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Sample records for jefferson county alabama

  1. Economic-environmental modeling of point source pollution in Jefferson County, Alabama, USA.

    PubMed

    Kebede, Ellene; Schreiner, Dean F; Huluka, Gobena

    2002-05-01

    This paper uses an integrated economic-environmental model to assess the point source pollution from major industries in Jefferson County, Northern Alabama. Industrial expansion generates employment, income, and tax revenue for the public sector; however, it is also often associated with the discharge of chemical pollutants. Jefferson County is one of the largest industrial counties in Alabama that experienced smog warnings and ambient ozone concentration, 1996-1999. Past studies of chemical discharge from industries have used models to assess the pollution impact of individual plants. This study, however, uses an extended Input-Output (I-O) economic model with pollution emission coefficients to assess direct and indirect pollutant emission for several major industries in Jefferson County. The major findings of the study are: (a) the principal emission by the selected industries are volatile organic compounds (VOC) and these contribute to the ambient ozone concentration; (b) the direct and indirect emissions are significantly higher than the direct emission by some industries, indicating that an isolated analysis will underestimate the emission by an industry; (c) while low emission coefficient industries may suggest industry choice they may also emit the most hazardous chemicals. This study is limited by the assumptions made, and the data availability, however it provides a useful analytical tool for direct and cumulative emission estimation and generates insights on the complexity in choice of industries.

  2. Economic-environmental modeling of point source pollution in Jefferson County, Alabama, USA.

    PubMed

    Kebede, Ellene; Schreiner, Dean F; Huluka, Gobena

    2002-05-01

    This paper uses an integrated economic-environmental model to assess the point source pollution from major industries in Jefferson County, Northern Alabama. Industrial expansion generates employment, income, and tax revenue for the public sector; however, it is also often associated with the discharge of chemical pollutants. Jefferson County is one of the largest industrial counties in Alabama that experienced smog warnings and ambient ozone concentration, 1996-1999. Past studies of chemical discharge from industries have used models to assess the pollution impact of individual plants. This study, however, uses an extended Input-Output (I-O) economic model with pollution emission coefficients to assess direct and indirect pollutant emission for several major industries in Jefferson County. The major findings of the study are: (a) the principal emission by the selected industries are volatile organic compounds (VOC) and these contribute to the ambient ozone concentration; (b) the direct and indirect emissions are significantly higher than the direct emission by some industries, indicating that an isolated analysis will underestimate the emission by an industry; (c) while low emission coefficient industries may suggest industry choice they may also emit the most hazardous chemicals. This study is limited by the assumptions made, and the data availability, however it provides a useful analytical tool for direct and cumulative emission estimation and generates insights on the complexity in choice of industries. PMID:12173425

  3. Effect of Surface Coal Mining on the Hydrology of Crooked and Turkey Creek Basins, Jefferson County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Puente, Celso; Newton, John G.

    1979-01-01

    Streamflow, sediment yield, and water quality were monitored from October 1975 through May 1977 to determine the impact of surface coal mining on the hydrology of Crooked and Turkey Creek basins in Jefferson County, Alabama. The basins are in the northeast part of the Warrior coal field. Coal is and has been mined from the Blue Creek, Mary Lee, and and Newcastel coal beds in the Mary Lee group. Results show water-quality degradation, increased sediment yields, and increased low flow in most tributaries draining mined areas. The impact of mine drainage and sediment yield from mined subbasins on water in the main stem of Turkey Creek was small due to the alkalinity of the water in the creek and to dilution ratios that ranged from 1:30 to 1:300. Mine drainage has affected the quality of water in Crooked Creek. The dissolved solids concentration in water downstream from the mined areas was as much as 7 times greater than that in water in unmined parts of the basin. The sediment yield to Crooked Creek was lower in the mined area than in the unmined segment of the stream. The lower yield is due, in part, to the trapping of sediment in sediment ponds in the mines and in a swamp downstream from the mines. (USGS)

  4. A Multilevel Analysis of Individual, Household, and Neighborhood Correlates of Intimate Partner Violence Among Low-Income Pregnant Women in Jefferson County, Alabama

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Russell S.; Sigler, Robert T.; Hwang, Sean-Shong; LaGory, Mark E.; Goldenberg, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. We examined individual, household, and neighborhood correlates of intimate partner violence (IPV) before and during pregnancy. Methods. We used multilevel modeling to investigate IPV among 2887 pregnant women in 112 census tracts who sought prenatal care in 8 public clinics in Jefferson County, Alabama, from 1997 through 2001. Data were collected from the Perinatal Emphasis Research Center project, the 2000 Census, and the local Sheriff and Police Departments Uniform Crime Reports for 1997 through 2001. Results. Participants were predominantly young, African American, on Medicaid, and residents of low-income neighborhoods. The prevalence of past-year male partner–perpetrated physical or sexual violence was 7.4%. Neighborhood residential stability, women performing most of the housework (lack of involvement among partners), being unmarried (being in an uncommitted relationship), and alcohol use were positively associated with elevated IPV risk. Significant protective factors for IPV included older age at first vaginal intercourse and a greater sense of mastery (e.g., the perception of oneself as an effective person). Conclusions. Both neighborhood contextual and individual and household compositional effects are associated with IPV among low-income pregnant women. The results imply that combined interventions to improve neighborhood conditions and strengthen families may effectively reduce IPV. PMID:19696385

  5. 75 FR 80524 - Watercress Darter National Wildlife Refuge, Jefferson County, AL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-22

    ... 12, 2007 (72 FR 11048). Watercress Darter NWR, near the city of Bessemer, Jefferson County, Alabama... Register on April 16, 2010 (75 FR 19988). We received five comments on the Draft CCP/EA. Selected... Fish and Wildlife Service Watercress Darter National Wildlife Refuge, Jefferson County, AL AGENCY:...

  6. Assessment of Water-Quality Conditions in Fivemile Creek in the Vicinity of the Fivemile Creek Greenway, Jefferson County, Alabama, 2003-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gill, Amy C.; Robinson, John A.; Redmond, Jymalyn E.; Bradley, Michael W.

    2008-01-01

    The watershed of Fivemile Creek (FMC), a tributary to the Locust Fork of the Black Warrior River, is located north of Birmingham, Alabama. Areas that have been previously coal-mined border the creek, and portions of the upper watershed have been and are currently (2007) being used for industrial and urban uses. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the City of Tarrant, the Freshwater Land Trust, and the Jefferson County Commission, conducted a water-quality assessment of 12 sites along FMC during 2003?2005. Water samples were analyzed for basic physical and chemical properties and concentrations of major ions, nutrients, fecal indicator bacteria, organic wastewater compounds, pesticides, trace elements, and semivolatile organic compounds. Streambed-sediment samples were analyzed for concentrations of trace elements and semivolatile organic compounds. Benthic invertebrate communities were evaluated for taxonomic composition and relation to water-quality conditions. Nutrient concentrations in the FMC watershed reflect the influences of natural and anthropogenic sources. Concentrations of total nitrogen in all samples and total Kjeldahl nitrogen in at least one sample each collected from FMC at Hewitt Park, FMC below Springdale Road, FMC at Lewisburg, FMC near Republic, FMC at Brookside, and FMC at Linn Crossing exceeded U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) ecoregion nutrient criteria. Total phosphorus concentrations in about 58 percent of all samples were above the ecoregion nutrient criteria. Concentrations of chlorophyll a, an indicator of algal biomass, in the FMC watershed were below the appropriate USEPA ecoregion criteria. Fecal indicator bacteria concentrations occasionally exceeded criteria established by the Alabama Department of Environmental Management (ADEM) and the USEPA to protect human health and aquatic life. Median fecal-coliform concentrations equaled or exceeded USEPA criteria at four of the six sites with multiple samples

  7. EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING WEST ALONG JEFFERSON COUNTY 71 WITH RAILROAD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING WEST ALONG JEFFERSON COUNTY 71 WITH RAILROAD BRIDGE (RIGHT), SADDLEBAG COTTAGE (LEFT) AND COAL TRUCK. - Linn Crossing Trestle Bridge, Spanning County Road 71, Linn Crossing, Jefferson County, AL

  8. Investigation of water quality and aquatic-community structure in Village and Valley Creeks, City of Birmingham, Jefferson County, Alabama, 2000-01

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McPherson, Ann K.; Abrahamsen, Thomas A.; Journey, Celeste A.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a 16-month investigation of water quality, aquatic-community structure, bed sediment, and fish tissue in Village and Valley Creeks, two urban streams that drain areas of highly intensive residential, commercial, and industrial land use in Birmingham, Alabama. Water-quality data were collected between February 2000 and March 2001 at four sites on Village Creek, three sites on Valley Creek, and at two reference sites near Birmingham?Fivemile Creek and Little Cahaba River, both of which drain less-urbanized areas. Stream samples were analyzed for major ions, nutrients, fecal bacteria, trace and major elements, pesticides, and selected organic constituents. Bed-sediment and fish-tissue samples were analyzed for trace and major elements, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and additional organic compounds. Aquatic-community structure was evaluated by conducting one survey of the fish community and in-stream habitat and two surveys of the benthic-invertebrate community. Bed-sediment and fish-tissue samples, benthic-invertebrates, and habitat data were collected between June 2000 and October 2000 at six of the nine water-quality sites; fish communities were evaluated in April and May 2001 at the six sites where habitat and benthic-invertebrate data were collected. The occurrence and distribution of chemical constituents in the water column and bed sediment provided an initial assessment of water quality in the streams. The structure of the aquatic communities, the physical condition of the fish, and the chemical analyses of fish tissue provided an indication of the cumulative effects of water quality on the aquatic biota. Water chemistry was similar at all sites, characterized by strong calcium-bicarbonate component and magnesium components. Median concentrations of total nitrogen and total phosphorus were highest at the headwaters of Valley Creek and lowest at the reference site on Fivemile Creek. In Village Creek, median

  9. Jefferson County Adult Reading Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefferson County Board of Education, Louisville, KY.

    The 1980-81 Jefferson County (Kentucky) Adult Reading Program served 601 students functioning below 6.0 grade level during the 1980-81 year. The project's instructional methods and materials were developed based on the experiences of the program for the previous two years. The program was considered a success not only from the viewpoint of the…

  10. 77 FR 124 - Biological Processors of Alabama; Decatur, Morgan County, AL; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Biological Processors of Alabama; Decatur, Morgan County, AL; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... Biological Processors of Alabama Superfund Site located in Decatur, Morgan County, Alabama. DATES: The...

  11. 78 FR 56980 - Muscle Shoals Reservation Redevelopment, Colbert County, Alabama

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-16

    ... Muscle Shoals Reservation Redevelopment, Colbert County, Alabama AGENCY: Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA... its final environmental impact statement (EIS) for the redevelopment of the Muscle Shoals Reservation... Statement for the Muscle Shoals Reservation Redevelopment was published in the Federal Register on...

  12. The Leyden uranium prospect, Jefferson County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gott, Garland B.

    1950-01-01

    The Leyden uranium prospect is in sec. 28, T, 2 S., R. 70 W, Jefferson County, Cplo, Examination of the property was made in February 1950. Uranium was first reported in this locality in 1875 by Captain E. L. Berthoud, who noted uranium minerals associated with the main coal bed. The Old Leyden coal mine workings have long been abandoned and caved, but specimens of the uranium-bearing rock can be seen on the old dump 700 feet to the south. The mineralized coal bed is 10 to 12 feet thick and occurs near the base of the Laramie formation of Upper Cretaceous age. Uranium minerals are present in the form of yellow incrustations and inclusions in fractured and partly silicified coal. Petrographic studies indicate that the silica and uranium minerals were deposited after deposition and carbonization of the coal. Secondary uranium minerals also were found by C. R. Butler along the outcrop of the sandstones in the Laramie formation. No uranium minerals were found in place by the writer, but four samples from the dump contained 0.001, 0,005, 0.17 and 0.69 percent uranium.

  13. Groundwater management and protection Madison County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    French, J.H.; Strunk, J.W.

    1990-07-01

    Groundwater is extremely important to Madison County as it provides nearly three quarters of the county's drinking water. In recent years, Madison County has increasingly recognized the need to protect its groundwater resource. A supply of usable groundwater is one element of a high quality environment, which can help spur economic development and provide for the needs of a growing population. Without planning protection and understanding of possible consequences, however, economic development and population pressures can cause a gradual degradation of groundwater. In April 1987, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) convened a local groundwater steering group in Madison County. At the first meeting the ground agreed upon these goals: (1) to seek incorporate groundwater protection into the planning and development process for Madison County, (2) to support efforts by Madison County to obtain authority to adopt zoning ordinances and subdivision regulations, and (3) to develop a groundwater management plan for the county. This report provides essential information needed in developing a plan and is based on the following assumptions: the citizens of Madison County value the environment in which they live and wish to protect it from pollution; continued economic development is necessary for a healthy local economy; and a healthy economy can be sustained and nurtured, without degradation of the groundwater resource, through countywide planning, education, and participation.

  14. Unconventional gas - exploratory drilling, Tuscaloosa County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    BF Goodrich owns and operates a large tire manufacturing plant located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. This plant consumes approximately 3000 MCF of natural gas daily in generating steam for the manufacturing process. In addition, Goodrich has other facilities with requirements for gaseous fuels. Because of increased costs for gas and oil, and forecasted shortages of gas, Goodrich is investigating alternative sources for energy. In the Tuscaloosa vicinity, Goodrich studied in depth the possibility of obtaining methane gas from coal beds. In this process, BF Goodrich worked with the Unites States Bureau of Mines, the University of Alabama School of Mines and Energy Development and various other companies having experience in coalbed degasification. The information available to Goodrich led to the conclusion that degasification may have the potential of meeting the Company's energy and financial objectives. With DOE funding, a test well was drilled and various analyses necessary to verify this potential were made. BF Goodrich management would contemplate investing Goodrich capital to develop production wells if the test well analyses indicated such development to be feasible and the economics of production were consistent with corporate objectives for return on investment. The completed analyses, however, indicate that investment in this program is not justified at this time. 20 figures, 13 tables.

  15. Surface-water availability, Tuscaloosa County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knight, Alfred L.; Davis, Marvin E.

    1975-01-01

    The average annual runoff, about 1,270 mgd (million gallons per day), originating in Tuscaloosa County is equivalent to 20 inches or 0.95 mgd per square mile. The Black Warrior and Sipsey Rivers, the largest streams in the county, have average flows of 5,230 mgd and 580 mgd, respectively, where they leave the county, and median annual 7-day low flows in excess of 150 mgd and 35 mgd, respectively. North River, Big Sandy Creek, and Hurricane Creek have average flows in excess of 100 mgd and median annual 7-day low flows in excess of 2 mgd. Surface water generally contains less than 100 mg/l (milligrams per liter) dissolved solids, less than 10 mg/l chloride, and is soft to moderately hard. Streams having the higher hardness and the higher dissolved-solids content are in eastern Tuscaloosa County.

  16. Water availability of Washington County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newton, John G.; McCain, Jerald F.; Turner, James D.

    1975-01-01

    Large quantities of ground water and surface water are available in Washington County. Major sources of ground water are the Gosport Sand and Lisbon Formation undifferentiated, the Miocene Series undifferentiated, and alluvium and low terrace deposits. The Miocene, the most productive source of ground water, will yield 0.5 to 1.0 mgd (million gallons per day) per well and is a potential source of larger supplies in most of the county. The quantity of potable water available is governed largely by geologic structures. Average flows of the Tombigbee and Mobile Rivers in the southeast corner of the county are 18,200 and 39,400 mgd. Average runoff originating in the county is about 1,100 mgd or 1 mgd per square mile. Water in aquifers tapped by wells generally contains less than 500 mg/l (milligrams per liter) dissolved solids. The water generally is soft to moderately hard. Water in streams is soft to moderately hard and low in dissolved solids. Estimated water use in 1966 was 43.5 mgd of which 10.9 mgd was ground water and 32.6 mgd was surface water.

  17. Ground-water resources data for Baldwin County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, James L.; Moreland, Richard S.; Clark, Amy E.

    1996-01-01

    Geologic and hydrologic data for 237 wells were collected, and water-levels in 223 wells in Baldwin and Escambia Counties were measured. Long-term water water-level data, available for many wells, indicate that ground-water levels in most of Baldwin County show no significant trends for the period of record. However, ground-water levels have declined in the general vicinity of Spanish Fort and Daphne, and ground-water levels in the Gulf Shores and Orange Beach areas are less than 5 feet above sea level in places. The quality of ground water generally is good, but problems with iron, sulfur, turbidity, and color occur. The water from most private wells in Baldwin County is used without treatment or filtration. Alabama public- health law requires that water from public-supply wells be chlorinated. Beyond that, the most common treatment of ground water by public-water suppliers in Baldwin County consists of pH adjustment, iron removal, and aeration. The transmissivity of the Miocene-Pliocene aquifer was determined at 10 locations in Baldwin County. Estimates of transmissivity ranged from 700 to 5,400 feet squared per day. In general, aquifer transmissivity was greatest in the southeastern part of the county, and least in the western part of the county near Mobile Bay. A storage coefficient of 1.5 x 10-3 was determined for the Miocene-Pliocene aquifer near Loxley.

  18. Ground-water resources and geology of Jefferson County, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borman, R.G.; Trotta, L.C.

    1975-01-01

    A steadily increasing population in Jefferson County, Wisconsin, is expanding the need for good-quality ground water. This need can be met by good-quality water available from the sand-and-gravel, Galena-Platteville, and sandstone aquifers. As much as 15 gallons per minute (0.95 liters per second) can be obtained from wells almost everywhere in the county. Yields of more than 1,000 gallons per minute (63 liters per second) are available from glacial drift where it contains a sufficient thickness of saturated sand and gravel. The Galena-Platteville aquifer is a dolomite that occurs mainly in the eastern one-half of the county and is locally more than 300 feet (90 meters) thick. Estimated well yields from this aquifer exceed 500 gallons per minute (32 liters per second). The sandstone aquifer underlies nearly the entire county except for small areas in the northwest corner. It is more than 1,100 feet (330 meters) thick in the southwest along the Dane-Jefferson County line. This aquifer is capable of yielding more than 1,000 gallons per minute (63 liters per second) to wells in much of the county and is the principal source of municipal water. The chemical quality of water from the three aquifers is similar. The water is very hard, having a median hardness between 315 and 325 milligrams per liter. Median values for dissolved solids range between 325 and 349 milligrams per liter. Iron and manganese commonly are present in bothersome amounts (combined total exceeding 0.3 milligrams per liter. About 13.0 million gallons per day (0.570 cubic meters per second) of ground water was pumped in the county in 1972, 87 percent from the sandstone aquifer. About 62 percent of the total water pumped was for industrial and commercial purposes, 26 percent for residential use, and 12 percent for municipal, irrigation, and institutional use.

  19. Bedrock Geology of the Turkey Creek Drainage Basin, Jefferson County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Char, Stephen J.

    2000-01-01

    This geospatial data set describes bedrock geology of the Turkey Creek drainage basin in Jefferson County, Colorado. It was digitized from maps of fault locations and geologic map units based on age and lithology. Created for use in the Jefferson County Mountain Ground-Water Resources Study, it is to be used at a scale no more detailed than 1:50,000.

  20. Mussel remains from prehistoric salt works, clarke county, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGregor, S.W.; Dumas, A.A.

    2010-01-01

    Archaeological research at salt springs in Clarke County, AL (Tombigbee River drainage), documented bivalve mollusk exploitation by late prehistoric American Indians. A total of 582 valves representing 19 species of freshwater mussels (Unionidae) and an estuarine clam (Mactridae) from the Lower Salt Works Site (ca. A.D. 900-1550) and 41 valve fragments representing 6 mussel species from the Stimpson Site (ca. A.D. 1200-1550) were documented. The Lower Salt Works fauna was dominated numerically by Fusconaia ebena and Quadrula asperata, the dominant species reported during recent local surveys. The mussel species represented are known from medium to large streams in sand and gravel habitats and include four federally protected species and other species of conservation concern in Alabama. Results offer comparative data for other archaeological and ecological studies in the region.

  1. 78 FR 17468 - Alabama Railroad Co.-Abandonment Exemption-in Monroe County, AL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-21

    ... Surface Transportation Board Alabama Railroad Co.--Abandonment Exemption--in Monroe County, AL Alabama... Abandonments to abandon approximately 7.42 miles of rail line between milepost 655.20 (east of Route 21 at...., Indiana Southwestern Ry.--Abandonment Exemption--in Posey & Vanderburgh Cntys. Ind., AB 1065X (STB...

  2. Digital computer processing of LANDSAT data for North Alabama. [Linestone County, Madison County, Jackson County, Marshall County, and DeKalb County

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, A. D.; Atkinson, R. J.; Lybanon, M.; Ramapriyan, H. K.

    1977-01-01

    Computer processing procedures and programs applied to Multispectral Scanner data from LANDSAT are described. The output product produced is a level 1 land use map in conformance with a Universal Transverse Mercator projection. The region studied was a five-county area in north Alabama.

  3. Potentiometric surface of the Miocene-Pliocene aquifer system of Baldwin County, Alabama, 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, James L.; Moreland, Richard S.; Clark, Amy E.

    1996-01-01

    Baldwin County, the fastest growing county in Alabama in 1995, is 100-percent dependent on ground water for public water supply. Ground-water withdrawals in Baldwin County were estimated to be about 7 million gallons per day in 1996, 12 million gallons per day in 1980, and 30 gallons per day in 1990. The effects of future increases in ground-water withdrawals, to supply the needs of the growing county population, cannot be assessed without defining baseline conditions. To address the future of ground-water development, the Baldwin County Commission requested the USGS to perform a study of the ground-water resources of Baldwin County.

  4. Alteration and vein mineralization, Ladwig uranium mine, Jefferson County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, Alan R.

    1979-01-01

    Uranium ore at the Ladwig mine, Jefferson County, Colo., occurs in steeply dipping, northwest-striking faults and related fractures with a carbonate-adularia assemblage that forms in altered wallrocks and fills veins. The faults occur between large intrusive pegmatites and garnetiferous gneisses of Precambrian age, and were reactivated as the result of the early Paleocene uplift of the Front Range foothills. Mineralization in the deposit includes both wallrock alteration and vein filling. Alteration was intense but local, and chiefly involved the carbonatization of mafic minerals in the wallrocks. Felsic minerals in the wallrocks are relatively unaltered. The veins are filled with an adularia-pitchblende-carbonate assemblage with minor related sulfides and coffinite. Many of the iron-bearing carbonates in both the alteration and vein assemblages have been altered to hematite. The mineralization and alteration are believed to have formed in response to initially high amounts of CO2 and the subsequent release of dissolved CO2 by boiling or effervescence. Uranium, carried in a dicarbonate complex, was precipitated directly as pitchblende when the CO2 was released. The expulsion of H+ during boiling created a net oxidizing environment which oxidized the iron-bearing carbonates. Late stage calcite and sulfides were deposited in existing voids in the veins.

  5. Transforming Our Schools: Lessons from the Jefferson County Public Schools/Gheens Professional Development Academy, 1983-1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyle, Regina M. J.

    A school/community partnership in Louisville, Kentucky, the Jefferson County Public Schools/Gheens Professional Development Academy, is described. This report provides a framework for assessing Jefferson County School System reforms in the past 8 years or more designed to enhance student success in learning. A Spiral of Assessment was used to…

  6. Assessment of aquatic macroinvertebrate communities in the Autauga Creek watershed, Autauga County, Alabama, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mooty, Will S.; Gill, Amy C.

    2011-01-01

    Only four families within the Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera orders were found during a 1999 survey of aquatic macroinvertebrates in Autauga Creek, Autauga County, Alabama, by the Alabama Department of Environmental Management. The low number of taxa of Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera families indicated that the aquatic macroinvertebrate community was in poor condition, and the creek was placed on the Alabama Department of Environmental Management 303(d) list. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study in 2009 to provide data for the Alabama Department of Environmental Management and other water management agencies to re-evaluate aquatic macroinvertebrate communities in Autauga Creek to see if they meet Alabama Department of Environmental Management water-quality criteria. Aquatic macroinvertebrate communities were evaluated at three sites in the Autauga Creek watershed. Macroinvertebrates were sampled at two sites on Autauga Creek and one on Bridge Creek, the largest tributary to Autauga Creek. Water-quality field parameters were assessed at 11 sites. During the 2009 sampling, 12 families within the orders of Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, Trichoptera were found at the Alabama Department of Environmental Management's assessment site whereas only four were found in 1999. The upstream site on Autauga Creek had consistently higher numbers of taxa than the Bridge Creek site and the lower site on Autauga Creek which is the Alabama Department of Environmental Management's assessment site. Chironomid richness was noticeably higher on the two Autauga Creek sites than the Bridge Creek site.

  7. Summary of reported agriculture and irrigation water use in Jefferson County, Arkansas, 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, T.W.; Manning, C.A.; Stafford, K.L.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the 1991 water-use reporting through the Conservation District Office in Jefferson County, Arkansas. The number of withdrawal registrations for Jefferson County was 1,636 (1,227 groundwater and 409 surface water). Water with- drawals reported during the registration process total 5.64 Mgal/day (3.89 Mgal/d groundwater and 1.75 Mgal/d surface water) for agriculture and 197.49 Mgal/d (161.39 Mgal/d groundwater and 36.10 Mgal/d surface water) for irrigation. The regis- tration reports for 1991 indicate that this water was applied to 132,667 acres of land to irrigate rice, sorghum, corn, soybeans, milo, cash grains, cotton, vegetables, and unknown crops as well as for the agricultural uses of animal aquaculture, crawfish, minnows, timber, and ducks. (USGS) {descriptors: *Water use, *Arkansas, *Jefferson County, Selective withdrawal, Groundwater, Surface water

  8. Final Evaluation Report for Conecuh County Experience-Based Career Education Program. Evergreen, Alabama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shively, Joe E.; Davis, Carolyn S.

    The goal of the Conecuh County (Alabama) project was to successfully implement an Experience-Based Career Education (EBCE) program based on the model developed by Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, which integrates academic requirements and work experience opportunities into a comprehensive curriculum. To determine program effectiveness at…

  9. A Phonological and Lexical Study of the Speech of Tuscaloosa County, Alabama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Lawrence Mason

    This study examines the lexical and phonological features in the speech of 27 native informants of Tuscaloosa County, Alabama which show distinctive regional or social distribution. The questionnaire used in the study is based on the short work sheets of the Linguistic Atlas of the United States and Canada, and the methodology is similar to that…

  10. A Blue Print for Elementary Literacy Reform--A Mobile County, Alabama, Public Education Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Les

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the goals and objectives of committees of the Mobile County school district in Alabama, which were set up to evaluate the current state of reading instruction. Discusses trends, the current situation, where they want to be, and current research. (RS)

  11. Floods of July 1956 in Clarke County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peirce, L.B.

    1957-01-01

    A weak tropical disturbance formed just off the coast of Alabama on July 5, 1956. Moving inland over the southeastern part of the State, the storm produced heavy rains on the 7th and the morning of the 8th before it dissipated and moved out toward the north.

  12. 75 FR 10547 - CSX Transportation, Inc.-Abandonment Exemption-in Jefferson County, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ... Surface Transportation Board CSX Transportation, Inc.--Abandonment Exemption--in Jefferson County, NY CSX... Abandonments to abandon a 0.24-mile rail line, known as the Roe Feed Industrial Track, on its Northern Region... condition to this exemption, any employee adversely affected by the abandonment shall be protected...

  13. Health Care Needs of a Hispanic Population in Dane, Dodge, and Jefferson Counties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slesinger, Doris P.; And Others

    In the summer of 1976, 133 permanent residents in the Hispano community in Wisconsin's Dane, Dodge and Jefferson counties were interviewed to determine their perceptions of their own and their families' health needs and of their unmet health needs. Respondents were primarily women since it was felt they were the best informed about the family's…

  14. 75 FR 19988 - Watercress Darter National Wildlife Refuge, Jefferson County, AL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-16

    ... on March 12, 2007 (72 FR 11048). Background The CCP Process The National Wildlife Refuge System... Fish and Wildlife Service Watercress Darter National Wildlife Refuge, Jefferson County, AL AGENCY: Fish... assessment (Draft CCP/EA) for Watercress Darter National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) for public review and...

  15. 78 FR 14414 - The Alabama Great Southern Railroad Company-Abandonment Exemption-in Gadsden, Etowah County, Ala...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    ... Surface Transportation Board The Alabama Great Southern Railroad Company--Abandonment Exemption--in Gadsden, Etowah County, Ala.; Tennessee, Alabama, and Georgia Railway Company--Abandonment Exemption--in... exemption under 49 CFR 1152 subpart F--Exempt Abandonments for AGS and TAG to abandon service...

  16. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 4): Interstate Lead (ILCO), Jefferson County, Leeds, AL. (First remedial action), September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-30

    The Interstate Lead (ILCO) site consists of seven subsites located in and around the City of Leeds, Jefferson County, Alabama. The site includes an 8.5-acre active lead smelting facility and its parking lot, a service station; a manufacturing company; a church parking lot; a 1.4-acre residential property; a municipal landfill; and a restaurant. Land use in the area is mixed industrial and residential. Parts of the ILCO site overlie the Fort Payne Chert and Ordovician Undifferentiated aquifers, both of which are sources of drinking water for the City of Leeds. State investigations in 1983 and 1984, and a number of subsequent EPA investigations, identified metal contamination in onsite soil, sediment, ground water, surface water, and air. In 1984, EPA conducted an emergency removal action at the church subsite, and removed and disposed of approximately 5,000 cubic yards of waste material and soil offsite. The Record of Decision (ROD) provides a final remedy for soil contamination at all of the subsites except the main facility portion of subsite No. 1, and ground water contamination at four of the subsites as Operable Unit 1. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, sediment, debris, and ground water are metals including arsenic, chromium, and lead. The selected source control remedial action is included.

  17. Results of a test well in the Nanafalia Formation near Melvin, Choctaw County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, M.E.; Sparkes, A.K.; Peacock, B.S.

    1983-01-01

    Test drilling at Melvin, Choctaw County, Alabama, discloses that the Nanafalia Formation (Paleocene) contains freshwater in sand at a distance of 25 miles downdip from the outcrop area. A nearby fault on the north side of Gilberttown-Pickens fault zone does not appear to affect either the head or the water quality in sand of the Nanafalia. This presently undeveloped aquifer could be a source of water supply in this area. (USGS)

  18. Health InfoNet of Jefferson County: collaboration in consumer health information service.

    PubMed

    Smith, K H

    2001-01-01

    Health InfoNet of Jefferson County is a new collaborative consumer health information service of the Jefferson County public libraries and the UAB Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences. Working with the input and cooperation of local voluntary health agencies, health care professionals and other health information providers, the intent is to improve the efficiency with which consumers might access such information while avoiding duplication of effort on the part of the information providers. Various considerations in InfoNet's mission include providing service not only to established library and Internet users, but also those on the other side of the "digital divide" as well as those with low literacy skills or English as a second language. The role of health care professionals in guiding their patients to the best consumer health information resources is emphasized. PMID:11757392

  19. Chemical quality of bottom sediments in selected streams, Jefferson County, Kentucky, April-July 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, B.L.; Evaldi, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    Bottom sediments from 25 stream sites in Jefferson County, Ky., were analyzed for percent volatile solids and concentrations of nutrients, major metals, trace elements, miscellaneous inorganic compounds, and selected organic compounds. Statistical high outliers of the constituent concentrations analyzed for in the bottom sediments were defined as a measure of possible elevated concentrations. Statistical high outliers were determined for at least 1 constituent at each of 12 sampling sites in Jefferson County. Of the 10 stream basins sampled in Jefferson County, the Middle Fork Beargrass Basin, Cedar Creek Basin, and Harrods Creek Basin were the only three basins where a statistical high outlier was not found for any of the measured constituents. In the Pennsylvania Run Basin, total volatile solids, nitrate plus nitrite, and endrin constituents were statistical high outliers. Pond Creek was the only basin where five constituents were statistical high outliers-barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, and silver. Nitrate plus nitrite and copper constituents were the only statistical high outliers found in the Mill Creek Basin. In the Floyds Fork Basin, nitrate plus nitrite, phosphorus, mercury, and silver constituents were the only statistical high outliers. Ammonia was the only statistical high outlier found in the South Fork Beargrass Basin. In the Goose Creek Basin, mercury and silver constituents were the only statistical high outliers. Cyanide was the only statistical high outlier in the Muddy Fork Basin.

  20. Water availability and geology of Sumter County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Marvin E.; Sanford, Thomas H.; Jefferson, Patrick O.

    1975-01-01

    Geologic units that crop out in Sumter County include the Selma Group of Late Cretaceous age; the Midway and Wilcox Groups of Tertiary Age; and terrace deposits and alluvium of Quaternary age. The Tuscaloosa Group, consisting of the Coker and Gordo Formations, and Eutaw Formation of Late Cretaceous age underlie the entire county. The Cretaceous units dip southwestward about 45 feet per mile and strike northwestward. They consist chiefly of deposits of sand, gravel, chalk, and clay. Potential sources of large supplies of ground water are major aquifers in the Coker, Gordo, and Eutaw Formations; expected yields are 1.6 mgd (million gallons per day or more per well. The Naheola and Nanafalia formations, Tuscahome Sand, and terrace deposits and alluvium are expected to yield 10 to 50 gallons per minute per well.

  1. Procedure for locating 10 km UTM grid on Alabama County general highway maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paludan, C. T. N.

    1975-01-01

    Each county highway map has a geographic grid of degrees and tens of minutes in both longitude and latitude in the margins and within the map as intersection crosses. These will be used to locate the universal transverse mercator (UTM) grid at 10 km intervals. Since the maps used may have stretched or shrunk in height and/or width, interpolation should be done between the 10 min intersections when possible. A table of UTM coordinates of 10 min intersections is required and included. In Alabama, all eastings are referred to a false easting of 500,000 m at 87 deg W longitude (central meridian, CM).

  2. Diagenesis of Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation, Mobile and Baldwin Counties and offshore Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, R.L. Jr.; Benson, D.J.

    1988-09-01

    The Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation is an important deep gas reservoir in Mobile and Baldwin Counties and offshore Alabama. The producing reservoir consists of a well-sorted fine-grained subarkose to arkose. Sedimentological studies indicate this unit was deposited on a broad desert plain in environments ranging from eolian dune and interdune to wadi and beach-shoreface. Diagenetic minerals comprise from 5 to 20% of the bulk volume of the sandstone. Porosity ranges from less than 3% to more than 25% and averages around 10%. Most of the porosity consists of hybrid solution-enlarged intergranular and intragranular pores resulting from the dissolution of cements, framework grains, and grain replacements.

  3. Subaqueous evaporites of Buckner member, Haynesville Formation, northeastern Mobile County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, S.D.

    1988-09-01

    The lower part of the Buckner anhydrite member of the Haynesville Formation (Upper Jurassic) was deposited as shallowing upward cycles of subaqueous to subaerial deposits on the north flank of the Wiggins arch in northeastern Mobile County, Alabama. The unit studied conformably overlies the Smackover Formation and is generally evaporite dominated. The Buckner anhydrite averages about 35 m (115 ft) thick and has been buried to depths of 5.5 km (> 18,000 ft). Despite this deep burial, the unit has suffered little deformation since alteration of gypsum to anhydrite.

  4. Effectiveness of a Pharmacist-Led Cardiovascular Risk Reduction Clinic in Rural Perry County, Alabama

    PubMed Central

    Sands, Charles; Ford, Frances

    2016-01-01

    Background. The Cardiovascular Risk Reduction Clinic (CRRC) in Perry County, Alabama, provides free pharmacist-led services. Clinic goals include improving health outcomes and reducing cardiovascular risk factors. Objective. To investigate the effectiveness of the CRRC in rural Perry County, Alabama. The reduction of the modifiable cardiovascular risk factors, blood pressure and body mass index, was evaluated to measure a decrease from baseline to last clinic date. Methods. This retrospective chart review identified 130 patients with at least two blood pressure and BMI measurements from baseline to June 30, 2010. The patients' paper files were used to collect baseline data and most recent measurements, which were recorded on a data collection sheet. Results. There was a statistically significant reduction in systolic blood pressure of 4.08 mmHg, 3.25 mmHg reduction in diastolic blood pressure, and 0.42 kg/m2 reduction in mean BMI. At their last visit prior to June 30, 2010, 59% of hypertensive patients and 35% of diabetic patients were meeting their blood pressure goals. Conclusion. Pharmacist-led management of patients with cardiovascular risk factors significantly reduced blood pressure and allowed more patients to meet their hypertension treatment goals. Despite being modest, reductions in blood pressure and BMI help reduce overall cardiovascular risks. PMID:27525302

  5. Techniques for estimating the quantity and quality of storm runoff from urban watersheds of Jefferson County, Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evaldi, R.D.; Moore, B.L.

    1994-01-01

    Linear regression models are presented for estimating storm-runoff volumes, and mean con- centrations and loads of selected constituents in storm runoff from urban watersheds of Jefferson County, Kentucky. Constituents modeled include dissolved oxygen, biochemical and chemical oxygen demand, total and suspended solids, volatile residue, nitrogen, phosphorus and phosphate, calcium, magnesium, barium, copper, iron, lead, and zinc. Model estimations are a function of drainage area, percentage of impervious area, climatological data, and land uses. Estimation models are based on runoff volumes, and concen- trations and loads of constituents in runoff measured at 6 stormwater outfalls and 25 streams in Jefferson County.

  6. 32. 1700 BLOCK OF JEFFERSON AVE. 172125 JEFFERSON AVE., DOUGAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. 1700 BLOCK OF JEFFERSON AVE. 1721-25 JEFFERSON AVE., DOUGAN BUILDING (1891), PICKLES & SUTTON, ARCHITECTS. 1735 JEFFERSON AVE., MOFFITT & TOWNE COMPANY BUILDING (1910). - Union Depot Area Study, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  7. Final Evaluation Report for the Conecuh County Part D Experience-Based Career Education Program. Evergreen, Alabama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shively, Joe E.; Watts, Rebecca

    The goal of the Conecuh County (Alabama) project was to successfully implement an experience-based career education (EBCE) program based on the model developed by Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, whcih integrates academic requirements and work experience opportunities into a comprehensive curriculum. To determine program effectiveness of…

  8. Final Evaluation Report for the Conecuh County Part D Experience-Based Career Education Program, Evergreen, Alabama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shively, Joe E.; Davis, Carolyn S.

    The goal of the Conecuh County (Alabama) project was to successfully implement into its curriculum an Experience-Based Career Education (EBCE) program based on the model developed by Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, which integrates academic requirements and work experience opportunities into a comprehensive curriculum. To determine…

  9. Changes in use of county public health services following implementation of Alabama's immigration law.

    PubMed

    White, Kari; Blackburn, Justin; Manzella, Bryn; Welty, Elisabeth; Menachemi, Nir

    2014-11-01

    Several states have enacted legislation restricting undocumented immigrants' access to publicly funded health benefits not protected by federal law. Using electronic health records from 140,856 county health department visits, we assessed the monthly change in Latino patients' visits compared to non-Latinos 12 months before and after implementation of Alabama's immigration law. We used ICD-9 diagnosis codes to determine whether visits included services exempt under the law: immunizations, testing and treatment for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and communicable diseases, and family planning. Differences between groups in the mean percent change were assessed with t-tests. Among children younger than 18 years, there were no significant differences by ethnicity. Visits among Latino adults decreased by 28% for communicable diseases, 25% for STIs, and 13% for family planning; this was significantly different from changes among non-Latino adults (p <.05). State-level legislation may reduce immigrants' access to protected benefits, which could adversely affect the broader public's health.

  10. Trails through time: A geologist's guide to Jefferson County open space parks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Jefferson County Open Space Parks, as well as other nearby parks and National Forest lands, offer marvelousopportunities to explore the geologic story behind this singular landscape. At first the distribution of rocks of differentages and types seems almost random, but careful study of the rocks and landscape features reveals a captivatinggeologic story, a history that tells of the building of the foundations of the continent, the rise and destruction of longvanishedmountain ranges, the ebb and flow of ancient seas, and the constant shaping and reshaping of the landscape inresponse to the never-ending interplay between uplift and erosion. This historical account is constantly being improvedand expanded as new evidence accumulates and new interpretations evolve.

  11. Spatial analysis of geologic and hydrologic features relating to sinkhole occurrence in Jefferson County, West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doctor, Daniel H.; Doctor, Katarina Z.

    2012-01-01

    In this study the influence of geologic features related to sinkhole susceptibility was analyzed and the results were mapped for the region of Jefferson County, West Virginia. A model of sinkhole density was constructed using Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR) that estimated the relations among discrete geologic or hydrologic features and sinkhole density at each sinkhole location. Nine conditioning factors on sinkhole occurrence were considered as independent variables: distance to faults, fold axes, fracture traces oriented along bedrock strike, fracture traces oriented across bedrock strike, ponds, streams, springs, quarries, and interpolated depth to groundwater. GWR model parameter estimates for each variable were evaluated for significance, and the results were mapped. The results provide visual insight into the influence of these variables on localized sinkhole density, and can be used to provide an objective means of weighting conditioning factors in models of sinkhole susceptibility or hazard risk.

  12. Shapefile of the Elevation of the Bedrock Surface Beneath the Rocky Flats Alluvial Fan, Boulder and Jefferson Counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knepper, Daniel H.

    2003-01-01

    The Rocky Flats alluvial fan is a large early Pleistocene gravel deposit at the mouth of Coal Creek Canyon along the eastern flank of the Colorado Front Range in Jefferson and Boulder Counties, Colorado. Elevations of the bedrock surface beneath the alluvial fan gravels have been compiled at selected points from a variety of sources and recorded in a digital dataset suitable for importing into commonly used GIS and image processing software packages.

  13. Impervious Surface Assessment of the Towne Creek Watershed, Etowah County, Alabama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffy, D. A.; Blalock, C.

