eleven spectrally-multiplexed Bragg grating-based extensometers, four FBG temperature sensors and an acquisition unit have been installed into the Saint-Jean bridge in Bordeaux, France with the help of the Infrastructure Regional Direction (DRE-Aquitaine) and the Bordeaux Authority (Communaute Urbaine de Bordeaux). A standardized loading of the bridge has been performed on October 29, 1001, with the purpose of correlating its mechanical reaction to loading conditions. Moreover, the equipment has been operating for one year to take into account the winter-summer cycle.

  15. "To afford the wounded speedy assistance": Dominique Jean Larrey and Napoleon.

    PubMed

    Skandalakis, Panagiotis N; Lainas, Panagiotis; Zoras, Odyseas; Skandalakis, John E; Mirilas, Petros

    2006-08-01

    Dominique Jean Larrey (1766-1842) has been described as the father of modern military surgery and is considered even today as the model military surgeon. He developed a plan of rapid evacuation of wounded soldiers from the battlefield during combat, using flexible medical units which he named ambulances volantes ("flying ambulances"). He won the admiration of Napoleon Bonaparte (1769-1821), who was amazed by the results of Larrey's sanitary system. Larrey spent almost 18 years with Napoleon, accompanying him in 25 campaigns, 60 battles, and more than 400 engagements. Napoleon's enormous military success was due not only to his strategy and skill but also to the medical services provided by Larrey. The surgeon became a master of wound management and limb amputation. In his vivid battlefield journals, Larrey documented the course of tetanus, the pathophysiology of cold injury, the effective control of hemorrhage, the drainage of empyema and hemothorax, the aspiration of pericardial effusion or hemopericardium, and the packing of sucking chest wounds. Larrey established a categorical rule for the triage of war casualties, treating the wounded according to the observed gravity of their injuries and the urgency for medical care, regardless of their rank or nationality.

  16. Crystallization and emplacement of the Lac St-Jean anorthosite massif (Quebec, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woussen, G.; Dimroth, E.; Corriveau, L.; Archer, P.

    1981-05-01

    The Lac St-Jean anorthosite massif underlies an area of over 20,000 km2 and has been emplaced into migmatitic gneisses of the central granulite terrain of the Grenville Province of the Canadian shield. Field data and petrography in an area straddling the anorthosite-gneiss contact, close to Chicoutimi (Quebec) permits an outline of its tecto-magmatic evolution. Depositional magmatic textures in the massif reveals that it crystallized from a magma in a relatively calm tectonic environment. The absence of fusion in pelitic gneisses at the contact proves that the crystallization did not take place at the level presently exposed. The parallelism of subvertical foliation in the enveloping gneisses and the anorthosite indicates that both were deformed together. It is suggested that the deformation results from a diapiric ascent of the anorthosite massif after its consolidation at depth. The depth of consolidation of the anorthosite is estimated at ˜ 25 30 km from subsolidus reaction between plagioclase and olivine. The diapiric ascent is further substantiated by the fact that three sets of mafic dykes of different ages, intrusive into the anorthosite, have a mineralogy which indicates successively decreasing P, T conditions of emplacement from granulite fades to amphibolite facies. An evolution of the basement gneisses and the anorthosite is proposed as a working hypothesis; it relies on the fact that metabasite dyke swarms in the basement gneisses represent a period of major crustal extension and could be used as a stratigraphic subdivision of the Grenville Province.

  17. Jean-Anthelme Brillat-Savarin's 1825 treatise on the mouth and ingestion.

    PubMed

    Chong, Gabriel Tse Feng

    2012-12-01

    This article quotes and discusses Jean-Anthelme Brillat-Savarin's musings on the mouth and ingestion as described in his book The Physiology of Taste. The book was first published in France in December 1825, and is still widely read as a key work in Gastronomy today. The mouth is intimately related to the acts of chewing, swallowing and eating and it would be interesting to report an early 19th century epicurean's views on the mouth. Passages from Brillat-Savarin's book describing the functions of the teeth and tongue and the acts of tasting, chewing, and swallowing are quoted in full. Anecdotes also include one on the horrifying punishment of having one's tongue removed and another illustrating the poor oral health found among Europeans of that era. His work offers a unique glimpse into how a 19th century gastronome viewed the oral cavity and its gastronomical functions. While some of his writings may appear archaic and antediluvian to the modern reader; others relating to, for example chewing and swallowing, are surprisingly accurate by contemporary standards. Nonetheless, the gastronomic savant seemed to know a lot right about modern stomatology!

  18. Ivan Djaja (Jean Giaja)1 and the Belgrade School of Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Andjus, Pavle R.; Stojilkovic, Stanko S.; Cvijic, Gordana

    2016-01-01

    Summary The founder of physiology studies in the Balkans and the pioneer of research on hypothermia, Ivan Djaja (Jean Giaja) was born 1884 in L’Havre. Giaja gained his PhD at the Sorbonne in 1909. In 1910 he established the first Chair of Physiology in the Balkans and organized the first Serbian Institute for Physiology at the School of Philosophy of the University of Belgrade. He led this Institute for more than 40 subsequent years. His most notable papers were in the field of thermoregulation and bioenergetics. Djaja became member of the Serbian and Croatian academies of science and doctor honoris causa of Sorbonne. In 1952 for the seminal work on the behaviour of deep cooled warm blooded animals he becane associate member of the National Medical Academy in Paris. In 1955 the French Academy of Sciences elected him as associate member in place of deceased Sir Alexander Fleming. Djaja died in 1957 during a congress held in his honour. He left more than 200 scientific and other papers and the golden DaVincian credo “Nulla dies sine experimento”. His legacy was continued by several generations of researchers, the most prominent among them being Stefan Gelineo, Radoslav Andjus and Vojislav Petrović. PMID:21777022

  19. Historical perspective on pressure ulcers: the decubitus ominosus of Jean-Martin Charcot.

    PubMed

    Levine, Jeffrey M

    2005-07-01

    Jean-Martin Charcot was a towering figure in the French medical community in the 19th century. Among the diseases he studied was the decubitus, or pressure ulcer, as it is commonly called today. He did not believe that pressure or local irritation were causative factors for the decubitus but rather subscribed to the "neurotrophic theory," which held that damage to the central nervous system led directly to its occurrence. Charcot observed that many patients who developed eschar of the sacrum and buttocks died soon afterwards, and referred to this lesion as the decubitus ominosus, implying that its occurrence heralded impending death. His description of the evolving decubitus is extraordinarily detailed and accurate and includes complications that are seldom seen today, such as gangrenous metastases to the lung and invasion of the spinal cord. Charcot's therapeutic nihilism is largely a product of the limited medical technology of his day. The importance of risk factor assessment and timely intervention for persons at risk is now understood. In addition, it is recognized that not all pressure ulcers are unavoidable and that many ulcers, particularly those in early stages, can be reversed. Comparing Charcot's view of the decubitus with our own, insight is provided into the way medicine is practiced today.

  20. Jean Martin Charcot and aphasia: treading the line between experimental physiology and pathological anatomy.

    PubMed

    Brais, B

    1993-11-01

    During his entire career Jean Martin Charcot published or lectured on aphasia and brain localization in man. He contributed case studies during the early 1860s, while in the 1870s he became the leading French promoter of localizationism. It was in 1883 and 1884 that he summarized his thoughts on aphasia in a series of 14 lectures he delivered at the Salpêtrière Hospice. His paramount ambition was to achieve didactic clarity. His proposed "bell diagram" was widely criticized for its simplicity, but nevertheless gained considerable popularity in France. His teaching borrowed extensively from the writings of contemporary researchers and was clearly associationist in nature. Charcot's major contribution in the history of aphasiology is that he introduced the works of "diagram-makers" to the French scientific community at large. Charcot's lecture series also played a key role in renewing interest in psychology. Charcot's dismissal of experimental physiology as a legitimate means of investigating central nervous functions in man allowed him to define a separate field of research for a new psychology, one, he believed, which should depart from introspection and turn to his clinicoanatomic method for guidance.

  1. Jean-Martin Charcot's house officers at La Salpêtrière Hospital.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    From the time he became chef de service at La Salpêtrière Hospital in 1866 until his death in 1893, Jean-Martin Charcot oversaw 32 house officers. Some of them became famous, such as D.M. Bourneville, E. Brissaud, P. Marie and G. Gilles de la Tourette. Others are less well known. The fact remains that Charcot knew how to surround himself with fine students and leverage their talents in order to make the neurological discoveries by which he would become famous throughout the world. Here, we present the biographies of H. Soulier (1862), J. Cotard (1865), R. Lépine (1867), A. Gombault (1872), A. Pierret (1874), A. Pitres (1876), P. Oulmont (1877), G. Guinon (1885), P. Blocq(1887), E. Huet (1888), E. Parmentier (1890) and A. Souques(1893). Each of these men with their unique paths and interests helped lay the foundations for the birth of neurology at the end of the 19th century in Paris. As Emile Littré said: 'La science de la Médecine, si elle ne veut pas être rabaissée au rang de métier, doit s'occuper de son histoire et soigner les vieux monuments que les temps passés lui ont légués', which could be translated as 'to avoid being reduced to a trade, the science of medicine must attend to its history and take care of the old monuments handed down by time'.

  2. Jean-Charles Houzeau's Visual Magnitude Estimates from Jamaica in 1868

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, Christiaan

    2012-09-01

    Jean-Charles Houzeau de Lehaie (1820-1888) was a Belgian astronomer who, as an observer, covered astronomy, geography, cartography, geodesy and natural sciences. He is known for designing the ``heliometer with unequal focal lengths" for the 1882 transit of Venus, for which he organised two expeditions: one to San Antonio (Texas), and one to Santiago (Chile). Less known, but historically important from the point of view of his consistent approach to observational science, was his ``Uranométrie générale", in which he systematically recorded visual magnitudes of 5719 northern and southern stars up to mag 6.4. He carried out the visual estimates from Jamaica in less than 400 nights in 1875--76. This presentation discusses the observational approach of his project, and weighs the merit of a dataset that was produced in one throw, by one single person from one single observing site of excellent atmospheric quality, without any recourse to data produced by other observers. A proving example of the virtue of Houzeau's Uranométrie is that it has been used in the construction of the charts of the first edition of ``Norton's Star Atlas".

  3. Jean-Martin Charcot's role in the 19th century study of music aphasia.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Julene K; Lorch, Marjorie; Nicolas, Serge; Graziano, Amy

    2013-05-01

    Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-93) was a well-known French neurologist. Although he is widely recognized for his discovery of several neurological disorders and his research into aphasia, Charcot's ideas about how the brain processes music are less well known. Charcot discussed the music abilities of several patients in the context of his 'Friday Lessons' on aphasia, which took place at the Salpêtrière Hospital in Paris in 1883-84. In his most comprehensive discussion about music, Charcot described a professional trombone player who developed difficulty copying music notation and playing his instrument, thereby identifying a new isolated syndrome of music agraphia without aphasia. Because the description of this case was published only in Italian by one of his students, Domenico Miliotti, there has been considerable confusion and under-acknowledgement of Charcot's ideas about music and the brain. In this paper, we describe Charcot's ideas regarding music and place them within the historical context of the growing interest in the neurological underpinnings of music abilities that took place in the 1880s. PMID:23576129

  4. [A XVIth century journeyman apothecar in Montpellier: Jean Magnol (1562-1632)].

    PubMed

    Charlot, Colette

    2006-11-01

    J. Magnol came from Ardèche to Montpellier to learn how to be apothecary grocer. He is characteristics of the transition between the Middle-Ages statutes and Renaissance ones (1572/1598) in a city famous for its school of medicine. For thirteen (13) years he worked as a journeyman apothecary was like a drysalter grocer. But the 1572 statutes due to king Henry IV (the fourth), having force of law, changed the trade into an art, as highly regarded as the legal profession. Long before the 1777 nationwide statutes due to king Louis XIV (the fourteenth). To become a master, Magnol had to give four masterpieces, the formulas of which can be found in the new pharmacopoeia written by the medicine chancellor: "the pharmacopoea Monspeliensis" an alternative to the ancient one by Nicolas de Salerne. The pratical experiments were carried out by those famous apothecary masters who made up the 1572 statutes. Jean Magnol is Pierre Magnol's ancestor (1638-1715), the famous botanist whom Carl Linné dedicated the magnolia genus to. PMID:17526144

  5. Jean-Martin Charcot's role in the 19th century study of music aphasia.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Julene K; Lorch, Marjorie; Nicolas, Serge; Graziano, Amy

    2013-05-01

    Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-93) was a well-known French neurologist. Although he is widely recognized for his discovery of several neurological disorders and his research into aphasia, Charcot's ideas about how the brain processes music are less well known. Charcot discussed the music abilities of several patients in the context of his 'Friday Lessons' on aphasia, which took place at the Salpêtrière Hospital in Paris in 1883-84. In his most comprehensive discussion about music, Charcot described a professional trombone player who developed difficulty copying music notation and playing his instrument, thereby identifying a new isolated syndrome of music agraphia without aphasia. Because the description of this case was published only in Italian by one of his students, Domenico Miliotti, there has been considerable confusion and under-acknowledgement of Charcot's ideas about music and the brain. In this paper, we describe Charcot's ideas regarding music and place them within the historical context of the growing interest in the neurological underpinnings of music abilities that took place in the 1880s.

  6. Weighing the galactic disc using the Jeans equation: lessons from simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candlish, G. N.; Smith, R.; Moni Bidin, C.; Gibson, B. K.

    2016-03-01

    Using three-dimensional stellar kinematic data from simulated galaxies, we examine the efficacy of a Jeans equation analysis in reconstructing the total disk surface density, including the dark matter, at the `Solar' radius. Our simulation data set includes galaxies formed in a cosmological context using state-of-the-art high-resolution cosmological zoom simulations, and other idealized models. The cosmologically formed galaxies have been demonstrated to lie on many of the observed scaling relations for late-type spirals, and thus offer an interesting surrogate for real galaxies with the obvious advantage that all the kinematical data are known perfectly. We show that the vertical velocity dispersion is typically the dominant kinematic quantity in the analysis, and that the traditional method of using only the vertical force is reasonably effective at low heights above the disk plane. At higher heights the inclusion of the radial force becomes increasingly important. We also show that the method is sensitive to uncertainties in the measured disk parameters, particularly the scalelengths of the assumed double exponential density distribution, and the scalelength of the radial velocity dispersion. In addition, we show that disk structure and low number statistics can lead to significant errors in the calculated surface densities. Finally, we examine the implications of our results for previous studies of this sort, suggesting that more accurate measurements of the scalelengths may help reconcile conflicting estimates of the local dark matter density in the literature.

  7. Assessing the Jeans Anisotropic Multi-Gaussian Expansion method with the Illustris simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongyu; Li, Ran; Mao, Shude; Xu, Dandan; Long, R. J.; Emsellem, Eric

    2016-02-01

    We assess the effectiveness of the Jeans Anisotropic Multi-Gaussian Expansion (JAM) technique with a state-of-the-art cosmological hydrodynamic simulation, the Illustris project. We perform JAM modelling on 1413 simulated galaxies with stellar mass M* > 1010 M⊙, and construct an axisymmetric dynamical model for each galaxy. Combined with a Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation, we recover the projected root-mean-square velocity (Vrms) field of the stellar component, and investigate constraints on the stellar mass-to-light ratio, M*/L, and the fraction of dark matter fDM within 2.5 effective radii (Re). We find that the enclosed total mass within 2.5 Re is well constrained to within 10 per cent. However, there is a degeneracy between the dark matter and stellar components with correspondingly larger individual errors. The 1σ scatter in the recovered M*/L is 30-40 per cent of the true value. The accuracy of the recovery of M*/L depends on the triaxial shape of a galaxy. There is no significant bias for oblate galaxies, while for prolate galaxies the JAM-recovered stellar mass is on average 18 per cent higher than the input values. We also find that higher image resolutions alleviate the dark matter and stellar mass degeneracy and yield systematically better parameter recovery.

  8. Chapter 15: Jean-Martin Charcot and the anatomo-clinical method of neurology.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Christopher G

    2010-01-01

    Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893) was the premier clinical neurologist of the 19th century. Charcot's research was anchored in the anatomo-clinical method, a two-part methodology that linked clinical signs with anatomical lesions. The first step of this method involved the careful documentation of clinical signs with longitudinal observation. At the time of death, the second step involved autopsy examination of the brain and spinal cord. With combined clinical and anatomical data, Charcot was able to suggest concrete clinical-anatomical correlations. This method helped to define the tracts and nuclei responsible for normal and abnormal neurological signs and was pivotal to a new classification of neurological diseases based on anatomy. The best-developed example of this method was Charcot's work with motor system degenerative disorders, specifically amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. These studies led to the international designation of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis as Charcot's disease. Other examples of the fruits of the anatomo-clinical method included several stroke syndromes and the linkage of specific signs to specific lesions in multiple sclerosis. The discipline fostered cortical localization theory, which moved neurologists away from the concept of the brain as a homogenous organ in preference to the concept that brain regions controlled specific motor, sensory and language functions. Charcot's attempts to apply his anatomo-clinical method to the knotty neurological diagnosis of hysteria led him to experiments and conclusions that drew criticism and even scorn from colleagues. These events tarnished Charcot's reputation at the close of his career. In the context of Charcot's extensive discoveries and lasting contributions, the anatomo-clinical method remains the anchor of modern neurological diagnosis and is Charcot's most important contribution to clinical neurology.

  9. Generalized Jeans' Escape of Pick-Up Ions in Quasi-Linear Relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2011-01-01

    Jeans escape is a well-validated formulation of upper atmospheric escape that we have generalized to estimate plasma escape from ionospheres. It involves the computation of the parts of particle velocity space that are unbound by the gravitational potential at the exobase, followed by a calculation of the flux carried by such unbound particles as they escape from the potential well. To generalize this approach for ions, we superposed an electrostatic ambipolar potential and a centrifugal potential, for motions across and along a divergent magnetic field. We then considered how the presence of superthermal electrons, produced by precipitating auroral primary electrons, controls the ambipolar potential. We also showed that the centrifugal potential plays a small role in controlling the mass escape flux from the terrestrial ionosphere. We then applied the transverse ion velocity distribution produced when ions, picked up by supersonic (i.e., auroral) ionospheric convection, relax via quasi-linear diffusion, as estimated for cometary comas [1]. The results provide a theoretical basis for observed ion escape response to electromagnetic and kinetic energy sources. They also suggest that super-sonic but sub-Alfvenic flow, with ion pick-up, is a unique and important regime of ion-neutral coupling, in which plasma wave-particle interactions are driven by ion-neutral collisions at densities for which the collision frequency falls near or below the gyro-frequency. As another possible illustration of this process, the heliopause ribbon discovered by the IBEX mission involves interactions between the solar wind ions and the interstellar neutral gas, in a regime that may be analogous [2].

  10. Diamagnetic Corrections and Pascal's Constants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bain, Gordon A.; Berry, John F.

    2008-01-01

    Measured magnetic susceptibilities of paramagnetic substances must typically be corrected for their underlying diamagnetism. This correction is often accomplished by using tabulated values for the diamagnetism of atoms, ions, or whole molecules. These tabulated values can be problematic since many sources contain incomplete and conflicting data.…

  11. From past to current tectonics: Thematic issue dedicated to Jean-François Stéphan (1949-2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manighetti, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    This thematic issue of Comptes rendus Geoscience has been assembled to honor the memory of our late colleague and friend Jean-François Stéphan. Jean-François was a great scientist, specialized in tectonics, and a great colleague who devoted his time for his community. His work and actions deeply imprinted both the French and the International Earth Science communities. This volume brings together contributions of colleagues of Jean-François, who were also close friends or colleagues who knew and deeply appreciated him. Naturally, tectonics is the common theme of these contributions. Some of the papers presented here focus on tectonic questions and/or regions Jean-François worked on during his career; other papers present studies Jean-François motivated or encouraged in one way or another; other papers are simply tectonic studies he would have liked. Taken together, the nine papers of this thematic issue take the reader on a beautiful trip, from past to current tectonics.

  12. Terpenoids, flavonoids and caffeic acid derivatives from Salvia viridis L. cvar. Blue Jeans.

    PubMed

    Rungsimakan, Supattra; Rowan, Michael G

    2014-12-01

    Three diterpenoids, 1-oxomicrostegiol (1), viroxocin (2), viridoquinone (3), were isolated from the roots of Salvia viridis L. cvar. Blue Jeans. Five known diterpenoids, microstegiol (4), 7α-acetoxy-14-hydroxy-8,13-abietadiene-11,12-dione (5; 7-O-acetylhorminone tautomer), 7α,14-dihydroxy-8,13-abietadiene-11,12-dione (6; horminone tautomer), ferruginol and salvinolonyl 12-methyl ether (7) were also found in the roots together with 1-docosyl ferulate (8), and a mixture of 2-(4'-alkoxyphenyl) ethyl alkanoates (9). Two lupane triterpenoids, 2α-acetoxy-lup-20(29)-en-3β-ol (10), and 3β-acetoxy-lup-20(29)-en-2α-ol (11) were found in the aerial parts together with known compounds, lup-20(29)-ene-2α,3β-diol (12), ursolic acid, oleanolic acid, β-sitosterol and β-sitosterol glucoside. A known phenylpropanoid, trans-verbascoside (or acteoside; 13), was the main constituent in the polar fraction of the aerial part, and it is now reported in the genus Salvia for the first time. Other polyphenolic compounds were cis-verbascoside (14), leucosceptoside A (15), martynoside (16), caffeic acid, 6-O-caffeoyl-glucose (18), rosmarinic acid, salidroside, luteolin-7-O-α-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→6)-β-galactopyranoside, luteolin-7-O-β-galactopyranoside, luteolin-7-O-α-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→6)-β-glucopyranoside, luteolin-7-O-β-glucopyranoside, and apigenin-7-O-β-glucopyranoside. The structures were determined by 1D-, 2D-NMR and HR-ESI-MS techniques. Compounds 6, 10, ferruginol, ursolic acid and oleanolic acid exhibited antibacterial activity against Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 775) with MIC 50 μM, 25 μM, 50 μM, 12.5 μM, 12.5 μM respectively. Ferruginol, ursolic acid and oleanolic acid were also active against Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6571), and Bacillus cereus (ATCC 2599) with MIC 12.5-50 μM. 4 was also active against S.aureus (ATCC 6571) with MIC 50 μM. These values are consistent with previous studies on the antimicrobial activity of Salvia diterpenoids.

  13. [WILD MAMMALS OF THE GRAND DUCHY OF LITHUANIA IN THE WORKS OF JEAN-EMMANUEL GILIBERT].