    2004-12-01

    A Geographic Information System (GIS) based approach was used to do a preliminary assessment of a watershed's vulnerability and has been proven to be a quick, inexpensive, and effective means to provide guidance to the watershed manager. This GIS-based approach was used in an assessment of a watershed's proportion of impervious surface as a quantifiable measurement its vulnerability. The percent of a watershed area that is impervious was determined by utilizing the Impervious Surface Analysis Tool (ISAT), which is an extension of the ArcGIS program. ISAT uses landuse/landcover, watershed boundary, and population density data sets to calculate the percent impervious surface (%IS). The Towne Creek watershed covers 24,730 acres in southern Etowah County, Alabama, was investigated. The watershed, which empties into the Middle Coosa River, includes the suburbs of the City of Gadsden. The watershed was delineated into 75 catchments ranging from 230 to 3,163 acres. Initial assessment of the watershed estimated 10.5% of the area is impervious. Individual catchments within the watershed were then classified as being degraded (>25 %IS), impaired (10 to 25 %IS) or protected (<10 %IS). According to this classification scheme, 5 catchments covering 2.6% of the watershed is classified as being degraded, and 5 catchments covering 3.6% of the watershed is impaired, and the remaining 65 catchments covering 93.8% of the watershed is protected.

  14. Hydrogeologic Factors Affecting Base-Flow Yields in the Jefferson County Area, West Virginia, October-November 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evaldi, Ronald D.; Paybins, Katherine S.; Kozar, Mark D.

    2009-01-01

    Base-flow yields at approximately the annual 75-percent-duration flow were determined for watersheds in the Jefferson County area, WV, from stream-discharge measurements made during October 31 to November 2, 2007. Five discharge measurements of Opequon Creek defined increased flow from 29,000,000 gallons per day (gal/d) at Carters Ford to 51,400,000 gal/d near Vanville. No flow was observed at 45 of 110 additional stream sites inspected, and discharge at the 65 flowing stream sites ranged from 1,940 to 17,100,000 gallons per day (gal/d). Discharge at 28 springs ranged from no flow to 2,430,000 gal/d. Base-flow yields were computed as the change in stream-channel discharge between measurement sites divided by the change in drainage area between the sites. Yields were negative for losing (influent) channel reaches and positive for gaining (effluent) reaches. Channels in 14 watersheds were determined to have lost flow ranging from -9.6 to -1,770 gallons per day per acre (gal/d/acre). Channels in 51 watersheds were determined to have gained flow ranging from 3.4 to 235,000 gal/d/acre. Water temperature at the stream sites ranged from 5.0 to 16.3 deg C (quarry pumpage), and specific conductance ranged from 51 to 881 microsiemens per centimeter (uS/cm). Water temperature at the springs ranged from 11.5 to 15.0 deg C, and specific conductance ranged from 22 to 958 uS/cm. Large springs in some watersheds in western Jefferson County are adjacent to other watersheds with little or no surface-water discharge; this is probably the result of interbasin transfer of groundwater along faults that dissect the area. Most watersheds located adjacent to the Potomac River in northeastern Jefferson County were not flowing during this study; this is most likely because the Potomac River is deeply incised, and groundwater flows directly to it rather than to the local stream systems in these areas. Except for one watershed with a yield of 651 gal/d/acre, no watersheds in northeastern

  15. Estimation of peak-discharge frequency of urban streams in Jefferson County, Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Gary R.; Ruhl, Kevin J.; Moore, Brian L.; Rose, Martin F.

    1997-01-01

    An investigation of flood-hydrograph characteristics for streams in urban Jefferson County, Kentucky, was made to obtain hydrologic information needed for waterresources management. Equations for estimating peak-discharge frequencies for ungaged streams in the county were developed by combining (1) long-term annual peakdischarge data and rainfall-runoff data collected from 1991 to 1995 in 13 urban basins and (2) long-term annual peak-discharge data in four rural basins located in hydrologically similar areas of neighboring counties. The basins ranged in size from 1.36 to 64.0 square miles. The U.S. Geological Survey Rainfall- Runoff Model (RRM) was calibrated for each of the urban basins. The calibrated models were used with long-term, historical rainfall and pan-evaporation data to simulate 79 years of annual peak-discharge data. Peak-discharge frequencies were estimated by fitting the logarithms of the annual peak discharges to a Pearson-Type III frequency distribution. The simulated peak-discharge frequencies were adjusted for improved reliability by application of bias-correction factors derived from peakdischarge frequencies based on local, observed annual peak discharges. The three-parameter and the preferred seven-parameter nationwide urban-peak-discharge regression equations previously developed by USGS investigators provided biased (high) estimates for the urban basins studied. Generalized-least-square regression procedures were used to relate peakdischarge frequency to selected basin characteristics. Regression equations were developed to estimate peak-discharge frequency by adjusting peak-dischargefrequency estimates made by use of the threeparameter nationwide urban regression equations. The regression equations are presented in equivalent forms as functions of contributing drainage area, main-channel slope, and basin development factor, which is an index for measuring the efficiency of the basin drainage system. Estimates of peak discharges for streams

  16. Digital Data Set of Orchards Where Arsenical Pesticides Were Likely Used in Clarke and Frederick Counties, Virginia, and Berkeley and Jefferson Counties, West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, Bradley W.; Larkins, Peter; Robinson,, Gilpin R.

    2006-01-01

    This Fact Sheet provides information on a digital data set that identifies orchard areas under cultivation between the 1920s and 1960s in Clarke and Frederick Counties, Virginia and Berkeley and Jefferson Counties, West Virginia. The apple orchards in these areas likely used arsenical pesticides during this time. The digital data set can be used in a geographic information system (GIS) to identify where elevated arsenic and lead concentrations may be present in soils. The digital data set, the associated metadata, and the related files are available on the World Wide Web at http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2006/1330/shapefile/.

  17. A theoretical model of subsidence caused by petroleum production: Big Hill Field, Jefferson County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, D.W.; Sharp, J.M. Jr. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-02-01

    In the Texas Gulf Coastal Plain, there is a history of oil and gas production extending over 2 to 5 decades. Concurrent with this production history, there has been unprecedented population growth accompanied by vastly increased groundwater demands. Land subsidence on both local and regional bases in this geologic province has been measured and predicted in several studies. The vast majority of these studies have addressed the problem from the standpoint of groundwater usage while only a few have considered the effects of oil and gas production. Based upon field-based computational techniques (Helm, 1984), a model has been developed to predict land subsidence caused by oil and gas production. This method is applied to the Big Hill Field in Jefferson County, Texas. Inputs include production data from a series of wells in this field and lithologic data from electric logs of these same wells. Outputs include predicted amounts of subsidence, the time frame of subsidence, and sensitivity analyses of compressibility and hydraulic conductivity estimates. Depending upon estimated compressibility, subsidence, to date, is predicted to be as high as 20 cm. Similarly, depending upon estimated vertical hydraulic conductivity, the time frame may be decades for this subsidence. These same methods can be applied to other oil/gas fields with established production histories as well as new fields when production scenarios are assumed. Where subsidence has been carefully measured above petroleum reservoir, the model may be used inversely to calculate sediment compressibilities.

  18. Natural radioactivity in geothermal waters, Alhambra Hot Springs and nearby areas, Jefferson County, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leonard, Robert B.; Janzer, Victor J.

    1978-01-01

    Radioactive hot springs issue from a fault zone in crystalline rock of the Boulder batholith at Alhambra, Jefferson County, in southwestern Montana. The discharge contains high concentrations of radon, and the gross alpha activity and the concentration of adium-226 exceed maximum levels recommended by the Environmental Protection Agency for drinking water. Part of the discharge is diverted for space heating, bathing, and domestic use. The radioactive thermal waters at measured temperatures of about 60°C are of the sodium bicarbonate type and saturated with respect to calcium carbonate. Radium-226 in the rock and on fractured surfaces or coprecipitated with calcium carbonate probably is the principal source of radon that is dissolved in the thermal water and discharged with other gases from some wells and springs. Local surface water and shallow ground water are of the calcium bicarbonate type and exhibit low background activity. The temperature, percent sodium, and radioactivity of mixed waters adjacent to the fault zone increase with depth. Samples from most of the major hot springs in southwestern Montana have been analyzed for gross alpha and beta activity. The high level of radioactivity at Alhambra appears to be related to leaching of radioactive material from siliceous veins by ascending thermal waters and is not a normal characteristic of hot springs issuing from fractured crystalline rock in Montana.

  19. Facies and reservoir characterization of an upper Smackover interval, East Barnett Field, Conecuh County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Bergan, G.R. ); Hearne, J.H. )

    1990-09-01

    Excellent production from an upper Smackover (Jurassic) ooid grainstone was established in April 1988 by Coastal Oil and Gas Corporation with the discovery of the East Barnett field in Conecuh County, Alabama. A structure map on the top of the Smackover Formation and net porosity isopach map of the producing intervals show that the trapping mechanism at the field has both structural and stratigraphic components. Two diamond cores were cut from 13,580 to 13,701 ft, beginning approximately 20 ft below the top of the Smackover. Two shallowing-upward sequences are identified in the cores. The first sequence starts at the base of the cored interval and is characterized by thick, subtidal algal boundstones capped by a collapse breccia facies. This entire sequence was deposited in the shallow subtidal to lower intertidal zone. Subsequent lowering of sea level exposed the top portion of the boundstones to meteoric or mixing zone waters, creating the diagenetic, collapse breccia facies. The anhydrite associated with the breccia also indicates surface exposure. The second sequence begins with algal boundstones that sharply overlie the collapse breccia facies of the previous sequence. These boundstones grade upward into high-energy, cross-bedded ooid beach ( ) and oncoidal, peloidal beach shoreface deposits. Proximity of the overlying Buckner anhydrite, representing a probable sabkha system, favors a beach or a very nearshore shoal interpretation for the ooid grainstones. The ooid grainstone facies, which is the primary producing interval, has measured porosity values ranging from 5.3% to 17.8% and averaging 11.0%. Measured permeability values range from 0.04 md to 701 md and average 161.63 md. These high porosity and permeability values result from abundant primary intergranular pore space, as well as secondary pore space created by dolomitization and dissolution of framework grains.

  20. Hydrologic and water-quality characterization and modeling of the Chenoweth Run basin, Jefferson County, Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Gary R.; Zarriello, Phillip J.; Shipp, Allison A.

    2001-01-01

    Rainfall, streamflow, and water-quality data collected in the Chenoweth Run Basin during February 1996?January 1998, in combination with the available historical sampling data, were used to characterize hydrologic conditions and to develop and calibrate a Hydrological Simulation Program?Fortran (HSPF) model for continuous simulation of rainfall, streamflow, suspended-sediment, and total-orthophosphate (TPO4) transport relations. Study results provide an improved understanding of basin hydrology and a hydrologic-modeling framework with analytical tools for use in comprehensive waterresource planning and management. Chenoweth Run Basin, encompassing 16.5 mi2 in suburban eastern Jefferson County, Kentucky, contains expanding urban development, particularly in the upper third of the basin. Historical water-quality problems have interfered with designated aquatic-life and recreation uses in the stream main channel (approximately 9 mi in length) and have been attributed to organic enrichment, nutrients, metals, and pathogens in urban runoff and wastewater inflows. Hydrologic conditions in Jefferson County are highly varied. In the Chenoweth Run Basin, as in much of the eastern third of the county, relief is moderately sloping to steep. Also, internal drainage in pervious areas is impeded by the shallow, fine-textured subsoils that contain abundant silts and clays. Thus, much of the precipitation here tends to move rapidly as overland flow and (or) shallow subsurface flow (interflow) to the stream channels. Data were collected at two streamflowgaging stations, one rain gage, and four waterquality- sampling sites in the basin. Precipitation, streamflow, and, consequently, constituent loads were above normal during the data-collection period of this study. Nonpoint sources contributed the largest portion of the sediment loads. However, the three wastewatertreatment plants (WWTP?s) were the source of the majority of estimated total phosphorus (TP) and TPO4 transport

  1. Analyses of geochemical samples and descriptions of rock samples, Adams Gap and Shinbone Creek Roadless Areas, Clay County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erickson, M.S.; Hanley, J.T.; Kelley, D.L.; Sherlock, L.J.

    1983-01-01

    Semiquantitative spectrographic analyses for 31 elements on 105 rocks, 47 stream-sediment, and 70 soil samples from the Adams Gap and Shinbone Creek Roadless Areas and vicinity, Talladega National Forest, Clay County, Alabama are reported here in detail. Atomic-absorption analyses for zinc in all samples and for gold in 5 selected rock samples are also reported. Localities for all sables are given in Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) coordinates. A brief description of each rock sample is included. Rocks analyzed include quartzite, phyllite, vein quartz, and schist.

  2. Geohydrology and susceptibility of Coldwater Spring and Jacksonville fault areas to surface contamination in Calhoun County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, J.C.; Harris, W.F.; Cobb, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    Coldwater Spring in eastern Calhoun County, Alabama, is one of the largest springs in Alabama. The spring, which has an average discharge of about 31 million gallons per day, supplies water for about 70,000 people in the Anniston, Alabama area. A potentiometric map of the study area indicates that the recharge area for the aquifer system that supplies the spring is only about 23 square miles. However, base-flow data for streams in the area indicate that this recharge area is not sufficient to account for an average discharge of 31 million gallons per day from Coldwater Spring. Complex folding and faulting of the carbonate and quart zitic rocks that comprise the aquifer system may have produced fractures and joints that increase recharge to the spring. Some recharge to the spring may be derived from outside the recharge area delineated from the potentiometric map or from the surface. This part of the recharge area contamination from the surface. This part of the recharge area consists of flat to gently rolling terrain underlain by cavernous limestone and fractured quartzite. (USGS)

  3. Uranium occurrences in the Golden Gate Canyon and Ralston Creek areas, Jefferson County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, John Wagstaff; Gude, A.J.; Beroni, E.P.

    1953-01-01

    Pitchblende, associated with base-metal sulfides, has been found at nine localities in the northern part of Jefferson County, Colo., in shear zones that cut pre-Cambrian metamorphic and igneous rocks, chiefly hornblende gneiss, biotite schist, and granite pegmatite. The known deposits are in the vicinity of Halston Creek and Golden Gate Canyon, in the foothills of the Colorado Front Range and about 15 miles east of the pitchblende-producing area of the Central City district. Two of the pitchblende occurrences were found by a local prospector in 1949; the seven other deposits were found by Geological Survey. personnel in 1951-52. The pitchblende deposits, with one exception, are in major shear zones that contain veinlike bodies of carbonate-rich breccia that ranges from 1 to 5 feet in thickness. The breccias probably are related to the Laramide faults, or 'breccia reefs' of similar trend, mapped by Loverinq and Goddard (1950). The breccias are composed of fragments of bleached and iron-stained wall rock, usually hornblende gneiss, that have been cut by veins and cemented by carbonate minerals, quartz, and orthoclase(?). Pitchblende and associated ore minerals, chiefly copper sulfides, occur in and along the margins of the breccias and apparently were introduced at a late stage of the carbonate deposition. At one deposit, the Buckman, the pitchblende is in narrow shear zones not closely related to any large breccia bodies. Secondary uranium minerals are subordinate except at the Schwartzwalder mine, where torbernite and metatorbernite are common. Some alteration of pitchblende to non-opaque materials, believed to be hydrated oxides, has been noted in ore from two of the deposits.

  4. Maps showing mines, quarries, oil and gas activity, and sample localities in and near the Sipsey Wilderness and additions, Lawrence and Winston Counties, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Mory, P.C.; Behum, P.T.; Ross, R.B. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    This report presents the results of a mineral survey of the Sipsey Wilderness and additions, William B. Bankhead National Forest, Lawrence and Winston Counties, Alabama. The survey includes: limestone quarrying, coal mining, and oil and gas activity. 7 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  5. Geology of the Ralston Buttes district, Jefferson County, Colorado: a preliminary report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sheridan, Douglas M.; Maxwell, Charles H.; Albee, Arden L.; Van Horn, Richard

    1956-01-01

    The Ralston Buttes district in Jefferson County is one of the most significant new uranium districts located east of the Continental Divide in Colorado. The district is east of the Colorado Front Range mineral belt, along the east front of the range. From November 1953 through October 1956, about 10,000 tons of uranium ore, much of which was high-grade pitchblende-bearing vein material, was shipped from the district. The ore occurs in deposits that range in size from bodies containing less than 50 tons to ore shoots containing over 1,000 tons. The only other mining activity in the area has been a sporadic production of beryl, feldspar, and scrap mica from Precambrian pegmatites, and quarrying of dimension stone, limestone, and clay from sedimentary rocks. Most of the Ralston Buttes district consists of complexly folded Precambrian metamorphic and igneous rocks - gneiss, schist, quartzite, amphibolite, and granodiorite. Paleozoic and Mesozoic sedimentary rocks crop out in the northeastern part of the district. These rocks are cut by northwesterly-trending fault systems of Laramide age and by small bodies of intrusive rocks that are Tertiary in age. The typical uranium deposits in the district are hydrothermal veins occupying openings in Laramide fault breccias or related fractures that cut the Precambrian rocks. Pitchblende and lesser amounts of secondary uranium minerals are associated with sparse base-mental sulfides in a gangue of carbonate minerals, potash feldspar, and, more rarely, quartz. Less common types of deposits consist of pitchblende and secondary uranium minerals that occupy fractures cutting pegmatites and quartz veins. The uranium deposits are concentrated in two areas, the Ralston Creek area and the Golden Gate Canyon area. The deposits in the Ralston Creek area are located along the Rogers fault system, and the deposits in the Golden Gate Canyon area are along the Hurricane Hill fault system. Two geologic factors were important to the localization

  6. Building District Capacity for System-Wide Instructional Improvement in Jefferson County Public Schools. Working Paper. GE Foundation "Developing Futures"™ in Education Evaluation Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darfler, Anne; Riggan, Matt

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes findings from one component of the Consortium for Policy Research in Education's (CPRE) evaluation of the General Electric Foundation's (GEF) "Developing Futures"™ in Education program in Jefferson County Public Schools (JCPS). As described in the CPRE proposal and research design, the purpose was to…

  7. Environmental assessment for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Big Hill facility storage of commercial crude oil project, Jefferson County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    The Big Hill SPR facility located in Jefferson County, Texas has been a permitted operating crude oil storage site since 1986 with benign environmental impacts. However, Congress has not authorized crude oil purchases for the SPR since 1990, and six storage caverns at Big Hill are underutilized with 70 million barrels of available storage capacity. On February 17, 1999, the Secretary of Energy offered the 70 million barrels of available storage at Big Hill for commercial use. Interested commercial users would enter into storage contracts with DOE, and DOE would receive crude oil in lieu of dollars as rental fees. The site could potentially began to receive commercial oil in May 1999. This Environmental Assessment identified environmental changes that potentially would affect water usage, power usage, and air emissions. However, as the assessment indicates, changes would not occur to a major degree affecting the environment and no long-term short-term, cumulative or irreversible impacts have been identified.

  8. Ash-flow eruptive megabreccias of the Manhattan and Mount Jefferson calderas, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Shawe, D.R.; Snyder, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    A detailed field study of ash-flow megabreccias associated with the Manhattan and Mount Jefferson calderas shows that megaclasts were brecciated in sub-caldera level before incorporation in ash flows. This evidence in addition to the presence of some clast lithologies that are nowhere recognized in caldera walls and the occurrence of some megabreccia units as outflow suggest an origin by eruption rather than by collapse of caldera walls. Geophysical investigations and a mathematical analysis are presented in the paper.

  9. Assessment of a severe-weather warning system and disaster preparedness, Calhoun County, Alabama, 1994.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, S; Quenemoen, L E; Malilay, J; Noji, E; Sinks, T; Mendlein, J

    1996-01-01

    Tornado preparedness warning system effectiveness, and shelter-seeking behavior were examined in two Alabama areas after tornado warnings. In the area without sirens, only 28.9% of 194 respondents heard a tornado warning of these, 73.2% first received the warning from radios or television. In the area with sirens, 88.1% of 193 respondents heard a warning, and 61.8% first received the warning from a siren. Knowledge of warnings, access to shelter, and education were key predictors for seeking shelter. Our findings indicate that installing sirens, providing access to shelter, and teaching appropriate responses to warnings are important elements of an effective disaster prevention system. PMID:8561251

  10. Freshwater mussels (Unionidae) in the headwaters of Chipola River, Houston County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garner, J.T.; McGregor, S.W.; Tarpley, T.A.; Buntin, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Big and Cowarts creeks lie in extreme southeastern Alabama and form the headwaters of Chipola River. Qualitative and quantitative sampling for freshwater mussels in these reaches during 2006 and 2007 revealed an intact fauna, relative to historical reports. A cumulative total of 17 species, including federally protected Elliptio chipolaensis (Chipola Slabshell), Lampsilis subangulata (Shinyrayed Pocketbook), Medionidus penicillatus (Gulf Moccasinshell), and Pleurobema pyriforme (Oval Pigtoe), was encountered. A total of 3382 mussels (density 5.84 per m2) was estimated for one 65-m reach of Big Creek and 9627 mussels (density 8.09 per m2) were estimated to occur in one 170-m reach of Cowarts Creek. Tributaries had depauperate faunas, apparently due to substrate instability.

  11. Agricultural irrigated land-use inventory for Jackson, Calhoun, and Gadsden Counties in Florida, and Houston County in Alabama, 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marella, Richard L.; Dixon, Joann F.

    2015-09-18

    The irrigated acreage estimated for Jackson County in 2014 (31,608) is about 47 percent higher than the 2012 estimated acreage published by the USDA (21,508 acres). The estimates of irrigated acreage field verified during 2014 for Calhoun and Gadsden Counties are also higher than those published by the USDA for 2012 (86 percent and 71 percent, respectively). In Calhoun County the USDA reported 1,647 irrigated acres while the current study estimated 3,060 acres, and in Gadsden County the USDA reported 2,650 acres while the current study estimated 4,547 acres. For Houston County the USDA-reported value of 9,138 acres in 2012 was 13 percent below the 10,333 acres field verified in the current study. Differences between the USDA 2012 values and 2014 field verified estimates in these two datasets may occur because (1) irrigated acreage for some specific crops increased or decreased substantially during the 2-year interval due to commodity prices or economic changes, (2) irrigated acreage calculated for the current study may be estimated high because irrigation was assumed if an irrigation system was present and therefore the acreage was counted as irrigated, when in fact that may not have been the case as some farmers may not have used their irrigation systems during this growing period even if they had a crop in the f

  12. Agricultural irrigated land-use inventory for Jackson, Calhoun, and Gadsden Counties in Florida, and Houston County in Alabama, 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marella, Richard L.; Dixon, Joann F.

    2015-09-18

    The irrigated acreage estimated for Jackson County in 2014 (31,608) is about 47 percent higher than the 2012 estimated acreage published by the USDA (21,508 acres). The estimates of irrigated acreage field verified during 2014 for Calhoun and Gadsden Counties are also higher than those published by the USDA for 2012 (86 percent and 71 percent, respectively). In Calhoun County the USDA reported 1,647 irrigated acres while the current study estimated 3,060 acres, and in Gadsden County the USDA reported 2,650 acres while the current study estimated 4,547 acres. For Houston County the USDA-reported value of 9,138 acres in 2012 was 13 percent below the 10,333 acres field verified in the current study. Differences between the USDA 2012 values and 2014 field verified estimates in these two datasets may occur because (1) irrigated acreage for some specific crops increased or decreased substantially during the 2-year interval due to commodity prices or economic changes, (2) irrigated acreage calculated for the current study may be estimated high because irrigation was assumed if an irrigation system was present and therefore the acreage was counted as irrigated, when in fact that may not have been the case as some farmers may not have used their irrigation systems during this growing period even if they had a crop in the field, or (3) the amount of irrigated acreages published by the USDA for selected crops may be underestimated in some cases.

  13. Agricultural irrigated land-use inventory for Jackson, Calhoun, and Gadsden Counties in Florida, and Houston County in Alabama, 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marella, Richard L.; Dixon, Joann F.

    2015-01-01

    The irrigated acreage estimated for Jackson County in 2014 (31,608) is about 47 percent higher than the 2012 estimated acreage published by the USDA (21,508 acres). The estimates of irrigated acreage field verified during 2014 for Calhoun and Gadsden Counties are also higher than those published by the USDA for 2012 (86 percent and 71 percent, respectively). In Calhoun County the USDA reported 1,647 irrigated acres while the current study estimated 3,060 acres, and in Gadsden County the USDA reported 2,650 acres while the current study estimated 4,547 acres. For Houston County the USDA-reported value of 9,138 acres in 2012 was 13 percent below the 10,333 acres field verified in the current study. Differences between the USDA 2012 values and 2014 field verified estimates in these two datasets may occur because (1) irrigated acreage for some specific crops increased or decreased substantially during the 2-year interval due to commodity prices or economic changes, (2) irrigated acreage calculated for the current study may be estimated high because irrigation was assumed if an irrigation system was present and therefore the acreage was counted as irrigated, when in fact that may not have been the case as some farmers may not have used their irrigation systems during this growing period even if they had a crop in the field, or (3) the amount of irrigated acreages published by the USDA for selected crops may be underestimated in some cases.

  14. 40 CFR 81.301 - Alabama.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Birmingham area is a maintenance area for the 1-hour NAAQS for purposes of 40 CFR part 51 subpart X. Alabama... affecting § 81.301 see the List of CFR Sections Affected which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... County Choctaw County Clarke County Clay County Cleburne County Coffee County Colbert County...

  15. A spatial resolution threshold of land cover in estimating terrestrial carbon sequestration in four counties in Georgia and Alabama, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhao, S.Q.; Liu, S.; Li, Z.; Sohl, T.L.

    2010-01-01

    Changes in carbon density (i.e., carbon stock per unit area) and land cover greatly affect carbon sequestration. Previous studies have shown that land cover change detection strongly depends on spatial scale. However, the influence of the spatial resolution of land cover change information on the estimated terrestrial carbon sequestration is not known. Here, we quantified and evaluated the impact of land cover change databases at various spatial resolutions (250 m, 500 m, 1 km, 2 km, and 4 km) on the magnitude and spatial patterns of regional carbon sequestration in four counties in Georgia and Alabama using the General Ensemble biogeochemical Modeling System (GEMS). Results indicated a threshold of 1 km in the land cover change databases and in the estimated regional terrestrial carbon sequestration. Beyond this threshold, significant biases occurred in the estimation of terrestrial carbon sequestration, its interannual variability, and spatial patterns. In addition, the overriding impact of interannual climate variability on the temporal change of regional carbon sequestration was unrealistically overshadowed by the impact of land cover change beyond the threshold. The implications of these findings directly challenge current continental- to global-scale carbon modeling efforts relying on information at coarse spatial resolution without incorporating fine-scale land cover dynamics.

  16. Teaching Jefferson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Thomas Jefferson has long fascinated Americans. Even though Jefferson biographer Merrill Peterson once termed Jefferson "impenetrable," a host of recent scholars have tried to penetrate the "inner Jefferson" in an attempt to make him "more vital to people." Trying to understand Jefferson, one could argue, is akin to trying to understand America,…

  17. Mineralogy and paragenesis of the McAllister Sn-Ta-bearing pegmatite, Coosa County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foord, Eugene E.; Cook, Robert B.

    1989-01-01

    The McAllister Sn-Ta deposit (Alabama) is localized in a complex pegmatite that contains large zones of mineralized late-stage replacement-type saccharoidal albite and nearly monomineralic muscovite 'greisen-like' pipes. The dyke is at least 450 m long and averages approximately 9 m in thickness. At least two 'greisen-like' pipes, as much as 7.6 m by 4.5 m in cross-section and extending at least 76 m down a steep easterly pitch, occur near the center of the dyke. The dyke is hosted by an approximately 300-Ma-old pluton of a group referred to as the Rockford Granite, a mesozonal to epizonal two-mica, peraluminous tin-bearing granite. The pluton is genetically affiliated with a well-defined sequence of simple to complex pegmatite dykes and quartz-casiterite veins that occur near its margin and within the immediately adjacent metasedimentary rocks of the Wedowee Group.

  18. Geochemical survey of the Adams Gap and Shinbone Creek Roadless Areas, Clay County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, G.R.; Klein, T.L.; Lesure, F.G.; Hanley, J.T.

    1984-01-01

    Reports covering the mineral resources of Clay County and vicinity include Brewer (1896) and Adams (1930) on gold, Prouty (1923) on graphite, and Heinrich and Olson (1953) on mica. The mineral resources of the Talladega National Forest were evaluated by Gilbert and Smith (1973). The mineral resource potential of the two roadless areas is detailed in Robinson and others (1983) and an accompanying geologic report is given in Robinson and others (in press).

  19. Fluid Geochemistry of Blount Springs (Blount County, Alabama): Implications for the resident microbial communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrissey, T.

    2011-12-01

    Microbial assemblages (biofilms) were recently documented in a mineral spring at Blount Springs, Alabama. These biofilms are distinguished by color and diverse morphologies within the individual assemblages. Refractile grains in microscope images may be indicative of elemental sulfur. DNA was extracted from biofilm samples and amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using bacterial and fungal primers. A study of the diversity of the bacterial and fungal communities by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism community analysis (TRFLP) is ongoing. δ 18O and δ D analysis of stream waters yield mean values of -5.7 ±1.0% (VSMOW) and -29.0 ±1.3% (VSMOW), (n=27) for oxygen and hydrogen isotopes, respectively. The measured isotope compositions of the stream waters plot along the Gulf Coast Meteoric Water Line (GCMWL) indicating local rainwater as the main water source for the springs. The concentration of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), 3.0 ±0.1mM, (n=17) and δ 13CDIC values -4.8 ±1.9% (VPDB), (n=17) are compatible with microbial oxidation of organic matter and CO2 release into the stream. Sulfur isotopes of sulfide (H2S) and sulfate (SO4) and oxygen isotopes of sulfate will be analyzed in order to gain a better understanding of how microbial processes are modifying the sulfur cycle. Understanding the links between microbial activities and the stream water chemistry will lead to a better understanding of how the biosphere impacts the geochemical cycles and may provide clues to ancient environments.

  20. Depositional history of the Smackover Formation, Appleton Field, Escambia County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.J.; Pultz, L.M.; Bruner, D.D.; Lu, G.

    1996-12-31

    Appleton Field is a Smackover field situated above two pre-Mesozoic paleohighs near the updip limit of the Smackover in the Conecuh Embayment of southwestern Alabama, Smackover deposition in Appleton Field was influenced by both pre-Smackover paleotopography and sea level fluctuation. Fourteen lithofacies were identified in the Smackover and the overlying Buckner Anhydrite Member of the Haynesville Formation. These lithofacies were deposited in three depositional stages (early, middle, and late Smackover) that correspond to periods dominated by marine transgression, aggradation, and ultimately progradation. Early Smackover deposition accompanied a rapid sea level rise that inundated the paleohighs. Rapid sedimentation produced a system that was first transgressive and then aggradational in nature. Algal patch reefs developed around the periphery of the paleohighs and onlapped the structures as sea level rose. Middle Smackover deposition was the result of a decrease in the rate of sea level rise. Tidal flat, lagoon, and shoal complexes formed across topographically higher parts of the field, while subwavebase sediments were deposited off structure. Short-term sea level fluctuations produced seven shallowing-upward packages. During Late Smackover deposition long term sea level was relatively stable allowing the Smackover to aggrade and prograde. Upper Smackover deposits are peritidal dominated. Short-term sea level fluctuations again produced shallowing upward packages capped in crestal locations by exposure surfaces. With continued sedimentation, supratidal sabkhas formed over the crests of the paleohighs and prograded offstructure during early Buckner deposition. Short term fluctuations in sea level produced a series of shallowing upward sabkha cycles. Development of coastal salinas or restriction of the northern Conecuh Embayment led to deposition of subaqueous evaporites in the upper Buckner.

  1. Depositional history of the Smackover Formation, Appleton Field, Escambia County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.J.; Pultz, L.M.; Bruner, D.D.; Lu, G. )

    1996-01-01

    Appleton Field is a Smackover field situated above two pre-Mesozoic paleohighs near the updip limit of the Smackover in the Conecuh Embayment of southwestern Alabama, Smackover deposition in Appleton Field was influenced by both pre-Smackover paleotopography and sea level fluctuation. Fourteen lithofacies were identified in the Smackover and the overlying Buckner Anhydrite Member of the Haynesville Formation. These lithofacies were deposited in three depositional stages (early, middle, and late Smackover) that correspond to periods dominated by marine transgression, aggradation, and ultimately progradation. Early Smackover deposition accompanied a rapid sea level rise that inundated the paleohighs. Rapid sedimentation produced a system that was first transgressive and then aggradational in nature. Algal patch reefs developed around the periphery of the paleohighs and onlapped the structures as sea level rose. Middle Smackover deposition was the result of a decrease in the rate of sea level rise. Tidal flat, lagoon, and shoal complexes formed across topographically higher parts of the field, while subwavebase sediments were deposited off structure. Short-term sea level fluctuations produced seven shallowing-upward packages. During Late Smackover deposition long term sea level was relatively stable allowing the Smackover to aggrade and prograde. Upper Smackover deposits are peritidal dominated. Short-term sea level fluctuations again produced shallowing upward packages capped in crestal locations by exposure surfaces. With continued sedimentation, supratidal sabkhas formed over the crests of the paleohighs and prograded offstructure during early Buckner deposition. Short term fluctuations in sea level produced a series of shallowing upward sabkha cycles. Development of coastal salinas or restriction of the northern Conecuh Embayment led to deposition of subaqueous evaporites in the upper Buckner.

  2. Occurrence and hydrogeochemistry of radiochemical constituents in groundwater of Jefferson County and surrounding areas, southwestern Montana, 2007 through 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caldwell, Rodney R.; Nimick, David A.; DeVaney, Rainie M.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Jefferson County and the Jefferson Valley Conservation District, sampled groundwater in southwestern Montana to evaluate the occurrence and concentration of naturally-occurring radioactive constituents and to identify geologic settings and environmental conditions in which elevated concentrations occur. A total of 168 samples were collected from 128 wells within Broadwater, Deer Lodge, Jefferson, Lewis and Clark, Madison, Powell, and Silver Bow Counties from 2007 through 2010. Most wells were used for domestic purposes and were primary sources of drinking water for individual households. Water-quality samples were collected from wells completed within six generalized geologic units, and analyzed for constituents including uranium, radon, gross alpha-particle activity, and gross beta-particle activity. Thirty-eight wells with elevated concentrations or activities were sampled a second time to examine variability in water quality throughout time. These water-quality samples were analyzed for an expanded list of radioactive constituents including the following: three isotopes of uranium (uranium-234, uranium-235, and uranium-238), three isotopes of radium (radium-224, radium-226, and radium-228), and polonium-210. Existing U.S. Geological Survey and Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology uranium and radon water-quality data collected as part of other investigations through 2011 from wells within the study area were compiled as part of this investigation. Water-quality data from this study were compared to data collected nationwide by the U.S. Geological Survey through 2011. Radionuclide samples for this study typically were analyzed within a few days after collection, and therefore data for this study may closely represent the concentrations and activities of water being consumed locally from domestic wells. Radioactive constituents were detected in water from every well sampled during this study regardless of location or

  3. Pipeline Corridors through wetlands -- Impacts on plant communities: Mill Creek Tributary Crossing, Jefferson County, New York, 1992 Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyke, G.D.; Shem, L.M.; Zimmerman, R.E.

    1994-12-01

    The goal of the Gas Research Institute Wetland Corridors Program is to identify representative impacts of existing pipelines on the wetlands they traverse. To accomplish this goal, 12 existing wetland crossings were surveyed. These sites varied in elapsed time since pipeline construction, wetland type, pipeline installation techniques, and right-of-way (ROW) management practices. This report presents the results of the survey July 1992, at the Mills Creek tributary crossing, Jefferson County, New York. Data were collected from three wetland communities along the 1991 pipeline and compared with predisturbance data obtained in a June 1991 survey. Within one year after pipeline installation, 50% of the soil surface of the ROW in the scrub-shrub community was covered by emergent vegetation. Average wetland values for the ROW in 1992 were lower than in 1991, indicating that the removal of woody plants resulted in a community composed of species with greater fidelity to wetlands. In the emergent marsh community after one year, the average percentage of surface covered by standing water was greater in the ROW than in the adjacent natural areas. The ROW in the forested wetland community also contained standing water, although none was found in the natural forest areas. The entire study site remains a wetland, with the majority of plant species in all sites being either obligate or facultative wetland species. Weighted and unweighted average wetland indices for each community, using all species, indicated wetland vegetation within the newly established ROW.

  4. Fair Housing: A Better Answer than Busing. A Plan for Louisville and Jefferson County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Commission on Human Rights, Louisville.

    In this paper, the Kentucky Commisssion on Human Rights outlines ways in which housing-related institutions and agencies can revise their policies and procedures to reverse the trend towards housing segregation. Recommendations are made to the city and county with regard to how Section 8 housing assistance programs can be used to promote…

  5. Age and source of water in springs associated with the Jacksonville Thrust Fault Complex, Calhoun County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, James L.

    2004-01-01

    Water from wells and springs accounts for more than 90 percent of the public water supply in Calhoun County, Alabama. Springs associated with the Jacksonville Thrust Fault Complex are used for public water supply for the cities of Anniston and Jacksonville. The largest ground-water supply is Coldwater Spring, the primary source of water for Anniston, Alabama. The average discharge of Coldwater Spring is about 32 million gallons per day, and the variability of discharge is about 75 percent. Water-quality samples were collected from 6 springs and 15 wells in Calhoun County from November 2001 to January 2003. The pH of the ground water typically was greater than 6.0, and specific conductance was less than 300 microsiemens per centimeter. The water chemistry was dominated by calcium, carbonate, and bicarbonate ions. The hydrogen and oxygen isotopic composition of the water samples indicates the occurrence of a low-temperature, water-rock weathering reaction known as silicate hydrolysis. The residence time of the ground water, or ground-water age, was estimated by using analysis of chlorofluorocarbon, sulfur hexafluoride, and regression modeling. Estimated ground-water ages ranged from less than 10 to approximately 40 years, with a median age of about 18 years. The Spearman rho test was used to identify statistically significant covariance among selected physical properties and constituents in the ground water. The alkalinity, specific conductance, and dissolved solids increased as age increased; these correlations reflect common changes in ground-water quality that occur with increasing residence time and support the accuracy of the age estimates. The concentration of sodium and chloride increased as age increased; the correlation of these constituents is interpreted to indicate natural sources for chloride and sodium. The concentration of silica increased as the concentration of potassium increased; this correlation, in addition to the isotopic data, is evidence that

  6. Comparison of NLCD with NWI Classifications of Baldwin and Mobile Counties, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Handley, Larry; Wells, Chris

    2009-01-01

    An assessment of the accuracy of National Land Cover Data 2001 as compared to National Wetlands Inventory mapping of Mobile and Baldwin Counties conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Wetlands Research Center (NWRC). Both classifications were checked against stratified randomly selected ground-based sites and with each other to compare the accuracy of the NLCD with NWI classification methods. For this accuracy comparison, numerous visits were made by photointerpreters to the Mobile Bay area to establish signatures for the modified NWI mapping. After all of the quadrangles in Baldwin and Mobile Counties were mapped, an accuracy assessment of those maps was conducted by field-checking the mapped classes with ground-based check sites. These same sites were used to check the accuracy of the NLCD and also as the basis for cross-walking the NLCD and NWI classification systems for direct comparison of the two methods. This accuracy assessment is dependent on a methodology and analysis developed for the unique characteristics and properties of NWI classification, which is mapped to polygon, as compared to NLCD, which uses raster classification and mapping. This cartographic presentation results in fundamentally different classification boundaries. Overlaying these map types cannot prevent boundary differences resulting in a tremendous proliferation of sliver polygons. The intersection of both maps resulted in three-quarters of a million polygons, nearly half of which were less than the 900-m2 pixel size used in NLCD mapping (the smaller of the minimum mapping units of NWI and NLCD versus NWI mapping was about 0.5 ha). It is the authors' opinion that this cartographic difference needs to be more fully explored before accepting the accuracy difference between NWI and NLCD presented here at face value.

  7. Final Technical Report. Upgrades to Alabama Power Company Hydroelectric Developments

    SciTech Connect

    Crew, James F.; Johnson, Herbie N.

    2015-03-31

    From 2010 to 2014, Alabama Power Company (“Alabama Power”) performed upgrades on four units at three of the hydropower developments it operates in east-central Alabama under licenses issued by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (“FERC”). These three hydropower developments are located on the Coosa River in Coosa, Chilton, and Elmore counties in east-central Alabama.

  8. Hydrogeologic framework, groundwater movement, and water budget in the Chimacum Creek basin and vicinity, Jefferson County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Joseph L.; Welch, Wendy B.; Frans, Lonna M.; Olsen, Theresa D.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents information used to characterize the groundwater flow system in the Chimacum Creek basin. It includes descriptions of the geology and hydrogeologic framework; groundwater recharge and discharge; groundwater levels and flow directions; seasonal fluctuations in groundwater level; interactions between aquifers and the surface-water system; and a groundwater budget. The study area covers 124 square miles in northeastern Jefferson County, Washington, and includes the Chimacum Creek basin, which drains an area of about 37 square miles. The area is underlain by a north-thickening sequence of unconsolidated glacial and interglacial deposits that overlie sedimentary and igneous bedrock units that crop out along the margins and western interior of the study area. Six hydrogeologic units consisting of unconsolidated aquifers and confining units, along with an underlying bedrock unit, were identified. A surficial hydrogeologic map was developed and used with well information from 187 drillers' logs to construct 4 hydrogeologic sections, and maps showing the extent and thickness of the units. Natural recharge was estimated using precipitation-recharge relation regression equations developed for western Washington, and estimates were calculated for return flow from data on domestic indoor and outdoor use and irrigated agriculture. Results from synoptic streamflow measurements and water table elevations determined from monthly measurements at monitoring wells are presented and compared with those from a study conducted during 2002-03. A water budget was calculated comprising long-term average recharge, domestic public-supply withdrawals and return flow, self-supplied domestic withdrawals and return flow, and irrigated agricultural withdrawals and return flow.

  9. Changes in ground-water quality resulting from surface coal mining of small watershed in Jefferson County, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hren, Janet

    1986-01-01

    Two samples were collected from each of six wells in a small watershed in Jefferson County, Ohio, in 1984. The watershed was mined and reclamation begun in 1980. Data collected from 1976 through 1982 indicate that ground-water quality was still changing at that time. The purpose of this study was to determine to what extent ground-water quality continued to change 4 years after mining. The upper saturated zone was destroyed by mining and replaced by spoiled material during reclamation. A new saturated zone then formed in the spoils material. The premining median concentrations of sulfate, manganese, and dissolved solids in the upper saturated zone were 84 milligrams per liter (mg/L). 30 micrograms per liter (?g/L), and 335 mg/L, respectively. The postmining median concentrations of these constituents in the upper-zone wells disturbed by mining were 360 mg/L, 595 ?g/L, and 814 mg/L, respectively. Concentrations of these constituents were still increasing in 1984 in the upper saturated zone. In the area not disturbed by mining, concentrations have remained nearly at premining levels. The premining median concentrations of sulfate, manganese, and dissolved solids in the middle saturated zone were 47 mg/L, 10 ?g/L and 405 mg/L, respectively. The postmining median concentrations were 390 mg/L, 490 ?g/L, and 959 mg/L, respectively. In the middle saturated zone, concentrations of these constituents also were still increasing in 1984, probably due to mixing with water if the upper saturated zone.

  10. Streamflow, water-quality, and biological conditions in the Big Black Creek basin, St. Clair County, Alabama, 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Journey, Celeste A.; Clark, Amy E.; Stricklin, Victor E.

    1998-01-01

    In 1997 synoptic streamflow, water-quality, and biological investi- gations in the Big Black Creek Basin were conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the City of Moody, St. Clair County, and the Birmingham Water Works Board. Data obtained during these synoptic investigations provide a one-time look at the streamflow and water-quality conditions in the Big Black Creek Basin during a stable, base-flow period when streamflow originated only from ground-water discharge. These data were used to assess the degree of water-quality degradation in the Big Black Creek Basin from land-use activities in the basin, including leakage of leachate from the Acmar Regional Land- fill. Biological data from the benthic invertebrate community investigation provided an assessment of the cumulative effects of stream conditions on organisms in the basin. The synoptic measurement of streamflow at 28 sites was made during a period of baseflow on August 27, 1997. Two stream reaches above the landfill lost water to the ground-water system, but those below the landfill had significantly higher ground-water gains. If significant leakage of leachate from the landfill had occurred during the measurement period, the distribution of ground-water discharge suggests that leachate would travel relatively short distances before resurfacing as ground-water discharge to the stream. Benthic invertebrate communities were sampled at four sites in the Big Black Creek Basin during July 16-17, 1997. Based on Alabama Department of Environmental Management criteria and on comparison with a nearby unimparied reference site, the benthic invertebrate communities at the sites sampled were considered unimpaired or only slightly impaired during the sample period. This would imply that landfill and coal-mining activities did not have a detrimental effect on the benthic invertebrate communities at the time of the study. Synoptic water-column samples were collected at nine sites on Big Black Creek and

  11. Assessment of water-quality conditions in the J.B. Converse Lake watershed, Mobile County, Alabama, 1990-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Journey, Celeste A.; Gill, Amy C.

    2001-01-01

    J.B. Converse (Converse) Lake is a 3,600-acre, tributary-storage reservoir in Mobile County, southwestern Alabama. The lake serves as the primary drinking-water supply for the city of Mobile. The Converse Lake watershed lies within the Coastal Plain Physiographic Province. Semiconsolidated to unconsolidated sediments of sand, silt, gravel, and clay underlie the watershed, and are covered by acidic soils. Land use in the watershed is mainly forest (64 percent) and agriculture (31 percent). Residential and commercial development account for only 1 percent of the total land use in the watershed. Converse Lake receives inflow from seven major tributaries. The greatest inflows are from Big Creek, Crooked Creek, and Hamilton Creek that had mean annual streamflows of 72.2, 19.4, and 25.0 cubic feet per second, respectively, for the period 1990 to 1998, which represents about 72 percent of the total annual streamflow to the lake. The total mean annual inflow to the lake is estimated to be about 163 cubic feet per second. In general, water quality in Converse Lake and its tributaries meets the criteria established by the Alabama Department of Environmental Management (ADEM) for drinking-water supplies, whole-body contact, and aquatic life. The exceptions include acidic pH levels, iron and manganese levels above secondary or aesthetic criteria, and fecal bacterial levels in some tributaries above whole-body contact (swimmable) criteria. The pH levels throughout the watershed were commonly below the criteria level of 6.0, but this appears to have been a naturally occurring phenomenon caused by poorly buffered soil types, resistant sediments, and forested land use. Median iron and manganese levels were above aesthetic criteria levels of 300 and 50 micrograms per liter, respectively, in some tributaries. All tributary sites in the Converse Lake watershed had median and minimum dissolved-oxygen concentrations above the ADEM criteria level of 5 milligrams per liter except for

  12. Alabama SEP Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, Elizabeth M.

    2014-06-30

    audit and home energy rating tool; emphasis on community based coordination and partnerships; marketing and outreach to increase homeowner participation; training for market actors; access to financing options including rebates, incentives, and loan products; and an in depth process evaluation to support continual program improvement and analysis. In Alabama, Nexus Energy Center operated energy efficiency retrofit programs in Huntsville and Birmingham. In the Huntsville community the AlabamaWISE program was available in five Alabama counties: Cullman, Lawrence, Limestone, Madison, and Morgan. In Birmingham, the program was available to residents in Jefferson and Shelby Counties. In both communities, the program was similar in terms of program design but tailored marketing and partnerships to address the unique local conditions and population of each community. ADECA and the Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance (SEEA) provided overall project management services and common resources to the local program administrator Nexus Energy Center, including contracted services for contractor training, quality assurance testing, data collection and reporting, and compliance. The fundamental components of the AlabamaWISE program included a vertical contractor-based business model; comprehensive energy assessments; third-party quality assurance; rebates for installation of energy saving measures; accessible, low-interest financing; targeted and inbound marketing; Energy Performance Score (EPS) tool to engage and educate homeowners; training for auditors, contractors, and real estate professionals; and online resources for education and program enrollment. Program participants were eligible to receive rebates or financing toward the assessments and upgrades to their home provided they reached at least 20 percent deemed or modeled energy savings. The design of each program focused on addressing several known barriers including: limited homeowner knowledge on the benefits of energy

  13. 2. ALABAMA GATES LOOKING SOUTHEAST ALONG LINED CHANNEL, NOTE CHEMICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. ALABAMA GATES LOOKING SOUTHEAST ALONG LINED CHANNEL, NOTE CHEMICAL PURIFICATION TANK IN DISTANCE FOR KEEPING DOWN GROWTH OF ALGAE - Los Angeles Aqueduct, Alabama Gates, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  14. 26. STARBOARD PROFILE OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN) WITH SAILS SET Original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. STARBOARD PROFILE OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN) WITH SAILS SET Original 2-3/4'x2-1/4' photograph taken c. 1930? - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

  15. Digital Data Set of Orchards Where Arsenical Pesticides Were Likely Used in Clarke and Frederick Counties, Virginia, and Berkeley and Jefferson Counties, West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, Bradley W.; Larkins, Peter; Robinson,, Gilpin R.

    2006-01-01

    This data set shows orchard locations in Clarke and Frederick Counties, Virginia and Berkeley and Jefferson Counties, West Virginia where arsenical pesticides were likely used. The orchard locations are based on air photos and topographic maps prepared using information from the time period of extensive use of arsenical pesticides between the 1920s and 1960s. An orchard's presence in this data set does not necessarily indicate the use of arsenical pesticides on the site or that elevated arsenic and metal concentrations are present. Arsenical pesticides may have been used on part, or none, of the land and, under current land use, the land may have been remediated and no longer contain elevated arsenic and metal concentrations in soil. The data set was created to be used in an assessment of soil contamination related to past use of arsenical pesticides in orchards in the northern part of the Great Valley region, Virginia and West Virginia. Previous studies have documented that elevated concentrations of arsenic, lead, and sometimes copper occur in the soils of former apple orchards (Veneman et al., 1983; Jones and Hatch, 1937). Arsenical pesticide use was most extensive and widespread in agricultural applications from the 1920s to the late 1950s, and largely ceased agricultural use by the early 1960s in the nation. During this time period, lead arsenate was the most extensively used arsenical pesticide (Peryea, 1998), particularly in apple orchards. Other metal-bearing pesticides, such as copper acetoarsenite (Paris Green), Bordeaux Blue (a mixture of copper sulfate and calcium hydroxide), and organic mercury fumigants were used to a lesser degree in orchards (Peryea, 1998; Shepard, 1939; Veneman et al., 1983). During the time arsenical pesticides were extensively used, federal and state pesticide laws did not require farmers to keep accurate records of the quantity, location, and type of arsenical pesticides used on their property, thus the quantity and distribution

  16. Occurrence and hydrogeochemistry of radiochemical constituents in groundwater of Jefferson County and surrounding areas, southwestern Montana, 2007 through 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caldwell, Rodney R.; Nimick, David A.; DeVaney, Rainie M.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Jefferson County and the Jefferson Valley Conservation District, sampled groundwater in southwestern Montana to evaluate the occurrence and concentration of naturally-occurring radioactive constituents and to identify geologic settings and environmental conditions in which elevated concentrations occur. A total of 168 samples were collected from 128 wells within Broadwater, Deer Lodge, Jefferson, Lewis and Clark, Madison, Powell, and Silver Bow Counties from 2007 through 2010. Most wells were used for domestic purposes and were primary sources of drinking water for individual households. Water-quality samples were collected from wells completed within six generalized geologic units, and analyzed for constituents including uranium, radon, gross alpha-particle activity, and gross beta-particle activity. Thirty-eight wells with elevated concentrations or activities were sampled a second time to examine variability in water quality throughout time. These water-quality samples were analyzed for an expanded list of radioactive constituents including the following: three isotopes of uranium (uranium-234, uranium-235, and uranium-238), three isotopes of radium (radium-224, radium-226, and radium-228), and polonium-210. Existing U.S. Geological Survey and Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology uranium and radon water-quality data collected as part of other investigations through 2011 from wells within the study area were compiled as part of this investigation. Water-quality data from this study were compared to data collected nationwide by the U.S. Geological Survey through 2011. Radionuclide samples for this study typically were analyzed within a few days after collection, and therefore data for this study may closely represent the concentrations and activities of water being consumed locally from domestic wells. Radioactive constituents were detected in water from every well sampled during this study regardless of location or

  17. 40 CFR 81.301 - Alabama.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Winston County 1 This date is November 15, 1990, unless otherwise noted. Alabama—Ozone (1-Hour Standard)2 Designated area Designation Date 1 Type Classification Date 1 Type Birmingham Area: Jefferson County 4/12/04 Attainment Shelby County 4/12/04 Attainment Rest of State Unclassifiable/Attainment Autauga County...

  18. Numerical simulation of the groundwater-flow system in Chimacum Creek Basin and vicinity, Jefferson County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Joseph L.; Johnson, Kenneth H.; Frans, Lonna M.

    2013-01-01

    A groundwater-flow model was developed to evaluate potential future effects of growth and of water-management strategies on water resources in the Chimacum Creek Basin. The model covers an area of about 64 square miles (mi2) on the Olympic Peninsula in northeastern Jefferson County, Washington. The Chimacum Creek Basin drains an area of about 53 mi2 and consists of Chimacum Creek and its tributary East Fork Chimacum Creek, which converge near the town of Chimacum and discharge to Port Townsend Bay near the town of Irondale. The topography of the model area consists of north-south oriented, narrow, regularly spaced parallel ridges and valleys that are characteristic of fluted glaciated surfaces. Thick accumulations of peat occur along the axis of East Fork Chimacum Creek and provide rich soils for agricultural use. The study area is underlain by a north-thickening sequence of unconsolidated glacial (till and outwash) and interglacial (fluvial and lacustrine) deposits, and sedimentary and igneous bedrock units that crop out along the margins and the western interior of the model area. Six hydrogeologic units in the model area form the basis of the groundwater-flow model. They are represented by model layers UC (upper confining), UA (upper aquifer), MC (middle confining), LA (lower aquifer), LC (lower confining), and OE (bedrock). Groundwater flow in the Chimacum Creek Basin and vicinity was simulated using the groundwater-flow model, MODFLOW-2005. The finite-difference model grid comprises 245 columns, 313 rows, and 6 layers. Each model cell has a horizontal dimension of 200 × 200 feet (ft). The thickness of model layers varies throughout the model area and ranges from 5 ft in the non-bedrock units to more than 2,400 ft in the bedrock. Groundwater flow was simulated for steady-state conditions, which were simulated for calibration of the model using average recharge, discharge, and water levels for the 180-month period October 1994–September 2009. The model as

  19. IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY FROM UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER CARBONATES THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES AT WOMACK HILL OIL FIELD, CHOCTAW AND CLARKE COUNTIES, ALABAMA, EASTERN GULF COASTAL PLAIN

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2004-12-13

    The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is drilling an infill well in the Womack Hill Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama. The objectives of the project are to drill and core an infill well in Womack Hill Field; to utilize samples from the core to evaluate further the feasibility of implementing an immobilized enzyme technology project in the field; and to use the new information resulting from the drilling of the well to revise and modify the 3-D geologic model, to further modify the injection strategy for the existing pressure maintenance program, and to assess whether a second infill well should be drilled using lateral/multilateral well completions.

  20. IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY FROM UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER CARBONATES THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES AT WOMACK HILL OIL FIELD, CHOCTAW AND CLARKE COUNTIES, ALABAMA, EASTERN GULF COASTAL PLAIN

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2004-12-06

    The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is drilling an infill well in the Womack Hill Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama. The objectives of the project are to drill and core an infill well in Womack Hill Field; to utilize samples from the core to evaluate further the feasibility of implementing an immobilized enzyme technology project in the field; and to use the new information resulting from the drilling of the well to revise and modify the 3-D geologic model, to further modify the injection strategy for the existing pressure maintenance program, and to assess whether a second infill well should be drilled using lateral/multilateral well completions.

  1. Lidar-revised geologic map of the Uncas 7.5' quadrangle, Clallam and Jefferson Counties, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tabor, Rowland W.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Haugerud, Ralph A.; Wells, Ray E.

    2011-01-01

    In 2000 and 2001, the Puget Sound Lidar Consortium obtained 1 pulse/m2 lidar data for about 65 percent of the Uncas 7.5' quadrangle. For a brief description of LIDAR (LIght Detection And Ranging) and this data acquisition program, see Haugerud and others (2003). This map combines geologic interpretation (mostly by Haugerud and Tabor) of the 6-ft (2-m) lidar-derived digital elevation model (DEM) with the geology depicted on the Preliminary Geologic Map of the Uncas 7.5' Quadrangle, Clallam and Jefferson Counties, Washington, by Peter J. Haeussler and others (1999). The Uncas quadrangle in the northeastern Olympic Peninsula covers the transition from the accreted terranes of the Olympic Mountains on the west to the Tertiary and Quaternary basin fills of the Puget Lowland to the east. Elevations in the map area range from sea level at Port Discovery to 4,116 ft (1,255 m) on the flank of the Olympic Mountains to the southwest. Previous geologic mapping within and marginal to the Uncas quadrangle includes reports by Cady and others (1972), Brown and others (1960), Tabor and Cady (1978a), Yount and Gower (1991), and Yount and others (1993). Paleontologic and stratigraphic investigations by University of Washington graduate students (Allison, 1959; Thoms, 1959; Sherman, 1960; Hamlin, 1962; Spencer, 1984) also encompass parts of the Uncas quadrangle. Haeussler and Wells mapped in February 1998, following preliminary mapping by Yount and Gower in 1976 and 1979. The description of surficial map units follows Yount and others (1993) and Booth and Waldron (2004). Bedrock map units are modified from Yount and Gower (1991) and Spencer (1984). We used the geologic time scale of Gradstein and others (2005). The Uncas quadrangle lies in the forearc of the Cascadia subduction zone, about 6.25 mi (10 km) east of the Cascadia accretionary complex exposed in the core of the Olympic Mountains (Tabor and Cady, 1978b). Underthrusting of the accretionary complex beneath the forearc

  2. Hydrologic conditions and assessment of water resources in the Turkey Creek watershed, Jefferson County, Colorado, 1998-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bossong, Clifford R.; Caine, Jonathan Saul; Stannard, David I.; Flynn, Jennifer L.; Stevens, Michael R.; Heiny-Dash, Janet S.

    2003-01-01

    The 47.2-square-mile Turkey Creek watershed, in Jefferson County southwest of Denver, Colorado, is relatively steep with about 4,000 feet of relief and is in an area of fractured crystalline rocks of Precambrian age. Water needs for about 4,900 households in the watershed are served by domestic wells and individual sewage-disposal systems. Hydrologic conditions are described on the basis of contemporary hydrologic and geologic data collected in the watershed from early spring 1998 through September 2001. The water resources are assessed using discrete fracture-network modeling to estimate porosity and a physically based, distributed-parameter watershed runoff model to develop estimates of water-balance terms. A variety of climatologic and hydrologic data were collected. Direct measurements of evapotranspiration indicate that a large amount (3 calendar-year mean of 82.9 percent) of precipitation is returned to the atmosphere. Surface-water records from January 1, 1999, through September 30, 2001, indicate that about 9 percent of precipitation leaves the watershed as streamflow in a seasonal pattern, with highest streamflows generally occurring in spring related to snowmelt and precipitation. Although conditions vary considerably within the watershed, overall watershed streamflow, based on several records collected during the 1940's, 1950's, 1980', and 1990's near the downstream part of watershed, can be as high as about 200 cubic feet per second on a daily basis during spring. Streamflow typically recedes to about 1 cubic foot per second or less during rainless periods and is rarely zero. Ground-water level data indicate a seasonal pattern similar to that of surface water in which water levels are highest, rising tens of feet in some locations, in the spring and then receding during rainless periods at relatively constant rates until recharged. Synoptic measurements of water levels in 131 mostly domestic wells in fall of 2001 indicate a water-table surface that

  3. CARDING MACHINES, JEFFERSON MILL. PHOTOCOPY OF c. 1900 VIEW. From ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CARDING MACHINES, JEFFERSON MILL. PHOTOCOPY OF c. 1900 VIEW. From the collection of the Manchester Historic Association, Manchester, N. H. - Amoskeag Millyard, Canal Street, Manchester, Hillsborough County, NH

  4. 76 FR 48879 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Alabama Beach Mouse General Conservation Plan for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Alabama Beach Mouse General... endangered Alabama beach mouse (Peromyscus polionotus ammobates) in Baldwin County, Alabama. The GCP analyzes... availability of the proposed GCP and the dEIS. These documents analyze the take of the Alabama beach...

  5. Flood of June 14-15, 1990, in Belmont, Jefferson, and Harrison counties, Ohio, with emphasis on Pipe and Wegee Creek basins near Shadyside

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shindel, H.L.

    1991-01-01

    A series of violent thunderstorms caused severe floods and consequent damage in the central part of Ohio during June 14-15, 1990. The eastern part of the State, particularly Belmont, Harrison, and Jefferson Counties, sustained the most damage. In the Pipe and Wegee Creek basins near Shadyside, Belmont County, at least 24 people died and property damage exceeded $10 million. An indirect measurement of discharge on Pipe Creek made near the mouth, indicates a peak discharge of 15,000 ft? /s (cubic feet per second) for the drainage area of 11.3 mi? (square miles) and a unit discharge of 1,330 (ft? /s)/mi? (cubic feet per second per square mile). The recurrence interval for this peak discharge is greater than 100 years. An indirect measurement of discharge of Wegee Creek, made 3 miles upstream from the mouth, indicates a peak discharge of 2,200 (ft? /s) /mi? . The recurrence interval for this peak discharge also is greater than 100 years. Longitudal water-surface profiles showed depths ranging from 7 ft. to 22 ft. The severity of flooding was highly variable. For example, the recurrence interval of the peak discharge at one U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging station was only 2 years, whereas the recurrence interval for the peak discharge was greater than 100 years at another gaging station about 22 miles away.

  6. Regional assessment of nonforestry related biomass resources: Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-11-01

    This document is a collection of spreadsheets detailing on a county by county basis the agricultural crop, agricultural wastes, municipal wastes and industrial wastes of Alabama that are potential biomass energy sources.

  7. 77 FR 67660 - Cahaba River National Wildlife Refuge, Alabama

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-13

    ... Cahaba River National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Bibb County, Alabama. We provide this notice in compliance... boundary. The refuge currently contains 3,608 acres in Bibb County. The refuge was established to:...

  8. Estimation of vertical hydraulic conductivity of the clay layer between the Eutaw and Gordo aquifers in the vicinity of Faunsdale, Marengo County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Planert, Michael; Sparkes, A.K.

    1985-01-01

    The vertical hydraulic conductivity of the confining bed between the Eutaw and Gordo aquifers in the vicinity of Faunsdale, in northeast Marengo County, Alabama, is 1x10(-5) foot per day or less. Modeling vertical conductivities larger than 1x50(-5) foot per day produced drawdowns in the Eutaw aquifer greater than those observed in a test where 750 gallons per minute were pumped from the Gordo aquifer. Modeling has shown that vertical hydraulic conductivity of the confining bed is the controlling factor on the drawdown in the Eutaw aquifer. At equilibrium (steady-state) pumping 750 gallons per minute there was 3 feet of drawdown in the Eutaw aquifer with a confining bed conductivity of 1x10(-5) foot per day. When the conductivity was decreased to 1x10(-6) foot per day drawdown in the Eutaw aquifer was only 0.35 foot. A conductivity of 1x10(-5) foot per day in the 48-hour simulation reproduced the drawdown in the well from the 48-hour pumping test, but the conductivity may be as small as an untested 1x10(-6) foot per day. (USGS)

  9. Transient calibration of a groundwater-flow model of Chimacum Creek Basin and vicinity, Jefferson County, Washington: a supplement to Scientific Investigations Report 2013-5160

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Joseph L.; Johnson, Kenneth H.

    2013-01-01

    A steady-state groundwater-flow model described in Scientific Investigations Report 2013-5160, ”Numerical Simulation of the Groundwater-Flow System in Chimacum Creek Basin and Vicinity, Jefferson County, Washington” was developed to evaluate potential future impacts of growth and of water-management strategies on water resources in the Chimacum Creek Basin. This supplement to that report describes the unsuccessful attempt to perform a calibration to transient conditions on the model. The modeled area is about 64 square miles on the Olympic Peninsula in northeastern Jefferson County, Washington. The geologic setting for the model area is that of unconsolidated deposits of glacial and interglacial origin typical of the Puget Sound Lowlands. The hydrogeologic units representing aquifers are Upper Aquifer (UA, roughly corresponding to recessional outwash) and Lower Aquifer (LA, roughly corresponding to advance outwash). Recharge from precipitation is the dominant source of water to the aquifer system; discharge is primarily to marine waters below sea level and to Chimacum Creek and its tributaries. The model is comprised of a grid of 245 columns and 313 rows; cells are a uniform 200 feet per side. There are six model layers, each representing one hydrogeologic unit: (1) Upper Confining unit (UC); (2) Upper Aquifer unit (UA); (3) Middle Confining unit (MC); (4) Lower Aquifer unit (LA); (5) Lower Confining unit (LC); and (6) Bedrock unit (OE). The transient simulation period (October 1994–September 2009) was divided into 180 monthly stress periods to represent temporal variations in recharge, discharge, and storage. An attempt to calibrate the model to transient conditions was unsuccessful due to instabilities stemming from oscillations in groundwater discharge to and recharge from streamflow in Chimacum Creek. The model as calibrated to transient conditions has mean residuals and standard errors of 0.06 ft ±0.45 feet for groundwater levels and 0.48 ± 0.06 cubic

  10. Continuous hydrologic simulation of runoff for the Middle Fork and South Fork of the Beargrass Creek basin in Jefferson County, Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarrett, G. Lynn; Downs, Aimee C.; Grace-Jarrett, Patricia A.

    1998-01-01

    The Hydrological Simulation Pro-gram-FORTRAN (HSPF) was applied to an urban drainage basin in Jefferson County, Ky to integrate the large amounts of information being collected on water quantity and quality into an analytical framework that could be used as a management and planning tool. Hydrologic response units were developed using geographic data and a K-means analysis to characterize important hydrologic and physical factors in the basin. The Hydrological Simulation Program FORTRAN Expert System (HSPEXP) was used to calibrate the model parameters for the Middle Fork Beargrass Creek Basin for 3 years (June 1, 1991, to May 31, 1994) of 5-minute streamflow and precipitation time series, and 3 years of hourly pan-evaporation time series. The calibrated model parameters were applied to the South Fork Beargrass Creek Basin for confirmation. The model confirmation results indicated that the model simulated the system within acceptable tolerances. The coefficient of determination and coefficient of model-fit efficiency between simulated and observed daily flows were 0.91 and 0.82, respectively, for model calibration and 0.88 and 0.77, respectively, for model confirmation. The model is most sensitive to estimates of the area of effective impervious land in the basin; the spatial distribution of rain-fall; and the lower-zone evapotranspiration, lower-zone nominal storage, and infiltration-capacity parameters during recession and low-flow periods. The error contribution from these sources varies with season and antecedent conditions.

  11. Multielement chemical and statistical analyses from a uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment survey in and near the Elkhorn Mountains, Jefferson County, Montana; Part II, Stream sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suits, V.J.; Wenrich, K.J.

    1982-01-01

    Fifty-two stream-sediment samples, collected from an area south of Helena, Jefferson County, Montana, were sieved into two size fractions (50 ppm for the fine fraction) were encountered in samples from the Warm Springs Creek drainage area, along Prickly Pear Creek near Welmer and Golconda Creeks and along Muskrat Creek. All groups showed a significant correlation at the 99 percent confidence level (r between 0.73 and 0.77) between U and Th. Uranium was found to correlate significantly only with Th (as mentioned above) and with -Ni in the fine fraction of the volcanics group. U correlates significantly with -Al2O3, Ba, organic C, -K2O, -Sr and Y in both size fractions for the Boulder batholith. Correlations between U and each of several elements differ for the fine and coarse fractions of the Boulder batholith group, suggesting that the U distribution in these stream sediments is in large part controlled by grain size. Correlations were found between U and CaO, Cr, Fe203, -Na2O, Sc, -SiO2, TiO2, Yb and Zr in the coarse fraction but not in the fine fraction. U correlates weakly (to the 90% confidence level, crc<.37) with -Co and -Cu in the fine but not the coarse fraction. These results are compared to a previous study in the northern Absaroka mountains. Correlation coefficients between all other elements determined from these samples are also shown in Tables 12 to 15.

  12. Drinking-water quality and variations in water levels in the fractured crystalline-rock aquifer, west-central Jefferson County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, Dennis C.; Johnson, Carl J.

    1979-01-01

    In parts of Jefferson County, CO, water for domestic use from the fractured crystalline-rock aquifer contained excessive concentrations of major ions, coliform bacteria, trace elements, or radiochemicals. Based on results of analyses from 26 wells, water from 21 of the wells contained excessive concentrations of one or more constituents. Drinking water standards were exceeded for fluoride in water from 2 wells, nitrate plus nitrite in 2 wells, dissolved solids in 1 well, iron in 6 wells, manganese in 8 wells, zinc in 2 wells, coliform bacteria in 4 wells, gross alpha radiation in 11 wells and possibly 4 more, and gross beta radiation possibly in 1 well. Local variations in concentrations of 15 chemical constituents, specific conductance, and water temperature were statistically significant. Specific conductance increased significantly during 1973-75 only in the vicinity of Indian Hills. Annual range in depths to water in 11 observation wells varied from 1 to 15 feet. The shallowest water levels were recorded in late winter, usually in February. The deepest water levels occurred during summer or fall, depending on the well and the year. Three-year trends in water level changes in 6 of the 11 wells indicated decreasing water storage in the aquifer. (USGS).

  13. Analysis of geophysical logs from six boreholes at Lariat Gulch, former U.S. Air Force site PJKS, Jefferson County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, Frederick L.; Hodges, Richard E.; Corland, Barbara S.

    2002-01-01

    This report presents and describes geophysical logs for six boreholes in Lariat Gulch, a topographic gulch at the former U.S. Air Force site PJKS in Jefferson County near Denver, Colorado. Geophysical logs include gamma, normal resistivity, fluid-column temperature and resistivity, caliper, televiewer, and heat-pulse flowmeter. These logs were run in two boreholes penetrating only the Fountain Formation of Pennsylvanian and Permian age (logged to depths of about 65 and 570 feet) and in four boreholes (logged to depths of about 342 to 742 feet) penetrating mostly the Fountain Formation and terminating in Precambrian crystalline rock, which underlies the Fountain Formation. Data from the logs were used to identify fractures and bedding planes and to locate the contact between the two formations. The logs indicated few fractures in the boreholes and gave no indication of higher transmissivity in the contact zone between the two formations. Transmissivities for all fractures in each borehole were estimated to be less than 2 feet squared per day.

  14. Antismoking Mass Media Campaigns and Support for Smoke-Free Environments, Mobile County, Alabama, 2011–2012

    PubMed Central

    Conaway, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In 2011, the Mobile County Health Department began a 12-month antismoking educational media campaign to educate citizens on the dangers of secondhand smoke. The campaign overlapped with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s 3-month national antismoking Tips from Former Smokers media campaign. We aimed to evaluate the effect of these campaigns on support for smoke-free environments and knowledge of the dangers of secondhand smoke. Methods Cross-sectional precampaign and postcampaign telephone surveys collected data from a random sample of Mobile County adults in the summers of 2011 and 2012. Outcome measures included changes in support for smoke-free environments and knowledge of the dangers of secondhand smoke. The participation rate among the households that were successfully reached was 45% in 2011 and 44% in 2012. Results On the postcampaign survey, 80.9% of respondents reported seeing a television advertisement, 29.9% reported hearing a radio advertisement, and 49.0% reported seeing a billboard. Overall, support for smoke-free bars increased significantly after the intervention (38.1% to 43.8%; P = .01) but not for workplaces or restaurants. Self-reported exposure to the media campaign was associated with higher levels of support for smoke-free workplaces, restaurants, and bars. Conclusion Educational mass media campaigns have the potential to increase support for smoke-free protections and may increase knowledge about the dangers of secondhand smoke among certain populations. PMID:25188275

  15. Geology and geothermal resources of the Santiam Pass area of the Oregon Cascade Range, Deschutes, Jefferson and Linn Counties, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, B.E.

    1992-10-01

    This open-file report presents the results of the Santiam Pass drilling program. The first phase of this program was to compile all available geological, geophysical and geothermal data for the Santiam Pass area and select a drill site on the basis of these data (see Priest and others, 1987a), A summary of the drilling operations and costs associated with the project are presented in chapter 1 by Hill and Benoit. An Overview of the geology of the Santiam Pass area is presented by Hill and Priest in chapter 2. Geologic mapping and isotopic age determinations in the Santiam Pass-Mount Jefferson area completed since 1987 are summarized in chapter 2. One of the more important conclusions reached in chapter 2 is that a minimum of 2 km vertical displacement has occurred in the High Cascade graben in the Santiam Pass area. The petrology of the Santiam Pass drill core is presented by Hill in chapter 3. Most of the major volcanic units in the core have been analyzed for major, minor, and trace element abundances and have been studied petrographically. Three K-Ar ages are interpreted in conjunction with the magnetostratigraphy of the core to show that the oldest rocks in the core are approximately 1.8 Ma. Geothermal and geophysical data collected from the Santiam Pass well are presented by Blackwell in chapter 4. The Santiam Pass well failed to penetrate beneath the zone of lateral groundwater flow associated with highly permeable Quaternary volcanic rocks. Calculated geothermal gradients range from about 50[degree]C/km at depth 700-900 m, to roughly 110[degree]C/km from 900 m to the bottom of the well at 929 m. Heat-flow values for the bottom part of the hole bracket the regional average for the High Cascades. Blackwell concludes that heat flow along the High Cascades axis is equal to or higher than along the western edge of the High Cascades.

  16. Pipeline corridors through wetlands - impact on plant communities: Mill Creek Tributary Crossing, Jefferson County, New York, 1991 survey. Topical report, June 1991--April 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyke, G.D. |; Shem, L.M.; Zimmerman, R.E.

    1994-12-01

    The goal of the Gas Research Institute Wetland Corridors Program is to document impacts of existing pipelines on the wetlands they traverse. To accomplish this goal, 12 existing wetland crossings were surveyed. These sites varied in elapsed time since pipeline construction, wetland type, pipeline installation techniques, and right-of-way (ROW) management practices. This report presents the results of a survey conducted in June 1991 at the Mill Creek tributary crossing, Jefferson County, New York. One pipeline had been installed through the wetland in 1966, and another was scheduled to be installed later in 1991. Data were collected along the existing pipeline ROW and also along the planned ROW for use as baseline data in future studies. Four separate communities were surveyed. A scrub-shrub wetland and a forested wetland were sampled along the existing ROW where the planned pipeline was to be installed. A mixed vegetation community was sampled along the existing ROW, west of where the planned pipeline would joint the ROW. A marsh community was sampled along the route of the planned pipeline. All plant species found on the ROW of the scrub-shrub community were also present in the adjacent natural areas. The vegetation on the ROW of the forested wetland community also consisted mostly of species found in the adjacent natural areas. In the mixed vegetation community, a small drainage channel present on the ROW, possibly resulting from the pipeline construction, provided habitat for a number of obligate species not found in other areas of this community. Differences noted among different areas of this community were also attributed to slight variations in elevation.

  17. Evaluation of the Origin and Fate of Nitrate in the Aquifer System of Southern Baldwin County, Alabama Using Multi-isotopic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgulet, D.; Tick, G. R.

    2008-12-01

    Continued and extensive residential and agricultural development of near-shore areas in southern Baldwin County, Alabama has led to increased inputs of nitrogen (N) to groundwater and to the Gulf of Mexico. Nitrate (NO3-) concentrations in several groundwater wells exceeded the regulatory drinking water standards (10 mg/L nitrate-N). Groundwater and surface water samples were analyzed for nitrate, phosphate, salinity, chloride, and total dissolved solids concentrations to assess the extent of nitrate contamination. Nitrogen and oxygen isotopes of nitrate (e.g., δ15N and δ18O of nitrate) were used in conjunction with other isotopic data (e.g., 13C, and 14C, and hydrogen and oxygen isotopes of groundwater) and hydrogeochemical data to place constraints on potential sources of nitrate. The δ15N and δ18O of groundwater nitrate values ranged between +3.1 and +9.6‰ and +4.2 and +8.7‰, respectively. This range of values suggests that nitrate is primarily derived from nitrification of reduced N compounds (primarily ammonia) from fertilizer and manure or septic waste. However, an overwhelming number of samples show isotopic signatures which indicate that the predominant source of nitrate in these aguifers is the fertilizer and to some extent, for deeper wells with older groundwater, the atmospheric nitrate. The narrow range of δ18O values further confirms the primary nitrate sources. The δ15N and δ18O of nitrate data indicate that denitrification was not an important processes in these aquifers. This conclusion is also supported by the 114C data which revealed relatively young groundwaters with sufficiently high oxygen levels. In the absence of denitrification and the presence of a permanent source, it is expected that the elevated groundwater nitrate concentrations will not be readily attenuated posing a potential contamination and degradation problem of coastal discharge zones into the future. The δ13C and δ18O of groundwater data indicates that water in the

  18. 14. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Southern RR at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Southern RR at Epes Alabama Great Southern RR bridge. View from S. Copy of photo taken in 1922 by Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms., Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  19. The Rural Alabama Pregnancy and Infant Health (RAPIH) Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leeper, J. D.; And Others

    The impact of the Rural Alabama Pregnancy and Infant Health (RAPIH) Program was evaluated in relation to prenatal care, birth outcome measures, and several child health and home environment outcomes. Begun in 1983, RAPIH targets poor rural blacks in three of west-central Alabama's poorest counties, where economic conditions and infant mortality…

  20. 23. VIEW FROM STARBOARD BOW OF ALABAMA AS 'ALABAMIAN.' Uncopyrighted ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. VIEW FROM STARBOARD BOW OF ALABAMA AS 'ALABAMIAN.' Uncopyrighted 3-1/2'x5-5/8' postcard; image taken on station in Gulf of Mexico, c. 1930? - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

  1. 24. STARBOARD PROFILE OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN); VESSEL AT ANCHOR ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. STARBOARD PROFILE OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN); VESSEL AT ANCHOR ON STATION IN GULF OF MEXICO WITH MOTOR BOAT TIED AT STERN Original 4-3/4'x6-3/4' photograph taken c. 1930? - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

  2. 25. VIEW OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN) FROM OFF PORT BOW; VESSEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. VIEW OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN) FROM OFF PORT BOW; VESSEL AT ANCHOR ON STATION IN GULF OF MEXICO WITH MOTOR BOAT TIED AT STERN Original 4-3/4'x6-3/4' photograph taken c. 1930? - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

  3. Migrant Children in Alabama. A Survey to Identify Children of Migrant Workers and Certain Former Migrant Workers in Alabama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Univ., Tuscaloosa. Coll. of Education.

    A 1-year study was completed in August of 1969 by the University of Alabama on procedures to identify the children of migrant workers and of former migrant workers in 6 school systems in Alabama (Blount, Cullman, Pike, and Washington County School Systems and Demopolis and Elba City School Systems). The report of this study (1) includes detailed…

  4. 2. GENERAL VIEW, CENTER BUILDING, WITH SIGN SAYING '1855 JEFFERSON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. GENERAL VIEW, CENTER BUILDING, WITH SIGN SAYING '1855 JEFFERSON 1907 INSURANCE BUILDING' Photocopy of April 28, 1915 photograph on file at City Archives of Philadelphia, located at Philadelphia City Hall - Jefferson Fire Insurance Company, 425 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  5. Multielement chemical and statistical analyses from a uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment survey in and near the Elkhorn Mountains, Jefferson County, Montana; Part I, Surface water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suits, V.J.; Wenrich, K.J.

    1982-01-01

    Fifty-two surface-water samples, collected from an area south of Helena, Jefferson County, were analyzed for 51 chemical species. Of these variables, 35 showed detectable variation over the area, and 29 were utilized in a correlation analysis. Two populations are distinguished in the collected samples and are especially evident in the plot of Ca versus U. Samples separated on the basis of U versus Ca proved to represent drainage areas of two differing lithologies. One group was from waters that drain the Boulder batholith, the other from those that drain the Elkhorn Mountains volcanic rocks. These two groups of samples, in general, proved to have parallel but different linear trends between U and other elements. Therefore, the two groups of samples were treated separately in the statistical analyses. Over the area that drains the Boulder batholith, U concentrations in water ranged from 0.37 to 13.0 ?g/l , with a mean of 1.9 ?g/l. The samples from streams draining volcanic areas ranged from 0.04 to 1.5 ?g/l, with a mean of 0.42 ?g/l. The highest U values (12 and 13 ?g/l) occur along Badger Creek, Rawhide Creek, Little Buffalo Gulch, and an unnamed tributary to Clancy Creek. Conductivity, hardness, Ba, Ca, CI, K, Mg, Na and Sr are significantly correlated with U at or better than the 95 percent confidence limit in both populations. For water draining the Boulder batholith, uranium correlates significantly with akalinity, pH, bicarbonate, Li, Mo, NO2+NO3, P04, SiO2, SO4, F, and inorganic carbon. These correlations are similar to those found in a previous study of water samples in north-central New Mexico (Wenrich-Verbeek, 1977b). Uranium in water from the volcanic terrane does not show correlations with any of the above constituents, but does correlate well with V. This relationship with V is absent within the Boulder batholith samples.