    PubMed

    Samojlik, Tomasz; Daszkiewicz, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Among the many topics of lively scientific work that Jean Emmanuel Gilibert (1741-1814) conducted in Grodno and Vilnius, an important place is occupied by his observations of wild mammals. Royal patronage and care from Antoni Tyzenhauz, Treasurer of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania and the governor of Grodno, allowed Gilibert to keep and observe wild fauna captured by royal services in royal forests, including Białowieża Primeval Forest. Such was an origin of a female bison kept by Gilibert in Grodno. Its description, published in Indagatores naturae in Lithuania (Vilnius 1781) for decades became the primary source of information about the behaviour, food preferences and the anatomy of European bison. European science has just begun to take interest in European bison, therefore Gilibert's account entered scientific circulation by way of French natural history encyclopaedias (mainly Georges Buffon's Histoire naturelle) and works by Georges Cuvier or Étienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire. Apart from the description of European bison, Gilibert left an entire series of observations of wild mammals inhabiting the forests of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania. His accounts of moose were important in building a knowledge base for this species. In the first half of the 18th century, moose was known mainly from fantastic descriptions in Renaissance works and from prescriptions devoted to using moose hoof as the epilepsy treatment. Gilibert's observations helped to overthrow such superstitions. Similarly, Gilibert's first-hand information verified the widespread legends concerning brown bear (e.g. the belief that white bears, belonging to other species than polar bears, occur in Lithuania) . List of species kept and thoroughly watched by the scholar is much longer and includes lynx, wolf (and hybrids of wolves and dogs), beaver, badger, fox, hedgehog, and even white mouse. Also his comments on the species of mammals then absent in Lithuania but known either from farming or from the fur

  14. [WILD MAMMALS OF THE GRAND DUCHY OF LITHUANIA IN THE WORKS OF JEAN-EMMANUEL GILIBERT].

    PubMed

    Samojlik, Tomasz; Daszkiewicz, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Among the many topics of lively scientific work that Jean Emmanuel Gilibert (1741-1814) conducted in Grodno and Vilnius, an important place is occupied by his observations of wild mammals. Royal patronage and care from Antoni Tyzenhauz, Treasurer of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania and the governor of Grodno, allowed Gilibert to keep and observe wild fauna captured by royal services in royal forests, including Białowieża Primeval Forest. Such was an origin of a female bison kept by Gilibert in Grodno. Its description, published in Indagatores naturae in Lithuania (Vilnius 1781) for decades became the primary source of information about the behaviour, food preferences and the anatomy of European bison. European science has just begun to take interest in European bison, therefore Gilibert's account entered scientific circulation by way of French natural history encyclopaedias (mainly Georges Buffon's Histoire naturelle) and works by Georges Cuvier or Étienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire. Apart from the description of European bison, Gilibert left an entire series of observations of wild mammals inhabiting the forests of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania. His accounts of moose were important in building a knowledge base for this species. In the first half of the 18th century, moose was known mainly from fantastic descriptions in Renaissance works and from prescriptions devoted to using moose hoof as the epilepsy treatment. Gilibert's observations helped to overthrow such superstitions. Similarly, Gilibert's first-hand information verified the widespread legends concerning brown bear (e.g. the belief that white bears, belonging to other species than polar bears, occur in Lithuania) . List of species kept and thoroughly watched by the scholar is much longer and includes lynx, wolf (and hybrids of wolves and dogs), beaver, badger, fox, hedgehog, and even white mouse. Also his comments on the species of mammals then absent in Lithuania but known either from farming or from the fur

  15. NOMENCLATURAL NOTES ON THE EURYTOMIDS (CHALCIDOIDEA: EURYTOMIDAE) DESCRIBED BY JEAN BRÈTHES HOUSED IN MUSEO ARGENTINO DE CIENCIAS NATURALES “BERNARDINO RIVADAVIA”

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nine species parasitic eurytomid wasps described by Jean Brèthes and deposited in the National Insect Collection of Argentina, Buenos Aires are treated and their nomenclature stabilized. The condition of the type material is described. Lectotypes are designated for Prodecatoma parodii, Eudecatoma o...

  16. Jean Langlais (1907-91): an historical case of a blind organist with stroke-induced aphasia and Braille alexia but without amusia.

    PubMed

    Fisher, C A H; Larner, A J

    2008-11-01

    The subject of a prior report of a blind organist with aphasia and Braille alexia without amusia, published in French, has been identified as Jean Langlais. His artistic and medical history is presented, the latter via translation of the original 1987 paper.

  17. Transitory Connections: The Reception and Rejection of Jean Piaget's Psychology in the Nursery School Movement in the 1920s and 1930s

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beatty, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    In 1927, nursery school educator Lucy Sprague Mitchell heralded Jean Piaget's psychology as of "outstanding interest" and wrote in "Progressive Education" that it should be of "immense service" to psychologists, teachers, and parents. In 1929, psychologist Lois Meek praised Piaget's research in the National Society for the Study of Education's…

  18. Absurdity and being-in-itself. The third phase of phenomenology: Jean-Paul Sartre and existential psychoanalysis.

    PubMed

    Jones, A

    2001-08-01

    Existentialism and phenomenology are closely linked philosophies. Existentialism preceded phenomenology and is not considered a single philosophy but several schools of thought, both theist and atheist in thinking, which grew out of a reaction to traditional philosophy. The development of phenomenology is divided into three separate phases ultimately merging with existentialism. Following Second World War, the phenomenological movement gained momentum in France and encompassed many of the ideas of Edmund Husserl and Martin Heidegger. Gabriel Marcel, Maurice Merlieu-Ponty and, notably, Jean-Paul Sartre established a 'third phase' of phenomenology. This paper explores some of Sartre's ideas related to being and later applications through Medard Boss and R.D. Laing, and offers a short illustrative case vignette that shows the concepts as they might apply to nursing practice. Consideration is finally given to existential psychoanalysis as an applied research methodology

  19. Reproductive attitudes of couples having a child with cystic fibrosis in Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean (Quebec, Canada).

    PubMed

    De Braekeleer, M; Bellis, G; Rault, G; Allard, C; Milot, M; Simard, F

    2000-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) has a high incidence (1/936 live births) and carrier rate (1/15 inhabitants) in Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean. One objective of a major enquiry among several subsets of individuals from this high-risk population for CF was to evaluate the reproductive behaviour of couples with a CF child attending the comprehensive CF clinic in Chicoutimi. The knowledge of the recurrence risk resulted in deciding against further progeny or in reducing the number of children. More reliable contraception methods after the birth of the CF child, but not prenatal diagnosis, were used. Although a minority of parents with a CF child would abort a CF foetus, they apparently started viewing pregnancy interruption for CF after prenatal diagnosis as an acceptable reproductive option.

  20. Jean-Martin Charcot, father of modern neurology: an homage 120 years after his death.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Marleide da Mota; Engelhardt, Eliasz

    2013-10-01

    Jean-Martin Charcot was a pioneer in a variety of subjects, including nervous system diseases; anatomy; physiology; pathology; and diseases of ageing, joints, and lungs. His medical achievements were mainly based on his anatomopathological proficiency, his observation, and his personal thoroughness that favored the delineation of the nosology of the main neurological diseases, including multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, peroneal muscular atrophy, and hysteria/epilepsy. The link of this anatomoclinical method with iconographic representations and theatrical lessons, and the rich bibliographical documentations, carried out in a crowded barn for diseased people--Salpetrière Hospital, were the basis of his achievements, which are still discussed 120 years after his death.

  1. Application of Jean Piaget's theory of human development for nursing children in an adult intensive therapy unit.

    PubMed

    Green, A

    1991-12-01

    Piaget (1964) believed that interaction with the environment has a large part to play in human development. Matthew (1986) states that in an ideal world critically ill children should be cared for by staff trained in paediatrics, within designated paediatric intensive therapy units. Unfortunately, there are only 28 paediatric intensive therapy units in Great Britain (CMA Medical Data, 1987), consequently each year a third of children requiring intensive care are admitted to adult intensive therapy units (ITU). A knowledge and understanding of developmental psychology can therefore be beneficial to nurses in assessing which stage of development a child has reached, in order to plan the correct level of stimulation, and hence facilitate progress rather than regression in the accomplishment of developmental tasks. The psychological and social processes involved in Jean Piaget's (1896-1980) theory of human development are discussed with regard to nursing children requiring intubation and ventilation in an adult ITU.

  2. Application of Jean Piaget's theory of human development for nursing children in an adult intensive therapy unit.

    PubMed

    Green, A

    1991-12-01

    Piaget (1964) believed that interaction with the environment has a large part to play in human development. Matthew (1986) states that in an ideal world critically ill children should be cared for by staff trained in paediatrics, within designated paediatric intensive therapy units. Unfortunately, there are only 28 paediatric intensive therapy units in Great Britain (CMA Medical Data, 1987), consequently each year a third of children requiring intensive care are admitted to adult intensive therapy units (ITU). A knowledge and understanding of developmental psychology can therefore be beneficial to nurses in assessing which stage of development a child has reached, in order to plan the correct level of stimulation, and hence facilitate progress rather than regression in the accomplishment of developmental tasks. The psychological and social processes involved in Jean Piaget's (1896-1980) theory of human development are discussed with regard to nursing children requiring intubation and ventilation in an adult ITU. PMID:1765639

  3. Resolving the mass-anisotropy degeneracy of the spherically symmetric Jeans equation - II. Optimum smoothing and model validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diakogiannis, Foivos I.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.

    2014-09-01

    The spherical Jeans equation is widely used to estimate the mass content of stellar systems with apparent spherical symmetry. However, this method suffers from a degeneracy between the assumed mass density and the kinematic anisotropy profile, β(r). In a previous work, we laid the theoretical foundations for an algorithm that combines smoothing B splines with equations from dynamics to remove this degeneracy. Specifically, our method reconstructs a unique kinematic profile of σ _{rr}^2 and σ _{tt}^2 for an assumed free functional form of the potential and mass density (Φ, ρ) and given a set of observed line-of-sight velocity dispersion measurements, σ _los^2. In Paper I, we demonstrated the efficiency of our algorithm with a very simple example and we commented on the need for optimum smoothing of the B-spline representation; this is in order to avoid unphysical variational behaviour when we have large uncertainty in our data. In the current contribution, we present a process of finding the optimum smoothing for a given data set by using information of the behaviour from known ideal theoretical models. Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods are used to explore the degeneracy in the dynamical modelling process. We validate our model through applications to synthetic data for systems with constant or variable mass-to-light ratio Υ. In all cases, we recover excellent fits of theoretical functions to observables and unique solutions. Our algorithm is a robust method for the removal of the mass-anisotropy degeneracy of the spherically symmetric Jeans equation for an assumed functional form of the mass density.

  4. Redefinition of the Lac-St.-Jean Anorthosite, Central Grenville Province, Québec, Based on Compositional, Structural, Geochronological, and Mineral Deposit Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebert, C.; van Breemen, O.

    2004-05-01

    The Lac-St.-Jean Anorthosite was previously recognized as one of the biggest anorthositic masses in the world (20,000 km2). Recent field and geochronological work has demonstrated that this anorthositic mass is, in fact, an assemblage resulting from four temporally distinct magmatic episodes, which took place between 1327 and 1012 Ma. This discovery has required the redefinition of the Lac-St.-Jean Anorthosite in terms of its component units. The 1327 ± 16 Ma De La Blache Mafic Plutonic Suite occupies the northeastern limb of the former Lac-St.-Jean Anorthosite. This suite is characterized by labradorite-type anorthosite, a large volume of olivine-bearing anorthositic rocks, a wide gabbronoritic fringe, and Fe-Ti and Ni-Cu occurrences. This magmatic body is constrained by a paired, dextral and sinistral strike-slip fault system. The Lac-St.-Jean Anorthositic Suite represents that part of the former Lac St.-Jean Anorthosite that was emplaced between 1160 and 1140 Ma. The suite still occupies the largest area of any anorthositic mass in the Central Grenville Province. It is characterized by labradorite- and andesine-type anorthositic rocks, is bordered by gabbronoritic fringes along its northern and southeastern margins, and contains sizeable Ti-Fe-P and Ni-Cu occurrences. The western part of this huge anorthositic mass is undeformed, whereas the eastern part was pervasively affected by a system of thrust and strike-slip faults, which resulted in a high degree of recrystallization of the anorthositic rocks. The 1180-1160 Ma Vanel Anorthosite occupies a large part of the eastern margin of the former Lac-St.-Jean-Anorthosite. This unit is characterized by labradorite- and andesine-type anorthositic rocks containing typically pink-colored and almost ubiquitously recristallized plagioclase. It includes abundant coronitic leuconorite, orthopyroxene-bearing leucotroctolite, and norite, and contains a few Ti-Fe-P occurrences. The 1012 +6/-4 Ma Mattawa Anorthosite is an

  5. Dominique-Jean Larrey, chief surgeon of the French Army with Napoleon in Egypt: notes and observations on Larrey's medical memoirs based on the Egyptian campaign.

    PubMed

    Wood, Mary Mendenhall

    2008-01-01

    Dr. Dominique-Jean Larrey wrote memoirs of 12 diseases he encountered while serving as chief surgeon of the French army during Napoleon's Egyptian campaign. He describes symptoms and treatments, evaluates remedies used by the Egyptians, and the effects of the climate. Of interest are his original though misguided explanations of causes of sickness or complications from wounds as well as descriptions of medications--now known to be dangerous--but all balanced by his common sense and efforts to ameliorate suffering.

  6. Jean-Martin Charcot and art: relationship of the "founder of neurology" with various aspects of art.

    PubMed

    Bogousslavsky, Julien; Boller, François

    2013-01-01

    Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893), the "father of neurology" in France and much beyond, was also the man who established academic psychiatry in Paris, differentiating it from clinical alienism. In his teaching, he used artistic representations from previous centuries to illustrate the historical developments of hysteria, mainly with the help of his pupil Paul Richer. Charcot liked to draw portraits (in particular, sketches of colleagues during boring faculty meetings and students' examinations), caricatures of himself and others, church sculptures, landscapes, soldiers, etc. He also used this skill in his clinical and scientific work; he drew histological or anatomic specimens, as well as patients' features and demeanor. His most daring artistic experiments were drawing under the influence of hashish. Charcot's tastes in art were conservative; he displayed no affinity for the avant-gardes of his time, including impressionism, or for contemporary musicians, such as César Franck or Hector Berlioz. Léon Daudet, son of Charcot's former friend and famous writer Alphonse Daudet, described Charcot's home as a pseudo-gothic kitsch accumulation of heteroclite pieces of furniture and materials. However, as Henry Meige wrote a few years after his mentor's death, Charcot the artist remains "inseparable from Charcot the physician." PMID:24041281

  7. Doctor Jean-Paul Marat (1743-93) and his time as a physician in Great Britain.

    PubMed

    Silver, J R; Weiner, M-F

    2013-01-01

    Jean-Paul Marat was a French revolutionary, famously murdered in his bath by Charlotte Corday in 1793. A lesser known fact is that for over ten years he lived in Britain where he practised as a doctor. During this time he visited London, Edinburgh, Dublin and Holland. Although he had no formal medical training, he published two medical papers on gleets (gonorrhoea) and diseases of the eyes and, on the recommendation of two eminent Scottish physicians, William Buchan and Hugh James, he was granted a medical degree from the University of St Andrews. Marat left no medical legacy and his related writings were forgotten for 100 years until the rediscovery of the two medical papers, which were eventually re-published in 1892 at the instigation of James Bailey, the librarian of the Royal College of Surgeons of England. Biographies by F Chevremont (1880), Ashbee Spencer (1890) and A Cabanès (1891) had rekindled interest in this intriguing revolutionary. A study of his time in Britain and his medical works and training provide an interesting insight into the mind of a revolutionary and how his sojourn may have shaped his future political career upon his return to France in 1777.

  8. Jean-Martin Charcot and art: relationship of the "founder of neurology" with various aspects of art.

    PubMed

    Bogousslavsky, Julien; Boller, François

    2013-01-01

    Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893), the "father of neurology" in France and much beyond, was also the man who established academic psychiatry in Paris, differentiating it from clinical alienism. In his teaching, he used artistic representations from previous centuries to illustrate the historical developments of hysteria, mainly with the help of his pupil Paul Richer. Charcot liked to draw portraits (in particular, sketches of colleagues during boring faculty meetings and students' examinations), caricatures of himself and others, church sculptures, landscapes, soldiers, etc. He also used this skill in his clinical and scientific work; he drew histological or anatomic specimens, as well as patients' features and demeanor. His most daring artistic experiments were drawing under the influence of hashish. Charcot's tastes in art were conservative; he displayed no affinity for the avant-gardes of his time, including impressionism, or for contemporary musicians, such as César Franck or Hector Berlioz. Léon Daudet, son of Charcot's former friend and famous writer Alphonse Daudet, described Charcot's home as a pseudo-gothic kitsch accumulation of heteroclite pieces of furniture and materials. However, as Henry Meige wrote a few years after his mentor's death, Charcot the artist remains "inseparable from Charcot the physician."

  9. Unsupervised classification of lidar-based vegetation structure metrics at Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kranenburg, Christine J.; Palaseanu-Lovejoy, Monica; Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John; Woodman, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Traditional vegetation maps capture the horizontal distribution of various vegetation properties, for example, type, species and age/senescence, across a landscape. Ecologists have long known, however, that many important forest properties, for example, interior microclimate, carbon capacity, biomass and habitat suitability, are also dependent on the vertical arrangement of branches and leaves within tree canopies. The objective of this study was to use a digital elevation model (DEM) along with tree canopy-structure metrics derived from a lidar survey conducted using the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) to capture a three-dimensional view of vegetation communities in the Barataria Preserve unit of Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve, Louisiana. The EAARL instrument is a raster-scanning, full waveform-resolving, small-footprint, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) lidar system designed to map coastal bathymetry, topography and vegetation structure simultaneously. An unsupervised clustering procedure was then applied to the 3-dimensional-based metrics and DEM to produce a vegetation map based on the vertical structure of the park's vegetation, which includes a flotant marsh, scrub-shrub wetland, bottomland hardwood forest, and baldcypress-tupelo swamp forest. This study was completed in collaboration with the National Park Service Inventory and Monitoring Program's Gulf Coast Network. The methods presented herein are intended to be used as part of a cost-effective monitoring tool to capture change in park resources.

  10. "Mathematics made no contribution to the public weal": why Jean Fernel (1497-1558) became a physician.

    PubMed

    Henry, John

    2011-01-01

    This paper offers a caution that emphasis upon the importance of mathematics in recent historiography is in danger of obscuring the historical fact that, for the most part, mathematics was not seen as important in the pre-modern period. The paper proceeds by following a single case study, and in so doing offers the first account of the mathematical writings of Jean Fernel (1497-1558), better known as a leading medical innovator of the 16th century. After establishing Fernel's early commitment to mathematics, and attempt to forge a career as a cosmographer, it goes on to explain his abandonment of mathematics for a career in medicine. The 'mathematization of the world picture' is usually explained in terms of the perceived usefulness of mathematics, but Fernel's case shows that for many pre-modern thinkers, mathematics was not regarded as a useful pursuit. The paper should serve as a reminder, therefore, that the take-up of mathematics by natural philosophers was by no means inevitable, but had to be carefully managed by early modern mathematical practitioners. The case of Fernel indicates that perhaps he was not the only would-be mathematical practitioner to abandon mathematics in favor of a calling that was more appreciated by contemporaries.

  11. CONSTRAINTS ON THE SHAPE OF THE MILKY WAY DARK MATTER HALO FROM JEANS EQUATIONS APPLIED TO SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Loebman, Sarah R.; Ivezic, Zeljko; Quinn, Thomas R.; Governato, Fabio; Brooks, Alyson M.; Christensen, Charlotte R.; Juric, Mario

    2012-10-10

    We search for evidence of dark matter in the Milky Way by utilizing the stellar number density distribution and kinematics measured by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to heliocentric distances exceeding {approx}10 kpc. We employ the cylindrically symmetric form of Jeans equations and focus on the morphology of the resulting acceleration maps, rather than the normalization of the total mass as done in previous, mostly local, studies. Jeans equations are first applied to a mock catalog based on a cosmologically derived N-body+SPH simulation, and the known acceleration (gradient of gravitational potential) is successfully recovered. The same simulation is also used to quantify the impact of dark matter on the total acceleration. We use Galfast, a code designed to quantitatively reproduce SDSS measurements and selection effects, to generate a synthetic stellar catalog. We apply Jeans equations to this catalog and produce two-dimensional maps of stellar acceleration. These maps reveal that in a Newtonian framework, the implied gravitational potential cannot be explained by visible matter alone. The acceleration experienced by stars at galactocentric distances of {approx}20 kpc is three times larger than what can be explained by purely visible matter. The application of an analytic method for estimating the dark matter halo axis ratio to SDSS data implies an oblate halo with q{sub DM} = 0.47 {+-} 0.14 within the same distance range. These techniques can be used to map the dark matter halo to much larger distances from the Galactic center using upcoming deep optical surveys, such as LSST.

  12. A New Jeans Resolution Criterion for (M)HD Simulations of Self-gravitating Gas: Application to Magnetic Field Amplification by Gravity-driven Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federrath, Christoph; Sur, Sharanya; Schleicher, Dominik R. G.; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2011-04-01

    Cosmic structure formation is characterized by the complex interplay between gravity, turbulence, and magnetic fields. The processes by which gravitational energy is converted into turbulent and magnetic energies, however, remain poorly understood. Here, we show with high-resolution, adaptive-mesh simulations that MHD turbulence is efficiently driven by extracting energy from the gravitational potential during the collapse of a dense gas cloud. Compressible motions generated during the contraction are converted into solenoidal, turbulent motions, leading to a natural energy ratio of E sol/E tot ≈ 2/3. We find that the energy injection scale of gravity-driven turbulence is close to the local Jeans scale. If small seeds of the magnetic field are present, they are amplified exponentially fast via the small-scale dynamo process. The magnetic field grows most efficiently on the smallest scales, for which the stretching, twisting, and folding of field lines, and the turbulent vortices are sufficiently resolved. We find that this scale corresponds to about 30 grid cells in the simulations. We thus suggest a new minimum resolution criterion of 30 cells per Jeans length in (magneto)hydrodynamical simulations of self-gravitating gas, in order to resolve turbulence on the Jeans scale, and to capture minimum dynamo amplification of the magnetic field. Due to numerical diffusion, however, any existing simulation today can at best provide lower limits on the physical growth rates. We conclude that a small, initial magnetic field can grow to dynamically important strength on timescales significantly shorter than the free-fall time of the cloud.

  13. Jean Martin Charcot (1825-93) and John Hughlings Jackson (1835-1911): neurology in France and England in the 19th century.

    PubMed

    Silvester, Alexander

    2009-11-01

    In 1862 Jean Martin Charcot was appointed Physician at the Salpêtrière Hospital in Paris, and simultaneously John Hughlings Jackson was appointed as assistant physician at the National Hospital for the Paralysed and Epileptic, Queen Square, London. Both men made significant contributions to the development of neurology, many of which remain important to contemporary neurologists. The achievements and the work of Charcot and Hughlings Jackson are considered in the light of their respective localities and medical education, and the structure of hospital institutions and political allegiances are compared in the late 19th century in France and Britain.

  14. [Comment on “Plate tectonics: Scientific revolution or scientific program?” by Jean-Claude Mareschal] Development of plate tectonics theory: The missing piece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doe, Bruce R.

    The recent article by Jean-Claude Mareschal (“Plate Tectonics: Scientific Revolution or Scientific Program?” in Eos, May 19, 1987, p. 529) adds to the interesting literature on the evolution of the theory of plate tectonics. It is curious that an aspect of the general theory that seems to be little considered and mentioned by Mareschal or others who write about the history of development of the theory, but that was vitally important in my own acceptance of the theory, was the discovery of subduction and, to a lesser extent, abduction.

  15. First observations of the second solar spectrum with spatial resolution at the Lunette Jean Rösch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malherbe, J.-M.; Moity, J.; Arnaud, J.; Roudier, Th.

    2007-02-01

    Context: A new polarimeter has been installed at the focus of the 50 cm refractor of the Lunette Jean Rösch (LJR), previously known as Turret Dome, Pic du Midi, France, for spectroscopic observations of weak solar magnetic fields. Fields can be derived through the Hanle effect from the depolarization of the second solar spectrum (i.e. the linearly polarized spectrum at the limb). Aims: We present the first observations with spatial resolution based on the new device performed with the large 8 m Echelle spectrograph, or recorded in imagery mode through narrow band filters. The observations started in April 2004, especially in the blue part of the spectrum where our instrumentation has a particularly good efficiency. The capabilities and the characteristics of the new instrument are briefly described. We observed several lines of the second solar spectrum with the slit of the spectrograph orthogonal to the limb to study the polarization as a function of limb distance (which is related to altitude in the atmosphere), and several spectral windows in imagery to determine the average continuum polarization. Methods: The polarimeter uses Nematic Liquid Crystal (NLC) technology at the primary focus of the refractor, in spectroscopic or imagery mode. Results: A continuous polarization profile through the limb is presented for the photospheric SrI 460.7 nm line, the low chromospheric BaII 455.4 nm line, and the CaI 422.7 nm line within a distance of 120´´, together with measurements of the mean continuum polarization obtained in imagery mode. Preliminary results of the polarization of the SrI 460.7 nm line are also shown at 40´´ from the limb, as a function of the brightness of structures visible in the continuum (granulation). They reveal a tendency for the polarization to be weaker in dark features (intergranules) than in bright ones (granules), suggesting a stronger magnetic field in intergranular lanes. As example the enigmatic and weak polarization signal in the

  16. Case presentation: Jean.

    PubMed

    Libbey, M

    1989-01-01

    This symposium was devoted to the consideration of Dr. Mary Libbey's treatment of a 22-year-old woman. The unfolding of the analysand's symbiotic attachment to her mother, the devastating sequelae of her having been the stable center of a pathological family that devoted itself to the care of a severely handicapped sibling, and her immersion in unresolved mourning form the center of this richly detailed and carefully reported case study. In addition, four verbatim sessions are reported, one from each year of the first two years of treatment, and two from the third year of treatment. Dr. Epstein's discussion, praising Dr. Libbey's therapeutic skill, makes note of the issues in the patient's family of origin that served to prepare her to feel endangered in the treatment. Dr. Epstein's view is that the analyst has created an analytic situation that, because it is minimally impinging, allows the patient to become increasingly aware of her unmet needs in a way that is tolerable and minimally "destabilizing to the symbiotically based organization of her internal self and object world." In the climate of safety created in the treatment, the patient can begin to complete the work of mourning for her sister, friend, and aunt, a process of mourning that would be impossible in the context of her nuclear family, centered as it is on a mother who cannot tolerate separation. Limit-setting in the treatment is seen to be reassuring to the patient, facilitating as it does the analyst's commitment to maintaining the integrity of the analytic situation. Dr. Schafer's discussion, while in agreement with Dr. Epstein in recognizing the excellence of the presentation and the sensitivity and hard work that had gone into both the treatment and the clinical presentation, included some specific and focused observations about the transference and countertransference situations prevailing in this treatment and also some suggestions for creating a more consistently safe analytic atmosphere for this particular patient and others like her. Dr. Schafer proposes that the therapist acknowledge to herself and accept as well as possible the inevitable feeling of helplessness such patients provoke. In a more concrete vein, he advocates talking in the first person declarative as much as possible, preferring "I don't understand" to the more standard "What do you mean?" or "Why?" The therapist is encouraged to eschew interpreting what the patient says about the therapeutic relationship for a long time, and, further, he suggests not quickly connecting or easily reducing the therapeutic relationship to childhood prototypes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2516334

  17. [Jean-martin charcot].

    PubMed

    Sakuta, Manabu

    2014-11-01

    Charcot created a system for the classification and diagnosis of neurological patients in the 1850s. His methodology consisted of listening to a patient's family history and present history, observing the patient scrupulously, and confirming lesions by autopsy once the patient was dead. He compared two different diseases in order to make their differences clear. Once he understood the fundamental form of a disease, he proceeded to study less perfect forms that had a single symptom. By this process, Charcot developed many new symptomatologies in Neurology.

  18. [The adventures of doctor Jean Matuszinski, friend of Frédéric Chopin, from Warsaw in 1808 to Paris in 1842].

    PubMed

    Hazard, Jean

    2005-01-01

    Jean Matuszinski, a Pole born in Warsaw, happened to be the student of a Frenchman who had emigrated to Poland: Nicolas Chopin. French was still widely spoken at that time in Matuszinski's native land. For a while, Matsuzinski was even a boarder in Warsaw, lived with this Franco-Polish family and became a close friend to Nicolas' son, Frederic Chopin. He was the only one who kept in touch with Chopin, despite the many international dramatic events of the time: an insurrection in Poland rapidly squashed by the Russians. Paris became the heart of the intellectual and artistic life for Polish citizens who took refuge there. After spending some time in Germany where Jean Matuszinski received a doctorate in medicine from the university of Tubingen in 1834, he went to Paris where he was delighted to meet again with Frederic Chopin, and received another doctorate from the Faculty of Medicine of Paris. During his short medical career, he was able to observe several forms of tuberculsis: an acute that killed Frederic's younger sister, and a chronic one that affected Frederic for more than fifteen years. But Matuszinski could take care of Chopin only during the first six years of the latter's illness because himself died from a severe subacute form of tuberculosis, when he was only 33 years old.

  19. Partial Row-Sums of Pascal's Triangle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ollerton, Richard L.

    2007-01-01

    Identities for many and varied combinations of binomial coefficients abound. Indeed, because of the wide range of interrelationships it is possible that a great deal of mathematical effort has been wasted in proving essentially equivalent formulae. As well as proving identities these methods can be used to rule out closed form solutions (at least…

  20. Pascal's Wager: Betting on the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schejbal, David

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an interview with David Schejbal, the chair of the 2012 UPCEA Annual Conference, about environmentalism and the role of continuing education. In this interview, Schejbal shares why he suggested the theme of sustainability for the annual conference. He says it is because all of them in the conference are continuing…

  1. Fluvio-deltaic progradation in forced regressive deglacial succession: lessons from the Lake Saint-Jean (Québec, Canada, late Quaternary)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nutz, Alexis; Ghienne, Jean-François; Schuster, Mathieu; Roquin, Claude; Dietrich, Pierre; Bouchette, Frédéric; Cousineau, Pierre A.

    2015-04-01

    Deltas simultaneously respond to modifications in water discharge, sediment supply and base-level change. As a consequence, they provide accurate archive for deciphering environmental change through times. In this contribution, a Late Quaternary deglacial sequence is documented from Lake Saint-Jean basin (Québec, Canada) where sediments have recorded the Laurentide ice sheet (LIS) retreat accompanied by the invasion of marine waters (Laflamme Gulf) from ca. 12.9 cal. ky BP. Subsequently, fluvio-deltaic and then coastal prograding wedges emplaced following the base level fall induced by the glacio-isostatic rebound. The related succession, representing a transition from glacial to post-glacial periods within a previously glaciated area, was investigated through recent geological mapping, preserved landforms, facies analysis, and new optical stimulated luminescence (OSL) and radiocarbon (14C) dates. Three basin-scale geological sections are presented focusing on the architectures and facies of fluvio-deltaic progradations emplaced from 12.9 cal. ka BP to present-day in Lake Saint-Jean. Overlying the bedrock, isolated ice-contact fan deposits are capped by glacimarine muds. Above, fluvio-deltaic and coastal prograding systems were deposited following four major evolutions through time: (i) deltaic systems progressively increased in width, (ii) coastal influence on sedimentation increased, (iii) hydrographic drainage systems became more organised, and (iv) delta graded from steep (Gilbert delta) to low-angle foresets (mouth-bar delta). These evolutions in fluvio-deltaic systems are attributed to the modifications in water discharge, sediment supply and rate of base level fall driven by the deglaciation. The presented succession is considered as representative of the sedimentological signature of fluvial progradations in forced regressive deglacial sequences. Derived from the Lake Saint-Jean basin, this study provides new elements for the recognition and interpretation

  2. Nomenclatural notes on the Eurytomids (Chalcidoidea: Eurytomidae) described by Jean Brèthes housed in Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales "Bernardino Rivadavia".

    PubMed

    Gates, Michael W

    2014-04-16

    Ten Eurytomidae (Hymenoptera) parasitic wasp species described by Jean Brèthes and deposited in the Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales in Buenos Aires are treated and their nomenclature stabilized. The condition of the type material is described. Lectotypes are designated for Decatoma cecidosiphaga Brèthes, Prodecatoma parodii Brèthes, Eudecatoma opposita Brèthes, and Eurytoma caridei Brèthes. One new generic synonymy, Xanthosomodes Brèthes with Tetramesa Walker, n. syn., and five new combinations are proposed: Tetramesa albiangulata (Brèthes), n. comb.; Phylloxeroxenus caridei (Brèthes), n. comb.; Aximopsis vulgata (Brèthes), n. comb.; Proseurytoma parodii (Brèthes), n. comb.; and Bruchophagus opposita (Brèthes), n. comb. Sycophila paranensis Brèthes is declared incertae sedis.

  3. Jean Decima Jacomb (1894-1988), matron of The London Clinic, 20 Devonshire Place, London W1 from 1938 to 1949.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Kathy

    2016-08-01

    Miss Jean Jacomb born into a wealthy family, was at the age of 22 a student nurse at St Bartholomew's Hospital, London in 1917 where she nursed convalescent soldiers from World War I. Her midwifery training was in the slums around Whitechapel where a nurses uniform and medical bag provided a safe passage in the East End of London. For a while she worked in South Africa and India and returning to UK in 1923 she progressed to appointment as matron at the now re-named Royal Marsden Hospital in Chelsea. In 1938 she was appointed matron to The London Clinic during the years of World War II following which in 1949 she retired at the age of 55. She then travelled the world extensively by ship, always first class. She died in 1988. PMID:24944046

  4. "He sees the development of children's concepts upon a background of sociology": Jean Piaget's honorary degree at Harvard University in 1936.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Yeh

    2004-02-01

    In the recent memory, Jean Piaget has been known as a cognitive developmental psychologist. But in 1936 when Harvard gave him his first honorary degree, he was recognized mainly as a sociologist. Why did Harvard honor him in 1936? Who knew his work well enough to nominate him? This article will address these questions by exploring archival documents from different sources. Evidence draws our attention to a broad social and intellectual endeavor in philanthropy, other social sciences, and especially industrial research that brought Piaget across the water. This article also attempts to interpret the circumstances of the nomination process inside and outside of Harvard University by using a theory of institutional design. It suggests that embodied in Harvard's honor of Piaget in 1936 was an idealistic act in social designing for a future society.

  5. Historical sources about diseases, death and embalming regarding the family of Jean Antoine Michel Agar, Minister of Finance of Gioacchino Murat.

    PubMed

    Marinozzi, S; Gazzaniga, V; Giuffra, V; Fornaciari, G

    2011-06-01

    Among the mummies preserved in the Basilica of San Domenico Maggiore in Naples, there are the bodies of the wife and three children of Jean Antoine Michel Agar, Minister of Finance of Naple's Kingdom during the Monarchy of Joachim Murat (1808-1815). Between 1983 and 1987 paleopathological analyses were performed; in particular, X-ray examination allowed investigation of the health status of the Agar family members and reconstruction of the embalming processes used to preserve the bodies. In addition, an analysis of the historical and archival documents was carried out, to formulate hypotheses about the causes of death, demonstrating how these sources could become important instruments to obtain diagnoses and pathological histories.

  6. "He sees the development of children's concepts upon a background of sociology": Jean Piaget's honorary degree at Harvard University in 1936.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Yeh

    2004-02-01

    In the recent memory, Jean Piaget has been known as a cognitive developmental psychologist. But in 1936 when Harvard gave him his first honorary degree, he was recognized mainly as a sociologist. Why did Harvard honor him in 1936? Who knew his work well enough to nominate him? This article will address these questions by exploring archival documents from different sources. Evidence draws our attention to a broad social and intellectual endeavor in philanthropy, other social sciences, and especially industrial research that brought Piaget across the water. This article also attempts to interpret the circumstances of the nomination process inside and outside of Harvard University by using a theory of institutional design. It suggests that embodied in Harvard's honor of Piaget in 1936 was an idealistic act in social designing for a future society. PMID:15022668

  7. LIFTING THE DUSTY VEIL WITH NEAR- AND MID-INFRARED PHOTOMETRY. I. DESCRIPTION AND APPLICATIONS OF THE RAYLEIGH-JEANS COLOR EXCESS METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    Majewski, Steven R.; Zasowski, Gail; Nidever, David L. E-mail: gz2n@virginia.edu

    2011-09-20

    The Milky Way (MW) remains a primary laboratory for understanding the structure and evolution of spiral galaxies, but typically we are denied clear views of MW stellar populations at low Galactic latitudes because of extinction by interstellar dust. However, the combination of Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) near-infrared (NIR) and Spitzer-IRAC mid-infrared (MIR) photometry enables a powerful method for determining the line-of-sight reddening to any star: the sampled wavelengths lie in the Rayleigh-Jeans part of the spectral energy distribution of most stars, where, to first order, all stars have essentially the same intrinsic color. Thus, changes in stellar NIR-MIR colors due to interstellar reddening are readily apparent, and (under an assumed extinction law) the observed colors and magnitudes of stars can be easily and accurately restored to their intrinsic values, greatly increasing their usefulness for Galactic structure studies. In this paper, we explore this 'Rayleigh-Jeans Color Excess' (RJCE) method and demonstrate that use of even a simple variant of the RJCE method based on a single reference color, (H -[4.5{mu}]), can rather accurately remove dust effects from previously uninterpretable 2MASS color-magnitude diagrams of stars in fields along the heavily reddened Galactic midplane, with results far superior to those derived from application of other dereddening methods. We also show that 'total' Galactic midplane extinction looks rather different from that predicted using 100{mu} emission maps from the IRAS/ISSA and COBE/DIRBE instruments as presented by Schlegel et al. Instead, the Galactic midplane extinction strongly resembles the distribution of {sup 13}CO (J = 1{yields}0) emission. Future papers will focus on refining the RJCE method and applying the technique to understand better not only dust and its distribution but also the distribution of stars intermixed with the dust in the low-latitude Galaxy.

  8. The raft of the Saint-Jean River, Gaspé (Québec, Canada): A dynamic feature trapping most of the wood transported from the catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, Maxime; Buffin-Bélanger, Thomas; Piégay, Hervé

    2015-02-01

    The rivers of the Gaspé Peninsula, Québec (Canada), a coastal drainage system of the St. Lawrence River, receive and transport vast quantities of large wood. The rapid rate of channel shifting caused by high-energy flows and noncohesive banks allows wood recruitment that in turn greatly influences river dynamics. The delta of the Saint-Jean River has accumulated wood since 1960, leading to frequent avulsions over that time period. The wood raft there is now more than 3-km in length, which is unusual but natural. This jam configuration allows a unique opportunity to estimate a wood budget at the scale of a long river corridor and to better understand the dynamics of large wood (LW) in rivers. A wood budget includes the evaluation of wood volumes (i) produced by bank erosion (input), (ii) still in transit in the river corridor (deposited on sand bars or channel edges), and (iii) accumulated in the delta (output). The budget is based on an analysis of aerial photos dating back to 1963 as well as surveys carried out in 2010, all of which were used to locate and describe large wood accumulations along a 60-km river section. The main results of this paper show that the raft formation in the delta is dynamic and can be massive, but it is a natural process. Considering the estimated wood volume trapped in the delta from 1963 to 2013 (≈ 25,000 m3), two important points are revealed by the quantification of the wood recruitment volume from 1963 to 2004 (≈ 27,000 m3 ± 400 m3) and of the wood volume stored on the bars in 2010 (≈ 5950 m3). First, the recruitment of large wood from lateral migration for the 40-year period can account for the volume of large wood in the delta and in transit. Second, the excess wood volume produced by lateral migration and avulsion represents a minimum estimation of the large wood trapped on the floodplain owing to wood volume that has decomposed and large wood that exited the river system. Rafts are major trapping structures that provide

  9. Who was first to diagnose and report neuropathic arthropathy of the foot and ankle: Jean-Martin Charcot or Herbert William Page?

    PubMed

    Sanders, Lee J; Edmonds, Michael E; Jeffcoate, William J

    2013-09-01

    In November 1883, Jean-Martin Charcot and Charles Féré reported on bone and joint disease of the foot in cases of tabes dorsalis, and referred to the condition as 'pied tabétique'--a disabling neuropathic osteoarthropathy that we usually now refer to as the Charcot foot. Charcot had originally described neuropathic osteoarthropathy in more proximal joints in 1868, and in his 1883 paper with Féré stated that involvement of the short bones and small joints of the foot had not yet been described. They emphasised in the paper that one of their cases was the first ever observed, two years earlier, in 1881. It is relevant, however, that it was in this same year that involvement of the foot by tabetic arthropathy was presented to the International Medical Congress in London by an English surgeon, Herbert William Page. We believe that Page was the first to diagnose and to report a case of tabetic neuropathic osteoarthropathy in which the bones of the foot and ankle were involved. He was also the first to propose a link between the tabetic foot and disease of the peripheral nerves, as opposed to the central nervous system.

  10. [Populational speciation or chromosomal speciation? About the book of Jean de Grouchy "From the birth of species to the aberrations of life" (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Ruffié, J

    According to Jean de Grouchy, the emergence of a new species is dependent on an "acceptable" chromosomic rearrangement, which passing from the heterozygous state (in the original bearer) to the homozygous state (in some of his enbred offspring) becomes definitively established and creates a population sexually isolated from its acestors. He is thus using the idea of karyotype to develop the typological theory put forward at the beginning of the century which postulates that a single mutant is at the origin of a new species. Although he gives an important place to chromosomic rearrangements in the sexual isolation of a new species, J. Ruffié demonstrates by arguments taken from population genetics and from the immunological polymorphism of wild populations that speciation is almost always the result of the evolution of an entire group, which, because of geographic isolation, drift, and differential selection, diverges from the ancestral branch and finally becomes totally incapable of breeding with it. He proposes a model of speciation which includes the two processes population and cytologic. At a first step, the group is isolated geographically and continues its independent evolution; the second step consists of chromosomic recombinations which render the sexual isolation complete. The modifications of the karyotype make the process of speciation irreversible. PMID:219541

  11. In memoriam: Jean Blancou, DVM, 1936-2010. World authority on rabies, historian and former Director General of the World Organisation for Animal Health (Office International des Épizooties: OIE).

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    Jean-Marie Blancou was born in Bangui on 28 August 1936 and passed away in Paris on 10 November 2010 at the age of 74. After studying at the Pierre de Fermat Lycée in Toulouse, Jean Blancou graduated from the Toulouse Veterinary School in 1960. He continued his studies in tropical veterinary medicine in Paris until 1963, extending his knowledge of immunology, microbiology, biochemistry and zoology, at the Institut Pasteur. He obtained his doctorate in biological sciences at the University of Nancy in 1982. Jean Blancou commenced his career as technical adviser to the Veterinary Services of Ethiopia where he directed a campaign against rinderpest in the south of the county. From 1965 to 1967 he was deputy director of the national veterinary laboratory in Niamey where he was responsible for the diagnosis of animal diseases and the production of veterinary vaccines. In 1967, he moved to the central livestock laboratory in Madagascar, where he commenced research on the diagnosis and control of dermatophilosis, bovine tuberculosis and other bacterial and parasitic diseases. In August 1968 he married Geneviève Orue. In 1975 he was appointed as head of the national veterinary laboratory in Senegal, where he remained until 1977. Initially deputy director, and then director of Research on rabies and wildlife diseases, at the World Health Organization collaborating centre in Nancy, he remained in this position until 1990. Jean Blancou was recognised as a world authority on rabies. He conducted research into the diagnosis, aetiology, epidemiology and control of rabies during his time in Nancy. Between 1988 and 1990, Dr Blancou also headed the animal health and protection department of the Centre national d'études vétérinaires et animales (CNEVA) in Maisons-Alfort. On 1 January 1991, he was appointed director general of the World Organisation for Animal Health (Office International des Épizooties: OIE) and was re-elected in 1995 for a further five-year term, until he

  12. Reduction of forecast uncertainty in the context of hydropower production: a case study for two catchment in Lac-St-Jean, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brisson, Cathy; Boucher, Marie-Amélie; Latraverse, Marco

    2014-05-01

    This research focuses on the improvement of streamflow forecasts for two subcatchments in the Lac-St-Jean area, a northern part of the province of Quebec in Canada. Those two subcatchments, named Manouane and Passes-Dangereuses, are part of a bigger system, which comprises many reservoirs and six hydropower plants. This system is managed by Rio Tinto Alcan, an aluminium producer who needs this energy for its processes. Optimal management of the hydropower plants highly depends on the reliability of the inflow forecasts to the reservoirs and also on the reliability of observed streamflow. The latter are not directly measured, but rather deduced from the computation of a water balance. This water balance includes streamflow computation based on rating curves for river sections and upstream reservoirs and a modelling process using CEQUEAU hydrological model (Morin et al., 1981). In addition, mostly during the winter, the model has to account for a transfer of water from Lac Manouane reservoir to Passes-Dangereuses through Bonnard channel. Winter flow though Bonnard channel is controlled by a spillway, and represented in CEQUEAU by a transfer function and a fixed time delay (2 days). However, it is suspected that the evacuation function, as it is currently computed, is inaccurate. The main objective of this work is to reduce predictive uncertainty for Lac Manouane and Passes-Dangereuses catchment, for the one-day ahead horizon. This objective is twofold. First, the uncertainty related to the parameterization of the hydrological model had never been evaluated. It was to be investigated whether it is better to spatialize the calibration of the hydrological model. In its actual form, the calibration of the hydrological model CEQUEAU (Morin et al., 1981) is based exclusively on the downstream outflow. There is, however, intermediate streamflow measurements data available for an intermediate location. Our study shows that calibrating the model using streamflows for both

  13. Crime, hysteria and belle époque hypnotism: the path traced by Jean-Martin Charcot and Georges Gilles de la Tourette.

    PubMed

    Bogousslavsky, Julien; Walusinski, Olivier; Veyrunes, Denis

    2009-01-01

    Hysteria and hypnotism became a favorite topic of studies in the fin de siècle neurology that emerged from the school organized at La Salpêtrière by Jean-Martin Charcot, where he had arrived in 1861. Georges Gilles de la Tourette started working with Charcot in 1884 and probably remained his most faithful student, even after his mentor's death in 1893. This collaboration was particularly intense on 'criminal hypnotism', an issue on which Hippolyte Bernheim and his colleagues from the Nancy School challenged the positions taken by the Salpêtrière School. Bernheim claimed that hypnotism was not a diagnostic feature of hysteria and that there were real-life examples of murders suggested under hypnosis, while hypnosis susceptibility was identified with hysteria by Charcot and Gilles de la Tourette, who saw rape as the only crime associated with hypnotism. The quarrel was particularly virulent during a series of famous criminal cases which took place between 1888 and 1890. At the time, it was considered that La Salpêtrière had succeeded over Nancy, since the role of hypnotism was discarded during these famous trials. However, the theories of Charcot and Gilles de la Tourette were also damaged by the fight, which probably triggered the conceptual evolution leading to Joseph Babinski's revision of hysteria in 1901. Gilles de la Tourette's strong and public interest in hypnotism nearly cost him his life, when a young woman who claimed to have been hypnotized against her will shot him in the head at his own home in 1893. It was subsequently shown that hypnotism had nothing to do with it. The delusional woman was interned at Sainte-Anne for mental disturbance, thus escaping trial. Ironically, Gilles de la Tourette may have been partly responsible, since he had been one of the strongest proponents of placing mentally-ill criminals in asylums instead of prisons.