  6. Landscape consequences of natural gas extraction in Cameron, Clarion, Elk, Forest, Jefferson, McKean, Potter, and Warren Counties, Pennsylvania, 2004-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milheim, L. E.; Slonecker, E. T.; Roig-Silva, C. M.; Winters, S. G.; Ballew, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    Increased demands for cleaner burning energy, coupled with the relatively recent technological advances in accessing hydrocarbon-rich geologic formations, have led to an intense effort to find and extract unconventional natural gas from various underground sources around the country. One of these sources, the Marcellus Shale, located in the Allegheny Plateau, is currently undergoing extensive drilling and production. The technology used to extract gas in the Marcellus Shale is known as hydraulic fracturing and has garnered much attention because of its use of large amounts of fresh water, its use of proprietary fluids for the hydraulic-fracturing process, its potential to release contaminants into the environment, and its potential effect on water resources. Nonetheless, development of natural gas extraction wells in the Marcellus Shale is only part of the overall natural gas story in this area of Pennsylvania. Conventional natural gas wells, which sometimes use the same technique for extraction, are commonly located in the same general area as the Marcellus Shale and are frequently developed in clusters across the landscape. The combined effects of these two natural gas extraction methods create potentially serious patterns of disturbance on the landscape. This document quantifies the landscape changes and consequences of natural gas extraction for Cameron, Clarion, Elk, Forest, Jefferson, McKean, Potter, and Warren Counties in Pennsylvania between 2004 and 2010. Patterns of landscape disturbance related to natural gas extraction activities were collected and digitized using National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) imagery for 2004, 2005/2006, 2008, and 2010. The disturbance patterns were then used to measure changes in land cover and land use using the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) of 2001. A series of landscape metrics is also used to quantify these changes and is included in this publication. In this region, natural gas and oil development disturbed

  7. Geohydrology and susceptibility of major aquifers to surface contamination in Alabama; area 4

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Planert, Michael; Pritchett, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Alabama Department of Environmental Management, is conducting a series of geohydrologic studies to delineate the major aquifers (those which provide water for public supplies) in Alabama, their recharge areas, and areas susceptible to contamination. This report summarizes these factors for two major aquifers in Area 4--Calhoun, Jefferson, St. Clair, Shelby, and Talladega Counties. The major aquifers in the study area are in Cambrian and Ordovician and Mississippian rocks. Highest yields from aquifers are associated with solution openings in carbonate rocks. Springs in the area provide substantial amounts of water for municipal supply. Coldwater Spring provides 17 million gal of water/day to the city of Anniston, the largest groundwater user in the area. All recharge areas for the aquifers are susceptible to contamination from land surface. Two conditions exist in the study area that may cause the aquifers to be highly susceptible to contamination on a local scale: fracturing of rock materials due to faulting and the production of a porous cherty soil through weathering. Where sinkholes are present, there may be a direct connection between the land surface and the aquifer. Areas with sinkholes are considered to be extremely susceptible to contamination. (USGS)

  8. 8. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of U.S. 11, N of Epes Southern RR. lift span, from SW. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  9. 11. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of U.S. 11 N of Epes Southern RR. lift span, S tower. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, MS. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  10. 46. LINED SECTION OF AQUEDUCT LOOKING NORTH TO ALABAMA HILLS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. LINED SECTION OF AQUEDUCT LOOKING NORTH TO ALABAMA HILLS - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH, CAMPUS OF UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA IN TUSCALOOSA. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW LOOKING SOUTH, CAMPUS OF UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA IN TUSCALOOSA. SOUTH LOCK WALL, LOCK NO. 3 (LATER NO. 12). - Warrior River, Lock No. 3 Wall, River Road at University Park, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  12. Availability of Asthma Quick Relief Medication in Five Alabama School Systems

    PubMed Central

    Stroupe, Nancy; McClure, Leslie A.; Wheeler, Lani; Gerald, Lynn B.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This paper documents individual asthma action plan presence and quick relief medication (albuterol) availability for elementary students enrolled in five Alabama school systems. Patients and Methods Data were obtained during baseline data collection (fall 2005) of a school-based supervised asthma medication trial. All students attended 1 of 36 participating elementary schools across five school systems in Jefferson County, Alabama. In addition, they had to have physician-diagnosed asthma requiring daily controller medication. Each school system had its own superintendent and elected school board. Asthma action plan presence and albuterol availability was confirmed by study personnel. Asthma action plans had to contain daily and acute asthma management instructions. Predictors of asthma action plan presence and albuterol availability were also investigated. Associations between albuterol availability and self-reported characteristics including health care utilization prior to study enrollment and outcomes during the study baseline period were also investigated. Results Enrolled students had a mean (SD) age of 11.0 (2.1) years, 91% were African American, and 79% had moderate persistent asthma. No student had a complete asthma action plan on file and only 14% had albuterol physically available at school. Albuterol availability was not predicted by gender, race, insurance status, second-hand smoke exposure, need for pre-exercise albuterol, asthma severity, or self-reported health care utilization prior to study enrollment. Albuterol availability did not predict school absences, red/yellow peak flow recordings, or medication adherence during the study's baseline period. Conclusion Despite policies permitting students to possess albuterol, few elementary students across five independent school systems in Alabama actually had it readily available at school. PMID:22454787

  13. Availability of Asthma Quick Relief Medication in Five Alabama School Systems.

    PubMed

    Gerald, Joe K; Stroupe, Nancy; McClure, Leslie A; Wheeler, Lani; Gerald, Lynn B

    2012-03-01

    OBJECTIVES: This paper documents individual asthma action plan presence and quick relief medication (albuterol) availability for elementary students enrolled in five Alabama school systems. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data were obtained during baseline data collection (fall 2005) of a school-based supervised asthma medication trial. All students attended 1 of 36 participating elementary schools across five school systems in Jefferson County, Alabama. In addition, they had to have physician-diagnosed asthma requiring daily controller medication. Each school system had its own superintendent and elected school board. Asthma action plan presence and albuterol availability was confirmed by study personnel. Asthma action plans had to contain daily and acute asthma management instructions. Predictors of asthma action plan presence and albuterol availability were also investigated. Associations between albuterol availability and self-reported characteristics including health care utilization prior to study enrollment and outcomes during the study baseline period were also investigated. RESULTS: Enrolled students had a mean (SD) age of 11.0 (2.1) years, 91% were African American, and 79% had moderate persistent asthma. No student had a complete asthma action plan on file and only 14% had albuterol physically available at school. Albuterol availability was not predicted by gender, race, insurance status, second-hand smoke exposure, need for pre-exercise albuterol, asthma severity, or self-reported health care utilization prior to study enrollment. Albuterol availability did not predict school absences, red/yellow peak flow recordings, or medication adherence during the study's baseline period. CONCLUSION: Despite policies permitting students to possess albuterol, few elementary students across five independent school systems in Alabama actually had it readily available at school.

  14. The Economic Impact of Jefferson College on the Community and the State, FY 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefferson Coll., Hillsboro, MO.

    This document is a report on the economic impact of Jefferson College on Jefferson County and the State of Missouri. The information from the this study can be used to support the community college's effectiveness, assessment, public relations, and accreditation efforts. Results show that: (1) the community college impacts the county economically…

  15. 77 FR 26541 - Alabama Power Company; Notice of Application for Amendment of License Accepted for Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-04

    ... Request: Due to drought conditions in the Coosa River basin, Alabama Power proposes to release from Jordan.... d. Applicant: Alabama Power Company. e. Name of Project: Jordan Hydroelectric Project. f. Location: On the Coosa River, in Elmore, Chilton and Coosa Counties, Alabama. g. Filed Pursuant to:...

  16. Alabama Public Library Service Library Directory and 1996 Statistical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    This publication presents library contact information and statistics for Alabama public libraries for fiscal year 1996 (October 1, 1995-September 30, 1996). The library directory is arranged by type of library: public libraries, single-county public library systems, multi-county public library systems, and multitype library systems. Entries…

  17. 41. Photocopy of engraving from History of Franklin, Jefferson, Washington, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. Photocopy of engraving from History of Franklin, Jefferson, Washington, Crawford and Gasconade Counties, Missouri (Chicago: Goodpeed Publishing Co., 1888) Wittenberg-Sorber, St. Louis, engraver, ca. 1888 'STONE HILL VINEYARDS AND CELLARS OF THE STONE HILL WINE COMPANY, HERMANN, MO.' - Stone Hill Winery, 401 West Twelfth Street, Hermann, Gasconade County, MO

  18. 32. PORT PROFILE OF THE ALABAMA. Uncopyrighted 31/4'x5'photograph taken by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. PORT PROFILE OF THE ALABAMA. Uncopyrighted 3-1/4'x5'photograph taken by Thigpen Photography, c. 1965. Written on back of photo: 'This is what the vessel looked like when I bought her in 1966 R.S. Douglas.' Also, stamped on back is: Thigpen Photography 1442 So. Beltline Highway Mobile, Alabama 46609 to reorder specify no. M7062-1 - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

  19. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plan (Phase II)

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini; Joe Benson; David Hilton; David Cate; Lewis Brown

    2006-05-29

    The principal research efforts for Phase II of the project were drilling an infill well strategically located in Section 13, T. 10 N., R. 2 W., of the Womack Hill Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, and obtaining fresh core from the upper Smackover reservoir to test the feasibility of implementing an immobilized enzyme technology project in this field. The Turner Land and Timber Company 13-10 No. 1 well was successfully drilled and tested at a daily rate of 132 barrels of oil in Section 13. The well has produced 27,720 barrels of oil, and is currently producing at a rate of 60 barrels of oil per day. The 13-10 well confirmed the presence of 175,000 barrels of attic (undrained) oil in Section 13. As predicted from reservoir characterization, modeling and simulation, the top of the Smackover reservoir in the 13-10 well is structurally high to the tops of the Smackover in offsetting wells, and the 13-10 well has significantly more net pay than the offsetting wells. The drilling and testing of the 13-10 well showed that the eastern part of the field continues to have a strong water drive and that there is no need to implement a pressure maintenance program in this part of the Womack Hill Field at this time. The success achieved in drilling and testing the 13-10 infill well demonstrates the benefits of building a geologic model to target areas in mature fields that have the potential to contain undrained oil, thus increasing the productivity and profitability of these fields. Microbial cultures that grew at 90 C and converted ethanol to acid were recovered from fresh cuttings from the Smackover carbonate reservoir in an analogous field to the Womack Hill Field in southwest Alabama; however, no viable microorganisms were found in the Smackover cores recovered from the drilling of the 13-10 well in Womack Hill Field. Further evaluation is, therefore, required prior to implementing an immobilized enzyme technology project in the Womack Hill Field.

  20. Educational Equity in Alabama: What We Learned from Report Card 2000. Research Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller-Whitehead, Marie

    This study examined Alabama State Education Report Card indicators for the year 2000 to identify predictors of student academic achievement at both the district and school levels for 128 public city and county school systems and 1,272 Alabama public schools. School district performance grade and school performance grade as provided on the Alabama…

  1. 3. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE RAILROAD BRIDGE AND FERRY 1.5 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE RAILROAD BRIDGE AND FERRY 1.5 miles N. from Cochrane on Ala. route 17. Copy of photo by Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms., 1927. West ferry landing ferry barge, andcar in foreground. Alabama, Tennessee & Northern (later Frisco) RR bridge in background. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  2. 4. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE COLLAPSED RAILROAD BRIDGE 1.5 miles ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE COLLAPSED RAILROAD BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. from Cochrane on Ala. route 17. Western half of collapsed Alabama, Tenn. & Northern RR. Bridge Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms., photographer, 1973. Copy by Sarcone Photography, Columbs, Ms Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  3. FACING SOUNT AT JEFFERSON STREET AND 16TH STREET. NORTH AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACING SOUNT AT JEFFERSON STREET AND 16TH STREET. NORTH AND WEST BACKSIDES OF JOHN BREUNER AND COMPANY BUILDING IN CENTER (BACKGROUND), SURROUNDING STRUCTURES ON CLAY, JEFFERSON AND 15TH STREETS AT LEFT, RIGHT, AND FOREGROUND - John Breuner & Company Building, 1515 Clay Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  4. The Economic Impact of Jefferson College on the Community and State--FY1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefferson Coll., Hillsboro, MO.

    This document provides an estimation of the ways in which Jefferson College (Missouri) impacts the economy of Jefferson County and the state as a whole. It offers quantitative information and acts as a reference for the Board of Trustees, administrators, faculty, and staff regarding the economic significance of the college to the area it serves.…

  5. Effects of Jefferson Road stormwater-detention basin on loads and concentrations of selected chemical constituents in East Branch of Allen Creek at Pittsford, Monroe County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherwood, Donald A.

    2004-01-01

    Discharge and water-quality data collection at East Branch Allen Creek from 1990 through 2000 provide a basis for estimating the effect of the Jefferson Road detention basin on loads and concentrations of chemical constituents downstream from the basin. Mean monthly flow for the 5 years prior to construction of the detention basin (8.71 ft3/s) was slightly lower than after (9.08 ft3/s). The slightly higher mean monthly flow after basin construction may have been influenced by the peak flow for the period of record that occurred in July 1998 or variations in flow diverted from the canal. No statistically significant difference in average monthly mean flow before and after basin installation was indicated. Total phosphorus was the only constituent to show no months with significant differences in load after basin construction. Several constituents showed months with significantly smaller loads after basin construction than before, whereas some constituents showed certain months with smaller and some months with greater loads, after basin construction. Statistical analysis of the 'mean monthly load' for all months before and all months after construction of the detention basin showed only one constituent (ammonia + organic nitrogen) with a significantly lower load after construction and none with higher loads. Median concentrations of ammonia + organic nitrogen showed a statistically significant decrease (from 0.78 mg/L to 0.60 mg/L) after basin installation, as did nitrite + nitrate (from 1.50 mg/L to 0.96 mg/L); in contrast, the median concentration of dissolved chloride increased from 95.5 mg/L before basin installation to 109 mg/L thereafter. A trend analysis of constituent concentrations before and after installation of the detention basin showed that total phosphorus had a downward trend after installation. Analysis of the data collected at East Branch Allen Creek indicates that the Jefferson Road detention basin, in some cases, provides an improvement

  6. Thomas Jefferson's Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Catherine F.

    1996-01-01

    Notes that taken together, Thomas Jefferson's contributions to the history of writing technology demonstrate a virtual "computer." Links Jefferson's development of writing technology to his democratic political philosophy. Argues that this link should interest writing teachers. Suggests that Jeffersonian optimism effectively counters Foucaultian…

  7. Thomas Jefferson and the Constitution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Merrill D.

    1987-01-01

    Examines Thomas Jefferson's role in the making and interpretation of the United States Constitution. Discusses the dominant features of Jefferson's constitutional theory; the character of Jefferson's presidency; and Jefferson's ongoing concern about constitutional preservation and change. Lists important dates in the history of the constitution.…

  8. 13. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES HIGHWAY BRIDGE U.S. 11 N ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES HIGHWAY BRIDGE U.S. 11 N of Epes Gorgas Bridge from NW. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  9. Pesticide occurrence in groundwater in areas of high-density row crop production in Alabama, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moreland, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    High-density row crop production occurs in three areas of Alabama that are underlain by productive aquifers, northern Alabama, southeastern Alabama, and Baldwin County in southwestern Alabama. The U.S. Geological Survey collected five groundwater samples from each of these three areas during 2009 for analysis of selected pesticides. Results of these analyses showed detections for 37 of 152 analytes. The three most frequently detected compounds were atrazine, 2-Chloro-4-isopropylamino-6-amino-triazine (CIAT), and metolachlor. The highest concentration for any analyte was 4.08 micrograms per liter for metolachlor.

  10. Geology and geothermal resources of the Santiam Pass area of the Oregon Cascade Range, Deschutes, Jefferson and Linn Counties, Oregon. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, B.E.

    1992-10-01

    This open-file report presents the results of the Santiam Pass drilling program. The first phase of this program was to compile all available geological, geophysical and geothermal data for the Santiam Pass area and select a drill site on the basis of these data (see Priest and others, 1987a), A summary of the drilling operations and costs associated with the project are presented in chapter 1 by Hill and Benoit. An Overview of the geology of the Santiam Pass area is presented by Hill and Priest in chapter 2. Geologic mapping and isotopic age determinations in the Santiam Pass-Mount Jefferson area completed since 1987 are summarized in chapter 2. One of the more important conclusions reached in chapter 2 is that a minimum of 2 km vertical displacement has occurred in the High Cascade graben in the Santiam Pass area. The petrology of the Santiam Pass drill core is presented by Hill in chapter 3. Most of the major volcanic units in the core have been analyzed for major, minor, and trace element abundances and have been studied petrographically. Three K-Ar ages are interpreted in conjunction with the magnetostratigraphy of the core to show that the oldest rocks in the core are approximately 1.8 Ma. Geothermal and geophysical data collected from the Santiam Pass well are presented by Blackwell in chapter 4. The Santiam Pass well failed to penetrate beneath the zone of lateral groundwater flow associated with highly permeable Quaternary volcanic rocks. Calculated geothermal gradients range from about 50{degree}C/km at depth 700-900 m, to roughly 110{degree}C/km from 900 m to the bottom of the well at 929 m. Heat-flow values for the bottom part of the hole bracket the regional average for the High Cascades. Blackwell concludes that heat flow along the High Cascades axis is equal to or higher than along the western edge of the High Cascades.

  11. 12. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of U.S. 11 N of Epes Southern RR. lift span, wide angle side view from SE. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  12. 9. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of U.S. 11 N of Epes Southern RR. lift span, view from S approach. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  13. 10. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of U.S. 11 of Epes Wouthern RR. lift span, wide=angle view from SW. bank. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  14. 76 FR 27139 - Alabama Disaster Number AL-00036

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ..., Fort Worth, TX 76155. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S... INFORMATION: The notice of the Presidential disaster declaration for the State of Alabama, dated 04/28/2011 is..., Jackson, Limestone, Madison, Morgan, Washington, Winston. Contiguous Counties: (Economic Injury Loans...

  15. Cardboard Houses with Wings: The Architecture of Alabama's Rural Studio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botz-Bornstein, Thorsten

    2010-01-01

    The Rural Studio, an outreach program of Auburn University, designs innovative houses for poor people living in Alabama's Hale County by using "junk" such as car windshields, carpet tiles, baled cardboard, and old license plates. The article theorizes this particular architecture in terms of Critical Regionalism, developed by Tzonis/Lefaivre and…

  16. Jefferson Lab Virtual Tour

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-13

    Take a virtual tour of the campus of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. You can see inside our two accelerators, three experimental areas, accelerator component fabrication and testing areas, high-performance computing areas and laser labs.

  17. Jefferson Lab Virtual Tour

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Take a virtual tour of the campus of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. You can see inside our two accelerators, three experimental areas, accelerator component fabrication and testing areas, high-performance computing areas and laser labs.

  18. Alabama Education Quick Facts, 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Department of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This document is a quick look at general information about Alabama schools. The document contains 11 sections: (1) state statistics; (2) Alabama public schools; (3) Alabama board of education members; (4) financial data; (5) school size and enrollment; (6) transportation and school meals; (7) graduation requirements; (8) additional enrollment;…

  19. Late Pleistocene fishes of the Tennessee River Basin: an analysis of a late Pleistocene freshwater fish fauna from Bell Cave (site ACb-2) in Colbert County, Alabama, USA.

    PubMed

    Jacquemin, Stephen J; Ebersole, Jun A; Dickinson, William C; Ciampaglio, Charles N

    2016-01-01

    The Tennessee River Basin is considered one of the most important regions for freshwater biodiversity anywhere on the globe. The Tennessee River Basin currently includes populations of at least half of the described contemporary diversity of extant North American freshwater fishes, crayfish, mussel, and gastropod species. However, comparatively little is known about the biodiversity of this basin from the Pleistocene Epoch, particularly the late Pleistocene (∼10,000 to 30,000 years B.P.) leading to modern Holocene fish diversity patterns. The objective of this study was to describe the fish assemblages of the Tennessee River Basin from the late Pleistocene using a series of faunas from locales throughout the basin documented from published literature, unpublished reports, and an undocumented fauna from Bell Cave (site ACb-2, Colbert County, AL). Herein we discuss 41 unequivocal taxa from 10 late Pleistocene localities within the basin and include a systematic discussion of 11 families, 19 genera, and 24 identifiable species (28 unequivocal taxa) specific to the Bell Cave locality. Among the described fauna are several extirpated (e.g., Northern Pike Esox lucius, Northern Madtom Noturus stigmosus) and a single extinct (Harelip Sucker Moxostoma lacerum) taxa that suggest a combination of late Pleistocene displacement events coupled with more recent changes in habitat that have resulted in modern basin diversity patterns. The Bell Cave locality represents one of the most intact Pleistocene freshwater fish deposits anywhere in North America. Significant preservational, taphonomic, sampling, and identification biases preclude the identification of additional taxa. Overall, this study provides a detailed look into paleo-river ecology, as well as freshwater fish diversity and distribution leading up to the contemporary biodiversity patterns of the Tennessee River Basin and Mississippi River Basin as a whole.

  20. Late Pleistocene fishes of the Tennessee River Basin: an analysis of a late Pleistocene freshwater fish fauna from Bell Cave (site ACb-2) in Colbert County, Alabama, USA.

    PubMed

    Jacquemin, Stephen J; Ebersole, Jun A; Dickinson, William C; Ciampaglio, Charles N

    2016-01-01

    The Tennessee River Basin is considered one of the most important regions for freshwater biodiversity anywhere on the globe. The Tennessee River Basin currently includes populations of at least half of the described contemporary diversity of extant North American freshwater fishes, crayfish, mussel, and gastropod species. However, comparatively little is known about the biodiversity of this basin from the Pleistocene Epoch, particularly the late Pleistocene (∼10,000 to 30,000 years B.P.) leading to modern Holocene fish diversity patterns. The objective of this study was to describe the fish assemblages of the Tennessee River Basin from the late Pleistocene using a series of faunas from locales throughout the basin documented from published literature, unpublished reports, and an undocumented fauna from Bell Cave (site ACb-2, Colbert County, AL). Herein we discuss 41 unequivocal taxa from 10 late Pleistocene localities within the basin and include a systematic discussion of 11 families, 19 genera, and 24 identifiable species (28 unequivocal taxa) specific to the Bell Cave locality. Among the described fauna are several extirpated (e.g., Northern Pike Esox lucius, Northern Madtom Noturus stigmosus) and a single extinct (Harelip Sucker Moxostoma lacerum) taxa that suggest a combination of late Pleistocene displacement events coupled with more recent changes in habitat that have resulted in modern basin diversity patterns. The Bell Cave locality represents one of the most intact Pleistocene freshwater fish deposits anywhere in North America. Significant preservational, taphonomic, sampling, and identification biases preclude the identification of additional taxa. Overall, this study provides a detailed look into paleo-river ecology, as well as freshwater fish diversity and distribution leading up to the contemporary biodiversity patterns of the Tennessee River Basin and Mississippi River Basin as a whole. PMID:26855876

  1. Late Pleistocene fishes of the Tennessee River Basin: an analysis of a late Pleistocene freshwater fish fauna from Bell Cave (site ACb-2) in Colbert County, Alabama, USA

    PubMed Central

    Ebersole, Jun A.; Dickinson, William C.; Ciampaglio, Charles N.

    2016-01-01

    The Tennessee River Basin is considered one of the most important regions for freshwater biodiversity anywhere on the globe. The Tennessee River Basin currently includes populations of at least half of the described contemporary diversity of extant North American freshwater fishes, crayfish, mussel, and gastropod species. However, comparatively little is known about the biodiversity of this basin from the Pleistocene Epoch, particularly the late Pleistocene (∼10,000 to 30,000 years B.P.) leading to modern Holocene fish diversity patterns. The objective of this study was to describe the fish assemblages of the Tennessee River Basin from the late Pleistocene using a series of faunas from locales throughout the basin documented from published literature, unpublished reports, and an undocumented fauna from Bell Cave (site ACb-2, Colbert County, AL). Herein we discuss 41 unequivocal taxa from 10 late Pleistocene localities within the basin and include a systematic discussion of 11 families, 19 genera, and 24 identifiable species (28 unequivocal taxa) specific to the Bell Cave locality. Among the described fauna are several extirpated (e.g., Northern Pike Esox lucius, Northern Madtom Noturus stigmosus) and a single extinct (Harelip Sucker Moxostoma lacerum) taxa that suggest a combination of late Pleistocene displacement events coupled with more recent changes in habitat that have resulted in modern basin diversity patterns. The Bell Cave locality represents one of the most intact Pleistocene freshwater fish deposits anywhere in North America. Significant preservational, taphonomic, sampling, and identification biases preclude the identification of additional taxa. Overall, this study provides a detailed look into paleo-river ecology, as well as freshwater fish diversity and distribution leading up to the contemporary biodiversity patterns of the Tennessee River Basin and Mississippi River Basin as a whole. PMID:26855876

  2. Alabama Water Use, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutson, Susan S.; Littlepage, Thomas M.; Harper, Michael J.; Tinney, James O.

    2009-01-01

    Water is one of Alabama's most precious natural resources. It is a vital component of human existence and essential to the overall quality of life. Wise stewardship of this valuable resource depends on a continuing assessment of water availability and water use. Population growth in many parts of the State has resulted in increased competition for available water resources. This competition includes offstream uses, such as residential, agricultural, and industrial, and instream uses for maintenance of species habitat and diversity, navigation, power generation, recreation, and water quality. Accurate water-use information is required for sound management decisions within this competitive framework and is necessary for a more comprehensive understanding of the link between water use, water supply, and overall water availability. A study of water use during 2005 was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs, Office of Water Resources, Water Management Branch (ADECA-OWR), to provide water-use data for local and State water managers. The results of the study about the amount of water used, how it was used, and where it was used in Alabama have been published in 'Estimated use of water in Alabama in 2005' by Hutson and others, 2009, and is accessible on the Web at http://pubs.usgs.gov/sir/2009/5163 and available upon request as a CD-ROM through USGS and ADECA-OWR.

  3. Alabama and SREB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) is a nonprofit organization that works collaboratively with Alabama and 15 other member states to improve education at every level--from pre-K to postdoctoral study--through many effective programs and initiatives. SREB's "Challenge to Lead Goals for Education", which call for the region to lead the…

  4. Homonegativity among Alabama Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satcher, Jamie; Leggett, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Members of the Alabama Counseling Association were surveyed to examine the extent to which they demonstrate homonegativity (prejudicial attitudes toward homosexuality). The majority of the counselors did not appear to approach homosexuality from traditional prejudices, although almost one-third believed homosexuality to be immoral. The counselors…

  5. Academic Standards in Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    A+ Education Partnership, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Education policymakers and educators in Alabama are committed to improving the state's public education system to ensure that students gain the knowledge and skills they need to graduate from high school ready for real life. The state is on the path to implementing higher academic standards--the College and Career Ready Standards--which lay a…

  6. Geology of the Huntsville quadrangle, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanford, T.H.; Malmberg, G.T.; West, L.R.

    1961-01-01

    The 7 1/2-minute Huntsville quadrangle is in south-central Madison County, Ala., and includes part of the city of Hunstville. The south, north, east, and west boundaries of the quadrangle are about 3 miles north of the Tennessee River, 15 1/2 miles south of the Tennessee line, 8 miles west of the Jackson County line, and 9 miles east of the Limestone County line. The bedrock geology of the Huntsville quadrangle was mapped by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the city of Hunstville and the Geological Survey of Alabama as part of a detailed study of the geology and ground-water resources of Madison County, with special reference to the Huntsville area. G. T. Malmberg began the geologic mapping of the county in July 1953, and completed it in April 1954. T. H. Sanford, Jr., assisted Malmberg in the final phases of the county mapping, which included measuring geologic sections with hand level and steel tape. In November 1958 Sanford, assisted by L. R. West, checked contacts and elevations in the Hunstville quadrangle; made revisions in the contact lines; and wrote the text for this report. The fieldwork for this report was completed in April 1959.

  7. Analytical results for 35 mine-waste tailings cores and six bed-sediment samples, and an estimate of the volume of contaminated material at Buckeye meadow on upper Basin Creek, northern Jefferson County, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fey, D.L.; Church, S.E.; Finney, C.J.

    1999-01-01

    Metal-mining related wastes in the Boulder River basin study area in northern Jefferson County, Montana have been implicated in their detrimental effects on water quality with regard to acidgeneration and toxic-metal solubilization. Flotation-mill tailings in the meadow below the Buckeye mine, hereafter referred to as the Buckeye mill-tailings site, have been identified as significant contributors to water quality degradation of Basin Creek, Montana. Basin Creek is one of three tributaries to the Boulder River in the study area; bed sediments and waters draining from the Buckeye mine have also been implicated. Geochemical analysis of 35 tailings cores and six bed-sediment samples was undertaken to determine the concentrations of Ag, As, Cd, Cu, Pb,and Zn present in these materials. These elements are environmentally significant, in that they can be toxic to fish and/or the invertebrate organisms that constitute their food. A suite of one-inch cores of dispersed flotation-mill tailings and underlying premining material was taken from a large, flat area north of Basin Creek near the site of the Buckeye mine. Thirty-five core samples were taken and divided into 204 subsamples. The samples were analyzed by ICP-AES (inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy) using a mixed-acid digestion. Results of the core analyses show that the elements listed above are present at moderate to very high concentrations (arsenic to 63,000 ppm, silver to 290 ppm, cadmium to 370 ppm, copper to 4,800 ppm, lead to 93,000 ppm, and zinc to 23,000 ppm). Volume calculations indicate that an estimated 8,400 metric tons of contaminated material are present at the site. Six bed-sediment samples were also subjected to the mixed-acid total digestion, and a warm (50oC) 2M HCl-1% H2O2 leach and analyzed by ICP-AES. Results indicate that bed sediments of Basin Creek are only slightly impacted by past mining above the Buckeye-Enterprise complex, moderately impacted at the upper (eastern

  8. Jefferson and Democratic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holowchak, M. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    This essay is a reply to James Carpenter's "Thomas Jefferson and the Ideology of Democratic Schooling." In it, I argue that there is an apophatic strain in the essay that calls into question the motivation for the undertaking.

  9. Foraminifera from Paleocene Clayton Formation lithostratotype, Barbour Count, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Fluegeman, R.H. Jr.

    1986-05-01

    A detailed search of the Clayton lithostratotype for microfossils has produced the first significant foraminifera fauna from the section and only the second occurrence of foraminifera in the Clayton Formation in eastern Alabama. The fauna is well preserved, but low in abundance and diversity; all assemblages are dominated by species of Anomalinoides. No planktonic species were identified in the studied samples. The benthic assemblages bear little resemblance to the more diverse foraminifera faunas of the Pine Barren and McBryde Members of the Clayton in western Alabama. The fauna from the Clayton lithostratotype closely resembles an assemblage collected from a sand unit within the middle part of the Porters Creek Formation of Butler County, Alabama. Biostratigraphic information is presently unavailable for the Clayton Formation in eastern Alabama; therefore, the authors cannot determine whether the Clayton and Porters Creek are time-equivalent units. However, occurrences of like foraminiferal assemblages imply equivalent paleoecologic conditions, and similarities in lithology are found between the Clayton Formation at its stratotype and the Porters Creek in Butler County, both of which indicate that both units represent the same depositional aspect of the early Paleocene transgressive-regressive cycle.

  10. Ground-Water System in the Chimacum Creek Basin and Surface Water/Ground Water Interaction in Chimacum and Tarboo Creeks and the Big and Little Quilcene Rivers, Eastern Jefferson County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simonds, F. William; Longpre, Claire I.; Justin, Greg B.

    2004-01-01

    A detailed study of the ground-water system in the unconsolidated glacial deposits in the Chimacum Creek Basin and the interactions between surface water and ground water in four main drainage basins was conducted in eastern Jefferson County, Washington. The study will assist local watershed planners in assessing the status of the water resources and the potential effects of ground-water development on surface-water systems. A new surficial geologic map of the Chimacum Creek Basin and a series of hydrogeologic sections were developed by incorporating LIDAR imagery, existing map sources, and drillers' logs from 110 inventoried wells. The hydrogeologic framework outlined in the study will help characterize the occurrence of ground water in the unconsolidated glacial deposits and how it interacts with the surface-water system. Water levels measured throughout the study show that the altitude of the water table parallels the surface topography and ranges from 0 to 400 feet above the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 across the basin, and seasonal variations in precipitation due to natural cycles generally are on the order of 2 to 3 feet. Synoptic stream-discharge measurements and instream mini-piezometers and piezometers with nested temperature sensors provided additional data to refine the positions of gaining and losing reaches and delineate seasonal variations. Chimacum Creek generally gains water from the shallow ground-water system, except near the community of Chimacum where localized losses occur. In the lower portions of Chimacum Creek, gaining conditions dominate in the summer when creek stages are low and ground-water levels are high, and losing conditions dominate in the winter when creek stages are high relative to ground-water levels. In the Quilcene Bay area, three drainage basins were studied specifically to assess surface water/ground water interactions. The upper reaches of Tarboo Creek generally gain water from the shallow ground-water system

  11. Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  12. Alabama Education News. Volume 34, Number 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  13. Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  14. Alabama Education News. Volume 27, Number 9

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  15. Alabama Education News. Volume 32, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  16. Alabama Education News. Volume 28, Number 9

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  17. Alabama Education News. Volume 28, Number 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  18. Alabama Education News. Volume 30, Number 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  19. Alabama Education News. Volume 27, Number 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  20. Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  1. Alabama Education News. Volume 30, Number 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  2. Alabama Education News. Volume 33, Number 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  3. Alabama Education News. Volume 34, Number 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  4. Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  5. Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  6. Alabama Education News. Volume 29, Number 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  7. Alabama Education News. Volume 28, Number 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  8. Paleocene lignite deposits of southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A.

    1984-04-01

    In southwest Alabama, lignite having economic potential occurs in the Oak Hill Member of the Naheola Formation. This middle Paleocene lignite generally consists of a single bed of 1-14 ft (0.5-4 m) in thickness and is the most extensive lignite in the southwest Alabama region. The Oak Hill lignite deposit accumulated in lower delta plain coastal marshes in interchannel areas behind a barrier system. The source area for the deltaic sediments was probably to the west and/or northwest of Choctaw County, Alabama. The lignite occurs in a clay-dominated sequence. Oak Hill interdistributary bay ripple-laminated clays are interbedded with ripple-laminated, crevasse splay sands generally less than 15 ft (5 m) thick. The glauconitic sands of the overlying Coal Bluff Marl Member of the Naheola Formation represent times of marine encroachment into the interchannel basin area. Lignite having subeconomic value at present occurs in the upper part of the Tuscahoma Sand. This upper Paleocene lignite is irregular in its outcrop pattern and apparently is not represented over extensive areas. It is locally persistent with one or more beds less than 3 ft (1 m) thick. The Tuscahoma may contain up to 6 lignite seams that may exceed a total thickness of 5 ft (1.5 m). These lignite beds were deposited in lower delta-plain coastal marshes adjacent to high constructive deltaic bar finger sands. Tuscahoma marsh clays are interbedded with ripple-laminated and cross-bedded bar finger sands. The Tuscahoma Sand is overlain by the Bashi Marl Member of the Hatchetigbee Formation. The Bashi contains a diverse lower Eocene marine fossil assemblage.

  9. Paleocene lignite deposits of southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A.

    1984-04-01

    In southwest Alabama, lignite having economic potential occurs in the Oak Hill Member of the Naheola Formation. This middle Paleocene lignite generally consists of a single bed of 1-14 ft (0.5-4 m) in thickness and is the most extensive lignite in the southwest Alabama region. The Oak Hill lignite deposit accumulated in lower delta plain coastal marshes in interchannel areas behind a barrier system. The source area for the deltaic sediments was probably to the west and/or northwest of Choctaw County, Alabama. The lignite occurs in a clay-dominated sequence. Oak Hill interdistributary bay ripple-laminated clays are interbedded with ripple-laminated, crevasse splay sands generally less than 15 ft (5 m) thick. The glauconitic sands of the overlying Coal Bluff Marl Member of the Naheola Formation represent times of marine encroachment into the interchannel basin area. Lignite haing subeconomic value at present occurs in the upper part of the Tuscahoma Sand. This upper Paleocene lignite is irregular in its outcrop pattern and apparently is not represented over extensive areas. It is locally persistent with one or more beds less than 3 ft (1 m) thick. The Tuscahoma may contain up to 6 lignite seams that may exceed a total thickness of 5 ft (1.5 m). These lignite beds were deposited in lower delta-plain coastal marshes adjacent to high constructive deltaic bar finger sands. Tuscahoma marsh clays are interbedded with ripple-laminated and cross-bedded bar finger sands. The Tuscahoma Sand is overlain by the Bashi Marl Member of the Hatchetigbee Formation. The Bashi contains a diverse lower Eocene marine fossil assemblage.

  10. Evaluation of broiler litter transportation in northern Alabama, USA.

    PubMed

    Paudel, Krishna P; Adhikari, Murali; Martin, Neil R

    2004-10-01

    The profitability of using broiler litter as a source of crop nutrients was calculated using a phosphorus-consistent litter application rule. A ton of litter can cost effectively be transported up to 164 miles from the production facility. A cost-minimizing phosphorus-consistent transportation model developed to meet the nutrient needs of 29 counties in northern Alabama revealed that not all of the litter can be utilized in the region. The total cost increased when transportation of the litter out of the heavily surplus counties was prioritized. Total litter use was minimally affected by changes in chemical fertilizer prices. Shadow prices indicated the robustness of the model.

  11. Confronting Thomas Jefferson, Slave Owner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackman, James A.

    1992-01-01

    Although Thomas Jefferson's view of freedom was the cornerstone of the Declaration of Independence, this founding father owned 170 slaves to run his 5,000 acre plantation. This article describes a unit developed by the Monticello (Virginia) Education Department that teaches secondary students about slave Isaac Jefferson while exposing them to…

  12. The Vision of Thomas Jefferson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Robert F.

    1993-01-01

    Contends that it was the blend of public service and public interests that distinguish the life of Thomas Jefferson. Discusses Jefferson's political philosophy found in his writings. Explains that nearly all of his writing was done to accomplish specific goals, although it had significance far beyond the immediate context. (CFR)

  13. Adsorption Kinetics of CO2, CH4, and their Equimolar Mixture on Coal from the Black Warrior Basin, West-Central Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S; Naney, Michael {Mike} T; Blencoe, James {Jim} G; Cole, David R; Pashin, Jack C.; Carroll, Richard E.

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the adsorption kinetic behavior of pure and mixed gases (CO2, CH4, approximately equimolar CO2 + CH4 mixtures, and He) on a coal sample obtained from the Black Warrior Basin at the Littleton Mine (Twin Pine Coal Company), Jefferson County, west-central Alabama. The sample was from the Mary Lee coal zone of the Pottsville Formation (Lower Pennsylvanian). Experiments with three size fractions (45-150 m, 1-2 mm, and 5-10 mm) of crushed coal were performed at 40 C and 35 C over a pressure range of 1.4 6.9 MPa to simulate coalbed methane reservoir conditions in the Black Warrior Basin and provide data relevant for enhanced coalbed methane recovery operations. The following key observations were made: (1) CO2 adsorption on both dry and water-saturated coal is much more rapid than CH4 adsorption; (2) water saturation decreases the rates of CO2 and CH4 adsorption on coal surfaces, but it appears to have minimal effects on the final magnitude of CO2 or CH4 adsorption if the coal is not previously exposed to CO2; (3) retention of adsorbed CO2 on coal surfaces is significant even with extreme pressure cycling; and (4) adsorption is significantly faster for the 45-150 m size fraction compared to the two coarser fractions.

  14. Adsorption kinetics of CO2, CH4, and their equimolar mixture on coal from the Black Warrior Basin, West-Central Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gruszkiewicz, M.S.; Naney, M.T.; Blencoe, J.G.; Cole, D.R.; Pashin, J.C.; Carroll, R.E.

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the adsorption kinetic behavior of pure and mixed gases (CO2, CH4, approximately equimolar CO2 + CH4 mixtures, and He) on a coal sample obtained from the Black Warrior Basin at the Littleton Mine (Twin Pine Coal Company), Jefferson County, west-central Alabama. The sample was from the Mary Lee coal zone of the Pottsville Formation (Lower Pennsylvanian). Experiments with three size fractions (45-150????m, 1-2??mm, and 5-10??mm) of crushed coal were performed at 40????C and 35????C over a pressure range of 1.4-6.9??MPa to simulate coalbed methane reservoir conditions in the Black Warrior Basin and provide data relevant for enhanced coalbed methane recovery operations. The following key observations were made: (1) CO2 adsorption on both dry and water-saturated coal is much more rapid than CH4 adsorption; (2) water saturation decreases the rates of CO2 and CH4 adsorption on coal surfaces, but it appears to have minimal effects on the final magnitude of CO2 or CH4 adsorption if the coal is not previously exposed to CO2; (3) retention of adsorbed CO2 on coal surfaces is significant even with extreme pressure cycling; and (4) adsorption is significantly faster for the 45-150????m size fraction compared to the two coarser fractions. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  15. Hurricane Frederic tidal floods of September 12-13, 1979, along the Gulf Coast, Heron Bay, Little Dauphin Island, Fort Morgan, and Fort Morgan NW quadrangles, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohman, Larry R.; Scott, John C.

    1980-01-01

    Shown on a topographic map are floodmark elevations and approximate areas flooded by Hurricane Frederic tides of September 12-13, 1979, along the southeastern tip of Mobile County, including Dauphin Island, Alabama. Nearly all the mainland area shown on the map was inundated by the tidal surge. The Dauphin Island Parkway Bridge (Alabama State Highway 163) was almost totally demolished. Storm-tide frequency and records of annual maximum tides at Mobile, Alabama, since 1772, are presented. Offshore winds reached about 160 miles per hour. A wind-velocity of about 145 miles per hour was recorded near Dauphin Island, Alabama. (USGS)

  16. Neutron Transversity at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Ping Chen; Xiaodong Jiang; Jen-chieh Peng; Lingyan Zhu

    2005-09-07

    Nucleon transversity and single transverse spin asymmetries have been the recent focus of large efforts by both theorists and experimentalists. On-going and planned experiments from HERMES, COMPASS and RHIC are mostly on the proton or the deuteron. Presented here is a planned measurement of the neutron transversity and single target spin asymmetries at Jefferson Lab in Hall A using a transversely polarized {sup 3}He target. Also presented are the results and plans of other neutron transverse spin experiments at Jefferson Lab. Finally, the factorization for semi-inclusive DIS studies at Jefferson Lab is discussed.

  17. Water EducaTion for Alabama's Black Belt (WET Alabama): Facilitating Scientific Understanding of the Hydrologic Cycle in Low-Resource Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, L. W.; Lee, M.; Stone, K.

    2008-12-01

    Youth, as future citizens, play an important role in obtaining and maintaining water resources. Water EducaTion for Alabama's Black Belt (WET Alabama) provides off-campus environmental and water-education activities designed to increase the appreciation, knowledge, conservation, and protection of water resources by middle-school teachers and children from predominantly African-American families in some of Alabama's poorest counties. The project is structured around a variety of indoor and outdoor activities held at two field sites, Auburn University's E. V. Smith Center in Macon County and the Robert G. Wehle Nature Center in Bullock County located in Alabama's "Black Belt" region, a region in which the prosperity of local communities is low. The educational activities provide an engaging laboratory and field experience for children from rural schools that lack scientific facilities and equipment. Both hosting centers have easy access to surface water (ponds, wetlands, streams) and offer facilities for basic hydrologic experiments (e.g., aquifer models, permeameter, water quality). The E.V. Smith site has access to groundwater through pairs of nested wells. Educational activities are designed to help students and teachers visualize groundwater flow and its interaction with surface water in an aquifer tank model; compare the hydrologic properties (porosity and permeability) of different aquifer materials (sands, gravels, and clays); learn about groundwater purging and sampling; and assess water quality and flow direction in the field. Simple exercises demonstrate (1) the balance of recharge and discharge, (2) the effects of flooding, drought and pumping, and (3) movement of contaminants through aquifers. A set of ready-to-teach laboratory exercises and tutorials address goals specified by the State of Alabama science curriculum for grades 6 to 8. The ultimate goal of Project WET Alabama is to help students and teachers from resource-poor schools become knowledgeable

  18. Thomas Jefferson and American Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coonen, Lester P.; Porter, Charlotte M.

    1976-01-01

    Presented are the numerous contributions made by Thomas Jefferson to the fields of biological sciences. In addition to his actual contributions and discoveries, his extensive verbal and literacy support of the sciences is traced. (SL)

  19. Libraries in Alabama: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/alabama.html Libraries in Alabama To use the sharing features on ... JavaScript. Birmingham American Sports Medicine Institute Sports Medicine LIBRARY 833 St. Vincent's Drive Suite 205 Birmingham, AL ...

  20. 77 FR 18857 - Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision for Alabama Beach Mouse General...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ... species. On August 9, 2011, we published a notice of availability for a draft EIS (76 FR 48879) for a 90... Mouse General Conservation Plan for Incidental Take on the Fort Morgan Peninsula, Baldwin County, AL... Alabama beach mouse (Peromyscus polionotus ammobates). For record of decision (ROD) availability,...

  1. 1. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE HIGHWAY BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE HIGHWAY BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. from Cochrane on Ala. route 17 Aerial view of Milner bridge, from SW. David J. Kaminsky, Architectural Photography, Atlanta Ga. Aug 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  2. 7. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just off U.S. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just off U.S. 11, N of Epes Copy of photo by Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms. 1922. Picture of earlier bridge: turn span and fixed spans. Ala. Great Southern RR. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  3. 5. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE COLLAPSED RAILROAD BRIDGE 1.5 miles ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE COLLAPSED RAILROAD BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. from Cochrane on Ala. route 17. Copy of photo by Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms., after bridge collapsed in 1973. Shows broken turn span and overturned center pier. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  4. 6. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE RAILROAD BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE RAILROAD BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. from Cochrane on Ala. route 17 Copy of photo by Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms., 192. Shows center turn span and part of one fixed span. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  5. 2. ALABAMA, PICKENS, CO., COCHRANE HIGHWAY BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. ALABAMA, PICKENS, CO., COCHRANE HIGHWAY BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. from Cochrane on Ala. route 17. Aerial view of Milner bridge, from SE. David J. Kaminsky, Architecturl Photography, Atlanta Ga. Aug 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  6. Luminous electrical phenomena in Huntsville, Alabama, tornadoes on April 3, 1974

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, O. H., Jr.; Vonnegut, B.

    1976-01-01

    Unusual lightning and varicolored luminous phenomena were observed on the evening of April 3, 1974, when severe tornadoes passed through Madison County, Alabama. Photographs and eyewitness accounts of this electrical activity are related to the trajectories of the tornadoes and the damage areas they produced.

  7. Glyphosate-resistant horseweed (conyza canadensis) control with dicamba in Alabama

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Widespread horseweed resistance to glyphosate has resulted in the use of dicamba as an alternative treatment. Horseweed populations in Cherokee and DeKalb counties in northern Alabama were not well controlled following glyphosate and dicamba treatments. This research evaluates horseweed populations ...

  8. Assessing the Quality of Life in Rural Alabama: Results of High School Students' Community Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knopke, Harry J.; And Others

    Rural Alabama high school freshmen and sophomores collected and analyzed data about community drinking water supplies in a social science research project designed to acquaint them with health care issues in their communities. Students interviewed government and business leaders, health care professionals, and residents in three rural counties. In…

  9. Diet Quality Is Low among Female Food Pantry Clients in Eastern Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Patricia; Zizza, Claire; Jacoby, Jocelynn; Tayie, Francis A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Examine diet quality, food security, and obesity among female food pantry clients. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: A food pantry in Lee County, Alabama. Participants: Fifty-five female food pantry clients between 19 and 50 years of age. Main Outcome Measure(s): Diet quality using United States (US) Department of Agriculture…

  10. 33 CFR 117.101 - Alabama River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alabama River. 117.101 Section 117.101 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.101 Alabama River. (a) The...

  11. 33 CFR 117.101 - Alabama River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alabama River. 117.101 Section 117.101 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.101 Alabama River. (a) The...

  12. 33 CFR 117.101 - Alabama River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alabama River. 117.101 Section 117.101 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.101 Alabama River. (a) The...

  13. 33 CFR 117.101 - Alabama River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alabama River. 117.101 Section 117.101 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.101 Alabama River. (a) The...

  14. 33 CFR 117.101 - Alabama River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alabama River. 117.101 Section 117.101 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.101 Alabama River. (a) The...

  15. Silent reminders: geologic wonders of the George Washington and Jefferson National Forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,; ,

    2001-01-01

    The iron industry played a vital role in the industrialization of the United States and in the development of the U.S. economy and society. Much of the early history of the iron industry took place in Virginia. The remains of 11 iron furnaces and nearby mines in the George Washington and Jefferson National Forests in Virginia and West Virginia are silent reminders of a time when iron mines and furnaces operated along a belt that extended through the Appalachian Mountains from New York State to Alabama.

  16. Ground-water resources of the Alabama River Basin in Alabama; Subarea 8 of the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint and Alabama-Coosa-Tallapoosa River Basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kidd, Robert E.; Atkins, J. Brian; Scott, John C.

    1997-01-01

    Drought conditions in the 1980's focused attention on the multiple uses of the surface- and ground-water resources in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) and Alabama-Coosa-Tallapoosa (ACT) River basins in Georgia, Alabama, and Florida. State and Federal agencies also have proposed projects that would require additional water resources and revise operating practices within the river basins. The existing and proposed water projects create conflicting demands for water by the States and emphasize the problem of water-resource allocation. This study was initiated to describe ground-water availability in the Alabama River basin of Alabama, Subarea 8 of the ACF and ACT River basins, and to estimate the possible effects of increased ground-water use within the basin. Subarea 8 encompasses about 6,750 square miles in the Coastal Plain physiographic province in central and southwestern Alabama. The Alabama River extends from the juncture of the Coosa and Tallapoosa Rivers near the city of Montgomery, to its juncture with the Tombigbee River, near the town of Calvert in Washington County. Subarea 8 includes the Cahaba River basin from the physiographic 'Fall Line' at the city of Centreville in Bibb County, to its mouth in Dallas County; and the Alabama River basin from near Montgomery to the Alabama River cutoff, about 6 miles northeast of its juncture with the Tombigbee River. The study area is underlain by sedimentary deposits of Cretaceous, Tertiary, and Quaternary ages. Major aquifers underlying Subarea 8 are, from shallowest to deepest, the Coastal lowlands aquifer system, the Floridan aquifer system, the Lisbon aquifer, The Nanafalia-Clayton aquifer, the Ripley aquifer, the Eutaw aquifer, and the Tuscaloosa aquifer. The conceptual model described for this study qualitatively subdivides the ground-water flow system into local (shallow), intermediate, and regional (deep) flow regimes. Ground-water discharge to tributaries mainly is from local and intermediate flow

  17. Jefferson InterProfessional Education Center, Thomas Jefferson University.

    PubMed

    Arenson, Christine; Rose, Molly; Lyons, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Thomas Jefferson University initiated the Jefferson InterProfessional Education Center in early 2007. The Center facilitates many diverse student and faculty projects on interprofessional education yearly. Faculty development programs include, most recently, the second Jefferson Interprofessional Education conference, IPE scholarly lecture series, an IPE and care practicum, and multiple lecture/discussions to select faculty/administrative groups. At present, there is no external funding for any of the programs. The Health Mentor Program is one of the major student programs. It is a required two-year longitudinal interprofessional chronic illness program for all medical, nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, pharmacy and couples and family therapy students. It began in the fall of 2007 and is integrated into existing coursework in each of the participating disciplines.

  18. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Grames, Douglas Higinbotham, Hugh Montgomery

    2010-09-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) in Newport News, Virginia, USA, is one of ten national laboratories under the aegis of the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). It is managed and operated by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC. The primary facility at Jefferson Lab is the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) as shown in an aerial photograph in Figure 1. Jefferson Lab was created in 1984 as CEBAF and started operations for physics in 1995. The accelerator uses superconducting radio-frequency (srf) techniques to generate high-quality beams of electrons with high-intensity, well-controlled polarization. The technology has enabled ancillary facilities to be created. The CEBAF facility is used by an international user community of more than 1200 physicists for a program of exploration and study of nuclear, hadronic matter, the strong interaction and quantum chromodynamics. Additionally, the exceptional quality of the beams facilitates studies of the fundamental symmetries of nature, which complement those of atomic physics on the one hand and of high-energy particle physics on the other. The facility is in the midst of a project to double the energy of the facility and to enhance and expand its experimental facilities. Studies are also pursued with a Free-Electron Laser produced by an energy-recovering linear accelerator.

  19. Alabama Counseling Association Journal, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Gypsy, Ed.; Elliott, Glenda R., Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Communicating ideas and information that will help counselors to implement the counseling role and develop the profession of counseling is the purpose of this journal. The first issue in volume 21 contains the following articles: "Policies and Procedures for Reporting Child Abuse in Alabama: Considerations for Counselors, Teachers, and School…

  20. Community food environment measures in the Alabama Black Belt: Implications for cancer risk reduction.

    PubMed

    Gyawu, Rebecca; Quansah, Joseph E; Fall, Souleymane; Gichuhi, Peter N; Bovell-Benjamin, Adelia C

    2015-01-01

    In-store measures were utilized to evaluate the availability of healthy food choices and nutrition/health promotion messages for cancer risk reduction in the selected Alabama Black Belt counties/cities. Sixty one retail food outlets (RFOs) were audited in 12 Alabama Black Belt cities. Store types included convenience stores (49.2%), restaurants (19.7%), fast food restaurants (16.4%), small supermarkets (8.2%), and large supermarket and farmers' markets (3.3 %), respectively. Although there were low numbers of farmers' markets/street stands and large supermarkets, these had significantly (p < 0.0001) higher health scores than the other store types. A few health promotion messages were highly visible or obscurely positioned in some RFOs. The Alabama Black Belt food environment had limited opportunities for healthy food choices. PMID:26844138

  1. Community food environment measures in the Alabama Black Belt: Implications for cancer risk reduction

    PubMed Central

    Gyawu, Rebecca; Quansah, Joseph E.; Fall, Souleymane; Gichuhi, Peter N.; Bovell-Benjamin, Adelia C.

    2015-01-01

    In-store measures were utilized to evaluate the availability of healthy food choices and nutrition/health promotion messages for cancer risk reduction in the selected Alabama Black Belt counties/cities. Sixty one retail food outlets (RFOs) were audited in 12 Alabama Black Belt cities. Store types included convenience stores (49.2%), restaurants (19.7%), fast food restaurants (16.4%), small supermarkets (8.2%), and large supermarket and farmers' markets (3.3 %), respectively. Although there were low numbers of farmers' markets/street stands and large supermarkets, these had significantly (p < 0.0001) higher health scores than the other store types. A few health promotion messages were highly visible or obscurely positioned in some RFOs. The Alabama Black Belt food environment had limited opportunities for healthy food choices. PMID:26844138

  2. Thermal maturity patterns in Pennsylvanian coal-bearing rocks in Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, West Virginia, Ohio, Maryland, and Pennsylvania: Chapter F.2 in Coal and petroleum resources in the Appalachian basin: distribution, geologic framework, and geochemical character

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, Leslie F.; Trippi, Michael H.; Hower, James C.; Grady, William C.; Levine, Jeffrey R.; Ruppert, Leslie F.; Ryder, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal maturation patterns of Pennsylvanian strata in the Appalachian basin and part of the Black Warrior basin were determined by compiling previously published and unpublished percent-vitrinite-reflectance (%R0) measurements and preparing isograd maps on the basis of the measurements. The isograd values range from 0.6 %R0 in Ohio and the western side of the Eastern Kentucky coal field to 5.5 %R0 in the Southern field in the Pennsylvania Anthracite region, Schuylkill County, Pa. The vitrinite-reflectance values correspond to the American Society of Testing Materials (ASTM) coal-rank classes of high-volatile C bituminous to meta-anthracite, respectively. In general, the isograds show that thermal maturity patterns of Pennsylvanian coals within the Appalachian basin generally decrease from east to west. In the Black Warrior basin of Alabama, the isograds show a circular pattern with the highest values (greater than 1.6 %R0) centered in Jefferson County, Ala. Most of the observed patterns can be explained by variations in the depth of burial, variations in geothermal gradient, or a combination of both; however, there are at least four areas of higher ranking coal in the Appalachian basin that are difficult to explain by these two processes alone: (1) a set of west- to northwest-trending salients centered in Somerset, Cambria, and Fayette Counties, Pa.; (2) an elliptically shaped, northeast-trending area centered in southern West Virginia and western Virginia; (3) the Pennsylvania Anthracite region in eastern Pennsylvania; and (4) the eastern part of the Black Warrior coal field in Alabama. The areas of high-ranking coal in southwestern Pennsylvania, the Black Warrior coal field, and the Pennsylvania Anthracite region are interpreted here to represent areas of higher paleo-heat flow related to syntectonic movement of hot fluids towards the foreland associated with Alleghanian deformation. In addition to the higher heat flow from these fluids, the Pennsylvania

  3. Ecological characterization atlas of coastal Alabama: Map narrative

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.F. Jr. )

    1984-08-01

    The southwest Alabama coastal region is the study area of this narrative and accompanying maps. The offshore area includes the region from the State-Federal demarcation to the shoreline, and the inland area includes Mobile and Baldwin Counties. These counties are included in the following six US Geological Survey 1:100,000-scale topographic maps: Citronelle, Atmore, Mobile, Bay Minette, Biloxi, and Pensacola. The data in this atlas meet all cartographic and narrative specifications of the Minerals Management Service and the US Fish and Wildlife Service and should be useful for coastal decisionmakers. The topics included within this map narrative are biological resources; socioeconomic features; soils and landforms; oil, gas, and mineral resources; and hydrology and climatology. 21 figs., 52 tabs.

  4. Water use in Alabama, 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mooty, Will S.; Richardson, Joanne R.

    1998-01-01

    During 1995, the amount of water withdrawn from ground- and surface- water sources in Alabama was estimated to be about 7,100 million gallons per day. Of this amount, about 6,650 million gallons per day were from surface-water sources and about 445 million gallons per day were from ground-water sources. Total withdrawals in Alabama in 1995 for nine withdrawal categories were as follows: thermoelectric power, 5,200 million gallons per day; public supply, 813 million gallons per day; self-supplied industry, 733 million gallons per day; irrigation, 139 million gallons per day; aquaculture, 93.9 million gallons per day; self-supplied domestic, 61.9 million gallons per day; livestock, 34.9 million gallons per day; mining, 20.0 million gallons per day; and self-supplied commercial, 4.88 million gallons per day. Total withdrawals in Alabama decreased about 12 percent from 1990 to 1995, despite an increase of about 5 percent in the State's total population during the same period. Total withdrawals have increased about 135 percent since 1955, however, because of greater than normal usage for generation of thermoelectric power in 1975, withdrawals peaked in that year.

  5. Alabama's Education Report Card, 2000: Significant Predictors of Student Achievement at the District and School Level. Research Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller-Whitehead, Marie

    This paper examines Alabama's State Education Report Card for the year 2000. It identifies predictors for student academic achievement at both the district and school levels for 128 public school systems and 1,272 public schools. Separate analyses were conducted for 61 city and 67 county school systems. The variables included number of students,…

  6. 76 FR 48941 - Alabama & Florida Railway Co., Inc.-Abandonment Exemption-in Geneva, Coffee, and Covington...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Alabama & Florida Railway Co., Inc.--Abandonment Exemption--in Geneva, Coffee..., Coffee and Covington Counties, Ala. The line constitutes A&F's entire rail system and traverses...

  7. 76 FR 74116 - Alabama & Florida Railway Co., Inc. d/b/a Ripley & New Albany Railroad Co.-Acquisition and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-30

    ... Tennessee Railroad, LLC Alabama & Florida Railway Co., Inc. d/b/a Ripley & New Albany Railroad Co. (RNA), a... Ripley, a distance of 22.54 miles in Union and Tippah Counties, Miss. RNA states that it proposes to... amended notice was filed on November 14, 2011. RNA certifies that its projected annual revenues as...

  8. First report of the cucurbit yellow vine disease caused by Serratia marcescens in watermelon and yellow squash in Alabama

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Symptoms typical of cucurbit yellow vine disease (CYVD) were first observed in a 2 ha watermelon field in Crawford, Russell County, Alabama on 8 June 2010. Watermelon plants, cv. 'Jubilee,' exhibited a yellow or chlorotic appearance and some plants were completely wilted. On 24 June plant samples ...

  9. Dietary patterns and diet quality among diverse older adults: The University of Alabama at Birmingham study of aging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives: To characterize dietary patterns among a diverse sample of older adults (= 65 years). Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Five counties in west central Alabama. Participants: Community-dwelling Medicare beneficiaries (N=416; 76.8 ± 5.2 years, 56% female, 39% African American) in the Univer...

  10. Alabama Allied Health Needs Assessment Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Libby V.

    This study assessed the supply of and demand for allied health professionals in Alabama, focusing on the relationship between supply and demand in various workplace settings in the context of Alabama's demographics, current educational programs, and projected changes in health care. The health care professions included in the study were all fields…

  11. Alabama Department of Education Quick Facts, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This brochure presents state statistics; Alabama public schools 2007-08; Alabama State Board of Education members; financial data; public school size and enrollment; transportation; school meals; school personnel, 2007-2008; graduation requirements; student assessment; additional enrollment; and dropouts, 2006-07.

  12. 2008-2009 Alabama Education Report Card

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Year after year, the goal of educators, parents, and concerned citizens throughout Alabama is to provide this state's children with the highest level of quality education possible. The future of Alabama's businesses, industries, commerce, labor force, arts, humanities, and countless other areas are determined by the education that is provided to…

  13. Alabama Public Library Service Annual Report, 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    This annual report highlights the accomplishments of the Alabama Public Library Service (APLS) during 1989. Introductory materials include a map of Alabama's Congressional districts, photographs of the executive board of APLS, and comments from the chairman of the executive board and from APLS' director. The following accomplishments are then…

  14. Alabama Public Education at a Glance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rains, Thomas; West, Jill; Mitchell, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    A+ Education Partnership is a statewide, non-partisan, non-profit organization that works to shape policy, improve teaching and learning, and engage communities in ongoing conversations about the best ways to create great schools for every child and build a bright future for Alabama. "Alabama Public Education at a Glance" provides in…

  15. Alabama Education Quick Facts, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This brochure presents state statistics; Alabama public schools 2009-10; Alabama State Board of Education members; financial data; public school size and enrollment, 2009-10 school year; transportation; school meals; school personnel, 2009-2010; graduation requirements; student assessment; additional enrollment; and dropouts in school year 2008-09.

  16. Alabama Counseling Association Journal, 1998-1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnuson, Sandy, Ed.; Norem, Ken, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This document consists of the two issues of the "Alabama Counseling Association Journal" that make up volume 24. Articles in Issue 1 include: (1) "Learning Comes in Many Forms" (Holly Forester-Miller); (2) "Legislative, Legal, and Sociological Aspects of Alabama's Mental Health System" (David Gamble; Jamie S. Satcher); (3) "Peer Supervision: A…

  17. Alabama Education Quick Facts: Plan 2020

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This brochure presents state statistics for the following categories; Alabama public schools, 2012-13; Alabama State Board of Education members; financial data, FY 2012; public school size and enrollment, 2012-13 school year; transportation, 2012-13; school meals, 2011-12; school personnel, 2012-13; graduation rates, 2010-11; graduation…

  18. Alabama Public Library Service Annual Report, 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    This annual report highlights the accomplishments of the Alabama Public Library Service (APLS) during 1990. Introductory materials include a map of Alabama's Congressional districts, photographs of the executive board of APLS, and comments from the chairman of the executive board and from APLS' director. Accomplishments are reported under the…

  19. AWARE (Alabama Working at Reading Excellence).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Univ., Tuscaloosa. Coll. of Education.

    The selected material from the Right-to-Read Institute consists of: (1) Goals of the Institute and Specific Objectives, (2) Alabama Working at Reading Excellence Program, (3) What is the Right to Read?, (4) Objectives, (5) Activities - Studies, (6) Inventory, (7) Recommendations, (8) Alabama Population Characteristics and (9) Sounds and Light for…

  20. Alabama's Appalachian overthrust amid exploratory drilling resurgence

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.D. ); Epsman, M.L.

    1991-06-24

    Oil and gas exploration has been carried out sporadically in the Appalachian overthrust region of Alabama for years, but recently interest in the play has had a major resurgence. The Appalachian overthrust region of Alabama is best exposed in the valley and ridge physiographic province in the northeast part of the state. Resistant ridges of sandstone and chert and valleys of shales and carbonate have been thrust toward the northwest. Seismic data show that this structural style continues under the Cretaceous overlap. The surface and subsurface expression of the Alabama overthrust extends for more than 4,000 sq miles. Oil and gas have been produced for many years from Cambro-Ordovician, Ordovician, Mississippian, and Pennsylvanian rocks in the nearby Black Warrior basin in Alabama and Mississippi and the Cumberland plateau in Tennessee. The same zones are also potential producing horizons in the Alabama overthrust region.

  1. Annotated bibliography of the Black Warrior basin area, northern Alabama - northern Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Ward-McLemore, E.

    1983-01-01

    This bibliography contains 1964 records related to the geology of the Black Warrior basin of northern Alabama and northern Mississippi. Specific topics include, but are not limited to: coal, petroleum, and natural gas deposits; mineralogy; lithology; paleontology; petrology; stratigraphy; tectonics; bauxite; iron ores; geologic correlations; earthquakes; fossils; gold deposits; geological surveys; hydrology; and water resources. The subject index provides listings of records related to each county and the geologic ages covered by this area. Some of the items (54) are themselves bibliographies.

  2. Monkey Baker at U.S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1958-01-01

    On May 28, 1958, Jupiter Intermediate Range Ballistic Missile provided by U.S. Army team in Huntsville, Alabama, launched a nose cone carrying Baker, a South American squirrel monkey and Able, an American-born rhesus monkey. Baker, pictured here and commonly known as 'Miss Baker', was later given a home at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center until her death on November 29, 1984. Able died in 1958. (Photo - Courtesy of Huntsville/Madison County Public Library)

  3. 40 CFR 81.301 - Alabama.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for purposes of 40 CFR part 51 subpart X. Alabama—NO2 Designated area Does not meet primary standards... affecting § 81.301 see the List of CFR Sections Affected which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... County Choctaw County Clarke County Clay County Cleburne County Coffee County Colbert County...

  4. 40 CFR 81.301 - Alabama.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... maintenance area for the 1-hour NAAQS for purposes of 40 CFR part 51 subpart X. Alabama—NO2 (1971 Annual... see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume... County Cherokee County Chilton County Choctaw County Clarke County Clay County Cleburne County...

  5. 40 CFR 81.301 - Alabama.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... for purposes of 40 CFR part 51 subpart X. Alabama—NO2 (1971 Annual Standard) Designated area Does not... see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume... County Choctaw County Clarke County Clay County Cleburne County Coffee County Colbert County...

  6. Water use, availability, and net demand in the Tennessee River watershed within Alabama, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gill, Amy C.; Harper, Michael J.; Littlepage, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey worked in cooperation with the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs—Office of Water Resources to estimate water use and water availability for 2005 for the portion of the Tennessee River watershed contained within the borders of the State of Alabama. Estimates of water use and availability are an important part of planning for population and economic growth in the Tennessee River watershed in Alabama. Total water use for the region in 2005 was 5,197 million gallons per day (Mgal/d). Total surface-water withdrawals were 5,139 Mgal/d, and total groundwater withdrawals were about 58 Mgal/d. About 92 percent of the total water withdrawn was surface water used for once-through cooling for thermoelectric power generation. Self-supplied industrial and public-supply water uses accounted for the next greatest uses of water, constituting approximately 49 and 42 percent, respectively, of the total water use excluding thermoelectric power use. Summaries of water use by county and subbasin indicated the areas of greatest water withdrawals and use within the Tennessee River watershed. Limestone (2,012 Mgal/d), Jackson (1,498 Mgal/d), and Colbert (1,363 Mgal/d) Counties were the counties with the greatest total water use in 2005 and had large amounts of water withdrawn for thermoelectric power generation. When water use from thermoelectric power generation was not considered, the counties with the greatest withdrawals were Morgan (124 Mgal/d), Madison (72 Mgal/d), Colbert (69 Mgal/d), and Lawrence (67 Mgal/d). The subbasin with the greatest total water use was Wheeler Lake (2,260 Mgal/d) in the Middle Tennessee—Elk subregion. Wheeler Lake subbasin also had the greatest public-supply, irrigation, industrial, mining, and thermoelectric withdrawals of any subbasin in the Tennessee River watershed within Alabama. Total water availability for the Tennessee River watershed within Alabama was estimated to be 34,567 Mgal/d by the Geological

  7. The DVCS program at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Niccolai, Silvia

    2014-06-01

    Recent promising results, obtained at Jefferson Lab, on cross sections and asymmetries for DVCS and their link to the Generalized Parton Distributions are the focus of this paper. The extensive experimental program to measure DVCS with the 12-GeV-upgraded CEBAF in three experimental Halls (A, B, C) of Jefferson Lab, will also be presented.

  8. Thomas Jefferson and Architecture. Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabriel, Robin H.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the importance of architecture in Thomas Jefferson's life. Presents a lesson plan based on Jefferson's Monticello and designed to encourage students to identify and understand elements of classical architecture in their local area. Includes a photograph of Monticello and six architectural illustrations. (CFR)

  9. Experimental Results in DIS from Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian Kuhn

    2009-10-01

    We are summarizing the experimental program of Jefferson Lab (Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, VA) in deep inelastic electron scattering. We show recent results and discuss future plans for both the present 6 GeV era and the 12 GeV energy-upgraded facility.

  10. Latest results from FROST at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, Barry G.

    2014-06-01

    The spectrum of broad and overlapping nucleon excitations can be greatly clarified by use of a polarized photon beam incident on a polarized target in meson photoproduction experiments. At Jefferson Lab, a program of such measurements has made use of the Jefferson Lab FROzen Spin Target (FROST). An overview of preliminary results are presented.

  11. Elevations U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Medical Officer in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevations - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Medical Officer in Charge Residence, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  12. First Floor Plan U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Therapeutic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    First Floor Plan - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Therapeutic Exercise Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  13. Landscape Plan U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Therapeutic Exercise ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Landscape Plan - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Therapeutic Exercise Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  14. Window Details U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Therapeutic Exercise ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Window Details - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Therapeutic Exercise Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  15. Triassic/Jurassic faulting patterns of Conecuh Ridge, southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Hutley, J.K.

    1985-02-01

    Two major fault systems influenced Jurassic structure and deposition on the Conecuh Ridge, southwest Alabama. Identification and dating of these fault systems are based on seismic-stratigraphic interpretation of a 7-township grid in Monroe and Conecuh Counties. Relative time of faulting is determined by fault geometry and by formation isopachs and isochrons. Smackover and Norphlet Formations, both Late Jurassic in age, are mappable seismic reflectors and are thus reliable for seismicstratigraphic dating. The earlier of the 2 fault systems is a series of horsts and grabens that trends northeast-southwest and is Late Triassic to Early Jurassic in age. The system formed in response to tensional stress associated with the opening of the Atlantic Ocean. The resulting topography was a series of northeast-southwest-trending ridges. Upper Triassic Eagle Mills and Jurassic Werner Formations were deposited in the grabens. The later fault system is also a series of horsts and grabens trending perpendicular to the first. This system was caused by tensional stress related to a pulse in the opening of the Gulf of Mexico. Faulting began in Early Jurassic and continued into Late Jurassic, becoming progressively younger basinward. At the basin margin, faulting produced a very irregular shoreline. Submerged horst blocks became centers for shoaling or carbonate buildups. Today, these blocks are exploration targets in southwest Alabama.

  16. Electroweak Physics at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    R. D. McKeown

    2012-03-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility provides CW electron beams with high intensity, remarkable stability, and a high degree of polarization. These capabilities offer new and unique opportunities to search for novel particles and forces that would require extension of the standard model. CEBAF is presently undergoing an upgrade that includes doubling the energy of the electron beam to 12 GeV and enhancements to the experimental equipment. This upgraded facility will provide increased capability to address new physics beyond the standard model.

  17. Alabama Power Company HVAC Training Center

    SciTech Connect

    Lovvorn, N.

    1996-06-01

    Alabama Power Company`s (APCo`s) HVAC training Center began in 1986 and serves people from around the country. The staff has a combined field experience of over 75 years. This paper describes the training facility and program.

  18. 76 FR 9700 - Alabama Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-22

    ... Alabama program in the May 20, 1982, Federal Register (47 FR 22030). You can also find later actions..., deletes the language where a license becomes null and void and replaces it with the issuance of...

  19. Alabama Magnet School Races toward Job Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Morgan

    2002-01-01

    Describes Alabama's Brewbaker Technology Magnet High School, which was built for only $70 per square foot. Explores the relationship between its school-to-work, collaborative-learning approach and the building's design. (EV)

  20. Assessment of the geothermal/geopressure potential of the Gulf Coastal Plan of Alabama. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, G.V.; Wang, G.C.; Mancini, E.A.; Benson, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    Geothermal and geopressure as well as geologic and geophysical data were studied to evaluate the potential for future development of geothermal resources underlying the Alabama Coastal Plain. Wire-line log data compiled and interpreted from more than 1300 oil and gas test wells included maximum recorded temperatures, mud weights, rock resistivities as related to geopressure, formation tops, fault locations, and depths to basement rock. The Alabama Coastal Plain area is underlain by a conduction dominated, deep sedimentary basin where geothermal gradients are low to moderate (1.0 to 1.8/sup 0/F/100 feet). In some areas of southwest Alabama, abnormally high temperatures are found in association with geopressured zones within the Haynesville Formation of Jurassic age; however, rocks of poor reservoir quality dominate this formation, with the exception of a 200-square-mile area centered in southernmost Clarke County where a porous and permeable sand unit is encased within massive salt deposits of the lower Haynesville. The results of a petrograhic study of the Smackover Formation, which underlies the Haynesville, indicate that this carbonate rock unit has sufficient porosity in some areas to be considered a potential geothermal reservoir. Future development of geothermal resources in south Alabama will be restricted to low or moderate temperature, non-electric applications, which constitute a significant potential energy source for applications in space heating and cooling and certain agricultural and industrial processes.

  1. Thomas Jefferson and the Purposes of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jewett, Thomas O.

    1997-01-01

    Thomas Jefferson was the first conspicuous U.S. advocate of free education supported by local taxation and of state aid to higher education. He believed that only an educated citizenry could assume the responsibilities of self-government. (SK)

  2. PLC Support Software at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    P. Chevtsov; S. Higgins; S. Schaffner; D. Seidman

    2002-10-01

    Several Automation Direct (DirectNet) Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) have been integrated into the accelerator control system at Jefferson Lab. The integration is based on new software that consists of three main parts: a PLC driver with a state machine control block, a device support module, and a common serial driver. The components of new software and experience gained with the use of this software for beam dump systems at Jefferson Lab are presented.

  3. 75 FR 2896 - Alabama Disaster Number AL-00028

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-19

    ... Only for the State of Alabama (FEMA-1870-DR), dated 12/31/2009. Incident: Severe Storms and Flooding... Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of Alabama, dated 12/31/2009, is hereby amended to...

  4. Jefferson Lab: Present and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Patrizia

    2016-08-01

    The continuous electron beam accelerator facility and associated experimental equipment at Jefferson Lab comprise a unique facility for nuclear physics research whose upgrade is presently underway, with completion expected in 2017. The upgraded facility will accelerate electron beams to 11 GeV for experiments in the existing Halls A, B and C. In addition, a 12 GeV beam can be provided to a new experimental hall, Hall D, to generate a 9 GeV tagged photon beam. This upgrade will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential to address important topics in hadronic, nuclear, and electroweak physics. Further in the future, it is envisioned that the Laboratory will evolve into an electron-ion colliding beam facility.

  5. Jefferson Lab's Trim Card II

    SciTech Connect

    Trent Allison; Sarin Philip; C. Higgins; Edward Martin; William Merz

    2005-05-01

    Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) uses Trim Card I power supplies to drive approximately 1900 correction magnets. These trim cards have had a long and illustrious service record. However, some of the employed technology is now obsolete, making it difficult to maintain the system and retain adequate spares. The Trim Card II is being developed to act as a transparent replacement for its aging predecessor. A modular approach has been taken in its development to facilitate the substitution of sections for future improvements and maintenance. The resulting design has been divided into a motherboard and 7 daughter cards which has also allowed for parallel development. The Trim Card II utilizes modern technologies such as a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and a microprocessor to embed trim card controls and diagnostics. These reprogrammable devices also provide the versatility to incorporate future requirements.

  6. Integration of vertical and in-seam horizontal well production analyses with stochastic geostatistical algorithms to estimate pre-mining methane drainage efficiency from coal seams: Blue Creek seam, Alabama

    PubMed Central

    Karacan, C. Özgen

    2015-01-01

    Coal seam degasification and its efficiency are directly related to the safety of coal mining. Degasification activities in the Black Warrior basin started in the early 1980s by using vertical boreholes. Although the Blue Creek seam, which is part of the Mary Lee coal group, has been the main seam of interest for coal mining, vertical wellbores have also been completed in the Pratt, Mary Lee, and Black Creek coal groups of the Upper Pottsville formation to degasify multiple seams. Currently, the Blue Creek seam is further degasified 2–3 years in advance of mining using in-seam horizontal boreholes to ensure safe mining. The studied location in this work is located between Tuscaloosa and Jefferson counties in Alabama and was degasified using 81 vertical boreholes, some of which are still active. When the current long mine expanded its operation into this area in 2009, horizontal boreholes were also drilled in advance of mining for further degasification of only the Blue Creek seam to ensure a safe and a productive operation. This paper presents an integrated study and a methodology to combine history matching results from vertical boreholes with production modeling of horizontal boreholes using geostatistical simulation to evaluate spatial effectiveness of in-seam boreholes in reducing gas-in-place (GIP). Results in this study showed that in-seam wells' boreholes had an estimated effective drainage area of 2050 acres with cumulative production of 604 MMscf methane during ~2 years of operation. With horizontal borehole production, GIP in the Blue Creek seam decreased from an average of 1.52 MMscf to 1.23 MMscf per acre. It was also shown that effective gas flow capacity, which was independently modeled using vertical borehole data, affected horizontal borehole production. GIP and effective gas flow capacity of coal seam gas were also used to predict remaining gas potential for the Blue Creek seam. PMID:26435557

  7. Alabama's Education Report Card, 2011-2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Educational progress has been moving in the right direction for several years in Alabama. Now, with the implementation of Alabama's own Plan 2020, an even higher level of accountability for students, teachers, administrators, support systems, and schools/school systems, Alabama is poised to experience unprecedented growth. Add to that, the…

  8. Borrelia sp. in ticks recovered from white-tailed deer in Alabama.

    PubMed

    Luckhart, S; Mullen, G R; Durden, L A; Wright, J C

    1992-07-01

    Six hundred sixty-five hunter-killed white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) from 18 counties in Alabama (USA) were examined for ticks. Most of the collections were made at state-operated wildlife management areas. Four species of ticks (n = 4,527) were recovered: the lone star tick Amblyomma americanum (n = 482); the Gulf Coast tick A. maculatum (n = 11); the winter tick Dermacentor albipictus (n = 1,242); and the black-legged tick Ixodes scapularis (n = 2,792). Fifty-six percent of the ticks (n = 2,555) were examined for Borrelia sp. spirochetes using an immunofluorescent, polyclonal antibody assay. Spirochetes were detected in I. scapularis (five females, seven males) from Barbour, Butler, Coosa, and Lee counties and A. americanum (four males, four nymphs) from Hale, Lee, and Wilcox counties. Area-specific prevalences in ticks were as high as 3.3% for I. scapularis and 3.8% for A. americanum.

  9. Graptemys pulchra Baur 1893: Alabama Map Turtle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Godwin, James C.; McCoy, C.J.; Rhodin, A. G. J.; Pritchard, P. C. H.; van Dijk, P. P.; Saumure, R.A.; Buhlmann, K.A.; Iverson, J.B.; Mittermeier, R.A.

    2014-01-01

    The Alabama Map Turtle, Graptemys pulchra (Family Emydidae), is a moderately large riverine species endemic to the Mobile Bay drainage system of Alabama, Georgia, and Mississippi. Sexual size dimorphism is pronounced, with adult females (carapace length [CL] to 273 mm) attaining more than twice the size of adult males (CL to 117 mm). The species is an inhabitant of relatively large, swift creeks and rivers, often with wide sandbars. Stream sections open to the sun and with abundant basking sites in the form of logs and brush are preferred. Six to seven clutches of 4–7 eggs are laid each year on river sandbars. Although the species is locally abundant, populations are threatened by habitat destruction, declines in their prey base, commercial collection, and vandalism. It is listed as a Species of Special Concern in Alabama.

  10. 76 FR 13615 - B&B Manufacturing Site; Mobile, Mobile County, AL; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... AGENCY B&B Manufacturing Site; Mobile, Mobile County, AL; Notice of Settlement AGENCY: Environmental... Manufacturing Site located in Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama for publication. DATES: The Agency will consider... No. EPA-RO4- SFUND-2011-0192 or Site name B&B Manufacturing Superfund Site by one of the...

  11. 76 FR 14970 - National Starch and Chemical Company, Salisbury, Rowan County, NC; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... AGENCY National Starch and Chemical Company, Salisbury, Rowan County, NC; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... National Starch and Chemical Company Site located in Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama for publication. DATES..., identified by Docket ID No. EPA-RO4- SFUND-2011-0278 or Site name National Starch and Chemical...

  12. Thomas Jefferson, the Community College and the Pursuit of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, George B.

    1980-01-01

    Demonstrates the strong philosophical ties between Thomas Jefferson's views on public education and the modern day community college. Reviews Jefferson's proposals for publicly financed education and for increased access to education and discusses the mission of the community college. (AYC)

  13. Ground-water program in Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaMoreaux, P.E.

    1955-01-01

    Several recent years of drought have emphasized the importance of Alabama's ground-water supplies, a matter of concern to us all.  So far we have been blessed in Alabama with ample ground-water, although a combination of increased use, waste, pollution, and drought has brought about critical local water shortages.  These problems serve as a fair warning of what lies ahead if we do not take the necessary steps to obtan adequate knowledge of our ground-water resources.

  14. Preliminary report on the Comet area, Jefferson County, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becraft, George Earle

    1953-01-01

    Several radioactivity anomalies and a few specimens of sooty pitchblende and other uranium minerals have been found on the mine dumps of formerly productive base- and precious-metal mines along the Comet-Gray Eagle shear zone in the Comet area in southwestern Montana. The shear zone is from 50 to 200 feet wide and has been traced for at least 5? miles. It trends N. 80 ? W. across the northern part of the area and cuts the quartz monzonitic rocks of the Boulder batholith and younger silicic intrusive rocks, as well as prebatholithic volcanic rocks, and is in turn cut by dacite and andesite dikes. The youngest period of mineralization is represented by chalcedonic vein zones comprising one or more discontinuous stringers and veins of cryptocrystalline silica in silicified quartz monzonite and in alaskite that has not been appreciably silicified. In some places these zones contain no distinct chalcedonic veins but are represented only by silicified quartz monzonite. These zones locally contain uranium in association with very small amounts of pyrite, galena, ruby silver, arqentite, native silver, molybdenite, chalcopyrite, arsenopyrite, and barite. At the Free Enterprise mine, uranium has been produced from a narrow chalcedonic vein that contains disseminated secondary uranium minerals and local small pods of pitchblende and also from disseminated secondary uranium ,minerals in the adjacent quartz monzonite. Undiscovered deposits of uranium ore may occur spatially associated with the base- and precious-metal deposits along the Comet-Gray Eagle shear zone and with chalcedonic vein zones similar to the Free Enterprise.

  15. Preliminary report on the Comet area, Jefferson County, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becraft, George Earle

    1952-01-01

    Several radioactivity anomalies and a few specimens of sooty pitchblende and other uranium minerals have been found on the mine dumps of formerly productive base-and precious-metal mines along the Comet-Gray Eagle shear zone in the Comet area in southwestern Montana. The shear zone is from 50 to 200 feet wide and has been traced for at least 5 1/2 miles. It trends N. 80° W. across the northern part of the area and cuts the quartz monzonitic rocks of the Boulder batholith and younger silicic intrusive rocks, as well as the pre-batholitic volcanic rocks, and is in turn cut by dacite and andesite dikes. The youngest period of mineralization is represented by chalcedonic vein zones comprising one or more discontinuous stringers and veins of cryptocrystalline silica in silicified quartz monzonite and in alaskite that has not been appreciably silicified. In some places these zones contain no distinct chalcedonic veins, but are represented only by silicified quartz monzonite. These zones locally contain uranium in association with very small amounts of the following minerals: pyrite, galena, ruby silver, argentite, native silver, molybdenite, chalcopyrite, arsenopyrite, and barite. At the Free Enterprise mine, uranium has been produced from a narrow chalcedonic vein that contains disseminated secondary uranium minerals and local small pods of pitchblende and from disseminated secondary uranium minerals in the adjacent quartz monzonite. Undiscovered commercial deposits of uranium ore may occur spatially associated with the base-and precious-metal deposits along the Comet-Gray Eagle shear zone, and chalcedonic vein zones similar to the Free Enterprise.