  14. Alfred Vulpian and Jean-Martin Charcot in each other's shadow? From Castor and Pollux at La Salpêtrière to neurology forever.

    PubMed

    Bogousslavsky, Julien; Walusinski, Olivier; Moulin, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    While Alfred Vulpian (1826-1887) is not completely forgotten, he cannot match the uninterrupted celebrity which Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893) still enjoys today. After becoming interne (residents) at the same institute in 1848, both were involved in shaping the cradle of what would become modern neurology. Both started work as chiefs at a La Salpêtrière service on January 1, 1862, making common rounds and studies, with several common publications. While their friendship remained 'for life', as stated by Charcot at Vulpian's funeral, their career paths differed. Vulpian progressed quicker and higher, being appointed full professor and elected at the Académie Nationale de Médecine and the Académie des Sciences several years before Charcot, as well as becoming dean of the Paris Faculty of Medicine. These positions also enabled him to support his friend Charcot in getting appointed full clinical professor and becoming the first holder of the chair of Clinique des Maladies du Système Nerveux in 1882. Before studying medicine, Vulpian had worked in physiology with Pierre Flourens, and his career always remained balanced between physiology and neurology, with remarkable papers. He introduced Charcot to optic microscopy during their La Salpêtrière years, indirectly helping him to become his successor to the chair of pathological anatomy in 1872. While Vulpian succeeded so well in local medical affairs, Charcot spent his time building up a huge clinical service and a teaching 'school' at La Salpêtrière, which he never left for over 31 years until his death. This 'school' progressively became synonymous with clinical neurology itself and perpetuated the master's memory for decades. Vulpian never had such support, although Jules Déjerine was his pupil and Joseph Babinski was his interne before becoming Charcot's chef de clinique (chief of staff) in 1885. This unusual switch in Parisian medicine contributed to Charcot's unaltered celebrity over more than a century

  15. Formative Assessment Probes: Wet Jeans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeley, Page

    2015-01-01

    Picture a wet towel or a puddle of water on a hot, sunny day. An hour later, the towel is dry and the puddle no longer exists. What happened to the water? Where did it go? These are questions that reveal myriad interesting student ideas about evaporation and the water cycle--ideas that provide teachers with a treasure trove of data they can use to…

  16. [Portrait of Jean Martin Charcot].

    PubMed

    Bonduelle, M

    1993-06-01

    Throughout paintings, engravings, and photography, Charcot's face and his life at the Salepêtrière have become widely known. More importantly, his biographers and those who wrote about their firsthand experiences with Charcot have brought to life his authority and his penetrating eye. Charcot held his students, his patients, and all those in close contact with him under a despotic rule. His shyness and emotions hid behind a cold and impenetrable mask. Much has been written about Charcot's life at the Salpêtrière. He transformed the old hospice into an institute of neurology considered internationally as a model, and its fame attracted visitors and patients from around the world. He formed a school at the Salpêtrière composed of his many students. These young men gathered each Tuesday evening in the luxurious reception halls of his mansion on Boulevard Saint-Germain. There they mixed with writers, artists, and politicians who were firmly republican and anticlerical. There is only information on Charcot's early years other than the major dates of his career and a few legends. Arriving at the Salpêtrière in 1862, he created the foundations of neurology over the next decade by applying the anatomoclinical method. Built on the traditions of the French anamatopathological method, his system was adapted by Charcot to incorporate the new advances in microscopy and cellular pathology. Later in his career, he also directed a scientific effort towards psychophysiologic explorations of hysteria and hypnosis, some inciting severe criticism. This judgement has been revised and in its place there remains the boldness of an innovative mind. His neurological achievement remains undisputed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Fish and Aquatic Invertebrate Communities in Waterways, and Contaminants in Fish, at the Barataria Preserve of Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve, Louisiana, 1999-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swarzenski, Christopher M.; Mize, Scott V.; Thompson, Bruce A.; Peterson, Gary W.

    2004-01-01

    Fish and aquatic invertebrate communities in waterways of the Barataria Preserve of Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve, Louisiana, were surveyed from 1999 to 2000. An inventory of fish in the Barataria Preserve was established, and concentrations of selected organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and trace elements; iron; and manganese in fish tissue for selected species were determined. The fish and aquatic invertebrate sampling completed for this study indicated that abundant and diverse communities are present in the Barataria Preserve. Thirty-two species of fish were identified in the Barataria Preserve during this survey. The total number of species identified in a single sampling ranged from 20 to 26. Most of the fish sampled are designated as intermediate in their tolerance to poor water quality. Three species of fish designated as tolerant (common carp, Cyprinus carpio; golden shiner, Notemigonus crysoleucas; and yellow bullhead, Ameiurus natalis), and one as intolerant (lake chubsucker, Erymizon sucetta), were identified. In November 1999, the average total weight of all fish collected by boat-mounted electroshocker from a single site was about 35,000 grams; in May and July 1999, the average total weight was between 9,000 and 10,000 grams. The contribution of spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus) to the total weight of the fish averaged between 38 and 41 percent among the three sample periods. Members of the sunfish family (Centrarchidae) contributed between 18 and 28 percent of the total weight. For each sampling period, 60 to 83 percent of the total weight from the sunfish family was contributed by bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Aquatic invertebrates were sampled at three sites. Most aquatic invertebrates identified were freshwater species, but some were brackish-water and marine species. About 234,000 organisms were identified and enumerated from the richest-targeted habitat (RTH

  18. Description of a New Genus and Species of Stygobiontic Diving Beetle, Psychopomporus felipi Jean, Telles, and Miller (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae: Hydroporinae), from the Edwards-Trinity Aquifer System of Texas, USA

    PubMed Central

    Jean, April; Telles, Nicole D.; Gibson, J. Randy; Foley, Dan; Miller, Kelly B.

    2014-01-01

    Psychopomporus felipi Jean, Telles, and Miller, new genus and new species (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae), is described from San Felipe Springs, Val Verde County, Texas, USA, which emerges from the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system. Psychopomporus felipi shows several features typical of subterranean diving beetles, such as depigmentation, compound eyes reduced, elytra fused, and flight wings absent. Psychopomporus differs from other hydroporine genera in having a broad elytral epipleuron, the prosternal process small and with a medial, strongly produced prominence, and the meso- and (to a lesser extent) protibia apically broadly expanded and medially distinctly curved. This is the fourth stygobiontic diving beetle described from the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system in south-central Texas, USA. PMID:25177045

  19. Resurvey of quality of surface water and bottom material of the Barataria Preserve of Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve, Louisiana, 1999-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swarzenski, Christopher M.

    2003-01-01

    The quality of water and bottom material in the Barataria Preserve of Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve, Louisiana, was surveyed from March 1999 to May 2000. Organochlorine, chlorophenoxy acid, and organophosphorus pesticides; polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB?s); and trace elements were analyzed in surface water and bottom material from three sites previously sampled in a 1981-82 survey. Surface water at six sites was sampled and analyzed for selected nutrients and major inorganic ions based on their importance to human health, the health of the marshes of the Barataria Preserve, or their usefulness in tracking the circulation of Mississippi River water in the Barataria Preserve. Southern Louisiana was in a moderate to severe drought during most of the sampling period, which elevated salinity in the Barataria Preserve for at least 8 months. Specific conductance values were less than 3,000 ?S/cm (microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius) in surface water throughout the Barataria Preserve from March through September 1999. Specific conductance values increased over the next 2 months and then remained between 5,000 and 6,000 ?S/cm. The herbicide 2,4-D was detected in water at the two sites sampled in August 1999 but not at any site during the two other sampling times. Iron, manganese, and the trace elements copper, nickel, and zinc were detected in dissolved and whole-water samples at all three sites. Nitrite+ nitrate, as nitrogen, concentrations ranged from less than 0.002 to 0.19 mg/L (milligrams per liter). Ammonia, as nitrogen, concentrations ranged from less than 0.01 to 0.16 mg/L. Orthophosphate, as phosphorus, concentrations ranged from less than 0.002 to 0.14 mg/L. Calcium, magnesium, potassium, sulfate, and chloride concentrations in surface water were elevated due to the marine influence on the composition of surface water in the Barataria Preserve during the sampling period. Sulfate and chloride concentrations reached 379 and 2

  20. Plato, Pascal, and the Dynamics of Personal Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otte, Michael Friedrich; Campos, Tania M. M.; Abido, Alexandre S.

    2013-01-01

    Educational practices are to be based on proven scientific knowledge, not least because the function science has to perform in human culture consists of unifying practical skills and general beliefs, the episteme and the techne (Amsterdamski, 1975, pp. 43-44). Now, modern societies first of all presuppose regular and standardized ways of…

  1. The Spirit of Investigation: Modifying Pascal and Fibonacci

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Real, Francis

    2008-01-01

    Using investigations in teaching mathematics has for many years become an established feature of most curricula around the world. Investigations can be a vehicle for enabling children to experience the genuine excitement that comes from mathematical discovery. The true spirit of inquiry and investigation lies in the mind-set that continually asks…

  2. The Pascal-Fermat Correspondence: How Mathematics Is Really Done

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlin, Keith

    2010-01-01

    The mathematics that students see in their textbooks is highly polished. The steps required to solve a problem are all clearly laid out. Thus, students are denied what could be a valuable learning experience. Often when students meet a problem that differs only slightly from the ones in the book, they are unable to proceed and afraid to "play…

  3. Cardioprotection with beta-blockers: myths, facts and Pascal's wager.

    PubMed

    Messerli, F H; Bangalore, S; Yao, S S; Steinberg, J S

    2009-09-01

    Beta-blockers were documented to reduce reinfarction rate more than 3 decades ago and subsequently touted as being cardioprotective for a broad spectrum of cardiovascular indications such as hypertension, diabetes, angina, atrial fibrillation as well as perioperatively in patients undergoing surgery. However, despite lowering blood pressure, beta-blockers have never shown to reduce morbidity and mortality in uncomplicated hypertension. Also, beta-blockers do not prevent heart failure in hypertension any better than any other antihypertensive drug class. Beta-blockers have been shown to increase the risk on new onset diabetes. When compared with nondiuretic antihypertensive drugs, beta-blockers increase all-cause mortality by 8% and stroke by 30% in patients with new onset diabetes. Beta-blockers are useful for rate control in patients with chronic atrial fibrillation but do not help restore sinus rhythm or have antifibrillatory effects in the atria. Beta-blockers provide symptomatic relief in patients with chronic stable angina but do not reduce the risk of myocardial infarction. Adverse effects of beta-blockers are common including fatigue, dizziness, depression and sexual dysfunction. However, beta-blockers remain a cornerstone in the management of patients having suffered a myocardial infarction and for patients with heart failure. Thus, recent evidence argues against universal cardioprotective properties of beta-blockers but attest to their usefulness for specific cardiovascular indications. PMID:19702791

  4. LIFTING THE DUSTY VEIL WITH NEAR- AND MID-INFRARED PHOTOMETRY. III. TWO-DIMENSIONAL EXTINCTION MAPS OF THE GALACTIC MIDPLANE USING THE RAYLEIGH-JEANS COLOR EXCESS METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    Nidever, David L.; Zasowski, Gail; Majewski, Steven R. E-mail: gz2n@virginia.edu

    2012-08-01

    We provide new, high-resolution A(K{sub s} ) extinction maps of the heavily reddened Galactic midplane based on the Rayleigh-Jeans Color Excess ({sup R}JCE{sup )} method. RJCE determines star-by-star reddening based on a combination of near- and mid-infrared photometry. The new RJCE-generated maps have 2' Multiplication-Sign 2' pixels and span some of the most severely extinguished regions of the Galaxy-those covered with Spitzer/IRAC imaging by the GLIMPSE-I, -II, -3D, and Vela-Carina surveys, from 256 Degree-Sign < l < 65 Degree-Sign and, in general, for |b| {<=} 1 Degree-Sign -1.{sup 0}5 (extending up to |b| {<=} 4 Degree-Sign in the bulge). Using RJCE extinction measurements, we generate dereddened color-magnitude diagrams and, in turn, create maps based on main sequence, red clump, and red giant star tracers, each probing different distances and thereby providing coarse three-dimensional information on the relative placement of dust cloud structures. The maps generated from red giant stars, which reach to {approx}18-20 kpc, probe beyond most of the Milky Way extinction in most directions and provide close to a 'total Galactic extinction' map-at minimum they provide high angular resolution maps of lower limits on A(K{sub s} ). Because these maps are generated directly from measurements of reddening by the very dust being mapped, rather than inferred on the basis of some less direct means, they are likely the most accurate to date for charting in detail the highly patchy differential extinction in the Galactic midplane. We provide downloadable FITS files and an IDL tool for retrieving extinction values for any line of sight within our mapped regions.

  5. [Jean Oury, "I am a poumista"].

    PubMed

    Drogoul, Frank

    2015-01-01

    If being a poumista means considering that people disalienate themselves by revolutionising the world, being a poumista psychiatrist consists in taking into consideration psychological alienation and social alienation. Hence the importance of hospital committees and clubs, to give back to patients the status of a subject and to understand the question of hierarchy. The caregiver in psychiatry must bear in mind that one of the essential dimensions of their work is to "make do with" schizophrenic patients and that they must engage in everyday acts. PMID:26564490

  6. Biot, Jean-Baptiste (1774-1862)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Physicist and astronomer, born in Paris, France, professor at the Collège de France. His most important work was on the polarization of light (which he correctly suggested was due to asymmetric molecules). With Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac he made in 1804 an ascent in a balloon to study a variety of phenomena at high altitude. Biot headed a commission from the Academy of Sciences to study the meteor s...

  7. Jean-Pierre Luminet: Renaissance Communicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullen, L.; Russo, P.

    2009-02-01

    As science communicators dealing with astronomy we often find a strong interest amongst the public in astrology - how the stars and planets directly affect our individual lives. Nowadays astrology is at odds with the scientific nature of astronomy, but this has not always been the case. Presented here is a background to astrology, to give a deeper understanding of where it has come from and why it has such an enduring place in all forms of global media.

  8. [The tourniquet of Jean-Louis Petit].

    PubMed

    Renner, Claude

    2014-01-01

    In the early part of the 18th century the mechanization of Petit's tourniquet is one of the most outstanding medical inventions. During more than a century that tool without any noticeable change was in the surgical boxes in all countries. As the mechanic Peron has been intensely working to handcraft the device with the utmost urgency Petit's tourniquet could have become that of Petit and Peron.

  9. Morin, Jean-Baptiste (1583-1656)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Doctor, alchemist and astrologer, born in Villefranche, Beaujolais, France, became professor of mathematics at the Collège Royal, published a defense of ARISTOTLE, attacked GALILEO, being convinced that the Earth was fixed in space. Morin proposed an impractical method to solve the longitude problem, based on measuring absolute time by the position of the Moon. He put the method in for a pri...

  10. Towards Re-Reading Jean Piaget. Commentary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vidal, Fernando

    1997-01-01

    Instead of limiting himself to postulating two discontinuous types of thought, autistic and logical, Piaget studied transitional forms, thereby placing autistic and logical thought on a developmental continuum. Nevertheless, the discovery of transitional forms did not lessen the opposition between the two extremes of autistic and logical thought.…

  11. Generalized Pascal's triangles and singular elements of modules of Lie algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyakhovsky, V. D.; Postnova, O. V.

    2015-10-01

    We consider the problem of determining the multiplicity function m_ξ ^{{ ⊗ ^p}ω } in the tensor power decomposition of a module of a semisimple algebra g into irreducible submodules. For this, we propose to pass to the corresponding decomposition of a singular element Ψ((L g ω )⊗p) of the module tensor power into singular elements of irreducible submodules and formulate the problem of determining the function M_ξ ^{{ ⊗ ^p}ω }. This function satisfies a system of recurrence relations that corresponds to the procedure for multiplying modules. To solve this problem, we introduce a special combinatorial object, a generalized (g,ω) pyramid, i.e., a set of numbers ( p, { mi})g,ω satisfying the same system of recurrence relations. We prove that M_ξ ^{{ ⊗ ^p}ω } can be represented as a linear combination of the corresponding ( p, { mi})g,ω. We illustrate the obtained solution with several examples of modules of the algebras sl(3) and so(5).

  12. BACTID: a microcomputer implementation of a PASCAL program for bacterial identification based on Bayesean probability.

    PubMed

    Jilly, B J

    1988-01-01

    A computer program (BACTID) is described which enables the identification of bacteria based on a priori data and Bayesean probability testing. The program is not limited to a specific format, has a short execution time, can be easily applied to a variety of situations, and can be run on almost any microcomputer system operating under either 8-bit CP/M or 16-bit MS-DOS or PC-DOS. Additionally, BACTID is not limited to one type of computer (hardware independent); is not limited by size of the computer's random access memory (RAM independent); can recognize various database matrices (format independent); is able to compensate for missing data; and allows for various methods of data entry. The efficacy of the program was checked against a commercially available test system and a 99.34% agreement was obtained. Also, the execution time for a 46 x 21 data matrix was as little as 3.5 seconds. These results show that microcomputer identification programs not only are viable alternatives to code-book registers, but also offer flexibility which is not found in commercial systems. PMID:3282771

  13. Jean Piaget: The Old Theory and the New.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beilin, Harry

    When Piaget ascribed the origin of knowledge to action, he distanced his theory from most other theories of the origins of mind. As a result, Piaget's conception of mental action has been quite controversial. Piaget's recent, functionalist revisions emphasize procedures and their role in the development of structures. In the new view, structures…

  14. Rational Emotive Education and the Developmental Stages of Jean Piaget.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Janet M.

    Rational-Emotive Therapy (RET) is predicated on a theory of causality. According to Ellis (1962), beliefs regarding an event, and not the event itself, cause emotional reactions. Mentally healthy persons practice this reational theory of causality. Neurotic persons accept an irrational theory of causality based on coincidental or correlational…

  15. Jean-Francois Lyotard and the Question of Disciplinary Legitimacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gietzen, Garett

    2010-01-01

    The modern university developed as an institution legitimated by external referents, including national culture and its emancipatory potential. Today's university, however, has been largely destabilized as these referents have become, at the very least, significantly less compelling relative to larger concerns about economic competitiveness and,…

  16. Boys and "Second Chance" Education: Same Jeans, Different Consequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFadden, Mark G.

    This paper examines the perceptions and interactions of disadvantaged young people returning to mainstream education through Street Kids Access Tertiary Education (SKATE), a university bridging program in Sydney, Australia. Although both males and females in the study shared common backgrounds of disadvantage, "second-chance" educational success…

  17. 36 CFR 7.37 - Jean Lafitte National Historical Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and locations and establish conditions governing the taking of crayfish upon a written determination that the taking of crayfish: (i) Is consistent with the purposes for which the unit was established... conditions or designations for the taking of crayfish is prohibited....

  18. 36 CFR 7.37 - Jean Lafitte National Historical Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and locations and establish conditions governing the taking of crayfish upon a written determination that the taking of crayfish: (i) Is consistent with the purposes for which the unit was established... conditions or designations for the taking of crayfish is prohibited....

  19. 36 CFR 7.37 - Jean Lafitte National Historical Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and locations and establish conditions governing the taking of crayfish upon a written determination that the taking of crayfish: (i) Is consistent with the purposes for which the unit was established... conditions or designations for the taking of crayfish is prohibited....

  20. 36 CFR 7.37 - Jean Lafitte National Historical Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and locations and establish conditions governing the taking of crayfish upon a written determination that the taking of crayfish: (i) Is consistent with the purposes for which the unit was established... conditions or designations for the taking of crayfish is prohibited....

  1. 36 CFR 7.37 - Jean Lafitte National Historical Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and locations and establish conditions governing the taking of crayfish upon a written determination that the taking of crayfish: (i) Is consistent with the purposes for which the unit was established... conditions or designations for the taking of crayfish is prohibited....

  2. Un cosmologiste oublié: Jean Henri Lambert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Débarbat, Suzanne; Lévy, Jacques

    Si les travaux de Kepler ont eu une large influence sure les progrès réalisés en astronomie au cours du 17e siècle, le Siècle de lumières a vu apparaître de nouvelles conceptions. La court vie de J.H. lambert s'inscrit dans le 18e siècle. Il s'agit d'un nom bien connu dans différents domaines (photométrie, projections cartographiques, mathématiques appliquées, etc.); mais il n'est guàre mentionné en cosmologie, alors que Lambert y a fourni une contribution originale offrant quelques suprenantes anticipations...

  3. Foucault, Jean Bernard Léon (1819-68)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Physicist, born in Paris. Became professor at the Paris Observatory and member of the Longitude Institute. Collaborated with FIZEAU in the measurement of the velocity of light using the Fizeau wheel. After they quarrelled, independently of Fizeau he measured the speed of light in water, and found it to be slower than in air, as predicted by the wave theory of light, and against the corpuscular th...

  4. Jean-Jacques Rousseau's views on adult education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dame, Frederick William

    1996-01-01

    Although Rousseau describes in Émile only his scheme for childhood education, he presents us in this work with some direct statements which can be applied to explain more fully the nature of adult education. The author surveys Rousseau's ideas on the role of the general will in adult educational philosophy, subject matter, methodology and negative education, as well as the relationships between the family, student, teacher, community and the state. He concludes that the modern Rousseau would not limit education to males and would recognize that the four Rousseauian periods of educational development — infancy, childhood, youngster, adolescence — is followed by a fifth: adulthood. Adult education is the logical continuation of the four previous phases. Throughout each phase education must permit intellectual and moral growth and always allow for creativity and diversity. Only then can adults become positive contributors to their society.

  5. Jeans instability of a dusty plasma with dust charge variations

    SciTech Connect

    Hakimi Pajouh, H. Afshari, N.

    2015-09-15

    The effect of the dust charge variations on the stability of a self-gravitating dusty plasma has been theoretically investigated. The dispersion relation for the dust-acoustic waves in a self-gravitating dusty plasma is obtained. It is shown that the dust charge variations have significant effects. It increases the growth rate of instability and the instability cutoff wavenumbers. It is found that by increasing the value of the ions temperature and the absolute value of the equilibrium dust charge, the cutoff wavenumber decreases and the stability region is extended.

  6. Jean-Martin Charcot and Silas Weir Mitchell.

    PubMed

    Goetz, C G

    1997-04-01

    Although Charcot and Mitchell only met once or possibly twice in Paris (1873 and 1875), they interacted in multiple ways to influence one another's research and the development of nineteenth century neurology. Charcot strongly relied on, and openly credited, Mitchell's important contributions on the fragility of bones in locomotor ataxia when he postulated his own historic concepts on neuropathic arthropathies (Charcot joints). Mitchell likewise referred to Charcot in his texts and manuscripts, although his comments were not always complementary. Most notably, Mitchell publicly criticized Charcot for wrongfully claiming precedence over Americans (i.e., Mitchell himself) in the development of isolation therapy. The two men shared many specific neurologic interests, especially the effects of trauma and disorders affecting women, including hysteria. In the development of clinical neurology as a new scientific field, Charcot and Mitchell were both strong empiricists who distrusted theory but believed that clinical medicine, and specifically neurology, required continued infusion of new data from the laboratory sciences. Both men were exemplary teachers, Mitchell primarily a preceptor and supervisor of doctors outside the university system and Charcot the first European professor of clinical neurology and head of the celebrated School of the Salpêtrière.