  16. A lone biodetrital mound in the Chesterian (Carboniferous) of Alabama?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kopaska-Merkel, D. C.; Haywick, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    A carbonate mound in the Chesterian Bangor Limestone of Lawrence County, Alabama, consists chiefly of packstone and grainstone dominated by echinoderm ossicles and fragments of fenestrate bryozoans. In-situ colonies of the rugose coral Caninia flaccida comprise about 8% of the mound by volume. The exposed portion of the mound is approximately 25 m wide, 1.6 m thick at the thickest point and roughly circular in plan. The mound developed on top of a shallow ooid shoal that had been cemented and stabilised during an earlier episode of sub-aerial exposure. Subsequent flooding of the exposed shoal surface permitted establishment of the mound biota. Lateral and vertical facies relationships suggest that the mound possessed about 45 cm of synoptic relief when fully developed. Rugose corals, fenestrate and ramose bryozoans, stalked echinoderms, and sessile soft-bodied organisms encrusted by foraminifera colonised the shoal, forming a mound. Baffling resulted in deposition of mixed-fossil packstone containing locally derived debris and coated grains from the surrounding sea floor. Strong currents within the mound are indicated by preferred orientation of corals and by coarse, commonly cross-stratified grainstone in channels between neighboring coral colonies. Corals are most abundant on the windward side of the mound, where they account for about 13% of the mound compared to 6- 10% in the central part of the mound, and 2-4% on the leeward flank. Biodetrital mounds such as the one described here are uncommon in upper Paleozoic strata and previously unknown in the Bangor Limestone. Of 10 carbonate buildups we examined in the Bangor in Alabama and Tennessee, only one is a biodetrital mound. Two are rugose coral-microbial reefs, one is a coral biostrome, and six are dominated by microbialite. The Bangor shelf, previously interpreted as sedimentologically simple, appears to contain many small mounds of quite varied characteristics. Also, the discovery of a biodetrital mound in

  17. Thomas Jefferson and Slaves: Teaching an American Paradox. Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fehn, Bruce

    2000-01-01

    Provides 11 primary sources that enable students to contemplate how Thomas Jefferson and his slaves produced a culture and community at Monticello (Virginia) and his other plantations. Focuses on Jefferson's relationship with his slaves, particularly addressing Sally Hemming's relationship with Jefferson, in order to study the complicated history…

  18. Jefferson Lab's Distributed Data Acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Trent Allison; Thomas Powers

    2006-05-01

    Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) occasionally experiences fast intermittent beam instabilities that are difficult to isolate and result in downtime. The Distributed Data Acquisition (Dist DAQ) system is being developed to detect and quickly locate such instabilities. It will consist of multiple Ethernet based data acquisition chassis distributed throughout the seven-eights of a mile CEBAF site. Each chassis will monitor various control system signals that are only available locally and/or monitored by systems with small bandwidths that cannot identify fast transients. The chassis will collect data at rates up to 40 Msps in circular buffers that can be frozen and unrolled after an event trigger. These triggers will be derived from signals such as periodic timers or accelerator faults and be distributed via a custom fiber optic event trigger network. This triggering scheme will allow all the data acquisition chassis to be triggered simultaneously and provide a snapshot of relevant CEBAF control signals. The data will then be automatically analyzed for frequency content and transients to determine if and where instabilities exist.

  19. Is Jefferson a Founding Father of Democratic Education? A Response to "Jefferson and the Ideology of Democratic Schooling"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neem, Johann

    2013-01-01

    This response argues that it is reasonable to consider Thomas Jefferson a proponent of democratic education. It suggests that Jefferson's education proposals sought to ensure the wide distribution of knowledge and that Jefferson's legacy remains important to us today.

  20. New technology N products in alabama

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because of high fertilizer N prices, growers are interested in using less expensive sources of N and using fertilizer additives to reduce ammonia volatilization losses from urea sources. An experiment on a Lucedale fine sandy loam in Central Alabama (Prattville Research Unit) was conducted in 2007 ...

  1. New technology N products in alabama

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because of high fertilizer N prices, growers are interested in using less expensive sources of N and using fertilizer additives to reduce ammonia volatilization losses from urea sources. An experiment on a Lucedale fine sandy loam in Central Alabama (Prattville Research Unit) was conducted in 2007 t...

  2. Alabama Public Library Service Annual Report, 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    This annual report summarizes activities of the Alabama Public Library Service for the fiscal year 1992. The following general areas are discussed: (1) agency services, including agency restructuring and personnel lay-offs, children's summer library program, the state union list of serials, automated systems, and production of a second edition of…

  3. Implementation of Alabama Resources Information System, ARIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, B. E.

    1978-01-01

    Development of ARIS - Alabama Resources Information System is summarized. Development of data bases, system simplification for user access, and making information available to personnel having a need to use ARIS or in the process of developing ARIS type systems are discussed.

  4. 75 FR 60371 - Alabama Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-30

    ... Register (47 FR 22030). You can also find later actions concerning the Alabama program and program... hearing until 4 p.m., c.d.t. on October 15, 2010. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments, identified by SATS No. AL-075-FOR by any of the following methods: E-mail: swilson@osmre.gov . Include ``SATS No....

  5. 76 FR 9642 - Alabama Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-22

    ... Alabama program in the May 20, 1982, Federal Register (47 FR 22030). You can also find later actions... the proposed amendment in the September 30, 2010, Federal Register (75 FR 60371). In the same document... the racial, gender, geographic, urban/rural and economic diversity of the state. This seven...

  6. Chemical Technician Manpower Survey: State of Alabama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Donald; And Others

    The study was undertaken to assess the needs of Alabama's industry for chemical technicians and to determine the kinds and levels of skills required by major employers. Of the 75 organizations responding to the questionnaire with usable data, 62 were private industries, 6 were testing laboratories, and 7 were federal agencies. Generally, the study…

  7. Alabama Kids Count 2002 Data Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Apreill; Bogie, Don

    This Kids Count data book examines statewide trends in well-being of Alabamas children. The statistical portrait is based on 18 indicators in the areas of child health, education, safety, and security: (1) infant mortality rate; (2) low weight births; (3) child health index; (4) births to unmarried teens; (5) first grade retention; (6) school…

  8. Financial Reporting for Alabama Public Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Commission on Higher Education, Montgomery.

    Guidelines for preparing year-end financial reports are provided for Alabama public university staff to insure that reporting formats produce comparable financial reports and to keep up with recent developments in college accounting and financial reporting. The public institutions comply with two publications issued by the American Institute of…

  9. The University of Alabama's Integrated Science Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rainey, Larry; Mitrook, Kim

    This program, supported by the Center for Communication and Educational Technology at the University of Alabama, incorporates the perspectives of biology, earth/space science, chemistry, and physics into an innovative science curriculum for the middle grades. Students are engaged for 20 minutes 3 times a week by an on-air instructor who is doing…

  10. Alabama Public Library Service. Annual Report, 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    This report on Alabama public and regional libraries and their services includes brief discussions of the year's state and federal aid, public library development, interlibrary cooperation, library automation, summer reading programs, services for the blind and physically handicapped, planning and research, library services to institutions,…

  11. Continuing Education in Alabama after One Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutton, Donnie; And Others

    Statistical data are presented on the attitudes, opinions, and participation patterns of 291 Alabama public health workers involved during the 1967-68 in statewide professional continuing education programs. Reactions to program components (instructional television, study manuals, group discussion sessions) and specific topics are summarized. Item…

  12. 78 FR 11577 - Alabama Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... Alabama program in the May 20, 1982, Federal Register (47 FR 22030). You can also find later actions... initiative. We announced receipt of the proposed amendment in the September 5, 2012, Federal Register (77 FR... competition, herbaceous ground cover on areas planted with woody vegetation or planted to food plots shall...

  13. Exploratory Programs in Alabama Middle Grades Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Louis L.; Allen, Michael G.; McKenna, Beverly

    Many educators believe that middle grades schools have a responsibility to capitalize on the natural curiosity of young adolescents through the use of an exploratory curriculum to help students understand the world in which they live. This study examined the status of middle grades exploratory programs in Alabama. A 22-item questionnaire was sent…

  14. Significance of selected lineaments in Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drahovzal, J. A.; Neathery, T. L.; Wielchowsky, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    Four lineaments in the Alabama Appalachians that appear on ERTS-1 imagery have been geologically analysed. Two of the lineaments appear to have regional geologic significance, showing relationships to structural and stratigraphic frameworks, water and mineral resources, geophysical anomalies, and seismicity. The other two lineaments are of local geologic significance, but, nevertheless, have important environmental implications.

  15. Alabama Public Library Service Annual Report, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    This annual report summarizes activities of the Alabama Public Library Service (APLS) for the fiscal year 1995. The APLS is charged with improving library services throughout the state to ensure that all citizens have access to quality library and information services. During fiscal year 1995, major building renovations were completed with the…

  16. Alabama Kids Count 2001 Data Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Apreill; Bogie, Don

    This Kids Count data book examines statewide trends in well-being for Alabama's children. The statistical portrait is based on 17 indicators in the areas of health, education, safety, and security. The indicators are: (1) infant mortality rate; (2) low weight births; (3) child health index; (4) births to unmarried teens; (5) first grade retention;…

  17. Alabama Counseling Association Journal, 1997-1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnuson, Sandy, Ed.; Norem, Ken, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This document consists of the two issues of the "Alabama Counseling Association Journal" published during 1997. The focus of the journal is on communicating ideas and information that will help counselors to implement the counseling role and develop the profession of counseling. The following articles are contained in issue 1: "Management and…

  18. Reservoir heterogeneity in Carter Sandstone, North Blowhorn Creek oil unit and vicinity, Black Warrior Basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Kugler, R.L.; Pashin, J.C.

    1992-05-01

    This report presents accomplishments made in completing Task 3 of this project which involves development of criteria for recognizing reservoir heterogeneity in the Black Warrior basin. The report focuses on characterization of the Upper Mississippian Carter sandstone reservoir in North Blowhorn Creek and adjacent oil units in Lamar County, Alabama. This oil unit has produced more than 60 percent of total oil extracted from the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. The Carter sandstone in North Blowhorn Creek oil unit is typical of the most productive Carter oil reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. The first part of the report synthesizes data derived from geophysical well logs and cores from North Blowhorn Creek oil unit to develop a depositional model for the Carter sandstone reservoir. The second part of the report describes the detrital and diagenetic character of Carter sandstone utilizing data from petrographic and scanning electron microscopes and the electron microprobe. The third part synthesizes porosity and pore-throat-size-distribution data determined by high-pressure mercury porosimetry and commercial core analyses with results of the sedimentologic and petrographic studies. The final section of the report discusses reservoir heterogeneity within the context of the five-fold classification of Moore and Kugler (1990).

  19. The HAPPEX experiment at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna Kumar; Paul Souder

    1997-10-01

    A new experimental program is under way at Jefferson Laboratory to probe the strange structure of the nucleon via parity violating electron scattering, HAPPEX is the first experiment from this program to run Jefferson Laboratory. We describe the physics motivation, provide an experimental overview and report on the results from the first data run. The asymmetry for the elastic scattering of 3.3 GeV electrons off target protons at a scattering angle of 12.5 degrees was measured to a precision of 15% of itself. The contribution from strange quark form factors was found to be zero within the experimental and theoretical uncertainties.

  20. 3. EXTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING EAST, SHOWING QUENCH TOWER, WITH QUENCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. EXTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING EAST, SHOWING QUENCH TOWER, WITH QUENCH IN PROGRESS, WILPUTTE BATTERY, COAL PRE-HEATING UNIT, INCLINE CONVEYOR AND BATHHOUSE. - Alabama By-Products Company, Coke Plant, Highway 79 (Pinson Valley Parkway), Tarrant City, Jefferson County, AL

  1. 68. VIEW OF THE SOUTH END OF THE GENTLEMEN'S LOUNGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    68. VIEW OF THE SOUTH END OF THE GENTLEMEN'S LOUNGE WITH AN ENGLISH HUNT THEME, ON THE BASEMENT LEVEL, LOOKING FROM THE NORTH - Alabama Theatre, 1811 Third Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  2. Strangeness production experiments at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, Reinhard

    2004-06-01

    Experimental results for photo- and electro-production of open strangeness from the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility are discussed. The results are from work completed by mid-2003 on elementary $KY$ production, nuclear targets, and the exotic $\\Theta^+$ state. It is shown how the increases in intensity and precision of JLab experiments over earlier work have allowed new phenomena to become measurable.

  3. Thomas Jefferson versus Wellesley High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loss, Richard

    1983-01-01

    One reason for the concern with high schools is that their performance limits, sometimes severely, what the colleges and universities can accomplish. Thomas Jefferson's views of education are used as criteria to judge the quality of liberal education the author received from Wellesley (Massachusetts) High School. (RM)

  4. To: Thomas Jefferson. Re: Your Proposal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deyoe-Chiullan, Rita M.

    1993-01-01

    A tongue-in-check response claimed to be from the prime minister of England to Thomas Jefferson regarding the "Declaration of Independence." Claims that the declaration fails to meet recently adopted specifications for proposals to the Crown and lacks a line-item budget, citations from recent literature, and measurable goals. (MLF)

  5. Strategies: The Thomas Jefferson University Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrest, Jane L.

    1991-01-01

    Thomas Jefferson University (Pennsylvania) has two dental professional hygiene education programs, one a prelicensure, entry-level clinical education program and the other a postcertificate or baccalaureate degree completion program. Recruitment strategies include prerequisite restructuring and part-time programs, and retention efforts begin with…

  6. COMPUTATION OF UNSTEADY FLOWS IN THE ALABAMA RIVER.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jeffcoat, Hillary H.; Jennings, Marshall E.

    1987-01-01

    An application is described of the branch-network flow model, BRANCH, to the upper Alabama River system in central Alabama. The model is used to simulate one-dimensional unsteady flows and water surface elevations in approximately 60 river miles of the Alabama River system. Preliminary calibration was made using 72 hours of observed data. Simulated discharges are about 10 percent lower than observed discharges at higher discharge rates and computer flows lag observed flows by about 30 minutes.

  7. Georgia/Alabama Regional Seismographic Network

    SciTech Connect

    Long, L.T. . School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)

    1990-11-01

    Data from the Georgia/Alabama network have contributed to a better understanding of the seismicity in the Southeast. Based on these data, a new theory explaining intraplate earthquakes was developed. The theory predicts that a decrease in strength of the lower crust (e.g. through a change in the fluid regime) leads to weakening and deformation of the stress channel in the mid-crustal zone. The weakening and stress concentration may lead to major earthquakes. Earthquake focal mechanisms in southeastern Tennessee are consistent with such a model. Conclusions reached from this and other studies suggest that major earthquakes have happened or could happen in southeastern Tennessee. Earthquakes in the Piedmont are of a different type, being mostly shallow, consistent with failure along joints and predominantly associated with reservoir impoundment. This mechanism may leave an upper magnitude limit of 5.7. In Alabama, except near southeastern Tennessee, the seismicity is largely induced by coal mine collapses. 3 figs.

  8. Gray bats and pollution in Missouri and northern Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, D.R.; Bunck, C.M.; Cromartie, E.; LaVal, R.K.; Tuttle, M.D.

    1981-01-01

    Gray bats died with lethal brain concentrations of dieldrin and rising levels of heptachlor epoxide in 1976, 1977, and 1978 at Bat Caves No. 2-3, Franklin County, Missouri. The colony disappeared in 1979. Dieldrin was banned in 1974 and 1981 was the last year for heptachlor use in Missouri. The State is recommendiing three organophosphates (chlorpyrifos or Dursban, dyfonate or Fonophos, and ethoprop or Mocap) as substitutes for heptachlor. All three compounds have excellent records in the environment. Analyses of insects collected where bats of this colony fed showed beetles, particularly rove beetles (Staphylinidae), to be the most heavily contaminated part of the bat's diet. Lactation concentrated these residues so that levels in milk were approximately 30 times those in the insect diet. Gray bats found dead in caves in northern Alabama showed DDD (a DDT derivative) contamination. Bats from the colony at Cave Springs Cave on the Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge contained up to 29 ppm DDD in their brains, but this is probably less than one-half the lethal level. Bats from other colonies contained less. The DDD contamination enters the Terinessee River just above the Wheeler Refuge and is seen in gray bat colonies as far as 60 miles downriver.

  9. Investigation of coal deposits in the Fairview and Coal City basins, Coosa Field, St. Clair County, Ala.: reserves, petrography, and chemical properties of coals: washability characteristics of coal from Fairview bed: geology of area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Toenges, Albert L.; Turnbull, Louis A.; Jolley, Theodore R.; Shields, Joseph J.; Smith, H.L.; O'Donnell, H. J.; Cooper, H.M.; Abernethy, R.F.; Gandrud, B.W.; Riley, H.L.; Rothrock, Howard E.

    1949-01-01

    Report issued by the Bureau of Mines discussing the coal deposits in Saint Clair County, Alabama. Investigations of the estimated reserves and analyses of the coal fields in this area are presented. This report includes tables, maps, illustrations, and photographs.

  10. Development of Alabama Resources Information System (ARIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, B. E.; Vachon, R. I.

    1976-01-01

    A formal, organized set of information concerning the development status of the Alabama Resources Information System (ARIS) as of September 1976 is provided. A series of computer source language programs, and flow charts related to each of the computer programs to provide greater ease in performing future change are presented. Listings of the variable names, and their meanings, used in the various source code programs, and copies of the various user manuals which were prepared through this time are given.

  11. Haynesville sandstone reservoirs in the Updip Jurassic trend of Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Kugler, R.L.; Mink, R.M.

    1994-09-01

    Subsequent to the 1986 drilling of the 1 Carolyn McCollough Unit 1-13 well, which initiated production from the Frisco City sand of the Haynesville Formation in Monroe County, Alabama, seven Haynesville fields have been established in Covington, Escambia, and Monroe counties. Initial flow rates of several hundred BOPD are typical for wells in these fields, and maximum rates exceed 2000 BOPD in North Frisco City field. As of August 1993, these fields produced more than 3,400,000 bbl of oil and 4,000,000 mcf of gas from depths of 12,000 to 13,000 ft. Haynesville sandstone reservoirs are concentrated in two distinct areas: (1) an eastern area (Hickory Branch, North Rome, and West Falco fields; API oil gravity = 40{degrees}) in the Conecuh embayment and (2) a western area (Frisco City, North Frisco City, southeast Frisco City, and Megargel fields; API oil gravity = 58-59{degrees}) on the Conecuh ridge complex. Eastern fields are productive from Haynesville sandstone, which is not continuous with the two distinct, productive sandstone bodies in western fields, the Frisco City sand and the Megargel sand. Hydrocarbon traps are structural or combination traps associated with basement paleohighs. Reservoir bodies generally consist of conglomerate (igneous clasts in western fields; limestone clasts in eastern fields), sandstone (subarkose-arkose), and shale (some of which is red) in stacked fining-upward sequences. Shale at the tops of these sequences is bioturbated. These marine strata were deposited in shoal-water braid-delta fronts. Petrophysical properties differ between the two areas. Maximum and average permeability in western fields (k{sub max} = 2000 md; k{sub ave} = 850-1800 md) is an order of magnitude higher than in eastern fields. The distribution of diagenetic components, including a variety of carbonate minerals, evaporate minerals (anhydrite and halite in western fields), and carbonate-replaced pseudomatrix, commonly is related to depositional architecture.

  12. Hydrologic characterization of the unconfined aquifer at the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center, Tuscaloosa, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, S.H.; Newcomer, D.R.

    1992-02-01

    Seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) involves storing thermal energy such as winter chill, summer heat, and industrial waste heat for future use in heat and/or cooling buildings or for industrial processes. Widespread development and implementation of STES would significantly reduce the need to generate primary energy in the United States. Recent data indicate that STES is technically suitable for providing 5% to 10% of the nation's energy, with major contributions in the commercial and industrial sectors and in district heating and cooling applications. This report describes aquifer characterization at the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. The purpose of the testing is to provide design data for the University's use in modifying and expanding an existing ATES well field. The aquifer characterization work was conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program) in cooperation with the University of Alabama as part of efforts to assess the use of chill ATES for space cooling.

  13. Ground Floor Plan (Section B) U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Ground Floor Plan (Section B) - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and Tuberculosis Neuropsychiatric Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  14. Second Floor Plan (Section B) U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Second Floor Plan (Section B) - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and Tuberculosis Neuropsychiatric Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  15. First Floor Plan (Section B) U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    First Floor Plan (Section B) - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and Tuberculosis Neuropsychiatric Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  16. U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and Tuberculosis Neuropsychiatric Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  17. Second Floor Plan (Section A) U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Second Floor Plan (Section A) - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and Tuberculosis Neuropsychiatric Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  18. Ground Floor Plan (Section A) U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Ground Floor Plan (Section A) - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and Tuberculosis Neuropsychiatric Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  19. First Floor Plan (Section A) U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    First Floor Plan (Section A) - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and Tuberculosis Neuropsychiatric Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  20. West wall, looking northeast U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    West wall, looking northeast - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and Tuberculosis Neuropsychiatric Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  1. Southeast corner, looking northwest U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Southeast corner, looking northwest - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and Tuberculosis Neuropsychiatric Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  2. Floor Plans and Stair Section U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Floor Plans and Stair Section - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Medical Officer in Charge Residence, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  3. Interior, east bedroom, looking southeast U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior, east bedroom, looking southeast - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Medical Officer in Charge Residence, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  4. Interior, rear sunporch, looking north U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior, rear sunporch, looking north - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Medical Officer in Charge Residence, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  5. Southwest corner, looking north U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Southwest corner, looking north - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Medical Officer in Charge Residence, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  6. Interior, living room, looking west U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior, living room, looking west - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Medical Officer in Charge Residence, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  7. Basement, bathroom, looking south U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Basement, bathroom, looking south - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Medical Officer in Charge Residence, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  8. Northeast corner, looking southwest U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Northeast corner, looking southwest - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Medical Officer in Charge Residence, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  9. North wall, looking southeast U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North wall, looking southeast - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Medical Officer in Charge Residence, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  10. Interior, dining room, looking southeast U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior, dining room, looking southeast - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Medical Officer in Charge Residence, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  11. South (front) wall, looking northwest U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South (front) wall, looking northwest - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Medical Officer in Charge Residence, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  12. North and South Elevations U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North and South Elevations - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Therapeutic Exercise Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  13. Making the Case for Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, Franz

    2011-06-01

    This chapter is a personal account of the initial planning and competition for a new laboratory, which eventually became known as the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, with the official nickname "Jefferson Lab." The period covered starts as far back as 1964, with the introduction of quarks, and extends up to the late 1980s after the initial team was assembled, the superconducting design was in place, and construction was well underway. I describe some of the major experiments that were proposed to justify the laboratory, reflect on the present status of those initially proposed experiments, and very briefly outline some of the new ideas that emerged after the laboratory was constructed. The science is presented in a simple manner intended for a lay audience, with some of the ideas illustrated by cartoons that were often used in popular lectures given during this period.

  14. Contributions of Thomas Jefferson to American medicine.

    PubMed

    Cohn, L H

    1979-08-01

    Thomas Jefferson, the third president of the United States and author of the Declaration of Independence, had a consuming interest in all fields of education and science, including the practice of medicine and public health. He actively developed medical education, supported measures for public health, and encouraged scientific research supported by the government without policy intervention. Although a close friend of eminent physicians, his rationalism and scientific method placed him ahead of many practitioners of his time. He disparaged medical quackery but actively supported therapies such as vaccination that were based on research and careful observation. The School of Medicine at the University of Virginia was Jefferson's concrete contribution to the advancement of medical education in the United States and epitomized his preoccupation with medicine and science as important cornerstones of a healthy American nation.

  15. Jefferson Lab Data Acquisition Run Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Vardan Gyurjyan; Carl Timmer; David Abbott; William Heyes; Edward Jastrzembski; David Lawrence; Elliott Wolin

    2004-10-01

    A general overview of the Jefferson Lab data acquisition run control system is presented. This run control system is designed to operate the configuration, control, and monitoring of all Jefferson Lab experiments. It controls data-taking activities by coordinating the operation of DAQ sub-systems, online software components and third-party software such as external slow control systems. The main, unique feature which sets this system apart from conventional systems is its incorporation of intelligent agent concepts. Intelligent agents are autonomous programs which interact with each other through certain protocols on a peer-to-peer level. In this case, the protocols and standards used come from the domain-independent Foundation for Intelligent Physical Agents (FIPA), and the implementation used is the Java Agent Development Framework (JADE). A lightweight, XML/RDF-based language was developed to standardize the description of the run control system for configuration purposes.

  16. Harmonic Lasing Characterization at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Benson; Michelle D. Shinn

    2006-08-27

    Harmonic lasing is normally suppressed because of lasing at the fundamental wavelength. It can, however, be achieved by using any of several methods that suppress fundamental lasing. In this paper we discuss two methods used at Jefferson Lab. The first is to use the characteristics of dielectric coatings to allow harmonic lasing at cavity lengths longer than the synchronous length for the fundamental. The second is to use a dielectric coating that has little reflectivity at the fundamental. This allows us to directly compare fundamental and harmonic lasing with the same optical resonator and electron beam. We present measurement carried out at Jefferson Lab using the IR Upgrade FEL operating at 0.53, 0.94, 1.04, 1.6, and 2.8 microns in which both schemes are used to produce lasing at both the 3rd and 5th harmonic of the fundamental.

  17. Alabama's Education Report Card, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In a more consistent and viable manner than ever before, education in Alabama is moving toward its ultimate goal of providing every student with a quality education, thereby preparing them for work, college, and life after high school. Alabama's graduation rates from 2002 to 2008 increased significantly, tripling the national average increase…

  18. 76 FR 77995 - Southcross Alabama Pipeline LLC; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Southcross Alabama Pipeline LLC; Notice of Filing Take notice that on December 7, 2011, Southcross Alabama Pipeline LLC (SAP) submitted a revised Statement of...

  19. The Alabama High School Graduation Examination Experience: Technical Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockwood, Robert E.

    A technical advisory committee assisted the Alabama State Department of Education in establishing passing scores and equating test forms of the Alabama High School Graduation Examination (AHSGE). The committee examined four methods of setting cutting scores: (1) Jensen's theoretical method--probability theory is used to set standards that are…

  20. Aeromonas hydrophila in 2010: Characteristics of Alabama outbreaks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For a second year, epidemics associated with a virulent strain of Aeromonas hydrophila resulted in losses of hundreds of thousands of pounds of market size Alabama (AL) catfish. During this period, the Alabama Fish Farming Center diagnosed outbreaks of this strain of A. hydrophila on 25% (28/113) o...

  1. Alabama's Education Report Card 2010-11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Public education in Alabama is moving in the right direction and is poised to be a national model for the college and career readiness of its students. Through some of the most challenging financial circumstances, public education in Alabama has continued to show great promise in many areas, including reading, math, and science. The success of…

  2. 76 FR 32982 - Alabama; Emergency and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-07

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Alabama; Emergency and Related Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of the Presidential declaration of an emergency for the State of Alabama (FEMA-3319-EM), dated April 27, 2011, and...

  3. Alabama Commission on Higher Education. Occasional Papers on Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Commission on Higher Education, Montgomery.

    Two papers on the funding formula of the Alabama Commission for Higher Education are presented. The first paper, by John F. Porter, Jr., "The Origins and Evolutions of the Funding Formula Model Utilized by the Alabama Commission on Higher Education, 1973-82," presents the historical antecedents for the existing formula elements and notes…

  4. Alabama Linkage: An Innovative Higher Education Consortium Maximizing Statewide Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joiner, Charles L.; And Others

    In the late 1960's and early 1970's, attracting physicians to areas of rural Alabama was virtually impossible because of the lack of professional health care workers available to become part of the necessary health care team. To address this problem, the University of Alabama (UA) adopted a plan to create a consortium of higher education…

  5. Trends in Tobacco Use by Alabama Youth (1995-1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Feng; Bruess, Clint

    To examine changes in tobacco use among high school students in Alabama from 1995 to 1999, Alabama Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBS) survey data were analyzed. The survey has been used since 1990 to examine the health practices of adolescents and to monitor priority health-risk behaviors that contribute to the leading causes of…

  6. Inservice Education at a Distance: A Rural Consortium in Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Addleton, Robert L.; Edmonds, Charles; Gamble, Lanny; Watkins, J. Foster

    1983-01-01

    The articles describes the efforts of seven rural systems in northeast Alabama to respond in a cooperative manner to new initiatives from the State Department of Education to improve their inservice/staff development programs. The University of Alabama, primarily through its Gadsden Center, provided professional support and coordinating…

  7. A Study of School Size among Alabama's Public High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindahl, Ronald A.; Cain, Patrick M., Sr.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the size of Alabama's public high schools, selected school quality and financial indicators, and their students' performance on standardized exams. When the socioeconomic level of the student bodies is held constant, the size of high schools in Alabama has relatively little…

  8. Alabama University Professor's View of the Birmingham Bombing Trial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Presents the views of Alabama university scholars regarding the historical significance of the 2001 trial of Thomas Blanton for his role in the Ku Klux Klan bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist church in Birmingham, Alabama thet killed four girls. Their discussions note the need to examine the American judicial system, the weak case against Mr.…

  9. Phorid Flies in Alabama: A tale of two species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two species of phorid fly have been released at 11 sites in Alabama and have been recovered from 9 sites. Pseudacteon tricuspis Borgmeier (Diptera: Phoridae) was released in South Alabama in populations of the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), and Pseudacteon...

  10. 77 FR 41132 - Air Quality Implementation Plans; Alabama; Attainment Plan for the Alabama Portion of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-12

    ... for the 1997 PM 2.5 NAAQS (72 FR 20586). This rule describes the CAA framework and requirements for... portion of the Chattanooga Area on February 8, 2012 (77 FR 6469). EPA has determined that Alabama's PM 2.5... for EPA's proposed action? A. Designation History On July 18, 1997 (62 FR 38652), EPA established...

  11. 77 FR 60904 - Air Quality Implementation Plans; Alabama; Attainment Plan for the Alabama Portion of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-05

    ... October 7, 2009, SIP revision regarding reasonably available control technology (RACT) and reasonably... the mobile source contribution to ambient PM 2.5 levels for the Alabama portion of the Chattanooga... insignificance determination for mobile direct PM 2.5 and NO X emissions for transportation conformity...

  12. Alabama Bound: Identifying Factors Associated with Secondary Education Students' Choice of Attending The University of Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acker, Jon Charles; Hughes, William W.; Fendley, William R., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Alabama's primary competitor in recruiting is in-state rival Auburn University which lures away roughly one in eight of UA's admitted students. Two factors stand above all others in attracting students to UA--academic reputation and social activities reputation. Factors following distantly are a visit to the UA campus, financial assistance and the…

  13. Lattice QCD and the Jefferson Laboratory Program

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek, Robert Edwards, David Richards, Konstantinos Orginos

    2011-06-01

    Lattice gauge theory provides our only means of performing \\textit{ab initio} calculations in the non-perturbative regime. It has thus become an increasing important component of the Jefferson Laboratory physics program. In this paper, we describe the contributions of lattice QCD to our understanding of hadronic and nuclear physics, focusing on the structure of hadrons, the calculation of the spectrum and properties of resonances, and finally on deriving an understanding of the QCD origin of nuclear forces.

  14. Water resources of Jefferson Parish, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prakken, Lawrence B.; Lovelace, John K.

    2014-01-01

    This fact sheet presents a brief overview of groundwater and surface-water resources in Jefferson Parish, Louisiana. Information on the availability, use, and quality of water from groundwater and surface-water sources in the parish is discussed. Previously published reports and data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Information System (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis) are the primary sources of this information.

  15. Overview of Nuclear Physics at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, Robert D.

    2013-08-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and associated experimental equipment at Jefferson Lab comprise a unique facility for experimental nuclear physics. This facility is presently being upgraded, which will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential to address important topics in nuclear, hadronic, and electroweak physics. Further in the future, it is envisioned that the Laboratory will evolve into an electron-ion colliding beam facility.

  16. Jefferson Lab Science: Present and Future

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, Robert D.

    2015-02-12

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and associated experimental equipment at Jefferson Lab comprise a unique facility for experimental nuclear physics. Furthermore, this facility is presently being upgraded, which will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential to address important topics in nuclear, hadronic, and electroweak physics. Further in the future, it is envisioned that the Laboratory will evolve into an electron-ion colliding beam facility.

  17. Groundwater quality at Alabama Plating and Vincent Spring, Vincent, Alabama, 2007–2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Michael W.; Gill, Amy C.

    2014-01-01

    The former Alabama Plating site in Vincent, Alabama, includes the location where the Alabama Plating Company operated an electroplating facility from 1956 until 1986. The operation of the facility generated waste containing cyanide, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, zinc, and other heavy metals. Contamination resulting from the site operations was identified in groundwater, soil, and sediment. Vincent Spring, used as a public water supply by the city of Vincent, Alabama, is located about ½ mile southwest of the site. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, conducted an investigation at Vincent Spring and the Alabama Plating site, Vincent, Alabama, during 2007–2008 to evaluate the groundwater quality and evaluate the potential effect of contaminated groundwater on the water quality of Vincent Spring. The results of the investigation will provide scientific data and information on the occurrence, fate, and transport of contaminants in the water resources of the area and aid in the evaluation of the vulnerability of the public water supply to contamination. Samples were analyzed to evaluate the water quality at the former plating site, investigate the presence of possible contaminant indicators at Vincent Spring, and determine the usefulness of stable isotopes and geochemical properties in understanding groundwater flow and contaminant transport in the area. Samples collected from 16 monitor wells near the plating site and Vincent Spring were analyzed for major constituents, trace metals, nutrients, and the stable isotopes for hydrogen (2H/H) and oxygen (18O/16O). Groundwater collected from Vincent Spring was characterized as a calcium-magnesium-bicarbonate water type with total dissolved solids concentrations ranging from 110 to 120 milligrams per liter and pH ranging from about 7.5 to 7.9 units. Groundwater chemistry at the monitor wells at the Alabama Plating site was highly variable by location and depth

  18. The evolution of Jefferson Lab's control system

    SciTech Connect

    K. S. White; M. Bickley; W. Watson

    1999-10-01

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility's (Jefferson Lab) accelerator controls were initially implemented as a proprietary in-house system. During machine commissioning, problems were encountered leading to a decision to migrate to the Experimental Physics and Industrial Controls System (EPICS). Since then, the accelerator and all other laboratory controls have been successfully converted. In addition to implementing Jefferson Lab's controls using EPICS, new data visualization tools have been developed and existing programs have been enhanced with new capabilities. In order to provide a more generic interface for high level applications development, a device abstraction layer, called Common DEVice (CDEV), was implemented. These additions have been made available to other laboratories and are in use at many sites, including some that do not use EPICS. Control System development is not limited to computer scientists; operators, engineers and physicists frequently add capabilities using EPICS, CDEV, Tel/tk, and other tools. These contributions have tailored the control system for many different types of customers. For the future, the authors envision more intelligent processing and more capable tools for data storage, retrieval and visualization.

  19. Reservoir characterization of the Smackover Formation in southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Hall, D.R.; Mann, S.D.; Tew, B.H.

    1993-02-01

    The Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation is found in an arcuate belt in the subsurface from south Texas to panhandle Florida. The Smackover is the most prolific hydrocarbon-producing formation in Alabama and is an important hydrocarbon reservoir from Florida to Texas. In this report Smackover hydrocarbon reservoirs in southwest Alabama are described. Also, the nine enhanced- and improved-recovery projects that have been undertaken in the Smackover of Alabama are evaluated. The report concludes with recommendations about potential future enhanced- and improved-recovery projects in Smackover reservoirs in Alabama and an estimate of the potential volume of liquid hydrocarbons recoverable by enhanced- and improved-recovery methods from the Smackover of Alabama.

  20. 77 FR 60003 - Alabama Disaster #AL-00044

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... Counties: Baldwin; Mobile; Pickens' The Interest Rates are: Percent For Physical Damage: Non-Profit... Federal Domestic Assistance Numbers 59002 and 59008) James E. Rivera, Associate Administrator for...

  1. Soil Sampling Techniques For Alabama Grain Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, A. N.; Shaw, J. N.; Mask, P. L.; Touchton, J. T.; Rickman, D.

    2003-01-01

    Characterizing the spatial variability of nutrients facilitates precision soil sampling. Questions exist regarding the best technique for directed soil sampling based on a priori knowledge of soil and crop patterns. The objective of this study was to evaluate zone delineation techniques for Alabama grain fields to determine which method best minimized the soil test variability. Site one (25.8 ha) and site three (20.0 ha) were located in the Tennessee Valley region, and site two (24.2 ha) was located in the Coastal Plain region of Alabama. Tennessee Valley soils ranged from well drained Rhodic and Typic Paleudults to somewhat poorly drained Aquic Paleudults and Fluventic Dystrudepts. Coastal Plain s o i l s ranged from coarse-loamy Rhodic Kandiudults to loamy Arenic Kandiudults. Soils were sampled by grid soil sampling methods (grid sizes of 0.40 ha and 1 ha) consisting of: 1) twenty composited cores collected randomly throughout each grid (grid-cell sampling) and, 2) six composited cores collected randomly from a -3x3 m area at the center of each grid (grid-point sampling). Zones were established from 1) an Order 1 Soil Survey, 2) corn (Zea mays L.) yield maps, and 3) airborne remote sensing images. All soil properties were moderately to strongly spatially dependent as per semivariogram analyses. Differences in grid-point and grid-cell soil test values suggested grid-point sampling does not accurately represent grid values. Zones created by soil survey, yield data, and remote sensing images displayed lower coefficient of variations (8CV) for soil test values than overall field values, suggesting these techniques group soil test variability. However, few differences were observed between the three zone delineation techniques. Results suggest directed sampling using zone delineation techniques outlined in this paper would result in more efficient soil sampling for these Alabama grain fields.

  2. 2012 Alabama Lunabotics Systems Engineering Paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Justin; Ricks, Kenneth; Hull, Bethanne J.

    2012-01-01

    Excavation will hold a key role for future lunar missions. NASA has stated that "advances in lunar regolith mining have the potential to significantly contribute to our nation's space vision and NASA space exploration operations." [1]. The Lunabotics Mining Competition is an event hosted by NASA that is meant to encourage "the development of innovative lunar excavation concepts from universities which may result in clever ideas and solutions which could be applied to an actual lunar excavation device or payload." [2]. Teams entering the competition must "design and build a remote controlled or autonomous excavator, called a lunabot, that can collect and deposit a minimum of 10 kilograms of lunar simulant within 10 minutes." [2]. While excavation will play an important part in lunar missions, there will still be many other tasks that would benefit from robotic assistance. An excavator might not be as well suited for these tasks as other types of robots might be. For example a lightweight rover would do well with reconnaissance, and a mobile gripper arm would be fit for manipulation, while an excavator would be comparatively clumsy and slow in both cases. Even within the realm of excavation it would be beneficial to have different types of excavators for different tasks, as there are on Earth. The Alabama Lunabotics Team at the University of Alabama has made it their goal to not only design and build a robot that could compete in the Lunabotics Mining Competition, but would also be a multipurpose tool for future NASA missions. The 2010-2011 resulting robot was named the Modular Omnidirectional Lunar Excavator (MOLE). Using the Systems Engineering process and building off of two years of Lunabotics experience, the 20ll-2012 Alabama Lunabotics team (Team NASACAR) has improved the MOLE 1.0 design and optimized it for the 2012 Lunabotics Competition rules [I]. A CAD model of MOLE 2.0 can be seen below in Fig. 1.

  3. Flood of April 13, 1980, Mobile, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hannum, Curtis H.; Nelson, George H.

    1980-01-01

    This report presents basic data collected during the flood of April 13, 1980, in Mobile, Alabama. The data consists of high-water marks, accumulative rainfall, peak discharge at local gaging stations, hydrographs of discharge and rainfall, and photographs at various locations taken during and immediately after the flood. The report presented in map-series and lists data that are readily usable by local planners and developers. During th afternoon of April 13, 1980, the National Weather Service at Mobile recorded a total of 10.4 inches of rainfall. Immediately after the flood approximately 60 to 70 percent of the roads in the Mobile area were impassable. (USGS)

  4. 30 CFR 901.25 - Approval of Alabama abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Approval of Alabama abandoned mine land... STATE ALABAMA § 901.25 Approval of Alabama abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments. The... publication Citation/description June 15, 1987 July 7, 1988 Alabama policies and procedures for...

  5. 30 CFR 901.25 - Approval of Alabama abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Approval of Alabama abandoned mine land... STATE ALABAMA § 901.25 Approval of Alabama abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments. The... publication Citation/description June 15, 1987 July 7, 1988 Alabama policies and procedures for...

  6. 30 CFR 901.25 - Approval of Alabama abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Approval of Alabama abandoned mine land... STATE ALABAMA § 901.25 Approval of Alabama abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments. The... publication Citation/description June 15, 1987 July 7, 1988 Alabama policies and procedures for...

  7. Alabama Education News. Volume 28, Number 4, November-December 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama," as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  8. 75 FR 43964 - Enterprise Alabama Intrastate, LLC; Notice of Compliance Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Enterprise Alabama Intrastate, LLC; Notice of Compliance Filing July 20, 2010. Take notice that on July 19, 2010, Enterprise Alabama Intrastate, LLC (Enterprise Alabama) pursuant to a July 8, 2010, Letter Order which required Enterprise Alabama to file within 30 days of...

  9. 75 FR 27340 - Enterprise Alabama Intrastate, LLC; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Enterprise Alabama Intrastate, LLC; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval May 6, 2010. Take notice that on May 3, 2010, Enterprise Alabama Intrastate, LLC (Enterprise Alabama.... Enterprise Alabama states it is filing to justify its current system-wide transportation rate of 47.93...

  10. Alabama Education News. Volume 29, Number 3, November-December 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama," as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  11. Thomas Jefferson: The Architect of Democracy. Classroom Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Merrill D.

    1994-01-01

    Presents a biographical sketch and teaching activities on the life of Thomas Jefferson. Asserts that the world's political geography changed dramatically during his lifetime and presents a classroom lesson on this topic. Includes a chronology of Jefferson's life and six quotations exemplifying his political and social views. (CFR)

  12. The World of Thomas Jefferson: A Guide for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valand, Elisabeth, Ed.

    This teaching guide contains two essays about Thomas Jefferson, along with teaching activities, resources and organizations, a chronology, and quotes. The two essays are: (1) "The Architect of Democracy" (Merrill D. Peterson); and (2) "Jefferson's Legacy: Civic Learning in Public Education" (R. Freeman Butts). Teaching activities center around the…

  13. RACIAL DIFFERENCES IN MYASTHENIA GRAVIS IN ALABAMA

    PubMed Central

    OH, SHIN J.; MORGAN, MARLA B.; LU, LIANG; HATANAKA, YUKI; HEMMI, SHOJI; YOUNG, ANGELA; CLAUSSEN, GWENDOLYN C.

    2010-01-01

    Demographic, clinical, and laboratory features were compared in 235 white and African-American (AA) patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) at the University of Alabama at Birmingham Neuromuscular Disease Clinic from May 2003 to January 2008. Seventy nine percent of patients were white. Acetylcholine receptor antibody was positive in 71% of white patients and in 59% of AA. In patients with seronegative generalized MG, the rate of positive muscle-specific tyrosine kinase antibody (MuSK-Ab) was significantly higher in AA than it was in whites (50% in AA vs. 17% in whites). Ocular MG was seronegative in 75% of AA patients. In AA, MG occurred earlier and more frequently in females, whereas, in whites, disease onset was later and more common in males. Another significant difference was a higher percentage of abnormality on repetitive nerve stimulation in AA. There was also a tendency for more severe forms of MG in AA. There are racial differences in MG between whites and AA in Alabama. These racial differences highlight the need to study biological factors in the pathogenesis of MG and to assess different approaches in diagnosis and treatment. PMID:19127534

  14. Water Resources Data, Alabama, Water Year 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearman, J.L.; Stricklin, V.E.; Psinakis, W.L.