  7. Jean-Martin Charcot and the epilepsy/hysteria relationship.

    PubMed

    Faber, D P

    1997-12-01

    Research from many perspectives has been made on the work of the French neurologist, J.-M. Charcot (1825-1893) with particular reference to his fame for his studies and "construction" of hysteria. What has not been demonstrated so far is the extent to which Charcot's construction can be explained by the perceived relationship between hysteria and epilepsy and Charcot's access to epileptic patients at La Salpêtrière. From the confusion that reigned concerning hysteria and epilepsy, both separately and in relation to each other, Charcot claimed to have isolated hysteria as a distinctive and universal pathology. This claim was partly based on the "grande attaque", representing the most intense degree of hysteria. A comparison with Gowers, the contemporary English neurologist suggests that diagnosis was the function of the practitioners' preferences; and a linguistic analysis pinpoints Charcot's problems in describing an isolated pathology in terms of its relation to its neighbour, epilepsy.

  8. Jean-Martin Charcot at the birth of Russian neurology.

    PubMed

    Vein, Alla A

    2011-01-01

    Russian neurology was virtually nonexistent in the middle of the 19th century which made a traineeship abroad an absolute necessity. Charcot and his school did not just offer professional training, but created the best minds, which would determine the direction of neurology and psychiatry in Russia for many decades. After returning home, young Russian doctors not only implemented everything they had learned in Western Europe, but proceeded to make their own original contributions. The most talented pupils of Charcot, including such prominent names as Kozhevnikov, Korsakov, Minor, Bekhterev and Darkshevich, became the founders of neurological schools in Russia. They laid the basis for the further development of neurology and psychiatry. Remarkably, though trained by the same teachers, each of these future 'founding fathers' of these neurological and psychiatric schools followed his own individual path which resulted in an undeniable diversity in Russian neurology and psychiatry during the period of their formation.

  9. 77 FR 56647 - Lisa Jean Sharp: Debarment Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-13

    ... Director of Clinical Trials for Lee Research Institute. Schering/ Plough was a pharmaceutical company... Lee Research Institute, Ms. Sharp's employer, to perform a clinical study known as ``A 28-Day Study...-Induced Rhino conjunctivitis.'' Ms. Sharp was the Lead Clinical Research Coordinator for the...

  10. How-to-Do-It: Green Jeans Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menger, Richard A.

    1989-01-01

    Describes an outdoor classroom curriculum project which was devised to accommodate students of average and below-average academic ability and provide them with practical horticultural experiences. Discusses funding, plant facilities, program, and resultant products. (RT)

  11. Apport de l’écho-doppler artériel des membres inférieurs dans la prise en charge du pied diabétique à l'hôpital Saint-Jean de Dieu de Thiès (Sénégal)

    PubMed Central

    Dia, Aliou Amadou; Affangla, Désiré Alain; Dione, Jean-Michel; Akpo, Géraud; Mbengue, Marie; Ka, Mamadou Mourtalla; Diop, Bernard Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Le pied diabétique se définit comme l'ensemble des manifestations trophiques du pied survenant chez le diabétique par atteinte nerveuse, artérielle et ou infectieuse. Le pied diabétique est un problème majeur de santé publique à l’échelle mondiale avec un taux d'amputation de membres inférieurs très élevé. L’écho-doppler artériel des membres inférieurs est de nos jours incontournable dans la prise en charge du pied diabétique. Le but de cette étude est de montrer la place prépondérante qu'occupe l’écho-doppler artériel dans le bilan lésionnel du pied diabétique. Méthodes Nous avons mené une étude rétrospective monocentrique incluant 46 patients sur une période de 24 mois, de mars 2012 à mars 2014 à l'hôpital Saint-Jean de Dieu, un des deux hôpitaux de référence de la région de Thiès, doté depuis juillet 2011 d'un centre moderne de traitement du diabète et des maladies cardio-métaboliques (Diabcarmet). Dans les critères d'inclusion, nous avons sélectionné tous les patients diabétiques adressés pour un écho-doppler artériel des membres inférieurs dans le cadre d'une prise en charge du pied diabétique. Etaient exclus de l’étude, les patients artéritiques non-diabétiques et les patients diabétiques asymptomatiques référés pour un bilan écho-doppler de routine. Résultats Le sex-ratio était de 1.42 (27 hommes pour 19 femmes). L’âge moyen des patients était de 62,86 ans avec des extrêmes de 23 et 88 ans. 60% des patients (n=28) étaient âgés entre 50 et 70 ans. Le diabète de type 2 était retrouvé chez 95% des patients (n=44) alors que le diabète de type 1 représentait 5% (n=2). La moyenne d’évolution du diabète était estimée à 8 ans, avec des extrêmes de 2 et 20 ans. On notait une atteinte du pied droit chez 24 patients, une atteinte du pied gauche chez 18 patients et une atteinte bilatérale chez 4 patients. La plupart du temps, les lésions du pied diabétique survenaient

  12. Pazopanib in Metastatic Renal Cancer: A "Real-World" Experience at National Cancer Institute "Fondazione G. Pascale".

    PubMed

    Cecere, Sabrina C; Rossetti, Sabrina; Cavaliere, Carla; Della Pepa, Chiara; Di Napoli, Marilena; Crispo, Anna; Iovane, Gelsomina; Piscitelli, Raffaele; Sorrentino, Domenico; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Maiolino, Piera; Muto, Paolo; Perdonà, Sisto; Berretta, Massimiliano; Pignata, Sandro; Facchini, Gaetano; D'Aniello, Carmine

    2016-01-01

    Pazopanib is an oral angiogenesis inhibitor, currently approved for treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) and soft tissue sarcoma. The present study analyzed the outcomes of pazopanib in first-line treatment of mRCC, in a single Italian cancer center. In the light of the retrospective, observational nature and the unselected population, our experience can be defined a "real-world" study. The medical records of 38 mRCC patients treated with front-line pazopanib were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. The progression free survival (PFS) and the overall survival (OS) were the primary endpoints, while secondary objectives included objective response rate (ORR), disease control rate (DCR), and treatment tolerability. Pazopanib achieved a median PFS (mPFS) of 12.7 months (95% CI, 6.9-18.5 months). The median OS (mOS) was 26.2 months (95% CI, 12.6-39.9 months); the observed ORR and DCR were 30.3 and 72.7%, respectively, with a median duration of response of 11 weeks. mPFS appeared not to be influenced by number of co-morbidities (< 3 vs. ≥3), gender, Fuhrman grade and age. Conversely, the ORR and the DCR positively affect the mPFS (HR = 0.05 [95% CI, 0.05-0.55], p = 0.01; HR = 0.10 [95% CI, 0.02-0.43], p = 0.002, respectively). A worse outcome was associated with a lower mPFS in patients with liver metastases (p = 0.2) and with a high tumor burden (number of metastatic sites < 6 vs. ≥6) (p = 0.08). Worst OS was observed in patients aged ≥70 years old (HR = 6.91 [95% CI, 1.49-31.91], p = 0.01). The treatment was well-tolerated: no grade 4 adverse events, nor discontinuation due to toxicities was reported. Grade 3 hypertension affected positively the OS reaching the statistical significance (HR = 0.22 [95% CI, 0.05-0.8], p = 0.03). Thyroid dysfunction (hypo and hyperthyroidism) seems to correlate with better outcome in terms of a longer mPFS (HR = 0.12 [95% CI, 0.02-0.78], p = 0.02). Our results are consistent with those reported in prospective phase III trials and the published retrospective "real world" experiences. This analysis confirms the safety and efficacy of pazopanib in first-line setting, both in frail patients with multiple co-morbidities and Karnofsky PS < 80% and in younger, healthier patients with a number of metastatic sites < 6. PMID:27630568

  13. Scale-invariance of sediment patterns - the fingerprint of fundamental drivers (Jean Baptiste Lamarck Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlager, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    In contrast to the realms of magmatism and metamorphism, most depositional processes can be observed directly at the earth's surface. Observation of sediment patterns advanced significantly with the advent of remote sensing and 3D reflection seismics. Remote sensing is particularly relevant for the present topic because it documents mainly Holocene sediments - the best objects to link depositional processes to products. Classic examples of scale-invariant geometry are channel-fan systems, i.e. river-delta and canyon-fan complexes. The underlying control in both instances is the energy-dispersion of a channeled stream of water that discharges in a body of still water. The resulting fan-shaped sediment accumulations are scale-invariant over 7 orders of magnitude in linear size. The Mesozoic-Cenozoic record shows comparable trends and patterns. Further examples of depositional scale-invariance include foresets of non-cohesive sediments and braided-channel deposits. Reefs and carbonate platforms offer an example of scale-invariance related to biotic growth. Shallow-water carbonate platforms rimmed by reefs or reef-rimmed atolls with deep lagoons are characteristic morphologies of tropical carbonate deposits. The structure has been compared to a bucket where stiff reef rims hold a pile of loose sediment. Remote sensing data from the Maldive, Chagos and Laccadive archipelagos of the Indian Ocean show that bucket structures are the dominant depositional pattern from meter-size reefs to archipelagos of hundreds of kilometers in diameter, i.e. over more than 4 orders of magnitude in linear size. Over 2.5 orders of magnitude, the bucket structures qualify as statistical fractals. Ecologic and hydrodynamic studies on modern reefs suggest that the bucket structure is a form of biotic self-organization: The edge position in a reef is favored over the center position because bottom shear is higher and the diffusive boundary layer between reef and water thinner. Thus, the reef edge has easier access to nutrients. Moreover, the edge is less likely to be buried by sediment. The bucket structure is an ecologic response to these conditions. Buckets have been documented from all periods of the Phanerozoic and analogous structures from the late Proterozoic show that the microbial carbonate factory also built buckets. We conclude that a voyage through scales in the sediment realm reveals islands of scale-invariance wherever a single principle dominates the sedimentation process.

  14. Utilizing the language of Jean Watson's caring theory within a computerized clinical documentation system.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Susan

    2006-01-01

    The healthcare facility described in the following article is part of an eight-hospital organization that adopted Watson's Theory of Caring as part of their nursing philosophy. According to Watson, this theory is an attempt to find and deepen the language specific to nurse caring relations and its many meanings. Yet during the implementation of the theory within the setting described, it was noted that there was no mechanism in the current documentation system for clinical nursing staff to document the patient experience using any language specific to the theory. Nursing members recognized an opportunity to develop a new context in charting during an extensive clinical documentation system upgrade. A discussion of the steps taken and the results within the clinical documentation system supporting the newly adopted caring philosophy are summarized here.

  15. High School Roundtable: NCEA's Jean Rutherford Discusses America's High Schools at ECS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Educational Accountability, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Governors and state and local education officials assumed that raising student achievement in the elementary and middle grades would solve the problems with high schools--but it hasn't. Why? Good information is the basis for successful improvement, and high school reform lacks accurate information about what students are to learn and about how…

  16. "Days of future passed" - climate change and carbon cycle history (Jean Baptiste Lamarck Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissert, Helmut

    2013-04-01

    With the beginning of the fossil fuel age in the 19th century mankind has become an important geological agent on a global scale. For the first time in human history action of man has an impact on global biogeochemical cycles. Increasing CO2 concentrations will result in a perturbation of global carbon cycling coupled with climate change. Investigations of past changes in carbon cycling and in climate will improve our predictions of future climate. Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations will drive climate into a mode of operation, which may resemble climate conditions in the deep geological past. Pliocene climate will give insight into 400ppm world with higher global sea level than today. Doubling of pre-industrial atmospheric CO2 levels will shift the climate system into a state resembling greenhouse climate in the Early Cenozoic or even in the Cretaceous. Carbon isotope geochemistry serves as tool for tracing the pathway of the carbon cycle through geological time. Globally registered negative C-isotope anomalies in the C-isotope record are interpreted as signatures of rapid addition (103 to a few 104 years) of CO2 to the ocean-atmosphere system. Positive C-isotope excursions following negative spikes record the slow post-perturbation recovery of the biosphere at time scales of 105 to 106 years. Duration of C-cycle perturbations in earth history cannot be directly compared with rapid perturbation characterizing the Anthropocene. However, the investigation of greenhouse pulses in the geological past provides insight into different climate states, it allows to identify tipping points in past climate systems and it offers the opportunity to learn about response reactions of the biosphere to rapid changes in global carbon cycling. Sudden injection of massive amounts of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere is recorded in C-isotope record of the Early Cretaceous. The Aptian carbon cycle perturbation triggered changes in temperature and in global hydrological cycling. Changes in physical and chemical oceanography are reflected in widespread black shale deposition ("Oceanic Anoxic Event 1a"), in carbonate platform drowning and in biocalcification crises. "Days of future passed" (Moody Blues, 1967) reminds us that the past provides essential information needed for decisions to be made in the interest of mankind's future.

  17. Jean--an illness story: the quest to address the advance of chaos.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Brian Arthur

    2015-02-01

    In Arthur Frank's book The Wounded Storyteller, the illness story is brought to life, highlighting the disruption in the life course that serious illness brings. Frank shows that a narrative can aid suffers by giving a voice to those silenced within the health system. In this article, one sufferer marginalized within the health care system is offered a voice, and writing the illness story is explored as a healing process for the author, whose mother suffered from Alzheimer's disease some 30 years ago. Elements of Frank's theoretical processes ofa "chaos story" and a "quest story" are combined in the author's attempt to gain closure with the health and political systems. The author highlights the absence of a meaningful social work intervention, makes recommendations from an anti-oppressive perspective, and offers a discussion of social work interventions that have developed over time. Further, the author advocates for adaptation in a system ill prepared for the possible future onslaught of dementia cases and details how the illness-story narrative can be used as a therapeutic tool for caregivers.

  18. The Constructivist Epistemology of Jean Piaget: Its Philosophical Roots and Relevance to Science Teaching and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staver, John R.

    The goal of this paper is to sketch the epistemological roots of constructivism, to clarify certain implications of Piaget's constructivist theory for science education, and to explicate the issues surrounding a specific research study and its replication. Constructivist epistemology is described in terms of its emergence from rationalist,…

  19. [JEAN EMMANUEL GILIBERT AND FRENCH SCIENTISTS IN POLAND AND LITHUANIA IN 1770-1780].

    PubMed

    Beauvois, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The author is trying to remind us of great role of French culture and French people in spreading the ideas of Enlightenment in Poland. Common use of French language in high societies in 18th century and excellent knowledge of books from Paris created favourite conditions for contacts of Poland with France. The best evidence of common culture of Enlightenment was the Commission of National Education (KEN) and the deep social changes. The direct contacts of French thinkers, writers and scientists with Poland also caused the changes of horizons of aristocracy and gentry. We will remind the main animators of this movement followed A. Jobert. J.E. Gilibert takes a very important place among the animators of Enlightenment. Author intends to present the phases of knowing him, generally mentioning the main conclusions of many research on Gilibert. At the same time author leaves to next speakers a detailed analyze of Gilbert's contribution to the development of Polish science.

  20. "I Knew Jean-Paul Sartre": Philosophy of Education as Comedy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Morwenna; Peters, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Ludwig Wittgenstein suggests that "A serious and good philosophical work could be written consisting entirely of jokes". The idea for this dialogue comes from a conversation that Michael Peters and Morwenna Griffiths had at the Philosophy of Education of Great Britain annual meeting at the University of Oxford, 2011. It was sparked by an…

  1. [JEAN EMMANUEL GILIBERT AND FRENCH SCIENTISTS IN POLAND AND LITHUANIA IN 1770-1780].

    PubMed

    Beauvois, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The author is trying to remind us of great role of French culture and French people in spreading the ideas of Enlightenment in Poland. Common use of French language in high societies in 18th century and excellent knowledge of books from Paris created favourite conditions for contacts of Poland with France. The best evidence of common culture of Enlightenment was the Commission of National Education (KEN) and the deep social changes. The direct contacts of French thinkers, writers and scientists with Poland also caused the changes of horizons of aristocracy and gentry. We will remind the main animators of this movement followed A. Jobert. J.E. Gilibert takes a very important place among the animators of Enlightenment. Author intends to present the phases of knowing him, generally mentioning the main conclusions of many research on Gilibert. At the same time author leaves to next speakers a detailed analyze of Gilbert's contribution to the development of Polish science. PMID:26445742

  2. Jean-Martin Charcot and his vibratory chair for Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Christopher G

    2009-08-11

    Vibration therapy is currently used in diverse medical specialties ranging from orthopedics to urology to sports medicine. The celebrated 19th-century neurologist, J.-M. Charcot, used vibratory therapy to treat Parkinson disease (PD). This study analyzed printed writings by Charcot and other writers on vibratory therapy and accessed unpublished notes from the Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris. Charcot lectured on several occasions on vibratory therapy and its neurologic applications. He developed a vibration chair for patients with PD after he observed that patients were more comfortable and slept better after a train or carriage ride. He replicated this experience by having patients undergo daily 30-minute sessions in the automated vibratory chair (fauteuil trépidant). His junior colleague, Gilles de la Tourette, extended these observations and developed a helmet that vibrated the head on the premise that the brain responded directly to the pulsations. Although after Charcot's death vibratory therapy was not widely pursued, vibratory appliances are reemerging in 21st century medicine and can be retested using adaptations of Charcot's neurologic protocols.

  3. The enduring mark left by Jean-Martin Charcot on rheumatology.

    PubMed

    Lagier, R

    1997-12-01

    Although Charcot is remembered above all as an outstanding neurologist, he also left a lasting imprint on the study of rheumatic diseases, primarily in two fields. a) He performed a pathologic-nosographic confrontation based on principles that remain relevant in today's era of imaging techniques. His vision as a pathologist allowed him to establish links between nonspecific lesions, which led him to develop a unified concept of chronic rheumatism. At the same time however, his experience as a clinician gave him a sense of the nosologic distinctions that are widely accepted today. b) He analyzed osteoarticular dystrophies associated with neurologic disorders, most notably tabetic arthropathies with epiphyseal fragmentation and in some instances spontaneous fractures. In addition, a constellation of alterations of the synovial membrane, ligaments, and muscles identified in those analyses foreshadowed today's concept of reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome.

  4. [Professor Jean-Charles Sournia and the French Society of Medicine].

    PubMed

    Cornet, André; Dulieu, Louis; Ségal, Alain

    2002-01-01

    The authors recount the important contribution of Professor Sournia as he worked for the French Society of Medicine History for thirty-five years. As a devoted general secretary he managed in 1973 the Society officially recognised as a state-approved institution. Then in 1979 and 1980, he was the President of our Society with authority and awareness of need for some reforms. He was an attentive chief editor of the journal "Histoires des Sciences Médicales" in which many of his original papers demonstrated his wide-ranging education and the diversity of his interests: Arab Medicine and Surgery books, History of Public Health, History of Medical Jargon, the lexicography by Littré, the major epidemics included leprosy, many medical biographies etc. Thus it was not surprising that he has published his "Histoire de la Médecine et des Médecins".

  5. Jean-Jacques Is Alive and Well: Rousseau and Contemporary Sociobiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masters, Roger D.

    1978-01-01

    A description of the author's personal fascination with and study of Rousseau's life. Discusses Rousseau's many questions that are relevant to evolutionary biology, sociobiology, anthropology, and ethology. Questions concern the nature of human nature, the origin of human society, nurture-nature influences on humans, and the nature of male-female…

  6. Cassini, Gian Domenico [Giovanni Domenico; Jean Dominique; known as Cassini I] (1625-1712)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Italian-born French astronomer, born in Perinaldo, near Naples. Attracted to astrology in his youth, became Professor at Bologna, during which time he conducted hydrological studies for the Pope to mitigate flooding of the River Po. In 1669 Cassini moved to France and set up the Paris Observatory, remaining director for the rest of his career. He pushed continually for the observatory to acquire ...

  7. Reflections to Jean-Marie, Normore, and Brooks' Article within the Context of Korean Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seong, Sang-Hwan; Shin, Jung Cheol; Ilon, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    With respect to leadership for social justice in education, Korea needs to take a proactive approach to support the development of an educational infrastructure for a multicultural society. The testing culture of education within Korea also needs to be considered with social justice consequences in mind. Through these measures, Korea can…

  8. A path to the detection of Earth-type planets (Jean Dominique Cassini Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, Michel

    2016-04-01

    "How many planets in the Milky Way?", "How many planets similar to our Earth?" On the last twenty years, significant results have been obtained in the domain of extrasolar planets. More than two thousand planets have characterized orbits, for several hundred of them their radii are known. We have discovered an amazing diversity of planetary systems. These observations have revealed the importance of new physical process to be taken into account for the formation and evolution of planetary systems. The synergy between ground-based radial velocity measurements and the detection of transiting planets have permitted exciting possibilities to characterize planets. Already we have the possibility to get clues on the internal composition of exoplanets and their atmosphere. Do we have the instrumental capabilities to detect and study planets as Earth analogues? What are the intruments in development and their scientific goals.

  9. Discovering habitable environments and life in the Saturn System (Jean Dominique Cassini Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunine, Jonathan I.

    2015-04-01

    One of the most notable scientific adventures of our time is being conducted jointly by Europe and the United States around the solar system's great ringed planet, Saturn. The Cassini-Huygens mission arrived in orbit in 2004, and the Huygens probe descended through Titan's atmosphere in January 2005. Titan's surface has been found to host a rich and still-enigmatic methane cycle, complete with lakes, seas, rivers and rain. Enceladus is jetting its interior volatiles into space, where the Cassini Orbiter detected and measured a number of species within the resulting plume. These include water, organic molecules, nitrogen compounds, and salts. Cassini radio science detected the presence within both Enceladus and Titan of internal water oceans. Variability with orbital phase of the Enceladus plume, also discovered by the Cassini Orbiter, makes a convincing case for the jets themselves being derived from the deep interior and controlled by tidal forces. Both Enceladus and Titan host potentially habitable environments, and they represent unique opportunities for testing whether either or both of these bodies harbor life. Titan's interior will be difficult to access, but its large surface hydrocarbon seas can be explored in situ with Huygens-like vehicles. The Cassini Orbiter determined the liquid in Titan's seas to be methane and ethane, which raises the question of whether simple chemistry can evolve into autocatalysis and self-replication in a non-aqueous liquid environment. In effect, is there an exotic kind of "life" in the Titan seas? Enceladus is perhaps more straightforward: given that the interior water ocean as expressed through the plume appears to satisfy the formal requirements for habitability, is biological activity occurring there? Answering these questions will require a new generation of robotic vehicles beyond Cassini-Huygens -- and new opportunities for international collaborations in planetary exploration.

  10. Algorithms and programming tools for image processing on the MPP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, A. P.

    1985-01-01

    Topics addressed include: data mapping and rotational algorithms for the Massively Parallel Processor (MPP); Parallel Pascal language; documentation for the Parallel Pascal Development system; and a description of the Parallel Pascal language used on the MPP.

  11. Indexation Rules for Metallurgy in PASCAL. Original Title: Regles d'Indexation de la Metallurgie'--Technical Note Issued by Informascience--January 1980. Translated by Marie Wallin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Library.