    2003-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2002 water year for Alabama consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stages and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels in wells. This report includes records on both surface and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) discharge records for 131 streamflow-gaging stations, for 41 partial-record or miscellaneous streamflow stations; (2) stage and content records for 14 lakes and reservoirs and stage at 47 stations; (3) water-quality records for 12 streamflow-gaging stations, for 17 ungaged streamsites, and for 2 precipitation stations; (4) water temperature at 14 surfacewater stations; (5) specific conductance and dissolved oxygen at 12 stations; (6) turbidity at 3 stations; (7) sediment data at 6 stations; (8) water-level records for 2 recording observation wells; and (9) water-quality records for 21 ground-water stations. Also included are lists of active and discontinued continuous-record surface-water-quality stations, and partial-record and miscellaneous surface-water-quality stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Alabama.

  15. Inventory of Alabama greenhouse gas emissions and sinks: 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chumeng; Herz, W.J.; Griffin, R.A.

    1996-12-31

    Greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere have been increasing since the industrial revolution. Worldwide efforts are being made to study anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. This study quantified the anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions in Alabama in 1990. Alabama anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions and sinks from 13 sources were studied. 1990 Alabama total anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions and sinks were estimated to be 153.42 and 21.66 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalent. As a result, the net total greenhouse gas emissions were estimated to be 131.76 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalent. Fossil fuel combustion is the major source of emissions, representing approximately 78 percent. Coal mining and landfills are other two significant emission sources, representing approximately 10 and 6 percent of the total emissions respectively. Forests in Alabama represent the major sink, offsetting approximately 14 percent of the total emissions. On a per capita basis, Alabama`s emission rate is 32.3 tons of carbon dioxide equivalent per capita in 1990, compared to the national per capita average of 23.4 tons of carbon dioxide equivalent. The high emission rate is attributed to higher emissions than the national average from fossil fuel combustion, from coal mining and landfills in Alabama.

  16. Diversity and Educational Gains: A Plan for a Changing County and Its Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orfield, Gary; Frankenberg, Erica

    2011-01-01

    This report is a response to the Jefferson County School Board's request for an independent study of the best way to carry successfully into the future its long-term commitment to diversity in its schools. The Board's first principle is preservation of diversity in the schools. The authors' assignment from the board was two-fold: to build on the…

  17. Responses to lost letters about a 2000 General Election amendment to abolish prohibition of interracial marriages in Alabama.

    PubMed

    Bridges, F Stephen; Keeton, Kato B; Clark, L Nicholle

    2002-12-01

    A field study using 621 "lost" letters was conducted in the city of Mobile and in small towns in mostly rural Baldwin County, Alabama. Milgram's lost letter technique was validated against the actual votes cast during the November 7, 2000 General Election. The technique was successful as an unobtrusive measure useful for predicting patterns of voting behavior. Rates of return of lost letters "in favor of and opposed to legalizing interracial marriage" agreed with the actual election returns (chi-square "goodness of fit"). Community size seemed associated with return of lost letters.

  18. 76 FR 8808 - Supplemental Final Environmental Impact Statement: Clark County, Indiana, and Jefferson County, KY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... same need by constructing a pedestrian walkway and bike path on the Big Four Bridge; (4) Collecting... statement (SEIS) will be prepared for the Louisville-Southern Indiana Ohio River Bridges (Project) in Clark... the reasons for its selection. The Selected Alternative consists of a new northbound I-65 bridge...

  19. Geoscience research databases for coastal Alabama ecosystem management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hummell, Richard L.

    1995-01-01

    Effective management of complex coastal ecosystems necessitates access to scientific knowledge that can be acquired through a multidisciplinary approach involving Federal and State scientists that take advantage of agency expertise and resources for the benefit of all participants working toward a set of common research and management goals. Cooperative geostatic investigations have led toward building databases of fundamental scientific knowledge that can be utilized to manage coastal Alabama's natural and future development. These databases have been used to assess the occurrence and economic potential of hard mineral resources in the Alabama EFZ, and to support oil spill contingency planning and environmental analysis for coastal Alabama.

  20. Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind Biodiesel Project Green

    SciTech Connect

    Edmiston, Jessica L

    2012-09-28

    Through extensive collaboration, Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind (AIDB) is Alabama's first educational entity to initiate a biodiesel public education, student training and production program, Project Green. With state and national replication potential, Project Green benefits local businesses and city infrastructures within a 120-mile radius; provides alternative education to Alabama school systems and to schools for the deaf and blind in Appalachian States; trains students with sensory and/or multiple disabilities in the acquisition and production of biodiesel; and educates the external public on alternative fuels benefits.

  1. Alabama Tin Belt. Metallogenesis and mineral resource evaluation. Final report for the 1983-1984 project year

    SciTech Connect

    Green, N.L.; Tompa, B.; Gomolka, J.; Wade, G.; Usdansky, S.I.

    1986-03-01

    The Alabama Tin Belt covers an area of approximately 180 km/sup 2/ within the Tallapoosa lithotectonic block of the Northern Alabama Piedmont. In the second year of this three year project, efforts continued towards detailing the distribution and petrogenesis of tin-bearing peraluminous granitoids in central Coosa County. In particular, mapping, structural analysis and petrographical/petrological studies have been used to examine the geologic settings, geochemical and mineralogical variations, crystallization conditions and nature of source rock(s) of selected granitic plutons and related pegmatite bodies in the vicinity of Rockford, Alabama. Thermobarometeric techniques (a ternary feldspar thermobarometer and a plagioclase-muscovite geothermometer), that could be used in conjunction with compositions of constituent minerals to yield reasonable estmates of granite crystallization and alteration temperatures, were also developed. Preliminary results provide evidence that: (1) the granitoids possess characteristics possibly derived from both sedimentary (S-type) and igneous (I-type) sources; (2) feldspars of the tin-bearing pegmatites possess extremely high Rb and Cs concentrations; (3) the peraluminous granitoids crystallized under varying oxygen fugacity conditions at temperatures of 510 to 710/sup 0/ and pressures greater than 6 kbar; and, (4) the Rockford Pluton occupies the core of a post-D/sub 1/, antiformal structure that is overturned to the northwest.

  2. Mortality associated with Hurricane Katrina--Florida and Alabama, August-October 2005.

    PubMed

    2006-03-10

    On August 25, 2005, Hurricane Katrina made landfall between Hallandale Beach and Aventura, Florida, as a Category 1 hurricane, with sustained winds of 80 mph. Storm effects, primarily rain, flooding, and high winds, were substantial; certain areas reported nearly 12 inches of rainfall. After crossing southern Florida and entering the Gulf of Mexico, the hurricane strengthened and made landfall in southeastern Louisiana on August 29 as a Category 3 hurricane, with sustained winds of 125 mph. Katrina was one of the strongest hurricanes to strike the United States during the past 100 years and was likely the nation's costliest natural disaster to date. This report summarizes findings and recommendations from a review of mortality records of Florida's Medical Examiners Commission (FMEC) and the Alabama Department of Forensic Science (ADFS). CDC was invited by the Florida Department of Health (FDOH) and the Alabama Department of Public Health (ADPH) to assess the mortality related to Hurricane Katrina. The mortality review was intended to provide county-based information that would be used to 1) define the impact of the hurricane, 2) describe the etiology of deaths, and 3) identify strategies to prevent or reduce future hurricane-related mortality. Combined, both agencies identified five, 23, and 10 deaths, respectively, that were directly, indirectly, or possibly related to Hurricane Katrina. Information from the characterization of these deaths will be used to reduce hurricane-related mortality through early community awareness of hurricane-related risk, prevention measures, and effective communication of a coordinated hurricane response plan.

  3. Carbon monoxide poisonings after two major hurricanes--Alabama and Texas, August-October 2005.

    PubMed

    2006-03-10

    Hurricanes Katrina and Rita struck the U.S. Gulf Coast on August 29, 2005, and September 24, 2005, respectively, causing widespread damage and leaving approximately 4 million households without electrical power. Despite public health measures to prevent carbon monoxide (CO) poisonings after major power outages, multiple CO poisonings were reported in Gulf Coast states in the wake of these hurricanes. The Alabama Department of Public Health and Texas Department of State Health Services asked CDC to assist in investigating the extent and causes of these hurricane-related CO poisonings. The investigation identified 27 incidents of CO poisoning resulting in 78 nonfatal cases and 10 deaths in hurricane-affected counties in Alabama and Texas, nearly all of which were caused by gasoline-powered generators. Most of the generators involved were placed outside but close to the home to power window air conditioners (ACs) or connect to central electric panels. Few homes had functioning CO detectors. CDC continues to recommend that generators be placed far from homes, away from window ACs, and that CO detectors be used by all households operating gasoline-powered appliances (e.g., generators and gas furnaces), with batteries replaced yearly. Although the risk for CO poisoning likely decreases as generators are placed further from the home, additional studies are needed to establish a safe distance for generator placement.

  4. Volcano hazards in the Mount Jefferson region, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walder, Joseph S.; Gardner, Cynthia A.; Conrey, Richard M.; Fisher, Bruce J.; Schilling, Steven P.

    1999-01-01

    Mount Jefferson is a prominent feature of the landscape seen from highways east and west of the Cascades. Mount Jefferson (one of thirteen major volcanic centers in the Cascade Range) has erupted repeatedly for hundreds of thousands of years, with its last eruptive episode during the last major glaciation which culminated about 15,000 years ago. Geologic evidence shows that Mount Jefferson is capable of large explosive eruptions. The largest such eruption occurred between 35,000 and 100,000 years ago, and caused ash to fall as far away as the present-day town of Arco in southeast Idaho. Although there has not been an eruption at Mount Jefferson for some time, experience at explosive volcanoes elsewhere suggests that Mount Jefferson cannot be regarded as extinct. If Mount Jefferson erupts again, areas close to the eruptive vent will be severely affected, and even areas tens of kilometers (tens of miles) downstream along river valleys or hundreds of kilometers (hundreds of miles) downwind may be at risk. Numerous small volcanoes occupy the area between Mount Jefferson and Mount Hood to the north, and between Mount Jefferson and the Three Sisters region to the south. These small volcanoes tend not to pose the far-reaching hazards associated with Mount Jefferson, but are nonetheless locally important. A concern at Mount Jefferson, but not at the smaller volcanoes, is the possibility that small to- moderate sized landslides could occur even during periods of no volcanic activity. Such landslides may transform as they move into lahars (watery flows of rock, mud, and debris) that can inundate areas far downstream. The population at immediate risk in the Mount Jefferson region is small, but these residents as well as other people who visit the area for recreation and work purposes should be aware of the potential hazards. Probably the greatest concern in the Mount Jefferson region is the possibility that large lahars might enter reservoirs on either side of the volcano

  5. Physics with CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Michel Garcon

    2006-05-22

    The CLAS collaboration at Jefferson Lab is engaged in a wide range of experiments, covering mostly meson and baryon spectroscopy, nucleon structure through elastic and deep inelastic scattering, nuclear transparency and nucleon correlations in nuclei. These experiments use the CEBAF highly polarized electron beam, or the secondary tagged photon beam, together with the CLAS detector (CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer), to which specific experiments bring additional equipment. In this talk, examples of recent results on subjects mentioned hereabove will be given, with special emphasis on nucleon structure. A short description of the planned upgrade from CLAS to CLAS12 is presented.

  6. Strangeness Physics with CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, Reinhard

    2010-08-05

    We review recent developments in strangeness photo- and electro- production off the proton and neutron, as investigated using CLAS in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. By measuring sufficient spin observables one can decompose the reaction mechanism into elementary amplitudes. We discuss progress toward this end in recent data from CLAS, including cross sections and spin observables. We next discuss new results on the mass distribution of the {Lambda}(1405), which shows signs of being a composite meson-baryon object of mixed isospin. The work on other hyperons such as the {Xi} resonances will be mentioned, and future prospects for the CLAS program outlined.

  7. Strangeness Physics with CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhard Schumacher

    2010-08-01

    We review recent developments in strangeness photo- and electro- production off the proton and neutron, as investigated using CLAS in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. By measuring sufficient spin observables one can decompose the reaction mechanism into elementary amplitudes. We discuss progress toward this end in recent data from CLAS, including cross sections and spin observables. We next discuss new results on the mass distribution of the Lambda(1405), which shows signs of being a composite meson-baryon object of mixed isospin. The work on other hyperons such as the Xi resonances will be mentioned, and future prospects for the CLAS program outlined.

  8. The EG4 Experiment at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    X. Zheng

    2009-07-01

    The main physics goal of the CLAS EG4 experiment at Jefferson Lab is to measure the generalized GDH sum for the proton and the neutron at very low Q2 down to Q2 = 0.015 (GeV/c)2 (inclusive channels). The same data can be used to extract asymmetries of pion electroproduction in the resonance region (exclusive channels). An overview of the experiment is presented here, as well as the analysis status of both inclusive and exclusive analyses. Some preliminary results on the single-target and the beam-target asymmetries of charged pion electroproductions are presented.

  9. Antibaryon photoproduction using CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, W.; Guo, L.

    2016-05-01

    There is little known about baryon-antibaryon photoproduction mechanisms. Three reactions, γ p →p p p ¯, γ p →p p n ¯π-, and γ p →p n p ¯π+ have been investigated for the photon energy range of 3.95-5.45 GeV. The data were from the g12 run period taken with the CLAS detector using a liquid hydrogen target in Hall B at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. This experiment had high statistics, with an integrated luminosity of 68 pb-1. General features of the data and preliminary cross sections are presented.

  10. Water resources of Jefferson Davis Parish, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, Vincent E.; Prakken, Lawrence B.

    2014-01-01

    Information concerning the availability, use, and quality of water in Jefferson Davis Parish, Louisiana, is critical for proper water-supply management. The purpose of this fact sheet is to present information that can be used by water managers, parish residents, and others for stewardship of this vital resource. Information on the availability, past and current use, use trends, and water quality from groundwater and surface-water sources in the parish is presented. Previously published reports and data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Information System (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis) are the primary sources of the information presented here.

  11. Hydrologic characterization of the unconfined aquifer at the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center, Tuscaloosa, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, S.H.; Newcomer, D.R.

    1992-02-01

    Seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) involves storing thermal energy such as winter chill, summer heat, and industrial waste heat for future use in heat and/or cooling buildings or for industrial processes. Widespread development and implementation of STES would significantly reduce the need to generate primary energy in the United States. Recent data indicate that STES is technically suitable for providing 5% to 10% of the nation`s energy, with major contributions in the commercial and industrial sectors and in district heating and cooling applications. This report describes aquifer characterization at the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. The purpose of the testing is to provide design data for the University`s use in modifying and expanding an existing ATES well field. The aquifer characterization work was conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program) in cooperation with the University of Alabama as part of efforts to assess the use of chill ATES for space cooling.

  12. Large Meteor Tracked over Northeast Alabama

    NASA Video Gallery

    On the evening of May 18, NASA all-sky meteor cameras located at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center and at the Walker County Science Center near Chickamauga, Ga. tracked the entry of a large meteo...

  13. Topographic data of selected areas along the Alabama River near Montgomery, Alabama, collected using mobile terrestrial light detection and ranging (T-LiDAR) technology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimbrow, D.R.

    2014-01-01

    Topographic data at selected areas within the Alabama River flood plain near Montgomery, Alabama, were collected using a truck-mounted mobile terrestrial light detection and ranging system. These data were collected for inclusion in a flood inundation model developed by the National Weather Service in Birmingham, Alabama. Data are presented as ArcGIS point shapefiles with the extension .shp.

  14. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA region 4): Mowbray Engineering Company, Greenville, Alabama, September 1986. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-09-25

    The Mowbray Engineering Company (MEC) site consists of a 3-acre swamp located in Greenville, Butler County, Alabama. An aquifer underlying the site supplies 11,400 residents with potable water. Waste oils were dumped onto the ground behind the plant. Oil was also allowed to flow into a city storm sewer drain and ultimately into the swamp. Dumping and other discharges continued until the mid 1970s. MEC installed two underground storage tanks to collect oils for resale and prevent spills. PCBs were detected in swamp soils at 500 ppm, leading EPA to remove the top six inches of swamp soil and disposing the wastes in an approved offsite hazardous waste facility. The primary contaminants of concern are PCBs. Selected remedies were proposed and are included.

  15. 76 FR 38264 - Alabama Disaster Number AL-00037

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ..., Straight-line Winds, and Flooding. Incident Period: 04/15/2011 through 05/31/2011. Effective Date: 06/22... major disaster declaration for Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of Alabama, dated...

  16. 76 FR 33805 - Alabama Disaster Number AL-00037

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-09

    ..., Straight-line Winds, and Flooding. Incident Period: 04/15/2011 and continuing. Effective Date: 06/01/2011... disaster declaration for Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of Alabama, dated 04/28/2011,...

  17. 76 FR 32982 - Alabama; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-07

    ... certain areas of the State of Alabama resulting from severe storms, tornadoes, straight-line winds, and... State, and any other forms of assistance under the Stafford Act that you deem appropriate subject...

  18. A reliable solar-heating system--Huntsville, Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Final report on solar-heating demonstration project in Huntsville, Alabama, is rich in technical data, planning considerations, test and maintenance data, and other information. It can be useful reference for those planning similar systems.

  19. Occurrence of the megatoothed sharks (Lamniformes: Otodontidae) in Alabama, USA.

    PubMed

    Ehret, Dana J; Ebersole, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The Otodontidae include some of the largest sharks to ever live in the world's oceans (i.e., Carcharocles megalodon). Here we report on Paleocene and Eocene occurrences of Otodus obliquus and Carcharocles auriculatus from Alabama, USA. Teeth of Otodus are rarely encountered in the Gulf Coastal Plain and this report is one of the first records for Alabama. Carcharocles auriculatus is more common in the Eocene deposits of Alabama, but its occurrence has been largely overlooked in the literature. We also refute the occurrence of the Oligocene Carcharocles angustidens in the state. Raised awareness and increased collecting of under-sampled geologic formations in Alabama will likely increase sample sizes of O. obliquus and C. auriculatus and also might unearth other otodontids, such as C. megalodon and C. chubutensis. PMID:25332848

  20. Alabama: A Successful Home-Based Business Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centrallo, Carol B.

    1999-01-01

    The Alabama Cooperative Extension Service transformed a traditional textile/clothing program into a home-based business program. It was delivered by multiple methods including meetings, printed materials, audiovisual resources, and, in the second phase, videoconferencing. (SK)

  1. Description and Status of the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, Richard J.; Christian, Hugh J.; Bailey, Jeffrey C.; Buechler, Dennis E.; Hall, John M.; McCaul, Eugene W.; Stano, Geoffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) is a network LMA detectors that detects and maps lightning using VHF radiation (TV Channel 5) in a region centered about Huntsville, Alabama that includes North Alabama, Central Tennessee and parts of Georgia and Mississippi. The North Alabama LMA has been in operation since late 2001, and has been providing real time data to regional National Weather Service (NSF) Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs) since mid 2003 through the NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) center. Data from this network (as well as other from other LMA systems) are now being used to create proxy Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) data sets for GOES-R risk reduction and algorithm development activities. In addition, since spring 2009 data are provided to the Storm Prediction Center in support of Hazardous Weather Testbed and GOES-R Proving Ground activities during the Spring Program. Description, status and plans will be discussed.

  2. Occurrence of the megatoothed sharks (Lamniformes: Otodontidae) in Alabama, USA.

    PubMed

    Ehret, Dana J; Ebersole, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The Otodontidae include some of the largest sharks to ever live in the world's oceans (i.e., Carcharocles megalodon). Here we report on Paleocene and Eocene occurrences of Otodus obliquus and Carcharocles auriculatus from Alabama, USA. Teeth of Otodus are rarely encountered in the Gulf Coastal Plain and this report is one of the first records for Alabama. Carcharocles auriculatus is more common in the Eocene deposits of Alabama, but its occurrence has been largely overlooked in the literature. We also refute the occurrence of the Oligocene Carcharocles angustidens in the state. Raised awareness and increased collecting of under-sampled geologic formations in Alabama will likely increase sample sizes of O. obliquus and C. auriculatus and also might unearth other otodontids, such as C. megalodon and C. chubutensis.

  3. Occurrence of the megatoothed sharks (Lamniformes: Otodontidae) in Alabama, USA

    PubMed Central

    Ebersole, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The Otodontidae include some of the largest sharks to ever live in the world’s oceans (i.e., Carcharocles megalodon). Here we report on Paleocene and Eocene occurrences of Otodus obliquus and Carcharocles auriculatus from Alabama, USA. Teeth of Otodus are rarely encountered in the Gulf Coastal Plain and this report is one of the first records for Alabama. Carcharocles auriculatus is more common in the Eocene deposits of Alabama, but its occurrence has been largely overlooked in the literature. We also refute the occurrence of the Oligocene Carcharocles angustidens in the state. Raised awareness and increased collecting of under-sampled geologic formations in Alabama will likely increase sample sizes of O. obliquus and C. auriculatus and also might unearth other otodontids, such as C. megalodon and C. chubutensis. PMID:25332848

  4. Development of a predictive model for porosity distribution in the Smackover Formation of southwest Alabama. Final report, 1983-1984

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, J.

    1984-11-15

    The Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation is the major hydrocarbon producer in the State of Alabama having produced over 69.5 million bbls of oil, 63 million bbls of condensate, and 237 million Mcf of gas since the initial Smackover discovery from Toxey Field, Choctaw County in 1967. Smackover hydrocarbon exploration is hampered in Alabama and throughout the Gulf Coast by the inability to effectively predict porosity distribution in the unit. This report represents the results of the first year of a study designed to develop a predictive model for porosity distribution in the Smackover of southwestern Alabama. This study is based on analysis of over 900 thin-sections from 70 wells in southwest Alabama. Eight lithofacies were recognized in the Smackover in the study area. These are: anhydritic mudstone, microcrystalline dolomite, oolitic grainstone, skeletal-peloidal grainstone/packstone, algal boundstone, finely-crystalline dolomite, coarsely-crystalline dolomite, and mudstone. Depositional porosity in the Smackover ranged from very high in the oolitic grainstone lithologies to very low in the mudstone lithologies. This depositional porosity, however, has been significantly modified by diagenesis. Smackover sediments have undergone a complex history of diagenetic modification which has included micritization, multi-stage cementation, multi-stage dissolution, dolomitization, and sulfate mineralization. These diagenetic processes have occluded primary porosity and, in some cases, produced secondary porosity in lithologies which lacked primary porosity. Four primary pore types have been recognized in the Smackover; primary interparticulate, oomoldic, dolomitic intercrystalline, and vuggy. The occurrence of these pore types indicates porosity distribution is controlled by paleotopography which significantly influenced depositional and diagenetic processes. 20 references, 14 figures.

  5. Investigation using data in Alabama from ERTS-A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, H. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1972-01-01

    There are no author-identified significant results in this report. Brief summaries are presented of accomplishments by the state of Alabama in the areas of: (1) investigation of environmental factors; (2) land use compilation; (3) data processing for land use compilation; (4) photo-reproduction and unsupervised land use classification from digital tape; (5) data collection buoys; and (6) activities of the Geological Survey of Alabama.

  6. PC/104 Embedded IOCs at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Jianxun Yan, Trent Allison, Sue Witherspoon, Anthony Cuffe

    2009-10-01

    Jefferson Lab has developed embedded IOCs based on PC/104 single board computers (SBC) for low level control systems. The PC/104 IOCs run EPICS on top of the RTEMS operating system. Two types of control system configurations are used in different applications, PC/104 SBC with commercial PC/104 I/O cards and PC/104 SBC with custom designed FPGA-based boards. RTEMS was built with CEXP shell to run on the PC/104 SBC. CEXP shell provides the function of dynamic object loading, which is similar to the widely used VxWorks operating system. Standard software configurations were setup for PC/104 IOC application development to provide a familiar format for new projects as well as ease the conversion of applications from VME based IOCs to PC/104 IOCs. Many new projects at Jefferson Lab are going to employ PC/104 SBCs as IOCs and some applications have already been running them for accelerator operations. The PC/104 - RTEMS IOC provides a free open source Real-Time Operating System (RTOS), low cost/maintenance, easily installed/ configured, flexible, and reliable solution for accelerator control and 12GeV Upgrade projects.

  7. New GPIB Control Software at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew Bickley; Pavel Chevtsov

    2005-09-21

    The control of GPIB devices at Jefferson Lab is based on the GPIB device/driver library. The library is a part of the device/driver development framework. It is activated with the use of the device configuration files that define all hardware components used in the control system to communicate with GPIB devices. As soon as the software is activated, it is ready to handle any device connected to these components and only needs to know the set of commands that the device can understand. The old GPIB control software at Jefferson Lab requires the definition of these commands in the form of a device control software module written in C for each device. Though such modules are relatively simple, they have to be created, successfully compiled, and supported for all control computer platforms. In the new version of GPIB control software all device communication commands are defined in device protocol (ASCII text) files. This makes the support of GPIB devices in the control system much easier.

  8. "I Cannot Live Without Books": Thomas Jefferson, Bibliophile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladenson, Alex

    1978-01-01

    The article discusses Thomas Jefferson's preoccupation with collecting books and some of his other intellectual pursuits, including the classification scheme he developed for his personal library. The sale of his personal library to the federal government is briefly described. (JPF)

  9. The "Other Jeffersons" and the State University Idea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Eldon L.

    1987-01-01

    Thomas Jefferson and the University of Virginia as the quintessential beginning of the state university is seen as simplistic. Two contributors to the new type university, William R. Davie and Abraham Baldwin are discussed. (Author/MLW)

  10. Jefferson's Views on Education: Implications for Today's Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, James J.

    2004-01-01

    It is virtually impossible to find a U.S. civics or government textbook that does not cite Thomas Jefferson's faith in a well-educated citizenry as the great defense against tyranny. It is also common to open a U.S. history textbook for middle or high school students and find a reference to Jefferson and the value he put on education. Because the…

  11. Production of Resonances Using CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Moriya, Kei

    2015-07-01

    Measurements of hadronic resonances produced in photoproduction reactions at Jefferson Lab are shown and discussed. Emphasis is placed on the production of the excited hyperon states Sigma(1385), Lambda(1405), and Lambda(1520). Some future prospects for the upcoming Jefferson Lab 12 GeV era are given, where the CLAS12 and GlueX detectors will see unprecedented amounts of data using electromagnetic probes and further our knowledge of hadronic resonances.

  12. Nucleon Form Factors - A Jefferson Lab Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    John Arrington, Kees de Jager, Charles F. Perdrisat

    2011-06-01

    The charge and magnetization distributions of the proton and neutron are encoded in their elastic electromagnetic form factors, which can be measured in elastic electron--nucleon scattering. By measuring the form factors, we probe the spatial distribution of the proton charge and magnetization, providing the most direct connection to the spatial distribution of quarks inside the proton. For decades, the form factors were probed through measurements of unpolarized elastic electron scattering, but by the 1980s, progress slowed dramatically due to the intrinsic limitations of the unpolarized measurements. Early measurements at several laboratories demonstrated the feasibility and power of measurements using polarization degrees of freedom to probe the spatial structure of the nucleon. A program of polarization measurements at Jefferson Lab led to a renaissance in the field of study, and significant new insight into the structure of matter.

  13. RICH Detector for Jefferson Labs CLAS12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trotta, Richard; Torisky, Ben; Benmokhtar, Fatiha

    2015-10-01

    Jefferson Lab (Jlab) is performing a large-scale upgrade to its Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) up to 12GeV beams. The Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS12) in Hall B is being upgraded and a new hybrid Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector is being developed to provide better kaon - pion separation throughout the 3 to 8 GeV/c momentum range. This detector will be used for a variety of Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering experiments. Cherenkov light can be accurately detected by a large array of sophisticated Multi-Anode Photomultiplier Tubes (MA-PMT) and heavier particles, like kaons, will span the inner radii. We are presenting our work on the creation of the RICH's geometry within the CLAS12 java framework. This development is crucial for future calibration, reconstructions and analysis of the detector.

  14. The Jefferson Lab Frozen Spin Target

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Keith, James Brock, Christopher Carlin, Sara Comer, David Kashy, Josephine McAndrew, David Meekins, Eugene Pasyuk, Joshua Pierce, Mikell Seely

    2012-08-01

    A frozen spin polarized target, constructed at Jefferson Lab for use inside a large acceptance spectrometer, is described. The target has been utilized for photoproduction measurements with polarized tagged photons of both longitudinal and circular polarization. Protons in TEMPO-doped butanol were dynamically polarized to approximately 90% outside the spectrometer at 5 T and 200-300 mK. Photoproduction data were acquired with the target inside the spectrometer at a frozen-spin temperature of approximately 30 mK with the polarization maintained by a thin, superconducting coil installed inside the target cryostat. A 0.56 T solenoid was used for longitudinal target polarization and a 0.50 T dipole for transverse polarization. Spin relaxation times as high as 4000 hours were observed. We also report polarization results for deuterated propanediol doped with the trityl radical OX063.

  15. APEX: A Prime EXperiment at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beacham, James

    2014-06-01

    APEX is an experiment at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) in Virginia, USA, that searches for a new gauge boson (A') with sub-GeV mass and coupling to ordinary matter of g' ˜ (10-6 - 10-2)e. Electrons impinge upon a fixed target of high-Z material. An A' is produced via a process analogous to photon bremsstrahlung, decaying to an e+e- pair. A test run was held in July of 2010, covering mA' = 175 to 250 MeV and couplings g'/e > 10-3. A full run is approved and will cover mA' ˜65 to 525 MeV and g'/e > 2.3 × 10-4.

  16. APEX: A Prime EXperiment at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Beacham, James B.

    2014-06-01

    APEX is an experiment at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) in Virginia, USA, that searches for a new gauge boson (A') with sub-GeV mass and coupling to ordinary matter of g' ∼ (10{sup −6} − 10{sup −2})e. Electrons impinge upon a fixed target of high-Z material. An A' is produced via a process analogous to photon bremsstrahlung, decaying to an e{sup +}e{sup -} pair. A test run was held in July of 2010, covering m{sub A′} = 175 to 250 MeV and couplings g′/e > 10{sup −3}. A full run is approved and will cover m{sub A′} ∼65 to 525 MeV and g′/e > 2.3 × 10{sup −4}.

  17. The Jefferson lab FEL driver ERLs

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, David R.; Tennant, Christopher D.

    2013-11-01

    Jefferson Lab has - for over a decade - been operating high power IR and UV FELs using CW energy recovering linacs based on DC photocathode electron sources and CEBAF SRF technology. These machines have unique combinations of beam quality, power, and operational flexibility, and thus offer significant opportunity for experiments that use low and medium energy (several tens - few hundreds of MeV) electron beams. We will describe the systems and detail their present and near-term (potential) performance. Recent internal-target analysis and validation testing will be discussed, and schemes for single- and two-pass fixed target operation described. An introduction to subsequent discussions of beam quality and upgrade paths to polarized operation/higher energy will be given.

  18. The Jefferson Lab High Power Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Boyce

    2006-01-01

    Jefferson Lab has designed, built and operated two high average power free-electron lasers (FEL) using superconducting RF (SRF) technology and energy recovery techniques. Between 1999-2001 Jefferson Lab operated the IR Demo FEL. This device produced over 2 kW in the mid-infrared, in addition to producing world record average powers in the visible (50 W), ultraviolet (10 W) and terahertz range (50 W) for tunable, short-pulse (< ps) light. This FEL was the first high power demonstration of an accelerator configuration that is being exploited for a number of new accelerator-driven light source facilities that are currently under design or construction. The driver accelerator for the IR Demo FEL uses an Energy Recovered Linac (ERL) configuration that improves the energy efficiency and lowers both the capital and operating cost of such devices by recovering most of the power in the spent electron beam after optical power is extracted from the beam. The IR Demo FEL was de-commissioned in late 2001 for an upgraded FEL for extending the IR power to over 10 kW and the ultraviolet power to over 1 kW. The FEL Upgrade achieved 10 kW of average power in the mid-IR (6 microns) in July of 2004, and its IR operation currently is being extended down to 1 micron. In addition, we have demonstrated the capability of on/off cycling and recovering over a megawatt of electron beam power without diminishing machine performance. A complementary UV FEL will come on-line within the next year. This paper presents a summary of the FEL characteristics, user community accomplishments with the IR Demo, and planned user experiments.

  19. Petabyte Class Storage at Jefferson Lab (CEBAF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Rita; Davis, Mark

    1996-01-01

    By 1997, the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility will collect over one Terabyte of raw information per day of Accelerator operation from three concurrently operating Experimental Halls. When post-processing is included, roughly 250 TB of raw and formatted experimental data will be generated each year. By the year 2000, a total of one Petabyte will be stored on-line. Critical to the experimental program at Jefferson Lab (JLab) is the networking and computational capability to collect, store, retrieve, and reconstruct data on this scale. The design criteria include support of a raw data stream of 10-12 MB/second from Experimental Hall B, which will operate the CEBAF (Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility) Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). Keeping up with this data stream implies design strategies that provide storage guarantees during accelerator operation, minimize the number of times data is buffered allow seamless access to specific data sets for the researcher, synchronize data retrievals with the scheduling of postprocessing calculations on the data reconstruction CPU farms, as well as support the site capability to perform data reconstruction and reduction at the same overall rate at which new data is being collected. The current implementation employs state-of-the-art StorageTek Redwood tape drives and robotics library integrated with the Open Storage Manager (OSM) Hierarchical Storage Management software (Computer Associates, International), the use of Fibre Channel RAID disks dual-ported between Sun Microsystems SMP servers, and a network-based interface to a 10,000 SPECint92 data processing CPU farm. Issues of efficiency, scalability, and manageability will become critical to meet the year 2000 requirements for a Petabyte of near-line storage interfaced to over 30,000 SPECint92 of data processing power.

  20. Synoptic water-level measurements of the Upper Floridan aquifer in Florida and parts of Georgia, South Carolina, and Alabama, May-June 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinnaman, Sandra L.

    2012-01-01

    Water levels for the Upper Floridan aquifer were measured throughout Florida and in parts of Georgia, South Carolina, and Alabama in May-June 2010. These measurements were compiled for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Floridan Aquifer System Groundwater Availability Study and conducted as part of the USGS Groundwater Resources Program. Data were collected by personnel from the USGS Florida Water Science Center, Georgia Water Science Center, South Carolina Water Science Center and several state and county agencies in Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, and Alabama using standard techniques. Data collected by USGS personnel are stored in the USGS National Water Information System (NWIS), Groundwater Site-Inventory System (GWSI). Furnished records from cooperators are stored in NWIS/GWSI when possible, but are available from the source agency.

  1. 75 FR 57412 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans Alabama: Volatile Organic Compounds

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans Alabama: Volatile Organic... ``volatile organic compounds'' (VOCs) found at Alabama Administrative Code section...

  2. Paleocene sequence stratigraphy of southwestern Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A.; Tew, B.H.

    1988-09-01

    In southwestern Alabama, the Paleocene consists of about 1300 ft (396 m) of marginal marine and marine terrigenous and carbonate sediments. Based on regional stratigraphic, sedimentologic, and paleontologic data, up to seven unconformity-bounded depositional sequences resulting from relative changes in coastal onlap during the Paleocene are recognized in these strata. These sequences are, in ascending order, the TP1.1a, comprised of the Pine Barren Member of the Clayton Formation; the TP1.1b, comprised of the Turritella rock beds of the Pine Barren and the McBryde Limestone Member of the Clayton Formation, and the clays and marls of the lower member of the Porters Creek Formation; the TP1.2, comprised of the cross-bedded sands of the lower member and the Matthews Landing Marl Member of the Porters Creek Formation, and Oak Hill Member of the Naheola Formation; the TP1.3, comprised of the Coal Bluff Marl Member of the Naheola Formation; the TP2.1, comprised of the Gravel Creek Sand, Ostrea thirsae beds, and Grampian Hills Members of the Nanafalia Formation, and the lower beds of the Tuscahoma Sand; the TP2.2, comprised of the Greggs Landing Marl Member and the middle beds of the Tuscahoma Sand; and the TP2.3, comprised of the Bells Landing Marl Member and the upper beds of the Tuscahoma Sand.

  3. Sedimentation profiles in Lake Tuscaloosa, Alabama, 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stricklin, Victor E.

    2001-01-01

    Lake Tuscaloosa, created in 1969 by the impoundment of North River, is the primary water supply for the cities of Tuscaloosa and Northport, Alabama, and surrounding areas. In 1982, 17 cross-sections were established in the principal tributaries of the lake, which include North River, Dry Creek, Turkey Creek, Binion Creek, Tierce Creek, Carroll Creek, and Brush Creek. These cross-sections were resurveyed in 1986 to determine the amount of sedimentation or scour occurring in the lake at these areas. In May 2000, 14 of the 17 cross-sections were located for resurveying to determine the amount of sedimentation or scour since 1986. The maximum amount of sediment deposition determined from the 2000 survey occurred in the upper end of the Carroll Creek tributary at cross-section CC8 (3.0 feet). The maximum amount of scour occurred in the Turkey Creek tributary at cross-section TRC2 (7.0 feet). Of the 14 cross-sections, 6 indicated increased amounts of sediment deposition, 5 indicated scouring of bottom sediments, and 3 indicated little or no change.

  4. Comparison of Health-Related Measures of Two Groups of Adolescents in a Rural Southeastern County in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sands, Charles D.; Hensarling, Robert W.; Angel, James B.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to establish baseline values on physiological parameters for 7-11 graders (n = 146) in a rural area of Alabama and to examine whether differences existed among the adolescents in the county. Design: Descriptive. Setting: Many adolescents in the southern portion of the United States suffer disproportionately…

  5. 75 FR 23264 - Public Water System Supervision Program Revision for the State of Alabama

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-03

    ... AGENCY Public Water System Supervision Program Revision for the State of Alabama AGENCY: Environmental... of Alabama is revising its approved Public Water System Supervision Program. Alabama has adopted the following rules: Arsenic Rule, Lead and Copper Minor Revisions Rule, and Radionuclides Rule. EPA...

  6. 30 CFR 901.20 - Approval of Alabama abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Approval of Alabama abandoned mine land... § 901.20 Approval of Alabama abandoned mine land reclamation plan. The Secretary approved the Alabama abandoned mine land reclamation plan, as submitted on May 29, 1981, and revised on August 13,...

  7. 30 CFR 901.20 - Approval of Alabama abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval of Alabama abandoned mine land... § 901.20 Approval of Alabama abandoned mine land reclamation plan. The Secretary approved the Alabama abandoned mine land reclamation plan, as submitted on May 29, 1981, and revised on August 13,...

  8. 30 CFR 901.20 - Approval of Alabama abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Approval of Alabama abandoned mine land... § 901.20 Approval of Alabama abandoned mine land reclamation plan. The Secretary approved the Alabama abandoned mine land reclamation plan, as submitted on May 29, 1981, and revised on August 13,...

  9. 30 CFR 901.20 - Approval of Alabama abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Approval of Alabama abandoned mine land... § 901.20 Approval of Alabama abandoned mine land reclamation plan. The Secretary approved the Alabama abandoned mine land reclamation plan, as submitted on May 29, 1981, and revised on August 13,...

  10. The Technology Scholarship Program for Alabama Teachers at Jacksonville State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Franklin L.; And Others

    The Alabama Commission on Higher Education (ACHE) recently established the "Technology Scholarship Program for Alabama Teachers" (TSPAT). Jacksonville State University (JSU) is one of the state institutions participating in the program, which was funded by Act 93-636 of the Alabama Legislature. The program addresses technological literacy,…

  11. Today's Students, Tomorrow's Citizens: Pathways for Learning, Science. Alabama High School Graduation Exam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery. Div. of Instructional Services.

    This document introduces the Alabama Graduation Examination Program (AGEP) which provides learning opportunities for high school students to meet the minimum competency requirements to earn a high school diploma in the state of Alabama. The Alabama High School Graduation Examination (AHSGE) content includes the subject areas of reading…

  12. 30 CFR 901.15 - Approval of Alabama regulatory program amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Approval of Alabama regulatory program..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE ALABAMA § 901.15 Approval of Alabama regulatory program amendments. The following is a list of the...

  13. 76 FR 72495 - Alabama Metal Coil Securement Act; Petition for Determination of Preemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Alabama Metal Coil Securement Act; Petition for... determination that the State of Alabama's Metal Coil Securement Act is preempted by Federal law. FMCSA requests comments on what effect, if any, Alabama's metal coil load securement certification requirements may...

  14. Opening the Schoolhouse Doors: Tax Credits and Educational Access in Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Dick M., II.; Erickson, Angela C.

    2014-01-01

    In 2013, Alabama adopted the Alabama Accountability Act, an education reform measure that includes two new school choice programs that extend a lifeline to Alabama students trapped in failing public schools. One program offers a tax credit to help offset the cost of tuition for families who move their children from public schools designated as…

  15. 77 FR 36274 - Public Water System Supervision Program Revision for the State of Alabama

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-18

    ... of Alabama is revising its approved Public Water System Supervision Program. Alabama has adopted the following rules: Long Term 1 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule, Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water... AGENCY Public Water System Supervision Program Revision for the State of Alabama AGENCY:...

  16. 78 FR 54640 - Alabama Power Company; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing With the Commission, Soliciting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-05

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Alabama Power Company; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing With the... Major License. b. Project No.: 2203-015. c. Date Filed: August 16, 2013. d. Applicant: Alabama Power Company (Alabama Power). e. Name of Project: Holt Hydroelectric Project. f. Location: The project...

  17. 78 FR 4844 - Alabama Power Company; Notice Rejecting Request for Rehearing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Alabama Power Company; Notice Rejecting Request for Rehearing On March 31, 2010, the Commission issued a new license to Alabama Power Company (Alabama Power) for the continued operation and maintenance of the...

  18. Evaluation of Alabama Public School Wellness Policies and State School Mandate Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaines, Alisha B.; Lonis-Shumate, Steven R.; Gropper, Sareen S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study evaluated wellness policies created by Alabama public school districts and progress made in the implementation of Alabama State Department of Education (ALSDE) school food and nutrition mandates. Methods: Wellness policies from Alabama public school districts were compared to minimum requirements under the Child Nutrition…

  19. Alabama Student Assistance Program. Third Annual Report. 1977-78. Academic Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Commission on Higher Education, Montgomery.