    The indexing rules presented are designed for use with a new French-German database on metallurgy being developed under an agreement by CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Paris) and BAM (Bundesanstalt fur Materialprufung, Berlin). The new database, which will feature multilingual titles and index terms (French-German-English-) and…

  12. Comparison of Selecting, Abstracting, and Indexing by COMPENDEX, INSPEC, and PASCAL and the Impact of This on Manual and Automated Retrieval of Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Jong-Hofman, M. W.

    1981-01-01

    In order to compare effects of input processing on information retrieval in three databases, 25 articles from a specific journal were examined. Tables and Venn diagrams show retrieval results from different manual and computer searches. The relation between document surrogates and subject matter of the documents is discussed. (SW)

  13. International Congress on Transposable Elements (ICTE) 2012 in Saint Malo and the sea of TE stories.

    PubMed

    Ainouche, Abdelkader; Bétermier, Mireille; Chandler, Mick; Cordaux, Richard; Cristofari, Gaël; Deragon, Jean-Marc; Lesage, Pascale; Panaud, Olivier; Quesneville, Hadi; Vaury, Chantal; Vieira, Cristina; Vitte, Clémentine

    2012-10-30

    An international conference on Transposable Elements (TEs) was held 21-24 April 2012 in Saint Malo, France. Organized by the French Transposition Community (GDR Elements Génétiques Mobiles et Génomes, CNRS) and the French Society of Genetics (SFG), the conference's goal was to bring together researchers from around the world who study transposition in diverse organisms using multiple experimental approaches. The meeting drew more than 217 attendees and most contributed through poster presentations (117), invited talks and short talks selected from poster abstracts (48 in total). The talks were organized into four scientific sessions, focused on: impact of TEs on genomes, control of transposition, evolution of TEs and mechanisms of transposition. Here, we present highlights from the talks given during the platform sessions. The conference was sponsored by Alliance pour les sciences de la vie et de la santé (Aviesan), Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale (INSERM), Institut de recherche pour le développement (IRD), Institut national de la recherche agronomique (INRA), Université de Perpignan, Université de Rennes 1, Région Bretagne and Mobile DNA. CHAIR OF THE ORGANIZATION COMMITTEE: Jean-Marc Deragon ORGANIZERS: Abdelkader Ainouche, Mireille Bétermier, Mick Chandler, Richard Cordaux, Gaël Cristofari, Jean-Marc Deragon, Pascale Lesage, Didier Mazel, Olivier Panaud, Hadi Quesneville, Chantal Vaury, Cristina Vieira and Clémentine Vitte.

  14. Enseignement et analyse de discours: Un rendez-vous prometteur. Entretien avec Sophie Moirand et Jean Peytard (Teaching and Discourse Analysis: A Promising Meeting. Interview with Sophie Moirand and Jean Peytard).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pecheur, Jacques

    1992-01-01

    The authors of a new book on the relationship of discourse and French language instruction, bringing different language backgrounds and professional perspectives to the issue of language teaching theory and practice, are interviewed. Discussion focuses on the role of discourse analysis in language teaching. (MSE)

  15. A resolution designating Jean M. Manning as Chief Counsel for Employment Emeritus of the United States Senate.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Reid, Harry [D-NV

    2014-03-13

    03/13/2014 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S1669; text as passed Senate: CR S1664) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  16. Marguerite Bottard (1822-1906), nurse under Jean-Martin Charcot, portrayed by G. Gilles de la Tourette.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Hospitals in Paris underwent considerable change at the end of the 19th century. As they moved from providing accommodation to care, their mission shifted from helping to healing. The glorification of scientific progress, as opposed to religious obscurantism, affected all of French 'Republican' society, in particular a significant part of the medical profession, led by figures such as D.M. Bourneville, former interne (house officer) under J.M. Charcot and also his publisher. Bourneville helped bring about the creation of nursing schools and the gradual replacement of religious orders by educated secular nurses. Marguerite Bottard, Charcot's chief nurse made famous by A. Brouillet's painting 'Une leçon clinique à La Salpêtrière', would be glorified and decorated as a model for this movement. A letter by G. Gilles de la Tourette to Charcot's successor F. Raymond, never before published, illustrates this progressive current of thought and revisits the struggle to secularise hospitals under the Third Republic in France. At the same time, it renews interest in the exemplary career of a nurse whose name was recently given to a building at La Salpêtrière Hospital.

  17. The Framing of Calvin Klein: A Frame Analysis of Media Discourse about the August 1995 Calvin Klein Jeans Advertising Campaign.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Lauren R.

    1998-01-01

    Deconstructs the "kiddie porn" media frame used by the industry and mainstream media to characterize Klein's ad campaign. Extends scholarship on the construction of youth in the media, showing how the kiddie-porn frame produces and reproduces common-sense beliefs about the nature of youth. Suggests a metadiscourse encompassing the politicized…

  18. Map of risks for the implementation of radio-frequency identification: application of ancillaries in the University Hospital Jean Verdier.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, E; Schlatter, J

    2010-01-01

    Ancillaries are surgical instruments, such as orthopedical instruments set for reconstruction of knee (a mounting arm...) used to implant or extract prosthesis. Their management involves the departments of sterilization and surgery as well as the suppliers. Such a long circuit exposes the instruments to potential risk hazards like a lack of traceability as the suspicion of Creutzfeldt-Jakob. In order to reduce the risk of errors we will propose the implementation of radio-frequency identification (RFID) to trace the ancillaries during each step of the supply chain. The objective of our study is to analyze and to map the risks associated with RFID implementation. A preliminary analysis of risks (APR) is conducted to map out the hazards for the implementation of RFID. The APR identifies 162 scenarios with a maximum risk connected to environment and technology. To reduce the risks identified, 22 courses of action are proposed, such as audits, training, and internal controls. For each action, a procedure has been designed and evaluated. This preliminary analysis of risks allows targeting the potential dangers for the RFID implementation applied to ancillaries and reduces them significantly.

  19. 'Epidemic' of hand deformities in the French Renaissance paintings of Jean and François Clouet.

    PubMed

    Weisz, G M; Albury, W R; Matucci-Cerinic, M; Lazzeri, D

    2016-09-01

    This article analyses the nature of the multiple finger anomalies found in portraits by the French Renaissance artistic dynasty, the Clouets. The multiplicity of finger anomalies could be either innocent congenital variants, or pathological and traumatic deformities. In view of the presence of such `beautifying variations' in the works of other Renaissance artists, the authors decided that these features were not the result of an epidemic of deformities, but instead represented a stylistic approach in paintings of this period at the French Court.

  20. Effects of dermal exposure to Nicotiana tabacum (Jean Nicot, 1560) leaves in mouse evaluated by multiple methods and tissues.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Fernanda R; Erdtmann, Bernardo; Dalpiaz, Tiago; Nunes, Emilene; Da Rosa, Darlan P; Porawski, Marilene; Bona, Sílvia; Simon, Caroline F; Da C Allgayer, Mariangela; Da Silva, Juliana

    2010-09-01

    Tobacco farmers are routinely exposed to complex mixtures of the compounds present in tobacco leaves, including organic and inorganic pesticides. Penetration through skin is the most significant route of uptake in occupational exposure to chemicals, including dust and liquids containing toxic and carcinogenic substances. This study evaluates the genotoxic effect of tobacco leaves with and without dermal exposure to flumetralin in Mus musculus, determining cell damage by the micronucleus test and the Comet assay as well as antioxidant enzyme activities and hematologic parameters. Nicotine was used as positive control. Blood samples were collected for 0, 3, 24 and 48 h exposure periods, and DNA damage by Comet assay and micronucleus test was evaluated for all these periods. Bone marrow and liver cells were also evaluated for the 48 h exposure period. Significant differences between Comet assay results in blood cells from animals exposed to tobacco leaves with and without pesticide were found in 24 and 48 h exposure periods in relation to negative control. Bone marrow cells from the group exposed to leaves with pesticide (48 h) also demonstrated significant increase in DNA damage. Concerning the micronucleus test, only animals exposed to tobacco leaves without pesticide (24 h) showed increase in frequency of micronuclei when compared to the negative control. Oxidative stress activities also were demonstrated for different groups. The results demonstrate the injury effect caused by tobacco leaves in different Mus musculus tissues, suggesting that the effects of dermal exposure to tobacco leaves are caused by complex mixtures present in the plant, but mainly by nicotine. PMID:20684553

  1. Contributions to the history of psychology: LXXXV. Jean Piaget, student of Pierre Janet (Paris 1919-1921).

    PubMed

    Amann-Gainotti, M

    1992-06-01

    This article provides information about an important period of Piaget's formative years, those he spent in Paris from 1919 to 1921, during which he came into contact with eminent members of the French scientific and philosophical community of the time. Among these was the psychiatrist and psychologist Pierre Janet, whose genetic approach to the psychology of behaviour and ideas about the hierarchical organization of psychological functions converged with Piaget's early scientific interests and provided Piaget a conceptual framework within which to work and develop his own project of studying the genesis of knowledge.

  2. [Jean Guillaume Auguste Lugol (1788-1851): his life and his works: a brief encounter, 150 years after his death].

    PubMed

    Neuzil, Eugène

    2002-01-01

    J.G.A. Lugol was born on August 18th, 1788 at Montauban. Medical student in Paris, he was admitted as an intern of the hospital 1807. Medical doctor in 1812, he was appointed acting physician at Saint-Louis hospital of Paris in 1819 and named head of a department in the same establishment, a post he held till he retired in 1851. After his death on September 16th, 1851 at Neuilly-sur-Seine, his elder child, his daughter Adèle-Augustine, married Paul Broca in 1857. French pioneer of iodine therapy, Lugol is famous for his iodine-iodurretted solution, still registered in the French Codex and present in most foreign Pharmacopoeia, and also for his four books on scrofulous diseases and their treatment (1829, 1830, 1831, 1834) These publications gather a wealth of the detailed observations of an excellent practitioner who constantly proved a great independence of spirit towards some medical concepts "à la mode", especially those sustained by Broussais. He was very close to his patients and to his medical students, who admired the quality of his lessons, the efficiency of his therapeutic innovations, his intellectual uprightness as well as his success in private practice.

  3. Getting It Wrong from the Beginning: Our Progressivist Inheritance from Herbert Spencer, John Dewey, and Jean Piaget.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egan, Kieran

    This book sets out to prove that the progressivist tenets that have become the foundation of American education are mistaken. The author does not argue against progressivism on the basis of the usual alternatives of liberal or traditional theories of education because it is not adequately attuned to preparing students for jobs. The author sets out…

  4. Map of risks for the implementation of radio-frequency identification: application of ancillaries in the University Hospital Jean Verdier.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, E; Schlatter, J

    2010-01-01

    Ancillaries are surgical instruments, such as orthopedical instruments set for reconstruction of knee (a mounting arm...) used to implant or extract prosthesis. Their management involves the departments of sterilization and surgery as well as the suppliers. Such a long circuit exposes the instruments to potential risk hazards like a lack of traceability as the suspicion of Creutzfeldt-Jakob. In order to reduce the risk of errors we will propose the implementation of radio-frequency identification (RFID) to trace the ancillaries during each step of the supply chain. The objective of our study is to analyze and to map the risks associated with RFID implementation. A preliminary analysis of risks (APR) is conducted to map out the hazards for the implementation of RFID. The APR identifies 162 scenarios with a maximum risk connected to environment and technology. To reduce the risks identified, 22 courses of action are proposed, such as audits, training, and internal controls. For each action, a procedure has been designed and evaluated. This preliminary analysis of risks allows targeting the potential dangers for the RFID implementation applied to ancillaries and reduces them significantly. PMID:20187581

  5. Will the Real Jean Piaget Please Stand Up; A Critique of Three Piaget-Based Curricula, and a Rejoinder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Barry A.; Banet, Bernard

    The relationship between Piagetian theory and its application in three early childhood programs is discussed in two papers with differing points of view. The first paper discusses Piaget's epistemology and presents a critical analysis of the three programs, concluding that only one of them is consistent with Piaget's epistemology. A rejoinder,…

  6. Will the Real Jean Piaget Please Stand Up: An Epistemological Critique of Three Piaget-Based Early Childhood Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Barry A.

    This critique of three Piaget-based curricula presents the argument that it is essential for early childhood educators to distinguish between the actual contributions of Piaget in regard to specific epistemological questions and the way these contributions have been reinterpreted to provide a basis for early childhood curriculum reform. The…

  7. Contributions to the history of psychology: LXXXV. Jean Piaget, student of Pierre Janet (Paris 1919-1921).

    PubMed

    Amann-Gainotti, M

    1992-06-01

    This article provides information about an important period of Piaget's formative years, those he spent in Paris from 1919 to 1921, during which he came into contact with eminent members of the French scientific and philosophical community of the time. Among these was the psychiatrist and psychologist Pierre Janet, whose genetic approach to the psychology of behaviour and ideas about the hierarchical organization of psychological functions converged with Piaget's early scientific interests and provided Piaget a conceptual framework within which to work and develop his own project of studying the genesis of knowledge. PMID:1501961

  8. Continuing Education of Civics Teachers for Teaching the European Union: Results of the Jean Monnet Project PEB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberle, Monika; Forstmann, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    The European dimension is of salient importance for understanding and shaping politics especially, but not only, in Europe. The European Union by now has become a compulsory content of civics classes in secondary schools throughout Germany. For teachers, however, teaching this topic is connected with manifold difficulties, for example, due to the…

  9. Theoretical Modeling for the X-ray Spectroscopy of Iron-bearing MgSiO3 under High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Tsuchiya, T.

    2012-12-01

    The behaviors of iron (Fe) in MgSiO3 perovskite, including valence state, spin state, and chemical environments, at high pressures are of fundamental importance for more detailed understanding the properties of the Earth's lower mantle. The pressure induced spin transition of Fe-bearing MgO and MgSiO3 are detected often by using high-resolution K-edge X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) [1,2,3] and confirmed by theoretical simulations. [4,5] Since the Fe K-edge XES is associated to the 3p orbital, which is far from the valence orbitals (3d and 4s), it provides no information about its coordination environments. However, the Fe L-edge XES and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) can directly present the distribution and intensity of Fe-3d character. To identify both the spin states and the coordination environments of iron-bearing MgSiO3, we systematically investigate the L-edge XAS, XES and X-ray photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopy of Fe2+- and Fe3+-bearing MgSiO3 under high pressure by using the first-principles density functional method combined with the slater-transition method. Our results show that Fe2+ and Fe3+ can be distinguished easily by taking the XPS spectra. The spin transition of Fe2+ and Fe3+ can also be clearly certified by XAS and XES. Interestingly, the broadness of L-edge XES of Fe changes depending on the iron position, meaning that its coordination environment might also be distinguishable by using high-resolution XES measurements. Research supported by the Ehime University G-COE program and KAKENHI. [1] James Badro, Guillaume Fiquet, FranÇois Guyot, Jean-Pascal Rueff, Viktor V. Struzhkin, György VankÓ, and Giulio Monaco. Science 300, 789 (2003), [2] James Badro, Jean-Pascal Rueff, György VankÓ, Giulio Monaco, Guillaume Fiquet, and FranÇois Guyot, Science 305, 383 (2004), [3] Jung-Fu Lin, Viktor V. Struzhkin, Steven D. Jacobsen, Michael Y. Hu, Paul Chow, Jennifer Kung, Haozhe Liu, Ho-kwang Mao, and Gussell J. Hemley, Nature 436, 377 (2005). [4

  10. 40 CFR 60.501 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... its product delivery tank will sustain a pressure change of not more than 750 pascals (75 mm of water) within 5 minutes after it is pressurized to 4,500 pascals (450 mm of water). This capability is to...

  11. 40 CFR 60.502 - Standard for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... exceeding 4,500 pascals (450 mm of water) during product loading. This level is not to be exceeded when... terminal's vapor collection system shall begin to open at a system pressure less than 4,500 pascals (450...

  12. Development of a prototype multi-processing interactive software invocation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    The Interactive Software Invocation System (NASA-ISIS) was first transported to the M68000 microcomputer, and then rewritten in the programming language Path Pascal. Path Pascal is a significantly enhanced derivative of Pascal, allowing concurrent algorithms to be expressed using the simple and elegant concept of Path Expressions. The primary results of this contract was to verify the viability of Path Pascal as a system's development language. The NASA-ISIS implementation using Path Pascal is a prototype of a large, interactive system in Path Pascal. As such, it is an excellent demonstration of the feasibility of using Path Pascal to write even more extensive systems. It is hoped that future efforts will build upon this research and, ultimately, that a full Path Pascal/ISIS Operating System (PPIOS) might be developed.

  13. The New Microbiology: a conference at the Institut de France.

    PubMed

    Radoshevich, Lilliana; Bierne, Hélène; Ribet, David; Cossart, Pascale

    2012-08-01

    In May 2012, three European Academies held a conference on the present and future of microbiology. The conference, entitled "The New Microbiology", was a joint effort of the French Académie des sciences, of the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina and of the British Royal Society. The organizers - Pascale Cossart and Philippe Sansonetti from the "Académie des sciences", David Holden and Richard Moxon from the "Royal Society", and Jörg Hacker and Jürgen Hesseman from the "Leopoldina Nationale Akademie der Wissenschaften" - wanted to highlight the current renaissance in the field of microbiology mostly due to the advent of technological developments and allowing for single-cell analysis, rapid and inexpensive genome-wide comparisons, sophisticated microscopy and quantitative large-scale studies of RNA regulation and proteomics. The conference took place in the historical Palais de l'Institut de France in Paris with the strong support of Jean-François Bach, Secrétaire Perpétuel of the Académie des sciences.

  14. Quark Matter 2011 (QM11) Quark Matter 2011 (QM11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-12-01

    International Advisory Committee Antinori, FedericoPaic, Guy Braun-Munzinger, PeterPajares, Carlos Cifarelli, LuisaPeitzmann, Thomas Erazmus, BarbaraRedlich, Krzysztof Eskola, KariRiccati, Lodovico Gaardhøje, Jens JørgenRoland, Gunther Gale, CharlesRoy, Christelle Gelis, FrancoisSchukraft, Jürgen Giubellino, PaoloSinha, Bikash Greiner, CarstenSrivastava, Dinesh Gyulassy, MiklosStachel, Johanna Harris, JohnSteinberg, Peter Hatsuda, TetsuoStroth, Joachim Heinz, UlrichSugitate, Toru Jacak, BarbaraTserruya, Itzhak Karsch, FrithjofVelkovska, Julia Kharzeev, DimaWang, Enke Kodama, TakeshiWang, Xin, Nian Lévai, PéterWessels, Johannes Manko, VladislavXu, Nu Müller, BerndtZajc, William Ollitrault, Jean-Yves Organizing Committee Arleo, FrancoisDupieux, Pascal Bastid, NicoleFurget, Christophe Bourgeois, Marie-LaureGranier de Cassagnac, Raphael Bregant, MarcoGuernane, Rachid Carminati, FedericoHervet, Carnita Castillo, JavierKuhn, Christian Cheynis, BrigitteOlivier, Nathalie Conesa, DelValle, Zaida Connor, MichelleRenshall, Lucy Crochet, PhilippeSuire, Christophe Delagrange, HuguesTihinen, Ulla Program Committee Schutz, Yves (Chair)Baldisseri, Alberto Wiedemann, Urs (co-Chair)Safarik, Karel Aurenche, Patrick

  15. Geochemical and isotopic record of anthropogenic activities - Thematic issue dedicated to Jean Carignan (1965-2012). Part 1: Radiogenic isotopes and elemental geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabaux, François; Sonke, Jeroen E.; Négrel, Philippe; Cloquet, Christophe

    2015-09-01

    Anthropogenic activities are today one of the major factors controlling the evolution of our environment with major consequences on all Earth surface compartments: atmosphere, oceans, continents and biosphere. Such consequences accelerated with the industrial revolution, but probably started much earlier as they are related to the demographic evolution and the settlement of various human communities during the last millennia. They are presently reaching unequal effects all over the globe.

  16. [The Anatomy Institutions of Jean Guinter d'Andernach (1487-1574), and André Vésale (1514-1564). ].

    PubMed

    Drizenko, Antoine

    2011-01-01

    The text of the Anatomical Institutions of Johann Guinter von Andernach, in its original version, was published almost simultaneously in Paris and Basel in 1536. Guinter was then in his fiftieth year, and Andreas Vesalius who was his student in Paris between 1533 ans 1536, was only twenty-two years old. His studies being finished in Leuven and his thesis being published for the first edition in Leuven in February 1537, and for the second in Basel in March 1537, Vesalius went to Padua where he was named professor of anatomy and surgery. Vesalius, besides the reasons put forward in his dedicatory lettre to Johann Armenterianus, tried to have rapidly printed documents for his students. He published in this way in April 1538 the engraved version of the great plates which he had mostly drawn and used to support his demonstrations during sessions of dissection. For the accompanying text, he choosed the handbook of his Master Guinter von Andernach which he decided to edit incorporating modifications and which he published in Venice in 1538 by D. Bernardinus. The modifications made by Vesalius on the Guinter's text can be classified in several headings: minor adjustments, additions of anatomical comments, additions corroborating traditional physiology, and anecdotes peppering the text. PMID:22400471

  17. Implications in the Theories of Lev Vygotsky, Jean Piaget, George Kelly and Erik Erikson for the Assessment of Instruction in College Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaplin, Miriam Thomas

    The interpretation a mature reader gleans from written language is a reflection of his linguistic, cognitive, emotional, and experiential level. In providing adequate instruction, therefore, instructors must be knowledgeable about the developmental sequences characteristic of each of these domains. The theories of L.S. Vygotsky, George Kelly, Jean…

  18. Aliiglaciecola aliphaticivorans sp. nov., an aliphatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium, isolated from a sea-tidal flat and emended description of the genus Aliiglaciecola Jean et al. 2013.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hyun Mi; Jeong, Hye Im; Jeon, Che Ok

    2015-05-01

    A Gram-stain-negative heterotrophic bacterium, designated GSD6(T), capable of growth on aliphatic hydrocarbons as a sole carbon and energy source, was isolated from sea-tidal flat sediment of the Yellow Sea, South Korea. Cells were facultatively aerobic, catalase- and oxidase-positive, motile rods with a single polar flagellum. Growth of strain GSD6(T) was observed at 4-37 °C (optimum 30 °C), at pH 5.5-9.0 (optimum pH 6.5-7.5) and in the presence of 1-9% (w/v) NaCl (optimum 2%). Strain GSD6(T) contained ubiquinone-8 (Q-8) as the sole isoprenoid quinone and summed feature 3 (comprising C16 : 1ω7c and/or iso-C15 : 0 2-OH), C16 : 0, C18 : 1ω7c, C17  : 0 10-methyl and C17 : 1ω8c as the major fatty acids. Phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol were identified as the major polar lipids. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 44.6 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain GSD6(T) formed a phylogenetic lineage with members of the genus Aliiglaciecola . Strain GSD6(T) was most closely related to Aliiglaciecola lipolytica E3(T) with a 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 97.4%, but their DNA-DNA hybridization value was 39.1 ± 7.1%. On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and molecular features, strain GSD6(T) represents a novel species of the genus Aliiglaciecola , for which the name Aliiglaciecola aliphaticivorans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is GSD6(T) ( =KACC 18129(T) =JCM 30133(T)). An emended description of the genus Aliiglaciecola is also proposed. PMID:25713045

  19. Parents’ and adolescents’ willingness to be vaccinated against serogroup B meningococcal disease during a mass vaccination in Saguenay–Lac-St-Jean (Quebec)

    PubMed Central

    Dubé, Eve; Gagnon, Dominique; Hamel, Denis; Belley, Sylvie; Gagné, Hélène; Boulianne, Nicole; Landry, Monique; Bettinger, Julie A

    2015-01-01

    A mass vaccination campaign with the 4CMenB vaccine (Bexsero®; Novartis Pharmaceutical Canada Inc) was launched in a serogroup B endemic area in Quebec. A telephone survey was conducted to assess parental and adolescent opinions about the acceptability of the vaccine. Intent to receive the vaccine or vaccine receipt was reported by the majority of parents (93%) and adolescents (75%). Meningitis was perceived as being a dangerous disease by the majority of parents and adolescents. The majority of respondents also considered the 4CMenB vaccine to be safe and effective. The main reason for positive vaccination intention or behaviour was self-protection, while a negative attitude toward vaccination in general was the main reason mentioned by parents who did not intend to have their child vaccinated. Adolescents mainly reported lack of interest, time or information, and low perceived susceptibility and disease severity as the main reasons for not intending to be vaccinated or not being vaccinated. PMID:26236359

  20. Lillian Jean Kaplan International Prize for advancement in the understanding of polycystic kidney disease. Understanding polycystic kidney disease: a systems biology approach.