    The Alabama Student Assistance Program, a state/federal cooperative aid program to provide financial assistance to residents of the State of Alabama for undergraduate postsecondary education at institutions within the State of Alabama, is described in this annual report for the 1977-78 academic year. A total of 15,710 applications for aid were…

  20. Ground-water resources of the Coosa River basin in Georgia and Alabama; Subarea 6 of the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint and Alabama-Coosa-Tallapoosa river basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, James L.; Journey, Celeste A.; Atkins, J. Brian

    1997-01-01

    Drought conditions in the 1980's focused attention on the multiple uses of the surface- and ground-water resources in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) and Alabama-Coosa-Tallapoosa (ACT) River basins in Georgia, Alabama, and Florida. State and Federal agencies also have proposed projects that would require additional water resources and revise operating practices within the river basins. The existing and proposed water projects create conflicting demands for water by the States and emphasize the problem of water-resource allocation. This study was initiated to describe ground-water availability in the Coosa River basin of Georgia and Alabama, Subarea 6 of the ACF and ACT River basins, and estimate the possible effects of increased ground-water use within the basin. Subarea 6 encompasses about 10,060 square miles in Georgia and Alabama, totaling all but about 100 mi2 of the total area of the Coosa River basin; the remainder of the basin is in Tennessee. Subarea 6 encompasses parts of the Piedmont, Blue Ridge, Cumberland Plateau, Valley and Ridge, and Coastal Plain physiographic provinces. The major rivers of the subarea are the Oostanaula, Etowah, and Coosa. The Etowah and Oostanaula join in Floyd County, Ga., to form the Coosa River. The Coosa River flows southwestward and joins with the Tallapoosa River near Wetumpka, Ala., to form the Alabama River. The Piedmont and Blue Ridge Provinces are underlain by a two-component aquifer system that is composed of a fractured, crystalline-rock aquifer characterized by little or no primary porosity or permeability; and the overlying regolith, which generally behaves as a porous-media aquifer. The Valley and Ridge and Cumberland Plateau Provinces are underlain by fracture- and solution-conduit aquifer systems, similar in some ways to those in the Piedmont and Blue Ridge Provinces. Fracture-conduit aquifers predominate in the well-consolidated sandstones and shales of Paleozoic age; solution-conduit aquifers

  1. Geohydrology and susceptibility of major aquifers to surface contamination in Alabama; area 12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, J.C.; Cobb, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    This report delineates and describes the geohydrology and susceptibility of major aquifers to contamination in Coffee, Dale, Henry, Houston, and Geneva Counties, Alabama. The major aquifers are the Upper Floridan, Lisbon, Nanafalia-Clayton, and Providence-Ripley aquifers. Estimated groundwater withdrawals for public water supplies are about 42 million gal/day. Maximum withdrawals for irrigation are 15 to 20 million gal/day. Withdrawals for self-supplied industrial and domestic uses are estimated to be 3 and 2.5 million gal/day, respectively. Long-term withdrawals of water from the Nanafalia-Clayton aquifer have resulted in significant declines in the potentiometric surface in Coffee, Dale, and Houston Counties. Significant declines in the potentiometric surfaces of the other major aquifers are not apparent. Recharge areas for all major aquifers are susceptible to contamination, but the probability of contamination of the Lisbon, Nanafalia-Clayton, and Providence-Ripley aquifers is low because the recharge areas are remote from areas of withdrawal. The recharge area for the Floridan aquifer, which consists largely of flat, sandy farmland , coincides with the area of use. This area is highly susceptible to contamination from insecticides and herbicides. (USGS)

  2. Diachronous ranges of benthonic Foraminifera in the Eocene of Alabama and South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Willard, G.D.; Fallaw, W.C. . Dept. of Geology); Price, V. ); Snipes, D.S. . Dept. of Earth Sciences)

    1994-03-01

    Seventeen species of benthonic Foraminifera reported by Bandy (1949) from the Eocene of Little Stave Creek in Clarke County, Alabama were identified from the middle eocene Santee Limestone and the upper Eocene Dry Branch Formation in Aiken and Barnwell counties, South Carolina. Of the 17 species, seven occurred in South Carolina stratigraphically above or below the ranges listed by Bandy. Bandy made a detailed study of Foraminifera from the Claibornian and Jacksonian Tallahatta, Lisbon, Gosport, Moodys Branch, and Yazoo formations exposed on Little Stave Creek and plotted the stratigraphic ranges within the section of numerous species. The authors' samples came from well cores at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Of 13 species from the middle Eocene Santee and also reported by Bandy, four are stratigraphically below the lowest occurrence listed by Bandy, and one is stratigraphically above the highest occurrence. Of four species from the upper Eocene Dry Branch Formation and also listed by Bandy, two are stratigraphically above his highest occurrence. Dockery and Nystrom (1992) and Campbell (1993) have described diachroneity among mollusks in the Eocene of South Carolina. Caution should be used in relying on a small number of species in correlating Eocene deposits in the Atlantic and Gulf coastal plains.

  3. Education Outreach Programs - Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surles-Law, Lisa

    2007-04-01

    Jefferson Lab has a strong record of helping DOE achieve its science education and workforce development goals. The Lab works with the local community to enhance the quality of K-12 STEM education in the public schools. Jefferson Lab serves the nation by providing an educational pipeline for the country's brightest students at the high school and undergraduate levels to help ensure that the next generation of scientists and engineers are capable of solving complex problems. The BEAMS (Becoming Enthusiastic About Math and Science) program, a national-model partnership with Newport News City Public Schools, supports inner-city students as they progress from the 6^th to the 8^th grades. The BEAMS program, unique to Jefferson Lab, has positively influenced math and science standardized test scores for participating schools, closing the scoring gap between traditionally low and average scoring schools. Jefferson Lab's High School Summer Honors Internship Program draws the region's highest achieving high school students. Jefferson Lab scientists transfer essential technical knowledge and enthusiasm for science to these young people at the critical time they begin to make career choices. Undergraduate students interested in STEM fields are selected from a competitive, nationwide pool to work with scientists and engineers on projects related to Jefferson Lab's research program. Each year, the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship program prepares fifteen students to pursue STEM careers of benefit to the nation. Jefferson Lab offers its Teacher Academy in Physical Science program to teachers each summer. This four-week program for upper elementary and middle school teachers offers advanced scientific content and teaching methods in math and science. JLab's unique research environment and expertise in science, math, and technology create the basis for extraordinary educational opportunities that are solidly grounded in the Laboratory's scientific programs. These

  4. Deepwater Horizon oil spill impacts on Alabama beaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayworth, J. S.; Clement, T. P.; Valentine, J. F.

    2011-12-01

    From mid June 2010 to early August 2010, the white sandy beaches along Alabama's Gulf coast were inundated with crude oil discharged from the Deepwater Horizon well. The long-term consequences of this environmental catastrophe are still unfolding. Although BP has attempted to clean up some of these beaches, there still exist many unanswered questions regarding the physical, chemical, and ecological state of the oil contaminated beach system. In this paper, we present our understanding of what is known and known to be unknown with regard to the current state of Alabama's beaches in the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon disaster. Motivated by our observations of the evolving distribution of oil in Alabama's beaches and BP's clean-up activities, we offer our thoughts on the lessons learned from this oil spill disaster.

  5. Deepwater Horizon oil spill impacts on Alabama beaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayworth, J. S.; Clement, T. P.; Valentine, J. F.

    2011-07-01

    From mid June 2010 to early August 2010, the white sandy beaches along Alabama's Gulf coast were inundated with crude oil discharged from the Deepwater Horizon well. The long-term consequences of this environmental catastrophe are still unfolding. Although BP has attempted to clean up some of these beaches, there still exist many unanswered questions regarding the physical, chemical, and ecological state of the oil contaminated beach system. In this paper, we present our understanding of what is known and known to be unknown with regard to the current state of Alabama's beaches in the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon disaster. Motivated by our observations of the evolving distribution of oil in Alabama's beaches and BP's clean-up activities, we offer our thoughts on the lessons learned from this oil spill disaster.

  6. Current water resources activities in Alabama, fiscal year 1986

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, L.J.; Meadows, E.A.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the current (as of 1986) water resources activities of the U.S. Geological Survey in Alabama. The responsibilities and objectives of the Survey; organization of the Alabama District; sources of funding; current projects; hydrologic data program; and a selected bibliography of hydrologic reports are presented. Water resources projects are undertaken usually at the request of and with partial funding from another agency, provided: they are high priority problems and generally identified to fall within the mission of the Water Resources Division and they are consistent with the Program Management Plan developed by the Water Resources Division in Alabama to meet the long range plan for hydrologic data in the State. (USGS)

  7. ATM Coastal Topography-Alabama 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Yates, Xan; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Klipp, Emily S.; Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived first surface (FS) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Alabama coastline, acquired October 3-4, 2001. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative scanning Lidar instrument originally developed by NASA, and known as the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), was used during data acquisition. The ATM system is a scanning Lidar system that measures high-resolution topography of the land surface, and incorporates a green-wavelength laser operating at pulse rates of 2 to 10 kilohertz. Measurements from the laser ranging device are coupled with data acquired from inertial navigation system (INS) attitude sensors and differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS) receivers to measure topography of the surface at accuracies of +/-15 centimeters. The nominal ATM platform is a Twin Otter or P-3 Orion aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the ATM system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of Lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for pre-survey flight line definition, flight path plotting, Lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS is routinely used to create maps that

  8. Integrated Distribution Management System for Alabama Principal Investigator

    SciTech Connect

    Schatz, Joe

    2013-03-31

    Southern Company Services, under contract with the Department of Energy, along with Alabama Power, Alstom Grid (formerly AREVA T&D) and others moved the work product developed in the first phase of the Integrated Distribution Management System (IDMS) from “Proof of Concept” to true deployment through the activity described in this Final Report. This Project – Integrated Distribution Management Systems in Alabama – advanced earlier developed proof of concept activities into actual implementation and furthermore completed additional requirements to fully realize the benefits of an IDMS. These tasks include development and implementation of a Distribution System based Model that enables data access and enterprise application integration.

  9. 76 FR 18753 - Jefferson Island Storage & Hub, L.L.C.; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Jefferson Island Storage & Hub, L.L.C.; Notice of Filing Take notice that on March 28, 2011, Jefferson Island Storage & Hub, L.L.C. (Jefferson Island) submitted a revised...

  10. Dolomitization of the Devonian Jefferson Formation, south-central Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, T.M. ); Dorobek, S.L. )

    1989-07-01

    Dolomitization of the Devonian Jefferson Formation in south-central Montana probably occurred as a result of multiple dolomitizing events. Petrographic and geochemical studies show the presence of five distinct dolomite types: cathodoluminescently nonzoned euhedral dolomite, nonzoned subhedral/anhedral dolomite mosaics, zoned euhedral dolomite, irregularly luminescent dolomite, and zoned dolomite cement. Data from Jefferson Formation dolomite indicate a progression from early, nonstoichiometric, euhedral replacive dolomites, to nearly stoichiometric, subhedral/anhedral dolomite mosaics. {delta}{sup 18}O and {delta}{sup 13}C ratios decrease with increasing degree of dolomitization. Euhedral replacive dolomites in lower dolomitic limestone layers probably formed by early, refluxing hypersaline brines in evaporitic settings. These dolomites are the least stoichiometric and have the heaviest {delta}{sup 18}O signatures of all dolomites which were analyzed. Massive dolomitization of the upper two-thirds of the Jefferson Formation probably occurred when dolomitizing brines migrated downward through the upper Jefferson Formation during deposition of thick evaporite sequences in the overlying Three Forks Formation. Mass balance calculations indicate that this mechanism was more than adequate to cause the massive dolomitization in the upper Jefferson Formation. Massive dolomitization during Logan Gulch deposition may have been the final phase of dolomitization, or dolomite may have recrystallized to more stoichiometric, {sup 18}O- and {sup 13}C-depleted subhedral/anhedral mosaics during later burial.

  11. Perception of Alabama Science and Career Technology Teachers Concerning Teaching the Alabama Aquaculture Course of Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, David John

    The purpose of this study was to improve teachers' ability to effectively use aquaculture as a tool to teach math and science. The study population included Alabama science and career tech teachers that were certified to teach the Alabama aquaculture course of study. The teachers were electronically surveyed regarding their perceptions of the importance of the aquascience elective and aquaculture science course content standards, their knowledge of those topics and how they perceived the quality of available teaching materials. While all of the content standards were rated above average in importance, aquaculture career awareness and safety concerns were rated the highest by teachers. Teachers were most knowledgeable about career opportunities, categorization of aquaculture species, and the adaptations of aquatic organisms. The average materials ratings were below average for all content standards. The highest rated materials were for career opportunities, categorization of species and safety topics. Using Borich's (1980) model of mean weighted discrepancy scores, the control of diseases and pests in the aquatic environment and concepts associated with health management of aquacrops were identified as top priorities for in-service teacher training. Aquaculture industry infrastructure and the effects of the fishing industry were also identified as priority training topics. Teachers were self-divided into 3 categories those that taught science (SCI), career tech (CTE) and those that taught both (BOTH). They were further divided by their level of experience. A multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) revealed a significant effect between teacher types but there was no significant interaction effect between (a) teacher type and experience level or (b) the two levels of experience. A follow-up analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicated that the science teachers thought significantly less of the available materials than either the CTE or BOTH groups.

  12. Beamline Insertions Manager at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Michael C.

    2015-09-01

    The beam viewer system at Jefferson Lab provides operators and beam physicists with qualitative and quantitative information on the transverse electron beam properties. There are over 140 beam viewers installed on the 12 GeV CEBAF accelerator. This paper describes an upgrade consisting of replacing the EPICS-based system tasked with managing all viewers with a mixed system utilizing EPICS and high-level software. Most devices, particularly the beam viewers, cannot be safely inserted into the beam line during high-current beam operations. Software is partly responsible for protecting the machine from untimely insertions. The multiplicity of beam-blocking and beam-vulnerable devices motivates us to try a data-driven approach. The beamline insertions application components are centrally managed and configured through an object-oriented software framework created for this purpose. A rules-based engine tracks the configuration and status of every device, along with the beam status of the machine segment containing the device. The application uses this information to decide on which device actions are allowed at any given time.

  13. Exclusive Pion Electroproduction Results from Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Garth

    2013-04-01

    Forward exclusive meson production is a particularly useful tool in the study of hadronic structure. Measurements at different squared four-momenta of the exchanged virtual photon, Q^2, and at different four-momentum transfer, t, allow one to probe QCD's transition from meson-nucleon degrees of freedom at long distances to quark-gluon degrees of freedom at short scales. Furthermore, by forming ratios of separated response functions in ^ and ^ electroproduction, there may be a partial cancellation of nonperturbative QCD contributions, allowing this transition to be more readily apparent. These strong theoretical motivations make worthwhile the significant experimental challenges needed to accurately separate the four response functions in forward, exclusive -/+ electroproduction off deuterium. We report the results of our study from Jefferson Lab Hall C, where for the first time ratios of separated response functions were extracted at several kinematic settings: Q^2 = 0.6, 1.0, 1.6 GeV^2 with W=1.95 GeV, and Q^2=2.45 GeV^2 with W=2.22 GeV, respectively.

  14. Clinical career ladders: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Smith, J E; Sheaffer, S L; Frey, B M

    1989-11-01

    The clinical career ladder program developed for pharmacists at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, a 700-bed teaching hospital, is described. A task force was assembled to develop a clinical career ladder that would parallel the managerial advancement track in terms of rewards and recognition. The task force created separate lists of competencies for staff and clinical pharmacists and ranked the competencies according to their complexity and the number of years most pharmacists would need to achieve them. Separate pathways were established for staff and clinical pharmacists: staff pharmacist I, II, and III and clinical pharmacist I, II, and III. A salary scale designed to provide meaningful salary increases between levels was established. Nearly all pharmacists who are hired begin at level I and are allowed to apply for promotion to level II within six months. Opportunities for promotion occur twice annually. Pharmacists who have received an overall rating of effective or outstanding at the most recent performance appraisal may submit documented evidence that they have gained the knowledge and skills required at the higher level. A promotions review board evaluates each application and informs the director of pharmacy as to whether the applicant meets the criteria for promotion. Response to the program has been favorable, as indicated by the number of pharmacists who have applied for promotion and the quality of their applications. A carefully planned clinical career ladder program was well received by pharmacists, who responded by acquiring the knowledge and skills necessary for promotion.

  15. Di-hadron production at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Anefalos Pereira, Sergio; et. al.,

    2014-10-01

    Semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) has been used extensively in recent years as an important testing ground for QCD. Studies so far have concentrated on better determination of parton distribution functions, distinguishing between the quark and antiquark contributions, and understanding the fragmentation of quarks into hadrons. Hadron pair (di-hadron) SIDIS provides information on the nucleon structure and hadronization dynamics that complement single hadron SIDIS. Di-hadrons allow the study of low- and high-twist distribution functions and Dihadron Fragmentation Functions (DiFF). Together with the twist-2 PDFs ( f1, g1, h1), the Higher Twist (HT) e and hL functions are very interesting because they offer insights into the physics of the largely unexplored quark-gluon correlations, which provide access into the dynamics inside hadrons. The CLAS spectrometer, installed in Hall-B at Jefferson Lab, has collected data using the CEBAF 6 GeV longitudinally polarized electron beam on longitudinally polarized solid NH3 targets. Preliminary results on di-hadron beam-, target- and double-spin asymmetries will be presented.

  16. The Jefferson Lab Free Electron Laser Program

    SciTech Connect

    George R. Neil; Steve Benson; George Biallas; James Boyce; L.A. Dillon-Townes; David Douglas; H. Fred Dylla; R. Evans; Al Grippo; Joe Gubeli; C. Hernandez-Garcia; Kevin Jordan; Geoffrey A. Krafft; Rui Li; J. Mammosser; Lia Merminga; Joe Preble; Michelle D. Shinn; Timothy Siggins; R. Walker; Gwyn Williams; Byung Yunn; S. Zhang

    2001-01-01

    A Free Electron Laser (FEL) called the IR Demo is operational as a user facility at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, Virginia, USA. It utilizes a 48 MeV superconducting accelerator that not only accelerates the beam but also recovers about 80% of the electron-beam power that remains after the FEL interaction. Utilizing this recirculation loop the machine has recovered cw average currents up to 5 mA, and has lased cw above 2 kW output at 3.1 microns. It is capable of output in the 1 to 6 micron range and can produce {approx}0.7 ps pulses in a continuous train at {approx}75 MHz. This pulse length has been shown to be nearly optimal for deposition of energy in materials at the surface. Upgrades under construction will extend operation beyond 10 kW average power in the near IR and produce multi-kilowatt levels of power from 0.3 to 25 microns. This talk will cover the performance measurements of this groundbreaking laser, scaling in near-term planned upgrades, and highlight some of the user activities at the facility.

  17. Progress at the Jefferson Laboratory FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Tennant, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    As the only currently operating free electron laser (FEL) based on a CW superconducting energy recovering linac (ERL), the Jefferson Laboratory FEL Upgrade remains unique as an FEL driver. The present system represents the culmination of years of effort in the areas of SRF technology, ERL operation, lattice design, high power optics and DC photocathode gun technology. In 2001 the FEL Demo generated 2.1 kW of laser power. Following extensive upgrades, in 2006 the FEL Upgrade generated 14.3 kW of laser power breaking the previous world record. The FEL Upgrade remains a valuable testbed for studying a variety of collective effects, such as the beam breakup instability, longitudinal space charge and coherent synchrotron radiation. Additionally, there has been exploration of operation with lower injection energy and higher bunch charge. Recent progress and achievements in these areas will be presented, and two recent milestones â installation of a UV FEL and establishment of a DC gun test s

  18. The BDX experiment at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Celentano, Andrea

    2015-06-01

    The existence of MeV-GeV dark matter (DM) is theoretically well motivated but remarkably unexplored. The Beam Dump eXperiment (BDX) at Jefferson Laboratory aims to investigate this mass range. Dark matter particles will be detected through scattering on a segmented, plastic scintillator detector placed downstream of the beam-dump at one of the high intensity JLab experimental Halls. The experiment will collect up to 1022 electrons-on-target (EOT) in a one-year period. For these conditions, BDX is sensitive to the DM-nucleon elastic scattering at the level of a thousand counts per year, and is only limited by cosmogenic backgrounds. The experiment is also sensitive to DM-electron elastic and inelastic scattering, at the level of 10 counts/year. The foreseen signal for these channels is a high-energy (> 100 MeV) electromagnetic shower, with almost no background. The experiment has been presented in form of a Letter of Intent to the laboratory, receiving positive feedback, and is currently being designed.

  19. Jefferson Lab: New opportunities in hadronic physics

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Patrizia

    2014-11-11

    Jefferson Lab (JLab) is a fundamental research laboratory located in Newport News (Virginia-USA) whose primary mission is to explore the fundamental nature of confined states of quarks and gluons. It consists of a high-intensity electron accelerator based on continuous wave superconducting radio frequency technology and a sophisticated array of particle detectors. The design features and excellent performance of the accelerator made it possible to plan an upgrade in energy from 6 to 12 GeV without substantially altering the construction scheme of the accelerator. The program includes the construction of major new experimental facilities for the existing three Halls, A, B, C and the construction of the new experimental Hall D. The research program that motivated the upgrade in energy includes: the study of the nucleon 'tomography' through the study of generalized parton distribution functions (GPDs) and transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs), the study of exotics and hybrid mesons to explore the nature of the quarks confinement, precision test of the Standard Model through parity-violating electron scattering experiments. Major highlights of the program at 6 GeV will be presented as well as an overview of the 12 GeV physics program.

  20. Jefferson Lab: New opportunities in hadronic physics

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Patrizia

    2014-11-01

    Jefferson Lab (JLab) is a fundamental research laboratory located in Newport News (Virginia-USA) whose primary mission is to explore the fundamental nature of confined states of quarks and gluons. It consists of a high-intensity electron accelerator based on continuous wave superconducting radio frequency technology and a sophisticated array of particle detectors. The design features and excellent performance of the accelerator made it possible to plan an upgrade in energy from 6 to 12 GeV without substantially altering the construction scheme of the accelerator. The program includes the construction of major new experimental facilities for the existing three Halls, A, B, C and the construction of the new experimental Hall D. The research program that motivated the upgrade in energy includes: the study of the nucleon "tomography" through the study of generalized parton distribution functions (GPDs) and transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs), the study of exotics and hybrid mesons to explore the nature of the quarks confinement, precision test of the Standard Model through parity-violating electron scattering experiments. Major highlights of the program at 6 GeV will be presented as well as an overview of the 12 GeV physics program.

  1. The 12 GeV Energy Upgrade at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, Fulvia C.

    2012-09-01

    Two new cryomodules and an extensive upgrade of the bending magnets at Jefferson Lab has been recently completed in preparation for the full energy upgrade in about one year. Jefferson Laboratory has undertaken a major upgrade of its flagship facility, the CW re-circulating CEBAF linac, with the goal of doubling the linac energy to 12 GeV. I will discuss here the main scope and timeline of the upgrade and report on recent accomplishments and the present status. I will then discuss in more detail the core of the upgrade, the new additional C100 cryomodules, their production, tests and recent successful performance. I will then conclude by looking at the future plans of Jefferson Laboratory, from the commissioning and operations of the 12 GeV CEBAF to the design of the MEIC electron ion collider.

  2. Geriatric profile of Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826).

    PubMed

    Sherman, E D

    1977-03-01

    This geriatric profile specifically reflects the impressive achievements of Thomas Jefferson during the years of his retirement (ages 66-83) following a distinguished political career culminating in the Presidency. President Monroe sought his advice even after the age of 80, and Jefferson's reasoning was instrumental in the formulation of the Monroe Doctrine. Education was a foremost priority in retirement. He was responsible for the establishment of the University of Virginia, in which his versatility was manifested as architect, builder, and fund raiser. Jefferson was a man of breadth and extraordinary vision for his time, and has come to be known as the "Father of American Democracy." The basic concepts of his philosophy, including the realm of aging, remain valid today-150 years after his passing.

  3. Focus on: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Department of Biomedical Instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Tackel, I S; Bell, D; Edelson, R C

    1993-01-01

    Technology management services at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital are provided by two distinct cost centers: The Department of Biomedical Instrumentation and Jefferson Biomedical Shared Services. The in-house division of the Department of Biomedical Instrumentation (BMI) provides clinical engineering services to the hospital, a 717-bed, tertiary care facility. BMI supports traditional patient care instrumentation, as well as dialysis machines, anesthesia machines, lasers, and the neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) systems. In addition, the department supports over 3,000 personal computers and associated peripherals, and provides research, design, database support, device evaluation, incident investigation, and product problem investigation services. Jefferson Biomedical Shared Services, an integral component of the Department of Biomedical Instrumentation, offers a shared services program to local area hospitals. It has a current client list of 11 major healthcare institutions with annual revenues approaching $3,000,000 per year.

  4. Laboratory Safety Manual for Alabama Schools. Bulletin 1975. No. 20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

    This document presents the Alabama State Department of Education guidelines for science laboratory safety, equipment, storage, chemical safety, rocket safety, electrical safety, safety with radioisotopes, and safety with biologicals. Also included is a brief bibliography, a teacher's checklist, a listing of laser facts and regulations, and a…

  5. Smoking, Sociodemographic Determinants, and Stress in the Alabama Black Belt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuaib, Faisal; Foushee, H. R.; Ehiri, John; Bagchi, Suparna; Baumann, Angela; Kohler, Connie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In the Alabama Black Belt, poverty is high, and the educational level is low. Studies have found increased tobacco use among individuals exposed to high levels of stress. Few studies have been conducted in this region to measure smoking status, its sociodemographic determinants, and how smoking status relates to stressful environmental…

  6. 76 FR 31388 - Alabama Disaster Number AL-00037

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-31

    ... Only for the State of Alabama (FEMA--1971--DR), dated 04/28/2011 . Incident: Severe storms, tornadoes, straight-line winds, and flooding. Incident Period: 04/15/2011 and continuing. Effective Date: 05/20/2011. Physical Loan Application Deadline Date: 06/27/2011 Economic Injury (EIDL) Loan Application Deadline...

  7. 76 FR 34121 - Alabama Disaster Number AL-00037

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-10

    ... Only for the State of Alabama (FEMA-1971-DR), dated 04/28/2011. Incident: Severe storms, tornadoes, straight-line winds, and flooding. Incident Period: 04/15/2011 through 05/31/2011. Effective Date: 05/31... continuing through 05/31/2011. All other information in the original declaration remains unchanged....

  8. 76 FR 28842 - Alabama Disaster Number AL-00036

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-18

    ... disaster for the State of Alabama (FEMA-1971-DR), dated 04/28/ 2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line Winds, and Flooding. Incident Period: 04/15/2011 and continuing. Effective Date: 05/06/2011. Physical Loan Application Deadline Date: 06/27/2011. Eidl Loan Application Deadline Date:...

  9. Day Care Training in Alabama: A Follow-Up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eddowes, E. Anne; Martin, Kathleen

    This study reports information gathered from 82 of the 1,056 child care workers who participated in the Alabama Statewide Day Care Training Project, the first comprehensive training program for child care providers in the state. The project sponsored training workshops in four regions of the state and included correspondence study as an option.…

  10. Training Teachers to Use Technology: The Alabama Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFadden, Anna C.; Johnson, Eddie

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the need for teacher training in media use and describes a plan developed in Alabama consisting of a three-course sequence in technology for teacher education that can be incorporated into a master's degree program. Required primary computer skills and primary instructional design skills are listed. (Contains three references.) (LRW)

  11. Three Alabama Teen Parent Programs: Perspectives from Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Cynthia Ivey

    2009-01-01

    Although there are many programs that concentrate on reducing the overall rate of teen pregnancy, there are few programs designed to assist teen parents. The purpose of this study was to determine how and to what extent three teen parenting programs in Alabama met the needs of teen parents with a positive environment and assisted them in…

  12. Retention Issues: A Study of Alabama Special Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plash, Shawn; Piotrowski, Chris

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated issues that impact attrition, migration and retention of special education teachers in Alabama. The sample comprised 70 teachers designated as "highly-qualified" who responded to a job satisfaction instrument, with a focus on retention issues, developed by Levine (2001). The results indicated that the major reasons for…

  13. 75 FR 2882 - Alabama; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-19

    ... Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, 42 U.S.C. 5121 et seq. (the ``Stafford Act''), as follows: I... warrant a major disaster declaration under the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Alabama; Major Disaster and Related Determinations...

  14. Alabama and the Southern Regional Education Board, December 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2014

    2014-01-01

    This report details Alabama's participation in Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) programs and services from December 2013 through November 2014. Appropriations from member states support SREB's core operations and general services. SREB leverages the long-standing commitment of member states to attract external funding for an array of…

  15. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for Alabama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    This report presents existing workforce levels, training programs and career potentials and develops staffing level projections (1976-1982) based on available information for the State of Alabama. The study concerns itself with the environmental pollution control areas of air, noise, potable water, pesticides, radiation, solid waste, wastewater,…

  16. Back to the Basics: Birmingham, Alabama, Measurement and Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handley, Lawrence R.; Lockwood, Catherine M.; Handley, Nathan

    2005-01-01

    "Back to the Basics: Birmingham, Alabama" is the fourth in a series of workshops that focus on teaching foundational map reading and spatial differentiation skills. It is the second published exercise from the Back to the Basics series developed by the Wetland Education through Maps and Aerial Photography (WETMAAP) Program (see "Journal of…

  17. Marketing Education. Alabama Course of Study. Bulletin 1996, No. 19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

    This guide, which is intended for classroom teachers, supervisors, and administrators throughout Alabama, contains the minimum required content (core program) for public school instruction in marketing education in grades 7-12. Presented first are the following: introduction examining the mission, purpose, goals, and structure of marketing…

  18. Parables and Politics: Clergy Attitudes toward Illegal Immigration in Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wickersham, Mary Eleanor

    2013-01-01

    The passage of a stringent immigration law in Alabama in 2011 makes relevant the juxtaposition of clergy and congregant attitudes and behaviors toward illegal immigrants as related to Biblical teachings that require charity to aliens. In order to examine the relationship between religious attitudes and illegal immigration, approximately 426…

  19. Exceptional Child Education in Alabama: The State of the Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frith, Greg

    The monograph describes the progress that has been made in exceptional child education in Alabama during the last decade and addresses needed areas of improvement. Brief sections focus on the following items: financing special education programs, instructional programing in local education agencies, individualized education plans, diagnosis of…

  20. 77 FR 29924 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Alabama River, AL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-21

    ... Act notice regarding our public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR... modify the operating schedule that governs the Meridian and Bigbee Railroad (MNBR) swing span bridge.... C. Basis and Purpose The MNBR swing span bridge crosses the Alabama River at mile 205.9, at...

  1. 77 FR 57022 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Alabama River, AL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-17

    ... of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking Sec. Section Symbol U.S.C... Register (77 FR 29924). We received no comments on the proposed rule. No public meeting was requested, and... governing the Meridian and Bigbee Railroad (MNBR) swing span bridge across the Alabama River at...

  2. The Alabama Space and Rocket Center: The Second Decade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckbee, Edward O.

    1983-01-01

    The Alabama Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, the world's largest rocket and space museum, includes displays illustrating American rocket history, exhibits and demonstrations on rocketry principles and experiences, and simulations of space travel. A new project includes an integrated recreational-educational complex, described in the three…

  3. Alabama State Lodging Tax: A Lesson for All Camps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sieckmann, Amy

    2003-01-01

    A dispute between an Alabama business conference center and a nearby camp prompted the state's revenue department to charge camps an old lodging tax that had never been applied to them before. The state camping association members worked together to have the tax law and regulations amended so that nonprofit camps were exempt from the tax in most…

  4. Alabama Commission on Higher Education. Annual Report, 1993-94.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Commission on Higher Education, Montgomery.

    This annual report of the Alabama Commission on Higher Education describes new academic programs approved, allied health programs, off-campus instruction, computer-based articulation, rising junior exam, the Academic Common Market, educational technologies, Governor's Conference on Higher Education, Eminent Scholars Program, Meharry Medical…

  5. Statistical Abstract: Higher Education in Alabama, 1999-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Commission on Higher Education, Montgomery.

    This report provides data and reference information on Alabama's public institutions of higher education and private universities and colleges. After an institutional data summary (public four-year institutions, public two-year institutions, and private institutions), the first section examines current enrollment data (e.g., general…

  6. Alabama Commission on Higher Education. Annual Report 1987-88.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Commission on Higher Education, Montgomery.

    Activities of the Alabama State Commission on Higher Education are described. Three sections discuss the following: (1) planning and coordination activities (unified budget recommendation, statewide planning process, research and service program inventory, new program approval, off-campus instruction, non-resident institutional review, conference…

  7. Agribusiness Education. Alabama Course of Study. Bulletin 1990, No. 60.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

    This course of study provides a framework for the content of a program in agribusiness education as part of the Alabama vocational education program. The course of study was designed to assist educators in developing and maintaining high quality vocational programs and to ensure uniformity of vocational programs. Following a description of the…

  8. 77 FR 8942 - Alabama Disaster Number AL-00040

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Alabama Disaster Number AL-00040 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... remains unchanged. (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Numbers 59002 and 59008) James E....

  9. The Social Stratification of /aI/ in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crane, L. Ben

    This study is a sociolinguistic analysis of the variant pronunciation of /aI/, a selected phonological variable, by white informants in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Through a purposive sampling procedure, 56 informants were interviewed to determine their pronunciation of /aI/. Informants were ranked according to education, income, and occupation to…

  10. Arts Education. Alabama Course of Study. Bulletin 1998, No. 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

    This curriculum guide provides the framework for K-12 arts education program in Alabama's public schools. Content standards in the guide are minimum and required, and fundamental and specific but not exhaustive. School systems may include additional content standards and add implementation guidelines, resources, and/or activities. In response to…

  11. Aeromonas hydrophila: Observations of the Alabama industry in 2010

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2009, the Alabama catfish industry experienced widespread mortality from infection by the bacterium Aeromonas hydrophila. As soon as pond water temperatures warmed above 26 degrees centigrade (80 degrees fahrenheit) in 2010, epidemics have again occurred across the industry. This talk, which is a...

  12. Jefferson Lab Accelerator Operations Training and Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Michael A. Epps

    2008-01-23

    The mission of the Jefferson Lab Operations Group is to provide safe and efficient delivery of high quality electron beam for Jefferson Laboratory's nuclear and accelerator physics programs. The Operations staff must be able to setup, transport, maintain, and troubleshoot beam to all three experimental halls in a safe, efficient, and expeditious manner. Due to the nature of shift work, high employee turnover is always as issue. This creates a unique situation where highly trained staff members must quickly be produced and maintained in order to meet the needs of the Laboratory. Some methods used to address this problem will be presented here.

  13. Jefferson and Adams on the mind-body problem.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Daniel N

    2003-08-01

    Amidst the voluminous correspondence between Thomas Jefferson and John Adams are several letters pertaining to the material basis of mental life. These reveal in a most suggestive way the substantial differences between them. Well informed on prevailing scientific and philosophical perspectives, Jefferson and Adams used the issue to express their positions on the nature and limits of knowledge, the relative authority of scientific methods and speculations, and the larger question of human perfectibility. At the same time, their exchanges illuminate the prevailing and divergent perspectives on human psychology adopted by major leaders of thought in the New World.

  14. Erosion monitoring along the Coosa River below Logan Martin Dam near Vincent, Alabama, using terrestrial light detection and ranging (T-LiDAR) technology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimbrow, Dustin R.; Lee, Kathryn G.

    2013-01-01

    Alabama Power operates a series of dams on the Coosa River in east central Alabama. These dams form six reservoirs that provide power generation, flood control, recreation, economic opportunity, and fish and wildlife habitats to the region. The Logan Martin Reservoir is located approximately 45 kilometers east of Birmingham and borders Saint Clair and Talladega Counties. Discharges below the reservoir are controlled by power generation at Logan Martin Dam, and there has been an ongoing concern about the stability of the streambanks downstream of the dam. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Alabama Power conducted a scientific investigation of the geomorphic conditions of a 115-meter length of streambank along the Coosa River by using tripod-mounted terrestrial light detection and ranging technology. Two surveys were conducted before and after the winter flood season of 2010 to determine the extent and magnitude of geomorphic change. A comparison of the terrestrial light detection and ranging datasets indicated that approximately 40 cubic meters of material had been eroded from the upstream section of the study area. The terrestrial light detection and ranging data included in this report consist of electronic point cloud files containing several million georeferenced data points, as well as a surface model measuring changes between scans.

  15. Evaluating the operational changes in the Alabama and Chattahoochee basins

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.K.; Mittelstadt, R.I.

    1995-12-31

    During the 1950`s and 1970`s, the Corps of Engineers constructed three major storage projects on the headwaters of the Alabama-Coosa-Tallapoosa Rivers, referred to as the Alabama Basin and Apalachicola-Chattahoochee Rivers, referred to as the Chattahoochee Basins in northern Georgia. Carters and Allatoona are located in the Alabama Basin while Buford is located in the Chattahoochee Basin. The three projects have 1.8 billion cubic meters (1.5 million acre-feet) of conservation storage, and can be regulated for navigation, hydropower, recreation, water supply, water quality, and for fish and wildlife purposes. Above the conservation pools is additional space reserved for flood control. For many years, the conservation storage at the three projects has been regulated primarily for hydropower and navigation, although maintaining the reservoirs at near full pool during the recreation season has taken on increased importance. More recently, rapid growth and development in Atlanta and the surrounding area have led to proposals for reallocating much of this storage to water supply. These reallocations could have an impact on downstream river uses, including power production at twenty-seven Federal and non-Federal hydroelectric projects. The Mobile District, Corps of Engineers, is conducting a comprehensive study of the Alabama and Chattahoochee Basins in order to evaluate impacts of the proposed changes as well as other possible future changes in reservoir system operation. This study is being conducted in partnership with the States of Alabama, Florida, and Georgia. A major objective of the study will be the development of a long range water budget and water management strategy. This strategy will enable the three states to effectively coordinate the management of the basins` water resources in concert with appropriate Federal agencies.

  16. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 4): Perdido Groundwater Contamination Site, Perdido, Alabama (first remedial action) September 1988. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-30

    The Perdido Groundwater Contamination site is located in the Town of Perdido, Baldwin County, Alabama. Site contamination occurred as a result of a 1965 train derailment on the Louisville and Nashville Railroad (now CSX Transportation, Inc.). Chemical (particularly benzene) from derailed tank cars spilled into drainage ditches, infiltrating the underlying aquifer. The area of ground water contamination covers approximately 15 acres and is centered downgradient about 300 yards from the derailment site. The Alabama Department of Public Health, Division of Public Water Supply (ADPWS) first documented reports of taste and odor problems in resident's water wells in 1981. Further studies showed benzene contamination in 6 of 27 wells, which led to supplying bottled water to 250 affected residents. The selected remedial action for this site includes: ground water pump and treatment using air stripping or activated carbon adsorption with the reinjection of treated water back into the aquifer, and air monitoring during operations; and ground water monitoring to measure success of the cleanup. The estimated capital cost for this remedial action is $169,000 with estimated annual O C cost of $103,000.

  17. Tech Prep Articulation from Alabama's Public Schools to Alabama's Two-Year Colleges: Perceptions of Administrators, Counselors, and Technical Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cain, H. Jason

    2013-01-01

    Although dual enrollment and other programs that allow high school students to earn college credit are viable and beneficial, articulation is not being extensively utilized. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the articulation policy and its implementation between Alabama's high schools and two-year colleges. It was expected that…

  18. 77 FR 69498 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-19

    ... or faxed comments should be submitted by December 4, 2012. Before including your address, phone.... ALABAMA Mobile County Africatown Historic District, Bounded by Jakes Ln., Paper Mill, & Warren Rds., Chin, & Railroad Sts., Mobile, 12000990 COLORADO Jefferson County Staunton Ranch Rural Historic Landscape,...

  19. Policies and Procedures for Foreign Exchange Agencies. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Donald D.

    The guide details the policy of the Jefferson County (Alabama) Board of Education policy concerning international exchange of students (travel both to and from United States) in elementary and secondary grades. The first section specifies the standards by which the county will evaluate all international exchange agencies concerning structure,…

  20. Topobathymetric model of Mobile Bay, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Danielson, Jeffrey J.; Brock, John C.; Howard, Daniel M.; Gesch, Dean B.; Bonisteel-Cormier, Jamie M.; Travers, Laurinda J.

    2013-01-01

    Topobathymetric Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) are a merged rendering of both topography (land elevation) and bathymetry (water depth) that provides a seamless elevation product useful for inundation mapping, as well as for other earth science applications, such as the development of sediment-transport, sea-level rise, and storm-surge models. This 1/9-arc-second (approximately 3 meters) resolution model of Mobile Bay, Alabama was developed using multiple topographic and bathymetric datasets, collected on different dates. The topographic data were obtained primarily from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Elevation Dataset (NED) (http://ned.usgs.gov/) at 1/9-arc-second resolution; USGS Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) data (2 meters) (http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/400/); and topographic lidar data (2 meters) and Compact Hydrographic Airborne Rapid Total Survey (CHARTS) lidar data (2 meters) from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) (http://www.csc.noaa.gov/digitalcoast/data/coastallidar/). Bathymetry was derived from digital soundings obtained from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) (http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/geodas/geodas.html) and from water-penetrating lidar sources, such as EAARL and CHARTS. Mobile Bay is ecologically important as it is the fourth largest estuary in the United States. The Mobile and Tensaw Rivers drain into the bay at the northern end with the bay emptying into the Gulf of Mexico at the southern end. Dauphin Island (a barrier island) and the Fort Morgan Peninsula form the mouth of Mobile Bay. Mobile Bay is 31 miles (50 kilometers) long by a maximum width of 24 miles (39 kilometers) with a total area of 413 square miles (1,070 square kilometers). The vertical datum of the Mobile Bay topobathymetric model is the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD 88). All the topographic datasets were originally referenced to NAVD 88 and no transformations