    PubMed

    Grantham, Jared J

    2003-10-01

    Understanding polycystic kidney disease: A systems biology approach. Fluid secretion was discovered in the mammalian nephron in the early 1970s upon a chance observation. This finding aroused interest in the possibility that a similar process might be involved in the filling of renal epithelial cysts. A research strategy was formulated to understand the life cycle of human renal cysts using a systems biology approach. A not-for-profit foundation was begun to increase the number of researchers in the United States and abroad working on the polycystic kidney disease (PKD) problem. Primary outcomes related to PKD include (1). explication of the transport mechanisms underlying the transepithelial secretion of chloride, sodium and fluid, and the regulation of that secretion by cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP); (2). the discovery that cyclic AMP stimulates the proliferation of cyst epithelial cells through activation of of B-Raf and the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway; and (3). the discovery that normal medullary collecting ducts secrete solutes and fluid under the control of cyclic AMP. The Polycystic Kidney Disease Foundation has become an international leader in promoting the research of these disorders and is a strong advocate for increased translation of fundamental laboratory discoveries to the care of the millions of patients with PKD.

  1. [Jean-Baptiste de Lamarck (1744-1829). A dispute on the mechanism of evolution. On the bicentenary of the publication of Philosophie Zoologique (1809)].

    PubMed

    Bednarczyk, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    The author of the paper has made an attempt to prove that a teleological interpretation of Lamarck's theory is false. It is unwarranted to attribute to Lamarck the idea that a living organism has an internal tendency to complicate its organization and to improve its mode of functioning; such a concept is not confirmed by existing textual evidence, and it is also in direct conflict with Lamarck's undisputed mechanicism. The proof presented in the paper begins with an outline of the history of this false interpretation, including the opinions of Charles Lyell and Charles Darwin. As the tendency is ascribed also to nature itself, the next phase of the proof has involved reconstructing the fully ateleological notion of nature to which Lamarck subscribed. Supposed evidence for the tendency is said to be provided by the existence of a series in which the organization of a living body grows from the simplest to the most complex. That is why the author of the current paper has analysed the concept of série animale used by Lamarck in some detail, in order to demonstrate that it is typological in character, and has nothing to do with the tendency that is allegedly inherent in the nature of an organism. Also presented in the paper, in connection with the construction of the series, is the problem of spontaneous generation, which was made complicated by Lamarck. Finally, the very notion of tendency is analysed and confronted with Lamarck's text; the latter in fact does not contain any explanations that would be teleological in the strict sense of the word. The analysis has enabled the author of the current paper to conduct an exegesis of the fragment of Lamarck's text which might give grounds to it being construed in terms of an explanation resorting to the notion of tendency, and possible interpretations of that fragment have been presented. The paper ends with a description of the mechanism which, according to Lamarck, is responsible for the rise in complexity of an organism that has the nature of a machine; such a mechanism leaves no place for any tendency to be in operation.

  2. The Mediterranean Plio-Pleistocene: A reference frame for astronomically paced low and high latitude climate changes (Jean Baptiste Lamarck Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lourens, Lucas

    2016-04-01

    The astronomical theory of climate has revolutionized our understanding of past climate change and the development of highly accurate geologic time scales for the entire Cenozoic. Most of this understanding has started with the construction of high-resolution stable oxygen isotope (18O) records from planktonic and benthic foraminifera of open ocean deep marine sediments explored by the international drilling operations of DSDP, ODP and IODP. These efforts culminated into global ocean isotopic stacked records, which give a clear picture of the evolution of the climate state through time. Fundamental for these reconstructions are the assumptions made between the astronomical forcing and the tuned time series and the accuracy of the astronomical solution. In the past decades, an astronomically calibrated time scale for the Pliocene and Pleistocene of the Mediterranean has been developed, which has become the reference for the standard Geologic Time Scale. Characteristic of the studied marine sediments are the cyclic lithological alternations, reflecting the interference between obliquity and precession-paced low latitude climate variability. These interference patterns allowed to evaluate the accuracy of astronomical solutions and to constrain the dynamical ellipticity of the Earth and tidal dissipation by the Sun and the Moon, which in turn provided the backbone for the widely applied LR04 open ocean benthic isotope stack of the past 5 Myr. So far, the assumed time lags between orbital forcing and the global climate response as reflected in LR04 have not been tested, while these assumptions hark back to SPECMAP, using simple ice sheet models and a limited number of radiometric dates. In addition, LR04 adopted a shorter response time for the smaller ice caps during the Pliocene. Here I present the first benthic 18O record of the Mediterranean reference scale, which strikingly mirrors the LR04. I will use this record to discuss the assumed phase relations and its potential to constrain global sea level changes and their cause over the past 5.3 million years.

  3. Stellar Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Michael J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen

    2003-05-01

    Preface; 1. A selective overview Jørgen Christensen-Dalsgaard and Michael J. Thompson; Part I. Stellar Convection and Oscillations: 2. On the diversity of stellar pulsations Wojciech A. Dziembowski; 3. Acoustic radiation and mode excitation by turbulent convection Günter Houdek; 4. Understanding roAp stars Margarida S. Cunha; 5. Waves in the magnetised solar atmosphere Colin S. Rosenthal; Part II. Stellar Rotation and Magnetic Fields: 6. Stellar rotation: a historical survey Leon Mestel; 7. The oscillations of rapidly rotating stars Michel Rieutord; 8. Solar tachocline dynamics: eddy viscosity, anti-friction, or something in between? Michael E. McIntyre; 9. Dynamics of the solar tachocline Pascale Garaud; 10. Dynamo processes: the interaction of turbulence and magnetic fields Michael Proctor; 11. Dynamos in planets Chris Jones; Part III. Physics and Structure of Stellar Interiors: 12. Solar constraints on the equation of state Werner Däppen; 13. 3He transport and the solar neutrino problem Chris Jordinson; 14. Mixing in stellar radiation zones Jean-Paul Zahn; 15. Element settling and rotation-induced mixing in slowly rotating stars Sylvie Vauclair; Part IV. Helio- and Asteroseismology: 16. Solar structure and the neutrino problem Hiromoto Shibahashi; 17. Helioseismic data analysis Jesper Schou; 18. Seismology of solar rotation Takashi Sekii; 19. Telechronohelioseismology Alexander Kosovichev; Part V. Large-Scale Numerical Experiments: 20. Bridges between helioseismology and models of convection zone dynamics Juri Toomre; 21. Numerical simulations of the solar convection zone Julian R. Elliott; 22. Modelling solar and stellar magnetoconvection Nigel Weiss; 23. Nonlinear magnetoconvection in the presence of a strong oblique field Keith Julien, Edgar Knobloch and Steven M. Tobias; 24. Simulations of astrophysical fluids Marcus Brüggen; Part VI. Dynamics: 25. A magic electromagnetic field Donald Lynden-Bell; 26. Continuum equations for stellar dynamics Edward A

  4. Stellar Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Michael J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen

    2008-02-01

    Preface; 1. A selective overview Jørgen Christensen-Dalsgaard and Michael J. Thompson; Part I. Stellar Convection and Oscillations: 2. On the diversity of stellar pulsations Wojciech A. Dziembowski; 3. Acoustic radiation and mode excitation by turbulent convection Günter Houdek; 4. Understanding roAp stars Margarida S. Cunha; 5. Waves in the magnetised solar atmosphere Colin S. Rosenthal; Part II. Stellar Rotation and Magnetic Fields: 6. Stellar rotation: a historical survey Leon Mestel; 7. The oscillations of rapidly rotating stars Michel Rieutord; 8. Solar tachocline dynamics: eddy viscosity, anti-friction, or something in between? Michael E. McIntyre; 9. Dynamics of the solar tachocline Pascale Garaud; 10. Dynamo processes: the interaction of turbulence and magnetic fields Michael Proctor; 11. Dynamos in planets Chris Jones; Part III. Physics and Structure of Stellar Interiors: 12. Solar constraints on the equation of state Werner Däppen; 13. 3He transport and the solar neutrino problem Chris Jordinson; 14. Mixing in stellar radiation zones Jean-Paul Zahn; 15. Element settling and rotation-induced mixing in slowly rotating stars Sylvie Vauclair; Part IV. Helio- and Asteroseismology: 16. Solar structure and the neutrino problem Hiromoto Shibahashi; 17. Helioseismic data analysis Jesper Schou; 18. Seismology of solar rotation Takashi Sekii; 19. Telechronohelioseismology Alexander Kosovichev; Part V. Large-Scale Numerical Experiments: 20. Bridges between helioseismology and models of convection zone dynamics Juri Toomre; 21. Numerical simulations of the solar convection zone Julian R. Elliott; 22. Modelling solar and stellar magnetoconvection Nigel Weiss; 23. Nonlinear magnetoconvection in the presence of a strong oblique field Keith Julien, Edgar Knobloch and Steven M. Tobias; 24. Simulations of astrophysical fluids Marcus Brüggen; Part VI. Dynamics: 25. A magic electromagnetic field Donald Lynden-Bell; 26. Continuum equations for stellar dynamics Edward A

  5. A Random Variable Transformation Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheuermann, Larry

    1989-01-01

    Provides a short BASIC program, RANVAR, which generates random variates for various theoretical probability distributions. The seven variates include: uniform, exponential, normal, binomial, Poisson, Pascal, and triangular. (MVL)

  6. Photographs and Committees: Activities That Help Students Discover Permutations and Combinations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szydlik, Jennifer Earles

    2000-01-01

    Presents problem situations that support students when discovering the multiplication principle, permutations, combinations, Pascal's triangle, and relationships among those objects in a concrete context. (ASK)

  7. 46 CFR Appendix II to Part 153 - Metric Units Used in Part 153

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... common metric Force Newton N 0.225 lbs. Length Meter m 39.37 in. Centimeter cm .3937 in. Pressure Pascal Pa 1.450×10−4 lbs/in 2. Kilo-Pascal (1,000 Pascals) kPa 0.145 lbs/in 2. Kilo-Pascal kPa 1.02×10−2 kg/cm2. ......do kPa 1×10 3 N/m 2. Temperature Degree Celsius °C 5/9 (°F-32). Viscosity...

  8. The SIFT hardware/software systems. Volume 2: Software listings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L.

    1985-01-01

    This document contains software listings of the SIFT operating system and application software. The software is coded for the most part in a variant of the Pascal language, Pascal*. Pascal* is a cross-compiler running on the VAX and Eclipse computers. The output of Pascal* is BDX-390 assembler code. When necessary, modules are written directly in BDX-390 assembler code. The listings in this document supplement the description of the SIFT system found in Volume 1 of this report, A Detailed Description.

  9. Comparison of the Bender Gestalt Test for Both Black and White Brain-Damaged Patients Using Two Scoring Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Oliver T.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    This study tested for cultural bias in the Bender Visual Motor Gestalt Test. Subjects were 72 black and white patients diagnosed as either brain damaged or psychiatric. Bender protocols were scored by Pascal-Suttell and Hain systems. No race effect appeared except for the Pascal-Suttell system for which blacks scored significantly better. (Author)

  10. A General-Purpose Graphic Plotting Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freese, David H., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Describes subroutines in a group of assembly-level programs (program listings included) which provide the interface between a Basic, Pascal/Z, or JRT Pascal program and the BASE2/IDS-560 graphics printer. The interface can be easily modified for other printers and other languages. (JN)

  11. 40 CFR 60.501 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... cycles. Loading rack means the loading arms, pumps, meters, shutoff valves, relief valves, and other... its product delivery tank will sustain a pressure change of not more than 750 pascals (75 mm of water) within 5 minutes after it is pressurized to 4,500 pascals (450 mm of water). This capability is to...

  12. 40 CFR 60.501 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... cycles. Loading rack means the loading arms, pumps, meters, shutoff valves, relief valves, and other... its product delivery tank will sustain a pressure change of not more than 750 pascals (75 mm of water) within 5 minutes after it is pressurized to 4,500 pascals (450 mm of water). This capability is to...

  13. A Straightforward Way to Determine Relative Intensities of Spin-Spin Splitting Lines of Equivalent Nuclei in NMR Spectra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orcutt, Ronald H.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a simple way of obtaining a set of relative intensities of spin-spin splitting lines using Pascal's triangle rather than calculating binomial coefficients. Provides tables showing Pascal's triangle and the relative intensities of multiplets for a range of nuclear spins. (TW)

  14. [Humanitarian action...and then? An interview of Jean-Christophe Rufin, ex vice president of Médecins sans Frontières, president of Action contre la faim, Goncourt prize 2001].

    PubMed

    Rufin, Jean-Christophe

    2004-06-01

    First dedicated to emergency situations, then more involved in long term duration development, humanitarian action is concerned by a crisis which appears absolutely necessary after 30 years of growing up. Many factors may contribute to that situation: structural professionalisation, official financial pressures, political influences, more ideology for less ideal behaviour, competition with rising of new ideas like alter mondialisation etc. It seems interesting in such a situation to get some advice about humanitarian future from a personality who has recognised responsibilities in both action and thoughts consideration.

  15. "The Clouds Are Alive because They Fly in the Air as if They Were Birds": A Re-Analysis of What Children Say and Mean in Clinical Interviews in the Work of Jean Piaget

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pramling, Niklas

    2006-01-01

    This article is about the contributions children make in clinical interviews. This issue is studied by re-analysing a selection of the empirical excerpts used by Piaget in his seminal book The Child's Conception of the World. The focus is on how children use language non-literally, and especially on how they use meta-communicative markers ("as…

  16. Stendhal: A Collection of Critical Essays. Twentieth Century Views Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brombert, Victor, Ed.

    One of a series of works aimed at presenting contemporary critical opinion on major authors, this collection includes essays by Victor Brombert, Martin Turnell, Erich Auerbach, Jean Prevost, Raymond Giraud, Irving Howe, Judd D. Hubert, Leon Blum, Jean Starobinski, Jean-Pierre Richard, and Simone de Beauvoir--all dealing with the biography and…

  17. Alpha 90. Current Research in Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hautecoeur, Jean-Paul, Ed.

    This publication contains 21 reports that explore and document literacy. Following an introduction (Jean-Paul Hautecoeur), the first part deals with literacy in North America. Reports are "Functional Illiteracy and the 'New Literacy'" (Jean-Pierre Velis); "Literacy Policy in Quebec: An Historical Overview" (Jean-Paul Hautecoeur); "Literacy and the…

  18. [Comparative characteristics of current tonometric methods].

    PubMed

    Astakhov, Iu S; Akopov, E L; Potemkin, V V

    2008-01-01

    Corneal thickness is known to have a considerable impact on the results of applanation tonometry. A Pascal dynamic contour tonomer (SMT Swiss Microtechnology AG) the readings of which are not affected by the properties of the cornea has recently come into the world market. The objective of the investigation was to comparatively evaluate Pascal, Goldmann, and Maklakov tonometers. The mean intraocular pressure measured by various procedures significantly differed. The greatest correlation was found between dynamic contour tonometry and Goldmann's tonometry. The Pascal and Goldmann tonometers underestimated data on remeasurements. The results of applanation procedures, unlike those of dynamic contour tonometry, depend on the data of keratopachymetry. PMID:19062549

  19. Programming with Style.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKelvey, James

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the elements of programming style, considering capitalization, variables, constants, format, GOTO statements, user friendliness, and clarity. Although Pascal is used as the example, the information provided is applicable to any programming language. (JN)

  20. A Short History of the Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid-Green, Keith

    1981-01-01

    Beginning with Blaise Pascal's adding machine (1642), a brief look is taken at mechanical computers, electronic developments, transistors, and first, second, and third generation computers. A glossary is appended. (KC)

  1. Accurate Molecular Dimensions from Stearic Acid Monolayers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Charles A.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Discusses modifications in the fatty acid monolayer experiment to reduce the inaccurate moleculary data students usually obtain. Copies of the experimental procedure used and a Pascal computer program to work up the data are available from the authors. (JN)

  2. Editorial: Biotechnology Journal - a review of 2013 and a preview of 2014.

    PubMed

    Peng, Judy

    2014-01-01

    Biotechnology Journal completed another successful year in 2013 and looks forward to 2014. Many thanks to Dr. Pascal Loyer for winning the e-subscription prize draw and congratulations to Dr. Ravi Radhakrishnan for providing the best cover of 2013.

  3. Which Programming Language is Right for You?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Wayne

    1984-01-01

    Describes the strengths and weaknesses of four programing languages (Logo, PILOT, BASIC, Pascal) in terms of the tasks to be performed (task environment), capabilities of the language (programing environment), and skills user wants to develop (user environment). (JN)

  4. Points on the Path to Probability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiernan, James F.

    2001-01-01

    Presents the problem of points and the development of the binomial triangle, or Pascal's triangle. Examines various attempts to solve this problem to give students insight into the nature of mathematical discovery. (KHR)

  5. Interactive Program System for Integration of Reaction Rate Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesick, John P.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a Pascal-language based kinetics rate package for the microcomputer. Considers possible ecological uses for the program and illustrates results for several rate laws. Discusses hardware and software needs for adequate operation. (ML)

  6. Fractal Geometry in the High School Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, Dane R.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses classroom activities that involve applications of fractal geometry. Includes an activity sheet that explores Pascal's triangle, Sierpinsky's gasket, and modular arithmetic in two and three dimensions. (Author/MKR)

  7. Shapes of Bubbles and Drops in Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connell, James

    2000-01-01

    Explains the shape distortions that take place in fluid packets (bubbles or drops) with steady flow motion by using the laws of Archimedes, Pascal, and Bernoulli rather than advanced vector calculus. (WRM)

  8. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Cervin Robinson, Photographer July 1960 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Cervin Robinson, Photographer July 1960 MAIN ENTRANCE ON WEST ELEVATION - Hanson-Cramer House, End of Sea Street (moved from Pascal's Avenue), Rockport, Knox County, ME

  9. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Cervin Robinson, Photographer July 1960 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Cervin Robinson, Photographer July 1960 WEST ELEVATION OF CENTRAL BLOCK - Hanson-Cramer House, End of Sea Street (moved from Pascal's Avenue), Rockport, Knox County, ME

  10. 40 CFR 61.126 - Monitoring of operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Radionuclide Emissions From Elemental Phosphorus Plants § 61.126 Monitoring of operations. (a) The owner or... manufacturer to be accurate within ±250 pascal (±1 inch of water). The owner or operator of any source...

  11. 40 CFR 61.126 - Monitoring of operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Radionuclide Emissions From Elemental Phosphorus Plants § 61.126 Monitoring of operations. (a) The owner or... manufacturer to be accurate within ±250 pascal (±1 inch of water). The owner or operator of any source...

  12. 40 CFR 61.126 - Monitoring of operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Radionuclide Emissions From Elemental Phosphorus Plants § 61.126 Monitoring of operations. (a) The owner or... manufacturer to be accurate within ±250 pascal (±1 inch of water). The owner or operator of any source...

  13. 40 CFR 61.126 - Monitoring of operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Radionuclide Emissions From Elemental Phosphorus Plants § 61.126 Monitoring of operations. (a) The owner or... manufacturer to be accurate within ±250 pascal (±1 inch of water). The owner or operator of any source...

  14. 40 CFR 61.126 - Monitoring of operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Radionuclide Emissions From Elemental Phosphorus Plants § 61.126 Monitoring of operations. (a) The owner or... manufacturer to be accurate within ±250 pascal (±1 inch of water). The owner or operator of any source...

  15. 14 CFR 34.2 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) LTOLanding and takeoff minMinute(s) NOXOxides of nitrogen PaPascal(s) rORated output rPRRated pressure ratio secSecond(s) SPShaft power SNSmoke number TTemperature, degrees Kelvin TIMTime in mode...

  16. 7 CFR 51.603 - Similar varietal characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Celery Stalks Definitions § 51... container have the same character of growth. For example, celery of Giant Pascal and Golden Self...

  17. 7 CFR 51.603 - Similar varietal characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Celery Stalks Definitions § 51... container have the same character of growth. For example, celery of Giant Pascal and Golden Self...

  18. 7 CFR 51.603 - Similar varietal characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Celery Stalks Definitions § 51.603 Similar varietal... of growth. For example, celery of Giant Pascal and Golden Self Blanching types must not be mixed....

  19. 7 CFR 51.603 - Similar varietal characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Celery Stalks Definitions § 51.603 Similar varietal... of growth. For example, celery of Giant Pascal and Golden Self Blanching types must not be mixed....

  20. 7 CFR 51.603 - Similar varietal characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Celery Stalks Definitions § 51.603 Similar varietal... of growth. For example, celery of Giant Pascal and Golden Self Blanching types must not be mixed....

  1. An Expert System for Identification of Minerals in Thin Section.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donahoe, James Louis; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Discusses a computer database which includes optical properties of 142 minerals. Uses fuzzy logic to identify minerals from incomplete and imprecise information. Written in Turbo PASCAL for MS-DOS with 128K. (MVL)

  2. Programming Languages for Microprocessor Courseware.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuyler, James A.

    1979-01-01

    Suggests criteria for choosing a programing language in courseware development. Authoring languages (PILOT, TUTOR, BASIC, and PASCAL) are compared; driver programs' compilers and interpreters are discussed; and the tasks of an authoring system are presented. (RAO)

  3. 40 CFR 65.84 - Operating requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements of 49 CFR part 180 for tank trucks and 49 CFR 173.31 for railcars; or (2) Have been demonstrated...-tight means that the pressure in a truck or railcar tank will not drop more than 750 pascals (0.11 pound per square inch) within 5 minutes after it is pressurized to a minimum of 4,500 pascals (0.65...

  4. PCACE-Personal-Computer-Aided Cabling Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billitti, Joseph W.

    1987-01-01

    PCACE computer program developed to provide inexpensive, interactive system for learning and using engineering approach to interconnection systems. Basically database system that stores information as files of individual connectors and handles wiring information in circuit groups stored as records. Directly emulates typical manual engineering methods of handling data, thus making interface between user and program very natural. Apple version written in P-Code Pascal and IBM PC version of PCACE written in TURBO Pascal 3.0

  5. On Why It Is Impossible to Prove that the BDX90 Dispatcher Implements a Time-sharing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, R. S.; Moore, J. S.

    1983-01-01

    The Software Implemented Fault Tolerance SIFT system, is written in PASCAL except for about a page of machine code. The SIFT system implements a small time sharing system in which PASCAL programs for separate application tasks are executed according to a schedule with real time constraints. The PASCAL language has no provision for handling the notion of an interrupt such as the B930 clock interrupt. The PASCAL language also lacks the notion of running a PASCAL subroutine for a given amount of time, suspending it, saving away the suspension, and later activating the suspension. Machine code was used to overcome these inadequacies of PASCAL. Code which handles clock interrupts and suspends processes is called a dispatcher. The time sharing/virtual machine idea is completely destroyed by the reconfiguration task. After termination of the reconfiguration task, the tasks run by the dispatcher have no relation to those run before reconfiguration. It is impossible to view the dispatcher as a time-sharing system implementing virtual BDX930s running concurrently when one process can wipe out the others.

  6. Orbital flight simulation utility software unit specifications, revision 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, S. W.

    1986-01-01

    The HP PASCAL source code defines the specifications for a Utility Software Unit (USU) designed to support orbital flight simulators such as MANHANDLE and GREAS (General Research and Engineering Analysis Simulator). Besides providing basic input/output, mathematical, matrix, quaternion, and statistical routines for such simulators, one of the primary functions of the USU is to isolate all system-dependent codes in one well-defined compartment, thereby facilitating transportation of the simulations from one computer to another. Directives are given for the PASCAL compilers of the HP-9000 Series 200 Pascal 3.0 and the HP-9000 Series 500 HP-UX 5.0 operating systems that produce a single file of relocatable code from four separate files of source code. Three of the source code files are common to both operating systems. The fourth source code file (utilspif.I) contains all of the system-dependent PASCAL code for the USU. A fifth file of source code written in C is required to interface utilspif.I with the HP-UX I/O package. The Pascal 3.0 compiler directives and the driver source code for a unit rest program and counterparts for the HP-UX 5.0 operating system are given. The major portion of the unit test program source code is common to both operating systems. Unit test results from the Pascal 3.0 operating system and results from the HP-UX operating system are given.

  7. 75 FR 6398 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ..., IN 46805, Officers, Tonya R. Watson, Vice President, (Qualifying Individual), Sabah A. Qiyas..., COO, (Qualifying Individual), Jean Jacques Lalou, CEO. Geevee Enterprises Inc. dba Aerosend, 245...

  8. 76 FR 1492 - Notice of Actions Taken at December 16, 2010, Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-10

    ... Approved 1. Project Sponsor and Facility: Anadarko E&P Company LP (Pine Creek--3), Watson Township... Sponsor and Facility: Leonard & Jean Marie Azaravich (Meshoppen Creek), Springville Township,...

  9. A Piagetian Constructivist Perspective on Curriculum Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    London, Clement B. G.

    1990-01-01

    Focuses specifically on Jean Piaget's theory of development. Examines Piaget's ideas about constructivism and explores the application of this theoretical perspective to the conceptualization of curriculum development. (MG)

  10. Granuloma Annulare

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other oral medications such as potassium iodide, dapsone, nicotinamide, pentoxifylline, hydroxychloroquine, or cyclosporine Trusted Links MedlinePlus: Skin Conditions References Bolognia, Jean L., ed. Dermatology , pp. ...

  11. Zonal Wave Number 2 Rossby Wave (3.5-day oscillation) Over The Martian Lower Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, P.; Thokuluwa, R. K.

    2013-12-01

    Over the Mars, height (800-50 Pascal pressure coordinate) profiles of temperature (K), measured by radio occultation technique during the MGS (Mars Global Surveyor) mission, obtained for the period of 1-10 January 2006 at the Martian latitude of ~63N in almost all the longitudes are analyzed to study the characteristics of the 3.5-day oscillation. To avoid significant data gaps in a particular longitude sector, we selected a set of 7 Mars longitude regions with ranges of 0-30E, 35-60E, 65-95E, 190-230E, 250-280E, 290-320E, and 325-360E to study the global characteristics of the 3.5-day oscillation. The 3.5-day oscillation is not selected as a-priori but observed as a most significant oscillation during this period of 1-10 January 2006. It is observed that in the longitude of 0-30E, the 3.5-day oscillation shows statistically significant power (above the 95% confidence level white noise) from the lowest height (800 Pascal, 8 hPa) itself and up to the height of 450 Pascal level with the maximum power of ~130 K^2 at the 600 & 650 Pascal levels. It started to grow from the power of ~ 50 K^2 at the lowest height of 800 Pascal level and reached the maximum power in the height of 600-650 Pascal level and then it started to get lessened monotonously up to the height of 450 Pascal level where its power is ~ 20 K^2. Beyond this height and up to the height of 50 Pascal level, the wave amplitude is below the white noise level. As the phase of the wave is almost constant at all the height levels, it seems that the observed 3.5-day oscillation is a stationary wave with respect to the height. In the 35-60 E longitude sector, the vertical structure of the 3.5-day oscillation is similar to what observed for the 0-30 E longitude region but the power is statistically insignificant at all the heights. However in the 65-95E longitude sector, the wave grows from the lowest level (70 K^2) of 800 Pascal to its maximum power of 280 K^2 in the height of 700 Pascal level and then it started

  12. Effects of ambient and acute partial pressures of ozone on leaf net CO sub 2 assimilation of field-grown Vitis vinifera L

    SciTech Connect

    Roper, T.R.; Williams, L.E. Kearney Agricultural Center, Parlier, CA )

    1989-12-01

    Mature, field-grown Vitis vinifera L. grapevines grown in open-top chambers were exposed to either charcoal-filtered air or ambient ozone partial pressures throughout the growing season. Individual leaves also were exposed to ozone partial pressures of 0.2, 0.4, or 0.6 micropascals per pascal for 5 hours. No visual ozone damage was found on leaves exposed to any of the treatments. Chronic exposure to ambient O{sub 3} partial pressures reduced net CO{sub 2} assimilation rate (A) between 5 and 13% at various times throughout the season when compared to the filtered treatment. Exposure of leaves to 0.2 micropascals per pascal O{sub 3} for 5 hours had no significant effect on A; however, A was reduced 84% for leaves exposed to 0.6 micropascals per pascal O{sub 3} when compared to the controls after 5 hours. Intercellular CO{sub 2} partial pressure (c{sub i}) was lower for leaves exposed to 0.2 micropascals per pascal O{sub 3} when compared to the controls, while c{sub i} of the leaves treated with 0.6 micropascals per pascal of O{sub 3} increased during the fumigation. The long-term effects of ambient O{sub 3} and short-term exposure to acute levels of O{sub 3} reduced grape leaf photosynthesis due to a reduction in both stomatal and mesophyll conductances.

  13. Twins reunited: scientific and personal perspectives/twin research studies: multiple birth effects on IQ and body size; life style, muscles, and metabolism; monochorionic dizygotic twin with blood chimerism; amniocentesis for twins/twins in the media: identical doctors; freedom fighter for twins; twin scholarships; Auguste and Jean-Felix Piccard; twins born apart.

    PubMed

    Segal, Nancy L; Mulligan, Christy A

    2014-04-01

    A reunion of 38-year-old female monozygotic twins took place in Daegu, South Korea, on January 14, 2014. Scientific and personal perspectives on this extraordinary event are provided. A review of timely twin research follows, covering the effects of multiple births on IQ and body size, lifestyle and physical fitness associations, a rare case of a dizygotic twin with blood chimerism and definitional issues surrounding amniocentesis-related loss in multiple birth pregnancies. Interesting and informative mention of twins in the media includes twin doctors, a twin freedom fighter, the availability of college scholarships for twins, a new book about the Piccard family (two of whose members were twins), and co-twins born before and after the new year. A follow-up to a previous mention of identical twin biatheletes is also provided. PMID:24589452

  14. MoMar-Demo at Lucky Strike. A near-real time multidisciplinary observatory of hydrothermal processes and ecosystems at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannat, M.; Sarradin, P.; Blandin, J.; Escartin, J.; Colaco, A.; MoMAR-Demo Scientific Party : Aron Michael, Aumont Virginie, Baillard Christian, Ballu Valérie, Barreyre Thibaut, Blandin Jérôme, Blin Alexandre, Boulart Cédric, Cannat Mathilde, Carval Thierry, Castillo Alain, Chavagnac Valérie, Coail Jean Yves, Colaço Ana, Corela Carlos, Courrier Christophe, Crawford Wayne, Cuvelier Daphné, Daniel Romuald, Dausse Denis, Escartin Javier, Fabrice Fontaine, Gabsi Taoufik, Gayet Nicolas, Guyader Gérard, Lallier François, Lecomte Benoit, Legrand Julien, Lino Silva, Miranda Miguel, Mitard Emmelyne, Pichavant Pascal, Pot Olivier, Reverdin Gilles, Rommevaux Céline, Sarradin Pierre Marie, Sarrazin Jozée, Tanguy Virginie, Villinger Heinrich, Zbinden Magali

    2011-12-01

    , pressure probes, tiltmeter, temperature probes in selected smokers, currentmeters and temperature probes in the water column), and colonization devices for time-integrated faunal studies. In this presentation we will outline the latest results of this prototype sub-sea multidisciplinary observatory system. The MoMAR-Demo Scientific Party : Aron Michael, Aumont Virginie, Baillard Christian, Ballu Valérie, Barreyre Thibaut, Blandin Jérôme, Blin Alexandre, Boulart Cédric, Cannat Mathilde, Carval Thierry, Castillo Alain, Chavagnac Valérie, Coail Jean Yves, Colaço Ana, Corela Carlos, Courrier Christophe, Crawford Wayne, Cuvelier Daphné, Daniel Romuald, Dausse Denis, Escartin Javier, Fabrice Fontaine, Gabsi Taoufik, Gayet Nicolas, Guyader Gérard, Lallier François, Lecomte Benoit, Legrand Julien, Lino Silva, Miranda Miguel, Mitard Emmelyne, Pichavant Pascal, Pot Olivier, Reverdin Gilles, Rommevaux Céline, Sarradin Pierre Marie, Sarrazin Jozée, Tanguy Virginie, Villinger Heinrich, Zbinden Magali

  15. Architecture and evolution of La Réunion inferred from geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gailler, Lydie; Lénat, Jean-Francois

    2010-05-01

    Architecture and evolution of La Réunion inferred from geophysical data Lydie Gailler and Jean-François Lénat Laboratoire Magmas et Volcans, Université Blaise Pascal, CNRS, Clermont-Ferrand, France The Island of La Réunion, the Indian Ocean, is a large, mostly immerged, oceanic volcanic system. We present a study of its internal structure using geophysical methods. Subaerial and marine gravity and magnetic measurements has been compiled along with terrestrial-based electromagnetic surveys. The ensemble of data has been used to construct gravity, magnetic, and electromagnetic models, which are based on geological constraints and previous geophysical interpretations. We are able to differentiate structures from before and after the Brunhes-Matuyama magnetic inversion using the magnetic measurements according to the polarity of the anomalies. The gravity measurements allow us to detect and characterize the dense intrusive complexes and to complement the magnetic measurements in regard of the nature of the coastal formations and submarine flanks. The electromagnetic surveys allow us to determine the distribution of electrical resistivities which we interpret in terms of saturation of rocks with water, hydrothermal alteration and the presence of mineral hydrates, or complexes of phaneritic or microphaneritics rocks. The integration of the geophysical results allows us to build up a large scale model of the volcanic system. At the scale of the Piton de La Fournaise we distinguish both shallow and deep sources. The shallow ones correspond to the filling of ancient depressions by dense lavas flows, to the Central Cone which is largely constituted of scoria, or to the level of breccias at the base of the large valleys to the south. The deep structures are associated with the intrusive complexes from the Alizés volcano and from the Ancient Shield of the Piton de la Fournaise. The analysis of magnetic anomalies demonstrates a very shallow layer of products from Piton de

  16. Orbital flight simulation utility software unit specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, S. W.

    1986-01-01

    The HP PASCAL source code contained in pages 6 through 104 was developed for the Mission Planning and Analysis Division (MPAD) and takes the place of detailed flow charts defining the specifications for a Utility Software Unit designed to support orbital flight simulators such as MANHANDLE and GREAS (General Research and Engineering Analysis Simulator). Besides providing basic input/output, mathematical, vector, matrix, quaternion, and statistical routines for such simulators, one of the primary functions of the Utility Software Unit is to isolate all system-dependent code in one well-defined compartment, thereby facilitating transportation of the simulations from one computer to another. Directives to the PASCAL compilers of the HP-9000 Series 200 PASCAL 3.0 operating system and the HP-9000 Series 500 HP-UX 5.0 operations systems are also provided.

  17. From theory to practice: caring science according to Watson and Brewer.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Pamela N; Watson, Jean; Brewer, Barbara B

    2009-10-01

    Caring science is presented by Jean Watson and Barbara Brewer through an interview and dialogue format. Jean Watson presents caring science and its philosophy and evolution and the impact of her model on nursing and other disciplines. Barbara Brewer addresses the implementation of the model in a Magnet hospital setting and describes how her leadership facilitated implementation.

  18. 78 FR 38070 - Renewal of Approved Information Collection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-25

    ... Budget, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, fax 202-395-5806, or by electronic mail at OIRA... electronic mail. Mail: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, 1849 C Street NW., Room 2134LM, Attention: Jean Sonneman, Washington, DC 20240. Fax: to Jean Sonneman at 202-245-0050....

  19. 78 FR 6830 - Renewal of Approved Information Collection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    .... ADDRESSES: Comments may be submitted by mail, fax, or electronic mail. Mail: U.S. Department of the Interior.... Fax: to Jean Sonneman at 202-245-0050. Electronic mail: Jean_Sonneman@blm.gov . Please indicate ``Attn... use a telecommunication device for the deaf may call the Federal Information Relay Service at...

  20. 77 FR 36290 - Renewal of Approved Information Collection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-18

    ... Federal Cave Resources Protection Act--one which requires Federal agencies to consult with interested.... ADDRESSES: Comments may be submitted by mail, fax, or electronic mail. Mail: U.S. Department of the Interior.... Fax: to Jean Sonneman at 202-245-0050. Electronic mail: Jean_Sonneman@blm.gov . Please indicate...

  1. Topics in Cognitive Development: Language and Operational Thought. Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Presseisen, Barbara Z.; And Others

    This is the second volume in a series that records the official Symposium Proceedings of the Jean Piaget Society and examines the theoretical, empirical, and applied aspects of Jean Piaget's seminal epistemology. The 12 papers are divided into four areas: language development, formal reasoning, social cognition, and applied research. The topics of…

  2. 76 FR 16802 - Extension of Approval of Information Collection, OMB Control Number 1004-0196

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-25

    ... Information and Regulatory Affairs, fax 202-395-5806, or by electronic mail at oira_docket@omb.eop.gov . Please provide a copy of your comments to the BLM by mail, electronic mail, or fax: Mail: U.S. Department..., Washington, DC 20240. Fax: to Jean Sonneman at 202-912-7102. Electronic mail: Jean_Sonneman@blm.gov ....

  3. A Blind Analysis of Another Case of Multiple Personality Using the Semantic Differential Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osgood, Charles E.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    In 1954 Osgood and Luria reported a blind analysis of a case of triple personality, popularly known as "The Three Faces of Eve," that had been analyzed by Thigpen and Cleckley. Here they combined with Robert Jeans to do a similar blind analysis of a case Jeans was treating in the late 1960s. (Editor/RK)

  4. The Long and the Short of It: Telescopes of the Seventeenth Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudd, M. Eugene

    An historical review of telescope makers and users, and the state of telescopes in the 1600s. Mentioned are: Jean Dominique Cassini, Hans Lippershey, Galileo, Johannes Kepler, Scheiner, Francesco Fontana, Evangelista Torricelli, Eustachio Divini, William Gascoigne, Adrien Auzout, Jean Picard, Christian Huygens, Johannes Hevelius, Edmund Halley, and Isaac Newton.

  5. System analysis for the Huntsville Operational Support Center distributed computer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingels, E. M.

    1983-01-01

    A simulation model was developed and programmed in three languages BASIC, PASCAL, and SLAM. Two of the programs are included in this report, the BASIC and the PASCAL language programs. SLAM is not supported by NASA/MSFC facilities and hence was not included. The statistical comparison of simulations of the same HOSC system configurations are in good agreement and are in agreement with the operational statistics of HOSC that were obtained. Three variations of the most recent HOSC configuration was run and some conclusions drawn as to the system performance under these variations.

  6. Methodology for the description and validation of communication protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattavina, A.; Roveri, A.; Trigila, S.

    1981-12-01

    The models which may be used for the formal description of communication protocols, such as those required for complex computer networks, are analyzed and compared. Two types of models are studied: (1) the abstract automata models including finite state machines, UCLA graphs, Petri nets and formal grammars, and (2) the algorithmic models based on high level programming languages, including sequential languages, such as Pascal, Simula, PL/1, and concurrent languages such as Concurrent Pascal and Chill. Advantages and difficulties are found in both type of models. The evolution of hybrid models is mentionned.

  7. Dynamics of the Pacific-North American Plate Boundary in the Western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flesch, Lucy M.; Holt, William E.; Haines, A. John; Shen-Tu, Bingming

    2000-02-01

    The vertically averaged deviatoric stress tensor field within the western United States was determined with topographic data, geoid data, recent global positioning system observations, and strain rate magnitudes and styles from Quaternary faults. Gravitational potential energy differences control the large fault-normal compression on the California coast. Deformation in the Basin and Range is driven, in part, by gravitational potential energy differences, but extension directions there are modified by plate interaction stresses. The California shear zone has relatively low vertically averaged viscosity of about 1021 pascal.seconds, whereas the Basin and Range has a higher vertically averaged viscosity of 1022 pascal.seconds.

  8. Dynamics of the pacific-north american plate boundary in the western united states

    PubMed

    Flesch; Holt; Haines; Shen-Tu

    2000-02-01

    The vertically averaged deviatoric stress tensor field within the western United States was determined with topographic data, geoid data, recent global positioning system observations, and strain rate magnitudes and styles from Quaternary faults. Gravitational potential energy differences control the large fault-normal compression on the California coast. Deformation in the Basin and Range is driven, in part, by gravitational potential energy differences, but extension directions there are modified by plate interaction stresses. The California shear zone has relatively low vertically averaged viscosity of about 10(21) pascal.seconds, whereas the Basin and Range has a higher vertically averaged viscosity of 10(22) pascal.seconds. PMID:10657292

  9. A unified data flow model for fault tolerant computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, T. R.; Ramanamurthy, V. V.; Youssefi, A.; Kavi, K. M.

    1984-01-01

    The Dataflow Simulation System (DFSS) at USL was used as the medium on which a functional simulaton of sIFT was produced. DFSS is written in PL/I and is supported by MULTICS. Within the simulation, all the interprocessor communication, fault simulation, system state data, and monitoring were implemented in dataflow and supported directly by DFSS. The actual processor level computation was carried out by the SIFT code in PASCAL. The interface between DFSS in PL/I and the SIFT code in PASCAL was supported under a mechanism in DFSS called a Node Realization Module (NRM).

  10. GOMER: a PC-based expert system

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrell, G.D.

    1986-04-01

    The algorithm for a PC-based expert system for interpretation of seismic data from remote sensors is described. The original expert system was written on a Symbolics computer using Zeta LISP. The PC version is written in Pascal and runs on the IBM PC or on any IBM-compatible computer. The Pascal source code is included with this report. To date the software has been used only on simulated sensor data but will be modified to accept data from fielded sensors. Extensive field testing will be required to refine the program's knowledge base. 8 figs.

  11. [Nurse hygienist, a role in everyone's interest].

    PubMed

    Auguste, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    Pascale Auguste has been working as a nurse hygienist for four years. Her managerial and pedagogical skills, specialised and up-to-date knowledge and human qualities enable her to work efficiently with the nursing teams. The diversity of the missions which she carries out makes her practice in hospital hygiene, not only complex but also very interesting.

  12. PROUST: Knowledge-Based Program Understanding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, W. Lewis; Soloway, Elliot

    This report describes PROUST, a computer-based system for online analyses and understanding of PASCAL programs written by novice programmers, which takes as input a program and a non-algorithmic description of the program requirements and finds the most likely mapping between the requirements and the code. Both the theory and processing techniques…

  13. Micro-PROUST.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, W. Lewis; Soloway, Elliot

    This detailed description of a microcomputer version of PROUST (Program Understander for Students), a knowledge-based system that finds nonsyntactic bugs in Pascal programs written by novice programmers, presents the inner workings of Micro-PROUST, which was written in Golden LISP for the IBM-PC (512K). The contents include: (1) a reprint of an…

  14. MENO-II: An AI-Based Programming Tutor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soloway, Elliot; And Others

    This report examines the features and performance of the BUG-FINDing component of MENO-II, a computer-based tutor for beginning PASCAL programming students. A discussion of the use of artificial intelligence techniques is followed by a summary of the system status and objectives. The two main components of MENO-II are described, beginning with the…

  15. 76 FR 7907 - Quarterly Publication of Individuals, Who Have Chosen To Expatriate, as Required by Section 6039G

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... AIMEE GOBLET DARWIN ANGELA MARY BRUCE DAVID CARY RICHARD DAVID-PELLERIN STEPHANIE DE CANDIA FABRIZIO DE... GRANT S FRAZER LINDA C FRENKEL SHARON FREY ELIZABETH U FUNG PASCALE N GIBSON MATTHEW CHARLES GIBSON... GUERLAIN MARIE HA PATRICIA HABOLDT BOB P HAJEK LINDA ANETTE HANSEN PAUL ROBERT HARDWICK III CHARLES...

  16. The Community View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuBray, Dan

    A community college instructor has incorporated the philosophy of Blaise Pascal into a course on organizational communication by providing community college students with a pragmatic small group exercise that requires them to see what communication skills are necessary to succeed within business and the community. This paper discusses how…

  17. The Domino Effect: Problem Solving with Common Table Games.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reimer, Wilbert

    1989-01-01

    Domino games are used to illustrate problem-solving techniques in a college principles-of-mathematics course. Students develop tables and use Pascal's triangle to find the total number of pips and the sum of numbers on the pieces. (DC)

  18. Evaluation of Vocational Education R & D Programs: An Integrative Analysis of Recent Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magisos, Joel H.; Moore, Allen B.

    This paper provides a composite picture of some recent studies of research, demonstration, and curriculum development programs. The primary focus is on three studies: "Assessing Vocational Education Research and Development" (National Academy of Sciences, 1976, COVERD Report, ED 128 754); Anthony H. Pascal, et al., "Federal Programs Supporting…

  19. A Brief Look at the History of Probability and Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lightner, James E.

    1991-01-01

    The historical development of probability theory is traced from its early origins in games of chance through its mathematical foundations in the work of Pascal and Fermat. The roots of statistics are also presented beginning with early actuarial developments through the work of Laplace, Gauss, and others. (MDH)

  20. Student's Lab Assignments in PDE Course with MAPLE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponidi, B. Alhadi

    Computer-aided software has been used intensively in many mathematics courses, especially in computational subjects, to solve initial value and boundary value problems in Partial Differential Equations (PDE). Many software packages were used in student lab assignments such as FORTRAN, PASCAL, MATLAB, MATHEMATICA, and MAPLE in order to accelerate…